Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th September 1825.
Reference Number: 18250915
Reference Number: f18250915-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 15th of SEPTEMBER, 1825, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; and George Bridges , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Thomas Trellay ,

Matthew Taylor ,

James Eames ,

Edward T. Jeffries

Charles Self ,

Wm. Younger ,

Alex. Cuthbert ,

Richard Edwards ,

Richard Sharp ,

Thos. Summers ,

James Bowker ,

Wm. Light .

Second

Wm. Wagg ,

Robert Jones ,

Robert Friggatt ,

Ebeneza Raven ,

Vincent Phillips ,

George Cranidge ,

Samuel Sadler ,

John Medhurst ,

John Bundy ,

Henry Burn ,

John Hopson ,

John Brooks .

Third

John Warwicker ,

George Welch ,

George Procter ,

George Lawrence ,

Thomas Sterry ,

James Carvill ,

Frederick Snell ,

Nathan. Harding ,

John Hebworth ,

James Gibbons ,

Alfred Holt ,

Wm. Sundry .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

James Donn ,

Peter Fararor ,

Thomas Parker ,

Charles Jackson ,

James Rutland ,

Wm. Senior ,

Simon Rodgers ,

James Davis ,

Wm. Matthewson ,

John Tomlinson ,

Thomas Crofts ,

John Brock .

Second

James Corder ,

Anthony Pusey ,

Richard Sewell ,

John Bowen ,

John Whitaker ,

James Abbott ,

Wm. Oak ,

John Kennedy ,

Richard Morley ,

H. Thompson ,

Wm. Wood ,

Richard Carley .

Third

Robert Wilson ,

Pearce Hall ,

Wm. Smith ,

Wm. Austin ,

Samuel Thompson

John Dunn ,

Andrew Imray ,

Jonathan Coles ,

Charles Handy ,

James Woodman ,

Benjamin Palmer ,

Wm. Skeats .

Fourth

Richard Wilson ,

John Leighton ,

Charles Jack ,

Jas. Thompson ,

Richard Feesy ,

Jas. Wm. Jones ,

Thos. Burgess ,

George Bristow ,

Thomas Parker ,

Samuel Clarke ,

Wm. Kinlock ,

R. W. Tabor .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1825.

GARRATT, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18250915-1

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1223. ANN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , five spoons, value 36 s., and four sheets, value 24 s., the goods of Henry Thwaites , in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOSEPH THWAITES . I am the son of Henry Thwaites, who lives in Euston-square . The family were out of town; the prisoner was left in care of the house, and had some of the keys. I was occasionally at home; I came to town about three weeks ago, and missed some spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Can you identify them? A. Yes. I believe I had told her I should return to town that day.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Churchway, St. Pancras. I have some spoons and other things, which were pawned by the prisoner.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, on the 27th of August, and gave me ten duplicates - nine of which are for property pawned at Bath's, and which she said were Mr. Thwaites's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 49. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-2

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1224. SAMUEL FURMEE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a watch, value 5 l.; a sovereign, and twelve shillings, the property of William Brown , in the dwelling-house of John Learmouth .

WILLIAM BROWN. I am coachman to Mr. Learmouth, of Russell-square. On Thursday, the 4th of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out from the stables in Montague-mews , and left my watch, a sovereign, and 12 s. in a box in my bed-room, over the stable. The prisoner had been pot-boy at the Montague Arms, public-house, and on leaving there he occasionally assisted me in the stable. I returned at six o'clock in the evening, and found my box open, and property gone; the box had not been locked: he could open the coach-house doors by putting his knee against them. I met him going down the mews as I came out. I have not found the property.

JOHN TURNER . I lodge where the prisoner formerly lived. On Friday morning I heard of this robbery, and on the Monday following I met the prisoner in Broad-street, St. Giles's, and took him to the mews. I charged him with stealing the watch, which he denied.

ROBERT SEEKINGS . On the 4th of August, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the mews - he put his hand inside, and lifted up the hasp of this stable door; he went in; I did not see him come out: I had seen Brown go out two minutes before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-3

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

1225. WILLIAM RIPPEN, THE YOUNGER , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Woolf , about one o'clock in the night of the 23d of June , at St. Martin in the Fields , with intent to steal, and stealing therein thirty-four yards of cloth, value 28 l.; fourteen yards of kerseymere, value 56 s.; fourteen yards of velveteen, 1 l.; twenty-nine yards of shalloon, value 2 l.; 5 lbs. weight of silk, value 10 l.; 10 lbs. weight of twist, value 20 l., and one hundred yards of silk serge, value 20 l., the goods of the said Joseph Woolf ; and WILLIAM RIPPEN, THE ELDER , was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously and burglariously stolen , against the statute, &c.

JOSEPH WOOLF. I am a draper , and live in Bedfordbury . On the night of the 23d of June I went to bed about twelve o'clock - my doors and windows were perfectly secure. I was alarmed at four o'clock in the morning, by the watchman; I got up, and went down. My house was under repair; the prisoners lived next door, at No. 19: I have a parlour behind my shop - it is separated from the shop by a door, which I locked that night, and had the key in my bed-room. Upon getting up I found my shop rifled. I lost nearly one hundred yards of broad cloth, and other property - in value above 100 l. in all, and have recovered all but about 40 l. worth. I received information from the watchman, and placed people to watch the back and front of the prisoner's house. I received information from my son, Philip, which led me to suspect the prisoners. I went to Queen-square a little before six o'clock - Pace returned with me, and examined my premises; we got a search-warrant, and searched the elder prisoner's premises, and in the cellar found in a large grape jar some black silk twist, and four remnants of cloth, containing nine or ten yards in all - in another part of the

cellar I found some of the property in a sack, and the rest tied in bundles; part of them have been returned to me: Woodbury has had possession of the rest. The elder prisoner had called at my house two or three days previous to the robbery; I was at the door as he passed, and he said, "Mr. Woolf, you are having a grand alteration made here;" I asked him to walk in to look at it, which he did; and the afternoon before the robbery he came in and went back, and asked the workmen to lend him a screw-driver. About five o'clock on the morning of the robbery I saw him looking out of his window - it might be ten minutes past five; the alarm had then been given. The elder prisoner is a carpenter - his son lives with him. There is a cow-house behind my house; the loft window of which looks into my yard. My shop ticket still remained on the property.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long have you lived there? A. Twelve months. I believe he has lived there seven years - one Ratcliff lodged with him. I saw Ratcliff looking out of window at half-past five o'clock; I do not know whether he had his shirt sleeves up - I believe they were. I searched the premises about eleven o'clock; the elder prisoner and his wife were there: I told him what we came about; he said we might search, but should find nothing. When we asked for a light one was brought. Pace asked him to go into the cellar with us, which he did, and was then taken into custody; his son was taken soon after.

COURT. Q. The door between the shop and parlour was broken open - but how did the persons get into your house? A. The box of the lock of the parlour door was wrenched; the back of my house was quite open to the yard, as an alteration was being made; any one in the yard could come into the parlour without obstruction, and a ladder had been put down from the window of the hay-loft of the cow-house into the yard.

THOMAS PLUNKETT . I am servant to Mr. Sparkes, a cow-keeper. On Friday morning, the 24th of June, a few minutes before four o'clock, I went to the cow-house to work, and when I got there I found the door open, which was shut overnight - a ladder was taken from the cow-house; it was there at night. I went to the bay-loft window, which looks into Woolf's yard, and saw the ladder there - any one could get down by the ladder from the window into the yard. I found a piece of shalloon on the floor of the loft; I also found some remnants of kerseymere and other things in the loft; Mr. Woolf took them. On finding the ladder moved I alarmed the watchman - he came to the loft, and saw what I have described.

WILLIAM ROTTENBURY . I am a watchman. Plunkett gave me information on the morning of the 24th of June; I went to Mr. Woolf's, and alarmed him. At half-past one o'clock that morning I saw two persons, seventeen or eighteen years old, come out of Hop-gardens - I knew one very well; his name is Reedy. I did not particularly notice the other; it was not day-light: I did not speak to them, not suspecting them; the cow-house is in Hop-gardens. About ten minutes afterwards I went to this spot again, as the lamps had not been lighted that night, and I saw another young man going out of Hop-gardens into St. Martin's-lane - I took it to be the younger prisoner, and knowing that he kept company with the others, I thought they had been together; I believe it to have been him. I went and tried the cow-house door several times - it was all fast at three o'clock, which was the last time I tried it. I could not see into Woolf's yard. When I called four o'clock a milkman called to me, saying there had been a robbery, and shewed me the cow-house. I called Woolf, and went into the cow-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not one of the lads named Roody? A. Reedy or Roody, as I have heard - I knew him by sight, and knew they kept company with the younger prisoner. I have driven them off my beat several times.

JOSEPH CARCASS . I know the younger prisoner. On the 24th of June, the morning of this robbery, I saw the younger prisoner going to work, with a board under his arm - I was at my own door, No. 41, Bedfordbury; I did not speak to him. About half-past ten o'clock that morning I saw Woolf's son taking candles into Rippen's house, to search, and knowing where young Rippen worked, I went to him, and said, "Bill, what have you been about, they are searching your father's place?" he said, "Are they?" and scratched his head; I said they were: he said he thought how it would be. I asked him if John Reedy, John Flannergin, and Davy were in the robbery; he said they were, and told me to go up and see how it went on, and then to come and let him know. I then left him, went home, and told my mother of it. I then went down to young Rippen, and found him in custody of Woolf's son.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he told you who committed the robbery, and that he knew nothing of it? A. Yes. I knew him very well, and the others by sight.

RICHARD PONTING . I know Rippen, jun. On the night of the 23d of June I saw him between ten and eleven o'clock, with three other boys about his own size, standing at the prosecutor's door - I did not know the others; they all stood close by Woolf's door.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live in the neighbourhood? A. Yes. I have known the old man between six and seven years, and always understood him to be an honest industrious man.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the morning of the 24th of June Mr. Woolf came to my house - I went with him, and found his shop in confusion - the parlour was under repair, and open to the yard. I examined the door between the parlour and shop very minutely; the box which holds the catch of the lock had been forced aside. I found a chisel on the bench in the parlour; it exactly corresponded with the marks. I then went into the yard, and found that a ladder was let down from the hay-loft window of the cow-house, as if the parties had got in that way. I found there was a vacancy over the cow-house door in Hop-gardens; it is a yard and a quarter long, and fifteen inches wide, sufficient for a person to enter. I desired Rottenbury to examine the back of Woolf's premises in Hop-gardens, and placed Woolf's son to look after Rippen's house while we went for a search-warrant - I went to Rippen's house with Woodbury, about a quarter past eleven o'clock; Rippen, sen. and his wife were at home: I read the warrant to him; he said he knew nothing about it, and it was very strange Mr. Woolf should suspect him. We proceeded to

search the house; we searched the parlour floor, and then asked for a light to go down stairs; young Woolf fetched a light from his father's: Woodbury took it into the cellar; Rippen and his wife remained with me in the parlour - and in half a minute Woodbury hallooed out, "Pace, it is all right." I then took Rippen and his wife down stairs, and saw Woodbury pull some silk twist and cloth out of the jar. I handcuffed Rippen in the cellar, and in a recess in the cellar, between the front vault and a kind of back kitchen, he found the rest of the property - it was in a very dirty hole. We sent young Woolf and Woodbury to apprehend young Rippen, in consequence of information. We brought the property up stairs, and Mr. Woolf claimed it; we took it to the office, with the prisoners: the Magistrate ordered Mr. Woolf to have most of it back, and Woodbury has had the rest ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear astonished at the charge? A. He certainly did; he did not object at all to my searching, but declared most solemnly that he knew nothing about it, both before and after it was found; he appeared much agitated: both he and his wife offered every facility to the search.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I produce the property. I and Pace have had the key of the room at the office, where it has been ever since it was found; it was tied in bundles. Mr. Woolf's marks are on it now.

Cross-examined. Q. You found some of the property in a jar? A. Yes; there was a little barley: there were fowls in the yard. I suppose it was to feed them. I found the rest of the goods in a recess at the foot of the stairs - the recess has a door to it; it could not be seen without opening the door: the jar had a lid on.

JURY. Q. Could the stolen property be conveyed into the recess without being taken through the prisoners' house? A. There is an area at the back of the house; it could be conveyed through there into the cellar.

PHILIP WOOLF . I am the prosecutor's son. On the morning of the 24th of June I was sent by my father to watch the back of Rippen's premises; it was as soon as the alarm was given, a little after four o'clock - it was quite day-light. I saw Rippen, sen. look out of the staircase window; he was dressed, but without his coat, and had his shirt sleeves up; I think he saw me. I was there when the watchman was calling five o'clock; I then heard a man and woman talking in a kind of back kitchen, on their ground floor, on a level with the pavement; I heard a female voice say, "They are on the watch now," and heard the man distinctly say, "D - n their eyes, let them watch - we have got it safe enough here." I had never talked to Rippen, sen., except saying, "Good morning," or so. I have often heard him talking to his children, and was familiar with his voice; I really believe it was his voice. I told my father immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you when you saw him at the window? A. In Hop-gardens; his house is at the corner of Hop-gardens; I was standing there when I began to hear the conversation, but went near to listen. I was walking up and down, a yard or two front his house - he has no yard; there was nothing between my house and his. We were not on terms of intimacy - I have heard him speaking to his family. They talked loud enough for any one to hear.

BANKS ROBERT NODDER . I am governor of Tothill-fields Bridewell. The prisoners were committed there on the 24th of June. On the 1st of July Mr. Markham, the committing Magistrate, sent word that young Rippen might have a sheet of paper, and on the 2d of July he applied for one - I went to him; he had pen and paper: I left him entirely to himself: I neither threatened or promised him any thing. He returned this written paper to me (looking at it;) I am certain this is it: I saw him writing, and after he had done he delivered it to me.

(Read.)

SIR - On Friday evening I went out with my mother and father, for a walk, about eight o'clock, and returned a little after nine. A little after ten I was shutting up my father's shop, and I met John Flanergin , John Reedy , and a lad they call Dave - they asked me to go to a public-house in Chandos-street, and have something to drink; I said I could not go: they asked me to lend them some halfpence - I told them I had none. I gave them a silver sixpence, and they gave me threepence out, and then they went away. At eleven o'clock I went to bed, and about half-past twelve I heard somebody knocking at the shutters, calling Bill - I answered, "Who's there?" and John Reedy said, "It is me, I want you, come out." I got up, and went out - they told me they were going to rob Mr. Woolf's; they asked me to come with them, and I went; they went away, and came again at two o'clock, when Dave got into the cow-house, through a hole over the door, and unfastened the door - they went in. We all went up into the loft, and John Flanergin John Reedy, and Dave all went into the yard of Mr. Woolf's house; I stopped in the loft: they brought the cloth into the loft, and all came up. They said that the cow-man would soon be there, and asked me to let them put it into my father's kitchen while they fetched a coach to put it in - I said, very well, and left them in the cow-house I went in doors, and John Reedy took down one of the kitchen shutters, and shoved it in the window. They did not come for it, so I put it into the cellar, and I have not seen them since. I can tell where they live, but do not know the names of the streets.

WM. RIPPEN.

After I had put it into the cellar I went to bed till my father got up and came down stairs, and knocked at the door, which was about six o'clock. My mother nor father knew nothing about it till it was found.

RIPPEN'S (JUNIOR) Defence. I knew nothing of it till they came and knocked me up on the night they were going to do the robbery.

JOSEPH WOOLF. These are my property - the cloth has the number on it, and my shop ticket, with my private mark. I know it all. The value of what is found is 60 l. or 70 l. I always thought the elder prisoner a very honest worthy character.

HENRY RATCLIFF . On the 23d of June I lodged in the prisoner Rippen's house - I am a silversmith. On the morning of the robbery I got up early, being very busy; I got up about a quarter past four o'clock: my journeyman called me up. I dressed myself; I live on the first floor. I keep a shop over the kitchen, and a sleeping room in front; I had no coat on, and think my shirt sleeves were turned up. I looked out of my workshop window, and saw one or two of Mr. Woolf's sons - young Rippen slept in the parlour below, and the father and mother at the top of the house. I went into the front room at intervals, seeing persons watching the house; I was at home

till nine o'clock; I looked out of the stair-case window also. Old Rippen might come down stairs without my hearing him - I met him on the stairs about a quarter before or a quarter past six o'clock, coming down from his bed-room; there are other lodgers. I had not seen or heard of him till I met him on the stairs.

PHILIP WOOLF re-examined. I am quite positive that old Rippen is the man whom I saw looking out of window - it was just before the watchman called five o'clock. I know the last witness by sight.

Cross-examined. Q. What window was it? A. The stair-case window, which looks into Hop-gardens. I did not see the last witness looking out of his window, to the best of my knowledge, but there are two windows looking into Hop-gardens, his and the stair-case. I only saw him at the stair-case window.

HENRY RATCLIFF re-examined. I did not see Rippen at the window that morning. I saw Philip Woolf several times when I was looking out of each window, both at the back and front of the house.

HARRIET TULIP . I lodged with my husband at Rippen's at this time, and slept on the second floor back room - Rippen slept on the third floor, above me - there is only a thin partition between me and the stair-case; nobody can come down without my hearing them. I saw Rippen and his wife go to bed rather before eleven o'clock - I heard him come down stairs about a quarter past six. I sleep very light, and must have heard if any one had come down.

DAVID TULIP . I am the last witness's husband. On the morning of the robbery, at near three o'clock I was awoke by something, and remained awake till near six; no person could come down stairs without my hearing them. Rippen always awoke me when he came down. - I went out at six o'clock, and he had not come down then. I heard Ratcliff open his shutters about a quarter past four.

Several witnesses gave the elder prisoner an excellent character.

RIPPEN, JUN. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth.

RIPPEN, SEN. - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-4

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1226. MARY HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , at St. Margaret, Westminster , a watch, value 5 l., the goods of Richard Duckworth Dunn , in the dwelling-house of Richard Grant .

MASTER RICHARD DUCKWORTH DUNN. I am a pupil at Westminster-school , and board with Mr. Richard Grant. On Tuesday, the 12th of July, when I got up in the morning I left my watch under my pillow; it is gold, and cost me eight guineas about a fortnight before. I missed it about half-past eleven o'clock, when I went to look for it, it was gone, and my bed was made - I am sure I left it under my pillow. The prisoner was a servant in the house, and made the beds. I went and asked her in about five minutes if she had seen any thing of it - she said she had not.

THE REVEREND GEORGE PRESTON . I am usher at Westminster school, and know that Mr. Grant's house is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. A little before ten o'clock on Wednesday, the 13th of July, I heard of this loss, and at twelve o'clock I was present when the prisoner's box was searched; she had the key, and unlocked it herself, and began to take the things out - it seemed to contain nothing but rags, a bundle of which she put under her arm; one of the servants who stood by, said, "We had better open that bundle, Sir;" she took it from under her arm, and the watch fell out on the ground; she at first denied all knowledge of it. I neither threatened or promised her any thing; she at last fell on her knees, and said if I would let her go she would leave town, and never come again. When she found I had sent for a constable, she said, "I suppose the devil prompted me to take it." I kept it in my possession till I gave it to the constable.

EDWARD OXLEY . I am a constable. Mr. Preston gave me the watch. I have had it ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I always left my keys in the table-drawer, and did not know the watch was there.

Three witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her previous good character.

Reference Number: t18250915-5

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1227. HENRY GODFREY and THOMAS LOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , at St. George, Bloomsbury , a watch, value 5 l.; a watch-case, value 2 l.; and a snuff-box, value 5 l., the goods of James Jeremiah Tupman , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL HUNOT . I am shopman to Mr. James Jeremiah Tupman, who lives in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury , and is a watchmaker and jeweller - the shop is part of the dwelling-house. On the 22d of July, about half-past ten o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop - Godfrey asked if I had a silver watch to sell; I said Mr. Tupman would be down directly, and wished them to wait for him to serve them; he had gone up to shew the lodgings to a gentleman: they waited. I went on with my work at the end of the counter; they stood talking together. I heard a rustling over the glass-case, and turned round once or twice, and saw them leaning over the glass-case on the counter. I saw them both tapping on the counter, and saying, "This is a fine thing," and "That is pretty" - apparently to divert my attention. Mr. Tupman came down, and they asked him for a gold hunter - he said he had none to sell, and they went out of the shop, and before they passed the window I turned round, looked on the counter, and observed two brooches, which had been taken out of the glass-case - I made some remark to Mr. Tupman; he looked into the glass-case, and missed this property. The prisoners had not completely passed the window at that time. I ran out after them, and on looking down the first turning the street-keeper beckoned to me; I did not overtake them. I missed a gold snuffbox, worth twelve guineas, a gold engine-turned case and dial, and a gold French watch worth 5 l. or 6 l., which I had seen laying on the glass-case not half a minute before the prisoners came in. All of them being the largest articles I had observed them; I do not know the value of the case and dial: my eyes were occasionally off them when I was at work. I never saw them doing any thing, but the last time I looked at them I thought I heard something

drop. The glass-case has no fastening, and can easily be lifted up

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. At what time did you breakfast? A. About eight o'clock - I have my breakfast at the back of the shop. I kept my eyes upon them after I heard something fall. I had never seen them before. I saw them in custody at Bow-street that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The gentleman did not take the lodging? A. No. I saw the goods after he left the shop; no other person was in the shop while they were there. I had not left the shop all that morning, and do not recollect any other persons calling that morning. I am the only shopman.

COURT. Q. The gentleman who looked at the lodgings had been in the shop? A. Yes, my Lord, but he did not come into the shop after going up stairs; I am certain that I saw them safe after he had left the shop. I saw the prisoners at the office that afternoon; they were then both in different dresses.

JAMES JEREMIAH TUPMAN. I keep this shop, and occupy the house: it is in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. On the 22d of July I came down, and saw the prisoners in the shop - I never saw them before, but am certain of their persons; I had been shewing the upper part to a person, whom I let out at the private door, and then came into the shop at the front door. Godfrey asked if I had a second-hand gold hunter; I met him full in the face; I said, "No, I have not;" as they passed the window going out, my young man said something - I immediately saw two gold brooches laying on the counter, near the glass-case - I pushed away a book which I had left over the glass-case, and immediately missed this property, which cost me about 26 l. 16 s.; it was there two or three minutes before, when I left the shop. The gentleman who came about the lodging was not near the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When you came down stairs you found two persons there? A. Yes. The counter runs along the shop. I am positive of their persons. I have recovered none of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You never saw them before? A. Never. My house is three doors from George-street - I am rated in St. George's parish.

COURT. Q. Can you take upon yourself to swear that your house is not in St. Giles's? A. Only that I am rated in the books of St. George's; I pay rates to St. George's. The collector receives for both parishes.

JOSEPH WORMALD . I am an officer. On the 22d of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was fetched to Mr. Cowie's, a silversmith, in Long-acre, and saw the prisoners there - they were searched at the watch-house, but no part of the property found on them.

THOMAS WILSON . I am street-keeper of Russell-street. I always understood the prosecutor's house to be in St. George's parish. On the 22d of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners coming in a direction from Mr. Tupman's shop, down George-street; they walked at first, and then started off running, as if they were racing together; they ran down George-street, and into Bainbridge-street. I am positive of them both.

GODFREY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

LOCK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Reference Number: t18250915-6

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1228. GEORGE MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , at St. Pancras , a silver coffee biggin, value 8 l., and a silver milk ewer, value 2 l., the goods of James Window , in his dwelling-house .

MISS ELIZA MORRISON . On the 26th of August I was staying at Mr. James Window's, my brother-in-law, who lives in Upper Bedford-place ; I believe it is in the parish of St. Pancras. I was down stairs about twelve o'clock, directing the wine-merchant's men where to put the wine, and observed a man walk out of the pantry, with a bundle in his arm - I asked what he wanted; he said he came after a groom's place; I asked why he went into the pantry - he said he did not go in, he only knocked at the door; he then put down the bundle outside the pantry window, in the area, and went away up the area steps; the servant fetched me the bundle - it was not out of my sight: it contained a silver coffee biggin. The wine merchant's boy came into the area, and I sent him in pursuit, and the servants also followed.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Are you certain what parish the house is in? A. I have seen the rates paid, and am certain it is in St. Pancras.

SARAH OLIVER . I am servant to Mr. Window, and had the care of the plate. I know the coffee biggin perfectly well, and saw it in the pantry closet on the morning in question. On the alarm being given I went to the closet, and missed the biggen and milk-pot, which I had seen safe not ten minutes before. I then went after the prisoner down Bernard-street; he came running down Wilmot-street: he saw me running without a bonnet, and ran quicker. I called Stop thief! he threw down the milk-pot in the area of No. 9. Grenville-street, and was stopped and given into custody. I am sure he is the man - he was never out of my sight; I saw the milk-pot thrown down: he pushed it through the iron railing, and dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CATHERINE BROOKER . I live at No. 9, Grenville-street. On the 26th of August I was in the kitchen, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I immediately went to the area door, and saw the cream jug in the area; I picked it up, and gave it to Oliver. I saw the prisoner in custody in two minutes.

JOHN HUNT . I am watch-house keeper of the Foundling estate. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I think the prosecutor's house is in St. George, Bloomsbury.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am beadle of St. George, Bloomsbury, and am certain the house is in that parish.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-7

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

1229. JOSEPH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , at St. Mary-le-bone , a clock, value 5 l., the goods of Samuel Lomax , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL LOMAX. I rent a house in Byanstone-street , and let it out in ready furnished lodgings. On the evening of the 4th of July I went to bed a little after ten o'clock - the watchman alarmed me a little before four; the prisoner was then in custody. I found the drawing-room window open, and the street door also. I missed this clock off the bracket on the stair-case.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you let all the house out, or only part of it? A. In the height of the season I let it all out. I have another house elsewhere, in which my family reside. I had slept there for six weeks.

JOHN ATKINS . I am a watchman. On the 13th of July, at a quarter past three o'clock in the morning, I was at the end of Portman-street and Portman-square - it was quite light. I observed two men coming out of Bryanstone-street; the prisoner was one of them, and had the clock in his hands; I let them pass, and perceived them hasten their pace - I followed, and came up to the other man, who called out, "Jack." The prisoner, who was forward carrying the clock, came back - I asked where they were going with that property; they said to the White Horse cellar, Piccadilly; I said I considered the property stolen, and they must go to the watch-house - the other man said he would not, and that he would fetch his master - he had some things, which he threw down, and walked away. I directly seized the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house. He said he met a man in Oxford-road, who asked him to carry the clock. When I had discovered where the robbery happened I asked how he could say he got it in Oxford-road - he denied saying so, and said something about the neighbouring streets.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say Edgware-road? A. No, he did not mention the name of any street - the other man was about eight yards behind him - he set the clock down - I waited a quarter of an hour for the other man to come back.

JOHN GUEST . I am a watchman. I was in Bryanstone-street - Atkins was in Portman-street; I heard a door palled to very loud in Bryanstone-street - it was near Mr. Lomax's, but I am not certain that it was his - I saw two men go shortly round the corner from that place, and turn to the left up Portman-street. I did not observe whether they had any thing, and cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them. I came to the bottom of the street, and a watchman made some inquiries - I gave him information, and found the prosecutor's drawing-room window over the street door, open - I think he could not have entered without a ladder.

MR. LONAX. When I got up I found the parlour shutters fastened - I think they must have entered at the area gate in the evening and concealed themselves in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in company with some young people till two o'clock in the morning, and on going home found the house closed; about three I met a man like a gentleman's servant in Bryanstone-street, carrying two umbrellas, a carpet bag, and other things - he asked me to carry the clock, saying he was going to meet his master at the White-horse-cellar.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-8

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1230. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Abel Ram , from his person .

MR. ABEL RAM. I live in Baker-street, Portman-square. On the 19th of July, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, I was on this side of London bridge , with a friend - a man asked if I had lost my handkerchief, and on feeling I missed it. Salmon produced it to me. I had not noticed the prisoner near me.

JOHN SALMON . I am warder of the bridge. On the 19th of July I saw Mr. Ram get out of his carriage with his lady - the corner of his handkerchief hung out of his pocket. He proceeded about fourteen yards on the bridge, then returned: I did not then see his handkerchief, but on turning round I saw the prisoner shuffling a yellow handkerchief into his bosom: I laid hold of him and asked how he came by it? He said it was his own: I called to Mr. Ram, who claimed it. The prisoner then said he had picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell Mr. Ram that his handkerchief hung out? A. No; only the corner was out - the prisoner was not two yards from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this handkerchief on the ground and picked it up; this man asked what I had got - I said it was nothing to him - he said it was, and I shewed it to him - people who passed told him I picked it up; he said they were liars.

JOHN SALMON. I called nobody a liar - a woman said that he had picked it up - I asked her to go before the Lord Mayor, but she did not - somebody said she was a liar; it might have dropped without my perceiving it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-9

1231. WILLIAM CHRISTMAS was indicted for embezzling a 30 l. Bank note, and ten Exchequer bills, for payment of and value 100 l. each , the property of Henry Hoare , Henry Hugh Hoare , Charles Hoare , and Henry Merrick Hoare .

SECOND COUNT for stealing the same.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET, with MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

HENRY MERRICK HOARE, ESQ. I am junior partner in the firm of Henry Hoare, Henry Hugh Hoare, Charles Hoare, and myself. In September last the prisoner was a clerk in our banking-house, and had been so more than ten years - he was entrusted to receive Bank notes and other securities for us. In September last we had a variety of Exchequer bills - it was his duty to carry them to the Exchequer office, for the purpose of exchanging them and receiving the interest - we usually receive notice from the Exchequer to collect the bills advertised to be paid off - Mr. Christmas was then directed to select them, and make out a list of them from the different accounts of Exchequer bills, and take that account, with the bills, to

the Exchequer office - they were delivered to him in September last for this purpose - he left our employ on the 18th of June last.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I presume a number of these Exchequer bills are deposited at your house merely as security? A. Some are ours, and some are merely for safe custody - many of them belong to our customers - by referring to the entries we can tell which are ours; he has been in our house several years - I had no suspicion of him - I sent for him after he left us, and he came two or three times; he came on the very day he was taken.

HUGH RICHARD HOARE. I am the last witness' nephew, and am engaged in the house, but am not a partner. In September last I looked out the Exchequer bills of September, 1823, and delivered them to the prisoner - it was his business to take an account of them, and carry them to the Exchequer.

Cross-examined. Q. You took no account of them? A. No, I only handed all the bills of September 1823, out to him to get exchanged for others.

HOMER SNELGAR . I am employed in the audit office. Somerset-house, and produce a list of Exchequer bills delivered into the Exchequer bill office, and sent to our office - they are Exchequer bills of 1823, held by Messrs. Hoares - the amount of two lists which I have is 475,400 l. - they are numbered - the lists specify the numbers - the lists are sent to our office annually - we examine them and compare the old bills with them.

HENRY MERRICK HOARE, ESQ. The words "new bills and interest," at the bottom of this list is in the handwriting of the prisoner, and here is written at the back of it, in his hand-writing, "Received, 22d of September. 1824, of the paymaster of Exchequer bills, the principal and interest of the Exchequer bills within specified;" then follows a list of the new bills, the number and amount of each, and the words "Received the within bills;" and a demand for the new bills is in the prisoner's writing - the whole of the list of the old bills, with the receipts, are in his writing - all the writing except the numbers of the new bills, are in his hand-writing - the receipt for the new bills is his writing.

MR. BRODRICK to HOMER SNELGAR. Q. Did you compare the old bills with the numbers? A. I believe they have not been examined yet - we have the old bills sent with the list; I believe they have not been examined yet - the account was only delivered the beginning of this year - me amount of principal is 475,400 l., and interest 14262 l.; here is a list at the back, of the number, and amounts of the new bills, issued for them, not giving the particular numbers but how many of each amount.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is the receipt for the principal and interest of the old bills? A. Certainly.

MR. LAW. Q. What is the memorandum at the bottom of the paper, stating the amount, &c. of the new bills? A. It means that the party applied for new bills, but we have nothing to do with that; here is a memorandum at back denoting that the holder received new bills of the same amount for old ones.

JOHN HENRY LATHAM . I am paymaster of Exchequer bills. I paid off a number of Exchequer bills to the prisoner for Messrs. Hoare on the 22d of September, 1824. I delivered new bills for the old ones; here is the memorandum which was given to the prisoner when the old bills were brought in for payment, and on it is written the amount of the old bills and interest due thereon - principal 475,400 l., interest 14,262 l.; he had in exchange three hundred and sixty-five bills of 1000 l. each, one hundred and twenty-nine of 500 l., one hundred and sixteen of 200 l., and two hundred and twenty-seven of 100 l. - they were numbered from 3372 upwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see that memorandum made? A. No - the original book is here - the clerk who made the entry is not here.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET . Q. Did you compare the Exchequer bills delivered with any account? A. No; I received the bills from the accountant, with a label on them, to deliver to Messrs. Hoares; I delivered them to the prisoner - he examined them and made no objection to them: here is a book containing an account of the persons to whom the new bills are issued, with their numbers - the prisoner is the person who received Messrs. Hoares' bills on the 22d of September - we always deliver bills of the same amount as we receive.

COURT. Q. Suppose I had three 1000 l. old Exchequer bills, if I wished six of 500 l. for them, could I have them? A. No, we must issue the same amounts or pay in money - no money was paid on this occasion except the interest - I paid him a draft for the interest, on the Bank, and have it here; it amounts to 14,262 l.; here is an endorsement at the back of it "For Hoares and Co. William Christmas."

MR. HOARE. This endorsement is in the prisoner's hand-writing.

The draft for 14,262 l. was here put in and read.

WILLIAM WOOD , paymaster of his Majesty's forces at Whitehall, was called to prove the payment to the prisoner of a cheque upon the Bank, on the 22d of September, 1824, but had not brought the necessary documents for that purpose.

HENRY WHITING . I am a clerk in the public drawing office at the Bank of England. On the 22d of September, 1824, I paid the prisoner an Exchequer draft of 14,262 l., and another draft of 35 l. 6 s. 8 d. I find that amount at the back of this cheque - it was on account of Messrs. Hoares; I gave him an order for the amount on Everingham, who pays him in Bank notes.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You gave him an order? A. Yes, two orders; one for Bank notes and the other for money; the order is paid by the pay clerks.

Q. What does the name Christian, on the back of this mean? A. I have written the name Christian for Christmas, but I knew him very well; I read the name on the draft as Christian.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did you see him write his name on the draft? A. No, but I saw him come from the desk with it. I never knew but two instances in which the person receiving the money did not write his name on the cheque for the sake of reference if necessary; bankers' clerks do it as a matter of course, and if a stranger comes we ask him to do it. I cannot be certain that the prisoner is the person to whom I paid it, but I should pay it to nobody who did not answer to the name.

WILLIAM EVERINGHAM . I am pay clerk at the Bank of England. On the 22d of September, 1824, a note ticket,

drawn by Whiting, was presented by the bearer Christmas - I cannot swear that the prisoner is the person; I paid the ticket, and when delivering it I ask the person's name, and if he had not answered to the name of Christmas I should not have paid it. I read the name as Christmas: I always knew the prisoner by that name. I paid him fourteen notes of 100 l. each. I took a memorandum of it from our books made by a clerk under my direction at the time. When the ticket is presented I give it to my companion, who enters it and passes it to me - I call over to him the notes which I pay - he enters them in the book and I check them - he calls them over to me as a double check; the notes are paid in regular numbers - if I say fourteen of 1000 l. he says, perhaps, 64 to 76, 1000 l.

COURT. Q. Are the notes entered one by one? A. No, my Lord, the books are printed to correspond with the numbers - we pay them in following numbers; if a mistake was made we should discover it in the next entry - in this case Numbers 6483 to 6496, dated the 1st of September, 1824, were paid.

MR. LAW. Q. Without reference to your memorandum can you, from memory, state what notes were paid? A. No. The regular course of cashing this cheque for a banker would be to give him fourteen of 1000 l., one of 200 l., and three of 30 l., unless it was desired in a different manner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you recollect the prisoner himself coming for this money? A. No, but I have every reason to believe so. I should not pay it to any person unless I thought they came from Messrs. Hoares: I have known him some years, and knew his name.

ROBERT COTTLE . I am cashier to Messrs. Hoares. I have the book containing an account of the Exchequer bills of the 22d September, 1824; it is the book in which they are entered before they are entered in the Exchequer bill ledger: here is an account of the new bills brought back for the old ones - the account of the old bills is in the prisoner's writing; the entry is "Exchequer bills, dated 20th of September, 1823, paid off 20th of September, 1824;" the total amount entered by him is 474,400 l. Here is the dividend book, in which the bills paid off are entered - the new bills are entered into the Exchequer bill ledger; they are distributed into a variety of accounts in the other book.

Q. Have you an account in the prisoner's hand-writing, in which he gives credit for the total amount of principal and interest received for these bills? A. Yes, here is an account in his writing of the old bills, and each person is debited for the new bills on the other side; the amount of debits for new bills is 474,400 l.; the amount he credits for principal and interest is 488,632 l.; the difference, 14,232 l. is the interest. He has entered 1000 l. short in bills and 30 l. short in interest. Here is Miss Wood's Exchequer bill account; there was in her account an old Exchequer bill of 1000 l. No. 10,588; it is marked in the prisoner's hand-writing as having been paid off to the 20th of September, 1824, and her account is not credited for any new bill in the room of it - the interest on that bill is exactly 30 l.; if it had been paid off she would have had credit for 1030 l., principal and interest; it was the prisoner's business to give her credit for that amount - she is not credited for principal or interest.

Q. Is it customary when a draft on the Bank is received from the paymaster of the Exchequer, to carry that draft for payment on the same day? A. Certainly not - he ought to have brought this draft to the banking-house, and another clerk would have to take it to the Bank the next day. There are two clerks named Ryder and Lee; one of whom would have to receive it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are all the pages in that book in the prisoner's writing? A. Yes. - The entry of the old bill on Miss Wood's account is dated the 22d of September, 1823. If it had been delivered to her there would be written against it, delivered on such a day, but he has written against it, "paid off on the 20th of September, 1824;" he should have entered a new bill on the credit side. If she had received the bill she must have given an order for the delivery of it; if it had been paid off in money the cash would have been carried to her general account, which is not here. I never quarrelled with the prisoner. I never write for newspapers.

Q. Look at this paper, is it your writing? A. Yes; I do know that I wrote any more of that sort - I might have written two, but will swear I did not write three. I sent one to the Times newspaper - I sent them no other communication, and know of none being sent; that was sent to a newspaper-office. I sent a notice to the Herald also, and I went to the Times office; I had some conversation with the publisher, but cannot say whether I left one there - I called no where else. I thought it so black against him that the public ought to know it.

Q. You sent this notice to the papers, "Mr. Christmas, for robbing Messrs. Hoares, will be publicly examined at Bow-street, this evening?" A. Yes, that is it. I was not directed by any of our firm to do so; I expect no advancement by his fall. I said nothing at the Times-office but that he would be examined that night. I never furnished materials for any of the articles which appeared there.

Q. The interest entered in the book tallies with the principal sum entered? A. Yes. The entry is made on the 22d of September, the day on which they were paid off - the interest is added to the principal, to make the two sums tally - there is 1000 l. principal, and 30 l. interest omitted; but here is a list in his hand-writing, in which he enters both those sums. This particular bill is entered there; here is a list of Exchequer bills, which should tally with the other, but it does not. The first amounts to 475,400 l.; it is a rough copy, made out from the bill-book. In the other list the bill, No. 10,588, is omitted.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Where does that list come from? A. From the banking-house; the casting up makes the amount 474,400 l, and interest 14,232 l.; but it is cast wrong - 1000 l. principal and 30 l. interest; although there is but two items to cast up: if the bill had been paid off the money would be entered; this bill is not entered to her account any where.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. On your solemn oath are not the figures 474,700 in another person's writing? A. They are very like his figures.

Q. They are one of the two sums which would make the 475,400 l.? A. Yes. I can swear to all the rest of the figures.

MR. LAW. Q. Here is 474,700 l. - have you any doubt of the figure 7 being in his writing? A. I cannot swear to that particular line being his, but to all the rest - the

casting up is in his writing, and that is where the inaccuracy lies. Both the totals of principal and interest are his writing.

GEORGE MELMOTH . I am a clerk in the banking-house. I have examined the Exchequer bills with the prisoner's list. I have examined all the books, and find all the bills correspond, except ten of 100 l.; they make 474,400 l., but it should be 475,400 l. to tally with the old bills. The 1000 l. bills tally; the deficiency is in ten of 100 l.

Q. You could not tell the number of each bill? A. Not as to the actual number, but I compare the number of bills belonging to different people with the new bills, and find ten of 100 l. short. I have compared to see if the new bills tally with the old ones; the entries in the accounts are the prisoner's writing: the new bills are certainly every one entered in his writing.

Q. Tell me the names of any person in whose account the deficiency will appear? A. I can mention them if obliged, but had rather not.

Q. Well, point out the accounts, and do not read the names? A. Here is one, it is Miss Wood's - 1000 l. is deficient. I will state others without mentioning names; here is an account, in which the old bills were, four of 1000 l., three of 500 l., five of 200 l., and sixteen of 100 l.; in return for them there should be the same number and amount - instead of which I find five of 1000 l.; three of 500 l., five of 200 l., but only six of 100 l.; there is the same sum in total: this is in his hand-writing.

MR. LAW. Q. There is a deficiency of 1000 l. in Miss Wood's account? A. Yes, and the actual deficiency is in ten bills of 100 l.

JOHN TURNER WATTS . I am a stock-broker. On the 22d of June I received from the prisoner, and sold for him three Exchequer bills of 100 l., dated the 20th of September, 1824. On the 25th of June I sold three 100 l., of the same date, and on the 14th of July four more of the same amount and date.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you money transactions with him to a considerable amount? A. Yes, many thousands; he acted as agent for people - he did not state for whom he sold those bills.

MR. MELMOTH re-examined. Q. Will you refer to the clearing book - are there any entries of the prisoner's, of notes paid in on the 22d of September, 1824? A. I find an entry amounting to 13065 l. 6 s. 8 d.; it is paid in two notes of 30 l. each among others.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. My Lord, we will give up the charge of embezzling the 30 l.

The prisoner being called upon for his Defence, entered into a long detail, desiring the Jury to banish from their minds any prejudice which they might have received from the statements in the public press - stated that his character was unimpeachable, and that he was high in the confidence of his employers after he left them, and contended that had he been guilty of the charge he should not have left, as while he continued in their employ detection would have been impossible; but entered into no explanation of the facts deposed to.

MR. HOARE re-examined. I am certain it is not our practice for any draft of the Exchequer Bill office to be presented at the Bank on the day it is dated.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-10

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1232. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Launcelot South , from his person .

LAUNCELOT SOUTH. I was walking up New-street, Covent-garden , on the 5th of July, with a friend, about eleven o'clock in the evening - a gentleman came and told me I had lost a handkerchief, and if I would go back about twenty yards I should see the person - I went back, and found the prisoner in the custody of Bertram, and in his trowsers my handkerchief was found.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAM . I was in New-street, and saw the prisoner in company with another person; the prisoner took this handkerchief from Mr. South's pocket, and turned into a door way. I secured him, and sent a gentleman to tell Mr. South. I searched him, and found this handkerchief in his trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no one with me, and did not go up a door way.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-11

1233. THOMAS BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a chaise harness, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Binford Kerswell .

THOMAS BINFORD KERSWELL. I live in the Colonade, Russell-square , and am a shopkeeper . On the 10th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed my harness - I had hung it up in the stable at the back of my shop, about eleven o'clock the evening before.

JAMES PARTRIDGE . I am a watchman. On the 10th of April, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner and another (who was tried last Sessions) going down Compton-place; the other man had the harness on his back, and the prisoner said, "Watchman, never mind, it is all right - the man is in the street who gave us the harness to carry;" he then went away, and said he would fetch the man, but did not return. I secured the other man. I have known the prisoner from a child.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you still watchman there? A. Yes. I saw the two lads together - I do not know which of the two said, "It is all right;" but it was the prisoner who said the man who gave it to them was in the street, near the coach rank.

JOSEPH CADBY . I apprehended the prisoner in Nelson's skittle-ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking with the other lad, and a man came and said he would give him a shilling to carry the harness to Compton-place; he took it, but I had nothing to do with it; the man went to the end of the turning, but when he saw the watchman he made off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-12

1234. RICHARD HORNSBY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , three tea-chests, value 2 s. , the goods of Luke Ridge .

RICHARD MAYBANK . I apprehended the prisoner in

the house of Reynolds, who keeps a marine store shop, in Turks-row, on the 1st of February; there were two other persons there - I took them all, but the prisoner got over the wall, and escaped. There were three tea chests in the shop - here are pieces of them.

JOSEPH POINTER . I was going down Lower Sloane-street one evening, about three months ago; I saw the prisoner and a man named Sawder standing by Ridge's shop; I went to Maybank, and told him - he came to the place with me, and we saw the prisoner carry a tea-chest on his shoulder, which he took to Reynolds's house; Maybank and I followed him, and there we found two other tea-chests.

RICHARD MAYBANK re-examined. Q. Can you say which of the tea-chests those pieces belong to? A. No. The prisoner was turning in with one, but I cannot say which.

GEORGE GORDON . I was in Reynolds's shop on Thursday, the 1st of February, and saw the prisoner bring in a tea-chest. The officer and Pointer came in, and said it was Mr. Ridge's; I did not hear the prisoner say any thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-13

1235. GEORGE GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , four live tame fowls, price 6 s., and nine chickens, price 2 s. , the property of Arthur Gordon .

ARTHUR GORDON. I had a cock, three hens, and nine chickens safe in my yard in Golden-lane, St. Luke's , at twelve o'clock on the night of the 5th of June; I missed them at eight o'clock next morning. I saw one hen and nine chickens on the prisoner's premises the same morning, between ten and eleven o'clock; I afterwards saw the prisoner, and told him they were mine; he said, "Take them" - I said, "I will take you, I have been plundered so frequently, I will not put up with it;" he then obstructed the officer from going up stairs without a search-warrant, but one of the officers said as part of the property was found on his premises he thought the rest was there. He then got up stairs, and brought down a cock and two hens in a dirty bag.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not he tell you that he bought them of a person of the name of Smith? A. He told the officer that he bought them of Smith, the dog stealer. Smith was taken into custody, but has escaped. The prisoner was discharged by the Magistrate, after a second examination. This bill was found two days before the last Session ended; I do not know why he was not tried.

COURT. Q. At what time did the prisoner say he bought them of Smith, the dog stealer? A. After they had gone up stairs.

SUSANNAH TWEEDY . On the 6th of June, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I went up to my window, and saw in the prisoner's yard a fine brood of chickens, and a hen. I had heard that Gordon had lost some fowls - I went and told him; he came to my room, and said, "They are my chickens, and my hen;" I went with him, and got an officer. The prisoner had had chickens of his own, but they were not then in his yard. I afterwards heard Gordon say to the prisoner, "Where is the hen belonging to these chickens, I saw it here when I was up in Tweedy's room;" he said, "I had no hen here:" Gordon said,

"I will take an oath I saw it."

Cross-examined. Q. Should you not have seen these chickens before eleven o'clock if they had been there? A. I think I should.

ELEANOR PERL . I lodge with Tweedy - she called me about eleven o'clock, and left me to watch the hen and nine chickens while she went to get an officer. I watched there some time, and saw the prisoner come out, and throw down a bit of barley - he then caught the hen, and took her away.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a headborough. I was with Gordon at the prisoner's house, about eleven o'clock; Gordon said he had lost some fowls, and they were in that place; the chickens were running in the yard; the prisoner was then up stairs, but he came down, and either I or the prosecutor said they were his fowls - he said he had bought them that morning about ten o'clock; I then went up stairs, and when I was coming down again he met me, and said, "You had no right to go up stairs without a warrant;" I said as part of the property was found I would go. Gordon, the officer, and myself, then went up again to the dormer, and the officer found the cock in a bag: I inquired who he bought the fowls of; he said of Smith, the dog fancier, or stealer, I do not know which, I think fancier; I said, "Where does he live?" he said "In Cherry-tree-alley;" I went there with another man, and found Smith; I brought him some distance, and he begged of me to loose his hands, which I did; he then drew a knife and rushed at me; I seized him by the throat, and made him drop the knife; he then said "Go to the Benbow public-house," and about thirty persons came round me and knocked me about; he got away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner keep pigeons in his dormer? A. Yes.

EDWARD MURRILLS . I went with Collins, and found three fowls in the dormer, in a kind of jacket, but I cannot be positive whether they were cocks or hens - the prisoner was in the room at the time; I heard him say that Collins had no right to go up stairs.

ROBERT LOCK . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I was called in and saw the prisoner at his house - he said "What do you want?" I said "I am told there are some fowls;" he said

"You shall come in;" I went in and saw the fowls; a young man, named Williams, said to him, "Why don't you tell Lock where you got them?" he then said he had bought them that morning of Jem Smith, but if he had known they had been stolen he should not have bought them. I took him and he was discharged after a second examination.

ARTHUR GORDON re-examined. Q. When you first went did you see the hen and the chickens together? A. Yes, when I saw them from the window, but when I had got the officer the hen was gone; I asked the prisoner about the hen, and said Mrs. Pearl saw you take the hen away; he said "I have no hen belonging to this brood;" he then opened a cupboard in his room and said, "Is this your hen?" I said "No, it is not;" I afterwards saw my own hen brought down from the loft, with the wing partly plucked. I lost four fowls in all, but only three were found.

Prisoner's Defence. There were only two fowls found.

Smith came to my house and asked me to buy some fowls, for which I gave him 5 s. 6 d.; there were two dead fowls and nine chickens. I took the hens into the loft, and laid them down on some straw; the officer came about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and I said I bought them of Smith. The prosecutor first said a fowl that was there was his, and then he said it was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-14

1236. FREDERICK BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a shawl, value 10 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and five napkins, value 1 s. , the goods of Philip Wainwright .

PHILIP WAINWRIGHT. I live in White Lion-street. On the 1st of August, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was at the Blue Anchor public-house, in Chancery-lane , with my wife; I had a bundle containing a red shawl and five napkins; I put the bundle in the parlour window; the prisoner was close by the window - he went out while we were there, and when we were going the bundle was gone - I saw the articles again on the 18th of August.

ELIZABETH MARGARET TAYLOR . My father keeps the Blue Anchor. On the 1st of August I let a man out just as the house was shutting up - I cannot be positive as to his person, but he had a bundle with him.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodgings; he was ill in bed at the time; we found the handkerchief in his room, and the shawl and napkins in his landlord's room - he said he had found them on the floor, and was drunk at the time - he was very sorry.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that on the 1st of August he picked up this bundle in a public-house, being intoxicated at the time; but had not attempted to dispose of a single article.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-15

1237. RUTH BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a shirt, value 5 s , the goods of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER. I am a labourer , and live in Dove-row, Hackney. On the 6th of August, I lived in Mr. Rossiter's house, and the prisoner lived there on the first floor; I went into my room and missed a shirt from a bundle which was tied up at my bed-head - I had seen it safe the evening before; here is the shirt - it is not marked, but I know it to be mine.

THOMAS EAGLES . I went to the prisoner's room on the 6th of August; she was in bed; I said I came to apprehend her for taking some things, and among the rest a shirt; she said to a man who was there, "Give me my pockets;" he took out of her pocket a number of duplicates, which I prevented him from giving her; I found one for the shirt among them.

RICHARD CARPENTER . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned this shirt for 4 s. at our house.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it to get victuals - I meant to have returned it - it is the first thing of the kind I ever did.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-16

1238. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 9 lbs. of mutton, value 4 s.; 10 lbs. of beef, value 5 s.; 2 lbs. of butter, value 2 s.; two umbrellas, value 8 s., and three brushes, value 1 s. , the goods of Martha Tobin , widow .

MARY BEATH . I am servant to Mrs. Martha Tobin, a widow, who lives in Great George-street, Hampstead road . I put a roll of butter, some beef, and a leg of mutton, with a slice cut out of the middle of it, into the area cupboard, about eleven o'clock on the night of the 27th of August; the area gate was locked, but it was open in the morning; I went to the watch-house the next day, and saw all the articles, with two umbrellas and some shoe-brushes.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am watch-house-keeper of St. Pancras. I saw the prisoner on Sunday morning, the 28th of August, a little before me, with a bag on his shoulder, and two umbrellas under his coat. I followed him to Buckingham-street, and then stopped him; he went with me as far as Fitzroy-street; he then said he was very sick, and begged me to let him lean against a post, which I did; he then snatched the staff from my hand, and broke the strap from my wrist; he struck me on the head, and on several other parts; I called to a man named Jones to come, but the prisoner kicked him, and he went away; I then saw one of the patrol, and called to him; he refused to come, but at last he came, and the prisoner was secured; these brushes fell out of the prisoner's pocket in the scuffle; the other property was found in the bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been down to Battle-bridge, and as I was returning a man said to me, "Young man, do you want a job?" I said, on Monday morning I should. He said, "If you come to the Adam and Eve public-house, at five o'clock to-morrow morning, I will take you to my master's." I went about six o'clock, and did not find him. I was returning home, and in Tottenham-court-road a man met me with a kind of shooting-jacket on, and he said, "Have you a mind to earn 1 s. 6 d.; take this bag to the Buffalo's Head, in the New-road, I shall be there by the time you get there." Soon afterwards I was stopped by the officer, and made no resistance.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-17

1239. THOMAS HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , a snuff-box, value 15 l., the goods of Sir George Beaumont , Bart. , from his person .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HANDS . I am in the service of Sir George Beaumont. On Sunday morning, the 17th of July, my master gave me information; I saw the prisoner near us; he was running very fast; I followed him, and before I came up with him he had run round some carriages, and had been stopped; he was then speaking to another man; I collared him, and said, I believed he had something that did not belong to him. I am certain he said he had not. I said I believed he had, and, after some little hesitation, he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out this box, and gave it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were there more carriages

than one there? A. There was only one which he ran round. When I came up to him he was speaking to another man, and, I believe, he was about to give the box to him. He hesitated at first, but, upon my repeating the question, he gave up the box, and after some little resistance he accompanied me to Sir George Beaumont. He said at first, that after having given up the box he ought to be allowed to go. The person he was speaking to went away.

SIR GEORGE BEAUMONT. This is my box. I missed it, as my servant has stated, from my right-hand coat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you been to church. A. Yes. I had used the box but the minute before. The prisoner was brought back to me, and went to my house. He might tell me that he had picked it up and presented it to some person as an owner, but I do not recollect it.

COURT. Q. Were there some persons pressing on you? A. Yes; my arms were pinioned to my side. As soon as they were gone I missed my snuff-box. I cannot swear that the prisoner was one of the persons; but I pointed with my hand to a person who was running, for my servant to follow.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing up St. George-street, and at the corner of Maddox-street I saw the snuffbox laying; I took it up, and followed a person who I supposed had dropped it; the servant came up and said, "Have you not something that does not belong to you?" I said, in the hurry of the moment, "No;" but when he repeated the question I offered it to him. I afterwards advertised for the person who saw me pick it up, and he is here.

WILLIAM HENRY SMITH . I am a wax-chandler. I live in Clerkenwell. On Sunday, the 17th of July, I was passing St. George's, Hanover-square . I saw a young man pick up what I believe was a snuff-box. I cannot be positive to the person of the prisoner, but I believe it was him. There was a carriage passing at the time. I did not notice what the person did with it. I was going to Earl Carter's. I have no acquaintance with the prisoner; but I attended in consequence of an advertisement.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear that the prisoner is the person you saw pick up the snuff-box? A. I cannot say positively that he is, but he is like him in size and appearance - I did not observe what sort of box it was, but I think it was like the one produced - I did not see the person run, nor hear him speak a word - I did not see the pursuit of any person - nor Sir George Beaumont and his lady - I was not the person to whom the box was offered.

SIR GEORGE BEAUMONT re-examined. Q. Are you quite sure the box could not have come out of your pocket without being taken? A. No; I think it was impossible, and the passing of the persons was so regular that it could not have been jostled out but by those persons who pressed me.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-18

1240. ROBERT GATEHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , a bridle, value 15 s. , the goods of Frederick Bull .

SECOND COUNT stating it to be the property of James Gibling .

JAMES GIBLING. On the 11th of July I was at Mr. Jessop's, Bell-yard, Oxford-street ; the prisoner was servant to a gentleman whose horses stood there, and he could come to the yard at any time. I know this bridle - it is the property of Mr. Frederick Bull - it was missed on a Monday, and the prisoner was taken on the Friday.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Has not your master a great many bridles? A. Yes; I am positive to this - there are other bridles like it in the harness room, but this has been champed by the horse. I went to take the prisoner and he said he had bought it of a person named Williams, who was formerly an hostler in the yard.

THOMAS KENT . I went to Mr. Jessop's yard, to get a horse on a Saturday - I saw the prisoner there, whom I had known for six or seven years - he asked me if I wanted to buy a saddle and a bridle; I said I would look at them; I then said I would have the curb and saddle, but not the bridle - he said he wanted 50 s. for the curb and saddle, and I agreed to have them; a young man, who was there, said, if I had not had them he would. I took the saddle and curb home, and on the Monday evening my man told me that a bridle had been brought to my stable; I went to the prisoner on the following Saturday, and said heard they had been stolen; he said the saddle was his own, and the bridle he had bought of Williams, and he would go and tell Mr. Jessop of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not persons in the line of business that the prisoner is, often buy and sell articles of this description? A. Yes, they do.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-19

1241. CORNELIUS GORE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , two pewter pots, value 2 s. , the goods of John Adams .

JOHN ADAMS. I keep the York Arms public-house, East-street, Manchester-square . In consequence of information, on the 31st of August, I sent for a constable - we went to the door, and stopped the prisoner as he came out of my house, with a bag under his arm; I seized the bag and he ran away; in the bag we found this quart pot - he threw another pot from him into an area.

RICHARD WYAT . I saw the prisoner take a pot off the table in the tap-room, and informed Mr. Adams.

WILLIAM LEADBEATER . I was drinking in the house and saw the prisoner take the pot, and gave information - I pursued and saw him drop a pot into an area from a frock which he had on.

The prisoner put in a written paper stating, that he was intoxicated at the time of committing the offence.

Six witnesses gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-20

1242. CHARLES LESSIN and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a spoon, value 10 s., and a fork, value 1 s. , the goods of Joshua Platt .

HARRIET PITT . I am the wife of William Pitt . I have the care of the house of Mr. Joshua Platt, No. 61, Lincoln's inn-fields . On the evening of the 6th of July, the prisoner

Lessin, came into the kitchen and asked for Mr. Platt said he was out: he said he must see him as he had some money to give him, and Mr. Platt had appointed eight o'clock as the time when he would be in the way; I said it was likely Mr. Platt would be in if he said so. He then took a chair and sat down about ten minutes: he went away soon afterwards - the door bell rung - I went up - one of the witnesses gave me information, and I missed the articles stated, which I had seen safe about two minutes before. I had not seen the other prisoner.

JOHN BAGSHAW . On the night of the 6th of July, I was with a person in Lincoln's-inn-fields - the two prisoners went past me, and stopped at the corner of the house No. 61 - one of them said "Not yet." Williams then went past the house, and seemed to look if any one was coming out; Lessin then went in and came out in about ten minutes with something in the left side of his coat - he ran down Duke-street, and Williams immediately followed him; I rang the bell and told the lady I suspected all was not right, and asked if she missed any thing. I afterwards went with the officer to seek for Williams, whom I had described. I had not taken particular notice of Lessin, but I believe he is the person.

JONATHAN ASQUITH . I am a turner and brush-maker, and live in St. Martin's-lane. The prisoner Lessin called at my house about two months ago - I believe it was on the 7th of July: in consequence of some information I sent for an officer, and a handkerchief, with nine bagatelle balls and a pair of steel snuffers were taken from him in my presence - he had put the handkerchief, with something in it, on the table.

JOHN JONES . I am an officer. I was sent for by Asquith, on the 7th of July - I searched Lessin, and found several articles, and among the rest this silver spoon, which he put out of his pocket on the table.

LESSIN'S Defence. I had been to Mr. Hancock's, about some prize money due to my father, and they told me to go to Mr. Platt's - I went and the lady said he was not at home.

WILLIAMS' Defence. I was coming from my work to my lodgings - I met my fellow prisoner, who asked me where I was going; I said home; and he said if I would wait for him he would go with me; I waited a few minutes - he then came out, and we went away together, but did not run.

LESSIN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-21

1243. JOHN LOTHIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a chaise, called a tilbury, value 8 l. , the goods of Thomas Miller .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS MILLER. I am a coach-maker , residing in Mary-le-bone. On the 22d of July the prisoner came to my house, and said he knew of some harness to be sold at Kentish-town, which might suit me - I said I wanted to go that way; he said if I would use one of my gigs he would bring his horse and harness; we went, but it did not suit me - we came back, and he had tea at my house; he then asked what I let out that tilbury for - I said 15 s. per week; he said would I let him have it the next day to go to Woolwich to see his daughter: I said I would, and I went part of the way, and while I was in a house he went off with it; I saw him on the 26th, and asked him why he did not bring the tilbury back - he said he should keep it for another week; I saw him several times afterwards, but he did not bring it home; I saw him about a fortnight afterwards, and he said he should hire it another week, and pay me altogether. I then saw him again, and said, "Why don't you bring the gig home;" he said he should keep it; I said he could not keep it, for I had sold it. He then said he had let it to a lawyer for a month. - I asked where he lived; he said he did not know the name of the street - I told him I should expect it in a short time, or I should see about it some other way - he had called at my house several times before, and said he kept several men at work in the harness line. I have never got the tilbury back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had seen this man several times? A. Yes, and he had it week after week.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-22

1244. EDWARD M'DONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 30 lbs. of lead, value 6 s. , the goods of the Imperial Gas Light and Coke Company .

EDWARD TOWNSEND . I am store-keeper to the Imperial Gas and Coke Company - the prisoner was in their employ; on the 6th of July he had some lead given him to take to the foreman. I know this lead here - I believe it to be their property.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am a plumber. The prisoner came to my shop on the 9th of July; he said he had some lead to sell: I agreed to buy it - he afterwards brought this lead to me, which I bought for 6 s.; he came again afterwards - I asked him where he worked, and he said for the Chelsea Water Works - I sent for a constable, who took him.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner where he got the lead - he said from a court in Wapping, and he gave 27 s. a cwt. for it; I said I thought he had made a bad bargain, as it was not worth so much. When he was questioned about it afterwards he sent to the Company, and told them of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the New-road.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-23

1245. WILLIAM MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a saw, value 7 s. , the goods of William Dove .

WILLIAM DOVE. I am a carpenter . On the 13th of July, when I went to dinner at twelve o'clock, I left this saw in a shop at the corner of Rotherfield-street, Lower-road, Islington . While I was at dinner my wife gave me information - I went out, and saw the prisoner, but he dropped the saw before I took him.

JAMES SHIELS . I was with Dove, and saw the prisoner with the saw - he threw it away in King-street. When I first saw him he was about fifty yards from Rotherfield-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy gave it to me, and said he picked it up in Lower-street.

One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character, and engaged to take him into his employ.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-24

1246. MARY M'DERMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , five shirts, value 3 l.; two shifts, value 1 l.; a pair of drawers, value 3 s.; a slip, value 8 s.; a night cap, value 6 d.; two pairs of trousers, value 30 s., and four pairs of stockings, value 5 s. , the goods of Anthony Whitting .

MARY ANN SUMMERS . The prisoner was employed by me as a washerwoman . On the 11th of August I gave her a basket of linen to take to Mr. Anthony Whitting - they were delivered safe, and she fetched another parcel from there on the following Monday, which she never delivered to me; she never came to me again till the Saturday evening following, when she brought me six duplicates, and said she had not made away with the other things; I told her to bring them - she came on the Sunday, and said she had pawned every thing but two pairs of stockings, and she was very sorry.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt and a shift, which were pawned with me on the 13th of August, by the prisoner.

GEORGE POILE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shirt and a petticoat, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM HARRIOTT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt pawned by the prisoner.

GEORGE WALKER . I am a pawnbroker. I have one shirt and a pair of trousers pawned by the prisoner.

LEWIS HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shift and a shirt pawned by the prisoner.

ANN WHITTING . My husband's name is Anthony. I know this property to be ours.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-25

1247. THOMAS PARMINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , eight live tame fowls, price 20 s. , the property of Aaron Rowley .

AARON ROWLEY. I live in South-place, Somers'-town . I had seventeen fowls on Saturday, the 20th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I missed eight of them the next morning: I found them on Monday morning at the watch-house, and knew them to be mine; six of them were alive, and two dead.

WILLIAM NOTT . I am a watchman. I was calling the hour on Sunday morning, near the Bedford nursery, and saw the prisoner there with a bag; I asked what he had got; he said, only some fowls, which he had got from Churchway, and was going to take them to the Seven-dials. I took him to the watch-house with them.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am watch-house keeper. I received the fowls; the dead ones were quite warm. I shewed them to the prosecutor on Monday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from work on Saturday night, and saw a man with these fowls to sell; I bought them at 1 s. 6 d. a piece, and on the Sunday morning I was going along with them when the watchman stopped me, and asked me where I got them - I told him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-26

1248. HENRY SHARP , JOHN WHITE , and JAMES GOODING were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , three bottles, value 4 d.; two quarts of gin, value 3 s., and a quart of wine, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Beane .

BETSY HORNBY . I am sister to Mrs. Beane, who keeps the White Hart, public-house, Clare-market . I was in the yard at the back of their house on the 6th of July - there is a cellar door which comes into that yard; it was not open when I went out, but soon afterwards I saw it open. I watched, and saw Sharp, who was quartered in the house, come out of the cellar - he appeared to be tipsy, and had two bottles in his hand, full of a liquor which looked like gin; he went into the tap-room, where the other two prisoners were; they were also tipsy. I went and told Mrs. Beane what I had seen; she went to the tap-room, and asked Sharp what he was doing with the two bottles he had brought out of the cellar - he said, "I have none, search me;" the two bottles were found on White.

SARAH BEANE . I am the wife of Robert Beane. I heard what my sister said, and went to the tap-room - I saw the prisoners, and asked Sharp what he was going to do with the two bottles he brought from the cellar; he denied having any, and told me to search him; he was rather intoxicated, and White was more so - the constable found the bottles on White.

GEORGE WOODHALL . I live in Crown-court, Dean-street. I went to the public-house on the 6th of July - I went to the yard, and found White asleep there; I tried to awake him, and saw the cork of a bottle in his pocket; the constable was sent for, and I saw the same bottle taken from him.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a constable. I took this bottle from the prisoner White, who was very drunk.

THOMAS PRICE . I am landlord of the Taylor's-Arms, public-house - James Gooding was quartered at that house. On the 8th of July I went and looked into his box - I found this bottle of wine, and this bottle of gin; I asked him about them, and he said the drayman, meaning White, had given them to him; I had seen White at my house on the Wednesday before, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - he beckoned to Gooding to go up the turning with him, and gave him something, but I could not see what it was.

RICHARD GARDNER . I apprehended Sharp on the 7th of July, and took Gooding on the day following, at the Taylors' Arms.

SHARP'S Defence. I was in liquor, and know nothing about it.

WHITE'S Defence. I was in liquor - I saw a bottle in the back yard, and took it up to give to Mrs. Beane.

GOODING'S Defence. I am in the habit of having liquor from the country, and these bottles were my own.

SARAH BEANE re-examined. Q. Was there gin in bottles

in the cellar? A. No; there was gin in a cask and empty bottles.

SHARP - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

WHITE - NOT GUILTY .

GOODING - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-27

1249. WILLIAM RADCLIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , two gowns, value 10 s.; three caps, value 3 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; three collars, value 2 s.; a pocket, value 1 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; three shirts, value 3 s., and two pairs of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of William Scraggs .

WILLIAM SCRAGGS. I live at the Canteen, in the King's-mews . The prisoner was stationed in the barracks there - he is a private in the 3d regiment of Guards . On the evening of the 30th of July I sent my servant, Jane Nuttal up stairs - she found the prisoner there; she returned immediately, and I sent her up a second time, and desired him to come down; he came down, and I asked what business he had in the bed-room - he said he had been looking for his comrade; he then went to the barracks, and in about half an hour I sent my servant up with a boy - I then went up stairs myself, and met the prisoner on the stairs; he again said he had been looking for his comrade - I had him taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was not he brought to your house by the corporal? A. No - he was taken from the Canteen door by the serjeant, and I desired him to be put into the guard-room; there were other soldiers there, but not a recruit.

JANE NUTTAL . I was servant to Scraggs. On the 30th of July, between nine and ten o'clock, I was desired by my master to go up stairs, and see if any body was there - I went up, and found the prisoner apparently asleep; my master sent me up again to tell him to come down, but when I went up he was gone - he must have followed me down stairs. In about half an hour I was desired to go up again, in consequence of my mistress coming home. I got the boy to go up stairs with me - we found the prisoner there, and some things were removed from the bed, where I had laid them about three o'clock. I saw the prisoner again when he came down stairs, and asked him what he had been doing - he said, looking for his comrade.

THOMAS BRADLEY . I went up stairs with Nuttal, and saw the prisoner there - I saw him looking under the bed - he said he was looking for his comrade. It was under my bed that the property was found.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 2d of August. I was fetched by the serjeant of his regiment, and the property was given to me.

WILLIAM HINCH . I am a private in the 3d regiment of Guards. I was posted at the door about half-past eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner go up stairs - I told the landlord to send some person after him; he then came down, and in about half an hour I saw him come out of the house again - I did not see any thing in his hand. Proctor was there the first time, but he went soon afterwards.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with a recruit, and Proctor was with us. The recruit got away, and I went up stairs to look for him, being a little in liquor I laid down, as it is punishable to be in liquor in the barracks; the servant came up and said, "Oh! is it you;" I then came down with her. I went to the barracks, and then came back again, and went up stairs to look for the recruit - the servant and the lad followed me up, and when I came down I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-28

1250. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, a candlestick, value 3 s.; a snuffers' tray, value 1 s., and a tea caddy, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Evans .

THOMAS EVANS. I live in Little Earl-street . On the 5th of August I went out of my room, about nine o'clock in the evening, and left my articles there; I returned in about half an hour and did not then miss them; some friends came with me; I went out again about eleven o'clock, and returned again at near twelve; I then sat down in my chair and fell asleep; my landlady awoke me afterwards and said some of my property was gone: I saw the articles again the same night in the custody of the watchman.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I live at this house. On the morning of the 6th of August my wife alarmed me, and said there was some person in the house: I listened and heard some person say that the b - y watchman had locked them into the house. I went out of my room and found the prisoner in the passage, with two of these articles in her possession; I put on my clothes and got the watchman; the street door was locked, and bolted top and bottom, so that no person could have put her in; she afterwards said that the man had brought her in and had no money to give her, and she had taken these articles to pay herself.

JAMES MAHONY . I am the watchman. I received charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor about twelve o'clock at night - he took me to a watering-house, and then to his lodgings; he gave me two shillings and a half-crown piece, which I thought not enough, and I was joking with him about taking these little things towards housekeeping, and he said I might take them if I liked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-29

1251. ELIZABETH WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a hat, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Stacey .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-30

1252. CHARLES M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Kyberly Pritchard , from his person .

THOMAS KYBERLY PRITCHARD. I live in Burlington-street. On the 18th of July, as I was passing in Oxford-street , a lady, who is present, told me my handkerchief was gone; I felt my pocket and missed it; she pointed the prisoner out - I seized him by the collar - he denied it the first time, but I persisted in saying he had it - and he

pointed to it lying on the ground, about half a yard from him - this is the handkerchief.

LETITIA DAVEY . I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner put his left hand into the gentleman's pocket, and support the pocket with his right hand - I informed the gentleman of it and he secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-31

1253. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , a watch, value 1 l., the goods of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES. I am a labourer and live in Britania-street, Battle-bridge. On the 28th of July I was making bricks with the prisoner - in the evening we went to the Britania public-house - we had some porter - I fell asleep there and awoke about half-past ten o'clock and the prisoner was gone - I then missed my watch: he did not come to his work next morning, nor did I see him again till the following Monday, when I went with the officer to him at Islington. I know the watch to be mine - it had been in my fob.

GEORGE STOWELL . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned at our house on the 29th of July, by the prisoner.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am a constable at Islington. I went with the prosecutor to the Nelson public-house, and found the prisoner with the duplicate of the watch in his fob.

Prisoner's Defence. We had both been drinking all the afternoon, and then went and had some more beer - he gave me his watch to go and pawn for him, but I fell asleep in the fields and next morning, I pawned it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-32

1254. JAMES WALLEN and JOHN ELLSON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , a necklace, value 3 s., the goods of Robert Elliott , from the person of Mary Ann Elliott , spinster .

ROBERT ELLIOTT. I live in Margaret-street, Hackney-fields. About two o'clock on the 7th of July, I heard of my necklace being lost - I went to the door and was told to go to the watch-house, where I saw it again.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How do you know this necklace? A. By the manner in which the beads are tied on. I had seen it on my child's neck about twelve o'clock.

SARAH ELLIOTT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had put the necklace on my daughter's neck that morning, and sent her out with Mary Chambers - they returned about two o'clock and said the necklace was lost.

JOHN TURNER . I was in London-fields between twelve and one o'clock - I saw the prisoners standing with some other persons; I saw Wallen go and take the necklace from the neck of the child which was in the girl's arms - he gave it to Ellson, who put it into his pocket, and they walked away; I lost sight of them for about five minutes, but I know them to be the same; I gave information to the officer - he searched them in the field, and found it on them.

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I am an officer. I took up the prisoners on the 17th of July, in consequence of the information I received from Turner - I found this necklace in Ellson's right-hand waistcoat pocket, which Mr. Elliott described to me before he saw it.

ELLSON'S Defence. Two boys ran by me and dropped these beads - I picked them up.

Seven witnesses gave Wallen a good character.

WALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ELLSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-33

1255. JOHN LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , two yards of cloth, value 10 s., the goods of Samuel Pope and Richard Pope , his masters .

RICHARD POPE. I am in partnership with my brother Samuel Pope. We are woollen-drapers , and live in Holborn . The prisoner was in our service about three months - this kerseymere is our property; I know it by the colour, the selvidge, and the quality. On the 1st of August I gave directions to William Maton to measure eight or ten yards of cloth, and send it for the prisoner to cut: when it came down there was about two yards or two yards and a quarter, missing; but I was not then at home. On the 12th of August there were two yards more missing from a piece which Maton had measured by my orders the day before: I then called the prisoner and asked him about it, and he confessed that he had taken the cloth out in his hat, and said it was the first he had taken: this piece of cloth was found in his drawer in his room. He is married and has three children - he had a good character.

JOSHUA WORMALD . I went to the prisoner's apartments, in Dorrington-street, and found this piece of cloth in his drawer, which was not locked.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-34

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1256. WILLIAM WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , a watch, value 10 l.; a seal, value 2 l.; a chain, value 2 l., and a watch-key, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Selby, the younger , from his person .

MR. THOMAS SELBY, JUN. I am an attorney . I was going with a party into Surry-street , to see the last heat of a boat race, about half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 15th of August: when I got to the stairs at the bottom of Surry-street there was a great crowd of persons, and the prisoner refused to let me pass; I spoke to him about it three or four times; while I was endeavouring to pass, he went before two men, who stood in front of me, and I immediately felt my watch drawn from my pocket. The prisoner was certainly near enough to me to have done it, but I cannot swear that he did. I then saw the watch fall on the stairs - it was parted from the chain - I took it up and seized a person who was near me, but I saw that was not the person who I thought had robbed me. I then saw the prisoner making his escape - I pursued and saw him run down Strand-lane - I took him, in company with a friend, and while I had him by the collar a person in the crowd gave me my seals.

SIMON DE FOISSEY . On the 15th of August, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was near Mr. Selby, at

the Surry-stairs - I heard him ask leave to pass, and saw the prisoner go in front of two men, pass his arm between them, and take the watch from Mr. Selby; he raised the alarm, and said he was robbed - and in a few minutes I saw the watch lying on the steps.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Bow-street, that it was a man in a brown coat, but you could not say it was me? A. I never said any such thing.

JAMES PURCELL . I am a labourer. On the 15th of August I saw Mr. Selby, between six and seven o'clock, while I was standing on the steps, at the bottom of Strand-lane; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me in great agitation: he tried to pass me but I stopped him, and he threw a chain and seal from his left hand behind him - they were given to Mr. Selby, who claimed them as his. The prisoner was taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did I make any resistance? A. No.

Q. Did I throw the chain and seal away? A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I certainly did run from the steps, but it was to see a few friends who had a cutter for the afternoon, and I saw them going down the river.

A witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-35

1257. EDWARD PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , twenty-two books, value 1 l.; a pint of fish sauce, value 2 s., and seven bottles, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Roberts , his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY ROBERTS. I live near the Regent's Park . The prisoner has been in my service for eighteen months as a groom ; I have been concerned in building ; I had missed property at different times, but as I had many persons about I did not suspect the prisoner till the beginning of this year, when, during a confinement of several months, I missed several books and some wine, and in consequence of some information, I caused a search to be made at the prisoner's lodgings, at the Old Rectory house, where the books and wine were found by the officer - I can swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This prisoner had been in your house some time? A. Yes, but he was kept at a distance - he tried to intrude his conversation upon me with vindictive motives against others; I know a gentleman of the name of Rumball - the prisoner came to me from his service, in a destitute state; I gave him livery, but I did not make him any other presents. I was unwell in the year 1823, and, in consequence of seeing an advertisement in the Papers, I went to a medical gentleman's house for retirement, and finding it a delightful situation, I made a temporary residence there; but I was in a state of recollection during that period. I will swear I never gave him these books and bottles. I did not, at Mrs. Willoughby's house, claim two bottles as mine which turned out to be hers. I saw a handkerchief there which I said might have been mine, as it was a new one. I had given him old handkerchiefs, but it is not likely I had given him a new one - but when Mrs. Willoughby said it was her's, I said, "Very well." I had never given him any books or wine in my life. I did not claim two bottles at Mrs. Willoughby's house - I said "These are my bottles I think;" that is all: the prisoner was not appointed to attend me in my confinement, nor was there any person set over me when I was in that unfortunate illness. I behaved generously to him, but did not give him any thing besides clothes and pocket handkerchiefs. I paid some debts out of his wages - I missed several of these books about two months ago, when I was looking for "Ash, on Mineral Waters;" I cannot tell how long before I had seen that book safe, but it was found at the Rectory-house - I did not claim other property which was not mine - I pointed out things which I supposed were mine, but when they were claimed by other persons I did not take them away - I was in Mr. Rumball's house, but I was not in such a state of mind as to forget what I gave, or what I said.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can the prisoner read French? A. No; some of those books are French: here are some old volumes of history, and I do not give odd volumes away, and leave my sets incomplete. When I lived in the physician's house in 1823, the prisoner was his stable-keeper - he was turned out of that service, and I took him in and gave him 9 l. a year.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody - he took me to the Old Church-house, at Stanmore-marsh - I searched the parlour first; he said he believed Mrs. Willoughby was in the house: I found six bottles, which Colonel Roberts said were his property, and he had some at home which would match with them - I asked Mrs. Willoughby where she got them; she said from her son, in London; I said, "You may as well tell the truth" - she then made no answer, but the prisoner said, "It is no use saying any thing about it - I brought them." I then went up stairs, and found those books, which he said the Colonel gave him; I said, "Did the Colonel give you these pickles too" - the Colonel replied that he never did; there were some other articles there, but the Colonel would not swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What were the other articles which the Colonel claimed? A. There was a silk handkerchief which he thought was his, but Mrs. Willoughby said it was her husband's. I do not believe he claimed any bottles that were not his.

EDWARD WILLOUGHBY . I have been employed by the prosecutor as his professional adviser, for about two years. I never saw him irritated till to day, and I always considered him fully competent to manage business - he was not in such a state of mind as to give away his property, and not know what he did.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not the prisoner lived with the Colonel as a servant? A. Yes. I have not heard that the Colonel was at any time in a state of derangement. He keeps a tilbury, and I believe the prisoner has driven it, but I am not certain. I am not aware that the Colonel kept any other male servant.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had the prosecutor under his care at a private mad-house, kept by Mr. Rumball, at Stanmore, and upon the prosecutor leaving that establishment he engaged the prisoner as a groom, and at different times gave him the articles in question.

JAMES PILCHER RUMBALL . I am a medical man. -

The prosecutor applied to me in 1823, in consequence of an advertisement which I inserted in the papers - he was with me about twelve months - he was a short time under some restraint in a strait waistcoat; I believe twice, for a week each time - he had occasional aberations, not quite so violent. The prisoner was the principal person I had to assist me. It is customary for persons in the situation in which the Colonel was, to be sometimes extremely kind, and sometimes the reverse. I certainly never turned the prisoner out of my house so destitute that he had need of clothes - he left me of his own accord, without notice. - His dress was not such as any gentleman need have been ashamed of seeing him in his house. I believe the Colonel had given him a pair of boots while he was in my service. I should not be surprised at persons who have been in such a situation as the Colonel, being subject to occasional excesses of kindness and unkindness.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did not the prosecutor come voluntarily to your house in consequence of an advertisement? A. Yes, he did. I considered him sane about two months before he left me - I had called in another medical gentleman to give his opinion as to the state of his mind, who agreed with me that he was sane. He would sometimes drink a little too much, and be a little violent. I have had opportunities of seeing him since he left my house, in consequence of his raising persecution against me. This letter is my writing (looking at it.) but I do not know whether I wrote it before the prisoner left me to go into the Colonel's service or not. I believe I still owe the Colonel some money - he was to be with me at ninety guineas a year, and it was raised to one hundred, including washing, and I do not consider it was too much, because during part of the time he was very violent. Part of the time he was with me his friends paid me, but when he got better I considered him capable of managing his own affairs. I received at one time, I think, 50 l. from him, and a day or two before he left me he offered me another sum of money, which I would not accept of, and he was offended with me for it; the prisoner had a good situation with me. I wrote these words in that letter, that

"I would not suffer Colonel Roberts to be ignorant that Edward was a deserter of the worst description," and I repeat them now. I do not know whether the Colonel is likely to do things and forget them - he would while he was in my house. I have seen nothing to day which indicates a want of memory.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-36

1258. SYDNEY FREDERICK REED was indicted for bigamy .

RICHARD LUCAS . I am a boot and shoe maker, and live in Ropemaker-street. I have a daughter , whose name is Eliza - the prisoner lived fellow servant with her at Enfield, and married her on the 27th of August, 1823, at Cripplegate-church. I was present at the marriage - he continued to live with her about twelve months, when he left her, and went into Mr. Freshfield's family.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not your daughter and him disagreed? A. No, by no means.

Q. Was there no deed of separation between them? - A. No - she is still alive.

MARY ANN DONOGHUE . I am turned twenty one years of age. I have been acquainted with the prisoner upwards of two years; when I first became acquainted with him I was living at Mr. Freshfield's, as housemaid ; he paid his addressess to me, and we were married at Christ-church , on the 11th of March last - he had represented himself as single, with no tie upon him - but about four weeks after my mother heard, through Mr. Freshfield, that he was married, and I ceased to live with him. He behaved well to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not continue to see him after you heard he was married? A. Yes. He had no pecuniary inducement to marry me.

GEORGE AVIS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of July, at the Duke of York, public-house, in Baker-street. I told him my business, and he told me he had been married before.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that an agreement to separate had been drawn up between him and his first wife, after which he considered himself at liberty to marry.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250915-37

1259. THOMAS WYATT was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HERN . I am brother-in-law to the prisoner. I was present at his marriage at Newington, in the summer of 1820, with my wife's sister, whose name was Martha Delahoy - they did not live together, but he went into service again; they have had three children, which are all alive.

CHADD RANDALL . I am a clerk to a solicitor. Here is a certificate of the marriage of the prisoner with his first wife, on the 17th of May, 1820, at St. Mary, Newington.

SARAH HORTON . I was married to the prisoner on the 10th of August, 1822 , at St. John, at Hackney - I had lived servant with him twelve months; he represented himself as a single man. I had one child by him, which is now upon the parish. We lived together at my father's house after marriage - he arose from his bed at four o'clock one morning, without saying a word of his intention - we never had an angry word.

JOHN GARVA . I am a beadle of Hackney. I apprehended the prisoner, who was living at Enfield, with his first wife and three children.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-38

1260. MARY BOTTOMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , seven 10 l. Bank notes, the property of John Newing from his person .

JOHN NEWING. I am single and live at Tilbury-fort. I came to town about eight o'clock in the morning of the 25th of June and went to Spitalfields-market. I met the prisoner who was a stranger to me about eleven o'clock in the forenoon - she passed me several times in Whitechapel; she asked me to follow her, which I did to a house in George-street, Whitechapel ; we went to a room on the ground floor. I had 70 l. in 10 l. notes, two sovereigns and some silver - the notes were in my trouser's pocket, wrapped up together, and the pocket was buttoned - there was no other person in the room. I gave her two half crowns,

and buttoned my pocket again; after we had been on the bed together about two minutes, I felt her hand about my pocket, but I could not tell whether it was inside or out; as soon as she had got it, we heard a knock at the door, she said "I have got a friend with me;" there was another knock, and she got up and went away - I missed my money immediately. I saw her again in about a fortnight, and can swear to her. I went to Lambeth-street Office, and gave information - the money could not have fallen from my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. What did you come to town for? A. To get money. I was sober - there were no other girls with her.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a fruit salesman at Spitalfields-market. On the morning of the 25th of June, the prosecutor came for his father's account. I paid him in seven 10 l. notes and two sovereigns; he came back in about two hours and said he had been robbed.

THOMAS ALMOND . I took charge of the prisoner. I have known her lodgings and her beat for some time. I sought for her for three weeks before I found her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-39

1260. MARY COLLINS and ANN BROWN , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a snuff box, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s.; a pair of gloves, value 2 d., and sixteen shillings, the property of Henry Menzie , from his person .

HENRY MENZIE. I am a cabinet-maker . I was coming from Haughton-street, Clare-market, on the 9th of August, about four o'clock in the morning - I had been up about half an hour, and was going to Turnmill-street to work. I met the two prisoners in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane , in company together. I believe Collins addressed me first, in a great many flattering words, and then each of them took hold of my arms - they kept hold of me till they had cut away my pocket with 16 s. in it - they took my gloves, snuff box and handkerchief. I cried for the watchman, but they got away; as soon as I got out of the court, I found a patrol, and went with him and the watchman; we found them in Fetter-lane, Holborn. 5 s. 6 d. was found on Collins, and a pen knife and 2 1/2 d. on Brown.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you lose this 16 s.? A. In Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane. I had slept the night before in Haughton-street. I had not been drunk. I had only had a little porter - they were found about twenty minutes after, but none of the property was found on them. I knew them by having seen them many times before in Holborn of an evening.

EDWARD LUDLOW . I am a watchman. The prosecutor applied to me, and described the prisoners. I took them. Mr. King searched them at the watch-house - the prosecutor appeared to me to be sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it the nearest way to Turnmill-street, to go through Gray's Inn-lane? A. I do not know - there are seven houses of ill fame in Fox-court.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I was watch-house-keeper; the prisoners were brought to me - I found 5 s. 6 d. on Collins, and a pen knife and 2 1/2 d. on the other.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-40

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1261. THOMAS PICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , at St. Giles in the Fields , fifty-six sovereigns; one guinea, and a 5 l. Bank note, the property of Robert Mollyner Pite , his master, in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT MOLLYNER PITE. I am a silk mercer and haberdasher , and live at No. 278, High Holborn , in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields - the prisoner was employed by me to shut up the shop and go on errands. I took him as my servant when he was in great distress. I have an iron box which I keep in an iron chest in the shew room at the back of the shop - it is generally kept locked. On the 28th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed fifty-six sovereigns, one guinea, and a 5 l. Bank note from the chest. I had counted my money five minutes before, and it was all safe - he had been backward and forward in the shew room while I was counting it, and nobody but him had been there before I missed it, for I was not out of the place; on my missing the money, he had absconded - I had not sent him out. I gave information to Cousins; he was not taken till the 19th of August. I had left him alone in the shew room for two minutes.

Prisoner. Q. Have you ever paid me any money for my service? A. No; I took him in great distress, and clothed him from head to foot - I had known him twelve years. When the officer brought him to me, he fell on his knees and hoped I would forgive him. I said "What have you done with the money you robbed me of;" he said "Oh I lost it just after I went out."

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am an officer. Mr. Pite gave me information of the robbery. I was looking for the prisoner till the 19th of August, when I found him in a public-house in White Hart-yard - he came down stairs. I said "How do you do, I believe I am addressing Mr. T. Pickett;" he said "No. my name is Gray, I am not the person you take me to be." I said "I know you very well, you must go with me to Mr. Pite, in Holborn;" he immediately sunk on his knee, and said "For God's sake don't take me there; if you do, I am a dead man." I took him to Mr. Pite; he begged for mercy, and said he had lost the money soon after he had taken it.

Prisoner. Having made up my mind to plead guilty, I have not sought for witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18250915-41

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1262. MARGARET NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a shawl, value 3 s.; two coats, value 2 l. 8 s.; a pair of trousers, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 4 s.; a gown, value 4 s.; a tippet, value 6 s.; three caps, value 3 s., and a towel, value 6 d., the goods of Russell Munday , in his dwelling house .

HENRIETTA MUNDAY . I am the wife of Russell Munday

- we live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell - he is a bricklayer . This property was in our room on the second floor; we lodge there. On the 9th of July, at half-past twelve o'clock, I went out with my husband's dinner; I locked the room door and had the key in my pocket; I returned in an hour, found the door still locked, but the property gone. On the 14th I was going out and met the prisoner (who is a stranger) with another person, they passed my door, and went into a barber's shop; the prisoner had my shawl on, but I was not then quite certain, of it being mine, and did not like to stop them. I followed them to Smithfield, then stopped and asked her to let me look at the shawl, which she did; it was mine, and I gave her in charge; she said she bought it on the afternoon I lost it, of a woman in the street, who was in distress: the young person who was with her, had my bundle handkerchief in her hand, she threw it down and ran away - the bundle contained bacon.

MARY MARIA BROMFIT. I lodge on the ground floor of this house. On the 9th of July, about one o'clock, I was in the passage, and saw two women come out of a gateway, which leads to the back part of the house; the prisoner was one of them, she had a bundle in her hand - an elderly woman was with her; when they got three doors off, the other woman took the bundle and they went up the street together. I am certain of the prisoner's person.

(Shawl produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shawl that morning.

GUILTY. Aged 16. Of Stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-42

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

1263. PATRICK WELCH and ELLEN LYONS were indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Welch .

Messrs. ANDREWS and CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

MARY DONOVAN . I am the wife of John Donovan , who lives in Church-street, St. Giles's, and is a woodcutter. I had known Mary Welch for 15 years; she was married to the male prisoner in Ireland; I was present at the marriage six years ago; they lived together as man and wife at Mrs. Corkery's, in Church-street, St. Giles's; they lived very happy and comfortable together - Lyons is the deceased's first cousin; she came to England about two months before Welch and his wife left Church-street, and lived with them; they left Church-street, and went to live in Little Turnstile, Holborn . I called there on the Tuesday before she died. I had seen her at Mrs. Corkery's before that and she was very ill - she said she was bad, her head was very bad - the clergyman, who was in the room, said she was deranged; there was nothing to make me think so; she told me something which I afterwards mentioned to Welch, and told him that she had said she wanted to go back and live at Mrs. Corkery's, for she did not like to live there, for she was jealous of Nell Lyons: he said there was no notice to be taken of what she said, for she did not know what she was saying, this was on Tuesday - on the Friday I heard she was dead; I went to Turnstile, between one and two o'clock, and saw her in bed, dead; Mrs. Corkery and Nell Lyons were there; I helped Mrs. Corkery to wash the body, and when I went to the head I found a cut; I asked Lyons how it happened, she said, she had fallen down stairs on Sunday night; I said I would not wash her any further till I saw Welch - I wanted her to move her head on the pillow, she kept her hand on the head, and said it would do very well as it was - I asked why she kept her hand there, she said she was purging out of her mouth the day before - I sent her for Welch, he came; I asked him how it happened; he said that he was drunk on Sunday night, that she had gone down stairs, and he was carrying her up again, when she put her feet on the stairs, and fell back on the tiles which were laying on one side of the door. After this I washed and cleaned her, cut off a good deal of her hair, and said I would go to the searchers and give an alarm; when I cut off her hair, I observed a bit of lint in the cut, which was at the back of her head, and her hair was bloody - I examined the bed and there was a little blood, which Lyons said proceeded from her head when she was brought up stairs - there was a little flour shook on her head; I fetched the searchers and was there next morning when they came; Lyons was present but not Welch; they asked Lyons what was her illness? she said she had been ill a good while, but she did not know what was the matter with her: she took off her cap, but did not shew the cut - I went home soon after. Welsh did not ask me to the funeral, but I went to walk after it; she was going to be buried on the Sunday; I went there on Sunday and saw the body in the coffin, the prisoners were present - Kennedy, who was there went to the body, put his finger on the cut, and said it should not be buried that day - Welch said, he had no business to prevent his burying his wife, Kennedy fetched the beadle. When I saw the deceased on the Tuesday, she was speechless.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. They had lived very happy together? A. Yes; her maiden name was Mary Connell: it is not the custom in Ireland to bury married women by their maiden names, that I know - they often use their maiden names after marriage. I believe she has had two children; she never complained to me of any particular suffering at their birth. When she said she was jealous of Lyons, I think she was flighty; they bury the day after the death happens in Ireland, but that is not observed here. I was not surprised at not being invited - it is common to follow without - she always went by the name of Welch in England.

MARGARET CORKERY . I live in Church-street, St. Giles's, and know Welch - he lodged with his wife at my house for twelve months; they lived happily together. Lyons came to lodge with them about March last; they lived with me in my room, in the same room as me; they all three slept in the same bed. I and my husband slept in a bed in the same room: they moved from my house to Turnstile; I called there on the Sunday before his wife died: she had come to see me about a fortnight before that, and appeared very ill, and was not in good spirits; I thought her wrong in her head. On the Sunday before she died I and my husband met Welch in Bloomsbury, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon - we knew she was ill, and he asked us to go and see her - we went: she was sitting up in bed, and appeared better than when I last saw her; she said she was better: I do not know whether Welch was present - he was not sober when he

met us. Lyons let us in, and went up to the room with us. Mrs. Welch said somebody had stolen her gown and cloak, and if I would send my girl with some of my clothes she would come and see me next day - she had told me when she was out of her mind that she was jealous of Nell Lyons and her husband - they were both present then. She said on Sunday that she had something to tell me - she did not appear very steady then. I left her about six o'clock that afternoon - Welch and Lyons were then in the room; she did not complain of any injury then. On the Tuesday following, which was the 28th of June, Welch called on me, about eleven o'clock that morning, and said his wife was very ill, and that he had brought the clergyman to prepare her; he asked me to go and see her. I and Donovan went between one and two o'clock - she was then in bed, and speechless; Lyons was in the room: Donovan told me to lift her up on the holster; I felt a handkerchief or something about her head; I asked Lyons what it was - sh said it was a handkerchief about her head, because her head had been light; she said nothing about any cut or accident then. On Friday, the 1st of July, Welch came to me, and said his wife was almost dead - in consequence of which I went about twelve o'clock, and found her very bad; she could not be worse: both the prisoners were there. She opened her eyes, and looked at me, but neither spoke or moved. I was there when she died between one and two o'clock - Welch was not then in the room; I sent for him - he came. I think he then had on a fustian jacket, and was in his working dress. I told him his wife was dead, and I wished Mrs. Donovan to be present when I washed the body - he said I could do it myself; Lyons was in the room: Donovan came up in the mean time, and helped me to wash the body. Donovan found out a cut - Welch had told me before that he was tipsy on the Sunday night, and was stretched on the bed - that she went down stairs, and Lyons called to him; he went down after her, and caught her by the body to bring her up - that she put her foot against the stairs, and fell back, with her head against the tiles, and so got that injury on the head.

Q. Did Donovan point out a spot of blood on the deceased's neck? A. Yes, and on the bolster - it was a mark of blood; Lyons said Mrs. Welch had purged that blood out of her mouth. I saw some tiles on the stair-case on Tuesday - I do not know whether any were broken. - Lyons's hand was on the back of the deceased's head when we were washing the body. I wanted to wash her face - Donovan told me to turn the body to wash her neck; Lyons said there was no occasion for that. Donovan turned the body on the side, and found the cut. Before that it lay on its back. Donovan called out that the woman was murdered, and immediately fainted in a chair. I saw the cut very plain; there was blood about it: Donovan cut off some of the hair - it was bloody. I said I would do no more till the searchers were sent for. Donovan and I went for them - they did not come till eleven o'clock next day (Friday) - he was at work. I was in the room on Sunday, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. Kennedy prevented the funeral.

Q. Did you know from Welch or Lyons that she had met with an accident, till you discovered it on Friday? A. No.

Cross-examined. Q. Welch was an affectionate husband? A. Yes. I had every opportunity of observing his conduct - he was a good kind husband - he always spoke feelingly of her, and when she died he did the same - Poor women in Ireland go by their maiden names after marriage. I was with her about six months ago, when she had a dead child - she was very delicate; no violence was used to produce the birth: she was very ill afterwards. I know of nothing that caused her illness; her conduct was not such as to need control.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did she always go by the name of Welch? A. Yes. I saw her four or five times after she left Church-street - she had not lost her senses before she left me.

JAMES STACK . On Sunday, the 26th of June, between three and four o'clock, I was in Welch's company - he was in liquor, but not very drunk; he came into Corkery's room, where I was, and asked me to go out and take a pot of beer; I went with him - we drank together. I asked how his wife was - he said she was very bad, and asked me to go and see her; we met Mrs. Corkery, and all went together - she was in bed; we got there between five and six o'clock, I think; she was very ill indeed. I saw Lyons there; Welch came away with me - he said that they three, meaning himself, wife, and Lyons, were sleeping in one bed, and that he thought Lyons was with child - I did not ask him by whom; I partly judged it was by him, from their sleeping together. I was there on Saturday at the wake - the prisoners and a woman were there. Welch told me that he and she were walking down stairs, and she was very drunk, fell, and was hurt; I think this was before she died, but cannot say - I think it was at the wake.

Cross-examined. Q. Welch did not say she was with child by him? A. No. He did not mention about her falling till Saturday. I was not with him above five minutes on Monday.

JAMES HODGE . I am a journeyman carpenter, and work for Mr. Thomas, with Welch, who lived in this house, which Mr. Thomas was repairing: he lived there with his sister, as he called his wife; and Lyons staid there with them. On Tuesday, the 28th of January, he came into the shop to me and asked if I should be afraid to go and see a sick person - I said no - I went up stairs with him to the top room, and there saw the woman whom he had described as his sister, laying on her back in bed. I should have thought at first that she was dead: he took hold of her left hand, which was closed, and pulled it open - it closed again of itself, which satisfied me she was not dead; I asked if he had any medical assistance - he said Mr. Thomas's doctor had attended her - he had told me, on a former occasion, that Mr. Thomas had let him have money, with which he had sent his wife to Ireland - he gave me no account of her illness - Mr. Thomas came to the house that morning - I told him I had been up by Welsh's desire; I afterwards saw Welch, and said I had told Mr. Thomas about his wife being ill - he said he had mentioned it himself, and he thought his master would call and see her: the house was under repair, and there were tiles at the foot of the stairs. On the Friday morning master's apprentice brought a basket for Welch to take somewhere, and while the apprentice was talking to me Lyons came down, and said, "Go and fetch Welch, for she is gone." I supposed by that she was dead; the apprentice went - Welch came soon after and went up immediately, and in

about half an hour I heard a noise, which I supposed to be in their room - Welch came down afterwards, and I questioned him what the noise was up stairs - he said they had found a scratch on her pate, and the people up-stairs were talking of sending for a beadle - that he was searching about and the people asked him what he was looking for, and he said for a paper, which contained flour, which he had got to stop the blood; he told me that day, that on the Sunday he got more to drink than usual, and had laid himself down on the bed - his cousin Lyons awoke him, and said she had put on his coat, and gone down stairs - that he went after her, and in bringing her up in his arms she put her foot on the third stair, and shoved them both backward - she fell against some tiles, which caused the scratch on her pate. I examined the tiles on the Thursday after her death, but could observe no blood on them, nor about the stairs - some were broken: he said his sister had spoken to him that very morning, and said she wished him to follow her to the grave as chief mourner, and to bury her in St. Giles's church-yard, as her husband was away, he was the only friend she had: I asked him if she was a married woman - he said yes, and had parted from her husband through some differences.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not know whether she was his wife or not? A. No; I used to ask Lyons of a morning how Welch's sister was. Some of the tiles might have been removed before I examined them.

ANTOINETTE PENARIO . My uncle, Steward, keeps the Ship, wine vaults, in Little Turnstile. Welch had his beer from our house - Lyon lived with him and his sister, as I always called her. I went over for the pots, two or three times in the week she died - she was very ill when I saw her - I was there on the Thursday, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the day before her death - she was then sitting on something behind the door, and appeared very ill; I asked how she was - she answered me very faintly, "Very ill, indeed;" she was sitting alone; I observed no blood about her - Lyons was there - I met Welch that afternoon, and asked him if it was not his wife who was up stairs ill - he said no, that his wife was at Reading, very ill. A week before that I had occasion to go up to the room, the deceased was there alone - just as she was beginning to tell me something Lyon came in and the deceased said hush.

Cross-examined. Q. You had said very little to her? A. No; she said she had something to mention and begged I would not mention it again. Welch has described her as his sister ever since he has been at the house.

ANN WALDIE . I am servant to Mr. Thomas. On the 1st of July Welch came to the house, I had met him on the Monday; he said he was going to ask his master's leave to go home as his sister was taken very ill after breakfast; that before breakfast she was quite well, and said to him "I think we may part with our cousin, as I am now quite recovered; when you can give her a trifle, I think you may let her go."

Q. Did he say what happened to her after breakfast? A. He said it was one of her fits which she had been subject to; he had said she had scratched herself in her fits and hit herself, but did not say where; he told me on the following morning that he had had a doctor to her, but the doctor said it was too late for him, he could not save her - he came on Friday the 1st of July; he took a piece of paper out of his pocket, and asked me to give him some flour to stop the bleeding of the scratches - this was before twelve o'clock in the morning. I am sure he called them scratches, and in the course of the week he said there was a scratch about her temple, and the other on the cheek. I gave him about a tea-spoon full of flour, which he said would be enough; he never described her illness in any other way to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How long before her death had he told you she was his sister? A. He always said so. I never heard her called Mrs. Welch.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a painter, employed by Mr. Thomas, and work with Welch; he told me his wife was at Reading - this was while he lived in Turnstile; at another time he told me she was gone to Ireland, and when she returned he would give me some whiskey. I understood from him, that one of the women who lived with him was his sister, and the other his cousin; he came to me on Friday morning, the 1st of July, at Southampton-row, where I was working - I think it was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - he was much agitated. I asked him to get me some turpentine; he said hastily, "Say nothing, oh! I am maddened! maddened! distressed and mad." I said, "What is the matter;" he said "She is gone," I said "What, your sister?" he said Yes; and seemed in a most agitated state; he put his hand to his head, as if he was in pain. I asked if he had a coffin for her, he said "No, master will see to that, he is very good to me."

Q. Did he describe the manner of her dying? A. He said she was frightened, for she seemed to spring up in her bed, and look at him, and he could not bear to stand to see her; that she said in her illness, that no person should follow her but himself, and she wished to be buried in St. Giles's church-yard; that he would bury her on Sunday, and have her screwed down as soon as possible, for poor creature she would not keep - she was not fit to be seen.

Q. Had he his working dress on that morning? A. He had a clean grey coat on, which I had never seen before; he usually wore a fustian or blue jacket - a circumstance occurred in my business, which makes me certain that this passed before eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that? A. I had a particular piece of work to do, and was to be at my master's house as soon as I finished it, and was there before eleven o'clock. He expressed sorrow and was crying a little.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a builder. The prisoner was labourer to the carpenters. I had an empty house in Turnstile, and put him to live there to save his rent - he bore a very good character - he came to work for me in July, 1824. I then understood him to be married, and living with his wife. About Christmas he told me one of his children were scalded to death, which caused his wife to be seriously ill, and made her subject to fits; that the doctor said she must go into the country. I advanced him 2 l. to take her, and he told me she was gone - this was at the end of March; he went to Turnstile soon after Midsummer, and I understood from him that his sister and cousin lived with him there. On the Sunday after

her death, he was apprehended, and confessed to me then that she was his wife. On the Monday before that, I asked him how his sister was - he said very ill, and that last night she had received a slight accident - I asked him the nature of it, he said he had laid himself on his bed, and his cousin awoke him, and told him she had gone down stairs, he followed her, and got to her just before she got to the street door, took her round the waist, and was carrying her up; when they got about the fourth or fifth step, she put out her feet, and by a sudden spring threw them both down - that she struck her feet against the sash, and bounded over the bannisters, and fell on some stones at the bottom. I am sure he said sash, and I think stones or tiles. I asked if she had hurt herself; he said she had a slight scratch on the head, pointing his finger to his head; he wished me particularly to go and see her, but I did not. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon of the day she died. I saw him in my yard; he said his sister was gone at last, and that she would have gone half an hour before, but she had waited to see him, to give directions about her funeral; that she wished to be buried very plain, and only him to follow. I saw him again that evening; he said, now his sister was gone, he must see about a lodging, and what was he to do about the bedstead, meaning one I had given him. I said "Sleep on it to be sure;" he said he would not sleep on it again for 50 l. Mr. Blair is my doctor - I never sent him to attend her.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not you object to sleep on the bed on which a person had died? A. I told him I should not mind it, but I know he was rather timid.

THOMAS CHANDLER . I am a baker, and live in Turnstile. At a quarter past seven o'clock on Saturday morning, the 2d of July, Lyons came to me, and asked for a bit of flour to stop the bleeding of a woman's bad head. I told her where she dealt for bread, I dare say they would give her flour - she did not say that the woman was dead.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it was Saturday? A. I particularly recollect it, the Inquest sat on the 5th of July - it was on the Saturday previous.

THOMAS KENNEDY . I keep the Black Horse public-house. The witness Donovan is my sister. On Sunday, in consequence of what she said, I went to the house where the deceased lay. I found the corpse in the coffin - they were going to bury it - the room was full of people. I said I should look at the body. I pushed the coffin lid aside - Lyons was in the room but not Welch. I lifted up the head, and my hand sunk into a large cut in the back, cap and all, and when I took my hand out it was quite bloody - I shewed it to the people, and forbid the funeral. Welch came into the room - I asked how that happened; he at first said I had no occasion to interfere with his wife, what was his wife to me. I said there was visibly something wrong - he said, what was that to me. I forbid the undertaker to bury: he said he would if the husband ordered him. Welch said, she slipped down at the bottom step of the stairs. I went with the beadle next morning, and examined the stairs carefully, but could not find the least appearance of blood. I looked at the sacking of the bed on Monday - it was stained with blood, and had some flour over it - there was blood on the bed and bolster, and on the boards of the room - the bolster was very bloody; there was an appearance of flour on the bed, but not on the bolster; a cap was very bloody, also a jacket had blood on the sleeve.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not remove the corpse? A. No; the people were dressed ready for the funeral.

JAMES TAYLER . I am a beadle. On Sunday, the 3d of July, I went to this house. I told Welch we had heard the woman was murdered, and I must stop the funeral, and take him into custody. I said the corpse should not be taken out of the house till it was examined by a medical gentleman; his master came afterwards. I examined the body; Lyons was present when I discovered the wound. I took Welch to the watch-house; he told me she had fallen down stairs. At the watch-house I asked why he had not sent for a doctor. He said, "I don't know what is the reason, but I did not do it." I afterwards took Lyons. I examined the stair-case minutely, but found no marks of blood there; there was blood under the bed, and a large quantity in the centre of the bed; the blood mark on the floor was exactly under that, and the sacking was also stained with blood; the floor appeared to have been washed to get out the blood, and there was flour on the floor; the stain on the bolster, had nothing to do with the other part of the bed. I found a jacket between the bolster and ticking - the back of it was stained with blood; there was none on the sleeves; there were two caps and a handkerchief stained all over with blood, and an old cloth in the cupboard was stained with blood; it appeared to have been used as an apron; I found it in the cupboard, with shavings on the top of it; I found an old hatchet in the cellar of the house, and an iron hammer under the shavings with the cloth; there was no blood on them; I produce the cloth, sacking, &c.

MR. ROBERT BLAIR . I am a surgeon, and live in King-street, Bloomsbury. I attend Mr. Thomas's family, and know the prisoner. I have no recollection of attending his wife; if I had I should have remembered it. He never called on me to attend her. I have attended several of Mr. Thomas's men. I remember his speaking to me of a woman having received an injury on the head, but he did not request me to attend her, and I did not.

ANDREW TWEDDALE . I am assistant-surgeon, and live at St. Giles's work-house. On Sunday, the 3d of July , the beadle shewed me this woman's body. There was a wound on the back of the head, about two inches long, it appeared a recent wound. I examined it more particularly the same evening with Mr. Paty. There was an extensive fracture of the skull, which commenced at the left ear, and extended right across the head, and terminated in the base of the skull, on the opposite side; a small branch of the same fracture extended backward; this fracture was in addition to the wound. The wound appeared a clean incision, as if cut with a sharp instrument. I think this axe could have inflicted it. A fall down three or four stairs could not have done it. A blow with the axe, if given with force, would have caused the fracture. It did not come in contact with the brain. There was an artery of the membrane of the brain ruptured by the bone, which was driven in. There had been an effusion of about four ounces of blood from the artery. I found it between the skull and dura mater.

Q. Could you judge how long before death these wounds had been inflicted? A. I do not think the wound could have been inflicted more than twenty-four hours before death; I think so from the appearance of the wound; the injury of the head altogether was the cause of her death. I opened the body; there was no appearance of disease elsewhere, except a disorder of the bowels, but not such as to cause death; blood must have flowed from the wound immediately it was inflicted.

Cross-examined. Q. You say the wound could not be caused by a fall down three or four steps; would not that depend on the nature of what the head came in contact with? A. That would make a difference.

COURT. Q. If she had fallen down the whole stair-case would that have caused the wound? A. If she had fallen on any thing sharp; the edge of a common tile could not have caused it; a sharp slate tile would.

MR. BARRY. Q. Might not the fracture have been caused by falling against the post of a bed? A. No; a fall from a great height might do it certainly; the membrane was naturally very strong.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. From the appearance of the wound, could it have been inflicted by a fall on the Sunday before death? A. I think not. I have it proved by a witness that she was seen sitting up without assistance. In my judgment the injury must have happened after that.

MR. JAMES PATY . I have heard Mr. Tweddale examined. I assisted him in dissecting the body. I differ from him in one respect. I think it possible for a woman to have had intervals of sensibility - that she might have sat up and talked - but it entirely depends upon whether the blood effused slowly or quickly, and I think there must have been two blows or falls to have inflicted the incised wound and fracture.

COURT. Q. Could you, from external appearances, judge that there had been more than one blow? A. Yes; the incised wound was a clean cut, and on introducing my finger I did not find the fracture corresponding - it was two inches beyond it, from which I conclude there must have been two blows. I think the fracture might have existed on the Sunday, but not the incision.

Q. Did you look at any part of the skull, where you saw the mark of a bruise where the fracture had been made? A. The extravasation of blood had taken place, and there was some external appearances of a blow corresponding with the fracture; the fracture of itself was sufficient to cause death; the incised wound was not sufficient I think.

MR. THOMAS. There were small paving-stones in the passage.

JAMES HODGE . There were some red paving-tiles there; no slates had ever been there.

ELIZA BUTTERS . I am searcher of the parish; the female prisoner shewed me this body; it looked very clean and comfortable. I asked the deceased's name; she said Mary Conner - that she had been ill for two months, and died of a brain fever.

MR. PATY re-examined. I think the incised wound not mortal; but from its appearance I judged that it had been inflicted shortly before death.

WELCH'S Defence. On Sunday I went to bed; my wife got up; this woman came, and said she was gone down stairs to St. Giles's work-house, to fetch some clothes. I went down, and begged of her to come up she would not; I brought her up; she put her foot on the stairs, and threw me down; she fell on the tiles.

WELCH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

LYONS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-43

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1263. HENRY WILLIAMS, alias MARTIN , MICHAEL WILLIAMS, alias FLINN , and FREDERICK WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , at St. Michael, Queenhithe , a wooden tea-chest, value 2 s., and 90 lbs. weight of tea, value 20 l., the goods of James Randall and others, his partners, in the dwelling-house of John Howell .

MESSRS. ALLEY and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD GRANGE . I am porter to James Randall and Co., who are wharfingers : there are four partners. On the 6th of July last, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, a chest of tea came there, and was placed in the warehouse at Queenhithe ; it is the same building as the dwelling-house. I believe it came from Thorman and Co., of Lawrence Poultney-hill. I missed it about half-past five o'clock that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know, of your own knowledge, where it came from? A. I received three chests, and by the note brought with them I found they came from Thorman's. I did not see them opened.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. From whom did you receive them? A. Rutt.

MR. JOHN HOWELL. I am a wharfinger, in partnership with James Randall and others. The dwelling-house joins the warehouse, and is under the same roof. I live there with my family. It is in the parish of St. Michael, Queenhithe.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Who pays the rent and taxes? A. The firm - the house belongs to us all - it is agreed that the firm should pay the rent and taxes - they come into the profit and loss account; James Randall is never called senior.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If any other partner had occasion to sleep in town, he would sleep there? A. No; the house is made over to me in the articles of partnership - none of the trade servants sleep there; one of the partners may have slept there once within the last ten years, but it was by invitation; they have no right to sleep there. I remember Mr. James Randall sleeping there, when I invited him to dinner.

JOSEPH WINTER . I am servant to Messrs. Thorman and and Co., tea-dealers. On the 6th of July I delivered three chests of tea to Rutt, to take to Messrs. Randall and Co., Queenhithe Wharf.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not pack them? A. No; but I cleared them from the East India-house, and know they were tea.

JOHN RUTT . I am a ticket-porter. Winter delivered me three chests of tea, which I delivered at Messrs. Randall and Co.'s premises, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, to Grange.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you deliver them into the warehouse? A. Yes.

SUSAN KETLING . I live at No. 6, Queenhithe, with my mother. On the 6th of July, I saw all the three prisoners pass my mother's door; the house is two or three yards from the corner which turns round to where the prosecutor's house is; it was six o'clock in the evening as near as I can judge: I saw them pass the door where I stood; one of them had a chest of tea on his back; that was Frederick Williams (pointing him out,); they came in a direction from the prosecutor's house; I followed them to Mr. Riley's, the Blue Last public-house, Distaff-lane, and saw Frederick and Henry go into the house; Frederick still had the chest, and Henry carried his hat; Michael crossed the road, and I directly went and gave information to Jackson, the officer, who lives close by; before I came out of Jackson's, Michael and Frederick were gone; Henry ran a little distance and was taken. Mrs. Coesar, who lives two doors from me, came out and joined me in the pursuit.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know any of their names before that day? A. Yes, I knew the Christian names; Henry and Frederick went into the public-house; I do not know whether they are related - when I came from the officer's, Henry stood opposite to the public-house - the other two had gone away; Henry had come out of the public-house and stood opposite. I swear that he was with them carrying Frederick's hat in his hand - the public-house is about as far as from here to St. Paul's church-yard; I get my living by servitude; I had just left my place; I knew them all personally.

Q. Have you had no quarrel with Frederick? A. No, no quarrel - if he chose to abuse me I could not help it; I do not think such characters worth quarrelling with - he has abused me several times, but I never quarrelled with him; I did not answer him.

Q. How do you get your living, when out of service? A. I was with my mother who keeps a mangle.

Q. The words you had were entirely on the prisoner's side - were they before this charge? A. Yes; I was not at all angry; after I left my situation, I thought no more about it.

Q. Did you leave in consequence of the dispute? A. I left when I found what characters frequented the house; it was at Mr. Dyson's, a public-house; I took the place not knowing what a set used the house.

Q. Was it a little chastity quarrel? A. He thought proper to abuse me; I thought it best not to answer him; I took no notice of him - it happened twice.

Q. How long after that did you discover the tea on his back? A. I believe it was three months after - I frequently saw him in the day time. I do not now know what he quarrelled with me about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know Michael? A. I know them all by serving them with liquor at the bar, nothing more; there was nothing to hinder Michael from going into the public-house, except that I think he saw me - he saw me going and might suspect that I was going for the officers, and he could beckon the others out, which he did, and they came out.

Q. Had he not full time to go into the house? A. Yes, if he chose; I brought the officer in about a minute after I saw them go into the public-house - the one who carried the hat had the same opportunity of seeing me as Michael, but the one with the chest had not; I told Coesar of it before I went to the officer; she lives next door to me; I told her of it as I passed her door behind them; she and I followed them to the public-house, and then I went to the officer; they could have heard me acquaint her, and I have no doubt but they did, for two of them looked back, the one with the chest could not look back - they went into the public-house after I called her.

Q. What did you say to Coesar? A. As I was standing at the door seeing the men pass, I gave the alarm, having known them before. I said to Coesar that I thought those men who had gone on with that chest, had not got it honestly, and we followed them: Coesar was in her front room - she could see them pass; she heard me speaking, and came out; I directly told her and we followed them - I spoke loud enough for her to hear me in her parlour - I do not know whether she heard the words, but she heard me speaking; the prisoners heard me - I have no doubt every one in the street must have heard me - no one was passing at the time.

Q. Who were you speaking to then? A. I stood at the door and said so - my mother's is next door but one to Coesar's - the men had just turned the corner - the place was so public they could not get rid of the chest without going into the public-house - for though no one was in our street, they turned into Fish-street, and there are all shops there. Coesar is a married woman - my mother and her's live in one house, and she herself keeps the house next door but one, but her mother lives in my mother's house; Coesar's husband lives with her and was at home, but did not come out. I am acquainted with Coesar, she did not know the prisoners before, that I know of - she never told me she was acquainted with them or any of them - when I called, she said we will follow them and see where they take it.

Q. Now, did not you at the time let Coesar know that they were the William's? A. I mentioned their names to her at the time - she did not give me to understand that she knew who they were before.

Q. Do you say that you saw Michael speak to the other two persons? A. I saw him beckon them out - I might not have told the Magistrate so - I do not recollect whether I mentioned it or not - I never saw either of them speaking to Coesar - I told her they were men whom I had served many times with liquor - I do not know now that she was acquainted with either of them.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have no doubt of their persons? A. Not the least; Coesar took notice of them.

MARY ANN COESAR . I know the last witness, and live two doors from her. My husband is a lighterman. On the 6th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, we saw three men come by the door with a chest of tea - I was sitting in my own house at tea - Ketling came up as far as our door - I was coming out and asked her if she knew where those men had got that tea - she mentioned all three of their names - I did not know them - she said she did not know where they got it; I said "We will follow them to see where they take it;" we did so - they went up Bread-street-hill, when the short one (Michael) parted from the others and went up the church-yard - he had his arm in a sling - I was not acquainted with him; the other

two went up the hill, and turned up Fish-street - one carrying the hat and the other the tea - they went to the Blue Last and beckoned to the other prisoners, who joined them again, and the two went into the Blue Last; the short one stood on the opposite side - he crossed once and beckoned the two others out - they had not then been there more than three minutes; I was standing at the corner of Distaff-lane - he crossed the way on the same side as the Blue Lasts - the other, who I supposed to be the man who carried the tea, came out without it, but his apron, which he had on before, was off, and the other one came out - the one who carried the tea walked away without turning his face to me; the other one, when he came out walked about the door, and wiped his face - the other two walked away; the second one who came out, staid till the last witness went to Jackson; I remained at the corner - she came back with Jackson; he then crossed over and walked swiftly away, and I saw Jackson running, and then he ran and stopped short, by the pump; he returned back, and appeared to ask the mob what was the matter - I said "that is the man," and he was taken - he was the one who carried the hat.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Which was the man who remained behind? A. That is him, Henry - he carried the hat - I first heard his name was Henry when he passed the door. I had no acquaintance with any of them before - I swear that.

Q. Where were you when you first heard of this? A. Sitting in my own place. I saw them pass my door - I live close up in the corner; Henry was coming towards us when he was taken - Jackson was with us - I said "That is one of them;" there might be more persons call out besides me, as a good many people had assembled by that time; I do not know whether the last witness called out that he was the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where do you live? A. At No. 8, Naked Boy-alley. Ketling's house is not in the alley - I live two doors from her; I was at tea in a lower room adjoining the street - I came to the door, seeing a genteel dressed man run up the place with a hat in his hand, as if to see if it was a thoroughfare - my husband was at tea with me, and saw me go out - he did not leave the table.

Q. You were astonished at seeing the man pass? A. No, not till I saw the tea chest pass, I then came out - I did not tell my husband why I went. It was more than half an hour before I returned - he was not there when I came back. When I got out I first saw Henry, who carried the hat, then the one with the tea - I do not know his name; I then saw the other with his arm in a sling, and an umbrella in his hand. I never saw either of them before to my knowledge - I did not know the one who had his arm in a sling.

Q. Now, for fear of a mistake, his name is Michael - do you persist in saying you never saw him before that night? A. Not to my knowledge. When I came to the door Ketling came up - she had got to my door at the time - I had not heard her saying any thing - it was not her voice that brought me out - the first thing I said to her was to ask if she knew where the tea came from; I do not think that she spoke to me first; she said she did not know, but she knew the three persons who were carrying it, and mentioned all their three names directly - I said "We will follow and see where they go." I knew Ketling by her living in an apartment two doors from me - her mother, whose name is Johnson, lives there, and my mother also lives in the same house; it might be ten minutes after I came out before Michael went away. The officer lives close by.

ROBERT RILEY . I keep the Blue Lasts, Distaff-lane. On the 6th of July, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Henry came to my house - I do not know either of the others - he came with another who I cannot speak to - I was at tea in the bar - something came lumping into the passage, I looked, and it was a chest of tea - they had a glass of gin each at the bar, and did not remain more than five minues - only while they drank it - they went out, leaving this chest of tea behind.

JURY. Q. Did any body else come to your house about the same time. A. Not a creature came to the bar but them. Jackson apprehended Henry and brought him by my house - he asked if I knew him - I said he was the person - he denied it; Jackson took him away with the tea.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Which carried the tea you do not know? A. No.

Q. Did not the other man give Henry a glass of gin, saying it was for his trouble in carrying the load? A. I heard nothing of the sort - each drank a glass and went away; Henry did not go out till there was a noise about the tea - he then walked off about twenty paces, and then ran. I went to the door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Could you see whether either of the two had his arm in a sling? A. I cannot say.

SAMUEL BUDD. I was in Distaff-lane on the evening of the 6th of July, and saw Jackson. I saw the prisoner Henry standing at the door of the Blue Last, public-house; he walked from the door, and afterwards ran away into Friday-street; I ran after him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was doing nothing? A. He was walking alongside another who was carrying a chest of tea. I saw the tea go out of their hands into the door of the public-house - he took it off the man's shoulder, and helped him to pitch it down.

Q. Did you hear the other invite him to take a glass of gin for his trouble? A. No. I saw him go to the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You only saw two go into the house? A. I saw them at the door.

JOHN JACKSON . I am an officer. On the evening of the 6th of July Ketling called on me, and gave me information - I went out to Riley's passage, and saw the chest of tea there. I said, "Who does this tea belong to;" (Henry was by at the time) he crossed the way, and somebody said, "That is one of them" - I called out, Stop him! he directly ran; I followed him up Friday-street, towards Cheapside - I was caught hold of by a dog, by which he got a head of me, but was stopped by somebody, and turned back. I took hold of him, searched, but found nothing on him. I took the tea into my possession.

JURY. Q. Did he run before he saw you? A. Not till somebody hallooed out Stop him.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended Frederick and Michael in Bunhill-row, on the 7th

of July, both together; Michael appeared to have a bad arm - it was not in a sling.

MR. HOWELL. This is the chest of tea - it weighs 80 lbs., and is worth full 20 l.

The prisoners' Counsel called

MARY DUNN . I am the wife of John Dunn , and live in Benbow's-rent. I have known Henry Williams eight years, as a boot and shoe-maker. The witness Ketling was in my room on the 4th of May; I know she had quarrelled with the prisoner Frederick: she said she would have her revenge on him, and should like to see him hung, and if she had her will she would hang him, for revenge was sweet - she said that three or four times in my room.

COURT. Q. How came you to recollect that it was the 4th of May? A. Because it was exactly a month before my child died, which was on the 4th of June. I told Frederick's wife of this, and was subpoened here.

One witness gave the prisoner Frederick a good character, and one appeared for Michael.

H. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

M. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

F. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18250915-44

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1264. MARY KEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a hat, value 4 s. , the goods of John Allen .

JOHN ALLEN. I live at No. 37, Duke-street, St. Ann's , and am a tailor . This hat hung up for sale - a person came to me on the evening of the 6th of September, and gave me information; I went out, and in about two minutes overtook the prisoner in the next street with it.

JOHN BALL . I was standing at Mr. Mitchell's window, opposite Allen's shop - I saw the prisoner go to his door, and immediately after I saw her with the hat; I told my landlady, who told Allen.

JOHN PROCTER . I took up the prisoner, and produce the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and saw this hat on the ground - I did not know who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-45

1265. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of James Pattie , from his person .

JAMES PATTIE. I was going along the left-hand side of Holborn , towards Oxford-street, about nine o'clock on the evening of the 11th of September, and saw the prisoner, who touched me twice; he came to me a third time; I then put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe about five minutes before; he was in the custody of a witness, who had the handkerchief in his hand.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I was in Holborn on Sunday last, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket; he threw it on the ground - I took it up, and took hold of him.

DANIEL HONE . I am an officer, and took him into custody.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-46

1266. WILLIAM RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Bancks , the younger, from his person .

ROBERT BANCKS. On the 26th of August I was going along Holborn , and felt something passing sharply behind me - I missed my handkerchief, which was safe a very few minutes before. I turned round, and the first person I saw was the prisoner; I secured him, and found it on the ground, within a few feet of him.

JESSE PHILLIPS . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Bancks, who turned suddenly round, and he dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my brother's, and saw this man following me - there were some more boys on before me, and I could not pass; they made a bit of a push, and I was about to pass, when the prosecutor turned round, and said I had robbed him; I said, "Me, Sir - no it was not me," and some gentleman there said it was not me, but some boys on the other side; he said he would hit the gentleman if he did not hold his tongue; he took hold of me, and tore my jacket. I was then taken back a few yards, and the handkerchief was on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-47

1267. SUSANNAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a watch, value 10 s.; a chain, value 6 d., and a key, value 1/2 d., the goods of George Burman , from his person .

GEORGE BURMAN. I was in Wentworth-street , on the night of the 24th of July - I was very tipsy, and do not know that I saw the prisoner, but I was called to by some person, who asked me if I had lost any thing; I said, No; they called a second time; I then felt about my person, and found my watch, chain, and key were gone. I saw it the next morning at the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say when I was taken into custody, that the female who had robbed you was a much taller woman than I am? A. On my oath I could not say so, nor did I. I cannot be sure that I had not been with some woman that night.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate at Worship-street that you were sorry, but you believed that I was not the woman? A. I have no recollection of it.

THOMAS ARNOLD . I am inspector of the watch at Spitalfields. On the 25th of July, about three o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Wentworth-street; I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor come out of a court - the prosecutor was putting up his breeches; I asked him if he had lost any thing; he said, No. I said, "Make sure of it;" he then said he had lost his watch: I pursued the prisoner, who was running, and took her about one hundred yards off; she stopped down - I pulled her back, and found the watch close by her feet; I said that was

wanted - she said she knew nothing of it, so help her God. I took it back to the prosecutor, who said it was his.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JURY to THOMAS ARNOLD. Q. Had you seen the prosecutor go over the ground where the watch was found? A. No. I do not know which way he went to Wentworth-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-48

1268. WILLIAM STEPHENSON and GEORGE STEPHENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , two table-cloths, value 5 s., a pair of buckles, value 2 s.; three waistcoats, value 3 s.; a pair of trousers, value 2 s., and three flat-irons, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Dundas , Esq .

CHARLES DUNDAS, ESQ. I live at the Manor-house, King's-road, Chelsea . My servant, Charlotte Stephenson had the care of my house while I was in the country. I was out of town on the 28th of July - since then I have seen some articles which are mine. I had missed some of them in March last.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not Charlotte Stephenson been with you some time? A. Yes, about nine years, and I believe was honest in my service. I have no knowledge of any of her family.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLOTTE STEPHENSON. I am in Mr. Dundas's service, and had the care of his house. The two prisoners are my brothers - they sometimes slept in the house; I cannot tell where they slept on the night of the 27th of July. On missing some articles I accused William of having taken them; he confessed that he had, and gave me the duplicates.

Cross-examined. Q. Had George often slept in the house? A. No, only one week previous to my missing the property - he had not slept there in March. George has had a good character - he has been in the poultry business.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, and live in Queen's-row. I produce two table-cloths and two silver buckles - I believe one of the table-cloths was pawned by the prisoner George. I did not take in the other.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Eaton-street, Pimlico. I have a waistcoat and three flat-irons, which were pawned by William - the waistcoat on the 23d of October, and the irons the 3d of November.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in York-street, Westminster. I produce a waistcoat and trousers, pawned by William.

WILLIAM STEPHENSON. My brother is innocent - I pawned the articles, and leave it to the mercy of the Court.

WILLIAM STEPHENSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE STEPHENSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-49

1269. THOMAS RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Thomas Beavan , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS BEAVAN. I was in Peter-street on the 9th of August, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening - I felt a twitch at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner running down the street, and stoop; I missed my handkerchief, and pursued; I saw him throw something into a cellar. The handkerchief was produced to me in about five minutes.

JOHN COLLARD . I live in Peter-street. Beavan knocked at my door on the 9th of September, and said a person had thrown something into the cellar - I went, and found this handkerchief, which I gave to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing down Peter-street, and this man said I had taken his handkerchief, which I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-50

1270. PETER M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d September , two gorgets, value 12 s.; two waist belt plates, value 37 s. 6 d., and a pair of cap scales, value 1 l., the goods of John George Nutting , privately in his shop .

DAVID DAWES . I am clerk to Mr. John George Nutting, of King-street, Covent-garden . On the 2d of September, the prisoner came and asked if we wanted an errand lad - he staid about five minutes; as soon as he was gone I missed a small parcel from the counter, which contained these articles. I had seen them safe half an hour before. I saw them afterwards in the possession of the constable.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know any thing of him before? A. No; I spoke to him while he was in the shop, but did not see him take any thing from the counter; he might have taken them while I was taking my tea in the back office - I did not see him come in.

SOLOMON COLLINS . I live in Chandos-street. The prisoner came to my house on the 5th of September - he offered these articles for sale - they were wrapped up in a brown paper - he said he had found them - I detained him; he afterwards told the officer that a young man left them with him, and borrowed half a crown on them, and said if he did not fetch them by Monday he might sell them.

JOSEPH GREEN . I am a constable. I produce the goods which I received from Mr. Collins; the prisoner gave no account to me of how he became possessed of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVID DAWES re-examined. Q. Is it usual to be in the office when you are left in charge of the shop? A. The porter generally attends the shop, but he was gone to take his tea in the back part of the shop; a person might have come in without his seeing them - he had been there about a quarter of an hour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-51

1271. THOMAS ADCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , two sovereigns , the property of William Jordan .

WILLIAM JORDAN. I am a carpenter , and live in Marylebone. On the 13th of August, I was at the Devonshire Arms, public-house , paying my men - the prisoner was

there; he received 1 l. 5 s. for his wages; he then laid down 6 d. for his share of the reckoning, and went away; after I had done paying the men, I missed two sovereigns from the table - I had laid them down but had not used them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you go to the pay table a little later than usual? A. Yes; I had been drinking a little more than usual, and had gone to bed to make me better. I had had four glasses of sherry, and my beer, that was all. I asked the prisoner next day how much I had paid him, but it was merely to find out where I had lost the money - he had not been many weeks with me.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a bricklayer. I was at the pay table, and sat on the left hand of Jordan. I saw him lay down two sovereigns, the prisoner took them up in five or six minutes, and put them into his pocket; he then came and sat down on the left hand of me at the lower end of the room. Mr. Jordan afterwards said to me, "Have I done paying;" I said, "I don't know indeed;" he then looked round, and said "O there is Adcock, I have not paid him;" he then paid him 1 l. 5 s.; the prisoner then got up and said "Who is clerk?" I said "There is no clerk;" he then laid down 6 d. and went away. I did not know but what the sovereigns had been his own, as he was task master.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Jordan appear to be sober? A. I cannot upon my oath say he was sober. I never had any difference with the prisoner about a plumb-bob. I said it was in the building. I never said I would be up with him. I was present when he was asked to compromise this business the next morning, but he said No.

WILLIAM JORDAN re-examined. Q. Did you offer to compromise the matter with him the next morning? A. Yes; I said if he would return them, or confess that he took them, I would compromise the matter, but he said he knew nothing about them. I told him that Simpson and Inwood saw him take them; he said "I believe Simpson and Inwood had the money;" and Simpson said "If you don't prosecute him I will."

JOHN INWOOD . I am a carter. I was at the pay-table, and received my money that night. I saw the prisoner take up the two sovereigns into his hand - I did not see what he did with them. I staid there some time, and saw him afterwards receive his wages. I did not say anything about what I had seen, because I did not know whether they were his right or not.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Jordan pay all that was paid at that table? A. Yes.

Q. Did it not appear very odd that Adcock should take the money from off the table? A. I did not know anything about the business. I told Mr. Jordan after he had done paying the men, that I had noticed three payments; he had paid three sovereigns to a carpenter, and two sovereigns to a plasterer; that I saw Adcock take the two sovereigns from the table, and that after that he had paid him 1 l. 5 s. I did not hear him say "O there is Adcock, I have not paid him." I was present on the Monday morning, but I did not hear the prisoner say "I am innocent, if any one took the money, it was you or Simpson." I did not hear Simpson say "If Mr. Jordon does not prosecute you, I will, for saying that," - it was not said in my presence. I heard Mr. Jordan say, that if he confessed he had taken the money, he would take it any way, and let him go free; they were together after I was there, and I dare say Adcock was at large all that day.

JURY. Q. Where did the prosecutor sit, at the table? A. About the middle. Adcock was not sitting at all when he took the two sovereigns - he was standing opposite to Mr. Jordan. I was next but one to Mr. Jordan on his right hand, and Simpson was next to him on his left - it was a long table about ten feet long.

Q. Why did you not tell Mr. Jordan that Adcock had taken the two sovereigns? A. Because I did not know but it was his right.

WILLIAM JORDAN re-examined. Q. Where did you sit at the table? A. On one side of it, and the men were in different directions about me. Adcock stood before me, and I said "There's the man I like, because he has been at work this week." I had taken four sovereigns out of my pocket, and had to pay a plasterer 3 l., and I said "Perhaps a pound's worth of silver would be of use to you?" I gave him two sovereigns and a pound in silver, and laid down the other two sovereigns on the table close by my right hand. I cannot recollect who sat next to me.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was the compromise offered to him? A. On the Monday morning about six or seven o'clock - it might be later - I cannot tell exactly; he went to work on the following morning.

WILLIAM SIMPSON re-examined. Q. What sort of a table was it you were at? A. It was a long table - Mr. Jordan sat on one side of it. I was next to him on his left hand, and the prisoner stood opposite him when he took the sovereigns, and then he went and sat at the end. I saw Jordan put down the sovereigns nearer to the prisoner than to himself. At the time he laid down the money, he said, "That is the man I like;" the prisoner took up the money.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner. He said he knew nothing about it - his wife said that he had brought home 25 s. and that was all.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-52

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1272. SARAH BALBY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , a sheet, value 6 s.; a table-cloth, value 5 s., and a shirt, value 4 s. , the goods of Ann Day , widow .

ANN DAY. I am a widow, and live in Hewit's-court, Strand . The prisoner worked for me for about five years as an ironer . On the 27th of June I missed a sheet, tablecloth, and shirt, which were safe on the Saturday before, when she had been at work.

THOMAS RUTLAND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in West-street, Soho. On the 29th of June I took in, from the prisoner, a sheet, table-cloth, and shirt, in the name of Sarah Smith.

RICHARD MUNDY . I am an officer; I took her into custody, and from her I heard where the property was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that the goods were given to her to pledge by one Denne.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-53

1273. MARGARET BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. , the goods of Henry Denis de Vitre .

HENRY DENIS DE VITRE. I live in Gray's-inn-passage , and am a linendraper . About five o'clock on the after noon of the 23d of August, I was attending on two ladies near the window; my servant gave me information; I pursued the prisoner, and brought her back with the print, which had hung on the post of my door; she said she found it.

MARY HATTERSLEY . I am in the prosecutor's service. I saw the prisoner take this print. I informed master immediately.

JOSEPH BLUNDELL . I am an officer, and have the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-54

1274. THOMAS DOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a pair of trousers, value 20 s. , the goods of James Pattills .

JAMES PATTILLS. I live in New-street, Covent-garden . I had a pair of trousers hanging, with other articles, inside my shop, on the 25th of July. I went out that evening about six o'clock, and returned about half-past nine, and found these trousers in the possession of the street-keeper.

JAMES NYE . I was left in the care of my master's property; these trousers hung on a rail inside the shop; I saw the prisoner come to the door and take them off; I ran after him, and he dropped them at the bottom of the street; a man named Levy, picked them up; I had not lost sight of the prisoner; I gave them to the officer.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-55

1275. ALEXANDER SANDERS and GEORGE SCHWARTZ were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a set of chaise-harness, value 6 l.; two chaise-lamps, value 1 l.; an umbrella, value 2 s., and two candles, value 1 s., the goods of John Conrad Hopke ; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a flute, value 3 s.; two books, value 3 s., and a looking-glass, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Rawlinson .

THOMAS RAWLINSON. I am groom to Mr. Hopke, who lives in Ratcliff-highway, and is a surgeon . I had the care of his stables. On the 14th of August I fastened his stable-door, on Chickweed-hill , about half-past eleven o'clock at night, leaving the articles stated in the indictment there. I went next morning about half-past seven - I found the lock had been broken off, and put on again - I picked up the cork of a phosphorus bottle in the stable; and my neckcloth, which I had left in the stable, was brought to me by the officer on Monday morning.

ELIZABETH BRITTLE . I live in George-yard, Whitechapel. The prisoner Sanders was my lodger, but I know nothing of Schwartz except by seeing him call on Sanders. On Saturday, the 13th of August, Sanders slept at home, but I do not know what time he came in. I generally go to bed about half-past ten o'clock, and leave the street door open for my lodgers. There were four other lodgers in the house.

SAMUEL CLEMENGEE . I lived at Mrs. Brittle's. On Sunday morning, the 14th of August, I was in the backyard about twenty minutes past one o'clock. I saw a man come down stairs with a collar in his left hand, and a flute in his right. Schwartz followed him down stairs, and Sanders came after him with a bag of harness, which I saw at the mouth of the bag. Schwartz took the bag, and went away with the man who had the collar.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived there? A. About three years. I had no quarrel with Sanders. I have always said the mouth of the bag was open. I get my living by mending a few shoes, or selling fruit at the market.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I heard of this on Sunday evening, and from the description of the persons, I went to the prisoners' lodgings on Monday morning, between three and four oclock. I found Sanders on the bed with a woman - he had his clothes on, and two women and another man were in another bed - I took them all to the office, and they were examined. When I went in, this piece of wax candle was burning. I found this looking-glass, these keys, a vice, a file, and some other tools, and phosphorus box without a cork. I afterwards had this cork given to me by the servant, it fits the box exactly. On Sanders I found this handkerchief round his neck, a broken padlock, and this book, which Rawlinson claims; about ten o'clock that morning, Schwartz came to him with a mug of tea, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were there in the room? A. Two men and three women; I saw a young woman named Webster there - she did not tell me then that these articles did not belong to them, but she has said so since.

THOMAS RAWLINSON re-examined. Q. Can you swear to these candles? A. No; but I left some candles of this description in the lamps on the Saturday night - this glass and neckcloth are my own - I have not seen the harness nor the lamps since.

JOHN CONRAD HOPKE. I heard of this on the Sunday morning - this handkerchief is one of twelve which I gave to my servant; I believe the mark has been picked out out of it.

Three witnesses gave Schwartz a good character.

SANDERS - GUILTY Aged 42.

SCHWARTZ - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-56

1276. EDWARD CLEAVLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , four books, value 22 s.; a spoon, value 2 s.; a cane, value 10 s.; a pocket book, value 6 d., and a night gown, value 2 s., the goods of Lucius Hook Robinson , his master .

LUCIUS HOOK ROBINSON. I live in Greek-street ; and am a London agent , the prisoner was my footman - I parted with him on or about the 10th of August, when my business called me to France for about three weeks, and on my return in consequence of information, I examined my

property but missed nothing - I then got a warrant to search the prisoner's lodging in Fullwood's-rents, where the cane was found - I had not given him any part of this property.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I went to search the prisoner's lodging - I found him and his mother there; I asked if he had robbed his master, he said he had not: I found three keys on him, and this cane was in a drawer - he said, a boy who had lived at Mr. Robinson's before him, gave it to him - and his mother said he had brought it home a long time before and given it to his father. I then asked if they had any other rooms; she said they had a room up stairs - I went up and saw a box which the prisoner said had been his at Mr. Robinson's - he unlocked it, and I found in it some duplicates, which he said related to his own property.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any thing on his person? A. No.

MR. ROBINSON re-examined. This is my cane - I had seen it on my premises after the prisoner came into my service - the person who lived with me before was William Billinghurst. I did not know the prisoner's father.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am in the employ of Chaffers and Mills, Greek-street - these six books were pawned there by a woman on the 26th of February - three of them are claimed by Mr. Robinson.

BENJAMIN GRIFFITH . I am in the employ of Mr. Beauchamp, pawnbroker, Holborn-bars. I have two shirts, a tea-spoon, and a book, which were pawned by a woman in the name of Cleaveland, on the 27th of June.

WILLIAM BILLINGHURST . I was in the service of Mr. Robinson, which I left nine months ago - I never saw this cane in his house.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-57

1277. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , three pairs of boots, value 20 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s., and a birdcage, value 2 s. , the goods of William Ponsonby .

WILLIAM PONSONBY. I am a shoemaker , and have a shed in Manor-row, Tower-hill ; my son padlocked it on Friday, the 2d of September, at ten o'clock at night - I went there at a quarter past six next morning, and missed these articles.

THOMAS IBBERSON . I am a private in the 1st battalion of guards; I was on duty at the one gun battery, in the Tower, on Saturday morning, the 3d of September, at five o'clock; it is opposite to the court where this shed is - I saw three men go across Tower-hill, one of them had a black coat and top boots on - they went to the shed, and one of them attempted to break in; a second then tried - the third man then pulled something out of his pocket, and the door opened - two of them then went in, but the man with the top boots stood outside. I went on Monday morning, and gave what description I could of their dress, but I had not seen their faces. I could not swear that the prisoner is the man who had the top boots on, but he is like him.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a waterman. I was standing at my own door, No. 5, Providence-street, Commercial-road, on Saturday week; the prisoner came by with three or four birds in a cage, one of them was a goldfinch; I bought one of the canary birds of him, for 2 s. 6 d.

JAMES LEE . I heard of the robbery on Monday morning, and from the description given of the person, I went to the prisoner's house, in Baker-street, Commercial-road, about ten o'clock at night; I waited till two, when he came home with a black coat and top boots on, as he has been described - the bird cage was in the parlour, and those boots which he said were his.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I was with Lee. I searched him, and found three bunches of keys - this one opens the door of the shed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at my own door - a young man came along the street with three canaries and a goldfinch, which he asked me to buy - he said he wanted 17 s. for them - I said it was too much; he then said he had a pair of boots which he would sell for 7 s., or I should have the whole for 22 s. I said I would give him 1 l. for them, but he would not take it. I then borrowed 1 s. of a lodger to pay the money.

ELIZABETH PERRING . I am housekeeper to the prisoner. I have lived with him five months; I saw him buy these goods of a person at the door, on Saturday week, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning - he went up stairs and asked Mrs. Stevens to lend him 1 s. to buy some birds. I and Mrs. Stevens went down - we saw the three canaries and a goldfinch, in a cage, and a pair of boots - he gave a sovereign and 1 s. for them.

MARY STEVENS . I am the wife of Charles Stevens , a coachman. I have heard what the last witness has stated - it is true - I lent the prisoner 1 s.

COURT. Q. Did you come down? A. Yes, and saw the prisoner give the money, and also saw the man give him the three canaries, the goldfinch, the cage, and the boots; he is a dealer - he buys clothes for his mother, and brother in the country. I did not see him try the boots on.

Q. What sort of a man was it who sold them? A. He was a shortish man with a fustian jacket and velveteen trousers. The prisoner owns the house, and I have lodged there about two months. My husband is a groom, but generally follows the coach business. On the Saturday night the prisoner came home soon, and went to bed, as far as I can recollect, about ten o'clock, and was in bed at half-past seven the next morning. He occupies the two parlours and the kitchen. I believe the birds all died on the Saturday - he has borrowed money of me several times.

CHARLES STEVENS. I have heard what my wife has stated - it is true - I saw all this transaction - the man had a fustian jacket on, but I do not know what trousers - I am not aware whether the prisoner has any top boots or not.

ELIZABETH PERRING re-examined. Q. Are you a regular servant to the prisoner? A. Yes; I saw the bargain - it was a man with a fustian jacket on - I never saw my master make a bargain before - he does sometimes wear top boots.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-58

1278. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing,

on the 27th of August , a chimney ornament, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edward Foster .

THOMAS BIRCH . I am a clerk to Mr. Edward Foster, an auctioneer , who lives in Greek-street . On the 27th of August I met the prisoner coming out of Mr. Foster's premises very quick, and the porter was following him - he was brought back and searched in the room - a chimney ornament was found on him, which I had seen safe about eleven o'clock.

THOMAS MELLOWS . I was in the auction room, asking for a catalogue - I heard that something was stolen, and when the prisoner was brought back I took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-59

1279. GEORGE HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 4 oz. of opodeldoc, value 4 d.; 6 ozs. of nitre, value 4 d; 6 ozs. of Spanish liquorice, value 6 d.; ten nutmegs, value 6 d.; an ounce of ginger, value 1 d.; half an ounce of magnesia, value 1 d.; a syringe, value 4 d.; 2 ozs. of bees' wax, value 1 s.; 10 ozs. salts, value 10 d., and two bottles, value 4 d. , the goods of the President, Treasurer, and Governors, of St. Bartholomew's Hospital .

The Charter of the Hospital, authorising them to sue as in the indictment, not being produced, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-60

1280. CASSANDRA GAUCHERON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , a napkin, value 18 d.; 8 ozs. of tea, value 5 s., and 1 lb. of sugar, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Henry Marshall .

SARAH MARSHALL . I am the wife of Charles Henry Marshall, and live in Old Quebec-street . The prisoner came to our house, to hire lodgings, on the 14th of July - she was to give me two guineas and a half a week, and to take them for herself, her husband, and her brother, who was a foreigner; she came the next day, and desired me to get her a dinner and some wine, and then tea, which I did - she said she would pay me the next morning, as she had only a 5 l. Marlborough note, and a 35 l. cheque - she then desired me to get her some more tea and sugar, and asked me to lend her a sovereign, which I did not do. While I went out in the evening she went away - she had locked the drawers, and taken the keys - she had not put the tea in the caddy, but had taken it away, with a napkin which I had lent her. I do not know whether the napkin was to be considered as part of the furniture.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-61

1251. CASSANDRA GAUCHERON was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , a napkin, value 2 s.; 8 ozs. of tea, value 5 s.; 1 lb. of coffee, value 3 s., and 1 lb. of sugar, value 1 s. the goods of Francis Williams .

CAROLINE WILLIAMS . - I am the wife of Francis Williams - we live in Park-street . The prisoner came on the 6th of July, and took our lodgings - she ordered a loin of lamb, peas and potatoes, a pint of wine and some strawberries, for her dinner; she afterwards told me to get her some tea and sugar - she said her husband was a solicitor, and her brother a young officer, and they were coming from Marlborough the next morning, when her husband would pay me. The tea and sugar were laid on the table after dinner, and while she was taking her fruit and wine she wrote a note to me to borrow a sovereign, to discharge her bill at the hotel where she had been staying a few days, and, as it did not rain much, she set off to walk there - but as she was going Mr. Williams followed her and brought her back. She had asked me to lend her a napkin, about ten minutes before she left - I was to find her in linen, but not of that description - it was lent for her private use.

FRANCIS MARSHALL. I took her into custody - she said she had borrowed a sovereign, and she would give it back.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I have the napkin, which I got of Mrs. Duckham.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH DUCKHAM . The prisoner came to my house about nine o'clock one night, and asked me to lend her 10 d., to pay for a letter - I rather hesitated to do so, as she was a stranger; she said she had all the way to go to Surry-street, and the letter lay in Oxford-street, and if I doubted her paying me she would leave me this napkin as security, and call any time I would appoint - I lent her 1 s. and appointed five o'clock the next day, but she came no more.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope your Lordship will be kind - I had my family to support - my husband had left me, after being fifteen years his wife. As soon as I had received 5 l. I should have replaced these articles.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Of stealing the napkin.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-62

1282. RICHARD LATTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a truck, value 2 l. ; the goods of Edmund Dowling .

EDMUND DOWLING. I am a grocer , and live at No. 30, King-street, Tower-hill . I had a truck which I lost on or about the 1st of January, from my door, where my boy had just left it. On the 9th of July I saw it in the hands of a butcher, named George Barnett. I went and asked him where he had got it - he said of a person in the City-road.

GEORGE BARNETT . I am a butcher, and live in Cross-street, Islington; I bought this truck on Easter Monday, of a man named Gold.

JOHN GOLD . I am a broker. I sold this truck to Mr. Barnett - I bought it of the prisoner near the beginning of the year - he brought it to my door while I was out - he then offered it to a number of persons, and they brought him to me; thinking he had not got it fairly, we took him to the Magistrate, who committed him - but they could not find an owner; after he had been in custody for a fortnight, he came to me again, and I bought it of him - it was not long after the beginning of the year; I bought it for 11 s. and sold it for 30 s.

LEWIS HANDS . I am a broker. About five or six months ago, the prisoner offered to sell me two or three trucks; I knew Barnett had bought some trucks of him, and I said to Mr. Gold "We may get into trouble, for I don't think he gets them honestly." I did not buy the first he brought, but he brought one a week or two ago - I then went to my next door neighbour, and we followed him, and when he got to Mitchell-street, I saw him offering

it to another broker; I took hold of it and said "You are in a great hurry to sell this - whose is it?" he said it was his own; I then said "Did you not sell a truck to Mr. Gold?" I then took him to Mr. Gold, and said "Is this the man?" he said "He is;" I then asked the prisoner where he lived; he said in Great or Little Cutler's-street; - we went there and found it was so. Gold fetched an officer.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he had bought the truck in Smithfield.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-63

1283. ELIZABETH LOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a counterpane, value 4 s.; a pillow, value 1 s., and a curtain, value 2 s. , the goods of John Yealfe .

ANN DANIEL . The prisoner came to sleep with me on the 25th of June, and left on the 30th. I missed my counterpane from the top of the bed - she said she had put it under the bed to keep it clean, as the weather was warm; I then missed the curtain, which she said she had pawned, and the counterpane likewise, but she would bring them back again; she begged of me not to name it to my daughter.

ANN MARIA YEALFE . I am the wife of John Yealfe. The prisoner came to work for me and my mother, and lodged there; I never gave her permission to pawn my property. The curtain and counterpane were let to her as part of the furniture.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-64

1284. EDWARD LIANAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , four shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of William Ward .

WILLIAM WARD. I am a shoemaker , and live at Highgate . On the 21st of August I had left these shoes safe at nine o'clock - there is a back window looking into a farm-yard, which was open a little way. I was called up next morning, and found these old shoes on a man's feet - I missed another pair of new shoes, which I have not found. The prisoner lived about there, and knew my premises very well.

JAMES PETHER . The prisoner was a stranger to me. I bought a pair of shoes of him for 2 s. on the Sunday morning, and had them on when I was spoken to.

JAMES DORSWELL . On Sunday morning I was taking my toll at the turnpike-gate at Highgate - Pether came up, and said, "I was talking to you about buying a pair of shoes, and here they are;" I knew them to be mine, and I went down with him to Ward's, who had them to repair. The prisoner was taken into custody soon after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took any thing, nor did I sell the shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-65

1285. JANE MANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , three spoons, value 12 s. , the goods of Andrew Butler .

ANDREW BUTLER. I live in Park-terrace - the prisoner was servant to a lodger of mine, named Haydon. I went out on the 12th of August, and on returning about nine o'clock in the evening I missed three silver teaspoons from the kitchen cupboard; the prisoner could go there, but it was not her duty to go. I accused her of it, and she denied it - they were found at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN ELDERKIN . I live with Mr. Wadmore, in Tottenham Court-road. I have three tea-spoons, which were pawned on the 12th of August, by a person, in the name of Ann Barton . I am not certain of the person of the prisoner, but the person had a white straw bonnet on, and pink ribbons; the prisoner had the same when she was at the Office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-66

1286. ELIZABETH MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a tea-spoon, value 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Rohde .

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I have had the care of a spoon, which I received from a witness who is here; I shewed it to Mr. Rohde's servant, who swore to it, but I have had the misfortune to lose it.

JAMES WOOD . I am a jeweller and silversmith. The prisoner came to my shop, and offered a spoon for sale, which I bought of her for 3 s., on Friday, the 19th of August. I afterwards gave the same spoon to Schofield.

MARY PALMER . I am lady's maid in the family of Mr. Samuel Rohde, of York-place, Mary-le-bone. I remember seeing a silver spoon in the custody of Schofield; I swore to it as being my master's - I had seen it myself in the house. I lost it on Wednesday, the 17th of August, after making tea in the housekeeper's room. I had not seen the prisoner near the house.

ANN GRIFFITHS . I am cook at Mr. Rohde's. I saw the prisoner near the house on the 17th of August; the area was open - she told Schofield that she had gone down, but I did not see her. I saw the spoon, and knew it to be my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on Thursday night, and having no food I thought I might dispose of it.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-67

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1287. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , sixteen loaves of bread, value 6 s., and 3 lbs. of flour, value 1 s. , the goods of Christian Dill .

JACOB KORN . I am in the service of Mr. Christian Dill, a baker , who lives in Oxford-street. I took out some bread on the 27th of July, about twelve o'clock - I placed my barrow at the corner of Lower Brook-street, Grosvenor-square ; I went with two loaves to Hart-street, which took me about eight minutes. When I returned I found the bread was taken out of it; there had been sixteen loaves and 3 lbs. of flour in a paper bag, with my master's name on it. I had covered my basket with green baize. I saw the prisoner coming back in the custody of a young man, with the bread and flour.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you leave these baskets and bread in the highway to tempt any poor hungry man to take it? A. Yes.

JAMES KORMERY . I saw the prisoner in Mount-street about twelve o'clock - he had an empty basket. I stopped him in Brook-street, about five or seven minutes afterwards, with bread in the basket, and the flour in his hand - I said to him, "You are my prisoner," and asked him how he got it - he said he had been served so himself. - Korn then came up, and we took him.

FREDERICK STANTON . I took charge of him - I said it was a great pity for him to do such a thing; he said he had been six months out of place, and that was the only method of living he could find out; he appeared to be in a state of poverty.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-68

1288. MICHAEL MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 cwt. of hand stuff, value 11 s., and a bag, value 3 d. , the goods of Joseph Gardener .

JOSEPH GARDENER. I am a stationer and rag merchant , and live in Shoreditch . The prisoner was in my employ. Hand stuff is old bagging and stuff, used to make coarse paper of - we had several bags of it, marked P. W. N. - this appears like one of them, but I could not miss it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you speak to the property merely by the mark on the bag? A. Yes - I had many others similar to it.

GEORGE GOODLAND . I am a broker, in the rag way, and live in Red Lion-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 19th of August, and brought this bag, which he put down in the shop; I asked him how he came by it - he said a man in Whitechapel gave it to him to sell, and gave him 6 d. to bring it. I asked if he knew the name of the man, or where he lived; he said No. I saw the officer passing, and gave charge of him.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I was passing, and was called in. - The prisoner said a man in Whitechapel gave him 6 d. to bring it to sell. I found three sixpences on his person.

JOSEPH DUET . I have worked with the prisoner. - On the 19th of August I was walking up Plough-yard, and saw him come out of Mr. Gardener's warehouse, with a bag on his back, similar to this. There was another man with him, who is in Mr. Gardener's employ. The prisoner went up King's Head-court; the other man locked the door, and went the contrary way; the prisoner went towards Red Lion-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say you thought the bag contained shoes? A. Yes, I did, because they are allowed to be taken away by Mr. Gardener.

Prisoner's Defence. If he had seen me would he not have stopped me, and made it known to Mr. Gardener? He said at Worship-street that he was near me, and spoke to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-69

1289. JOHN STEVENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , three coats, value 24 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Pennington .

THOMAS PENNINGTON. I live in Percival-street, and am a veterinary surgeon . On the 17th of August, about two o'clock, I missed these coats and a handkerchief, from behind the door of Mr. Cartwright's house. The handkerchief was in the side pocket of one of the coats. - I saw them again about seven o'clock the same evening; they are my property.

JAMES WARREN . I am a coal-dealer, and live in Brunswick-place, near St. John-street-road. I saw the prisoner coming down Market-street on the 17th of August, about three o'clock, with three coats and some keys in his hand; I knew the coats to be Mr. Pennington's, as I had seen him with them - I did not speak, but followed him to Wilderness-row, and took him into a public-house, and sent for an officer. He said a man had employed him to carry them for him to Aldersgate-street.

JOHN HAYFORD . I came to the house, and took the prisoner with the three coats; the handkerchief I found in his hat.

Prisoner. I asked him to go with me to the Three Cups inn, to see the person who gave me the coats to carry? Witness. He did say so, and said he was to have the handkerchief for taking the coats.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Percival-street, with the rough white coat on, and the others on his arm; he offered me 6 d. to carry them to the Three Cups, Aldersgate-street; I refused - he pulled the handkerchief out of his pocket, and said he would give me that; I consented - he said he should overtake me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-70

1290. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , a shirt, value 2 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Stride .

THOMAS STRIDE. I am a servant , and lodge at the Black Horse, public-house, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner slept in the house on the night of the 21st of August; next morning, I went out about half-past eight o'clock, and returned about ten - I had left him in bed, but when I came back he was gone, and I missed the articles from a chair by my bed side. I found him in Harley Mews. I asked if he had not slept at the Black Horse the last night; he said No; he had just come from the country. I said he certainly was the man - he said No, I was mistaken. I took him to the landlord, and asked him if that was not the person - he said it was; he still denied it - the landlord said he would send for a constable; the prisoner then took off his hat and gave the shirt out, and said "Now you have got your property, I hope you will let me go." I said I had lost a pair of stockings - he said he had not got them; he shewed something out of his pockets, and said that was all he had got, but I saw there was something in his breast pocket. I tapped on that pocket, and said, "What is in there;" he then took out a pair of stockings, and said "Now you have got all your property, let me go, I did it through distress."

JOHN LEWIS . I am landlord of the Black Horse. I went with Stride, and heard him ask the prisoner, if he had not got his shirt, which he denied at first; but when I said he was certainly the man who had slept at the house - he took the shirt out of his hat, and gave it to

Stride. He said "That is your shirt, and now you have got it, I hope you will forgive me." Stride then said he had lost a pair of stockings - he denied having them, but afterwards pulled them out of his pocket and gave them to him.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took charge of the prisoner. On searching him I found 2 s. 6 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a shirt which I brought from Woolwich and Greenwich in my hat. I met an old mate, and we had some grog - to the best of my knowledge my own shirt was in my hat when I slept at the house. I do not know of any one having changed the shirt, and I thought it was my own. I had plenty of time to have been miles off, or to have disposed of it in different ways. I had been suffering some months with a rheumatic fever, and the reason I gave up the article was, that rather than be locked up in a prison, or a watch-house, which I never was, I would have given up every thing.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-71

1291. ELIZABETH SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , six pairs of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d.; a thimble, value 3 d.; a piece of ribbon, value 3 d., and a work-bag, value 6 d. , the goods of Henry Milner .

HENRY MILNER. I keep an eating-house in Bridge-street . On the evening of the 19th of July, I went, by the desire of my servant, after a woman whom he had in possession at the corner of Maddox-street. I found it was the prisoner at the bar. I saw her attempting to put a pair of stockings down an area. I found these six pairs of stockings in this calico bag, which I had seen safe on my counter about an hour before.

JAMES PATRICK . I am Mr. Milner's servant. I followed the prisoner in the street on Tuesday evening, the 19th of July, and saw her in a few minutes, about thirty yards from our house - she had a bundle which contained wood, and a basket with several things in it, and among the rest this calico bag. I sent for my master, and as he was coming, she put some stockings down the area - she was putting some down, and my master prevented her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a glass of liquor, and a little overcomes me. I did not know I had the goods till I was taken. I gave up the bag, and said if it belonged to his mistress, he might take it.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-72

1292. JOHN TOWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a watch, value 7 s., and a watch key, value 2 d. , the goods of William Coulston .

WILLIAM COULSTON. I live in Berwick-street. I went to bathe on the 1st of August, and met John Town - he asked me to mind his clothes, and then said he would mind mine, while I went in; after I had dressed myself, I told him, I missed my handkerchief; I had given my watch to him before, to take care of.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-73

1293. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a truck, value 6 l. , the goods of Charles Bates .

CHARLES BATES. I live in the Borough-road . I make trucks and lend them out ; I lent a truck on the 5th of August, to one George Harland, for Mr. Smoker - Harland said, he took it down to the side of the King's-bench, and then a man took it of him - I went to the office, and saw it there.

GEORGE HARLAND . I live with my father in Princes-street, Borough. On the 5th of August, I saw the prisoner near the King's-bench; he asked me to fetch a truck from Mr. Bates's for Mr. Smoker, and he would give me 3 d. for fetching it - he said, he did not like to go there himself, because he owed Bates 1 s.; I went and got the truck and brought it to the Stone's-end, where the prisoner met me and took it of me - he gave me the 3 d.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me about there before? A. No, but I know your person.

JOHN SMOKER . I know nothing of the prisoner, and I never employed him to get the truck for me - I did not send for any truck on the 5th of August.

JEREMIAH NEERES . I am a dealer in coals, and live in Petticoat-lane. On Saturday morning, the 6th of August, I saw the prisoner at my house about nine o'clock; he asked me, if I wanted a strong truck - I asked him whose it was; he said, it was his own, and that it was at his lodgings - I said, fetch it - he did so; I again asked him whose it was, and he said, it was his own; I said, if you can satisfy me of that, I will buy it - I went to his lodgings, but was not satisfied, and did not buy it; when I returned, the officer took him in charge; the truck had stood at my door till our return.

JOHN GRIFFITH . I took the prisoner into custody on the 6th of August, and found the truck at Neeres's door; I asked the prisoner how he got it - he said, his father died about six months before and left it to him; I then went with him to his lodgings - the woman there said that she gave him leave to put a truck in there the night before, but she did not know whose it was; I then made him draw the truck to a cooper's, and we put it up there and went to the Magistrate's - he was committed for a week; I afterwards saw written in pencil in front of the truck, "Bates, Borough;" and by that means I found the owner; I shewed it to Bates, who claimed it.

CHARLES BATES re-examined. Q. Did you see your truck before the Magistrates? A. Yes, I knew it to be mine, because I made it myself; I had seen the pencil mark on it when it was in my possession, but do not know who wrote it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it on Friday in Smithfield, for 25 s. I had the address of the man of whom I bought it, but since I have been apprehended he has gone away.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-74

1294. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , two watch keys, value 28 s. , the goods of Thomas North .

THOMAS NORTH. I am a clock and watch maker , and live in Old Compton-street . On the 29th of August, the prisoner came to my shop, and said he wanted his watch cleaned and a bolt to his case; he asked what it would come to - I said 4 s.; he then said he should wish to part

with that watch, in exchange for another; I shewed him two or three, and he chose one - the difference might be about 2 l. 15 s. - I laid it aside with the ticket; he then said, I wish to have a good gold key; I shewed him several; while I was giving him the last key, I saw him take up two from the counter; he then went towards the door, and I said, "Sir, do you mean to pay for those keys?" "Oh no," says he, "I'm going to see if there's another watch in your window I like better." As he passed the window, I saw him run - I pursued him to New Compton-street, and called Stop thief! he was there stopped and brought back.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had he purchased the watch of you which he wanted to exchange? A. Yes, he had some months before, and had paid me by different payments.

Q. When he took the keys, did he not say, I will see which I like best, and I will pay you for it. A. Yes, he took the keys out of the shop - he did not say he would see which would do and return the other; he took them up in a very curious manner - I asked him if he was going to pay for them; he said, "Oh dear, no! I am going to look at the watches in the window."

Q. Where was the old watch? A. He took it off the counter again.

COURT. Q. How long had he had the old watch of you? A. About six months - I knew his name, but not where he lived.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . On the 29th of August, I saw a mob in Crown-street, but I did not see the prisoner; I saw a person pick up a watch key in the middle of the road.

JENKIN JONES . My father keeps a shop in King-street, Soho. On the 29th of August, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out and saw the prisoner running with a mob after him; I saw him throw a watch key opposite the coffee-shop - I do not know what became of it; I followed him, and he was taken in New Compton-street; he was taken back to the prosecutor's shop.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you off the lad when he was running? A. I was in my father's shop, and he was four or five doors off when I first saw him - I followed him, and I was just by the corner of Crown-street, when I saw him throw away the key; I did not see it when it was on the ground - there were some persons walking before him, but none running.

WILLIAM MELLOWS . I was called to take this prisoner; I found a watch on him, but nothing else.

THOMAS NORTH re-examined. Q. How often did you see the prisoner? A. I never saw him after he had paid for the watch, which was about five months before. He came about five or six times to pay the money; I never saw him any where else to my knowledge; I believe I charged him 30 s. or 35 s. for the old watch. I kept the property till the payments were made.

Prisoner's Defence. Does it stand to reason that I should go and purchase the watch for 2 l. 11 s., and then wish to exchange? I asked what he would charge for mending it, and he said 4 s. 6 d.; I said, it was a great deal; I then asked him if he would make an exchange; and he said he would - I looked at one at 3 l. 18 s.; I thought it too much - I then asked to look at some watch keys: he shewed me some which I did not like - I then looked at some more, but it was not likely, that I should take two keys out of a shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-75

1295. JAMES VEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a bolster, value 7 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; a pillow-case, value 1 s.; a table-cloth, value 1 s.; a sofa-cover, value 1 s.; a sheet, value 1 s.; three books, value 2 s.; a jug, value 2 d.; a towel, value 6 d.; a blanket, value 5 s., and a coat, value 10 s., the goods of George Ferguson ; a cap, value 5 s.; three chimney-ornaments, value 1 s.; two glasses, value 6 d.; a box, value 2 d.; a chisel, value 2 d.; a screw-driver, value 2 d., and a rule, value 6 d. , the goods of Robert King .

GEORGE FERGUSON. I am a haberdasher , and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields - those articles are mine - they were in a summer-house of mine in a garden at Hoxton - I had locked them up there at eight o'clock on the evening of the 1st of September - I went there next morning about seven, and missed them - I saw them again at the office, about eleven o'clock, that day.

ROBERT KING. I had a cap, and some other articles, in a summer-house in an adjoining garden.

ALEXANDER PHILLIPS . I lodge at the Crown and Sceptre public-house. On the morning of the 2d of September I was in Mr. Thacey's garden. I saw the prisoner and another person in a garden adjoining the prosecutor's - one of them had a bundle in his arm, but I am not certain which; for as soon as they saw me they both ran off - they left the bundle in Mr. Saul's garden - I saw the prisoner's back, so as to know him again - they got over a fence and a gate - the other got over it, but the prisoner broke it down - I was not then above three feet from him - I had kept my eye on him from the first moment I saw him till he got to the gate, except in going round a corner - I opened a gate which led into East-street, and saw him running very fast - Adams stopped him - we took him to the watch-house, and I took the watchman to the place where I first saw him, where we found the bundle which is here produced - it appeared to be the same which I had seen the man first carrying.

EDWARD ADAMS . On the 2d of September I was on the pits, going to work. I saw the prisoner going along the other side of the way, and went and collared him - he was not running - he said, "Pray don't stop me, I have only been having a bit of a game in a garden."

JOSEPH SIMMONS . I am a watchman. Phillips took me to a garden, where I found the bundle.

GEORGE MEADOWS . I opened the bundle, and searched the prisoner. I found on him two little bits; and the bundle, which was sworn to by the prosecutor. I found a knife belonging to Mr. King in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-76

1296. WILLIAM WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , 18 lbs. of leaden pipe, value 5 s. , the goods of John Lea .

MARY LEA . I am the wife of John Lea. We keep the Fox and Bull public-house, at Knightsbridge . The prisoner lodged there for nearly twelve months. On Wednesday, the 3d of August, there were two twenty-feet-lengths of pipe brought in to lay on the water - it was put into the kitchen

by the plumber. The prisoner is a carpenter , and a Chelsea pensioner .

ANN WESTBROOK . I live in Charles-street, New-road, Chelsea. I was with Mrs. Lea for about a week - when the lead was missed I went to look for it, but could not find it - I afterwards saw it accidentally, about eight o'clock in the evening, under some green baize, in the grain hole - I told Mrs. Lea of it, and she desired me to leave it as I found it. Shortly after I heard a bell ring in the back kitchen - I went to answer the bell, and saw the prisoner with six other men - I was ordered to fetch a pot of half-and-half - when I took that in I saw the prisoner take up an empty basket, and go out - his companions asked him why he did not stay - he said he would be back presently - he afterwards came to me at the bar for some paper, which he said Mrs. Lea sent him for - I afterwards saw him near the skittle-ground, with the basket in his hand.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am a whitesmith. I was desired by Mrs. Lea to keep watch in the grain-hole - while I was there the prisoner came with a basket under his arm - he had covered something, and put it in the basket - he was going up the steps, when I touched him on the shoulder and said, I believed he was the person I wanted - he then dropped the basket - I took him to the door - an officer was sent for - I picked up the basket, but no one had done any thing to it till the officer received it.

EDWARD GRANT . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mrs. Lea's on the night of the 5th of August. I received a basket from Holmes with the leaden pipe, which I have here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had no intention of stealing it - I meant to take it to Mrs. Lea - I had a coat in pawn, and took the basket to fetch it back - I was going past the grain-hole, and saw the lead.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-77

1297. MICHAEL HARTNETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Gobby , with intent to rob him .

SECOND COUNT, for demanding money of the said John Gobby, with intent to rob him.

JOHN GOBBY. On the 27th of August, about five minutes after one o'clock in the morning, I was near Plump-tree-street, St. Giles's - my brother-in-law, Watkins, was with me, and Hannah Brown - we were about parting, when the prisoner came up with two others - he claimed Hannah Brown as a countrywoman of his, and another claimed her as a sister - I told them to walk off, and called the watchman - the watchman did not come, but the prisoner went away, and when I came to the end of Plump-tree-street the prisoner came up and tapped me on the shoulder, and said "We want money for some beer, and money we will have;" I told him to go away, when he knocked me down, and put his foot on my neck - I called Watch! and he was taken at the end of George-street - he did not attempt to get any money from me when I was down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-78

1298. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN KING . I am a baker , and live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner was in my employ. On the 25th of July he was to collect money from the customers - he was to settle with me on the Monday evening - he did not pay me any money on the 25th of July, as received from Sarah Hawkins, or any other person - he came home and left his basket, and went to a public-house - the next day I met him in Bermondsey-street, Borough, where I had heard he was - I asked him what he had done with the money, and why he had left his work - he said he had lost the money.

SARAH HAWKINS . I am the wife of James Hawkins , of the Star and Garter public-house, in St. Martin's-lane. On the 25th of July I paid the prisoner 1 l., in shillings and sixpences, on account of Mr. King - I do not know how many there were of each - I had not been accustomed to have a receipt, as I pay every Monday.

WILLIAM KEYS . I arrested the prisoner in the Borough on the evening of the 26th of July. I found some bits of paper on him, but none about Mrs. Hawkins.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home, and intended to settle the account with master, but he was out. I tendered my mistress the money, which she took, and then returned it, and desired me to keep it till I saw my master. I went out to get some refreshment, and with the labour of the night, and the heat of the day, I fell asleep. When I awoke I missed the money, and did not like to go back without it.

WILLIAM KEYS re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner tell the same tale about the wife as he has now, and about his going to sleep at the public-house? A. Yes.

JOHN KING re-examined. Q. Did he tell you what he had done with the money? A. He said he got into a coach, and laid out some of it in shirts and other things, and some of it he lost.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-79

1299. GEORGE GATEHOUSE was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS BROWN . I am in partnership with my brother, Charles Brown - we are cheesemongers , and have one shop in Grafton-street , and another in Greek-street. The prisoner was in our service nearly two years - he left us about the 6th of June - he never accounted for two shillings and a penny, received from Mrs. Ann Stuart .

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did the prisoner pay any money to you on the day he left? A. He might have paid some money - this money was due to the shop in Grafton-street, to which my brother attends, but he is ill in the country.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-80

1300. ALEXANDER NESBITT was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES STIRK . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ - he was to receive money for me, and to account to me every evening - he never accounted to me for 11 s., received on the 6th of June from Mr. W. Nicholson - I had been out that day to try to make some discoveries - when I named a circumstance to him he denied it, and I said "I will take you to the person;" as we were going along he said it was useless to go, and we returned - I had not heard that Mr. Nicholson had paid him till after he was in prison - I had been in the habit of giving him

weekly bills - on Monday, the 6th of June, he accounted to me for other payments, but not any for Mr. Nicholson.

WILLIAM NICHOLSON . Q. Did you pay the prisoner any money on the 6th of June? A. I cannot say about any particular day; but I paid him every day as the bread was delivered.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-81

1301. ALEXANDER NESBITT was again indicted for embezzlement .

MARY DELAMORE . I am a customer of Mr. Stirk. On the 11th of July I paid the prisoner two half-crowns for Mr. Stirk. I have a receipt which he gave to me at the time.

CHARLES STIRK . On the 11th of July the prisoner did not account to me for any money received of Mrs. Delamore: he accounted for other money, and said that was all he had received.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-82

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1300. RICHARD MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , at St. Ann, Westminster , a work-box, value 4 l.; a handkerchief, value 2 s., and three sovereigns, the property of Benjamin Colyer , in the dwelling-house of the said Benjamin Colyer and William Spurr .

WILLIAM SPURR. I am a jeweller , in partnership with Benjamin Colyer - we both reside in one house, which is in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster. On the 13th of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the bell rang - I went down and saw Mrs. Spurr in the passage - she gave me information - I immediately went in pursuit, and overtook the prisoner about one hundred yards off, with this box and property in his hand - it belongs to Mr. Colyer only; he was quite a stranger; I took him back with it: I had seen the box in the parlour half an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are your rates paid by the firm? A. Yes.

BENJAMIN COLYER. I am in partnership with Mr. Spurr. I was at work in the shop, and saw him bring the prisoner in with the box - it is all mine.

SUSANNAH SPURR . I am the wife of William Spurr. I was looking out of window and saw the prisoner going out of the house with the box under his arm; I told my husband, who fetched him back with it.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not you be mistaken in his person? A. No.

JOHN PROCTOR . I took him into custody with this box.

MR. COLYER. It is mine, and is worth 4 l., and contains three sovereigns besides.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18250915-83

1303. JOHN HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , a watch, value 40 s.; a purse, value 6 d.; six shillings, and a sixpence, the property of Thomas Knapton , in his dwelling-house .

MATILDA KNAPTON . I am the wife of Thomas Knapton - we live in Prague-street, Paddington . On the 11th of June, a little after twelve o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of my parlour door - he turned round and asked for Mrs. Austin, a dress-maker - I said I knew no such person, and, on turning my eye, missed my watch off the mantel-piece; I had seen it safe only a minute before; he walked away quietly - I followed, and saw him give the watch to a companion - he then ran, and I overtook him in a brickfield, brought him to the top of the street, and gave him to my husband - the watch was worth 40 s., and I lost a purse, with 6 s. 6 s. in it, off the mantel-piece also.

THOMAS KNAPTON . I took the prisoner from my wife - he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-84

1304. JOHN RIDER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Stephen Bean , in the King's highway, on the 30th of July , at St. John of Wapping , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a handkerchief, value 1 s., and three sovereigns, his property .

STEPHEN BEAN. I am a seaman , and belong to the brig Patience, which lay in the London Docks. On the 30th of July, at six o'clock in the evening, I was going on board my ship - I was a little intoxicated, but quite capable of knowing every thing, and am quite certain that I had three sovereigns tied in a handkerchief, which was in my cap. I am sure the money was in my cap - I was just outside the London-dock-gate - a man came up alongside of me, said nothing, but knocked me down with his fist, by a blow in the chest - my cap fell of my head; I saw him put his hand into my cap, and take out the handkerchief with the sovereigns in it, and heave it to another man who was with him, and who ran away with the handkerchief and money. I am sure the prisoner is the man who knocked me down - he was a stranger to me; when the other man ran away I picked up my cap, and ran after the prisoner; as both ran away; I called "Stop thief!" but nobody stopped him; I caught him myself, and he knocked me down twice after that - I had the marks on me for weeks after; I secured him at last, and gave him to an officer. I have not recovered my money.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You had lately returned from sea? A. Yes - I had 2 l. in my pocket when I left the Docks at two o'clock - I received 1 l. from my master that morning. I had not drank much - I called at the Brown Bear, and had four or five pots of beer among three or four of my shipmates, and some spirits - we were there from two till near six o'clock - it was close by the London-dock gate - Marsh and Smith were with me - I left John Cane at the Brown Bear - I went to no other house. I saw the prisoner knock my hat off, and saw him take the money - I was capable of running after him - I caught him in the alley - I did not meet him - I followed and took him, without losing sight of him - he was not more than two rods from me.

JOHN MARSH . I am a seaman, and belong to the Patience. On the 30th of July I was with Bean at the Brown Bear, and saw him put the sovereigns into his cap - he left

the house between five and six o'clock, and I did not see him knocked down - he was a little intoxicated but appeared to have his senses about him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the prisoner lame? A. I do not know; Smith, who helped to take him, is gone to sea.

JAMES COLE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge at the watch-house - the prosecutor appeared to have been drinking, but was capable of describing the affair.

Prisoner's Defence. The man is speaking great falsities.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18250915-85

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1305. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for an unnatural crime .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-86

1306. CORNELIUS SULLIVAN was indicted for the wilful murder of Jane Earl .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MARY MELTIS. The prisoner and Jane Earl lived together next door to me, at No. 6, White Horse-court, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell . On the evening of the 2d of August , between eight and nine o'clock, she came up the court to get her supper from the bakehouse, and asked me to go and have some supper with her at Con Sullivan's. While we were talking together, the prisoner came up the the court, knocked her down, and kicked her - I did not hear her say a word - she had her hand in her pocket to give some money to my child to get the victuals from the bakehouse; and he knocked her down with his fist, and kicked her with his legs several times while she was down - he kicked her in several parts about her body, side, and thighs; persons began to collect, and as soon as she recovered herself, she got up and ran into a chandler's shop at the corner of the court; he dragged her out by the hair of her head and her handkerchief, knocked her down again, and jumped upon her twice - the mob collected, and I saw no more - whether he dragged her down the court or what I cannot say. I stood at the top of the court, and said

"Pray Con don't you;" he said "If you don't get away, I will serve you the same;" the woman had not spoken to him in my presence.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you see him first on that day? A. About four o'clock - they were both together, and seemed very agreeable; neither of them were sober, but they were not far gone - he was more sober than her.

Q. Do you recollect his complaining of her not getting the supper? A. No; she was giving my girl the money to pay the baker, when he came up. I did not hear him speak to her, nor she to him.

Q. Did she not say to him "You may kiss my head?" A. Oh dear No. He kicked her, the first time he knocked her down. I was perfectly sober, and she seemed quite sensible.

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . I live in Turnmill-street, with my mother. I saw nothing of this till Earl ran into the chandler's-shop. The prisoner ran in, and pulled her out by the collar, and hit her on the back of the head with his foot - she did not fall; he then pulled her to the top of the alley, where they live, took her by the hair of her head, and threw her down the steps where they live - the alley goes down six steps - he forcibly threw her down them. I did not go farther, and saw nothing more.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you know the deceased? A. From a child. I have known the prisoner about a year; she seemed solid when she ran into the shop - she did not appear at all drunk - she did not slip down the steps; he dragged her down by her hair - he did not fall himself. I had not been drinking with them.

SUSAN WELCH . My husband is a chimney-sweeper. I was in White Hart-court, and saw Sullivan run into the chandler's-shop after his wife - he kicked her in the shop, and pulled her out by her hair, drew her down the steps by her hair, then pulled her all along the court, and dashed her in-doors like a dog, into the room where they live. I did not see him strike her till he got her in; he then fastened the door, and broke the chair all to pieces over her - he was beating her with the chair till he broke it; he struck her eight or nine times with the chair - it was not a heavy one - every body was afraid to go near him; she was laying down all this time, and all her senses were gone.

Q. How did you see all this? A. I followed him and said "Con govern your passion;" he said "I will serve you the same." I peeped through the key-hole of the room-door, and saw him beating her with the chair - the room door opens into the court. While I was looking through the key-hole, I saw him tie a handkerchief round her throat - he tried to choak her, as it appeared to me; he said at Hatton garden, that when he got out, he would cut me with a knife.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mrs. Meltis? A. Yes; I had been selling cucumbers that night, and was quite sober; he kicked her when she was going into the shop; the house is in a broad paved court; he said the first person he caught near him he would murder - he would not let any body go in.

COURT. Q. Where did he strike her with the chair? A. About her back and sides - his face was turned towards the door - he had a waistcoat with sleeves on. I did not see the chair fall on her head at all.

STEPHEN HEARN . I keep this chandler's-shop. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was serving two customers - the deceased came forcing into my shop apparently terrified, and before I got a sight of her the prisoner fetched her back by force, but I could not see how, and in about half a minute I heard a scuffling under my window. I went out and saw the deceased laying on the pavement - the prisoner stamping his feet on her rather than kicking her - I saw that repeated several times; her head lay towards my window, and her feet towards the curb stone; he took her up in his arms, and I saw no more - my shop is next door to the court where they live; she appeared to have no senses left, when he took her up - he stamped on her about the middle of her body, but not all on one place.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a smith, and live in White Horse-court - the prisoner lives in the first house in the court. I was coming out of my room, and heard a person telling the prisoner not to go and ill use his wife any more. I saw him open his door and give his wife two kicks in her side, and say "Lay there you b - y w - e." I was just at the

door - I saw nobody else there - the door was shut; he came and opened it, and went in alone - I went away. I think the kicks were in the body - it was near nine o'clock - no mob was assembled then.

JOHN COOPER . I am a surgeon, and live in Cow-cross-street. I was called in to see the deceased on Wednesday, the 3d of August, twenty-four hours after the injury - I found her laying in a most wretched state, perfectly insensible; when I felt her extremities she did not appear to feel at all; I proceeded to bleed her arm, but without success. I afterwards opened an artery, and got about three ounces of blood - I took her some medicine, and with difficulty got two spoonsfull down. I had a blister applied all over her head, and mustard poulticies to her feet; her disease being an oppression of the brain. I was convinced she could not live - she was perfectly sensible all the time, and on Thursday she died. I opened her, and found several bruises under the scalp, very well marked indeed, particularly on the left side of the head - the bruises were inflicted by blows of considerable violence; they were very black, and very extensive. A person being dragged along the pavement would not produce them, but a fall would. I found four ounces of extravasated blood on the left hemisphere of the brain. I ascribe her death to the extravasation, which was caused by the violence on the head - that certainly produced her death; her chest and abdomen were perfectly healthy: there were several bruises on her body and legs, but not sufficient to cause death.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not the extravasation proceed from other causes? A. The bruises could not. I have in some cases of apoplexy seen extravasated blood, but not so great a quantity - but here there was no cause for apoplexy; there was no fracture: the bruises without the extravasation would not produce death. I saw the prisoner - he paid me 2 s. 6 d. for attending her, and said he would pay me any charge when he received his money. I said she would not survive; he said he was very sorry, and exhibited extreme anxiety. It is not improbable that the edge of stone steps would produce such appearances, except that there was no cut.

GUILTY. Aged 33. Of manslaughter only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250915-87

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1307. WILLIAM TUTTON was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Gray .

MARY RANKIN . I keep an eating-house in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea. On the 17th of July , about eleven o'clock at night, I went across the road to fetch my little girl out of a crowd, and as I returned there was an uproar; I saw the prisoner's arm strike a blow, and Gray fell; I heard the prisoner's wife's voice, but did not see her. There were a great many persons round; I understood two women had been fighting; a girl, who they called Scotchey, was laying on the pavement, quite drunk - it was dark. I saw the blow given, and Gray fall; what happened before that I do not know. The prisoner kicked at him three times while he was on the ground, but whether his feet reached him I cannot be certain - he turned over on his left side, on his hands, got up, and walked away, with his two hands on the bottom part of his stomach, in a leaning position. As he passed my window I saw him bleeding from his face - my husband asked if he was hurt; he returned no answer.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you see any more of him? A. Never. There had been an uproar for a considerable time before I went up; what provocation had been given I cannot tell. The prisoner certainly resembles the man who struck him, but he is a good deal altered - it was on a Sunday.

MR. HENRY PITMAN . I am house surgeon of St. George's Hospital. The deceased was brought in about eleven o'clock on Monday morning, and complained of a stoppage of his urine; he said it was occasioned by a blow he had received the night before - there was every appearance of external violence. I considered him in danger; he was there till Thursday, the 21st, when he died. I opened his body, and found the urinary canal ruptured - mortification had ensued, which caused his death; there was no appearance of previous indisposition; it was certainly a recent complaint. I should suppose great violence must have caused it - there was no external wound; it might arise from a blow or kick.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Falling against any very hard substance might occasion it? A. Yes.

DANIEL SHEA . I am a labourer. I was coming by when this row happened - I saw the deceased laying down, and Tutton standing over him, and while he was getting up Tutton hit him, and knocked him down again; he struck him some where about the ribs, with his fist. I saw him get up, and walk away double, and have not seen him since - his name was Thomas Gray.

JAMES MUSTY , was called to prove certain declarations made by the deceased, but it appearing that he did not consider himself to be near death, this evidence was inadmissible.

RICHARD PAINTER . I am a brick-maker. I was in Jews'-row, and saw the prisoner and his wife coming home, arm-in-arm; Mrs. Tutton went up to a woman, and had a few words with her, understanding that her husband had been with her that afternoon; she hit the woman, who fell down, crying - the deceased then came up to the prisoner, and said, "If you don't take your wife home, and give her a good hiding, I will;" Tutton said, "You had better go home my friend - you have nothing to do with me or my wife;" the deceased turned round, and made a blow at Tutton's face; he lifted his arm, and received it, and then stood in his own defence, and knocked the deceased down, who stood in a fighting attitude - he got up, and walked away, saying, "Never mind, you have not hurt me;" he walked away as well as a man could, considering that he was rather in liquor - he put one hand into his pocket, and the other swinging by his side. I was near enough to see all that passed, but not to hear. I did not see him strike or kick him as he got up. I was about three yards from him, and must have seen if he had kicked him. I only saw one blow.

Cross-examined. Q. It happened in consequence of words between the women? A. Yes. Gray spoke to Tutton first, and struck him first.

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman asked me to go and have a glass of gin; we went to the Coach and Horses, public-house - somebody went and told my wife, and she struck her. I said, "We had better go home" -

we were going home; the deceased said, "That is right, take her home, and give her a d - d good hiding." I said, "Go about your business;" he struck me - I struck him again, and he fell.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-88

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1308. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-89

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1309. LETITIA GEORGE was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, with feloniously killing and slaying Samuel Cook .

Two medical gentlemen deposed, that in their opinion the deceased died of inflammation in the bowels, produced by natural causes. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-90

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1310. MARY SCOTT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Welch , about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of August , (he and others being therein) and stealing a scarf, value 5 s.; a gown-piece, value 10 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; five caps, value 2 s., and a pair of stockings, value 1 s., the goods of Elizabeth Cripps , spinster .

ELIZABETH CRIPPS. I lodge on the first floor, at No. 13, Gloster-court, St. Andrew's, Holborn , in Robert Welch's house - he lives there himself. On Sunday, the 21st of August, the prisoner came to see a person who lodged in the house - the person was in my room - she came in to see her, and we all went out together about one o'clock - I saw the person I was with lock the door, and put the key into her pocket - we all went down Gray's-inn-lane together - the prisoner left us at two o'clock - we returned at three - I found my door burst open, and a box taken out, and the articles stated in the indictment gone - I value them at 30 s. - I opened the box, and saw them before we went out - I had left Welch and several of the lodgers in the house - the screws of the lock were forced out and broken - I am single.

DANIEL HALFPENNY . I am a watchman. On the 21st of August, at one o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in Drury-lane, and asked what she had there - I took her to the watch-house - I had received information of the robbery, and fetched the prosecutrix - she had a basket containing these articles - Gloster-court is between Brook-street and Hatton-garden.

GEORGE LEVELL . I am a bellows-maker, and live in Queen-street, Seven-dials. On Saturday evening, the 20th of August, I saw the prosecutrix. I went there again on Sunday, about three o'clock, and heard her place was broken open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 26. Of stealing only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-91

London Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Recorder.

1311. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , at St. Bartholomew, by the Exchange , thirteen yards and a half of woollen cloth, value 16 l. 4 s., the goods of Thomas Simpson , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD SIMPSON . I am son of Thomas Simpson, a tailor , who lives at No. 6, Sweetings-alley , in the parish of St. Bartholomew, by the Exchange. On the 2d of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw this cloth safe in the shop - I went out soon afterwards, and on returning, about two, the officer came and produced the end of it - two shopmen were in care of the shop - I found the prisoner at the watch-house - I have no recollection of seeing him near the shop - I know the cloth to be my father's - there are thirteen yards and a half of it - the lowest value is 24 s. a yard.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was time, after you saw it safe, for another person to steal it and give it to him? A. Yes; I have since seen his friends - I believe he has a very respectable sister, and an aged mother, who says he is her principal support - the shop is part of the dwelling-house.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am ward-beadle of Walbrook, and know Mr. Simpson's house. On the 2d of September, a little before two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man running along George-street - the prisoner was carrying this piece of cloth, which hung loosely under his arm - this arose my suspicion - I followed, and overtook him with it at the back of the Mansion-house - the other escaped - I asked the prisoner how he came by it - he said a man gave it to him in the street; and said, "Don't hurt a poor fellow" - that is all he said then - I took it from him - he gave it up readily - I took him to the watch-house, and after locking him up opened the cloth, and found the end with the ticket in it, with the name of Marsham on it - I inquired and found a wholesale dealer of that name in Ironmonger-lane - they directed me to Mr. Simpson, who claimed it at the watch-house - when Mr. Simpson came to the watch-house, nothing was said to induce the prisoner to say any thing - he said a person had requested him to take it from Lombard-street towards Temple-bar, and would pay him for it, and I think he said a shilling - he mentioned no house that he was to take it to, but described the person as a man rather tall.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say this before Mr. Simpson? A. Yes; he had as good an opportunity of hearing it as me - he said instantly, that another person gave it to him - he must have come through a public street from Mr. Simpson's to get to George-street - he carried it openly - his carrying it that way and running made me suspect him - he said instantly that another man gave it to him.

EDWARD SIMPSON. He said at the watch-house that some man employed him to carry it to Temple-bar - he gave the account the constable has mentioned.

JOHN SANDILANDS . I am foreman to Mr. Simpson. I cut a coat off this cloth on the 1st of September - I did not see it on the 2d. I am certain it is master's. He deals with Mr. Marsham. The prisoner is quite a stranger.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him about your master's house? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare myself innocent.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18250915-92

1312. JOSEPH TUNBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a wooden box, value 2 d.; eight shillings, and eight sixpences , the property of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES. I am a publican , and keep the Crown and Anchor public-house, Fleet-market . On Sunday night, the 4th of September, about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock, I put a little box into my till with 12 s. or 15 s. in shillings and sixpences, in it - the prisoner occasionally came to the house - there were only three people in the parlour - he was not one of them; persons in the parlour cannot see into the bar; I went into the parlour to dismiss the company, and on returning to the bar I saw the prisoner within a foot of the till - I thought all my doors were closed, but the side door was not - I said. "Halloo Joe! what are you doing there?" he made no answer, but ran towards the door - on going to the till, I found it half open and the box gone - I had not put it there two minutes before; I ran out, crying Stop thief! but did not tell him till Thursday night, when he came out of Mr. Clark's, opposite - he drew back on seeing me, and got to the corner, running as hard as he could - I followed; he stopped in the archway in the market - two others who were with him, stood looking at me, they at last ran off, he was stopped by the watchman - there was no stranger in the house but him - I charged him with it: he said, I was going to swear his life away.

CHARLES BRADY . I heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran out of Fleet-market, up Stone-cutter-street - I pursued; and sprang my rattle, he turned round, and I took him.

CHARLES MORGAN . I am a watchman, and assisted in securing him.

WILLIAM ELMS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he used very bad expressions, declared his innocence, and said, "Jones wished to swear his life away;" as I was convincing him to the contrary, he made a most desperate attempt to get away.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a few words with a man and hit him, he gave charge of me, which made me run away.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250915-93

1313. ROBERT PETCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , two sovereigns, the property of Joseph Wakeman Lea , his master .

JOSEPH WAKEMAN LEA. I am a fringe maker , and live in Bagnio-court, Newgate-street ; the prisoner was about five weeks in my service - I gave him two sovereigns, to purchase some silk of Mr. Robinson, in Bunhill-row, on Saturday, the 9th of July, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - he never returned - I found him in custody in about a month - he had never returned me the sovereigns or silk; he had 5 s. a week - no wages were due; he gave me no notice.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 11th of August, I apprehended the prisoner - I stated the charge to him; he said nothing to it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got into Chiswell-street, I lost the money, and was afraid to return.

GEORGE THOMPSON. He never stated this before.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years , to the Prison ship .

Reference Number: t18250915-94

1314. MARY FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , an apron, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of William Workman , her master .

SARAH WORKMAN . I am the wife of William Workman; we keep a twine shop in Bishopgate-street - the prisoner was our char-woman , there was no other servant - about the 27th of June. I missed an apron and handkerchief from the foul clothes closet; I accused her of taking them, which she denied - I never authorised her to pawn them; no body but her has access to the upper part of the house.

JOHN HARDING . I am a constable. On the 27th of June, I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutor's house, she took me to her room, where there were three children; I found some duplicates in the room, one of which was for these things pawned at Seabrook's.

The witness Seabrook not being in attendance, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-95

1315. MARY FREEMAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a pillow-case, value 1 s.; a pinafore, value 1 s., and a table cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of William Workman .

SARAH WORKMAN . I missed these things at the same time - she said, she wished God might strike her dead, if she had seen them. I found them in pawn.

JOHN SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. On the 6th of June, this table cloth was pawned for 1 s., whether by the prisoner I cannot say.

JOHN HARDING . I found the duplicate of this table cloth and an apron, at her lodging.

THOMAS OLIVER SEABROOK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a table cloth and a pillow-case, pawned on the 8th and 21st of June, in the name of Freeman, in which name the prisoner always pawned, but I cannot be positive it was her; I have no doubt of it - the duplicates I gave for them, are among those found at her lodging.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, having been deserted by her husband.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-96

1361. GEORGE GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a coat, value 25 s. , the goods of Edward Brown .

THOMAS NORTON BROWN . I am the son of Edward Brown, pawnbroker , Fetter-lane . On the 10th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, a stone was thrown at one of our back windows, which looks into a yard - I went to the side door to see who threw it, and saw no body; I was sitting in the parlour which commands a view of the shop, and went from there - this coat hung at the front door, and while I stood at the side door, which is in Neville's-court, I saw the prisoner pass with a coat - he threw it away on seeing me - I ran after him immediately, he was secured without my losing sight of him - the coat was picked up - it is my father's - he begged he might be liberated.

RICHARD JONES . I am a jeweller, and live in Bluett's-buildings. I was coming up Neville's-court, and saw the prisoner turn short round the corner from Mr. Brown's front door, and just opposite to the side door, he threw down a coat, and ran away on seeing Brown - I stopped him

without losing sight of him - picked up the coat, and took him back to the shop - he begged to be let go, saying, it was his first offence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Fetter-lane, three men asked me if I wanted employ - they said if I would take that coat from the door, and wait at the bottom of the alley, they would give me 6 d.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-97

1317. SAMUEL WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Wilkinson , from his person .

JOHN WILKINSON. I live in Cateaton-street. On the 2d of August, about nine o'clock at night, I was in Cheapside - I had left home about an hour - my handkerchief was then in my pocket - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner and an officer, struggling in the middle of the street - the officer stooped and picked up something - he had hold of the prisoners, and brought him up to me with my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any private mark on it? A. No, it is not a common pattern - I bought the whole piece - I felt no pull at my pocket.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a City officer. I saw Mr. Wilkinson, with a lady, in Cheapside, going towards home; I saw the prisoner and another go under a hoard at the corner of Old Change - they followed Mr. Wilkinson - he crossed over towards Gutter-lane - they went on before him a little, then crossed over and came behind him - there was no appearance of his handkerchief hanging out. I kept my eye on them, and, just opposite to Bread-street, I saw the other one take the handkerchief out of Mr. Wilkinson's pocket, and immediately give it to the prisoner, who put it inside his bosom, closed his coat, and crossed over to go down Friday-street - the other went strait by the prosecutor; I caught hold of the prisoner in the middle of the road, and in the scuffle the handkerchief fell down between our feet - the other ran off - he gave no account how he got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character in consequence of which he was recommended to mercy.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-98

NEW COURT. (3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1318. WILLIAM HILLIER PERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 6 lbs. of brass, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Dodd and Edward Dodd , his masters .

CHARLES SWIFT . I am in the employ of Thomas and Edward Dodd, brass manufacturers . The prisoner was in their service as a carpenter - I superintend the brass department - I know this brass to be theirs - I have seen it in the shop to which the prisoner had access.

RICHARD WILLIAM HARTLEY . I am a locksmith, and live in Crown-street, Soho. The prisoner came to my shop about the 1st of September, with this brass in his apron - he offered it to me for sale - I said I thought he had not come honestly by it, as it was in a rough state. I sent for a constable, who took him.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and the brass - he said he worked at Mr. Perry's a builder, in Oxford-street, and a man gave it to him to sell; I asked where the man lived; he said he did not know; my brother officer went to Mr. Perry's, and while he was, gone the prisoner admitted that he took it from Messrs. Dodd's.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-99

1319. JOHN QUELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Rowland Yallop , from his person .

ROWLAND YALLOP. On the afternoon of the 15th of August, I was in Gray's-inn-lane - a young woman told me my pocket was picked, and the person had run down a court - I ran and met the prisoner turning back, as it was no thoroughfare - he threw the handkerchief at my feet - I took it up and secured him.

SOPHIA KIDDLE . I was in Gray's-inn-lane. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his own - I pointed out to Mr. Yallop the court which he turned down.

WILLIAM THISTLETON . I took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-100

1320. JAMES CANNON was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH HOLMES . I am a tobacconist . The prisoner was in my service for some time, and then left me; I took him again on the 22d of August - he was entrusted to receive money for me. On Tuesday, the 23d of August , I delivered to him some segars, snuff, and tobacco, to take to Mr. James Thorney , of Peckham, with a bill and receipt - he was to bring the amount, which was 1 l. 13 s., and a bag, which I had left there - he came back and told my wife he had lost the money - I was at home but did not see him.

MARY THORNEY . I live at Peckham. The prisoner brought in some segars, snuff, and tobacco on the 23d of August, for which I paid one sovereign, some shillings, and some copper, and he gave me this receipt.

JAMES BROWN . I am a patrol. I took up the prisoner on the Friday following, and he begged me to persuade Mr. Holmes to forgive him - he said he fell asleep in the fields, and his coat and waistcoat were taken from him while he was asleep, and the bag from under his head, and the money from his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I laid down in the fields, and put the bag under my head, when I awoke they were gone, and the money from my pocket, with two or three halfpence of my own.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-101

1321. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , eight shillings, and 2 s. 7 d. in copper monies, the property of Edwin Rickcord , from his person .

EDWIN RICKCORD. I lodge in the Almonry, Westminster . On the morning of the 11th of August, about two o'clock, the prisoner awoke me; I saw him leaning over me; he was quite a stranger to me - I asked what he wanted - he made some answer but I could not tell what - I said "If you don't go away I will knock you down, and cut your head open with a poker;" he then went to the door, wished me good morning, said it was all right, and went away. When I went to bed I had eight shillings, a sixpence, and 2 s. 7 d. in copper, in my jacket pocket, which I placed on the chair; when he was gone I saw my clothes on the floor, and I missed the money; I ran out immediately after him, without my clothes on. I saw the watchman in Tothill-street - I asked him if he had seen a soldier pass - he said Yes. I saw the prisoner again at the watch-house, in about an hour - I am quite sure he is the person - I know I had one sixpence with a small bit melted out of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the watchman tell you anything about the money when he came to fetch you? A. No, he did not.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a watchman of Tothill-street. I saw the prisoner pass me between two and three o'clock, as it was getting light - he appeared very cold, and I said "Why don't you walk fast and get warm?" he went into the Almonry, and I saw him again about ten minutes before three, running very fast - while I was calling three the witness came to me naked, and asked if I had seen a soldier pass. I then pursued through some courts, and found him in Little Chapple-street, and found 10 s. on him in silver, and 2 s. 9 1/2 d. in copper. The witness told me he had lost 10 s. 7 d., and before he saw the money, he gave me a particular description of this sixpence with a bit melted out of the edge.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness said he had lost some money in the Almonry, and a soldier had taken it from him, but it was not me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250915-102

1322. SARAH CLEMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a half crown, the property of Joseph Cutler , from his person .

JOSEPH CUTLER. On the 6th of August, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was coming through Princes-street, Coventry-street ; this young woman took hold of my arm - she said "Come along with me." I said "I don't want to go with you, I have but 1 d. in my pocket, which I will give you to go away;" she took that, and then came round to my right-hand pocket, put her hand in and drew the pocket half out, in taking her hand out. I felt my pocket, and missed half a crown. I said "If you don't return it, I will put you where the dogs can't bite you;" she said "Me, you villain," and called the Watch, and said I had charged her with robbing me.

ROBERT HOWARD . The prisoner came to the watch-house with the prosecutor, who charged her with robbing him of half a crown. I searched her, and found a half crown, 1 s. and 1 d. - he said he had given her the 1 d.; he at first said "Give me the half crown, and you may go," but she denied having it. When I found it on her, she said "You may take it," but I said "It is too late now;" she said she had got the 3 s. 6 d. from a gentleman in Whitcomb-street.

The prisoner put in a written defence, charging the prosecutor with taking liberties with her, and that on her resistance, he charged her with this robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-103

1324. WILLIAM ELDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , forty-eight pairs of shoes, value 2 l. 15 s., the goods of Daniel Homan , from the person of Charles Gregory .

CHARLES GREGORY. I am eleven years of age, and am in the employ of Mr. Daniel Homan, shoemaker , of Goldsmith-row, Hackney-road. On the 31st of August, he counted out forty-eight pairs of shoes, and put them into a market-basket, with a blue handkerchief over it, which he gave me to carry to Mr. Homan's, in Shoreditch. When I got as far as Shoreditch-church, I saw the prisoner, who said he would give me 1 d. to go with him down Bateman's-row. I went there, and put down my basket at the end of Princes-street, Bateman's-row , and sat upon it; the prisoner then snatched it up, and I saw him and another boy running away - the prisoner had the basket. I went home and told my master. I saw him again on Saturday, the 3d of September, when my master and I were in Old Street-road. I called Stop thief! - he ran away, and my master overtook him.

DANIEL HOMAN. I was with my boy on the 3d of September - he cried Stop thief! and I took the prisoner, who said, what did I collar him for. I said "For stealing some shoes;" he said he knew nothing about them. I asked what he ran away for, and he said my boy hit him a punch in the mouth, and he ran away from him.

GEORGE SMITH . I took the prisoner into custody, and begged the boy to be particular in identifying him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Kingsland-road, and the boy came up to me while I was looking to see what o'clock it was, and I said "What are you looking at me for;" he said "I will give you a slap of the mouth."

I then ran away, and the gentleman came and took me; the boy came up and said, I had sent him on an errand, and took away his shoes, but I never had seen him before.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-104

1325. ELLEN GARRATT and MARY WHARF were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a 10 l. Bank note, the property of George Cusons , from his person .

GEORGE CUSONS. I am a seaman . I live in Ann-street, Limehouse. Sometime in the afternoon of the 21st of August, I went with the prisoner Garratt to a house in Sun-yard - I was a little groggy. When we had been there some time, the other prisoner came in. I had a 10 l. Bank note in a purse in my left-hand breeches pocket. I went to sleep, and when I awoke it was dark, and the prisoners were gone. I then overhauled my pocket, and missed the note. I went down stairs, and found Wharf in the kitchen or parlour, but I did not say any thing about my loss - I staid in the house till morning. I then saw Wharf again, and asked her where the purse was - she said she had not seen it. I said "Where is the 10 l. note;" she said she had not seen a 10 l. note for some time. I afterwards saw Garratt. I did not ask her about the note in the house, but I asked her out of doors - she said she had not seen it. I afterwards made inquiries if two such women had changed a note, and Mr. Fletcher said he had changed it for them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you go with Garratt? A. Yes; and Wharf was there. I undressed myself and went to bed. Garrat was in bed with me a short time - I had put my trousers on a chair. I had not made any observation on the note.

RICHARD WICKERS . I had given the prosecutor this 10 l. note in change for a cheque - it is marked with my initials by my son, but he is not here. I am certain it is his writing.

JOHN FLETCHER . I live at the Ship and Gun, public-house, in Sun-yard. This note was brought to my house about four o'clock in the afternoon of Saturday, the 20th of August, by Garratt, who bought half a pint of gin. Wharf was with her. I gave Garratt nine sovereigns, 19 s. and 3 d., and wrote her name on the note.

THOMAS OBORNE . I am a headborough. I went with Cusons on the 21st of August to Wharf's house in Sun-yard. I saw Garratt, and asked her what she had done with the note - she said she knew nothing about it. I searched her room, but found no money. I came down to Wharf's room, and saw her standing at a drawer. I said "I must look into that drawer." I found three sovereigns and 1 l. 13 s. in silver there, which she said was for her landlord; but as we were going along, Garratt said it was part of the change of the note.

GARRATT'S Defence. We both went out, he bought me a pair of shoes, and a pair of stockings, we then came back, and went to bed again.

GEORGE CUSONS re-examined. Q. Did you exchange the 10 l. note which you received of Mr. Wickers for any other 10 l. note? A. No - I did not.

GARRATT - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

WHARF - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Reference Number: t18250915-105

1326. RICHARD JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , two shillings, the monies of Stephen Jones , from his person .

The prosecutor's name being Stephen Lloyd Jones , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-106

1327. MARY ANN STARKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , a crown piece, the money of John Burrows , from his person .

JOHN BURROWS. On the 2d of August, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was in Princes-street, Coventry-street , coming home from Hammersmith - I saw a female, who wanted me to go and give her some liquor; I did not go with her, but told her I would give her 2 d.; I suppose she took 5 s. from my pocket, but I did not see her, nor feel her take it. I accused her of taking it; she denied it. I had been drinking a little, but I think I perfectly recollect every thing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you know her the next morning? A. No, I fixed on somebody else. I had been to a bean feast, and felt my money safe when I got off the coach. I had been to a wine-vaults with another woman, and do not know whether it was safe after that.

THOMAS EDMONDS . I am a constable. I was at the corner of Porter-street, Newport-market, and saw the prisoner running down the street, and the prosecutor after her - she came up towards me; the prosecutor said, "Give me that 5 s. back;" she said she had not got such a thing about her - I took her to the watch-house, and she then said she had a 5 s. piece down her bosom, which he had given to her.

ROBERT HOWARD . The prisoner was brought to St. Ann's watch-house. I asked what she had done with the money; she said it was in her bosom - she put her hand in, but did not find it; I then took her into the lock-up place, and opened her frock - it fell down at her feet.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-107

1328. ANN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a watch, value 3 l.; two seals, value 1 l., and two keys, value 7 s., the goods of Richard Hart , from his person ; and JOSEPH JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

RICHARD HART. On the 21st of August I met the female prisoner in Grosvenor-place, and went with her into a stable in Pembroke-mews - while I was there with her she took my watch, two seals, two keys, and a ring; there was no other person there. I went out, and got a light - when I came back she was gone; I had not seen her before, but am certain of her person. I saw her again on the 30th of August.

Prisoner TURNER. Q. Was you not very much in liquor? A. I was not.

Q. Did you not give me the watch instead of money, and say you had been with a young woman, and given her 1 s., which was all your money? A. No, I did not.

THOMAS COLE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Waterloo-road. On the 22d of August this watch was pawned at my house, by the prisoner Jones, for 1 l. 16 s. I afterwards lent him some more upon it.

JOHN WARREN . I am a patrol. The prisoner Turner was given into my custody by Hart, on the 30th of August

- I took her to the watch-house, and asked her name - she said Ann Turner, but she was better known by the name of Ann Jones. I found the watch at the pawnbroker's, and then took Jones; I questioned Turner about being with Hart; she denied being with him, and said she knew nothing about the watch, but afterwards, at Queen-square, she said he gave it to her.

TURNER'S Defence. He gave it to me to sleep with him, instead of money.

JONES'S Defence. She gave it to me to pawn next morning, which I did - she said it was her own.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-108

1329. ELIZA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , six ounces of gold, value 27 l., the goods of Henry Harris , from his person .

HENRY HARRIS. On Monday, the 1st of August, about six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Smithfield - we went to a public-house, and I got very tipsy; I went into the street with her about eleven o'clock: I do not recollect any thing after that till I missed six ounces of fine gold, worth 27 l.; I met her again about a quarter past twelve o'clock, running along Field-lane - I called Watch! and two watchmen came up and pursued her; as we were going along Saffron-hill, the parcel, containing the gold, was dropped; the watchman and I picked it up - the prisoner was close by us at the time: the gold had been tied up in two papers while I was with her, and put into my right-hand small-clothes pocket. When it was found it was tied up in a silk handkerchief, and a neck handkerchief belonging to me. I suppose I must have dosed, and had the handkerchief taken off my neck.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time did you meet the prisoner? A. About seven o'clock in the evening. I got drunk, and I believe I went to sleep; there is no mark on the gold.

RICHARD ABINETT . On the night of the 1st of August I was called by the prosecutor in George-alley, to take the prisoner, whom he had in custody - he accused her of robbing him, but did not say of what. As we were going along Saffron-hill we found this property.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there many persons about? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18250915-109

1330. ANDREW ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September, 1822 , a set of chaise harness, value 7 l.; a bridle, value 10 s., and a saddle, value 50 s. , the goods of Eleanor Wills .

JOSEPH MASLIN . I live with Mrs. Eleanor Wills, a widow , at Queen's-buildings, Brompton . On the 2d of September the harness was all safe in the harness-room, adjoining the stable, at seven o'clock in the evening - I went again about eight o'clock, and found the outside door of the stable broken open, and the harness gone. I saw it the next day, at Marlborough-street.

JOHN RICKETTS . On Saturday, the 3d of September, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I saw a bundle of harness in a ditch, in the Five-fields, Chelsea; I went and told the watchman - he went, and found part of it. I saw the prisoner in about half an hour afterwards, in the fields, with a bag on his shoulder. I followed him, and he sat down by the side of Colonel Peters' house - I went to get the watchman to take him, but he was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you found part of the harness was the prisoner there? A. No. I saw him about half an hour afterwards, sitting down by Colonel Peters'.

WILLIAM COOKE . I am a watchman. I received information from Ricketts, and went to the hedge - I found a saddle there; I said I would take it to my master's; while I was gone the witness came again, and told me he saw a man coming out of the hedge; I went, and found the prisoner some time afterwards, about the middle of the Five-fields.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-110

1331. ELIZA BYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , thirteen yards of lace, value 13 s. , the goods of Joseph Sanders .

OWEN ROBERTS . I am in the employ of Mr. Joseph Sanders, a haberdasher , of Little Pulteney-street . The prisoner came to the shop on the 2d of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, for some lace; I shewed her some - she did not buy any, but took a card of lace, and put it under her shawl; I saw the corner of it project; I took hold of both her hands, and it fell from her in the shop - it contained thirteen yards; she said it accidentally dropped from the counter, but I am certain it did not.

ELIZABETH TWICK . I was in the shop, and stood behind the prisoner. I saw the shopman seize her hands, and saw the card of lace drop from under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy a small quantity of lace, and the gentleman knocked this down with the top of the box.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-111

1320. JAMES CROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a pair of sheets, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Anscomb .

THOMAS ANSCOMB. I live in Great Windmill-street . - On the 2d of September the prisoner hired a ready furnished lodging of me - the sheets were let to him as part of the furniture.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-112

1333. RICHARD ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , two silver spoons, value 20 s. , the goods of George William Newton .

MARY WELCH . I am servant to George William Newton, who lives in Smith's-buildings, City-road . On the 20th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming out, and saw the prisoner moving in the parlour. I knocked at the door, and gave an alarm; he then jumped out at the window. I called to some persons, who stopped him till the officer came. I went into the room, and saw two silver spoons moved from the place where I had seen them before.

MARY ANN MARTIN . I live in the same family. I had

put the spoons on the right side of the sideboard, and they were moved to the left.

WILLIAM HERROL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. He had a basket in his hand, and some willow shavings in it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250915-113

1334. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Smith ; eight yards of linsey, value 10 s.; a quarter of a yard of calico, value 1 d., and twelve yards of cotton binding, value 4 d. , the goods of Samuel Marsh .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the wife of Thomas Smith . On the 13th of July I sent two little boys to carry four waistcoats to Mr. Samuel Marsh, and to bring some more work; they returned without it.

EDWARD SMITH . My mother sent me to Mr. Marsh's, in Onslow-street, with a bundle, and my cousin went with me; when we got there he gave us four linsey jackets, and some cotton, to take home; as we were returning we met the prisoner, who asked if we knew where Cannon-street was, and we said Yes; he then asked if we knew the watchmaker's opposite the Church; he then said to me. "Go there, and get a pair of boots and a bundle, which I left there last night; your cousin shall stop here with your bundle, and I will go and get a pint of beer;" I went, and when I returned he was gone, and the bundle.

JAMES BOARDMAN . I am ten years of age. I went with my cousin to get the things from Mr. Marsh's. I have heard what he has stated; it is true. When he was gone, the prisoner pretended to shove against the door of a public-house, and said "This is not open, we will go to some other." He then went with me to the end of Pennington-street , and then he told me to go to a shop and ask for a pair of boots and a bundle, which were left there in the name of Silk, the night before, and he would mind my bundle. I said I would rather keep my bundle; and he said "It is not your's, it is your cousin's." He took it from me. I went on to the place, and when I came back he was gone with it.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer. On the 13th of July, a little after three o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming along Ratcliff-highway. I stopped him with this bundle under his arm, and asked what it was. He said "Unmade slops for my mother." I asked where she lived - he said up this way. When I got about half way up Blue-coat-fields, he said he was sorry he had told me a lie - that he bought it of a man for two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. As for the boy stating what he has now, when he was at the office he stated he did not know who took it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-114

1335. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , two silver spoons, value 20 s. , the goods of William Martin .

WILLIAM MARTIN. I am a barge-builder , and live in Fore-street, Limehouse . On the 26th of July the prisoner came to my house - my wife came backwards to call me to speak to him - he said he had called to know if any body had been there about same business - I said "No" - he asked if I should be at home in the evening about nine o'clock - I said that was my time to be out in general - he said if a person calls, tell him I have called, and he left some name, but I forget what - he had been standing in our middle room, where we had some spoons - the next day a pair of spoons were found at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How many spoons had you there? A. About three table-spoons, and eight or nine tea-spoons; my wife missed two of them; she is not here.

EDWARD BURLES . I am an apprentice to John Dicker, a pawnbroker, of Three-colt-street. The prisoner came to our shop, on Friday, the 26th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and offered a pair of table-spoons to pawn; they were greasy, which led me to suspect; I asked his address; he said Jones, 12, Jamaica-place, Commercial-road; I asked him if they were his own; he said "My own! to be sure; where's the master of the house, I'll talk to him;" we then sent for master, who put several questions to him; he said the property was his own, they had not been lately used, and were used with vinegar last; but upon being told that they had been used with gravy, he denied it; I then offered to go with him to his residence, and went part of the way, but he appeared as if he would not take me to his house, and I told him to return, which he did; he then said his name was Wilson, and desired to have the spoons, or one pound for them; an officer was procured, and he was desired by Mr. Wyatt to attend next morning with two witnesses, to say where he got them; he attended with one; he gave his true address to the Magistrate - "William Ross, Commercial-road;" the Magistrate then allowed him to go and bring two persons, and he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not go again the next day? A. Yes he did, but he was ordered to appear again.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am watch-house-keeper. On the 26th of July the prisoner was brought to me; I asked how he came to go by three names; he then said that his name was Ross, of No. 14, Jubilee-place; I sent an officer with him to the Magistrate; on the Saturday I found who the spoons belonged to, and the Magistrate ordered me to apprehend him again if I saw him; I found him on the Monday in the Commercial-road; he said he was then going to get two friends.

JOHN MARTIN . I am the prosecutor's son. To the best of my knowledge these are our spoons, but I cannot swear to them. I have one more, but they are not marked.

Q. From what circumstance do you think they are your spoons? A. Because my mother bought a duplicate of a person, and I got them out of pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-115

1336. THOMAS DONAHEA was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , a table-cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of William Barry .

JAMES SHEE . I live at William Barry's eating-house, in Drury-lane ; the prisoner came there on the 22d of July, and had a plate of beef; as soon as he was gone we missed the table-cloth; I pursued him, and found it in his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and had a white apron with me. I took the table-cloth in mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-116

1337. THOMAS HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one hundred pamphlets, value 20 s. , the goods of George Hall .

GEORGE HALL. I am a brass-turner . On the 26th of July, I was in the employ of Mr. Broderip, of the Thames Police, in Furnival's-inn - I have known the prisoner many years, he is a writer to a law stationer. On Wednesday, the 27th of July, I met him at the door of the chamber with something under his coat, but I could not see what; I asked him what it was, and he said, it was a parcel which a young man had given him to take to his sister.

JOHN NICHOLLS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 28th of July - I went to Mr. King's, the bookseller, in Chancery-lane, and received some books of him.

EDWARD KING . I am a bookseller, and live in Chancery-lane; I gave some pamphlets to the officer, which I bought of the prisoner, they are small two-penny pamphlets, and I bought them at different times in July - I gave for the whole about 14 s. - I had known the prisoner for years - he bore a good character - he has been in habits of intimacy with Mr. Hall, and he had books of him from time to time - he said, he had at that time very little to do, and if I would let him have the money, he dare say he could purchase them again, and if not, he could get them at a cheap price.

GEORGE HALL re-examined. Q. Had you lent the prisoner your books? A. Yes, sometimes.

COURT. Q. How many years have you known the prisoner? A. Seven or eight years; we have been on terms of intimacy; he has had books of all sorts of me from time to time.

Q. Were you in company with him when the officer took him in Essex-street? A. He came there to see me; he said, he had heard of the loss, and came there to talk to me about it. I had the officer ready, who took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-117

1338. SARAH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., and a sovereign , the property of William Howell .

WILLIAM HOWELL. I live in Sleep's-alley - the prisoner came to my house as a neighbour, to assist in doing any thing.

SARAH HOWELL . I am the prosecutor's wife; the prisoner was a neighbour, and frequented our house - I missed a handkerchief and a sovereign from my drawer about the 22d of July, but I was asleep when they were taken.

EDWARD BULWORTHY . I am a pawnbroker. I received a handkerchief in pawn on the 22d of July, of a person who gave her name Ann Jackson , but I cannot say it was the prisoner.

JOHN WIGGINS . I went to take the prisoner into custody, for robbing her ready furnished lodgings - and in a box, which she said was her's, I found the duplicate of the handkerchief.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the sovereign, nor pawn the handkerchief; I gave up the key of the box, but I do not know how the ticket came there.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-118

1339. MARY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , five aprons, value 4 s., and four towels, value 1 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Coghlan , widow .

ELIZABETH COGHLAN. I am a widow, and live in Monmouth-street - the prisoner came in early one morning, and took these articles out of a drawer; she was quite a stranger, and had no right in the house.

WILLIAM SHERMAN . I live opposite Coghlan. On the 15th of August, I got up at a quarter before six o'clock, I saw a blacksmith go out and shut to the door - this prisoner then went in and went up stairs to a landing place - she took the things out of a drawer, and put them in her apron. I ran down stairs, and took her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-119

1340. HARRIET LAWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a cloak, value 9 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; a table cloth, value 1 s.; three gowns, value 1 l.; three petticoats, value 3 s.; two shifts, value 1 s.; a pair of pillow cases, value 6 d., and a curtain, value 6 d. , the goods of Maria Thompson , widow .

MARIA THOMPSON. I live in Chapel-street, St. George's, East ; the prisoner had lodged with me, six or seven weeks. I got up on Sunday morning, the 21st of August, and went out to get my milk - after serving some of my customers, I returned home, and met my son at the door, who said, "Mother we have been robbed;" I missed this property from the lower back room where I live.

DANIEL THOMPSON . I am the prosecutrix's son. On the 21st of August, Mrs. Bradshaw, another lodger of my mother's, came to me, and said, the prisoner was in my mother's room - I went towards my mother's house, and met the prisoner with the bundle in her possession - I stopped her.

MARY BRADSHAW . I lodge with Mrs. Thompson. On Sunday, the 21st of August, I went into the yard about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I saw her window shutters were open, which was unusual - I looked in and saw the prisoner in the room. I went and told the last witness, and as he came along he met her with the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to get something for breakfast - and as I returned, I met the son who charged me with robbing his mother; I went and told my husband of it - I went down again, and saw this bundle in the passage - the son said, "Leave the bundle, and I will have nothing more to do with you;" he then said, "Leave the house directly." I said, "No, I will not, I will stand my ground" - I have every reason to believe that the son robbed his mother himself as I have heard them say that they have not bought any thing themselves.

DANIEL THOMPSON re-examined. Q. Did you see her husband at all? A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-120

1341. MARTIN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 7 lbs. of lead, value 18 d. , the goods of William Herbert .

JOHN STENT . I am foreman to Mr. William Herbert, a builder . I was waiting for the men to come out of the building in Cavendish-square , on the 30th of August; when the prisoner came out, I took him by the arm, and asked him, what he had got in his hat? he said, "nothing," I took his hat off, and found 7 lbs. of lead, belonging to Mr. Herbert, in it - the prisoner was a bricklayer's labourer .

DANIEL KEEBLE . I am a bricklayer. I received the hat from Stent, and left it with the officer - I saw the lead found on the prisoner.

GEORGE COLL . I am the officer. I have had the lead ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it among some rubbish.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-121

1342. THOMAS RAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , forty yards of bed tick, value 30 s. , the goods of Charles Roper .

JOSEPH BELCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Roper, of Sloane-street . On the 6th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock, a person told me some ticking was gone, which I had hung up in the shop between eight and nine o'clock.

WILLIAM JOSEPH SHEPHERD . I live in Sloane-street. I was standing opposite Mr. Roper's, and saw the prisoner take the ticking from his door - as soon as he saw me, he hallooed something, which I did not understand - I went round another way and met him - he then asked me if any body saw it, and offered me a dark purse, which I did not take.

JOHN WARREN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and found the ticking, this purse, and a blue apron upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home, when a young man asked me to carry that parcel as far as the Jew's-road - I took it up, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I was then taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250915-122

1343. SARAH SCALTOP was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , nine bobbins of silk shoot, value 20 s.: a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a bag, value 6 d.; a skein of thread, value 1/2 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of John Ward .

JOHN WARD. I am a Greenwich pensioner . On the 9th of September, between four and five o'clock, I went to the sign of the Adam and Eve public-house, Church-street, Bethnal-green . I saw the prisoner there, and a man sitting by her; I had a bundle, nine bobbins of silk shoot, a pair of shoes, a skein of thread, and a bag in a handkerchief - I saw an acquaintance there - I got up to speak to him, and while I turned round, the bag was gone, and the man and woman likewise.

GEORGE FRANKLIN . I keep this house. I recollect the prosecutor coming with a bundle, tied in a blue spotted handkerchief - he kept it in his hand nearly all the time he was there - he spoke to an acquaintance, and laid down the bundle on the table to have some oysters. As I was going into the tap-room, I met the prisoner going out with the bundle, but I did not know, but that she was a friend of his - he said to me in a minute or two, "Where is the bundle;" I said, "That woman who has been drinking here, took it" - he then went away - the prisoner returned in a few minutes without a bundle, and I detained her.

GEORGE CAVALIER . I was at the house and saw the prisoner go out with the bundle - I am quite certain of her person - she was absent about five or ten minutes, when she returned, and was detained - Ward was talking to me when she took the bundle out.

ISAAC RUSSELL . I am a harness-maker. I was going towards the house, and met the prisoner about six or eight yards from it - she had a handle in her hand which she tried to secrete under her shawl. When I got into the house I heard of the robbery - I waited till she returned, and saw her taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to get some bread and cheese - the witness asked me to have some beer with him, which I did not, as I said I had a friend with me; as to the bundle I did not see it - I had one of my own, which was taken before the Magistrates.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-123

1344. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 7 lbs. of cheese, value 5 s. , the goods of John Chidley .

THOMAS OBORNE . On the 28th of August I received information. I went and saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's door, with something in his hand, which he was wrapping up - I followed him till he got near the watch-house, and I then laid hold of him - he dropped this piece of cheese, and struck me, and struggled with me, but I got him into the watch-house, and went to Mr. Chidley, who owned the cheese.

JOHN CHIDLEY. I keep a cheesemonger's shop in East Smithfield . On the evening in question I missed a piece of cheese of this description from a show-board; I had not seen the prisoner; when the officer came I looked round and missed the cheese - I went to the watch-house and saw it there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Blackwall, I saw two women put something down - I saw it was a piece of cheese, and was coming home with it when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-124

1345. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of Charlotte Coombes , spinster .

CHARLOTTE COOMBES. I am single. The prisoner lodged with me for about six weeks. I missed this spoon on the 11th of August from the cupboard in my own room - I had not lent it to her.

ROBERT BIRD . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the spoon which I took in of the prisoner, on the 11th of August, in the name of Mary Wood.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me leave to pawn any thing I would; she desired me to take the spoon, and to leave the duplicate with her.

CHARLOTTE COOMBES re-examined. One night she was very much distressed, and I lent her a handkerchief to pawn, and lent her 9 d. of it; she asked me another day to lend her a shawl - I lent it to her, and she went out and returned and took the spoon while I was away - she had pawned the shawl, and the duplicate of it led to the discovery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-125

1346. GEORGE ADAMS and SUSANNAH COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , two sheets, value 8 s., the goods of William Ellis , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM ELLIS. I am a shoemaker . The two prisoners took my lodgings in Great Earl-street . On the 2d of May Cook came first, with another woman, saying she had a husband; I told her to fetch him, which she did, and I let the lodgings to them both - I let these two sheets as part of the furniture - they continued there till the 4th of July, and went away suddenly and kept the keys till the 7th. I had missed the property a night or two before they sent the key: they owed me four weeks rent.

THOMAS MILLS . I live with Chappel and Mills, Greek-street, Soho. I took a pair of sheets in pawn of a person, but I cannot say who it was, in the name of Mary Ellis .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD HEDGES . I was beadle of the night. I found on Cook the duplicate of the two sheets pawned at Chappels.

COOK'S Defence. I did not pawn them. I asked Mrs. Ellis for a pair of clean sheets, which she sent me up by a woman, and the other sheets were sent down to be washed, but the woman I sent them by did not return them, but went and pawned them at Chappel's. I knew nothing of it for a week afterwards, when I was going out, and my landlady called me back, and said "You did not send the sheets." I said they were returned, and she said they were not. I then went to the woman - she said they were pawned at the shop. I got the duplicate from her.

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

ADAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-126

1347. MARY CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , a crown, and two half-crowns, the monies of David Williams , from his person .

DAVID WILLIAMS. I am a tailor . On the 23d of July, I was in Bedfordbury, Covent-garden , about two o'clock in the morning - I had been drinking a little, but knew what I was about. I saw the prisoner, who asked me to treat her with a glass of porter. I said if she would go into a house I would, and did. When we came out, she wanted me to go with her, and I said I should not. I stood talking with a friend of mine at the door - she kept asking me to go with her. I then felt her hand coming out of my breeches pocket. I missed a crown piece, and two half-crowns - she ran away, and was pursued - the money was found upon her.

Prisoner. When I first met him in Bow-street, he said he had met with a female, and gone with her to Long-lane, or Long-acre; and that he had been there a week before, and they had stripped him of his clothes, and then he asked me to go and have a glass of porter with him.

Witness. I had not said a word to her, till she asked me to give her a glass of porter.

JAMES BARTLETT . I was watch-house keeper. The prosecutor came in with the prisoner; he charged her with having robbed him of a crown piece, and two half crowns. I searched her myself, and found this money on her; she said a gentleman had given her the two half-crowns, but she gave no account of the crown - she did not appear to me to be in liquor.

THOMAS DOWNS . I was the watchman. I took her into custody, and saw her searched, and the money found upon her; the prosecutor stated that the date of the crown was 1821.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-127

1348. ANN FIELDGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a sovereign and a crown, the monies of Richard Houseman , from his person .

RICHARD HOUSEMAN. I am married. On the 6th of September, I had been out taking supper, and was returning home at past one o'clock. I met the prisoner near Chiswell-street - she walked two or three hundred yards with me; she was then making into a court, and said "Good night." I then put my hand into my waistcoat pocket, and missed a sovereign which I had had there. I then felt in my trousers pocket, and missed a crown piece. I said "You have robbed me;" she said she had not - the watchman was near, and I gave charge of her; she said, in the presence of the watchman, that she had no such thing as a crown about her - she was searched, and a sovereign and some shillings were found, but not the crown piece.

Prisoner. Q. I met this gentleman in Featherstone-street; he spoke to me first - I then walked towards my own home, and had got the length of two streets - I then heard him walking after me, and some one said, "Stop a bit." I then turned round, and he said I had taken his money; I only said the money I had about me was my own. I did not say I had not a sovereign. Witness. You said several times you had no sovereign at all.

GEORGE GARRETT . I was the watchman. I heard the witness say the prisoner had robbed him of a sovereign and a crown; the prisoner said she had not - she said five times as we were going to the watch-house, that she had no such thing as a sovereign. She was searched by the officer, in my presence, and there was a sovereign, 3 s. 6 d., and some copper found on her.

EDWARD LIDIARD . I was the night constable. The prisoner appeared perfectly sober, and said she had no sovereign about her. I searched her, and found the sovereign, 3 s. 6 d., and 9 1/2 d. in copper.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-128

1349. ELIZABETH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a watch-chain, value 1 s.; a seal, value 5 s., and a key, value 5 s., the goods of John Lloyd , from his person .

JOHN LLOYD. On the 27th of July, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I fell in with the prisoner in Chiswell-street; she accosted me, and I went with her to a house in Grub-street ; I had been spending my evening in Tottenham Court-road. I went up one pair of stairs; I

took my watch out, and laid it on the table. When I had been in the room about a quarter of an hour she moved from one side of the room to the table, and put the candle out - she pretended to go down to light it, and I went after her, and found her on the stairs, with the watch in her hand. I suspected that she had got my brooch as well; I alarmed the landlady, and gave her in charge; she was taken to the watch-house, but nothing was found upon her.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me 1 s., and say that was all the change you had, but if I liked to go and leave the watch with the landlady for a few shillings, I might do it? A. Upon my oath I did not.

JOHN COCKS . I am a watchman. I was called for as I was going round at three o'clock. I saw the prosecutor standing at the door - he said he gave charge of the prisoner, and that she had robbed him of a brooch; I said, "Have you got it?" she said No. I said, "Is it in the room?" the prosecutor said No, he had looked with the landlady, and it was not there. He then said she had taken his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-129

1350. CATHERINE MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , two half-crowns, and eleven shillings, the monies of John Sherwin , from his person .

JOHN SHERWIN. I am a carrier , and live at Edmonton. On the 25th of August, about two o'clock, I met the prisoner near George-yard, Whitechapel . I went into a house up an alley with her. In going up stairs, I put my money, consisting of 16 s. in silver, into my right-hand trousers' pocket, and my handkerchief upon it. I had one or two half-crowns - I do not know which. We went on the bed together, and in four or five minutes, she got up and ran down stairs. I had before that, paid her 1 s. for the room. I got up and went down stairs. I crossed the road, and waited there some minutes; a woman came and asked me if I had lost any thing - I said "My money;" she asked if I had lost anything else. I then found my pocket-book was gone - she said "Come over, and perhaps I may find it." I then crossed over to the house where I had been, and saw a woman going up stairs with the book under her apron; she got to the top, and threw the book down. I took that, but I could not get the money - the prisoner was taken in about a fortnight.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you no business to do? A. Yes; I had, but I had done it. I was then going to meet a person of the name of Nelson, in Whitechapel - I was perfectly sober. I had never heard the character that place bears; we had been in a public-house together at the corner of George-street - there was no dispute between us.

JURY. Q. Had you ever been with this girl before? A. No, never.

SAMUEL GILES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Shoreditch, on the 7th of September. I told her she was wanted for robbing a countryman in Whitechapel; she said she knew nothing about it; the prosecutor attended next day; we turned the prisoner out in the yard with two other women, and he swore to her - there was nothing found upon her.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. She had not been out of the way, had she? A. Yes; from the place where she generally was.

Prisoner's Defence. I am truly innocent of it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18250915-130

1351. CATHERINE FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , a snuff-box, value 1 s., and three shillings, the property of Richard Schofield , from his person .

RICHARD SCHOFIELD. I am sixteen years of age, and am a hair-dresser . I had been to the play on the 7th of July, and met this girl, with another, at the bottom of Charles-street, about twelve o'clock. I treated them with some rum, and then went with them to a house in Leg-alley , to a room on the second floor - they asked me what I would give the prisoner, and I gave her half a crown, the other one then took hold of my sleeve, and the prisoner put her hand into my pocket, and pulled out my snuff-box, with three shillings in it; they went on the other side of the table - I tried to get my box; the prisoner said she would swear her life against me, if I touched it. I then came down and gave charge of them both - the other person was discharged by the Magistrate - I was quite sober. I had not given them the box.

MICHAEL RAGAN . I am the watchman. The prosecutor called me a little after twelve o'clock. I took charge of the prisoner, and another woman in Hart-street; as I was coming down James-street, the prisoner gave me the box, I opened it, and said to my fellow watchman "You see there is nothing but a bit of snuff," there was no money in it.

JAMES BARTLET . I was watch-house keeper. I searched the prisoner, and found half a crown, which the prosecutor said he had given her, and 3 s. on the other woman; the prosecutor said his money was all tarnished with gunpowder, which I found to this be.

Prisoner's Defence. He followed me down Russell-street, and asked me to have something to drink - he called for a quartern of rum; we went on further, and he called for another quartern; we then went to the house - he paid 1 s. for the room, and then gave me the snuff-box, and said he wanted to get home, but he would call the next evening, and give me something else; he walked down stairs with us, and came to Hart-street. I said the box was of no value to me - he then gave charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-131

1352. CATHERINE MOORHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , three sovereigns, and ten shillings, the monies of Thomas Brock , from his person .

THOMAS BROCK. I am married, and am a carpenter . On the 12th of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in a public-house in the Broadway, Westminster; she came in several times, and asked me to go with her to another house in Tothil-street - I was not over drunk. I went with her to that house, and then to another, which she said was her lodging; but when we got there, a woman came and demanded 1 s. for the use of the room, which I paid her; she then asked for some liquor, and I gave her another 1 s., but had no change from it. I then gave her 2 s. I had three sovereigns and 10 s., which I

told in her presence, and put them into a bag, which I put in my left-hand trouser's pocket. I had some more loose silver in my pockets. I took off my trowsers, doubled them up, and put them under my pillow - she said "You need not be so careful, you will not be robbed here." I put a chair against the door, as the lock did not fasten well. I fell asleep, and was awoke by her hand being in my pocket - my money was gone, but my purse was left; she then went down stairs, and I should have followed, but I was naked - she was dressed different to what she was before. I got up and put my clothes on, and went to Mr. Hayne's, to buy some tools - he is a constable; he sent me to another constable, who went with me and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Why did not you seize her with her hand in your pocket? A. I had not time, she was too quick for me. I do not know whether she opened the door and any other person came into the room. I had been in company with two or three women and a man, who said he was a carpenter - he said to me, "Halloo! old mate, come and treat us. I gave them a pint of gin altogether.

JURY. Q. What sort of a purse was your's? A. A brown canvass one.

WILLIAM PATMORE . I received charge of the prisoner about a quarter of an hour after the prosecutor had been robbed. I found 17 s. in silver, and some copper on her.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she attempted to run away? A. No - she was at the place which she frequented.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-132

1353. JOHN TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Rowland Ryley , from his person .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am an officer. On Sunday evening last I saw the prisoner with another, following some persons from Long-acre - I followed them in company with Reardon; I then saw his companion take something from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner; I followed the companion, but he made some resistance, and I did not pursue my man any further. - Reardon secured the prisoner.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am beadle of St. George's. I keep the Turk's Head. On Sunday night I heard a noise in the street; I came down, and this witness and another ushered the prisoner into the house; he said, "You shall not search me - you are no officer;" I said, "Then I am, I will search you," and in his small-clothes I found this handkerchief. I called on Mr. Riley the same night, who claimed it.

DANIEL REARDON . I was with Colton - we watched the prisoner and another, who were following a gentleman and a lady down King-street - his companion took a handkerchief from one of their pockets; Colton followed him, and I followed the prisoner.

ROWLAND RILEY. I was near the end of King-street, Long-acre , and Colton said, "You have been robbed;" It expressed some difficulty about leaving my wife, as it rained, but he said there was no occasion for that, as the person was in custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two young men pass me - they dropped this handkerchief, which I took up, and put into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250915-133

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1354. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a watch, value 5 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and a chain, value 6 d., the goods of James Garbett from his person , and SUSAN JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES GARBETT. I live in Marshall-court, Drury-lane. On the 9th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I went home with Ann Smith, to a house in Shire-lane, Temple-bar - we went to bed; I put my trousers on a chair adjoining the bed; there was a watch, some seals, and a chain, in the watch pocket. - About half-past one o'clock the woman belonging to the house came to me, and said, "Sir, the young woman who brought you here has left the house;" I then missed the watch, chain, seals, a snuff-box, and a little money.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-street. On Friday morning last the two prisoners came to my house, and offered the chain and seals, in pawn for 5 l.; Jones said it was gold, and given to her by a gentleman named Harris, who lived in Bond-street; she said she lived in Cow Heel-alley - I went there, found she did not, and detained them.

WILLIAM THISTLETON . I am an officer. I have the seals and a key, which were given to me before the Magistrate.

THOMAS WILLIAM ROBINS . I live with Mr. Samuel Fryet . The two prisoners came there, and Smith offered to pawn the watch for 5 l. - I gave her 4 l. for it; she said it belonged to a gentleman named Jackson, and her name was Margaret Conner .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I met this gentleman in Shire-lane; he said he had no money, but would give me what would bring money, which was his watch - he said, "You had better leave it with the landlady."

JONES'S Defence. This female asked me to take a walk with her, and she asked me to offer the seals and chain in pawn.

JAMES GARBETT re-examined. Q. Did you give her any money? A. Yes - I gave her 6 s. or 7 s. before she went to bed. I had more money taken from my purse, and the purse was found under the mattress.

Prisoner SMITH. He mentioned at the Office that he had given me the watch; he was very drunk, and I did not wish to take it, but he said he had rather I had it than the landlady.

PROSECUTOR. I have said nothing but the truth - I did not give her the watch. I believe I had been with another girl in the house, and met Smith as I was coming out. I saw the watch, snuff-box, and money safe when I went to bed.

ANN LEE . I searched these two women at the watch-house,

and found 3 l. on Smith, and 14 s. and some copper on the other.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 25.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-134

1355. JOHN WHITE and JAMES RILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a snuff-box, value 1 l. , the goods of Peter Everard Buckworth .

ANN COOPER . On the 2d of September I was coming up the Haymarket, and saw the two prisoners go and take hold of a gentleman's right-hand coat pocket; they went on - when I got to the end of Cranbourn-street , I saw them go and take something from the pocket of Mr. Buckworth - I told him of it; he felt, and said, "I have lost my snuff-box."

JOHN GREEN . I was following two suspicious characters down Cranbourn-street; I looked round, and saw the two prisoners following a gentleman, who turned into a house; I came to the corner of the street, and there I saw Cooper. I did not take the prisoners till the 5th of September. The prosecutor is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-135

1356. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , a cap, value 5 s. , the goods of John Pain .

JOHN PAIN. I am a hatter , and live at Shadwell . - The prisoner came to my shop about the 16th or 17th of July - he said he had come home in the Enchantress, Captain Druce, that the ship was not paid off, but if I let him have a hat on credit he would pay me to-morrow; my wife persuaded me to let him have it. On the Saturday following he came with a black girl, and another woman - he said he wanted to treat his wife with a beaver bonnet, and a fine feather in it; I objected to let him have it, but I was prevailed on to do so by my daughter; he said the ship would be paid off on the Monday, and he would come and pay for the hat and bonnet; he got to the window, and was pulling some of the travelling caps about, and put some of them upon his head; I then saw him lean against the counter, buttoning his jacket. As soon as they went out of the shop I followed - they went into a chandler's-shop at the corner of Little Union-street - I then crossed the way, and peeped in at the window; I saw him with a travelling cap on his head, which I had been shewing to a gentleman an hour before. When they came out I followed them to a house in Little Union-street. The next morning I went to the Lord Exmouth, public-house, where he said he boarded, but he was not there. I then took an officer to No. 3, Little Union-street, where he found the cap and the prisoner. I waited for them at the chandler's-shop, where I had seen him the night before; he had left his hat at that house. I am positive the cap is mine - I made it myself.

Prisoner. Mr. Pain, himself, opened the slides, and took the caps out for me to look at. Witness. There are no slides to the window.

JAMES BEECHEY . I am a Thames Police officer. I went to the house in Little Union-street, and found the prisoner in bed with a black woman; this cap was on the bed - I asked him where he got it: he said he bought it of a boy of Mr. Pain's. I brought him over to Pain's shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-136

1357. CHARLES BARRON and JEREMIAH SINFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Cole .

WILLIAM COLE. I am a carpenter , and live in Bethnal-green-road. I was working at some premises in White-row , on the 6th of July, with my son, who is deaf and dumb; I heard there was a coat stolen - I ran out into Whitechapel-road - one of the witnesses, I believe, gave me the coat, which I had made for my son, who is about seventeen years old.

THOMAS PRICE . I was in White-row and saw the prisoner near a gate-way - I afterwards saw Barron come out of the gate-way with a coat in his hand; I ran up to give an alarm, and a girl came out and took the coat from him - I heard Sinfield say "It is all right - go it;" and they went up the street quite fast.

ELIZABETH COCKMAN . I ran after the prisoners as Cole came up to ask my mother if she had lost a coat - I stopped them at the corner of Baker-row, and took the coat from Barron - I gave it to Mr. Cole.

JAMES HILL . I am a surveyor. I heard the cry of Stop thief! about six o'clock in the evening of the 6th of July, and stopped Barron - there were a great many persons about, and Cole came up and gave charge of him - I never saw the other prisoner till he was taken.

WILLIAM HENRY BURN . I apprehended Sinfield about a week after the offence; he said "What is it for? it is about the coat I suppose?" those were his words. I did not know any thing about it but from information - there were three or four of his companions following him, and he said to them, "Say I shall not be at home to night."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BARRON'S Defence. I had been out on business for my father, when I was apprehended, and know nothing of it.

SINFIELD'S Defence. I was returning from the Docks, and took shelter from the rain, under an archway, and found the coat there, as if it had been thrown away.

BARRON - GUILTY Aged 20.

SINFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-137

1358. JANE BRISCOE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Francis Bedford .

FRANCIS BEDFORD. I keep a clothes' shop in Finsbury-market . I was outside my shop about half-past one o'clock on the 20th of July: the prisoner came, and while she was there I saw her put her hand to the window, and take something, which she put into her bosom - as she was coming out I took hold of her, and said "Where is the handkerchief you took last night?" she said "I took none;" I then said "What have you taken now?" I turned her shawl aside, and saw a corner of this handkerchief out of her bosom.

ANN BEDFORD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I served the prisoner at our shop on the 20th of July - I did not

see her take any thing, but I saw my husband take this handkerchief from her at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-138

1359. JOSEPH COLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a male ass, price 10 s. , the property of William King .

WILLIAM KING. On the 14th of August I was in Nelson-street, City-road , with this ass by my side. The prisoner was there, and said "Let me have a ride for 1 d.;" he got on, and rode away, without my permission - I saw him again on the Monday, in Chiswell-street, and asked what he had done with the donkey? he said be had sold it to Mr. Barber for 10 s., and had bought a shirt with 1 s.

JACOB BARBER . I am a labourer. The prisoner and another came to my house one Saturday night, and asked me if I wanted to buy a donkey; I asked if they had one to sell - they said Yes; I asked what the price would be; they said 15 s.; I said that was too much, as I could get one for 10 s.; they brought the ass on the Sunday morning - I said I would have it for 10 s.; they said they had given 13 s. 6 d. for it; they took it away but came again in about ten minutes, and I paid them a half sovereign for it, and about twenty minutes afterwards King came about it.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to me on Sunday morning, and said a boy had got on his donkey, and rode away with it, and sold it to Mr. Barber. I said he must find the boy - which he did the next day. I have had the ass ever since - the boy was committed.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I am an officer. I heard the prisoner say he had sold the donkey for 10 s., and had bought a shirt for 1 s., and spent the other 9 s.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night a boy and I went to Mr. Barber's, and asked if he wanted to buy a donkey; he said he did; I asked him when I should bring it - he said the next morning - it was taken to his house, and the money was paid; the other boy had one half the money, and I had half; I bought a shirt and a pair of shoes. On the Tuesday Mr. King and his brother, caught me in Fleet-street.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18250915-139

1360. BENJAMIN DOLPHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , a coat, value 3 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I am a manufacturing chemist , and live at Oldford. On the 11th of August I was at the Triangle, at Hackney , and left my horse and chaise at the door of a house, while I went in; I received some information, and went out and saw the prisoner drop the coat. I never lost sight of him till he was secured.

JOHN GODDARD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-140

1361. ROBERT DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a glass decanter, value 3 s., and two glasses, value 18 d. , the goods of William Seymour .

THOMAS M'DONALD . I am a waiter at Mr. Seymour's, Highbury Barn Tavern . The prisoner was employed there by me as an extra waiter , on the 3d of August, when we had a dinner for about 140 persons, and I had fourteen extra hands; between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day I was in the glass cupboard, and considered all the glasses safe; about eleven o'clock I saw the prisoner in the passage, and I paid him; I asked him what was become of a napkin which I had lent him - he said he had mislaid it. I then took him into the glass room, and said "There is something about you I don't admire - have you any thing in your pockets?" he said No; I said I would see, and I found a wine glass and a foot tumbler, in his left pocket, and a cut pint decanter in his right; he seemed much confused, and said he did not know how they came there. He has certainly borne a good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT BROWN . I am the officer, and took charge of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them in my pocket but did not mean to take them out of the house - I had taken them from the table and put them into my pocket; I then filled my hands and did not think of them; the prosecutor asked me for a glass-cloth, which I said I had not got - some of the waiters had taken it; he said feel in your pockets - I said "Now I recollect, I have glass in my pocket."

Witness. He did not say so to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-141

1362. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , an umbrella, value 18 s.; a shawl, value 2 s., and 4 ozs. of tea, value 1 s. , the goods of Mary Sawyer .

MARY SAWYER. I am single and live in Upper Caldwood-street . On the 2d of July the prisoner went home with me, and gave me money to get a pot of beer; I was out for about five minutes - when I came back he was gone, and had left these things in my room twenty minutes before.

Prisoner. I went to bed, and slept in the bed all night, when I awoke she was gone - I missed half a sovereign from my jacket pocket - I then went out of the house.

PROSECUTRIX. I slept there all night, with my child.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am a Thames police officer. I apprehended the prisoner - I asked him, what he had done with the shawl, the umbrella, and the tea - he said, he had not taken them, but upon taking him to the watch-house, he said, he had taken the umbrella and shawl, but the tea he knew nothing about - he had taken them out of vexation - when he was before the Magistrate, he said, he had been robbed of half a sovereign: on the following morning, he sent for a person, and told me to go with him to his room, and there I should find the umbrella and the duplicate of the shawl.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the prosecutrix say, if I would produce every thing she would drop the prosecution? A. No.

GEORGE FREAKS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Watts, of East Smithfield - this shawl was pawned by a woman in the name of Ann Robinson .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She decoyed me to her house and left the room under pretence of going to see a friend, and did not return, she had taken half a sovereign from my pocket, and exasperated at her conduct, I took the umbrella and shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-142

1363. WILLIAM FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , a pair of trousers, value 6 s. , the goods of James Camper and John George Parnell Heyliger .

JAMES CAMPER. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Whitechapel-road . I was in partnership with John George Parnell Heyliger. On the 13th of August, I placed a pair of trousers on the door post, for sale, they were hanging by the tape - in the afternoon William Fenson gave me some information - I jumped over the counter, and found the prisoner with the trousers in his hand.

WILLIAM FENSON. I was coming through Whitechapel; I saw the prisoner pull at the trousers several times - he got them down, and put them under his apron - I ran and fetched him back, and made him give them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was distress and poverty that drove me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-143

1364. JOSEPH HODGSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , a crown, a half-crown, two shillings, and a sixpence , the monies of Sarah Brown .

SARAH BROWN. I live in Collingwood-street, City-road . On the night of the 24th of July, I met the prisoner near the Angel, public-house, and asked him to give me something to drink - he said he would, but he had nothing but a sovereign, and a half-crown, so I was not to call for any thing very high - we went to the Angel, but it was past the time, and they would not serve us; he went to my room - he called the girl of the house, and gave her half a crown to get drink - she brought him back 1 s. change; we drank a part of it. I then asked him, if he intended to stop all night - he said Yes; and he would give me a sovereign for the night. I asked him several times for it, but he did not give it to me. I said, if he would give me leave, I would go and get some supper. I put a shawl on, and went out of the room for about five or ten minutes; when I returned, I saw a drawer open, which had been shut when I went out, and some duplicates which had been in a little box in that drawer lying on the floor; there had been in that box a crown piece, a half crown, two shillings, and a sixpence I first picked up my duplicates, and then looked for the money, which was gone. The landlady found some duplicates under the pillow, and under the bed she found the box empty. I had seen the box safe a short time before; when I undressed myself I put the pins on the top of it, which is a pincushion. I had then opened the box, and saw the money all right; my landlady went down and brought up the watchman, who asked me if I would give the man in charge - I said I would; he said he was willing to go, but not till a watchman came to take him. I saw him searched, and a crown, a half-crown, three shillings, and a sixpence taken from him, which were in his left-hand trousers' pocket, and some halfpence in his coat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you taken the box out to put the pins in the cushion? A. Yes; he said that if I wanted him searched a watchman should be sent for - I had named the money I had lost before I saw it taken out of his pocket - the landlady came up stairs - I asked him for the sovereign several times - I did not go out to get another woman to come and make this charge - I was taken, and searched about a felony, the next night, but it was not true - the man has found his property since - I never went by the name of Wood nor Young, nor any name but my own.

THOMAS DIMMING . I was fetched to No. 1, Collingwood-street, by the landlady - I went to the front room on the first floor, where I found the prisoner and the girl - she said she had lost a five shilling piece, a half crown, and three shillings and sixpence, from a box - the prisoner denied having taken it - he did not say what money he had about him - I asked him if he would let me search him - he said not till we got to the watch-house; he went very peaceably - I had hold of his left arm - they found a crown, a half crown, and three shillings and sixpence, in his left hand trousers' pocket, and some halfpence in his coat pocket - he had no sovereign - he appeared sober.

JOHN FORDHOUSE . I was night officer. I have brought the little box and the money. The prisoner gave no account of how much money he had. I particularly asked him if the girl had seen what money he had - he said No. I then said to the girl, "What money have you lost?" and she told me. I found a crown, a half crown, three shillings and sixpence, and some halfpence, in his pockets; and in his other trousers' pocket I found a small chain and three keys.

Prisoner's Defence. The major part of what has been said is false; this female accosted me, and asked me to treat her, which I told her I had not the least objection to. I put my hand into my pocket, and took out all the money I had, and gave half-a-crown to the servant, and the servant went to get some liquor. The prosecutrix drank some, and then went out of the room for about twenty minutes, and then she and two other females came up and accused me of the robbery.

MR. BRODRICK to SARAH BROWN. Q. Upon your oath did not this gentleman take the money out of his waistcoat pocket; and among that was a crown, a half-crown, and the silver? A. No, he did not. There was no other girl in the room - the girl who fetched the liquor came to the door - the landlady opened the street door, and I took the light from the foot of the stairs - he did not take any money out of his waistcoat pocket - he only took out the half crown, and I think that was from his trousers' pocket - I was not out of the room more than five minutes - the prisoner saw the box found under the bed, but he did not know that the landlady was gone for the watchman

MR. WINCH. I am an attorney. The prisoner has been clerk to me about six months. On the Saturday night I had paid him the balance of his wages - he was to return me 12 s. on the Monday, as I am security for a suit of cloaths for him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-144

1365. HENRIETTA HINE was indicted for stealing,

on the 25th of August , 16 lbs, of bacon , the goods of John Goddart .

JOHN GODDART. I keep a chandler's shop in Little Coram-street . On the evening of the 25th of August, I saw the prisoner in the shop, between seven and eight o'clock. I was called out just before eight, and stayed till half-past ten. I cannot say whether he was in the shop when I went out. The bacon was not missed till about half-past ten next morning. Ann Watkins sent for me, and gave me my bacon, cut in two pieces. I am certain it was mine.

ANN WATKINS . I live in Russell-place. The prisoner brought a basket for me to take care of for a day or two - she said it was a parcel she was going to send into the country to her friends - he husband and she had been quarrelling, and he had pressed her to do it - this was on the Friday, and the parcel was with me till the Sunday morning - I then heard of the loss, and got Mr. Goddart to see it.

JOSEPH CADBY . I took up the prisoner on Saturday, the 27th of August. She said she had not taken it, and was let go. The next day I took her again.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the shop. I had some tea and sugar, and held her little boy for her. I then went and got half a pint of beer. As I came back I saw this piece of bacon by the wall.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-145

OLD COURT. FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.

London Cases - Second Jury.

1366. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 5 dwts. of gold, value 20 s. , the goods of Anna Maria Lindsey Nora Shield .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to William Shield .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-146

1367. THOMAS BAKER was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , from and out of the General Post Office, a certain letter , the property of Anna Maria Lindsey Nora Shield .

THIRTEEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. GURNEY, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-147

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1368. FREDERICK WILSON was indicted for feloniously forging upon a certain Bill of Exchange, for payment of 150 l., an acceptance of the same, as follows, "Accepted payable at Sir James Esdailes and Co., London, Joseph Thompson," with intent to defraud the said Joseph Thompson .

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud other persons.

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, charging him with uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

SARAH HAMBLY . I live in New Union-street, Moorfields - the prisoner lodged in the same house at one time; I had frequent opportunities of seeing him write, and am acquainted with his hand-writing. (The witness examined three papers, and a bill on Exchange, which she identified as the prisoner's hand-writing.

One of the papers was here read - it was a letter, addressed to "Mr. Thompson, coal-merchant and brewer, Northampton," and signed William Oglivie, stating, that understanding Mr. Thompson was in want of the loan of 500 l. the writer would discount his promissory notes, of 250 l. each, at six and twelve months date, payable to order, at 5 per cent. discount, and 2 s. 6 d. commission; and desiring to direct to him at the Ram Inn, Smithfield.

THOMAS BROUGH . I am landlord of the Ram-inn, Smithfield. The prisoner was at my house once or twice in April last - I saw him there in a room with Mr. Thompson - it was on a Friday in April; the prisoner had left his card at our house, in the name of Oglivie, and said he had a letter coming from a person, and would I take it in for him. One came, addressed to Mr. Oglivie, at the Ram-Inn, Smithfield, and he took it; this was about a fortnight before I saw him with Thompson; several other letters came in the same name, from Ireland and Scotland, as appeared by the post-marks; he had them all: I did not see him open them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he say more than this to you, "If any letters come in the name of Oglivie, please to take them in?" A. It was to that purpose - he left a card, which I supposed was his own. I did not find that his name was not Oglivie till after I came here, and heard him plead to the name of Wilson.

Q. You only thought his name was Oglivie from his leaving that card? A. No.

MR. LAW. Q. State what he did about that card? - A. He brought a card, and said, "I have taken the liberty of having a letter addressed, for me, or to me, to your house - will you take it in?" I said certainly, and next day one came - he called the same morning, and took it.

WILLIAM E. I am waiter at the Ram. I remember seeing the prisoner there with Mr. Thompson - he went by the name of William Oglivie at our house - I never knew him by any other name.

DANIEL FORRESTER . Mr. Thompson, the prosecutor, gave me a bill, which I produced to the witness Hambly - I received it at Mr. Isaacs' office, having been sent for in consequence of a dispute.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mr. Isaacs is an attorney? A. Yes; a gentleman calling himself Moss was there, disputing with Mr. Thompson about possession of the bill; Mr. Isaacs, and a person named Creed, were also there; Mr. Isaacs said Mr. Thompson came there under pretence of taking the bill up, and then put it into his pocket; Mr. Thompson had possession of it when I got there; Mr. Isaacs wished me to take Mr. Thompson in charge, but I did not attempt to do so; he consented to leave the bill in my hands till it was decided; one of Mr. Isaacs's clerks came for me.

MR. LAW. Q. Did not Thompson consent immediately that it should be in your custody till this trial? A. Yes; he said it was not his hand-writing; that he was not the acceptor of the bill.

SAMUEL SHANNON . I live in Duke-street, Houndsditch. I received this bill (looking at it) from the prisoner in my house - I cannot rightly tell whether the acceptance was on it then - I paid it away about a month before it was due, to Henry Moss.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose your house is in the City? A. Yes; I know the prisoner; I certainly do not believe the acceptance to be in his hand-writing.

COURT. Q. Do you know one Oglivie? A. I do not; I have seen Thompson since.

Q. The bill is indorsed F. Wilson - was that on it at the time? A. No; he indorsed it afterwards at my place.

WILLIAM CREED, JUN . (looking at one of the letters produced). I received this from the watch-house-keeper of Bunhill-row. I then went to No. 7, Lloyd's-row, and found a bundle of papers in the first room, on the right. This paper (looking at it) was among them: -

(Letter read.)

MY DEAR ANN. - I am in custody at Bunhill-row watch-house; let him know by seven o'clock in the morning, or to night, to send Mr. Harmer to me, as I go to Worship-street by ten o'clock - hide my papers. I am in good spirits. Bring me a shirt and stockings by nine o'clock; say to the landlady I am arrested for putting my name to a bill, to oblige a friend - shew this to him., and he will send some one to me with some money.

To Mrs. Williams, No. 7, Lloyd's-row, Sadler's Wells.

The paper found at Lloyd's-row, was directed on the back,

"Mr. Shannon," dated

"9th June, 1825," contained a list of various bills, amounting in all to 1100 l.; the one in question being among them, and under the list was written as follows. "I have received the above bills from F. Wilson, for which I have given him 50 l. on account, and it is expressly understood between us, that he is to receive a quarter of whatever I recover on them."

MR. ADOLPHUS to MR. CREED. Q. What had you to do in this business? A. Mr. Coles being in town, and having had a bill got from him, I went as his friend. I was not employed by any one. I went to search the lodging, and found this paper - no officer was with us. Mr. Coles, my father, and one Cleaveland went with me; he is clerk to Messrs, Cox and Co. army agents.

Q. Do all these gentlemen happen to form members of a society? A. We do; we belong to the society of Guardians, for the protection of trade - it was established before I was born. Messrs. Foss and Sons are the attornies.

Q. Mr. Foss has nothing to do with the society who set this prosecution on foot? A. No; Mr. Matthews is their attorney. That society has nothing to do with the one Mr. Foss belongs to. I did not know Coles till about a fortnight before I went there. I am a member of another society like Mr. Foss's, and so is my father.

MR. LAW. Q. In consequence of Coles complaining to you, did you go there in search of a bill? A. I did; we found his bill there - his name is at the head of this list.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you go to Messrs. Esdaile's, to stop payment of this bill? A. No; Thompson made some application to my father about the bill, and I believe my my father went to Messrs. Esdaile's.

Q. Did he not tell your father to stop payment of the bill, because he had been swindled out of it? A. I never heard him tell him so. I know that he said it was a forgery. I think he said the amount was 150 l.; but he understood there were others - he explained to me that the bills were drawn, I think at the Ram Inn, and Mr. Cooper wished him to accept them, but he declined. I do not know how he gained information of the forgery, or how he knew they were made payable at Messrs. Esdaile's.

MR. LAW. Q. What did he state about the bills? A. He said he met Cooper by appointment - that Cooper drew them, and wished him to accept them, which he declined, for, as Cooper was to send the bills into Scotland to be discounted, and as he was a stranger there, they might be sent there without his acceptance, on his (Cooper's) responsibility, and if Cooper would bring the money down to him, at Northampton, he would pay his expenses.

Q. You mention the name of Cooper; was that the name Thompson knew him by? A. No, he knew him as Oglivie. I call him Cooper, because he was apprehended by that name. We did not discover till afterwards, that Cooper and Oglivie were the same persons. Thompson said he knew him as Oglivie, and he drew the bills as Wilson - it excited his suspicion, and I believe was one reason why he refused to accept.

COURT. Q. Did Thompson explain how Wilson could get the bills discounted in Scotland without being accepted? A. If the money was got he was to accept them.

JOSEPH THOMPSON, JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. The acceptance of this bill is not in my father's hand-writing (looking at it). I am well acquainted with his hand - he is a maltster at Northampton - there is no other there of his name.

Cross-examined. Q. Look at that acceptance again, and tell me, on your oath, whether you believe it to be your father's hand-writing? A. I do not - It is nothing like it.

Q. Look at this paper - do not open it any further - is that his writing? A. Yes, (looking at another), and so is this.

Q. Look at the first again - is the whole of it your father's writing? A. Yes, all except the direction, which is mine; the acceptance on the bill is not my father's writing.

MR. LAW. Q. Had you seen that bill before to-day? A. No; any man who knew my father's writing could tell that.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you have not seen it you had heard of it? A. I heard there was such a bill since last sessions. I am eighteen years old. (Bill read).

Prisoner's Defence. I met Mr. Thompson, by appointment, at the Ram, and spent the evening with him - he objected to accept the bills there, as it was too public, and in the morning accompanied me to Davis's, the Fox and Anchor, Charter-house-lane, where he accepted them as I shall prove.

CYRUS DAVIS . I keep the Fox and Anchor public-house, Charter-house-lane. Mr. Thompson, of Nottingham, generally comes to my house when he is in town. I first knew him about March or April last. I saw him there, in company with the prisoner, about the beginning of April. I think they came in to my front room, which I call the tap-room; they had some conversation; they came again together in two or three days, had some conversation, and went into my back parlour; they desired

some ham for lunch, which I fetched them, from Charterhouse-street, and after some conversation they desired that some bill stamps should be sent for; I cannot say what the amount was - it was two or three; my little boy fetched them; I took them into the back room myself, and put them on the table; Thompson asked for a pen and ink, which I took into the room; the prisoner wrote on the stamps, and I had occasion to withdraw from the room, to go to the table in the yard, close to the parlour window, which was open, to wash my hands, and saw the prisoner writing on the stamps; after washing my hands I had occasion to go into the room; I believe they then asked for more ale; I took it in, and while I was in the room I saw Thompson writing across one of the stamps; what he wrote I do not know.

Q. Now, did you write a letter to Mr. Thompson on the 4th of June? A. I have written a letter or two to him, and received this letter (one before produced) in answer to mine of the 4th of June; I answered it by post; (looking at another) this was also written to me; I saw him afterwards, and conversed with him about the contents; I have seen him write myself.

Q. Now look at this bill - do you believe what is written across it to be his hand-writing? A. I really do - I have not the least doubt of it. I saw him at my house last Saturday week - I think he said to me that it was a hard case to loose so much money - that he did not wish to hang the prisoner if he could get his acceptances back - that there was one coming due in October - he wished me to endeavour to get them if I could - I said I did not know how to proceed in it - I had nothing more to do with it.

MR. LAW. Q. Now, take care, did he say "acceptances or bills?" A. I cannot take upon myself to say which.

Q. To the private room of your house there is a window, which was open, and you could see what passed? A. I saw a great part of it - I did not pretend to wish to know about it - I am quite certain the prisoner wrote on the stamps - I do not know his hand-writing - I never saw him till about a month previous to his coming with Mr. Thompson.

Q. You have sworn they were there on two occasions, one of which was two or three days after the other? A. As near as I can recollect - it might be more - I did not make a minute of it.

Q. What makes you recollect the bread and cheese one day, and the ham the other? A. Because I have frequently seen Thompson - he has dined with me when I have had roast beef - I was once one of the Fancy - I was called St. Davis when I was on the list - I did not put my head through the window - I did not wish to see what was going on, or I could have looked more minutely - I always knew the prisoner by the name of Wilson.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went yourself to fetch the ham? A. Yes, that makes me remember it - I have left off fighting about a year and a half - I went to shew Thompson the way to Worship-street - he stated that he had to charge the prisoner with getting either bills or acceptances from him in a manner that was not proper - I cannot say what were his words.

HENRY MOSS . I am the holder of this bill - I received it from Shannon - I presented it for payment at Sir James Esdaile's, and then put it into Mr. Isaacs's hands - a gentleman calling himself Wright, but who I found afterwards was Creed, called at my house with Mr. Thompson, and proposed an arrangement to pay the bill, saying that Thompson was defrauded out of the acceptance - I told him it laid in my solicitor's hands, and we three went to Mr. Isaacs - Thompson said he was defrauded out of the bill, and Creed asked Mr. Isaacs if he had any objection to shew the bill - it was shewn to Mr. Creed, who handed it over to Thompson, who walked up to Mr. Creed and said, "Have you your barnacles?" or something of that sort - Creed said he knew nothing about that, and then Thompson put the bill into his pocket - Mr. Isaacs protested against it, and said he should certainly give him in charge unless he gave it up - Forrester was sent for - Creed proposed that Forrester should take charge of it, and they then said it was a forgery - Thompson said it was hard that he should have to pay them - I said

"What need you be afraid of if it is a forgery" - he never answered, but walked up and down the room.

ELIAS ISAACS . I am an attorney, and was instructed by Mr. Moss to apply for payment of this bill - there have been no proceedings taken yet. While I was in possession of it Mr. Thompson called on me, in company with Mr. Moss, and a person calling himself Wright; Mr. Moss said they had called to propose some arrangement; one of them asked if less than the whole amount would be taken; the answer was, that it could not be done without the consent of Shannon, an indorser; something was said about time; Mr. Creed requested a sight of the bill; I called to the outer office for the bill, and put it into Creed's hands; he looked at it for a short period, and handed it to Mr. Thompson, who pretended to be looking for something, and asked Creed if he had his barnacles about him (I should have mentioned that he said he had been tricked out of this and other bills); he then folded up the bill, grasped it very tight, and said, "This is a forgery; I shall keep this bill;" I said I could not allow that, but, if he wished it for the purposes of justice, I should produce it at any time; he insisted upon holding it, and I sent for Forrester.

WILLIAM LAMBERT JONES . I am a carpenter, and know Thompson well. I have seen him write five or six times. To the best of my belief the acceptance on this bill is his writing. I have very little doubt of it. I should not have objected to take it as his acceptance.

MR. LAW. Q. When did you first give information that you knew any thing of his hand-writing? A. I am assistant to a Sheriff's officer; an attorney at Northampton knew I had had business with Thompson; that is the way they found me out; the last time I saw him write was about two months ago, at his own house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What attorney at Northampton applied to you about this? A. Mr. Jay's clerk; he sent to me on Tuesday to know what I knew, and subpoenaed me directly; they applied to my master first, and sent to me as the person who knew the hand-writing; I have seen him sign his name two or three times; I only saw him scribbling two months ago.

COURT. Q. What was the reason of his scribbling? A. He was making a bill, which he had referred to his son to finish; we had arrested him, and there was

a bill between the plaintiff and him; I asked for it; he began to scribble.

Q. Was that scribbling at all like this acceptance? A. Not at all.

- DAVIS. I am the wife of Cyrus Davis. Thompson came twice to our house with Wilson. I remember the second time; bill stamps were sent for - I think it was two - they were in a little back parlour adjoining the bar - Thompson called for pen and ink - a window looks from that room into the yard - I have seen Thompson write several times, and swear that the acceptance on this bill is his writing.

MR. LAW. Q. How often have you seen him write? A. Five or six times - in March, April, and May last - he made no difficulty at writing - my little boy fetched the stamps.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is there by the window looking into the yard a place to wash hands? A. There is a table at the window - my husband washes his hands there.

COURT. Q. Were you in the parlour while these persons were there? A. Part of the time - the window was open all day - I have received letters from Thompson, and he has afterwards asked me if I had received them - he wrote to us, stating that there was ale at the wharf for us - we bought ale of him.

WILLIAM DAVIS (aged nine years, upon being questioned, appeared to understand the obligation of an oath). I saw the prisoner at my father's house with a stout fat gentleman named Thompson - my father or mother sent me for some stamps, which I fetched from the second house opposite - I fetched two - they were small pieces of paper - I laid them on the table in the little parlour at the back of the bar.

MR. LAW. Q. Was the prisoner very much at your house? A. I do not know; I often saw him there, and knew him by the name of Wilson. I do not know when I went for the stamps - it is not very lately.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect what sort of stamps you asked for? A. No: I do not know how much money I had.

COURT to JONES. Q. How long have you known Thompson? A. For six or seven years - he carries on a large business in bricks, malt, &c.; his sons, I believe, manage the business for him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-148

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1369. DENNIS KELLY and JEREMIAH FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Field , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a coat, value 2 s., and a hat, value 1 s., his property .

JAMES FIELD. I am an umbrella-maker , and live at Deptford. On the 3d of July I had been making hay - I was at the Swan public-house, at Hendon , in the afternoon, and left at half-past ten o'clock, with Smith, my brother-in-law, and Sullivan - we all went out about the same time, and when we got opposite Hickman's gate , some person struck me on the side of my head, with a stick or something - I was struck again immediately - I turned round and fell to the ground senseless - I did not recover till next day; I was taken to the Swan. I had left about twenty people at the Swan when we came away - they were strangers: I do not know whether the prisoners were among them. I lost my hat and coat.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you not seen the prisoners at the Swan? A. I do not know - they were not hay-making with us.

THOMAS SMITH . On the 3d of July I was at the Swan, and left about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, with Field and Sullivan; when we got opposite Hickman's-gate Sullivan left me - I was two or three yards from Field when he left - the prisoners were in the middle of the road with a quantity more - it was not dark; I had seen Fitzgerald that day, but never before; I was struck and knocked down, and when I got up I saw Field on the ground and a man kicking him: I cannot say who it was - there was more than a dozen in the gang - Ledger came afterwards to my assistance.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-149

1307. DENNIS KELLY and JEREMIAH FITZGERALD were again indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Smith , on the 3d of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a jacket, value 8 s.; a hat value 3 s. and eleven shillings, his property .

THOMAS SMITH. On the 3d of July, when we came opposite to Hickman's gate , Sullivan wished us good night - I wished him the same, and then Fitzgerald struck me in the stomach with his fist - I returned the blow, and he held me by the collar while Kelly kicked me in the mouth. I had my jacket taken from my back, my hat from my head, and 11 s. from my breeches' pocket - I was knocked down on the ground - I had seen both the prisoners before on that day, and am certain of them; I do not know who took my property, but only them were round me just at the time I missed it - I was not stunned - I felt them take my jacket off, and felt a hand in my pocket, which they turned inside out - there were several people about when I got up, but when my property was taken I only saw the prisoners - Ledger and Foster afterwards came to my assistance. Kelly was afterwards brought down to me to the Swan.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you first go to the Swan? A. About half-past six o'clock in the morning, and left in about an hour - I went there afterwards about five or six o'clock and remained till half-past ten: it was Sunday, and we had not been hay-making that day. I remember seeing Kelly by the Swan that afternoon, - not in the house - I had no words with any body at all.

Q. Did you say you would have the blood of an Irishman that night? A. No; I cannot swear who took my jacket - I do not know whether my hat fell off or not - I was sober. I saw Sullivan next morning, but did not say I had lost my jacket and hat, and wished I could find them - I said I had lost them, but did not tell him to go and find them - he did not tell me he had seen a strange man run away with my hat - there was no quarrel at the Swan while I was there - I sat in the garden having my porter - Sullivan offered to come as a witness for me, next morning, but as I did not want one he has come against me.

EDWARD LEDGER . On the 3d of July, I was going to the Swan, public-house, where I lodge, about half-past ten o'clock, and saw a number of people in the road - I heard them for a quarter of a mile before I got up to them. I do not know whether the prisoners were there. I found Smith laying on the grass bleeding - he had no jacket on; he asked me to go and look at James - we were taking him to the Swan, and met the patrol - it was dark.

JOHN FOSTER . I am a constable. When the prisoners were taken, Kelly pointed out where the coat was, about half-past one o'clock in the morning; the patrol took Fitzgerald that morning at Littlewood's farm; his lips were cut, and his face also - he said that was done in the Borough; he then said "I will tell the truth, I did strike Thomas Smith, and my mates helped me."

Q. How came you to interfere? A. I was going home with Ledger, and heard persons quarrelling half a mile before we got up to them. Smith and James were laying on the field. I think seven men were taken that night on suspicion.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am a horse-patrol. On the 3d of July, I met Smith opposite the Swan; he desired me to go on, as he thought they had murdered his brother-in law. I went and found him laying by the road-side, took him to the Swan, and from information I received from Smith, I went to the out-buildings of Mr. Barnes' premises, and apprehended seven persons - Kelly was one of them; he came off the hay-rick, and I collared him; and seeing a scar on his face, I asked what he had done with the coat - he said he knew where it was; he would not tell me then, but would in the morning.

JOHN ROACH . On the night of the 3d of July, I assisted in apprehending the prisoners and six more, between one and two o'clock. When I got to the rick, the patrol asked Kelly where the coat was; he said he knew, and would tell in the morning - this was not Smith's jacket; he said there had been a quarrel in the road, and he was there, and after a little hesitation took us to where the coat was.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose these men were gone to rest in the rick? A. No; Kelly was employed as a watchman to guard the rick. I had been at the Swan between five and six o'clock - Smith and Field were then outside the house, and the prisoners in the parlour - Smith was sober.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer, and was present when the prisoners were taken. Fitzgerald was taken between two and three o'clock. Kelly got off the stack - Daintry saw blood on his cheek, and told him he was the man who had committed the robbery - he denied it at first, but afterwards said he knew where the coat was, but knew nothing of the jacket or hat. Fitzgerald was taken in the barn; he said voluntarily that he was the man who first knocked Smith down.

James Field deposed as in the former case.

JAMES TOWLE . I am a constable. I assisted in apprehending seven persons - Kelly was among them; he said he knew nothing of the robbery at first, but afterwards shewed us where the coat was - the jacket was not found, and he said he knew nothing about it. When Fitzgerald was taken, he said he was the first man who struck Smith.

FITZGERALD'S Defence. There are witnesses to prove how it happened.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I am a labourer. I was at the Swan on the 3d of July, and shaved the two prosecutors; they were both intoxicated; and in the afternoon Fitzgerald was in the parlour - two men and six women were in their company; the prosecutors sat outside - the window was lifted up, and Thomas Smith asked Fitzgerald for a light - he handed him one two or three times; he asked for another, and Fitzgerald said he would be his servant no longer; he then made a blow at Fitzgerald, who put up his hand and stopped it, and about seven o'clock Kelly came into the tap-room with two women, and were drinking a pot of beer; and between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on dispersing, about three or four hundred yards from the house - I was in the road - the two prosecutors went towards the fence, and got two pieces of pailing, crossed over the road, and both hit Fitzgerald; he hit Smith again. Several of my countrymen were near - Kelly wanted to make peace between them, and the prosecutors knocked him down. I called Kelly to me, and while we were in conversation Smith pulled off his coat, threw it into the road, and hit Fitzgerald, who struck him again. I told Kelly he was a man of family, and to have nothing to do with the row, which he accordingly did. Fitzgerald went towards his barn where he slept. A man named Callaghan seized a piece of fence, and knocked Smith down, and one Banks knocked Field down - there was then a general fight between them and the Irish. After the row Smith said he missed his coat, and told me to go and look for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-150

London Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

1371. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , four leghorn hats, value 6 l., the goods of William Anderson , his master .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution. There being no evidence against the prisoner but a confession, obtained by the prosecutor, under an inducement held out, the evidence was not proceeded with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-151

1372. WILLIAM FRANCIS CHERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , six yards of woollen cloth, value 6 l., the goods of John Wells , and William Onyon , his masters, in the dwelling-house of the said John Wells .

WILLIAM ONYON. I am in partnership with Mr. John Wells - we are woollen-drapers , and live in Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was our porter - his business was chiefly in the cellar. I missed a piece of cloth, and sent for an officer, and while we were searching, the prisoner, (who had gone to dinner) returned, and came down; the officer searched him, and found about 5 l., a watch, seals, and a tab, or ticket, containing the number and price of a cloth - also five or six pawnbroker's duplicates; he fell on his knees, begged pardon, and said he had taken the cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He shewed great contrition? A. Yes. Mr. Wells, only, resides in the house.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the tab; also five duplicates for cloth.

He fell upon his knees, confessed the robbery, and seemed extremely sorry.

Q. When he begged for mercy was the cloth in sight? A. No. He said he had taken it, and pawned it at Sowerby and Upsall's, and the money he had, as well as the watch and seals, were the produce of it.

FRANCIS WITTY . I am shopman to Mr. Upsall, pawnbroker, of Barbican. On the 20th of August the prisoner pawned two yards and a quarter of cloth, for 21 s., and on the 26th two yards and three quarters, for 32 s.

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . I am apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, of Chiswell-street. I have three yards of cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on the 23d of July, for 24 s.

JAMES KILLINGWORTH . I am also shopman to Mr. Sowerby. I have three yards of cloth, pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th of August.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 29. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-152

1373. HUGH MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , two blankets, value 8 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 8 s.; two pillowcases, value 2 s. 6 d., and a rug, value 3 s., the goods of John Trinder Walters , in a lodging-room .

FANNY WALTERS . I am the wife of John Trinder Walters - we live in Harp-court, Fleet-market . On the 30th of May the prisoner and his wife took a furnished lodging of us, at 5 s. 6 d. a week; they staid ten weeks, and paid for all. I went into their room when they were at home; they objected to my looking at the bed, so I sent for an officer, and missed these articles from their room.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a day patrol. I was fetched to this house - they refused to open the door, but I got in. I found the bed stripped, and found in the prisoner's possession duplicates of the property, pawned at different times.

WILLIAM STAPLES . I am servant to Mr. Fleming. - Most of these goods were pawned at our shop, at several times - part by the prisoner, and part by his wife.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250915-153

1374. WILLIAM MAULDEN and THOMAS HAWKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain person whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY JACKSON . I am beadle of St. Faith. On the 30th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-street , and saw the two prisoners, in company with another person, coming towards Ludgate-hill; I knew them before: they were following a gentleman who was coming towards me - I turned, and watched them, remaining on the same side of the way as them; they left the gentleman, and all three followed another, who had a lady with him, and just as he got to the hoard by St. Bride's church, I saw Hawkins draw a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and give it to Maulden - the third person was close behind him. I collared Maulden, and caught the handkerchief in the act of falling from his person. I called to the gentleman, who turned round; I shewed him the handkerchief, and told him to secure Hawkins, who had got before him, close by his side; he laid hold of him, brought him to me, and wished me to return the handkerchief, and let them go; I desired him in the King's name to assist me with them to the Compter, but he did not, and has not attended. I do not know his name or residence.

WILLIAM NESBIT PALMER . I am a midshipman in His Majesty's service, but at present am clerk to a gentleman in the City. I was in Fleet-street, and saw Hawkins draw a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, roll it up, and throw it to another. I do not know the gentleman's name or residence. I afterwards saw Jackson scuffling with Maulden, to get him secured, and saw the handkerchief drop from him. Hawkins escaped, and ran up Shoe-lane, but was taken shortly after. I saw him in custody next day, and am certain of his person.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 30th of August Jackson described a man to me. I went to several houses that night, and found Hawkins at the Coopers' Arms, public-house, West-street, Smithfield, about eleven o'clock at night - it is a very bad house. He denied the charge, but said he was in Fleet-street.

MAULDEN'S Defence. I was in Fleet-street between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and kicked against this handkerchief - I picked it up, and put it inside my jacket - Jackson laid hold of me; I opened my jacket to give it to him, and it fell down. I never saw the other prisoner before.

HAWKINS' Defence (written.) I was passing through Fleet-street between five and six o'clock, on my way to Covent Garden, with my donkey, and heard a cry of Stop thief! turned round, and Jackson accosted me, and said I was his prisoner - that he saw me pick a gentleman's pocket; I said he must be mistaken - the gentleman said he had lost nothing, and advised him to let us go; the persons assembled at last rescued me, and being convinced of my innocence I never avoided apprehension. It must be perfectly obvious to you that I am labouring under a deformity, and have lost the use of my limbs.

MAULDEN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

HAWKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250915-154

1375. SARAH HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , a watch, value 15 s., the goods of William Mansell , her master .

WILLIAM MANSELL. I am clerk at the White Horse Inn, Friday-street . The prisoner was servant at my private house. On the 31st of August I missed this watch - I might not have seen it for perhaps six months; I thought it was kept in the first floor, but cannot swear that it was in my house while she was in my service. On the 1st of September I was present when she, herself, took it from her box - she said she found it among some rubbish.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it a watch or a case? A. A watch - it had neither hands nor glass.

ARTHUR JOHN JACKSON . I am a constable. I was

sent for, and saw the watch found. The prisoner said it was her brother's, and next morning said she found it among the rubbish.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she not going away from her place? A. Yes. When the watch was found she said, "You had better say that is your's" - Mrs. Mansell said it was not, and I returned it. The prisoner told us where she was going - I found her there. Next morning I was sent for, and Mr. Mansell claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave them my address - Mr. Mansell came next morning, examined it a good while, and then said it was his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-155

NEW COURT. (4th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1376. MARY ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a shift, value 1 s.; three caps, value 3 s., and a table-cloth, value 1 s., the goods of Sarah Martin ; two shirts, value 12 s., and a night-cap, value 6 d., the goods of William Martin ; two shirts, value 12 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Martin . - Also for stealing, on the 27th of August , a nightgown, value 6 d.; a night-cap, value 6 d.; a gown, value 4 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s.; a sheet, value 6 s., and two caps, value 10 s. , the goods of William Cooke .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-156

1377. JOHN GOODDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 32 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., the goods of George Mills , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-157

1378. MATTHEW GILCHRIST & MARY ANN GILCHRIST were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , two shillings, one sixpence, and 8 d. in copper monies , the monies of Elisha Brownjohn .

ELISHA BROWNJOHN. I am a baker , and live in York-street, Macclesfield-road . I marked seven shillings and twenty-one sixpences, on the 29th of July, and put them into a till by themselves, at half-past ten o'clock at night; I locked it - the next morning, about three, I found only five shillings and nineteen sixpences - the till was locked, and a person to have got to it must have crossed a passage, and a sitting-room, and unlocked the passage door, which was locked the night before, and was still locked - the prisoners had lodged in the house about eight weeks - this sixpence was tendered to me by the woman on the 31st of July, and the shilling on the 1st of August - I knew them to be two of those which I had marked on the 29th.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you quite sure of the number you put in? A. Yes - the woman dealt with me for bread, but I had not changed any money for her before - I changed half-a-crown afterwards, but whether it was on the Monday or Tuesday I cannot tell - I did not take her into custody when she tendered me the marked money - I did not know I could till I had sent for the officer - no one served in the shop but myself.

JAMES HANDLEY . I received this sixpence and shilling from the prosecutor, on Monday, the 1st of August. I went to search the prisoners' apartments on Wednesday, the 3 d. I found two keys, wrapped up in a child's frock, between the bed and the sacking - the small key opens the till, and the large one opens the passage door at the foot of the stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you searched the place before you found them? A. Yes, at seven o'clock in the morning - the man was then in bed on the floor. I searched the clothes, and the sacking of the bedstead; but the keys were not there then.

JURY to ELISHA BROWNJOHN. Q. Has your journeyman any access to the shop? A. No, he did not lodge in the house. My bake-house communicates with the passage, and there is no way of getting to the shop but by the passage, or the street door.

JAMES HANDLEY . I searched every place in the room the first time. I went down while the woman was being searched by a female, and I think the keys must have been placed then on the sacking.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-158

1379. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN KING . The prisoner was in my employ, and left me in the month of July - he had been round on the day he left me to my customers to receive money - he did not account for any money he had received of Mrs. Williams - he came home that evening and put the basket in, and went to a public-house - I went after him and said, "John, will you come and stir the sponge" - he said "Not before eight o'clock." I met him on the following evening between nine and ten, in the Borough. There was 5 s. 4 1/2 d. found on him, which I believe the officer gave him again.

HANNAH KING . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner did not come to me to offer me any money; on the evening when he went away he borrowed half-a-crown of me.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am the wife of John Williams. I paid the prisoner 3 l. 10 s., on the 25th of July , for his master - he put "paid" on the bill. I paid 3 l. in silver, and 10 s. in copper - there were some shillings and sixpences - I cannot say how many of each.

WILLIAM KEY . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on the evening of the 11th of July, at the Obelisk. I found two or three bakers' bills on him, but I do not recollect that I found any money on him - if I did I gave it him again.

Prisoner. I had no intention of embezzling my master's money. I offered it to my mistress, but she would not take it. I borrowed 2 s. 6 d. because I would not touch it.

SARAH HAWKINS . I live in St. Martin's-lane. The prisoner said at Bow-street that he offered his mistress the money; and Mr. King told me that he had offered the money to his wife.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-159

1380. ESTHER POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a petticoat, value 6 d., and a gown skirt, value 18 d., the goods of William Hands , from the person of Catherine Hands .

HANNAH HANDS . I am the wife of William Hands, and live in Wheeler-street. I dressed my daughter on the 29th of July in these articles, and sent her to school about nine o'clock. She returned at twelve, and had them still on. I sent her to her grandmother's, a few doors off, just before one. She returned home with another girl, between four and five o'clock, without her clothes.

WILLIAM MANARKY . I am between nine and ten years of age. I saw a person strip the child of Mrs. Hands, in Hare-street-fields . She put the clothes into her apron and ran away. I took the child up, and gave her to another little girl to take home. I think it was the prisoner, but I am not sure.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-160

1381. JOHN FLOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 9 lbs. of mutton, value 6 s., and an apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Lamb .

CHARLOTTE MITCHELL . I live opposite Mr. Lamb's shop, at Hammersmith . I saw the prisoner, while no one was in the shop, with a leg of mutton in his hand.

CHARLES SNELSAM . I am an apprentice to Mr. Richard Lamb. On the 11th of August, Mitchell came and gave me information; I went down the lane opposite, and found the prisoner with a leg of mutton which had been in the shop before.

EDWARD HANSON . I received charge of the prisoner. I asked what he was going to do with the mutton; he said he was going to sell it, to buy him a shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I had gone to Hammersmith to seek for work the day before - I called on one Mr. Slater, who gave me 6 d., but would not employ me; I went to a Mr. Watkins, and I then had some beer; a young man then came in and said to me "There is a joint of mutton for you" - it was wrapped up in an apron; I was going down the lane and was stopped: I had not been in Mr. Lamb's shop.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-161

1382. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , a dressing-case, value 30 s. , the goods of Charles Turner .

CHARLES TURNER. I live in Warwick-court, Gray's-inn - the house is let out - the prisoner is an errand boy there. On the 2d of August, when I returned home, about eleven o'clock at night, I missed a dressing-case, which I had seen safe at six o'clock that evening: I went next day to the prisoner's mother's house, and found it. He, in the first instance, denied it, but when the officer began to search him for some of the articles, he pulled out some others, and said he was very sorry, and could not tell what he had taken it for - I think he said he had some trifling debt he wanted to pay.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say there was a Mrs. Davis, to whom he owed 5 s., and she had kept his hat and he wanted to redeem it? A. I believe he did. I have known him some time, and he has conducted himself well.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-162

1383. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , forty feet of quartering, value 9 s. , the goods of Thomas Griffiths .

THOMAS GRIFFITHS. I live at No. 129, St. John's-street , and am a carpenter . On the 2d of July I was working at my house about five minutes past eight o'clock - I saw the prisoner take up a piece of quartering from my door - he asked if I wanted it, and I gave him an answer which he did not understand; he then took up another piece and walked off with the two nearly as far as the church; I then stopped him - I had never seen him before.

Prisoner. The prosecutor told me the timber did not belong to him, and I took it to get some victuals.

WILLIAM BODEN . I took the prisoner in Corporation-lane, with the timber: I asked him how he came by it? he said "I stole it and I did it for want."

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-163

1384. DAVID HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , thirty-four fathoms of rope, value 20 s.; five blocks, value 2 s., and two iron books, value 6 d. , the goods of John Gordon .

JOHN GORDON. I am owner of a small vessel lying in the Thames . The prisoner was employed on board ; these ropes are my property - there are no particular marks on them, but there are some blocks to which they are fitted, which I know to be mine.

JOHN PERRY . On the night of the 6th of July, I saw the prisoner with this rope on his shoulder: there was another person who had some rope likewise - they were at a small distance from Mr. Gordon's vessel, the Malvina; I went up to them; they threw down the ropes and ran away; I took the prisoner - I did not see him in on board the vessel.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-164

1385. JAMES HICKEY was indicted for stealing, two brass complings, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Robert Knight .

The articles being partly iron and partly brass the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-165

1386. ANN HARRISON and MARGARET AMELIA WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , a fish slice, value 2 s.; a soup ladle, value 10 s.; five spoons, value 20 s.; two bowls of punch ladles, value 5 s.; a handle of a fish slice, value 5 s., and a pocket-book, value 6 d. , the goods of Charles Barham and William Kingsford .

CHARLES BARHAM. I am in partnership with Mr. William Kingsford - we keep the Belle Sauvage . On the 3d of July I missed 3 l. or 4 l. in gold and silver, a Weymouth note, and some silver articles, from the cupboard; I had seen the money safe the day before; they were two gravy spoons, a marrow spoon, a punch ladle, two fish knives and the handle of a fish slice.

ELIZA JANE KEITH BARHAM . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had used the fish slice and the soup ladle for dinner on Sunday at four o'clock; I know these articles to

be mine - there was a canvass bag in the bureau in the parlour, where the plate was kept - there was about 5 l. in it; there were three or four sovereigns; there was a rose-wood writing-desk taken, containing a pocket-book, with a 1 l. Weymouth note in it. The book has been found but not the desk.

JOHN HART . I am a salesman in Holywell-street. On Monday, the 4th of July, the two prisoners came into my shop and said they had something to sell-they would not shew it to me for some time, but I would see what it was - they then shewed me this plate; I said "What do you want for it?" they said "O, never mind, give us 30 s. for it;" I said I would send for an officer; they said "Never mind, let us go; and we will leave you the plate."

DAVID HERRING . I am an officer. I received the property from Hart, and took the prisoners. I went to Wells' lodgings, No. 52, Old Pye-street, Westminster; I found a black man there, named John Peter Michael, whom Wells said was her husband; I went again next day and found this pocket-book under the foot of a bedstead.

THOMAS FORD . I locked up the prisoners; I found two sovereigns and some silver in Harrison's right shoe, and after they were gone to Tothil-fields, I looked down the privy and found this canvass bag and a towel.

HARRISON'S Defence. I came up from Hull to look for my husband; I arrived early in the morning, and asked two young men the way to Westminster; they said they were going there: when I got there I took a room of the prisoner Wells; the two young men came again afterwards, and left the bundle, which they said they would give me 5 s. to sell, and they would stand at the corner of the street; I went out and met Wells, and we went to Hart's shop, and offered the things; when the officer came I went out with him to look for the young men.

WELLS' Defence. On the 4th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I came out of my room and met the other prisoner, who asked me if I had a room to let - between two and three o'clock that afternoon, as I was returning home, I met her again, and she said could I tell her where they sold old silver; I went and asked Mr. Hart - he said come in, and then we were taken.

HARRISON - GUILTY . Aged 31.

WELLS - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-166

1387. ELIZABETH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a watch, value 10 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 2 d., and a key, value 1 d. , the goods of Timothy Elliott .

TIMOTHY ELLIOTT. On the 12th of July I was in the back yard, adjoining my house at Islington - I pulled out my watch, and laid it on the corner of the seat of the privy - I came away and forgot it; I missed it in about eight or ten minutes: I went back, but it was gone. I saw it again the next day, at a pawnbroker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY ELLIOTT . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner lodged with me. On the 12th of July I saw her come out of her room, and go to the privy, soon after my husband had left it; she came out in about three minutes, and I thought went to her own room, but when my husband missed his watch I went to look for her, and found her at the King George the Fourth, public-house, quite drunk.

JOHN FITCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. John-street. This watch was pawned with me, by the prisoner, on the 12th of July, about three o'clock, in the name of Tilsey, for 10 s.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found 3 s. 8 d. in her possession - she said she had got the money of her master, and meant to buy bows and arrows with it.

Prisoner's Defence. The man I unfortunately live with gave me his wages - we then went out and got a little too much. I found the watch, and did not know who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-167

1388. ELIZABETH JEFFRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , a gown, value 8 s. , the goods of Samuel Ashby .

ELIZABETH ASHBY . I am the wife of Samuel Ashby; we live at No. 5, Wood's-buildings, Chelsea . The prisoner is my cousin - she came to see me on the 28th of June, and staid three or four hours; I saw my gown safe on the post of the bedstead: I left the room, and while I was gone she went away. I went to her mother's, but she was not there.

SAMUEL ROSE . I live with Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker. The prisoner, to the best of my belief, pawned this gown, on the 28th of June, in the name of Mary Ann, for Mrs. Jeffries.

WILLIAM WOODRURY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of July - she acknowledged at the watch-house that she had pawned it, and destroyed the duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18250915-168

1389. ELIZABETH MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 6 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of William Gammage .

WILLIAM GAMMAGE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Drury-lane . On the afternoon of the 17th of August the officer came to my shop, and shewed me a piece of bacon, which I knew to be mine; it was safe in my window about half an hour before.

GEORGE POUND . I am an officer. About three o'clock on the 17th of August I was in Drury-lane; the prisoner was pointed out to me by a shop-keeper - I followed, and saw her stop at Mr. Gammage's shop; she then went into a passage next door to his house, and I saw something in her apron. I went, and asked her what she had got - she said, nothing, but I found this bacon upon her - she begged I would not take her to the watch-house.

Prisoner. This man saw a woman give me the bacon; he owes me a spite, because I would not give him liquor.

Witness. There was no woman with her.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-169

1390. JOHN MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , two coats, value 30 s. , the goods of Richard Edgar Sanders .

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am constable of Hornsey. I

was in Duvall's-lane about a quarter past ten o'clock on the 2d of September, and saw the prisoner with two others - he unlocked Mr. Sanders' gate, went up to the house, and took two coats, which were hanging up in the passage - he put them into an empty basket which he had, and covered them with shavings; he was coming out, and I took hold of him.

RICHARD EDGAR SANDERS. These coats are mine, and hung in my passage.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry the parcel to some place, which I could not find; I went into this garden because I could not find the bell. I saw no one in the house, and came back to find the bell.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-170

1391. ARCHIBALD MICKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a pelisse, value 32 s. , the goods of Joseph Rumball .

CHARLES SMITH . I live with Mr. Joseph Rumball. - On the evening of the 30th of August I saw the prisoner about half-past eight o'clock, come to the door, and snatch down a cloth pelisse. I pursued, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken - the pelisse was found upon him.

HENRY JOHNSON . I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, rolling up the pelisse - I seized him; he struck me, and in the struggle his hat fell off; he got from me, and Smith secured him.

ROBERT WORTHING . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and secured the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-171

1392. JOHN ROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a shovel, value 18 d. , the goods of George Holiwell .

GEORGE HOLIWELL. I am a labourer , and live at Poplar. On the 18th of August I went to the Two Brewers, public-house, and asked the waiter to let me leave my shovel there. I put it up the back kitchen chimney - I went at six o'clock the next morning, and it was gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES STONE . I keep the Two Brewers, at Wapping . Holiwell came to my house, and the prisoner was there. I saw him take the shovel into the kitchen, and put it up the chimney - about an hour after he was gone I heard my servant say, "Where are you going with that shovel?" I got up, and saw the prisoner going out with it - he said it was his own, and he had it of Mr. Sharp - I sent for him, and he denied it.

Prisoner. I had gone to that house for several days - I put my own shovel in that house, and took this by mistake.

JAMES STONE. He never brought any shovel into my house.

THOMAS JUDD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - he said he had taken his shovel into that house, and the pot-boy said he had given him a shovel.

Prisoner's Defence. Stone said he would serve me out for not paying him the 9 d. on Saturday night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-172

1394. STEPHEN STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , a shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Gladding .

CAROLINE GLADDING . I am the wife of Samuel Gladding. On the 30th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, I was up stairs, and was called down by my child. I missed my shawl off a line in the yard, where it had hung to dry; I went to Sowerby's, the pawnbroker's, and found the shawl and prisoner there.

JOHN TUSHAW . I am a weaver. I saw the prisoner go through Mr. Gladding's pailing, and in a few minutes he came out with a bundle under his arm - I saw the corner of a white shawl.

ELIZABETH CARRICK . I was a nurse at Mr. Gladding's. I missed the shawl and two handkerchiefs from the yard.

JOHN JACKSON . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought this shawl to our house on the 30th of July - Mrs. Gladding came in while he was there.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-173

1395. MARY SAYWER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of Augustus Boulland .

AUGUSTUS BOULLAND. The prisoner was employed by me as a shoe-binder . On the morning of the 3d of August she and several other women came to my house for work, but I was not at home.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes, pawned by the prisoner, on the 3d of August.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-174

1396. MARY SAWYER was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , two pairs of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of Augustus Boulland .

AUGUSTUS BOULLAND. On the morning of the 20th of of August, the prisoner and some others came for work. I came out of the parlour to serve, and to pay them. I missed a pair of shoes from some others, and immediately inquired if any one had moved them - they all said they had not. I said I was sure some of the binders had taken them, and I would send for an officer - the prisoner then pulled out two pairs, and said she was very sorry.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I produce the shoes which I got from Mr. Boulland.

Prisoner's Defence. I unpinned my shawl and set down my basket. I then took up my basket again, and the shoes were in it. I gave them up, and said I knew nothing about them.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-175

1397. SARAH THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , nine yards of cotton, value 8 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and 2 lbs. of bacon, value 1 s. the goods of John Twelves .

ANN TWELVES . I am the wife of John Twelves, we live in New Compton-street . I have known the prisoner between six and seven years - she called at our house about three o'clock on the 24th of July - I was poorly, and was lying down. I begged her to make me a cup of tea. I then went to sleep till my husband came home and awoke me - she was then gone. I did not miss any thing till the next morning.

JOHN BARTLET . I am an officer. I went to St. Giles's workhouse, where the prisoner is a pauper, on the morning of the 25th of July. I asked her what she had done with these articles - she hesitated some time, and at last gave them to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I said I had got the things, and they belonged to a person in Compton-street, who I expected would call for them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-176

1398. ROGER TOBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , a ham, value 9 s. , the goods of Richard Morris .

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a constable. About eight o'clock on the evening of the 23d of August, I saw the prisoner and another boy at the Foundling-hospital gate; the prisoner had a ham on his shoulder, which he said a man had given him to carry to the King's-road; he afterwards said the other boy had stolen it, and given it to him to carry.

JAMES MARKS . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Morris, of Skinner-street . I saw this ham at the watch-house - I knew it by a mark I had made upon it. It was safe in the shop on Tuesday evening, the 23d of August, and I missed it about half-past nine o'clock.

RICHARD MORRIS. I know this ham by a flaw at the bone. I did not miss it till I was told it was lost.

JOHN HULTON . The prisoner was delivered to me at the watch-house - he said a boy of the name of Kelly gave him the ham.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-177

1399. OBADIAH WEBB , JOHN HASWELL , and JOHN MONK , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , five spoons, value 10 s. , the goods of Jasper Vander Sluys .

The Christian name of the prosecutor not being proved, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-178

1400. JOHN DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , two sheets, value 10 s., and a pillow, value 4 s., the goods of John Rayner , in a lodging room .

ANN RAYNER . I am the wife of John Rayner, a stonemason - we live in Old Gravel-lane . I let a furnished room to the prisoner in July. In about a fortnight, I asked him for the sheets, and said I would give him a clean pair - he said they were not dirty, but if I wished for them, he would give them to me in the course of the day; he went away, and did not return. Five days afterwards I opened the door, and found the sheets and pillow gone. I met him two days afterwards in Ratcliff-highway, and asked him what he had done with them; he said he had taken them to his bake-house, as it was too far for him to come home to sleep; but he would bring them to me. I met him a second time and he told me the same. I met him a third time, and he said he would bring them in the course of that day. I asked if he had pawned them, and said, if he would give me the ticket, I would get them out; he went into a passion, and asked what I meant.

THOMAS COOMBS . I am a pawnbroker, of Ratcliff-highway. This pillow and two sheets were pawned at our shop, on the 14th, 15th, and 16th of July, by the prisoner - we lent 3 s. on each of them.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. I met the prisoner on the 13th of August. I asked what he had done with the sheets and pillow; he said they were at the bake-house. I took him home, and found the duplicates of the property; he has been a respectable shopkeeper, but failed.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-179

1401. JANE ROWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two blankets, value 6 s.; a sheet, value 2 s.; a looking-glass, value 1 s., and a frying-pan, value 6 d., the goods of James Power , in a lodging-room .

MARY POWER . I am the wife of James Power, we live in Red Lion-court, Saffron-hill . The prisoner had a ready furnished room of ours, and these articles were a part of the furniture; she eloped on the 8th of July, and next day I called in the watchman, and opened the door. I missed the blankets, sheet, looking-glass, and frying-pan.

JOHN WATSON . I am a watchman. I went to break open the room. I found in a table-drawer a duplicate of a sheet and blanket pawned at Mr. Creed's.

WILLIAM CREED . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoner pawned this blanket - the sheet was pawned by another person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-180

1402. ANN THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , two blankets, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 2 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; a cover lid, value 2 s., and two flat irons, value 1 s., the goods of Jonathan Layton ; in a lodging room .

JONATHAN LAYTON. I live in Jeffery's-buildings ; the prisoner lodged next door in a furnished room of mine - she had been there about five weeks - on the Sunday, I sent my housekeeper to get some money from her, but she could not. I then went myself and missed these articles - I had seen them all safe, except the sheet, the day before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chapel-street - I have a cover lid, two flat irons, and a sheet, pawned by the prisoner at different times in July.

LEONARD LEES . I am a pawnbroker of Tothill-street; I have two blankets pawned at our house, on the 8th of June - I do not know who by; and a pillow, and a sheet, on the 16th of July by the prisoner.

WILTIAM PATMORE . I took her into custody, and found the duplicates upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress - I had been out of work for twelve months and my husband likewise.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-181

1403. CHARLES READ was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 28 lbs. of Sugar, value 14 s. , the goods of Silas Feaver .

SILAS FEAVER. I am a grocer , and live in Shadwell ; on the 5th of July, I went out near my own door I took the prisoner with this raw sugar in his possession - it had been on my counter in two 14 lb. paper bags, and a cloth round them.

JANE FEAVER . I am the prosecutor's sister - about half past five o'clock, on the 5th of July, I was five or six yards from my brother's shop, and saw the prisoner come out with this parcel - I gave information, and my brother went after him.

BENJAMIN BLABY . I took the prisoner, and produce the bags - he said, a boy named Adams, who sleeps in the carts in Spitalfields - told him to go into the shop and fetch it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-182

1404. GEORGE WHITEHAIR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , a feather bed, value 3 l., and a sheet, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Cogan , widow , in a lodging room .

SARAH COGAN. I am a widow; the prisoner hired a second floor back room, furnished, at my house in St. Pancras - he remained a fortnight, and went away on the 15th of July, without notice - this feather bed and a sheet, were a part of the furniture of his room.

JAMES SMITH . I am a watchman; on the 15th of July, I met the prisoner about half past five o'clock in the morning, in Charlotte-street, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's - I asked what he had got in his bundle? he said, a bed which he was going to sell - I asked, if it was his own - he said it was, his wife had gone to Bristol, and he was going to sell the bed to get a little money to go to Bristol after her - I bought the bed of him, and kept it till the 19th of July, when I gave it up.

ANDREW LLOYD . I went to search Smith's premises for the bed - he told me who he got it of, and gave it up - I showed it to Mrs. Cogan, who claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. Having the misfortune to marry an unworthy woman, who has gone to live with another man, and left me with three children, and an aged mother to support, I was driven to distraction, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-183

1405. MARGARET MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , ten yards of silk, value 3 l. 12 s., and a wooden roller, value 2 d., the goods of William Henry Smith , privately in his shop .

HENRY WILLIAM SMITH . I live with my uncle, William Henry Smith, at Westminster . On the 20th of August I put ten yards of black silk on a roller, that was marked, into our window, about eight o'clock in the morning; about seven o'clock in the evening I went to take the goods from the window; I found the window broken close by where the silk had been - it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. What have you got that other piece of silk for? A. To compare with the one which was stolen - they correspond exactly.

JOHN MURRAY . I cut the remainder of the silk into small pieces, and delivered it about to different pawnbrokers. On the 24th of August, I got this yard and a quarter from Mr. Jones; I have compared it, and it appears to be the same; I went on the same evening to the prisoner's husband's house, and the officer found, in my presence two more pieces of silk, of a yard and a quarter each, in a drawer in their back parlour; he then asked if they had any more - the prisoner said there was another cut in the lower drawer; I then found a roller in the cupboard, which I believe the silk had been round, but the mark had been filed off.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I was with Murray at the prisoner's husband's; it was an old iron shop; the prisoner came down stairs; I asked her about the silk - she denied having it, but I found these in the drawer, and then she said there were some she had pawned with Mr. Jones, which she had bought at separate times of two young men.

GEORGE POPLE . I went with Murray to the prisoner's house on the 25th of August; I told her we had a search warrant; she seemed anxious to know what it was for - I said for silk, and asked her, if she had not pawned it at Jones's; she said she had, and she had bought it of a costermonger, who lived in Pye-street; his mother had got it at a tally-shop, and it was too good for him to wear.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this yard and a quarter of silk for 5 s.

Prisoner. I was ill in my bed at the time it was stolen, which my doctor and witnesses can prove; I certainly pawned it, but I had bought it of a young man the day before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-184

1406. ALEXANDER STEPHENSON and DAVID WARDROBE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , three loaves of bread, value 18 d., and a peck of flour, value 2 d., the goods of William Todd , their master ; and WILLIAM SOMERFIELD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

ESTHER TODD . I am the wife of William Todd, a baker , who lives in York-street, Montague-square . Stephenson and Wardrobe were in his service; I sent for Webster, the officer, on the 6th of August, who sat up in my room, on the third floor: between twelve and one o'clock that night, I saw the watchman, William Somerville, walk backwards and forwards, and then come up to the door, and sit down on the steps; I then heard the rattling of a tub in our yard; I came down and let Webster out of a private door into York-street a few minutes afterwards; I saw the other two prisoners at the top of the area steps, talking.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not the men in your business employ the watchman to call them? A. Yes, they do sometimes; but our men do not, to my certain knowledge.

CHARLES LEA . I am a coal merchant, and live in Hampstead-road. On the 3d of August I went to keep watch at the prosecutor's house. I was in the top room, on the third floor, at a quarter past one o'clock, and saw the watchman come and sit down on the steps of the door - he then turned round, apparently at a signal being given, and moved to the other end of the steps, near the area

steps, and I saw a man's arm and hand give him, (through the rails,) what appeared to me to be loaves of bread - they came from a person standing on the area steps - he put it under the left side of his coat, and went round the corner, and I saw no more of him.

SARAH TOLLWORTHY . I sat up with Lea, and saw the watchman come and sit down on the steps. I heard the rattling of a door, and then saw a person hand, at different times, through the railing, two loaves and two half loaves, to William Somerville. He had shut our shop up at ten o'clock that evening - he had been crying the hour shortly before the bread was taken - when he had got it he went into Quebec-street.

Cross-examined. Q. What time do the men get up to go to work? A. At eleven o'clock.

THOMAS WARDEN . I am in the employ of Mr. Todd, and sleep in the same bed with Wardrobe and Stephenson. I go to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, and they get up to make their bread. On Wednesday, the 3d of August, I went to bed between eleven and twelve, and they got up, and came down the steps to go to work. I did not see the officer till the Saturday morning. I then saw Mr. Webster in the shop, but it was Tidds who took the men. Wardrobe told me, on Saturday morning, that if I had told him my mistress had been watching, he would have given me ten shillings.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was sent for, and watched there on the 6th of August. I took Somerfield up, but did not hear any thing said about what had passed on the 3d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-185

1437. THOMAS SHRIMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a half crown, the money of Jesse Philips , his master .

JESSE PHILIPS. I live in St. Giles's ; the prisoner was my errand-boy . I marked two half crowns and a sixpence with my initials, on the 3d of September. I gave three shillings to a lady, a friend of mine, to come and purchase something at the shop - the other half crown I gave to Mr. Simmons, who came and bought a vegetable dish with a cover, and two egg-cups - he gave the half crown to pay for them. I then went into my shop, and found there was no half crown in my till. I asked the prisoner if he had taken any money - he said No. The next morning I got Pound, the street-keeper, and gave the prisoner into custody. He searched him in my presence, and found two half crowns and one shilling and sixpence wrapped up in paper. One of the half crowns was the one I had given John Simmons.

JOHN SIMMONS . Philips gave me the half crown to make a purchase in his shop, and! gave the same half crown to the prisoner.

GEORGE POUND . On the morning of the 4th of September I took the prisoner - in his left hand trousers' pocket I found two half crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-186

1408. MARY JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a sovereign, the money of William Robert Weible , her master .

WILLIAM ROBERT WEIBLE. I am a publican - the prisoner lived servant with me. On the 4th of August, a little before two o'clock, I put a sovereign into a box in the bar, and in the evening, at eight, I missed it. I sent for an officer, who came and found the sovereign on her. She told the other servant that a letter had been received from her mother with a sovereign in it.

Prisoner. I went to sweep the room after some gentlemen, between one and two o'clock, and found the sovereign in the saw-dust.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM BARRATT . I was sent for, about nine o'clock, to search the prisoner. She resisted violently, and I was forced to tie her hands. When I got her to the watch-house she contrived, with her left hand, to drop her pocket; I took it up, and asked her if it was her's; she said it was not; I opened it, and found a sovereign, a sixpence, and some copper in it. On the following morning, before the Magistrate, she acknowledged it was her pocket; she said the sixpence was his and the sovereign, but she knew nothing about the copper.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-187

1409. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HILL . I am a publican . The prisoner was in my employ as pot-boy , and was entrusted to receive money. He never accounted to me for any money received from Mr. Robert Campion.

ROBERT CAMPION . I paid Charles Evans, on Thursday, the 8th of September , or the Friday morning, three single shillings and a penny piece, for his master, Mr. Hill.

WILLIAM HILL re-examined. Q. When did you balance your accounts with your servant? A. On Friday, about eight o'clock, and he received this money of Mr. Campion about nine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-188

1410. SARAH OLIVIA PINCHBACK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , two pelisses, value 20 s.; a gown, value 1 s.; a habit-shirt, value 3 s., and a pair of stockings, value 1 s., the goods of Anthony Cooper , her master .

ANTHONY COOPER. The prisoner lived in my service about three weeks, and was about to leave me on the 24th of August. I desired to see her clothes, to which she said she had no objection, for it was the usual practice in places where she had been. We opened a bundle, but she said she had lost the key of her box. I took it up and opened it. I sent for an officer, and we found in it two pelisses, a gown, some sugar, some soap, and a habit-shirt, belonging to me - she begged for mercy.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am the officer. I searched the box, and found the articles here produced. The prisoner was upon her knees asking for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZA MORGAN . I am a laundress, and live in Beaufort-buildings, Strand. I have known the prisoner seven years; she has been an honest industrious girl; she was greatly affected at the death of her brother; and as she was in St. Martin's School they would not let her go and see him buried. I believe it has affected her mind.

Two other witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent

character, one of whom stated that he would again take her into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18250915-189

1411. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , two sheets, value 7 s., the goods of Joseph Morgan , in a lodging room .

JOSEPH MORGAN. I let the prisoner a ready-furnished room, about six weeks ago; he was out for some time, and came home on the 13th of September, and went out again in a minute or two - he appeared to me to have something round his waist. I ran up stairs and missed the sheets off the bed in his room, and a pan from an adjoining room.

WILLIAM KEELEY . I lodge at Mr. Morgan's. I followed the prisoner, and saw him go into Mr. Peachy's shop, the pawnbrokers. I went in and saw two sheets lying before him on the counter - I fetched Morgan.

JOSEPH MORGAN re-examined. Q. Did you go to the pawnbroker's? A. Yes; and there I saw this pair of sheets, and this odd one, laying on the counter - the pawnbroker gave them to the officer.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the sheets. I found another sheet in his trousers.

Prisoner. I had been drinking all the evening before, and did not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-190

1412. JAMES SIMMONS and BENJAMIN INGRAM , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , ten loaves of bread, value 5 s. , the goods of James Gray .

JAMES GRAY. I am a baker , and live in Peter-street, Westminster . The prisoner Simmons lived with me about six weeks, or two months, and on the 12th of August, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, I missed twelve loaves out of a bin; one of the witnesses came and told me, that they saw Simmons take it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you not at the making up of a stakes for a fight between Mr. Beresford and Mr. Lawson the night before? A. Yes, I was. I went about nine o'clock, and remained about two hours.

Q. Did you see your bread after that? A. Yes.

Q. Did you count your loaves? A. No; but the tiers of bread were both full.

NICHOLAS HARWOOD . I am a butcher. I live opposite to Gray. On the 12th of August, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw Simmons standing at the door. Ingram went and took an empty basket, and they went in together. Ingram came out with the basket of bread - Simmons came and shut the door. I went and told Mr. Gray of it in the course of the day.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. In my own parlour, looking through the windows - they were 4 lb. loaves. I told Mr. Gray about noon.

GEORGE POPLE . I am the officer. I took Ingram into custody, and found a basket at his lodgings.

SIMMONS' Defence. My master did not come in from making the stakes good till one o'clock in the morning, and the boy was serving from eight o'clock till nine, and then Mrs. Gray came and served in the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-191

1413. CHARLOTTE DEVEREUX was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , two sheets, value 5 s.; a blanket, value 1 s., and a chair, value 1 s., the goods of Eugene M'Carthy , in a lodging-room .

EUGENE M'CARTHY. I live on Saffron-hill . I let the prisoner a room for about six months. On the 8th of August, she was getting her things ready to go away. I went into the room, and missed two sheets, a blanket, and a chair.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. I have two sheets pawned by the prisoner; one on the 2d of August, and one on the 3d.

PETER CREED . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I go out to sell sweet stuff, I was short of sugar, and I took these things, meaning to replace them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-192

1418. ANN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a shawl, value 2 s.; three half-handkerchiefs, value 18 d., and a yard of calico, value 3 d. , the goods of Henry Hammer .

THOMAS MILLER . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Hammer. I remember the prisoner coming to his shop on the 5th of August; she was looking at some shawls, and they did not agree about the price; she then asked to look at some cotton, and while the young man, who served her, was turning round, I saw her put the shawl into a basket in her hand: I took no notice of it; she then asked to look at some stockings, and said if he would take 10 d. a pair for them she would take three pairs; I then went out and got an officer; she then took up a parasol and asked me if she did not look handsome; I said she was quite killing; as she was going out of the shop, I asked her if she could not agree about the shawl; she said No, and went out of the shop; I followed, and brought her back, saying, I would just look at the contents of her basket; she said she had nothing but what she had purchased - I opened it and found the shawl.

CHARLES DAVY . I am in the employ of Mr. Hammer. I remember the prisoner coming to look at some shawls; she did not buy any but bought a remnant of calico, for which she paid 4 d.; she then looked at some other things; when she was brought back, I saw the basket opened, and the shawl found in it; she was about an hour in the shop.

THOMAS MOODY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. I saw Miller take the shawl from the basket - I afterwards searched her at the office, and found three half-shawls, and a piece of calico, which she had bought, and a piece of calico, which she had not bought.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-193

1412. MARY SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a gown, value 3 s. , the goods of John Wells .

GEORGE POYLE . I am in the employ of John Wells, of Broad-street, Bloomsbury . On the 24th of August, I was

at the window, and saw the prisoner come into the shop, and go out again; I did not miss any thing; I received some information soon afterwards - I went to Matthews', and saw the gown - I had seen it safe in our shop just before she came in.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner came to our shop on the 24th of August, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon; she offered a gown to pawn, but I saw part of a duplicate on the neck of it - I asked if it was her own - she said two women gave it to her to pawn, and they were at the door - I went to the door but there were no women there.

JOHN KENDRICK . I am beadle. I took the prisoner, and have the gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in St. Giles's, and met two women who lived in a house with me - one of them went away, and the other asked me to go and have some beer with her; she went back, and came back in about a quarter of an hour, and said she had had some words with her husband, and asked if I would pawn it for her; she directed me to go to the corner of the gateway; the pawnbroker asked me if it was my own - I said it was given to me by a woman in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-194

1358. ANN SPENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a whittle, value 5 s. , the goods of William Gofton .

JOHN WENTWORTH . I am in the employ of Mr. William Gofton, a pawnbroker , of Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 8th of September I hung up a whittle in the shop - I saw it safe about twelve o'clock, and about three, Lawes came and gave me information.

GEORGE LAWES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to our shop, in Duke-street, Manchester-square, about half-past two o'clock, and brought a whittle - she wanted 3 s. upon it; in folding it up I saw a ticket on the corner; I then asked if it was her own - she said Yes, she had had it two months; she caught hold of the mark, and tore it in two; I then asked her where she had stolen it from: she said from the linen-draper's below: I went there, but they had not lost one. I came back, and the people in our shop had got the mark from her, and I found it was Mr. Gofton's.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-195

1417. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of William Thomas Wilkins .

MARGARET JONES . I am in the employ of Mr. Grover, a confectioner. Mr. Wilkins lives nearly opposite to us, in Cranbourne-passage . On the 10th of September I saw the prisoner and another lad near his house - I went out to drive the boys away, but before I got to the door the prisoner went into Wilkins' shop, and took a pair of shoes - I went and told Mrs. Wilkins of it, and the prisoner dropped them. A gentleman stopped him, but he got away, and was stopped again.

SARAH FRANCES WILKINS . I am the wife of William Thomas Wilkins. I pursued the prisoner, and saw him stopped - he dropped the shoes.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I saw the two boys running - the prisoner was taken, and the other got away.

Prisoner. I only knocked them down - I did not take them.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-196

1418. MARY PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a shirt, value 1 s., and two shifts, value 2 s. , the goods of Ann Hause .

MARY HEMMINGS . I know Mrs. Hause's house, on Saffron-hill - she takes in washing . I saw the prisoner near her house last Thursday week, about a quarter past seven o'clock. The door was open, and there were shirts and shifts drying in the passage; she went in, and took them off the line - I gave an alarm; she got away about a hundred yards, but was taken.

ANN HAUSE . I live at home with my mother, whose name is Ann; she is a widow . We had linen in our passage to dry - I heard the alarm, and went into the passage, but there was no one there; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running - she threw the things out of her left hand.

JAMES ISAAC . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner with a number of persons round her. This is the bundle - it contains one sheet and two shifts.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WILCOX . I was standing two doors from Saffron-hill, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running - she threw down the bundle; I took hold of her hand, and said, "What is the matter?" she said "Nothing - I am going to my husband;" I said, "What did you throw the things down for?

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250915-197

1419. MARY O'DONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , two gowns, value 5 s., and a spencer, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Fox .

ANN FOX . My husband's name is Charles - we live at No. 8, Gardener's-lane, Westminster . The prisoner lodged at my house four nights - about half an hour after she was gone I missed two gowns and a spencer, which had been in a trunk under her bed. I went after her, and overtook her - I asked her to come back - she was loath, but I said if she did not I would get assistance to make her; when she came back I looked her all over, but I could not find any thing. I then got an officer, and looked over her again, and then I found some scissars, which were mine - she was then taken to the watch-house, and the officer found some duplicates upon her.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house. I searched her, and found this ticket in her boot.

GEORGE WALKER . I live with Mr. Young, a pawnbroker, in St. Martin's-lane. I produce two gowns and a spencer, which were pawned for 14 s., by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-198

1420. THOMAS POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one hundred and twelve gas light burners, value 12 s,; five brass sockets, value 6 d.,; nine brass elbows, value 2 s.; nine union joints, value 1 s.; a drill, value 6 d.; a tap, value 2 s.; a pair of stocks and dyes, value 15 s.; and three padlocks, value 1 s., the goods of the Ratcliff Gas Light and Coke Company ; two pairs of stocks and dyes, value 30 s., the goods of William Stone , and a saw, value 4 d. , the goods of William Beaver .

WILLIAM STONE. I am head engineer of the Ratcliff Gas Company - it is embodied by a private Act of Parliament. I know this pair of stocks and dyes to be their property; here are two pairs of stocks and dyes, belonging to me - the prisoner had been in our employ, as lamplighter - he left it on the Saturday before the 6th of August - in consequence of some information, we went to the Royalty Theatre, with an officer, where he was employed - he was there; some part of the property was found in the retort house, and the other in the gasometer - other persons had access to those places.

JOHN DUNN . My father is proprietor of the Royalty Theatre. The prisoner was engaged to work the gas works, belonging to the theatre - he was to find his own tools, such as stocks and dyes, in case of any accident occurring to the pipes - I did not see him bring them, but I heard him acknowledge he had brought them on the 4th or 5th of August.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the poor man been employed in the gas works for some time? A. I do not know - he said, the stocks and dyes were his own property, and he brought them there for his own use - he said, his brother was remaining as his substitute in the gas works, and he was to give in his resignation on the ensuing Saturday.

THOMAS MEADOWS . I am employed by the Ratcliff Gas Company, to repair shop lights - the prisoner was a lamplighter, to superintend the works at the Royalty Theatre - I found a pair of stocks and dyes in the retort house, which Mr. Stone states, were his private property - these are them, they were taken out of my shop - I have used them scores of times - they are worth about 25 s. a pair - one pair has got the size of three different tubes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they all appear to be of use at the Theatre? A. Yes. I have been two or three years in the Company's service - the prisoner was there before me, and he lately quitted them to go to the Royalty Theatre.

WILLIAM SOMERS . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the articles - he admitted that he had brought them from the Company.

JOSEPH ARDEN . I am an officer of the Thames police - I found three locks belonging to the Company, at the prisoner's house.

Prisoner's Defence. The pipes are very tender, if a little thing touches them, they break in half, and being called out frequently at night, I got those things to do what was necessary - they were given to me by a person named Jones, who is now dead, to prevent the gas smelling in the street. Being in some distress at home, in consequence of a child dying, and my wife being but four weeks out of her confinement, I had not returned them, but I told them where I got them, and gave them up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-199

1421. MARY PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a watch, value 40 s.; a seal, value 40 s.; a key, value 20 s.; a ring, value 10 s., and a ribbon, value 3 d., the goods of George Clapp , in his dwelling-house ; and JAMES SMITH, alias HENRY BULLER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

GEORGE CLAPP. I am coachman to Captain Swain, of Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. I met the prisoner Price in Bartholomew-fair, about nine o'clock in the evening of the 8th of September - we went about the fair, and had something to drink - we left it about half past eleven - I had been with her about six weeks before - I took her to my master's stable, No. 10, Portman-mews ; we got there about twelve - we slept together - I awoke about six in the morning, and missed my silver watch, a gold seal, key, and a ring, from under my head, under the pillow - she was gone, and had left the stable door open - I went and gave information, and found my watch, which was stopped at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you know where this woman lived? A. No, the first time I was with her was at the stable - I had not given her any thing, but I should in the morning - I had 7 s. in my pocket, which she did not touch - she told me she was in service.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. On the 7th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor came to my house, and gave me information - I went to the pawnbroker's, in Tothill-street, and stopped the watch; in about an hour Mr. Barnes came to me, and said, he had stopped the watch - I went to the house, and found James Smith there - I searched him, and found this watch, seal, and ribbon; he said, it was his brother's property - he did not say how long it had been his brother's; it was then in the possession of the pawnbroker, and the seal and ribbon were in his hat - he said, he knew nothing at all about it, they were all identified by the prosecutor - Smith was asked, if he had the key, and denied it - I was there when he said it was his brother's.

JAMES BARNES . I am in the employ of Graham and Stocks. On the morning of the 7th of September, about half-past seven o'clock, the prosecutor and the officer, came to our house and described the watch, seal, and key; about nine o'clock I went in to breakfast, and Mr. Stocks came in and asked me if I thought this was the watch; I said I thought it was; I went out and went to Timbrell; he said he thought it was; I then ran home; I said, "Who gave this watch?" the prisoner Smith said he did, and that it was his brother's, who lived in Oxford-road; I asked him if he had any seal or key belonging to it, as it was going, and lately would up; he said he had not. The officer came in and I gave him in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear in great trepidation? A. No, not at all - he was not so much confused as I was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PRICE'S Defence. I picked up this man between ten and eleven o'clock, very much intoxicated, and then he left three other women - he took me to a booth in the fair, and shewed me a person who, he said, was his brother; he

took the watch from his pocket, in Oxford-street, and wound it up, and then gave it into my hand; I went with him to the stable, and I told him I could not stop all night. When I came away I could not awake him, but I came down stairs with the watch.

SMITH'S Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the crime. I have known this female six months and have gone backwards and forwards to her apartment; on the evening of the 6th of September, I had been at work, I went to the Fair, and drank a little freely; in coming home I suppose I sat down at the step of a door in Bloomsbury, and dropped asleep; when I awoke I went to the prisoner's lodgings; her door was not locked; I went in; she came home in the morning, and said she had been with a gentleman who had entrusted her with this watch, and she was to pawn it and return him the duplicate.

GEORGE CLAPP re-examined. Q. You had been at the Fair drinking? A. Yes, I had been there four or five hours - I had only had two small glasses of gin and a little beer: I am no drinker. Upon my oath I did not pull out this watch in the street - there was another girl with the prisoner, and she fared with us - she went with us to Regent-street - there were some other young girls in the Fair whom I did not know.

JURY. Q. Did any thing pass between you as to what you were to pay her? A. No, I had done no more than treated her - I should have paid her in the morning - I meant to have got up and gone home with her.

Seven witnesses gave Smith an excellent character.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-200

1422. NATHANIEL NUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , two half-crowns, twelve shillings, six sixpences, and a sovereign , the monies of Robert Bryant .

MARY BRYANT . I am the wife of Robert Bryant, who sells fruit in Whitechapel . The prisoner was employed by us for five or six weeks, to sell fruit in the street , as my husband was taken very ill, and could not go out himself - we told the prisoner on the 5th of July, to go to Mr. Green's, in Spitalfield's market, to see if cherries were come in - he came back and said there was a cart of cherries in, and asked for a sovereign, which I gave him - he went away and came back, and said he had bought five sieves of cherries, and he wanted another sovereign - I gave him two half-crowns, twelve shillings, and six sixpences - he then went away and I saw him no more till he was at the office.

ROBERT GREEN . The prisoner stated, that he came to me and bought the cherries, but I never saw him.

WILLIAM HORNE . I apprehended the prisoner. He denied any knowledge of the prosecutor, but I went there, and he was identified.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-201

1423. MICHAEL KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , a pair of shoes, value 4 s., and five pieces of Kerseymere, value 8 s. , the goods of James Lodger .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-202

1424. MARY JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a pair of shoes, value 18 d. , the goods of John Wilkes Dixon .

HANNAH DIXON . My husband's name is John Wilkes Dixon; we live in York-place, York-street . I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, going from my door, and hiding something under her shawl, on the 24th of August. I ran after and stopped her. I saw one of my shoes under her shawl, and said "You have robbed me." I held her till the officer came, and my shoes were found on her. I had seen them safe just before - she said she was in distress, and took them for want.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman, who lives at No. 10, Wheeler-street; she was going for milk to where this person lives - she told me to stand in the court; she came out and gave me these shoes, and said "Go, run home with them for me, and I will come with the milk."

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-203

1425. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Henry Harben the elder , and Henry Harben the younger .

GEORGE SHARP . I live with Mr. Henry Harben, a cheesemonger , who is in partnership with his son, at High-street, Bloomsbury . Between four and five o'clock on the evening of the 25th of July, I saw the prisoner steal a piece of bacon from the window, while I was standing on the left side of the shop. I gave an alarm, pursued and came up with him, and took it from him.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman dropped this bit of bacon, I took it up. I have a son now worth 1000 l. in Bermondsey parish - I never took any thing in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined Nine Days .

Reference Number: t18250915-204

1426. SARAH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a yard of muslin, value 1 s., and a pair of stocking, value 1 s. , the goods of William Thomas Loftus .

MARIA LOFTUS . I am the wife of William Thomas Loftus. I have lived with my mother in Bedford-place , during his absence from England; the prisoner was in the employ of my mother as housemaid . I lost several articles, and had suspicion of some of the servants. I told the prisoner I had lost my stockings, and said, "As I am going out, have the goodness to let me find them in their place when I come home;" she made no answer, but went out of the room. I returned home, and did not find them; next day I missed other things. I then asked the cook in the prisoner's presence, if she would have the goodness to let me look into her box, which she immediately opened. I then said to the prisoner "Will you open yours?" she did so - the cook then gave me a bag, which she said was the prisoner's. I was about to open it, but she snatched it out of my hand, put her hand into it and took something out, which she put behind her into the box. I looked to see what it was, and it was a yard of muslin, and my stockings, with the marks picked out.

Prisoner. I bought the stockings of Mr. Steven's, in Aldgate; they cost 1 s. 6 d. a pair - I have the other pair at home. The muslin was in the room, and the child had it to play with - it was not there with an intent to steal. - Witness. The muslin had been in the drawer, and the

stockings likewise. I sent for an officer, and had her taken. I asked her if the muslin was mine, and she said it was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JURY to MR. LOFTUS. Q. Were there any children playing in the room? A. There was a little boy, but the muslin was in a drawer, which he could not open - he is but two years old.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-205

1427. THOMAS HARRIS and WILLIAM ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 14 lbs. of cheese, value 10 s. , the goods of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS. I am a shop-keeper, and sell cheese . I went on the 1st of July, and bought half a cheese in Whitechapel - I brought it home.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 1st of July he bought this cheese - it came home about eight o'clock, was in the shop at ten, and a few minutes afterwards I saw the prisoner Robinson turn out of the shop door; I first looked for my weights, but they were all right. I then missed the cheese - it weighed 15 lbs, at first, but I had cut a quarter of a pound off it; I looked about, but could not see any one; I saw it at Lambeth-street the next day - I knew it by a particular mark which I had cut.

ISSAC FOOT . On Friday, the 1st of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I saw Harris with the cheese under his arm, and the other prisoner with him; they were about three hundred yards from Davis' house - after they had passed me a few yards they began to run - I pursued Harris, and took him with the cheese. I said to him, "Is that your brother?" he said it was; I told him to call him - he did, and he came back; I took them into custody, and went round the next morning. I found Davis had lost the cheese.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARRIS' Defence. I was going along Whitechapel - a countryman came to me, and asked me to buy it for 8 s.; he said there were 14 lbs. of it - I pulled all my money out of my pocket, which was 6 s. 8 d., which he took. This young man was a stranger to me.

ROBINSON's Defence. I saw the witness with this young man. I came to see what was the matter, and was taken.

HARRIS - GUILTY Aged 19.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-206

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1428. GEORGE HAMERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , at St. George, Hanover-square , thirty-six silver forks, value 23 l., and twelve silver spoons, value 9 l., the goods of Thomas Tringham Smith , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH JEFFRIES . I am housemaid to Mr. Thomas Tringham Smith, who lives in Charles-street, Berkeley-square , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. On the 14th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a little girl alarmed me - I went out, and saw the prisoner going out of my master's area gate; he had an umbrella: the area door was open. I gave an alarm, and he was taken in five minutes - I did not lose sight of him for above a minute, and am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM RICKETTS . I keep a public-house in Charles-street. I was standing opposite the area-gate when this young woman ran up - I followed the prisoner into Hill-street; he was pursued, and secured, and at the watch-house the officer found thirty-six silver forks and twelve spoons in his pocket.

ROBERT TURNER . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner, searched him at the watch-house, and found twelve dessert spoons, twenty-four large forks, and twelve small ones.

SARAH JEFFRIES. My master's crest is upon them - they were taken from the butler's pantry.

CHARLES BROWN . I am butler to Mr. Smith. I left the plate safe in the pantry about one o'clock; it was all safe then: they are worth a good deal.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18250915-207

1429. CHARLES BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , a watch, value 10 l.; a chain, value 2 l.; a seal, value 10 s., and a watch-key, value 3 s., the goods of Edward Rayment , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Rayment , widow .

EDWARD RAYMENT. I live with my mother, Sarah Rayment, who is a widow, and keeps a public-house - it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - she pays the rent and taxes. On the 23d of July, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I went up stairs to brush the billiard-table, and in about half an hour the prisoner and three others came in together. I put the brushes away, and took a pair of boots into the next room. I had laid my watch on a table on the left hand side of the room - the prisoner sat himself down by the side of that table. I then went into the next room with the boots, returned in about two minutes, and immediately missed the watch - the prisoner was also absent. I spoke to the others, and sent for two officers - Gleed came, and in about twenty minutes he brought the prisoner back. He came running up stairs into the billiard-room, and said "What is the matter?" I said "You know very well - I have lost my watch, and you are the person who has got it." He denied all knowledge of it several times, and at last one of his companions spoke to him in Hebrew, and then said in English, "You had better give it up, for you will get us all into trouble." I said he had better give it to me, or they would all be obliged to go to the Office. The prisoner came to me in a few minutes and said, if I would not trouble him with the law, he would produce the property. I said all I wanted was my property. He said I should have it, if Gleed would go with him and fetch it - Gleed went and brought it back - he was detained - the watch is gold, and worth 10 l. alone.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not go up to him and say I know it is a joke? A. No - I said at first to the persons in the room, if that they had taken it in

a joke I did not allow such liberties - the prisoner was not there then - when I spoke of a joke I thought one of them might have had it in his pocket - I found that the prisoner lived about half-a-mile off.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I was sent for, and searched the three persons in the room. I found nothing about them. I then went down stairs, and met the prisoner coming into the door of the house. I went up stairs with him, and Rayment said, "I think you have got my watch;" he said he had not; I only heard him say that once. The other three talked with him in Hebrew. Rayment then said, "All I want is my property, for I think it might be done in a lark." The prisoner said, "Gleed, if you will go with me I will give you the watch."

Q. Did he say any thing about not being prosecuted? A. Not in my hearing - I was on the other side of the room, which is large.

Q. Before you brought him into the room, had you said something very unpleasant had occurred about a watch? A. Yes; and then he said he knew nothing about it; the prosecutor said he must be the person, for nobody else had left the room.

Q. Look at your deposition before the Magistrate - you said there "He still denied any knowledge of it?" A. That in the room; he denied it at first in the street; I did not know that what he said in the street was evidence. I have been an officer twenty-six years. One of the Jews said to him, "You must be the man, for nobody else has left the room." They said they would not be charged with things they were innocent of. He said "Gleed, if you will go home with me into Cox-square, Petticoat-lane, I will give you the watch;" and when I got near the square, he asked me to lend him my pocket handkerchief. He went into his house, and came out with it in a handkerchief, and gave it to me, saying, "This is the watch, Gleed, that I took off the table of Mr. Rayment's house; I thought some gentlemen had been playing at billiards, and had left it on the table; I did not take it with an intention to steal it."

Cross-examined. Q. As long as you treated it seriously he was not willing to communicate about it - but directly Rayment said he only wanted the property, he proposed to deliver it up? A. Yes.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I accompanied Gleed to the Wellington public-house, in Shoreditch - the prisoner ran up into the billiard-room - Gleed has stated what he said - I only heard him deny all knowledge of it once - I was not with him in the street - he said he took it out of a lark - it is a large room, I was against the door - they were talking together on the other side of the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I entered the room the watch lay on the table - the three persons knew I had it, and I was only down stairs - the moment I went up I said "Here is the watch; I did not know who it belonged to - I took it out of a joke" - he told the Magistrate he believed it was a joke - the moment I heard it owned, I said I had got it, and would produce it. I have been to that house for three years.

EDWARD RAYMENT. I never saw him before.

Prisoner to GLEED. Q. Did not the witness tell the Magistrate he had seen me at the room before? A. He did not, nor that he had known you before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18250915-208

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1430. JOHN PEDLEY was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-209

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1431. WILLIAM WYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 13 lbs. of annatto, value 2 l. 5 s. 6 d., the goods of William Emberick , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM EMBERICK. I am a dyer , and live in Worship-street . The prisoner was in my employ, and generally comes on a Sunday morning to attend to the blue vats. On Sunday, the 31st of July, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was at the stair case window, and saw him go down the yard into the dye-house - he came back, up the yard, and, as I supposed, went into the warehouse - he had business in the dye-house, but not in the warehouse. I went down stairs and found the warehouse door nearly closed, and him inside - he seemed rather alarmed at seeing me; I said "Wynn, what are you doing here?" he answered

"Nothing, Sir;" I said "You have no business here; I am sure you are doing something which you ought not;" he said "No, Sir." I observed that his hands were all over annatto, and said "Where is that annatto which you have taken out of the cask?" there was a cask of it in the warehouse - he said "Here it is;" pointing behind him; I said "Hand it over to me;" he handed the parcel to me - I went out of the warehouse, and remonstrated with him on his conduct - he walked down the yard - I said "Don't think to escape, for you shall not:" he said "No, Sir;" I turned round to speak to the servant girl, who stood in the passage - he ran down the yard, and got over the gate - I went to the front door - he was running along the street - I called Stop him! - a man ran and brought him back to me - I gave him in charge. The parcel of annatto was in the warehouse - it had been taken out of the cask, and wrapped in paper - it weighed 9 lbs., and cost me 3 s. 6 d. a pound - he said it was his first offence. I was in the warehouse the night before, it was not taken out of the cask then.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long has he lived with you? A. Since May, 1821, and was one of my best workmen - the parcel of annatto was on a cask in the warehouse - he had been in the dye-house, but had not performed his duty there. I have two boys in the warehouse - they leave at eight o'clock at night.

COURT. Q. How near was the annatto cask from the parcel? A. It was on a cask close to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly declare I never touched any thing - I have a wife and three children in the greatest distress.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 30. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-210

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1432. BENJAMIN BULLOCK and MOSES SAMUEL were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house

of George Richardson , about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 28th of July , at St. Botolph, Aldgate , (he and others being therein,) and stealing six pairs of spectacles, value 46 s., his property .

GEORGE RICHARDSON. I live in Upper East Smithfield , in the parish of St. Botolph, without Aldgate, and am an optician . On the 28th of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners two or three times - my apprentice pointed them out to me, as they passed my window. I gave directions to my workmen, in the back shop, to be on the alert; and very soon after, I saw them cross on the opposite side of the way, and soon after Bullock placed himself in front of the square of glass, which was broken before - it was cracked in three directions - the piece was not out; it was sufficiently secure to keep together, unless force was used. Samuel then came up, and placed himself in front of the window, near the door. Bullock immediately put his hand under his apron, and I saw him cutting the putty from the glass. After he had been at work some time, he forced the glass in with his hands still under his apron. Salmon then came alongside him, and Bullock put his hand through the aperture which had been made, and took out six pairs of spectacles, which lay in a little tray; they both turned from the window, and were moving off very gently - they were close together. Samuel concealed Bullock from persons who were passing; they went from the window. I went out and laid hold of Bullock with the spectacles in his hand. I then laid hold of Samuel, who was separating from him - my men came out. I came to the warehouse, searched Bullock, and found a piece of wire bent at each end on him - Samuel had nothing - the spectacles cost me 46 s. Bullock reached his arm half into the shop to get them.

THOMAS OBORNE, JUN . I am apprentice to the prosecutor. I was in the back shop, and saw the prisoners at the window. I saw Samuel by the door, and Bullock by the glass, which I afterwards perceived was cracked. A man came to the door, and wished to speak to my master. I came into the front shop to call my master down, and opened the door to let the man in - he came in. I then saw the prisoners walk from the window. I called my master, and while he was coming down stairs, I looked at the window where Bullock had been, and found it had been cracked. I had opened the shutters about a quarter past six o'clock - it was safe then. I pointed them out to my master standing on the opposite side of the way, and saw no more of them till he had secured them, when I assisted in taking them to the watch-house. I saw Bullock drop the spectacles on the stones, after my master had secured them - Goddard picked them up.

SAMUEL GODDARD . I am in Mr. Richardson's employ. On the 28th of July, I was in the kitchen under the shop window, and saw the prisoners talking by the shop. I looked up to watch, and in a few minutes they came up to the window, placed themselves there and said "Now look out, look out;" the other prisoner replied "It is all right, go on." I then thought it time to go up. I spoke to my master, who stood in the passage, then went round the back way, and met my master, who went out in front - I met him with the prisoners. Bullock said "We have done nothing." I saw him drop the spectacles from his right hand on the ground - I picked them up, followed him to the watch-house, and gave them to my master.

THOMAS OBORNE, SEN . I am headborough of St. Botolph, without Aldgate. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house with the spectacles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

One witness gave Bullock a good character.

BULLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SAMUEL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of Larceny only.

Respited

Reference Number: t18250915-211

1433. CHARLES STIRLING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a saddle, value 2 l.; a bridle, value 10 s., and a gelding, price 20 l. , the property of James Martin, sen .

JAMES MARTIN, JUN . I am a riding-master. In July last I was employed by my father, who lives in Mary-le-bone Place, Burton Crescent; his riding-school is in Bidborough-street, Burton-street . On the 14th of July, about the middle of the day, the prisoner came there to hire a horse; he said he wanted it for a few hours ride, to go to Poplar, for which he paid me 8 s. 9 d. It was a grey gelding, with a bridle and saddle, and worth twenty or thirty guineas - he took it away. I did not observe which way he rode, he said he should be back in a few hours, but he did not return. I saw the horse again on the 2d or 3d of August, and had seen him at his mother's a day or two before.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. His mother is a lady living at Camden-town? A. Yes; he is eighteen or nineteen years old; his sister had been a pupil of ours - she met with an accident; he came to the school afterwards, and got acquainted with my father; he took the remainder of her lessons. I went with my father on the 2d of August to his mother's, but I remained outside on horseback; my father sent me for an officer. I then went in and saw the prisoner; I believe he had told my father that he had rode the horse to Windsor.

HENRY THUMWOOD . I am a coach-master at Windsor. On the 15th of July, I saw the prisoner at Windsor, riding up and down the town on a grey pony. I told my porter if that gentleman should pass, and should like to sell his pony, I should like to buy it. I went to my farm, which is a little way out of Windsor, and when I returned next night my porter spoke to me, and in a few minutes the prisoner came into my office; the porter said, that was the gentleman who wished to sell his pony. I accompanied him down to the Swan Inn, had it out of the stable; the bridle and saddle were put on. I rode it up the town, and on returning asked him the price of it; he said his father had given 20 l. for it, but as it was not able to carry him, it was for sale, he asked 14 l. or 15 l. for it; it had two broken knees, and was rather lame - I offered 10 l.; he said he could not think of taking that; we went on to the Swan, he at last said he wanted money, and I should have it. I rode it home, and said I should send the money down to Lillywhite, the landlord, who would pay him, as he owed them a bill. I asked his address, he gave his father's address, Mr. Charles Stirling. I have lost the direction; I sent it up by one of our coachmen, and have not seen it since. I sent the money about nine o'clock that evening (Saturday), sent to town next morning, and found the address correct.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. You are a coach-master? A. Yes, I am in partnership with Mr. Lillywhite,

who keeps the Swan; the prisoner did not apply to me to sell it; I did not hear of his having been robbed by some women - I think his bill was about 2 l.

RICHARD MORTON . I live with Mr. Thumwood - he told me, if the prisoner wished to sell the pony, he should like to buy it - this was on Friday - I said nothing to the prisoner about it, but on Saturday he came to the office, and asked me at what time the coaches went to London - I said, at six o'clock, nine, three, and five, and that the fare was, 4 s. outside, and 7 s. in - to the best of my recollection, he said, "I was very tipsy last night." I said, "Yes, Sir, I saw you were, the back of your coat was very dusty, and I thought you had had a fall;" he said, yes, he had a violent fall; I said, "I thought you were out of your mind" - he then said, the pony did not exactly suit him, it was not big enough, he thought he should sell it, and have a bigger, which would suit him better. I said, "If you wish to sell it, I have no doubt my master will buy it;" I do not recollect that I had said a word about my master buying it before - he offered it for sale first; I asked the price, he said, about 14 l. for the saddle, bridle, and pony, and that he gave 20 l. for it - he did not say he would call again in the evening, but he did come, and my master that evening gave me ten sovereigns to take to the Swan, to pay for it - I understood my master was to pay the prisoner, which I did, and got a receipt signed C. Sterling.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear, whether you was the first person to offer to buy the horse, or he to sell it? A. I never mentioned a word about buying it, till he said he would sell it - our coach office is at the Swan - I did not know that the horse was detained, but I thought the young man was short of money - I had seen him just before dusk, riding to and fro in the town - many people thought him mad - he did not tell me he had been robbed.

JAMES MARTIN, SEN. I have seen the horse in the possession of Thumwood it is mine - I did not see the prisoner from the 14th of July to the 2d of August, when I saw him at his mother's house, No. 47, Park-street, Camden-town - I myself did not know him before - his sister had been a pupil of mine in July, 1824; I did not know where she lived: after the horse was lost, I received two letters, I believe both came from the prisoner - I have lost one, the officer has the other, it is signed, "Anonymous." I went to his mother's house on the 2d of August, and saw Miss Sterling; I told her the purport of my visit, and she fainted away - I called the landlady of the house to her, she recovered a little, and went up stairs, and fainted again on the stairs - the prisoner came down, and I asked if his name was Charles Sterling, he said, Yes - he then walked into the parlour, and sat down - I asked if he hired a horse at my school on the 14th of July last; he said he did; I asked what he had done with it - he said, he had sold it to Mr. Thumwood, coach proprietor of Windsor - I produced the letter, and asked if he had written it - he said, he did - I inquired how I could receive the horse back; he said, he could not tell, but he would remunerate me for the loss at some future period - he would not state exactly what period, but said he should be in possession of money at some other time - I asked if he had any friend who would come forward to guarantee the payment - he said not - I then said, I could not suffer myself to be robbed with impunity, and must give him in charge; my son fetched an officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you never attend the prisoner at the school? A. No. The letter has the Camden-town post-mark upon it. I went to the post-office, and they told me where they lived. My impression is, that he did not intend to steal it, from the penitence and reflection he seemed to have - I really think that to be the case.

The letter was here read, as follows: -

SIR - Your generosity and forbearance towards an unfortunate young man, shall ever be remembered with veneration and gratitude by me. - He has entrusted me with a secret, on which his life depends. Think me not presumptions when I address you a few words on his behalf; he has a mother and a sister, both of them are so honourable, and so fond of him, that were they acquainted with the capital deed he has been guilty of, they would not survive it, I am sure, at the utmost, more than a month - the rest of his family are of the most respectable; and of high rank, both in the Army and Navy, I urge this not in palliation of the crime he has been guilty of, but that you may be induced to spare the feelings of his poor family, by whose exposure and ultimate consequences of the law, they would be involved in misery and despair. He has been driven headlong to commit a crime, at which he now shudders, and recoils back with horror; his conscience gives him such true agony, that I am fearful he will soon labour under an abjuration of intellect - As you are a good man, and a charitable man, forbear the prosecution and exposure for a season. Though I am poor at present, still I hope it will soon be in my power to make you ample compensation for the loss you have sustained by him. Although I am urging a powerful request, yet the case is of such a momentous nature - the fate of three persons are involved in it - the mother, sister, and brother; if the latter were exposed, the two former would certainly fall victims; and, it is for their sakes more than for his own that he now appeals for your clemency and charity, by the practice of which virtues in this instance you will hereafter meet with an equivocal reward. For God's sake treat not this supplication lightly, but exercise your goodness; and as to the loss, if money can cancel it, although, as I said before, I am poor at present, and not able to remunerate you according to your deserts, yet, as soon as it is in my power to do you justice, depend on it I will not fail in the full achievement of my promise.

ANONYMOUS.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, you have heard the testimony, and are best able to judge of the case. I can say with a clear conscience I never intended to steal it; I did not say I was going to Poplar - it is a mistake. I had not the slightest idea of committing a crime at the time; when at Windsor I was unfortunately deprived of what money I had; fell into the company of women of a low description, and was robbed of my money. I had none to defray my bill, and did not know what to do. I should have returned to London immediately if I had had a few shillings. I inquired the fare to town, and should have gone to town and told Mr. Martin immediately, but having no money I could not; and as the offer was made me I sold it, without thinking of the criminality. I returned to town directly, and told a friend of it; he said I had been guilty of a felony, and after a fortnight elapsed, I wrote a letter, as if from a friend.

JAMES MARTIN, JUN. I am certain he said he wanted it to go to Poplar.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-212

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1434. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a watch, value 3 l., the goods of Jenkin Davis , in his dwelling-house .

AMELIA BLOOM . I am sister to Mrs. Davis, of Frog-lane, Lower-road, Islington . On the 8th of August, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner knocked at the door - I opened it, and asked what he wanted; he gave no answer, but pushed himself into the back-room; I stopped him, and asked what he wanted; he said, "I want to know the rent of your shop;" there was a bill up to let it: I said 4 s. a week. He asked me to lend him a rule, cane, or string, to measure the place; I said I had none: he said, "You can find a bit of string somewhere or other I should think." I went to the cupboard, but could find none, and while I was there he said, "Never mind, I will go home and fetch some." I turned my eye up to the mantel-shelf, where the watch had hung, and it was gone. I ran after him, and before he had got half way along the passage I saw the chain hanging out of his hand; I called out Stop thief! nobody heard me, and he got away, but was brought back in less than an hour, by my sister, who was out when he came. I saw it safe a few minutes before he came - I am certain he is the man.

MARY DAVIS . I am the wife of Jenkin Davis. I saw a crowd about my house as I came home, and saw my sister crying; she described the prisoner's person and dress to me - I saw him in less than three quarters of an hour, going towards town, from Islington, with another boy; I did not know him before. I went to several people to lay hold of him, but at last took him myself - I told him he had been in my house, and stolen a watch; he asked what time of day it was, and told me not to catch hold of him - he turned back with me; he and the other lad abused me very much: he said he would punish me for taking hold of him. He had a bundle of matches in one hand, and ballads in the other - he gave them to the other lad; he then took off his hat, and gave him a small parcel about the size of my fist, out of it. I met Cope in a few minutes, and gave him in charge. My sister said he was dressed in a light jacket, nankeen trousers, with a pink stripe in it, and a broken hat - he was dressed so.

THOMAS COPE . I am street-keeper. I was in the Lower-road, and took the prisoner. I found a few matches in his hat; he said he was innocent. He wore a light short jacket, and white trousers.

JENKIN DAVIS. On the 8th of August, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, my watch was safe; I had had it three years, and gave 4 l. for it - I have not found it.

Prisoner's Defence. As soon as she accused me of it I turned back with her.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-213

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1435. RICHARD CLAYTON , WILLIAM TURNER , and HENRY WALDUCK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , twenty-one stuff bodies of hats, value 5 l., and 3 lbs. of fur, value 2 l. , the goods of Charles Constable .

CHARLES CONSTABLE. I live at Cambridge , and carry on a hat manufactory there. Clayton was in my service. On Saturday evening, about seven o'clock, I settled his wages with him; he went out of the shop, not having finished his work, and did not return, I did not miss this property till I found him at Guildhall, with it, and have no doubt of it being mine, though I cannot find a deficiency in my stock. I was fetched to town, and found all the prisoners in custody at Guildhall, with the property - it is worth 7 l.

EDMUND HEALY . I am Mr. Constable's apprentice. - Clayton worked for him. On the Friday before he went he asked me if I would write a direction for him, and I think I saw that direction on a box at Guilhall.

Q. You must know your own writing? A. Yes; but at the time I wrote it I was tipsy. I believe it to be mine, it is to the same purport as I wrote. I went to London after my master; the property appeared very much like my master's; but hats in that state are alike - he did not come to work after Saturday. I saw him off for London at eleven o'clock on Saturday night by the coach - he had nothing with him, but his bundle, which I fetched from his washerwoman. I did not see the direction put on the box; he told me he wanted to send a parcel to his wife, and to direct it to James Turner. I said "Why direct it to him?" he said he wanted him to take it to his wife. I wrote the direction as he desired me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Can any human being identify this property? A. They cannot.

THOMAS NEWMAN . I am clerk to Messrs. Deacon and Co. wharfingers from Cambridge to town. A box was sent to town, directed for

"James Turner, to be left till called for;" it was entered at Cambridge - was put into the waggon on Monday the 8th, and would arrive on the 9th.

DANIEL DEACON . I am proprietor of the White Horse Inn, Cripplegate. This box arrived there on Tuesday, the 9th of August, about eight o'clock in the morning; and that morning, the prisoners Turner and Walduck called to inquire after it. Clayton waited outside while they came down the yard. I suspected them the moment I saw them, and said "Call tomorrow morning, and then the waggon will be in;" they all went off in company. I then had the box opened, and found it contained unfinished hats - some of them marked "C." I got Herdsfield to attend, and next morning Walduck came and said he had called for a box in the name of Turner. I asked if his name was Turner - he said Yes. I asked if he could identify the box by the direction, or any key - he said No; but he could tell the contents. I asked what they were - he said "Hats." I said "Mind what you are about, I am a very particular man - is your name Turner?" he said it was. I then called Herdsfield, who took him - he then said his name was not Turner, that he was only sent by another person, who was waiting in the tap-room. I went into the tap-room, and found the other two prisoners there - they were secured, and the box taken before the Alderman.

CHARLES TWIST . I am book-keeper at the White

Horse Inn; this box was brought to our inn by the waggon; the three prisoners came on Tuesday, the 9th of August, for it - Clayton addressed himself to me and said, the person he had left the box in charge with at Cambridge, promised him it should come off on Friday - he seemed disappointed that it had not arrived. I said it could not arrive till next day - the other prisoners stood at his elbow. I saw them all three next day - Walduck came first for the box, which was directed to be left till called for, in the name of J. Turner. Mr. Deacon entered into conversation with him, as he has stated. I afterwards went to the tap with Herdsfield, found Clayton there smoking his pipe, and the other prisoner with him.

EDWARD THORNTON . I keep the Red Lion public-house, Cross-street, Finsbury. On Wednesday, the 9th of August, I saw the prisoners in company together, in Mr. Deacon's yard. I went to the book-keeper's office - the witnesses' account of what passed is correct.

WILLIAM JEWSTER , foreman to the prosecutor, identified the property by marks of his own upon it.

WILLIAM HERDSFIELD . I am a City officer. I took Walduck, and said to him, "Come, old gentleman, tell us all about it." He directly told me where the other two were. I took him to the White Horse tap, where the prisoners were. I asked Clayton for the key - he made no answer - I found it in his pocket - it opened the box instantly. I found a small quantity of rabbits' fur on Turner.

MR. CONSTABLE. This rabbits' wool appears like the wool in the box.

EDMUND HEALY . Here is the direction on the box, which I wrote at ten o'clock on Friday night for him.

Cross-examined. Q. You remember as well as a drunken man can? A. Yes.

THOMAS NEWMAN . The waggon leaves Cambridge about noon - if not sent till ten o'clock at night, it would be sent by the Monday's waggon.

CLAYTON - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

TURNER - NOT GUILTY .

WALDUCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-214

1436. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. RICHARD WILLSON . The prisoner was in my service for six months up to the early part of June; he was intrusted to collect money. I am keeper of the Hamboro' Wharf , and receive consignments there. In April last, Messrs. Newbold and Sons made a consignment on my account. I gave the prisoner an account of freight to deliver to them - this is it (looking at it); he afterwards went to receive it; it was his duty to receive a cheque from the house, and bring it to me, or to Brumwell or Dare, my clerks, in my absence; they receive all monies from the other clerks in my absence; but if I was in town, which was the case, he should deliver it to me; he did not bring me a cheque for this account; it was his duty to do so before he went home; every clerk, except two, made their accounts up nightly; he remained with me till the 6th of June, and then absconded; I had two sets of bills printed to have him apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You would have been satisfied if he had brought the money home? A. Yes; but his duty was not to present a cheque for payment - he has not brought this amount to account.

JOHN NEWBOLD . I am a hoop-bender, and merchant. (Looking at a cheque for 10 l. 11 s. 9 d.) I drew this on the 7th of May , and gave it to my brother as a payment for freight, due to Wallis and Co., to whom Mr. Willson is agent.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you give it to your brother? A. In our counting-house, at Potter's-fields, Southwark.

CHARLES NEWBOLD . My brother gave me this draft - I paid it to the prisoner, and took this receipt for it. (Producing it.)

MR. WILLSON. I am agent to Wallis and Co. and have given them credit for this freight in their general account, which has been settled.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you given them the money? A. I have given them credit for it, and have paid them a much larger sum.

(The cheque and receipt were here read.)

JOHN WILSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Remmington and Co. bankers. I have my book here, with an entry of this cheque being paid on the 7th of May, but I cannot say that I paid it, for when we pay in money we do not enter them at the time but altogether, I can swear it has been paid.

GEORGE DARE . I am clerk to Mr. Willson, and have seen the prisoner write often. I believe this letter to be his hand-writing, (examining it.) I am clerk at Mr. Willson's counting-house, at Mill-street-wharf - the prisoner never accounted to me for this draft.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he generally account to you? A. Not for the Hamboro' wharf concern, he never paid me money for that concern.

MR. WILLSON re-examined. I have two places of business where he might account, Hamboro' wharf is where he should have brought this cheque, my other place of business in Mill-lane, Tooley-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not employed by both concerns? A. Sometimes. He went from Tooley-street that day, and was at both places most days; he generally accounted for monies at Tooley-street, but not always, I think.

GEORGE BRAMWELL . I am clerk to Mr. Wilson, at Hamboro' wharf; the prisoner never accounted to me for this money - it was his duty to deliver drafts to me if Mr. Willson was absent, at Hamboro' wharf.

Cross-examined. Q. The usual place for him to account was over the water? A. Generally. I cannot name an instance in which he has accounted to me.

COURT. Q. If he received a bill for the Hamboro' wharf concern, was it his duty to pay it at that wharf? A, Yes; but I believe he has paid money at Mill-wharf for our concern.

R. W. NELSON . I live in Berkeley-street, Clerkenwell. On the 7th of June, I went to Ramsgate, the prisoner travelled with me, and went by the name of Smith; on the 8th he shewed me about eighty sovereigns.

RICHARD SLADDEN . I am constable of Ramsgate. I apprehended the prisoner there on the 15th of July, at his lodgings. I said, "Well, Master Richards, what brings you here?" He said, "Are you an officer from London." I

said, "I am an officer, but not from London, and that I took him for robbing his master" - (he was passing by the name of Smith, and told me his name was not Richards.) I cautioned him to say nothing, but he said, "I shall feel relief in stating to you the whole transaction;" he stated the kindness of his employer, and the bad company he had been led into, and said he was extremely sorry, and asked what would be the end of it? but he wished to unburthen his mind; that he had robbed his master, and whether he said it was under 100 l. or 120 l., I cannot say.

(Letter read.)

To H. Brundock, George-street, New Kent-road.

Horsemonger-lane Prison, July 18, 1825.

DEAR HENRY, - This comes with all my kind love to you. I hope you are well: since the unfortunate day I left, your house is in my sight; and when I was in it I little thought it would be my doom to be one of them; but I hope you have never stopped out one night since. If I had my time to come over again I would never stop out another night: there would be a difference in my character; but it is now too late for me to repent, for I am sure Mr. Wilson will prosecute to the utmost extent of the law: why should he not, because I have robbed him of money to a great extent: but if I should not be prosecuted I shall pay him by instalments. I have had several fits since I was taken, but am happy to what I was before I was taken. For God's sake I hope they will not prosecute for my family sake, for I am the first who was ever inside a prison. The portion is bread and water, but I cannot smell it - the very sight makes my blood turn again; but I don't want, thank God; but I ought not to mention his name. If I had taken my dear grandmother's advice, and that gentleman, whom I have robbed to that great extent, I should be as happy as the day is long, but now to be shut within a cell, fast bolted up, and high walls well secured, and when I saw Mr. Willson and Mr. Davis, I never felt such a sensation before; I sweat blood from the arm-pits. I wish I could recall my time again and alter my conduct, and if I should get off, that will be a warning to me, and I will warrant you I would never do what is wrong again. If you will call on me between twelve and two o'clock, or write to me, and tell me whether he intends to prosecute. I desire, Henry, don't look at my spelling, for I have been in such a dreadful sensation.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250915-215

NEW COURT. (5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1437. ROBERT FEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , eight hundred slates, value 10 l., the goods of William Struthers , his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM STRUTHERS. I am a slater , and live in Grosvenor-walk, Milbank-row, Westminster. The prisoner had served his apprenticeship to me, and was in my employ seventeen years in July last - he was my foreman ; I had formerly a man in my service, named Haskins - he has left me about two years and a half, and set up in business as a slater, in a small street leading from Vauxhall-road - I have had no dealings with him - I know Philip Branton by sight, that is all. On the 20th of April a barge of slates, called duchesses, arrived at my wharf - they were mine - I told the prisoner to send two loads of them to the Penitentiary, but had not directed him to dispose of any others to any person, and certainly not to Haskins.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you allow the prisoner to sell any slates for you? A. At one time I allowed him to sell a sort called waste, but no others; there was a pass-book kept, in which he furnished me with an account of what he sold; he always had a desire to sell slates, but I forbid him; he had paid me money for some which he had sold, perhaps two days before he was taken: there never was a meeting for the purpose of settling this business, and there was never a balance of 30 l. due to me from him - I have an entry in my book, on the 23d of June, when he paid me some money. He lived in a house of mine on the wharf - I lived at a distance; if a person came to give orders they made inquiries of him; he generally settled with me on a Saturday evening, for the slates he sold - there were some deficiencies, but I did not think it worth while to discharge him for them, being an old servant.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had he at any time after, no authority from you to sell valuable slates, by the cart load? A. No never - there is no entry of a cart load of slates sold by him in his book - there is no entry of two cart loads sold to Haskins. I did not find it out till July - this little book is the prisoner's wife's writing - he cannot write himself. I have had no meeting with him or his wife, in which it was stated that if 30 l. was paid, the business should be settled.

JOHN WEBB . I was a carter, in the employ of Mr. Struthers. In April last I remember the barge load of slates coming to Grosvenor-wharf . The prisoner gave me orders, at six o'clock next morning, to load the cart with two loads of slates, which I was to carry to the Vauxhall-road, about a quarter of a mile beyond the Penitentiary - he said I should meet Mr. Haskins there, and that the slates were for him. I met him, and he told me to put the slates down by the side of Mr. Westmacott's wall, near the iron foundry. I took them at two separate times, in Mr. Struthers' cart. Haskins gave me 5 s. a load for taking them - I do not generally receive so much; I never gave my master information about it till I had been examined. I had told the prisoner I thought matters were not going on right, and it would be found out: he said it will make no odds to you.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not been in custody some days before you said any thing about it to your master? A. Yes; I was in custody for the slates taken in April.

JAMES BRADLEY . I am a slater, in the employ of Mr. Struthers. I saw these Duchess slates in the wharf, but did not see them come. I saw two loads taken by Webb past the Penitentiary - the prisoner was standing by when they were loaded; there were two loads ordered by my master the night before, to be taken to the Penitentiary, but these were taken beyond it.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of June, and was present at the examination before the Magistrate. I heard a paper read to the prisoner - he cannot write, nor read writing himself -

it was signed by Mr. Wyat. When I took the prisoner, I told him I wanted him about some slates; as we were going down Millbank-row, I thought he would have fainted. I said "Fear, what is the matter?" he said "I feel I have done wrong about the slates, and if I had hearkened to my wife I should not have done it." When he was before the Magistrate, what he said was taken down, and read over to him; but I do not recollect what he said. I apprehended Haskins and Brandon or the 30th of June. I took them before the Magistrate, and they were examined at night; they promised to be there the next day, but they got away, and I could not find them since.

MR. STRUTHERS re-examined. Q. After the prisoner had been apprehended, did he say any thing to you? A. Yes; I asked Webb, in his presence, if he did not take two loads of Duchesses out of the yard; he said he did. I then asked Fear if that was true; he said it was, and he was very sorry he had done wrong.

WILLIAM BOWEN . I am a carman. I drove a load of slates out of Elizabeth-place, Vauxhall-road, for Mr. Haskins. I do not know who put them there.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

1438. ROBERT FEAR was again indicted for a like offence .

The prisoner pleaded >GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-216

1439. PHILLIS ISTED was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , ninety yards of ribbon, value 20 s.; a locket, value 2 s.; a necklace, value 5 s., and five yards of gimp, value 7 s. , the goods of Christian Kidney .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MISS CHRISTIAN KIDNEY. I am single and live at Maida-hill . I have lived there eleven years; the prisoner was my confidential servant for three years; she was discharged on the 25th of July - she had had warning till then: I thought her honest, but after she was gone I missed a diamond ring and other things. I received information that she was lodging with one Cox (who had been occasionally employed by me), in Earl-street, Edgware-road. I had considered Cox as married - I went there between six and seven o'clock the next morning, and saw a coach at the door, with the prisoner's boxes in it: I told the coachman not to stir till I had got an officer - I then got Hewitt and Morris; we went up into the room and found Cox, Isted, and Waters, drinking some spirits, which appeared to be rum and gin: I saw some property there which I knew to be mine - the prisoner's boxes were then searched, and thirty yards of ribbon, a locket, a necklace, with a basket attached to it, and some gimp, which I believe to be mine, were found - I had not given them to her - I had seen the gimp, the Friday before the Monday on which she left me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you give Isted warning? A. Yes, she had been taken to Bow-street, but not on this charge, on the 26th. When she left me, I searched her boxes, but found nothing of mine - I have given the servants a present of a bit of ribbon on my birth day, but I never gave them any ornaments, or any thing improper for them to wear - I did not wish that after all, Isted and Waters should remain in my service - Waters left me the same night; it was the officer who searched the boxes, and an officious person, named Cox.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did that officious person, Cox, search the boxes before they left your house? A. Yes, I had a charge against my coachman at Bow-street; in consequence of what I there heard, I turned Isted and Waters away that night; I had given my servants two yards of ribbon on my birth day, but I never gave them thirty yards alike - the boxes were searched, just before they left, on the top of the stairs - Waters had given me warning two or three days before - I am sure the prisoner did not give me warning.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer. I have some property, part of which I found in Isted's box, and part in Cox's room on a table; a direction was tied on the box - I got the key from a Bow-street officer to whom the prisoner had given it.

Q. What did you find in the box? A. This thirty yards of ribbon, the gimp and the locket - Isted was not in the room when I searched the box - I have the box and the clothes which were in it in my possession.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where was she when you searched? A. In custody at Mary-le-bone-office. I did not tell her I had found these things - they were produced to her at the office; I had not seen any list given by Miss Kidney.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was she present when these things were produced before the Magistrate? A. Yes, between two and three o'clock, on the 26th of July - I had told her I had got the key, and was going to search her box - it was at her second examination, these things were produced - I think she said Miss Kidney had given them to her, alluding particularly to the ribbon.

MISS KIDNEY re-examined. Q. When did the prisoner leave you? A. On the 25th of July - on the 26th, in the morning, I found the coach, and had her apprehended about three o'clock that day - we got the key, and two of three days afterwards it was mentioned to her that the things were found.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I assisted Hewitt in the search; some of the boxes were in the coach, and one or two of them in the passage, which had been removed by Hewitt - I was present when the property was produced before the Magistrate, in the prisoner's presence - the words which she used, alluding to the ribbon, were that Miss Kidney had given it to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. ANDREWS to MISS KIDNEY. Q. Have you never said you had given these things to her? A. No, I believe I gave a list of the articles I missed - I had charged my coachman with a robbery, and Sir Richard Birnie discharged him.

Prisoner. That locket Miss Kidney gave me.

The Prisoner's Counsel called,

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer of Bow-street. The lady searched the prisoner's box - there were some beads found in a small box in the large one, these appear to me to be them. I asked Miss Kidney if they were her's - she said she had given them to Phillis - there was a locket found which Miss Kidney saw. I had a list of articles on the 27th of July, which she said she had lost - I attended at the office, and gave evidence.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Miss Kidney, on the 22d, make a complaint of what had been lost? A. Yes, and I took Isted upon the 23d, but none of the property was then found - there was a complaint against this lady's coachman before that - I went round with the list to the pawnbrokers, but could not find any of the property - some beads were returned to the prisoner at the Office, but I do not know whether they were the beads I found in the box - there was a locket found by me on the 22d - that I swear - I was called as a witness by the prisoner, and gave my evidence.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you, or do you not believe, that those are the beads and the locket you saw in the box? A. I believe they are.

- BROWN. I am a married woman. I know Miss Kidney. I was her servant, I think in the year 1814 or 1815. I have been to her house to see her while Isted was there. I was there when Isted's box was searched, but I have no recollection of the day. I believe the coachman was then in custody. I saw a little box taken out of the large one, which had in it a little blue necklace. I think I should know it if I saw it, but I do not think this is it. I think they were larger beads, and only two rows of them - the officer shewed them to Miss Kidney. There were some ribbons found, and two white gowns, and one blue muslin, with imitation lace flounces. Miss Kidney said she had given them to her. She then returned to the parlour and said to me, "See what I have given these girls." When I lived with Miss Kidney she was very much given to drink, particularly at night - I think she is very treacherous. She has asked me, since the prisoners have been in custody, if I could tell her any thing against them, and she would give me an anodyne necklace. Mr. Butler and Miss Cressy were present when she said that. I never heard her say whether Phillis had given her warning or not.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When this servant had left, did not Miss Kidney send for you to assist her? A. Yes; she asked me if the girls owed me any thing; I said Yes, a sovereign for some shoes my husband had made; she said I might not see them again, but I begged her not to trouble herself about it. I saw a necklace found, but not a locket. I saw this broad bit of ribbon found, but not the narrow - the only thing I can swear to is this broad ribbon. Miss Kidney had all the things shewn to her, and very readily disclaimed them all. I have heard her give these girls the best of characters.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. I ask you, whether this search was not while the prisoners and Taylor were in the house? A. Yes; I cannot swear to this narrow ribbon, nor do I think any one could.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. At Chiswick - I was subpoenaed to attend. I had called at the Asylum where I was brought up, and the gentleman there told me Miss Kidney had left word for me to call upon her - she should be glad to see me. I went to her house in the morning, and stayed till the evening. I believe the girls were going to leave, to be married, and it looked to me like a bit of spite. I think it was about eleven o'clock in the morning when the box was searched. I was up stairs in Miss Kidney's room, and the box was there. I had not heard before that Taylor had been sent for. No one desired me to be present to see what was in the box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-217

1440. ELIZABETH COX was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , a pencil-case, value 35 s. , the goods of Ernesto Diana Domenica Spagnoletti .

MISS CHRISTIAN KIDNEY . I remember Signor Spagnoletti coming to give me a lesson in music on the day of the drawing room, the 8th of June; he left his pencil-case behind him, which I understood to be gold. Mr. Harrison called afterwards, and wanted a pencil - I saw him use this. Isted then dressed me to go to Court - the prisoner and Barbara Waters were there; Isted and Waters then went out, and when I went away I saw the pencil-case there, and I desired Isted to take particular care of it - when I returned I missed it, and said to them all three, "Have you seen it?" they all denied it, and Cox said, what business should she have up in the drawing-room. On the following morning Signor Spagnoletti called, and we could not find the case. I do not know that Cox's husband had been at my house that day; he had been there once, but I refused his coming again.

MICHAEL MORRIS . In the course of a second search at the house of Cox, about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 26th of July, I found this pencil-case in a jar by the side of the mantel-piece; Cox was not there, but her husband was.

ERNESTO DIANA DOMENICA SPAGNOLETTI. This is my pencil-case - I left it upon the piano-forte at Miss Kidney's, on the morning of the 8th of June; I think I called a day or two afterwards - Miss Kidney is mistaken in saying it was the next day: we could not find it. I gave a guinea for it - I bought it because it belonged to poor Naldi.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Can you swear to it? A. Yes, by a mark I made upon it.

MICHAEL MORRIS re-examined. Q. Were you at the Office when the pencil-case was mentioned to the prisoner? A. Yes, and I think it was the last prisoner who said that was the case which was left in the drawing-room.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-218

1441. BARBARA WATERS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , eight yards of velvet, value 12 s.; three pairs of stockings, value 12 s.; a muslin slip, value 6 s.; a flounce of a gown, value 3 s.; a veil, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s.; seven pieces of patch-work, value 10 s.; a yard of lace, value 6 s., and a gown sleeve, value 1 s., the goods of Christian Kidney , her mistress .

MISS CHRISTIAN KIDNEY. The prisoner was my cook , and she is Isted's cousin - they were both discharged at the same time.

ESTHER ILSLEY . I lodge in the same house as Cox. On the day the officer came she put some preserves into my room, in little white pots, and something in a blue bag was put there by some other person; I put them on the landing-place, by Cox's door, and was down stairs when Morris found them - I saw them again at the Office; I put the bag on the landing-place, in the same state as it was when it was in my room. I did not see this prisoner at all to my knowledge till I saw her at the Office.

MICHAEL MORRIS . In the course of my search I found this bag - there were some other articles in it, which Miss Kidney did not claim, and I left them in Cox's room. I found a letter very near the bottom of the bag; it is directed to Barbara Waters, at Miss Kidney's, No. 15, Maida-hill, Paddington . The things in the bag were shown to the prisoner at the Magistrate's; she denied the bag altogether, to the best of my belief - what she said was not taken down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-219

1442. PHILLIS ISTED , BARBARA WATERS , and ELIZABETH COX were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , two pin-cushions, value 3 s.; one hundred yards of ribbon, value 26 s.; three salt-cellars, value 3 s.; one cotton box, value 2 s.; five dishes, value 28 s.; six plates, value 9 s.; a jar, value 6 s.; two quarts of peas, value 1 s.; 6 lbs. wt. of rice, value 2 s.; 6 lbs. wt. of candles, value 6 s.; 6 lbs. wt. of soap, value 3 s.; one card-case, value 2 s.; two finger glasses, value 3 s.; six quarts of currant jelly, value 6 s.; six quarts of currant jam, value 6 s.; six jars, value 6 s.; one basin, value 10 s.; one cup and ball, value 1 s.; one tureen, value 1 s.; eight yards of velvet, value 12 s.; three pairs of stockings, value 12 s.; one muslin slip, value 6 s.; one flounce of a gown, value 3 s.; one veil, value 5 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s.; seven pieces of patch-work, value 10 s.; one yard of lace, value 6 s.; one gown sleeve, value 1 s.; one cup and saucer, value 4 s.; one locket, value 2 s.; one necklace, value 5 s., and five yards of gimp, value 7 s., the goods of Christian Kidney , to whom they were servant s; and one pencil-case, value 35 s. , the goods of Ernesto Diana Domenica Spagnoletti .

MR. ADOLPHUS declined calling any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-220

1443. CHARLES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Samuel Peek .

The prosecutor's name being Peck, not Peek, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250915-221

1444. HENRY HYAMS , was indicted for stealing on the 11th of July , a pair of trousers, value 15 s. the goods of Michael Henry Hart .

HENRY SOUTHAM . I am in the employ of Michael Henry Hart, slopseller . On the 11th of July, I was in his shop at Ratcliff-highway , when he missed some trousers; while the prisoner was up at the the other shop he went for an officer, and I told the prisoner he was gone for an officer to search us both; he said he was welcome to search him; he then went into the privy. I went after him, and saw him standing up; I said, "Why don't you come forward and show your face?" he came out - I went in and pulled the trousers up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever see the trousers in his possession? No. I was not suspected myself. Mr. Hart sent for an officer at my suggestion. I do not know how many quarrels I had with the prisoner.

MICHAEL HENRY HART. I am a slopseller, the prisoner was my shopman two years. On the morning of the 11th of July, I missed a pair of trousers from a glass case; there was a jacket there, and another pair of trousers were put in the place of those which were taken. I called Southam, the prisoner, and the servant girl, and said "Here is the old work going on again, and I am determined to discover who is the person;" they all denied knowing you thing of them. Southam proposed to have an officer to have them all searched; the prisoner then went to the other shop at Shadwell. I said, "We will have an officer," I went for him, and sent the servant to fetch the prisoner back. When I returned, Southam stated, that the prisoner asked where I was gone, and the moment he told him he ran into the yard, and Southam found the trousers, in the prisoner's presence, down the necessary; the prisoner cried, and said, "O my father." I think these trousers are mine, but my servant can speak more positively.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any mark on them? A. No; the prisoner was with me two or three years - he was sometimes at my other shop - I considered that he had a good character - my apprentice had absconded long before this - I had not a very good opinion of him.

HENRY SOUTHAM re-examined. Q. Did Mr. Hart swear to this property at the office? A. I believe he did, but I was out of the office at the time.

Q. Have you had them ever since? A. Yes.

Q. Upon you oath, did you put this mark upon them? A. No, I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-222

1445. HENRY ROBINSON and SAMUEL HOWS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , four pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; a gown, value 2 s., and four aprons, value 1 s. , the goods of Hannah Morris .

Hows pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

HANNAH MORRIS. I live in Carlile-street, Lambeth. I hired myself as servant to Mr. Ratham, in Langley-street . I took my bonnet-box there, with the articles stated in the indictment, on the 31st of August.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners together, on the 31st of August, in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden. Hows had the box in his hand. I asked what it was - he said a hat. I looked into it, and found it was wearing apparel. I took them before the Magistrate.

SARAH RATHAM. I live in Langley-street, Long-acre. I hired the prosecutrix as a servant; her box was put into my parlour; I saw it on the Sunday; the window was open; I am out at market most of the day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-223

1446. JOHN DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , four plasterers' tools, value 5 s., and a brush, value 6 d., the goods of James Moore ; a trowel, value 18 d., the goods of George Adams ; a hammer, value 6 d., and a trowel, value 18 d. , the goods of John Skerratt .

JOHN SKERRATT. I lost a trowel and a hammer from a house, No. 16, in Dorset-square , on the 23d of July. I had seen them safe about seven o'clock in the evening, and missed them next morning.

WILLIAM NORSWORTHY. The prisoner is my apprentice , and had absconded. I had intelligence that he was working at Kensington-gravel-pits. On the 22d of July I went there, and found the tools.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had not the tools he had been at work with, been brought to your house? A. Yes.

GEORGE ADAMS. I had a trowel at the house, which I had seen safe on the Wednesday evening at seven o'clock; I missed it at five next morning; I did not see it again till the following Saturday.

JAMES MOORE. I am a plasterer ; I lost four plasterer's tools and a brush, from the two pair of stairs room of this house. The prisoner had worked four months with me at that house; he had been at work on the Saturday before, but did not come again.

EDWARD HUGHES . The prisoner worked for me on Thursday, the 31st of July - these tools are what he brought with him - on Friday Mr. Norsworthy came and asked for his apprentice's tools.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer, and took up the prisoner - I know nothing more.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-224

1447. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , two punch bowls, value 5 s.; six saucers, value 1 s.; two cups, value 6 d., and a milk jug, value 6 d. , the goods of William Umpleby .

ANN UMPLEBY . I am the wife of William Umpleby - we keep the Golden Anchor, public-house, on Saffron-hill . The prisoner came in on the night of the 31st of July, and called for some porter; he asked if he could not sit down, and I directed him to the club-room; he stopped about half an hour. I saw him come along the passage, and go towards the door; my daughter cried out, "Mother, we are robbed;" I called Stop thief! he went out, and she followed him; he came back in a few minutes, with his hat in his hand, and said, "Are you the landlady?" I said, Yes. He then said, "I have got some property of your's, which I will give you;" I said, "My husband is not at home - I will not take it till an officer comes."

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see him go out before your daughter cried Stop thief? A. Yes - I saw him come and put a glass down, and while he was doing it my daughter cried out, "Mother, we are robbed" - he was not at all in liquor.

JANE UMPLEBY . I saw the prisoner sitting in the club-room, with a glass of porter before him. I afterwards saw him in the little parlour adjoining the club-room - there was no one there but him. There is a little cupboard on the right-hand side, in which the china is kept - I am certain it was locked at four o'clock in the afternoon; I found it open - the lock had been picked. After the prisoner was gone I went into the parlour, and he came out; he said nothing to me, but went into the club-room again, and put down two punch bowls, which he had taken out of the cupboard. I asked him what he was going to do; he said he wanted to go to the bar to get a glass of ale - he went to the bar, put the glass down, and went out of the house, and I went after him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say when you stopped him, "I am taking these things for a frolic?" A. No - he said, "What do you want with me? you have nothing to do with the house;" I said, "Have not I?" he then came back.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me, and I found this cream-jug in his pocket; these cups and saucers were in his hat - he was sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to be forty-two years of age that day, and had been drinking a good deal. I went into this house, and into the club-room, and there were many persons there - I went into the parlour, and saw the cupboard door open; I took the punch-bowls, and thought I would take them into the next room, and have a bit of fun, and have a pint of gin, or something of that, but I had no idea of stealing them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-225

1448. WILLIAM ROLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , nineteen feet of mahogany, value 12 s. , the goods of George Frederick Richard Lloyd .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE FREDERICK RICHARD LLOYD. I am a chair-maker . The prisoner was in my employ on the 18th of July - I had previously employed him, when in Whitecross-street - on his coming out of there he came to me, and asked for work, and said if I would allow him to take the wood to his lodgings he could do more work, as he could get up at four o'clock in the morning. I gave him eighty-three feet of Cuba and Honduras wood; of what we generally call a peacock mottle - it was a log which had been opened under peculiar circumstances; he was to make it into Trafalgar nail-over chairs. In consequence of some information I applied to Mary Buckle , and there I found some children's chairs made of the wood I had given to him. I went to his lodgings, and found about nineteen feet of my wood deficient; he had not completed my order, and had no direction from me to sell the wood, but to make the chairs I had ordered.

Prisoner. Q. Were the chairs you found made of one sort of wood? A. No; a part of them are of another sort of wood.

DAVID THOMAS . I am a sawyer to Mr. Lloyd. I sawed the log of mahogany; I saw Mr. Lloyd and the prisoner looking out the wood - this wood matches to this slab as much as ever I experienced.

Prisoner. Q. Is there no other part of that log but what is here? A. Yes; there must have been more, but I do not know where it is.

THOMAS VANN . I produce these chairs, which I received at the office.

MARY BUCKLE. I bought these two children's chairs of the prisoner, for 1 l. 16 s., two days before the prosecutor called upon me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a large quantity of pieces by me, and the small pieces, which will make these chairs, are considered as waste. I worked them up at different times into these little chairs to sell.

JOHN HARDING . I live in President-street, York-street, City-road. I am a cabinet and chair-maker. I know the prisoner well: I have looked at these chairs particularly, and if I had known I should have been called on to-day, I believe I could have brought a piece of wood from which the top of this chair has been made. I was present at the prisoner's house, when these things

were making, and he said to me "You see your stuff comes in useful now;" I said "What is this?" he said, "It is some wood of which I made some chairs for you some years ago. I made a couch," said he, "last week, and could not sell it, so I am making up these things, which are sure to sell, to get money." My wood was Cuba wood, and so is this; there is a resemblance between the chairs and this piece of wood produced, but I do not think it is the same: it would be a waste of Cuba wood to buy it to make these chairs of - but odd bits are used for them - workmen do sometimes keep small pieces which we call offal wood - we are not all so stingy as some people are.

JOHN WILLIAM BICKERS . I live in Old-street. I am a cabinet and chair-maker. I have known the prisoner upwards of six years - he was in my employ while he was in Whitecross-street prison - he had, I have no doubt, a great many odd bits of stuff of mine; the whole of these chairs, except the tops, are made of odd bits, and the tops are pieces which are often given to the men. I have a log myself, which has nearly the same veins, and I have no doubt would correspond with those chairs quite as well as this. I do not believe these are parts of the same tree - they do not correspond at all.

CONNINGSLEY BAILEY . I live in the Curtain-road. I have employed the prisoner for six months. I sent him some wood to Whitecross-street - I do not think these chairs are made of this wood - they do not correspond at all - I would not swear about it.

MR. LLOYD re-examined. Q. In what way do you think the chair was cut off this wood? A. From the side - not the end; it was twice the width when I gave it to him, but the same length - he had made a set of Trafalgar chairs, and some nail overs.

Prisoner. I had the wood to make the chairs, and in consequence of his not giving me money to go on with, I was forced to make those chairs, and get some person to buy them, to get money for my family. He found I had sold them and came and took away the chairs on which I was at work.

MR. LLOYD. I had paid him more than he earned.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-226

1449. EDWARD CATLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , a hod, value 3 s. , the goods of Maurice Fitzgerald .

MAURICE FITZGERALD. I live in Spread Eagle-court, Gray's-inn-lane. On Saturday, the 14th of September, I left a hod in Mr. Cubits' house, at Newington-green , about half-past five o'clock; I returned about a quarter past six, on Monday morning - it was then gone - here it is - it was made for me, and I have made some alterations in it, and painted it.

JOHN MARLING . I am a bricklayer's labourer. I bought this hod of the prisoner for 2 s. 6 d. and a pint of beer. I took it to my lodgings and went to work with it the next morning.

GEORGE GREAVES . I am an officer. I went to Marling when he was at work, and got the hod.

Prisoner's Defence. I and two other persons were going across some fields; I had occasion to get over a hedge and saw this hod with a knife sticking in it; one of my companions said we will take it down the town, and if none of the bricklayers own it, we will sell it for a little beer; there were four bricklayers, and they did not own it; we then took it to the Rochester Castle public-house, and a carpenter came in and said "I have to make the top of a hod for a young man, and if you take it to him I think he will buy it of you.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-227

1455. MARY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , twenty-two penny-pieces, and three half-pence , the monies of Thomas North .

THOMAS NORTH. I am a publican and live in Shoreditch . On the night of the 25th of July, I put 5 s. in copper pence and half-pence, into the till - at eight o'clock the next morning I took them out and counted them; I locked the till and put the key into my pocket; in about half an hour the prisoner, who was my servant , went into the bar to clean the counter; there was no other person there; I was in the tap-room; in about ten minutes I saw her go from the bar to the kitchen, and then to the yard; I then went to my till and missed 2 s. 10 1/2 d; she came again into the kitchen and I saw her putting her bonnet on to go out for her pots; I told her it was too early and she went up stairs; she came down again, and again attempted to go for the pots; I then desired her to come back, and give me the 2 s. 10 1/2 d. which she had taken - she denied having taken it; I sent for an officer, and he found 3 1/2 d. of my money; I asked her for the remainder - she denied having it - the officer said "Its of no consequence, I shall be sure to find it;" she then got up and said "I will save you the trouble;" she went to the kitchen range, and took out the remainder of the money except one penny.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I found the money on the prisoner's person, and the remainder was wrapped in a bit of rag and put between the stove and the oven.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-228

1451. ANN COWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , sixty penny-pieces , the monies of Thomas Ross .

HARRIETT ROSS . I am the daughter of Thomas Ross; he keeps a rag and bottle shop in Jerusalem-passage . On the evening of the 20th of August, about eight o'clock, while two boys were in the shop - the prisoner came to sell apples - she dropped some apples down and then went out; when she was gone there was a 5 s. paper of copper missed off the counter; I had seen it there just before - it was my father's property; I believe I have seen that parcel since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know what was in the paper? A. No, it was taken for 5 s., worth of copper in change for a sovereign - I had not opened them - she was in the habit of coming to our shop - she had been there to leave a quilt, on which I lent her 3 d., and she said she would give me 4 d. for it, but I said I would only take the 3 d.

THOMAS DYMOCK . I was in Mr. Ross's shop, and saw the prisoner take a little parcel off the counter in whitey-brown

paper; I cannot tell what was in it; it seemed to be penny-pieces; they were as large and as round, and were in two rolls. I did not say any thing about it then, but I told Harriett Ross afterwards, that I saw the old woman take something off the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. Did any one tell you that the parcel had penny pieces in it, or any thing like penny pieces? A. I thought they looked like it; I did not hear at the office anything about penny pieces, and was not offered any money; the officer did not tell me to swear, but asked me what I saw her do - I said I saw her take something off the counter and I thought it was penny pieces.

COURT. Q. Has your father had any conversation with you since you saw the woman in the shop? A. No, but the officer has told me since what he thought was in it.

ROBERT HAMBER . I am twelve years of age; the prisoner came in while I was there; there were three parcels on the counter, two in brown paper, and one in whitey-brown; when she left the shop, I saw the two parcels in brown paper - the other was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at the office? A. Yes. An officer came to our house on the Saturday night, and asked me what I saw. I told him - he said he should have me up at Hatton-garden.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am constable of Clerkenwell. I went with Miss Ross to the prisoner's lodgings, on the 20th of August, about eight o'clock, in the evening, at No. 8, Woodbridge-street; I found her at home, and told her I wanted her for a felony - and Miss Ross told her, she was suspected of taking some coppers from her room; she then kneeled down at the foot of the bed, and began to pull some Gilberts about, and said, "You see I have got none." I then took her back to the room, and in the very same spot in which she had kneeled down, I found 3 s. in copper-pennies, and 3 d. on her shelf.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say she was saving up 9 s., to pay her rent? A. Not then - but she did on the Monday morning.

HARRIET ROSS re-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you at the office? A. Yes. Dymock's father said, his son had not a right memory, and did not wish him to be examined.

Prisoner. I had been with a bushel of apples, and had not sold them all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-229

1452. JOSEPH WORROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pencil case, value 5 s.; a card-case, value 1 s., and a pocket-book, value 6 d., the goods of William Moore ; and a watch, value 5 s.; a key, value 2 d.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and a shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of Sarah Addison .

WILLIAM MOORE. I live with my father, William Moore , who keeps the George and Dragon, Buckingham-street, Fitzroy-square ; the prisoner was quartered there, his room adjoined mine. On the evening of the 23d of August, having heard something, I went to see if all the property was right in my bed-room, and missed these articles - they were safe between eight and nine o'clock. I saw him the same evening in the street, seized him by the collar, and said, "You rascal, you've robbed me;" he said, "I know that - I am going to bring them back." He had the waistcoat on, and the pocket-book was in the pocket, and two duplicates of two handkerchiefs which he had taken.

SARAH ADDISON. I lost my articles at the same time; they were not in Moore's room.

WILLIAM STABBING . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to our shop on Tuesday, the 23d of August, and brought this waistcoat to pawn.

MORRIS ARIEL . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought a handkerchief and a whittle to our house, between two and three o'clock on Tuesday, the 23d of August. I lent him 4 s. upon them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-230

1453. CHARLES BECKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , two pairs of shoes, value 6 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Lathy .

ELIZABETH LATHY. I live with my father in Mount-street-terrace, Whitechapel . On the 1st of August the house adjoining ours was on fire - we came out, and no one was left there to my knowledge. My father was not at home - I went there next morning about eleven o'clock, and found a pair of shoes missing, which were there the day before, and several other things, which I cannot recollect. I had left the door open the night before.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 1st of August there was a fire next door to this house - the door of their house was left open, and a gentleman wished me and my brother officer to go in and turn the people out; we went in, and met the prisoner coming down stairs, with a bundle, containing many things, which he put into the parlour. I then searched him, and found these shoes in his hat - he was very much in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my employ about half an hour before the fire happened; I was in Baker's-row, having a pint of beer, when I heard the cry of fire; a man of the name of Edwards called me to assist in getting the things from the top of the house - I brought these things down, but they were not in a bundle; they were loose in my arms - the officer asked me if I had any thing else - I said, Yes, I had some old shoes; I took off my hat, and gave them to him. I have lived in that neighbourhood a year and a half.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-231

1454. MARY BARR and ELIZABETH BURLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a yard of kerseymere, value 1 s., and five remnants of woollen cloth, value 6 d. , the goods of Godfrey Cogle .

GODFREY COGLE. I live at the Blacksmiths' Arms, public-house, Back-church-lane, St. George's in the East . The prisoners were my servant s. I lost some kerseymere and woollen cloth on the 18th of August - I saw it again at a tailor's, where it was sold on the 22d; it had been in a cupboard in a room where the prisoners worked.

BOYD SYLVESTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoners on Monday, the 22d; Burley told me that Mary Barr had asked her for some things, and said she could make money of them - that she got these things, and they went

to sell them; she stood at the door while Barr went in to sell it.

- SIMS . I purchased this kerseymere of Barr; I did not see the other prisoner. I had known Barr by sight, and believed she worked at the tailoring business; she said her husband was a tailor, and was in the greatest distress, and would I give her 1 s. 6 d. for it - the article is not worth 1 s., but as she seemed to be in distress I gave her the 1 s. 6 d.

Prisoner BURLEY. Barr is innocent.

BURLEY - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Two Months .

BARR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-232

1456. SARAH PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a necklace, value 12 s., the goods of William Brown , from the person of Mary Ann Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN. I am the father of Mary Ann Brown - she is turned two years old; she lost her necklace on the 6th of July.

SARAH MILES . I am servant to Mr. Brown. On the 6th of July I went to the house of Mrs. Chicks - the child was with me; she had a necklace on, which I believe to be this. The prisoner was there. I saw the necklace round the child's neck; she took the child, and went out for a bottle of water - she staid about ten minutes, and then returned without the child; I asked where the child was, and she said she had not been with her - I looked out at the door, and saw the child without her beads; I said, "Oh! good God, Sarah, where's the child's beads?" she said she knew nothing about them. I then went about the neighbourhood - she went with me, and asked if any one had seen them, and she told me when I went home that I had better not say anything about them.

WILLIAM HENRY MILLS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hewitson, a pawnbroker. This necklace was pawned at our house on the evening of the 8th of July. Mills called and I asked her to send her mother. I shewed her the necklace, which the prisoner had pawned.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found on her the duplicate of the necklace.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-233

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1457. WILLIAM THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a watch chain, value 3 l.; three seals, value 4 l., and a key, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Alcock , from his person .

JOSEPH ALCOCK. I am a gentleman , and live in Hoxton-square; on the 3d of July, I was in Britania-street , about one o'clock in the morning - the prisoner came to my left side, suddenly snatched the chain of my watch, and left the watch in the fob - I was panic struck, but as soon as I could recover, I cried Stop thief! and he was taken - I had lost sight of him, while he turned the corner, but I believe he is the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you mean to swear to the man? A. I am convinced it is him, but still from caution, I do not swear to him - it was dark, but there were lamps, and I was near to one of them - I only saw him for a minute or two by the light of the lamps. I do not think I am mistaken with respect to this man - I could know him for seven years afterwards - I had supped with a friend, that evening, after I came off a journey from Bristol - I was not intoxicated - I had taken three or four glasses of white wine.

FRANCIS LEONARD . I was in Britania-street; I heard the cry of Stop thief! between one and two o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner running with great speed, and I took him into custody - and on the spot where I took him, I and my brother watchmen found the chain and the seals, which we took to the watchouse - there were no other persons running - the prisoner said, "You are mistaken in the man."

THOMAS DUNNING . I heard the alarm, and saw my brother watchman stop the prisoner - I then went to the spot, and we found the seals and chain. I cannot say I saw any person running.

GEORGE WILMOT . I am headborough. I received the prisoner and searched him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-234

1458. MARY KANE , ROBERT CLARK , and JANE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a purse, value 1 s.; four sovereigns, and three half-crowns, the property of Elizabeth Upjohn , from her person .

ELIZABETH UPJOHN. I am a widow . I was in Albemarle-street, Clerkenwell , between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of the 9th of August; a little boy was with me; two women hustled me about, and this man stood before me, and would not let me go on - the woman Smith was very close to me, pressing upon me - they appeared to me to be all in company - I then asked the man to let me go forward, which he did; and when! got a little forward, I missed my purse - I then went after them, and the officer shewed them to me, but I thought it was of no use to go back - I saw my purse afterwards at Hatton-garden, it had four sovereigns, three half-crowns, and some other silver in it.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAM . I am an officer. I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoners Clarke and Smith, with another man, who is not in custody; I watched them down as far as Leather-lane, where they called for Mary Kane; they then went on towards Albemarle-street, where I saw the prosecutrix - they went up to her, and Kane put her hand into her left hand pocket, the man stood in front of her, and Smith was on the other side - when they got on to the end of the street, Kane put her hand to her pocket again; I crossed over and saw the prosecutrix lift up her hands, and say, "Good God! I am robbed;" I told her what I had seen, and my brother officer followed them to St. John-street, where we pushed them into a potatoe warehouse, and found the purse.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Bertram - I saw Kane put her right hand into Mrs. Upjohn's left hand pocket, and take something - I sent Bertram to ask what she had lost - I followed them up St. John-street; we there pushed all the three into a potatoe warehouse, and Kane dropped the purse at her feet.

SMITH'S Defence. We did not know what we went to the watch-house for.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

KANE - GUILTY . Aged 78.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 74.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250915-235

1459. SAMUEL FIELDEW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of James Smith , from his person .

JOSEPH TISDEL . I am an officer. I was in the Strand, between twelve and one o'clock, at night, on the 13th of September, and saw the prisoner following two gentlemen - I followed him on to Catherine-street , and there saw him draw a handkerchief from Mr. Smith's pocket, whom he had followed from the Opera-house; Mr. Smith turned round, and took up the handkerchief - I took the prisoner.

JAMES SMITH. I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket, and saw the prisoner drop it - the officer took him while I was picking it up; I know it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and was going up Catherine-street, and saw the handkerchief lying on the pavement; before I could take it up, the officer came and said I had picked the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-236

1460. ANN CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , thirteen shillings and a sixpence, the property of Amos Nicholls , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-237

1461. SAMUEL BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Arthur Waller , from his person .

ARTHUR WALLER. On the evening of the 25th of August, about eight o'clock, I was walking with my wife, near Islington ; I thought I heard some one behind me; I missed my handkerchief, and on turning round, I saw a person putting what appeared a bundle into his bosom - I called Stop thief! he got away - I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner with it - I had not seen his face till I got to the watch-house.

RICHARD SEWELL . On Thursday evening, about eight o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Islington-green, and saw a young man come running toward me very fast; there was an area close by me, and he threw over the rails a handkerchief; I put my hand through the rails, and took out this handkerchief - I am quite certain the prisoner is the person, he was stopped directly after; I had not lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you ever see the man's face? A. No; he was stopped before I picked up the handkerchief, scarcely twelve yards from where I was; about half way towards the watch-house; there were, I suppose, half a dozen people running after him.

THOMAS COKE . I am street-keeper. I was crossing the road, and saw a crowd. I went up, and the prisoner was given into my custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman turned round and cried Stop thief! I ran in the direction he pointed out, and was stopped.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-238

1462. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , three half-crowns, eighteen shillings, and eight sixpences, the goods of John Beavens , his master .

JOHN BEAVENS. I keep livery stables in Bury-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner worked in my stable . On the 14th of September, I had occasion to go to Mr. Aldridge's, in St. Martin's-lane. I went to my desk, and took out of my pocket 1 l. 9 s. 6 d. in silver, which I put into a bag in a little drawer in the desk. I locked it, and went out. I returned about four o'clock, and found a letter from Worcester. I went to put it into my desk, and found it broken open. I called my head ostler and the prisoner, and asked if they had been out - they said No. I then sent for a gentleman, who advised me to wait till the evening. The prisoner was the last man who went out that night, and I stopped him. I said "You are the man who robbed me a fortnight ago; for which I discharged a young man;" he then began crying. I said "Where your coat?" he took it down, and in the pocket of it I found the bag with the 1 l. 9 s. 6 d.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am an officer. I was sent for. I had the man before, and put the question to him, whether he saw any person come into the stable - he said No - he had ridden a horse up and down, and had not seen any one. I told the prosecutor I should leave it till night, and quarter past eight o'clock, he brought the purse and money to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-239

1463. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a clock, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Wood .

MARY ANN WOOD . I live in Church-street, Gray's Inn-lane - my husband's name is Thomas - he is a tinplate-worker . On the 8th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went down stairs. I shut my room door, but did not lock it. The clock hung by the side of the fire place. I came up in about ten minutes, and found the door open, and the prisoner in the room with the clock in his hand. I said "My God, what are you doing;" he said "I beg your pardon;" he put the clock down on the table, and ran away, but was brought back to me in a quarter of an hour - he had cut the weights off the clock.

EDWARD WILD . I am a tailor, and live in the next room to Wood. On the 8th of September, I heard four knocks at his door, but no one answered. In a few minutes I heard a person cry "Stop thief! I then ran out, and passed Mrs. Wood in the passage - the street-door was banged to. I went out, and pursued the prisoner to Baldwin's-gardens, but did not see him till he was stopped; he was asked if he he had been in the house - he said Yes, and he wanted to know where Mrs. Wood's sister lived.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I called on Mrs. Wood. I knocked at the street-door, and was desired by a woman who was washing, to go up stairs to Mrs. Wood's room. I went up and knocked at her door. I saw a woman come out, and

I went in and staid in the room. When Mrs. Wood came up, she accused me of having stolen the clock; I said I had not, but I would fetch the woman who I thought had taken it down. I ran down after her and was taken myself.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-240

1464. WILLIAM BROWNNUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , two portmanteaus, value 10 s.; two coats, value 2 l.; five waistcoats, value 1 l.; six pairs of trousers, value 1 l.; two pairs of breeches, value 10 s.; five pairs of drawers, value 5 s.; thirty-eight pairs of stockings, value 4 l.; twelve pairs of gloves, value 12 s.; fifteen shirts, value 3 l.; nineteen handkerchiefs, value 1 l.; six night-caps, value 3 s.; six collars, value 1 s.; five brushes, value 1 s.; a case of razors, value 4 s.; six maps, value 1 l.; three pairs of boots, value 10 s.; three pairs of shoes, value 6 s., and a pair of spurs, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles John Howard , commonly called Viscount Andover .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD FERRIS . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Mitcham-street, Lisson-grove, on the 6th of July; about a quarter past three o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner and another young man standing by a cart in Middlesex-mews, at the bottom of Mitcham-street; I knew the horse, and went up and asked the men how far they had come, as the horse seemed much fatigued; the prisoner said "Twenty-five miles;" I looked into the cart, but saw nothing but straw; I walked round the horse, and put my hand on him and said, "You have killed poor Johnny - where is Brown?" meaning Kit Brown; the prisoner or his companion said they had left Kit Brown at Portman-street - that he was lushy, meaning tipsy, and he was talking to some coachmen; I went and stood at some distance till the clock went half-past three; one of the men said "It is half-past three;" I got another watchman and returned; when they saw me come so close to them again, his companion said "I will go and call Mr. Brown;" I then called to my companion, who was concealed, and we went up to the cart; the first thing I saw was a goose; the prisoner then said, "There is a trunk in the cart;" there were some pease, and two portmanteaus; I then took him, the cart, goose, and the portmanteaus, to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did I make any resistance? A. Certainly not.

EDWARD LUCAS ELTON . I received the prisoner from Ferris. In the prisoner's waistcoat pocket I found two turnpike-tickets of the Uxbridge-road, and in the large portmanteau some visiting cards of Lord Andover's, and a quantity of wearing apparel.

GEORGE ALLEN . I am groom to Charles John Howard, commonly called Viscount Andover, son of Lord Suffolk. I remember these articles being packed up to be sent by Lord Suffolk's waggon; it was going near Malmsbury, in Wilts; it would go by Hyde-park-corner, down to Uxbridge; I delivered the portmanteau to Harrax, valet to Lord Andover; it contained the articles stated in the indictment; it left town on the 5th of July, and I saw the articles on the 6th in London; I followed the waggon, and overtook it about five miles on the other side of Maidenhead; the driver had not missed them.

JAMES HARRAX . I am valet to Lord Andover. I received the portmanteau from Allen, and put it into the waggon, which left Great Cumberland-street on the 5th of July, about half-past three o'clock, for Hounslow, where the waggoner was to put up for the night.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Turnham-green, and the cart came along with three men in it. I asked them what they would take me to town for - I said I would give them 1 s., and they said jump up; when we got to Mitcham-street, two of them got down, leaving me and another to mind the cart; they said they should soon come back; they asked me to put the tickets into my pocket as we came through the turnpikes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-241

1465. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a frock, value 18 d. , the goods of John Elliott .

GEORGE VARLEY . I live with John Elliott, a pawnbroker , in Kingsland-road . On the 8th of July the prisoner pawned a handkerchief for 3 s., and as she was going out a woman came in, and in consequence of what she said, I pursued the prisoner; as she was turning the corner I pulled her, and said she had left something behind her; she came back; I took her into the parlour, and the frock was found on her; she said it had caught her shawl as she was going out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I came out of the door I took off my apron and put it on my arm; I met a woman going in - I had not got far before the witness came and said I had left something behind me; I went back, and the frock was hanging at my elbow unknown to me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250915-242

1466. JOHN SCOBIE MACKAY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , six handkerchiefs, value 12 s, and eleven pairs of stockings, value 27 s., the goods of John Dutton , his master .

JOHN DUTTON. I am a linen-draper and live in Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner was my shopman ; in consequence of information I told him, on the 2d of August, that I suspected he was not so honest as he should be, and wished him to shew me the contents of his bag and boxes; he rather hesitated but at last complied; I sent a boy up stairs for his bag; he said it was his - he had the key of it in his pocket, and opened it himself - it contained a variety of letters, and two pieces of handkerchiefs, containing six handkerchiefs each - which were my property. I then asked him if he had any thing more; he said, so help him God he had not - but a friend of mine, who was there, was not satisfied, and asked if he had no box: I went up with him to his bed-room - he opened his trunk, and I there found a paper of stockings, containing eleven pairs - he owned that he had taken them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are the stockings here? A. Yes; the officer was not present at the search.

JAMES KENRIDGE. I was present on this occasion. I saw the prisoner open the bag - he took out the handkerchiefs, which Mr. Dutton said were his; the prisoner said he meant to pay for them: Mr. Dutton said it was a very idle excuse, and asked if he had any thing else; he said "So help me God I have not! if you find any thing else you may go as far as the law will allow you;" he begged and prayed very much that he would not prosecute; we then went up stairs, and in the box, which was opened by the prisoner, we found the stockings, which Mr. Dutton said were his property - the prisoner said he knew they were.

SAMUEL FERGUSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner delivered in a petition, soliciting mercy, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-243

1467. THOMAS WAVING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a watch, value 12 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 2 d., and two keys, value 1 d. , the goods of William Snell .

WILLIAM SNELL. I am servant to Mr. Cook, of Hyde Park-corner . The prisoner was my fellow servant . On the 18th of July, I got up in the morning, and found my pocket-book by the side of my box, which had been in the box the night before. The box was locked and the key in my breeches' pocket; I asked the prisoner about it, and he said the key was down the privy - that he had taken 6 d. from the book, and he hoped I would forgive him. I then missed my watch from my box - he said "I beg your pardon, I will go and fetch the watch;" which he did.

JAMES COOK . I am Park-keeper. The prosecutor is my servant; he told me he had lost his watch, and the prisoner must have it; I called the prisoner and told him it would be worse for him if he did not tell where it was; he then went into the cellar and fetched it out of the sand.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by Mr. Cook, who promised to get him a situation.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-244

1468. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Potter .

WILLIAM POTTER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Ratcliff-highway ; the prisoner was my apprentice ; in consequence of suspicion, I went to Mr. Cording's, a pawnbroker, in my neighbourhood, on the 9th of September. I found the prisoner in the shop - I said, "Thomas, what do you do here?" He said, "Nothing, Sir." I turned his apron aside, and found a pair of my shoes in his hand.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the shoes in my possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character; one of whom promised to send him abroad.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250915-245

1469. JOHN VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , two handkerchiefs, value 14 s. the goods of Thomas Foster .

NOAH FOSTER . I am shopman to my brother, Thomas Foster, linen-draper , of Oxford-street . On the 15th of September, the prisoner came into the shop; I saw him going out, while I was speaking to a gentleman in a gig; he pretended to match a bit of print in his hand; I took hold of him, and found under his coat, these two handkerchiefs, which had hung behind the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to take them at all, I had not got them in my hand; they were hanging on my shoulder as I came out.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-246

1470. RICHARD TOPPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of John Watson , from his person .

JOHN WATSON. I am a stone-mason . I was in High-street, St. Giles's , about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, of the 31st of July, and lost my handkerchief, but I did not feel it taken; the officer came, and asked if I had lost it? I said, I had. I did not see the prisoner.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am an officer. I was in St. Giles's, and saw the prisoner, and watched him for some time; he and another boy were following Mr. Watson. I crossed over, and saw him trying to put something about him; I took hold of him, and he dropped the handkerchief at his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going on an errand, and saw two boys drop something. I went across the road, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250915-247

1470. CATHERINE SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a gown, value 6 s. , the goods of John Matthews .

GEORGE WILLIAM DEAN . I live with Mr. John Matthews, a pawnbroker , in White-cross-street . On the 2d of September, about nine o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise like something being pulled off a nail - I looked round, and missed a black silk handkerchief. I went round, and the prisoner had picked it up; she said, it had blown down. I then missed another handkerchief, and on requesting her to move, I found it at her feet. I then missed a gown - some of the people in the shop said, she had been out of the shop and returned. I went out, and called on Mr. Brooks, another pawnbroker. I saw the gown there.

JAMES SMEE . I live with Mr. Brooks, a pawnbroker, who lives thirty-four doors from the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner in our shop, about a quarter past nine o'clock, on the evening of the 2d of September. She first brought a silk handkerchief, which I lent her 6 d. for; she came again in about a quarter of an hour, and pawned a gown for 6 s. Mr. Matthews' man came in about nine o'clock, and claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 8 s., in Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-248

1472. WILLIAM FORDER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a yard of satin, value 5 s. , the goods of John Dawson .

JOHN DAWSON. I am a journeyman silk weaver - the prisoner is one likewise, we lived in the same house. I had a cane of satin of one hundred and thirty yards - I had cut off a number of yards at a time, as my master wanted it. On Wednesday, the 12th of July, I cut off ten yards, and left a remnant of seven or eight yards in the loom. I then took home the work, and returned in two or three hours. My master had not given me any shute, and I made a holiday that day and the next; and on the Friday morning I went to work, and found it rolled up in a different manner - I rolled it down again, while the prisoner was out, and found the mark which had been on my work was gone - some had been cut off. I went to a pawnbroker's, and found a yard or a little better.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Capel, a pawnbroker. I have a yard of Florentine pawned by the prisoner on the 13th of July, for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250915-249

1473. THOMAS DYKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , ten brushes, value 9 s., and a pair of spurs, value 1 s. , the goods of John Horton .

JOHN HORTON. I am a brush maker . The prisoner was my errand boy . I had missed property; one of my workmen told me he had seen the prisoner at a pawnbroker's. I then took him to Hatton-garden office, and the officer found three duplicates on him.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I took the boy, and found on him three duplicates.

WILLIAM CREE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 20, Gray's Inn-lane. I have five brushes pawned by the prisoner between the 11th and 21st of July.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am shopman to Mr. Eves, a pawnbroker. I have three brushes pawned by the prisoner on the 21st of July.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I live with Mr. Nichols, a pawnbroker, in Gray's Inn-lane. I have six brushes and a pair of spurs pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250915-250

OLD COURT. SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1474. CHARLES M'ROLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , at St. James, Westminster , thirty-two yards of kerseymere, value 12 l., the goods of Henry Samuel Dodd , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD THOMPSON . I am shopman to Henry Samuel Dodd, who lives in Regent-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On the 23d of August, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I went into the shop and on turning round saw the prisoner come in and take this kerseymere off a pile of cloth, and put it on his shoulder - he turned round and walked out of the shop with it, at a very quick pace - I ran out and took him; he said he was very hungry, and begged I would let him go - here is the property (producing it) - it has my master's mark on it, and is worth 12 l. - there are thirty-two yards.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. 1 s Mr. Dood here? A. No; he always signs his name Henry Samuel; he said his name was Samuel; he lives in the house and pays rent and taxes; the property has our shop-ticket on it, and I saw it taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the Quadrant; - this man said he saw me come out of the shop - if so why not take me before I got round the corner.

RICHARD THOMPSON. I was so struck that I could not take him before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to mercy on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18250915-251

1475. EDMUND EDGAR, alias EDMUND EDGAR BULT , was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone , four spoons, value 26 s.; a cruet-stand, value 1 l.; a watch, value 3 l.; two chains, value 2 l.; a necklace, value 15 s.; four gowns, value 2 l.; twenty handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; a pair of stockings, value 4 s.; five pieces of lace, value 10 s.; a shawl, value 8 s.; a scarf, value 16 s.; five combs, value 4 s.; four rings, value 1 l.; a thimble, value 1 s., and two knives, value 2 s., the goods of Elizabeth Smith , in her dwelling-house .

JANE GOODCHILD . I am servant to Miss Elizabeth Smith, who lives at No. 16, Alpha cottages , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 11th of September I was the last person up. When I got up in the morning, I found the first floor window open; I had fastened it the night before: I missed the plate as stated in the indictment, out of the closet, mistress's watch from her drawer, a gold chain, tortoiseshell combs, nineteen handkerchiefs, four rings, and several other things.

GEORGE CULL. I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On the 12th of September, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Lisson-grove, north, with a bundle under his left arm, and a red shawl swinging in his right hand; I ran after him, and got just before him about two yards, turned back and asked him what he had got there? he looked me very hard in the face, and said "What is that to you?" and made round a wall; I ran and collared him, took him to a public-house, searched him, and in the shawl were two large table and four tea spoons; I took him up stairs, searched the bundle, and found five combs, a silk handkerchief, nineteen white pocket-handkerchiefs, a pair of silk stockings, two white dresses, two silk dresses, a cruet and stand, and three salt spoons - the purses, some trinkets, and a gold watch and chain, were in his pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. After he was taken to the watch-house did not a person come and say they had seen a man come out of this house? A. No - When I asked where he got them he would not tell me; I shewed him my staff. I never heard him give any account of them, except telling the Magistrate that he pulled them out of a ditch. I met him in the public road, going towards the New-road. I found a miniature painting upon him.

MISS ELIZABETH SMITH. I live in Alpha cottages, and rent the house. This property is all mine - I lost about 130 l. worth altogether. I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I arose at half-past five o'clock in the morning, and was walking in the Regent's-park before breakfast, intending to breakfast with my sister, at Bayswater. My attention was attracted by the bundle and articles in a ditch; I collected them together to take to the office to be claimed, when I was arrested by this man, in a rough manner, saying, "What have you there?" I said, "What is that to you?" judging from his appearance that he might be concerned in the robbery; he took me to the watch-house, and in three quarters of an hour a labourer was brought from the grove, to see if I was the person who had been seen coming out of this house - he said it was a much taller and stouter man; and in the lock-up room, in the presence of four people, one of the men said, I was a likely man to run; I applied to the witness to know if I had attempted to run; he said, No, but told the Magistrate I had turned round to attempt an escape. At the second examination the Magistrate spoke to him about this, and he said I had not run.

GEORGE CULL re-examined. There was a bricklayer's labourer went to the watch-house with a Bow-street officer, to see if he was the man who had robbed a house by the New church on Sunday.

JURY. Q. Did the bundle appear to have been in a ditch? A. It was not dirty at all - it was tied up in a black silk handkerchief.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18250915-252

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1476. JAMES LYNCH and WILLIAM FREWIN were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Oram , on the King's highway, on the 6th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a handkerchief, value 5 s., his property .

JAMES ORAM. I am a tailor and draper , and live in Newgate-street. On the 6th of July, about twenty minutes or half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Holborn , and at the corner of Gray's-inn-lane I saw the two prisoners standing, with some more men - I observed them look at me - I crossed over from that side of the way towards Middle-row, and when I came on the pavement I saw the two prisoners before me - they had crossed over also - I saw them look back at me - I went off the pavement, got in front of them, and mended my pace. The prisoners then came up behind me - Lynch took from my pocket a silk handkerchief, and gave it to the other prisoner, who put it under his coat. I collared Lynch, and said to him, "You villain, you have robbed me." Frewin ran into the crowd, I ran after him, and got hold of the tail of another man's coat - it rent the coat from top to bottom; and while holding the man's coat tail, I received a blow on the side of my face, or a kick - it stunned me; I fell on the pavement, and was taken into the shop of Mr. Saunders; the prisoners were gone then. When I first saw them at the corner of Gray's-inn-lane, they were with fifteen or sixteen others; I did not observe whether any of the others crossed; but I took particular notice of the prisoners, because they watched me, and I thought were after my watch, which I tucked up. I am sure Lynch is the person who took my handkerchief and gave it to Frewin. Lynch was taken in about five minutes, while I was in the shop, and Frewin about seven o'clock that evening. I knew them both, and pointed them out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen them before? A. Never; I felt Lynch's hand in my pocket, and saw my handkerchief in his hand; I was watching them for five minutes before it was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How came you to take hold of the tail of another man's coat? A. He ran into the crowd - they all three went together - I could not get through the crowd - I was too ill at the first examination to give my evidence - I did not hesitate for a moment to identify Frewin - I believe he had a blue coat on, but am not positive - my attention was taken up with his person - I did not speak to any woman - I called Stop thief! and the thief was stopped.

COURT. Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing him by Gray's-inn-lane? A. For five minutes.

THOMAS WHALLEY . I was standing in Baldwin's-gardens, on the 6th of July, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and saw a young man run by me as hard as he could, and in a few minutes heard a call of Stop him! Stop thief! I and my nephew, Cambray, followed him - Cambray ran fastest, and caught him just as he ran into a house - I got up, and am sure he is the same person who was running - it was Lynch. I took him towards Holborn, where the hue and cry proceeded from, and in going along he said he had got money in his pocket, and would give it all to me if I would let him go - I said No, and asked what it was for - he said for an attempt to pick a pocket of a silk handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were any other persons running? A. A good many were running after him, joining in the cry.

THOMAS CAMBRAY . I secured Lynch.

CHARLES READ . I am a constable. Mr. Oram gave me the handkerchief about an hour and a half after the alarm; while Lynch was in the lock-up place at Hatton-garden, Frewin came to him, and, in consequence of what Thissleton said, I secured him. Mr. Oram immediately swore to him.

MR. ORAM. Here is my handkerchief - a lady brought it into Mr. Saunders's shop to me.

WILLIAM THISSLETON . I am an officer. On the 6th of July I was at the office, and saw Frewin there. He called through the partition of the lock-up place, and said "Lynch, how do you get on?" Lynch said "I have not been up yet." I told Read, who secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure he used the name of Lynch? A. I am - I was six or seven yards behind him - he applied his mouth to a hole in the partition, and said so.

LYNCH'S Defence. On the evening in question I left my home in Tash-street, Gray's-inn-lane, and as I was passing Gray's Inn a mob was coming calling Stop thief! I went with them, and was in front of the mob when sto