Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th April 1825.
Reference Number: 18250407
Reference Number: f18250407-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 7th of APRIL, 1825, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Stephen Gazelee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart.; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Venables , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

Thomas Clark ,

Rodham Smith ,

Rd. Mitch. Roberts ,

Joseph Reid ,

Wm. Veeres ,

John Plowman ,

James Oram ,

Edward Evans ,

Samuel Ridley ,

James Phipps ,

Charles Woodward ,

John Murdoch .

2d London Jury,

Wm. Blundell ,

John Geo. Lacey ,

John Foss ,

Edward Clark ,

Ephraim Brain ,

Wm. Young ,

Francis Sinderby ,

John Triguey ,

James Ball ,

Thomas Burbidge ,

Thomas Bennett ,

James Wainman .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Wm. Rowey ,

John Bonner ,

George Watt ,

Wm. Schufield ,

Thomas Greenaway ,

Geo. Robert Lee ,

Wm. Crosby ,

Thomas Smith ,

Wm. Collins ,

Charles Lahee ,

James Brunton ,

Charles Spooner .

2d Middlesex Jury.

John Harrison ,

Thomas Ascroft ,

Wm. Caswell ,

Richard Buddle ,

James Sherrin ,

Thomas Heeney ,

Wm. Jumpson ,

Wm. Brock ,

John Faker ,

St. John Avery ,

Thomas Long ,

Nicholas Morrison .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Edmund Pugh ,

Wm. Jarman ,

Eden Bowler ,

Thomas Wells ,

Robert Bill ,

Wm. Toplis ,

John Saunders ,

John Grant ,

Thomas Gardner ,

Ephraim Simmonds ,

James Winks ,

John Goodenough .

4th Middlesex Jury.

John Thistleton ,

Charles Rayment ,

John Toby ,

Thomas Nichols ,

John Mitchel ,

James Cooper ,

John Newson ,

T. Bedsworth , jun.

Thomas Faulkner ,

Richard Mann ,

Robert Steers ,

John Parton .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 7, 1825.

GARRATT, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18250407-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

585. WILLIAM PROBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, a mare, price 25 l. , the property of Andrew Meredith .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ANDREW MEREDITH. I am a miller , and live at Ruardean, Glocestershire , which is 120 miles from London. I know the prisoner. On the 10th of February I had a black mare in my possession - my boy turned her into the orchard that night, but I did not see her there; I missed her next morning, the 11th: the prisoner had been at my house twice, but I was not at home the last time. I saw him there nine days or a fortnight before the mare was stolen; I missed her on the Friday morning, and on receiving information I went and watched the prisoner's mother's premises all Friday night; she lives about two miles from me; he had been living there a few months - I should think two months. In the morning I went home, and then went to Coleford, and got an advertisement drawn up. I went to Gloucester on Sunday morning, and to Cheltenham the same day, and then to London; from there I went to Andover, in Hampshire, and got back to London on Saturday morning, about eight o'clock, and saw the mare in possession of Ellis, an officer, at Bow-street; it is the mare I lost: I had her two years last September. She did not look so well as before; she appeared to have been worked hard: her tail had been trimmed and cropped, and her mane a little cut. I am positively sure she is mine. I have seen her here this morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where did you get her? A. I bought her two years ago last September; she was black, with some little white about her: she had been roughly used. I cannot be mistaken in her; there was a particular mark on her, which I had not noticed before, but my son had. I could pick her out among a thousand.

Q. Did you ever hear your wife say she had lent the mare to Probert? A. Never, on any occasion whatever.

MARY MEREDITH . I am the prosecutor's wife, and know the prisoner; he resided in our neighbourhood some time, at his mother's house; I saw him first last hay making time: he was at our house three times. On Tuesday, the 8th of February, he came about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening; the mare was then in the fold: I was helping my son to pull her out of the shafts - the prisoner came into the fold, with a candle and lantern in his hand, and his little son with him; he asked me if that was where we kept the mare; I said Yes, sometimes, and that sometimes we turned her out in the orchard; he said nothing more about the mare - he came into the house, and stopped there till a quarter before ten, and then left; my husband was not at home then. I saw the prisoner on Thursday, the 10th, at half-past twelve o'clock in the day time, at his mother's house.

ANDREW MEREDITH , JUN. I am fourteen years old, and have known the prisoner a long time - I remember his coming into the fold one evening, when my mother was there - it was dark: he came on Tuesday night, and we lost the mare on Thursday night. I heard him ask my mother if that was where we kept the mare; she said, Yes, in bad weather we kept her there, but of a fine might we turned her out in the orchard. He came into the stable after that, but did not speak to me - I was pulling the gear off the mare. On Thursday night, about dusk, I put her into the orchard - my brother was with me. I shut the orchard gate; it has a spring lock, which catches if the gate is pushed too. I went on Friday morning to look for the mare, and it was gone. I came to town last Monday evening (not before) and have seen the mare in possession of Ellis; it is my father's: she is rather fatter now than before; her tail has been cut since. I am sure it is my father's - it is black, with a white star on the forehead, and a spot on her back, where the saddle had hurt her - I had noticed that many times.

Cross-examined. Q. A star on the forehead is not uncommon? A. No. I cannot make a mistake - I am certain of her. It was brought out of the stable to me in town by the hostler.

JAMES STAMMERS . I am hostler at Mr. Frances's livery stable, Phillimore-place, Kensington. On the 16th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my master's stables, with a black mare; it had a saddle and bridle on, and appeared to have had a hard day's work; he said,

"Hostler, will you take care of my mare for the night;" I took her into the stable - he followed me in, and said again,

"Hostler, will you take care of my mare, for I have come a long way - I have come forty miles to day with her." She is about fourteen hands high, and is a strong mare - he told me to feed her well, to take care of her, and give her half a peck of oats,

and a feed of beans; he gave me his spurs, and said he did not know that he should fetch the mare himself next day, as he did not know whether he should come that road, and if not he should send for her; he asked my name: I said, Stammers; he asked my Christian name; I said James. He said he should send a note next day by the person who was to take the mare away, and he should direct the note to James, the hostler; at Frances's livery stables, Kensington, near the Adam and Eve public-house. Next day the witness, Frewin, brought me a note; this is it (looking at it:) in consequence of this note I delivered the mare to Frewin, who paid me for her keep. I have seen the same mare this morning, in possession of Ellis, the officer, and at Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? A. Not to my knowledge.

JAMES FREWIN . I am a green-grocer, and live in Carnaby-street. I have known the prisoner, by sight, for about five months before he last came to me. I am in the general line, and occasionally cook meat, and know him by his coming four or five times, to take meat - I knew him by the name of Thompson. The last time he came to me was on Friday night, the 18th of February - I have no doubt of his being the person; he had come to me on the Wednesday night, between eight and nine o'clock, and asked if I knew of a lodging - I said No; he said he had seen one as he came through Cross-street. He went away, returned, and said he had taken the lodging for a week. He asked for a slice of bread and cheese, which he had, and sent me for a pot of porter; we drank it together, and he asked me to call on him next morning, at his lodging, No. 8, Cross-street; I went there on Thursday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, and he said he had got a horse from the country, and it was for sale, and if I would take it he would give me a sovereign for my trouble; he sent me to a livery stables in Oxford-street, to enquire when the sale days were at Dixon's repository, also at one in Goswell-street, and another in St. Martin's-lane - I returned, and told him Dixon's sale was on Friday, also that in Goswell-street; he asked me to call again in the afternoon: I went to him about three o'clock, and he wrote three notes; (looking at two notes.) I can only speak to this one, which is the note directed to the hostler - he sealed the other two up, but the hostler's note was open; he gave me all three notes, and told me I should see the name of Cozens on the right-hand side of High-street, Kensington - I was to leave one of the sealed notes there, and take the other to Dixon's. Before I left the room he told me to take the mare through the iron gates at Kensington, across the park, and make my way to Battle-bridge, as the mare had not been used to London the stones would hurt her. I went and delivered the note to Cozens, then went to the hostler, and delivered him the note; he gave me the mare; I paid him 4 s. 6 d. for her, and took her through the Park, out of Grosvenor-gate, to Dixon's repository, and delivered it to one of the men in the yard, with one of the notes he had given me - it was then dark. I went home; he came to me again that night, and asked me what they said - I said, when they looked at the note they said he had opened his mouth too wide - I suppose they meant he had asked too much for her; he then asked me to go next day, and see it sold, and told me to tell Dixon to sell it for what it would fetch. I went to Dixon's, and spoke to a man, who is here - I gave him the directions the prisoner had given me, and afterwards saw her sold for twenty guineas. I saw the prisoner that night, and told him she was sold for 18 l.

Q. Why did you say so? A. I thought it would surprise him when he took the money. He said nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive the money? A. No. I cannot identify the two sealed notes, as I did not see the contents.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you see the mare at Bow-street? A. Yes - it was the same.

EDWARD CLAUGHTON . I am foreman to Mr. Dixon. I have seen Frewin. I was present when the black mare was brought - a note came with it; this is it, (looking at it.) Frewin came next day, and pointed the mare out to me in the stable; I told him she was booked at too much money - he said she was to be sold for what she would fetch; she was sold on Friday, for twenty guineas, to Mr. James Eames, whose brother is a coach proprietor. I was at Bow-street at the last examination, and saw the same mare there; she was sent by one of our men to Mr. Eames's yard. I gave the note to the clerk at Bow-street, and it was handed to Ellis in my presence.

JAMES EAMES . I am a coach master, and live at the Angel Inn, St. Clements. On Friday, the 18th of February, I bought a mare at Dixon's repository, for twenty guineas - she was brought to me that day, and given up to Ellis, the next day, I think. I saw the same mare at Bow-street.

WILLIAM COZENS . I am a linen-draper, and live at Kensington. I have known the prisoner some years. Frewin brought me a note, signed Thompson; I destroyed it in his presence. (Looking at a note, signed Cozens, and addressed to Mr. Dixon.) this is not my writing; I know the prisoner's writing, and have no doubt of it being his. The note addressed to the hostler is also his writing. I never sent any mare to Dixon's, nor authorised the prisoner to send any.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Frewin say why he brought the note? A. No. The note stated that Mr. Thompson would call in the morning; I did not at that time recognise the hand-writing, nor do I now know that it was his writing. I did not know Mr. Thompson, and destroyed it.

JAMES ELLIS . I am a principal officer of Bow-street. I received information, and apprehended the prisoner on Friday, the 18th of February; I found some bills, and a large pair of scissars on him.

Cross-examined. Q. The memorandum on the bills lead you to Dixon's? A. Yes, and I got information there, which lead me to Mr. Eames, where I found a black mare, which has since been seen by Andrew Meredith, his son, and Frewin; it has been under my care all the time.

The papers found upon the prisoner were here produced; they were bills for refreshment, for man and horse, at Swindon, and other places in Wilts. On the back of one of them was written,

"Dixon's repository, Barbican."

The letters referred to were here read, as follow: -

"For James, the hostler, at Mr. Frances's livery stables, Kensington, near the Adam and Eve."

"JAMES - Let the bearer have my mare - he will pay you the keep of her.

JAS. THOMPSON, Thursday Afternoon."

Thursday, Kensington.

"Mr. DIXON - Sir, I have sent my man with a mare; I shall be obliged if you can do the best you can with her; she is perfectly sound, and quiet in harness and saddle. I think she is worth thirty guineas. If not there myself my man will.

I am, &c.

M. COZENS."

MR. BARRY to MRS. MEREDITH. Q. You are a distant relation of the prisoner's? A. Yes.

Q. On your solemn oath have you not at any time lent him, or offered to lend him that mare? A. Never in my life; he never put the question to me. It was never lent to him by any person on my premises. I never said to any one that I had lent it to him.

COURT. Q. You said you saw him at his mother's on the Thursday - did you see him after that? A. No, my Lord.

ANDREW MEREDITH , SEN. re-examined. Q. Did you see him about the neighbourhood after losing the mare? A. Never after she was missed, which was on Friday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, If I have pleaded not guilty to this indictment it is not that I wish by subtleties to evade or screen myself from the verdict, and sentence which may be awarded against me, if convicted; but that I might have an opportunity to say something to convince the public that whatever may have been the unhappy circumstances of the latter days of my life, I was not driven into my present crime from depravity of disposition, but from a species of fatal necessity, which had placed me far beyond the reach of all human assistance and charity. - The appeal I now make is not with a view to lessen my past error (as there is a God, on whom I alone rely for mercy,) but to beg the Jury to banish all former unfortunate circumstances from their minds. It cannot have escaped your notice that ever since my discharge from Hertford, the public animosity has been kept alive against me by the public press, which has reached every part of England; even the smallest village I went to spurned me as an outcast; the chief instrument which prevented my obtaining employ, or indeed to effect a reformation, was the public press. I could scarcely move from one place to another without seeing my route marked in the daily papers; every door was shut against me, and every hope of future support blasted. With this dreary prospect I felt my fortitude forsaking me. I appeal to your Lordship and the Jury, whether my situation was not most deplorable, and what would you have done under similar circumstances? If you should discern any feature in my case deserving of commisseration, I trust you will recommend me to the clemency of my gracious Sovereign, as no former conviction appears on the record against me. Since the calamitous event which occurred at Hertford I have been a lost man, and on the eve of self-destruction. My innocent wife was involved in my ruin, and has suffered every privation. I have endeavoured to leave the country, but could not for want of means.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18250407-2

Before Mr. Justice Park.

586. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Davidson , spinster , on the king's highway, on the 24th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster, putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, seven shirts, value 2 l. 9 s.; twelve handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; the goods of the Reverend William Van Mildred , Doctor in Divinity, Bishop of Llandaff ; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and an apron, value 1 s. , the goods of the said Elizabeth Davidson.

ELIZABETH DAVIDSON . My mother is a laundress. On the 24th of February, rather before half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Tothill-street, Westminster ; it was not quite dark - I had a bundle with me, containing seven shirts, belonging to the Bishop of Llandaff, and twelve handkerchiefs - I was taking them to my mother to be washed; they were tied in a white apron of my own, and a coloured silk handkerchief over that; as I was coming by a passage in Tothill-street, this young man came out of the passage, he gave me a blow on the head, and took my bundle; he struck me on the back part of my head - he was just at my side - he snatched the bundle immediately after he gave me the blow - I felt the blow first - he ran away down the passage and I after him; I never saw him full in the face; I got above half way up the passage, about forty yards; it leads into the Almonry; I ran to the bottom of the Almonry. I fell down or I could have caught hold of him I was so near; when I got up I still followed; he turned to the left, at the bottom of the Almonry and I lost him; he was taken that night, but not in my presence. I am positive he is the boy, I was so agitated.

Q. That is the very reason why you should not know him? A. I can safely swear to him - it was light enough in the Almonry - it was almost day-light; I did not notice whether the lamps were lighted.

Prisoner. The passage is not twenty yards long. Witness. It is: I did not lose sight of him when I fell; he was at the top of the court when I got up - I saw him take the bundle with his left hand.

EMANUEL JOSEPH , JUN. I live in the Almonry; I am not a Jew My father is a watchman; on the 24th of February I had been for some coals and saw the prisoner run with a bundle under his arm. I had seen him before in the Almonry and know his face, but only saw part of his face that night - I am sure he is the boy; the bundle was in a red silk handkerchief; the prosecutrix was running after him; I heard her call out

"Murder! stop thief!" he was not stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see my face? A. A part of it; he wore a short blue coat and corderoy breeches.

ELIZABETH DAVIDSON. He had a short blue jacket on, dirty white stockings, and light-coloured knee breeches.

WILLIAM BYRON . I hawk goods about the streets. On the night in question I heard a female call out murder, in the Almonry; a boy ran by me; I saw the left side of his face; he wore a blue coat, light knee breeches, and white stockings; he had a bundle under his coat, under the left arm - I could not see what colour it was - I looked towards the prosecutrix or I could have stopped him - I knew him before by seeing him about Westminster, and am quite sure the prisoner is the youth who ran by me.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my sister's at half-past six, and went to Drury-lane - I was not at Westminster from half-past six till half-past twelve at night; when I was coming home, and knowing my sister was a-bed, I went

to the Almonry to get some supper. The watchman came and said

"How many times am I to tell you not to come here?" I said he had never seen me before; he looked at me and said,

"Oh, it is not you," but he must take me under the disorderly act. He took me to the watch-house and said he thought I was the boy whom he had information against about a robbery. Byron swore at the office at first, that I was not the boy; he afterwards swore that I was - I suppose the prosecutrix promised to make him a present if he would say so.

COURT. His deposition before the Magistrate agrees with his evidence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18250407-3

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

587. WILLIAM SARGEANT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , at Hanworth, a mare, price 10 l. , the property of John Poile .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN POILE. I live at West Oatley, Sussex . I had a little black mare; I saw her safe about six o'clock in the evening of Sunday, the 27th of February, and missed her next morning with a bay gelding, which was also safe the night before. I came to town and got to the George the Fourth public-house, at Hounslow, on the Thursday following, and saw my mare there; her tail was cut and seared; I saw that it had been recently seared; in consequence of this I went to Bath and Bristol, but found the prisoner on the Monday, at Henley-on-Thames. Hill saw the mare in my presence; she is worth 10 l.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was she a full size or a pony? A. A pony - it is six years old - I have had it about five years. I am a farmer, and have no partner. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am landlord of the Roebuck public-house, Witchcross, near East Grinstead; it is four or five miles further from town than where Poile lives. On Saturday morning, the 26th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my house with another person - they remained there till Sunday evening. I knew the prisoner by the name of Thomas Baker; he said he wanted to get to town by Monday morning, but the weather being bad he stopped till the evening, intending to go by the mail cart if he could.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live further from town than the prosecutor? A. Yes, his house is not in the direct road to town from my house. I heard of the horse being lost on the Monday morning.

HENRY PULLEN . I was hostler at the King's Arms public-house, Weybridge, Surry. On Monday, the 28th of February, between one and two o'clock in the day, the prisoner came to master's house - I did not see him come, but about a quarter to two they sent for me - I found a little black mare and a bay gelding in the stable; the prisoner and another man were there - they came out of the stable and told me to fetch some corn for the bay gelding and black mare. The prisoner remained there till Tuesday, and went away on the little black mare, between three and four o'clock, leaving the other man and the gelding there. He returned next day on foot without the mare, and went away between two and three. May has shewn me a black mare in London, on Tuesday last - it had a white star in the forehead, and I think it is the same, but will not be positive.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not common for a black mare to have a white spot? A. No, I speak to no other circumstance - it was the same size; my attention was not particularly called to it in the stable.

WILLIAM HILL . I'am a grocer, and live on Hounslow Heath. I have known the prisoner a year and a half, or two years, by the name of William Sargeant; he lived within thirty yards of my house. On the 1st of March (Tuesday, I think) I was driving a hog to Hanworth and met the prisoner on a little black mare pony; it took fright at my hog, and started, and nearly threw him off, which made me notice it. I said

"William, you have got a nice lively little thing there;" he said, yes, he had, and that it had never been rode before - he trotted away towards Hounslow Heath. I live next door to the George the Fourth, and was there one day when Poile was there - I think it was on a Thursday; I saw the same black pony there as I had met the prisoner on, and knew it again - Poile claimed it. On the 8th of March I saw the prisoner in custody at the Marquis of Granby, at Hounslow - he told me not to say any thing about the black pony I saw him with the other day - two constables had him, but he whispered to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you had any quarrel with him? A. I never had a word with him; I met him about a mile and a half from the George the Fourth, on the road between Weybridge and Hounslow.

HENRY RIDLEY . I am a labourer in Mr. Poile's employ. In consequence of directions I received I went to Hounslow; I was at the George the Fourth public-house, on Wednesday, the 2d of March, and saw the prisoner there. I have known him eleven years; I saw him come out of a small room, and when he saw me he went away without speaking. I then went to the stables of the George the Fourth, and in consequence of inquiries which I made I found master's pony there - I knew him by seeing him at Poile's.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew him by sight? A. Yes, and knew his friends; I knew him by the name of T. Baker; I said nothing to him.

CALEB STACEY . I was at the George the Fourth, Hounslow, on the 1st of March, and saw the prisoner come there on a black pony: he put it into the stables of the house; I saw it through the window, and saw it at the stables next morning, and knew it to be the same; Poile's man has since pointed it out to me. I knew it to be the same. I was in company with Hester, the landlord.

JOHN FINCH . I knew the pony to be Poile's property; I shewed it to Stacey.

HENRY RIDLEY . I was present when the witness saw it - it was master's.

JOHN HESTER . I am landlord of the George the Fourth, public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Stacey says he was with you when the pony came? A. He was with me but I did not see it come - I never said that a tall man came with it - I said a tall man ordered me to feed it. I did not see who brought it. A man came to the front of the house, and said he had put a horse into the stable, and I was to feed it. On Wednesday

morning the prisoner was in my parlour with two more - I think one of them was this tall man.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Pike, of Weybridge, knows that I rode from his place on a pony, three years old.

WM. PIKE. I keep the Old King's Arms at Weybridge. The prisoner came to my house on the 28th of February, and rode away on the 29th, on a pony; I looked at its mouth at the same time as I looked at the bay horse which I bought of another man who was with him, and sold it it again. I was not at home when they came to my house, and cannot say whether they came together, but they drank together. I have seen the pony claimed by the prosecutor; I cannot say whether it is the same as the prisoner rode away on or not; I am no judge of the age of ponies.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18250407-4

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

588. ALEXANDER FENNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , in the dwelling-house of Pillet Kirkham , a cloak, value 50 s. , the goods of William Heathcot Unwin , his master.

ISAAC BATEMAN . - I am valet to Mr. William Heathcot Unwin. The prisoner was put in my place for a fortnight during my illness; he attended on Mr. Unwin for me.

WILLIAM FENNEN . I am not related to the prisoner. He lodged in my room. I met him at a public-house near Kirkham's hotel, Bond-street , on Friday night, eight or ten days before he was taken; he was then living with Mr. Unwin, at the hotel; he asked me to take a parcel home to his wife; he called me out of the public-house, and gave me a bundle tied in a handkerchief. He told me he wanted a few shillings, and to get it for him upon that bundle. I said I would not, but I would take it home or any where else he chose. I took it home and gave it to a man, named Butler, next morning, to get whatever the prisoner wanted on it. Butler brought me 1 l. and a duplicate - I gave the prisoner the money on Monday morning, when he called; I offered him the ticket - he said he should take the articles out in a day or two, and desired that the duplicate might remain on my mantle-piece. I did not shew it to him - I did not know what was in the bundle. (Looking at a duplicate) this is it.

CHARLES COOK . I am shopman to Mr. Baker, pawnbroker, Upper George-street. I have a cloak pawned on the 12th of March, in the name of Wetherell, for 1 l. 10 s.; I gave the person the duplicate produced, but it has been altered since - the 10 s. are erased.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is Butler? A. I do not know.

WILLIAM BARRATT . I am a constable of Marlborough-street. On the 24th of March I was fetched to Kirkham's hotel - the prisoner was out - he came in and was shewn into Mr. Unwin's room, and charged with stealing a cloak, which he denied; he at first refused to tell where he lodged, and then said he could not recollect. I took him to the office, and on the road he asked me to go to his lodging, as he wanted me to advise with him; I said I could not - it was for him to do as he pleased about saying any thing of the cloak. He repeatedly asked me to go to his lodging - I at last went; he asked if I should search his wife - I said certainly. When we got to the watch-house he again asked me to go; I said

"Is the cloak or ticket there?" he said no, but he thought there was a clue that I could get it by. I then accompanied him to his lodging in Adam-street, West, where I found the witness Fennen in bed. The prisoner asked him what he had done with the cloak he gave him; he said

"What cloak? I have had no cloak of yours." The prisoner said

"Did you not tell me you had pawned it just by here - I gave it you in the bundle you were to take to my wife." Fennen acknowledged receiving the bundle, and said he took it to his wife, and then that he gave it to another person to take to her. I asked Fennen if he had any duplicates; he said no; I searched his room and found three in a portmanteau, one of which was for the cloak; he then said he had given it to another person to pawn, who brought him the ticket and money, but he gave the money to the prisoner, which he did not deny, but said he had taken the cloak as he was distressed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was his wife there? A. No, she is in service; he spoke of two children - I never heard that he had six.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to replace it next day - I merely did it to prevent being arrested.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing only, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy. Confined 1 Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

589. WILLIAM DARBY and SARAH, HIS WIFE , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Wine , and with a certain sharp instrument, striking and cutting him, with intent, of their malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS stating their intent to be to disable or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM WINE. I am a wire-drawer and live in Turk-street. Last Tuesday three weeks, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, William Darby, came to my house with his brother and Mr. Green; they said they had come to make up an old quarrel. We had a pot of beer and some gin; the prisoner Sarah, came in and took tea with my wife. She came to me and said

"You *** if you owe my Bill any animosity come and take it out of me." She tucked up her sleeves and struck me. Green carried her down stairs; and in about two minutes William Darby offered to strike me but was prevented - Green and my wife held me. I went out in about ten minutes to go over to the Duke of York public-house, and met the prisoners, both very drunk. I asked if they did not think they had acted wrong in kicking up a disturbance in my place; the woman said

"No, you ***." She ran at me, to claw my face, but did not do it - I knocked her down twice; William came up and struck me - I felt a great deal of pain in a certain place - I collared and threw him down - he ran at me five or six times, he leaned against the wall and seemed much fatigued - I went home and found I had been stabbed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Whatever dispute arose was at your lodgings - you went out afterwards and

began with them? A. Yes, the female prisoner is my wife's sister; I knocked his wife down before he came up to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-6

Before Mr. Justice Park.

590. PETER CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , at St. James, Westminster, a knife, value 1 s.; nine caps, value 20 s.; six frills, value 6 s.; nine handkerchiefs, value 9 s.; two bonnets, value 15 s.; a whittle, value 1 l.; two shawls, value 1 l.; a scarf, value 15 s.; two tea-caddies, value 1 l.; eighteen gowns, value 5 l.; seven petticoats, value 1 l.; thirteen shills, value 3 l., and nine pairs of stockings, value 12 s., the goods of Margaret Douglas , widow , in the dwelling-house of Joshua Davidson .

MARGARET DOUGLAS. I am a widow. On the 16th of February a trunk and a box of clothes were to come for me, from Harrow, to Mrs. Speed's house, No. 38, Rupert-street, in the parish of St. James. I had put the articles stated in the indictment into them (enumerating them); but I cannot say which were in each; I expected them to come on Wednesday, the 16th of February; I was living at Mrs. Field's then - they did not come at all: I waited till Friday, the 18th, then went to the Green Man and Still, Oxford-street, and from information I received there, I went to the house of Joshua Davidson, No. 33, Rupert-street - it is a private house; I told Mrs. Davidson what I came about - she shewed me my box, a very few things were left in it - the direction was torn off - it was uncorded and broken open - I had corded it; I have lost the trunk altogether; I had put a white-handled clasped penknife into one of them at Harrow; I had had it five or six months.

JAMES BANKS being called did not appear.

ANN DAVIDSON . I am the wife of Joshua Davidson - we live at No. 33, Rupert-street, in the parish of St. James, and rent the house; we have lived there about seven months. The prisoner took a first floor back room at our house, on the 15th of February, and was to sleep there that night, but did not. He brought a box that day, and then went away; I did not see him bring the box in. On Thursday, the 17th, he came again; I let him in, between four and five o'clock - before that two boxes had come to our house: I paid 1 s. 6 d. porterage for them. The box was corded, and the trunk was in a wrapper.

Q. Did you observe how they were addressed? A. No. I did not take them in myself; I was present when they came: one was left in the parlour, and the other taken into the prisoner's room, as the porter, when he brought them, asked if a young man named Douglas was moving in, and we did not know the prisoner's name - he had not said that he expected any boxes. When the prisoner came on the 17th, I said two boxes had come from the Green Man and Still, and was it right; he said Yes: I said I had paid 1 s. 6 d. porterage, was that right; he said Yes, and he would settle with me by and by. He went up stairs, came down again in about a quarter of an hour, and went out with the trunk; he returned in about twenty minutes, without the trunk - he went up to his room for about ten minutes, and then went out with two bundles; he came back in a few minutes, and went up stairs again, came down with another bundle, and brought me the key of his room, and said if Henry came in he should be in about eight or nine o'clock, to bed. Henry Ball had recommended him to us; they were to sleep in the same room. I saw no more of him till he was in custody; he did not come home, and Ball did not come till next day; he had lived about three months at our house. Next day, Friday, Mrs. Douglas came to our house; I shewed her the box which was left behind.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask if there was a letter left with the boxes, as I should like to know where they came from? A. He asked if there was a letter; I said No, and he said he said he supposed it was inside. He said nothing about liking to know where it came from.

JANE SLADDEN . I was nursing at Davidson's. The prisoner came on the 15th, and brought a trunk. On the 16th James Banks brought the other boxes - I took them in.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 2d of March, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, and took him to St. Ann's watch-house, searched him, and found a pen-knife on him, which I have had ever since. When I first took him I asked if his name was Peter Carroll; he said No, it was George Day; I said I apprehended him for stealing a box and trunk from Rupert-street; he at first denied it, but afterwards said he took them to his mother's lodging, and sold them to a Jew, who he called out of the street, for 50 s., and that his right name was Peter Carroll. I found 20 s., on him, which he said was all he had left from the produce of the property; I found three silk handkerchiefs on him, two of which were in his hat; they do not belong to the prosecutrix.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I was with Schofield when the prisoner said he had taken the things from Rupert-street, and sold them to a Jew, at his mother's place, in her absence; he said he sold the trunk, with its contents, altogether, to the Jew, for 50 s., and it was impossible to get any of them back, as he did not know the Jew, nor where he was likely to be found.

MRS. DOUGLAS. I am quite sure this knife is mine; I have had it so many times in my hand: it was in the trunk or box when I packed them at Harrow. My goods were worth 20 l. to me. Banks is employed at the Green Man and Still; he referred me to No. 33, Rupert-street.

Prisoner's Defence. The box which was corded was not broken open; it appeared to have been forced with the weight of the clothes. If I had thought it was not for me I would not have sold them.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250407-7

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

591. GEORGE HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a watch, value 25 s., the goods of Charlotte Dixon , spinster ; and three silver spoons, value 20 s.; sixteen towels, value 8 s.; eleven napkins, value 8 s.; eleven caps, value 11 s., and nine frocks, value 18 s., the goods of Thomas Hewitt , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HEWITT. I live in Sovereign-street, Paddington , and am a butcher ; I have never slept in the

house, as it is unfinished: I intend to live there when it is completed. I placed Charlotte Dixon, my servant, there to air the rooms, and to sleep there when she thought them aired. Three rooms wanted plastering and papering. I have not opened the shop yet. I had sent in twelve chairs, two tables, a box of linen, and three silver spoons. On the 16th of March, about one o'clock in the morning, Stevens, the watchman, called me up; I went to the house; the box of linen laid in the room, and the spoons on it; they were in a cupboard the day before.

CHARLOTTE DIXON. I am servant to Mr. Hewitt, and had been so for a fortnight or three weeks. I slept at this house for the first time on the 15th of March, and between twelve and one o'clock I thought I heard somebody walking about the house; I listened, and heard a person coming up the attic stairs, without his shoes; I got out of bed, opened the window, and called the watchman, who came, and sprung his rattle; more watchmen came up, and while they were trying to break open the private door at the side of the house, I saw a man jump down from the fan-light over the shop door, and run away; the watchmen sprung their rattles, and pursued, but returned without him. I sent them to alarm Mr. Hewitt, who came. I had fastened the shop door the night before, but the space above was open, as the fan-light had not been put in. I let Mr. Hewitt and the watchmen in; we all went up stairs, looked round the front attic, and found the box of linen gone from there; it was there overnight: it was found at the bottom of the attic stairs, with three silver spoons on it, wrapped in a cloth; they were in the cupboard the night before, with a watch, which was found on the prisoner when he was taken: it belonged to Mrs. Winders, where Mr. Hewitt lodged; she had lent it to me. I am a widow. The linen still remained in the box.

THOMAS DRAKE . I am a watchman. On the 16th of March, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Hertford-street, Park-lane, looking through the iron rails of the Marquis of Londonderry's house; I heard him moving, and found he was without shoes; I went to him, and said,

"What are you doing here?" he said,

"I am looking for a place to lay down;" I said,

"This is a very improper place," and took him to St. George's watch-house, and found a watch, two knives, a gimblet, and two duplicates upon him. He was not quite a mile from the prosecutor's house.

CHARLOTTE DIXON . One shoe was found in the house - a watchman brought another in from George-street. I know the watch to be the same Mrs. Winders lent me. I have the spoons - they are not new.

THOMAS HEWITT. I put the linen into the box; it contained sixteen old towels, eleven napkins, and eleven caps; they were worth 37 s., and the spoons 20 s.

WILLIAM STEVENSON . I am a watchman I pursued a man who escaped from the house; he ran up George-street, towards Park-lane. I picked up one shoe in George-street.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-8

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

500. JAMES WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 4 lbs. of printing type, value 8 s.; two composing sticks, value 6 s.; two quires of paper, value 3 s., and 200 sheets of printed paper, value 8 s. , the goods of William Marchant , his master.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-9

601. GEORGE WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , four jars, value 6 d.; a pint of oil, value 6 d.; and fifty nails, value 3 d., the goods of Thomas Brandram , and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM CALDWALL BRANDRAM . I am in partnership with Mr. Thomas Brandram and others - the prisoner was one of our porters . On the 1st of March, in consequence of information, I had three or four of the men searched, and on the prisoner was found two jars of oil, some bladders, string, and other things, in his hat and about his person. He said he had taken them from us, and asked for mercy; he has lived two or three years with us, and had 20 s., a week. He has a wife and family.

WILLIAM HOLT . I am clerk to Mr. Brandram, whose evidence is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-10

602. BENJAMIN CADE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , ten bottles, value 2 s. 6 d., and sixteen pints of wine, value 19 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Malins .

WILLIAM WAITE . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre. On the 3d of March, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was in Skinner-street , about one hundred yards from Mr. Malins's, who is a British wine merchant - I heard glass break; I got up, and saw the prisoner coming towards me with some bottles; I asked what he had got; he appeared very drunk, and said wine. I went to collar him, and he made a blow at my head with a bottle; I stooped to avoid it, and he ran across the way; I called to Scott, who knocked his hat off with his stick: he fell: we seized him, and as he arose wine ran from his waistcoat. I took two bottles of wine from him, and Scott another; he struck me several blows, and ran off, as I had the bottles I could not hold him; we at last secured him. I picked up the broken pieces of five bottles.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How could you tell how many broken bottles there were? A. I found the necks of four. I thought him drunk at first, but am now convinced that he was shamming - he might be half and half.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a watchman. Waite's account is correct. He certainly was drunk.

GEORGE GODFREY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said he had bought the wine at Mr. Malins's. He appeared the worse for liquor.

WILLIAM CUTLER . I am servant to Mr. John Malins, wine merchant, of Newgate-street. The prisoner came there between ten and eleven o'clock, with Terry; they each had a glass of wine. I fell asleep, and do not know when they left; we retail wine. After he was in custody I missed a 5 s. piece from the till, and found wine had been drawn from the casks below; I did not see them after eleven o'clock. Nobody but myself was at home; I was

asleep in the counting-house from eleven to three o'clock, and when I awoke he was gone. I missed some bottles from different bins; I know them by the corks.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not very drunk that night? A. No. Terry was in the warehouse when I awoke - he was once in Mr. Malins's service, and as the prisoner came with him I received him.

JURY. Q. How did the watchman get in? A. The door was open.

GEORGE TERRY . I left Mr. Malins's between ten and eleven o'clock, and went to a free-and-easy club in Theobald's-road; the prisoner was in the chair; I invited him home to take a glass of wine at master's - Cutler asked me to light the counting-house fire, and as soon as I had done so I fell asleep, and there the watchman found me; I and the prisoner were intoxicated.

MR. JOHN MALINS . I keep this house - it is not kept open so late; the witnesses were in my service - whether they gave the wine to the prisoner or not I cannot tell.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-11

603. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , four hundred and twenty-eight sheets of printed paper, value 16 s. the goods of Thomas Plummer and George Brewis , to whom he was a servant.

GEORGE BREWIS. I and Thomas Plummer are in partnership, as printers , and live in Love-lane. The prisoner was our errand-boy . In consequence of information I found a quantity of my paper in possession of Mr. Epps, in five of his shops.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. On Wednesday morning, the 23d of February, between seven and eight o'clock, the witness Rushton, gave me information; I went to Blossoms Inn, and found 11 lbs. of paper; I waited there, but nobody came for it - I at last found out the prosecutors. I then went to Epps's shop on Holborn-bridge, and found more; I asked if they had any more, which they denied - we got a search warrant, and found a bundle more, and on going to several of Epps's shops I found more.

ARTHUR GEORGE RUSHTOM . I live at Blossoms Inn, Lawrence-lane. On the 23d of February, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came, and asked if he might leave a bundle of paper with me till the shop was open; I said Yes, and about eight o'clock he came - I questioned him; he said his mother lived at a stationer's, and had it given her to sell. I said I would send for a constable, and he ran away.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am an officer. I went with a warrant to Epps's and found more paper.

THOMAS FROST . I am servant to Mr. Epps. I bought some of the paper of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-12

604. THOMAS SERING and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 18 ozs. of tea, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

JOHN MAYHEW . I am a labourer in the East India warehouse. On the 26th of February I saw the two prisoners in Seething-lane , with Mr. Thomas Clark's cart, at half-past two o'clock in the afternoon; it was loaded with twenty or thirty chests of tea. I saw Smith break open one chest of tea; he then emptied one of the nose bags into the other, and gave it to Sering under the cart, to hold for the tea to run into I suppose, but I ran into our yard to get assistance, came out, and they had moved further down the lane. Hickman, my fellow-servant, followed the cart.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did Smith break the chest with? A. A cross prop.

JOHN HICKMAN . Mayhew came into the yard, and asked whose teas they were which had gone out of the yard; I said it was Clark's cart; but the tea was Mr. Garratt's. I went out; there was a stoppage down the lane. Sering got off the cart till a truck was unloaded; they then moved on to Tower-street, and instead of turning to go to Old Swan, they turned to the left, to Barking churchyard, and staid there a short time; Smith was at the horses' heads - Sering got on the cart; he came down in five or ten minutes - they put a nose bag on the horse. Sering pulled off his hat, put on a leather cap, and got on the tilt; Smith tied the tilt down upon him. An Excise officer came by; I sent him for an officer, who came - Sering was then in the cart, and had broken the tea chest open. We found a nose bag, with 11 b. 2 ozs. of tea in it, with him in the cart - his hand was in the chest. Smith had gone away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you speak to Sering? A. Not till we got him off the cart; I thought him tipsy when he was in our yard - he was fresh, but not so drunk as he pretended. Smith did not appear so tipsy as him; they were both in our yard when the cart was loaded. I cannot say whether there was a cross bar in the cart - Sering was driver of the cart; Smith was his odd man.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a carrier - Sering was my carman, and has been several months in my employ. I do not know whether there was a cross prop in the cart.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am an Excise officer. I got an officer by Hickman's desire, and helped them untie the tilt, and caught Sering in the cart, with his hand in the chest, and the nose bag under him, with tea in it - he was tied under the tilt, inside the cart, laying on his belly.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear in an helpless intoxicated state? A. I considered him quite sober; he jumped out of the cart as well as I could.

JOHN BISSETT . I am an officer. I produce the tea.

JOHN HICKMAN . The tea in the chest corresponded with this.

SERING - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Nine Months .

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-13

605. JOSEPH SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , ninety-six yards of printed muslin, value 1 ld. , the goods of Samuel Tanner , and Augustus Keppel Baylis , his masters.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARK LEGG . I am porter to Messrs. Ray and Lewis. I took a parcel to the Gloucester warehouse, Whitecross-street, directed to Mr. Thomas, of Gloucester.

JOSEPH NICHOLSON . I packed four pieces of printed muslin in paper, and directed them to Mr. William

Thomas, of Gloucester, enclosing an invoice. I delivered it to Legg. I have since seen the invoice.

GEORGE HOLT . I am nephew to Andrew Holt , who is agent to Samuel Tanner and Augustus Keppel Baylis, at the Gloucester warehouse. I received a parcel from Legg, for William Thomas, of Gloucester, on the 31st of March - it was put aside in the yard, to go by the waggon that night: it was not missed till it was found. - There was a stable on the premises, under the loft. The prisoner was our porter, and had access to it. I saw the parcel found in the loft; three pieces of the goods were gone when it was opened.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see it in the stable? A. Yes. There are eight servants in the yard. I think that the prisoner can read.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, went into the stable, and found one piece of cotton under the manger - in the prisoner's pocket I found the invoice of the goods, and in his hat a piece of brown paper and string.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he picked the paper up in the yard? A. He said he picked it up. I think he can read and write, for I found some writing at his lodgings. There is a mark on the brown paper, but no direction.

JOSEPH NICHOLSON . This invoice is my writing, and what I put into the parcel. The paper is such as what I packed it in.

Cross-examined. Q. The direction is not on it? A. No. I packed it in two whole sheets - here are two sorts of string; the thickest is the size we use.

GEORGE HOLT. Here is a mark on this paper, which I particularly noticed; it is part of the paper which inclosed the parcel; the mark is a blot.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the invoice as I went to dinner, and by the wool I found the paper.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-14

NEW COURT.

(1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

606. MARY BECK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a watch, value 3 l., the goods of Samuel Smith , from his person .

SAMUEL SMITH. I was in Long-acre on the 18th of August, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, and was accosted by two young women, who asked if I would give them anything to drink, or go with them - I at first refused, but afterwards went with them to the Black Boy, public-house; I took a glass in my hand, but did not drink any thing. I stood against the tap-room door about a quarter of an hour; I then went out, and one of the young women (who was convicted last Session) followed me - she came up to me, and put her hand into my pocket - the prisoner came up to me in a few minutes, and stood quite close to me: I did not feel my watch go, but I missed it very soon. I pursued the prisoner, and overtook her; before I took her I had seen her extend her hand towards the other; I told her I thought she had taken my watch: I turned round to look for the other, but she had run away - I then gave charge of the prisoner, and as we were coming up Long-acre we met the other, and had her taken into custody - the prisoner was discharged after a second examination.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When she was taken did you not say you was not certain whether she was the woman? A. No, I did not. I was not in liquor.

JOHN BOYD . I am a watchman. On the night of the 18th of August I took charge of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-15

Before Mr. Recorder.

607. HANNAH COLT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , four gowns, value 8 s.; a pair of stays, value 2 s.; a piece of patch-work, value 2 s.; a pair of sheets, value 8 s.; a table-cloth, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; a spencer, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; an apron, value 6 d.; three yards of calico, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two pairs of scissars, value 4 d.; a pillowcase, value 6 d., and two glasses, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Till .

ANN TILL. I lodge in Little Portland-street . The prisoner lived in the same room with me - I gave her her lodging for nothing. On the 27th of March I left her in my room, when I went out to chapel, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; I returned about half-past one - she was gone, and these articles were missing; they had not been locked up. She was taken about five o'clock, with some of the property. I have known her about six years; she went out charing and washing.

WILLIAM REED . I apprehended the prisoner about half-past four o'clock, in the Haymarket. A girl came to me, and said she had robbed Mrs. Till - she denied the charge, but I detained her. Here is the property; part of it was on her, and some was at a public-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Some of the property is mine; the rest is her's.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-16

608. THOMAS NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a copper, value 10 s., belonging to William Tapscott , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

2d COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

ELIZABETH TAPSCOTT . I am the wife of William Tapscott; we live in Marsham-street, Westminster . We had a copper stolen from our house on the 17th of March; it had been fixed in the wash-house, which is attached to the dwelling-house - I had seen it safe about a quarter after seven o'clock - it had been used that day; a person might get to the wash-house by the street door being left open. I heard a knock at the street door about a quarter before eight; I went to open it; it was a man who came to deliver a message. One of the witnesses came down stairs, and told me there was a noise in the wash-house; I went towards the wash-house, and found the prisoner in the passage; there was no other person about. I went to the wash-house, and found the copper was gone from its usual place, and left in the yard. Nothing was found on him but a pen-knife and a few halfpence.

JANE STUBINGTON . I live in Tapscott's house. I was coming down stairs about a quarter before eight o'clock, and heard some person in the wash-house - I went up stairs, and got a light; I came down again, and met the prisoner coming from the wash-house: I had called my sister, who did not come. I took him by the arm, and he was detained. I went into the wash-house, and found the copper removed.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner. I saw the copper removed from the wash-house.

THOMAS PACE . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found a few halfpence and this knife. His hands and trowsers were covered with mortar.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-17

609. MICHAEL RAINEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 70 lbs. weight of lead, value 7 s. , the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

PATRICK CRONIN . I am a labourer. The prisoner brought about 70 lbs. of new lead into a house which I have the care of in Bennet-street, Westminster, on the 15th of March, about four o'clock - he was quite a stranger - he asked for a knife to cut it up - I asked where he brought it from - he said from Mr. Whitehead's, a plumber - I detained it - he ran away but was taken that evening; I have not found any owner for the lead.

THOMAS PACE . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner in the room of a person who lodges in the house; I have not found any owner for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-18

610. ELIZABETH SCHRODER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a bolster, value 6 s.; a quilt, value 4 s.; a pillow, value 3 s.; and three blankets, value 9 s.; the goods of Henry Mellin ; and a blanket, value 2 s. , the goods of Harriet Sinclair .

ELIZABETH MELLIN . I am the wife of Henry Mellin. We live in Gray's Inn-road; I had been in a little business, and when I gave up business I left my things in the care of Sinclair, who lived with the prisoner. On the Monday after Michaelmas day I told her to take care of them till Christmas, but I went for them about nine or ten days before Christmas - they were then gone - she said it must be the prisoner who had taken them - she was there and said she had pawned them - she went with me to the pawnbroker's, where we found them.

HARRIET SINCLAIR. I am a widow . I take in washing , and live in Hart-street, Covent-garden ; the prisoner had lived with me about nine months; Mrs. Mellin's things were under my bed - the prisoner sleeps with me - I had not missed them till Mrs. Mellin inquired for them - I had no knowledge of the prisoner having made use of them - I missed a blanket of my own after she left, which was the next day; she took Mrs. Mellin to the pawnbroker's, where she had pawned them; she took in needlework.

ROBERT BURNS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. The articles stated in the indictment were pawned, at different times, by the prisoner - I am certain of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM EDWARDS . - I am a constable. I took the prisoner - I found no duplicates on her, but she said where the articles were pawned.

GUILTY. Aged 70.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-19

611. CATHERINE SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , forty yards of calico, value 10 s. ; the property of John Birt .

JOHN BIRT. I am a linen-draper , and live in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden . On the 29th of March, between one and two o'clock, I was at dinner in my back parlour - the calico was on an iron bar about one yard within my shop; I saw the prisoner come in and look at it, then take it off the bar, and walk off with it; I followed and took her about ten yards from the door, with it under her shawl - she appeared to be sober.

WILLIAM BOND . I am conductor of the patrol at Bow-street - I took charge of the prisoner - I have kept the calico ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor and do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-20

612. EDWARD BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Stephen Pilgrin , from his person .

RICHARD CORBETT . I am twelve years of age. I know the nature of an oath; I have seen the prisoner several times on Clerkenwell-green. On the 29th of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw Mr. Pilgrin in York-place, City-road ; I did not see the prisoner at that time, but as I was sitting on a butcher's block in Sydney-street, about five minutes afterwards, I heard the cry of Stop Thief! and saw the prisoner run down Sydney-grove; he appeared to be the person the people were pursuing; I followed and saw him hide a yellow silk handkerchief under a post in a dust hole - Mr. Pilgrin was not then pursuing him; I saw him taken the same day - I told the officer I had seen the prisoner hide the handkerchief, and saw the officer take it from the dust-hole; I saw Mr. Pilgrin afterwards; the handkerchief was shewn to him and he claimed it as his property, in the presence of the prisoner, who said he had not seen it nor had it.

WILLIAM COATES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. Corbett accused him of having hid the handkerchief, and shewed me where it was; a woman said, in his presence that she saw him pick the gentleman's pocket - Mr. Stephen Pilgrin claimed it. The prosecutor is now dead.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-21

613. MATTHEW WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , twenty-eight brass cocks, value 50 s., thirty brass rods, value 70 s.; 5 lbs. of nails, value 2 s., and eighteen sheets of sand paper, value 1 s. , the goods of David Evans .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. DAVID EVANS. I am a stove-grate manufacturer , and live in Crutched-friars . The prisoner was in my service

about three years, in the capacity of steel-burnisher - he had accros to my premises - I have missed the articles stated in the indictment.

ROBERT ADAMS . I am a carpenter, and live in Charles-street, Westminster. I know the prisoner - he produced some brass cocks, and other articles to sell, on the 7th of February.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not say that it would be better for him to give you some information? A. No, I did not.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you buy any of them? A. Yes, I bought eight cocks of him, at the sign of the Robin Hood public-house - I took them home and Mr. Evans came about a month or five weeks afterwards and I delivered them to him - I gave him 11 s. for the cocks and some nails; he paid me 4 s. which he owed me - I asked how he got them - he said he worked for different employers, and they sometimes paid him in goods - his father-in-law had worked for me five years - I had no suspicion - I also bought of him some stair carpet rods for 18 s. which I delivered to the officer, and the cock likewise.

ELIZABETH ADAMS . I saw the prisoner at my husband's house some time after the 7th of February - he brought a bundle of rods and a bundle of cocks.

JOHN WHEEL . I am an officer of Queen's-square. I received this property from Mr. Adams, which I have kept ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN JORDAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Adams. These marks on the paper are my writing - I tied the cocks up in it - there are twenty-eight, which are worth 2 l. 16 s.

Prisoner's Defence. There are a great many cocks on the premises, and Mr. Evans can swear to no marks on them - he promised me a free pardon if I would tell him of them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-22

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

614. ELIZABETH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a purse, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a crown piece: two half-crowns, and four shillings, the property of John Underhill , from his person .

JOHN UNDERHILL. I am a schoolmaster , and live in South Molton-street. I left home about nine o'clock in the evening, on the 21st of February - the prisoner and another female, took hold of my arms in Oxford-street - I desired them to go about their business; the other left me in a short time, but the prisoner still kept hold of my arm, begged pardon, and hoped I would excuse her walking with me a little way - I told her I was going but a short distance, and as far as that was she was welcome - she was a stranger - she said if I would walk with her down the next street she had something particular to say to me. I went down a short distance and at the corner of a court she pointed out two houses, each of them having a light in the passage - she asked if I would go to one of them, and said they were very respectable; I told her if that was her business I had nothing more to do with her; she still kept hold of my arm, and endeavoured to persuade me to go. I told her she need use no arguments, as I would have nothing to do with her. I turned round to go away, and she clasped her arms round my waist and begged I would excuse her - I then walked a few paces away, she still walking by my side - she then called some female by name, and I perceived her put her hand over my shoulder to that female - I put my hand to my breeches pocket and found my purse and money were gone; I have never got it again; I then took hold of the prisoner and said

"You have picked my pocket;" she said

"Oh, you naughty man, how can you say so? - I have not any thing about me." I said

"If you have not, the person to whom you just now handed something, most likely has." She then stooped down, as if to look on the ground, and then ran away - I pursued her - she dodged me through several courts and got into Oxford-street, crossed over and fell down, but she got up and ran down Mary-le-bone-lane; I called Watch! several times - I could have taken her but did not know that I had a right.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were afraid to touch her at all without an officer? A. Yes - I was going to Mary-le-bone-street to supper. It was the tone of distress that she assumed which took my attention - I had no suspicion of what she was - she put her two arms round my waist - she was before me, and her two hands were behind my back - it was immediately after that I missed my purse. It was in Woodstock-street that she asked me to go into the house; we had not spoken together in Oxford-street; the other person went from me in a great hurry, but I did not miss my purse till after the prisoner put her arms round me.

Q. Had you not told this young woman again and again that you had not a farthing of money about you? A. No, I did not.

COURT. Q. Had you no suspicion of what she was? A. No, not in the least - I was perfectly sober.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-23

615. ELIZABETH WEBSTER, alias Eady, alias Hewett, alias Withnell , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , twenty yards of bombazeen, value 3 l. 15 s.; thirteen yards of crape, value 2 l. 12 s.; twenty-four yards of sarsnet, value 6 l. 16 s.; twenty-four yards printed cotton, value 3 l.; eight yards of lawn, value 1 l.; three pairs of stockings, value 27 s.; three yards of muslin, value 13 s., and three scarfs, value 5 l. , the goods of William Bates Drew .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BATES DREW. I am a linen-draper , and carry on business in Parliament-street, under the firm of Mann and Co. I had a customer of the name of Mrs. Edward Johnstone . On the 7th of February I was absent from town, but about twelve o'clock on the 8th, a letter was put into my hands; on the 11th another letter was put into my hands, and in consequence of some suspicion, I ordered my horse and chaise to be got ready at seven o'clock on the morning of the 12th, and went to Woodford-bridge, taking the parcel with me. Mrs. Johnson said she had not ordered it - I shewed her the letter, and she said she knew nothing of it. I then came back to town and went to Mr. Pedley's shop, No. 268, Holborn, where the parcel was directed to be left, and after waiting there till between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came there, and said she had no idea the parcel was so large,

had she would get a coach - she then went away, and I saw no more of her till she was apprehended - I gave directions to follow her.

JESSE HALL . I am in the employ of Mr. Drew. On the 7th of February I received this letter:

(The Letter was here read.)

Woodford, Feb. 7.

"Mrs. Edward Johnson will thank Messrs. Manas to send her, to her late residence in Gerrard-street, the under-mentioned mourning for her three nieces, who are just returned from France. She will be glad if they will not said sending the parcel, carefully packed up, as she is sending by ten o'clock to-morrow, and the servant will call and bring it down to Woodford. Let the articles be good. I send this by the post-boy, with orders to post it immediately, consequently there will be plenty of time to send them."

(Here followed a list of articles, see Indictment.)

JESSE HALL. I know Mrs. Johnson - she is a customer of ours - her late husband lived in Gerrard-street; when I received the letter I packed up the goods, directed it for Mrs. Johnson, and delivered it in Gerrard-street, to Thomas Byford; I asked who I was to leave the parcel with, and they directed me to leave it with him. Mr. Johnson had been a comptroller of the Twopenny post-office there; I was not at home when the second letter arrived - I had not seen the prisoner in the transaction, or given her any credit at all - the second parcel was made up according to this letter, and taken the next morning, by Mr. Drew, with a bill of parcels. The second letter is as follows.

(reads):

"Feb. 11, 1825.

"Mrs. Johnson received the parcel quite safe, and likes the scarfs very much; she will be glad if Mr. Mann will send her down as much gros de Naples and lining as will make two more pelisses, as the quantity sent is only sufficient for one; also ten yards of Welch flannel, and twenty-five yards of calico, at about 1 s. 3 d.; and a piece of diaper, small pattern, Be so good as to send them to-morrow to Mr. Pedley's, No. 268, High Holborn, two doors from the George and Blue Boar, directed to me, A friend of mine is coming down to spend a few days with me, and sets off from the above Inn, therefore I have requested her to call at Pedley's, and bring the parcel in the coach with her - pack it secure."

THOMAS BYFORD . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Musgrove - he is comptroller of the Twopenny post-office - I was in the same capacity to Mr. Johnson; I saw the prisoner on the 7th of February come to Gerrard-street - she asked if I would have the goodness to take a parcel in for Mrs. Johnson, which I did; she said she was going into the country in a few days, and she would call and take it with her - that it was to come from Mann and Co.'s in Parliament-street; the parcel was brought on the 8th of February, by Hall - I did not notice the direction - the prisoner called afterwards and asked if the parcel was come; I said it was, and gave it to her.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not recognize me as the niece of the late Mr. Johnson? A. I had never seen her before to my knowledge.

THOMAS JONES . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner at No. 3, Queen-street, Brompton; I enquired for her under several names, and was told she was not at house: but I went up stairs, and found her in as attic behind the door - I brought her down, and found there articles in a box in the room; these handkerchiefs are marked E. W. - I took her in the watch-house for the night, and in the morning I found in the room where she had been kept some bits of duplicates - she had been asked if she had any duplicates - she said so. I put the bills together as well as I could, and went to the pawnbroker's and found these scarfs and prints.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I am apprentice to Courtney and Page, of Lower Faton-street, pawnbrokers. These scarfs and prints were pawned by the prisoner in the name Ann Hewit.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Debenham, Queen's-row, Pimlico. On the 8th of February, a scarf was pawned by the prisoner, and another on the 10th - both in the name of Hewit.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Chaffers and Mills, pawnbrokers, Greek-street. A parcel of silk and lisha-zise was pawned by a woman in the name of Hewit - I do not know who brought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Mrs. ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am a widow, and I live at Woodford - the prisoner is a relation of mine; this letter is not my writing, nor did I send such a letter to Messrs. Mann and Co.'s; I have dealt with Mr. Drew upwards of twenty years - I did not order any goods to be sent to Gerrard-street on the 7th of February; I had not seen the prisoner for several years, till I saw her at Bow-street.

MARY SELL . I am forewoman to Mr. Lewis, No. 23. Queen's-buildings, Brompton. The prisoner came to her home about the 10th of February, and asked if we could make up a dress, a pelisse, and a bonnet, by the following Tuesday - she said her name was Whithnell, No. 14, Yeoman's Row, Brompton.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit ever since I lost my father at eleven years of age, of having my bill paid yearly at Mr. Mann's. After my marriage with Mr. Webster, I still continued to deal with them - we afterwards went to Ireland - when I returned I had some more goods of Mr. Mann, in consequence of the death of Mr. Johnson, as I wished to look as respectable as the rest of the family, by whom I had been forgotten. I had hoped that Mrs. Johnson would have enabled me pay the bill before it became due - I went to the house and ordered the print myself - I then went to Gerrard-street, and saw the porter; I enquired if the parcel was come, and he gave it me - I did not do it with intent to defraud Messrs. Mann.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-24

Before Mr. Recorder.

616. CATHERINE SPANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , three sovereigns, sixteen shillings, and a sixpence, the monies of John Thompson , from his person .

JOHN THOMPSON. I live in Fallwood's-rents, and am a wheelwright . On the 9th of March, about two o'clock in the morning, I was at a public house in White-hart-yard, taking a pint of porter - I was not drunk; I might be a little fresh; I went out of the house, turned into Drury-lane , where the prisoner accosted me. I had seen her in the public-house before, we went down a court nearly

opposite to the theatre into a house - the landlady came into the room and I gave her a sovereign to give me change, she said she had no change, and said should she get any thing to drink; she brought in half a pint of gin and some beer; I drank one glass; she then went away, after giving me the change. I had these three sovereigns and the change; I sat up till half-past four - I then said I should he down for an hour; I took off my trowsers, put them under my pillow - so other person came into the room, as I bolted the door; I did not awake till just after day light; the prisoner then was gone - my trowsers were removed, and laid across the bed; there was no money in them. I am quite certain it was there when I put them under the pillow - I saw her that morning at the watch-house - when I awoke I knocked at the door, the landlady came up; I asked her if she had my money, she said no, but the woman who had been with me had gone out, and given her 5 l. to let her go out - when I got to the watch-house the constable asked me if I had lost any thing but my money; I said no - but when I came to look I missed a duplicate from my pocket; he showed it me.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I am watchman. I was calling the hour of five in Wellington-court when Mrs. Donovan, the landlady of this house, gave me charge of the prisoner on suspicion of having robbed Thompson; I took her to the watchhouse, and found a sovereign and 16 s. 6 d. on her; we afterwards found 5 s. more on her person. - I saw Thompson between eight and nine o'clock - he then appeared quite sober; he accused the prisoner of being the person who had stolen his money; she denied the charge, and said the sovereign was given to her by a gentleman at the Wrekin-tavern in Broad-court, Drury-lane - she had an apron round her shoulders, as she was going to the watch-house, but when she got there, she denied having it, the constable found it round her waist.

JULIA DONOVAN. I keep this house No. 7, Wellington-court; I have known the prisoner for several months - on the morning she was taken up, between two and three o'clock, I was waiting for my lodgers to come in, the prisoner came in with Thompson; I shewed them into a room on the one-pair front; they took it for that night only; I charged them 2 s., for it - I went out to get change for a sovereign and brought in half a pint of gin, and a pint of beer - they came to 1 s., 9 d., - I had some of the gin with them; I then left them and no one else went into the room. About five o'clock, the prisoner wanted to come down, and I told her to go to bed again, as I did not want to let her out while the man was asleep; she went up stairs again, but came down and said

"Here is 5 s. for you to let me go" - I would not take it; I heard the watchman crying five o'clock and I called him and gave charge of her - my husband got up, and went to the watch-house with her; the prosecutor did not get up till between eight and nine o'clock; he then asked me if he had given me his money to keep for him - I said No but the woman was in custody When the prisoner left my house she had an apron round her shoulders.

JOHN SCOTT . I was constable of the night. This prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I found 11 s., in her hand, which she laid down on the table, and said they were the man's change, and that was all she had - the watchman then intimated that she had some gold about her; I then searched her, and found five shillings in her pocket; I then saw her put her hand very quick to her mouth - she appeared to be trying to swallow something - I stopped her, and she put a sovereign out of her mouth into her hand, I got it from her; she had a duplicate in her hand, which she said belonged to the man; but the sovereign did not, as a gentleman had given it to her at the Wrekin-tavern; I saw the apron on her shoulders, and when the prosecutor came he said he had lost his apron; I then asked her for it - she denied having it; but I said I would search her again if she did not give it me - she then stooped down and took it from under her

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave me the sovereign; I then went with the prosecutor and wished to get away, as he was disgustingly drunk; he had been sick in the room; I went down stairs to go out, but I offered no 5 s., to the landlady.

JULIA DONOVAN . re-examined. Q. Was the man drunk? A. He did not appear so to me - he had not been sick in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-25

617. MARIA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a purse, value 6 d., three sovereigns and two half-pence, the property of Curtis Chapman , from his person .

CURTIS CHAPMAN. I live in Radnor-street, and am a watch spring maker . On the 8th of March between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was going towards home, and the prisoner accosted me at the corner of Rotten-row, Goswell-street ; and asked me for a few half-pence, being in distress - I gave her nothing; she seized me by the arm, and when we got to the top of Rotten-row, she appeared to be in liquor, and exclaimed

"Here is my husband." I looked round and she ran off, and turned into Old-street; I had a purse with three sovereigns and some old half-pence, In my left hand waistcoat pocket; I clapped my hand to my side, and missed it - I pursued her, but did not come up with her; I supposed I had passed her - I then turned back to where I had first seen her - I there saw the watchman, and told him what had happened - I went to the watch-house, and told the officer, and went with him to a house of ill-fame, where I found the child which she has now in her arms; by the officers advice, I placed myself opposite the house, after changing my light coat which I had on - she came to the house soon after with another female; they had previously changed bonnets; the watchman seized her before she got into the house; I said

"That is the woman who robbed me;" and the moment I said so, my purse fell on the ground; it then contained two sovereigns, a half sovereign, two half crowns, and sixpence - I am quite certain it was mine, and that she is the woman.

Prisoner. The prosecutor is the father of the child I have now in my arms; and he had been drinking with me at several public houses that night. Witness. I never saw her or the child before in my life.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I am a watchman. I was crying twelve o'clock, when the prosecutor came to me, and said he had been robbed; he described the person, and I told him to wait, and in the course of half an hour I had no doubt I should find her; we went to the house - I hid my light under my coat, the prisoner came up with another woman

in about a quarter of an hour; I caught hold of her, and said,

"I want you" - she said she was going home; the prosecutor came up and said,

"That is the woman who robbed me;" I then heard the purse fall on the ground; she said she was innocent - I took her the watch-house, and a woman brought the child to her; she lodged at the house where the child was; I had never seen the prosecutor in company with her.

THOMAS WATTS . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; she denied having had the purse, or knowing the man at all; but when we got to Hatton-garden, she said he was the father of the child; I had never seen the prosecutor with her before.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor never allowed me any maintenance for the child; and about a week before I was taken, I asked him to give me the price of a pair of shoes - we went to a shop, and he said they were too dear; then we went to another shop, and while the woman went to get some more shoes, he wanted me to take a pair and run away; I then came out, and he said he would give me some the week afterwards; I met him with the child in my arms and we had something to drink - I went home and put the child to bed - then I met the other young woman and we all went together, and had some more to drink; he took me aside, and gave me the purse which I had myself given to him last Bartholomew fair; I went back and took the young woman with me - when I got near home the watchman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-26

618. JOHN STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , a breast pin, value 10 l. the goods of Lewis Raphael , from his person .

LEWIS RAPHAEL. I live with my father in the Crescent, in the Minories - I a merchant ; about half-past eleven o'clock, on the night of the 2nd of March, I was in Catherine-street , near the theatre; I had been with a party to the theatre, and about a quarter of an hour before it concluded, as it rained, I came out to try to get a coach; I applied to one or two, and found they were engaged, there was a coach, but the coachman was away; I was standing by waiting for him; the prisoner came up to me with a red handkerchief in his hand, with which he pulled the pin out of my shirt; I felt and missed it; I immediately collared him and called the watch; I held him four or five minutes, he broke from me; I pursued crying Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him, and taken to the watch-house, and I saw him again at Bow-street, where Sir R. Birnie showed me the skeleton of the pin, the diamond had been removed from it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you a party there? A. Yes, There were some ladies, and one gentleman, none of them are here; it was a diamond pin, the prisoner was a stranger; it rained very fast, but it was very light - the rest of the party were in the theatre; I saw the handkerchief put towards me and felt the pin go; I do not know who found the pin, of my own knowledge; I did not see the prisoner searched.

Prisoner's Defence. I was leaving the Theatre at the same time as the prosecutor; he was applying for a coach - I happened accidently to run against him: he then charged me with having taken his pin; I asked how he dared to charge me with such a thing: he stood struggling with me some time, and then gave charge of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-27

619. GEORGE TUTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , four chaise cushions, value 40 s. , the goods of William Thomas and Edward Thomas .

EDWARD THOMAS. I keep livery stables in Park-lane . On the evening of the 1st of March I saw the prisoner come out of the coach-house, with two cushions under each arm - he was a stranger. I was in the harness room - I came down as quick as I could, and overtook him in Piccadilly, with them; I stopped him, brought him back to my stable, and gave him in charge. My brother William is in partnership with me.

WILLIAM MEDBURY . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, about six o'clock in the evening - he made great resistance, but did not deny the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-28

620. JOSEPH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Peter Rierson , from his person .

PETER RIERSON. I live in Upper Harley-street - I have retired from business. On the 23d of February I was in Harley-street , going home about six o'clock in the evening - my handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket - I had not seen the prisoner; I was walking very quick, and felt some person at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner close by me; I took hold of him, and said he had got my handkerchief; he denied it, and pointed to the handkerchief, which was then laying on the ground; he ran away; I pursued him, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken. When I came back the handkerchief had been taken away.

HENRY STOWEL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. The handkerchief has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a number of persons, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran with others, and a man came up to me, took hold of my collar, and said a gentleman in the next street wished to speak to me, and he took me back to him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-29

Middlesex Cases; Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

621. JAMES CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , two ounces of silver, value 10 s., the goods of Sampson Mordan and Gabriel Riddle , his masters .

SAMPSON MORDAN. I am in partnership with Gabriel Riddle - we are silversmiths, and pencil-case makers . - The prisoner was in our employ for about three weeks (Looking at some silver) this is in the same state as that we use, but I do not know that it is ours.

LAWRENCE CHILD . On Monday, the 21st of February, the prisoner brought this silver to our house, for sale - I

asked him whose it was; he said it was his master's, Mr. Walters, of the City-road; he left it, went away, and came again in about half an hour, and said his master would call in the evening, but he did not come again - some other person came and claimed it.

JOHN SHIRLEY . I am foreman to the prosecutors. I went to Child's house, and saw the silver, which is here; some of these pieces I know. I know one by the hammer marks on it.

WILLIAM WALTERS . I am a bookbinder, and live in City-terrace; the prisoner was in my service, but left me last Christmas. Mr. Child brought this silver to me; I had never seen it before.

GEORGE HICKMAN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Mordan and Co. I know one piece of this silver, which is this piece of tube; I had drawn it rather too long, and was obliged to file it off - I expected to get scolded for so doing. On the Saturday afterwards I gave up these pieces to the foreman, and the scraps likewise; it was found to have been stolen, when the prisoner went to offer it for sale.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-30

622. RICHARD GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , forty pannel boards, value 30 l., the goods of John Houlditch and James Houlditch , to whom he was a servant : and JOHN HEWETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HOULDITCH. I am one of the firm of John and James Houlditch, of Long-acre and Carburton-street - we are coach-makers . The prisoner Green had been in our employ four or five years, as foreman of the sawyers - Hewett had worked for us while Green was in our employ, but I do not know where he lived. Green had access to our planks continually - I saw some of them at Long-acre after they had been at Bow-street, and knew them to be ours. Green had no power to dispose of them in any way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any mark upon them? A. Yes; they had been cut from one tree.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had Green authority to buy any wood for you? A. A small quantity for our joiners, but not for our coach-makers - he has looked at wood which he did not purchase; he could have told some other person of this wood, who might have gone and bought it. The marks on those planks correspond exactly with the marks on those left behind; he never sold any wood for us; Green was only a sawyer; he did not look out wood for us.

JOSEPH NEALE . I have been in the employ of Messrs. Houlditch for two or three years, as a labourer, for a day or two in a week; Green was employed there, but I never saw Hewett there. On Saturday, the 25th of March, Green gave me twenty mahogany boards, and an elm board upon a truck, to take to Mr. Hewett, No. 5, Duck-lane, Berwick-street, Soho; I took them, and gave them to a man of the name of Davy; I went back again with the truck to Carburton-street, and got twenty more mahogany boards, and another elm board, which were loaded by me and some boys; Green and I took them to the same place, by Green's direction. I saw Mr. Davy again, and when I was unloading them I saw Mr. Hewett in the loft; when I had unloaded the truck Davy asked me if there was any thing to pay; I said Mr. Green told me Mr. Hewett was to pay me: he asked me what - I said 5 s., which he paid me. Mr. Hewett did not speak to me at all, but I am sure of his person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you then in the employ of Messrs. Houlditch? A. No. I did not know but that Messrs. Houlditch had employed Mr. Green to sell these boards - that I swear. Mr. Houlditch never sent me with any boards to sell. Green told me that Mr. Hewett was to pay me for my trouble; I did not ask what he was to pay me. I have been employed by Green, and always left it to him. I took them in Mr. Houlditch's truck - the distance might be half a mile. I was nearly six hours about it, and I earned the money; I asked if a crown was too much, and he said No; he went and got it. None of the boys are here who helped to load. I did not know the prosecutors' premises very well. I did not give Mr. Houlditch any notice of this. I went according to Green's direction. I was taken to the watch-house on Monday week - I never suspected there was any thing wrong. I was accused before the Magistrates, and then made the charge against Green. Avis took me; I asked what he took me for; he said concerning Green robbing Messrs. Houlditch. I did not say at the public-house that I did not know Green at all to my knowledge, but I will not swear whether I did or not. I heard an officer tell the Magistrate on Tuesday, that I had said I did not know Green - I said I had not said so to my recollection; I was a little in liquor, but not tipsy. I was sworn before the Magistrate, as to where I took the boards. I did not accuse Green to get off myself.

Re-examined. Q. Whether a crown was too little or too much, is that what you received? A. Yes, I received two half-crowns. I lodge in Carburton-street, and come at a short notice to assist at Messrs. Houlditchs'. I was taken at the Nelson, public-house, in Charles-street; the officers told me they had been looking after me, about the robbery which Green had been taken up for, at Messrs. Houlditch', and I had taken the boards down - I said I had. I was taken about half-past eleven o'clock at night; I was a little in liquor, but not drunk.

GEORGE DAVY . I was working at Mr. Hewett's in March last; I was employed there by a man of the name of Howe, a coach-maker. I was there when Neale came with a truck; Mr. Hewett was then in the loft: I took twenty boards from Neale the first time, and put them into the loft, by Hewett's direction. Neale came back again with twenty more. Hewett told me he expected some pannel boards to come, and wished me to assist the man in bringing them into the loft. - I heard no question asked who brought them, and did not see a name on the truck; I paid Neale two half-crown pieces, which I got from Hewett; he said it was too much, but he sent down the money; I did not hear where he came from, or any thing about him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was your master there, Mr. Howe? A. Yes; it was about three or four o'clock - Howe was in the loft when the last pannels came, and he had been there before, but was not there when the first pannels came. The loft is Hewett's, but my master was working in it: there was no other person at work there. The boards were large - any person could see them in the street.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mr. Howe and Mr. Hewett were both then in the loft? A. Yes; my master had leave to work there. I believe the stores there were Hewett's property; there is no conveying such things privately by day-light; it is not usual for trucks to stand in the night delivering such things; I should be afraid the watchman would take me into custody.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a police officer. In consequence of some information I executed a search warrant on the premises of Hewett, in Duck-lane, on the 28th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon - I found forty mahogany and two elm boards; there were no other articles there - I saw Davy there; I asked questions of him, but did not take him into custody; Green was taken the same night - I saw him next day. I took Neale myself at a public-house at the corner of Carburton-street, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there a brother officer with you? A. No. I took him to the office myself; I told him I wanted to ask him no question, but that I took him for taking the boards down; I did not mention Green's name to him. Duke, who was with me, was not bound over; I did not hear Duke say that Neale had denied knowing Green. Neale had been drinking a little, but he could understand very well.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q You searched Mr. Hewett's premises? A. Yes, I had some conversation with Davy. Hewett came and surrendered himself to me the same evening; he said he bought these boards of Green, and thought it was all right; he gave 6 1/2 d. per foot for them; he had paid 3 l. on account, and came voluntarily to answer any questions that might he put to him; this was before Green was taken - I did not hear him say he had been a fellow workman with Green.

RICHARD BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Jas. Holditch. I went to see Green taken in custody by Johnson, one of the Bow-street officers - I believe he was not told what he was taken for; I had I some conversation with him before he was taken, at the corner of Long-acre and St. Martin's-lane - I met him there promiscuously; I went up to him and asked if his name was Green, and if he had heard of what had occurred - he then stated that he had robbed his master; he was very sorry for it, and that others were implicated in it - he said there was a man of the name of Wright, in Carburton-street, who had been concerned in it as well as himself; and he had sold the property for 20 l.; and had given Wright, or was to give him 10 l. to keep the secret, instead of which, he had heard he had informed his master of what had occurred, and he intended to be a hundred or a hundred and fifty miles from the spot by that time to-morrow - this was about nine o'clock in the evening, and he was in custody in about three quarters of an hour - I went and told Mr. James Holditch of it immediately; I went to the officer, and then went with him to take him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you still in Mr. Holditch's employ? A. Yes - I know Green only by sight; he told me all this of his own accord - he was tipsy - we were not intimate. A man named Wright was produced next day, but he was let go. Green was taken in a public-house near his own residence - I have been in Mr. Holditch's employ about three months.

GEORGE WRIGHT. I am a wheeler, in the employ of Messrs. Holditch's, and have the care of their premises in Carburton-street - I saw part of this property removed by Neale, between two and four o'clock; I did not see Green at that time; there was no engagement that he was to give me any money, or any thing of that kind - I did not give any information to Mr. Holditch - Green had access to all the boards on the premises; and I considered Neale as a porter; he had been at work there at different times; I had seen Green that day, before he was in custody, but had no conversation with him.

SAMUEL CHOICE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Holditch, as a coach-maker. I know Green and Hewett - I have seen Hewett twice I am certain, and I think three times at their premises - I never saw him come up into the loft with Green till the last time, about six weeks ago.

SAMUEL SANDERS . I am a Bow-street officer. I took Green into custody at the Cart and Horses, public-house Little St. Martin's-lane, soon after nine o'clock; he was rather in liquor and asleep - he was not sensible till I shook him up; I told him what I took him for when we got to Bow-street; he said he had nothing to say - I saw Neale by his side in the public-house - I asked him he if knew Neale, and he said No; and Neale denied knowing him at the door of the public-house; I did not know then that Neale was wanted, and I let him go. I searched Hewett and found on him a book and a rule which belong to Neale.

RICHARD GREEN'S Defence. I deny saying, that I did not know Neale.

HEWETT'S Defence. I purchased these boards of Green, as I would of any other person; he had introduced me on a former occasion to some person over the water - I agreed to give 6 1/2 d per foot for them; I had a regular bill of parcels with them - I gave Green a written note, to deliver them on the premises, and told him to send them there in consequence of my being moving about that time. They were sent in, and 5 s. was asked for the cartage, which I did not consider an over-charge - it could not be supposed that I should buy them, if I had known they were not properly come by, having my character and family at stake - I had rather a large stock in hand considering the state in which it was; not being dry - very ill sawed, and shaken - I considered it a fair price; it cannot be supposed, that with all the yards in the metropolis open to me, I should be guilty of doing a mean action.

JOHN NOURSE . I am foreman to Messrs. Houlditchs. I missed a number of boards from Carburton-street on the 28th of March; I could not tell how many - I found them in Duck-lane, in a loft, which Hewett admitted to be his; I had seen the boards at Christmas stock-taking, to the best of my knowledge. I asked Green on Monday morning where these boards were taken to, and he said to Long-acre.

I applied at Bow-street to get a search-warrant, and found them; Hewett said he had bought them.

JURY. Q. What are you in the service of Messrs. Holditch? A. I am foreman; we should be glad to buy the boards at 8 d. a-foot, but they cost us 8 1/2 d. or 6 d., which was the market price then. I am not aware of any place where we could have bought them at 5 1/2 d.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Have you been on good terms with Hewett? A. I have not animosity, and have had no quarrel with him.

Witnesses for the Defence.

WILLIAM HENRY VERNON . I am a coach-maker in the New road. I have known Hewett fifteen years - he has been a very good character, and a very honest man. I have seen the boards outside - they are worth about 6 1/2 d. or 7 d. a foot; I have had them offered to me for that within this two months - I consider 6 1/2 d. a fair price for them; I have known Hewett by his dealing with me; the boards would be worth more than that if they were not shaken - the longer a board has been in seasoning the more valuable it is.

JAMES WATSON . I am a coach-maker, residing at No. 15, Long-acre. I have looked at these boards - I should think 6 d. a-foot quite enough for them: I have known Hewett twenty-five or twenty-six years - I have had no dealings with him but have always heard him spoken well of.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean to say that, shaken as these boards are, 6 d. would be too much for them? A. I have bought some much better than they are, this morning, at 7 d.

JOHN AXTEL . I am a coach-maker, and live in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-lane - I have lived there thirty-five years. I have known Hewett since 1821; he was always an honest upright character, and the most industrious man in the trade - the value of these boards is about 6 d.; I would not give 6 d. for them: these boards are shaken, but if they were sound I would not give 6 d. for them.

Three witnesses gave Green a good character.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HEWETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-31

623. BENJAMIN CAMP was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , seventeen napkins, value 30 s.; a towel, value 3 s.; a night-cap, value 1 s., and a pair of socks, value 1 s. , the goods of John Beit .

SARAH BEIT . I am the wife of John Beit. In December last these articles were taken from the orchard, where they had been left out all night to dry; and some were stolen in June, they were left out by my orders, but those in December were left out through neglect - the prisoner worked for us three days.

CHARLES MARSHALL . I had a warrant to search the prisoner's house for some poultry on the 20th of March, and there I found this linen in a box up stairs - he was sitting by the fire - he gave no account of where he got it from.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-32

624. BENJAMIN CAMP was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , seven live tame fowls, price 7 s. , the property of John Brant .

JOHN BRANT. On the night of the 19th of last March, my poultry-house was robbed - I had some malt in that evening, and when I went with the light, to get the malt, into the granary, the poultry made a noise, I looked up and saw they were all safe - there was a cock and seven hens. Next morning, at seven o'clock, I found the brew-house window wrenched open, and all the fowls gone but one hen. I looked up the yard, and found a quantity of blood and feathers - I got a search warrant and found them on the prisoner's premises, about a quarter of a mile from my house; he was sitting by the fire, and the constable said

"Mr. Brant has had some poultry stolen, and has strong suspicion of you." The prisoner said

"I know nothing about it," but I saw some feathers on the ground, and said

"I am confident the fowls are here." The officer then opened the door of a cupboard, and found two of them unpicked. We took him to the cage and then returned and looked into the privy, and found a fowl thrown down which had been picked and trussed ready for the pot. The prisoner said he had found them at ten o'clock the night before. I had given him two days work about three months before, and given him some food and some drink.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are there no fowls like yours in this country.? A. Yes, but these were the spangled Poland breed, and one of them was a brown speckled pullet. I can positively swear to them.

WILLIAM GILDERSON . I went with Brant to execute the search-warrant on the 20th of March - what he has said is all correct - the prisoner said he knew nothing of the fowls.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming home at night I picked up the two fowls - I shewed them the spot where I found them, and said if they were Mr. Brant's they might take them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-33

625. MARIA BUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a pocket-book, value 1 s.; two 20 l., one 10 l., and three 5 l. bank notes , the property of George Morris .

GEORGE MORRIS. On the 26th of June, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the office of the Morning Post; when I got home I missed my pocket-book from my breast pocket - it contained two 20 l., one 10 l., and three 5 l. notes, and a bill of exchange for 29 l. I knew the numbers of the notes and gave notice at the Bank.

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I went on the 29th of March, to search the prisoner's lodgings, No. 5, East-street, Manchester-square; in the two pair back-room I found her there, and told her I came about a 20 l. note - she said it was in this old pocket-book, which was on the table - I searched the book and did not find it - I said then,

"If you don't produce the note I will strip you naked;" she then put her hand under her stays, and produced a note which she said she had picked up in the Strand.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I was with Westwood, and began to search the prisoner - I could not find the property on her; she then stated that the note was in the old black book: I looked into one of her boxes - I saw she was putting

something behind her with her heel, but she said she had not; I said I would strip her - she then said would we go out of the room, and she would give the book to Mr. Morris; she put her hand under her gown, and pulled out the book, which had a 20 l. note in it; we found five sovereigns in her room, which she said was the change of a 20 l. note, which she had changed the Saturday before.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the book in the Strand.

Jury to MR. MORRIS. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? A. Not to my recollection. I took the book out at the office to pay for an advertisement - there was then 70 l. in it; my name and address is in the pocket book; it is mine, and so is the note.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-34

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 8.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

626. WILLIAM RICHARDS and EDWARD CASTLEDINE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a bridle, value 10 s. , the goods of William Nichols and George Nichols .

ROBERT MARTIN . I am carman to Messrs. William and George Nicholls, of Thames-street. On the 22d of March I stopped at the Oxford Arms, public-house, Camden-town , about half-past seven o'clock - my team stood outside; when I came out I missed the bridle off the horse; I am certain it could not have fallen off; it was not loose. I did not see the prisoners there.

THOMAS HUNT . I am constable of Hampstead. I received information, and sent for the prisoner Richards, who is a labourer, and lives at Hampstead; I knew him before: I told him I wanted the bridle - he said,

"If that is all you want I will go and fetch it;" he left me, and did not bring it. Next morning I got up early, and saw Castledine in the street - he said,

"Master, did you want me last night;" I said,

"Yes, I want that bridle, where is it?" he said it was at his house; I went with him - he brought it out of the house, and gave it to me - this was on the 25th. I told him he might go to work, and I should apprehend Richards, which I did, on Hendon-road, and in the afternoon I took Castledine.

JOHN BOSTON . I was with Hunt; his account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARDS'S Defence. I picked it up in Hampstead-road; Castledine came into the Cock, public-house - I asked him to take it home to find the owner.

CASTLEDINE'S Defence. I went into the Cock - he said he had picked it up, and would I find an owner.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

CASTLEDINE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-35

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

627. JOHN M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , a shirt, value 2 s., and a soot-cloth, value 3 s., the goods of George Bell ; three gowns, value 30 s.; a pelisse, value 20 s.; two spencers, value 7 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; a shawl, value 8 s., and a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Mary Ann Cooper ; and a shawl, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Reed , in the dwelling-house of George Bell .

GEORGE BELL. I am a chimney sweeper , and live at Edgware . On Friday, the 11th of February, the prisoner applied to me for work, which I gave him - he slept in my house till the Monday night following, when he went to bed with the apprentice, about eight o'clock. I was called up by the watchman about four in the morning; I got up, and found everybody in bed but the prisoner, who was gone; I found the door open, and a box belonging to my daughter-in-law was open, and the things taken out, and missed a shirt from a closet below, and my soot-cloth from the barn, opposite to the door at the bottom of the garden. None of the things have been found.

MARY ANN COOPER. I am the prosecutor's daughter-in-law. A box with my clothes was on the landing place opposite to the prisoner's room. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I had seen safe at nine o'clock, after the prisoner was gone to bed; they are worth 3 l. 15 s.

WILLIAM OWEN . I am apprentice to Mr. Bell, and am nine years old. The prisoner went to bed on this night with me; I saw him open this box while I was undressing, but did not see him take any thing. I was asleep when he went away.

Prisoner. Q. I did not come to bed till after you? A. I saw him at the box when I was in bed.

JOHN DOLLING . I am a watchman of Edgware. On the 15th of February, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner with a soot-cloth on his shoulder, containing something, and asked where he was going so early - he said to Mr. Bevan's, to do a job; Bevan's is a boarding school, at Little Stanmore - I am sure he is the person; I knew him before.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer. On the 25th of February I apprehended the prisoner at cellar in Cato-street, and told him it was on suspicion of robbing Mr. Bell; he said Mr. Bell must prove it. I found 4 s. upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's son is a noted thief, and robbed his father of a watch a fortnight before - his father would not admit him in doors, and he was lurking about the premises till I was apprehended. I suspect that he committed this crime.

PROSECUTOR. My son was not about the house that night.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-36

Before Mr. Justice Park.

628. DANIEL TROTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , sixteen ounces of silver, value 4 l., the goods of Michael Starkey , in his dwelling-house .

MICHAEL STARKEY. I live in North-street, City-road . On Sunday night, the 6th of February. I went out at six o'clock, and on returning at ten, found the upper part of my house destroyed by fire; the first and second floors were destroyed - it was extinguished when I returned;

the ceilings of the parlours were only damaged, and the kitchens unhurt - no part of it is yet habitable. I am a working silversmith, and had about 300 ozs. of silver there - some worked, and some not. On Monday I attended the firemen to search, and found from 113 to 120 ozs.; some of it had melted and run together, and some had not melted; there had been about 100 ozs. in bars, as it came from the refiners. I found that quantity considerably deficient; we continued to search on Tuesday and Wednesday, and found in all 170 or 180 ozs. The prisoner was one of the firemen, and in his presence I showed them all some stone and tile, and told them the silver, in the state it probably would be, would resemble that, except in weight, and told them not to throw any thing of the sort away without showing it to me - they left on Wednesday, and I afterwards found 13 ozs. more. On the 15th, Abut and Sons, refiners, sent me a piece, weighing 16 ozs. 5 dwts. - I went there, and took Heath into custody: we next took South, in the Borough, and then went to the Hope Insurance Office, and took the prisoner.

WILLIAM MEAD . I am foreman at the Hope Fire Office. I was at Mr. Starkey's on the day after the fire. On Tuesday Mr. Starkey took up a piece of tile, and said the silver would resemble that, and desired us to bring it to him - I believe the prisoner was present.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long has he been in your employ? A. Eighteen years - I have trusted him with property to a considerable amount he was always honest and industrious.

Q. You consider pewter or lead found in the ruins as useless? A. No.

JOHN SUTELIFFE . I am principal clerk to Messrs. Abuts. On Tuesday morning, the 15th of February, Heath brought me a piece of silver to be assayed; he is a gold and silver chaser: as soon as I saw it I knew it to have been melted by me, by the shape of the ingot into which it was cast - the fire had not affected it. I sent to Mr. Starkey. I melted 2,200 ozs., and he had 200 ozs. of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Has the heat had no effect on it? A. It has only blackened it. An ignorant person might not know it to be silver.

COURT. Q. Must an unskilful person know from its weight that it was valuable metal? A. They must.

JOHN HEATH . I am a gold and silver chaser. On the 14th of February I received a piece of silver, similar to this, from South, to ascertain its value; I took it to Messrs. Abuts', as I deal there.

SAMUEL SOUTH . I am a beer machine maker, and pewterer, and live in Bride-lane, Fleet-street. On Sunday, the 13th of February, the prisoner came to my house about six o'clock in the evening, and said he had got a piece of metal which he had found in the ruins of a fire - he did not know what it was, but it would serve me as solder; I gave him nothing for it: he was an acquaintance. I thought it heavier than the metal I generally use, and next morning took it to Heath, to be assayed. I could not tell what it was from the colour.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not sell it to you? A. No. I just took it up and put it down; solder is heavier than pewter, but silver is still heavier.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner - he said he knew nothing about it; but when South's name was mentioned, he said he had kicked against something, and picked it up - he did not know what it was.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was of any value.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-37

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

629. ALFRED COOPER was indicted for wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully assaulting Philip Williams , and with a certain sharp instrument, striking and cutting him on his body, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or to do him some grevious bodily harm.

The prisoner had attacked the prosecutor, and struck him with the blunt part of an adze. The Court ruled that this was not cutting and stabbing with a sharp instrument, as alleged in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-38

Before Mr. Justice Park.

630. JAMES CORBETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Sanders , widow , about eight o'clock in the night of the 28th of February , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a gown, value 2 s.; a pair of drawers, value 6 d.; ten towels, value 10 d.; a napkin, value 6 d.; a piece of calico, value 1 s.; a bed-gown, value 1 s.; three shifts, value 3 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s., and three aprons, value 18 d., the goods of John Nelson ; and a picture, value 1 s. , the goods of the said Sarah Sanders.

ROBERT ENNEVER . I live in Seymour-place, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On Monday, the 28th of February, between half-past eight and nine o'clock at night, I was going down Edgware-road - it was quite dark; I was about two yards from Mrs. Sander's house, in Portman-place , and heard a shrill whistle, and saw two young men run across the road, directly opposite to Sanders's, and saw the prisoner jump out of her parlour window, into the front garden; I took hold of him as he came out of the garden gate, and he dropped a bundle. I took him into the house; the bundle was brought in; the watchman was sent for, who opened the bundle in our presence - it contained different articles of female apparel, and a picture.

Q. How did you get into the house? A. I got in at the parlour window, by Mrs. Sanders's desire, to see if anybody else was there - the parlour door was locked outside - the street door was not open.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What was done with the prisoner while you got in at the window? A. He was in charge of a watchman, and not out of my sight.

SARAH SANDERS. I am a widow, and live at No. 28, Portman-place, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - I rent the house, and sleep there. Mrs. Nelson lodges with me.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a watchman, and produce the property - I have had it ever since.

CLARA NELSON . I am married to John Nelson, but we have been many years separated - the last time I heard of him was six years ago; I do not know whether he is

alive - he was butler in a gentleman's family. I lodge in this home; here are several things here which are all mine; they are marked with my name, and I made them; here is a silk gown, ten towels, and other property, all of which are mine; I occupied the parlour, and slept there. I went out at two o'clock in the afternoon, returned about ten in the evening, and found this had happened; I locked the parlour door, and left the window down, but am not sure that it was quite down, for I have observed since that unless it is quite down it will not latch, and I recollect that I did not latch it - I could not have left it quite open, but it might not be quite down.

Q. Can you say whether you had left it open wide enough for the prisoner to get in? A. No, I certainly did not - it must have been lifted up for any one to get in, I am certain.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long is it since you and your husband parted? A. We have been quite separated for twelve years - I saw him six years ago last June. All the things were bought with my money.

SARAH SANDERS. Here is a picture of mine among the property - it hung in the parlour.

MR. BRODRICK contended that if the window was not quite down a burglary had not been committed. The Court over-ruled the objection.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18250407-39

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

681. STEPHEN MEDWINTER and WILLIAM BROUGH were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nathaniel Solomon , about seven o'clock in the night of the 8th of March , at St. Luke, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a jug, value 5 s., and a dish, value 7 s. , his property.

NATHANIEL SOLOMON. I am a glass and china dealer . and live in Chiswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke - I rent the house. On the 8th of March I was in my shop till twenty-five minutes past six o'clock, when I went up stairs to tea; the day-light was then gone, and the shop was lighted up. This jug was in the window, and the dish on the counter at the time I left the shop, and the door was latched.

HARRIET PHILLIPS . I was on a visit to my sister, who is Solomon's wife. On the eight of March, about half-past six o'clock, I was up stairs, and heard a knocking in the shop - I went down, and found the prisoner Brough in the shop, with an apron on, and his right-hand under it; he asked if we sold china marbles; I said we did not sell any thing of the kind; he then went a little on one side; I opened the door, and let him out - I stood at the door a minute, and then shut it, and am sure that I latched it; I went up stairs again. I had seen the glass dish and jug in the shop before he came in, but did not look for them afterwards, not suspecting any thing. He was brought back by Watkins four or five minutes after I let him out.

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . I am apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, of Chiswell-street. On the 8th of March, about twenty-five minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I was shutting up the shop - day-light had quite gone; I saw the prisoner Medwinter looking in at the prosecutor's window: I did not know him before, but am sure of him. In about half a minute I saw him open the door and go in, and in about another half minute I saw him come out with something glass in his right hand, and when he passed me I saw that it was a glass jug; he ran down Finsbury-street - at the corner of which is our house - I pursued him, and at the bottom of Finsbury-street saw him give the jug to Brough, saying,

"Here Jem, is another;" this was about 100 yards from Solomon's house - he was never out of my sight - a person in Finsbury-street could not see Solomon's shop; he walked on a little, and then ran. I collared Brough, took the jug from him, and began to unrol his apron - he then said,

"Here is something he has just been making me a present of," which I found was the dish. I took him back to Solomon's; a constable was sent for, to whom I gave the jug and dish.

JOHN BEE. I am a constable. Here is the jug and dish, which I received at Solomons.

NATHANIEL SOLOMON. I know them both very well.

HARRIET PHILLIPS . When I let Brough out I stood at the door for a few minutes - I did not notice any body near; I saw Brough run away.

MEDWINTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

BROUGH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-40

Before Mr. Justice Park.

682. FREDERICK MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , at St. Mary, Islington, four yards of cloth, value 3 l. the goods of George Samuel Blunt , in his dwelling house .

CHARLES COCKERILL . I am apprentice to Mr. George Samuel Blunt, a tailor , of Pophamterrace, St. Mary, Islington . On the 28th of February, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, (it was quite dark, candles were lighted; I do not know whether the shop door was shut or not;) I was working in a room behind the shop, the door between the room and the shop was open; there was a candle in the shop; my fellow apprentice and a man were at work with me; my side was towards the shop; I observed the wind blow the candles, turned my head, and saw some person in the shop, with something in his arms before him; I jumped up, called out thieves; he ran out at the door; I and Ursell (my fellow apprentice) followed him; he ran round the corner of the shop, and threw the cloth on the ground; about three yards from the shop door; Ursell took hold of him, it was the prisoner; I pursued another person who I saw running.

THOMAS URSELL . I am apprentice to Mr. Blunt; Cockerill ran out calling Stop thief! I followed and saw the prisoner when I got out, standing opposite the next door; I took the cloth out of his hand; one end was in his hand, and the other on the ground; I cannot say whether he was dropping or picking it up; I delivered it to Martha Smith, who lodged in the house; the prisoner was not out of my possession till master came and took him.

GEORGE SAMUEL BLUNT . I was in my parlour, heard a cry of Thieves! ran out, and saw the prisoner with one end of the cloth on the ground, and the other in his arms; I took him, and gave him in charge with the cloth.

THOMAS COPE . I am a constable. I have had the cloth ever since; I had been by the house a quarter of the hour before, and saw the prisoner leaning against a wall,

about twenty yards from the house; he moved on seeing me; I wear a badge being a street keeper.

MR. BLUNT. I have not doubt of the cloth being mine; there are four yards and a half, it cost me 14 s., a yard.

MARTHA SMITH . I received the cloth from Ursell and gave it to Mrs. Blunt.

HANNAH BLUNT. I had it on the shop-board, and saw it given to the constable it was the cloth Smith gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the terrace to a friend at Islington; I am a tailor; I heard a call of Stop thief! and saw a man who was going along throw the cloth down; I went to pick it up and was secured.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, his parents being industrious .

Reference Number: t18250407-41

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

633. ELIZABETH DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at St. Giles, in the fields, twenty nine spoons, value 12 l.; a silver gill, value 3 l.; a cream ewer, value 1 l.; a ladle, value 10 s.; a wine goggle, value 10 s.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 8 s.; a fork, value 3 s.; a box, value 1 s.; three pairs of ear rings, value 15 s.; a ring, value 3 s.; three shirt pins, value 10 s.; two brooches, value 4 s.; a seal, value 4 s.; three clasps, value 5 s.; a buckle, value 2 s.; four feathers, value 4 s.; a skirt, value 1 s.; a spencer, value 1 s.; and a frill, value 1 s.; the goods of George Collinson , her master, in his dwelling house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE COLLINSON. I am an upholsterer , and live in China-street, Bedford-square, in the parish of St. Giles's . The prisoner came into my service about the latter end of December, and left on the 27th of January, without any intimation; I had no idea of her going.

ANN COLLINSON . I am the prosecutor's wife, On the 27th of January, about five o'clock, the prisoner brought up the tea; I rang the bell in about twenty minutes, and she was missing. I knew nothing of her going away; I went up stairs soon after, and missed all the plate, and some frocks; inquiry was made for her, but she could not be found.

ELIZABETH SHAW . I live at Kingston-on-Hull. The prisoner come to my house to lodge in February, about a fortnight, and two days before she was taken into custody; the constable came to my house for her; she was in the room and made her escape; but was afterwards taken; I saw the bed, on which she slept examined after she was taken.

ROBERT DORSEY . I am a constable of Kingston. In consequence of information, on Monday the 28th of February, I went to Mrs. Shaw's house; I searched a bed in Mrs. Shaws presence, and found, sewed up in the bed, three different parcels; one bundle contained a feather, artificial flowers, and some frocks, and another all this plate which I produce.

MRS. COLLINSON. Here is a silver gill, a cream ewer, two gravy and eight table spoons, and a variety of plate, which are my husband's; they were kept in a drawer in our bed room; I looked into that drawer and missed them when she was gone; we had used the spoons at dinner; I had seen most of the silver safe that day; I think I had seen all of it; the frocks and feathers, were in my daughter's room; the table spoons are worth 6 l.; I had seen the silver forks, cream over, and sugar tongs that day.

Prisoner's Defence, written. I beg leave humbly to inform your Lordship, I never opened any drawer; and that I restored the plate as I took it; I had warning, and was to have left two days before this happened; I was not aware of the value of what I had taken; I did it with a desire to go home to Ireland, and hearing my brother was ill at Hull, I took the plate, having no means to get home without money.

MR. COLLINSON. I have inquired about her at Hampstead since she left, and heard a good character of her; she had lived there two months, and I understand behaved well; we took her without a character, as she was recommended by my porter.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18250407-42

Before Mr. Justice Park.

634. WILLIAM AUGUST was indicted for, that he on the 28th of February , at St. Mary, Stratford-le-Bow, in and upon Thomas Lewis , a subject of the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, &c., did strike, cut, and stab him, in and upon his left arm and left side, with intent, in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him against the statute .

2d. COUNT, stating his intention to be to disable the said Thomas Lewis.

3d. COUNT, stating his intent to be, to do him some grievens bodily harm.

THOMAS LEWIS. I live at Old Ford. On the 27th of February, I was at a public-house, and left at 12 o'clock at night. I had only drank one glass of liquor there, but had had a pint of beer at another house before. I had been drinking in the afternoon, and was not quite sober. I have to cross the fields as the nearest way home from the public-house. I saw the prisoner near Bow-fair field gate - I had to cross that field. I had a bundle and umbrella with me; I knew him before; we joined in conversation, and walked along the road together, and in the course of our walk, words ensued about an old grievance between me and him last summer - he challenged me to fight, and said he would fight me on any man in the parish I said, I should decline it for that time - I did not wish to fight. I walked on some hundred yards, and just as I got to the end of the last field, he struck me a blow with his fist - we fought and had two rounds, nobody was with us. I took the first opportunity to get from him, and run away leaving my bundle on the grass; I had put it down to fight. I went to the public-house where I lodge, the landlady opened the door; I then missed my bundle, and went back to look for it by myself; I went as fast as I could, till I arrived at the spot where I put it down - it was not there; by the time I arrived there King came up, he lodged at the same house with me - I searched round the field, but could not find the bundle. King went to the prisoner's father and mother's house just by; we could gain no entrance at the gate for some time; his mother said he was not at home. King got on a bank, and looking into an adjoining garden, called out,

"Here he is." I told him to get over into the garden, he did so - the prisoner arose and ran away. I said,

"Follow him King," I was at some little distance, the prisoner was running away, and as he

ran, he threw away part of the bundle; I did not see him throw it away, but I picked some things up which were thrown over the hedge. I said to King,

"This is not all, there is a silk handkerchief missing," in which a shirt and stockings had been tied. I made the best of my way over the bank, and said to the prisoner,

"I want my handkerchief." King was then near to him; and I took hold of him, demanding the handkerchief; we were some time wrestling. I do not know that any blows passed; we both fell on the ground, and as soon as I arose again, I found myself stabbed on the left arm, and the left side of my back; there were two wounds. I said,

"King, I must go home, I am stabbed in two places, I feel the blood running." King said,

"Are you?" I said,

"Yes." The prisoner came forward with his arm extended, and said to King,

"D - n your eyes, I will serve you the same." King had my umbrella in his hand, and parried off the blow with it; we both got safe over the bank, the prisoner still remained in the garden; we went home as fast as possible. I had a doctor that night, and have been laid up ever since; nobody else was present.

Cross examined by MR. LAW. Q. At what public house had you been drinking? A. The Three Tuns at Bow - I live at a public house nearly a mile off; we fought on the grass; it was dirty weather - I fell in the fight and believe he fell also - I believe he is a gardener - we got to the last field before the fighting commenced - Q. What had you been talking about in the mean time? A. Saying I did not wish to fight, as I did not owe him any animosity from the former quarrel; I had not applied for King to accompany me from the public house; the landlady sent him after me - I had not spoken to him - the garden is about ten yards from the prisoner's father's house; the prisoner was near enough to hear me desire King to get over after him; I was standing in a place called Sounding-alley, between the father's house and garden.

Q. Did not the prisoner retreat as you advanced? A. He did not; when I got over the hedge, he stood still - I demanded my handkerchief - he ran away from King, who pursued him; I was on the other side of the edge at that time - I came up to him, and asked for my property - he was standing still then; having been stopped by King; I and the prisoner took hold of each other, and down we came, and he stabbed me; I felt the blood running down my arm, and down my small clothes.

Q. Were you not talking to a woman when you first met the prisoner? A. No, I had been in company with my relations that afternoon.

JAMES KING . I lodge at the same house as the prosecutor. On the 12th of February, about 12 o'clock, he came to the door; I heard him say he had lost his bundle in the field - he went back again; the landlady desired me to follow him; I did not overtake him till I came to the field where it happened - he was looking about for the bundle; I helped him, but could not find it, nor see any body; we went to the prisoner's house, knocked at the garden gate, his mother opened the window. I asked if her son was there, he was denied. I got on the bank opposite the house; there is an alley between the house and bank; I saw the prisoner laying under the bank, with this bundle. Lewis was in the alley; I said,

"Here he is;" the prisoner immediately got up and run away with the bundle; I followed him, and got off the bank over into the garden, where he was. I followed him and saw him throw the bundle away; Lewis was on the other side, and picked it up; he said he had not got all, and told me not to let him run away; he made several attempts to run away; I said, if he did; I would knock him down. Lewis then came over and demanded a silk handkerchief of him; I believe he denied having it - a scuffle ensued between them; I did not see any blows given; I did not join in the scuffle - they were both down, and got up; Lewis said, he must go home, for he was stabbed in two places, and felt the blood run down his arm and back; I said,

"Are you;" he said,

"Yes;" the prisoner then said,

"Yes, and d - n your eyes, I will serve you the same;" he was coming up to me, holding his arm up with a gardener's pruning knife in his hand; I parried the blow off with an umbrella: Lewis then made the best of his way to go home - I followed him; the prisoner followed us both with the knife in his hand; Lewis got over the bank into the alley - I was in the field then, and the prisoner was standing about two yards off with the knife in his hand; I got over the bank; Lewis and I went home. On getting home, when I saw what mischief was done, I went for the doctor; I went with the constable to the prisoner's house; we knocked at the gate, his mother opened the window the officer asked if her son was at home, and demanded admission, and after some time she said he was at home; she came down, opened the gate, and shewed us where he was in bed. The officer told him to get up, and put on the same clothes as he had on before; and when he had done so, he searched him, and among other things found a small knife with two blade; I said, that was not he, and he must have another knife somewhere; the officer pulled down the bed clothes, and between the bed and sacking found a large gardener's pruning knife, which I believe to be the same; there was some blood on it; it was a moonlight night; we lodge with Mrs. Hughes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. I never saw him before; I was not long after Lewis - I did not see him till he came to the field, where he had lost his bundle; when I knocked at the gate, I asked if the son was at home - the mother said he was not, and she had not seen him that night.

Q. Did not the prosecutor say what he would do if he could catch him? A. He did not.

Q. Did neither of you say

"D - n his eyes, if we catch him we will be the death of him?" A. No, I heard nothing of the kind: after he was gone back, the landlady told me he had been having a scuffle, and left his bundle behind - she desired me to go and look after it - he did not tell me he had been fighting, or say he would do any thing to the prisoner if he caught him - he has not since told me that he offered five sovereigns to fight him - I have heard him say he had two rounds with the prisoner.

Q. He endeavoured to get from you, instead of meeting you? A. He made several attempts to run away - the hedge prevented him.

Q. And when you got over the hedge to go home, he was within two yards of you? A. Yes.

CHARLES HUDSON . I am a constable. On the 28th of February, between two and three o'clock in the morning

I went with King to apprehend the prisoner - we found him in bed and apparently asleep - I awoke him; he said

"What is the matter now?" I said he was charged with cutting and stabbing T. Lewis, and desired him to get up and put on his clothes - he did so, and I found a small two-bladed knife in his pocket; King said, that was not the knife - I said

"August, you have another knife, have not you?" he said

"No, if I have it is down stairs;" I then searched the bed and found this knife concealed between the bed and sacking, and, on taking it out of the case, King exclaimed

"That is the knife;" it was bloody on both sides of the blade; I then secured him. I produce the prosecutor's clothes - his shirt is bloody, the arm of the coat is more than half cut - there is a stab in the back of the coat, and near the waistband of his breeches is a holo corresponding with it; he had a great coat and an under one on - both are cut through, and through the small-clothes behind.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you perceive some dirt on the knife? A. No, only blood - I did not examine the prisoner's clothes - it was not a very dirty night.

Q. Did not the knife appear to have scraped dirt of his clothes? A. No, there was no dirt on it at all - it is such a knife as gardeners use.

Q. Suppose a person had such a knife in his hand, and falling with another person, he might inflict such wounds? A. I should think it impossible - it would rip a coat with great case.

JAMES FAIRHEAD . I am a surgeon. On the night of the 27th of February I was called in to attend Lewis, and found him in a faint state - he had a cut in the middle of the upper part of the arm - it was a very severe cut - and he had a stab in the back; I could see into that wound about an inch deep without probing it - it was about three inches long - he has been under my care ever since, and is not yet quite recovered - he was kept in bed for a week, and was in very great danger of his life for four or five days.

T. LEWIS re-examined. The clothes produced are mine, and what I wore that night.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

Three witnesses deposed to the prisoner bearing the character of a kind and humane man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

On the 2d and 3d Counts only.

Reference Number: t18250407-43

Before Mr. Justice Park.

635. THOMAS PEMBROOKE and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , two live tame fowls, price 8 s. , the property of William Lewington .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am constable of Bow-street. On the 12th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was near Tyburn gate - and saw the prisoners coming up the Uxbridge-road, with each a basket slung over his shoulders; Brown was walking about six yards before Pembrooke; I crossed over - Pembrooke passed me - I looked into his basket and said,

"What have got here; fowls?" He said

"No, they are ducks" - I took him across the road, and gave him in charge of a man at the toll-gate - they were ducks; Brown seeing that I had got Pembrooke, set off running - I pursued, calling Stop thief! and a man stopped him two hundred yards off; when I came up, he asked why I hallowed Stop thief! I said, I had reason to believe he had stolen property, and as I brought him back, I saw his hand in his pocket, and heard something fall on the ground - I turned round and found a chisel; I said

"You have dropped this; how did you get it;" he said he had found it. I found five ducks in his basket; there were three or four ducks, two fowls, and two bells in Pembrooke's basket; the prosecutor claimed two hens from Pembrooke's basket.

WILLIAM LEWINGTON . I live at Wilsden. I had eight hens and a game cock; I locked them up about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the 11th of March, in the stable, and about six in the morning I found the stable door broken open, and missed two hens; I found them at the office two or three days after - the leg of one was broken, I had set it, and the spur had grown out.

PEMBROOKE - GUILTY .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-44

636. THOMAS PEMBROOKE and WILLIAM BROWN were again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , nine live tame fowls, price 13 s. , the property of Mary Carty .

WILLIAM FULLER . I am servant to Mary Carty, a widow , who lives in John-street, Edgware-road . On the 11th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I fastened up her ten ducks in the duck-house; next morning the coach-house lock was broken, and seven ducks and two drakes gone.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I stopped the prisoners by Tyburn-gate - I found five or six ducks in Brown's basket; and three or four in Pembrooke's; they were all dead - I produce the heads.

WILLIAM FULLER. These are the heads of the ducks I lost; I saw them before the heads were cut off; and I know them by marks - two drakes are here.

PEMBROOKE - GUILTY . Aged 26.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-45

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

637. CHARLES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , one hundred brass ornaments, value 24 s. , the goods of Archibald Wilson .

ARCHIBALD WILSON. I am a brass finisher , and live in High-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner was in my service for two months, On the 8th of March, I missed some brass figures, and next day at two o'clock, I told him I had lost two figures, and shewed him the pattern of them - he denied having them - I said I was sure he must have them, for nobody else could take them; he then said he had got them, but nothing else. I had an officer ready; we went to his lodgings and found the figures and several other articles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-46

Before Mr. Justice Park.

638. MARGARET PUNCHEON , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , two pairs of trowsers, value, 10 s. , the goods of William Chitty .

ELIZABETH HAMSON . I live with my father-in-law, William Chitty; I was making regimental trowsers, and employed the prisoner to work for me. On the 26th of February I missed two pairs, off my mother's table, in Orchard-street - I went to the prisoner's house on Monday, the 28th - she was in bed; I did not go in, but asked if she had got any trowsers; she said No; and that she had had none - I came away.

BARNARD HART . I keep a clothes shop in Monmouth-street. On Wednesday, the 2d of March, the prisoner brought me two pairs of trowsers for sale, and asked 5 s. for them both - she said they were her own - I said they belonged to the military, and gave her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had them to make - I was in Monmouth-street, and this young man's brother pulled me into the shop.

MARTHA JEPPS . I made these trowsers for Chitty, and took them home the day they were stolen.

GUILTY . Aged. 61.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-47

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

639. JAMES MONK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , two optic glasses, value 2 s.; a purse, value 1 d.; four boot hooks, value 6 d.; a book, value 1 s.; six pounds of wire, value 7 s.; a candlestick, value 6 d.; and twenty pick-lock keys, value 1 s. ; the goods of William Lemon .

WILLIAM LEMON. I am a lock-smith and live at No. 7, Off-alley, Buckingham-street . My work shop is in a cellar, at No. 5. On the 23d of March, I fastened the door and went to dinner, returned in three quarters of an hour, and found the back door split as under, a basket of tools was on the stairs; I had left it in the cellar. I found a hat on the bench in the shop, with four boot hooks which I had left in the basket; I knew the hat to be the prisoner's; he had been in my employ nearly six weeks before Christmas; I found a bundle containing four rolls of wire, a candlestick, and some pick-lock keys, which I had left in the cellar. There were some keys, a screw wrench, and steelyards in a bag; I went up stairs and found the prisoner without his hat against the back room door, and gave him in charge; and saw two optic glasses, and a steel purse, found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to get a job, the door was open.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-48

London Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

640. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , twenty yards of crape, value 20 s.; and a wooden roller, value 2 d.; the goods of Evan Thomas , privately in his shop .

LEWIS PHILLIPS . I am shopman to Evan Thomas, a linen draper . On the 26th of February, the prisoner came into the shop, the young man who served him is dead; he asked for black shalloon, we had none, he showed him some holland; he was a quarter of an hour in the shop, and bought nothing; he went out, and the young man after him, and brought him back with a piece of Norwick crape in a bag, which he had brought into the shop; we gave him in charge; the young man said he had missed it, and suspected him; he said nothing, to it - the end of it hung out of his bag.

THOMAS PIKE . I am an officer. I was fetched to Mr. Thomas's, and took the prisoner; they said he had taken a piece of Norwich crape off the bench; that a person came in and asked if he had bought anything; upon which the young man who is dead, said he pursued and brought him back with it in the bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was tipsy and know nothing of it.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-49

641. FRANCIS SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a handkerchief, value 4 s.; the goods of John Hooper , from his person .

JOHN HOOPER. I am a law-stationer . On the 28th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street, walking towards Temple-bar , - I felt something at my right-hand coat pocket - and on turning round, saw three persons together, the prisoner was one of them; one of them (not the prisoner) drew my handkerchief out of my pocket, and immediately gave it to the prisoner who took it, and immediately put it under his coat, and walked forward; he turned up Chancery-lane, and seeing me following him he ran; I called Stop thief! and saw him throw it into the kennel; I secured him immediately without loosing sight of him.

JOHN WILLIS . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-50

642. JOHN ASHBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , sixteen pairs of stays, value 32 s., the goods of William Tompkins , his master .

MARY TOMPKINS . I am the wife of William Tompkins, and am a stay maker; I live in Fleet-lane; the prisoner came into my service as foreman - he was to cut out stays, press them, and return them to me when finished; his wife used to collect orders, but did not work in the house - she was never in the room except when he was there; he had a room to himself. On the 15th of February I gave him fifteen pairs to press and bone. I went up stairs next day, and there were only fourteen pair; he said the other three were down in the work room; I went down, but they were not there; I went up, and said I insisted on finding them; he said,

"Do you accuse me of them?" I said

"Yes;" he said,

"You are robbed, and if you will count your goods you have lost more." I then missed sixteen pairs; I said,

"Who am I to accuse?" he said, Shields had stolen a dozen pairs, another person four, and another person two, and called his Maker to witness, that they had robbed me. I was going with them to search their lodgings, but heard him creeping down stairs, and told him he must not go -

he said he must; the officer came, and thought proper to detain him instead of the women whom he accused; the duplicate of the stays was found on his wife.

FRANCIS BYAS . I am servant to Mr. Maynard, pawnbroker. I have ten pairs of stays pawned by the prisoners wife on the 15th, 16th, and 17th, of February. She was in the habit of pawning stays to a great amount.

SARAH SHIELDS . I was the prosecutrix's forewoman. On the 15th and 16th I gave the prisoner some stays to finish; I missed three pairs from one lot, and four from another. Those produced are what I gave him.

Prisoner. The stays are made by my daughter; the room I worked in was used as a bed-room, and every thing was in confesion - a man there said he would prig all he could lay hold of - and one of the witnesses is a common prostitute. The prosecutrix often authorised women to pawn goods for her at that and other shops.

MARY TOMPKINS re-examined. I swear they are all my property; his statement is false - I never employed him or his wife to pawn goods. She pawned things twice without my knowledge; I did not object to it, but gave her the money to get them out.

HARRIET WARWICK . I was in the prosecutrix's employ; five pair of these stays are what I made for her.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-51

643. JAMES PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a wooden cask, value 1 s., and 70 lb. of butter, value 29 s. , the goods of Edward Ronalds and Nathaniel Ronalds .

MARY STANNER . On the 12th of March, I was in the kitchen on the first floor, at Messrs. Ronalds', in Upper Thames-street , and saw the prisoner standing by the butter, on some ruins outside the house, for half an hour - I then saw him take up a cask on his shoulder and run away with it; he was brought back almost directly with it - I am sure he is the man.

JOSEPH DUVALL . I am servant to Mr. Ronalds. Stanner gave an alarm - I ran and took the prisoner about one hundred and twenty yards from Mr. Ronalds', standing, with the firkin of butter about two yards from him - I took him back and she said he was the man.

Mr. E. RONALDS. I am in partnership with my brother Nathaniel. This firkin of butter is ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I was near London bridge when the witness stopped me, and asked where the butter was? I said I knew nothing of it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-52

644. WILLIAM ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a hat, value 10 s. , the goods of Henry John Parnell .

MARY CLARK . I am shopwoman to Mr. Henry John Parnell, hatter , Minories . On the 2d of April the prisoner came into the shop, took a hat off the counter, put it on his head, and walked out; I gave an alarm and he was taken in my sight, about one hundred yards off, when he threw the hat down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the boy running away with it - hallooed out Stop thief! he threw it down. I should bevery glad to get into the Refuge.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-53

645. THOMAS HOPPY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a butter flat, value 2 s., and twelve fowls, value 36 s. , the goods of Henry Palmer .

HENRY PALMER. I am a higgler . On the 10th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was driving my waggon up Ludgate-hill , with several butter flats, one of which contained fowls. I had information and missed it from the hind part of the waggon; my brother was by the side of the horses - he pursued, and in two minutes brought back the prisoner, flat and fowls.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it day-light? A. About dusk; I am certain it could not have fallen out of the waggon.

JOHN PALMER . I am the prosecutor's brother. A person gave me information, and pointed out which way the thief was gone - I ran and came up with the prisoner, with the flat in his hand, about one hundred yards off - he said I should have lost it if it had not been for him. It could not have fallen from the waggon - it was a dirty day and the flat was quite clean.

Cross-examined. Q. Might it not have fallen on the pavement? A. The waggon was not near the pavement; he was standing still when I took him - the waggon stopped when the alarm was given.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing with my face towards him, and asked if it was his.

JURY to PALMER. Q. Was your attention directed to any one person? A. A gentleman said,

"A man has taken your flat, and gone towards Pilgrim-street;" and I found him at the corner of the gateway leading to Pilgrim-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-54

NEW COURT. (2d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

646. JOHN NUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a blanket, value 4 s., the goods of John Smorphet , in a lodging room .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-55

647. SAMUEL TURNER and JAMES SCRACE were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a gallon of gin, value 8 s. , the goods of Dennis Healy .

ELIZABETH HEALY . I am the wife of Dennis Healy. We keep the Adam and Eve public-house, at Kensington . I directed my son and daughter to watch on the night of the 23d of February - they sat up in the room adjoining the kitchen, till three o'clock in the morning. I got up between five and six next morning, and came out on the stairs - I thought I heard some footsteps moving softly in the passage - I came on to the middle of the stairs, and heard the two prisoners whispering together at the bar door - I saw the light of a candle at the foot of the stairs I called and said

"Is that you, James?" and Scrace said

"It is;" I said

"Give me a light?" He did so - I put it in

my room and came down on the stairs without it. I then heard the bar door shut and locked, and the key taken out - I then heard the cellar door opened with a key, and heard one of the men go down into the cellar - I came down near the cellar door, and heard some liquor rattling into a can; Scrace then came out and went along the passage, stamping and calling out - I waited till Turner came up with a can full of gin - when he came to the top of the cellar stairs I took hold of his arm - I said

"Samuel, is it you who is robbing us?" - he made no answer, but tried to get away - I cried Murder! he let the can drop, but got from me - he got over the pales in the yard and got away. I then went into the kitchen and saw Scrace standing there - I said

"You and Samuel are robbing us;" he said he knew nothing at all about it - he seemed anxious to light the fire, and take up the ashes; we sent for a constable, and before he came another servant lighted the fire, and in the ashes we found this key, which will lock and unlock the bar door - we gave Scrace into custody. They had no right to draw any liquors - they get up about six o'clock generally - they usually slept together in the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not one of the prisoners to have some gin for cutting your husband's corns? A. Yes, he gave it to him the night before.

Q. Did not your husband give him some directions to go and get some bottle for a medicine for a dog? A. No, there was no bottle for dog medicine in the cellar - they must have known that - I had got a light of them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time do your servants generally get up? A. Between five and six; the kitchen joins the bar, which was locked the night before by my son, who had the key - the cellar is on the other side of the passage - the cellar keys were locked up in the bar.

ELEANOR BRADLY . In consequence of some information we had received, I and my brother sat up till three o'clock in the morning, and then I went to bed. I had seen my brother lock the cellar door, and put the key into the bar - he locked the bar door and put the key into his pocket - soon after five we were awoke by a cry of Thieves! I went down and saw Scrace standing by the kitchen fire - I asked if they had been robbing us; he said he had not; I said one could not do it without the other; he said he knew nothing about it; he seemed anxious to light the fire and take up the cinders - I said he should not do any thing till the constable came. When the cinders were sifted this key was found there - it was his usual business to fight the fire.

HARRIET WHITNEY . I am servant to the prosecutor. The shavings are kept in a shed at the back of the house - on the morning of February the 22d, I found a piece of glass bottle among them, and a whole bottle nearly full of rum; I went in and told my mistress.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you seen your master the night before? A. Yes; he was sober.

GEORGE HULL . I am a constable. On the 23d of February I was applied to take Scrace into custody - Turner was brought to me at the watch-house afterwards; I believe I said I was sorry for what they had done, or to see them in that situation - I have no recollection of any thing they said, but that they were sorry, or something to that effect. I had known them some time, as servants at the Adam and Eve, public-house; I know Mr. Healy - there was nothing said in my hearing about their being transported or hanged.

PITT COLNETT . I am beadle of Kensington. I took Turner opposite Brompton-row - I took him to the watch-house; he said,

"What has become of James;" I said

"He is safe enough;" he said,

"Now I shall be transported;" I said,

"I hope not" - that is all that passed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell him it would be better for him to tell all about it? A. No.

SCRACE'S Defence. I did not sleep in the house that night, as my young master knows.

JOHN HEALEY . I slept in the house that night, but I do not know whether Scrace did - his usual place was with Turner; I know he went to sleep in the soldiers' room while Turner was cutting my father's corns - he could let himself into the house when he came to work in the morning; I stood by my father part of the time while he was having his corns cut, and then staid up till three o'clock. I gave orders to Turner to get some castor oil for the dog, and said I would get him a bottle out of the cellar in the morning, but he was not to get it. I fastened the cellar door, and hung the key in the bar, and then locked the bar, and put the key into my pocket.

Three witnesses gave Turner a good character.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

SCRACE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-56

Before Mr. Recorder.

648. JOHN BOWERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of William Wilford .

WILLIAM WILFORD. I live in Hales-court, Kensington. On the 9th of March I was walking alongside my horses, and saw the prisoner take my coat off the shafts of my waggon - I pursued, and caught him; there was another person with him, whom he threw the coat to, and he escaped. I am certain of the prisoner's person.

JOHN LEADLY . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner - he said he did not take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a building to inquire for work; I came out, and was going home; I sat down upon a step, being tired, and a man came up to me, and said,

"You have taken my coat;" I said,

"I have but just come out of that building;" he said,

"I know better - I can bring a man who saw you take it;" he took me back, and some persons said,

"Is that the man;" he said,

"No, the man is further down;" the people said,

"That won't do, if you take him to the Magistrates you must swear to him." He said,

"Then I will swear to him."

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-57

649. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , two glass dishes, value 3 l., and three glass salts, value 15 s. , the goods of James Towers .

JOHN GODSIFF . I am in the employ of Mr. James Towers, of Great Titchfield-street. On the 26th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner

came into the shop, and inquired for Mr. Towers; I said he was down stairs; she said,

"It is of no consequence, you will do as well; I called to look at some glass dishes, which I looked at a few days ago" - I shewed her two, and she asked the price; I told her 33 s. each; she said,

"I think Mr. Towers said 23 s.;" I went below to inquire of him - when I came up I found the prisoner in the shop - I told her 33 s. was the lowest price; she said,

"Now, I recollect that is the price Mr. Towers told me." She selected two; she then asked to look at some glass salts, and I got three out of the window; she selected two of them, and said,

"I will take this pair." She then wanted to look at some china articles, and after selecting some she ordered a bill to made of them; the whole amounted to 5 l. 4 s. 6 d. After Mr. Towers had made the bill she said,

"I wish a receipt to be sent with me, and I will send back the money;" Mr. Towers asked in what name he should make out the receipt: she said,

"Mr. Turner, No. 25, Devonshire-place." She said, as I was putting the dishes into the basket.

"I am afraid you will chip the dishes, and the salts, I will take them in my basket," which she did; I then followed her to the corner of Wimpole-street, when she said to me,

"Go to the door of my house; I am going to Mr. Dixon's, the butcher's" - she went away. I went to the house, and found a Mr. Still lived there, and they knew nothing of Mr. Turner. I took the articles into the kitchen, and waited half an hour till the housekeeper came home, and no such articles were expected; I did not see the prisoner till the 23d of March. I have traced the dishes and the salts to two pawnbrokers.

JAMES BASSET . I am assistant to Mr. Harrison, of Wardour-street, a pawnbroker. I took in three salts on the 26th of February, one pair in the forenoon, about one o'clock, for 6 s., and a single one in the evening for 3 s.; they were pawned by the prisoner, whom I had seen before.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am assistant to Mr. Rochford, of Brewer-street. I took two glass dishes in pawn from the prisoner, on Saturday, the 26th of February, for 1 l.; they were claimed by Godsiff. I am certain of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BALLARD . I took her into custody, and found the duplicates of these articles in her lodgings; she was brought to the office by Foster and Godsiff.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18250407-58

650. MARY EDWARDS was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , two decanters, value 2 l.; four glass salts, value 14 s.; three goblets, value 3 s., and a mustard pot, value 18 d. , the goods of Ambrose Welchman .

ELIZABETH WELCHMAN . I am the wife of Ambrose Welchman - we live in Marchmont-street, Russell-square , and keep a glass shop . The prisoner came into our shop on Tuesday, the 22d of March, and inquired the price of some salts; she returned the next morning, and agreed for a pair of decanters, four salts, and a number of other articles - the boy was to go with her and take some things, and return for some others; they were to go to No. 15, Greenville-street, Brunswick-square; she took with her the decanters, salts, goblets, and the mustard pot, in her basket - she was to pay for them when the order was complete. The boy went with her to the door, taking the other things with him. She was apprehended in about two hours afterwards.

JOHN ALVERS . I am in the employ of Mr. Welchman. The prisoner came and bought the glass articles of my master on the 22d of March; she asked the price of some salts: she came next day, and bargained for the articles; I took some in the basket with her; she took the glass in her own basket. When we got to Wilmot-street, she said she would call at the butcher's, and I was to go on to Grenville-street, which I did, and the servant there said the things were not to come there; I took them home again, and did not see the prisoner till I got to Marlborough-street, about three o'clock the same day.

WILLIAM FOSTER . On Wednesday, the 23d of March, the prisoner brought two decanters and four glass salts to our house, to pawn them, but having heard of the robbery at Mr. Towers's, I stopped her, and took her to Marlborough-street.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I took charge of her - she had this basket in her hand; it has three goblets and four salts in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-59

651. HANNAH MAHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , twenty-six yards of stuff, value 24 s. , the goods of William Spooner .

WILLIAM SPOONER. I am a linen-draper , and live in Chiswell-street . I saw the prisoner in my shop on the 24th of February - she was brought back by my lad, and I saw twenty-six yards of stuff taken from her person.

THOMAS LLOYD . I am in the employ of Mr. Spooner. The prisoner came to our shop between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I was clearing part of the goods from the door; she came in, took the piece of stuff from the pile, and walked off with it. I pursued her half way across the road, and brought her back; I took it from her; there were twenty-six yards of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a friend of mine came to see me, and I went with her part of the way home; we had something to drink, and as I passed this shop, something came against my foot, I stooped and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-60

652. DAVID JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Gambier .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-61

653. CHARLES WITTINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a coat, value 2 l. , the goods of George Raban , Esq.

JAMES SQUIRES . I am coachman to George Raban, Esq., of King-street, St. James's-square ; my livery box-coat was taken from the stable on the 19th of March; I had seen it about one hour before; the prisoner had helped me to put a horse to the carriage; he was at work at Mr. Hudson's livery-stables, where my horses had been standing.

I received information in the afternoon that the coat had been taken; the stable was locked.

JOHN MILLS . I am a constable. On the 19th of March, I met the prisoner in the Strand, about half-past four o'clock, with a sack. I asked him what he had got there; he said, his master's top coat; I said,

"It is a queer thing for you to bag it," and asked his master's name; he said it was of no consequence - he should not tell me. I said,

"I shall take you to the watch-house." I opened the sack, and found the box-coat in it, which was claimed by Squires; after I took him to the watch-house, he said,

"I may as well tell you where I got it, I shall only get seven penny-worth - I took it from Mr. Mason's yard, Duke-street, St. James's."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-62

654. ESTHER WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , fourteen yards of linen, value 28 s., the goods of Robert Hawkes , privately, in his shop .

RICHARD GAY . I live with Mr. Robert Hawkes, linen-draper , Glass-house-street . I saw the prisoner in our shop on the 5th of March, about five o'clock; I showed her a gown, but she did not buy anything - she then left the shop; I had not missed any thing, but I followed her to the door, and saw her just getting up from stooping; I went back to see if I had lost anything, and missed a piece of Irish, which I had seen safe while she was in the shop; it was close by her on the same counter. I told the young man, and he went out after her - I went out soon afterwards, and met him and the prisoner in Warwick-street, two doors from my master's shop; I went for a constable; the Irish has not been found - it cost 2 s. 2 d. a yard.

JOHN THOMAS WILLIAMS . I work for the Gas Company at Westminster. I was looking in at this shop window, and saw the prisoner come out of the shop and pass by me behind, and drop a piece of linen - it appeared to me to be about fourteen or fifteen yards - there was no one with her. I said,

"My dear, you have dropped it:" she said,

"Yes, I have;" she then picked it up and walked on; it was plain Irish linen. Gay came out to me and made some inquiries - I told him what I had seen; she was then in sight, but not in hearing. Gay returned to the shop, and another person came out and followed the prisoner, who had then turned the corner; I followed him to Warwick-street, and saw him questioning her; I did not then see any linen with her; there were several persons by, and the shopman had hold of her.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When the linen fell on the ground, was she behind you? A. Yes, I told Gay what I had seen - he followed her immediately, and brought her back. I did not see her searched - she was searched by Mr. Hawkes' sister, in the back-room; she denied knowing any thing about it.

JOHN GEORGE BUCKLAND . I am a constable. I was sent for about half-past five o'clock, to take charge of the prisoner; no linen was found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it, and never saw it.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of Stealing, but not Privately .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-63

655. SAMUEL MURRELL & RICHARD GODDARD were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a blanket, value 3 s. , the goods of Ebenezer Olding .

EVAN PRICE . I am in the employ of Mr. Ebenezer Olding, upholsterer , of Fleet-street. I was with some goods which were delivering at a customer's house in Hackney-grove , on the 11th of March, about half-past two o'clock; this blanket was covered over the goods, and when we had left the goods it was put into the caravan - we were in the house and heard an alarm, and heard that two men had stolen a blanket. I pursued the two prisoners who were walking fast; I overtook them in London-field, with the blanket under the arm of Murrell; I called to them, and said they had stolen the blanket; they said they had found it - I secured them. I had lost sight of them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was the blanket ever out of the caravan? A. No, it had been over a chamber organ. I know nothing of Goddard - the caravan might be six or eight yards from the door; they might be near a quarter of a mile off when I first saw them; boys sometimes get in and throw the things about when goods are removed; they waited at the door till the officer's son came, and were quite willing to go with him.

WILLIAM PERKINS . I was assisting to deliver these goods. I did not see either of the prisoners near the caravan. I saw the blanket in the caravan after all the goods had been carried into the house; I heard it was stolen while I was in the house - I had seen it safe about five minutes before. I followed, and saw Price with the prisoners in London-field; they behaved very well, and said they would go back and wait for a constable, for they had found it.

MARTHER LEE . - I live at No. 8, Hackney-grove. I went into our dining-room, and saw a sort of carriage at the next house. I saw a man move a blanket from it, but did not see any person with him; I gave the alarm instantly, and said the man was gone in a direction toward London-field.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-64

656. DANIEL THOMAS PRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s., the goods of William Allen , privately in his shop .

THEODORE ANSPACH . I am in the employ of Mr. William Allen, a linen-draper , who lives in the Strand . I saw the prisoner (who was a stranger to me) in the shop, about half-past 7 o'clock in the evening of the 16th of March. We lost twenty-eight yards of printed cotton from a rail inside the shop - I had seen it safe five or ten minutes before it was missed - there was no one in the shop but myself - I saw it again the next day at the Thames police-office, when the prisoner was in custody. I am quite certain of the property.

WILLIAM FORTY . I am a Thames police surveyor. About eight o'clock in the evening of the 16th of March, I was watching a house in Great White Lion-street, Seven Dials, which I knew to be kept by a receiver of stolen goods. I saw the prisoner go in with a bundle under his arm - I asked him what he had got - he said a gown piece,

which a man had given him to bring there to sell, and he was to ask 1 l. for it, and to have 1 s. for his trouble; he did not then say who the man was, but he said afterwards that he met the man in Short's-gardens, and did not know that he should know him again if he saw him; I took him and the parcel out of doors - a man was waiting outside of the shop, and I asked the prisoner if he could see the man there who had given him the property; he said No; I said

"Is this the man?" he said No. I went next morning to several shops, and found Allen had lost it.

Prisoner. When he took me out of the house, he said

"Is that the man?" I said No, but I did not say I should not know the man. I told the officer I had no doubt it was a plan to get me into trouble.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About eight o'clock that evening, I came down Short's-gardens, and met a man, who said

"Young man do you want a job? if you take this to White Lion-street, and sell it at a house there, I will give you 1 s." I went, and the officer came in.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-65

657. WILLIAM BLOUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , two pounds of bacon, value 11 d. , the goods of William Grice .

WILLIAM GRICE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Hatton-wall . I saw the prisoner, with another person, elder than himself, come into my shop and take the bacon from my window - he went out - I followed him and took him - he had dropped it.

WILLIAM JAMES HEMMING . I was in the shop - I saw the prisoner take the bacon and put it under his arm - I and Price pursued and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man who told me to take the bacon for him, as he had had no food since Friday evening. I gave it to him and he dropped it.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom promised to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-66

658. CATHERINE SANDIFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a petticoat, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s.; a purse, value 1 s., and a thimble, value 1 d., the goods of Rebecca Young , from her person .

REBECCA YOUNG. I live with my parents, in Upper-court, Islington, and work at a laundry . On the 25th of February I had been to Hounslow to see a friend, and returned by myself in a cart, which had been down to take some foot soldiers; the carman was to have put me down at Westminster, but he went down the Chelsea road, and spoke to the prisoner, and she said if I would go with her she would take care of me, as it was getting late; it was about ten o'clock - I went with her to a house in Westminster , but I do not know the name of the street; it was a lower room in a private house; I went to bed as soon as I got there, but the prisoner staid up some time - I slept in a bed, on a bedstead, in which she and her daughter slept; there was another bed on the floor, in which a young woman slept; when we got to bed I heard the prisoner tell her daughter to get up and fasten the door - she got up, but I do not know whether she fastened the door; I got up about eight o'clock in the morning - the prisoner and her daughter were then in bed; I missed my clothes which I had pulled off the night before, and placed between two chairs when I went to bed. I asked what had become of my clothes; the prisoner said somebody must have come in and taken them; the two young women said they knew nothing about them; I went out, and brought an officer from Queen-square; I saw the stays about seven o'clock that evening.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say you would pawn something in the morning, to satisfy me for the night's lodging? A. No, I did not - it was the carman who made it up with her.

Q. Did not I ask you to stop to breakfast? A. No, you did not - you asked me to pawn something to get breakfast, but I would not do it.

SARAH MELLISH . The prisoner's daughter came to my room on the 27th of February, between three and four o'clock - she asked me to put these stays by for her mother, and she would call for them in the afternoon; the officer called afterwards while I was out, and my husband gave them to him. I saw the same stays at the office afterwards.

NICHOLAS WORSLEY . I am a labourer. On the 26th of February, I was at the Hoop and Grapes, public-house, Westminster, about two o'clock in the afternoon. I saw the prosecutrix crying, and saying she had been robbed - I asked her how, and went with her to where the prisoner lived - I found the prisoner there and another woman in an ill state of health; the prisoner said she had not taken the things, some person must have broken in and taken them; she had fastened the door with a towel; I saw the fastening of the door, and asked her if she slept with the door so - she said she did every night - I asked her for a duplicate which the prosecutrix had lost; she produced a bag with different duplicates, but not that one; she then went to the fire, and I saw her put a duplicate into it - I took it out, and it was claimed by the prosecutrix as the one she had lost; I asked how she came to put it into the fire - she said she did not, that it must have fallen from the shelf.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen's-square. I saw the prosecutrix about half-past eleven o'clock that day, came into a public-house facing the office, crying - she said she had been robbed at a house which she thought was in the Almonry; I told her to wait a bit and I would go with her, but while I went back to the office, Worsley went with her; he brought the prisoner to the office, and I took charge of her; I went by her direction to Mellish's room, and found the stays, which are here; they were claimed by the prosecutrix; on searching the prisoner I found this thimble.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the stays and the thimble on the ground after she was gone - she knew where the petticoat and the handkerchief were, because she sent me to pawn them in the morning; I took them to one shop and they would not take them in, they were so dirty; she then told me to keep them till Monday, and she would call and redeem them. When I met the waggoner, he said

"I have brought this young woman from the barracks

at Hounslow," and wished me to give her a night's lodging - I said, I did not like to do it, but she followed us for some time, and I asked her if she had got sixpence, and I would show her where to go - she said she had no money; I took her home and put her to bed with my daughter; I asked her in the morning if she would stop and have breakfast; she would not - I then went out and pawned her things for 2 s., and put the ticket on the shelf; it fell into the fire.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-67

659. MARY COURTENAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a coat, value 1 l., a violin, value 10 s., and a violin bow, value 6 d. , the goods of George Murray .

GEORGE MURRAY. I am a musician , and lodge in Brown-street, Bryanstone-square , in a back kitchen. I went on the evening of the 23d of March, to the Marquis of Granby public-house, and saw the prisoner there - I brought her to my room between 11 and 12 o'clock at night - I awoke between six and seven in the morning - she was gone - I missed my coat, my violin and bow; the door had been bolted inside - I am certain as to her person.

LAUNCELOT WILD . I am assistant to Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, Broad-street, Bloomsbury. I have a violin and bow, which were pawned on the 24th of March by the prisoner, for 4 s.; she said they belonged to her husband.

RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner into custody four or five days afterwards, at a pawnbroker's shop in Paradise-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and went with him - he promised me six or seven shillings, and he offered me seven-pence - I pawned the articles to make up the money.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-68

660. WILLIAM CLIBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a pair of breeches, value 14 s. , the goods of Henrietta Wood .

WILLIAM BLABY . I am in the employ of Henrietta Wood; she keeps a clothes shop at New Brentford . On the 29th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, she lost a pair of breeches from outside the shop; I had seen them safe about half an hour before - I received information that they were gone - I followed the prisoner, and got sight of him about two hundred yards off - he ran across a garden, and threw the breeches over a wall; I got over the wall and took them up - he got away, but was stopped in about half an hour; he had turned round once or twice while I was pursuing him, and I had seen his face.

WILLIAM DURBAN . I was in the street, and found the prisoner; I took him into custody.

THOMAS FREESON . I live opposite Mrs. Wood's; I saw the prisoner take the breeches down from the shop; put them under his coat, and go away - I gave information directly.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I was behind the counter in Mrs. Wood's shop; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and pursued the prisoner - I did not see him stopped, as he got over a wall.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-69

661. JAMES CONELLY and THOMAS LILLY were indicted for stealing on the 12th of March , a pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of William Mackbeth .

WILLIAM MACKBETH. I am gardener to Samuel Robinson , Esqr., who lives at Upper Clapton . I lost a pair of boots from my master's tool house, between the gates and the premises, on the 12th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, in the day; I did not see them taken, but I had seen them a short time before; I had been showing a gentleman the premises; and as I was coming through a private door from the back garden, I saw Conelly within five yards of the tool house; he had no business there; he asked me if that was Mr. Johnson's, and went to a corner as I suppose, to give a signal to Lilly; I suspected something was wrong, and went out at a door where I could see the outer gate; I saw Lilly going out with a bag - I followed and overtook him with the boots in the bag; I asked what he had got there - he said nothing; I found the boots in the bag; I had left Conelly by the side of a gentleman who prevented his getting away - which he tried to do; I got a constable and gave charge of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Lilly's Defence. I was outside the gates, and saw the boots in a ditch - I asked a gentleman whose they were, and he said mine if I liked to take them.

Conelly's Defence. I went with my brother up to Stamford-hill, to take a pair of drawers home; when I was coming back, a gentleman met me, and told me to go into this house and ask if Mr. Johnson lived there - and if he did, to tell the cook, she was wanted very particularly; I did not see any knocker, or bell - and I did not like to go into the kitchen; the man opened the door and asked what I wanted.

CONELLY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

LILLY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-70

662. JOHN DENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , an umbrella, value 3 s. , the goods of William Edwards .

WILLIAM EDWARDS. I am a post-boy . I lived in a back-room, on the first floor, in North-row . I gave up the room on the 20th of March, and left my umbrella, and some other things behind me, till I could have time to take them away; the prisoner had been a lodger there a day or two before - but I did not know him; he was taken up before I went back for my things.

GEORGE BROADBRIDGE . I rent the house. On the 11th of March, the prisoner came and wanted a lodging; he said he was going to work at the Bazaar for a long time, and wanted to live near; he took the room which Edwards quitted; Edwards's umbrella and box were lying in the room.

WILLIAM THACKER . I am a pawnbroker. I received the umbrella from the prisoner on Monday, the 21st of March, in the name of John Charr ; I lent 2 s., on it - it was afterwards claimed by Edwards.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of March, about nine o'clock, on another charge; I found in his pocket the duplicate of the umbrella.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Oxford-street, and met a man with this umbrella and a saw - he asked me to buy them, I said I had not much money - he said

"Let us go and get something to drink," we did so, and then I went and pawned the things and came back - we had a pot or two more.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-71

652. JOHN DENHAM was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a saw, value 3 s.; and a trying square, value 6 d. ; the goods of John Peters .

JOHN PETERS. I live in Park-street, and am a journeyman carpenter . On the 21st of March, I had been at work at the horse bazaar; I left my tools there on the Saturday night - on the Monday morning when I went to work at six o'clock, they were gone; the prisoner had worked with me at the same job - and had left his tools by the side of mine; he went early on Monday morning and packed up his own tools, and went away before I got there; he was taken up the same evening in consequence of some information I had given; I had never given him permission to take or to pawn my tools.

Prisoner. Was I not discharged on the Saturday night? - A. No, you said you were to come to work on Monday morning.

WILLIAM PLACKER . The prisoner pawned this saw at the same time, with the umbrella for 2 s.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner at the public house rather intoxicated - I found some duplicates on him, and about 9 s. 6 d. in silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged on the Saturday, by the clerk of the works; I met the man in Oxford-street, who gave me these things to pawn - my tools had been on one side of the loft - and the prosecutors on the other side of it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-72

660. WILLIAM ELMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a looking glass, value 36 s. ; the goods of John Forrs .

JOHN FORRS. I live in Cannon-street-road , and am a cabinet maker ; the prisoner was a stranger to me; on the 3d of March, this looking glass was in my passage; I was in the front kitchen, and saw the prisoner walk away with it under his arm; I looked in the passage, and found it was gone; I followed and took him with it under his arm - he pleaded distress; the officer found some silver in his pocket.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Forrs. I heard the glass had been stolen - I went out, and saw the prisoner who had then be taken; I know it to be my masters.

HENRY FARMER . am an headborough. I took the prisoner; and found two half crowns, one shilling and sixpence, in one pocket, and one penny farthing in the other; he said he did it through distress.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave me the glass to carry for him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-73

662. ELIZABETH GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a coat, value 2 s., and a cloak, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward White .

EDWARD WHITE. I am a labourer , and live in King-street, Walworth . The prisoner came there one very wet night, and said she had a long way to go; I gave her leave to sleep in the lower room, where my coat and cloak were; she did not pay for the lodging, as my wife knew somebody whom she knew. I got up at six o'clock and went out to work - in half an hour afterwards the prisoner was gone, and so were the things. I had her taken up on the Sunday following, with the cloak on her back, but the coat I have not found.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning, the 6th of March, with this cloak on; she said she had lost the coat. I searched her and found 6 d. on her.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Reference Number: t18250407-74

663. ELIZABETH GIBBONS was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , a quilt, value 4 s.; a bolster, value 2 s.; a pillow, value 2 s., and a blanket, value 9 d., the goods of William Rate , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM RATE. I live in Charles-street ; the prisoner took a back-room on my first-floor, in the beginning of February, at 4 s. 6 d. a week; a friend of her's came with her, and said she went out as a laundress, and could earn a guinea a week; she was there a month, but left without notice; she had paid three week's rent. She left the room locked up on the Saturday night, and on the Tuesday I had it opened; the bedding was all gone, and an Italian iron. I have seen part of the articles since. I saw her again when she was apprehended; she used to go out to work at Chelsea; the things which were found are a bolster, a pillow, a blanket and a quilt - an iron and a sheet are missing.

JOHN WHITTAKER , I am assistant to Mr. James Gideon, a pawnbroker. I received a pillow from the prisoner, I believe, on the 23d of February.

JOHN TRAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chapple-street, Lisson-green. I took in a bolster on the 25th, and this blanket on the 26th, of February.

JAMES HILLIER . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a quilt from the prisoner on the 25th of February.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-75

Third Middlesex Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

664. HENRY HART and GEORGE WOTSONCROFT were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a copper boiler, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

WILLIAM LONEY . I live at the Castle public-house. I work for Mr. Thomas Stevens, of Long-lane ; about half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 1st of March, I missed the boiler from behind the window in his shop - the door was then wide open, it is generally shut about

half-past five o'clock; I did not see it again till the officer shewed it me - I know it by its being my work and having a mark on it. I had seen it safe about four o'clock.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 1st of March I saw the prisoner, Hart, with another, in the parish of St. Sepulchre; he had the copper on his head; I asked him where he got it from - he turned round and said,

"That man gave it to me to carry." Greenaway took Wotsoncroft; when he brought him back, he said,

"To tell you the truth, that lad stole the copper." I asked him how he knew that - he said he saw it; they accused each other of the robbery, and we took them to the office.

JOHN GREENAWAY . I was with Merry on the 1st of March, and took Wotsoncroft - he said,

"To tell you the truth, gentlemen, the lad stole the copper.

HART'S Defence. I was walking up St. John-street, and the officer stopped me; I told them a man gave it me to carry; this lad was not trying to make his escape; he is quite innocent.

WOTSONCROFT put in a written Defence, denying the charge.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 15.

WOTSONCROFT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-76

665. SAMUEL AVERY was indicted for feloniously marrying Mary Haydon , his former wife being then alive, and that on the 17th of March , at St. Giles , he was apprehended for the said felony .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GEORGE PAUX . I am officiating clerk of St. Mary-le-bone - I have the register of that parish; here is a register of the marriage of Samuel Avery and Ann Kidd , by bans, on the 16th of March, 1819, attested by two witnesses.

GEORGE BLOUNT . I live in the family of Lord Bradford, as cook. I know the prisoner; the signature to this register is his hand-writing.

ANN BECKLEY . I know the prisoner, and know Ann Kidd; they were fellow-servants of mine at Sir Henry Wilson 's, of Chelsea-park; they afterwards lodged with me, as man and wife, and had two children - they came to live with me about two years ago, and afterwards lived next door.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. And how long did they live with you, or next door? A. Till within the last month or six weeks, when the prisoner came up from the country to see his wife, who was lodging at my house - she is now alive; I saw her on the 1st of this month.

THOMAS CLARKE . I keep a wine-vaults in Oxford-street. I know the prisoner; he brought Mary Haydon to me as his wife, they came and lodged at my house, as man and wife, for one week. I never heard him say any thing about any other marriage.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 17th of March, in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials - I told him he was charged with having two wives; he at first denied it, but afterwards at the office he said,

"I want to speak to you," and said,

"What had I better do, had I better confess it;" I said,

"You know best whether it is in the books or not;" he said,

"Then it is so in the books, and I shall confess it, it is true - we were married at St. Mary-le-bone six years ago, and have two children;" he afterwards said to Clarke, in my presence,

"I shall throw myself on the mercy of the law, or the mercy of the Court."

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say to this man,

"You had better tell the truth?" A. No, I am quite positive I did not; his wife came to the office on the evening before, with the register in her hand; she was not examined at all upon her oath.

MARY HAYDON. About the beginning of this year I lived about one mile from the Earl of Bradford's - the prisoner solicited me in marriage; he represented himself as single; I married him at Blynhill, in Staffordshire.

GEORGE BLOUNT. I was present at the marriage of this young woman and the prisoner, on the 24th of February last, at Blynhill.

MARY HAYDON re-examined. Q. How long did you live with the prisoner? A. About one month; he came to town, and staid about one month after he married me; he was living with me in London when he was taken up; he was very kind to me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-77

666. WILLIAM HAWKINS and JAMES HILLYARD were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of George Whitfield .

GEORGE WHITFIELD. I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in Gloucester-street, St. Pancrass . On the 5th of March the two prisoners came to my shop together, Hawkins wished to be measured for a pair of boots - Hillyard sat upon a chair next to him, on the back of which there were four pairs of shoes; they staid about five minutes, and when they were gone I missed a pair of shoes from the chair where Hillyard had sat. I went to Mr. Levy's shop, and found they had been pawned there.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Levy. I have a pair of shoes, which were pawned at his shop, by Hill-yard, on the night of the 5th of March.

CHARLES COUSINS . I apprehended the two prisoners; Hawkins was very much in liquor when I took him - he did not say anything about the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HILLYARD'S Defence. I was quite intoxicated - I had been drinking all day, and know nothing of the business. I had had a cut in the head with a shovel some time before, by a man who demanded payment for a bill which is not usually demanded, since that, if I get a drop of liquor, I do not know what I do.

WILLIAM MAYCOCK . I am an excavator. I have known Hillyard from a child - he has worked for me several different times; he has had the character of an honest man; I would employ him directly, and keep him work.

HILLYARD - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

HAWKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-78

667. HENRY HERRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 8 lbs. of solder, value 5 s. , the goods of William Richardson .

JAMES CHANDLER . I am a labourer in the employ of Mr. Bramah, of Pimlico. I had a job at Mr. Richardson's, in Upper Harley-street - we missed a bar of solder, about

three o'clock on the 9th of March - the prisoner had been at work there - I went after him to near the Diorama, where I found him and said if he would come back, and give us the bar, that was all we wanted; he came back, and got the bar from the coal vault of the next house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not he tell you he had seen such a bar in one of the coal vaults, and he would tell you where it was? A. Yes; I have known him some time at work on the premises - there were many persons about - the bar might have been removed by some other person. I do not recollect what he said when I first asked him about it.

JOHN BURKE . I was at work at No. 26, Upper Harley-street, at the time the solder was missed - Chandler came and told me of it. I saw the prisoner come back soon afterwards with Chandler, and two other plumbers, he shewed where it was, in the coal vaults of No. 27, covered with gravel - he said to me, while he pointed with his foot to the place,

"The bar is here;" I said

"If you have hid it there you have been the means of the men losing their time;" he then turned over the gravel, and said

"I can take my oath to you, Burke, that it is the only bar I have taken - for God's sake let me go, as I have a wife and five children;" I said

"Take the bar and give it to the people, as they are losing their time."

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-79

668. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a hearth rug, value 7 s. , the goods of William Bartholomew .

WILLIAM BARTHOLOMEW. I am a rug manufacturer - and live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields - the prisoner was in my employ between two and three years. On Saturday last I sent him out with some goods, about six o'clock in the evening. This hearth-rug is mine, but I cannot tell when it was on my premises, as I have many there.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. This rug was offered in pawn on Saturday evening last by the prisoner, about half-past eight o'clock; he said it was his father's.

One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-80

669. TIMOTHY RAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two saws, value 8 s., a plane, value 2 s., and a pair of compasses, value 6 d. , the goods of William Laver .

WILLIAM LAVER. I am a carpenter . On the 1st of March I left my tools in Frederick-street, Regent's-park , at twelve o'clock, and returned a quarter before one. I was beckoned to go over to Mr. Martin's yard, where I found the prisoner and the tools.

MICHAEL WEBSTER . On the 1st of March, about twelve o'clock, I was at a house opposite to where Laver was working - I saw the prisoner look out twice at the door of the house, and the third time he came out, and went down Osnaberg-street; I ran and overtook him - as I followed I saw a saw concealed under his jacket - I collared and asked him what he was going to do with the tools? he said a man was waiting for them who had taken a basket of tools, and had sent him for these. I took him back to Mr. Martin's yard, and had him locked up till Laver came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18250407-81

670. TIMOTHY RAGAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a rule, value 1 s., and a saw, value 8 s. , the goods of William Mitchell .

WILLIAM MITCHELL. I am a carpenter , and was working near the Diorama. I left the house about twelve o'clock, and returned in about half an hour, and missed some planes, a saw, and a rule. I went with Cousins, the officer, and saw them again.

CHARLES COUSINS . Mitchell came to me at the watch-house. I went to the prisoner's house and found this saw - I found the rule the next day in his box, at his master's shop - he said he had bought the saw for 2 s. 6 d. of a man who goes about sharpening tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tools on the Monday of a man who goes about sharpening saws.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-82

671. ELIZABETH SADLER and MARIA GANNON , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. , the goods of John Graham .

HENRY ESSEX BRISTOW . I am shopman to Mr. John Graham, a linen-draper , who lives in Holborn . On the 15th of March, about four o'clock, the two prisoners came to the shop - there were a great many other persons there - we attended to the prisoners in about five minutes; they asked for some half-mourning prints - I think Sadler asked for them - they bought three yards at 1 s. 2 d. I saw Sadler shuffling something under her, and Gannon put herself in front of her, as much as she could; they paid for what they bought, and left the shop - they had not been there altogether about ten minutes - when they were gone I missed a piece of cotton print off the counter - I had been shewing it to them - I told Scruton - he followed and brought them back with the print; I was then at the end of the shop, and did not hear any thing said.

Prisoner GANNON. Q. Did I stand before the other prisoner in the shop? A. Yes, you certainly did.

JOHN SCRUTON . I am in the employ of Mr. J. Graham. In consequence of what Bristow said I went after the prisoners, and overtook them in Hand-court; I asked them to give me the article they had stolen from the shop - Gannon said

"For God's sake, if you have got any thing give it to him;" I said

"Give it me, and you may go about your business." Sadler then took the print from under her clothes - Gannon fought to get away, and Sadler did get away - I pursued and took her again, and then came back and took Gannon.

Prisoner GANNON. He took the things from Sadler, and then he knocked her down three times. Witness - upon my oath I did not - Gannon attempted to fight - a gentleman

came up, and said he would give me assistance to take them - Sadler did fall down.

JOSEPH WORMARK . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I saw the prisoners standing at Mr. Graham's door, and went in and took them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SADLER'S Defence. I met Gannon in Holborn, and she said she was going to get some mourning - I said I would go with her - I did take the print, but she knew nothing of it. I did it through distress.

GANNON'S Defence. I was sent by my mother to buy some print.

SADLER - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

GANNON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-83

672. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a pair of trowsers, value 7 s. , the goods of William Elphick .

WILLIAM ELPHICK. I live in Old Bond-st reet, and am a breeches-maker . On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 28th of February, at half-past two o'clock, a lad, who, I believe to be the prisoner, knocked at my door, and asked for the trowsers which the groom had left in the morning - they were delivered to him by my young man - they had been brought in the morning by Mr. Nelson Hull's servant, and were to be done by three o'clock, and, I suppose, while the message was delivering, the prisoner listened to what was said.

GEORGE FOOT . I am in the service of Mr. Nelson Hull. I took the trowsers to Mr. Elphick, on the day in question, and left them there to have a pair of pockets put in.

JOHN COOK . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner on the 24th of February, and said I supposed him to be the person whom Mr. Elphick had described as having stolen a pair of trowsers - he denied it - I took him to the shop, and in his fob I found a duplicate of the trowsers. He confessed in the watch-house, that he had stolen and pawned them.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am assistant to Mr. Wadmore, of Tottenham-court-road. These trowsers were pawned on the 22d of February, by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-84

673. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , two candlesticks, value 15 s. , the goods of George Walter .

WILLIAM GARNSEY . I am principal waiter at the One Tun, St. James's-street , which is kept by Mr. George Walter - the candlesticks, plate, and glass are under my care; they were all right on the 12th of March, at eight o'clock in the evening. The patrol brought the prisoner in about half an hour afterwards, and took the candlesticks from him in our house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . When the watchman was crying half-past eight o'clock I heard some boys say,

"Master, you have dropped something;" I ran to the place, and saw the top of one of these candlesticks, which I took out of the boy's hand; I pursued the prisoner, and found the candlesticks on him; I took him to Mr. Walter's, and the top exactly fitted one of the candlesticks which he had. I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. My father was a clergyman, but I have been reduced to poverty, and have got my living by playing the violin; I had been playing the whole of that afternoon, and had got but 8 d.; it was poverty and great distress that brought me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-85

674. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a cheese, value 15 s. , the goods of John Moore .

JOHN MOORE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Essex. I was in Newgate market with my cart - I left the cart for a short time, and when I returned, I found one of the cheeses gone. On the Monday following, I was written to by one of the officers; I came to town and saw it - I knew it to be mine.

Cross-examined, by MR. PHILLIPS. Have you any private mark on it? Yes, they were covered with a tarpauling.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoner on the 8th of March, about five minutes after seven o'clock, with something wrapped up in a blue apron - I crossed and asked what it was; he said a cheese which he had bought, and was going to take it to his mother's - I asked where he had bought it; he said, in the street, for 3 s.; he said afterwards, if I would let him go, he would give me a crown and the cheese.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out with a cart selling some things, a man came and asked me to buy a cheese; I did buy it, knowing my mother had a family - I was going to give it to her.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-86

675. HENRY GRIFFITH and GEORGE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Burgh Lewis , from the person of William Ryland Lewis .

ANN MIDDLEDITCH . I am in the service of Mr. Thomas Burgh Lewis. I know this handkerchief, it was made by my mistress; I put it round the child's neck on the morning of the 29th of March, and took him out walking with me; his name is William Ryland Lewis - as we came back, the two men took it, as I suppose, from off his neck.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am headborough of Somer's-town. I saw the two prisoners about one o'clock; I watched them about the town, and saw Smith take the handkerchief from the child's neck; Griffith stood to cover him from the sight of the people passing - Smith put it into his hat and ran down a court with Griffith; I followed and took them in about a quarter of hour - I took Griffith, and Waddington took Smith; I tied them together, and took the handkerchief from an area, where I saw Smith throw it.

GRIFFITH'S Defence. I came down the street, and saw a great mob - I ran like the rest - this man came up and stopped me, and said I was one of the gang.

Prisoner SMITH to WADDINGTON. Q. Did you see me touch the handkerchief? Yes, I saw you take it from the child's neck and put it into your hat.

SMITH'S Defence. As I was going down Smith-street, I saw some persons ran; I run to see what was the matter - I saw two men running, and the officer came and said, I was the person who took the handkerchief - but I know nothing of it; the officer said, if this would not send me out of the country, he would say I had threatened his life.

TEASDALE. It is no such thing.

Two persons gave Griffith a good character, and one appeared in favour of Smith.

GRIFFITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-87

676. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , two sovereigns and fifty-one shillings ; the monies of Edward Gunnell , his master.

ISABELLA GUNNELL . I am the wife of Edward Gunnell, who deals in coals , and lives in Little Pulteney-street. The prisoner was employed by us to carry out coals. On the 12th of February, I gave him 4 l. 11 s., which I counted on the table, and he put it into a bag - he was to go and order some coals of Messrs. Dalgleish and Taylor, and to pay the money and return; I never saw him again till last Tuesday three weeks, when he was in custody - he said, he had paid his landlady 12 s., and went with some girls and got tipsy.

DANIEL SMITH . I am book-keeper to Dalgleish and Taylor; no such sum of money was paid to them by the prisoner.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I took the prisoner in charge; I asked him about the money, and heard him tell Mrs. Gunnell that he had paid his landlady; and part of it he had given to a woman of the town, who had robbed him of the rest.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-88

677. GEORGE SERLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a till, value 6 d., and five shillings in copper monies , the property of Sarah Brown .

ANDREW BROWN . I am the son of Sarah Brown; we live in Gray-street, Manchester-square. On the 4th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, as I was entering her shop I saw the prisoner behind the counter with the till in his arms-I ran in and seized him by the collar; he showed me his lame arm and begged for mercy; there was some copper in the till, there might be 8 s. or 10 s. worth.

JAMES MACKINTOSH . I took charge of the prisoner, but found nothing on him.

One Witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-89

678. JOSEPH WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , thirty yards of flannel, value 15 s. , the goods of Charles St. John .

ROBERT ST. JOHN . My brother's name is Charles - he lives in Paddington-street. On the 14th of March I saw the prisoner pass our shop about ten o'clock in the morning, with a roll of flannel on his shoulder; I followed him, he saw me, and threw the flannel down - I took it up, but did not lose sight of him; I threw it into a shop, and pursued, and took him. I had placed the flannel near my brother's door about two hours before.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-90

679. MARY WELDON and MARY MITCHELL were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a shawl, value 35 s. , the goods of Samual Hoskins .

RICHARD DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Samuel Hoskins, a draper , who lives at Shadwell . On the 14th of March, the two prisoners came into the shop about three o'clock; Mitchell said to Weldon,

"What shall we look at?" She replied,

"Some gown pieces." I showed them some; they fixed on one, and told me to cut seven yards off it. Weldon paid me 1 s. deposit, and told me to put it by; she said she was going a little further, and should bring a person with her to look at it, and then speak about a shawl - they were in the shop about half an hour; they returned in about half an hour, and Weldon asked to look at a shawl; I brought them seven to look at; while I was showing them, a lady came in and stood near the shawls, and while I was serving that lady, I saw Weldon put her arm under one shawl which she had spread over the rest, and draw another towards her - Mitchell was sitting by her side; I saw Mitchell jog Weldon with her foot, she did not then take the shawl; the lady went out, and I went to finish serving them. I saw Weldon draw a shawl towards her; Mitchell took it, and concealed it under her clothes; they then asked the price of one; I asked them 20 s., they offered me 18 s., I said I would take 19 s.; I wrapped it up, and counted the shawls over before them; there were then only six; I said there was one missing. Mitchell then got up and said I should search her, and so did the other. I said I knew Mitchell had got it; that I saw Weldon take it, and I would send for an officer. I went round the counter, and beckoned an opposite neighbour to send for an officer - and when I returned, the shawl was laying behind the counter, tumbled, and in different folds to what we fold them; I said one of them had thrown it there; they said they had not; I said I had seen the whole, and would send for an officer; the shawl was lying further from the window than I was; an officer was coming by, and a neighbour called him in; I gave them in charge. Mitchell offered me five shillings not to let her go before a magistrate. I said, I would not compromise the matter. She then offered to pay for the shawl, and Weldon said she would pay for the dress.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is not one of these women married? A. I have heard so.

Q. You observed a jog of the foot, while you were serving the lady? A. Yes, and saw her put the shawl under her clothes. These shawls were lying on the counter, and there is a space between where they laid, and the shelves; on my oath, the shawl was not behind the counter before I went round.

Q. Can you swear it was not there before you served them? A. No, I unpacked seven to shew them; I do not know whether there is a bell in the shop; I have been there seven months.

Q. And upon your oath, cannot you tell whether there is a bell in the shop? A. No.

Q. Under what part of her clothes, did the woman conceal the shaw? A. I do not know; it is a good size.

Q. Must it not have taken some time for her to conceal it? A. No, but a short time.

THOMAS BIRD . I am a headborough of St. Paul, Shadwell. I took the prisoners into custody on the 14th of March; I heard Mitchell say to the last witness, that she would give him five shillings not to send her before the magistrate; and she would have the shawl; Weldon said she would have the gown piece; I took them to the watch-house and searched them; I found on Mitchell, eight shillings and some copper - but nothing on Weldon - nor any goods on them; this is the shawl which was given me by the last witness; I understand that Mitchell, is a married woman with a family - her husband is a respectable man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WELDON'S Defence. I had nine shillings in my pocket when I went to Mrs. Mitchell's house, and asked her to take care of it till Saturday; I then asked her to go with me to buy a dark gown - we went to the shop - I chose the gown, and left one shilling till I came back; I said to Mrs. Mitchell

"Would you have this gown?" and I asked her to lend me two shillings, which she did - the gentleman never searched us; nor offered to do so - he said there was no occasion to do so; Mrs. Mitchell offered the officer half a crown to go to her husband; he took the half crown, but did not go.

THOMAS BIRD re-examined. Q. Did this woman send you to her husband? A. Yes, she did - and gave me half-crown for going; I took the money and gave it her back again - she gave me her proper direction; I walked, I suppose, twelve miles for her.

MITCHELL'S Defence. I took no shawl. I took up my clothes and said, you may search me if you please - but he said,

"I will not search you - but you b - ch, you shan't run away;" that was the word he said at the door - he sent for an officer, but the officer did not search me; I had 14 s. 9 d. in my pocket - I offered him five shillings not to let me go before a magistrate; and gave him my husband's direction.

ANN MARTIN . I am married, and live at Poplar. I have known both the prisoners from the time they were children; I have never heard any thing wrong of them; Weldon, lived five years in my service - I have trusted her to my drawers, and to every place in my house - if she was out of this scrape I would take her again to-morrow; the other prisoner is married, her husband is a respectable man - she has one child.

WELDON - GUILTY. Aged 20.

MITCHELL - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250407-91

680. JAMES SEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a coat, value 1 l., and a pair of breeches, value 2 s., the goods of Cornelius Cox , and a pair of trowsers, value 3 s., and a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of James West .

CORNELIUS COX. I am a coach-maker's labourer ; the prisoner and James West slept in the next bed to me on the 21st of February, at Mr. Hooker's house, at Kensington ; I left the room that morning about ten o'clock, and hung my great coat and breeches in the room: the prisoner was then below, in the house; I returned about seven o'clock in the evening; they were then gone. I saw the breeches again with the prisoner in the tap of the Goat, public-house, at Pimlico; I got the watchman to take him - he had the breeches on; the coat was at the pawnbroker's

JAMES WEST. I slept in the same room with these two men. When I returned in the evening I missed some of my property.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat, which was pawned at our house, I believe by the prisoner, on the evening of the 21st of February.

JOHN SPILSBURY . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to my house on the 21st of February; I found the duplicate of the coat on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-92

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 9.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

681. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of James Wilson , on the night of the 19th of February , and stealing eight pairs of stockings, value 2 l. 16 s. , his property.

JAMES PAXMAN . I am shopman to Mr. James Wilson, a linen-draper , who lives in St. John Street, Clerkenwell . On the 19th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, in consequence of information, I looked at the window, found a square of glass cut out, and missed six or a dozen pairs of silk stockings, which were safe that afternoon; we advertised them, and in about a week eight pairs were produced at Worship-street.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I am shopman to Mr. Attenborough, pawnbroker, Crown-street, Finsbury. On the 19th of February, between half-past five and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to pawn a pair of black silk stockings for 4 s. I asked whose they were, he said his mother's, mentioning a name which I think was Thompson, of No. 24, Long-alley; I sent a person there, and found it was incorrect; he then said Wentworth-street. I sent to the office for Waters, who came and found another pair in his pocket, and six or seven pairs in his cap.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer. I asked the prisoner if he had any more stockings, about him; he said,

"No." I found a pair in his pocket, and six or seven pairs in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this bundle in the road, sealed in brown paper, and the initials I. J. on it; the paper was wet, and I took it off, and put them into my hat.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s., and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-93

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

682. ANDREW THOMPSON was indicted for, that he,

on the 12th of November , having in his custody and possession a Bill of Exchange for payment of 25 l. 14 s., feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, on the same, on acceptance of the said bill, in the name of Thomas Oakley, with intent to defraud Richard Bury .

2d. COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with a like intent.

3d. COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, the said bill.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am agent to Mr. Richard Bury, and have a warehouse in King-street, Cheapside, as a silk hat shag manufacturer. On the 12th of August the prisoner purchased a small quantity of goods, amounting to about seven guineas, which he paid for at the time; he called again on the 16th, and bought about 8 l. worth of goods, and paid partly in cash, and a small bill for six guineas; he represented himself as one of the firm of Bakewell and Co. On the 20th of August I received a letter, and wrote an answer to Bakewell and Co.; and in consequence of another letter, I went to Mr. Rawlings, and enquired of him respecting Bakewell and Co; after which I opened an account with them on the behalf of Mr. Bury. I saw the prisoner, and agreed to receive in payment, bills drawn by Bakewell and Co. upon respectable parties - they carried on business at No. 3, King's-arms-yard, Commercial-road. The prisoner said Mrs. Bakewell was a relation of his, and he was the other partner. I furnished him with goods at different times up to the 12th of November. On the 22d of November I received a bill for 25 l. 14 s.; in a letter, which I produce.

GEORGE CHEESMAN . I know the body of this bill, the signature and endorsement

"M. Bakewell and Co.," to be in the prisoner's hand writing; this letter is also his writing.

This letter was here read - it stated, that the bill was enclosed, and contained an order for more goods. The bill was also read - drawn by M. Bakewell and Co., on Thomas Oakley, Brentford, and accepted; payable at Mr. H. Rawlings's, No. 18, St. Dunstan's-hill.

MR. HAYNES. I saw the prisoner afterwards, and inquired who Oakley the acceptor was; this was after it became due - he stated, that he was a very respectable man, living at Brentford; that he had done a good deal of business with him, and he had no doubt the bill would ultimately be paid. It was returned to me on the 15th of January, the day after it became due; I called at Bakewell and Co.'s, but did not see the prisoner; I called at Rawlings's where it was made payable, but did not get payment; I addressed a letter to T. Oakley, of Brentford, the same day; it was afterwards returned from the post-office; the date on the envelope is 22d of January, with this written on it,

"No such name at Brentford, J. Durhan:" I wrote to Bakewell and Co., the prisoner came to me some time after, and I received this letter.

This letter was here read; it stated, that a ship having sailed, without paying a shipment account, had placed them to temporary inconvenience, but they would take an early opportunity to satisfy the prosecutor as to Oakley's bill - signed

"for M. Bakewell, M. A. Thompson." This letter enclosed another, addressed to Bakewell and Co. - dated, Brentford, 17th of January, and signed T. Oakley; stating, that unexpected losses had caused him to dishonour his bill; but that in a few days, he should be able to return to his usual punctuality. - Post mark,

"20th January, 12 noon."

MR. HAYNES. I saw the prisoner a few days after this; it was then I asked him about Oakley's bill; he gave the account I have before stated - before it became due, I had had dealings with him to the amount of 150 l. or 160 l. - I have received bills for it, which have not been paid - I received another letter; after which I wrote to him, requesting a personal interview - he came to me - I said, I wanted to hear what he had to say, but I could do nothing without the advice of my solicitor. He then gave me a kind of statement, which I put down at the time; he proposed giving up property, as a security for the debt - he said, he had twelve dozen hats pawned for 30 l.; but which were worth 90 l. - that the stock in his house, after his paying rent and taxes, was worth about 35 l. - that he was going to sell the stock, to one George Owen, and to receive a bill from him, which he would give me as part security; I did not accept this security; I inquired who the parties were to the different bills he had paid me; mentioning Oakley among them - he said, he was an agent of the house, and not worth two-pence; and spoke of the parties to the other bills in the same way - he said, if I chose to take what there was, I might; if not, I might arrest him, and do what I liked; I went to Brentford about the latter end of February, and again about a week ago, and then made diligent inquiry, but could learn nothing of such a person as Oakley there - I went to almost every second or third house in the town; and I looked for the Swan; as he had stated that he lived opposite to the Swan - I could find no such sign; I found the Swan-stairs, and inquired about there, but could find no Oakley.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. A man might be there in November, and not in April? A. I inquired if any such person had lived there - they had never heard of him - my agreement with the prisoner was that he should furnish me with respectable acceptances - not Oakley's in particular. I have been to King's Arms-yard, and found a business carried on in the name of Bakewell and Co. - I did not inquire about Oakley till the bill was due.

Q. The prisoner stated, that he had been unfortunate, and obliged to pawn some goods, but would give up all he had: at your first interview did you not tell him you considered what he had done was a forgery? A. I did not. I took him into custody at our last interview - he had come of his own accord, upon an understanding that he was not to be arrested for debt.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you go to Brentford to make inquiry? A. The latter end of February, I inquired at both the post offices, but did not go round to the houses till a week ago.

JOHN DURBAN . I am post-master of Brentford, and have been so nineteen years and a half; the returned letter produced has my notification on it. I was born at Brentford. Before I returned the letter I personally made every possible inquiry, and directed my two men to do the same, but could discover no such person, and I made as diligent inquiry as possible, after my examination at Guildhall, whether any such person had been there for the last year, but could find no such person.

Cross-examined. Q. Many persons go to Brentford who you do not know? A. It is possible, but they must be very obscure lodgers - I inquired of all the shopkeepers.

The prisoner being called upon for his defence requested the Jury to dispossess themselves of all prejudice which had been excited against him, and complained of the vindictive conduct of a person named Catchpole, who had used every means to injure him. He stated he should prove the existence of Oakley, and that the acceptance was his; that Oakley had been engaged to sell shoes for him on commission. He would call persons who had heard him talk of going home to Brentford at night, and fearing he should be too late for the stage - that Oakley and Wilson had an office in Union-court, for the purpose of showing samples, as King's Arms-yard was at too great a distance for persons to come - that before he went to Mr. Haynes he had received an anonymous letter, cautioning him to get out of the way. The prisoner further stated the nature of the case he had to prove, which will be seen by the following evidence:

JAMES HILL . I am in the employ of Mr. Levy, a Sheriff's officer. I arrested the prisoner before the last term, between the 28th of November and the 23d of January - he proposed one Rochester, of Ratcliffe-highway, as bail; we took him to Rochester, who was not at home - my master sent me with the prisoner to find bail, and at last went to a man named Oakley, in Union-court, Broad-street. I saw a person in an office on the left hand side of the passage; the prisoner called him Oakley, and he answered to that name, and said he would become one of his bail; the writ was at the suit of Catchpole, for 17 l. - I asked him for a reference, and took down that he kept a situation with one Wilson, at Brentford - he said something about an establishment there in the hat line - Thompson said to him

"Oakley, I have paid your bill away;" - he said it was for 25 l. and upwards - he said

"I hope you will take care of it when it becomes due, or it will spoil my credit;" I went to Rochester with the bail bond, which he signed - Oakley went with me, but master would not take his bail as he lived so far he could not go to make inquiry.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you often bail persons yourself. A. Never - I have not got the warrant or bail bond here - I am in possession of a house at Knightsbridge, and did not know I should be called here till this morning. Oakley said his situation was in Union-court, and he had an establishment at Brentford. I knew I was to come here to give evidence of what passed at the prisoner's arrest - A young woman brought me a subpoena - she called herself Mrs. Riley - she said I was to mention what happened when Thompson was arrested.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What sort of a man was Oakley? A. Rather taller than I, but not so stout.

COURT. Q. Can you recollect whether there was any name on the door in Union-court? There was, but what I do not remember - it is the second door before you come to Wormwood-street.

ROBERT ROCHESTER . I am a grocer, and live at Shadwell. I know Thomas Oakley - I think it was in December last that he came with a message from the prisoner, to borrow 2 l., which I lent him, and took his receipt; he signed it Thomas Oakley; I believe the money was to pay for a bail bond, as Thompson had been arrested; I had executed a bail bond for him that day; Oakley came with the officer to me, with it. I have seen him with Thompson three or four times since, and have seen Wilson with them both; I was at Wilson's house, at Brentford, about two months ago; it is on the right-hand side, opposite to the Castle, public-house; I did not see Oakley there. When he came for the 2 l. he said he was in a hurry to go away, as he had to go to Brentford.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is Wilson a shoemaker? A. I do not know - I was there on a Sunday, at his private house; there was no shop there. I gave Oakley's receipt up to the prisoner when he paid me; I could identify him if I saw him.

MATTHEW PANTON . I am an accountant, and live in St. Swithin's-lane, Lombard-street. I have known Thomas Oakley six or seven months - he used to describe himself as living at Brentford; I do not think I have seen him for two months; I was employed to arrange the accounts of Bakewell and Co.

ELIZA WOODLAND . I live at No. 6, Thomas-street, Grosvenor-square. I know Thomas Oakley - a lady, who was a good deal with him lodged at our house; I saw him last on the evening of the 20th of March; before that time persons from Thompson have been to enquire for him; Oakley slept at my house, for what I know, for seventeen months; he gave me a draft for 4 l., which he owed me - I have it here; it was not paid: my daughter presented it.

CHARLOTTE HARCOURT . I am the daughter of the last witness. Oakley lodged at our house, with a woman. I took this draft on the 30th of October, to Rawlings', on St. Dunstan's-hill, where it is payable. Rawlings said he had no funds of Oakley's, and would not pay a shilling.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know Rawlings? A. I never saw him before, but I have been there two or three times since, and saw the same person - the last time I saw him was on the Wednesday or Thursday before Christmas.

MR. HAYNES. Rawlings has left the place within the last month.

THOMAS ELSDEN . I am a commission agent at Newwharf, Whitefriars. I have seen Wilson and Thomas Oakley - the last time I saw him was in August or September, acting as servant to the prisoner; I have been in company with him, and understand that he lived at Brentford - I recollect his saying one evening that he should be too late for the coach; I think that was about the end of October, or the beginning of November.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You considered him as the prisoner's servant? A. Or his assistant. I have seen him at the Rose and Crown, public-house, Leadenhall-market. I recollect taking a hat there to be covered - the prisoner gave it to Oakley, and told him to get it done by the following week. I have not seen Wilson this four months.

JAMES PLEDGER . I am a painter, and live in Philpot-lane. I know Oakley, the swindler.

Q. Do you know a person named Oakley? A. Yes; I believe his Christian name is Thomas; I used to see him at the Rose and Crown, Leadenhall-market; I understand he had a counting-house in Union-court, as I was ordered

to do some work there, but I never went there - one of my men took the order.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see Oakley write? A. Yes; (looking at the acceptance on the bill) this is exactly the form in which I have seen him write; I certainly think it is his writing. (Looking at the 4 l. draft,) I think this is his.

THOMAS HOARE . I am a hatter, and was in the employ of Bakewell and Co. from May till Christmas. I knew Oakley perfectly well - he was employed as agent, to sell hats for the firm; I have heard him say he lived somewhere by the west end of the town. I saw him last on Christmas day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-94

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Gazelee

683. CHARLES BATTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a mare, price 8 l. ; the property of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS. I live at Little Marlow . On the night of 13th of February, 1824, I lost a mare, from my yard - the gate was chained, but not locked; a saddle and bridle, were also taken from the stable; I found her about eight months afterwards in possession of Platt; I had bred her, and knew her directly.

THOMAS PLATT . I live at Old Brentford. I bought this mare, for eight guineas, on the 26th of March, 1824, of William Hopkins, of Chiswick, and kept her till Harris claimed it at Uxbridge market.

WILLIAM HOPKINS . I live at Chiswick. I bought this mare of the prisoner on the second or third Saturday in February, 1824 for 7 l.; I think it was the first Saturday after the 12th; I never saw him before nor since, till he was in custody; I had applied to one Bevan, a horse-dealer, at North-end, for a horse, and one Saturday, about a fortnight after, he and the prisoner came over with two horses; I went with them to the Feather's public house and looked at them - the prisoner claimed the one I chose, and asked 8 l., for it; I tried it, and offered 7 l., which he at last took; I kept it till I sold it to Platt.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Bevan is a horse-dealer? A. Yes, - I paid the prisoner for it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Smithfield, and told him he had better come to our office about a peace warrant, which I had against him - he came, and I apprehended him.

Court. Q. When had you received information about this felony? A. About September last; I told him there was a talk about a horse, but whether the charge would be made against him I did not know; I had received information about it in September, but having been ill since, I did not know whether he had been examined or not.

Prisoner's Defence. It is customary with me, when I get up in the morning, to go to my stable, and take my horse to water - and at the bottom of Millman-row, I met a man on this mare; I asked him to exchange it for a larger one - he said No; we went into a public house, and I bought it of him, for 5 l.

JOHN HARRIS . My horse was brown, and thirteen hands three inches high.

THOMAS BENNETT . I am a labourer, and live at Chelsea.

I was at the Hole-in-the-wall public house, near Battersea-bridge, about the end of February, 1824 - when the prisoner bought a dark brown horse, for five sovereigns; I wrote a receipt for the money (Copper here produced a receipt) this is it - I saw the money paid.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. I have worked in the parish ten years, under Mr. Long. I had seen the prisoner before; he sometimes deals in horses - and lived at Chelsea; the bargin was made outside the house; I was in and out - he bought it of a short elderly man.

JOSEPH COOPER . This receipt was produced by the prisoner to the Magistrate last Saturday evening - it is dated the 23d of February, 1824; I had apprehended him on the Monday previous.

The receipt was here read: it was signed,

"Thomas Webb, Southwell, his mark."

THOMAS BENNETT . I wrote that receipt - I asked them the date, and suppose it was correct.

JOHN CHAPNESS . I was at the Hole-in-the-wall, and saw the prisoner pay for this horse - it was a dark brown colour, with rather a large head; the man appeared between forty or fifty years of age; I saw him sign the receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-95

Before Mr. Justice Park.

684. DAVID SMITH and ELIZABETH BETTS were indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Willocks , on the night of the 14th of February , and stealing a set of bed-furniture, value 3 l. , his property.

SUSANNAH WILLOCKS . I am the wife of Thomas Willocks, we live in Wentworth-street ; he is a carcases butcher . On the 11th of February the prisoner came to my house with a boy about fourteen years old, named Haley, and took my lodgings. Smith came home about five o'clock in the evening with Haley; Betts was then up stairs; they remained there till the 14th - and between five and six o'clock that evening, Smith and Haley came down stairs three times, and the last time Smith went out; it was not dark then - we have a door at the foot of the stairs, which is kept bolted, and I let them in and out; when I let Smith out, he said he was going to take some porter, and should not be long. I bolted the door immediately after him, and heard a noise overhead - Betts and Haley were then up stairs - I opened the door, and they stood there; Betts immediately struck me in the throat, and ran out at the street door, and Haley followed. I ran up stairs and found the first floor front-room broken open, and the new furniture gone off the bedstead - the window was open. I had bought the furniture three years ago - there were thirty-eight yards of it, it cost 2 s. 1 d. a yard. Betts was taken on the 18th - they came to me as man and wife.

PRISCILLA BARBER . I am the prosecutor's servant, and remember Smith going out between five and six o'clock - Betts and the boy came next, I let them through the door at the bottom of the stairs; I then went up and found the room door broken open, and the furniture gone; the pannel of the door was pushed in; there were no other lodgers in the house.

FRANCIS PURCELL . I am the prosecutrix's brother. About half an hour after this happened, I secured the prisoner

and the boy, in Back-lane, about half a mile from the house.

SMITH'S Defence. I came out at five o'clock, and was taken about seven; she keeps two houses of ill fame, and there are twenty or thirty people on the stairs night and day.

SUHANNAM WILLOCKS re-examined. Q. Is not this a house which you let out to men and women? A. I let it to travellers - nobody had been there that day.

PRISCILLA PURCELL. I saw the furniture safe about half an hour before, when I shut the window and fastened the door; it was dusk when they went.

BETTS - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . - Confined Six Months .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-96

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

685. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , five coats, value 5 l., the goods of Charles Cox , in his dwelling house .

CHARLES COX. I live in St. Martin's-lane . On the 11th of February my house was broken open. I lost eleven coats, and other property.

SAMUEL JARMAN . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Kennington-place, Lambeth. I know the prisoner, he keeps a chandler's-shop. About the 23d of February I bought six coats of him for 10 l., I had seen them at his house three days before; he sells different things. I sold them all to Mrs. Cohen.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The prisoner is a money-taker at the Coburgh Theatre? A. Yes. I am also a money-taker. I have known him five years, he bore a very respectable character.

BARNARD COHEN . I am a clothes' salesman, and live at Lower-marsh, New-cut, Lamheth. My wife bought these coats on the 25th of February; I hung them in my shop for sale, and sold one at the door to a stranger; they were claimed three days afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you deal largely in clothes? A. Yes, I have four or five hundred in my shop: these coats were taken away in my absence; I know them to be the same; there were three drab, one green, and a blue.

COURT. Q. Were you present when they were bought? A. No, my wife shewed them to me when I came in - they lain by themselves on a chair in the parlour.

WILLIAM ROLF . I am a constable. Mr. Cox complained to me, and on Monday evening, the 28th of February, about five o'clock, I went to Cohen's with him, and found a drab coat hanging at the door for sale. Cohen was not at home; I left word for him to come to me; he came next morning, and said there were four more of the same lot, and brought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ROLF. I sent for Jarman, who told me he bought them of the prisoner, whom I apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search for a man named Turpin? A. Yes, on the 1st of March, on which day I took the prisoner - I could not find him - I looked for him in consequence of what the prisoner said.

MR. COX re-examined. I have endeavoured to find Turpin, but without effect. I lost about 100 l. worth of property; it was all safe at half-past eleven o'clock the night before.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of Turpin, who lives at Westminster: I told the officer and Cox so, the morning they came to me; Turpin had sent his sister to me. I called on him, and said they did not suit me - he asked me to sell them for him, as he was in trouble. I showed them to Jarman, who offered 2 l. less than I was to ask. I said, they were not my own, but if the person would take the money, he should have them. I paid Turpin the money - Jarman paid me; he allowed me 1 l.

JARMAN. I offered him less than he asked; he said, he could not take it, as they were not his own.

CHRISTOPHER WHITWORTH . I am cheque-taker at the Coburgh Theatre, which was open in February; we attend from half-past five till twelve o'clock; he was on duty every night till the 25th of February; I was then taken ill, and do not know about him; he was on duty on the night of the 10th.

DIANA WILMOTT . I lodge in the prisoner's house. On the morning of the 10th of February, my child was taken ill; I heard the prisoner come home that evening a little before twelve o'clock, and lock the door. I went down stairs about ten minutes past twelve o'clock - he was in bed, I knocked at his door, and asked his wife for a few matches, as my child was sick. I was up and down all night - he could not go out without my knowledge. I unfastened the door myself at six o'clock in the morning; I know it was the 10th, for I have a duplicate of some things which I pawned that day to raise money, as my child was taken ill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-97

London Cases - First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

686. ALFRED BRYER was indicted for stealing, two gold watches, value 19 l., the goods of William Thomas Dulin , privately in his shop .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250407-98

687. HENRY GOFF was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Grey , about seven o'clock in the night of the 24th of February , at St. Catherine Cree-church, and stealing therein six watches, value 57 l.; six watch chains, value 34 l.; five neck chains, value 23 l. 10 s.; a diamond pin, value 8 l.; six seals, value 3 l.; a ring, value 10 s., and a musical watch, value 15 l. , his property.

Mr. JOSEPH THOMAS GREY . I am the son of John Grey, a jeweller , who lives at No. 68, Leadenhall-street, in the parish of St. Catherine Cree-church - he rents the house and lives there. On the 24th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop behind the counter - it was dark - I heard a violent crash of glass - I immediately alarmed my father, called him down stairs, then went round the counter and saw that one of the windows were broken - I missed a great quantity of watches and chains from the window which was broken - I went out into the street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and was told the person who had broken the window was pursued through Hartshorn-alley, which is about twenty yards from our house, at the corner of which alley I picked up a gold watch; there was a ring, with five seals, attached to the chain - I picked them all up together, and went home;

and watches, chains, and neck chains, amounting in value to left use picked up in different parts of the street, and brought is to me directly - I was informed the prisoner was taken, and found him in about a quarter of an hour in the George public-house.

CHARLES COLES . I am a mariner. I was passing by the prosecutor's house as near seven o'clock as possible, and observed the prisoner standing close to Mr. Grey's window - I saw him rush his right arm through the glass, and pull out a quantity of jewellery - I was within eight yards of him - he ran off directly - I pursued him down Hartshorn-alley, and saw him constantly dropping jewellery, watches, and chains, one at a time; I kept following him - he was stopped without my losing sight of him - I am sure he is the man - he was taken in Northumberland-alley - he might have run a hundred and fifty or a hundred and sixty yards, but I never lost sight of him; we look him to the public-house to the officer - I did not pick up any of the property; I saw him take it and drop it - he said at the public house, that he was in among the mob and was running after the thief, but I was close to him all the way.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell the Lord Mayor, there were three or four persons round the window besides me? A. No, there was no other person but him - several were on the other side of the way.

Q. Was there not three or four people between you and me? A. No.

WILLIAM THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a tea-packer. I was at work in Northumberland-alley on this evening and heard a cry of Stop thief! and instantly ran out, and saw the prisoner running very fast; he was the first who was running - I had nearly overtaken him, when he threw something away, which made a great crash - he ran two or three yards further, then stood still and turned round - I went up and collared him; he said

"It was not me; what do you want with me?" I said I did not know, but he was running very fast, and must stop and see what was wanted of him. I picked up a gold chain in Northumberland-alley, and gave it to Smithers, the officer.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am a porter. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran out and saw the prisoner throw from his hand a parcel of trinkets, and stopped him. I picked up a gold chain - I am sure he is the man; he was runing when I stopped him - Phillips came up and took him out of my hands.

JAMES HARDEN . I am an officer of Aldgate Ward. I received the prisoner in charge and found nothing on him, but on hand-cuffing him I discovered some blood on his right hand - there was a small piece of skin off his finger - the blood was quite fresh.

CHARLES COLES . He made the rush with his right hand.

Mr. GREY. I produce the property. Here is a chain which I myself picked up - I have a mark at the end of it - the property is all my father's - the property here is worth 140 l. - there is 70 l. worth deficient; the musical watch was broken to pieces.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been looking for work, and on going down Fenchurch-street, I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I pursued a man down Northumberland-alley - he stopped by a pair of gates - I stopped there and was taken; I told the person the man was gone down there - Coles did not come up till the officer had me in charge.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18250407-99

681. FREDERICK DENMAN, alias ANNESLEY , and JOSEPH MOULD were indicted, for that they on the 25th of March , feloniously did by menaces, maliciously demand money (i.e. 5 l.) of Thomas Cozens - with intent the said sum of 5 l., from his person, and against his will, violently, and feloniously to steal, against the statute .

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS COZENS. I am a chemist and druggist , and live in Castle-street, Liecester-square - I have lived there six months; I took the business of another person. On Wednesday, the 2d of March, I had been employed on business all day, till half-past nine o'clock in the evening; and then went out to get a little fresh air - I went through New-street, Covent-garden, and saw the prisoner Mould on the same side of the way; I met him; I walked a little way, he turned and followed me perhaps twenty yards; and finding he pressed me, I turned round on my way home; he repeatedly pushed against me the whole of the way down St. Martin's-court; I went into my house, and pointed him out to Baxter my shopman; Mould was then standing looking in at a ham and beet shop, about fifteen yards off, on the opposite side of the way. In consequence of what Baxter said, I went out and followed him up the court, and lost sight of him half-way up St. Martin's-court; he crossed the court, and on looking back I found he was gone. On the 6th of March, a gentleman dined with me; and about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I went out a little way with him, and parted with him at the corner of Air-street, Leicester-square - I went along Coventry-street and met Mould, whom I recognized as having met before, as I stated; he put his hand to his hat, and said,

"How do you do, Sir?" I took no notice of him, but crossed the road; he crossed also, and then put his hand to his hat again, saying,

"How do you do, Sir? I am the lad you met the other evening; you have taken indecent liberties with me, and if you do not give me some money, I will give you in charge."

Q. I do not ask if you gave him any thing, but what did you do after that? Q. I proceeded in a direction for St. James's-square, along Charles-street, and saw several carriages driving about the square, and understood the Duke of Norfolk was coming out of a house there; I waited to see him, and while waiting, the prisoner Mould pushed up to me again - upon which I turned short round and went home; and on my way home, he accosted me at the corner of Charles-street, and said,

"This won't do, you must give me something more, or I'll give you in charge." I was exceedingly agitated at such a charge, at which one must recoil with horror. I told him he might take me, or my life, or what he pleased; I then went home. On the 9th of March, I met him again in Holborn, about two o'clock in the afternoon opposite Little Queen-street, he touched his hat with his hand and

said,

"How do you do, Sir?" I made him on I reply - I had occasion to go into different shops, and while there, I observed him - I saw him looking in at the window of Mr. Collett, an ironmonger, in Middle-row, where I was - I afterwards went to Wilson and Co., druggists, Snow-hill, and saw him there; he followed me from there to Mr. Biggerstaff's, my brother-in-law's, in Smithfield; just as I got to his door, he came before me, put his hand to his hat, and said,

"How do you do?" I gave him no answer; when I came out from Mr Biggerstaff's he was standing on the opposite side of the railing; I went from there to another brother-in-law's, Mr. Lever's, No. 15, Smithfield; he followed me to the door, and just as I got inside, I saw him walking up and down before the window; I left that house at the back entrance, in order to avoid him.

Q. Were you out on the 21st of March? A. I was going to Mr. Griffiths, No. 2, Pullen's-row, Islington, and met Mould about twenty yards on the City side of Templebar - he touched his hat and said, How do you do, Sir? - I said nothing to him; I afterwards went to Mr. Clark's in Fleet-street - intending to get him to assist me in taking him; having determined to do so, as he said in Fleet-street,

"I am the lad that met you the other evening and you injured me very much - and if you do not give me something, I will give you in charge;" I then determined to get assistance and take him - but Mr. Clark was not at home; while I was at Mr. Clark's I observed him looking through the window; I waited about twenty minutes, Clark did not come, and in order to avoid him, I sent for a coach which I got into - and observed him running down by the side of it, down Fleet-market; and about Smithfield-bars he got up behind the coach - I desired the coachman to flog him off; I proceeded in the coach to Mr. Griffith's and there discharged the coach; George, Mr. Griffiths servant, came to the door - I merely said to him,

"Let me out your back way, for there is a fellow lurking outside I wish to avoid" - I went out the back way.

Q. On the 24th did your receive any communication from Mr. Griffiths? A. Yes, and went to Mr. Biggerstaff's, in order to meet Mould; Mr. Lever, my brother-in-law, had come for me with a message from Mr. Biggerstaff - I understood I was to meet the prisoners in an hour. I had an officer ready to take them, but they did not come to Mr. Biggerstaff's. On the morning of 25th a note was brought to me by Mr. Griffiths's servant, and in consequence of that note I went to the terrace on the Temple, with the note; I got there in about ten minutes, when the prisoner Denman, came up, and said,

"Have I the pleasure of addressing Mr. Cozens?" I said,

"That is my name - what is your business?" his reply was that he had written a note to me, which of course I had received; I said I had, and in consequence of that note I had come to meet him at the appointed time.

Q. Had you received any other note to lead you there but that? A. None; I observed the prisoner Mould standing under the clock; Denman stated that he had come to me respecting some very unpleasant affair between me and that youth, pointing to Mould; that I had taken indecent liberties with him - that he (Denman) was a respectable stationer, residing in Edgware-road; that he had brought up a large family respectably - that the youth (pointing to Mould) had returned a few evenings since, and communicated to the whole of his (Denman's) establishment, that a gentleman had taken indecent liberties with him a few evenings since, whom he since understood to be me - that he could not suffer such a slur to remain over the character of himself and his family, and as the youth was going to sea he wished the affair to be compromised, and demanded of me as a compromise 5 l.; he said,

"We must have 5 l.:" he said he had once fitted the youth out for sea, and had been at a great expense with him: that he had unfortunately got into bad company, and frequented ale-houses, but that he had promised to reform, and he was about to re-fit him for sea. He again said,

"If you will give us 5 l. this affair shall be entirely buried in oblivion, and you may rely on it you shall never hear any more of it;" he said

"We must have 5 l." I merely stated that I was not a rich man - that I was a tradesman, and could not afford to give so much, upon which I took out two sovereigns, and about 10 s., in loose silver, from my pocket; Denman held out his hand for the two sovereigns - I said,

"I shall not give it to you - I shall give it to the person who has accused me." Mould then held out his hand, and I gave him the two sovereigns, which had been previously marked; Denman then said,

"You must make up the other as soon as you can, for we must have 5 l." - I immediately gave a signal, which had been agreed upon, and Wainwright, who was waiting, came up and took them into custody. There had been a plan to apprehend them; the sovereigns had been marked, and delivered to me for that purpose. I went afterwards to Denman's lodging, in Clement's-lane, with Mr. Harmer's clerk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You refused to give Denman the money, but said you would give it to the person who accused you? A. I did. I have lived in London at various periods, probably five or six years. I never saw Mould before the 2d of March; I went no further than New-street that night; he pushed against me in the street five or six times - I did not collar him; he did not speak to me that night. When I met him on the 6th he pushed against me, but not so much as before. I recognised him when he addressed me.

Q. Was it not day-light? A. No; it was about a quarter to nine o'clock on the 6th; I recognised him by the light of the lamps in Coventry-street; I did not give him in charge, nor ask why he pushed me: there were thirty or forty people in St. James's-square - he only pushed against me once in that crowd.

Q. Why not take him in charge - he had not accused you of any thing then? A. Yes, he had. I had no cause to give him in charge on the 2d. He pushed me purposely five or six times. I never saw Denman till I went to Temple-terrace; he told me there that the other had said I had taken indecent liberties with him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was Denman close by when you said you would give the money to the person who had accused you? A. Yes, and after I gave it to Mould, Denman said,

"We must have the other to make up the 5 l." Before I came to town I lived with Mr. Pitt, a surgeon, at Brighton. My father was a banker, at Watlington, in Oxfordshire - I was brought up there, and apprenticed to Mr. Hopewell, of George-street, Portman-square.

The letter alluded to was here read.

To Mr. Cozens, Jun., 82, Smithfield.

Private.

"Sir, - In consequence of private information calumniating your character, I am truly desirons of an interview, and having called several times this day, March the 24th, and not finding you at home has induced me to request your attention to this. You may rely on every confidence and honour attached to the name of u gentleman, by meeting me by twelve o'clock to-morrow morning, on the Temple-terrace, Temple; I will endeavour to adjust matters now existing. The affair of this communication is on behalf of a distressed youth of last Sunday fortnight's connection."

I am, Sir, your's respectfully,

W. J. SMITH."

"If you cannot see me this day, I shall fully expect you tomorrow, at the time appointed."

GEORGE BAXTER . I am shopman to Mr. Cozens. On the evening of the 2d of March, I remember his coming home and speaking to me; it was after half-past 8 o'clock; I cannot particularly recollect the time; I said something to him which induced him to go out; I saw a person who he pointed out standing under a lamp on the opposite side, I merely saw the colour of his coat.

JOHN LINCOLN . I am porter to Mr. Lever, No. 15, Smithfield bars. One day in March, about three o'clock, Mr. Cozens came to master's house, and after he had come in I observed Mould walking backward and forward, and looking in at the window; I went to the door, he came up and asked if the gentleman lived there who had just come in - nobody but Mr. Cozens had come in; I said he did not, and did not say where he did live. Mould walked into the shop again, about a week after, and asked if Mr. Thomas Cozens had been there? we said he had not. The shopman asked him if he had found out where Mr. Cozens lived; he said he thought either at No. 82, Smithfield or No. 2, High-street, Islington; that he got up behind a coach, but Mr. Cozens looked out and asked the coachman to whip him down - he went away.

Prisoner MOULD. You told me he was not within; that you knew what circumstances I had come under, and that his brother had been taken up on the same ground. Witness - It is all false; I did not know Mr. Cozens had a brother.

JOHN ALVIN . I am apprentice to Mr. Clark, a shoemaker, in Fleet-street. On the evening of the 21st of March, Mr. Cozens came to our shop; Mr. Clark was not at home; I was doing something to the window, and saw Mould at the corner of the window; he appeared to be noticing a person who was coming down our stairs; I afterwards got Mr. Cozens a coach; Mould still stood at the window, and appeared to take great notice of Mr. Cozens as he got into the coach; he appeared to follow the coach till I lost sight of him.

MARY FOSTER . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, No. 2, Pullen's-row, Islington. On the evening of the 21st of March, Mould knocked at our door; I asked what he wanted; he said he wanted a gentleman; I said

"What do you want with him?" he said it was not fit for any woman to know; I told him he must wait, and shut the door.

GEORGE AVERY . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths. On the 21st of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, Mr. Cozens came to master's house in a coach; he appeared very much frightened; he came into the passage and asked me to let him out our back way, which I did; Mould came to the door in about a quarter of an hour - nobody had called in the mean time; he asked for the gentleman who had come in the coach; I said he was not in the house; he said he was sure he was in the house, for he had been at the door ever since he came in, and that he could not get out the back way, because of the New River; he said he would fetch an officer and have the house searched; I said he might, for he was not there. On the 24th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, both the prisoners came in the house; Denman asked the last witness if Mr. T. Cozens was there - I came up, and then he asked me (Mould was by); I said he was not; Denman said he had received a letter, stating that he was residing at this house, No. 2, Pullen's row; I said he did not, but he might find him at No. 82, Smithfield; I looked round at Mould, and said

"You are the young man who was here the other evening?" He said

"Yes, I am." I said

"I knew your face again." They thanked me and went away; I followed them straight down St. John-street-road, and saw Denman go into the George and Dragon public-house; Mould went into a shop and got some paper and went over to him; I made the best of my way to No. 82, Smithfield, and informed master what had happened, and saw both the prisoners opposite to No. 82, Smithfield, three-quarters of an hour after I had left them in St. John-street.

SARAH JESSOP . I am servant to Mr. Wells, who keeps the George and Dragon, St. John's-street-road. On the 24th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, two young men came in and wrote a letter.

Mr. JOHN BIGGERSTAFF . I live at No. 82, Smithfield, and have been married to Mr. Cozens' sister 11 years. On the 24th of March, in the afternoon, the letter produced was brought to my house; before that I had received information from Mr. Cozens; I opened the letter, and stated to the lad who brought it, that Mr. Cozens would meet them according to appointment; Mr. Cozens has a brother Robert, who is about twenty-seven years of age. I have known the family thirteen years; I never knew any criminal charge made against Mr. Robert Cozens.

Mr. WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I am in partnership with Mr. Biggerstaff, and have been acquainted with Mr. Cozens' family eleven or twelve years. On the 24th of March, the day before the prisoners were apprehended, a man called at No. 82, Smithfield, and asked me if Mr. Cozens was there; I cannot positively swear to the man, but believe it to be Mould, and believed so when I saw him in custody next day.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. In consequence of a plan which had been laid, I attended at the Temple, and apprehended the prisoners; before that I saw two sovereigns marked at Mr. Harmer's office, and given to Mr. Cozens. A signal being given by Mr. Cozens, on the Temple, I went up and seized both the prisoners, and gave Denman to Lloyd, and in Mould's right hand found the same two marked sovereigns - I had seen them talking to Mr. Cozens.

ANDREW LLOYD . Wainwright's evidence is correct. I searched in Edgware-road, to find such a person as

Denman, a stationer, and called at all the should which appeared to sell stationary; I searched and made diligent inquiry but could find nobody of the name.

DENMAN'S Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, my not having pleaded guilty was with a conviction of my innocence of any felonious intention of extorting money from Mr. Cozens; having once swerved from the paths of rectitude two years ago - the press has held me up as a youth lost to all morality, and I was obliged to do as I could for a living; about six months ago I got a situation with a doctor, at Lambeth, but he was unable to support me; fearful of being arrested, I was obliged to go into obscure lodgings to avoid an arrest. If my fellow prisoner has mislead me I am sorry for it, but I trust that merely, which has always been held out by His Majesty, will be extended to me; I knew Mould, by having seen him in Covent-garden, with salesmen, where he lived, but being mislead he swerved from the paths of rectitude. - He came to me one night, and stated that he had known Mr. Cozens before Christmas, and that Mr. Cozens had actually given him a pound or two at a time - that he had seen him a night or two ago, and he had promised to serve him, and would I write to Mr. Cozens to assist him; wishing to serve him I wrote, and certainly did not wish to put my name to the letter. I am the son of a military officer, of some rank, who has fought the battles of his country. I was mislead by a set of fellows who kept a gaming-house, in the vicinity of St. James's, and was ruined; but it was not for money for myself that I acted in this business. If no commiseration can be shewn to me I must bow to my sentence, but I am innocent of any felunions intention. I had met with the patronage of His Majesty to a literary work of great magnitude, but His Majesty's official letter, having fallen into the hands of some gentlemen it was withheld from me.

DENMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

MOULD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-100

NEW COURT. (3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

688. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 lb. 11 ozs. of tea, value 10 s., and 4 ozs, of nutmegs, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Corder and James Corder , his masters .

JAMES CORDER. I am in partnership with Samuel Corder - we are grocers , and live in James-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner was in our service on the 10th of March, and for six months before; we missed some nutmegs that morning from a glass in the window - while he was out we sent for a constable, and searched his box, which was opened by a smith; we found in it some tea, nutmegs, and ginger; he came in in about a quarter of an hour - I asked him where he had taken the nutmegs and other things - he appeared very indifferent, and said,

"What nutmegs? I have taken none;" I asked him if he would allow us to look into his box; he said Yes, and went down for the key, which he said he could not find; the officer was present; I said we would save him the trouble of unlocking it - we brought it out, and opened it before him; I asked him when he got them - he said about nine weeks ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you entrusted him before? A. Yes, with 50 l. or 60 l., to take to the banker's; he always appeared very honest in money matters.

JOSEPH METCALFE . I am an officer. I was sent for - the lock of the box was picked by a smith, and the nutmegs and tea were found; the prisoner came in - I heard Mr. Corder ask what he had done with the things he missed; he said,

"What things?" Mr. Corder said ten, nutmegs, and other things; he said,

"I have none of them, and know nothing about them;" Mr. Corder said,

"Have you any objection to my looking into your box" - he said, No; he went down to look for the key, and said he could not find it - Mr. Corder said,

"Never mind, we have been opening the box;" it was opened again, and the ten and nutmegs were there; Mr. Corder then asked when he took them - he said nine or ten weeks ago.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-101

689. MARY SULLIVAN and CATHERINE CONNER were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of William Taylor .

MARGARET TAYLOR . I am the wife of William Taylor On the 17th of March the two prisoners lodged in the first floor front room of a house in Jones-court, St. Giles's - I lodge in the second floor back room. About eight o'clock that morning I went out, and left my door on the latch - I left a gown across a line in the room; I returned in about a quarter of an hour, and saw Sullivan on the stairs, between my room and her's, with my gown under her arm; I said it was mine - she said it was not - I went to my room, and found the door open. I fetched a constable, and had her taken.

Prisoner SULLIVAN. When she charged me with the robbery the gown was out of the house - she brought a constable, and then said she could not swear I had the gown, and he would not take charge of me; she then got another constable, and he took me. Witness. She got out of the house before I got a constable, and it was pawned then.

THOMAS CREED . I am a pawnbroker. This gown was pawned with me, by Conner, on the 17th of March, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, in the name of Smith.

JOHN HARDMAN . I am a constable. I went to the house, and took three persons into custody - they were remanded till I could bring the pawnbroker forward, and then one of them, named Smith, was discharged; Sullivan was charged with taking the gown - she said it was Ann Smith took it, and they had divided the money - she gave me 1 s. 4 d., which was her share of it.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. The constable was in the room when Smith owned that she took the gown. I did not take it.

CONNER'S Defence. I did not know the gown was stolen, but this young woman asked me to take it to pawn for her.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

CONNER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-102

690. JOHN STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , twelve pounds of iron, value 2 s. , the goods of William John Joliffe and others, his partners.

THOMAS ELWALL . I am foreman of the works at New London Bridge ; there are some iron plates there, marked J. B.; they belong to Mr. William John Joliffe and Sir Edward Banks - I have heard that there are other partners; here are some of the plates, they are made under my direction; they are marked J. B., which stands for Joliffe and Banks.

WILLIAM RICHARD CARTER . I am a Thames Police constable. On the evening of the 1st of April, I saw the prisoner in Wych-street, with some iron plates under his jacket; I asked how he came by them - he said he brought them from New London Bridge by his master's orders, (Mr. Richardson) and was going to take them to the shed.

AXEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames Police surveyor. Carter brought the prisoner and the iron to me - I pointed out to him the marks on the plates, and told him it was the marks of Joliffe and Banks - he said, his master's brother, who had been at work with him that day, told him to take them.

MARK RICHARDSON . I am a bricklayer, and superintend the steam engine at London-bridge. The prisoner was in our employ; he leaves work at six o'clock - I did not authorize him to take any iron that day, nor did my brother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-103

691. JAMES LYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , four yards of linen, value 3 s. , the goods of George Linford .

EDWARD GRATWICK . I am a servant to Mr. George Linford, a butcher , who lives in Spitalfields. On the 5th of March, I was wheeling my master's truck along Brick-lane , with a linen cloth in it; I felt the truck heavier than usual; I turned round and saw the prisoner running down Fashion-street, with the cloth under his arm - I called after him, and he ran down Rosemary-court. I saw him again at the watch-house, but had not known him before; I did not see him taking the cloth.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . On the 5th of March, I was in Nelson-court, going into my own door; I heard Gratwick cry Stop thief! I ran round to Rosemary-court, and saw the prisoner get over a fence - I ran down to Nelson-court and told two men to stop there, lest the boy should get out - I returned, and got over the fence; I found him standing under a door way; he said, if I would let him go, he would tell me where the cloth was - I gave him in charge of the two men, while I went to look for the cloth, but I could not find it; I then took him to the watch-house - I returned and found the cloth thrown over a wall where the prisoner had turned round, about fourteen-feet from where I took him.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. I received the cloth from Harris.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran up the court; there were some more men there, and I was taken.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-104

692. GEORGE KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a coat, value 25 s. , the goods of William Ely .

WILLIAM ELY. I am a coachman to Mr. Sutherland; he lives in Gloucester-place . On the 23d of March, about a quarter past ten o'clock in the evening, I put a coat into the farthest stall in the stable - I missed it about five o'clock, the next day, I went to the Public-office, Whitechapel and I found it there; I had known the prisoner before, but had not seen him for some years till within the last few days, when he came to see his mother, who was nursing my wife.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD SKINNER . I am a Bow-street, officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Osborn-street, Whitechapel, with the coat on his arm, on the 23d of March, about a quarter before nine o'clock, he said it belonged to him - and he was second coachman to Mr. Montague, of Gloucester-place, Portman-square; he had been there three days, and was going to take the coat to Enfield; I asked what was the crest on the button, he said it was a dog, but I found it to be a cat.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-105

693. DAVID JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a pair of boots, value 30 s.; a pair of boot covers, value 3 s.; and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. ; the goods of Thomas Geere .

THOMAS GEERE. I am a timber-merchant , and live at Stratford. I lost the pair of boots, boot top covers, and shoes, on the 17th of March; they were safe in my premies at half-past nine o'clock - I saw them again at Lambeth-street, on the 19th.

CHARLES HUDSON . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner about ten o'clock, on the 17th of March, near Bow-bridge, with some mats on his shoulder, and under them were these boots and shoes - I asked how he came by them, he said he bought them of a Jew on Epping forest.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-106

694. JOHN HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a sack, value 2 s. ; the goods of John Robottom .

JOHN ROBOTTOM. I keep a coffee-shop , in James-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner was employed to milk a cow of mine; this sack was in the stable where the cow is kept.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS, Q. Had you any idea that he meant to steal your sack? A. I do not know, I do not believe he had.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner, and two other boys coming through Broad-court, with this sack, and one hundred oranges in it; I stopped him, and asked where he got it - he said he did not know, it belonged to another boy who had run away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-107

695. JOHN HERBERT was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a hundred oranges, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Meacock .

THOMAS MEACOCK. I am an orange-merchant , and live in Covent-garden market. On the 19th of February I missed about a hundred oranges from a warehouse, in King's-head yard, Little Russell street , between seven and eight o'clock, in the morning - I had seen them all safe between seven and eight o'clock the evening before; I found the roof had been broken through.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I stopped the prisoner at a quarter past two o'clock, on the morning of the 19th of February, with the sack, and an hundred oranges in it - I asked him where he got them, he said he did not know, they belonged to another boy - he saw some companions with him but they run away; the prosecutor saw them at Bow-street that morning and swore to them.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom engaged to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-108

696. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , twelve yards of ribbon, value 6 d. the goods of John Hopkins .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am in the employ of Mr. John Hopkins, of Shoreditch . On the 26th of February, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, on the haberdashery side; she asked for some white ribbon; I took the drawer out and put it before her; a young man came up and asked me a question, which took my attention off the prisoner; I then saw her take her hand from the drawer; she asked me the price of some other ribbon, and bought a yard and a half of it; I then got over the counter and accused her of having taken the ribbon - she said she had not; I took her to the back part of the shop to Mr. Hopkins; he asked her for it, and she took this ribbon from her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him the price of some ribbon, and he said three-pence; I then asked the price of this - and he said I was going to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-109

Before Mr. Recorder.

697. ISAAC DENNING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 200 lbs. of lead, value 2 l. , the goods of Farmer Edwards .

FARMER EDWARDS. I am a builder , and live in Cannon-street-road. I was called up between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, on the 17th of March, and was told some of my lead was going from Oxford-street, Stepney ; where I am building two houses; I got down to the premises about half-past eleven o'clock and found one of the gutters, which had not been fixed, cut to pieces and thrown into the garden - I did not see the prisoner till he was in custody.

PETER THOMPSON . I am a watchman. This house is on my beat. At a quarter before ten o'clock on the night of the 17th of March, I came to the back part of the building, and saw one man on the top of the house, and the prisoner on the ladder; I took him before he got out of my sight; I asked what he was doing there; he gave me no answer, but slid down the ladder which was in the garden; I was close to the garden wall; he then got over the wall into the yard of the next house; I went after him and took hold of him there; he begged of me to let him go, and he would do so no more; the other got away. I saw Mr. Edwards about half-past eleven; we found the lead at the foot of the ladder.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I took possession of the lead at a public-house adjoining; it was claimed by Mr. Edwards; I measured it with the top of the house and it exactly corresponded with it - here is about 200 lbs. I had known the prisoner some time - I questioned him how he came to do it - he said it was not him who cut it but another lad named Sanders, whom he had seen two or three times before.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-110

698. WILLIAM DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a jacket, value 9 s. , the goods of Thomas Richard Salt .

THOMAS RICHARD SALT. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Charles-street, St. George's, Middlesex . I lost a jacket from the door-post of the shop about twelve o'clock on Monday, the 14th of March; I ran out and saw the prisoner with it on his arm, about one hundred yards off - I stopped him and sent for a constable.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by and saw the jacket laying in the street.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-111

699. JOHN CARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of William Marshall .

WILLIAM MARSHALL. I am a carman , and live at Bow. On February the 24th, I was going from London to Bow, and walking at my horses' heads, I had a coat taken from under a hogshead of sugar in my cart, when I was within half a mile of Bow ; I did not see it taken; I saw the prisoner in about two minutes afterwards running down the road with it - he dropped it in my presence, after the cry of Stop thief! was raised; I lost sight of him for about half a minute, but he was stopped in a short time.

Prisoner. Q. What do you know me by? A. By your dress - you had a black handkerchief on and a dark coat.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I live at Oldford, with Mr. Cox, a butcher. I saw Marshall with his cart on the 24th of February; he was by the side of his horses in Bow; I saw the prisoner on the cart, and then he leaned over and took something out; I did not know what it was, but I afterwards saw the coat; I told Marshall of it, and ran after the prisoner, I did not lose sight of him till he was taken; he dropped it after we cried Stop thief! I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

CHARLES HUDSON . I received the prisoner and coat in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the road and

heard the cry of Stop thief! - I ran and was stopped by a person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-112

699. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a jacket, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a shirt, value 3 s., and a pair of braces, value 2 d. , the goods of Edward Storey .

EDWARD STOREY. I am a sea-faring man , and live in Blue-anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane ; the prisoner lodged in the same room, and slept in the same bed with me; when I got up to go to work, about twenty minutes past six o'clock in the morning of the 26th of February, I missed these articles - they are what I had on the night before. I heard the prisoner come into the room in the night, but in the morning he was gone; there was an old man who slept in another bed by himself, he was in bed when I got up.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Were there no other persons slept in the room? A. No.

Q. How do you know the prisoner came into the room? A. He spoke to me, and came and sat down on the side of the bed, and took the things off the chair.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a patrol. On the 25th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, near Blue Anchor-yard, with a jacket and a pair of trowsers, a shirt and a pair of braces, under his arm. I asked him how he came by them? he said he had had a few words with his landlady, and was going from his lodging. I took him into custody: when we got before the Magistrate, he acknowledged he had stolen them; he stated he was a pensioner of the Navy, and had 16 l. a year.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have lost my hand. I met a man who had been a fellow-prisoner with me in France, and drank rather too much, and did not know what I did. I do not know how I came by the things, but when the patrol took me, I told him they must be the prosecutor's. I have not a farthing pension.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-113

700. GEORGE BAILEY and WILLIAM HORLING were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a box, value 6 d., and 100 lbs. of printing type, value 2 s. , the goods of John Trueman .

JOHN TRUEMAN. I am a porter . I lost a box containing some printing types out of a truck which I and another were drawing along to Cottage-lane, City-road, between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 28th of February - there was another chest on the truck, and they were tied on; we were drawing it behind - and as we found something hang, I went to look what was the matter, the box of types were gone - we were then near Chiswell-street, Moorfields . I saw it the next day at the Mansion-house; it had the direction on it.

GEORGE BLAKESLEY . I am thirteen years of age; I live at No. 11, John's-row, Bath-street, City-road; I work for Mr. Skinner, whip-maker, in Finsbury. On the 28th of February I saw one man standing on the curb, and the two prisoners go to the back of this truck, and each take hold of one end of the box and take it out. I gave information, and pursued them toward Ropemaker's-street - I lost sight of them; I went back to the truck, and myself and the youngest man who was drawing it went and saw the two prisoners and the box in a coach, in custody. I saw them at the office the next day.

Prisoner BAILEY. He said at Worship-street, he saw three men take it out. Witness. No. 1 said, two men took it, the man I saw upon the curb ran away."

JOHN BENNINGTON . I am a clerk at Chamberlain's wharf; I had delivered this box to the care of John Trueman; it was directed to Mr. Fouchee, Little Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields; there was another box directed for S. Cropley, Cottage-lane, City-road - that was a box of glass. I saw the box of types at the Mansion-house next day; it was taken to Worship-street.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Monday, the 28th of February, I was with Herdsfield in London-wall - I saw the truck which two men were drawing - the prisoner Bailey, and two others, were following it; one of them had a white hat on - we followed them along the pavement, and saw Bailey cross the truck two or three times; when they got between Ropemaker's-street, and Chiswell-street, I saw a man coming back with the box on his head: Bailey was ten or fifteen yards behind him; and a third person was behind him; we crossed the way, and the man with the box turned down Ropemaker's-street; Herdsfield cried,

"Stop thief!" and when we got into Ropemaker's-street, the box lay on the ground, and Horling was in the act of picking up this knot - I said,

"What have you got here;" he made some answer, but I do not know what. I took him, and Herdsfield took Bailey. I did not notice the persons who were drawing the truck.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was with Forrester. I saw the truck and the boxes in it. I stopped Bailey in Ropemaker's-street, the third person, with the white-hat, got away.

Prisoner BAILEY. Q. Did you see me in London-wall, and see me take anything from the truck? A. I saw you there, but did not see you take the box; it was taken near Mr. Skinner's shop.

GEORGE BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WILLIAM HORLING - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-114

701. JAMES BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 3 lbs. of mutton, value 18 d. , the goods of William Saunders .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS. I am a butcher , and live at No. 105; Old Gravel-lane, St. George's, East . I had 3 lbs. of mutton stolen from my shop about half-past seven o'clock in the morning of the 17th of March - I did not see it taken; the prisoner was brought back in two or three minutes with it; I knew it to be mine; I had the other parts of the same sheep in my shop.

THOMAS MOODY . I am a constable; between seven and eight o'clock in the morning of the 17th of March, I saw the prisoner turning the corner of Old Gravel-lane, about fifteen yards from Saunders' shop, with something under his jacket. I stopped him, and asked what he had got, he said, some mutton, which he had got from a butcher's shop - but he did not say what butcher's. I took

him back to Mr. Saunders'; he said he was a poor boy and was in distress: he had nothing about him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-115

702. JOSHUA HIRST BRITTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , a quilt, value 2 s.; two books, value 1 s., and a shawl, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Jones .

CHARLES JONES. I live at No. 102, Fetter-lane , and am a sheriff's officer . I lost a quilt, two books, and a shawl, from the front room, second floor; I missed them for upwards of a week - I only went home occasionally; I sometimes reside at my father-in-law's - I saw them at Bow street, when the prisoner was in custody; I had given him leave to sleep in my bed - he been on board a ship.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. How long had he slept there? A. About three weeks; he is an orphan.

SARAH JONES . I am the wife of the prosecutor - the things are our property; the prisoner is a relation of mine.

JOHN FITCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. John-street. This quilt was pawned on the 16th of March, by the prisoner for 2 s.

THOMAS CREE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. I have two books and a shawl, which were pawned on the 9th and 16th of March, by a person in the same of John Brittain.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-116

703. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , two sheets, value 20 s., the goods of John Spicer , in a lodging room .

JOHN SPICER. I live at the Cherry-tree, public-house, Kingsland-road . The prisoner came to lodge in my house on the 23d of February, about eight o'clock in the evening; he only took lodgings for the night; he was to pay 1 s., and have the room on the first floor to himself; he paid for the room before he went to bed - I saw him go away in the morning, and did not then suspect him of having taken any thing - but as soon as he was gone I sent my servant to see if any thing was taken; in consequence of what I heard, I followed, and took him about one hundred yards from the house - I said you have got my property; he acknowledged it, begged for mercy, and I went back to my house - I saw the pair of sheets, which I knew to be mine; they had been on the bed where he slept.

DANIEL CROCKWELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me; one of these sheets was round his body, and the other in his hat - I found two sixpences upon him and some duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress that drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-117

704. REBECCA BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , ten yards of ribbon, value 8 s., the goods of William Thomas Fry , privately in his shop .

THOMAS M'LEOD . I am in the employ of William Thomas Fry, linen-draper , of Long-acre . The prisoner came to the shop about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 7th of March, and asked for some white satin ribbon; I showed her the box, and she bought one yard, at 1 d. she then asked for some bonnet ribbon - I showed her a drawer, but she did not like them; I showed her two other drawers, but she did not buy any - I asked her if she liked any of those in the window; she pointed to one which I took out, but that did not suit her; before I went to the window, I had sorted the drawers on the counter, so that I could miss a piece of ribbon - when I returned from the window, I missed one - I gave her the yard I had first cut off, and told her to walk into the back shop, as we had some new ribbons there; she said, she wanted nothing else - I then got over the counter and stopped her, telling her, I suspected she had taken some ribbon from the drawer; she denied it - a constable was sent for, but she delivered it up from under her shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner put in a written Defence; stating, that she took the ribbon to give the shopman to cut her some from it.

One witness gave her a good character, and engaged to take her into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-118

705. SARAH PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a watch, value 12 s.; a shawl, value 2 s. ; the goods of John Martin , her master.

MARY MARTIN . I am the wife of John Martin; we live in Fleet-street-hill, Bethnell-green . The prisoner was a weekly servant ; she had been with me eleven days; on the 10th of February I went out and left my watch on the mantel-piece, at half-past one o'clock: I left her washing; I returned in about an hour, she was gone - and so were the things; she was taken on the 22d of February. I allowed her 4 s., a week; I had a good character of her from her mother who lives near me.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office on another charge; I took this shawl from her neck, she told me it belonged to Mrs. Martin.

RICHARD CLARK . I live with Mr. Cassel, a pawnbroker, in Church-street, Bethnell-green; I took this watch in on the 10th of February, in the afternoon, of the prisoner for 7 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-119

706. SUSANNAH SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a whittle, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods Isaac Hattrell , from the person of Mary Ann Hattrell .

MARIA HATTRELL . I am the wife of Isaac Hattrell - we live in the Commerial-road. I have a child nine years of age, named Mary Ann. On the 15th of March, I sent her to St. George's school; about one o'clock she had a whittle about her shoulders; she returned in about half an hour crying; in consequence of what the child told me I gave information; I saw the prisoner at Lambeth-street office, on the 18th, with the shawl; she is a stranger to me.

MARY ANN HATTRELL. I am nine years of age. I went out to go to school, with the shawl about my shoulders; the prisoner asked me how my mother did, I said I

did not know her; she said she nursed me when I was little; she then took me up a short street and said,

"I live here, will you lend me your shawl?" I did not make any answer, but pulled it round my shoulders - when I got round the corner, she ran after me and took it from me; she ran up the street - I could not run so fast as she did; I did not see her again till I went to Lambeth-street; I am quite sure she is the woman.

MOSES FORTUNE . This prisoner was taken by a gentleman who is not present, and delivered to my care on the 15th of March, about two o'clock with the shawl; she gave no account of the manner in which she became possessed of the shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-120

707. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a watch, value 2 l.; a chain, value 1 s.; a seal, value 6 s.; and a key, value 3 d. , the goods of Thomas Higginbotham .

THOMAS HIGGINBOTHAM. I am a silk throwster , and live in Castle-street, Shoreditch. On the 12th of March, about half-past nine o'clock, as I was passing the end of White Lion-street, I saw the prisoner coming up there, he was quite a stranger; he overtook me in Norton Falgate , - I was very weak in consequence of a fever I had had - he said to me

"Young man, I think you will fall" - he asked if I was going that way? I said Yes, he offered to assist me, and took hold of my arm - we went on till we came opposite the Magpie, and he wanted me to go in and have something to drink - I would not - but I said if he would go further, I would not mind having part of a pint of beer with him for his kindness; when we got near a cook's shop, I pulled my watch out and it was ten minutes past nine o'clock; when we got past the cook's shop, he pulled me by the arm, and wanted me to go and have some supper; I said I would not, as I did not find myself hungry - he said I had better, and then drew my watch out of my pocket without my consent - or knowing anything about it until I felt it; he then went off the flags - I could not pursue him from weakness, but I called, Stop thief! he turned towards Norton Falgate, but was pursued and taken in about ten minutes; I saw the watch again that night; I suppose he was in my company about ten minutes - I am positive he is the man.

JAMES BOISON . I am a silk weaver, and live in Rose-street, Spitalfields. On the 12th of March, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, I was going into the cook's shop in Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner with his hand on the prosecutor's shoulder, asking him to go in; they were both strangers to me - when I came out again, I heard the prosecutor crying, Stop thief! the prisoner was going across the road - the prosecutor appeared very weak, and was forced to be led home by myself and another man from the watch-house - I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him; I was the first person who laid hold of him; the watch was thrown down in Shoreditch - I saw it brought to the watch-house; it was not more than a minute and a half from the time I saw the prisoner with his hand on the prosecutor's shoulder till I saw him running away - when I stopped him he said,

"By God, I am innocent! I am innocent! I am done! I am done!"

RACHAEL LESAR . I live in Castle-street, at the back of Shoreditch Church, and am a winder. I was standing at the corner of Holywell Lane, and this watch was thrown at my feet - I do not know by whom. I heard the cry of Stop thief! at the same time, and saw persons running - but could not distinguish who they were; I sent an acquaintance, who was with me, to the watch-house for on officer, and gave the watch to him; the prosecutor claimed it as his, at the watch-house.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a constable. I received the watch from Lesar - it was claimed by Higginbotham. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran out of the watch-house, and came up with the prisoner and Boison, who had got hold of him; some person in the crowd said,

"That is he," and I took charge of him directly. As soon as Higginbotham came he charged him with having stolen his watch. While we were there some person said a woman had found the watch; I went to the corner of Holywell-lane, and got it. When I collared the prisoner he said,

"I am innocent;" I said,

"Why did you run?" he said,

"I did not run;" I said,

"You are now out of breath" - he then said,

"Oh! Lord! I am done, I am done."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past seven o'clock that night I left work, and went to a public-house, after being up all Friday night - I staid there a few minutes, and when I came out, by Church-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, and this witness came up, and said

"You are the man who has stolen the watch," but I am quite innocent.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-121

708. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Benjamin Hayles , from his person .

BENJAMIN HAYLES. I am assistant to Mr. Steward, a surgeon , of Great Mary-le-bone-street. On the 28th of February, about ten minutes past three o'clock, I was passing through a crowd in Holborn ; before I entered the crowd I pressed my handkerchief down as close as I could into my pocket, and kept my left hand on it. After I had passed the crowd I felt it gone; I directly turned round, and heard an officer say,

"Who has lost a handkerchief?" he had it in his hand, and had hold of the prisoner - I had not noticed him in the crowd.

Prisoner. Q. Was I in custody when the officer gave you the handkerchief? A. Yes, he had you by the collar.

CORNELIUS BOWER . I am beadle of St. Giles's. I was in Holborn, keeping the pavement clear opposite a fire which had happened the night before. I observed a rush, and the moment Mr. Hayles passed me I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief on the ground; I took it up, collared him, and said,

"Who has lost a handkerchief?" Mr. Hayles claimed it - my brother officer said,

"Don't put it into your pocket" - he then gave it to me, and I have had it ever since. The prisoner said he did not take it, and I was a false man altogether. I am certain he

dropped it out of his left hand; he was just behind Mr. Hayles at the time.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a beadle of St. Giles's. I met my brother officer going to the watch-house with this man, and assisted in taking him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is very odd that this man did not take me till after the prosecutor came up and said he had lost his handkerchief - I waited there till he found the owner, which I should not have done had I been guilty.

GUILTY . Aged 83.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-122

709. WILLIAM CARWARDEN , SAMUEL FALGATE , and JACOB JULIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a necklace, value 2 s., the goods of William Aves , from the person of Ann Aves , spinster .

ANN AVES. I live in Ellen-street, St. George's in the East . On Thursday, the 24th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in my own house, and did not see any thing of this - I take in washing, and had sent my child with a little boy to take some things to the mangle, about twelve doors from my house - when she went out she had the necklace on; she returned in about ten minutes crying, and said she had lost it. I saw it again on the Wednesday following, at Lambeth-street, and knew it. The prisoners were then in custody.

SARAH INCE . I live in Philip-street, and am a servant. I saw the child between five and six o'clock, at the corner of the street where I live; I did not see the little boy with her. I saw the three prisoners going up the street; I am quite certain of Julian, who is lame; they were about fifteen or twenty yards from the child: I came down stairs, and saw them make a stop at the top of the street. - The child had no necklace on then, and was crying,

"My beads, my beads." I took her home to her mother, and the mother and I went after the boys, but could not find them. I saw Julian at the office the next day.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. From information which I received I took Carwarden and Falgate into custody, on Saturday morning - Julian had been in custody before. I asked them what they had done with the beads - they said they knew nothing about them. I took them to a public-house, and searched them, but found nothing - Carwarden afterwards said to Julian's mother that he had given the beads to a girl in Rosemary-lane; she asked if he meant Betsy, and Falgate said Yes; I then went with Julian's mother, to Betsy, but she denied knowing any thing about them; I was bringing her to the office, and she said,

"It's of no use having a piece of work about a row of beads, come back, and I'll give them to you:" I went back, and she gave them to me - I showed them to Mrs. Aves, who claimed them as her's.

CARWARDEN'S Defence. I was coming by, and picked up the beads.

FALGATE'S Defence. I was on the other side of the way, and these two boys picked up the beads.

JULIAN'S Defence. I was coming along with this boy, and he shewed me the beads, which I took up.

Two witnesses gave Fulgate and Carwarden good characters.

CARWARDEN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FALGATE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JULIAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-123

710. FRANCIS NETTERVILLE WATKINS was indicted for stealing certain promissory notes , the property of Sir John Lubbock , Bart., and others.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250407-124

711. JOHN BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Gerard De Custear , from the person of Henry De Custear .

ELIZA DE CUSTEAR . I am the daughter of Gerard De Custear; he is a broker , and lives in Little Turnstile. My brother Henry is two years old; I was going with him between and four and five o'clock on the 24th of March, on a message to my mother, at No. 17, Tottenham-place . I had got to the house, and was going to knock at the door; my brother was by my left side, and had a handkerchief round his neck; the prisoner came round the corner and snatched it off, rolled it up, put it into his coat on the left side, and run away. I ran after him, and called

"Stop thief!" he ran through the turnpike in the New-road, into a new street, and threw the handkerchief down. I never lost sight of him, except when I was turning the corner - I am quite certain of his person. A gentleman picked up the handkerchief and gave it to me.

GERARD DE CUSTEAR. I am a broker, and live in Little Turnstile. I know this handkerchief to be mine.

JOHN COMPTON . I am a licensed hawker. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - he threw the handkerchief on some steps. I ran after him; he stopped of his own accord, and then walked back; the little girl came up and took hold of him by the collar. Two men came up and secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! as I was turning the corner, and I was stopped by a gentleman; the little girl came up and said I had stolen the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-125

712. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a coat, value 40 s. , the goods of Robert Reeves .

ROBERT REEVES. I live in Pancras-street, Tottenham-court-road, and am a coach trimmer . I had seen the prisoner about two years ago - she took my coat from a chair in her own room, in Maynard-street, St. Giles's ; I had gone up there to give her something to drink, and staid about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; she then asked if I was not going about my business; but I had given her half-a-crown to get something to drink - and I said, I would go as soon as she had given me the change; she said, she would make me go, and took up the poker and struck at me. I then struck her, and took the poker from her - she run out crying Murder! I staid in the room, and she returned with two strong men; they began to swear, and threatened to beat me. While they were doing that, she took the coat, and ran down stairs with it - the men then went away. I got down as soon as I could. and overtook, and gave charge of her.

Prisoner. Q. Had you not been in the next house disputing with some women of the town? A. I had been in the house, perhaps, three quarters of an hour - but I had had no dispute with them.

DANIEL CUSHION . I am a watchman. I heard an alarm not far from my box, which is at the end of Tottenham-court-road - I went out and heard this man call for the watch; he had hold of the woman, and said she had taken the coat, but she denied it; he said, she had had half-a-crown; she denied that, but said, the next day, at Marlborough-street, that she had the half-crown, but not the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down and saw him at the door of the next house; when he came up to my room, we had some altercation about the half-crown, and he struck me several times, and I could do no other but defend myself. As to the coat I know no more of it than a stranger.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-126

713. CHARLES WILMOT & WILLIAM M'BRIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , two boots, value 7 s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

RALPH WILCOXON. I live at No. 102, Berwick-street . I sell boots and shoes ; about a quarter-past eight o'clock on the evening of the 9th of March, I was standing in my shop, and the boots were at the side of the door on a board I saw a person come and take two away - I could not distinguish his features, but I went out and saw him give them to Wilmot, who ran away - I collared him, but he had dropped them just before. I did not see him drop them - I picked up one, and the watchman the other.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I am a constable. I was at the corner of Greek-street, Wardour-street, and saw a crowd running towards Mr. Wilcoxon's - M'Brian passed me, running; some persons said,

"That is him" - I pursued and overtook him in Wardour-street; he did not say any thing till he got to the watch-house, when Mr. Wilcoxon sent word that he could not swear to him; he then said, they were given him by some person whom he had never seen before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see M'Brian and Wilmot together? A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILMOT'S Defence. I was standing against the public-house, and some person threw the shoes against my feet, and Mr. Wilcoxon came up with a knife in his hand, and I thought he was going to cut my throat - he did cut my lip.

WILMOT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and discharged.

M'BRINE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-127

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

714. JOHN ARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a pair of half-boots, value 5 s. , the goods of William Goss .

WILLIAM GOSS. On the 5th of March I went to feed my father-in-law's rabbits in Castle-street, Long-acre ; about four o'clock in the afternoon; I met the prisoner, whom I had known before; he asked if I wanted any grains - I said I would give him 1 d. for some, he went with me to the shed where the rabbits were; there was a pair of boots in the shed. I went to take some hay into the shed, and while I was doing that, he went out with the boots in his hand - I ran after him to the top of the street, and saw them in his hand while he was running. I then complained to the patrole.

LAUNCELOT WILD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots pawned on the 5th of March by a boy, but not the prisoner, in the name of John Harty .

THOMAS BARTLET . I am an officer. I went on Sunday, the 6th of March, to No. 3, Charles-street, and found the prisoner in bed; he said,

"I know what you come about - for the boots;" he was very willing to go with me, but a man there said he should not go. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the boots.

Two Witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-128

715. WILLIAM BLACKBROW and THOMAS CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , three live tame ducks, price 3 s., and fourteen live tame fowls, price 14 s. , the property of Valentine Kingston .

JOHN CONWAY . I had a search-warrant; on the 21st of February and went to Blackbrow's house, near Finchley; I found part of two fowls partly boiled, and a quantity of burnt bones, and some wood-ashes up stairs. I found about two bushels of green feathers, two paper bags, with green feathers in them, and a cloth marked with blood, and a jacket on Smith. I found a pick-axe in Blackbrow's bed-room - I know Mr. Valentine Kingston; I do not know whether he has any other name.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am an officer. On the morning of the 25th of February I took up Clark at Hendon; he said he knew what he was wanted for - it was for taking Kingston's fowls, and that was the only thing that was against him.

SAMUEL SIMMONS . I am a horse patrol. I was with Daintry; he said to Clark,

"I want you;" he said,

"I know what for, it is for stealing Kingston's fowls;" he got up and dressed himself - his sister was crying very much, and he said to her,

"What are you making such a row about - I shan't be worse off than my mates are." We asked him who were his mates; he said,

"You know very well. I mean Tooley."

JAMES SMITH . I went with the prisoners on Saturday the 19th of February, to Mr. Kingston's; we went down the road, over the pales, and into the garden - we pulled the straw off the place, and got fourteen or fifteen fowls out, and three ducks; we then got through the garden, through the hedge, and down the road, into Blackhorse-lane; we went to Blackbrow's house, and stopped there all night; the fowls were there all that time, but I do not know what became of them afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your name James Smith, otherwise Tooley? A. No.

Q. How often have you been taken up before? A. Only once before; it was for plaguing an old man.

Q. Were you never taken up for poaching on Mr. Bacon's grounds? A. Yes, but I was not taken before a Justice. I know Mr. Mills, of Whetstone - I never had his bacon.

Q. Were you ever taken up for any thing else? A. I do not know of any thing else - I was innocent of that.

Q. Do you know Friar Barnett's grounds? A. I was accused of taking some tools there.

Q. After you had accused Blackbrow and Clark, you attempted to go off from the office? A. Yes, Mr. Kirby said, if I told the truth, I might get off.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am an officer. When Smith was apprehended, he was given into my custody; as we were going from the Green Dragon, public-house, to the cage, he lagged behind; I said,

"Come on," and he said,

"I have something to tell you." I said.

"If you have any thing to say, you had better go before the Magistrate."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-129

716. JOHN MARSLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a coat, value 3 l., a waistcoat, value 14 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 36 s. , the goods of Robert Chepperfield , his master.

ROBERT CHEPPERFIELD. The prisoner was my apprentice . On the 26th of February I sent him to take a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, to Mr. Smith, in Holloway-row; he returned about eleven o'clock, and said there was no message; he brought back the handkerchief which the clothes were in; he went out on the Sunday morning but did not return; I saw the clothes at the office, I think, on the Friday afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had there been any difference between him and you before? A. Yes, he had absconded from me under atrocious circumstances; I was accused of not teaching him the business; the Magistrate compelled me to take him back.

JOSEPH LAZARUS LAWRENCE . I am a salesman, and live in Broad-street; the prisoner brought some clothes to my shop on Saturday night, the 5th of March; he asked 50 s. for them; I said I would give him two guineas; he said his father was going to send them home, and it was rather too late, and therefore he wanted to sell them; I bought them and put them on my shelf; his father came to me on the Tuesday morning afterwards, and asked if I had the suit of clothes. I said I had.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they left with you to be taken away the next day? A. No, they were to be sold by me; I sold them to his father for 2 l. 7 s.

Q. Did not the Magistrate make you return the 2 l. 7 s.? A. Yes.

DANIEL HOLMES . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's father's house on the 11th of March, and got the clothes from him; I took the son up afterwards.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-130

717. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a live tame fowl, price 5 s. , the property of James Wortley .

JAMES WORTLEY. I live in Bleading-heart-yard, Saffron-hill . I keep fowls in my stable. On the 18th of March I lost this fowl, and found it about eight o'clock the next morning, in possession of the watchman.

CHARLES LANKHALL . I am watchman of Bleeding-heart-yard; at a quarter past ten o'clock, on the 18th of March, I saw the prisoner coming out of the prosecutor's stables; I asked what he had got - he said a fowl; I said

"I know it belongs to Mr. Wortley;" he said he certainly did take it, and was going to sell it, as he had neither victuals, drink, nor lodging.

JAMAS ISAACS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the fowl; I asked him what he was going to do with it - he said to take it for his own use.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past the place, and kicked the fowl with my foot; I told the watchman so.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-131

718. ISAAC STOW was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a pewter pot, value 18 d. the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I keep the Black-horse public house, Tower-hill ; this pot is mine, the name has been partly scratched out. On the 23d of February, my waiter was cleaning the pots in the yard, and hanging them on a horse before the tap room fire to dry. I saw the prisoner there that morning he had been in the habit of coming in about nine o'clock in the morning; just at the time the pots were before the fire; on that morning I missed a best coffee-room quart pot.

RICHARD CARTER . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 23d of February, I saw the prisoner with a quart pot under his smock frock - I asked where he got it, he said he brought it from Wiltshire - I told him I did not believe it, and should take him before the Magistrate; he then said he had been to Mr. Smith's, and brought the pot from there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along with the pot, and the officer said

"Where did you come from?" I said from Wiltshire - I told him I got the pot from Mr. Smith; I had been the night before at Mr. Smith's and asked Mrs. Smith, to lend me a pot to take home half a pint of beer - she said

"Yes, but do not let Mr. Smith know it?" I was going to take it home and the officer stopped me.

GUILTY Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-132

719. JOHN HARTIS and THOMAS BARNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , six pounds of sugar, value 3 s. the goods of Anthony Scott .

ANTHONY SCOTT. I am a carman . Hartis was in my employ he drove my waggon; for two or three years; on the 28th of January he was sent to the West India Docks, to take some sugar to Crowcher and Bishop's, Dock-street, Rosemary-lane; he went out about one o'clock - about half past five o'clock, I was sent for to Church-street, Rosemary-lane , and found my foreman Wait there - he gave me a bag of sugar, which I have here now; Hartis was there; I know but little of Barney; I employed him about Christmas for a short time.

RICHARD WAIT . I am foreman to the prosecutor. On Friday, the 28th of January, I saw the waggon with five hogsheads of sugar, which were to go to Crowcher and Bishops, on account of Mr. Scott; I went with it, and got on to Limehouse turnpike; finding the waggon did not come, I went back to meet it; I found it stopping near a turning in the road, and saw a tarpauling put over the sugar; there was no appearance of rain; I went on and stopped at the turnpike till the waggon came up, and the two prisoners were walking by it; I was in the toll-house, and do not know that they saw me, they went on and I saw Barney for a little distance; I then lost sight of him - I

went up and asked Hartis where he had been so long; he said to get a little beer, I said he had no business to stop; I then asked about the tarpauling, and if he thought it was going to rain; he repeated my question, and said

"Going to rain" - I then called to the horses to stop and told him to get up and take the tarpauling off, as people would have a suspicion there was something wrong; I then saw a man's hand which appeared to prevent it from coming off - and saw Barney between two hogsheads of sugar, scraping some loose sugar into a bag - I told Hartis to tell that fellow to get out; he said,

"What fellow?" I said Barney - Barney then jumped out and got away; I came with the waggon to Church-lane and sent for Mr. Scott; I did not examine the sugar, but gave it to Mr. Scott; I looked at the tin cover of the drawing hole of one of the hogsheads, it appeared to have been raised and put down without being driven down - an instrument could have been introduced into the hogshead from that piece of tin being moved; it was weighed soon afterwards, and was six pounds deficient.

ANTHONY SCOTT re-examined. Q. Was there any iron hoop found? A. Yes, in the waggon by the side of the hogshead; it was in the form of an hook.

BARNEY'S Defence. I was going down the Commercial-road, I came up with Hartis as far as the canal bridge; I then left him, and never saw him afterwards.

HARTIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

BARNEY - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-133

730. MARTHA COE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a gown, value 3 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 6 s.; a bonnet, value 18 d. a pair of stays, value 10 s.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. ; the goods of Jane Lundy .

JANE LUNDAY. I lived in Foster-street, Bethnell-green . At the end of January, I left a trunk with the prisoner, with the articles in it stated in the indictment; I locked the box and had the key with me - I went to Upton, and returned on the 15th of March; I then found the prisoner in the lower room, and asked her to assist me up stairs with a bundle and a trunk which I had in my hand; she told me she was sorry that she had a young woman lodging with her, and I could not remain there; I said it was of no consequence - she sat down, on the bed while I opened the things I had brought with me; after she was gone I unlocked the trunk I had left with her, and missed most of the things from it; I believe the hasp had been taken off; I then went to Mr. Whiting's who had recommended me to the prisoner's lodgings and she came with me to her - an officer was sent for, and we all went up stairs together - the officer searched, and between the bed and the sacking, my stays were found which I had left in my box; behind her box was one shift; a box of hers was looked over, and in it was found the gown and the pair of pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How do you know the things? A. They were most of them marked by myself; I slept in the room that she does - she keeps a school and sells milk; I do not know who had lodged there while I was away; she occupies the whole house which has but two rooms in it.

HENRY MAGNUS . I went with Lundy to the prisoners, on Tuesday the 15th of March - I searched between the bed and sacking, and found the stays; the prisoner said it was her bed; I found in a box which she called hers, a gown, a shift, a handkerchief, and a bonnet; she gave no account, of the things, but seemed much agitated; I found some other things behind the box.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the bed made at this time? A. Yes; the box was not locked.

ELIZABETH PENN . I went on the 9th of March to live in this house - there was no other lodger; I know nothing of these things; I do not know what lodgers had been there before. The prisoner keeps a school in the lower room - no other person came to the house while I was there.

ELIZABETH WHITING . I went on the 15th of March, and saw the things found. I had not been there before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of going in and out - I never opened the box: she came on the 15th of March, and ran up stairs; I went after her, and sat down on the bed. I saw the things she had brought with her, and said, I was glad to see she had got so many things; she then sent me down, and staid about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - she then came down and went out, and came back with Mrs. Whiting, and said she was robbed; I said,

"Dear me, how can that be, I have no one here to rob you." Mrs. Whiting said,

"If you don't produce the tickets, or the things, I will fetch an officer." I said,

"You must if you please, for I don't know anything about them."

JANE LUNDY re-examined. Q. Where have you lived? A. At Upton, near Stratford, in the character of a servant.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-134

721. JAMES SMALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , nine bushels of dust, ashes, and cinders, value 4 s. , the goods of Edward Kelly , his master.

EDWARD KELLY. I am a scavenger . The prisoner was in my employ; on the 26th of March I received some information, and went to see if all the dust and ashes were right, and missed some.

ROBERT EDMONDS . On the 26th of March, I saw the prisoner coming out of a public-house, in Edgware-road, and instead of putting the dust into Mr. Kelly's cart, which stood at the door, he took it to another cart in Little Queen-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-135

722. WILLIAM BUMPSTEAD and WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 15 s. , the goods of Frances Groves , widow .

FRANCES GROVES. I am a widow, and keep a linen-draper's shop , in Charlton-street, Somer's-town . On the 17th of March I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went to the door and saw the witness with Bumpstead in his hand; this cotton was produced, which had been stolen from my shop.

JOHN CUTHBERT . I live opposite to Groves's. About four o'clock on the 17th of March, I saw the two prisoners, whom I had been watching for about two hours; I saw Thomas take this print from a place, about a foot and a half from the door; Bumpstead was standing near the

window, with his apron up ready to receive it; he took it in his apron and began to run - I crossed over and he ran into my arms - Thomas ran off at the same time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BUMSPTEAD'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

THOMAS'S Defence. I was going along and saw it laying on the ground; I stopped and took it up, and gave it to this young man - he did not know where I got it; my father has run away, and left my mother with four of us.

BUMSTEAD - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and discharged.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-136

723. SAMUEL HODDER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , five planes, value 8 s.; a stock, value 1 s.; and two bits, value 6 d. , the goods of Richard Roney .

RICHARD RONEY. I am a carpenter ; my mother lives at Shadwell - the prisoner lodged in her house; I had a tool chest there, which I examined on Sunday, the 20th of February and missed the articles stated in the indictment - the prisoner had come there the Sunday before.

RICHARD CARTER . On the evening of the 19th of February, I stopped the prisoner in Cable-street, with four planes and one stock, in a handkerchief, and one plane in his hand, and two bits in his pocket; I asked him where he got them; he said from the Folly-house, Blackwall - I said, I would go and see; when we got to the door of the house, he tried to make his escape; I got assistance and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence stating that he was merely going to borrow money upon the tools for two days only.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-137

724. HANNAH STAFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , six towels, value 6 s. , the goods of John Mayhew , her master.

There being no evidence against the prisoner, but a confession, which had been extorted, she was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250407-138

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 11.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

725. HENRY GOODYEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of February , a blanket, value 4 s., and a sheet, value 3 s., the goods of John Williams , in a lodging room .

JOHN WILLIAMS. I live in Smith's-place, Wapping . On the 27th of September, I let the prisoner a furnished room, at 4 s. a week; he owed me 2 l. 16 s.; he said he had property at Chichester, and was going there; he left me on the 20th of February; his wife remained till the 28th, when we missed a sheet and blanket.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 28th of February I went to ask the prisoner's wife for the dirty sheets and missed a sheet and blanket.

CHARLES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker and live in Old Gravel-lane; this sheet and blanket were pawned at our house - the person who took them in was ill at the time of the examination.

JOHN JONES. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Snows-fields, and told him it was for carrying away a sheet and blanket belonging to Williams; he said he knew nothing about it; but on our way to the office, he said, was there any harm if he gave them up; he produced these two duplicates of them.

CHARLES COLLINS. These are counterparts of the duplicates; they were pawned in November and January.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-139

726. JOSEPH MOULD was again indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Cozens , on the King's highway, on the 6th of March , putting him in fear, taking from his person and against his will, a half-crown, five shillings, and three sixpences, his monies .

No evidence.

See page 291.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-140

727. SAMUEL MOXLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a snuff-box, value 25 s., the goods of William Brewer Roberts , from his person .

WILLIAM BREWER ROBERTS. I am a warehouseman . On the 26th of March, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Chancery-lane , and felt a pull at my coat pocket; I turned round instantly and took the prisoner close to me, and took my snuff-box from his hand; I asked how he came to do it; he said it was distress; I asked why he gave it up so soon - he said he wished to act honourably.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was put into my hand by a person unknown to me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-141

728. JAMES STRAHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , two coats, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 18 d.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a hat, value 5 s.; a pair of gloves, value 6 d. and a case of instruments, value 9 s. , the goods of William Siever .

WILLIAM SIEVER. I am an engineer , and lodge in Cromer-street , with Mr. Branskill. The prisoner lodged in the same room for about a month; on the 10th of December I missed the articles stated in the indictment, from my room - they were not locked up.

JAMES BRANSKILL . I am a pork butcher. The prisoner and prosecutor lodged at my house. On the 10th of December the prisoner went out between nine and ten o'clock in the morning with a bundle under his arm, and never returned.

Prisoner. Q. What sort of a bundle was it. A. A handkerchief; I never saw him take any thing out before - I had no particular suspicion of him; I found him in custody on the 6th of April.

JAMES WALTERS . I am servant to Mrs. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. I have a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, pawned on the 10th of December, in the name of Jones; I cannot say who by.

MATTHIAS STRAHAM . I am the prisoner's brother

(looking at some letters); I know these to be his handwriting.

These letters were here read; the first was addressed

"To William, my fellow lodger," and stated, that he was obliged to go to Liverpool; that he had been compelled to raise money on the prosecutor's clothes, and solicited his forgiveness. The second was addressed to Mr. Bransskill, begging him not to inform his (the prisoner's) brother of the circumstance, and expressing a hope that he should be able to redeem the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the letters.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-142

729. JOHN SPINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. , the goods of John D'Oyley .

JOHN PRATT . I live in Oxford-street , with Mr. John D'Oyley, a linen-draper . On the 18th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran to the door, and saw four handkerchiefs picked up twenty or thirty yards from the house; they had hung on a rod by the side of the door; the prisoner was brought back in a few minutes.

THOMAS ELLIS . On the 18th of February I was in Oxford-street, and observed the prisoner standing at Mr. D'Oyley's shop, and saw him take four handkerchiefs from the door; I called Stop thief! I followed and took him at the corner of Poland-street - I saw him drop them.

PENDER STOOKE . I was in Mr. D'Oyley's shop - heard an alarm - ran down the street, and picked the handkerchiefs off the pavement.

ANGELIUS BERTRAM . I am a constable. I was near the spot - heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Poland-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! and the gentleman said I was the person.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-143

730. JOHN BUDGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , a watch, value 2 l.; a chain and two seals, value 2 s., and a key, value 1 s., the goods of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES. I am a coal porter , and live in White-heart-yard, Drury-lane. On the 15th of March I was out late with my team, and went to the Plough, public-house, Beaufort-buildings, about ten o'clock, with my son, to have a pot of half-and-half - one of my fellow servants was there; after drinking that pot we agreed to have a pot each, which we drank; it was then half-past twelve o'clock: I looked at my watch, and said it was time to go home, for I would stop no longer; the prisoner sat opposite to me, he followed me out and caught hold of my arm. I could not get from him, he would go home with me. I am sure I put my watch back into my fob, and had it in my fob when he caught hold of me; I did not go into any public-house with him - he wanted me to go into several; as soon as he loosened my arm, I put my hand down and missed my watch; my pocket was cut in two places, nobody but him had been near enough to cut it; he was a stranger to me - my son was with me all the time; I have not received my watch. I went to the same public-house next morning, and saw him sitting there; he said,

"How did you get on when you got home last night?" I said,

"Very well." I immediately went to Bow-street and got an officer, but when we got back he was gone. I went again in the afternoon, and he was there; I had him secured.

WILLIAM JONES . I was at the Plough with my father; we had three pots there, and were both sober; my father took out his watch - I told him to take care of it, and put it into his pocket, as he did not know what company he might be in; the prisoner might have heard that - I can swear that he put it into his fob. We all three came out together - the prisoner followed us out; when I came to the top of the buildings, I turned into the Strand; he took hold of my father's arm, and insisted on seeing him home; I said, I was going that way myself, but all at once, by Catherine-street, I missed them; nobody but the prisoner went near enough to cut his pocket; we sat in a small box; there was only room for four.

GEORGE HOLMAN . I am an officer. On the 16th of March I took the prisoner at the Plough.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I recollect seeing the prosecutor very drunk, and said I would see him home: he could not get in at home, and said he would see if he could have a pint of beer; I said, I knew a watering house which I thought was open; he stopped by the piazzas in Covent-garden, talking to two women. I left him for three or four minutes, and no doubt the robbery was committed then.

JOHN JONES . I did not go into any house; directly I got home, he would pull me away to have something to drink, but there was no house open - he never loosed my arm; I spoke to no girls.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-144

731. EDWARD DAVEY DUNN , JAMES GOFF , and EDWARD CRAWLEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Alexander Brice , about two o'clock in the night of the 12th of March , at St. Pancras; with intent to steal, and stealing therein a cruet stand, value 30 s.; a toast rack, value 10 s.; four cruet tops, value 8 s.; two silver spoons, value 8 s.; a coat, value 2 l.; and a cake, value 2 s. , his property.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. ALEXANDER BRICE. I live at No. 17, Euston-square, in the parish of St. Pancras ; and rent the house. On the 11th of March, I and Mrs. Brice spent the evening at Mrs. Johnson's, in Holywell-street, Westminster: she is Mrs. Brice's mother, and gave us a cake for our children, rolled up in a piece of paper; upon which Mrs. Johnson's address was written. On our return home, about half-past nine, I saw the cake put into the side board drawer - it still had the paper on it; we went to bed a little after ten o'clock; I was not the last person up; the cook fastened the house up - I was alarmed a little before three o'clock by Mrs. Brice - I got up, opened my bed room door, and distinctly heard some persons in the house - I returned, threw up the window and called the watchman; I found eight or nine watchmen had assembled round the house. I then directed them to

the back of the house, as I had heard a noise there - I opened the hall door and let the watchmen in, on to the lead flats - I remained in the house and examined the ground floor; I found a square of glass taken out of the scullery window; the door leading from the scullery to the kitchen was bored through, and the bars undone, so that they could open the door; all the closets in the kitchen were broken open, also the wine cellar. The sideboard in the dining room was broken open, and several articles, which were in it, scattered about the dining room floor, and also in the kitchen; there was wine, rum, and jellies on the kitchen table - we had a drum of figs in the side-board; I found that nearly empty, and some scattered about the floor - the plumb cake and the paper were both gone; I saw all the prisoners in the watch-house that morning; I did not find any of them in the house; I saw marks of blood in the passage leading from the back yard to the stable, and where all the windows were broken, as if the parties had been endeavouring to escape there; the shutters of the stair-case window, and the glass was also broken; I had heard somebody escaping out that way, and have no doubt that is the way they did escape. The articles stated in the indictment were missing; there was a silver cruet stand, a coat, some cruet tops, and other things shewn to me when they were found.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you any other Christian name? A. None; when I gave the alarm, the watchmen were collected; there must have been an alarm before I gave any - the virander prevented my seeing into the street - I cannot say whether there were other persons besides watchmen; there were two other persons at the watch-house, in the morning, after breakfast when I went there - they were spectators, and were taken at the watch-house, about half-past nine in the morning; I have heard nothing of them since.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. It was a very dark night? A. Not very dark.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman, and was stationed near Euston-square - Mr. Brice lives at No. 17. On the morning of the 12th of March, I was attracted to his house by hearing a noise in the kitchen; I listened against the rails, and presently heard it again, and heard a noise as if a door creaked - I was convinced some persons were in the house - I ran up the steps - rang the bell - sprang my rattle, and other watchmen collected - there were no strangers about the house at that time; two men came up and asked me what o'clock it was - they went away. In consequence of what Mr. Brice said, I went to the back part of the premises with other watchmen; the other watchmen got on the leads of the stable of No. 22, with a ladder and torch; I staid at the end of the mews to prevent an escape, and I saw two of the prisoners come off the leads of No. 28, jump down into a garden; the leads were about twenty feet high - I think, they let themselves down by the boughs of a poplar tree; I was put over the wall into the garden, and found Dunn and Crawley there; they stood up concealed in one corner - I am positive they are the men who I had seen drop down by the poplar tree; no other men were in the garden - I secured and took them to the watch-house - returned to Mr. Brice's house, went on the leads and found a silver cruet stand, two cruet tops, a sugar spoon, and a dark lantern - I found a crow bar just under the staircase window; I found a chisel in the front kitchen, and a toast rack in the kitchen or pantry - it was bent; I saw some figs found in Crawley's pocket - I had heard a window break when I was listening in the street; I did not examine their hands.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How many watchmen were collected? A. Five or six; there might be fifty people collected in the course of the time - two persons came up while I was listening to the noise; they asked me what o'clock it was - there is a mews at the back of the houses, with coach-houses and stables, and a garden wall at the back of the house; it is very high, a person could not get over without assistance - I was heaved up: there is a space of about thirty-feet between the wall and the flats; there is not a garden to all the houses, only to No. 28.

Q. There is a space between the house and stables? A. Yes, I saw the two persons on the stables - watchmen do not carry dark lantern's - I returned from taking them to the watch-house in about a quarter of an hour; it is very near.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. When Mr. Brice gave an alarm at the front window the watchman ran round behind? A. Yes, there was nobody assembled round the house but the watchmen - there were about fifty persons in the mews after the prisoners were taken; Mr. Brice called out to me that they were escaping at the back - there were no persons round then; I saw the prisoners on the flats - I was not ten yards from the wall.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Though there is a space between the flats and the wall, there is a tree by which they got down? A. Yes, the two men asked me the time, before I heard glass break in the house - the crowd assembled after the prisoners were taken.

COURT. Q. The first thing you did on hearing the noise, was to ring the bell and spring your rattle, then the watchmen came, and Mr. Brice opened the window? A. Yes; the watchmen collected before I went to the back of the premises, but no other persons; when I got to the mews there were no persons collected that I saw, but I stopped at the end.

WILLIAM FINCH . I am a watchman. My attention was directed to Mr. Brice's house and the mews; I saw the heads of two persons going along the top of the stables, towards the end of the square; I saw one of them climb up the tree; a servant let me through into the garden of No. 28; I found Crawley and Dunn there; they are the men I had seen on the leads, I believe; there were no other men there; Hooper and I took them to the watch-house; they were searched in my presence by Cousins.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you come up on Hooper's springing his rattle? A. Yes, I only found Hooper there; another watchman or two came up before I went round to the back; Mr. Brice hallooed out of window that they were escaping backward; I went round - Hooper followed me, I believe; I found nobody in the mews that I recollect, but in a minute or two a watchman came along at the end of the street, with a prisoner, and said

"We have got one, and there are two more behind," but they did not come along the mews.

Q. Before you went into the garden of No. 28, how

many persons had collected? A. There was a watchman of two coming up, and there might have been a person or two; I went to the front for the servant to let me into the garden - about ten minutes had elapsed before I took the men.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Were you in the square when Mr. Brice gave the alarm? A. Yes; I got to the door of No. 28, about ten minutes after that - it was not a quarter of an hour; I found the two prisoners in the garden; the other watchman came over to me.

Q. You cannot say it was the prisoners whom you saw running over the leads? A. I believe it to be them, for I saw them go down into the garden, and there was nobody else there.

COURT. Q. Did you find a number of persons in the the mews? A. No, I saw nobody there - I had not been there two minutes before I saw the men running on the leads.

ROBERT ELLIOTT . I am footman to Mr. Roxborough, No. 28, Euston-square. On the morning of the 12th of March, at six o'clock, I went into master's garden, and found the stock of a center bit, a cake, a pot of jelly, some Turkey figs, and the top of a cruet frame. I was at home when the alarm was given, and let the watchman in; I had been in the garden at ten o'clock the night before; there was nothing of the sort there then; the prisoners had no business there; I saw the watchman find them in the garden, concealed in the area under the window; there is a poplar tree behind the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At what time did you let the watchman in? A. About three o'clock - I heard windows break - I opened the window, hearing an alarm, and thought I heard a man jump down by the tree - I let Finch and another person in in front - there might be half a dozen persons standing in the street at that time.

Q. How many persons were in the garden altogether? A. I cannot say, but there were not more than three or four, besides the two I let in; I have not seen the person since, who came in with the watchman; the prisoners were found in three minutes. I then shut the garden up and went to bed without looking about.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Though you did not look about, if a piece of white paper had laid on the ground you probably would have seen it? Yes; I should think the garden wall is twelve feet high; I am not certain of the height.

COURT. Q. You let Finch and another person in? A. Yes; they were both watchmen; I let nobody else in; another watchman was put over the wall; I let nobody else in and saw nobody else but the prisoners - they were taken through the house to the watch-house - I shut the door when I admitted the watchmen - nobody but them and the prisoners could be in the garden without my knowledge.

JURY. Q. How many did you let out at the front door? A. Five - three watchmen and the two prisoners.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a watch-house-keeper. On the 12th of March, Crawley and Dunn were brought to the watch-house; Crawley's hand was cut and bloody; it was quite a fresh cut; he washed it in the morning, and while he was washing it I said, he had made a bad job of it; he said

"Yes, and I don't care if I get off for life." Dunn did not hear this conversation - I searched Crawley and found some figs in his pocket; I went to Mr. Brice's house with a crow bar and implements which were brought to me by the different watchmen; I applied the crow bar to a lock which had been broken open, and the wide end of it corresponded exactly with it; Goff was brought to the watch-house before the other two; I examined his hand - it was cut; he said he had knocked his hands by some means or other, a day or two before; but it was a fresh cut, and appeared to have been grazed with glass, or something sharp; there was blood all round his finger.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What do you mean by being grazed? A. I suppose it was cut by glass or something; there was blood on it; I consider it a cut - it might be done by his running against any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. If a man had got over a wall he might have grazed it? A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Particularly if he was in a hurry? A. Yes.

JOHN BEETON . I am a watchman. I was in Euston-square on the night in question, and in consequence of information I went on the flats of the stables, and found Goff laying down in a gutter on the top of the stable - he was awake and laying on his belly - I laid hold of him and took him through No. 21, to the watch-house, with Liers' assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How many watchmen were there in the street? A. I do not know; Liers and I were the only two who went on the flats. I saw Hooper in front of the house; Liers and I were the two first who got to the mews - we left Hooper at the end; we went round as Mr. Brice said they were escaping behind; I went round in three or four minutes: I got on the flats with a lamplighter's ladder; we called to him to bring his ladder. I saw nobody in the mews till the prisoners were secured; I might have seen half a dozen people in the mews when I went into the stables; I found Goff in the gutter on the stables of No. 21.

Q. He was in the same position as a man would be who fell? A. I do not know that.

COURT. Q. Did you see Mr. Brice's back window broken? A. Yes; there is a landing leading from the window to the flats. Goff said nothing about tumbling down, but laughed when I laid hold of him.

JOHN LIERS . I am a watchman of Pancras new-church. On the 12th of March I went on the flats of these stables, with Beeton, and found Goff laying on his belly; he made no resistance: I asked him no question.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was he in liquor? A. Not that I observed; I believe the servant of No. 21 got up when we brought him down - there might be four or five persons about the mews. I got on the flats by the lamplighter's ladder; there were persons looking out of their windows. I went first to the front of the house - there were only two watchmen there then; I ran behind directly.

COURT. Q. Was the gentleman's servant on the leads after you took Goff? A. Yes, not before.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. People were running in all directions? A. Yes.

HANNAH MAKINS . I am cook to Mr. Brice. On the

night of the 11th of March I shut the house up - I fastened the scullery window, and the door leading from the scullery to the kitchen; the glass was entire: I fastened the house all up, and was the last person up. I heard glass breaking in the morning, and got up - I found the window leading to the leads broken; it was secure when I went to bed. I left no jelly pots on the table; I left a cloth and jug there. When I got up I found the drawers open, and the doors broken open, the store closets broken open, two bottles, two candles, and several pots of preserves were on the dresser - a square of glass was cut out of the scullery window; the back kitchen window was broken: a door leading to the safe had a square of glass broken: the cellar was also broken open.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is there any shutter to the scullery window? A. No, it looks into the front area; the window does not open. The glass was secure the night before. (Looking at the property,) here is a toast-rack, which was left on the kitchen table - this cruet frame was quite perfect the night before - these spoons are master's, they were found on the leads; this cruet top is his. The chisel was not in the house the night before.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far is the house from the stables? A. It is no distance; there is only an area between them - it is not more than half the length of this place.

CHARLES COUSINS . Here is a cake which was given to me by a man named Slook.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I found a dark lantern on the flats of Mr. Brice's premises, and the crow-bar just under a ladder, which leads to Mr. Brice's leads, and a chisel in the kitchen. I think the stable is twenty feet high.

ROBERT ELLIOTT . This is the cake which was found in the garden.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say whether it was in paper or not? A. Yes, just as it is; I gave it to Cousins: I did not find it.

WILLIAM COUSINS . It is the cake Elliott gave me, and is wrapped in the same paper.

JOHN FOWLES . I picked up a piece of a cruel stand, a pair of scissars, and a spoon, in Drummond-street, at six o'clock in the morning of the 12th of March.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I took the prisoners through Drummond-street in the way to the watch-house.

MR. BRICE. Here is the direction on the paper containing the cake,

"Mrs. Johnson, No. 43, Holywell-street, Westminster;" it is the paper which inclosed it when she gave it to me. All the property produced is mine - I value it at about 5 l. The cruet frame is silver, and cost me 16 l. When I gave the alarm I heard glass break; that window is on the first floor landing-place, and leads to the lead flat, which communicates with the stables.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is there a communication from your stair-case window to the flats? A. Yes; my yard is not above six feet wide; the stable is not above nine or ten feet from the house, and a flat leads from the window to the roof of it. The girl is mistaken in there being a yard half the length of this Court.

GOFF'S Defence. I had been to Highgate to take a pair of shoes home to a young woman - I supped there, and got rather intoxicated, and as I came through this square I heard an alarm - several people ran down the stable yard; they put a ladder up, and I, being intoxicated, ran up the ladder, fell down, and was immediately seized by two watchmen; several people saw me go up the ladder, but I was so drunk I had not power to speak for them to be here to prove it.

Two witnesses gave Goff a good character, and three deposed the same for Crawley.

DUNN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

GOFF - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18250407-145

732. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Watkins , in the night of the 29th of March , and stealing a pelisse, value 15 s.; two gowns, value 12 s.; a coat, value 12 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 6 s.; three petticoats, value 4 s.; two frocks, value 4 s.; a table cover, value 3 s.; a pair of sheets, value 10 s., and a bonnet, value 3 s. , his property.

THOMAS WATKINS. I am a cordwainer , and live in Ball-yard, Golden-lane . On the 29th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening. I was up in my workshop, and on coming down found the lock of my parlour door picked, and missed all this property, which was safe an hour before. The prisoner was a stranger.

ANN WATKINS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I fastened the parlour door about six o'clock, and went up stairs, leaving this property safe; it was worth above 3 l. I took the key with me; about ten minutes past seven I found the door wide open, and the property gone.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. On the 29th of March, between half-past seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was with Merry, and saw the prisoner come out of Charterhouse-lane, with a bundle - I turned to take him, as he passed me; he turned his head away; I followed, and he dropped the bundle; I pursued him up Peter's-lane - he took off his hat, and threw down two petticoats; I took one up; another person gave me the other: he ran off, but was stopped in my sight.

WILLIAM MERRY . I was with Brown - his account is correct. I picked up the bundle containing this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s., and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-146

733. WILLIAM BEEBY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , a 5 l. Bank note, the property of Elizabeth Fuller , from her person .

ELIZABETH FULLER. I am single , and live at Edmonton, and take children to nurse - I have known the prisoner about three months. On the 9th of February I had received a 5 l. note from Clark, and went to three different houses to get it changed; I went into the Cheshire Cheese public-house; they had not got change: the prisoner came in, and said he could get change for me in five minutes, at Well's - I said if so I should be obliged to him; I gave him the note - he went off with it, and said he would get me change in five minutes; I did not see him for seven days afterwards, when he was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me for my own use? A. No.

ELIZA HODGES . I am servant at the Cheshire Cheese. I was in the tap-room - the prosecutrix said she could not get her note changed; the prisoner asked for it, and said he would go to Mr. Wells's, and get it in five minutes; she gave it to him, and he never returned.

GEORGE CLARK . I paid the prosecutrix a 5 l. note.

JOHN TWEEDY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe she meant me to appropriate it to my own use. This prosecution is brought forward at the instance of the man she lives with; he said if I could muster 4 l. it should be dropped.

ELIZABETH FULLER. I live with no man. I authorised Perry, an acquaintance, to say I would drop it for 4 l.; he is a friend of the prisoner's, and advised me so to do.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-147

734. MARY ANN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a watch, value 8 l.; a key, value 5 s.; a guinea, and sixteen shillings, the property of William Scott , from his person .

WILLIAM SCOTT. I am a veterinary surgeon . On the 7th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I fell in with the prisoner in Woodstock-court, near Oxford-street, at a house. I met her there by chance - we got into conversation; I had only been a few days in town - I said, I had no residence, and we slept together there; she got up while I was asleep, about six o'clock; but I awoke before she was gone, and saw her with my clothes in her hand; my money was in my pocket, and my watch on the table; she said she was looking for money to fetch some beer; I said, I wished she would, for I was thirsty - she went out and never returned. I found my pockets empty, and my watch gone. I found her in the evening at her lodgings - she acknowledged having pawned my watch; and said she had lost the duplicate, but had a certificate, and would return it to me at Mrs. Baker's, at one o'clock, but she never came. I found her in the evening, and she delivered me a certificate of the watch, pawned for 30 s.; I gave her in charge. I swear I did not give her the watch - the door was bolted inside. I had been at the house one night before.

ANN BAKER . I keep this house; the prisoner came in to wait for another female who was up stairs: the prosecutor had been at my house from the Saturday before; they went up stairs together; she came down in the morning, and said the gentleman had lost his money, and borrowed sixpence of me to fetch some gin; she said the gentleman had no money, and she was inclined to pawn his watch to pay her; I desired her not, and she said she would not. I did not see her again till next day, when she brought the certificate; the prosecutor has slept at my house every night till now, as he has no money.

JOHN CROUCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Norfolk-street. On the 7th of April the prisoner pawned this watch.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had sent her to paw the watch, being without money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-148

735. JAMES TITMOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a sovereign, and nineteen shillings, the monies of John Wright , from the person of Richard Lines .

RICHARD LINES. I am a plough-man . On the 1st of April I was drinking with the prisoner at the Green Dragon, public-house, at Highgate ; I have known him two or three years. I had a sovereign and nineteen shillings in my pocket, and lost it while I was asleep; it was wrapped in a piece of paper in my pocket.

JOHN HASTED . I am a patrol. I was passing the Green Dragon, between nine and ten o'clock, and took the prisoner, and under the seat where he sat, I found 15 s. 6 d. covered with dust.

JAMES WINTERBURN . I saw Lines and the prisoner sitting outside the Green Dragon, both very fresh in liquor. I saw the prisoner put his hand to Lines's pocket - but he took nothing out.

WILLIAM BAILEY . I keep the Green Dragon; when I asked for the reckoning, the prisoner said, if the prosecutor did not pay, he would - and soon after I saw him fumbling about the prosecutor's pockets.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-149

736. WILLIAM ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a cap, value 2 s., the goods of John Maide , from the person of William Maide .

ELLEN MAIDE . I am the wife of John Maide, a tailor ; we live in Queen-street; my son William is a year and nine months old. On the 24th of March he was playing on Tower-hill with two more children - he came home without his cap; my children fetched me to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner in custody with it.

LEWIS MARKS . On the 24th of March I was on Tower-hill, and saw a crowd of people looking at a show; I saw the prisoner there fumbling about this child's cap, trying to take it off; he hit one boy who was with me for looking at him; we then went to another part of the crowd and watched, and saw him take the child's cap off, and throw it on the ground - he picked it up, and then went and pulled off a pair of white trowsers which he had on, and put them into his hat; he had a dark pair on under them, and when the crowd were gone, the children were crying about the cap; he came and asked what was the matter; an officer came by and took him, and found the cap on him.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, as Mark's charged him with the robbery; I took off his hat, and found the cap and white trowsers in it; he had corderoy trowsers on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-150

737. WILLIAM HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a sovereign, the money of John Larard , his master .

JOHN LARARD. I live in Great Russell-street , and am a china man ; the prisoner was my apprentice . On the 7th of March I left four sovereigns and some loose silver in the till, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and next morning missed a sovereign.

EDMOND WALDRON . I am shopman to the prosecutor, and had no occasion to go to the till - the prisoner had access to it; no stranger had been in the shop.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found 17 s. 6 d. in his waistcoat pocket; he said, voluntarily, that it was out of the sovereign he had taken from his master's till.

Prisoner's Defence, (written.) The prosecutor is my brother-in-law, and is prejudiced against me in consequence of his marriage with my sister, who has shared no small portion of his ill-treatment - he has treated me with the greatest barbarity, because I refused to be transferred to another business - he has brought forward this prosecution in order to cancel my indentures.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-151

738. CHARLES CULLINGFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a coat, value 30 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 20 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s.; and seven shillings, the property of John Woolverton , in the dwelling-house of James Fry .

JOHN WOOLVERTON. I am a wheelwright and lodge at Mr. Fry's, in Little Brook-street . The prisoner came to lodge in the same room on the 19th of March; he was a stranger; he went to bed about ten o'clock; I had seen my things safe in the morning; I missed them next day, and have not found them; he went away about six in the morning; I did not get up till eight o'clock; I have not found them - nobody but him slept in the room.

MARY SMALL . I lodge at Fry's, and let this room to the prosecutor; I took the prisoner in as a lodger on the 19th, at 3 s. a week; I heard him go out in the morning, but did not see him - he never returned.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer. I took him in charge on the 22d, but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a common lodging-house. The prosecutor was awake when I went out; I asked him how to open the door.

JOHN WOOLVERTON. I did not see him go out; he wished me good night when he had got the door open - my clothes were worth 40 s. - a piece of my box, which was broken open, was found under his bed.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Reference Number: t18250407-152

739. CHARLES CULLINGFORD was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a pocket-book, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a pencil case, value 1 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 l., and three sovereigns, the property of James M'Kenzie , in the dwelling-house of John Cater .

JAMES M'KENZIE. I am a servant , and lodge at John Cater's, Harcourt-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 11th of March I went to bed about eleven o'clock: I had three sovereigns in my box, which was locked; every thing but the trowsers were in the box; I had the key in my trowsers' pocket; the prisoner slept in the room - I awoke about five o'clock - he was in bed then - I went to sleep - awoke about eight and he was gone - I got up and missed all this property - it was all safe the morning before - I found the box unlocked, and the key left in the padlock.

CELIA CATER . I rent the first floor in this house. The prisoner engaged the back room on the 10th, for a week - he said he had come from Norwich to learn a business, and hoped to remain with me two years. I never saw him after the 11th - the house belongs to Mr. Burrows.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer. On the 5th of April, after the prisoner was committed, I heard the prosecutor had lost a pair of trowsers - he came to Newgate and identified those the prisoner had on.

(Trowsers produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-153

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

740. WILLIAM MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Welbank , from his person .

R. WELBANK, Esq. I am a Magistrate of Surrey. On the 8th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Newgate-street - I felt something behind and turned round - heard a cry of Stop thief! and immediately saw the prisoner wiping his face with my handkerchief - he was immediately secured.

JAMES WILD . I was in Newgate-street and saw the prisoner and two others following Mr. Welbank - I turned round again, and saw the prisoner putting the handkerchief into his pocket - I took it from him - the others ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two young men, who were walking before me, dropped it. I picked it up and wiped my face with it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-154

741. ELIZABETH EVEREAD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a loaf of bread, value 10 d.; 1 lb. of butter, value 6 d.; 1 lb. of soap, value 6 d.; 2 lbs. of candles, value 1 s.; a basin, value 2 d.; two bottles, value 2 d., and 2 lbs. of cherries, value 3 d. , the goods of Timothy Tyrrell , her master.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN CADMAN . I am an officer. On the 14th of March, I accompanied Ledbetter to watch Mr. Tyrrell's house, in Church-passage, Guildhall , and about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out - I called to Ledbetter, who came up, and went up to her - she had a basket in her hand, containing candles, soap, two sausages, a whole loaf and other things.

DANIEL BENJ. LEDBETTER . I am a marshal's man. Mr. Tyrrell, jun. employed me to watch the prisoner - I attended by the house, Cadman called me - I saw the prisoner a short distance from the door, with a loaf in her apron, under her arm, and a basket in her hand - I asked if she had come from Mr. Tyrrell's? she asked

"Why?" I said she might give me a civil answer: she said

"Then I will go back." I went back with her - she went into the scullery, put the basket down, and said I had no business there: I said I must see what she had there. I found the loaf in her apron, and in the basket were sixteen candles; three pieces of soap, some starch, blue, pepper, ginger, and about a pound of fresh butter; a paper, containing a pound and a half or two pounds of dripping, two sausages, and some broken bread - I found a pocketbook,

on her person, with a bill of the articles, the total amount of them is 4 s. 2 d. I went into the larder next day, and found a blue handkerchief, containing some victuals, and some beef, which appeared to have been cut off with a knife.

TIMOTHY TYRRELL. Esq. The prisoner was my servant - she had no permission to take articles from the house - she lived six or seven weeks with me - I received a good character with her.

MARGARET HAY . I am housekeeper to the family. The prisoner had articles of this description delivered out to her. I never gave her authority to take any thing from the house.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-155

742. BENJAMIN DOLPHIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d, of March , a great coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Joyce .

THOMAS JOYCE. On the 22d of March, I was at Hawkes and Co.'s in Ducks-foot-lane , delivering a load of iron. I went into the house a short time, leaving my coat, on the cart - returned in a minute, and it was gone; a young man gave me information, I ran and secured the prisoner in Laurence Poultney lane, with it on.

ROBERT MADDOX . I saw the prisoner take the coat off the cart.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-156

743. MARY ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a crown piece and a sixpence, the monies of John Hurley , from his person .

JOHN HURLEY. I am a boot and shoe maker , and live at Broadwall, Lambeth; the prisoner was a stranger - I met her in Fleet-street , at half-past eleven o'clock at night - she asked me to go home with her - I refused - she was rather in liquor - she took me by the arm and turned me round into an alley; I still said I would not go with her; she twisted me round and took 10 s. 6 d. out of my right hand waistcoat pocket - I had 11 s. 6 d. - there was a crown piece among it; I caught her hand in my pocket, and told her to give up the money - she would not; I called a watchman, and put her hand into his - he took her to the watch-house, opened her hand, and found a crown piece, five shillings and a sixpence.

WILLIAM GRIGG . I am a watchman. Hurley called me - I went up and found the prisoner there - he charged her with robbing him of 10 s. 6 d. - he was sober and she rather in liquor; I found a crown, five shillings and a sixpence in her hand - she had denied having any money.

THOMAS HORMAN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - Grigg's account is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-157

744. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a tea-pot, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Rose .

ELIZA ELMS . I am servant to Mr. John Rose, jeweller , of Fleet-market. On the 23d of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour and saw the prisoner take this tea-pot - I followed and brought him back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up outside the door.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-158

745. JOHN HAINSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of Anthony Smith Johnson and Henry Gage .

JOHN WEST . I am shopman to Anthony Smith Johnson and Henry Gage, shoe-makers . I was coming out of the room adjoining the shop, and saw the prisoner take a boot off a nail; he was looking at it; as I thought he did not want to buy, I watched him; saw him take the other; put both into his apron and walk off - I overtook him a dozen yards off with them; he said he took them because there was another person by who would if he had not - he then said he was drunk, and that he was happier in Newgate then out of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-159

746. JANE M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , two half crowns; eight shillings and a sixpence, the monies of Samuel Hall , from his person .

SAMUEL HALL. I am a bookseller . On the 22d. of March. at half-past two o'clock in the morning, I was passing along St. Martin's-le-grand , and met the prisoner in company with a man - she was a stranger; I had not proceeded a dozen yards, before she came skipping after me, and took hold of my arm, saying,

"My dear, where are you going;" I said home - she said, I had better go with her; I said, she had got a sweetheart; she said, she knew nothing of him - she gave me a push - I felt her hand against me, and said,

"You have taken something out of my pocket;" the watchman came by; I told him - he took hold of her hand, and before it was opened, I said she had two half crowns, eight shillings, and a sixpence - and they found exactly that in her hand - I did not give it to her.

JOHN GREGORY , I am a watchman. The prosecutor called Watch; I took the prisoner; she had two half-crowns, eight shillings, and a sixpence, in her hand, which he described, before he saw them - he was rather in liquor.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am the watch-house keeper; the prisoner was brought in with her hands shut-tight - I found the money in it - The prosecutor knew perfectly well what he was about.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-160

747. EVAN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of Francis John Jenkins , from his person .

FRANCIS JOHN JENKINS. On the 18th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going up Fleet-street, with my brother, and had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I turned round, and saw my brother take it from under the prisoner's waistcoat.

CHARLES HENRY JENKINS . I was with my brother,

I saw a person take his handkerchief from his pocket, and put it to the prisoner, who I collared immediately, and took it from under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. A person unknown to me dropped it; I picked it up; the prosecutor turned round and said I had his property.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-161

748. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of George Cheyne , from his person .

GEORGE CHEYNE. I am a chemist and druggist . On the 20th of March, I was walking down Holborn with a friend, and opposite Fleet-market , my friend alarmed me; I turned round and saw the prisoner concealing something under his coat, two yards from me - I seized him, and saw him throw away my handkerchief, which was in my coat pocket just before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against the handkerchief, picked it up, and it being of no value, I threw it away.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-162

749. JOSEPH DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a ream of foolscap paper, value 21 s., the goods of Edward Couchman , his master .

CHARLES OLIVER . I am errand boy to Mr. Edward Couchman. On the 28th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come out of the premises with a ream of paper under his arm - he got out of the gate; I ran up stairs and asked master if he had sent him out with paper; master ran out and caught him.

EDWARD COUCHMAN. I am a printer, and live in Throgmorton-street. The prisoner was my servant; Oliver gave me information - I pursued, and came up with the prisoner about one hundred and fifty yards off, with a ream of foolscap on his shoulder; I said,

"I have caught you at last" - he made no reply; he was rather intoxicated, but talked quite sensible.

Prisoner. I should not have done it if I had been sober.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-163

750. JAMES LEWIS and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a certain person, whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE JOSEPH FORD . I keep a shoe shop on Holborn-bridge, and am constable of Holborn. On the 7th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was on Holborn-bridge , and was induced to watch the prisoners, who followed a gentleman towards Snow-hill , and just as I thought they had committed a robbery, a cart came by - I kept on the other side of the way; they went up a yard, and then watched several gentlemen for ten minutes, and then followed a gentleman - I crossed over - Smith attempted the gentleman's pocket, nearly at the corner of Field-lane, but did not succeed; Lewis then tried; Smith touched him on the left shoulder; he fell back; Smith then took a handkerchief out, and gave it into Lewis's hand, who put it into his small clothes - I collared them both, and pushed them into a shop immediately; I knew them before - I could not follow the gentleman, having nobody with me; they swore how they would serve anybody who came to my assistance. At the Compter I found two handkerchiefs in the thigh of Lewis's trowsers.

Prisoner LEWIS. Q. What distance was you from me? A. Close to you. I had enough to do to lay hold of you; they behaved most desperately.

SMITH'S Defence. I was going by Holborn-hill - he came and seized me, threw me into the shop, pulled a handkerchief from this man, and said,

"This will do for you," and at Guildhall he had to choose which handkerchief he would swear to.

LEWIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250407-164

751. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , thirteen handkerchiefs, value 38 s. , the goods of Joseph James Vigevona .

WILLIAM HARVEY . I am in the employ of Joseph James Vigevona, a hosier , who lives in Bishopsgate-street . On the 30th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop, with another man; Watts asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs; I shewed them some: he kept saying they would not do, and asked if we had any coloured ones - I would not shew them any more; I saw the prisoner put some handkerchiefs into his hat, which he put on his head; he then asked to look at some stockings, which I shewed them - he closed a pair at 2 s.; he gave me 2 s. 6 d.; I said I had not got 6 d.: he took up the half-crown, and both ran out together, saying they would get change - I ran after them, giving an alarm; they ran down a court, and then the prisoner agreed to go back with me, as the crowd would not let him go away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you lose sight of him? A. Only while he ran up the court; he had thrown them out of his hat, but not in my sight. I found nothing about him; I had seen them both before, frequently, walking by the shop - they went by the day before.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a patrol of Bishopsgate-street. I was fetched to the prosecutor's shop, and found the prisoner there - I immediately went with the prosecutor, to Dorset-street, to enquire for some handkerchiefs which had been thrown over the wall; Cohen delivered me four handkerchiefs.

MARIAN COHEN . I live in Dorset-street, Spitalfields, near Artillery-lane. I heard an alarm, and saw a piece of black silk handkerchiefs thrown over my wall - I gave it to the officer.

JOSEPH JAMES VIGEVONA. Harvey is in my service - he gave me information; I came down, and found the prisoner in the shop, crying. He said,

"If you will tell me what they come to, I will pay you."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went with the other man to buy the stockings - I threw down half-a-crown, and said I

would go and get change. I went out, and the young man ran out; I ran after him: he cried Stop thief! I came back, knowing that I had nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-165

752. JOSEPH STALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 22 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., the goods of Joseph York Hatton , his master .

JOSEPH YORK HATTON. I am a watch-maker , and live on the City side of London-bridge. I employed the prisoner as a plumber ; I found tools and materials. On the 7th of March I took him to a house in Kent-street, to measure for lead to re-place a gutter - he gave me the measure as fourteen feet by two feet. On the 9th I sent him to Mr. Humpleby's, in the Borough, for that quantity of lead - I received information when I came home in the evening; in consequence of which I would not set him at work next day. On the 11th I took him to Mr. Humpleby's, and from there we went to the house; I had the lead taken up and re-weighed - I do not know the weight.

JEREMIAH BRIEN . I work for Mr. Hatton, and was with Stallard when he laid the gutter down - he sent me down to make the fire up, and when I came up he was cutting some of the lead off; I said,

"Did not master tell you to take the exact measure of the gutter?" he said,

"Yes;" I said,

"What will he say if he knows you have cut it off?" he said,

"Master, has no occasion to know, unless you tell him." After that he cut off a strip of lead the whole length of the gutter; there was enough left to fit the gutter. He put the strip into his tool basket - there was about 22 lbs.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate of the conversation about telling your master? A. Yes.

ELIZABETH HATTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the evening of the 9th of March, when the prisoner returned from work, he delivered me the tools, and a small piece of new lead, and went up stairs; I went into the shop, kicked against his basket, and finding it very heavy I looked into it, and found a coil of new lead; it weighed about 20 lbs. He came down, and went out with the basket and lead.

JAMES THOMAS CHERRY . I am clerk to the prosecutor. On the 11th of March I was at Mr. Humpleby's, and heard the prosecutor ask the prisoner what had become of a coil of lead which had been seen in his basket - he declared that he had none whatever in his basket, and that he had not cut any off the width; I went with them to the house, and measured it - it was one foot nine inches, as near as I could measure; he said the deficiency was caused by his hammering it down to the shape. The prosecutor went for his cart, intending to have it taken up and weighed, and as soon as he was gone the prisoner went away; I could not detain him - I followed, and had him apprehended. The lead weighed 96 1/2 lbs.; it was 22 1/2 lbs. short.

MR. WILLIAM HENRY HUMPLEBY . I am a plumber, and live in the Borough-market. On the 9th of March the prisoner came for some lead, which was weighed by one of the men, who is not here.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18250407-166

753. RICHARD ENGLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 33 lbs. of pork, value 22 s. , the goods of Thomas Alexander Forbes .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS ALEXANDER FORBES. I am a pork-butcher , at Newgate-market. The prisoner left my service on the 28th of February, and left part of his clothes, which he was to call for. In consequence of information which I received from Hickmott, I desired two officers to watch his motions, when he came for his clothes; I cannot very easily miss property. On the 13th of March he called about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - I saw him go out, and when he had got six or seven houses further I saw a quantity of pork found upon him; Read searched him, and found three belly pieces and two legs of pork; he had them tied in an apron.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any mark on it? A. I had marked it with a knife and fork.

WILLIAM HICKMOTT . I am servant to Mr. Forbes. On the morning master turned the prisoner away, he came to me, and said if I liked he could put me in a way to get 10 s. a week; he took me to a public-house, and gave me a glass of gin; his brother came out: he told me to go away - he then told me to go in doors, and take two bellies, tie them on each side of me, and he would give me 5 s., and if I would do it again he would give me 6 d. a pound for it - I said I would think of it. I immediately went and told master; Read was desired to watch him. - On the 13th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, he came in; I saw him take the pork, and tie in his apron - he went out; I told master, who followed him.

GEORGE READ . I am a constable. I was on the opposite side of the market, within view of the prosecutor's door. I saw the prisoner go in; he came out with a large bundle under his arm; I stopped him, and insisted on knowing what he had got; he said,

"Go back, and it will be all right," and when he got near the door he dropped the bundle, containing two legs and three belly pieces of pork, which weighed 33 lbs.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-167

NEW COURT. 4th (DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

754. JOHN FLOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 9 lbs. of mutton, value 5 s. , the goods of John Adolphus Young .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-168

755. ROBERT IRONS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , two pairs of shoes, value 30 s. , the goods of William Whitmore .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-169

756. HENRY PARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two yards of kerseymere, value 18 s. ,

the goods of Thomas Maire ; and THOMAS RILEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it same to have been stolen .

THOMAS MAIRE. I am a tailor , and live in Fountain-court , Strand - the prisoner Parton was my errand-boy . - On the Wednesday before the 1st of March I missed something from my shop, but had no suspicion of him - in consequence of some information, I went to Riley's house, in Clement's-lane, with a search-warrant, on the 1st of March, and found two yards of kerseymere, which I did not then know I had lost, but it was my property - Riley gave no account of it, but said he did not know Parton; I told Parton it was my kerseymere, and he must have taken it from me; he voluntarily said he had, and had sold it for 1 s. 6 d. on the Saturday before, at Riley's, who sells sweatmeats. When I went there with the officer he denied knowing the boy, or having any property of mine, or any other persons in his possession. I found nothing but the kerseymere that I could swear to. It was under some things on the tester of a bed. I fetched Parton, who told Riley, in my presence, that he had sold him the kerseymere, for 1 s. 6 d., on the Saturday before; Riley denied it altogether, but gave no account of how he became possessed of it.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I went with the prosecutor to Riley's, and found these articles under a parcel of rubbish on the top of a bed - Riley was not at home, but he came in, and I read my warrant; he denied having the property, or knowing the boy. Mr. Maire told me to stop five minutes, and fetched Parton, who said,

"That is what I sold him for 1 s. 6 d. on Saturday last."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you say to him? A. I only read my warrant, and said I was come to search his house - I did not say any thing more till Mr. Maire fetched the boy; Riley then denied knowing him, or having any kerseymere in his house.

THOMAS MAIRE. I know it by a pattern, which is marked on it, to cut out a pair of trowsers, but it would not do.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know any thing of Riley? A. No. I saw the property found on the top of the tester.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PARTON'S Defence. Two or three days before I was going to Mr. Bousfield's, with a pattern in my hand - I was standing by this man, and he asked me what I had got there; I said a pattern of cloth; he gave me some sweet meats, and asked me if I could bring him some. I took him this, and he gave me 1 s. 6 d. for it.

Six witnesses gave Riley an excellent character.

PARTON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-170

Before Mr. Recorder.

758. SUSANNAH SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a whittle, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Isaac Hattrell , from the person of Mary Ann Hattrell .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-171

759. JOHN BERRY and JAMES CARR were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , an apron, value 1 s.; a gown, value 6 s.; a table cloth, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 4 s.; a bed-gown, value 1 s., and a pinafore, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Holder , and an apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Sarah Burford .

SARAH HOLDER . I am the wife of Edward Holder, and live in Sun-place, Limehouse . I lost these articles in the early part of March - they were drying in the back garden; Sarah Burford's apron was taken at the same time - the garden is surrounded by walls six feet high - I had seen the things all safe about six in the evening, and missed them before nine o'clock; the prisoners are strangers to me; I saw the articles next day in the possession of the officer.

SARAH BURFORD. I am servant to Mr. Holder. I had an apron hanging in the yard with the other things - I had seen them safe at eight o'clock, and missed them at half-past eight; I had not seen either of the prisoners.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I apprehended the prisoners in Cable-street, about three-quarters of a mile from Mr. Holder's, about half-past eight o'clock; Carr had a bundle under his arm - Berry was just a-head of him; I asked Carr what he had carrying - he said clothes; I asked where he got them - he said it belonged to the lad a-head of him; my brother officer Fogg took Berry - Carr said then they were hired by a man to carry it for sixpence - Berry told the same story.

Prisoner CARR. I told him the gentleman was gone on a-head. Witness. No, he said a gentleman had given them to him in the Commercial-road, but he did not say where he was to take them to.

JAMES FOGG . I am a constable. Carter's statement is correct. When I took Berry I asked if the clothes belonged to him - he said

"No, to Carr's mother;" when we took them to a public-house, he said a man hired them near the Commercial Tap, and they were to have 3 d. a-piece for carrying it - they were then hand-cuffed together; he said, he did not know the gentleman nor where they were to take them - he tried to get away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BERRY'S Defence. I never said the things belonged to Carr's mother - it is all false.

CARR'S Defence. I told him the gentleman was gone on a-head.

BERRY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-172

760. WILLIAM BUTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of Ann Hayward , widow .

ANN HAYWARD. I live in Golden-yard, High-street, Hampstead . My handkerchief hung on the heath to dry I had seen it safe about an hour before it was taken - a little boy was minding the things - the prisoner was brought to me about one o'clock with it.

GEORGE TOOLEY. I am a working man. Mrs. Hayward's linen was put out to dry on the heath - I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, lying on the ground, where the linen was; about five minutes after one o'clock, I inquired

of the boy who was in care of it, if he had lost any linen? he said No; I do not know whether the prisoner heard what I said, but he got up and walked a short distance, and then began to run; I called Stop thief! and ran after him; I lost sight of him but he was stopped and brought back with the handkerchief in his hand; he said he had stolen it and was very sorry for it.

MICHAEL HUMPHREYS . I saw the prisoner run and some people after him; he dropped the handkerchief - I picked it up; he was stopped and was brought back.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a constable. He was delivered into my charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-173

761. JOHN LAMB and WILLIAM SLAUGHTER were indicted for stealing, on the 21st February , two asses, price 30 s. , the property of the Earl of Harcourt .

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am one of the under keepers of Windsor Great Park, between Windsor and Hounslow, in the country of Middlesex . Hearing that the prisoners were in custody, I went to the Magpie public house, and found the asses there; I knew them to be the Earl of Harcourt's; they were marked with this brand iron on each foot, W. H.; the prisoners lived within half a mile of where the asses were taken from; I saw them on the 25th of February, about the middle of the day and had seen them in the Great Park on Monday, the 21st, about twelve o'clock.

JOSEPH SAWYER . I am a horse patrol of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoners on Monday, the 21st of February, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock at night, at Arlington corner, opposite a public-house, about six or seven miles from the Great Park; they were driving the asses before them; I asked whose they were, and Lamb said they belonged to his partner's father - I asked Slaughter if they belonged to his father - he said Yes; I asked what they were going to do with them; he said to take them to Smithfield market to sell; I said

"What, on Friday, do you mean?" they said Yes; I said

"What, keep them till Friday?" they said they had a man there who would receive them of them; Lamb said he was a bricklayer's labourer, and Slaughter said he was a farmer's man. I took them to my own station, about three hundred yards from the place; kept the asses till the next morning, when they were claimed by Phillips, as Lord Harcourt's property - I saw the marks on their hoofs, and have no doubt they were made with this branding iron.

STEPHEN LEE . I am a horse patrol. I was at the station - Sawyer brought the prisoners to me - I took one of them and he kept the other.

LAMB'S Defence. We were coming to town to look for work and found the two donkies - we were going to drive them to Slough, to see for an owner - we should have left them there.

LAMB - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SLAUGHTER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-174

762. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26 of February , a bushel of beans, value 5 s. , the goods of Harry Gonde .

THOMAS STREET . I am in the employ of Harry Gonde, who is a farmer - I saw the prisoner go into the granary about half-past three in the afternoon, of the 26th of February, and take out a lot of beans in a sack, and go away - he was a servant of Mr. Gonde, but had no business with the key of the granary; but he went to the foreman's wife to get it - orders had been given that no more beans should be given out, as they were wanted to sow the field - I told my master of it the same night, about six o'clock, as soon as I saw him; we were on friendly terms, he went in a contrary direction to the stable.

MARGARET LAWSON . My husband is steward to Mr. Gonde. The prisoner had lived servant with Mr. Gonde about twelve months - on the evening of the 26th of February he came to me for the key, about three o'clock; I gave it to him; he returned it at six o'clock.

WILLIAM LAWSON . I am the bailiff. Orders had been given that no more beans should be used for the horses - I had given the order myself to all the servants; I missed the quantity of beans out of the bulk when I came home that evening, between six and seven o'clock; there might be four or five quarters of beans there - I had seen them all safe on the 25th; my master had a field then ready to plant beans, and I believe they had been planting beans that day; but the prisoner was not employed in that service; he ran away as soon as this was found out.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my custody; he was taken at Paddington.

Prisoner's Defence. What corn I took I gave to the horses.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-175

763. JOHN HORATIO MORRIS and MARTIN CANHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 100 lbs. of lead, value 20 s., the goods of Thomas Little , Esq. and James Curtois , Esq., and fixed to a dwelling-house of theirs, called the Manor house .

2d. COUNT, not stating it to have been fixed.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

PHILLIP WEBSTER . I a Bow-street patrol. On Thursday, the 17th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Hereford-place, New-road - I saw Morris, whom I had known before, and Canham a short distance behind him, with a porter's knot and something in a sack - I stopped Canham, and said,

"What have you got here?" he said, it did not signify to me - I said, I am an officer and demand to see what it was; I then endeavoured to pull it down, but he turned himself round; Morris came up and caught hold of the sack with one hand, and with the other tried to push him away from me - I got the sack down, and found it contained the lead - this was about a quarter of mile from the Manor-house at Paddington - I put the lead on Canham's head again, and said, I should take charge of him - Morris said, he should go home - I said I should take charge of him likewise, and as we were going along, Morris said,

"You are giving yourself unnecessary trouble - this is my property, and I can prove it;" we took the lead to my apartments, and in our way down to the office, Morris said,

"I have been as much as four or five months collecting this lead, buying it by 1 lb., or 1 1/2 lb. at a time;" I weighed the

the lead, and there is about 116 lbs., in a number of different pieces - I did not find where Morris lived.

Prisoner MORRIS. I told him my name and place of abode. Witness. I am certain he did not.

Prisoner CANHAM. Q. When you met me, you passed me, and then turned back - I told you it was Morris's property? A. I had not passed him - he did not tell me it was Morris's property, but Morris said so.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am a watchman of Paddington - the two prisoners were watchmen of that parish, and Morris was a pauper there - I know the Manor-house, it belongs to the parish. On Tuesday, the 16th of February, the prisoners were employed on that house, taking the lead off - I saw them there about half-past six in the morning of the 16th, stripping the lead off - I saw a great many pieces of lead lying on the ground, and these two pieces on the roof on Wednesday morning - I have no doubt in the least that these are the same.

Prisoner MORRIS. Q. What marks are there on it? A. There are two marks; they had been cut with a hacker - I had seen them on the roof.

Prisoner CANHAM. I was at work in Black-lion-lane for Mr. Stevens that day, and at that time; what time was it? Witness. It was before eight o'clock, I am certain.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. I have selected a piece of lead from the Manor-house, and it exactly corresponds with the lead found in the sack - I had Mr. Grubb, the plumber, with me at the time.

WILLIAM GRUBB . I am a plumber; I have compared these two pieces of lead together, and have no doubt whatever, but that they formed one piece; the marks of the water course, and the weight of the lead, together with the cutting, leave no doubt on my mind that it is so.

Prisoner MORRIS. Q. Suppose another building to be covered with lead, and a piece of that lead to be brought here, could you tell the difference? A. No.

JOHN WILLMOT. I am a plumber. I have no doubt these two pieces of lead were once one piece; and as to the rest of the pieces here, I think there is no doubt that all belonged to one sheet originally.

JAMES CURTOIS, Esq. I am one of the churchwardens' of Paddington - Mr. Thomas Little is the other.

MORRIS'S Defence. The property is mine; it never was on the Manor-house at Paddington ; it has been in my possession six months or more.

CANHAM'S Defence. I had been at work at the Manor-house, I went to my mate's house to breakfast, and he asked me if I would assist him in carrying this lead to sell, as he wanted to buy a pair of shoes and some other things; he said he would give me part of a pot of beer for carrying it; the watchman stated that I was at work on Tuesday morning; I was working in Black-lion-lane at that time for Mr. Stubbing, the surveyor; they sent a man to fetch us to work at the Manor-house. I have sent to Mr. Stubbings to beg him to come forward and prove that fact, but he said he dare not on account of the parish. I wish to ask Richardson, whether he saw me at work on Wednesday, and whether he remembers what I said to him on Thursday morning, when I came down from the top of the house, and whether I had any lead about me.

RICHARDSON. Not that I saw, he had no bundle; but I did not rub him down; I had no suspicion of him. I had to watch the building from six o'clock in the morning till twelve.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 38.

CANHAM - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-176

764. THOMAS BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , forty-six yards of flannel, value 2 l. , the goods of Richard Alderson .

THOMAS TEASDALE . I am in the employ of Mr. Richard Alderson, a linen-draper , who lives in Crawford-street . About five o'clock, on the 28th of February I heard this flannel was gone from the door-post - I ran out immediately, and saw the prisoner in Montague-place, with it under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and the temptation was very great to a needy person; it was at a distance from the door.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-177

765. WILLIAM BERGUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of David Ballinghall .

DAVID BALLINGHALL. I am a journeyman tailor ; and live at No. 8, Hewit's-court, Strand . On Easter Monday I went out about ten o'clock in the morning, and returned about eight, and my coat was gone - the room was not locked. I left my two children there; the prisoner was a slight acquaintance of mine; he was taken up on the Wednesday with the coat on his back.

WILLIAM CAWTE . I am a labourer. The prosecutor came to me on Easter Tuesday, and asked if I knew the prisoner - I said, I did; the next day I saw him walking up St. Martin's-lane; and watched him into a pawnbroker's shop - I then went and spoke to the pawnbroker to detain him, while I got an officer. I had him taken up with the coat on his back; he had 7 s. 9 d. in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the deepest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-178

766. JOSEPH BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of James Coiss .

JOHN HUBE . I am in the employ of James Coiss, who is a clothier , and lives in Shoreditch . On the 5th of April, this coat was pinned on a clothes-shape at the corner of the doorway. I received information, and went in the direction I was told, and found the prisoner concealed in an outhouse in a stable-yard, with the coat under his arm. I brought him back, and delivered him to an officer.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am a Bow-street patrol, and the prisoner was delivered to me - he had no money about him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-179

767. ELEANOR CONN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , two shillings , the monies of Edward Woodward .

EDWARD WOODWARD. I am a butcher , and live in Princes-street, Westminster . I was serving a customer with some steaks about half-past three o'clock, on the 21st of February, when the prisoner came into my shop - my customer had laid these two shillings on the board; while she was directing me to cut her some mutton chops the prisoner asked the price of a bit of meat, and then went out; I missed the two shillings immediately, and said to the customer,

"I have lost the money;" she said,

"That woman must have had it:" no other person had been in the shop - my customer, whom I knew, went after her immediately, and brought her back; there were three 3 s. or 4 s. found on her.

GEORGE SHEILSTON . I am twelve years old, and live with my mother, under Mr. Woodward's shop. I saw 2 s. on the board near where the meat was - I stood outside the shop - the prisoner took up a piece of meat, and asked the price of it; I then saw her take up the two shillings, and come out directly; I told the boy who belongs to the butcher's shop, and he told his master; I then got an officer - when we came back the woman had got hold of her.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am a constable. The butcher's boy came to me, and told me of the circumstance; I afterwards saw Sheilston, who gave the same account as he has now. I then saw the prisoner, with the other woman walking by her side, who said she was determined to follow her. I found on her 3 s. 6 d., wrapped up in a bit of rag, and 5 1/2 d. in copper.

The Prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring her innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18250407-180

768. GEORGE COCKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a shirt, value 2 s.; two collars, value 1 s.; three half-handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two pocket handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; two caps, value 3 s., and two neck-cloths, value 6 d., the goods of Henry Hawkins Freeman ; two shifts, value 9 s.; a petticoat, value 6 d., and a cap, value 2 d. , the goods of Susannah Flack .

HENRY HAWKINS FREEMAN. I am a tailor , and live in the Commercial-road ; the prisoner was a stranger to me. On the 22d of March this property was taken from my garden, which is surrounded by a wall six feet and a half high - I had seen it sate about four o'clock in the afternoon, and at six it was gone. About the 4th or 5th of April I saw part of it at the Police Office; the prisoner was then in custody.

SUSANNAH FLACK. I was in the service of Mr. Freeman. I had washed the linen, and hung it in the garden - I saw it safe about ten minutes before it was missed; the persons who took it must have got over the wall; I saw my petticoat and cap at the office on the 6th of April.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, the 22d of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, with a bundle under his coat; I asked how he came by it - he said he brought it from his sister's, who lived in Holywell-lane, who was lying in, and he was going to take it to his mother, who lived in Rosemary-lane, to iron - I took him into a shop; he ran away, but I got him again - he then said his mother lived in Spitalfields.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my sister's, and she gave me 1 s. 6 d. to go to Rosemary-lane to buy a hat; I was going along, and saw this bundle on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-181

769. JAMES DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 2 lbs. of brass, value 3 s., and 2000 nails., value 3 s. , the goods of William Young .

WILLIAM YOUNG. I am an ironmonger , and live in Oxford-street - the prisoner was my porter . On the 17th of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, I missed a piece of sheet brass from a hole in the shop; I had seen it safe about a fortnight before. While the prisoner was gone to breakfast the foreman told me there was something very mysterious in his conduct, and when he returned I asked him what had become of the sheet brass, which had been in the nail room - he said he had not taken it; I said if he did not produce it I would send for an officer; he then said he would fetch it from the nail room; he attempted to go, and I followed him - when he got about half way, he turned back, and begged I would let him go and fetch it; I told him I knew he had taken it, and I would know where it was: he said he had taken it home: I sent for an officer, and went with him to Callwell-buildings, and in the room where his mother said she lived, we found a rule, a thousand of nails, and two half thousands in the papers, with my private mark on them, in an old tin kettle in the cupboard, and the sheet brass was hid under some old clothes in a beds'ead - he had been with me about a month; I had a good character with him.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. The prisoner said he lived with his mother, in Callwell-buildings, in the front room two pair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of stealing the nails.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recmmended to Mercy .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-182

770. THOMAS LIPSCOMBE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , twenty apple-trees, value 20 s. , the goods of William Bolton Poynton .

WILLIAM BOLTON POYNTON, Esq. I am a barrister , and live at North End, Fulham . I had a great many apple trees, which I had been moving - some of them were put into the ground, but not fixed. I had seen them about five o'clock in the afternoon of Friday, the 4th of March; on the morning of Saturday, the 6th, I missed seventeen or twenty - I then went up to the prisoner's house, who is a tenant of mine, but had not been employed in the garden; I found a bundle near his house, which is about a quarter of a mile from where I live - I opened it, and found nearly twenty trees covered with a mat. I have no doubt but they were mine; they were worth 1 s. a tree; I intended to have them planted the next day in some other part of my garden. He was not at home when I found the trees; I saw him in about an hour, but had no conversation with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What kind of trees were they? A. Different sorts of pippins and russetins, and others; they were cut in a particular way, and had been lately grafted; the prisoner is a gardener - it is

usual for gardeners to put a mat over their trees to preserve them.

WILLIAM BEST . I am gardener to Mr. Poynton. I took up the trees, and put them on the ground to be planted the next day. I came next morning after Mr. Poynton was up - I then missed seventeen trees; I found some trees afterwards on the prisoner's premises, but I cannot be certain that they were my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you never seen the prisoner about the premises? A. Never in my life; the garden is fenced round, partly by palings, and partly with a hedge and ditch.

JOHN KEENES . I am a gardener, and live at North End, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Poynton's. I saw the prisoner go by with some trees on his shoulder, about eight o'clock in the morning of the 5th of March - he was going from his own house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you examine the kind of trees he had? A. No; he said to me,

"If any body asks you if you have seen me, tell them no."

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. Mr. Poynton came to me to apprehend the prisoner: I found him at Hammersmith about ten o'clock; he said the trees he had were his own property; the trees have not been found; I found nothing but some gooseberry and apple stocks, and plum stocks; his garden was open, and there were some other trees laid in by the heels; Mr. Poynton examined them, and said they were not his.

Prisoner's Defence. I had, I suppose, a cart-load of trees of different descriptions laid in by the heels on that day. I have lived with this gentleman many years, and paid him about 180 l., and about three months ago he brought in a broker, and took my goods; this charge was brought out of spite against me - he came and took one dozen gooseberry trees, and said they were his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-183

771. DAVID MOUNTFORD was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-184

772. THOMAS DUXBURY and WILLIAM STURDY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , two shifts, value 4 s., and a shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Margaret Fowler , widow .

MARGARET FOWLER . I am a widow, and live in Portman-place, Edgware-road. On the 15th of March, about two o'clock, this property was in my garden, which has a wall on each side and palings: the wall is about six feet high, and the palings at the end about a foot higher - the person who took the property must have got over the fence at the corner; the prisoners were brought in immediately after it was missed - there were other things on the lines, which were not taken.

ALEXANDER BROWN . I am a stone-mason, and live at Chelsea. I was looking for work near Portman-place on the 15th of March, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and the prisoner, Duxberry, passed me running - I stopped him as he was running, he pulled off his hat, and a shirt dropped from it. I brought him back, and picked up the shirt; he was about two hundred yards from Mrs. Fowler's. I took him to Mrs. Fowler's. I saw Sturdy run another way; he was stopped by Kelloway.

JOHN KELLOWAY . I live in Egerton-cottage, Elgware-road. I was in my own room, which is about one hundred and fifty yards from Mrs. Fowler's, on the 15th of March, and saw the two prisoners coming together across the field; they went to the back of the fence, looked through the palings, and then Duxberry got on the fence and took a shirt off the line, which he drew over and gave to Sturdy; he then got over the fence, and took some other things; Sturdy tied them up in a handkerchief. I got toward them and cried

"Stop thief!" I pursued Sturdy, and a carpenter stopped him, and delivered him to me: he had dropped the bundle, which I took up - it contained two shirts, which I delivered to Mrs. Fowler.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Several witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character, and engaged to take them into their employ.

DUXBERRY. - GUILTY . Aged 15.

STURDY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-185

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

773. MARY DOWNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a table spoon, value 8 s., and two shirts, value 12 s., the goods of Nathaniel Mason , and four shifts, value 30 s. , the goods of Frances Mason .

NATHANIEL MASON. I live in Burton-crescent ; the prisoner was employed as a needle-woman in my family; these shirts are my property, and have my mark on them. I had not missed them till I received information of their being lost.

HARRIET WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Mason. I missed a spoon from a basket on the table, in the kitchen, between twelve and one o'clock on the 29th of March; the prisoner had not then left the house. Miss Mason asked her, in my presence, if she had got it; she denied it at first - but afterwards produced it from her pocket, when Miss Mason said she would search her.

HENRY WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am a pawnbroker. The two shirts were pawned at our shop, one on the 11th of February, the other on the 25th, and the shifts, on the 21st of December, by the prisoner.

FRANCES MASON. I am sister of the prosecutor; these articles are ours - they were kept in a drawer in the bedroom; the prisoner had access to them.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I took up the prisoner on the 28th of March, at her house in the Colonnade. I found three duplicates on her, which answer to the things produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-186

774. MARY EVEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a dead fowl, value 3 s. the goods of John Stokes .

JOHN STOKES. I am a pork-butcher , and live in Aylesbury-street. Clerkenwell . On the 27th of February, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to look at some fowls;

I shewed her two - she bought some pork, and before she out of the shop, I saw the fowl under her shawl. I allowed her to leave the shop. I went after her and took it from her.

JOHN AYRES . I am apprentice to Stokes. I saw the prisoner take the fowl and go out with it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-187

775. JOHN FREDERICK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , three shirts, value 3 s.; five pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; and a pair of trowsers, value 1 s., the goods of John Snell ; five shirts, value 5 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; two blankets, value 1 s.; two rugs, value 1 s.; a pair of boots, value 2 s., and a jacket, value 2 s. , the goods of John Jackson .

JOHN SNELL , I am a seaman , on board the ship Progress, which laid in St. Catherine's dock . On the morning of the 6th of March I missed some articles out of my chest; the prisoner had been on board, but was then gone - I had seen them safe on the Saturday morning; my chest had been locked.

JOHN JACKSON. I am a seaman on board the Progress. On the 6th of March I missed five shirts, and some other things, from the forecastle, where they had been lying in a bundle. I had seen them safe on the Saturday night.

EDWARD ROBINS . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner into custody on the 6th of March; the Captain's wife gave me charge of him; he said he had deposited some things at the Crown, public-house; I went there, and the landlord gave me these articles; he said he got them from the Progress - the landlord stated in his presence that he had left them there about seven o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-188

776. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of William Whitmore .

WILLIAM WHITMORE. I keep a shoe-maker's shop in St. John-street. On the 26th of February a girl called me out, and I missed a pair of shoes from the door-post; the prisoner was brought into the shop - one shoe was shewn to me; it was one of two shoes belonging to me - but I can not tell if they were a pair.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-189

777. MARY FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , fourteen yards of linen, value 1 l. , the goods of William Toal .

WILLIAM TOAL. I am a licensed hawker . On the 31st of March I was at the General Elliott public-house, at Chelsea , and had some linen in my pack: I went to the door, returned in two minutes, and a person said the linen was gone - I got a constable in about half an hour - the prisoner was in the public-house all the time - I have never seen the property since.

JOHN RYAN . I was at the General Elliott - I saw Toal there - he went to the door, and the prisoner took his bundle and opened it, with one Mary Finch, who is not in custody; the prisoner took the linen out and gave it to Finch, with the key of the door of her lodging, and said

"D - n your eyes be off;" I did not follow her up stairs, but William Close did, and then he came down to tell the prosecutor. Close had been sitting by me, but he got out as fast as he could after her.

ISAAC TUTTON . I live at No. 2, Castle-street, and work for Mr. Walker. Mary Foster lives at No. 3; when I came home I heard an alarm of the robbery; I saw Mary Finch run up stairs to Foster's room - William Close followed her, and said she had been robbing a duffer; he went down again, and when he was gone I went and peeped through the key-hole, I saw Mary Finch tying some linen round her person, under her clothes; I went and told my wife there was something wrong; and while I was gone she went away - the prisoner and Finch lived together.

THOMAS PAGE . I am a constable. I received a warrant against Finch for this robbery; I went down the next morning, which was Good Friday, and found that the prisoner was accused of being a party in it; I searched her room but found nothing there. Ryan stated that he saw the prisoner open the bundle, and hand the article to Finch, and the key to go up stairs to conceal it - I could not find Finch, but I took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-190

778. JAMES GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , two saws, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Harding .

THOMAS HARDING. I was at work in Prospect-row, Hackney . I put my two saws near the window on the 15th of March, when I went to breakfast at eight o'clock - I returned at half-past eight and they were gone.

EDWARD RAYNER . I am a bricklayer. I was at my own premises opposite to this house, and saw the prisoner pass me with the two saws; I asked him where he got them and he told me from No. 18.

RALPH WILTSHIRE . I was with the last witness, and stopped the prisoner with the saws, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-191

779. GEORGE HOPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , twenty pieces of leather, value 4 s.; a pair of lasts, value 1 s., and two shillings , the property of Joseph Staples .

JOSEPH STAPLES. I am a shoemaker , and live in Homer-row, St. Mary-le-bone. On the morning of the 22d of March I gave the prisoner about twenty pieces of leather, one pair of lasts, and two shillings, to take to his master.

SAMUEL FORD . I am the prisoner's master. I sent him for the leather and lasts, and two shillings; he staid away two days - a man brought him home on Wednesday evening; I asked what he had done with the leather - he said a man took it from him at the corner of Cumberland-street: he has said since that he spent the money, and threw away the leather.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-192

780. BENJAMIN HOWE , WILLIAM HOLSWORTH and JOHN FORBES , were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , two boots, value 7 s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

Howe pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

RALPH WILCOXON. I am a shoemaker , and live in Berwick-street, St. James's . I lost these two boots from my shop on the 17th of March - I had seen them safe about seven o'clock in the evening, and saw them again about a quarter before eight.

DANIEL REARON . On the night of the 17th of March, I was in Wardour-street; I saw the prisoner, Holsworth, and Howe together; Forbes was close behind them; I followed them up Wardoor-court; they turned to the right, towards the prosecutor's shop, and remained there four or five minutes; I then I saw Howe run by the shop, and when he got past I saw something under his jacket: the other two were then standing in the road, opposite the door: Howe ran towards me: I laid hold of him; he dropped one boot and I took the other from under his arm: I took him to the watch-house, and we found the others near Golden-square.

ANGELIUS BETRANN . I was in company with Rearon. I saw the prisoners all in company, near the prosecutor's shop: I saw Howe come from the shop towards us, and drop one of the boots from under his coat: the other two prisoners ran off directly - we took Howe and found the others again in Broad-street, Golden-square.

Prisoner FORBES. I never saw Howe in my life till we got to the watch-house - I had not been in that street at all.

HOLSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FORBES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-193

781. JOHN HOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a shirt, value 10 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 d. , the goods of George Harrison .

LOUISA HARRISON . I am the wife of George Harrison, a hatter , who lives in Bethnell-green-road . I take in linen to iron. The prisoner came to our house on the 2d of April, and asked for a hat at about 12 s.; I said I had none so low, and asked what price he could go to; he said

"Not more than 14 s." he tried several on, but did not take any; I said I could make one to fit him in about a quarter of an hour; he then went away, and the carpenter, who we had at work, gave me some information - I looked round and missed a shirt and a handkerchief, which was wrapped round it, from off a table in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PETER MATAULL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Wackett, who lives about three hundred yards from Mr. Harrison's. I was passing the shop and saw the prisoner with a small bundle in his left hand, tied in a handkerchief: he was carrying it under his apron: I went and told Mrs. Harrison, and saw him brought back in about ten minutes - I did not lose sight of him.

JOHN WACKETT . I am a carpenter - the last witness is my apprentice. I pursued the prisoner and brought him back; he denied having taken any thing, but as we were coming back he took something from under his apron, and threw it away - I did not pick it up - he ran away - I pursued and took him again.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I sent this shirt to Mrs. Harrison's, to wash.

THOMAS COOPER . I took the prisoner, but found nothing on him but a paper of brass pins.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-194

782. SOLOMON HENNING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a coat, value 30 s.; the goods of Thomas Winder ; a hat, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 1 s. : the goods of Francis Boyd .

THOMAS WINDER. I am a shipwright . I lodged at Mr. Farmer's, at Limehouse . I left a coat in my room a little before six o'clock on the 21st of February, on a chair by the bed side; I had seen the prisoner the day before, but I did not know that he lodged in the house; I returned between ten and eleven o'clock, and my coat was gone; I saw it again between twelve and one at Lambeth-street.

FRANCIS BOYD. I lodged at the Ship public house. On the 21st of February I was sent for between eight and nine o'clock, and missed some clothes from my bed room, in which Winder slept; I had seen them safe in the morning when we went on duty, some of it in a bag, and some on a chest.

SARAH WATSON . I am servant at the Ship and Launch public-house. The prosecutor lodged there; I saw the prisoner that morning about seven o'clock, with a bundle under his arm tied up in Mrs. Scott's handkerchief; I went and told her of it, and she came and took it from him and found the great coat in it - he ran out at the back door and she cried Stop thief!

WILLIAM FARMER . I live in Colt-street. I was standing at my door on the 21st of February, which is about a furlong from the Ship and Launch, and saw the prisoner running from a cry of Stop thief! I stopped him, he said,

"Let me go, it is only a row;" he took his hat off his head, and I put my hand in and pulled out a pair of trowsers.

ELIZABETH SCOTT . I am housekeeper at the Ship and Launch - the servant told me the prisoner had a bundle, I took it from him and opened it - it had a coat in it.

EDWARD MAGRATH . I am a constable. I found this coat in the kitchen when I got to the house; here is a pair of trowsers and a waistcoat which were taken from the prisoner's hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-195

783. JAMES HAYNES and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , three pewter pots, value 4 s. ; the goods of Josiah Simcoe .

JOSIAH SIMCOE. I am a victualler , and live at Pentonville. On the 26th of February, two pewter pots were brought to me, which were marked with my name.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am an officer. On the 26th of February, I saw the prisoner Smith, take a quart pot off the rails of a house - he gave it to Haynes, he then went and took the pint pot, and they walked away.

WILLIAM OWEN . I had received the pots from the publican on the night before, they were taken from my rails.

HAYNES'S Defence. We took the pots to get a bit of victuals.

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-196

784. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 20 lbs. of beef, value 6 s. , the goods of Moses Wing .

HENRY WING . I am the son of Moses Wing, who is clerk to an attorney. I carry on the business of his shop in Tothill-street, Westminster - I had seen this beef safe about an hour before I missed it.

WILLIAM WING . On the evening of the 25th of February, I was in the parlour at the back of the shop - I saw the prisoner take the beef from the board outside the window - I knew him and run after him, but could not catch him, as I am a little lame; there was a light in the shop - I could see him very plainly.

HENRY WHITE . I live in Bennet-street, Westminster. On the evening of the 25th of February, I saw the prisoner in Tothill-street, about twenty doors from Wing's shop, with the beef under his arm - I heard William Wing call Stop thief! and ran after him, but he turned down Wright's passage, and I lost sight of him - I saw him next day on the ruins by Westminster Abbey, and told Timbrell the officer.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . White pointed the prisoner out to me, and on the 26th of February I took him up, in consequence of the information - when I took him to the watch-house, the two boys were with me, and I begged them to be certain before they charged him with the fact.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-197

785. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a coat, value 5 s. the goods of Samuel Montague .

SAMUEL MONTAGUE. I am hostler at Mr. Sanderson's, livery stables, in Well-street . This coat was stolen from the stable on the 22d of March - I saw it safe at eleven o'clock the night before, hanging against a stall; the stable was locked and I had the key.

JOHN MILLER . I live in Well-street, and am a watchman. On the 22d of March, about half-past five o'clock, in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Sanderson's, with the great coat on his arm - he asked me the hour, which I told him, and asked him whose coat it was - he said his own; I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with some friends and got a little in liquor and knowing this place, from having worked in it - I strolled in, but do not know how; I found myself cold, and took the coat to wrap myself up in. Montague has trusted me to go about his premises, and I have taken 6 or 700 l. to the bankers for Mr. Sanderson.

SAMUEL MONTAGUE. The stable was locked in the morning; a person could get in through a hole in the wall; the prisoner bore a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-198

786. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , two jackets, value 2 s.; two waistcoats, value 1 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 1 s.; four shirts, value 6 s.; four stockings, value 1 s.; a night-cap, value 3 d.; a razor, value 1 s.: a needle case, value 1 d.; and a handkerchief, value 2 d., the goods of John O'Conner ; a pewter-pot, value 18 d., the goods of William Payne : and two pewter-pots, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Mogge .

JOHN O'CONNER. I am a seaman . The prisoner came with me from Dublin, and lodged in the same room with me, in Brown Bear-alley - on the 16th of March he went out between nine and ten o'clock; I went out soon afterwards, and left all my things in a bag, in a chest at the foot of the bed - I came back about twelve o'clock; I found the bag, but the property had been taken out of it; and it was stuffed out with an old bed sacking, and other things; I came down stairs and told the master of the house of it - I saw my property about four o'clock the same day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LUCY GRIFFIN . The prisoner lodged at my house; on Tuesday night he was very tipsy, and brought in a pint pot in his hat; about eleven o'clock he sent one of my lodgers down with three pots - he left the house next morning with a bag apparently full of things.

EMMA BEST . I keep a cook shop at Wapping. The prisoner came to my house on the 16th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, with another man, who had a bag; the prisoner asked for a lodging - he left the bag in the parlour for two or three hours.

ADAM TIGH . I am an officer. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of March, I went to Best's house; I found a bag with these things in it - the prisoner had the razors and coat in his pocket - I took them to the office - he said, if there were any things belonging to his shipmate in his bag, it was unknown to him - but if they were his, to give them to him, and have no more bother about it - there were a couple of shirts in the bag, which he stated to be his own.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD . I received him into custody about five o'clock; he seemed very much intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. We had been paid off the morning before; I got intoxicated - when I got up the next morning, I went down to the Bull's-head, public-house, and got a place to go to Van Dieman's Land - I got intoxicated again, and went home for my clothes - they were scattered about the room - a man in the lodging, who had been a soldier, helped me to put the things in, and shouldered the bag, and took it away - I did not know that there was a pin's worth belonging to Conner in it.

LUCY GRIFFIN. Re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner take the bag? No, the other man took it - the prisoner was quite sober.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-199

787. JAMES ELY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a pot, value 2 s., and 40 lbs. of butter, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Dale .

THOMAS DALE. I am a farmer , and live at Enfield ; this pot is mine - it was missed from my dairy on the 27th of April - the prisoner had worked for me.

ELIZABETH DALE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had seen this pot on the Saturday evening the 26th, when I locked the door of the dairy, and put the key in the house.

MATILDA VALANCE . I am in the service of Mr. Dale. I know that this pot was in the dairy on the 26th of March, about two o'clock - the next day I went into the garden and saw five boards pulled down, and left under the dairy window.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know this pot? A. I have known it a long while: there is no mark on it.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's house about another robbery, a fortnight afterwards; he lives in a lane near Bull's-cross, at Enfield - I found this pot with the butter in it; I took him up, and brought him to Enfield - he said he bought it of a man, but did not know who he was.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-200

788. STEPHEN MARKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , seven live tame rabbits, price 5 s., and a trough, value 1 d. , the property of James Young and John Keene .

HENRY YOUNG . My son James is in partnership with John Keene. I was present when the constable found these rabbits under the prisoner's father's stairs; the prisoner was present, and told me he had bred them, and would fetch the doe from a lad named Hodsey.

JAMES YOUNG . I had some rabbits - they were kept in my father's stable; I missed them on Saturday morning, the 11th of March, about half-past six o'clock; the prisoner lived seventy or eighty yards from us; the stable was fastened with a pin; there was a horse in it; the constable brought them to me afterwards.

JOHN MEAD . I found the rabbits at the prisoner's father's house; I found him in the town, and told him I wanted him on suspicion of taking some rabbits; he said he had not; he had some rabbits, but he had bought them of a boy in the neighbourhood.

JOHN KEENE . I had a partnership with James Young in these rabbits, and know them to be ours.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250407-201

789. LYDIA MOFFATT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , three shirts, value 1 l.; a sheet, value 2 s., and two stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of Johannah Bryan , spinster .

JOHANNAH BRYAN. I am single. On the 30th of March, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my lodging, in Union-place, Compton-street - I gave her a lodging out of charity; the next day, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I missed a pair of stockings and a shirt, and then three shirts, out of a box - they were my own property. I went up stairs, and told her I had lost them - she denied having taken them. I sent for the watchman; I got some of them again that night.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner to the watch-house on the 31st of March; I found nothing on her.

JOHN HALL . I was watch-house keeper. I searched her, but found nothing on her; I took her up stairs, and when I came down again I found these two stockings by the side of the chair where she had sat. On the Sunday following I saw a duplicate down the water-closet, of a shirt, pawned at Mr. Smelly's.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Smelly. These two shirts were pawned, one on the 30th of March, and one on the 31st, but I do not know by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-202

790. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , two candlesticks, value 4 s. , the goods of Henry Dade .

THOMAS TINDALE . I live in White Hart-row , and am a butcher - Mr. Henry Dade lives four or five doors from me, and is a broker . I saw the prisoner take up two candlesticks from his shop - he then put them down again; he then walked a little way, came back, and took them - he put them under his coat; I stopped him; he gave them up, and said,

"I have done wrong."

Prisoner. I did it; I was in the utmost distress - it was very wrong.

GUILTY. Aged 64.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month

Reference Number: t18250407-203

791. JAMES PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two coats, value 10 s. , the goods of John Young .

MARY YOUNG . I am the wife of John Young - he lives in Thomas-street, St. George's . I saw the prisoner on the 6th of April, in Mr. Gudgeon's room, which is next to mine; he was there for a quarter of an hour: after he was gone Mr. Gudgeon gave me some information; I looked out of the window, and saw him coming up an alley, with something in his apron; he lives opposite. I went up to my bed-room, and missed two coats of my husband's, which were safe half an hour before. I went for an officer - he returned about twelve o'clock at night; the officer was then gone, but I sent for him, and he took him. - I went the next morning to a pawnbroker's shop, and saw the coats given to the officer.

JULIANA GUDGEON . I live in the same house with Young. The prisoner came there on the 6th of April, and staid about half an hour; after he left I thought I saw something in his lap; he had a black apron on; I told Mrs. Young. The prisoner told me at Lambeth-street the following morning, that he had sold the things to a Jew at the bottom of White Lion-street.

JAMES LEE . I went with Young to Mr. Ellis's shop, and found these two coats there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JULIANA GUDGEON re-examined. I asked the prisoner if he would tell me what he had done with the coats - he said he had sold them at the first shop on the right-hand, opposite White Lion-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mrs. Gudgeon's room to see my wife, who was making some shirts there - I took the shirts home, and when I got home there was no money, and I took one of my shirts to pawn.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250407-204

792. JAMES PITT , MOSES JOSEPH , & RICHARD MORTLOCK , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a watch, value 20 s.; a seal, value 5 s.; two keys, value 2 d., and a piece of ribbon, value 1 d. , the goods of Joseph Clifton Bingham .

JOSEPH CLIFTON BINGHAM. I am a printer , and live in a room on the first floor, in Old Boswell-court - I left my watch there when I went out at twelve o'clock on the 30th of March; I locked the door, and put the key under the window shutter on the landing-place; I returned at half-past two, and a person told me my door had been found open; the marble in which the watch had been was

on the table, but the watch, seal, and key were gone - I saw it again the same day, at Turner's, in Brydges-street.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, Brydges-street. On the 30th of March, about two o'clock, Moses Joseph came and brought a watch, a gold seal, and two keys; he wanted 15 s. for them; I asked whose they were; he said his brother's, who worked in Russell-court - I kept it, and told him to send his brother; a young woman came in soon afterwards, and gave me information - I went into the street, and saw Joseph looking at my window - I did not then see any body else; I sent a young man to take Joseph, which he did; I then sent for an officer. I saw Pitts pass the shop before the officer came - I called him in, and asked if he knew any thing of this young man; he said Yes: the young woman recollected him as being one of the boys who had spoken to her in the street; Pitt then said to Joseph,

"Why don't you tell the truth?" Joseph said,

"I don't care a pin about it;" I said,

"You should care, because you have got yourself into trouble."

JOSEPH MULFORD . I live in Shire-lane. On the 30th of March, about two o'clock, I was at Mr. Robinson's, a cook-shop, in Picket-street; I saw Joseph, who beckoned me to come out of the shop; I went to him when I was served; he said he had collared a watch in Boswell-court, and taken it to Mr. Turner's, to pawn for 15 s., and if I would go and own it, he would give me 3 s.; I said I would have nothing to do with it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Were you ever in this Court before? A. No; I have been in the other Court.

Q. Were you found guilty? A. Yes; I was imprisoned one month and whipped.

MARTHA BENNISON . I live in Denmark-court. I was in Exeter-street on the 30th of March, and saw the three prisoners at Hayman's public-house - they called me over, and Mortlock asked if I would go and own a watch which he had taken to Mr. Turner's, and it had been stopped; I said I would not do any thing of the kind; when I returned they met me again, and Mortlock said if I did not he would mark me for it; I was going away, and he put his foot out and threw me down in the street.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I live with my father, who is a compositor for the Morning Herald.

ELIZABETH EVANS . On the afternoon of the 30th of March I was in Exeter-street, going to see the last witness - the three prisoners were standing with their backs to the English Opera-house; Mortlock, whom I knew, crossed over, and asked if I would do him the favour to go to a pawnbroker's to own a watch which Joseph had been to pawn for 15 s. - it was a silver watch, with a seal, two keys, and a black ribbon; I said I did not like to do it; I then went on to Bennison's, and told her what they had said; I went to pawn a gown at Mr. Turner's - as I went down the court the prisoners asked me if I would own it then, and said they would watch me to see if I did; when I got to Mr. Turner's door Joseph again asked if I would own the watch - I said I would see about it; when I went in I saw him looking through the window; I told what he had said, and soon after Pitt came by, and I said that was another of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS FORD . I took up these boys; I found Mortlock at his father's, on Friday, the 1st of April. I have known Joseph some years - his friends are very respectable.

PITT'S Defence. My father sent me on an errand; I met Mortlock, and stood talking with him - Joseph came, and said he was going to pawn a watch for his brother.

MORTLOCK'S Defence. Pitt came and spoke to me; Joseph then came up, and said he had been to pawn a watch for his brother, and asked if we knew any body who could get it for him; I saw Bennison, whom I had known some years, and asked her to do it.

Three witnesses gave Pitt a good character, and two appeared on behalf of Joseph.

PITT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

JOSEPH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

MORTLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-205

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 12.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

793. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields, a bed, value 2 l.; a bolster, value 4 s.; two sheets, value 2 s.; a quilt, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 d., and a pair of trowsers, value 6 d; the goods of George Fish , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH FISH . I am the wife of George Fish - we live in Little St. Andrew's-street, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields , and rent the house - the street door is left open. On the 17th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner (who is a stranger) at the bottom of the stairs, carrying a bundle tied in a quilt - I collared him, and he said nothing. I sent for a constable, who examined the bundle - it contained the articles stated in the indictment - which are worth 2 l. 9 s.; he had taken them from the first floor back-room - the door was locked; he must have had a false key.

FRANCIS HONNOUR . I was at Fish's house; she called me; I found her holding the prisoner by the collar - the bundle laid by him.

THOMAS KENDRICK . I am a constable. I took charge of him with the property, and found a key in the passage which opens the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I mend umbrellas, and sell them in the street. On the 16th of March I sold a woman one - she said, if I called on her in St. Andrew-street, she would give me two to mend.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18250407-206

794. JOHN BOWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , at St. Dunstan's, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, twenty-six yards of crape, value 40 s., the goods of Ann Smith , in her dwelling-house .

ANN SMITH. I am a widow , and keep a haberdasher's shop , in the parish of Stepney ; I rent the house. On the 1st of April the prisoner came in and bought a yard of ribbon, which he paid for, and then asked for some silk

handkerchiefs. I shewed him one, he said it was too small. I had reason to suspect him; he asked to see some coloured ones; I said, I had none; he asked to see some Irish linens. I had put this crape on the counter just as he came in - and as I reached the Irish, I saw him take the crape, and put it into his pocket, which was a large pocket, as long as his coat. I said,

"You villain, you have taken that piece of crape." I collared and took him to the door, calling for assistance; he hit me on the side. I was obliged to let him go; he ran out, and I after him; a boy stopped him. I am certain he is the man; I took the crape from his pocket: it cost more than 40 s., wholesale price - it measures twenty-six yards.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am an officer, and have the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I paid her 6 d. for the ribbon; she sent her son for change; a gentleman came and asked what she wanted, as he could not understand the child. I looked at some handkerchiefs, which were too small. I asked to see some Irish. I took the crape up in my hand - she turned round, and said,

"You thieving villain, how dare you be guilty of that." I said, I would put it down; she pulled me into the parlour, and sang out as loud as she could; I ran out of the shop - but I had stolen nothing.

ANN SMITH . I swear that I took it out of his pocket.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18250407-207

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

795. ANDREW THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeit bill of exchange, for payment of 40 l., drawn by R. Wilson upon W. H. Rawlings, with intent to defraud Richard Bury .

TWO OTHER COUNTS charged him with forging an endorsement on the said bill, and uttering and publishing it as true. - (See page 286).

MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am agent to Mr. Richard Bury, and carry on business, on his account, in King-street, Cheapside. I had several transactions with the prisoner, as one of the firm of Bakewell and Co.: it was agreed that he should give me the acceptances of respectable parties. On the 30th of November I received a bill for 40 l. inclosed in a note which I believe to be the prisoner's writing.

JOHN CHEESMAN . This letter is the prisoner's writing, and so is the endorsement

"Bakewell and Co," on the bill. I cannot say any thing of the endorsement of

"R. Wilson and Co."

MR. HAYNES. Before the bill became due I asked the prisoner who Wilson was - he said he was the merchant and shipper of the hats.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were satisfied with Rawlings' acceptance, having had it before? A. I never had Rawlings' acceptance - it was Oakley's, payable at Rawlings'.

MR. LAW. Q. Had you more orders from him after you received the bill; but before it became due? A. Yes; perhaps to the amount of 100 l.; there was a running account; the bill was not given for any particular goods - Rawlings has acknowledged it to be his acceptance.

A letter was here read from the prisoner, dated the 22d of November, containing an order for goods, and promising to forward a bill, drawn by the shipper, on Rawlings.

ROBERT WAITE . I let the prisoner a house in the Commercial-road. A person named Wilson came to pay the rent about the 29th of October; he presented me with an account of some goods I had bought, which he deducted from the rent, and gave me a receipt, which I produce - I saw him write it on my table. I do not believe the endorsement on this bill to be the writing of that R. Wilson.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You never saw him write but once? A. No, I cannot say whether he wrote better at one time than another, but I should think the character of the writing would be the same.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Does the endorsement appear to be the same character of hand-writing? A. It does not; my account was only 1 l. 16 s.; he only wrote

"Received cash, Robert Wilson."

COURT. Q. How often has this bill been shewn to you to compare with the receipt? A. Only once; it struck me immediately that it was not his writing; but I compared it, as I had the receipt in my pocket.

Q. Suppose you had not seen the receipt after he gave it to you, do you think you could have such a recollection of his writing as to say it was not his writing? A. I do know that I could; the bill is so different from the receipt that it struck me immediately that it was not his.

JAMES SAUNDERS . I am landlord of a house at Brentford. A man named R. Wilson was a tenant of mine: I do not know whether he was connected with the prisoner; I once saw him write a receipt, about a month ago; I do not believe the handwriting of the drawer and endorser of this bill to be his.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw him once, after this bill was due, write a hand which you think not like that on the bill? A. Yes.

The prisoner entered into the same line of defence as on the former trial; and declared, that Wilson was the drawer and acceptor of the bill; and had paid it to him in the regular course of trade.

GEORGE BELAND . In November last the prisoner gave me a bill for 40 l., to take to Wilson to sign and endorse. I believe the bill produced to be the same; I gave the bill to Thomas Oakley, on the 30th of November, at one o'clock, at the White Hart tavern, Tower-street, for that purpose. I called there in the evening, and he gave it to me, signed and endorsed

"R. Wilson;" I took it home, and next morning, when I sent some bread to Bakewell and Co., I sent the bill by my son to give to Thompson. I knew Wilson about two years ago; he then lived in Rood-land, as a boot and shoe-maker; I have frequently seen him in Thompson's company, at the White Hart, since this bill was drawn, talking upon business.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know whether Wilson lived at Brentford? A. He was represented to me as having an establishment there in the boot and shoe line.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When were you at Brentford? A. Not lately; I have been in the habit of seeing him in town; the last time I saw him, was on the 4th or 5th of February; I have continued to go to places where I used to see him, but have not seen him since. He has made me out bills for

work done, (looking at the bill). I believe this endorsement and signature to be his writing.

COURT. Q. How often have you seen him write? A. It might be seven or eight times - I am a baker, and live in North-street, Bethnall-green. I do not know where Wilson is now; he wrote very much like a school-boy.

Q. Do you believe this to be his writing, (handing a paper)? A. I cannot be positive - it resembles it - I should think it was his.

Q. Now, will you venture to swear, that you believe the endorsement on the bill to be his writing? A. I do believe it is - I believe both to be written by the same person; I saw him write last about January, at Union-court, Broad-street: I had no connexion with the firm.

JAMES SAUNDERS re-examined. The last time I saw Wilson write, was last Friday week, at his house at Brentford.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-208

796. ANDREW THOMPSON was again indicted for forging an acceptance to a bill of exchange for payment of 76 l., with intent to defraud Richard Bury .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-209

797. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , at St. Catherine, Coleman, a tin box, value 2 s.; seventeen sovereigns; four half-crowns; sixteen shillings; six sixpences, and 8 d., in copper monies, the property of Thomas Young (to whom he was servant), in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LOWE . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Young, who lives at No. 62, Fenchurch-street ; he rents the house, and pays the taxes - it is in the parish of St. Catherine, Coleman. I manage his business; he is principally in Scotland. The prisoner was a porter in our employ, and has lived there about seven months - he did not live in the house - I live there. On Thursday, the 10th of March, about a quarter to two o'clock, I went up stairs to dinner; I left nobody in the counting-house; the street-door is usually barred inside. I went out afterwards on business; we enter by the private door. Mr. King, another clerk, was at dinner with me - I returned to the counting-house in about half an hour, found my desk broken open, and missed a tin cash-box which was locked. I found the box in the cellar about eight o'clock that evening; the lid of it was broken, but the lock, which was a very good one, was not broken; bills amounting to about 200 l., and about 1 l. 1 s. 6 d. in money, were left in it. I missed 18 l. 9 s. 8 d. in gold, silver, and copper; I believe there was seventeen sovereigns, sixteen shillings, four half-crowns, six sixpences, and 8 d. in copper. - It was Mr. Young's money. I went to the Mansion House; and went again on the 11th, and went with Martin to the prisoner's lodging, about three o'clock in the afternoon; he had not been to the counting-house after the robbery was discovered; he lodged in George-yard, at the end of Fenchurch-street. I went to the door with Martin, who asked at the door for Mr. Williams; I heard the prisoner's voice answering.

"I don't know him." I stepped forward, and said,

"That is the man." I observed a pistol in his right hand; he held it down by his side: I cried out,

"He has got a pistol;" the officer then seized him. He did not attempt to fire - I cannot say whether it was loaded - he had a dark great-coat on, which was not usual.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a constable. I went with Mr. Lowe to this house, and inquired of the prisoner for Henry Williams; I did not know him, as he was dressed different to what he had been described. He said he did not know him: Mr. Lowe then called out,

"Oh, my God, he has got a pistol." I then seized him, pinioned his arms, and he dropped the pistol on the bed which was in the room; I examined it - it was loaded with three small balls, but a very small quantity of powder, not sufficient to discharge it. I have the cash-box, which was found in the cellar; the lock being very good, it could not be forced; the lid has been wrenched up, and the cash shook out; but the inner box could not be got out, so that the bills, which were under it, did not come out. While he was on the bed, he begged for mercy; I neither threatened or promised him: he said he had robbed his master, that he was very sorry for it, and, if I would suffer him to get up, I might do as I pleased with him; he appeared very penitent at that time. I let him get up, and was in the act of searching him, when he stooped down, and, while he was stooping, I heard him cock a second pistol; I again seized him, threw him on the bed, and wrenched it from his hand; that was loaded with powder and wadding, but no ball, I searched him, and found three sovereigns, seven shillings, eight sixpences, and 7 d. in copper on him.

ELIZABETH FIRNEY . I am Mr. Young's servant, and have the care of his house; I attend upon the clerks. - The prisoner returned from his dinner while the clerks were at dinner; he went from the kitchin into the warehouse, remained there twenty minutes or more - I then heard him go up to the street door; I heard the great bar fall; he locked the door, took the keys and left them with a person who sits at a fruit stall before the door; he could go from the warehouse to the coal cellar without my seeing him - the counting house is in the warehouse; I went down stairs for some coals, kicked against the box, and found it; he never returned.

JOHN LOWE. He used to go to dinner about one o'clock and return after two, and remain till eight in the evening.

JOHN KING . I am in the employ of Mr. Young, and was at dinner with Mr. Lowe; his account is correct - I found his desk broken open.

JANE DUKES . I sit opposite Mr. Young's door with fruit. On the 10th of March, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out and lock the warehouse door - he laid the keys on my stall, and went away - he said

"I will leave these for our gentlemen."

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury - as to the robbery. I have nothing to say for myself, but about the pistols, I have a good deal to say - they were found in my possession, when in a state of intoxication; I bought them when I was intoxicated, and knew not whether they were loaded or not; I testify to you, that I did not know the three balls were in the one - I loaded the other with powder, but did not know how it was loaded, being in a state of intoxication; I have a doctor who will prove that when the least in liquor, I am not in my right reason - I am deranged in my mind - he has attended me for a week in that state; he is not here, nor have I any person to give me a character unless I write twenty-one miles for it; I did not present the pistols to any one but myself, to do myself an injury, being convinced

that I was guilty; I have been married seven years. Mr. Young has informed my wife he will speak on my behalf, as to character; I assure you, I am guilty of the robbery; and intended to do no person harm but myself, with the pistols.

JOSEPH MARTIN . He was very much intoxicated.

JANE DUKES . I often saw him - but I cannot say whether he was in liquor when he gave me the keys.

MR. THOS. YOUNG. I am the prosecutor. I only know the prisoner in my service; I had employed him occasionally for a month or two before he came into my constant employ; he was always regular, honest, and obliging. I am a good deal in Scotland, but had been at home three months while he was there; he had 18 s. a week, and most of his clothing.

The witnesses Lowe and King confirmed Mr. Young's statement,

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his good conduct .

Reference Number: t18250407-210

798. JOHN ALEXANDER CROOKSHANKS and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a plane, value 7 s. 6 d., the goods of William Reedman ; a stock, value 7 s.; a plane, value 4 s.; a chisel, value 6 d., and a rule, value 1 s., the goods of Joseph Rose ; a book, value 4 s., and a pair of compasses, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Jopling ; a basket, value 1 s.; two squares, value 5 s.; two planes, value 4 s., and a saw, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Venicombe Rowe .

FREDERICK PHILLIPS . I am a journeyman carpenter. I was working at the George Inn-yard, Smithfield . On Sunday morning, the 27th of February; at twenty minutes past seven o'clock, I was in Smithfield, and found the hoard door open - I went in, went up stairs, and found the foreman's room-door broken open, and the workmen's tools shifted from one basket to the other. I came away, put something against the door, went there again before one o'clock, and saw the prisoner, Davis, on the stairs, with a basket of tools; he appeared to be receiving it from a person above; he dropped it on seeing me, and turned as if going away - I secured him; my shopmate who was with me, said somebody else was up stairs. I afterwards stopped Crookshanks in the George-yard, under the gate-way; he seemed greatly agitated, very pale, and sick. Goddard said, in his presence, that he saw him lift the sash up, and drop down - the height is fourteen or fifteen feet.

WILLIAM REEDMAN . I was with Phillips, and detained Davis, and saw the basket in his possession - it contained a plane of mine.

ANN GODDARD . I am servant at the George Inn. On Sunday, the 27th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw Crookshanks come out of the window of the new building, and drop down - Phillips secured him by the gate. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CROOKSHANKS' Defence. I was very ill, and went to take a walk, and in Smithfield I saw a man come out of the George - I asked his leave to go there on a necessary occasion, he pointed down the yard; I went down, looked into the corner for a conveniency, and on turning to the left, this gentleman met me, and said I had come there to thieve tools; I told him what I came for.

DAVIS'S Defence. I saw this door open; curiosity lead me in to look at the building; I saw the basket of tools on the stairs - that is all.

FREDERICK PHILLIPS . Crookshanks said nothing about coming for a particular purpose.

ANN GODDARD. I am sure I saw him drop from the window.

CROOKSHANKS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250407-211

799. EDWARD THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Edward Osborne , from his person .

EDWARD OSBORNE. On the 4th of April I was in front of the Mansion-house , in attendance upon the Lord Mayor - I felt something at my pocket, put my hand round, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner close behind me; I collared and charged him with taking my handkerchief, which he denied; I attempted to search him but he got more into the crowd, turned himself from me, and I saw the handkerchief drop between his feet.

Prisoner. Q. Might not some person in the crowd have taken it, and pushed it down by me? A. It is possible.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stood by the Mansion-house, with the crowd, waiting to see the Lord Mayor; I came in contact with Mr. Osborne, who suddenly turned round and charged me with taking his handkerchief; he afterwards picked it off the ground; I declared it was never in my possession; he asked several people if they had seen me drop it - they said No; he asked me if I had seen any body take it from him.

E. OSBORNE. I asked the people if they had seen him drop it, but do not think I asked him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-212

800. HENRY READ was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of William Lloyd Birbeck , from his person .

MR. WILLIAM LLOYD BIRBECK. I live in Broad-street. On the 9th of March, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning. I was in Broad-street-buildings , where there had been a fire the night preceding; there was a crowd: in about five minutes I wanted to use my handkerchief, and missed it; I have seen it since in possession of Harding.

GEORGE SMITH . I was in Broad-street, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and walk away: he was in the act of putting it into his breeches when I laid hold of him, and took it from him, and returned it to the gentleman.

JOHN HARDING . Smith gave me the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy run and drop this handkerchief - I picked it up and went to give it to the gentleman, but it fell.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-213

801. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the

7th of April , four pieces of crape, containing forty-eight yards, value 3 l. , the goods of Daniel Lowe .

JOHN THORNE . I am carman to Daniel Lowe, who is a crape dyer . Last Thursday, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was loading gauzes at Mr. Herron's door, in Mitre-court, Milk-street . I left my cart to fetch some more gauzes from up stairs, and when I returned, in consequence of what Savage said, I missed a packet of crape from the cart - I had brought it from Mr. Lowe's; the prisoner was brought to Mr. Herron's in about ten minutes with it in his hand.

SAMUEL SAVAGE . I saw this cart unloading, and while the carman was away, I saw the prisoner put his foot on the step of the cart, and take the crape out - Mr. Herron came up, pursued and took him with it in his hand.

ARCHIBALD HERRON . I was going out and saw the prisoner's foot on the step of the cart; I spoke to Savage, then followed him to Honey-lane-market, and across Cheapside - he then ceased running, and I collared him with the crape in his hand; he said he had found it - I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing Queen-street, and saw a person run across with this parcel, and being pursued, he dropped it; I picked it up and hallooed after him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-214

802. WILLIAM SILVESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Samuel Carroll , from his person .

MR. SAMUEL CARROLL. I am a broker . On Saturday 26th of March, a few minutes before six o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing from London-wall to Little Bell-alley , and felt a tug at my pocket at the entrance of the alley; I turned round instantly and seized the prisoner close at my elbows; he said,

"Here it is," and produced my handkerchief from his left breast pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the watch-house that it was marked with two letters? A. I said so at first, but corrected myself before I saw it - recollecting it was new, and had not been marked.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was turning up Leather-sellers-buildings, and picked the handkerchief up, and put it in my pocket; this gentlemen turned round and laid hold of me, saying, you have got my handkerchief; I gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-215

804. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a candlestick, value 2 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Kemp .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250407-216

804. RICHARD STANLEY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d.; and an eye glass, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Howell .

ANN HOWELL. I am a widow , and live in Bartholomew-close. I advertised for a situation as housekeeper - the prisoner came on Thursday to hire me as housekeeper and bar maid; he said he kept the Hope hotel, at Ramsgate; he remained at my house till the Monday - I was to go on the 1st of April, but would not, as I did not like to be made a fool of - I missed a handkerchief and reading glass on Friday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He breakfasted with you? A. Yes, and dined, and slept at my house for three days.

Q. You went to the play together? A. Yes, I paid for him, as he had no money - we supped when we came home - I cannot say what we drank; he always took a bottle of wine after dinner and after supper - I did not lend him the handkerchief and glass - I did not go to the play in my widow's dress.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I keep the Pitt's-head, public-house, Old-street. On Sunday morning, the 20th of March, about six o'clock, the prisoner came to my house and requested I would make him a pint of ale purl; he said it was very unfortunate for him, during the time he had been in London, he had not been able to get purl early in the morning - but at home, his servant always brought him up a pint in bed; he drank it, and ordered another half-pint; he shuffled about in his pockets, and said,

"God bless me, it is very unfortunate, I have come out without money," and at the same time dropping this handkerchief over the bar, said,

"Have the goodness to take care of this, while I go to St. Bartholomew-close, where I live, and fetch the money;" he did not return.

MR. PHILLIPS to ANN HOWELL. Q. He was apprehended at your house - did he not come voluntarily to visit you? A. He came in to dress himself; I had two officers ready to take him - I went with him to several houses, to get 5 l. which he owed me; I had not then found the handkerchief.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. On the 23d of March I took the prisoner at Howell's house, and found a duplicate of the eye-glass on him, pawned at M'Dowell's, in Surry-road; I told him to be here, but he is not - he was not bound over.

Cross-examined. Q. How many different houses did they call at? A. She said he owed her 5 l., and called at three houses for him to borrow it, at his own request - if he had got it, there it would have been an end of it for what I know.

COURT. Q. Did she mention a glass and handkerchief? A. She said she had missed them.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief she lent me before we went to the Theatre, and the eye-glass she gave to me from a basket under her bed.

ANN HOWELL. It was never under the bed - I kept it on the side-board in the parlour. I lost the handkerchief before we went to the Theatre.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-217

805. JOSEPH TUNBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a tin box, value 2 d.; a handkerchief, value 2 d., five sovereigns, and ten shillings, the goods of Hugh Williams , from his person .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250407-218

806. EDWARD BRIGGS was indicted for stealing,

on the 6th of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Martin William Lawrence , from his person .

MARTIN WILLIAM LAWRENCE. On Wednesday last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Barbican , and felt my coat pocket touched behind - I missed my handkerchief, turned round, and perceived the prisoner running across the street; I followed him up Princes-street, and picked up my handkerchief; he was stopped by Mr. Alderman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWIN ALDERMAN . I was at my own door, and saw Mr. Lawrence in pursuit of the prisoner, and saw him throw the handkerchief down; I pursued, and caught him, without losing sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up at the gentleman's feet, and threw it down, as I saw him coming after me.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-219

807. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a tea-kettle, value 10 s.; two candlesticks, value 7 s.; two coats, value 5 s.; two pairs of shoes, value 6 d., and a knife, value 3 d., the goods of William Hutchinson ; four yards of linen cloth, value 13 s; a sheet, value 18 d.; a frock, value 2 s.; a lace cap, value 18 d.; two yards of lace, value 1 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. , the goods of Grey Jermain Cooper .

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON. I live in St. John-street . On the morning of the 21st of March, my servants discovered this robbery - I lost some property, and found it in possession of Matthews and Weston.

GREY JERMAIN COOPER. I live next door to Mr. Hutchinson - my house was also robbed.

COURT. That is another offence, and should be a distinct charge.

JOHN MILLS . On the 21st of March I lodged at the Bear and Ragged Staff, public-house, Smithfield. I was at the top of the house at six o'clock in the morning, looking over the party wall, and saw the prisoner twenty yards off, sitting in a gutter, on the top of the sheds, with three bundles and two coats - a labourer asked what she was doing there - she jumped up, and ran away from the things; I got on to the next roof, and secured her; the things were brought down: the part she was in is in the City.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-220

London Cases - Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

808. WILLIAM HEATH was indicted for feloniously receiving two promissory notes, for payment of and value 1 l., knowing them to have been stolen .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250407-221

809. DANIEL HENLEY was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury on the trial of a cause

"R. A. Cox, Esq. V. Edmund Kean," in the Court of King's Bench, London, on the 1st of December.

The defendant had positively sworn that he met Robert Albion Cox, Esq. Alderman, and Mrs. Cox, walking together, in St. Martin's-lane, about the beginning of June, 1824; it was proved that Mr. Alderman Cox had not seen Mrs. Cox since the 20th of April, 1824, till within the last three weeks, but that the defendant had met Mr. Alderman Cox in St. Martin's-lane, when walking with Miss Ann Wickstead, his niece, about the time stated.

Verdict,

" NOT GUILTY , being of opinion that the defendant swore mistakenly."

Reference Number: t18250407-222

810. HENRY BARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d March , 14 ozs. of tea, value 2 s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM REA . I am in the East India Company service. The prisoner was in their employ: some tea was missed from the floor where he was generally employed; and when he left work 14 ozs. of Twankay tea was found in his boots - we missed that quantity, and the quality corresponded: he had been some years in the Company's employ.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-223

811. PROSPER MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a waistcoat, value 10 s. , the property of Edward Phillips Doudney and Edward Doudney .

JOHN LINES . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 7th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in company with two others in Goswell-street, lurking about Miss Doudney's door. I watched them for half an hour, at last the prisoner went in and took out a black waistcoat; he ran towards me, and I caught him in my arms: he threw the waistcoat away, and it was lost while we were scuffling.

EDWARD DOUDNEY. I am in partnership with my father Edward Phillip Doudney; we are tailors. I was busy, with my back to the door. The officers brought the prisoner, in - I missed a black waistcoat.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am a patrol, and was watching these men for half an hour. I saw the prisoner run out of the shop, but did not see him throw the waistcoat away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-224

812. ANN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , six packets of court-plaister, value 1 s.; two needle-books, value 3 s.; two smelling-bottles, value 3 s.; a pin-cushion, value 6 d.; a pair of scissars, value 1 s.; a gold ring, value 4 s.; a printed bound book, value 2 s.; two ear-rings, value 2 s.; a steel pin, value 6 d., and two steel tassels, value 6 d., the goods of Edwin Alderman , her master .

EDWIN ALDERMAN. I am a silversmith and jeweller , and live in Barbican . The prisoner was my shopwoman , and had lived four or five months with me. On the 21st of February I received information from another servant; I sent for an officer (her box had been examined previously by my wife and a servant). I desired her to go up stairs, and open her box; she took the key, opened it, and I found the articles stated in the indictment in it, and a purse containing 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. As I came to each article she said she had purchased them out of the shop, and put the money into the till. It is customary, when shopwomen want things, to have them put down to them - she had a bottle put down against her wages: when I came to the gold ring, she said a friend of her mother's gave it to her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She had a very good character? A. Yes; I had paid her 3 l. 10 s. shortly before. She had run up stairs, and locked her box, on hearing she was to be questioned; it is impossible for me to ascertain whether they have been paid for.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-225

813. HENRY VEIZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , forty-four yards of sheeting, value 5 l. 16 s. 6 d., and twelve yards of linen, value 2 l. 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Betts , and Richard Bury .

RICHARD BURY. I am in partnership with Thomas Bury; we are waggon masters . I was from home when this occurred.

JAMES POTTER . I am servant to the prosecutors. On the 31st of March I put a parcel into the middle of the waggon, at the Ipswich Arms, Cullum-street; it was directed to

"- Tatton, Esq. Layston-hall Abbey." I missed it when I got to Ipswich; I left the Inn about six or seven o'clock in the evening.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer. On the 31st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch, with this parcel, directed to

"- Tatton, Esq. Leyston-hall Abbey." He said some gentleman gave it to him in Fenchurch-street, to carry to Bishopsgate-street. I found a bill of parcels in it, which lead to the owner.

BENJAMIN TODD . I am a linen-draper. I packed up this parcel - the direction is in my hand-writing.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me to carry it for him to Bishopsgate-street.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-226

814. RICHARD WILLIAM KEAN was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS BLACKETT . I am a shawl and bombasin warehouseman , and live in Cheapside. The prisoner was in my employ as a traveller - he received money on my account. He always accounted to my young man every day when he came home.

JEREMIAH HOWARD . I am a brazier; I bought a shawl of the prisoner, some time in November, for three guineas, at the Woolpack, public-house; he gave a receipt to the servant of the house; I gave her the money at 5 s. a week.

SARAH PINDER . I am servant at the Woolpack. I paid the prisoner 2 l. 18 s. at one time for the shawl - here is his receipt; I knew him by his using our house.

CHARLES PHIPP . I am clerk to Mr. Blackett. On the morning of the 23d of November the prisoner took out some goods; he returned, and said he had sold this shawl to Mr. Williams, of Mile-end, for 55 s. on credit; he brought on money home.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I am a haberdasher, and live at Mile-end. I bought no shawl of the prisoner at any time; there is no other person of my name in the trade at Mile-end.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave the name of Williams, as master had not given me leave to sell a single one; as such, I took the risk of it myself - I intended to pay the money when the credit had expired.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-227

815. RICHARD WILLIAM KEAN was again indicted for a like offence .

MR. BLACKETT. The prisoner never accounted to me for 30 s. for a shawl sold to Vesey.

CHARLES PHIPP . When the prisoner sold a shawl on credit, it was his duty to have it entered; and if he received the money, he was to pay it to me immediately - he has entered one on the 8th of March, to Mr. Haffenden.

MARY ANN VEZEY . I am bar-maid at Mr. French's. I bought a shawl of the prisoner for 30 s.; I paid him 10 s. on the 8th of March when I bought it - I have since paid the 1 l. to Mr. French.

BENJAMIN FRENCH . I paid the prisoner a sovereign, on account of this shawl, on the 15th of March.

GEORGE HAFFENDEN . The prisoner has charged me with this shawl - I never had it; I have bought nothing of him for a year - I live at Woolwich.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to pay for it, and offered to pay for it when I was taken.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-228

NEW COURT.

(5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

816. GABRIEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a tea-kettle, value 13 s., the goods of John Steward , privately in his shop .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-229

817. GEORGE HANNELL & WILLIAM HANNELL were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 30 lbs. weight of coloured glass, value 6 l. , the goods of Mary Muss , widow .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PIKE HEDGLAND . I superintend the business of Mrs. Mary Muss, at her factory, No. 30, Mary-street, Hampstead-road , where the glass is made; her dwelling-house is in Warren-street, Fitzroy-square.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever see William Hannell on the premises? A. No; the glass has been stolen within the last six months; I have lived there about five months; the stock was taken on the 4th of June, and again on the 3rd of March.

BENJAMIN BAILEY . I went to Mr. Levy's house, and found 30 lbs. of pot metal, which I am positive belonged to Mrs. Muss.

JOSEPH LEVY did not attend.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-230

818. WILLIAM HANNELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 100 lbs. weight of coloured glass, value 20 l. , the goods of Mary Muss , widow .

JOHN PIKE HEDGLAND . I am in the employ of Mary Muss. I did not know the prisoner, and never saw him about the premises.

BENJAMIN BAILEY . I have seen the prisoner about our premises occasionally, but not often; our stock was taken, and we missed a quantity of glass.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have seen

the prisoner? A. But seldom; he was sometimes employed to turn the mill; I have not seen him since Christmas; his brother was there in constant employ - he came to see his brother when he pleased.

WILSON COOK . I am a looking-glass manufacturer, and deal in paintings and stained glass, and live in Chapel-court, Long-acre; the prisoner brought me some stained glass, called pot-metal, about three weeks or a month before Christmas; he asked if I wanted to buy any, as he knew a person who was taken ill, in the looking glass way, who had some to dispose of, as he was obliged to go into the country, and his wife wished to sell it to go down to him. I bought 15 or 16 lbs.; he came to me again several times with a woman, saying she was the man's wife. I dealt with him five or six times for the same sort of metal; I bought about 150 lbs. within about two months - some of it is here now. Mr. Hedgland and Mr. Bailey afterwards made inquiry about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner's brother? A. Yes; but he never brought me any glass, except on his master's account, a Mr. Headley.

Q. Did you know his brother was employed by Mrs. Muss? A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was it a particular sort of glass? A. No, it is made by every manufacturer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-231

819. JAMES QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a gown, value 12 s., and a waistcoat, value 6 s. , the goods of Richard Nicholas Kenny .

ELIZABETH KENNY . I am the wife of Nicholas Kenny, we live in South Molton-street . On the 6th of April, the prisoner came into our tap-room and had some beer - he went to sleep for about a quarter of an hour, he awoke, and then went into the yard - we missed him soon after; there was a waistcoat of my husband's in the wash-house, and a gown of mine - they were missed after the prisoner was gone; I had seen them safe about one o'clock, and we found them at a pawnbroker's the same evening.

JOHN KING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street; a gown and waistcoat were pawned at my shop by the prisoner, to the best of my belief, in the name of William Kenny, on the 6th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, for 4 s. 11 d.

JAMES KNELLER . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner on the 6th of April, about six o'clock in the evening; I found 4 s. 7 d. on him, and two duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the yard; when I came out, I went to see a friend in Grosvenor-square - I then went to the house again, and the landlady said.

"Have you taken my gown?" I said,

"No."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-232

Before Mr. Recorder.

820. MARY ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Mann .

JOHN BRIGGS . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Mann, pawnbroker , of Greek-street , in the City of London. On the 22d of March, the prisoner came to the shop with another woman between twelve and one o'clock, with some dirty flannel shirts for which she asked 1 s.; we refused to take them in; they then went to the door, she returned to the counter, and offered the shirts for 6 d., but we would not take them; she gave them to the other woman, who went up the street; before the prisoner got to the door I saw her stooping - she then went away; I immediately missed this handkerchief, which had been pinned at the door, just inside; I had seen it safe about ten minutes before; I went, and overtook her in Crown-court, which is in the County - she threw the handkerchief on the ground, from under her clothes - I took it up and ran after her; and she ran into a house in Type-court; she was brought out and struck me, turned back to Finsbury-square, and got away - she was taken that day.

RICHARD BEVAN . I was going up Crown-court, with two pillars on my shoulder, and heard the cry of

"Stop thief!" I saw the prisoner running with the handkerchief in her hand, which she threw down and ran away. I am certain of her person - I was then going towards Finsbury-square, and saw her again, and saw her hit the boy in the face.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go to my husband yesterday, and ask him to give you 1 l. not to come against him? A. No; I took 6 d. from her husband, and my father told me not to have any thing to do with her.

JOHN BEE . I am a constable. Crown-court is in the County; the prisoner was delivered to me in Wine-court, Moor-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief at the step of the door.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-233

821. WILLIAM BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, three gallons of brandy, value 3 l. , the goods of Our Lord the King .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-234

822. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , eight shirts, value 2 l.; thirteen handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; seven waistcoats, value 1 l.; a pair of breeches, value 3 s.; four collars, value 4 s.; five books, value 2 l.; two razors, value 2 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 7 s.; and a book, value 1 l. ; the goods of Mary Ann Edwards , spinster .

JOHN HARRIS . I live at Kingston, and am a carrier from thence to London. Mary Ann Edwards, is a teacher of music and lives at Kingston, but is too ill to attend; I received these goods from her in a large chest to be taken to Sandy End Fulham; I put it behind the cart, tied it with a cord and put a chain over it; I brought it safe to London, and did not miss it till I got to Castle-street, Long acre ; I then found the cord had been cut, and the trunk lifted off - I was sitting on the front of the cart, and had not observed any person near; I had a parcel to call for, and then missed the box - it was directed for

"Mr. Fletcher, Sandy End Fulham;" I saw it on the following Monday, at Hatton Garden - the direction was then torn off; the prisoner was then in custody - I am quite sure it

was the box that was given to me, the contents were all in it as described in the indictment; the officers had opened the box with a key - I afterwards saw Miss Edwards at the office, she claimed it and the contents.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Islington. I was in Great Queen-street with Reynolds, between seven and eight o'clock, on Tuesday, the 27th of March, it was nearly dark - I observed the prisoner and two others going very quick along the pavement, and I saw the errand cart just entering the end of Long acre; in Drury Lane; I saw the prisoner cross the end of the cart several times, he appeared to be cutting a rope, and then crossed to the opposite side of the road; on one occasion, I saw a piece of rope fly on one side - I was about sixty or seventy yards from them; the cart then turned down Mercer-street towards Seven Dials, they followed - it then turned down Castle-street; the box was then loose - I saw them lift it up as if to try if it was fast; this was before the cart had stopped; Castle-street, is a dark street; I heard them whistle; they made a stand - we went round Seven Dials and met them again - one was walking at each end of the box, carrying it between them, and the third was on the opposite side of the way; we let them go on till they got into a street opposite the Seven Dials; I then went up to the person who was carrying the box with the prisoner, and asked him what he was doing with it - he stepped back directly, and struck me a violent blow in the mouth; we struggled for about five minutes - I kept hold of him as long as I could, but he got from me in consequence of the violence I met with - I took care of the box as well as I could, and then got it into a shop - from thence I took it to the office where it was claimed by Miss Edwards, who I believe is now dying; Reynolds seized the prisoner, the third person instantly came to try to rescue him; I saw him strike Reynolds on the side of the head to try to get the prisoner away, but we at length pushed the prisoner into the shop where the box was and secured him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me make any resistance? A. Certainly I did, it required some force to get you into the shop.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I am an officer of Clerkenwell. I was in Great Queen-street, with Colton, on the 22d of March. We saw the prisoner and two others following the cart; I saw the box behind the cart, but could not tell whether it was tied then or not; I saw the prisoner cross against the back of the cart and draw something across it - I could not distinguish what; one of them then crossed the cart, and lifted up the box to see if it was loose, but did not take it away; the cart turned down Mercer-street, and then my partner and I were close behind it, and saw that the rope had been cut - it was hanging down; the cart went on to Castle-street, where the carman stopped at an ironmonger's shop; the three persons gave a whistle and all came to the left side of the cart farthest from the shop. We passed the prisoner and his companions; we went round St. Andrew's-street and then returned; we met the prisoner and another carrying the box, the third person was walking on the other side; we followed them a little distance in hopes of getting some assistance: when we got to the Seven Dials we went over and asked what they had got; I laid hold of the prisoner, and Colton took the other, who was carrying the box; the third one crossed over in my direction, and struck me a violent blow in the mouth: I still kept hold of the prisoner, and he struck me on the right eye, the third person still continuing to strike me: I knocked the prisoner down and fell on him - the third person then got away: I kept hold of the prisoner and would not let him go: another person came up and we got him into a baker's shop: the box was brought over by Colton and the other person: the prisoner was taken to the watch-house; the box was taken to Hatton-garden and opened by the chief officer - it was claimed by the carrier and by the young lady.

PRISONER. Q. Were you walking with Colton, and coming down Long-acre? A. Yes; it was dark but the streets were lighted with gas. You appeared to be cutting a rope when in Long-acre.

WM. FRICKER . I am a broker and live at Kingston. I am uncle to Mary Ann Edwards - she is now very ill. I know the trunk; I assisted in putting it into the cart - I packed part of the property in it, and delivered it to the errand cart: the shirts were some she had made for her brother, who was going abroad; I directed it to be left at Mr. Fletcher's, Grove House, Sandy end, Fulham: I saw it at the office on the 23d of March - the direction had been torn off it.

THOMAS FOXALL . I am a watchman. I was going to my beat in the Seven Dials, and saw a great mob - I went up and saw Colton, the officer, with his face and his handkerchief covered with blood - the prisoner was then in custody: I took him to the watch-house - he went quietly with me: I saw the trunk in Mr. Gray's (a baker) shop - I saw some blood upon Reynolds.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I was going to the Sans Pareil Theatre, and in Great St. Andrew's-street, I saw two men put a box down as if to rest, and in a moment heard a cry of Stop thief! two men ran across and secured one of them; the other stumbled; the officer then turned round and secured me, saying that I was one of them: he struck me on the head, and stunned me. (The prisoner concluded by solemnly appealing to the Almighty declaring his innocence).

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-235

823. ROBERT GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , four shirt, value 3 l., and a hat, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Walker ; and JAMES ASPINALL and HANNAH RIDDEL were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WALKER . I am assistant to Mr. Hulmandel, the lithographic printer, of Great Marlborough-street. The prisoner Gardiner was in his service; I delivered to him, on Wednesday morning last, four shirts, to take to the laundress, at Battle-bridge, and a hat to take into the Borough: the shirts might be worth about 3 l. - the hat 20 s.; it was to be reduced in the brim - he never returned; he had given no notice of his intention of leaving his employer. On the following day I inquired after him at his usual residence, at a court in Wells-street, but I did not see him again till Friday evening, when he was taken up. I went with Schofield to a sort of clothes shop, No. 38, Wells-street, and saw Aspinall and Riddell; Schofield asked if they had bought any shirts of Gardiner; he

mentioned the price, 5 s. 3 1/2 d., naming the day on which they were taken by Gardiner: they denied positively having seen either the boy or the articles; they first said they were man and wife and then they denied it: they appeared to be in the shop as persons conducting the business: the officer then commenced his search; they mentioned something about his going into some back premises: the officer first looked round the counter and there he found one of the shirts, and another among the bed clothes: a third shirt was found concealed among some other things - I do not exactly know what they were: the fourth was found partly cut up in a corner of the room - the parts that were found made up the entire shirt when put together - my name was not on them, but I knew them to be mine - I stated so in the prisoners' presence. The man addressed himself to the woman, and insisted upon her giving them up if she had purchased them, which he said he knew nothing about: she denied knowing any thing about them: after the search the two prisoners were taken into custody: there was a third person in the shop, who was not taken - the duplicate of the hat was found in the possession of a waiter at the Jew's Harp tavern.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not some harness hanging on the outside of the door of the shop? A. Yes, there was.

Q. Did not the man and the woman tell you that he was a harness-maker, lodging in the house? A. Yes; the man denied that he had bought any shirts.

Q. Was it not as soon as the first shirt was found that the man said

"If you have bought any shirts you had better give them up? A. Yes. I have no private mark upon them.

Q. Were there any shirts exposed for sale? A. I did not notice any - there were some things hanging up.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. Walker applied to me. I apprehended Gardiner, and went with Mr. Walker to the shop, about two o'clock in the afternoon - I found the two prisoners in the shop, and another man - I had found Gardiner at the Jew's Harp, on the Thursday night; I told him he was charged with stealing a hat and five shirts; he denied all knowledge of it: I took him to the watch-house, and as we were going to the office next morning I told him I had found the hat - he then said he had taken it, and asked me if I had found the shirts; I said I had not, but I had traced different places where he had offered them for 12 s. - he then said he had sold them to a man and woman, who kept a shop at No. 38, Wells-street; he described the people, and said he had got but 5 s. 3 1/2 d., which was paid him by the woman, and that they then put him out at the back door of the house. I went to the house with Mr. Walker and his employer - the man was behind the counter, and the woman rather towards the end; there was a young man there, who appeared as if he had called on business - they were all in conversation; I told Aspinall I had got a search-warrant for five shirts, and asked if they had not bought them of a dirty looking boy, on Wednesday, for 5 s. 31 d. - they both positively denied any knowledge of them; there was a little harness inside the shop, and a little out; I understand the man works at that business; I then said I must proceed to search for the property; they said I was very welcome - they said they had some back premises, and wished me to go and search them - I began to search the shop first, and the woman assisted in moving the things. Under the counter I found a calico shirt - they did not at that time give any account of how they came by it, but the man told the woman to give the shirts up - she declared positively that she had got no more. I then let a bedstead down, and under the bed and bedclothes we found two linen shirts; the man still continued wishing her to give up the property, but neither of them gave any account of how they came by it; I searched in a recess in the wall, and among a parcel of rubbish I found another linen shirt; it was in strips, but appeared to be an entire shirt when the pieces were put together - Mr. Walker claimed them; the woman then said she had brought them of the prisoner Gardiner; I do not think she mentioned whether the man was present - I asked if he was present; he said he could not tell as there were so many things brought in; the woman then took it all on herself, and said the man had nothing to do with it; I took them both into custody. There is a back door to the house which leads to Booth-court.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go up stairs at all? A. No, I did not; I do not know whether the woman is a widow or not; at first they said they were man and wife, but afterwards they said they were not, and therefore I took them both, or I should only have taken the man.

CHARLES HULMANDELL . Mr. Walker is my assistant. Gardiner lived with me - he gave me no notice of his being about to leave. I went with Schofield to No. 38, Wells-street, and found the two prisoners and a man in the shop; the officer asked who owned the shop - the man stepped forward, and said he did. I saw some harness at the door, and some inside, and some phials and old rags - I did not see any wearing apparel. The officer then said he had a warrant to search for five shirts, which had been sold by a boy for 5 s. 3 1/2 d.; they both denied knowing any thing about it: a proposal was made by one of them, but I cannot tell which, to search the back premises, which was declined. The officer searched under the counter, in which Riddell assisted - among some rags he found a shirt, which was claimed by Walker: no objection was made to that, or any account given of how they became possessed of it; the man then told her to give up the other shirts if she had any; she denied knowing of any: the officer continued to search, and among the clothes of an old bed he found two other shirts; some conversation then took place, and they said they were not married. The officer proceeded to search, and near the place where the man appeared to have been at work, among some old bits of leather and other things was found a fourth shirt, which was partly unripped - I saw the parts put together, and they appeared to form a shirt - they were all claimed by Walker; the woman then said she had given 5 s. and a pint of beer for them, and had bought them of the boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it at the latter end of all that they said they were married? A. Yes.

ELIZABETH CARR . I live in Northampton-street, Battle-bridge; my husband works for Mr. Hulmandell, and generally brought Mr. Walker's linen to me to wash - the prisoner brought no linen to me on the Wednesday; I sent my little girl to inquire about it next day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ASPINALL'S Defence. I know nothing of the transaction; my business is quite separate from the other. I never saw the boy till we were taken into custody.

RIDDEL'S Defence. When the officer came into the shop Mr. Aspinall thought it was some person come about harness, and therefore he said he lived there; the officer then said he came for some shirts, but I did not think it was what I had bought on the Wednesday; I thought it had been some I had bought that day; I then took the shirts from the counter myself, and those from the bed - they did not lay hold of any of them till I put them on the counter; I did not form any idea they were stolen when I bought them; the boy said he brought them from his brother, and asked 6 s. for them - I said I would give 5 s. and a pint of beer for himself.

SARAH ALLENFORD . I live at Enfield, and am the landlady of the house where Mrs. Riddel lives - I let her the shop, and the kitchen under it; the house is let out in tenements - Aspinall rents the kitchen of her; he cuts out his work in the shop, and has men to work in the kitchen. I have known her four years; she has been an honest, sober, steady woman.

GARDINER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

RIDDEL - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

ASPINALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-236

824. DANIEL LEVERIDGE was indicted for, that he, on the 14th of March , forty pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made to the likeness of good and lawful shillings, the same not being cut in pieces, feloniously did put off to John Elledge , at a lower rate and value than the same by their denomination did import, and were counterfeited for .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden; in consequence of directions from the Mint, I employed John Elledge to discover sellers of counterfeit coin. On the 14th of March, I had given him some money to make a purchase; I do not remember what; but I had searched him before he went out, and he had nothing more about him than what I gave him. He brought me, to my own house in the afternoon, forty bad shillings; they were packed in separate papers; I bade him mark them, which he did in my presence, and I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he tell you where he was going? A. No. not particularly; but I had information that there were some at Westminster; I have known him twenty-five years. He had never been in any scrape, or difficulty, to my knowledge - I left him entirely to himself.

Q. Is he a relation of yours? A. Yes, he is; I gave him all the information I could to direct him in his search, but I had not named any particular person. I had given him money on several occasions - I cannot tell the amount of what I gave him that day.

JOHN ELLEDGE. I am a shoemaker, and live in Elder-walk. On the 14th of March I went to the sign of the Ship, public-house, in Duck-lane, Westminster; I saw a person there with whom I had made an appointment, but I could not then get any thing from him - the prisoner was present - we were all in one box together; that person and the prisoner conversed together; the prisoner afterwards asked what I wanted; I told him two-score of bobs, (I meant shillings). The prisoner went out, and returned in a very short time; he then came and sat down by my side: he said,

"Here are the things;" he gave me two paper parcels, and I paid him 15 s. - I paid him one crown, one half-crown, seven shillings, and a sixpence. I received this money in change for a sovereign which I had received from Limbrick. I delivered the papers to Mr. Limbrick, and made a mark upon each of the pieces of money - I had not opened the papers before I delivered them to him.

Cross-examined. Q. How often before have you been out upon such expeditions? A. Several times, but I never was examined before to day.

Q. Did Limbrick ask if you had any other money? A. Yes, and I said No. He did not search me - he has upon other occasions.

Q. Did he mark the money he gave you? A. No.

Q. Where did you learn that pretty phrase, two-score of bobs? A. I have learnt it some time, perhaps, some years.

Q. Where did you change the sovereign? A. At the Three Elms, public-house, St. Ann's-street, Orchard-street, Westminster.

Q. Have you ever been before a Magistrate before? A. Yes, in a case of felony, for stealing some cheese. I have been before a Justice on other occasions, but I do not know how many - it may be two or three years ago since I first went; the first time was the case of an assault. On one occasion, a night-constable took up a felon, and I attended as a witness; but I never attended a case in which Limbrick was concerned.

Re-examined. Q. Was the prisoner a stranger to you? Yes, but the man who was with him was not. I had seen him on the Saturday before; I went there by appointment - I had been employed on a similar business on the Saturday preceding; I have seen the landlord of the public-house here to day.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner from the information of the last witness, at the Ship, in Duck-lane, on Saturday, the 26th of March, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night. I was in company with Pace; the prisoner took us to a house in a court, which we searched, but found nothing; the next morning we searched a stable, of which he gave us the key, but found nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was this court to which he took you? A. I do not know the name of it; his wife was there washing; no one opposed our going in. I had been in search of him before for a day or two; I did not know where he lived before that night.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of the Mint; these are counterfeit shillings; they do not appear to have been in circulation; there is a preparation on them, which they put on before they circulate them - they are covered with a slight muriate of silver; I suppose 1 oz. of silver would cover some thousands of them - they are all from the same die.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Years , and Twice Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-237

825. BARNET LIEPMAN was indicted for unlawfully

and feloniously putting off to Elizabeth Mary Ann Williams , two pieces of counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of good sovereigns, the same not being cut in pieces, for the sum of 12 s.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable, and live in New-street, Lambeth. I know Elizabeth Mary Ann Williams, and Myers the officer; I gave directions to Williams to discover persons making counterfeit coin; on the 22d of December I employed her in that way, and on the 23d she came to me again with Myers, at the Bell, public-house, in Falcon-court; I then gave her twelve shillings - they were good. I searched her pocket, and her bonnet to see if she had any more money about her - she had not. On the day before I had gone with her as far as the end of Petticoat-lane, but did not go farther then, as the officers are pretty well known there. On the 23d I saw her and Myers again, between five and six o'clock in the evening, at my house at Lambeth; she gave me two sovereigns, which I marked before her face, and gave to Myers; he wrapped them up in paper, and wrote something upon it; I put my initials upon it, and the date. I think the sovereigns were in the same paper, but folded so as to prevent their rubbing against each other.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What parish are you constable of? A. Lambeth; I have been an officer eight or nine years. I never was an officer of Union-street; I have been employed as an extra officer there - I was prevented from being a constable for ten or eleven weeks, because I was arrested upon a trespass, and was forced to take the benefit of the act. I never knew Mrs. Williams by the name of Daly - I never heard of that name - I asked her to do this job for me; there was a woman present when I gave her the money, who goes by the name of Smith, and Myers the officer. I spoke to Mrs. Smith while she was there, about the transaction. I think she is between thirty and forty years of age. I believe we had some beer to drink; I called Mrs. Smith, Smith or Mary - and Williams, I called Betsey. I have heard Smith called Dowling, or Downing; I knew her best by the name of Smith.

Q. Was there a man there of the name of Daly, or Delay? A. I do not know him by name - Myers walked with Williams and me part of the way to Petticoat-lane, but with no other man. I do not know such a man as Delay; I heard there was a man of that name at the King of Prussia, public-house, in Petticoat-lane, but I never saw him.

Re-examined. Q. Why do you call the witness Mrs. Williams? A. I have seen her marriage register; her name before she was married was Richards. I was the person who made Smith and Williams acquainted together.

ELIZABETH MARY ANN WILLIAMS. I am the wife of William Frederick Williams . I do not know where he lives - he has left me; I know Goff, and live near him; I saw him on the 22d of December; I saw the prisoner that day at the King of Prussia, in Wentworth-street, and a man of the name of Liepman Liepman; the prisoner said he would look out, and be in Wentworth-street to meet me on the following day, and take me to his house; I met him on the 23d. I had seen Goff and Myers at the Bell, in Falcon-court, between three and four o'clock - Goff gave me 12 s. - before he gave me the money, he searched my bonnet and my pockets. I had no other money about me but what he gave; which was twelve separate shillings. I then went to Wentworth-street, met the prisoner, and went with him to his house in Marlborough-court, which leads from Petticoat-lane to Wentworth-street. Liepman Liepman came there - I had seen them both the day before; the prisoner then asked, what I wanted; I said,

"Two sovereigns;" and he told Liepman Liepman to go and get them, which he did; I paid 12 s. for them; the prisoner delivered them to me; I took them to Mr. Goff's house and gave them to him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was your maiden name? A. Elizabeth Mary Ann Smith Richards.

Q. Did you ever go by any other name except Richards or Williams? A. No, not that I remember; I never answer to any other name.

Q. Did you bring a charge of bigamy against your husband? A. Yes; but the Magistrate dismissed it.

Q. Are you well acquainted with Goff? A. Yes; I know him very well. I had emptied my pocket; I do not think he searched my gloves.

Q. What was you to have for this? A. I do not know; I have got nothing yet; I expect my expences like another witness.

Q. Do you not expect and hope to be paid by the gentlemen of the Mint for doing this job? A. I do not know who is to pay me; I have not been promised any thing - I expect they will pay me for my loss of time, either the gentlemen of the Mint or the Court.

Q. Before you set about all this trouble, did Goff say to you, or you to him, anything about what you was to get? A. No; he said, I should be paid for my time as a witness, that was all.

Q. Was Mr. Goff the only person who told you you was to be paid by the Court as a witness? A. Myers told me I should be paid as a witness.

Q. Did Myers mention no sum? A. No.

Q. What do you think will be a proper payment for what you have done? A. I do not know.

Q. Have you never made up your mind as to what you are to get for it? A. No, I have not.

Q. Were you ever at the office of the Solicitor of the Mint? A. Yes, I have been there.

Q. Did you ever get any money from Myers on the footing of this transaction? A. Not on this transaction nor on any other. No; I have borrowed a sovereign of Mrs. Myers, which I intend to pay her.

Q. Was that since you were employed in this transaction, or before? A. It is since that.

Q. Did Mr. Myers know of it? A. I believe he did.

Q. When you went to the Bell on the 23d, who were there? A. Mr. Goff and Mr. Myers.

Q. What part of the Bell was it? A. I do not know what they call it; it was a room that many people go into.

Q. How long were you there? A. Perhaps half an hour.

Q. Had you any refreshment? A. I had little porter.

Q. Did Mr. Goff and Mr. Myers take any thing? A. I did not watch them; they did take porter out of the same pot with me.

Q. Who went with you on the 23d to Petticoat-lane? A. A woman.

Q. Did Myers and Goff go with you on that day? A. No.

Q. Did they go with you on the day before the 22d? A. Yes, and a woman, the name she went by was Smith; I never saw her before that day, and they were the only persons, man or woman, who went with me.

Q. Have you seen her since? A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever heard her go by the name of Downing or Dowling? A. No; I have seen Delany; I saw him in Wentworth-street, he was speaking to Mrs. Smith; Goff and Myers were not with me then; I lived at that time at No. 6, Portugal-street, Lambeth; I get my living by my needle, or winding cotton.

Re-examined. Q. You have known Goff for twelve years; he employed you in this transaction, and he told you you should be paid for your loss of time? A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever had any promise from any of the gentlemen of the Mint for what you have done? A. No.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a constable. I saw the last witness on the 22d and 23d of December; Goff gave her 12 s.; I was at Goff's house in the evening when she returned; she put down a paper with two counterfeit sovereigns - I marked them, put them into another piece of paper which I also marked, and gave them to Goff, who put his initials on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Who introduced you to Williams? A. I have known her five years. I saw Morris Delany and Williams standing outside the door in Fenchurch-street; there was, I believe, one woman with them; I was at some distance and cannot tell whether they were in conversation: I had no conversation with Williams as to what she was to get for this business. I told her Government would pay her, I had no doubt of it: I never gave her any money myself; my wife told me on one occasion, she had given her some, but I do not know what - that is since this business; she gets her living by needle-work: I never heard Goff say any thing to her about what she was to get for it. I never knew of her going to the Solicitor of the Mint but once, when we all went together; she has been employed in other jobs besides this - I think about four - two of them were the same day - about the 21st of February - that was the last time; the job for which we are now trying the prisoner was the first - I have not received any money myself for this business.

JOHN FIELD . These are both counterfeit sovereigns, and I should think not worth 3 d. the two.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Years , and Three times Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-238

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

826. ISAAC SOLOMONS was indicted for a like offence .

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable, and employed a person of the name of Rose. I met him on the 21st of February, at the Bell, in Falcon-court; I gave him six good shillings which had been in circulation; I searched him before I gave them to him - he had no other money about him; he returned to me on the same evening while Myers with me; he then gave me fifteen counterfeit shillings, which I marked and put in a paper - he has kept it ever since.

WILLIAM ROSE . On the 21st of February I saw Goff and Myers. I received from Goff 6 s. in shillings, and went from them about five o'clock. I went with Elizabeth Williams to Petticoat lane; I left her at the top while I went down to the King of Prussia public-house; I had seen the prisoner before (on the 19th,) and he told me I might find him there; I found him with a pot of porter in his hand; he took it into the tap-room and came out with me - we walked up the lane, and as we were going along I asked him what he sold the bobs a score; he said 5 s.: we came to the top of the lane and Williams was there: he asked what we would take; we said a score each: he then said the price would be 6 s.: we then walked down a lane and he left us and returned to us and gave us a little paper parcel which contained only fifteen. I was counting them and he said I need not count them, they were all right: I then put them into my pocket and Williams took a paper of them likewise. I went to the Bell, in Falcon-court, and found Myers and Goff there: I gave the parcel to Goff, and the pieces were marked in my presence.

ELIZABETH MARY ANN WILLIAMS . I know the prisoner. On the 21st of February I was with Rose - I asked the prisoner for a score of bobs - he went and fetched them - I gave him 6 s. for them, and took them directly to Mr. Goff, at the Bell.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a constable. On the 21st of February I saw Rose deliver this parcel to Goff, and Elizabeth Williams delivered this parcel to him; I wrote upon each of them; Goff and myself went with them from the Bell in Falcon-court, to Aldgate, and there left them.

JOHN FIELD . These two papers contained thirty-five counterfeit shillings; they seen to be all from the same die - they are wrapped up carefully to prevent friction.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent of the charge.

JURY to ROSE. Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner before? A. I had seen him on Saturday evening, the 19th - that was the first time I saw him; I was at a wine vaults when he came up to me, and said

"Do you want any things?" I said

"What things, tanners?" he said

"I have no tanners, but I have some bobs - if you want any next week you can find me at the King of Prussia."

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-239

827. HENRY OLIVER was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN ELLEDGE . I live at No. 3, Elder-walk, Islington. I know the prisoner. I met him by appointment on the 4th of March. I had seen Limbrick and Lloyd the preceding evening, after I had made the appointment with the prisoner: I received 15 s. from Limbrick, and had no other money about me: the next morning I saw the prisoner at the Pied Horse public-house, in Chiswell-street; he asked me what I wanted; I said two score - meaning what are called bobs - that is counterfeit shillings; he said if I would give him 12 s. he would go and get them: I gave him two half-crowns, four shillings and six sixpences; he told me to wait till he returned: he returned in about twenty minutes, and I asked if he had got them; he said Yes; and we came out of the

house together, and walked along Chiswell-street; as we went along he said to me

"Have you got a shilling?" I said

"All I have got is 3 1/2 d.;" he said he wanted to buy stuff to colour them, as they were too bright to pass; I gave him the 5 1/2 d., and walked with him to the corner of Carthusian-street: he then pulled out one of the counterfeit shillings, and said

"When you see these again you will see them in a different state:" he then told me to call at the Cross Keys in Belton-street, between one and two o'clock and they should be ready for me; I went to the house about two o'clock, and saw him with some beer before him; I asked him if he had got them; he said Yes, and pulled them from a hat which he had between his legs; he produced two paper parcels which he said contained two score; he said I must give him 2 s. more for colouring them; I gave 1 s. 6 d. and was going to give him the half-penny - he said

"Never mind the halfpenny;" I then went to see for Limbrick at Hatton-garden office, but I heard he was out of town and I did not see him till Monday, when I gave him the parcel.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. The last witness was employed by me, on behalf of the Mint - I had seen him on the evening before the 4th of March - I had frequently given him money, and I think on that occasion, I gave him 1 l. 5 s.; - I was sent to Bath on the Saturday, and returned on Sunday; I saw Elledge again on the Monday, and he delivered to me two parcels of bad money, which he marked in my presence; in consequence of the information which I got from him, I assisted Lloyd in apprehending the prisoner.

ANDREW LLOYD . I assisted Limbrick in apprehending the prisoner; I searched him and found a bundle with two score of counterfeit shillings, and ten shillings and ten sixpences - he said he had just picked up the bundle; but it was a very dirty morning, and there was no dirt on it.

JOHN FIELD . The whole of this coin is counterfeited - it is all made from the same die - it has undergone a preparation to make it look like silver, which has been in circulation.

JOHN ELLEDGE re-examined. Q. Were you ever in a court of justice? A. Not as a prisoner - I am known by the officers, and have been for twenty-five years; I have never had any charge against me, either for passing forged notes or any thing else.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Years and Twice Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-240

828. HENRY BARTON and PHILLIP WARD were indicted for a like offence .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ELLEDGE . I saw the prisoner Barton between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 12th of March - the other prisoner was not then with him; I had been introduced to Barton, and had been talking about bad money, and asked if he could get me any - he said his partner was out, and he did not know. He sat some time, and then went out and returned, and said, he could not find his partner, but he was always to be found at the Ship, public-house, in Duck-lane - I went to the Ship, and met him there between nine and ten o'clock - Barton and I went into the Ship, Barton said the money would soon be forthcoming; we drank at the bar and I changed a sovereign - before I got the change, Barton called me out to the door, and said in Ward's presence, that they had been only able to make up ten bobs-worth - he said there is twenty-five bobs and five spuds - I took the coin and gave Ward the money; I then left them, they both ran after me and said, I had given them a tinker, meaning a bad sixpence - I changed it.

Prisoner BARTON. He came to me and asked me to sell some plate for him; I told him I could not - he said he had a great quantity of silver candlesticks, and spoons and forks, which he had brought from the country; and if I could sell them for him, he would take some bad money and some good. He then told me he would meet me on the Saturday following, which was the 11th of March - he shewed me a duplicate of four candlesticks, pawned for 3 l., and said he had got the rest of the plate concealed - and said, if I could sell it, he would rather sell it than pledge it; he then said,

"Have you got any bad money for me yet;" he pulled out two or three shillings, and said,

"Like these" - I said I should be at the Ship, in the evening; he said he would call again - from that time I never saw him till I was taken into custody - he had another man with him, who cannot be found. Witness. This is not true. I had another man with me, named Smith - he introduced me to Barton, and Barton introduced me to Ward.

Prisoner WARD. Q. What time was it when you saw me and gave me the money? A. It was near eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Did you not say at Hatton-garden that you never saw me before, and only knew me by my waistcoat? A. No, I did not, but I described you as wearing those clothes.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I knew Elledge; I received from him on Sunday the 12th of March, some counterfeit coin - he had been acting under my directions, and I supplied him with money.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. In consequence of some conversation with Limbrick, and some information which I received from Elledge and some officers - I took the prisoners at the Ship, in Duck-lane, about eleven o'clock at night on the 19th - they were together, and in company with about thirty other men - I found on Ward this fur waistcoat, by which I distinguished him.

Prisoner BARTON. I should like to know how Elledge has got his living. Elledge. By working at my trade as a shoemaker.

JOHN FIELD . This money is all counterfeit.

BARTON. - GUILTY . Aged 32.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Years , and Twice Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250407-241

829. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, a crown piece, and five half-crowns, the monies of Richard Glover , from his person .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD GLOVER. I drive the coach No. 768, which belongs to Mr. Richard Fule; the prisoner took a crown and five half-crowns out of my pocket when I came home, about two o'clock, with the coach on the 5th of April;

we make it a rule to give the same sum of money - so that if the first man gave 1 l., I must do the same, or else be out of employ - when I came home my fellow servant told me what he had given, and I paid the prisoner 17 s. for my day's work; and then he came to me and said,

"You b - y rogue what money have you got? I will see," and he put his hand in my pocket and took it out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-242

830. ANN SPARKES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , two baskets, value 5 s. , the goods of Mary Smith .

MARY SMITH. I am single ; I live in Upper Rathbone-place , and am a dress maker . On the 30th of March, these baskets were in my parlour, but in consequence of a fire, which took place between two and three o'clock in the morning, in the next house, we were obliged to go out; our house was open, and the neighbours removed some of our property - the two baskets were left behind me in the room.

WILLIAM FRITH . I saw the prisoner that morning when I was at the fire; she said she had lost all she had at the fire - I afterwards overtook her with a bundle on her head, and asked her where she brought it from; she said, from High-street, Mary-le-bone - I said,

"I have a suspicion you brought them from the fire;" she then threw it down, and d - d me, and said,

"Are they your's?" she then took out the two baskets, and said,

"You rascal. these are my daughter's baskets, they came from Paris;" I said,

"If they are your own, you shall go to the watch-house."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say, that these two baskets were what a gentleman gave me to take care of, as they belonged to his daughter, who had brought them from Paris? A. No, you did not.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man in a rusty black coat, gave me a shilling to carry them for him; I said I was going out to a day's work and he gave me a drop of beer, and took my bonnet off my head and left me without it; I have lived in respectable families, but I am now reduced; and had been but a few days out of the work-house; I lost my father and my eldest son in the flames, and have been reduced to the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-243

831. THOMAS SARGEANT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a pewter pot, value 18 d. , the goods of Christopher Clark .

CHRISTOPHER CLARK. I am a licenced victualer , and live at Paddington. On the 5th of April, I lost a pewter pot, from a customer's door.

ROBERT ARBER . I am a customer of Clark's. This pot was standing at my door for the pot-boy to take it; the prisoner came and took it, put it into his hat, and was putting it on his head; I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to get a drink of water; I told him so and put it down.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-244

832. JOSEPH ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , three yards of woollen cloth, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Lingham .

HENRY RICHARD HARDWICK . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Lingham who is a tailor , and lives in the Strand . On the evening of the 16th of March, I was in the counting-house at the end of the shop, and heard the shop door open, and saw a person pass the window, looking in very earnestly; after that, the prisoner came into the shop about half a yard, and went out again twice; he looked about, but did not take anything - he came in a third time, and stood for six or seven minutes watching some men who were at work; he then with his left hand, removed some cloth from the shelves; I stepped between him and the door, and stopped him - he dropped it.

Prisoner. I never came in the shop but once; then I knocked with my foot and no one came; I then put my hand on the cloth.

Witness. Yes, he knocked with his hand, not his foot, but that was the first time, before he had taken the cloth: I did not answer because I suspected that he came to steal.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-245

833. ROBERT SMITH and WILLIAM WISE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a live tame duck, price 4 s. , the property of Charles Mason .

CHARLES MASON. I live in the Running-horse yard, Piccadilly; I have a farm at Wilsden. On the morning of the 20th of February, I met my servant Parker, with a duck; I afterwards overtook Powell, when I was in my chaise.

JOHN POWELL . I am apprentice to Mr. Hall, of Kingsbury. I was at Dolly's hill, on the Edgware road , on the 20th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, and saw the two prisoners throwing at something in a pond - I came near to them, and told Parker of it; I then came near the pond and saw them throwing at the ducks - when we came near, they ran away - one of them had a bag in his hand; I saw him throw it away into a field - I saw Parker go for it, and they ran away; I assisted in the pursuit part of the way.

JOHN PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Mason. I saw the two prisoner near the duck-pond, but I did not see them do anything. I picked up a bag in a field about 10 minutes afterwards - I had not seen it in their hands - it had a duck in it with its neck wrong; I knew it to be my master's. I followed till I came up to them, and said,

"I have got you;" my master then came, and took them into custody - I do not know what became of the bag - it was a white one.

SMITH'S Defence. I got up, and was taking a walk with this young man; we went down a lane to cut a stick out of a hedge; a dog came and seized him, and, as we found we were trespassing, we came back, and got into the lane.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 28.

WISE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250407-246

834. CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , two sovereigns, and three shillings, the monies of Thomas Walkington , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250407-247

835. JOSEPH JAMES BREDGBY was indicted for

stealing, on the 7th of April , a coat, value 31 s. , the goods of Philip Mark .

PHILIP MARK. I live in High Holborn , and am a tailor . On the 7th of April the prisoner and another came into the shop; while I was bargaining with one of them, the other stole the coat; the officer brought the prisoner in with the coat within a minute after they had left - it had been in the window, and within their reach.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL REARDON . On Thursday evening last I was coming by the shop, and saw the prisoner coming out; I immediately suspected him, seeing him with something under his coat behind his back; he turned up against a door-way next to Mr. Marks'; I asked him what he had got, and he said nothing; I took him back to Mr. Marks, who claimed the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of the shop, and saw something lying on the rails; I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-248

836. JOSEPH BINFIELD and JOHN HOLMES were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , two puncheons, value 36 s. the goods of Henry Ashley Freer .

HENRY ASHLEY FREER. I am a victualler , and live in Wynyat-street, Goswell-street . On the 19th of March, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, my servant came to my bed-room, and said two men had taken two casks away - I went out, and in the neighbourhood of St. John-street, I found the two prisoners with a truck, one before and one behind; the truck had my two casks on it - they had been safe in my yard the night before, when I went to bed.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I took charge of the two prisoners: Holmes said he did it through distress. I searched them - they had 4 d. between them: as we were going to the watch-house, Holmes said he had employed Binfield to help him, but he knew nothing about it - the friends of Binfield are very respectable.

BINFIELD'S Defence. I was hired by the other prisoner to go and help him home with two casks - there was no fastening to the gate whatever, and I thought it was his property.

Two witnesses gave Holmes a good character.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Four Months .

BINFIELD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-249

837. HANNAH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a gown, value 4 s. , the goods of William Austin .

RENTON NICHOLSON . I am in the employ of Mr. William Austin, a pawnbroker . Akenhead told me on the 19th of February, about nine o'clock, that a gown was missing - I went into the street, but did not see the prisoner for about three hours afterwards; I then asked her what she wanted; she said she was waiting for some person: we stopped her, and an officer was procured, who took her into custody. The gown is Mr. Austin's - I had seen it hanging up in the back of the shop in the course of the day.

CHARLOTTE AKENHEAD . I was at Mr. Austin's shop, on the 19th of February, and saw the prisoner standing at the door; the gown hung in the middle of the shop; she reached out her left hand, and unhooked it; I was paying some money to Mr. Austin - when I turned round she and the gown were gone.

Prisoner. When the witness was asked if I was the woman, she said she did not know; if I was I must have changed my gown. Witness. No; I distinguished her from about twenty other persons.

JOHN FIELD . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this gown of the prisoner, on Saturday evening, the 19th of February, between eight and nine o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I had picked up a duplicate in the Duke of York, public-house, and went into the house to inquire whose it was, when I was stopped.

GUILTY Aged 36.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-250

838. THOMAS PALIN and THOMAS COX were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , five brushes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Church .

DAVID MITCHELL . I am thirteen years of age. I know Mr. Church: he is an oilman , and lives in Harley-street, Pentonville ; I saw Palin on the evening of the 6th of April, with five brushes in his hand, which he was showing to Cox, and some others who were on the opposite side of the way; I heard Palin say,

"Go it; go it again;" I then went to Mr. Church, and told him what I had seen.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the two prisoners running; I stopped them: the brushes were laying on the ground.

WILLIAM CHURCH. These brushes are mine; they were lost from my shop on the evening of the 7th of April.

PALIN'S Defence. I met Cox, and asked him if he would go with me - as we were going along Pentonville we heard the cry of Stop thief! we ran to see what was the matter, and the officer took us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250407-251

OLD COURT.

SIXTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13.

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

839. JOHN WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a flat, value 2 s.; a butter-cloth, value 6 d., and 20 lbs. of butter, value 30 s. , the goods of John Jennings .

HENRY PYBUS . I am servant to John Jennings, salesman , of Newgate-market . On the 4th of March, about ten minutes to seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take a flat of butter, and go off; I followed, and took him; he hesitated, and said he should not go back, and then asked me to forgive him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 63.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250407-252

840. ROBERT PEARCE and JAMES PURDY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 500 lbs. of cast iron, value 4 l. 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Rayner and James Ashwell .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOSEPH RAYNER. I am in partnership with James

Ashwell; we are iron-founders , and live in Fenchurch-street. Pearce was our porter , but had no authority to sell goods; the name of Purdy has occasionally been on our books, but whether the prisoner is that person I cannot say. I employed the officer to watch our premises, and after Pearce was in custody, he sent for me to Giltspur-street, and made a voluntary statement to me; I said I was informed a quantity of iron had been taken away on the 16th; he said he delivered it to the same person as on the 18th, and that an arrangement had been made, by which he (Pearce) was to have half the money; he said he was an honest man till seduced by that person, who had induced him at different times to supply him with our metal, for which he was exceedingly sorry; and that latterly he had not been paid any money for it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you not go to him for the purpose of getting him to confess? A. I went to hear what he had to say, as he sent for me. I told him, he must not expect that I should withdraw the prosecution. His duty was only to weigh goods and put them into the cart. One of my clerks, who was with us at the time, has absented himself, and I have reason to believe has taken our money. Our warehouse is opened at eight o'clock; I go there between nine and ten o'clock.

JOSEPH CROWTHER . I was warehouseman to the prosecutor in March last, and was entrusted to sell goods. Pearce had no authority to sell from my employers - but I knew that he did sell of a morning before I came. On the 16th of March, I got there at nine o'clock, and found him there; he did not account to me for any goods being sold; I always ask him if any are sold, or gone out, in order to enter them.

Cross-examined. Q. He had authority to sell? A. Ocsasionally, but my employers did not know it; the other clerk has absconded.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS? A. Persons out of doors could not tell that Pearce had no authority to sell? A. No.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had the clerk who has absconded authority to sell? A. He had - Purdy had an account with the house four years ago, when it was in other hands. The prosecutors did not give him credit.

NATHANIEL LAWRENCE . I am an officer. On the 16th of March, about half-past seven o'clock, in the morning I was watching the prosecutor's premises, and saw Pearce hand a quantity of metal out of the loop-hole to Purdy, who was in a cart; I had seen him draw his cart up; there might be twenty or thirty pieces of cast iron put into it; the cart turned round and came by me - I did not stop it; I apprehended both the prisoners on the 18th - and after the examination, Pearce asked me what Purdy had said - I said, he had stated that he paid him for the metal; he desired me to fetch Mr. Rayner to him; he said that on the 16th, he delivered about 4 1/2 cwt., which came to 4 l. 10 s. - that he was to receive half-price, but had not had a farthing, and would tell his master all about it.

PEARCE - GUILTY.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor believing him to have been seduced .

Confined Six Months .

PURDY - NOT GUILTY .

The prisoners were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, two stoves, but no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18250407-253

841. JAMES IRVING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a wooden box, value 2 s., and 28 lbs. of candles, value 15 s. , the goods of Charles Roberts .

THOMAS PATER . I am servant to Mr. Charles Roberts, tallow-chandler , of Chandos-street. I was taking a box of candles in the cart to the Saraeen's Head, Aldgate, between six and seven o'clock - it was safe when I was at the top of Houndsditch , and near Cutler-street; I missed it when I got to Aldgate-church ; I saw a man with it, whom the officer had given it to.

THOMAS BRANSCOMBE . I was on duty in Cutler-street, and saw the prisoner running towards Petticoat-lane, with a box. I asked what he had there - he threw it down and ran off; I took him twelve yards off, without loosing sight of him; three or four others were with him; he had a cord tied round it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible I could take it, having only one arm, it was never in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-254

842. THOMAS SEATON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 6 lbs. of veal, value 5 s. , the goods of Benjamin Hickenbothom .

BENJAMIN HICKENBOTHOM. I am a butcher , and live at Aldgate . On the 26th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop; I had a good many customers - he was going out, my man called out, and I took six pound and a quarter of veal out of his apron; he had not bought it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY - Aged 74.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250407-255

843. LOUISA HILL , MARY WATSON , and ANN M'KENZIE , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , twelve yards of printed cotton, value 16 s. , the goods of Isaac Johnson .

ISAAC JOHNSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in the Minories . On the 21st of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day-time, the prisoners came to the shop in company together, and asked to look at some printed cottons; the first four or five pieces which I shewed them, they would not allow me to open; saying they were not the description of print they wanted; I shewed them others, which I opened over the first; they bought a yard and a half, which Watson paid 2 s. 3 d. for; they all took part in the purchase; they then asked to look at some others, which I shewed them; they did not fix on any - Hill pointed to some on the shelves behind, and said they were more of the sort they wanted; I turned round, stepping a little back, so as to have my eye on them, and saw Watson and M'Kenzie endeavouring to get something from under the prints which were open; I shewed them several others - they at last bought fourteen yards; but, before that, Hill again pointed to the shelves, and I saw the other two endeavouring to conceal something under their clothes; after buying fourteen yards, they wished to see some more for aprons, and bought a small quantity; they then asked for stockings, which I left them to get; they then asked for Irish - I left them, to get it, and observed them again endeavouring to conceal something under their clothes. Watson handed Hill a 5 l. note to pay me; I had to take 34 s.; I asked the

address to put on the note - Hill said,

" Caroline Brown , Spital-square;" I put every thing out of their way, and then asked them to shew me what they had taken, and not paid for; they all denied having anything which was not paid for; they were altogether in the middle of the shop; I said, I was certain they had something - and Watson dropped behind her a length of printed cotton - I immediately took it up, and charged her with taking it; the rest said, they wondered how she could think of making such a mistake as to take what was not paid for. I fetched an officer, who took them; they were then all three in the middle of the shop, and Hill threw from her about three yards and a half of print behind her - I took it up and charged her with it; she said,

"You thought I threw it away, but you don't know that I did."

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer and took them in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WATSON'S Defence. I was intoxicated; the print must have fallen off the counter.

M'KENZIE'S Defence. I did not know they intended to take any thing.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 27.

M'KENZIE - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WATSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250407-256

844. EDWARD BUTTERWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a vat, value 4 l. , the goods of Samuel Davey .

WILLIAM MEAD . I live in Duke's-place, St. James's. On the 8th of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to sell me a vat, for 30 s. - he said he was employed by a man to sell it, and mentioned his name, but I do not recollect it; I told him to call again for the money, which he did, and was secured, as I had seen the prosecutor.

SAMUEL DAVEY . I live in Old-street . On the morning of