Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1825.
Reference Number: 18250217
Reference Number: f18250217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, 17th of FEBRUARY, 1825, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; and Samuel Bridges , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Wm. Sime ,

Wm. Garward ,

John Howard ,

John Mosley ,

Robert Laing ,

John Langley ,

Wm. Suttaby ,

Thomas Hughes ,

Wm. Robinson ,

Charles Vyse ,

Francis Westley ,

Thomas Cook .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Poole ,

John Rowe ,

Wm. Groves ,

Charles Gale ,

Wm. Stevens ,

Thomas Hannam ,

Thomas Dyke ,

Charles Yardley ,

Wm. Henry Smith ,

David Eaton ,

Samuel Pope ,

John Yearsley .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Wm. Bone ,

Thomas Shipley ,

Wm. Bainbridge ,

James Japps ,

Elihu Wilson ,

Joseph Adams ,

Wm. Grimstone ,

Francis Burton ,

George Harris ,

John Hughes ,

Edward Buck ,

George Turner .

3rd Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Mason ,

Wm. Todd ,

Wm. Morgan ,

John Morell ,

Thomas Gammage ,

Sampson Stevenson ,

Stephen F. Rimbolt ,

Samuel Rudduck ,

Wm. Cave ,

James Barker ,

Wm. Butterfield ,

Wm. Butterel .

4th Middlesex Jury.

John Frost ,

Joseph Tylor ,

John Hillier ,

Joseph Coles ,

Wm. Petersdorf ,

Thomas Wells ,

John Chapman ,

John Sherrin ,

Joseph Davy .

Wm. Iles ,

John Young ,

John Weaver .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 17, 1825.

GARRATT, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18250217-1

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

383. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a coat, value 4 l., the goods of John Craven , in the dwelling-house of George Mallough .

The Prosecutor stating his name to be John Howardin Craven , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250217-2

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

384. CHARLES LUCASEY and JOHN WOOD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Helps , about two o'clock in the night of the 27th of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a weather-glass, value 10 s.; a tea-caddy, value 5 s.; a dressing-glass, value 5 s., and two umbrellas, value 4 s., his property; a coat, value 2 l.; a hat, value 4 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a pair of gloves, value 2 d., and a tin box, value 2 d., the goods of James Plucknett .

JAMES PLUCKNETT. I now live in Bartlett's-buildings. On Thursday, the 27th of January, I lived at the house of my brother-in-law, James Helps, No. 21, Cummins-street, Pentonville , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. I went to bed on that night about half-past twelve o'clock, and was the last person up - I was in care of the house; only Noe, (the servant,) and myself were in the house: she went to bed before me. I did not particularly notice the back parlour window; but the girl called me about twenty minutes to eight o'clock in the morning: I then found the back parlour window shutter forced off its hinges - the hinge was fresh broken. I had heard a little noise about half-past one or two o'clock in the morning, as if something was moving about below. When I got up I missed the weather-glass, a tea-caddy, a swing dressing-glass, a few volumes of the Quarterly Review, belonging to Mr. Helps - a great coat, an umbrella, a prayer book, and a neck handkerchief, of my own - they were taken from different rooms. The weather-glass and tea-caddy were produced at Bow-street on Saturday, when the prisoners were in custody - also a pair of gloves and a handkerchief of mine.

Prisoner LUCASEY. Q. The weather-glass is not yours? A. No; but I know it by its general appearance - I have no doubt of it. I had put tea and sugar in the caddy that evening - it contains the same quantity, and one of the inside divisions opens very hard. I had often observed the cut glass bason which is in it. They were in my care.

JANE NOE . I am servant to Mr. Helps. On the night of the robbery I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock - I fastened the house up between five and six; I fastened the back room window. I got up between seven and eight o'clock in the morning - it was light. I found the back parlour door open, the window up, and the right hand bottom shutter broken - every thing was in disorder. I called Mr. Plucknett, and we missed the property as he has stated - it did not appear that the thieves had been up stairs, but into the back and front parlour. I have known the barometer for years.

MARY HAFFRON . I am servant at Mr. Dales, at the Thistle and Crown, public-house, St. Martin's-lane. The prisoners came into the house to breakfast, about half-past eight o'clock on Friday morning, about three weeks ago; when they came in they gave me the weather-glass and tea-caddy to take care of till the afternoon, when they would call for them; both gave me something, but which each gave me I cannot say. Lucasey came about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, and asked if Moses was down stairs - I understood him to mean the other prisoner - I said No; Wood came in in about half an hour, and both went up stairs to the parlour, to play at bagatelle; they had been at the house twice before - they went up of their own accord, and had a pint of beer. I went up stairs to stir the fire, and when I came down I told the constable that they were the young men who came in the morning - he apprehended them in half an hour. The tea-caddy and weather-glass were left in my master's care. They did not ask for their things; the officer had been to the house in the afternoon, and seen the things - he told me to let him know when the prisoners came again. I am sure they are the men.

CHARLES DONALDSON . I am a constable. In consequence of information I and Lack went to this house, about half-past one o'clock on Friday, the 28th of January, and saw the weather-glass, and tea-caddy. I informed the Magistrate, who told us to wait till they came - I staid there till five o'clock, then went home, and Haffron fetched me - Lack was there; we went up stairs, and found them alone - we said we were officers, and asked them where the things were, not mentioning; what things; Lucasey said they had bought them, and sold them - Wood must have heard him. I asked where they were; they said, "They are here," meaning in the house. I found a tin box and a pair of gloves in Lucasey's pocket.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I went to the public-house with Donaldson - his account is correct. I searched Wood, and found a handkerchief on him, with part of the name cut out, and some money. When I entered the room I asked them what they had done with the weather-glass and tea-caddy, which they had in the morning - Wood said they had sold them; I asked how he came by them: he said he bought them of a man in Princes-street, Drury-lane, and had sold them again. He afterwards turned round and said, "I have left them at this house;" all this was in the hearing of Lucasey - one of them said the man who they bought them of was a stranger. After they were examined I took the barometer to the prosecutor's house, and it fitted to the mark on the wall as complete as possible, in size, length, and breadth, and the mark of the nook behind.

MR. PLUCKNETT. I have not the slightest doubt of the barometer, and should think it worth 1 l. at least - it exactly fitted the marks on the wall. I am certain of the tea-caddy - I had filled it with tea and sugar about half-past ten o'clock that night, and I find precisely the same quantity in it. The gloves found on Lucasey are mine, and I lost a tin box similar to this. I believe the handkerchief to be mine - I can trace the top of the letter P still on it; the rest is cut out.

JANE NOE. I know the barometer by the maker's name, and its general appearance - my master had had it four years. I know the tea-caddy, and have cleaned the shell in it for the last nine years.

The prisoners jointly put in a written Defence, as follows: -

My Lord, we have been acquainted for many years, and were school-fellows together. On the 27th of January we were drinking together, and got intoxicated - we went home and slept at the house of Mrs. Wood; we got home about half-past ten o'clock, and did not leave the house till half-past seven next morning - we proceeded from home (John Wood being a cooper ) for the purpose of buying old casks - we went towards Covent-garden; we called at a public-house at the corner of Princes-street and Wild-street; there was a man sitting in the tap-room with the weather-glass and tea-caddy, who, after we had been sitting a few minutes, asked if we would buy them for ten shillings - we bought them, thinking we might get a shilling or two by them, as well as buying the other things. We found the caddy locked, and asked the man for the key - he said he had lost it. We shook it, and found it sounded as it something was in it - he said it was only the glass. We left the house, and proceeded to leave the things at the Thistle and Crown, a house we had been in the habit of frequenting for the purpose of playing at bagatelle, and asked to leave the things there till evening, as we were going on our business. We returned again about five o'clock, and went up stairs to play at bagatelle as usual; the landlord came up, and we asked him if he had the things safe - he said he had: he had been down but a few minutes when the two officers came up and asked Lucasey how he came by the property; he said he had bought them - they then asked what had become of them - he said he had sold them; the reason for which was, he thought they had no right to ask such a question, not knowing them to be officers, but immediately they said who they were he said they were in the house.

LUCASEY - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 19.

WOOD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250217-3

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

385. CHARLES NOBLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Pedder , about two o'clock in the night of the 9th of February , at Heston , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a coat, value 20 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a piece of green baize, value 6 d.; an apron, value 6 d.; two towels, value 6 d., and two caps, value 6 d., his property .

RICHARD PEDDER. I am a baker , and live at Hounslow . On the 8th of February I went to bed a little after ten o'clock at night - I was the last person up - the shop was fastened. I beard a noise about one o'clock, and thought it was Hill, my man, at work - he called me about half-past two - I ran down stairs, and found the prisoner making his escape - there was a hole in the ceiling, and the tiles were taken off the roof of the shop; it was not so the night before. I found the prisoner getting off the counter to a chair, and getting through the ceiling; Hill pulled him back and secured him - I never saw him before. The articles stated in the indictment were gone from the shop, and found in a bundle between the ceiling and tiles. He said it was the first time, and he was done. Being a constable myself I handcuffed him, and took him in charge.

WILLIAM HILL . I am in Mr. Pedder's service. I was awoke by the dog barking - I struck a light, and found it was one o'clock - so I laid down again, and about two I heard a man in the yard - I got up, found a ladder in the yard moved, and the prisoner in the shop - he had broken through the ceiling. I found the bundle between the ceiling and tiles.

The prisoner put in a written statement, representing that urgent distress, and his having been without food for three days led him to the commission of the crime, for which he implored mercy. He referred to Captain Pring , of Honiton - Lieutenant Charles Creswick , Andover - Rear Admiral Sir David Milne , Scotland - Captain Edward Chatham , of Fareham - and Mr. Chaffey, of Upper Tooting, for his character, but none of them were in attendance.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37. Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his distressed situation .

Reference Number: t18250217-4

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

386. GEORGE SCOTT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Scott , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 7th of February , at St. Mary, Islington , ( Mary Ann Jopson and other persons therein being,) and stealing therein eight silver spoons, value 4 l., his property .

JOHN SCOTT, ESQ. I live at Islington, in the parish of St. Mary's. I was not at home when this happened.

MARY ANN JOPSON. I am servant to Mr. Scott. Last Monday week Mrs. Scott and the man servant went out, leaving me at home; I went up about a quarter past eleven o'clock, to look at the parlour fire - I set the scuttle

down, and looked out of window, and saw a boy looking through the iron railing. I put the coals on the fire, looked again, and he was still there, looking towards the kitchen window. I went to the top of the kitchen stairs, for a brush to sweep the hearth - I looked out of window again, and he was gone. I ran down stairs, and found three doors open - two of them were open when I came up, but the other was shut. I ran through the kitchen into the pantry, and on looking over the plate I missed all the large silver table spoons - a person must open the door which was shut to get to the pantry. I missed eight table spoons, which I had seen five minutes before. I ran up the area steps, and found the area gate half open - it was shut before. I saw the boy who had been looking through the railing, and the prisoner, about six yards from the house - I saw the prisoner give a frail basket to the boy who had been looking through the rails. I ran after them, the boy came back, and asked what I wanted with him; I just opened his basket, and could see nothing but oranges and lemons in it. The prisoner ran away, and ran across a place on the left-hand side of the road, where there is some timber - I lost sight of him while he went behind seven new houses. The boy with the basket also ran away. I met a labouring man, and called to him to stop the prisoner, and when he was nearly caught he turned back, and came up to me. - I laid hold of him; he asked what I wanted with him - I said he had been into my master's house; he said he had only been to the door to see if I wanted any oranges or lemons. I took him home, and sat him in the kitchen - he took off his coat, and desired me to search him - nothing was found on him. Rumbold brought the property in. He told me afterwards that he had come in and took the spoons - I asked what he was going to do with them; he said to buy bread - this was before the officer took him.

THOMAS RUMBOLD . I was going up New North-road last Monday week, and saw the servant calling to two boys - the boy with the basket turned back - she looked into his basket, and then ran after the prisoner, who walked away. I found eight spoons under a piece of timber on the left-hand side of the road, the same day, and took them back. I saw no more of the boy with the basket.

CHARLES STEVENS . I am servant to the prosecutor. I went out at a quarter to eleven o'clock, and on returning home I met the servant - she said the spoons were stolen. I went in doors, and in a few minutes Rumbold brought the spoons in.

MARY ANN JOPSON. The place Rumbold has described is where I saw the prisoner run. He must have opened the door which was shut before he could get them. The other boy ran back towards the house, after I looked at his basket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a boy with oranges - I asked where he was going; he said to sell them - that lady came out, and said, "Boy" - he ran back, thinking she wanted to buy lemons - I walked on; she came and called me - I went to her, and she took me home.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 10. Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18250217-5

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

387. HENRY MUGGLETON was indicted for that he, on the 26th of January , at St. Pancras , in and upon William Sheppard , a subject of the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously, &c. did strike, stab, and cut him in and upon his right side, with intent, in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and on his malice aforethought to kill and murder him , against the statute.

2d COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

3d COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grevious bodily harm.

CHARLES LEWIS . I live at No. 10, Tottenham-mews, Middlesex Hospital. On the 26th of January I was fetched to assist the prisoner's mother, who lives in the mews - I went to her room - she said the prisoner was concealed in the house, with intent to rob her, and she could not get rid of him - she wanted an officer, and he wanted one also. I went to Manning, who came, and his mother gave him in charge, for ill-usage, and threatening to murder her. I did not go up stairs with Manning.

RICHARD MANNING . I went to the mother's house, by Lewis's desire - I found the mother in the mews; she took me up to her room - the prisoner stood in one corner of the room, armed with a knife, which I produce, (a small table knife) and a poker - his mother said, "I am afraid of that lad; I wish to have him removed;" I said, "My lad, what are you going to ill-use your mother in this kind of way for?" he said, "Are you an officer?" I said, "I am;" - he immediately up with the poker, and said, "D - n your eyes, stand away," and struck at my head - I held my arm up, which caught the blow, and it almost broke the bone. I then left the room, and sent Lewis to the watch-house for assistance. Sheppard came, and Richardson, another street-keeper. I waited down stairs till they came, then went up with them, and found him still in the room, armed with the poker and knife. Richardson said, "My lad, why do you ill-use a person in this way? do you know the consequence of it? you will be transported if you go on in this kind of way;" "That is what I want," said he - "Oh! you poor foolish boy," said Richardson, "take the advice of a father of children - you don't know the hardships of it" - he made no answer. Richardson pressed him to give up the weapons, and he gave up the poker at last to his sister, but still kept the knife in his hand. Richardson asked him for the knife - he made no answer that I heard - he held it in his right hand; Richardson came very near, made a spring upon him, and caught him by the left hand - then Sheppard ran to his assistance, and as he came to his left side the prisoner made a dart back wards with his hand, and stabbed Sheppard in the side. He had told me before I went for assistance that he would be hung for somebody that day. He did not appear at all in liquor. I know nothing of him myself.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD. I am street-keeper and constable of St. Pancras . On the 26th of January I was in Tottenham-mews - Lewis called on me, as a constable, to come and disarm somebody. I went to this house with Richardson - we all three went up to the room; Richardson caught hold of the prisoner's left hand, and I went to seize the right hand, with the knife in it - he drew his right hand back very hard, and thrust it into my breast,

just on the bone - it penetrated to the bone. I succeeded in getting it from him, after he had wounded me. I was ill for sixteen days, and attended at Middlesex Hospital.

MR. HENRY HAMMOND . I am house-surgeon at Middlesex Hospital. On the 26th of January I saw the prosecutor; he had a wound on the left side of the chest: it appeared a clean cut wound, as if done with a sharp instrument - it was about 1-12th of an inch deep; it struck on a rib, which prevented its going further. I should not call it a grevious bodily wound. If it had not been stopped by the rib, it would, most likely, have penetrated the lungs. I cannot say whether it was done with a pointed instrument. The prosecutor was ill about a fortnight, but never very bad, and in no danger. There is very little flesh about that part of the body.

MR. WONTNER, (keeper of Newgate.) I have had some little conversation with the prisoner since he has been in my custody, which is since the 6th of January - I have seen him several times, and consider him weak in his intellect.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17. Recommended to Mercy, on account of his weakness of mind .

Reference Number: t18250217-6

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

388. WILLIAM WALKER , MICHAEL HOLLAND , and JEMIMA, HIS WIFE, were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Downes , about six o'clock in the night of 2d of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a ring, value 10 l., his property .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH BURTLES . I am housemaid to Mr. Downes - Frances White is the cook. I lived seven months with Mr. Downes; the prisoner, Michael Holland, was in Mr. Downes's service, as footman , for nearly two months, and left in December last, and after that came occasionally to the house. While he was in the service the female prisoner visited him; he called her his sister: she used to go up to his bed-room, which was at the top of the house, and the first time she came we shewed her all over the house - she was in my mistresses bed-room, and staid there a very few minutes. She was up stairs once all the afternoon, and I was in the kitchen - I do not know what room she was in: the footman was with her part of the time, but she was up stairs alone for about two hours; I cannot say when that was. On the Saturday before the robbery the prisoner, Michael Holland, called at master's house - I and the cook where in the kitchen; it was agreed that he should come to tea on the Sunday evening: nothing was said about where master and mistress were going to my recollection. He came about five o'clock on Sunday afternoon; before that I had turned down the beds, and done every thing up stairs, and the lamps were lighted - he came into the kitchen: the cook was there with me. About half an hour or an hour after he came, he went out to get something to drink, and took a bottle with him - he was absent about five minutes, and returned with a violent knocking and ringing at the door - the cook let him in. When he went out he took a candle up stairs with him, and put it in the hall; he brought it down stairs with him when he returned. We sat down to drink the gin and water, and is about a quarter of an hour I heard a noise like the drawing back of the bolt of the street door; I said there was a noise, and I thought the street door was open - the cook took a candle, went up stairs, and called out that the street door was open. I then went up - Holland was in the kitchen; we went to the parlour, drawing-room, and up stairs, and seeing the bed-room doors open we returned down - Holland came to the foot of the kitchen stairs, and asked what was the matter; we said we thought somebody was in the house, for the bed room doors were open - I had found master's bed-room door open; he then took the poker, and went up stairs of his own accord, alone, then came down, and said he did not see any thing or anybody there - he must have seen mistress's bedroom door open; I asked if he had been up higher than mistress's room - he said, No; I asked him to go up - he was going, when a ring came at the bell, and he came down stairs again, and when the door was opened it was the female prisoner; she asked if Holland was there - we said, Yes; she asked what he did there, and if he did not know that he was keeping her waiting. I told her I thought somebody was in the house, for mistress's door was open, which I had shut when I turned down the bed - she said she would go up stairs with us: she went up with me and Holland, and then I found one of the chairs was moved into the middle of the room, (it should have been against the window) I discovered that a drawer was open, and the jewel cases taken out, and put on the top of the drawers - one jewel case was broken open, but the other had no lock to it - the jewels were all taken. I said mistress's jewels were gone, and that she had a great many; Michael Holland said he did not think that she had many. We came down stairs - he went and called the patrol, who searched about the house, but could not discover any thing, and went away; he searched all the rooms. It happened about six o'clock. Holland went away after that - he said he should go home and tell the people he was not coming home that night, as he was to come back and stop till Mr. Downes came home. Master returned at half-past ten o'clock; Holland returned in about an hour, and one of the officers who were there took him into custody.

Q. Before Holland came back had anybody else been at the house? A. No; but after tea there was a violent knocking and ringing at the door - I went up - there was a man with a blue coat and blue trowsers; he asked if Mr. Taylor lived there: I said, No, it was a few doors further on. Holland was then in the kitchen. The prisoner Walker is like that man, but I do not mean to be positive to him. (Looking at a jewel case,) this is the one which was not locked - nothing valuable was kept in that.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you and the cook often friends coming to see you? A. No; none came to see me but my mother and sister; one old woman used to come to see the cook - my brother came once to see me, when mistress was out - he did not come to see the cook - it was one Sunday, a long time ago, when mistress was in the country - he only came once. I have lived there seven months; the cook came about a month before the robbery. I do not know of any body named Allen visiting her - I never saw any body come to see her but a woman; and there were two young women came; I never

saw any man there. The cook was taken up about a week after the robbery; and I saw a man named Stevens in custody at Hatton-garden, charged with this robbery - I never saw him at the house - the cook was ten days in custody. Holland and the cook were very good friends - she did not know that he had a wife; after he was in custody I heard mistress say he had a wife - she was very indignant at it. Mr. Taylor lives about three or four doors from master. Holland came to the house about five o'clock - no other visitor came to see us - the patrol was called in between 6 and 7 o'clock; we told him the particulars in Holland's presence - he went home, after the patrol had been, and returned in an hour's time, and was taken into custody directly.

FRANCES WHITE. I am cook to Mr. Downes, and was there for a fortnight while Holland was footman there - I was there five weeks before the robbery, no other manservant was in the house while I was there. Master had a tool basket, I never saw it any where but in the prisoner's pantry. Holland called the day before the robbery, and came to tea on Sunday, at a quarter past five o'clock - he came into the kitchen, and after tea went out for some liquor, and returned in six or seven minutes - he took a light with him, and when I went up to let him in I found the light on the slab in the passage - we went into the kitchen, the gin and water was drank; my fellow servant said she thought that somebody had opened a door; I went up, and found the street-door open - I called her up - we went up stairs, searched the parlours, drawing-room, and afterwards the bed-rooms, and finding the doors open, would not go further, but came down. Holland came out of the kitchen, and asked what was the matter; and she told him that she had closed all the doors in the evening, and now they were open, and somebody must have been in the house. I wished to call the watchman, but he said No, I had better not proceed till we saw if anything was missing up stairs, and said there would be no watchman on for two hours to come. I said we must have some one in, for I did not think we were safe in the house. He went to go up stairs with the poker, the house-maid followed him, but she did not like to go, and both ran back, he threw the poker down, and said we had him there to make ridicule of him - he only went to the first landing-place, half-way to the drawing-room. I understand he went up stairs afterwards, but that I do not recollect - he then went to call a watchman - the patrol came - we told him something had happened up stairs; he drew his sword, and went up stairs directly, but I did not go with him. After he came down I went into mistress's bed-room - several drawers were open; the patrol said he had opened them - I saw a chisel in the patrol's hand, after he came down. I saw the jewel-boxes, one was broken open, a few trinkets, of small value, were left in one box, and on the drawers, I had not been into mistress's room that evening before: Holland had called about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, and I told him I did not think master and mistress would dine at home, but I was not sure. I do not recollect whether he asked me about it, or whether I told him without being asked.

Cross-examined. Q. Holland and you were good friends, and he came to drink tea with you? A. Yes; he had drank tea there two or three times before - mistress does not allow people to come of an afternoon - if they had dined at home he could not have come without their knowledge. I have no other acquaintance - an old woman called on me one evening; we were not forbidden to have followers - I only had this old woman to drink tea with me - I have no acquaintance named Allen, nor Stevens - I never saw the housemaid's brother - I never saw the cook, who lived there before me, visiting the house. Master and mistress knew that Holland and I were good friends, but we were forbidden to let him come - I did not know that he was married. There was no light in the hall, it was not unnatural for him to take a candle, as the staircase was dark - there is no key-hole outside the door. When my fellow-servant heard the noise, I went up, and called her - we went up, and saw the doors open, came down and told Holland - he and she went up, she ran back, and he threw down the poker.

COURT. Q. When you let Holland in did you shut the door? A. Yes, my Lord; and found it open a quarter of an hour afterward. Holland went for the patrol nearly an hour after - the patrol looked over the house, and went away, leaving Holland there - he afterward went away, and when he returned was apprehended. I was taken into custody - I never was charged with any thing else. A young woman owed me money, I had a shawl of her's, which I pawned, and when she came to pay me I gave her the shawl, it was taken out of pawn a fortnight before the robbery.

WILLIAM BANTING . I am a patrol. I was called into the prosecutor's house about a quarter past seven o'clock, and searched it minutely from top to bottom, but found nobody; I searched the lady's bed-room, found the chest of drawers broken open, and some cases on the top, and by the side of the cases I found a chisel, with a piece broken aslant at the corner. Lee has the chisel, I locked it up at the watch-house, and next day found it in Read's hands at Hatton-garden. I pulled two or three drawers open, which were not locked, and found the clothes undisturbed - nothing was disturbed but one drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. You searched the house minutely? A. Yes; I might he a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes about it - Holland was with me, and Elizabeth the servant - I left Holland in the house - the chisel was on the top of the drawers, by the jewel-case, I put it into my pocket, and delivered it to Hatton, the watch-house keeper to lock up - I put no mark on it. I came on duty about five o'clock - I rather think that I found the prosecutor's door ajar once before, it might be about four weeks before the robbery, but never more than once. I rang the bell, somebody came and said somebody was gone to fetch something. The chisel produced is the one I found.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the night in question I was sent for to Mr. Downes's - I got there about half-past nine o'clock, and about twenty minutes past ten Holland came in - I took him into custody; he stated that he had been to his lodgings, in Hackney-road, to inform his landlord that it was not likely he should be home that night, as Mr. Downes's house had been robbed, he thought that Mr. Downes would like to have him in the house all night to protect it - he said he lodged at Ivy's, No. 25, Hackney-road. I went there next morning, and found Ivy and Ivy's wife - Holland told me

his sister Jemima was there, but I found she was his wife - I found her there. I searched the house, but found nothing. I went there again on the Wednesday following, and apprehended Jemima. While we were there she went down stairs - I went to see where she was gone, and a man, named Stevens, whom I knew very well, came in, he also went by the name of Allen - I secured him, and found some sovereigns on him. Holland was discharged in eight or ten days, and afterwards apprehended.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On the 26th Jan., about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I went with Fortune to New-court, George-yard, Whitechapel, and found the prisoner Walker there; he had his hat on, and said he was just going out; I apprehended him on another charge, he had a flannel jacket on and blue trowsers, and inside his trowsers I found a blue bag, and a smaller bag in the blue one, containing nine skeleton and one picklock key. He said, "Recollect you find them on my person in my room, and not abroad!" I saw one of these skeleton keys applied to a drawer in Mr. Downes's room, five or six days ago, it opened the drawer from which the jewel-cases were taken. I found in his room a dark lantern, with a candle in it, which had been lighted, a vice and file, which would be useful in altering keys. After taking him into custody, I returned in half an hour to search his lodging again, and found the duplicate of a diamond ring, pawned, on the 3d Jan. 1825, at Anderton's, No. 15, Commercial-road, for 6 l. in the name of William Walker, Commercial-road; the duplicate was in a small hole in a cupboard where coals are kept, wrapped in a piece of paper; he wore blue trowsers, and there was a blue coat in his room, which he has on now. On the Friday after I found the duplicate I went to the pawnbroker's and saw the ring; I looked over a number of bills which we have at our Office, and traced the ring to Mr. Downes. I afterwards went to the pawnbroker's with Mr. and Mrs. Downes, and Mrs. Downes immediately claimed it. On the 29th of January I went to No. 25, Hackney-road, and apprehended Holland and his wife: I said I had come to apprehend him about Mr. Downes's robbery. He said he supposed Mr. Downes never meant to let him rest, but give him all the trouble he could.

Cross-examined. Q. You took him on the 29th of January, at the same lodging as had been visited at the time of the robbery? A. Yes. The skeleton key would open a good many locks. I understand that Walker has been a pawnbroker. A reward of 50 l. had been offered for the discovery of this robbery, but I did not particularly notice the bill till I found the ring - it might have been at our office for a fortnight.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road. I have a diamond ring, and the counterpart of the duplicate - it was pawned on the 3d of January; I took it in myself. I am not prepared to speak positively to the man who pawned it, but I have a strong belief that Walker is the man; I believe him to be the man - he told me his name was Walker - that the ring belonged to his father, who had occasion for 6 l., and had sent him with it - that his father had bought it six months ago, and had given twelve guineas for it, and that his father was a dyer, living in the Commercial-road. I knew there was a dyer of that name there, which induced me to take it in. He wore a blue coat, blue trowsers, and a waistcoat, which is here - (looking at it) - I am sure the man who pawned the ring wore that waistcoat, or one of that pattern. The duplicate is written by me.

JAMES LEA. I found that waistcoat in the prisoner's room.

WILLIAM PERRY. I am servant to Mr. Anderton, and was present on the 3d of January, when this ring was pawned, and am certain that Walker is the man who pawned it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No. I had not seen a bill offering a reward before I swore to him, nor had I heard of it till Lea brought the duplicate - I did not see Lea myself. I did not see Walker in custody till last Friday; I heard of the reward when Lea brought the ticket, but never saw the bill. A great many people come to our shop.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any expectation of a reward? A. No. The moment I saw him I was certain of him. I should have known him among other people.

MOSES FORTUNE. I saw that waistcoat found in the prisoner's room - Lea was with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did other people lodge in the room? A. I enquired, and understood that only him and a woman lived there. I believe a list of articles bought at a sale were found on him by Lea. Walker said nothing about that.

MRS. MARY CATHERINE DOWNES . I am the wife of Mr. Thomas Downes - we live at No. 31, Great James-street, Bedford-row, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 1st of January I was in possession of the jewels which these caskets contained - the ring produced is one of the rings stolen from this one, which was broken open; and four days after the robbery I found part of the broken chisel in that box. The ring had been in my possession nine years - I wore it on the 1st of January, and put it into that box on the morning of the 2d. I found this piece of the chisel in the jewel-case four days after (producing it.) The chisel was shewn to me on the evening of the robbery, when I returned home; I knew it to be one used by the servants, to take up the carpets. I have often seen it in the housemaid's hands, for that purpose, when I have been on the stairs, and seen her taking up the carpets.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you find the piece of chisel? A. Between the edge of the box and the lock. I happened to take the box up to shew a friend - I had not opened it before. Sarah Rouse was the last cook I had - I never knew her to have followers. I know the ring by the pattern and workmanship, and it fits me; I am convinced that it is mine: I swear to it. I never saw another of the same pattern; I have no mark on it.

MR. THOMAS DOWNES. I am a solicitor , and live in Great James-street . Holland came into my service on the 10th of October; I discharged him on the 7th of December - he did not come afterwards by my permission. On Sunday, the 2d of January. I and Mrs. Downes went out - we returned about half-past ten o'clock at night, and soon afterwards went into the bed-room, having received information of what had happened - I found Mrs. Downes's jewel cases on a chest of drawers; they were kept in one of the drawers of that chest - one box laid open, and the contents were gone, except a few beads - a tray belonging

to it laid near the window; I had seen the case the evening before, but not the contents; I had seen them about a week before. I have no doubt of the ring produced being hers; I gave twelve guineas for it. I had a tool basket when Holland was in my service - the chisel produced was in that basket; I saw it on the drawers on the night of the robbery - it was not there in the morning. The basket was kept in the footman's pantry, on the basement story. Whoever got the chisel must have gone into the pantry for it.

Cross-examined. Q. It was occasionally used by the housemaid - have you ever seen it used by the cook? A. Never. Holland came to me from Bath, with a good character; he did not give me warning: I discharged him on the 7th of December. He might have expressed a wish to leave - his conduct was good for the first month. I do not know that my former cook had followers. I always said I had no doubt about the ring.

Prisoner HOLLAND. Q. Did I ever have friends to see me without your leave? A. The female prisoner (your sister as you called her.) came at times with my leave, but often without our knowledge.

SARAH ROUSE . I was cook at Mr. Downes's part of the time that Holland lived there. I know this chisel; I used to take up carpets with it - it was usually kept in the tool basket, which was kept in the back office, but when Holland came it was moved into the pantry.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you visitors come to take tea with you? A. Yes; not many - the housemaid had friends occasionally - no man came to see her. The female prisoner has slept in the house, but no other woman, nor man ever did.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who did Jemima Holland sleep with? A. With me, and the housemaid.

EDWARD BOWEN M'INTIRE . I was confined in New Prison, Clerkenwell, about a sheet; I saw Walker during my confinement. I received this letter, marked No. 1, from him, on Tuesday, the 8th of February, to deliver to Haydon, according to the direction - he gave it into my hands himself. I received this one (No. 2,) the day before yesterday, and this (No. 3,) yesterday, both from his own hands.

These letters were here read, as follows: -

Tuesday morning.

No. 1.

"Friend Jack - I this morning have seen Mr. M'Intire, that person that messed with us this day before you went out; he came down to see you, but Poll could not find you. He as promised me to come forward himself, and another gentleman, on my trial, to prove a alibi, provising I can get a friend that is a housekeeper to come up with them - you will consult with him on the business, which, if we can get a friend, will be all right. When you see him do not let him pay any thing for drink; tell Tom about it, and that there is a letter left for him at H's. I hope you will do all that lays in your power for me. I wish you would come and see me.

I remain yours &c. W."

For John Haydon , at Mrs. Ward's, New-court, George-yard, Whitechapel.

No 2.

"Sir - I am sorry that my friends as deceived you, but you may depend that I will not deceive you; I will, if you come to me in the bail-dock on the day of trial, give 5 l. in ready money, and a bill, drawn and accepted by my father, for 5 l. My father lives at No. 1, Colet-place, Commercial-road, St. George's East, and is a respectable tradesman. I hope you will do all that lays in your power, as I have only got you to depend on.

I remain yours, &c. Wm. W."

Not directed.

No. 3.

Wednesday.

"Sir - Mr. M'Intire and his friend will wait on you, to consult with you on my business.

I remain yours, &c, Wm. WALKER."

Newgate Prison.

To Mr. Humphries, Broadway, Blackfriars.

M'INTIRE (in continuation.) I received the letter, No. 2, from him in Newgate, and waited while he wrote it. I merely wanted it as a document to shew to a supposed person, who was to come forward with me to prove an alibi. After I was discharged from the charge against me I went to Mr. Downes, to tell him what I knew - I thought it my duty so to do, and it was arranged that I should go on, and have interviews with him.

Q. What passed between you and Walker when you were in the New Prison? A. Walker said he was confined on suspicion of robbery, and that he had acted a foolish part in one respect, by detaining the duplicate of a ring, which he had pawned for six guineas - that he thought it was made away with, but, still it was all right, for he having been in a pawnbroker's employ for above five years, must be supposed to know how to act differently, and consequently had the ring come wrong to his hands he would not have put it in his own name; that he should represent himself as a general dealer, and having been apprehended with a catalogue in his pocket it would carry great weight - therefore all he wanted was to prove an alibi, and as I was sure of being discharged if I would procure another friend with myself to prove an alibi, they would find a third person, and then there was no doubt of they being turned up - this was on the Saturday. On Monday, the 8th of February, I felt it my duty to go to Mr. Downes, and acquaint him of what Walker had said to me - he desired me to carry the business on, and he found a second person, named Carter, who came to me on Tuesday, and I introduced him to Walker, through the bars of the prison; he said, "I hope you are well?" Walker said, "Stop a minute;" he went to a room, and came out with 5 s. in a piece of paper, with, "You and your friend will accept this for a bottle of wine," written in pencil. I said to him, "I cannot be introduced to your friend without a letter;" he said, "Be quiet - drink your wine and return to me, and I will have the letter ready for you." Carter and I went to the nearest house to the prison; returned, and received the letter marked No. 1, from his own hand - I took it to Mr. Downes, without breaking the seal, and after that went to enquire after Haydon, as the note was addressed to him - I went to him that night (Tuesday,) at New-court, George yard, Wentworth-street, but did not find him; I went home. I saw Walker next day, and told him I could not find Haydon - I had seen a woman, who gave me a note for Walker; I delivered it to him, and Walker gave me an answer; it was not sealed: I read it, and delivered the reply to Haydon himself, that night, Wednesday, as I found him then; he read it, but not loud, and burnt it in my presence. It was from Walker to Haydon, complaining of their not giving him the necessary support to bring him through this trial, and

observing that when they were placed in a similar condition he had not been wanting in doing the same for them. I afterwards saw Walker again, and told him I thought his friends were not acting so faithful to him as he might expect - he said that under similar circumstances he had supplied them, even with bread. and desired me to go to them again - I went, and an appointment was made, but they did not attend.

Q. Did you hear Walker say how this robbery was done? mention no names if you can avoid it? A. While I was in prison with him he told me, among other things that he had been a depredator for a considerable time, and had been very successful, and had gained more than 2000 l. in two years.

Q. Confine yourself to this charge? A. He said he knew of this robbery, and it was a put up thing for some time before - that a certain person told him how it was to be done; that they could know nothing of the crib (by which I understood the house) without that person's assistance, and two or three days before the robbery they were warned by that person, that on a certain day they would be there, and would take an opportunity at the appointed time to give them admittance. Walker further observed that they, one or other, were continually to walk before the house, and whoever should be nearest to the door when it was opened (by that certain person) he was to go in - that the case occured, and the lot fell upon Jonah; I understood him to mean himself, for his next expression was, "It being a put up job, I knew where to go to - it was all right, and it was done in a few minutes. I went out, and the produce was all done away with on the morrow;" he particularly lamented about a set of pearls - he said he had been five years with a pawnbroker, and knew a little about those things, and said, "If I had had to pledge them on the square, I could have got 80 l. on them" - he explained that if he was honestly authorized to sell them he could have got that, and very much lamented being obliged to break them up, and sell them under 20 l. He said nothing further then, but a prisoner, named John Haydon, came in, who I believe was implicated with him; I was introduced to him. Haydon said to Walker, "If I am discharged you will be all right." Walker had various conversations with me; he said it was a very clever job, very easily done - that when he got into the house he merely went to work, and was but a few minutes in the house; he said that the person who planned the robbery, naming him, was the person who opened the door to him. He said, "We were directed by that person to walk up and down, and whoever was nearest to the door when it was opened, by that person, was to go in, and the lot fell upon Jonah," and that the person shut the door with great violence, to prevent the servants from supposing that it was not closed.

Cross-examined. Q. What countryman are you? A. A Londoner. I was never in a Court of Justice before, either as principal, accessory, or defendant. I have been a printer from my childhood.

Q. When he spoke of an alibi did you say to him, how can you think of such a thing when it is not true? A. No; I was incarcerated in a place full of rogues, and found that a man who was not as big a rogue as themselves was treated shamefully, and they knew I had been to Botany Bay - I went in the Royal Admiral, which took out convicts and Missionaries; I was only there six weeks. I returned with the vessel. I was an officer of the ship, not a convict. I was afraid of being ill used in the prison.

Q. Did your fear take you to Mr. Downes? A. No; common Justice. I had never heard of a reward till within the last two days - I swear that. I went to Mr. Downes on Monday, the 8th - I had been liberated on the preceeding Saturday. Mr. Downes, at my request, found a man who was to prove the alibi with me - the prisoner having desired me to procure a person. Mr. Downes said if I went forward I should do justice to the public, and bring a set of villians to justice. Carter is not here. It was at my suggestion that Walker wrote a letter to his friend, to introduce us to him, and I believe the second letter was written by my desiring him to give me a confirmation, in writing, of his former proposals.

Q. Was it at your suggestion that you went to the prisoner's attorney, and stated all this, that you might be examined in Court? A. I went to his solicitor, and saw my evidence in your brief. Carter did not do so. I saw Carter yesterday week.

Q. Was anybody present when Walker made a communication to you about the alibi? A. Plenty; but none of them attended to our conversation - nobody was with me. I made no communication to the gaoler about what was going on.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. You went to Botany Bay, as an officer of the ship? A. Yes - I was not a transport. I did not tell Walker why I wanted his letters. I said it was for my own satisfaction, but did not tell him the use I put them to. I desired Mr. Downes to get some person, as I did not wish to be considered as acting in collusion.

MRS. DOWNES re-examined. I lost a complete set of pearls, three rows for the neck, drop ear-rings, a brooch, a handsome head ornament, and other things - they were very valueable.

Prisoner HOLLAND. Q. Had I an opportunity of knowing where your trinkets were? A. I cannot say - you once went into my bed-room with the plate: I desired the servant not to let you go in again.

WALKER'S Defence. I am altogether innocent. Mrs. Downes cannot swear to the ring; I could go round the City and get four hundred of the same description - I will find several in every jeweller's shop, and cannot think you will allow such a ring to be sworn to. As to that man - he makes himself out a complete villian: I gave him no letter, He has done this to get the reward.

HOLLAND, in his Defence, denied the charge, and complained of being uncomfortable in the prosecutor's service.

WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

M. HOLLAND - NOT GUILTY .

J. HOLLAND - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-7

London Cases, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

389. JOHN HENRY HALE was indicted for manslaughter .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-8

390. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 3 1/2 lbs. of flour, value 11 1/2 d., and two

penny rolls, value 2 d., the goods of Robert Abelton , his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT ABELTON. I am a baker , and live in Fenchurch-street - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 7th of February, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, he came in to go to work, and was alone in the bake-house. I concealed myself, and saw him take a bag with flour in it, and secrete it under the flour bin. I said nothing; but about twenty minutes past eight o'clock next morning, when he left to go to breakfast, I got an officer, who took him; 3 1/2 lbs. of flour were found in a paper bag in his hat, with my name on it, and two rolls in his pocket. I allowed him 23 s. a week, and bread and beer to eat in the house, and three 2 lb. loaves for his wife - he had no authority to take flour or rolls off the premises without my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are not your men allowed bread, so that they do not take too much? A. No. I never told Shepherd that I permitted the prisoner to take what bread he liked - I said what I allowed him, and that if he asked for more I should have given it to him; I always gave it to him, and did not permit him to take it.

COURT. Q. How did he secrete the flour under the bin? A. He took it from the shop into the bake-house, and put it under the bin, so that nobody could see it without going on their knees, and looking right under.

JOHN JUDD . I am an officer. I attended at Abelton's about a quarter past eight o'clock, and took the prisoner; I found the flour in his hat, and two rolls in his pocket. He told Mr. Abelton that he never took anything but once or twice, and that was for his own use, and not to sell.

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-9

391. JOHN JONES and JOHN FERGUSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lewis Gilson , about the hour of one, in the night of the 14th of January , at the parish of St. Dunstan in the East , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one soup-ladle, value 2 l.; two sauce-ladles, value 15 s.; six table-spoons, value 3 l.; four salt spoons, value 15 s.; a silver top of a mustard-pot, value 1 s. 6 d.; four desert spoons, value 30 s.; six tea-spoons, value 1 l.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s.; a mustard spoon, value 3 s.; a wine strainer, value 15 s.; a silver salver, value 6 l.; a muffineer, value 15 s.; two wine labels, value 10 s.; two cruet tops, value 5 s.; a plated skewer, value 3 s.; one cloth, value 5 s.; and a mourning ring, value 30 s.; the goods of the said Lewis Gilson; and two promissory notes for the payment of 1 l. each, the property of the said Lewis Gilson, and the sums of money payable and secured thereon, being at the time of committing the felony and burglary aforesaid, due and unsatisfied , against the statute.

MR. LEWIS GILSON. I live at No. 62, Thames-street , in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the East. The prisoner Ferguson was about eight years in my service, up to the time of this robbery, as clerk . I am a ship-broker and notary-public ; I know nothing of Jones. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, between one and two o'clock, I was aroused from my sleep by the bell ringing violently; I got up, went down stairs, and found three watchmen at the door - they gave me information - I went to the watch-house, and there found the constable of the night and watchmen; they shewed me the property stated in the indictment, which is mine - the prisoners were in custody, (examining the property,) it is all mine, and was kept on a side-board in my dining-room, and was in common use, I saw it all the evening before. Here are two 1 l. notes, which were in my iron chest in the front office; Ferguson had been in the habit of going to that chest, and knew where the key was: here is a ring, which was in my own desk, which I found locked, but missed the ring - his own desk was broken open. I saw the notes in the chest the night preceding; I had not fastened the door the night before myself - I had let the back office, where they got in, to Mr. Brocklebank, he had no occasion for it, and they informed me they had locked it up; I do not know what state it was in the night before, I know it was locked up because I have access to it from a door in the passage, and had seen it the day before (the 14th,) it was then fastened; I know of nobody going in after me - the robbery was on Saturday morning, the 15th.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you any partner? A. My son has been in partnership with me many years, he is insane, and therefore I cannot dissolve the partnership - I rent the house alone - the business is carried on in the front office; most of the property was in my dining-room: my son is in the house, attended by a nurse. The rent and taxes were never paid out of the partnership concern. I let the back office last June; Mr. Brocklebank has returned the key to me since the robbery - he is in occupation now, but does not use the office. I do not think that there was any agreement with him in the name of myself and son; the lease of the house is in my name; I only charge the partnership with a certain sum as rent of the office. I have known Ferguson ten years, he was in my service up to that very night, and bore an excellent character among most respectable individuals. He had a key of his own desk, it was broken open, and mine locked. The door leading from Mr. Brocklebank's office to the passage is merely fastened with a drop latch, and can be opened at any time. My daughter had fastened up the premises, she is not here: I heard the bar of the front door put up that night.

WILLIAM KAYLE . I am a watchman. Mr. Gilson's house is in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East. On the 14th of January I came on my beat at nine o'clock and stopped till eleven, when a man relieved me; I went to the watch-house, and relieved him about one, and in consequence of what he told me, I looked at Mr. Gilson's house, and saw a light through the fan-light over the door - I had never seen that before. I went up to the door, and the light instantly disappeared. I crossed over the road, and stood against a door directly opposite, and the light appeared again. M'Carty, another watchman, joined me, he called one o'clock, and the light again disappeared. He went round his beat, I stood at my post, and when he came back I saw the light again - he came towards me, and the light disappeared. I went to the corner post, keeping my eye on the fan-light, and the street door opened; the prisoner Jones looked out first, I

am certain he is the man; he put his head in, and in a minute or two Ferguson looked out over his shoulder; I placed M'Carty there while I fetched Caffyn, placed them both there, pulled the street door bell, and the door immediately came open. Ferguson came out first, with his two fists doubled, striking before him; he struck Caffyn, who fell against the other watchman: Jones came out after him, I followed and came up to him, with the other watchman, and caught hold of him. He said, "Don't ill use me, nor pull me about, I will go quietly, for this will be a finish." I took him to the watch-house, and saw one parcel of the plate produced found on him by Davis, the constable of the night: he was put into the strong room, and soon after Ferguson was brought in by Brown, a watchman: he told Davis that as he knew him, he would not deceive him, but give him up the articles. He put his hand into his pocket, and took out a crow bar, laid it on the table, and then some skeleton keys, and a phosphorus box - the remainder of the silver plate and the mourning ring. I am sure Jones is the man who came out of the house, I never lost sight of him.

MICHAEL M'CARTY . I am a watchman. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, I was on the next beat to Kayle: he called, and desired me to look after Mr. Gilson's door - he rang the bell - I was going up to the door when Ferguson ran out and knocked Caffyn down. I nearly fell over in attempting to catch Ferguson, but missed him. I had seen him put his head out before, and then shut the door; there was light enough for me to know him; I missed my hold and sprang my rattle, and called Stop thief! followed him down Mark-lane into Seething-lane; Brown stopped him, but not in my sight - I came up and took him from Brown.

JOSEPH CAFFYN . I am a watchman. I was by Mr. Gilson's house; Ferguson came out with his fists doubled, as if to resist any one who opposed him. I do not know that he struck me purposely, but by his forcing his way to escape he knocked me down: I struck at him, but missed him. I followed him down Mark-lane, saw somebody turn into Seething-lane, and heard Brown sing out "I have got him;" and when I came up found him in Brown's charge. I had not lost sight of him above a minute - I did not know him before - I had a good view of him when he came out, and am positive he is the man who came out.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you following him? A. Perhaps half a minute.

HENRY BROWN . I stopped Ferguson in Seething-lane, at rather better than a quarter past 1 o'clock. I collared him till M'Carty and Caffyn came up, and then took him to the watch-house. I took him about two stones throw from Mr. Gilson's house. I saw him running very fast down the lane; he attempted to strike me before I took him. I saw him give up the plate, skeleton keys, and crow bar.

Cross-examined. Q. You have not had the custody of the plate? A. No; but here is a salver, which I swear I saw taken out of his pocket - I put no mark on it - it might be half a minute in my sight - it was kept in Davis's possession.

Q. Is not the man who had possession of it dead? A. No; that was a Custom-house watchman, who I did not see till we got to the Mansion-house.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I was constable of the night. On the 15th of January, between one and two o'clock. Kayle brought Jones to the watch-house; I searched him, and found a parcel of silver plate on him, and a handle, which was broken off a ladle, which ladle was found on Ferguson, who was brought in in a few minutes, which I was surprised at, having known him so long. I told him I was sorry to see him, but I must search him. He said, "Mr. Davis, you must do your duty; I will give every thing up to you." He pulled these articles out. I searched him afterwards, and found a ring on him. I sent for Mr. Gilson, who claimed them: I went to Mr. Gilson's, and applied this key to the counting-house door, and found it opened it outside and inside. Ferguson's desk was broken open: I applied a skeleton key to Mr. Gilson's desk, and it opened it; and another key opened the side desks.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Some plate was produced from the pockets of both prisoners? A. Yes - I locked it up immediately; it has been in my possession ever since; I have had the key of the drawer. I took it to the Mansion House; it was in my custody all the time: it was in the hands of Mr. Cope, the City marshal, for seven or eight minutes - it was in his own office; I gave it into his care. I examined it to see if it was correct; I made no mark on it. The ring has Mr. Gilson's name on it.

COURT. Q. The plate was in your custody a short time, but you examined it when he gave it you again? A. Yes; I saw no difference in it, and the articles corresponded.

MR. GILSON. I know the property to be mine; here is a ladle with my initials on it: every thing here is mine, except the house-breaking implements.

Prisoner FERGUSON. We throw ourselves on the merciful consideration of the Court.

Mr. Richard Cheeseman , of Hatton garden, merchant; Mr. Brundith, of Thames street; Mr. T. Randal, solicitor, of Castle street, Holborn; Mr. J. Randal, and Mr. P. Randal, of the same place, gave Fergusson a most excellent character. T. L. Agar: Augustus Towers, of Peckham, printer; J. Hampton, of New street, Kent road, needle-maker; and B. Hall, of Threadneedle street, deposed to the same on behalf of Jones.

JONES - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 24.

FERGUSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary.

Both recommended to Mercy, by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of their character.

Reference Number: t18250217-10

NEW COURT. (1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

392. MICHAEL GOLLOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , a jar, value 1 s., and 1 lb. of snuff, value 4 s. , the goods of William Squire .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-11

393. JOHN BOSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a lamp, value 10 s., and a brass bracket, value 5 s. , the goods of William Hope .

JOHN TELLE . I am foreman to Mr. William Hope, of

Rathbone-place ; he is an upholsterer . The prisoner was in his service for about twelve months, and was dismissed on the 4th of December last. On the 12th of January I missed a lamp from the stock - it had been at the top of a wardrobe on the back of the front shop; I cannot say when I had seen it last; but having an order for six lamps which were generally kept there, I missed one of them. I made enquiries about, and accused the prisoner, who lodged with me, of having taken it; I said, "John, what have you done with the brass bracket lamp?" - he fell into tears, and produced a duplicate of it.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Whatmore, pawnbroker, of Tottenham Court-road. I produce the lamp, pawned by the prisoner, for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-12

Before Mr. Recorder.

394. CHARLES BARRON , WILLIAM SINFIELD , and MARIA SHELDRAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , two live tame fowls, price 5 s., the property of William Busher ; and two live tame fowls, price 2 s. , the property of George Chamberlain .

SAMUEL PINSON . I am a watchman. On Sunday night, the 30th of January, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw the two male prisoners in Maria Sheldrake's room, in Little Pearl-street - there were four fowls in the room, one cock and three hens; I asked the prisoners if they had lost any thing; they said No. I found a padlock key just outside the door, which I showed to them - they claimed it. There were other lodgers in the house. I asked where they had got the fowls; they said they had bought them down the lane, but did not say of whom. I took them into custody. I do not know whether the two men lived there or not.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable, and was sent for to take charge of the prisoners on the 30th of January - I found the two men, but not Sheldrake; one of them said the fowls were bought in Petticoat-lane: the other must have heard what was said. I found three fowls in one cupboard, and one in the other, all alive - I asked the men if they lived in the room; they said No: I said they could have no business there, and took them to the watch-house. I afterwards heard Sheldrake say it was her room - she was brought to the watch-house about half an hour after, and said she knew nothing about the fowls.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. I received information about eleven o'clock, and took Sheldrake in Vine-court - she said she rented the room.

MARY BUSHER . I am the wife of William Busher, and live at No. 4, Hart-street, Bethnal-green , about four or five minutes walk from where the prisoners were taken; Mrs. Chamberlain lives with me - I had seen her fowls and mine safe in the yard, between two and three o'clock on Sunday afternoon, the 30th of January. I saw them again at Worship-street Office, the next morning, and knew them all; she lost two, which were bantams: I lost three. We had had them for some months.

ELIZABETH CHAMBERLAIN . I am the wife of George Chamberlain. I kept two fowls, which were in the yard with Mrs. Busher's; I had seen them between two and three o'clock on the afternoon of the 30th of January. I found them at the office on the Saturday following.

JOHN SANDERS . I keep the house where Sheldrake lived; Barron lived facing me. I did not see the fowls in the house, but I met Hart going out with them.

BARRON'S Defence. I was in the place about five minutes - I had called to see a person, who was not there. I know nothing of the property.

SHELDRAKE'S Defence. I went out about eleven o'clock in the morning; I went home at night, and heard two young men had been taken in my room. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-13

395. FRANCIS EDWARD COURTENAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a bag, value 6 d., and 28 lbs. of coffee, value 40 s. , the goods of John Travers and Joseph Travers .

2d COUNT, stating it to be the goods of William Williams .

JOHN PRIOR . I am a carman to Messrs. John and Joseph Travers, of St. Swithin's-lane. On the 28th of January, about four o'clock, I had 28 lbs. of coffee of their's, to take to Mr. Wm. Williams, in Brick-lane, Old-street; it was in the front of the waggon, on the near side - it was safe when I was in Bunhill-row. I did not stop on the way. The waggon was covered in front, except where the coffee was. I was crossing Old-street to Bath-street; I was by the side of the horses, and saw the bag moving; I stopped, and let the waggon go on: I looked in at the tail, and saw the prisoner with the bag in his hand, which he had drawn two yards from the place where I placed it; I said, "Halloo! what are you after there?" he made no answer, but let go, and jumped out of the waggon at the tail. I collared him, and he struck me. I gave him to an officer.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable, and took the prisoner with the bag, which then had 28 lbs. of coffee in it.

SAMUEL WALKER . On the 28th of January I saw the waggon loaded with this coffee, and other things.

JOHN RAVEN . I am porter to Messrs. Travers. I marked the bag, and saw it put into the waggon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather intoxicated, and jumped into the waggon to have a ride - the carman came, and cut me with the whip, and used me very ill.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-14

396. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , two carpenters' planes, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Goswell .

THOMAS SWALES . I am a carpenter, and live in Silver-street, Golden-square . Thomas Goswell works for me. On the 10th of February I had two planes taken from a bench in my shop - I went out between nine and ten o'clock - returned about a quarter past twelve, and met the prisoner about three yards from my door, with them in his hand; I passed him, and asked a person at my door whether they were lent to him. I then returned, and took him about twenty yards off. He was a stranger to me.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. I took him in charge with the two planes; they have the name of Thomas

Goswell on them. He said he did it from distress - he had no money about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Whipped and discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-15

397. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , three pails, value 5 s. , the goods of William Farmer .

WILLIAM FARMER. I am a cooper , and live at Little Chelsea . I missed three pails on the 19th of January, about six o'clock in the evening - it was dark: I saw them again between seven and eight, on the prisoner's shoulder. No person was at home at the time but my wife. I asked where he got the pails; he said he found them under some trees in Chapel-row. I gave charge of him.

GEORGE SPARROW . I am a jeweller. I was standing at the corner of Seymour-place, and saw the prisoner and another lad: I watched them, and saw the prisoner soon after go away with something on his shoulder; I pursued him, and took him with Farmer.

WILLIAM WIGGINS . I am a constable, and took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Walham Green - I saw the pails under a tree; I took them on my shoulder, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-16

398. MARTHA GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , a purse, value 2 d.; a guinea, and sixteen shillings, the property of William Funnell , from his person .

WILLIAM FUNNELL. I live at Blackley, in Norfolk, and am master of a coasting vessel . I was in London on the 25th of January, between one and two o'clock in the day, looking in at a shop window in Whitechapel - the prisoner and another woman came up to me, and we got into conversation; I went home with the prisoner, but I cannot tell where to - we went to an upper room, where I staid about ten minutes: her companion was gone away. I am quite sure that when I went with her I had a purse in my pocket, containing a guinea and sixteen shillings; I had been taking a friendly glass, but was perfectly collected. I missed the purse while I was on the bed with the prisoner - I charged her with having taken it, and said I would not leave her till she gave it to me. She got off the bed, and opened the door - two other women made their appearance; I still kept hold of her, and would not let her go. All the women then made use of very bad language to me; I told them I would not let her go, but they got her from me. I pursued her - she fell at the bottom of the stairs, and I took hold of her again, and said if she would return my purse I would give her 5 s., but if she did not I would call an officer. I had given her 1 s. 6 d. before. She did not return the purse, and I gave charge of her to the beadle, who was passing. I have not seen the purse since. I am certain it was in my right hand trowsers pocket.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am the beadle of Whitechapel. I was coming down Wentworth-street, between one and two o'clock - I saw five or six women, and the prosecutor with them. I took the prisoner into custody; she made no answer to the charge. I searched her, and found two shillings and two sixpences upon her, but no purse. - The prosecutor had been drinking, but was quite collected.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent. He had been with another young woman before me.

WILLIAM FUNNELL. I swear I had not. I gave her the 1 s. 6 d. out of the purse.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-17

399. WILLIAM SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , a cap, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Eleanor Mason , widow , from the person of William Henry Mason .

ELEANOR MASON. I am a widow, and keep an oil-shop in Brick-lane - my son, William Henry, is eleven years of age. On the 4th of February he went to Wood-street, Cheapside, to a Mr. Brander's - he had a cap on when he went out; he returned home a little before eight o'clock, without it.

WILLIAM HENRY MASON. I am eleven years of age. I know the nature of an oath. I left Mr. Brander's on the 4th of February, a little after seven o'clock. As I was crossing Rose-lane, Spitalfields , the prisoner came up to me, and took my cap from my head; there seemed to be some others with him, and I heard a whistle - I am certain he is the person who took it: I caught hold of the tail of his coat, and kept him till a woman came up and secured him; a gentleman came and took him into custody. I have not seen the cap since.

HENRY SMITH . I live in Shorter-street. I was in Rose-lane on the 4th of February, and saw the prisoner take the cap off the prosecutor's head; I thought he had been at play till I saw the witness take hold of his coat: the prisoner said he had thrown it into the road; it has not been found. He was in company with two others - I saw him secured.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge at the watch-house, for stealing the lad's cap; he said he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Rose-lane - the witness took hold of my coat, and asked me for his cap; I told him I had not seen it, which I had not.

GUILTY. Aged 15. Rcommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-18

400. EDWARD KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a vinegarette, value 30 s., the goods of Henry Habberly Price , his master .

HENRY HABBERLY PRICE. I live in Regent-street , and am an engineer . The prisoner is the son of my housekeeper; I employed him as an errand-boy . I lost a silver gilt vinegarette on the 29th of January; I saw it on the mantle piece between twelve and one o'clock that day, and found it on the Tuesday following, at a pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM MARLAND . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 4, Belina-place, Westminster-road. On the evening of the 29th of January, about ten o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and offered to pawn a silver gilt vinegarette.

for 1 l. - I asked who it belonged to; he said to himself - that he was a captain's boy, and it had been left in the cabin, he supposed, by some passengers. I asked if he had informed the captain of it - he said No, it had happened twelve months ago, and no enquiries having been made he thought he had a right to convert it to his own use. I then opened the case, and found the vinegar was very strong, which convinced me he had lately stolen, or found it. On the following Monday I had to attend a sale, and before I left that sale, the officer and the prosecutor came to my shop about the business.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, who admitted that he had stolen it, and told me where to find it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it from distress.

GUILTY. Aged 19. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-19

401. CHARLES STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , a loo table, value 10 l.; a rosewood table, value 10 l.; a dining table, value 20 l.; a flap, part of a set of dining tables, value 2 s.; one other table flap, value 20 s., and two mahogany boards, value 40 s. , the goods of James Marshall .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Arber .

MR. PHILLIPS, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-20

402. ROBERT ROBERTS and JOSEPH HECKETT were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 36 lbs. of veal. value 25 s. , the goods of William Dexter, the elder , and William Dexter, the younger .

Heckett pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM DEXTER, JUN. I am in partnership with my father; we are butchers , and live in Paddington-street . - On Tuesday, the 1st of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, a person came in, and asked if I had lost any meat; I turned round, and missed the hind quarter of veal, which I had seen two minutes before: I called some of our men, and told them to run up the New-road. The prisoners were brought back in a minute or two.

FREDERICK WILLIAM DAVY . I was a servant of Messrs. Dexters'. I pursued the prisoners, and saw them both together - they had the quarter of veal with them; I had seen it in the shop, and knew it to be my masters'; one of them saw me, and dropped it; I pursued, and did not lose sight of Roberts till he was taken.

NICHOLAS COLE . I am a carpenter. I saw Roberts opposite the Mary-le-bone Infirmary - I heard the cry of Stop thief! Roberts was the man who was pursued. I went down Baker-street, and he turned into a mews, where he was taken before I came up; I had not lost sight of him.

JOHN STEVENS . I am a watchman. I was going round my beat, crying half-past eight o'clock; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I sprung my rattle, and run down the road. I met Heckett, and took him into custody. I did not see Roberts till he was in custody.

ROBERTS'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-21

404. JAMES BETTLES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two quarts of peas, value 2 s., the goods of William Welch , his master .

WILLIAM WELCH. I am a farmer , and live at Norwood . The prisoner was in my service, and slept in the house. On the 25th of January I went into a building in my yard and enquired for one of my servant s, the prisoner was there, and had an iron pot in his hand. I followed him into the kitchen, and saw him put the pot down, and saw the peas in it. I charged him with the theft: he at first denied it, but afterwards said he was very sorry, and it was the first time.

JAMES GRIFFIN . I am servant to Mr. Welch - I have the care of the granary - I have missed peas for some time. On the 25th of January I came home, and found a sack had been opened, and about a peck of peas gone.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was hired by the prosecutor, he agreed to give me so much a week and vegetables: I considered the peas as vegetables.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-22

405. WILLIAM THOMPSON alias LINTOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Lane , James Lane , and Peter Stoker , about two o'clock in the night of the 4th of December , at St. James, Westminster , with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house then being feloniously and burglariously to steal .

2d COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of James Lane.

MR. LOCKHART conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES WILLIAM JONES . I am shop boy to Messrs. Lane, of Old Burlington-street . On Saturday night, the 4th of December last, I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock; I was awoke at half-past two, on the Sunday morning, by a noise over head, as of some person jumping. I slept in a room opposite a passage leading into Saville-row: I saw a light, and heard something knocked down; I heard a voice say "D - n it, it is only the mens' beer!" I heard something like silver being

tossed up, and falling to the ground; I heard the fuse of a match taking fire. I then heard some one say, "Look to the door." I got out of bed, and went through the kitchen, which leads towards Burlington-street; I went and called my master; he, his brother, and myself went on the leads over the shop; there are two sky-lights there: one pane of glass was broken in one of them. My master showed me some blood on it next morning. The shop is near the room where I sleep; there are two doors to that room - one leads from the shop into a passage, which leads to Saville-row. I heard a door move while I was in bed - the door which leads into Saville-row was fastened with the spring lock after master got up, but it had been fastened with two bolts before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is your masters' house in Burlington-street? A. Yes; the warehouse is in Saville-row: there is a communication between them without going into the street; my master goes that way from time to time, to give orders, and do business. I heard a person jump, and a person speak, but I heard no answer. I do not know that there was more than one person there. By the fuse of a match, I mean the match taking light from the box; I have seen such things in the street; and heard the noise - it is the breathing of a flame. I did not see the pane of glass with the blood on it till the next morning. My master got up when I called him. I do not know that any other person was up at the time.

Re-examined. Q. You have been asked whether there were more than one person, and you say you heard a voice more than once - did they appear to be different voices? A. Yes. I distinctly heard the lighting of the fuse. There is a trap door from the room where the thieves were to my room - that door was open. I went out upon the leads - it did not rain then, but when I got up in the morning it appeared as if it had rained in the night. When I saw the blood it was on the inside.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How lately had you seen the window before? A. I do not know. The blood was a small smear - it might have been there a month before. I had not been on the leads for some time; I know that the skylight was whole in the course of the day before. When the glass was broken any person could have cut the string which fastened the sky-light.

WILLIAM LANE . I am an attorney, and am the prosecutor's brother; his name is James Lane: the house is in the parish of St. James, Westminster; my brother is the sole owner of it. On the 4th of December I was sleeping there, and was awoke by my brother and Jones. The room in which I sleep joins the work-shop, and communicates with the leads, by means of a passage. I got out of bed - I went into my dressing-room, and got a pistol. We got on the leads - as I passed the sky-light I thought I saw a person, and discharged the pistol at him; when we got to the end of the leads, leading to Saville-row, we saw a man within two yards of our door; that was Durham, who was tried last Session; I searched the premises, and found behind the door leading to Saville-row, a dark lantern, with a small wax candle in it. I examined the post of the door next morning, and saw some smears of blood on the right hand door post, in going out, about a yard from the bottom. On the night in question I went to the watch-house, and while I was giving charge of Durham the prisoner was brought in, and searched in my presence - I saw two whole wax candles and a piece of one taken from his person; I think from his breeches pocket. I went home immediately, and fetched the lantern which I had found on the premises; I compared the candle in the lantern with those found on they prisoner; they corresponded exactly. He said he lived somewhere in Whitechapel; I did not observe his hand. I think he said he was a commission broker, but had only been a short time in town. I attended at Marlborough-street the following morning. I examined the sky-light about nine or ten o'clock; I observed part of one of the panes had been cut out, and a part of it was lying by the side; we then went into the shop, into which that sky-light looks - I saw several marks of blood, which had run down on the inside of the sky-light; they appeared to be fresh - they were hardly dry.

Cross-examined. Q. That blood is the same as the boy saw? A. Yes. I think there were five marks.

Q. There are many tailors there at work, and some awkward fellow might have cut his finger? A. Yes. The blood on the door post was outside, and could have been made by a person going by the house. Durham was near that very door, and he was the only man I saw near the house. He had on a black coat. I saw Durham's hands at the watch-house, and there was no appearance of any blood on them.

JURY. Q. Did the candles appear to be cut, or where they whole short candles? A. They were whole candles.

RICHARD ADDISON . I am a watchman of St. George, Hanover-square. On the morning of the 5th of December I saw the prisoner while I was calling half-past two o'clock - he was coming from Mr. Lane's back premises, into Clifford-street, opposite Saville-row; I pursued him, but did not take him. When he was taken I saw some blood on one of his hands, but I cannot say which - it was more particularly examined by another person.

Cross-examined. Q. How far from Saville-row was he when you first saw him? A. He might have turned the corner, about one hundred yards towards Bond-street; he was upon the run. I crossed over, and cried Stop thief! I had seen Durham at the watch-house before, and knew of the robbery. I went to the watch-house, and stopped there till another watchman brought the prisoner in.

Re-examined. Q. Was there any alarm given to the watchmen about the robbery? A. Yes, and we had directions to look out.

JAMES COUSINS . I am a watchman - my beat is in Berkley-square. I was induced to follow the prisoner on the morning of the 5th of December - at the corner of Hay-hill I heard the footsteps of two persons running; I saw the prisoner, and the last witness running after him; the prisoner thought to get into Landsdown-passage, but I stopped him there, and he turned back into Bruton-mews; I followed after him, and desired him to stop several times, but he made no answer. I made a prisoner of him just as he got to Bruton-street; I thought he would faint every minute, as he was blowing so - he asked me to let him rest a minute; he appeared very warm, like a person who had just been running. I let him stop some time, and he put his hand into his pocket to take his handkerchief to wipe some blood off his hand; another

watchman came to my assistance a few minutes before; while the prisoner was taking out his handkerchief something fell out of his pocket, which sounded like a key, or a piece of iron; I said, "Something dropped from you" - he said, "It must be from yourself, not from me." I told my companion to take notice of the place. I did not hurt his hand so as to make the blood come, nor did Wilkinson. There was no scuffle between us.

Cross-examined. Q. What parish do you belong to? A. St. George's; Addison and Wilkinson belong to the same parish. There was no watchmen of St. James's there. The prisoner was taken to St. James's watch-house - he had a cut on his hand - I did not notice it particularly, but I think it was cut with glass; I think it was cut with the glass of a sky-light. I do not know which hand was cut, but I think the left - it was a small cut.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I am a watchman of St. George's, Hanover-square. I took the prisoner on the morning of the 5th of December. I heard something fall from him, which sounded like a key. We took him to Berkley-square, and delivered him to some watchmen of St. James's. I went back to the spot where I had heard something fall, and found two centre bits, which I delivered to Skinner, the patrol.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether they laid upon the ground before, or fell from the prisoner? A. No. I was on his right side, and had hold of his right arm, I am not sure that he could not put that hand into his pocket. I saw the prisoner pull out his handkerchief, but I cannot tell whether it was at that time I heard the iron fall; I believe he had his hand in his pocket two or three times in going down the mews. I do not think what I heard drop was when he pulled out his handkerchief; it might be about ten minutes afterwards before I picked up the centre bits. I had not seen any persons walking there shortly before they fell.

HENRY SKINNER . I am a patrol of St. George's. On the morning of the 5th of December I received two centre bits from Wilkinson - I marked them, and gave them to the beadle.

GEORGE LAWFORD . I was night constable. On the morning of the 5th of December the prisoner was brought to St. James's watch-house, and given in charge for attempting to commit a burglary in the house of Mr. Lane. When I requested him to account for his running, he could give no distinct reason, but said he was on his way home, and the watchmen had pursued him, and used him in a very rough manner; but he denied any knowledge of the transaction of which he was accused. I asked where he had been - I think he said he had been spending the evening near Knightsbridge; I then asked his name, and where he lived - he said he would reserve that for a future opportunity. On pressing him further on the point, he said he lived in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel - that he had lately come from Manchester, and his name was John Thompson. He was then searched, and a purse, with 3 s. or 4 s. was found on him. I kept the purse, and gave him the silver for his own use. I found a small knife, a glass, and three pieces of wax candles on his person. His hands were very dirty, and the right one bleeding very much - I desired him to shew it to me, which he did with great reluctance, and said it was in consequence of the struggle with the watchmen who took him captive - that it had been bruised against a wall - I looked at it, and though not a judge of wounds I am certain it could not have been from a bruise against a wall - it appeared to be cut with something sharp. The dark lantern was brought afterwards, by some of Mr. Lane's people; here is the lantern and the candle that was in it. The candle in his pocket exactly corresponds with that in the lantern. Durham was brought up the same evening, on the same charge - they did not appear to know each other.

Cross-examined. Q. On what part of the hand was the wound? A. It was about the middle of the back of the hand. I cannot undertake to say it might not have been made by some sharp nail in a wall, but I think not. I do not know whether the candles were particular ones or no.

JOHN MELAMPHY . I am a watchman of St. James's. - On the 5th of December I apprehended Durham, near Burligton Arcade, in Cork-street; he dropped a chisel, which I delivered to the constable of the night. Durham was running towards me, and crying Stop thief; but there was no one in the street but himself. I took him back to the other watchmen, who said that was the man; I saw nothing of the prisoner till he was at the watch-house.

GILBERT RILEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Stoker - he is a partner with Mr. Lane. I was at work at Mr. Lane's on the 4th of December - I shut the sky-light myself, and no pane of glass was broken then - the light is fastened by a cord which was cut the next morning. Cutting that cord would not enable a person to raise the sky-light higher - I think those who cut it did not understand it.

Cross-examined. Q. When the sky-light was shut as you left it, does it want any thing more than for a man to put his hand in to pull it up? A. No. It was not fastened by a bolt or latch, or any other fastening whatever. I had seen it on the Saturday evening, about six o'clock; it could not have been left a little way open - its own weight would have shut it.

MR. JAMES LANE. On the morning after the burglary I observed the sky-light open; it was propped up by this chisel, which I marked at the top - no person could have got in by any other means, but at this sky-light. My father, Mr. Richard Lane, and Mr. Peter Stoker are in partnership with me. At the time the alarm was given I went to that part of the premises leading to Saville-row; I found the door only on the spring, which had been double bolted and locked. Whoever opened that door must have done it to get out, not to get in.

JOHN NEWMAN . I was landlord of the Fox and Goose, public-house, on the 5th of December. Durham had lodged with me for a week or ten days; he left a box behind him in my room - some person, who was a stranger, called afterwards for a shirt belonging to him; I gave him a shirt and a pair of stockings. I have seen the prisoner in my house two or three times, but I never recollect seeing him in conversation with Durham. I delivered three keys to Cousins, and one of them fitted the box.

CATHERINE WINWOOD . I live at No. 11, Black Horse-court, Fleet-street. About the 5th of December the prisoner lodged at my house, by the name of Lintott - he had a two pair of stairs room; he lived there five months, till he was taken up. Cousins, the officer, came and searched

his apartment - I believe he took something out of his room. I saw a bundle, but I do not know what was in it. I did not know a person of the name of Durham. - I do not know how the prisoner got his living - he behaved very well in my house.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not Black Horse-court nearly opposite Whitefriars? A. It is two doors from Fleet-market.

Q. Might not a person have misunderstood Whitefriars for Whitechapel? A. I do not know.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to the Fox and Goose on the 10th of December - I enquired if a person of the name of Durham lived there; the landlord said he had, and showed me his room. I took two large skeleton keys from a drawer that day, and Mr. Newman gave me three keys - one of which opened a box, and I found some duplicates in it; I took them, and gave the keys back to Mr. Newman. I went again next day, and took a pair of worsted stockings and a shirt from the box: they were marked H. D. I afterwards went to Catherine Winwood's, No. 11, Black Horse-court, Fleet-street; I went to Lintott's room, on the second pair of stairs; I found in a drawer three files, a picklock key, and a phosphorus box, with no phosphorus in it - there were some matches in a piece of paper, and two small bits of wax candle, one of them appears to be cut at the end, to fit some small nozzle - in a second drawer I found a shirt, marked H. D., and a pair of speckled stockings, marked H. D., with ink: they appear to be marked in the same manner, and I think by the same hand as those found at Newman's. The shirt at Lintott's was marked H. D., and the shirt at Newmen's was marked H. D., No. 5 - they appear to be marked with the same sort of marking thread. On a chair in the room I found a dirty shirt, marked J. L. I then went into the cellar, and in a hole, behind some bricks, I found two bundles of skeleton keys. I have been in the habit of comparing property of different kinds, and I believe the shirts are made of the same sort of cloth; the stockings appear to be the same. I have seen the prisoner before he was in custody; I received a chisel from the night constable, which I marked, and gave to him again. I took the chisel, and compared it with the marks on the sky-light; it corresponded with them exactly; the other chisel was supporting the sky-light, but that did not correspond with the marks at all. I received the stock of a centre bit from a person of the name of Carter.

Cross-examined. Q. How did the sky-light shut? A. It appeared to require something to hold it up, but when down it did not appear to have any fastening but its own weight; one of the chisels was used to keep it up. A man could have got in when it was raised up. I am not a linen-draper. I have not marked much linen, but my own linen is marked. The prisoner had been in custody some days before I went to his lodgings - he could have sent to his lodgings if he had been so disposed. I knew where he had lived for some time before he was taken.

MR. WM. LANE re-examined. I saw Cousins compare the chisel with the marks on the sky-light - they appeared to fit it exactly.

JOHN PURTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 28th of November I saw the prisoner and Durham together in company with Abrahams; it was about half-past eleven, or a little before twelve o'clock at night; they appeared to me to be in company together; there were other persons there. I have known the prisoner five or six months.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you in the room? A. They might be together five or six, or seven minutes, and then Linlott went out. It is not uncommon for persons sitting in such a room as that to talk together.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentleman of the Jury, considering the situation in which I stand, I find it a most arduous task to address you - in a case like this, involving my life and liberty, but, relying on my innocence, I shall await your judgment with confidence. I had been to supper at the West end of the town - in returning I heard an alarm of Stop thief! a man ran past me - I pursued him: he turned up a mews; I stood still, and the watchman came and laid hold of me; I told them I was not the person - they said I was, and took me down the mews. I heard something strike against the stones, but I dropped nothing. They looked some time, and then went on to the bottom of the mews, where several watchmen were; it was two watchmen belonging to St. George's, who had me in custody - there were several watchmen, and they were contending about where I should he taken. I complained of my hand being hurt when I was up at Marlborough-street; the Magistrate desired one of the officers to look at my hand, and the officers gave it as their opinion that it was not a cut, but torn or rent. There is no evidence that I had been on the premises, and it must strike you as evident that if the sky-light would not lift up more than nine inches, it would not be possible for me to get through so small a crevice as that. The witnesses state there was blood on the sky-light, and on the door - but there is no evidence to prove I was near either. They state they came and looked over the leads, and saw the young man not included in the indictment, near the door. The nearest that any of them states I was, is one hundred yards at least, and it must have been very difficult for him to identify me; if any one had seen me near the premises it would have been evidence on the subject. The watchmen admit each of them having hold of an arm in the mews, and therefore it was not possible for me to let the bits fall from my person. You will, Gentlemen, have the goodness to look at these articles, and in a mews, which has always rough stones, it would be very easy for any person walking to have kicked them against the stones. As to the things which are stated to have been found at my lodgings, there is no proof that they were ever there, but an attempt has been made to crimluate me, and it is entirely out of malice that these things are brought here. The young man tried with me last Session was an entire stranger to me. I have now been nearly three months in custody; I was brought up last Session, but through some mistake in the indictment I was then sent back, and have had the greatest difficulty in providing myself with evidence to clear myself; while my prosecutors have had every advantage. I beg, Gentleman, you will consider the nature of the evidence is entirely circumstantial, and the very deceptive nature of such evidence, and I conjure you to divest your minds of every prejudice that may have arisen during this examinaation. One of the witnesses, of the name of Purton, who has this day come forward against me, was wanted as much at Marlborough-street, but then he was not brought forward.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18250217-23

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

405. SAMUEL BELLAMY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Layton , from his person .

JAMES LAYTON. I am a broker of the City of London. On the 27th of January, about half-past two o'clock, I was walking through a passage in Gray's Inn , with a friend - I felt something touch my coat pocket; I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner running from me, twenty or thirty yards off; we pursued him, and saw him tucking something under his trowsers; we overtook him, and demanded the handkerchief - he at first denied it, but afterwards confessed having it. He was taken to Hatton-garden.

HUGH WADE MACAUGHEY . I was in company with Mr. Layton, and heard him say, "Some one has picked my pocket." I turned, and saw the prisoner running away - we overtook him, and charged him with it; he at first denied it, but at last pulled it out of his trowsers.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer of Hatton-garden and took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have lately lived at Mr. Hammond's, a butcher, in Bloomsbury-market. I was going to a woman's, at whose house I lodged, and saw the handkerchief lay on a stone; I took it up, and heard some person call to me to stop - I stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three-Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-24

406. GEORGE REEVES and SAMUEL CUMBER were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , three seals, value 11 l., the goods of David Gass , privately in his shop .

DAVID GASS. I am a jeweller , and live in Oxford-street . On the 8th of February the prisoners came to my shop, about six o'clock in the evening - we had one or two lamps lighted; they came in arm-in-arm, and said they wanted to look at some gold seals. Cumber first addressed me, and said "The reason of my not coming back," (for an article which he named, but I forget what,) "was, the lady suited herself before she got home." They then asked to look at the seals, and I shewed them a tray of seals. Reeves looked at them, while Cumber stood at some little distance staring me in the face; he came once or twice to the counter and asked some questions about the price, and other things. I saw Reeves conceal a seal in his hand: I immediately removed the tray. Cumber then came up to his companion and pushed him on the elbow, and muttered something to him. Reeves then opened his hand, with the seal in it, and enquired the price of it. I took it out of his hand and put it out of the way. Two seals which he had before looked at, then laid close to my body, at a distance from them. Reeves then desired me to send those two to No. 15, Lincoln's-Inn-fields to his father, who kept a druggist's shop. They were then retiring from the counter. I then told them they did not wish to buy seals, but came to steal them. I immediately told my young man to go round and shut the door. Reeves then came close up to the counter, and leaned over it for a minute or two; he then turned round, and dropped three seals on the counter where he had been leaning. I am quite sure there were no seals on the counter just before, as I had removed them, suspecting their design. The officer took them into custody. I went to No. 15, Lincoln's-Inn-fields, and found there was no such person. The seals cost me 11 l. odd.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure Reeves did not mention the name of any street near Lincoln's-Inn-fields? A. No; I wrote it down immediately, and am sure I am right. There was no handkerchief or cloth on the counter when I saw the three seals there: there were two seals near me on the counter. There were perhaps two or three hundred seals in the box - he had asked the price of several, and of one of the three which were laid on the counter.

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am a shopman to Mr. Gass. I was not present when the prisoners came into the shop, but was afterwards; my master desired me to shut the the door, for the purpose of detaining them. I am certain the counter was clear of seals at the time I went round to shut the door; the prisoners were then at a short distance from the counter. I saw the three seals on the counter as soon as I turned round from shutting the door - there was a pocket handkerchief lying on the counter at some distance, belonging to one of them - the seals could not have been shaken from that handkerchief on the glass, without our hearing them.

ANGELIUS BERTRAND . I am an officer. I took the prisoners. I found 10 1/4 d. on Reeves, a mourning ring and a tooth-pick. I found nothing on Cumber.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CUMBER'S Defence. I met the prisoner Reeves in Oxford-street, who invited me to take a walk. He told me he was going to buy a seal, and as soon as we got to the shop, he said "I think I can get suited at this shop," I accordingly went in, and my feelings was severely wounded at what transpired - I declare I am innocent.

REEVES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

CUMBER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-25

407. THOMAS ARTHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a jacket, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Whittle ; and a jacket, value 6 s. , the goods of David Jones .

THOMAS WHITTLE. I lost my jacket from my chest on board a ship at Cotton's wharf - the prisoner was a seaman on board; it had been put into my chest about a week before.

DANIEL BLIGH . I am an officer of the Thames Police; I found the prisoner with the jackets in a boat on the river, on the 28th of February. I asked what he did with them? He said he had been ill-used by his master, and had run away. I took him to the Office - he had some other clothes with him, which have not been claimed.

DAVID JONES. I was a sailor on board this ship. I had my jacket hanging on a nail in the forecastle - I did not know of its being gone till next morning - I never gave the prisoner leave to take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had taken some clothes on shore

to wash - I came back to my ship, between eight and nine o'clock: a friend asked me if I would go down to Whitby, and I agreed to go - I took my clothes and went into the boat to go on board, and took up the two jackets, with my bed clothes through mistake. I took nothing out of any chest.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-26

408. ADOLPHUS BLACKBOURN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 360 yards of ribbon, value 10 l.; twelve handkerchiefs, value 3 l.; 150 handkerchiefs, value 7 l.; 20 lbs. of thread, value 3 l.: four cloaks, value 3 l.; 1000 yards of tape, value 3 l.; and twelve pounds of cotton, value 3 l. , the goods of Thomas Luck , Thomas White , and Thomas Castle .

2d COUNT, stating them to belong to Samuel Worpell .

SAMUEL WORPELL. I am a carrier from Ware to the Vine Inn, Bishopsgate-street. I had a parcel on the 12th of October, directed for Joseph Pollard, of Ware - I received it from the Vine Inn - I did not see it in the waggon. I had two servants with it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where do you live? A. At Ware; there are no other persons engaged in the business with me.

JOSEPH HODGSON . I am a warehouseman in the house of Thomas Luck, Thomas White, and Thomas Castle. On the 12th of October I sent a truss to the Vine Inn, it was directed to Joseph Pollard, of Ware, and was to go by Worpell's waggon: it contained the goods stated in the indictment.

TIMOTHY MOORE . I am a porter to the house of Luck and Co. On the 12th of October I took a truss to the Vine Inn, which I delivered to Travell, the book-keeper.

WILLIAM TRAVELL . I am book-keeper, I remember the truss being delivered on the 12th of October - I gave it to Gardner, the waggoner.

JOHN GARDNER . I am a servant to Worpell. I recollect taking the truss into the waggon - I put it in front of of the waggon, about a quarter past three o'clock, and drove to Smithfield, where I stopped about an hour to take up goods, I then went to the Cherry-tree, public-house, in Kingsland-road , where I stopped to get some refreshment, and there missed the truss - I had not left the waggon at all at Smithfield.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a bricklayer. I was in Kingsland-road on the 12th of October, between seven and eight o'clock at night, and saw the waggon there, and the prisoner in it - he had three more with him, who were standing against a stay shop; the prisoner got into the waggon twice, and came out again without bringing any thing - he went in a third time, and came out with a little bundle under his arm, which he gave to one of the others. I followed them into Hare-walk - they all went together, when they got to the bottom of Hare-walk I lost sight of them. I presently saw three of them come up again with the things in a basket, a bundle, and a bag - the prisoner had the bundle, it seemed to me to be the same. I followed them to the corner of Turner-square - one of them went up Hoxton, the prisoner and another went down the square - I did not see him again till he was in custody - I knew him before quite well. I went home and told my father, he told the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live? A. At the side of the Dutchess of York, public-house, Kingsland-road - the prisoner lived with his father. I have never been to his father to enquire about him. I saw the prisoner take this bundle from the waggon; it was after I had been here.

Q. How long afterwards? A. No, it was about a week after I had seen the waggon robbed; my father told me it was on the 12th of October.

Q. Where were you on the 9th of October? A. I cannot tell.

Q. What day is this? A. I do not know, nor what month. I can swear this was on the 12th of October, because my father told me so.

Q. Have you been at a fire to-day? A. Yes, on Ludgate-hill.

Q. And was you charged there with picking a pocket? A. Yes, but I never picked a pocket in my life. I am a bricklayer. I live in Union-buildings, Kingsland-road, but at the time of the robbery I lived in Wellington-street.

Q. The persons you appeared against before were Briggs and Carter? A. Yes.

Q. Have you always given the same account of it? A. Wells and Archer were with me, and saw what I did.

WILLIAM ARCHER . I work with my father, who is a shoemaker, in Kingsland-road. I saw the waggon at the Cherry Tree, on the 12th of October; I saw three or four boys looking at that waggon. I saw Briggs and Carter bring a large parcel out of it. I did not see the prisoner there at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in company with the last witness when he was charged with taking a handkerchief? A. Yes; we told the gentleman we were here as witnesses, and therefore we were not locked up.

WILLIAM WELLS . I was in company with the witnesses, at the Cherry Tree. I saw Briggs and Carter get in the waggon; there were five altogether. I think the prisoner was one who got into the waggon, because he had a black coat on: the person was almost of the prisoner's height but I cannot be positive to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-27

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

409. JOHN BARNETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Baynon , on the 19th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a jacket, value 15 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 10 s., his property .

JOHN BAYNON. I am apprentice to Mr. Nichols, of the Aurora brig, which laid at Cotton's wharf. On the Sunday before Christmas day, about twelve o'clock in the morning, I was going to the West India Docks, and as I went down Rosemary-lane two persons stood at the door of a clothes shop - the prisoner is one of them. One of them said, "Here shipmate, I want to speak to you." I

turned back, and when I got near the door they went back into the house; I went inside, and they immediately shut the door - the shop was then all dark. They said, "Go in there." I was all in the dark, and asked what for: they said nothing, but the prisoner shoved me into a back room at the further end of the shop, and while he was doing that I heard the other baring the street door. They both came into the room, and told me to strip - I asked what for; the answer was, I must strip: I said I would not; they said they would make me. Both laid hold of me, and pulled my jacket and waistcoat off; I did all I could to get from them, and called out, "They are robbing me." They hove me down on my back, and took off my trowsers. The prisoner then went into the shop, and brought in a frock, waistcoat, and trowsers, and told me to put them on, which I did. The frock and trowsers were new, and the waistcoat old, but mine were a complete new suit of sailor's clothes. When they had dressed me, they pointed to some steps, and told me to go down there, which I did, because I was afraid of my life. The street door was shut all the time. I went down the steps into the cellar, which was quite dark; they shut the flap door upon me. I remained there from about twelve o'clock till dark - the same men then came and opened the flap: they had no candle, but I could see them by a light from the back parlour fire. They said, "Come up," which I did - they told me to go out - I was going, but turned back, and asked if they would be kind enough to give me my clothes; they said they would not. I go out into the street - I do not know the time - I was afraid to go back to my vessel, as the captain would hide me for losing my clothes. I walked about the streets all night, and went on board a West Indiaman next morning. I saw the master of the Aurora three weeks after - I had told the mate of the West Indiaman of it. I had paid 2 l. 3 s. 11 d. for my clothes, and only wore them five times - those the prisoner gave me were worth about 7 s. altogether. On the 14th of January I went with Blythe to Rosemary-lane, and saw the prisoner standing at the door of a clothes shop - I do not know whether it was the same shop - it was on the same side of the way; I pointed him out, and knew him to be the man. I told the officer he was the very man who took my clothes off - he asked him if he belonged to the shop - he said he did. The officer took him in, and told him I charged him with robbing me of my clothes, and he must go with him; he said he would come at any time he appointed. He was taken to the office.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been at sea? A. Two years and nine months, under the same captain. I was never flogged for making away with my clothes. I should know the other man if I saw him. I do not know at what time they let me out - I saw the watchman, but did not tell him. I told nobody of it but the mate. I went down to Northfleet in the Indiaman, and told some persons of it there; they said I should write to my uncle, which I did, and told him I had lost my clothes; he came down with my indentures next day, and took me to the ship, and then took me to Blythe, the officer. I swear he is the man. I had no money about me. I had leave to go and see an old school-fellow. I was afraid to return to my ship.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-28

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

410. MARY KEATON was indicted for the wilful murder of Joseph Keaton .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD COCKHEAD . I am assistant at the Rose and Crown, public-house, Broad-street, St. Giles's. I knew Joseph Keaton - the prisoner was his wife. On Saturday night, the 5th of February , about seven o'clock, he was at my house with his fellow workmen, and about half-past eleven o'clock he came there with his wife - they had a pot of beer, which the husband paid 6 d. for; I gave him 1 1/2 d. change; the prisoner took it up, and said, "This will do for a glass for me in the morning;" the husband replied, "Very well, now let us go home to supper:" they took the beer home - they appeared rather merry with liquor, but he much more so than her: they were perfectly in good humour. They were decent people, and always appeared to live in harmony. They lived in Lascelles-court, and appeared rather above the class of persons living there.

MARY TAYLOR . My husband is a shoemaker, and lives at No. 5, Lascelles-court , on the first floor - the prisoner and her husband lived on the ground floor. About twelve o'clock on this night I was going out - the prisoner was in her room, and called out,,"Is that Mrs. Taylor?" and asked me to have a drink of beer; I said I was in a hurry, and went on an errand - when I returned she called me into her room; her husband was there; it was then very near twelve o'clock - they sat on each side of the fire, and I thought them very comfortable together. There were two quartern loaves, two pots of beer, and some fried steaks on the table; one pot was full of beer: she asked me to drink, which I did. I was then going out, but the deceased called me, and said I should drink with him before I went - it was all in good humour; I drank with him, wished him good night, and went up to my own room; they were not quite sober. I afterwards heard a loud talking, as if a man and woman were at words - I afterwards heard a voice calling out, "Mary, the man is bleeding." (Mary Moore lives opposite.) I had a young child to attend to, and did not go down. I heard people coming into the house: I went down in a quarter of an hour, to the door of the prisoner's room, and found several watchmen and neighbours there. The prisoner was on her knees, clasping her hands together, and calling out that she had murdered her husband - she was kneeling on his body, and kissing him; he laid on the flat of his back. I saw blood on his face and head - she appeared much distressed at what had happened. She was a sober, hard working woman - they appeared a very happy couple.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am the last witness's husband. I was at work in my room, and heard the voices of a man and woman talking loud, in the prisoner's room; it was only a few words, and then all was quiet. I then heard a noise as if something was broken, and thought something had fallen off the mantle-piece. I afterwards found a square of glass was broken - the window is near the fireplace. I heard no alarm of murder, and did not go down till the prisoner was in custody. I never knew them quarrel before.

WILLIAM MOORE . I live in Lascelles-court, opposite to the prisoner. About twelve o'clock on this night, the prisoner came into my room, fell on her knees, and said, " For God's sake, go over and pacify between me and my husband!" She said words had happened between them. I went over, leaving her in the room; on tapping at their room door, no answer was given: I opened it slowly, put my head in, and saw nobody there; a candle and two pots of beer stood on the table. I returned to my room, and told the prisoner I could see no one in her room. She said "He must he looking for me!" and said to my wife "For God's sake, go over, and see if my husband is there." My wife went, returned immediately, and told her the man was there stretched on his hands and knees by the fire, bleeding. I ran over and picked him up - he laid with his head towards the cupboard, but I cannot say whether it was on the ground, he was between a chair and the jam of the fire-place - there were some coals near him - I think the chair supported the body a little from falling - he drew his breath when I lifted him up, and blood came from the back part of his head. I called across to my wife "Mary, the man is murdered!" The prisoner and my wife came over. The prisoner took the deceased out of my hands, and told me for God's sake to fetch a doctor. I went to two, but could not get them. I returned and got the watchmen, who came - I believe the man was then dead: the prisoner was hanging over his body, crying and kissing him, and saying

"Joseph! Joseph! my dear I have killed you!" I waited till the doctor came, and saw him pick up a large handled hair broom, three feet long - the handle was broken in two.

Cross-examined. Q. The man's head was towards the cupboard, between the chimney jam and chair? A. Yes, it was very close to the fender - when I first went over I could not see that part of the room, as the table was between me and the body - I found him on his face.

MARY MOORE . I was at home with my husband. The prisoner came over, with a little blood on her nose, and said to my husband

"For God's sake come over, and pacify between me and my husband!" She seemed in great distress, and crying - I gave her a towel to wipe the blood off her nose, My husband went over, came back directly and said he saw nobody there. She said, "He is looking for me; do, Mrs. Moore, go over, and see if you can find him." I went over, bolted in, and saw him laying between the chair and fire-place, with his head towards the coals, (they are kept in a cupboard, which has no door to it.) I ran back and said "The man is murdered! and laying in his blood!" My husband ran over, and called out " Mary! Mary! the man is laying in his blood murdered!" I and the prisoner went over - she took her husband from mine, and began kissing and lamenting over him, and called out for God's sake to go for a doctor - she took a pillow from the bed, and laid it under his head, and began crying over him. My husband went for a doctor - the watchman and people came crowding in. They always appeared to live comfortable together; I had known them seven or eight months.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there a great deal of blood on the floor where the body lay? A. There was some, but I was so flurried I did not particularly notice - he laid against the jam - he might have fallen and injured himself.

JOHN HARDMAN . I am conductor of the patrol. I heard a rattle spring, and went to No. 5, Lascelles-court with Harrington - several people were round the door, and the room was crowded. The prisoner was leaning on the deceased, crying out "I have killed my husband!" he laid on his back, with his clothes on, and his face all over blood - he appeared to be dead. I saw two wounds, there was a deal of blood on the left of his head, near the coal place. There was a wound at the back, and one on the side of his head - they were some distance apart. I asked the prisoner what she had killed her husband with? she said with a brush. I saw this long-handled broom laying on his right hand, (producing it,) it was broken as it is now, and the brush part of it loose - I did not examine it to see if there was any mark on it - the shovel and poker laid by the broom. I believe there was a little hair on the point of the poker, and on the corner of the shovel, but no blood, except on the handles of them. I sent for a medical man, and took her to the round-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Many persons had been in the house before you arrived? A. Yes; I could scarcely get through the crowd; his face was smeared with blood, and about a yard from his face, near the coals, there was a great deal of blood - the broom was about a yard and a half from the fire-place - the poker and shovel might have been knocked down by the people.

THOMAS HARRINGTON . I am a watchman. I went with Hardman. The prisoner was laying over her husband, kissing him, and saying, "My dear, I have killed you! I have killed one of the best of husbands!"

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am keeper of the round-house. The prisoner was brought in about twenty minutes before one o'clock. Before I said any thing to her, I went to the house, and found the man dead. I returned - she was then crying bitterly, and said "Mr. Furzman, how is he?" bursting into a flood of tears, (I knew them both before, they were decent people.) I said he was a little better; not liking to tell her he was dead. I then asked her how they came to quarrel? she said, "Oh, good God! Mr. Furzman, you know us well, and I will tell you:" she said they went down Drury-lane to buy some meat for supper; and I think she said she paid 1 s. 6 d. or 1 s. 9 d. for it; and, on the way home, he requested to have a pot of porter. She said, "We have one pot at home, which is quite sufficient:" but he insisted on having another - they had one - they went home, she cooked the supper, and as they sat at table, he began to be playful, which she did not like - and he said "D - n your eyes! you have got three halfpence of mine! give them to me." Words occurred, and he struck her a blow across the nose with his hand or fist, and made it bleed - that she instantly jumped up, and laid hold of the first thing she could, which was the hair broom, and struck him a violent blow, as he sat on the chair - he fell off the chair, and she instantly ran to her opposite neighbour, and begged Moore to go in, for she was sure she had done something wrong. He went over, returned and said he could not see him; and she said "For God's sake, run for the doctor!" - that is all she said. She appeared very sorry for what she had done, and told me every thing without hesitation. She appeared to have been in liquor, but knew what she was about. On Monday morning she begged me to tell her how he was.

I said he was no more. She fell on her knees, clasped her hands together, and said, "Good God! I have lost the best of husbands!"

Mr. RICHARD OGLE . I am a surgeon, and live in Great Russell-street. On Tuesday the 8th February I was called in to view the deceased's body. I found two large wounds on the head; one of which communicated with an extensive fracture of the skull near the top of the head; the other was merely a wound of the scalp. I should think the wound on the top of the head was done by some obtuse instrument powerfully struck on the head. The broom head I think would have done it, it being angular as well as obtuse. There was a large portion of bone broken off and pressed on the brain. I have no doubt of his death happening from the bleeding, caused by that wound. The second wound had fractured the inner table of the skull. His skull-bone was exceedingly thin, and scarcely to be called a sound bone. The same blow on an ordinary skull would not produce such consequences. Some part of his skull was not much thicker than an egg shell.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating the particulars the case, in precisely the same manner as her account given to the witness Furzeman.

GUILTY. Aged 28. Of manslaughter only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-29

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

411. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for the wilful murder of John Coe .

ABRAHAM LEVY . I am a slopseller, and live at Aldgate. On the 1st of February , about ten minutes to nine o'clock at night, I was at the corner of the Minories and Aldgate , and observed two stage-coaches racing, one evidently endeavouring to pass the other. They had scarcely passed me an instant, when I heard an exclamation of terror or agony. I turned round and observed the stage driven by the prisoner stop short, and the deceased, (who was a watchman ,) laid on the ground about three yards behind it. The prisoner must have used much exertion to have stopped so short. I went up, and in answer to a question how he came to run over the man, he said he had used every exertion in his power to avoid it. The deceased was taken to the watchhouse, and the prisoner taken into custody. He did not attempt to go on. The deceased appeared in the act of crossing from the Minories to the watchhouse, which is opposite.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK - Q. This was a two horse coach? A. Yes; two Blackwall stages. It is not a time when many people cross the street. I saw a lad there, but did not hear him hail the coach.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am inspector of the watch. I was at the watchhouse door, and heard the rattling of stages. Two passed rapidly by the watchhouse. I saw the deceased fall before the coach nearest to the curb. The hind wheel went over him. I ran to the spot and found it was one of our watchmen, named John Coe. I had him taken to the watchhouse, and took the prisoner in charge. He stopped as soon as he possibly could. Mr. Wiskard, the surgeon, was sent for; he came directly. Coe was sent home in a coach, and died on the Monday following. He fell about five feet from the curb. Both stages were going at a rapid rate.

Cross-examined. - Q. He pulled up directly? A. Yes. I did not see the horse galloping - they were going fast. It was certainly not done wilfully. The deceased was above seventy years old. The prisoner offered to take him home, and expressed his sorrow.

JOHN HUCKIN . I was coming up the Minories close behind the deceased - when I came to the top of the Minories I saw two coaches driving very fast, and the deceased crossing the road within a few yards of the curb, the pole of the prisoner's coach knocked him down, and ran over him. I ran across. The coach immediately stopped. I fetched an officer from the watchhouse, which is close by. Taylor took the prisoner. He said he understood he had driven over the man, and was sorry for it.

Mr. J. L. WISKARD . I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased at the watchhouse about 9 o'clock. His scalp was wounded, and he complained of being bruised about the body. I had him taken home, examined him, and found his ribs and his collar bone fractured. He died on the Monday following. I opened his body, the ribs were fractured, and some of them perforated his left lung. He died from that injury I have no doubt.

Prisoner's Defence. Some person hailed me as I passed the Minories, I turned my head before I saw the man, and could not pull up before I did.

GUILTY. Aged 39. Of manslaughter only .

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-30

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

412. JOSEPH PACKER , THOMAS SAUNDERS , and SAMUEL HEARNE , were indicted for the wilful murder of John Stone .

Mr. R. ROBERTS , a surgeon, deposed that he was called to see the deceased, whom he understood had been fighting, he found him dead, and upon examining his body was decidedly of opinion that his death was occasioned by his own exertion and irritation in the fight, and not from any blows.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-31

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

413. JOHN BROWN and JOHN ALLIGAN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susannah Walker , spinster , and Ann Walker , spinster , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 14th of January , at Enfield , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a pair of sheets, value 5 s.; three pillow cases, value 1 s.; three towels, value 1 s.; three doyleys, value 1 s.; four table cloths, value 5 s.; six breakfast cloths, value 6 s.; two tea cloths, value 6 d.; a basket, value 1 s.; and eight pounds weight of sugar, value 6 s., the goods of the said Susannah Walker and Ann Walker; six spoons, value 8 s.; a liquor stand, value 10 s.; a mustard pot, value 6 s.; an extinguisher, value 1 s.; a table cloth, value 20 s., and a sugar basket, value 40 s., the goods of the said Susannah Walker; and a toast rack, value 4 s., and a work box, value 5 s., the goods of the said Ann Walker .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SUSANNAH WALKER. I live at Ponders End , in the parish of Enfield; my sister Ann, lives with me - the house is rented by us both. I saw the property in question all safe the day before the robbery; I went to bed before eleven o'clock. I was disturbed by a noise; I set up in bed, looked at my watch, and it was a quarter past twelve. I supposed it to be the noise of a gate swinging, and did not get up. The prisoner Brown had visited a servant of mine, and knew perfectly well the ways of the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you hire the house yourself? A. Yes; but it is a joint concern.

ANN WALKER. I am the last witness's sister. I go round every night to see the house safe; it was perfectly safe on the night in question - the window was bolted and fastened. When I came down in the morning I found it open, and two panes of glass broken. Some of the property stolen belonged to me, and some to my sister. The house is leased to us both.

JANE COOPER . I am servant to the prosecutrix. I saw the house all fastened up the night before the robbery. - I came down about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - it was hardly light then. I found the back door wide open. I went to the parlour, saw the door ajar, and saw a light shining through the door - I screamed out, and Brown came out of the parlour, and opened the door - I am sure he is the man; he came with a candle stuck in a bottle, and a carving knife in his hand - he said if I made any more noise he would murder me; I ran directly to the back door, and ran round over to a neighbour's cottage, and when I returned he had got out by the dust-hole. I examined the house, and found the kitchen window open - two panes of glass were broken; they could then open the sash and get in. I opened the parlour window, and missed two silver table spoons from the celeret - they belonged to Miss Susannah Walker, I believe. I found eggs and butter had been used by the persons who had been in the house. I missed a basket of linen which had come from the mangle; the basket itself was not moved. The property belonged to both Miss Walkers.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you examine the things after they came from the mangle? A. No. Brown was very tipsy - he did not do me any mischief. It was just light enough for me to see him. They had been drinking liquor in the house.

JOHN WEBB . I live at Edmonton. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, about seven o'clock, I was in Ponders End field, three or four hundred yards from the prosecutrixs', and saw a man crossing the field; he seemed very much in liquor - I watched him; he got into the hedge - I went up to assist him; it was Brown; he crawled up the bank, and went right across - he had a bundle under his arm when he passed me. I left him there, and when I went to breakfast I heard of this robbery. A boy, named Withers, gave me a little work box, and the top of a wicker basket.

Cross-examined. Q. The man was so drunk he was hanging about the hedge? A. Yes. I do not think he knew what he was about - he did not attempt to avoid me.

HENRY WILSON . I am constable of Edmonton. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, I apprehended the prisoners - I found Alligan near the Angel Inn at Edmonton, took him to Lower Edmonton, and found Brown, at the Jolly Farmers, public-house, quite tipsy. Alligan had been drinking; they were put into the same watch-house, but in the evening I separated them. On the Sunday afternoon I went with Wallis to a field near the Cock, and found a basket, containing several pieces of lump sugar, and a pair of white stockings - it was concealed in a ditch, two or three fields from the prosecutrixs' house. I have some table-cloths, a spoon, and other goods, which were brought to me - one lot by three boys, on the 18th, and the other by a man who is in Whitecross-street prison. A toast rack was brought to me by a boy named Soley.

GEORGE WALLIS . I am a watchman of Edmonton. - On the 14th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners near the door of the Three Tuns, public-house, and saw them again at twenty minutes past ten, going towards Ponders End - I had been watching them from six o'clock till then. I was present when they were examined before Mr. Mores; (looking at the examinations) - the signatures to these are Mr. Mores's writing; I saw the prisoners make their marks to the papers - they were read over to them by the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there all the time they were under examination? A. I went out once or twice while they were in the office - what the Magistrate said to them while I was absent I cannot tell.

COURT. Q. Were you there when it was read over to them? A. Yes: Alligan could not write, but Brown signed his name. The Magistrate asked what they had to say, and what they said was written down and read over (read.)

The prisoner, J. Brown, being asked what he had to say in defence of the charge made against him by Jane Cooper, says, "I am guilty of the charge brought against me. I, in company with John Alligan was drinking at the Three Tuns, at Edmonton, about ten o'clock on Friday night, the 14th inst.; I left the house, and John Alligan followed me; we agreed as we went along to break into Mrs. Walker's house, at Ponder's End, which we did by forcing the outside shutter of the kitchen window, breaking the window and unfastening the catch. I then lighted the fire in the parlour to cook some eggs which John Alligan was obtaining from some part of the premises. By the time I had lighted the fire Alligan brought four eggs and boiled them, I eat one, and Alligan two - one was rotten; we also eat bread and butter taken out of the pantry. Alligan broke the lock of a cupboard in the hall and brought in several sorts of liquor and wine, which we both drank of freely, tasting several sorts. After we had eat and drank as much as we liked, I fell asleep in the parlour. About one or two o'clock I heard the table clock strike which was on the table. I was very tipsy. I don't recollect any circumstance, till I awoke and found myself in a ploughed field close to the house, and the dust hole of which there was a board broken down which made the hole that John Alligan and myself crept through when we first went to the premises in order to break into the house. The parcels now produced, viz. a basket, containing several lumps of sugar, and a pair of white cotton stockings, as also a large piece of sugar about 7 lbs. in a blue paper and string round it, I found by my side. When I awoke I got up and took with me the basket containing the lumps of sugar as also the large piece of sugar, and hid them in a ditch in

in the adjoining field. I then went to the Jolly Farmers, in Church-street, Edmonton, where I was apprehended by the constable, Wilson.

JOHN BROWN.

Taken before me this 17th of January, 1825.

R. MORES.

John Alligan being asked what he had to say in his defence, or whether the account given of him by John Brown was true, says, "I was with John Brown when we broke into Mrs. Walker's house. I partook of the eggs and the liquor, but don't recollect any thing else.

The mark X of JOHN ALLIGAN.

Before me the 17th of January, 1825.

R. MORES.

Witness, H. WILSON.

SUSANNAH WALKER. The property is all ours - some of it is mine, and some my sister's - the sugar belongs to us both.

BROWN'S Defence. I picked the sugar up on the ploughed land.

ALLIGAN'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

Four witnesses gave Brown a good character.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

ALLIGAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by Prosecutrix.

Reference Number: t18250217-32

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

414. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for the wilful murder of John Humphries Parry .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JEAN BAPTISTA - I am a French Catholic clergyman. I was at the Prince of Wales, public-house, North-street, Pentonville , on the 5th of February , drinking a glass of ale at the bar. I saw Mr. Parry come to the bar, he disappeared at the same instant. He said to the landlord, "How do you do?" that is all I heard - he looked very wild. I saw the prisoner at the house - I did not hear him speak to Mr. Parry. Mr. Parry went away directly, and in four or five minutes I went out, and saw Mr. Parry, and the prisoner standing opposite to him - I heard the prisoner say "Stand up, like a man!" Parry was standing up like a statue, not in a fighting position - the prisoner instantly gave him a blow, which knocked him down, I said, "Why do you strike that man; who is incapable of resisting?" He said he had been very badly used by him. Mr. Parry did not get up again - he fell on his left side almost double, his head laid against the gutter, which is made of small stones, his head was on the stones. I gave notice to the landlord. I did not see the prisoner render him any assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the prisoner bring a piece of paper to the bar, and ask for change? A. No. There might be half a dozen persons about when I got outside the house. I never saw the deceased before - he was a tall, good-looking man, not very stout.

GEORGE JOHNSON . I am a labourer. On the 5th of February I was near the Prince of Wales, public-house, coming from Collyer-street, and saw Mr. Parry, the prisoner, and another man, coming from the public-house, which lays backward. The prisoner said, "If you are a man, stand up and fight." A man behind said, "Don't strike him, let him have fair play." Mr. Parry stood with his back towards me - I could not see in what situation his hands were. The prisoner struck him about the nose, and he fell with his head against the stones. Parry appeared to be very much in liquor - I do not think the prisoner was quite sober, but he was not drunk. Parry rolled into the kennel against my feet, and never spoke afterwards. I said the man was dead. The prisoner said he was not dead, but drunk; that he had struck him, and broken a pipe in his mouth. I saw no broken pipe. I said I was sure the man's skull was fractured, and he should go for a doctor. The prisoner said it was of no use, for the doctor would not attend to him. I said he was a respectable man, and the doctor was bound to attend to him. I and some others took him up to the front of the public-house, but he was so heavy we were obliged to rest several times. The prisoner said he supposed his hat was knocked over the railing in front of the house, and fetched it for him - it all happened three or four yards from the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Parry was much in liquor? A. Yes. I had never seen him before. There is a step to the public-house - there is no pavement but small stones, and the gutter goes down aslant - I think a trifle would have knocked him down.

EMMA PURDY . I am servant at No. 25, Pleasant-row. I was passing the Prince of Wales, public house - the deceased was two or three yards from the door. The first I heard, was somebody saying "D - n your eyes, if you want any thing come on!" The person who spoke was nearer to the public-house than the deceased. I only saw the deceased and the man who said these words - he had no pipe in his mouth - I was close to him - Mr. Parry made no answer, nor did he raise his hand to strike the person - he seemed to be very much intoxicated, and the man appeared quite sober - he struck Mr. Parry a tremendous blow in the mouth, and then struck him a tremendous blow on his side, which knocked him down - he fell with the back of his head against the curb-stone - I walked away immediately, and next morning I heard he was dead.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons besides you saw these blows? A. I saw nobody there. I did not wait to see him carried away - I had not seen either of them come out of the house.

HARRIET OLIVER. I live next door to the Prince of Wales, public-house, in the kitchen. I was standing against my steps and saw the gentleman. I heard the prisoner say, "D - n you, will you insult me?" The gentleman made no answer to him. I went up my steps, and saw the prisoner go and tap two or three times at the tap-room window - he called some one by his Christian name to come out and assist him, but nobody came. He then went up to the gentleman, who stood off the curb-stone. I was at my own gate, which is about thirty yards from them. I cannot say whether the gentleman was intoxicated or not - he saw the prisoner coming, and put up his hand to prevent a blow from coming, and said "Don't hit me, for I won't fight;" or something of that sort. The prisoner struck him, and he fell back - I only saw one blow - I was frightened, and went in doors.

Cross-examined. Q. How could you see thirty yards off? A. I heard the words, and after the gentleman was

knocked down I went close to him, and put my ear down to hear if he breathed, and the first witness came up. I did not see the prisoner when he first came out of the house - they might have been quarrelling before.

MR. SYMES. I am a surgeon, and live in Judd-street. I have known Mr. John Humphries Parry for some years. I was called in, about half-past nine o'clock on the 5th of February, and found him on a bed at the Prince of Wales public-house - he had been dead some time. I afterwards examined his body, and have no doubt his death was caused by apoplexy, occasioned by a blow, and very likely by concussion. A blow which knocked him down, and knocked his head against the pavement, was very likely to produce that effect, and, supposing him to be intoxicated at the time, it is more likely.

Cross-examined. Q. If a drunken man fell, from reeling, without a blow, the same effect might be produced? A. It is possible. He was thirty-eight years old, and about five feet ten in height - he was not so strongly built as the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses who saw him strike me, and saw the pipe in my mouth.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I am a bricklayer, and work for the prisoner. I went to this public-house to receive my wages - he usually pays his men there: I went there about three o'clock in the afternoon; I had not seen Mr. Parry in the house, but about a quarter to nine I heard a rapping at the window, went out, and saw my master and the gentleman standing together - another man was there, who had gone out before me; my master and Mr. Parry were both in a fighting attitude, and as soon as I stepped forward Mr. Parry made a hit at my master; the blow caught on his elbow; the prisoner then hit him; I could not see where; he staggered back, and fell, with his head against the curb stone - Mr. Bennett stepped forward, and lifted him up; two or three more gentlemen assisted, and got him to the door. I did not see the French gentleman there. They put him down at the door, for they would not let him in for some time; I went in and said, there was a man very ill - three or four persons came out and brought him in. My master went into the tap-room. He had had a pipe inside the house, but I did not see it outside.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did your master live? A. In Exeter-street, Lisson-grove. We were working by this public-house. I saw my master next morning.

Q. Did you see him on Monday and Tuesday about his work as usual? A. No; he was taken up on Tuesday afternoon; I had seen him at the Hope, public-house, at the bottom of the City-road, about a quarter of a mile from the Prince of Wales. I was at the Prince of Wales when the Inquest sat, but was not examined. I told a friend of the gentleman's what I had seen while the inquest were sitting. I saw Johnson there when it happened; he came up after I did: I was at the public-house door, about four yards from them. I did not hear Mr. Parry speak, nor did I hear master d - n him - he carried him to the door, and then went in: somebody said, "Take him to where he has been getting drunk."

CHARLES LINES . I am a sawyer, and was working where Bennett was. I was at this public-house. I saw the prisoner drinking and smoking there; he went out with his pipe, and in about a minute he pushed the door open, and hallooed for assistance; he said, Bill or Will - I went out, and directly I got to the door I saw him and the deceased, in a fighting attitude, seven or eight yards from the door; Bennett struck him - he reeled, and fell; I went to assist him up, and Bennett also went for the same purpose - he had no pipe then. Before he struck the blow he said the man had struck him. I do not think the blow would have hurt the man if he had not been in liquor. We sat him against the door, thinking he would come round, as he breathed - I thought he was only stunned. Bennett went into the house; I left at twelve o'clock - Bennett did not stay so long.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he stay long enough to hear that the man was dead? A. I believe he did. I was at the house when the Inquest sat, but was not called in. The beadle knew I was there.

Q. Did you call out, "Don't hit the man?" A. No. I did not hear a word spoken, except that Bennett said,

"This man has struck me," and then he struck him. - The prisoner had not paid his men; he had not got the money.

GEORGE JOHNSON re-examined. I did not see this witness there.

JOHN PEARCE . I keep the Prince of Wales, public-house, and have done so for twelve months. The prisoner paid his men there; he wanted me to cash a bill on this night, which I refused. Mr. Parry had not been drinking at my house - he came to the bar door soon after eight o'clock; he was intoxicated. Bennett was drinking and smoking there. When I let Mr. Parry out Bennett followed him with his pipe in his mouth; he went for a necessary purpose: there is a place outside. When Mr. Parry was brought back we thought he was only stunned - I had no idea of his being dead.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had Mr. Parry been in your house? A. About two minutes; he only came in and asked how my wife was; he appeared very much in liquor. He could not open the door, and said, "Cannot I get out:" I let him out. He said, "I don't want to mix with your tap-room company;" the prisoner replied that tap-room company was a good as him, and followed him out. I saw the sawyer go out in two or three minutes, and in about five minutes the body was brought in. I heard nothing about a pipe being broken. Bennett stopped there about half an hour after. I saw the prisoner at the Inquest on Wednesday afternoon.

Q. He was in custody then? A. I suppose he was; he did not desire that Williams or Lines should be examined.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he come before the Coroner of his own will? A. A warrant was issued against him; his brother went to fetch him, but the officer went after him.

GUILTY. Of Manslaughter only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-33

London Cases, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

415. THOMAS GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of John Daniel , from his person .

JOHN DANIEL. I am a draper , and live in Monmouthshire. On the 28th of January, about seven o'clock in

the evening, I was in Cheapside , and had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I did not feel it taken, but the officer produced it to me - he had the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM HENRY JACKSON . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner draw a handkerchief from Mr. Daniel's pocket - he passed Mr. Daniel: I seized him directly, and took it from his bosom, where I had seen him put it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was with a young man; he ran up to me, and said, "Here is a handkerchief, put it into your pocket" - I did so, and the officer seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-34

416. WILLIAM WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Charles Stevens , from his person .

CHARLES STEVENS. On the 16th of January, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon. I was at Smithfield-bars , with my father and Mr. Walker, who seized the prisoner, and exclaimed, "You rascal, you have stolen his handkerchief;" I turned round, and saw the prisoner pretending to blow his nose with my handkerchief, and saw it taken from him.

JOHN WALKER . I was with Mr. Stevens, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of Mr. Stevens's pocket, with great address; he blew his nose with it. I seized him immediately, and Mr. Stevens took it out of his hand.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I took him in charge. A gentleman gave me the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was turning up St. John-street; a young man before me turned back, very short - I saw a handkerchief on the ground, picked it up, and put it into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250217-35

417. JAMES DOVEY and ROGER ADAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Hugh Jones , on the King's highway, on the 18th of January , at St. Andrew by the Wardrobe , in the peace of God, and our Lord the King, and him in bodily fear and danger of his life, on the King's highway, feloniously did put, and one sovereign, of the money of the said Hugh Jones, from his person and against his will, in the King's highway, violently and feloniously did steal .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

HUGH JONES. I keep the Bell, public-house, on Addle-hill, Doctors' Commons . On the 11th of January I went out to buy some tobacco, and saw the prisoner Dovey in the Broadway, near Ludgate-hill - I saw a crowd round Fairburn's print shop there, and went to look, and in a short time somebody pressed behind me, and then I went on; the prisoner Dovey followed me, and asked where I was going (I was going towards home:) I said, "What is that to you?" he said he would follow me, and see me home; wherever I went, unless I gave him some money, and said, "Do you know what you have done with me at the print shop?" I told him I had never done anything, and never saw him to my knowledge, He said, "You have touched my p-v-t-s," and he would follow me home if I did not give him some money, for there were two men behind who could swear the same. I was frightened, and did not know what to do. I was so frightened at being charged with such a thing, I said, "What must you have?" he said' "How much have you got?" I said would 5 s. do for him - he said No; I asked if 10 s. would do: he said, No, he must have 15 s., "For" said he "that is a trifle - I had 10 l. the other night, from a gentleman, for the same thing;" I gave him 15 s., and he ran away. On the 18th he came to my house with Adams - (I suppose he must have followed me home) - they had a pint of beer, my man waited upon them; they went out, and as Adams went out he left a note on the bar, saying,

"Mr. Jones, there is a letter for you;" this is it (looking at it) - I saw Adams put it down there; he went out directly. Dovey was just before him, and must have heard what he said - they were going out close together. I read the letter -(read.)

"SIR, - I write these few lines to you, to inform you that the money as you gave me on Wednesday night I bought some clothes with - and yesterday my landlord came to me for rent, after I had spent what you gave me. I shall be obliged to you if you will send me 2 l. 16 s. 6 d., to pay the rent I owe; and then I say and swear I never will send, nor come to you any more. This person that has brought this letter, is the person that saw you feel my privates that night, at Fairburn's, but if you send the money he will not mention it. If you cannot send that sum, send as much as you can to pay my rent, and I will never trouble you no more, so help my God."

Mr. Jones, Welch Harp, St. Paul's.

HUGH JONES (in continuation.) I went to the door on reading the letter, and saw both the prisoners lurking about outside the door - on my coming out I asked Dovey what he wanted here (Adams was walking about on the other side - I cannot say whether he heard;) Dovey said he must have some more money, for what I had given him was nothing - that he had 10 l. from a gentleman before, for the same thing. He said he must have what he mentioned in the letter; I said I had not got so much with me, neither would I do it; he said then he must have a sovereign, or else there was an officer a little way off, who would come and take me up directly - Adams was at that time perhaps ten yards off, walking about. I did not know what to do - I was frightened, and had not an opportunity of getting an officer, and I gave him a sovereign; Adams was still walking backwards and forwards, and passed us once or twice. When I gave Dovey the sovereign they went away together. On the 20th Dovey came into my house; I was out - I came in and found him there, and in the evening, after I lighted the glass, he went out, and called to me; I went out to him; he said he wanted some more money - I said I would have no more of his nonsense - he went away. I went to St. Paul's church-yard for an officer, but he was gone before I returned. I had not said I was going for an officer; I only said I would stand no more of his nonsense, and would give him no more. He came to my house next day - I went out privately for an officer, who took him in my house, and took him to Guildhall.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you kept a public-house? A. I have been in that house five years all but three months. I have

been a publican seven years. I kept a house at Billingsgate, and before that I lived with Mr. Price, at a wholesale linen warehouse, in Old Change, for six years. I have been fifteen years in London, and was never in a court of justice, except being summoned here as a juryman. My house is not far from the Broadway. I never saw Dovey before in my life. He ran away towards St. Paul's when I gave him the 15 s. he ran a few yards. I did not look after him, but suppose he must have turned and followed me home. This was about eight o'clock. There were people about, and shops open, and I believe the watch was set.

Q. And you said nothing to any one while this man was threatening you with this charge? A. I was not in a public place then, for I went down over the bridge to avoid his seeing me home. He spoke to me several times. The first time was as I was going down the Broadway. I went down St. Andrew's-hill, and Earl-street, and over the bridge. He followed close to me all the way repeating his demand; and there were two more men behind, as he said; a good many people were walking about; but I cannot say whether I saw the two men or not, as I did not know them. I went as far as the Obelisk and Union-street, Borough. I gave him the money in Union-street, and came home over Blackfriars-bridge. He ran away as soon as I gave him the money.

Q. I thought you gave him the money in the Broadway, and he ran towards St. Paul's? A. He ran towards St. Paul's from Union-street. He attacked me in the Broadway.

Q. What sort of a crowd was there at Fairburn's? A. I saw a good many people there, but did not see Dovey there to my knowledge. I had got to the corner of Shoemaker-row, when he spoke to me - I did not know what to do at the time. I told my wife and the officer of it. I told my wife of it on the night of the 20th, when I went for the officer - I did not tell her before, for she was in trouble, having just buried our little boy. I went to Peter's-hill for the officer - he is a patrol. I never told any body of it before that. The letter, which Adams left on the bar, was wafered. Dovey said, at Guildhall, that Adams wrote it. There were several people in my taproom when I received the letter. I did not ask them to go out with me. I parted with my money through fear of their bringing an officer to take me up - if they charged me with this, I could not prove my innocence.

Q. How did you know they were to be there again on the second day? A. I did not know when he was coming; but he said he would come again, for that was not enough for him - There was no appointment for me to meet him.

MR. LAW. Q. Were you not in a state of agitation at the time? A. Yes: I told my wife of it two days after, we had lost our child more than a month before.

MR. WILLIAM BERESFORD . I am chief clerk at Guildhall. The prisoners were brought before the Alderman on the 21st of January. I took down what passed - neither threat or promise was held out to them. (Reads.)

Friday, 21st January, before Mr. Alderman Ansley. Dovey stated, that he lived at No. 2, New Pye-street, Westminster, and has worked for Deakin & Co., of Ludgate-hill, ironmongers, seven months ago - is now out of work - has no employment at present. Adams has worked with him there. "A stranger told me, this person was addicted to putting his hands to person's p - v - ts. I never received a farthing from him but 15 s." (He was remanded till next day, 22d, when Adams appeared at the Justice-room, and was identified by Jones. He came forward, and gave this statement.) (Reads,) "I went into the Broadway, and met Jones with a basket - he is in the habit of going out with a basket, and touching people's p - v - ts. He has served me so. I was a light porter at Deakin & Co.'s, seven or eight months ago, at the time Dovey was there. Dovey gave me 1 s. 6 d. out of the first money, and 5 s. out of the second. He said he would write Jones a note - I saw him write it - and he gave it to me to deliver. I was with him at Jones's, and I gave him the note. I knew he wanted to borrow money of him."

MR. BERESFORD, (in continuation.) Dovey was present, and heard Adams's statement, and said nothing to it. I think something was said about Dovey having sent for him. Jones seemed very much agitated and alarmed. Read and Herdsfield were present. Read took Adams into custody, by the Alderman's direction.

Cross-examined. Q. How many examinations had taken place before you saw Adams? A. Only one, which was the day before, he was in the Justice-room. Jones had described such a person, and said he should know him. He only talked of Dovey and another man, who, he said, he should know; and when he came into the room, next day, he said he did know him.

Q. When Adams said Dovey wrote the letter, did not Adams say he could neither read nor write? A. No: I heard nothing of the sort. He did not deny any part of the statement. Dovey had an attorney at the second examination, who cautioned him, and he kept himself quiet.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a City-officer, and was present at Guildhall when the prisoners were examined, I received the letter produced from Jones, and marked it.

GEORGE READ . I am patrol of Castle Baynard Ward. On Thursday, the 20th of January, soon after five o'clock in the evening, Jones came to me. He seemed very much agitated, and did not know how to act. I went with him to his house, and Dovey was then gone. Next day, about twelve o'clock, Jones fetched me again. I went to his house, and apprehended Dovey. Jones came into the parlour, and gave him into my charge.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known Jones? A. Four or five years. He did not know where I lived. I left him my address on Thursday evening. He had fetched me from duty in St. Paul's Church-yard.

DOVEY'S Defence. I am quite innocent. I could have had a character from Messrs. Eve and Deakin, where I left seven months ago, and since that have worked at the Surrey Theatre, but it being so disgraceful a charge I did not let my friends know of it. The prosecutor made me nearly tipsy when I met him by Fairburn's - he took me into a public-house, and gave me liquor, told me to say nothing to any one, and gave me 15 s. I gave Adams what money I owed him.

ADAMS'S Defence. I was in distress. Dovey owed me the money which he gave me. I can neither read nor write, and do not know what was in the letter. He asked me to take it to Jones, and I did.

DOVEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ADAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18250217-36

418. GEORGE SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , two pocket-books, value 5 s., she goods of John Guest , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-37

NEW COURT. (2d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

419. JOSEPH HOCKEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , four half crowns, value 10 s. , the monies of John Hopgood .

JOHN HOPGOOD. I live in Jermyn-street . Palmer is in my employ. On the 25th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening. I heard him call Stop thief! I ran out immediately, and saw some boys in pursuit. I saw the prisoner in the mews to which they directed me - he came into Jermyn-street again while I was in the mews - I pursued and took him.

JOHN PALMER . I am twelve years of age, and live with Mr. Hopgood. I was in the shop, and heard some money rattling behind the counter, where the till was - I went to look what it was, and saw the prisoner take the money from the till; I do not know what money was there. I had a good opportunity of seeing him, and am quite certain he is the person. He said, "Hold your tongue you fool!" he ran out, and I pursued, crying Stop thief.

JAMES LAKE . I am fourteen years of age. I was in Jermyn-street on the 25th of January - I saw the prisoner run out of Mr. Hopgood's shop; Palmer pursued - he knocked him down, and then ran down Well-street, into a mews - Mr. Hopgood went down there; the prisoner came out again - Mr. Hopgood followed, and I saw him taken.

JOHN HOPGOOD re-examined. There was some silver in the till, but I cannot tell what - I had put four half-crowns in a minute before.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-38

Before Mr. Recorder.

420. JAMES NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , a coat, value 15 s., and a pelisse, value 15 s. , the goods of William Dring .

WILLIAM DRING. I live at No. 2, New Exchange-court, Strand . I have nearly lost my sight, and turn a wheel for a cutler . On the 30th of September I lost a coat and a pelisse from my room, which is on the ground floor - I had brushed them a very few minutes before they were taken, which was about eight o'clock in the evening - the house is let out to lodgers, and the street door is sometimes open. The prisoner came in, and set down as a friend; we had a pint of beer, and he staid about a quarter of an hour: he got up from the table, and went towards the fire - he then returned, and took my coat and a pelisse from a nail in the room, and got out of the door before I could get to it. I and my wife met him again on the 12th of January - she took hold of his arm, but he got from her - and was stopped by some other person.

ANN DRING . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner come into our room; I went for a pot of porter by his desire, and before I returned he was gone - my husband cried out, "That man has robbed me:" he was not then out of sight; some persons followed him, but he got away - we met him again on the 12th of January, in Broad-street, St. Giles's; he was secured. We have never seen the property since.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-39

421. ROBERT PARMINGTON and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , three live tame ducks, price 7 s. , the property of John Winsor .

JOHN WINSOR. I live in Bow-common-lane , I keep poultry, which run on a waste spot of ground. I lost three couple of ducks about Michaelmas last; I had let them out of my premises about four o'clock in the afternoon. - On the 7th of February I lost three more; a young man came by, and asked if I had lost any ducks, as some young men had some in a bag at the corner of Regent-street - I went there, and found them; there were two ducks and a drake - the prisoners had got the bag.

Prisoner PARMINGTON. Q. Did you ever see me near your house? A. Many times, but not on that day.

GEORGE NEWMAN . I am a gardener. I saw Parmington about a quarter past four o'clock on the 7th of February, while I was at work in my garden, which comes down to the ditch, at the side of Mr. Winsor's garden; he had one duck in his hand, and called to Smith to make haste - Smith then held a bag open, and Parmington put the duck in; that was the last duck which was put in - they then went round the corner. I sent round to Mr. Winsor, and went round the garden into Saville-row - I took them myself - I had seen them before about the place.

PARMINGTON'S Defence. I was going along the street, and the witness came and took hold of me.

SMITH'S Defence. I was going to Bow, and found the bag at the corner of a turning - I was going to a chandler's shop to enquire whose it was when I was taken.

PARMINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-40

422. JAMES REECE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , a pair of boots, value 14 s. , the goods of Alexander Woodford .

THOMAS COOMBS . I am servant to Mr. Kelly. On Thursday, the 3d of February, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a sack, walking with John M'Donald - I thought they were about no good. I saw the prisoner go down the area of No. 11, Harley-street, Cavendish-square - the sack then appeared empty; when he came up again he had something in it, rolled up under his arm; I pursued him - M'Donald followed me, and cried, "Vanish Jem" - the prisoner then took to his heels, and ran away. I overtook him before I lost sight of him, with the boots under his arm; there were a number of persons about, and I pushed him down the area of No. 5, Harley-street, and left him in the care of a servant while I got an officer.

BENJAMIN WARMAN . I am in the service of Alexander Woodford. I saw the boots after the prisoner was taken,

and knew them to be my master's - I had seen them at eight o'clock in the morning, in a window which looks into the area from the servants' hall. The officer brought them back again about nine o'clock.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and M'Donald was coming down the street - he was a stranger to me; he went down the area, and told me to stop for him; he came up, gave me the bag, and told me to go on.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-41

423. ROBERT SHEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , four dead fowls, value 8 s. , the goods of George Aubrey and William Bedford .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of George Aubrey and Isabella Bedford .

GEORGE AUBREY. I live at No. 6, Clare-court, Drury-lane , and am a poulterer . William Bedford was in partnership with me, but has left me; Elizabeth Bedford had a share in the business on the 24th of January; I married her the next day I left the shop; on the 24th of January, about 4 o'clock the poultry was then in the shop-window.

ISABELLA AUBREY . On Monday evening, the 24th of January, I was standing at the back parlour door, which leads into the shop; I saw a man put his hand in across the window and take away four fowls which were lying there for sale; the moment I saw him, I cried Stop thief! and went out; I saw him running up the street with the fowls in his hand; I lost sight of him. He was taken in five or ten minutes; he dropped two fowls at the top of the passage. I picked them up. He dropped two others, but not in my sight. I cannot be positive of his person, as I did not see his face.

WILLIAM BRETT . I live in Clare-court, and am a tailor. I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I pursued the prisoner - saw him turn down a court which leads into White Horse-passage. He had two fowls in his hand, which he dropped. I followed him, till he was taken in Stanhope-street, and did not lose sight of him. I picked them up as I came back, and delivered them at the shop, to Miss Bedford.

WILLIAM MOORE . I live at No. 16, White Horse-passage. I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I went out and saw the prisoner run down White Horse-yard; I pursued him, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken. He had got rid of the fowls. He said he was not the man who took the fowls. He was taken at the Alphabet public-house. I stopped him first, and he said, "What do you stop me for? - I have got nothing now." I said, "You have been doing something wrong, and I shall keep you."

GEORGE SCOTT . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down White Horse-yard - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw some persons running. The last witness came and took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-42

424. THOMAS SMITH and GEORGE ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , a box, value 3 d., and the sum of four shillings and one penny in copper monies , the property of John Gillett .

JOHN GILLETT. I am a baker , and live in Upper Lisson-street . On the 22d of January I lost my till, and some money, from my shop - I cannot tell what money there was in it - I had seen it safe about half-past ten o'clock at night. My shop is generally open till about eleven. I was in the back parlour, and no one was in the shop. I was putting up my shutters, about eleven o'clock, when some persons passed my shop, and I heard that they had taken some thieves. I called my man to mind the shop while I went to Mr. Cooper's, at the corner of Hereford-street, and saw my till, and some copper, on the counter there. The prisoners were then in custody. I then went back to my shop, and missed the till and money.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I live in Stafford-street, near Mr. Gillett's, and am a milk-man. I was passing Hereford-street on the 22d of January, and saw the two prisoners running towards me about the middle of the street. I heard one of them say to the other, "Let us go in here," meaning into the carcass of a house. I immediately hallooed over to them, "What have you got there?" and they ran off. I pursued them a short distance, and called to a watchman. He went out near them. They threw down the till, turned round and ran towards me again. I heard the money drop. They jumped down into a foundation, which is dug for some more houses. I immediately went after them, and in a few minutes a light was brought, and I took them both, concealed in two separate vaults. Robinson asked me to let him go, as he had neither father or mother. Smith asked me to let him wash his hands, which he did. I asked him why he did not apply for relief to the parish? he said it was no use.

RICHARD BAXTER . I am a private watchman. I saw the two lads running towards me; they dropped the till within ten yards of me, and then turned back and crossed the street. They jumped down into the foundations of some houses. I took up the till and went to Mr. Cooper's house: there was 4 s. 1 d. in copper in it. I had seen the lads before.

(Till produced and sworn to.)

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoners in Mr. Cooper's shop.

SMITH'S Defence. I was going home and fell over the till in the street, the other prisoner was coming by at the time, and I said, "Here is a watchman up here, we will go and tell him to advertise it."

Two witnesses gave Smith a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 15. Judgment Respited .

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-43

425. WILLIAM TIERNEY was indicted for stealing on the 1st of February , twenty-five bricks, value 1 s. 6 d. ; the goods of John Maidlow .

JOHN MAIDLOW. I am a builder , and live at Portland Town. I have lost a great number of bricks at different times; those in question were at Lisson Green .

RICHARD BAXTER . I am watchman in the employ of

Mr. Maidlow. On the 1st of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner with a bed of bricks about ten yards from the stack where they were left. I asked him where he got them; he said from Mr. Chard's stack in the grove. Mr. Chard lives about a mile and a half from there. I asked where he was going to take them? He said to Braid-street. I then told him I should go and see where he took them; he took them to Conduit-place, near Bayswater, where I found a bricklayer setting a copper; he had used some bricks but different ones to those. I asked the bricklayer who he was at work for, and he told me quite a different name to what the prisoner had said. I asked him where the labourer was to go for the bricks; he said to the wharf, and that he had the money given him to buy them. I then went to Mr. Chard, who knew nothing about the business. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

JOHN CHARD . I am a builder. The prisoner worked for me some months back; he was not in my employ on the 1st of February: the watchman brought some bricks to me which were not mine.

JOHN DOWNING . I am a bricklayer. I was setting a copper in Conduit-place. Baxter brought the prisoner to me, and asked who I was at work for; I told him Mr. Thorber. My master had given the prisoner money to go out for bricks, but I do not know where he got them from.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to get half a hundred of bricks for my master, who had given me the money. I got them at the wharf. I then had to go out again for more, the wharf was shut, and as I thought Mr. Chard and my master were partners, I took them from his stack, and meant to return them the next morning. I did so last summer and told Mr. Chard of it. I did not take them from Mr. Maidlow's stack.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-44

426. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and MORRIS LITTLETON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. ; the goods of John Knight .

JOHN KNIGHT. I am a cheesemonger , and live in High Holborn . I lost 3 lbs. of bacon on the 18th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning. I had seen it about half an hour before; the officer brought in the prisoners with it; they were strangers.

CHARLES REED . I am an officer. I saw the two prisoners next door to Mr. Knight's, at a linen-draper's shop, it was very wet and a window had been broken; they were trying to get something out of that shop but could not; they then went to Mr. Knight's; Williams took the bacon, he gave it to Littleton; I pursued and took them.

WILLIAM's Defence. I was going to look for some work with the other prisoner, and the officer took us.

LITTLETON's Defence. I saw the piece of bacon laying on the ground, and took it up.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

LITTLETON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-45

427. WILLIAM SOLDER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , three tea-chests, value 2 s. ; the goods of Luke Ridge ; and BARNABY REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

LUKE RIDGE. I live at No. 32, Lower Sloane-street , and am a grocer . On Tuesday the 1st of February, about ten o'clock I saw these three chests safe on the landing stone over the area in front of the house. I heard they were taken about a quarter of an hour afterwards, and that Maybank and others were in pursuit. I went out and saw them in the back part of Reynold's shop, he is a dealer in marine stores. Solder was there at the time. I am quite positive they were mine.

Prisoner REYNOLDS. Q. Was it my shop or not? A. It is the house where he lives; I do not know whether it is his shop or not.

JOSEPH POINTER . I am a milkman, and live in George-street, Chelsea. I was coming from Turk's-row on the evening of the 1st of February, between six and seven o'clock, and saw Solder and Hornsby, who is not in custody, standing by Mr. Ridge's shop - one stood on one side of the shop, and the other on the other. Solder moved one chest from the rails to the next house. I then gave information to Maybank, the officer, who came down with me, and we saw Hornsby running, with a tea chest under his arm. I said,

"That is one of them," we followed him to Reynolds's house, in Turk's-row - there is a board over the door, and "Elizabeth Reynolds, dealer in marine stores," written on it - she is, I believe, the prisoner's mother, but she is now ill in bed. We found two tea chests in the back room, and the one which was just carried in in the front shop - there were several other persons in the shop, but Reynolds appeared to be managing the business. The officer left me in charge of Solder, who was there, and left Hornsby in charge of a green grocer, but he let him go again.

Prisoner SOLDER. Q. Were there not some other boys playing at marbles with me? A. No.

Prisoner REYNOLDS. Q. Was the green grocer desired to look after me as well as Hornsby? A. Yes; you were not taken for some days afterwards.

GEORGE GORDON . I am a shoemaker - I live next door to Reynolds - Mrs. Reynolds is ill in bed - I have not seen her this six months. I was in their shop when Hornsby brought in a tea chest. I went in for some shoes I was to mend. I had seen Hornsby before, the prisoner Reynolds was in the kitchen with Hornsby, but I did not hear what they said to each other. I saw the tea chest carried into the back room - Reynolds's brother was not there at that time. I saw Solder in the shop, but I did not see anything with him. I saw three tea chests in the house. I was there when Maybank came in, and then Reynolds's brother came down stairs. Hornsby got away, but Solder and Reynolds's brother were taken to the watch-house. I saw Mr. Ridge in the shop, he claimed the tea chests. I did not hear Reynolds or Solder say any thing at that time.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable of Chelsea. I was called, about ten minutes before seven o'clock, by Pointer, to go to Mr. Ridge's house. I saw no one there, but I went to Reynold's, and there I found Solder, Hornsby, Gordon, and another person, who was discharged by the Magistrate. I found the three tea chests

in the house - it is a marine at the shop, and the name of " Elizabeth Reynolds" is over the door - she has been confined for some months. Reynolds's brother was not in the shop when I went in, but he came down stairs some time afterwards - I took him into custody, and left Hornsby in custody of a man, but he got away. I told the man to shut the door while I searched the house. The prisoner Reynolds was not taken into custody that night, became I did not know which of them had the charge of the business - but he was taken four or five days afterwards - and committed - there were several other persons in the shop, who were known thieves - I knew them to be persons of bad character, but there was no charge against them then. I know Solder to be a bad character.

Prisoner SOLDER. Q. What do you mean by saying I was a person of bad character? A. He was discharged the last Quarter Sessions; and he has been in my charge three or four times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SOLDER's Defence. I was coming down the street when Hornsby met me, and said he was going to that shop to buy a pair of second-hand stockings. While we were there Maybank came and said, "Now I have got you all,"

REYNOLDS's Defence. Two men came in and asked would I buy three tea chests - they said they had been bought to make a box of, but they were too slight. I asked my mother if I should buy them - she said Yes, if they had no marks on them. I told them I would - they then went to fetch them. I went out, and when I came back two of the tea chests were left in the shop, an another was brought in immediately - the officer then came in and took them.

SOLDER - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

REYNOLDS - GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-46

428. HANNAH HANSBOROUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , two shawls, value 10 s., the goods of Edmund Traice and William Greenlaw Phillips , privately in their shop .

CHARLES ROBERT WISSETT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 28th of January, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock, the prisoner offered to pawn two shawls for 10 s. I suspected that they were stolen, and detained her. She said she had bought them half a year ago in Crawford-street, but could not tell who of - I took them to the prosecutor's shop, who claimed them.

EDMUND TRAICE. I am in partnership with William Greenlaw Phillips, we are linen-drapers and silk mercers , and live at the corner of Harcourt-street, Marylebone . The prisoner came to our shop on the 28th of January, about half-past seven o'clock - she was alone, I did not see her come - she was served by one of my young men - there were three young men, my partner and myself in the shop at the time, and one or two other customers. Mr. Wissett brought in the shawls, and asked if we had lost them - I knew them to be mine.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I received the prisoner in charge from Mr. Wissett, and found on her a bill of some things she had bought at Mr. Traice's - they were not shawls. As I was taking her to the watch-house she told me she found the shawls in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. After I left the shop, I met a woman well dressed, who asked me to go and pawn the shawls for her - she said she did not like to go in herself, but she would give me a shilling to take them; and if they asked me any questions, to say one cost 16 s., and the other 10 s. I saw her again the next night at the watch-house - I said to her, "You are the person who gave me the two shawls to pledge." She said, she had been but a short time out of the House of correction, and I believe she is now in prison.

GUILTY. Aged 25. Of stealing, but not privately . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-47

429. SAMUEL BELASCO , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a pen-knife, value 1 s.; a key, value 1 d.; and eight shillings; the property of James Coxhead , from his person .

JAMES COXHEAD. I live in Castle-street, Oxford-street. On the 15th of January, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the pit-door of Covent-garden theatre . I had a pen-knife, a key, eight shillings, and a half-a-crown, in my trowsers. There was a great crowd; and Mr. Hart, who was with me, desired me to be cautions of my pockets. I put my hand to my pocket to pay, and found it turned inside out. I told Mr. Hart of it, who seized the prisoner, and said he was the man. He was close to me - he was taken to the watch-house. I turned round - I found the 10 s. 6 d. and the knife and key lying at my feet - I do not know how they came there.

JOSEPH HART . I am a teacher of music, and live in Old Bond-street. I went to the theatre with Mr. Coxhead. I found a hand moving all about me. I looked round, and saw the prisoner next to me on the left hand, and Mr. Coxhead directly before him. I said, "James, take care of your pocket - I do not like the appearance of this little man - he has put his knuckles into my side." Mr. Coxhead soon after went to pay, and said he had lost his money. I immediately collared the prisoner, and seized his right hand; but the mob still pressing on, I let go his hand, but still held him till the officer came - in the mean time, the money fell at my feet. There was no other person between the wall and myself, on the left hand, but the prisoner. On my right hand was an elderly gentleman, and before him two ladies. When I seized him, he said, "I am a perfect gentleman - you are mistaken in the person - I will give you my card - I am known to the officers."

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Were there not many persons about you? A. Yes; there were. He did not conduct himself with any impropriety.

THOMAS AMSDEN . I am an officer. I was at the theatre, and heard the alarm. I took the prisoner, and found the key about a foot from where he stood - I did not search him.

JOSEPH WORMALD . I am an officer of Covent-Garden theatre. I was standing about four yards from the place where the money is taken. I heard Mr. Hart call for an

officer. I advanced, and got to his assistance. He said, "This is the man who has picked Mr. Coxhead's pocket." I took hold of his hand, and felt a knife and some silver in it. I then took him to the Grapes public-house, and searched him. He told me he had got one sovereign and eight shillings in silver, which I found to be the truth - he had no cards about him.

Prisoner's Defence. In going into the theatre, about half-past six, there was a great crowd - that is all I know about the business.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-48

430. GEORGE HORSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 9lbs. of pepper, value 9 s. , the property of the East-India-Dock Company .

2d COUNT, stating it to be the goods of James Barber .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH STIFF . I am a Thames-police constable, stationed at the east gate of the East-India Dock . On the 24th of January, the prisoner was employed in delivering pepper from the ship Cambridge. When he came up to me, about three o'clock, to be rubbed down, I found some pepper between a false crown of his hat and the hat itself. I searched him further, and found some pepper between his shirt and his arms; and in his stockings, there was 9 lbs. in all.

WILLIAM BOWERS . I am superintendant of the labourers in the Dock. The prisoner has worked there since June, 1821. On the 24th of January, he was employed in delivering cotton from the ship Cambridge. She was loaded with pepper, cotton, gum, and other things - the pepper, on board the ship, was Bombay black pepper; and that found on him appeared to me to be the same. There were 16 or 1700 bags of pepper in that vessel.

ROBERT WILSON . The ship Cambridge was unloading on the 24th of January. The Captain was Mr. James Barber - he had not given up the command.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-49

432. LITMAN FRASCH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a cap, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Cordell the elder , from the person of Joseph Cordell the younger .

SARAH CORDELL . I live in Little Anchor-street, Bethnal-green , and am the wife of Joseph Cordell. On the 26th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, my son Joseph went on an errand to a stationer's, in Shoreditch - he had a seal-skin cap on - he returned without it in about five minutes - he was crying, I went out and saw the prisoner running away. The child said, "That is the boy." I cried Stop thief! He stopped directly, and crossed over to me. He said, "I have not taken the boy's cap - another boy took it, and I was going to apprehend him."

JOSEPH CORDELL, SEN. I am a weaver ; I sent my little boy for a sheet of paper; I went down when he came home and found the prisoner at the door. He gave the same account then as my wife has stated.

JOSEPH CORDELL, JUN. I am eight years of age. I cannot be certain of the prisoner being the boy who took the cap.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-50

433. MARGARET PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , ten shilling and six sixpences, the monies of Richard Clark , from his person .

RICHARD CLARK. I am a carpenter , and lodge in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 23d of January, between ten and eleven o'clock at night. I was going home through Brook's-market ; I had been drinking a little, but was

quite sober - I had 14 s. in silver in my breeches pocket: The prisoner, who was quite a stranger, accosted me, and asked me where I was going; I said, to my lodgings - she asked me to go with her; I told her I did not want her company. She then came and put her hands round my waist, and picked my pocket of the money - I felt and missed the money; I took hold of her, and tried to catch her hand to get it, but she put it into her mouth. I put my hand to her mouth to try to get my money; she caught hold of my finger; she then threw herself down on the flags, and called out Murder! Two watchmen came up and took 13 s. out of her hand. I gave charge of her.

THOMAS PHILPOT . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Murder! I came up and saw the prisoner on the ground, struggling with the prosecutor; she said she was being murdered. I asked him what was the matter; he said he had been robbed of his money. My brother watchman came up and took twelve shillings and two sixpences from her hand. I took both of them to the watch-house. The prisoner was detained, and the prosecutor set at liberty.

THOMAS KETTELBY . I came up on the cry of Murder! The prosecutor said he had been robbed of 13 s. or 14 s. My brother watchman told me to take hold of her right arm; he had hold of her left. She had 13 s. in her hand. I saw no marks of violence upon her. The were both taken to the watch-house. I went before the Magistrate the next day; she did not then make any complaint of being ill used. As we were going to the watch-house, she said to me, "You fool, put 5 s. or 6 s. in your pocket." I said, that would not do.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with some young women, and had changed a sovereign; I had the change in my mouth. I met the prosecutor soon afterwards. I spoke rather thick, and he said what is the matter? I said, I had money in my mouth - he stood considering a few minutes, and then put his hand to my mouth to try to get it, and as I would not let him have it he struck me in the left eye.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-51

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

437. JAMES RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a hat, value 4 s., the goods of James Callow, the elder , from the person of James Callow, the younger .

JAMES CALLOW, JUN. I am the son of James Callow - I am nine years of age. On the night of the 30th of January, I was in Strutton-ground , there were two boys standing together; one took off my hat and gave it to another and both ran away; I went home and told my father; I had frequently seen the boys before, as I went to school; the prisoner is the boy who ran away with the hat; I am quite sure. I told my father he was the boy; but I did not then know his name. I saw him again on the day afterwards; I went home and told my father, but he was at work, and could not go; I told my father again the next day, and he went and took him.

JAMES CALLOW. I live in Strutton-place, Strutton-ground. My boy lost his hat on the 30th of January; he said he knew the boys well, and next day he told me he saw one of them in Pye-street, but my master was there, and I could not go. Next day he came to me again, and said the boy was in Strutton-ground; I went, saw the prisoner, and took him. I told him if he would give me the hat he might go about his business; he cried, but denied all knowledge about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I can bring witnesses to prove I was not out of my mother's house till half-past eight o'clock on Sunday evening.

SARAH DOWLING. I live at No. 7, Union-court, Orchard-street, Westminster. The prisoner was in my house the whole of that evening, with my husband; he had no shoes on. My husband went out about six o'clock, and staid till half-past eight - the prisoner then wished me good night, and went into his father's room, which is next to mine.

THOMAS DOWLING . I saw the prisoner in my room on the 30th of January - he spent the greater part of the day there; he had no shoes on. I went out in the evening, about half-past six o'clock, and left him in my room - I came home about nine o'clock; I did not see him again that night.

MARY ANN PARRY . I am the prisoner's mother-in-law. On the 30th of January he was in doors all day, in my room, or the last witness's. He had left his only pair of shoes to be mended, on the Friday before, so that he could not go out of doors till ten or eleven o'clock on the Monday morning, when he went out with an old pair of slippers.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-52

435. MARGARET WAGER and SUSANNAH COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two sheets, value 3 s., and a counterpane, value 2 s., the goods of William Garner , in a lodging-room .

MELISINA MARIA GARNER . I am the wife of William Garner, and live at No. 3, Lisson-place. The prisoners came to me about the 20th of January, and took a furnished room at 4 s. a week - they came that night, and went away on the Wednesday week following, without notice: I missed the goods that night, when a constable broke the door open - the sheets were gone from the bed, which I had let with the lodging - they had taken the key of the room, and their box away with them.

JAMES HILLIER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Edgware-road. The prisoner Wager brought one of the sheets to me on the 25th of January, and the other on the 26th; Cook was present at one of the times.

WILLIAM BOLTON . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house - I found the duplicates on Wager, and the key of the room on Cook. Here are three duplicates, two for sheets, and one for a counterpane.

(Sheets produced and sworn to.)

COOKS'S Defence. I was with the prisoner, but did not pawn the goods.

WAGER'S Defence. I took the goods because we were short of money to pay the rent, but I could have returned them, and I intended so to do.

WAGER - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Two Months .

COOK - GUILTY. Aged 23. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250217-53

436. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , a bushel measure, value 12 s. , the goods of William Johnson .

WILLIAM JOHNSON. I keep a coal shed , in Chapman-street, St. George's in the East . On the 25th of January I was sitting in my back room - I saw a man in the shop, stooping among the coals; I came into the shop, and saw the prisoner with the measure in his hand; he put it down again, about half a yard from where he had taken it. I secured him.

Prisoner. I never was near the measure - I went to ask the way to the Commercial-road - Witness. Yes - he had the door in his left hand, and the measure in his right - he said nothing about the Commercial-road till I detected him; he then cried, and said he did it from distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-54

437. JAMES CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , a watch, value 1 l., and two seals, value 10 s. , the goods of Joshua Muncey .

JOSHUA MUNCEY. I am a cow-keeper , and live in Little George-street, Edgware-road . I went out on the 22d of January, with my milk, and left my watch on the chimney piece - I returned in about three hours, and my servant said the watch had been stolen by the prisoner. - I saw him on the Monday following, in the Edgware-road, with another boy. I took him to the office, and saw the duplicate taken from him.

JOHN HOLDIS . I live in Little Harper-street, St. Mary-le-bone. On the 22d of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner running down Little Queen-street; he first went into a gentleman's coach house, and then to Mr. Muncey's house; I saw him in two or three minutes afterwards, with another boy - they both ran away. I was making a drain in the pavement - the prisoner had been looking at me for some minutes, and I noticed his person particularly.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a pawnbroker. The watch was pawned with me by a young man; certainly not the prisoner: this is the duplicate I gave of it.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner at the office, and found this duplicate - he put two half-crowns into his mouth, and tried to swallow them - I took them out again.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14. Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-55

438. JOHN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , two waistcoats, value 4 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; a pair of spurs, value 2 s.; a watch, value 20 s.; a hat, value 1 s., two sovereigns, and nine shillings , the property of Samuel Clarke .

SAMUEL CLARKE. I am in the service of Captain Astley , and live in Tavistock-mews . About the 11th of December I took the prisoner to help me in the stable - I kept him till the 1st of January; I had been ill, and my master told me to get some person to help me. When I got better I told him I should not want him any more, but he still slept with me. On the 1st of January he awoke me by unlocking the door; I asked where he was going; he said to Mr. Simpson's. I got out of bed to see what time it was, and my watch was gone from the chimney-piece, where I had hung it the night before - I went down stairs, but could not see him: I went back and put my clothes on, and gave information at the office - he was taken that afternoon. After I had been to the Police Office I returned, and missed a coat, two waistcoats, a pair of spurs, and the other articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chappel-street. The articles here produced were pawned on the 1st of January, by the prisoner, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer. I was called up on the 1st of January, on an information that there had been a robbery committed - the prisoner was brought up at three o'clock in the afternoon; I searched him, and found this knife, the point of which is broken into the box, out of which the property was taken; he had this lot of boot garters, and this sealing wax on his person. The boot garters were claimed by Clarke.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-56

439. WILLIM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , three loaves of bread, value 1 s. 11 d. , the goods of Thomas Hutchinson .

THOMAS SCRINGER . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Hutchinson, Crawford-street, Portman-square. I was out with my barrow on the 22d of January: I went down an area. I had seen the prisoner near the place - I watched him, and saw him take three loaves, and run away. I pursued, and took him - he said he was very hungry.

The prisoner received a good character, and pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 16. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250217-57

440. WILLIAM EDMUNDS and GEORGE MUNT were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a pair of boots, value 7 s. , the goods of William Pitt .

WILLIAM PITT. I am a shoemaker , and live in Little Coram-street . On Monday the 17th of January, I saw the prisoner Munt at my door, looking at a pair of boots which hung on a nail; he handled them in his hands - I did not see any one with him. I saw him again in a minute or two pass the shop window, with the boots under his coat. I followed him to Tavistock-place, where the prisoner Edmunds took the boots from him. I saw Edmunds with the boots about three minutes after Munt had taken them.

WILLIAM RICKARDS . I live in Tavistock-square. I was going to the prosecutor's house, on the 17th of January, between one and two o'clock, and I saw Munt take a pair of boots off the nail at the door - he put them under his coat, and walked away with them - he gave them to Edmunds when he got round the corner. Edmunds wrapped them up in a handkerchief, and I suppose was going to take them away. I took hold of Munt, and stopped Edmunds.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a constable, and produce the boots, which I got from Pitt.

EDMUND's Defence. Rickards did not take me, but a baker who was going by.

MUNT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

EDMUNDS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-58

441. FRANCIS GOSLING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a pocket-book, value 2 s., and twelve ornaments, value 3 d. the goods of Hannah Gravatt .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-59

442. JOHN JONES and JOHN EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , a dead pheasant, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Catherine Andrews , spinster .

SAMUEL CHEESE . I am a constable, and live in Flora-gardens, Bayswater. In consequence of information, on the 14th of January I went into the Uxbridge-road, about twelve o'clock, and saw the two prisoners looking toward my place - they saw me, and ran away. I followed them nearly half a mile - they turned into Bagnigge Wells, and I lost sight of them; but I saw them again, and knew them to be the same. Almond, who was with me, pursued them, and brought Evans back in a few minutes.

ROBERT ALMOND . I was at work in Mr. Cheese's garden. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw Evans running - I pursued him, and he turned round by Bagnigge Wells into Harper's-fields - I saw him throw something into Bagnigge Wells tea-gardens. I took him into custody, and when I returned I looked over into the tea-gardens, and found a pheasant. When they were put into the watch-house, Jones said to Evans, "You must not know me." Evans said "Hold your tongue, you fool!"

BETTY WEBB . I live in Elkin's-row . On the 14th of January I hung up the pheasant in the larder - it belonged to Catherine Andrews, who lodges there. I missed it between two and three o'clock. I saw it at the Office next day.

JONES's Defence. I went across the road to the same side as the other prisoner, and they came and took me.

EVANS'S Defence. I happened to turn my head, and saw the bird lie under a wall - I put it under my arm, and walked on.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-60

443. JOHN SHEA and THOMAS JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , two waistcoats, value 3 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 18 d.; and a jacket, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Harris .

HENRY HARRIS, I am a slopseller , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the evening of the 18th of January Shea came to my shop with another person, and asked for a pair of trowsers - I shewed them several pairs, which they did not like. I took down several better pairs - he said, "I think these will do - where can I try them on?" I said "Behind the counter." He went and put them on over his own, and then he came back and said "These will not do - have you not got a new pair?" He said he would give 24 s. I shewed him a new pair, which he went behind the counter and tried on. He then asked me to pull down his old trowsers: after I had done so, he came back again and said "They won't do - they are too long." I said it was a good fault; he then said, "They have got a broad flap." I said, "Your waistcoat will cover that." He said, "No; they won't do." They then said they would call again to-morrow. He went behind the counter and pulled them off, while his friend walked out of the shop. While Shea was pulling off the trowsers, two officers brought back the other man, and said to Shea "Give us your hand, Sir." He did so - and they put the handcuffs on him. I called my wife and said, "I suppose these men have stolen something." She said, "They have robbed you!" I then missed a child's dress, which the officer showed me, it had been on the shelves close to the door before they came into the shop. I described my shop mark which would be on it if it was mine - they found the mark I described. I then told the officer to take off Shea's hat - they took it off, and found a black waistcoat of mine in it, which had my shop mark on it. I know nothing of Jones.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not some person go out, and Shea said they had taken his hat? A. Yes: I did not see the prisoner Jones till he was brought in by the officer; I am certain he was not the one who went out of the shop. Shea complained that some one had taken his hat, and it was in the hat which the other had left him the waistcoat was found. I did not see Shea take off his hat while he was in the shop, but when I stooped down to pull down his trowsers he had it on. I might have been stooping down about a minute or two - he was at that time close to the shelf where the waistcoat was.

JAMES FOGG . I was in Ratcliff-highway on the evening of the 18th of January - I saw the two prisoners in company with another person; Shea and the other, who is not here, went into a tailor's shop, and then into Mr. Harris's; Jones stood on the other side of the way; I passed by several times, and saw Shea trying some clothes on - at first Jones had nothing in his hand, but when I returned he had a bundle. I then took him over to Harris's shop, and asked if they were his clothes; he said they were. I handcuffed the prisoners, and took them into custody; they denied knowing any thing of each other. The third man got away while we were crossing to the shop; he did not seem to have any thing in his hand. When Shields, my brother officer, went into the shop, and took the hat off Shea's head, he said "This is not my hat." There was some mud on the child's dress - it appeared to have been thrown over the hatch-door.

GEORGE SHIELDS . I am an officer. I was with Fogg, and saw the three persons together - I saw Shea and the other in the shop, and Jones standing on the other side of the way - Fogg took hold of Jones; I went into the shop, and took Shea; I found in the hat on his head a black waistcoat. There had been another young man in the shop, who ran away. Jones was not in the shop to my knowledge.

JONES'S Defence. I was coming down a turning, and saw the bundle lying on the ground.

SHEA - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-61

444. JOSHUA SEABURN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , two crowns, four half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence , the monies of George Johnson .

GEORGE JOHNSON. I am a grocer . I was at the Basing-house, which is about two hundred yards from my house, on the evening of the 27th of January, and was fetched home, and found the prisoner in custody - I said, "Have you been robbing me?" he said, "If you will lend me a candle I will find it." I gave him a candle, and he went round behind the casks, and found nothing. I then told the officer to take him away. There was no money found in the shop at that time. I had put 24 s. behind my counter on the day before, and had seen it safe at three o'clock that day.

JANE LESLIE . I am in Mr. Johnson's service. I was in the parlour at work on the 27th of January, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner behind the counter - I opened the door, and went into the shop; I took him behind the counter, on his hands and knees. I called out, and my mistress came to my assistance. The officer was fetched; I held him till the officer came: he threw some money towards the door before the officer came. I found half-a-crown on the sill.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an headborough. I went to the shop in consequence of a little child coming to me. I found Leslie and Mr. Johnson holding the prisoner - I took him. Leslie looked down, and took up half-a-crown, which she gave me. I said to the prisoner, "George, this is a bad thing you have been doing;" he said, "Oh! you will find the money;" he then asked for a light, which he had, and looked round for it, but could not find it. Some person brought in some silver while we were in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by the door - a boy took off my cap, and threw it behind the counter - I went to get it, and knocked the money down - the young woman came out, and said I was stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-62

445. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a table-cloth, value 5 s.; two sheets, value 1 l.; a napkin, value 5 s.; a towel, value 1 s.; six shifts, value 3 l.; a pair of drawers, value 2 s.; two collars, value 2 s.; four pairs of stockings, value 8 s.; a night gown, value 5 s.; two petticoats, value 10 s.; eight handkerchief, value 16 s.; four shirts, value 2 l., and two caps, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Berkenhead .

ELIZABETH BERKENHEAD . I am the wife of Joseph Berkenhead, and live on Chelsea-common. On the 7th of February I received some linen from Mr. Robert Panther - I put it into a cart. I went into Broad-street, Grosvenor-square , to take some more linen, and there we missed a bundle, containing these articles - it could not have fallen out of the cart.

THOMAS GOOK . About half-past six o'clock on the night of the 7th of February I met the prisoner with a bundle on his shoulder, in Great Marlborough-street, about one hundred yards from Broad-street - I followed him some distance, and took him at the corner of Portland-street - he said a person gave it to him to carry.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman met me, and asked me to carry the bundle for him; I carried it as far as Portland-street, and there I was taken - it is my first offence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-63

447. THOMAS SADLER EBBERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

There being no proof of what money was paid to the prisoner, he was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250217-64

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

448. FRANCIS JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , at St. James, Clerkenwell , a carpet, value 4 l., the goods of Sarah Wilson , widow , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Young .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18250217-65

449. DAVID COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , at St. James, Clerkenwell , a warrant for the payment of money (i.e.) for payment of and value 4 l. 15 s., the property of Thomas Taylor and William Lyon , in the dwelling-house of the said William Lyon , against the statute.

MR. THOMAS TAYLOR. I am in partnership with William Lyon. We are surgeon s. The prisoner had been four months in our service as errand-boy . On the 29th of January I drew a cheque for 4 l. 15 s. on Messrs. Rogers and Co., and gave it to Weston to pay to a tradesman, it was in the dwelling-house of Mr. William Lyon - I do not reside there. I had more than that amount at my banker's.

EDWARD WESTON . I am assistant to Messrs. Taylor and Lyon. Mr. Taylor gave me a cheque for 4 l. 15 s. - I put it into a drawer in the desk in the surgery, which was not locked, on the 29th, when it was given to me. I missed it on the 1st of February, but cannot tell when it was taken - the prisoner had access to the surgery.

GEORGE TESTOR . I keep the Penton Arms, public-house, Barron-street, Pentonville. On the 1st of February the prisoner brought me a cheque for 4 l. 15 s. Knowing that he lived with the prosecutors, and having changed cheques for them before, I gave him the cash for it, and paid it next morning to the agent of Johnson and Co., wine-merchants, with whom I deal.

STEPHEN OLDING . I am a clerk to Messrs. Rogers, Towgood and Co. On the 29th of January the prosecutors had cash in our hands. On the 2d of February this cheque was brought to us through Everett and Co. - we paid it - here it is.

MR. TAYLOR. This is the cheque - I drew no other of that amount about that time. I received a very good character with the prisoner.

GEORGE TESTOR. I cannot swear to the cheque, but I never changed one of that amount before.

GEORGE YOUNG . I am clerk to Messrs. Johnson and Co. wine-merchants, Crutched-friars. This cheque was paid to me.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am a constable. I apprehended him at No. 15, Strand.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16. Recommended to Mercy on account of character .

Reference Number: t18250217-66

450. WILLIAM COTTLE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Sambrook , on the night of the 1st of February , and stealing an umbrella, value 20 s., his property; an umbrella, value 4 s., the goods of George Robinson ; and an umbrella, value 18 d., the goods of Charles Vivash .

SARAH AMBROSE . I am assistant to Miss Sambrook, a straw-bonnet maker, who lives with her brother, Thomas Sambrook, in Warwick-street, Golden-square . These umbrellas were put in the shop against a chair to drain. I sat in the back parlour about half-past six o'clock on the 1st of February. I heard the lock of the door slip back, the door opened, and I saw the prisoner enter, lean over the chair, and take them. He ran out - I called Stop thief! - ran after him, and about twenty yards from the door, when I was close behind him, I saw him drop them - he was taken directly, but not in my sight. A man picked them up, and gave them to me - one belongs to Thomas Sambrook, one to George Robinson, and the other to Charles Vivash. There were three lamps in the shop, I saw him plainly.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Miss Sambrook lives in the house? A. Yes; I believe she pays part of the rent. I did not notice his dress - it is possible that I may be mistaken.

CHARLES WAKE . I am a dyer. I was in Glasshouse-yard - heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and stopped him.

JAMES SMITH . I was passing, heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, with two umbrellas in his hand. I crossed over, he dropped them, I took them up, and saw him stopped, without losing sight of him - he ran about twenty yards.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he run round any corner? A. No. I only stooped for them, and immediately followed him - there might be twenty persons round - I kept my eye on him when I stooped.

J. V. BUCKLAND . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-67

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

451. JAMES COTTON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-68

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

452. JAMES DUNHOO was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Salt , about eight o'clock in the night of the 24th January , at St. Martin in the Fields , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein five seals, value 9 l.; six rings, value 50 s.; a watch key, value 14 s.; a pin, value 2 s.; three seal stones, value 12 s.; and three composition seals, value 7 s., the goods of Newton Crouch .

NEWTON CROUCH. I am an engraver , and live at John Salts, No. 8, Long-acre , in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. I have the shop and back parlour. On the the 24th of January, at half-past seven o'clock, I was in the shop; it was quite dark; my goods were exposed for sale in the window. A young man was at work at the window with me. I heard a noise as if somebody had knocked against the window as they passed, but did not break it, but immediately afterward the window was burst through. I saw a large glass in the center crashed; it is twice as large as the others. Supposing something was gone I immediately ran round to the door, and could not get it open, it was tied. I forced it open and found this handkerchief (producing it) tied to the handle and the rail. I was not many seconds getting it open. My house is at the corner of a court leading into Hart-street. I was directed

down the court; saw somebody running; pursued him up Bird-in-hand court and along Hart-street, but lost sight of him at the corner of James-street. I returned to the shop, a mob had collected round the window; the pane was broken quite out. I looked at the window outside, and found several seals on the window and the mob picked up about twenty off the pavement, and brought them in. I examined to see what was gone, and missed more than five gold seals, six gold rings, a gold key, and a gold pin. I have not recoverd them. I am sure I saw them in the window before. The witness, Blackman came into the shop with others, and gave me information. The light falls only on the bottom of the window; a person of the prisoner's height could not be seen in the face so as to know him again, unless he was stooping down. I did not see him.

GEORGE BLACKMAN . I am fifteen years old. On Monday the 24th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, I was in Long-acre, by Mr. Crouch's shop. I was going after a situation to Newport Market. I saw the prisoner and his companion looking about the prosecutor's window. I went on a little way, and crossed over by Long-acre chapel, and saw the prisoner's companion tying the prosecutor's door with a handkerchief; the prisoner stood close by the window at the time, and I saw him shove his hand through the pane of glass - break it, and snatch at the seals; and I think he took some out, but I was too far off to be sure of that; they both ran up Bird-in-hand-court. I immediately called Stop thief, and followed them. I lost sight of them at the corner of Hart-street. I ran back to Crouch's and described the prisoner to him. I was sent to the officer in Phoenix-alley and described him; he is not here. On the Friday after the robbery, I was sent for by Mr. Crouch and taken to Bow-street; the prisoner was in custody. I saw him taken out of Covent Garden watch-house, and said directly that he was the man; nobody was with him. I am perfectly sure of him. I have not a doubt.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come into a public-house with the officer where I was sitting, and say you did not know me? A. I went to a public-house with the officer, but he had another dress on; if it was him he had a Scotch cap on. I said I did not think it was him. I did not see his dress then except his cap; this was before the Friday, but when I saw him in Covent Garden watch-house, I was sure of him, as I saw his dress then. I think the person I saw in the public-house was not him.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the office you were sixteen years old? A. No; I said I was fifteen; the Magistrate did not object to swear me.

MR. CROUCH. Blackman had described the prisoner's person and dress to me. When the prisoner was taken, his left hand was cut at the knuckles. When Blackman saw him he immediately recollected him, and his dress corresponded with the description he had given. He said at the office that he was fifteen or sixteen years old, I do not know which.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the play at the time with two young men, who will be here at two o'clock.

GEORGE BLACKMAN re-examined. There was a good light in the street, I do not think it was gas. I could see his face. I saw him on the same side of the way, and then crossed over. I was about a quarter of an hour observing him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18250217-69

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

453. ELIZABETH LEFEVRE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Page , spinster , on the King's highway, on the 20th of January , at Norton Falgate , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, two caps, value 2 s.; two waistcoats, value 2 s.; a shawl, value 7 s.; and a basket, value 4 d., the goods of William Page .

2d COUNT, the same, only stating the goods to belong to James Page .

MARY PAGE . I am the wife of James Page, we live in Wellington-street, Kingsland-road. On the 20th of January, about half-past 5 o'clock, I put two night caps, and two flannel waistcoats into a basket, and gave them to my daughter Sarah, to take to her uncle's in Bishopsgate-street, I pinned a shawl on her shoulders with three pins.

SARAH PAGE. My mother gave me a basket with these things in, and pinned a shawl on my should. I set out about half-past 5 o'clock. I went straight down Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner with another woman just by Hollywell-lane - the prisoner had a red gown and black bonnet on - they were behind me, and when I got just by the pump, the other woman came and held me round the watsi, and the prisoner snatched the basket out of my hand, then unpinned my shawl and took it off, and both ran down Worship-street with it. I am sure of the prisoner's person; it was light. I never saw her before. On the next Tuesday morning Smith brought her out to the end of a court to me; I knew her directly. I was quite sure of her, she had a cotton gown on over her red one then. I am certain of her.

SARAH SKERRATT . I was on the other side of the way facing Worship-street. I saw the prisoner and another woman following behind Page, and when she got as far as the pump, the other one held her round the waist while the prisoner snatched a basket out of her hand. I did not see her take the shawl. Both ran up Worship-street. Page ran to her uncle's. I have known the prisoner for twelve months, she used to live in the same court as me. She had a red gown and black straw bonnet on. I am sure it was her.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. In consequence of a description given to me by Sarah Page, I apprehended the prisoner in a court in Shoreditch. on the 25th - I told Page and Skerratt to stand at the end of the court, by the light, and directly I brought her out they both immediately said she was the woman: they had described her as having a red gown, and a cast in her eye. I have not found the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of doors at the time.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18250217-70

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

450. MARGARET BRODIE and MARIA CLARKE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a liquor

frame, value 2 l., and two decanters, value 1 l., the goods of George Cobb , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE COBB. I am a glass and china man , and live in High-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 19th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, when I opened the shop window, I missed a liquor frame, worth 30 s., and two decanters, worth 1 l. I know nothing of the prisoners. I missed several more things; they must have been taken by the inside sash being drawn aside - I saw them safe at four o'clock the day before. I went round to the pawnbrokers, and on returning, about twelve o'clock, I found the officer in my shop, with them. I had cut one of the liquor bottles myself. I know them all by the workmanship, and have others to match them. I have had the frame eight or nine years. I made it for a gentleman who is gone to Yorkshire.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Would they sell for more than 1 l.? A. Yes. The frame is plated with silver; it ought to fetch me the interest of my money. I have two quart and four pint decanters of the same pattern. I was out after eight o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your windows have sliding sashes? A. Yes, inside; the shutters were not broken.

JOHN PETERSON . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Tottenham-court-road. On the 19th of January the prisoners came to my shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning. Brodie produced a pair of decanters to pawn for 12 s. I turned round to put them on our back counter, and while my back was turned, one of them produced the liquor-frame and three bottles, upon which Brodie asked 14 s. I asked Brodie her name, but the other prisoner answered and said her (Brodie's) name was Clarke. I asked Brodie where she lived? Clarke answered at No. 10, Crown-street, Soho. I asked Brodie whose the property was? Clarke said they were things she had had by her a long time, and was going to sell them off. Having seen the prosecutor about half an hour before, I got an officer and gave them in charge.

CHARLES STEERS . I am a constable, and took the prisoners into custody at Harrison's shop. I went in rather quick - Brodie told me not to be in a hurry, for they would go quietly. As we went to the office, one of them asked if I knew who stole the things? I said No. She then said that a tall man, in a blue coat, with red hair and whiskers, met her in Crown-street, and asked her to pawn them. I think it was Brodie.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did she say it was at the George, public-house? A. No.

BRODIE'S Defence. I met Clarke, who asked me to go with her - she gave me two decanters, which I took, to prevent the others from falling.

BRODIE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CLARKE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Of stealing only.

Brodie Confined Three Months . - Clarke Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-71

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

455. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , at St. Pancras , a mare, price 20 l.; a saddle, value 2 l. 10 s., and a bridle, value 8 s. ; the property of Samuel Badgery .

SAMUEL BADGERY. I am a tailor , and live in Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square . I had a mare to sell, and advertised it. On the 14th of December the prisoner called at my house. My wife sent him to the stable. I was there. He asked me the particulars about the mare, and the price of it, with bridle and saddle. I asked 25 guineas for the whole. He saw the mare in the stable and out in the yard; he said he wanted it for an elderly gentleman - that he had not time then to try the pace of the mare, but would call next day, and, with my permission, would ride it; but he knew his friend would not give above 20 guineas. He did not mention his friend's name or address. He called on Friday the 17th, about twelve o'clock but I did not see him. He came again about three, when the boy fetched me to the stable to him. He asked if the mare was sold - I said No. He asked if she was quiet - I said Yes. He said, if I knew of any imperfection in it I must mention it; for it would be useless for him to show it to his uncle (as he then called his friend) if it was imperfect; and said, with my permission, he would ride it a few paces, and should then be able to judge whether it would suit his uncle or not; if it was not calculated to suit his uncle, he would return in a few minutes; but if it was he would ride it and show it to his uncle. I asked his address, he said No. 36, Davis-street, Berkley-square, and mentioned a name which I cannot recollect; he said, he and his uncle both lived there. I asked, if he said Davis or David-street. He said, Davis-street, Berkley-square; and said, "You know the neighbourhood of Davis-street, I presume?" I said, Yes, perfectly well; for I married my wife from there. He asked, what part of the street. I said, my father-in-law lived at No. 8, Davis-street, at the corner of a yard, and was a lock-smith and bell-hanger. He said, he knew the shop perfectly well, but did not personally know my father-in-law. The saddle and bridle were on the mare; he got on her, and rode away; but, before that, said, if the mare was likely to suit his uncle, he would take it to him, and I should have an answer; about half-past six o'clock that evening, he would send his servant to order me to come to his uncle's for the money for the mare, saddle, and bridle. He then rode away. I waited till rather later than half-past six o'clock - he did not come then or at any other time, nor did his uncle or any body else. No bargain was made for the mare; he said, he knew his uncle would not give more than 20 guineas; and, if his uncle did not approve of it, he would send it back; but, if he liked it, he would send to me to come for the money. I enquired the same evening at No. 36, Davis-street, Berkley-square, and was informed, no person of his description lived there. Mr. Hopkins, a coachmaker, lived there. I could not hear of any old gentleman living there, or any person answering the prisoner's description. I went to the office next morning, and had hand-bills printed, but have never found the mare, bridle, or saddle. I met the prisoner in Hyde-park on the 17th of January, and had him secured.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. If the person who took the mare had returned the money, you would be satisfied? A. Certainly. I had not sold it. If the money had been sent back, I should have thought the bargain concluded, but not till then. If it was approved of by his uncle, the money was to be returned. If the

mare or money had been sent at half-past six o'clock, I should have been satisfied. I let him have it to shew to his uncle. I expected either the mare or the money back. I bought it at the Bazaar. I never said it had come from my uncle, in Gloucestershire, who had sprained his uncle. I bought her on the 11th, but she would not go in harness, and I had no use for her. He did not offer to leave the money, or I should have been glad to receive it. I have not sent to him in prison for the money. I know Mr. Manley - I desired him to go and ask the prisoner where the mare was gone as I thought he was made the tool of others to get it.

Q. Do not you know that Manley said, if 20 guineas could be produced, you did not care? A. I understood Manley to say, that the prisoner would produce 20 guineas, if I should be satisfied: but I never sent him to say a word about money. Nothing was said about depositing the money, when he was at the stables. We were a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes bargaining about it.

COURT. Q. When did you see him again? A. On the 17th of January, in Hyde-park, with another man - he was about 150 yards off, walking towards me. He turned round, and ran away from me very fast: he left his companion. I have no doubt but he saw me. I passed his companion, and followed him. He ran out into Park-lane, and was overtaken by a groom. I came up to him in Pitt's-head-mews, collared him, and said, "You villain, I have got you at last." He said, yes; I had got him. Some person in the crowd asked what he had done. I said, he had stolen my mare. He said, I could only make a debt of it, for he had bought it. I gave him in charge. The Magistrate asked where he lived. He would not give his address.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When he rode away with the mare, did you not expect the money to be sent? A. I expected the mare or money back at half-past eight o'clock. He had not rode on it till he rode it away. My boy has left my service now. The Magistrate said, I need not bring him. The horse was bought for my own use: nobody else had a share in it.

JOHN LACY . I am an officer. On the 17th of January, I saw a crowd in Pitt's-head-mews, and found the prosecutor holding the prisoner; he charged him with stealing his mare.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor's servant was in the stable at the two interviews, and heard me offer to leave 25 guineas, as security for the mare. I declare, I never mentioned my uncle. He said, it came from his uncle, in Gloucestershire, who had sprained his anckle, and could not ride again. I took it away by his consent. He asked, if I was going to take it into the country. I said, no: I was going to a friend, in Davis-street, Berkley-square, and was going to Mr. Grinwood's, whom I once lodged with. I have been abroad six years, and have no friends in London.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35 Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, believing him to have been induced by others to commit the offence .

Reference Number: t18250217-72

Before Mr. Baron Graham.

456. WILLIAM DAYMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at St. Mary-le-bone , seven soverreigns, the monies of William Brown ; and a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Eliza Brown , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Dodsworth .

WILLIAM BROWN. I live in Portland-town with my father-in-law, Thomas Dodsworth: it is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. The prisoner lodged in the house. My seven sovereigns were in a box, in my bed-room, where he and his brother slept. I saw them safe on Sunday, the 30th of January, and missed them on Wednesday night following: he still lodged there. Upon missing them, I went to the officer, who took him over at the public-house opposite. He was searched, but nothing found on him. While we were taking him, the pot-boy at the public-house said, he had bought a handkerchief of him, and produced it to my father-in-law: my sister afterwards claimed it. I charged him with taking my sovereigns - he denied it.

ELIZA BROWN. My brother lost his sovereigns. The prisoner was taken up. I had not missed any thing; but my brother asked, if I had lost a handkerchief. I then searched, and missed one. My father-in-law brought it over from the public-house: the officer has got it.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On the 2d of February, about 20 minutes to eleven o'clock, I was applied to by the prosecutor, who said, he had lost seven sovereigns out of his box. I accompanied him to the Portland Arms public-house, Portland-town. The prisoner was there asleep, in company with two more men. I tapped him on the shoulder, and his companion said, "Bill, here is your master wants you." I said, "I want to speak to you, my good lad." He was unwilling to come. I sat down by him, and said, I had a charge of felony against him; he said, he would not go, and resisted. I handcuffed him: he struck me a violent blow. I took him over to Dodsworth, and Mr. Dodsworth came over with a handkerchief, which he gave me. Eliza Brown searched her box, and said, she had lost one: she described it before she saw it. I think he was intoxicated.

MARK NICHOLL . I am the pot-boy. I bought a handkerchief, on the 2d of February, of the prisoner, and gave it to Dodsworth that night when he was taken. I am sure I gave him the same as I bought of the prisoner.

ELIZA BROWN. I saw it in the officer's hands that night: it is mine. There is some dirt in the middle; my brother had worn it round his neck.

Prisoner's Defence. He said, at the office, that there had always been somebody in the house, from Sunday till Wednesday. I can prove, the house was left for three hours on Monday. He came to me in prison, and said, he had strong suspicions of another person. I can prove, I had liberty to go to Eliza's room whenever I pleased, whether she was in bed or not. She lent me a handkerchief, but this is my own.

PROSECUTOR. I did not then know the house had been left, but find it had. I did not suspect any other person. I told him. I did not wish to prosecute; he said, the way I could get off was, by saying I had strong suspicion of other people.

ELIZA BROWN. I have lent his brother a handkerchief, but not him.

GUILTY. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-73

London Cases, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

457. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 312 pieces of paper-hangings, value 40 l.; eight pieces of paper borders, value 20 s.; two silk handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s.; a quilt, value 1 s.; a table-cloth, value 1 s.; a prayer-book, value 5 s.; 4 1/2 reams of paper, value 2 l.; a gown, value 4 s.; two books, value 2 l.; a gold seal, value 5 s.; and a key, value 3 s.; the goods of George William Newton , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-74

458. ELIZABETH PROSSER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a pair of shoes, value 1 s.; a tea spoon, value 2 s. 6 d., and a table spoon, value 10 s., the goods of Ann Watson , her mistress .

ANN WATSON. I am a widow . The prisoner came into my service on the 25th of January - on the following Monday I found her in a state of intoxication, and discharged her on Tuesday - on Wednesday I missed several things, which were safe on the Saturday. I had left the shoes in the kitchen, and the spoons were kept there.

ELIZABETH MARTIN . The prisoner lived with me before she went to the prosecutrix, and came back afterwards. My daughter gave me a duplicate of some shoes I asked the prisoner what shoes she had pawned - she said none; I said she had, for I had the ticket, and then she said she thought they were her own: I said she had none to pawn; she then said she had taken them from Mrs. Watson. I always thought her honest.

SUSANNAH MARTIN . The prisoner came back to my mother's house. I found a duplicate in her bed-room, and gave it to my mother.

CHARLES CREED . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Blackfriars-road. On the 2d of February a pair of shoes and a tea spoon were pawned with me, by a woman - I cannot say who, but the duplicate produced is the one I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-75

459. JOHN M'CARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a seal skin cap, value 5 s., the goods of William Bond, the elder , from the person of William, Bond, the younger .

WILLIAM BOND, JUN. I am ten years old. On the 7th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon. I was going through a little passage leading from Long-lane to Cloth-fair - the prisoner and another man were behind; the prisoner came behind me, pulled off my hat, and ran away with it, and before I could turn round he was gone into Long-lane. It was a seal skin cap. I went home and told my mother - I live three doors up Long-lane. I knew the prisoner before, and am sure he is the man.

MARY BOND . My son went out, and came home in five minutes, without his cap.

HENRY DAVIS . I am an officer. The boy described the prisoner to me, and next morning pointed him out to me in Smithfield-market, at a great distance. I secured him - he denied the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-76

460. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , twenty-nine yards of floor cloth value 6 l. , the goods of William Hare .

JAMES HOLMAN . I live with Mr. William Hare, floorcloth manufacturer , Bishopsgate-street . On the morning of the 2d of February, I was in the cellar, and heard footsteps in the shop - I went up, and missed a roll of floor cloth, which stood seven yards from the door, packed up in a mat. I ran out one way, and the man another - I found the prisoner in about five minutes, in Catherine Wheel-alley, nearly two hundred yards off, with it on his shoulder. - he was alone, knocking at a door there: he saw me, threw it down, and ran towards Petticoat-lane - I pursued, and took him without losing sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you see a man outside the door when you came out? A. Yes; and he was going to send me the wrong way, but a milk-woman directed me down the alley. The prisoner said a gentleman in black employed him to carry it. The person outside had a drab jacket on.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I received him in charge - and asked if he was any trade? he said No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me to earn a 1 s. and carry it - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and it fell off my shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-77

461. JAMES LORFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , five sacks, value 10 s. , the goods of John Thomas Pocock .

CHARLES SMITH . I am a coal merchant, and live in Water-lane. On the 28th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was by Mr. Pocock's wharf , the prisoner passed me with a load of sacks on his back. I walked up to him and asked what he had got? He said he was going just above, and I should see if I went with him. I followed him to Primrose-hill, then stopped him and said, I was sure he had stolen them - he dropped them, and ran off - I followed, and secured him - they were tied in his apron.

SAMUEL POCOCK . I am son of John Thomas Pocock, and know the sacks to be his - our wharf is at the bottom of Water-lane .

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250217-78

462. JOHN VANN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , a rummer glass, value 1 s. 6 d., and a teaspoon, value 1 d. , the goods of William Holt .

WILLIAM HOLT. I keep the King's Head, public-house, Threadneedle-street . On the 5th of February the prisoner came and had a glass of beer, which he paid for. My daughter said something, in consequence of which I detained him at the door, and found a rummer glass, and pewter tea-spoon in his pockets.

SOPHIA HOLT . I am the prosecutor's daughter. The

prisoner came to the house - a gentleman who had been drinking gin and water left a glass and spoon on the table - the prisoner took his hat off, and put it before the glass - the people opposite could not then see it - and immediately the gentleman opposite went out I saw him take the spoon and put it into his waiscoat pocket, and the glass into his coat pocket. I was on the stairs, and before I could get down he had gone out. I ran out and seized him.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 41. Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-79

463. GEORGE LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , a handkerchief value 5 s., the goods of William Dawson , from his person .

WILLIAM DAWSON. I am a stationer , and live in Cannon-street. On the 15th of February I was going through Mitre-court, Wood-street , and felt a tug at my coat pocket. I turned round, and saw the prisoner making away from me. I called out, and he began to run - a gentleman stopped him in Wood-street; I collared and charged him with picking my pocket - he opened his coat, and said I might search him. I said "Perhaps you have given it to somebody?" He said he had not. I took him back, and found it in the gutter, close to where I felt the tug. There was nobody near me but him.

PREST KNIPE . I am a constable. I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-80

464. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for stealing on the 4th of February , two table spoons, value 40 s.; and three tea-spoons, value 5 s., the goods of John Harwood , in his dwelling-house .

ANDREW FRANCIS SIRKS . I am a vellum binder. On the 4th of February I was at work in Mr. Harwood's back-shop in Fenchurch-street , and about a quarter past five o'clock. I heard a noise on the stairs - I opened the door leading to the passage, and saw the prisoner just going out at the street door - I could not see whether he had any thing - he pulled the door after him - I opened it and ran out, calling Stop thief - he was stopped - I came up directly - I only lost sight of him while he turned into Rood-lane - he went at a quick pace - I took him back to the house, but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see his features sufficient to swear to him? A. Yes, as he turned from the door I had a side view of him and his dress - he was stopped in less than a minute after he left the door.

THOMAS LA ROCHE . I was in Rood-lane between five and six o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief, and saw the prisoner running down the lane from Fenchurch-street - he was the first of those who ran - I tried to stop him, but he struck at me and passed - I followed him to the top of Idol-lane and took him, and on the spot in the road I found some spoons, which I took to the house - the constable had them.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I was in Mr. Warner's yard in Rood-lane, and saw the prisoner run by the yard. I saw the two silver spoons on the ground and picked them up. I took them to the prosecutor's house.

ELIZA MORAN . I am servant to Mr. John Harwood - I went over the way for three or four minutes, and left the door ajar, and on returning I heard mistress speaking to somebody, and as I turned into the kitchen I saw a man run down stairs - the kitchen is up stairs.

JOHN JUDD . I am an officer. The spoons were given to me in the presence of Mr. La Roche and Mr. Williams - here are two table, two desert, and three tea-spoons, two of them are pewter.

LUCY GRIMES . On the 4th of February, between five and six o'clock, I was passing from the parlour to the kitchen in the prosecutor's house, and saw some one gliding up stairs - I said, "Who is that?" twice or thrice, but received no answer - the prisoner came down at last and said, "Do you know Mrs. Cooper?" I looked at him and said, "You know she does not live here, you are a thief," and at that moment I saw the spoons in his hand - he struck me and ran down stairs. I hallooed out, and in a short time I heard he was taken. I went into the shop and saw him, and said, "You should not have struck me," he said he did not strike me. I heard him drop one spoon on the stairs. I am sure he is the man - the light of the kitchen fire shone in his face.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-81

652. EMANUEL ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 3 lbs. of raw silk, value 2 l. 5 s. , the goods of Enoch Fowler .

ENOCH FOWLER. I am silk-throwster , and live at Rotherithe. On Friday, the 4th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I sent Buckner to Messrs. Pearks and Davis, Friday-street, for some raw silk: here is 3 lb. 3 oz. of silk, which is mine: I had contracted to manufacture it.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Is it your own? A. No; it was delivered to my servant, who was bringing it to me. I do not swear to it - I had never seen it.

JOHN BUCKNER . I am servant to Mr. Frost: he sent me to Messrs. Pearks and Co., who gave me the silk on his account. I put it on my truck, and saw it put into the bag - it was silk of this colour and in this state. I went down to Watling-street , and at the bottom of Budge-row a person hallowed out, "Your truck is being robbed." I saw several people running across the road. I went to the back of the truck, and found a hole in the end of the bag, which was quite full before - it must have been cut, and was large enough to admit a hand.

DANIEL HODDER . On the evening of the 4th of February I was in Watling-street, and saw the prisoner following Buckner's truck. I called Hugget, my fellow-servant we watched, and saw him go to the truck several times from the path, but I did not see him take any thing. Huggett went on before me, and took him; I saw him take a skein of silk from his pocket - I picked up some more in the street, and took it to Messrs. Pearkes and Co.

WILLIAM HUGGETT . I was with Hodder, and saw the prisoner following the truck, and saw him draw the silk

out of the bale: he put it inside his coat. I stopped him by Castle-court, and saw him drop seven for eight skeins, which Hodder picked up. He resisted.

JAMES CHALCRAFT . I heard a noise in Castle-street, where I live. I went to the door, and saw Huggett holding the prisoner, who was crying out, "Let me go." I saw him loosen his coat and throw the silk about the road. I picked up one skein, which laid on the foot-path. I had a ream of paper in my hand, which I took in doors; I then went to the watch-house, and left the silk with Collins.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am an officer, and have the silk. The prisoner made a violent resistance.

JOHN THOMAS . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Pearkes and Co. Silk of this description was delivered to Buckner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-82

466. JAMES HERBERT , and JAMES HERBERT THE YOUNGER , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a deal box, value 6 d., and 20 lbs. of figs, value 10 s. , the goods of Edward Buttenshaw and Edward Buttenshaw the Younger .

Mr. EDWARD BUTTENSHAW, JUN. I am in partnership with my father, whose name is Edward. We are grocer s, and live on Holborn Bridge . On Saturday, the 29th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came to my shop, and bought some trifling things, which came to less than 1 s. I suspected them from their manner, and observed a chest of figs moved partly off another box, ready to be taken away; it was near the door. About eleven o'clock they came again, and bought a few things; the young one went away without my seeing him, leaving the father in the shop. I missed the box of figs, and asked the old man where his companion was: he denied all knowledge of him: I gave him in charge, When they first came into the shop, the youngest had a leather apron on. The box was produced at the examination, and I knew it by the import mark on it.

Prisoner HERBERT, SEN. Q. Did I come at six o'clock in the evening? A. I cannot speak to half an hour.

THOMAS BRADBURY . I am a watchman. On the night of the robbery, a little after twelve o'clock, I went to the eldest prisoner's house in Bangor Yard, and in a yard belonging to all the houses there, I found this box covered with a leather apron, in a nook in the yard.

GEORGE CORBY . I am an officer, and took charge of Herbert, Sen., at the prosecutor's shop. He denied having had any body with him.

HERBERT, SENIOR'S Defence. My son was not with me; - there were a dozen people in the shop, and if he was there, it was unknown to me. Corby went for my son, and the gentleman said he was not the person. The nook where the box was found is not so much attached to my house as to others; one house there contains fifty people, - it was once the Bishop of Bangor's palace.

HERBERT, JUNIOR'S, Defence. I went to the shop about half-past nine o'clock for tea and sugar, I then went to the Red Lion, and in a few minutes I was called out. Mr. Buttenshaw looked at me, and said I was not the person. Corby told him to be positive; he took me into the bar, and said he was positive I was not the person, but he fetched his man, who said I was.

Mr. BUTTENSHAW. I am sure they came together both times. I went to the public-house, but did not say he was not the person. I had no doubt of him, but sent for our apprentice, thinking it best for two to speak to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-83

467. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , three shirts, value 12 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 8 s. 6 d., and two half-handkerchiefs, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Blundell ; - seven yards of stuff, value 6 s., and five yards and half of linen cloth, value 5 s. 6 d. , the goods of Richard Robins .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-84

468. THOMAS BARRETT and JAMES BRITTEN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , a cart, value 25 s. , the goods of Joseph Gordon .

JOSEPH GORDON. I sell garden-stuff about . On the 11th of February my cart stood about one hundred yards from my door, by Lloyd's Cricket-Ground ; but about half-past one I came to Smithfield to buy a donkey, and while there I saw the prisoners bring it into the market. It was safe when I left home. Barrett was in the shafts pulling, and Bennett pushing behind. I got an officer, who took them.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you seize them? A. I got the officer, who took them a short distance from the cart; I ran for him the moment they brought it in; they passed me with it: I am sure they are the men.

HENRY WOODS . I live in Devonshire Street, Marylebone. I saw Gordon's cart safe at one o'clock. I came to Smithfield afterwards, and saw the prisoners bring it into the market with a bull-dog under it; - Barrett was in the shafts, and I saw him doing something to the dog.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. About 4 o'clock in the afternoon I was in Smithfield, and saw the prisoners. I was going to take the cart to the green yard, as no horse was in it. I took hold of it, and the prosecutor came and claimed it. The prisoners were near it at the time, and went away directly it was owned; - I secured Burrett, and Winston took Britten.

BRITTEN'S Defence. I was in Cow Cross; - a man came from behind this cart and said, "Give this a push to the sheep pens, and I will give you a pint of beer," and said he should be at the corner public-house; and as I was going away, the officer took me; - I said a man was to give me some beer to push it.

CHARES MATTHEWS. He said he was hired to draw it, and at the Compter he said they were to have 5 s., but told the Magistrate they were only to have some beer.

BRITTEN'S Defence. The man asked me to push it.

THOMAS WINSTON . I am an officer. I took Britten about twenty yards from the cart; he was walking away fastish. They both stood together when I first saw them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the dog follow them? A. He could not, he was tied in the cart. I found a dirty handkerchief on Britten; he said it had been round the dog's neck.

BARRETT - GUILTY . Aged 28.

BRITTEN - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-85

469. MARY ANN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , twenty-eight yards of cotton, value 25 s. , the goods of John Graham .

JOHN GRAHAM. I am a linen-draper , and live in Holborn . On the 12th of January, in the afternoon, the officer brought me this cotton - I knew it to be mine, but had not missed it; it was on the counter that morning.

CHARLES BENWELL . I am a butcher, and live in Long-lane. On the 12th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner in front of my shop, with this print under her arm.

JAMES HOLIDAY . I am an officer. I was fetched to Benwell's shop, and found this print behind the prisoner.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-86

470. MARY ANN LAWRENCE was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 1/2 lb. of beef, value 10 1/2 d. , the goods of Charles Benwell .

CHARLES BENWELL. I am a butcher . The prisoner stood at my shop window - a person said something - I went out, and missed a piece of beef. I saw her on the other side of the way; I went over, and said she had some meat of mine - she denied it, and immediately dropped it; she appeared intoxicated.

JAMES HOLIDAY . I saw her take the beef.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-87

471. JAMES MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 lb. of copper, value 1 s., the goods of Edmund Pontifex , William Pontifex, the younger , and James Wood , his masters .

MR. EDMUND PONTIFEX. I am a coppersmith , in partnership with William Pontifex and James Wood - we live in Shoe-lane . On the 5th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought in, charged with robbing us - it was stated in his presence that two of our men had heard a noise like copper being beaten where he worked - that they called out who was there - he answered, and went down stairs; that the men went to his bench, and found some old copper - that they went down stairs afterwards, and finding the copper gone they followed the prisoner to the public-house, and asked him for it - he denied having it, but on their saying they knew he had got it, he said, "Pray don't tell of me" - they said they must, and had brought him to me; but instead of searching him, they let him go up to the shop - they then followed him, and heard copper falling, and on getting a light found it by his bench. He begged my forgiveness, and said he would do so no more, and it was his first offence.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the copper picked up? A. Certainly.

WILLIAM SOPAR : I work for the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner heating up some old copper about five o'clock, and said, " What are you at?" he made no reply but dropped it. After that we followed him to the public-house, and took him to Mr. Pontifex - he begged for mercy, and said he would pay for it, and wished master to turn him away.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear it was copper? A. Yes. When you went out you took it with you.

Q. Did not master promise you a sovereign? A. He said he would give us a sovereign, and would give every man one who detected a thief.

HENRY KING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge with the copper - he said he was very sorry, and begged forgiveness on his knees.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I begged of him not to lock me up from my family. I brought up three pieces of old copper to make clans for my vice, and put them on the bench - then went out; Sopar followed me, and said, "Where is the copper?" I said I did not know what he meant, and went back with him - master came up, and said, "Where is the copper which you have stolen;" I said I had stolen none, but took it for clans.

GUILTY. Aged 30. Of Petty Larceny . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-88

472. GEORGR IVERY and WILLIAM REID were indicted for stealing on the 17th of January , a pair of shoes, value 6 s., the goods of Mary Robson , and a teaspoon, value 3 s. , the goods of Peter Thomas Skipper .

Reid pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

MARY ROBSON. I am servant to Messrs. Carnaby and Co. Upper Thames-street . On the 17th of January the prisoners came to the house, they rang the bell, I answered the door. Reid asked if my name was Robson, and if I had a brother in the East Indies - I said yes, and expected him home every day - he said he had brought a quantity of India crape and silk handkerchiefs for me, and my mother, and sister, that they were at his lodgings, and he got them safe ashore. I asked them to sit down - the bell rang - I had to attend dinner, and left them in the kitchen - I came down, they said they wished to see my mother and sister - I gave them her direction, and they gave me a direction where to come for what they had brought me, they said they were going into the city and would call on me another time - my shoes hung over where they sat - they came again in the evening, and said they had called to state all the particulars about my brother, as they did not wish to say so much before the young man who was there in the afternoon - they said about half an hour, and about ten minutes after they were gone. I missed my shoes and tea-spoon - before they went Mr. Skipper, (who lives in the house) called for his tea, and I left them in the kitchen while I took it up - Reid introduced Ivery as his brother - they said they wanted to go to the theatre - they went out - I missed the tea-spoon and shoes soon after; the tea-spoon belonged to Mr. Skipper, and was taken from the drawer.

CHARLES COOPER . I was in the kitchen the first time the prisoners came, and know them to be the men.

JOHN RICE . I apprehended Ivery on the 19th of January - the prosecutrix's sister gave them in charge in King-street, Borough - he did not deny being in the house, but knew nothing of the robbery, and said he knew nothing of Read.

IVERY'S Defence. I know nothing of the other prisoner, I met him on Monday morning as I was looking for a situation, he took me to Thames-street, and said he should be glad of my company at the theatre, he went to Robson's again, but I know nothing of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-89

473. WILLIAM REID was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , eight yards of printed cloth, value 10 s.; three yards of linen cloth, value 4 s. 6 d.; a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d.; and a snuff-box, value 3 d. ; the goods of Elizabeth Christopher Davis .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-90

474. GEORGE LYONS was indicted for stealing on the 25th of January , three pounds and a half of cheese, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Gainsford .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-91

NEW COURT. (3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

475. FREDERICK LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on 14th of February , a hat, value 5 s.; a pair of shoes, value 3 s.; a ring, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 4 d.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s., and a shirt, value 1 s., the goods of James Rogers ; a bed, value 10 s., and a shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Rogers .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-92

476. JOHN HERSCE was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE GROVER . I am a publican , and live at Bromley . The prisoner was in my employ, to carry out beer and receive money : he was to account for the money he received every night. On the 7th of February he did not account for any; he absconded about eight o'clock at night, on Thursday, the 10th of February. I saw him again on the Saturday following, in custody, and asked him about the money, but he made me no answer.

Prisoner. Between eleven and twelve o'clock on the Monday morning before, master was sitting in the bar. reading the paper, and I gave him the 1 s. 6 d. which I had received from Mr. Burford. - Witness. You did not.

THOMAS BURFORD . I paid the prisoner 1 s. 6 d. for Mr. Grover on Monday, the 7th of February.

WILLIAM CLOLOW . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Somers' Town on the same evening.

Prisoner's defence. I am certain I paid master the money

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-93

477. REBECCA PERKINS and WILLIAM ROWLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , two sovereigns, the monies of John Francis Thebeaudier , from his person .

JOHN FRANCIS THEBEAUDIER. (Through an interpreter.) I live in John-street, Spitalfields. On the 16th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Brick-lane - I went with a woman to a house, and staid there about two hours; I paid 1 s. for the room, and gave the woman 2 s. 6 d. I had two sovereigns and some silver. I gave her money to fetch a candle; she did not come back, but another woman came into the room in about ten minutes, and said the first one had run away, and I must pay her - another woman then came in, and demanded money for the room; she did nothing to me, but another came in, and she robbed me - that is the woman (the prisoner Perkins;) she took it out of my waistcoat, which was on the table: the male prisoner was there, and she passed the money to him. I was on the bed with the third woman at that time. I saw two the sovereigns in the man's hand. I was quite sober.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor about one o'clock in the morning - he took me to a house. I took two girls to the watch-house, to whom he had given money - I then went back and took the two prisoners, who he said had robbed him. He stated that the woman took the money, and gave it to the man, they both denied it - they were in the room when I took the first two, but I could not understand the prosecutor at first.

PERKINS's Defence. I was just going to bed, and know nothing of the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-94

478. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , two quarts of brandy, value 5 s. , the goods of John Ruck .

4 OTHER COUNTS. stating it to belong to other persons.

5th COUNT, stating it to belong to Samuel Boddington , treasurer of the London Dock Company , for the time being.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SLATER . I am an officer of the Thames Police, employed at the London Docks . The prisoner is an excise watchman . I was on duty all night on Thursday, the 20th of January. I went round the Dock in company with Jury, a fireman, between eight and nine o'clock. I crossed the spirit quay, and saw the prisoner standing by a cask of brandy, with his small clothes unbuttoned - it was dark, but I had a light. I went up to him, and smelt a strong smell of brandy. I observed that the ground where he stood was very wet. I said "Mitchell, what are you about?" I afterwards saw a common glass bottle, stopped with a piece of hemp, laying by the cask - I took it up, and found it full of brandy. I saw the neck of another bottle sticking out of the inside pocket of his great coat. I took that out, and searched his under coat pocket, and found a brass tube, a gimblet, and a piece of wood, which would serve to stop up a hole made by a gimblet. I asked him how he came to have these things? He said he had had them seven or eight months about him, but had never used them in his life. He afterwards said he had hung his great coat up in the watch-box, and some person had put them into his pocket, and given me information - but I found them in the pocket of his under coat: he said he knew nothing of the bottle on the ground, but of the bottle in his pocket, he said some sailor had given him some liquor in it to drink. While I was searching his under coat I saw him throw this bag from him, with a bladder in it, which is surrounded by a wire, which would compress the bladder, so as to make it lay flat - there was about a gill of brandy in it - there was no stopper in the bladder, it was quite wet. The bottle in his pocket had got a little wine in it. I then gave him into the custody of a watchman and the fireman, while I put the things away. I afterwards examined the cask in his, and M'Donald's presence, and a few inches from the bung hole, I found a hole bored,

exactly of the size of the gimblet. We stopped it up, and he was taken to the Office. I tasted the brandy in the bottle, in the bladder, and in the cask, the next morning, and the appeared to me to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Might not some empty casks contain a little brandy in them, and if so, might not the ground be wet? A. It might be so.

Q. Is it not common for watchmen to have a little brandy about them to keep out the cold? A. Not to my knowledge.

Re-examined. Q. What was the wet on the ground? A. It was brandy. The cask seemed to be perfectly sound, and the wet was at a distance from it: if it had leaked it would have been more under the cask - the wet was just at the place to which liquor would have spirted from the cask through a spill-hole.

CHARLES JURY . I am a fireman, in the employ of the London Docks. On the night of the 20th of January, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, I was on duty, and went round to see that all fires and lights were out. I went with Slater across the spirit quay. I saw the prisoner standing near the head of the cask, upright, and with his face to wards it. I went within about three yards of the cask, and saw some wet, and smelt a strong smell of brandy. The officer said, "Mitchell, what have you been about?" He said, "Nothing." I saw a bottle under the bulge of the cask, which the officer took up, it was stopped with hemp, and was full of brandy. I tasted it some time afterwards. The officer searched him in my presence, and took a bottle from his great coat pocket, and in his body coat pocket he found a brass tube, a gimblet, and a piece of wood, in the form of a spill. Slater then left him in the custody of myself and a watchman. In about half an hour he came back with M'Donald - I saw them examine the cask, and saw a hole in it, a few inches from the bung - it was just such a hole as this gimblet would have made - it was open then. Before Slater went away, I saw him pick up a bag, with a bladder, which had a little brandy in it.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came up, was the cask running? A. No. There were no empty casks on the quay that I know of. The bottle was not out of my sight till I tasted it.

DONALD M'DONALD . I am a constable of the Thames Police-office. I was in company with Slater; what he has stated is correct.

ROBERT TALBOT . I am an excise-watchman. I had the charge of some brandy in London Docks, on the 20th of January, from seven o'clock in the morning till five in the evening: I then gave it up to the prisoner. There were fifteen or sixteen casks lying on the brandy-quay, on the south side: they were all safe when I left them, and no appearance of say wet on the ground. If the bungs were up, no brandy could have leaked from them. There had been no racking off for several days before.

EDMUND NORMAN . The Treasurer of the London Dock is Samuel Boddington, Esq.

Prisoner's Defence. I had fifteen or sixteen casks in charge. They were racking off some casks, and had left a racking-off cask there. I took and rolled it out of the way, which made wet on the ground. Slater came up, and asked me what I was doing: I said, my duty. I had been moving a racking-off cask, and had made a wet. He then took a bottle out of my pocket, which had a little wine in it. He took me to the guard-house. In the morning, he took me to the Magistrate; and there he said, the cask had been guaged and re-guaged, and nothing was found missing. I have a wife and seven children.

The JURY to SLATER. Q. Was there any racking casks near the cask of brandy in question? A. Not that I know of I had been there all day, and I think I must have seen it - I might not.

CHARLES WEBB . I am employed particularly at the spirit-quay. There had been no brandy racked off on the 20th of January. The casks, of which the prisoner had charge, had not been racked; nor had there been any racking cask for several days there. When there has been any racking, we empty them completely. If there had been any spilled, it would have been dry in an hour or two.

ROBERT TALBOT re-examined. Q. Did you see any bottle near the cask? A. I did not see any - there might have been one. There had been no vessel at work that day, in that part of the dock. The bung-hole is on the top of the cask.

JAMES SLATER. The spill-hole was a little lower on the side of the cask than the bung-hole.

GUILTY. Aged 38. Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-95

479. GEORGE OGDEN was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM LANGSTON . I keep the Great Mogul public-house , in Drury-lane . The prisoner was in my employ to carry out beer, and to receive money from the customers. He received the money from Elizabeth Walker, for nine weeks' beer, at 4 s. per week. I repeatedly asked, if he had received her money, he said, she would settle it, from time to time; but he never accounted to me for the money he received from her. He came into my service in April: he was always to pay when he received it. Walker came to my house one day, and the prisoner went away immediately, without giving me notice. He was apprehended on the Thursday following.

ELIZABETH WALKER . I live in Cross-lane, Long-acre. I have beer from Langston. The prisoner generally brought the beer to my house. I do not owe Mr. Langston any money: I always paid it regularly to the prisoner once a week. The last time I paid him was at the end of January. There never was more than 4 s. a week due. My general way of paying it was a sixpence, a shilling, and a half-a-crown, to make the parcel as small as possible, which I generally wrapped up in paper. I think the last time I paid him was in that way.

Prisoner's Defence. She once gave me two weeks' money; there was a hole in my jacket pocket; and, as it was a wet night, I ran home, and lost it. I was afraid of telling my master; and, on the Monday following, I meant to ask him for my wages, to replace the money which I had lost.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250217-96

480. CHARLES HUTTON was indicted for stealing,

on the 5th of February , a bag, value 2 d.; a sovereign, five shillings, and twelve sixpences, the monies of Charles Farnell , his master .

CHARLES FARNELL. I am a brewer , and live at Isleworth . The prisoner was in my service. Having lost several things in the brewery, I suspected him. On Saturday morning, the 5th of February. I missed a bag from a desk, which had been locked. I had seen it two or three days before; it contained a sovereign, five shillings, and twelve sixpences. I made no enquiries about it, but discharged him on Saturday evening, and had a man waiting at the gate to apprehend him; he brought him back to the counting-house. I desired him to empty his pockets: he then brought out a few shillings; I asked him to let me see if I could find the money; I found the bag in his left-hand pocket, with the sovereign in it: it is a farmer's sample bag, with a P marked on it. I have no doubt of it being mine. I then said, "My lad, this is not all." He then pulled from his pocket seven shillings, twelve sixpences, and two half-crowns; the two half-crowns and two shillings my brother had paid him as his wages.

WILLIAM STILLWELL . I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. Mr. Farnell told him he had been robbing him. The prisoner owned, that he had taken the bag and the money which was in it. I gave him the 7 s., which was his wages, and kept the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-97

481. JOSEPH SPOONER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a jacket, value 30 s., and a waistcoat, value 10 s. , the goods of David Cadenhead .

DAVID CADENHEAD. I am a seafaring man . On the 19th of January my jacket and waistcoat were on board my ship, in a chest, which was not locked. The prisoner was a seaman on board the next vessel - we laid in the West India Docks . I had seen the articles about one o'clock - there were no seamen on board the vessel. I returned about half-past two, and then missed them - I saw them again on board the Phillip, which was the vessel the prisoner was on board, on the Friday following.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you any acquaintance with him? A. No more than by his laying alongside of my vessel. I had other, clothes in my chest.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am a constable of the Thames Police. I was stationed in the West India Docks. In consequence of information I went on board the ship of which the prisoner was mate - I found the jacket and waistcoat in the after part of the ship, stuffed into a place which is never used for clothes; the prisoner was with me, and said he had put them there; he begged me to say nothing about it, but to consider his wife and children.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long? A. Yes, about ten years - he has a good character, and has been master and male of several ships.

The prisoner received a most excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 35. Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-98

482. SAMUEL MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 28 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., belonging to Joseph Ford , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

2d COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

JOSEPH FORD. I live in Bowling Green-lane, Clerkenwell . The lead was stolen from a shed adjoining the house - I locked up the premises between four and five o'clock on the evening of the 20th of December - it was all safe then. A little before six o'clock that evening I heard a noise on the tiles - I went out backwards, and saw two persons on the top of the gutter of the shed, which is covered with lead; I went into the shed; they were still outside, and as I went in a piece of lead fell nearly on me - one of them then came down, and made towards the gate of the yard. I went into the street, and just as I got to the gate I met the prisoner going out: he dropped the lead and his hat: I took him into custody. The lead he had with him weighed about 28 lbs.; it was the same piece as had nearly fallen on me. I put him into William Smith's hands while I fastened the gate - we then went to Hatton-garden. When I came back the gate was opened again, and we suppose the other had escaped. I had seen him some time before, lurking about the premises.

WILLIAM SMITH . I keep a coal-shed near Mr. Ford's; he gave me the prisoner to hold while he got a constable. The prisoner asked me to let him go and get his hat - I took him to a constable, then went back, and found the lead and the bat close by the gate. I went and found a knife on the top of the building; it appeared to have been cutting lead. The lead appeared as if fresh cut. Next morning I went with the officer to compare it with that on the roof; it appeared exactly to correspond. I took a piece off the top of the building, and carried it to the office.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. I took the lead down, and compared it with that on the top of the building - it exactly corresponded.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the yard, and thought it was a dust yard - the prosecutor said I had come to rob him of the lead, but I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-99

483. HANNAH PATTISON and ELIZABETH DAY were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , a purse, value 6 d.; six sovereigns, and eighteen shillings, the property of James Metcalf , from his person .

JAMES METCALF. I am a seaman . I came on shore on the 2d of February; and about ten o'clock at night I went home with Day. I had got acquainted with her at the Bunch of Grapes, public-house, about eight o'clock - Pattison was not then in her company. I went to her lodgings, in Blue-coat-fields - she took me into a lower room, my shipmate and another girl were in the room, and we all supped together. When I left the public-house I had seven sovereigns; and after supper I gave one to Day to get some rum and beer - she got them, and returned me 18 s. My sovereigns, were in a purse in my left hand pocket, it was a new red purse, which I had bought that afternoon. After supper I fell asleep on the chair - my shipmate and the girl were then gone to bed. Day awoke

me, and asked me where my money was? I had not seen Pattison in the room at all till after I awoke. I told Day she had robbed me - she then ran away. I was looking for my shoes, when Pattison came in very much intoxicated, and asked what I did there? She showed me a sovereign, and said she had got drunk at my expence. I tried to get it from her, and she tried to put it into her month. I went and called my shipmate out of bed - he was up stairs in the same house - he went and got the watchman. I told him what had happened. In about an hour the watchman brought Day back to the room - there was only 1 s. 3 d. found on her. I have never seen the purse nor the rest of the money.

THOMAS LIDDELL . I am a shipmate of Metcalf's. I went with him and two women to the house where he lost his money - Mary Barker was with me. I saw Metcalf count out of his purse six sovereigns, after he had given Day one to go and get some liquor; she brought him back 18 s. Barker could not have taken his money, she and I went to bed soon after we had supped. Metcalf called me up about half-past two, and said he was robbed of every farthing. I came down, and found Pattison in the room, very much intoxicated. Day was gone. I went out and told the watchman, and we went together in search of her.

JOHN ROBERTS . I was a watchman. I found Day nearly opposite the house where she lives; in a house of very bad character. I took her to the house she lived at, and told her the man had been robbed. She denied the charge - I searched them both, and found 6 d. in Pattison's mouth, and 1 s. 3 d. on Day.

DAY'S Defence. I met him - we went home to have some supper - I asked Pattison to lend me her room, as I had no fire in mine: the other man and his companion went up to bed soon afterwards. I then asked if he was going to settle with me? He said he would not till the morning. I told him I would not trust him till the morning. I then went up, locked my own door, and went out.

PATTISON'S Defence. The other prisoner asked me to let her and a young man sup in my room, which I agreed to do. I went out, and did not come home till about three o'clock in the morning, when I found Metcalf there, but no other person. I told him to leave the room, as I wanted to go to bed. He then said he had lost some money, but I know nothing about it.

DAY - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

PATTISON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-100

484. THOMAS SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , twenty-three coach-glasses, value 40 l. , the goods of John Dixon Hancock and Edward Stubbs .

JOHN DIXON HANCOCK. I live in Whitechapel , and am in partnership with Edward Stubbs - these glasses were safe on our premises on the 14th of January. The premises were perfectly safe at eleven o'clock at night. The men came to work next morning at day-light. I heard, about eight o'clock, that the glasses were gone. There was no violence used to the premises; I suppose the lock must have been picked. Some of the glasses were taken from carriages, and the glass-strings cut off; some were without frames. The prisoner was a perfect stranger to me. I saw them again next morning at the watch-house, where he was in custody - some of them were broken. I knew them to be mine - we could not replace them for 50 l. About a half of them were taken from carriages.

JAMES MARRION . I am a wire-weaver, and live in Dog-row, Bethnal Green. On Saturday morning, the 15th of January, between five and six o'clock, I met the prisoner and two other men, with an ass and some hampers; as they went on a little way, something fell from the hampers, and made a crash; a decent young man took it up, and laid it on the hampers. They went on towards Whitechapel Church. Two of the men seemed very genteelly dressed, and the other more shabby. The watchman came up to them near Whitechapel Church, and took hold of the ass; - two of them ran down Osborne-street, and the prisoner turned back down the road the same way as he had come. I minded the ass, while the watchman followed, and brought him back within two minutes. I am quite sure he is the man who was with the others, and turned back down the road. He was taken to the watch-house; I went with him, and saw twenty-one whole glasses in the hampers, and some broken pieces. He said he had been out late spending the evening, and had taken a walk: that is all I heard him say. The three men were all in company; sometimes one of them went to drive the ass, and sometimes another. The prisoner was well dressed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where were you going? A. To my work. I was on the other side of the way: it was dark, but the road is lighted with gas; I was going the same way as them; - their backs were towards me till I came abreast of them. When I took hold of the ass, I lost sight of them. The prisoner said he had been shut out of his lodgings, and had taken a walk; - he had nothing to drive the ass with, - one of them had a stick. I know the prisoner again by his clothes - he had a black coat on.

WILLIAM AVES . I am a watchman. My beat is by Whitechapel Church, down the road-side. I saw three men driving an ass out of Great Garden Street towards Whitechapel Church, about half-past five o'clock; they seemed all in company. I went abreast of them as far as the church, and noticed one man who had more command over the ass than the others; he had a light coat on; the other two seemed to be better dressed. I stepped off the pavement to stop the ass, and as soon as I got into the road, one of the better dressed men made a cough, and at that instant one of them ran down Osborne Street with the man who was with the ass; the prisoner ran down Whitechapel Road. I cannot say which coughed. The prisoner ran twenty or thirty yards, and then made a stop, and walked back to meet me. I had not said any thing to either of them. I took hold of him; he said, "Watchman, what do you want with me? I know nothing about it." I asked him what he ran back for? He said, to make water; I had not seen any thing of that sort. When I took hold of the ass, Marrion came up; I gave him the care of it, while I went after the prisoner. I took him to the watch-house. We found twenty-one whole glasses and some pieces which were claimed by Mr. Hancock.

Cross-examined. Q. You went with him to the watch-house?

A. Yes: Marrion went away before I did. I heard the prisoner say he had been to the play, could not get in at his lodging, and had taken a walk. I pursued him: he turned back - there were other watchman about; it was rather dark. The man in the white coat, who seemed to have more command of the ass than the others, had a stick in his hand.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I was officer of the night. I was at the watch-house soon after the prisoner came in. There were twenty-one whole glasses and two broken ones in the hamper. I asked what he did out, at that time in the morning. He said, he had been out late at night, and got locked out; hat he lived in St. Helen's, and had been walking the whole of the night. Mr. Hancock claimed the glasses.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-101

485. GEORGE RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , six ounces of silk, value 12 s., the goods of Andrew Sodo and William Collingwood , his masters .

ANDREW SODO. I live in Cleveland-street, Mile-end , and am in partnership with William Collingwood; we are silk-dyers . The prisoner was in our service for four or five months. I frequently missed silk. On Monday, the 17th of January, I missed one skein of silk, from a nail in the dye-house, where I had put it a few days before. I had all the workmen searched that night. Mr. Newton took two skiens of silk from him: they fell from his small-clothes as he was searching him. The prisoner said at first, it was not him. I then sent Thomas for an officer. He desired to speak to me alone: I told him to speak before all the people; he then said, it was the first time, and it was a d - d b - h of a woman who persuaded him to do it. The watchman afterwards found some silk in the street, and the officer found more in his coat pocket.

GEORGE NEWTON . I am clerk to Messrs. Sodo & Co., and was present when the prisoner was searched - I found no silk on any other person. There were about fifty workmen. The prisoner took off his shirt, and having put it on again, I desired him to let down his trowsers, which he did; and, in the act of putting them up again, I found a skein of silk at his feet, and another fell from his person. He said, it was his first offence, and implored forgiveness.

COLEMAN HOLLAND . I am a watchman. I was sent for, and took him to the watch-house. As I went along, he leaned upon me very hard, and said, he wanted to drink something. I said, he was near the watch-house; and, within three or four yards of the door, he dropped some more silk, which was picked up by another witness.

Prisoner. As I was going to the watch-house, some boy called out, there was something lying there, and the boy gave it to the witness. The watchman said, he saw a boy pick it up. - Witness. No; that was another part of the silk.

SAMUEL BENSON . I was going to the watch-house with this prisoner: I did not see any thing drop from him, but I picked up this silk near him. A boy directly said, "Here is another skein, Mr. Benson," which I took of him. The whole quantity is worth about 12 s.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I was officer of the night. I found three skeins of silk in his right-hand coat pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a petition, begging for mercy, and received a good character from three witnesses.

GUILTY. Aged 30. Recommended to mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250217-102

486. ISAAC SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , a stove, value 7 s. , the goods of Benjamin Bond .

JOHN JAMES BOND . I am the son of Benjamin Bond, who is a cabinet-maker , and lives in Ratcliff-highway . I saw the stove about four o'clock, in the afternoon of the 25th of January, inside the door: it was missed about half-past seven. I saw it again at the headborough's, three doors off. The prisoner was then in custody. I am certain it was ours: it is worth about 7 s.

JOHN PINCHEN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Knight, as oil-man, of Ratcliff-highway. On the 25th of January, about half-past seven o'clock. I was behind the prisoner, I saw him pass Mr. Bond's, and turn back again; he came to the corner of the shop, and tried to lift up something. He then went a little further, and took this stove from over the stall-board. I cried, Stop thief! ran over, and told a butcher, who came out and stopped him; he had then dropped the stove.

STEPHEN LAKEMAN . I am the headborough. I went to my door, and saw the stove on the pavement; I took it in, and in a few minutes the prisoner was brought in by a butcher - he had only 7 d. about him.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I was officer of the night. I received the prisoner in charge, and asked him how he came to do it - he said it was through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Eight Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-103

487. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 28 lbs. of flour, value 5 s.; a jug, value 2 s.; two cakes of gingerbread, value 1 s., and a pillow case, value 6 d. , the goods of George Wilson .

GEORGE WILSON. I live in Russel's-buildings, Dock Head, and am mate of the ship Providence . This property had been sent on shore on the evening of the 31st of January, to my house; I did not see it again till the day after, when I saw the flour and the pillow-case - the case had a hole in it, and I put a small handkerchief to stop it up. The prisoner is a stranger.

WILLIAM PAULEY . I was on board the ship, and was sent by Wilson with these things; the flour was in a pillow-case. I landed at Bell wharf-stairs a little after six o'clock. When I just got to the top of the stairs the prisoner sang out, "Halloo" - I had never seen him before; he asked me what I had there: I said flour. He told me to come up to the Police directly: I asked him if he would let me tell the mate first; he said, "No, go on;" when we got a little further, he told me to put the things down, and go and tell the mate directly; I went, and sang out on the stairs to the mate: he came on shore directly, but the

things were gone. We gave information at the Police Office directly; I saw the prisoner next morning, on the craft, and told him he was the man who took the things; he said I was mistaken: he was then taken. I saw the pillow-case at the office.

JOHN JAMES JONES . I am a Thames Police constable. The prisoner never belonged to that office. I heard this account; the prisoner came to the office himself - when the boy came there he charged him with being the man that took the things. The prisoner took me to a house, and gave me a pillow-case, containing the flour, but not the jug and gingerbread: he said he had had a lark, and had got a little flour, and he should like to have an officer to go to the house; he said he had eaten the gingerbread, and broken the jug.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did not he come and give you this information voluntarily? A. Yes, he did; the boy had not given the information before. I was not there when the boy first came to the office.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, representing it to be a mere frolic.

THOMAS BARTHOLEMEW . I live at Bell-wharf, Shadwell, and keep the White Swan, public-house. On the 31st of January, a little before seven o'clock, the prisoner came in, and told me he had had a fine lark, and said, "I have stopped a collier's boy with some flour, some gingerbread, and a little jug;" he then went away, and said no more - I did not say anything to him. I have known him ever since he was a child - I never knew him guilty of any harm; he bears an honest character.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-104

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

488. SARAH BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously harbouring and receiving Joseph Bennett and George Wortley , well knowing them to have committed a certain felony .

THOMAS ROGERS . I am apprentice to Messrs John and Henry Lainson, of Rotherhithe-street. I appeared here against two prisoners of the names of Bennett and Worttley, last Session. I know nothing of the prisoner.

ROBERT LOCK . I am headborough of St. Luke's. On 22d of December , between 6 and 7 o'clock in the evening, I was in Golden-lane, with my brother officer, Bee - I saw a certain person standing at the end of Playhouse-yard; I looked out, and in a few minutes saw two men cross the road to go up the yard; Wortley, who was one of them, had something under his arm: I pursued, and saw him go into the prisoner's house - he laid the parcel on a table; Mrs. Benjamin laid her hand on it. I took hold of Wortley and the parcel; I asked what he did there, and was going to take him out of the room, but was stopped by Mrs. Benjamin and her son. I told my brother officer to take Bennett, who had come in, I took a pair of handcuffs out of my pocket to put on their hands - Mrs. Benjamin came up to me, and pushed me away, and said she would give me two sovereigns if I would let them go - she then said she would give me three sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you state before the Magistrate that Mrs. Benjamin took hold of you and put herself in your way, and hindered you? A. I told him there was money offered me - I did not mention about Mrs. Benjamin interrupting me - I said when I went into her house money was offered me - I did not say that she laid hands on me.

Q. Were you examined here as a witness against these two young men last session? A. Yes; and said she laid hold of me.

JOHN BEE . I am a headborough of St. Luke's. I was with Lock on the 22 d of December - we were going up. Golden-lane, and saw a person at the end of Playhouse-yard - he said, there was something coming - we saw Wortley with a parcel, and followed him into Mrs. Benjamin's house, and she offered us two sovereigns, and then three, to let the prisoners go - we took them to the watchhouse.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you told us all that happened in the shop? A. She said we should let the prisoners go and leave the property, and say it was only a row.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-105

489. WILLIAM BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January , fifty-four fishes called soles, value 15 s.; and a basket, value 6 d. , the the goods of Abitha Broyd .

ROBERT SEAGROT . I am a watchman. On the 31st of January, about ten minutes before six o'clock in the morning, I saw a van going along Whitechapel - I saw the prisoner jump up into it, and take off a basket - I ran up to him, and took him - it contained a number of soles - I went down to Billingsgate and found Mrs. Broyd, who owned them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It was dark was it not? A. Yes; but there were gas lights - he ran towards the foot-path, and I caught him very close to the van - I stooped to pick up the parcel, and he got away - I cannot say - I did not lose sight of him before he was re-taken.

JOHN WALTON . I am a watchman - on the 31st of January I saw something taken from the back of the van - Seagrot took the basket, and I pursued the man, who was running - perhaps four or five hundred yards from the van.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not very dark? A. No; it was lighted with gas - there was another man who ran to try to stop him, but he ran by the side of a cart and got from him. I kept within ten to twelve yards of him.

SIMON SOLOMON . I am an officer of Whitechapel parish - the prisoner was brought to me - I produce the basket in which the property was.

ABIATHA BROYD. I convey fish from Chelmsford to London - I was on the box of the van when this happened - this basket was mine - while I was on the road the fish that was in it was delivered to the fish salesman - I am answerable for any thing that is lost - it had been delivered to me at Chelmsford to bring to London.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-106

490. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January , a gallon of brandy, value 26 s.; two

gallons of rum, value 32 s.; fifteen bottles, value 2 s., and a hamper, value 1 s. , the goods of Marmaduke Thompson .

JOSHUA HOBBS . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 31st of January I was coming down Norton Falgate about half-past eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and saw a coal waggon going along - I saw the prisoner and two others with him, one of whom went to the waggon and finished untying the rope which he had begun to untie before - he took off the hamper and crossed over to White Lion-street with it - the prisoner followed him - the prisoner might be about twenty yards from the waggon - I went and told the carman of it; we then came back and found the prisoner carrying the hamper before him. Beavis came up and took him.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I took the prisoner who was carrying the hamper - that was the first I saw - I saw the carman with his whip up going to strike the him, and took him to Worship-street.

CHARLES GREEN . I am a servant to Marmaduke Thompson, he is a coal-merchant . I had a hamper in his waggon, tied behind; I was going to take it to master's house at Southgate - I was told it was taken by Hobbs - I went up White Lion-street, and saw the prisoner with the hamper - I hit him with the whip - he turned round and put it down at my toes.

ANDREW RICHHOUSE . I had put two gallons of rum, and one of brandy into this hamper - it was Mr. Thompson's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the street and saw two men, who asked me to carry this hamper - I had not got far before I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-107

491. JAMES FIELD was indicted for stealing on the 3d of February , a washing tub, value 7 s. , the goods of James Beal .

JAMES BEAL. I am a cooper , and live in Cow-Cross-street . I missed a tub on the 3d of February, about seven o'clock in the evening - I had seen it in my shop about five minutes before - I went out and saw it on the prisoner's head, about twenty yards from my door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH BAILEY . I saw the prisoner with the tub on his head, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and I do not know whether I am guilty or not.

JAMES BEAL re-examined. Q. He did not appear in liquor in the least, he carried the tub very well.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-108

492. THOMAS PHILLIPS and EDWARD DIXIE were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown , from his person .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 31st of January, at a quarter past six o'clock, I was in company with Avery, the conductor of the patrol in Holborn . I saw some gentlemen coming out of Lincoln's-Inn-fields; the two prisoners followed them; they then went into Hand-court and into Fetter-lane. I saw Phillips take this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket. I crossed over to him, he put it under his coat. I said, "Give me the handkerchief." He took his hand away and it fell down. Dixie was then between two and three yards from him. While I was taking the handcaffs, and securing the prisoners, the gentleman got away. I ran after him down to Fleet-street, but could not find him.

JOHN AVERY . I was in company with Thompson, what he has stated is correct, respecting the boys, being in custody. I did not see Phillips take the handkerchief, but I saw Thompson cross a little before me. I had staid a little back, and Dixie looked me full in the face. I then crossed over after him, and took him. Thompson took Phillips.

PHILLIPS'S Defence. I was coming down Holborn, and saw two coal-heavers, and this handkerchief was hanging out of one of their pockets; it fell down: I know nothing of it.

DIXIE'S Defence. I know nothing about it: I was a good way off at the time. I had spoken to the other prisoner in Hand-court.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

DIXIE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-109

493. ELIZABETH CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a bed, value 1 l.; a bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 3 s.; a blanket, value 1 s.; a teakettle, value 1 s., and a looking-glass, value 1 s.; the goods of Belinda Whorrod , in a certain lodging let by her to the prisoner .

BELINDA WHORROD. I am a widow , and live at No. 27, Grenville-street, Somer's Town . I let a room to the prisoner and a cousin of her's. I looked to her to pay the rent. This is my property - it was let with the room to the prisoner and her cousin.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-110

449. EDMUND MERIDALE STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , a horse-cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of George Palmer .

ALEXANDER KERR BEECH . I am a conductor of the the Bow-street patrole. I was on duty on the 4th of February, near Highgate, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock at night. I fell in with the prisoner, who was carrying two horse-cloths. I stopped him, and asked what he had got there - he said, two horse-cloths. I asked to whom they belonged - he said, to a gentleman at Finchley, whose name he could not tell; he was going to take them there. I took him into custody. Mr. Palmer's name was on one of them.

JOHN WESTEL . I am son-in-law to Mr. George Palmers, who lives at the Blue Boar public-house, Aldgate. This cloth is his property. I know nothing of the prisoner.

H - ATKINS. The prisoner was in my service. I know a man of the name of the name of Cotchin; he took him out and made him tipsy. I believe he took the cloth, because he had scarcely any covering. I have no objection to take him home with me - one cloth is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-111

495. MARY SMITH and SARAH STEELE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a purse, value 6 d.; a sovereign, a crown, half-a-crown, two shillings, and

a sixpence, the property of Michael Simpson , from his person .

MICHAEL SIMPSON. I live in Petticoat Lane, at the sign of the Blue Anchor. On the evening of the 21st of January, I was coming out of a public-house, between nine and ten o'clock, near Petticoat Lane . I passed two women, and took my money out to count it; it fell from my hand, and they picked it up. I cannot tell whether it was the prisoner's or not. They laughed at me. I think they were drunk, and I was not sober.

JOHN LRWIN . I am a watchman. I took the two prisoners a few minutes after this robbery. I was about twelve yards from the place, when the prosecutor called out, Murder! Watch! and Robbery! There were many girls near him. I took one into custody, whom he gave charge of, after some time: he said at first, he did not know which was the girl.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I took Sarah Steele going into a public-house, about five or six yards from the place. She had a purse in her hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-112

496. DUERELL ANLEY and WILLIAM BRIGGS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a pair of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of John Luke .

SAMUEL LUKE . I live at Islington with my father, John Luke, who is a shoemaker . About five o'clock in the afternoon, of the 18th of January, I was out of the shop about three minutes: when I returned, I missed a pair of shoes. I saw them at the office the same night.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrole. I met the two prisoners near the Angel public-house, Islington, about two minutes' walk from Mr. Luke's shop: there was another boy with them. Anley was holding his apron up, as if something was in it. I followed him, and the other two ran away. I called to Mills to stop Briggs. I took Anley with the shoes.

RICHARD MILIS . I am an officer. I found a pair of pattens on Briggs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANLEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

BRIGGS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-113

497. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , eight handkerchiefs, value 6 s. , the goods of Edward Pike .

EDWARD PIKE. I am a linen-draper , and live at Knightsbridge . On the 25th of January, the prisoner came and looked at some handkerchiefs at my door, and then passed on. She came back, and said, "You have some purses: I will take one." I went to get one of them, and saw her stoop, as if adjusting her garter. I then came round to where the handkerchiefs had been, and served her with a purse, and saw the handkerchiefs under her arm. I let her go out, then followed her, and told her to return: she then dropped them. She said, "I will pay you for one handkerchief;" and then said, "It is my first offence."

WILLIAM TIMBERLAKE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had four pairs of shoes in my hand, which I laid on the counter; and when I was taken I did not know I had the handkerchiefs: whether they were taken up with the shoes or not. I cannot say.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-114

498. GEORGIANA LATHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a set of bed furniture, value 15 s. , the goods of Richard Latham .

RICHARD LATHAM. I live at Ball's-pond, Islington . The prisoner is my daughter - she lived in my house. I missed my bed furniture on the 31st of January, which I never gave her liberty to pawn or sell.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lower-road, Islington. The prisoner pawned this property with me, on the 31st of January. I am certain of her person.

Prisoner. Bad company led me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-115

499. JAMES BYWATER and JAMES CHARD were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , seven live tame rabbits, price 7 s. , the property of James Stole .

MARY STOLE . I am the wife of James Stole, and live in Rickman's-gardens, Knightsbridge . I keep rabbits in a shed adjoining the house. I missed them on the 15th of January: there was a buck and a doe and five young ones. I had seen them safe the night before. I saw them again, about two o'clock that day, in Mr. Edwards's stable, at the Rose and Crown public-house.

JOHN BRADBURY . I belong to the 1st regiment of Lifeguards. I was informed, that Bywater had offered the rabbits for sale. I went up to him on Knightsbridge-green, between one and two o'clock, on the 15th of January: Chard was with him. I asked him, if he had got rabbits to sell: he said, no. I asked, if he had sold them: he said, he never had any to sell - he did not keep rabbits. I said, "You had some to sell this morning." He said, he was sure he had not. I questioned him a good deal, and he at last said, he was the only one who had stolen them. I told him, the constable was after him, and he would be taken. He said, "Let me put my coat on;" which he did. He then went with me to Mrs. Stole's, and showed her where the rabbits were.

MARY STOLE re-examined. Q. Did Bradbury bring Bywater to you? A. Yes; he told me where the rabbits were; and said, I should get them again, if I would not hurt him. I said, "Well, take me." We went to Mr. Edwards's stables, and found them. I did not know the prisoners before.

EDWARD GRANT . I am a constable. I was sent for to take Bywater. I took Chard about half an hour afterwards. Bywater told me where the rabbits were.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I live with my father: he is a cow-keeper, in New-road, Chelsea. I bought these rabbits of Chard, about half-past nine o'clock, on the morning of Saturday, the 15th of January. Bywater was with him, They both asked me to buy them. Chard asked 4 s. for them. I said, "I will give you 3 s. 6 d." I gave them 2 s.; and Chard took 1 s. and Bywater the other: they

then left. I was to give them the other 1 s. 6 d. when I could get it.

BYWATER'S Defence. All that the last witness has said is false.

BYWATER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

CHARD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-116

500. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a coat, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 7 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; and a hat, value 7 s.; the goods of Alexander Duncan ; - two coats, value 50 s.; three waistcoats, value 12 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 20 s.; five shirts, value 11 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 7 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; and three sovereigns ; the property of John Spinks .

ALEXANDER DUNCAN. I live at Mr. Gray's nursery, Kensington-road . I lost my property from a room over the stables. On the 12th of February, I missed a coat, a waistcoat, a handkerchief, and a hat. John Spinks also lodged in the room. Some of the things were in a trunk, and some hanging over the bed, I saw them safe when I went out, between eight and nine o'clock at night. I went to the Hand-and-Flower public-house: I returned a little after eleven. The prisoner had worked in the garden , but did not lodge there. When I went to the public-house, he was there, and went out about nine o'clock, and returned in about an hour, and said, "I have been out, and got my Sunday hat on: it will fit you Duncan." I then took notice of the hat - it was different to the one he had on before. When I went home, I lighted a candle, and missed my things directly. I called a young man, named Foster; we went into the room again, and found two hats there: one of them was mine, the other was the prisoner's, and one of mine was gone. We then went down to see if the prisoner was in his lodging, at the Hand and Flower public-house - he was not; we then went further, and found him concealed in some straw; we asked him, what he did there; he said, as it was late, he did not like to disturb the people at the public-house. Foster brought the hat down, and asked him if it was his - he said, it was, and a handkerchief, which was in it. He denied having been in the room. I did not lock the door when I went out. He said, he knew nothing about the property - we found it concealed in the nursery the next morning. I cannot say whether he was drunk or not. We took him to the watch-house, and he said, we might do our best.

JOHN SPINKS. I lodge with Duncan. I left the room about eight o'clock, and left my property all safe. I went to town, and returned a little after twelve. I met Duncan and Foster at the gate, who told me of the robbery. I found all my property concealed in some straw, about seven o'clock the next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD GRANT . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought down to me at the watch-house, about one o'clock. I found 20 s., and 3 1/2 d. in copper, on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and do not know what was done.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-117

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

501. MARY WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Dorsett Pool , about 9 o'clock in the night of the 1st of February , St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein four handkerchiefs, value 10 s., his property .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18250217-118

502. WILLIAM JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , at St. Pancras , thirty-five yards of flannel, value 3 l., the goods of Martha Blakeman, widow , Thomas Blakeman , and Martha Blakeman, spinster , in their dwelling-house .

JAMES LANGRIDGE . I am shopman to Martha Blakeman, widow, Thomas Blakeman, and Martha Blakeman, spinster, who are in partnership, as haberdashers , and live in Judd-street , in the parish of St. Pancras - all three live in the house. On the 2d of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening. I was behind the counter, and saw the prisoner enter the shop, and go out with a piece of flannel. which stood about nine feet within the shop - I pursued, and caught him a few yards off, walking away with it under his arm - another person was standing within a few yards off the house - he dropped the flannel, got away, and ran about one hundred yards, and was stopped by a gentleman, without my losing sight of him. It measures thirty-five yards, and cost us 3 l. 10 s.

ROBERT MITCHELL . I am a watchman, and took him in charge. I delivered the flannel to Langridge after sealing it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18250217-119

503. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Warner , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 8th of February , at St. Paul, Shadwell , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 14 lbs. wt. of tobacco, value 3 l.; 8 lbs. wt. of tea, value 2 l.: a pair of shoes, value 5 s.; a pillow-case, value 6 d., and the sum of four shillings in copper monies, his property .

THOMAS WARNER. I live in New Gravel-lane , in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell, and keep a chandler's shop . On the 8th of February my house was fastened up - I went to bed at eleven o'clock at night, with my family. - I got up first in the morning, at seven - it had been light for three quarters of an hour. I found the back door broken open, and missed from the shop 14 lbs of tobacco, 8 lbs. of tea, a pair of shoes, and a pillow case. The till was broken open, and about 4 s. worth of copper taken out. The value of all the property lost is 7 l. or 8 l. I cannot swear to tea or tobacco, but I have brought samples, which match with what was found. I think I have seen the prisoner about New Gravel-lane. I was present when a neighbour found a pair of laced half boots in an unoccupied house at the back of mine, and traced

footsteps from my house through that house; they appeared fresh. The back door of the empty house comes immediately to mine. I gave the boots to Judge, the officer.

ELLEN WARNER . I am the prosecutor's wife. The house was fastened when I went to bed, and in the morning, when I got up, we found it broken open.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On the 9th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, Warner stated what had happened. I had apprehended the prisoner before eight, in bed, at a bad house, in Mordan's-court. I asked how he got his living - he would give no answer, and under the bed on which he lay I found these parcels of tobacco, and in the window place of the room I found a pillow-case, with tea in it - he said he knew nothing at all about them. I saw Jeffery find behind the fire place a crow-bar, a phosphorus box, and matches. I found more tea in two canisters, and some in a mug - nobody but him was in the room. The tea things were laid for two persons. I received a pair of boots from Warner, which I put on the prisoner's feet at the office - they exactly fitted him - he had a pair of old shoes on, but the boots were very muddy, and his trowsers which he put on were very muddy. They must go over a very muddy place to get to this back door. The mud on his boots and trowsers correspond.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer of the Thames Police. In consequence of information, I went with my brother officer, and found the prisoner in bed, and found what he has stated. I found in the cupboard a bundle of phosphorus matches, and on the mantle piece a phosphorus bottle, and what appears to me to be a skeleton key, and behind the fire place, behind some bricks, a crow-bar, the broad part of which exactly tallied with the marks on the prosecutor's door, where it was broken.

THOMAS WARNER. I saw the crow-bar fitted to the marks on the door - they corresponded exactly. I lost more tea than is here, but this is of the same quality. The tobacco exactly matches with some, which I had in two days before: it was in two jars - here is only 9 lbs. I have no doubt of it being the same quality, and the tea also.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this house, and slept there all night; a young man who lived with the woman went out at twelve o'clock. I do not know what was in the room. I was there all night.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15

Reference Number: t18250217-120

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

504. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , twenty sheep, price 40 l. , the property of James Rhodes .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LOWEN . I was servant to John Broker , a butcher, of Kingsland-road. On the 6th of January, in the evening, after candles were lighted, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Broker's shop door - he asked for master, who I called forward, and he said he had come to enquire whether he could kill twenty sheep - master said he could kill twenty or a hundred. On the 7th I saw twenty sheep there; I was not present when they came - the prisoner called the same day while they were there, and saw master; I was present: he went to the back premises, where the sheep were; he saw them, and asked why we had not began to kill them; master said he heard there was some thing wrong respecting them; the prisoner offered to give him a note of hand, to indemnify him that they were his; he went away; and on the 8th, in the evening, after candle light he came again (it was Saturday;) he asked me if I had got the key of the shed: I asked if he wanted to take the sheep away - he said Yes; I said I had not got the key, and if I had I could not let him take them: he then left the premises. I did not see him again till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was he known to you before? A. I had not spoken to him before the Thursday, but had seen him before. I think it was about five or six o'clock on Thursday when he came; it was soon after candles were lighted. I saw him again on Friday, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and again on Saturday. Master lives near the first turnpike in the Kingsland-road.

MR. LAW. Q. You saw him with the sheep when he was speaking about them? A. Yes; he was in the shed with them, when he asked why we had not began to kill them.

JOHN BUKRITT . I am son-in-law to Mr. Broker, of Kingsland-road. On Thursday night, the 6th of January, the prisoner came and asked my father if he could kill him twenty sheep; my father said, Yes, a hundred if he liked. The prisoner agreed to give him 1 s. a head, to kill, and send them to market, and book them in his (the prisoner's) name; he said his name was Bishop. They were to come on Friday; some man brought them about half-past eight o'clock on Friday morning; the prisoner did not bring them.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did he come? A. About seven o'clock, I think - we light candles soon after dark, and it was soon after they were lighted. I let the sheep in at a quarter or half-past eight o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer of Worship-street. I produce two sheep skins, which I got from a shed at the back of Broker's house, in the presence of the last witness on the 14th; I brought away eighteen live sheep also.

JOHN BURKITT re-examined. These are the skins of two of the sheep which I let in: the eighteen which Waters took away were the rest of the twenty.

JOHN BROKER. I am a butcher, and live in Kingsland-road. On the 6th of January, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, my man called me out - I saw the prisoner - he asked if I could kill him twenty sheep - I said yes, a hundred - he asked what I should charge - I said twenty shillings to kill and take them to market, with my horse and cart - he said he would send them in, and perhaps he should buy twenty more to-morrow - he asked me to take something to drink - we each had 3 d. worth of brandy - I asked him when they would come - he said between 8 and 9 o'clock next morning - a short stiff man knocked me up about half-past six o'clock, but I did not see the sheep - he said they were round at the back door. I went out to market, and when I came home found twenty sheep in my shed - the back door is the way my

sheep always came in - two of them were afterward killed - I hung the skins up and the officer took them away - no other skins hung in the shed. The prisoner called on me about ten or half-past ten o'clock on Friday morning, and asked me the reason I had not began to kill them - I said I had heard they had not been properly come by, and there had been an officer to stop them. He said he would give me a note of band to indemnify me that they were his, and if I did not like to kill them he would get somebody else. I said I would set two men to kill them in the afternoon - he said very well, and asked me to go and take a pint of ale with him, which I did. I lent him 1 s. to pay for it, and never saw him again till he was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure about his person? A. Yes; I went to his house on Sunday with the officer. The last time I saw him was between ten and eleven o'clock on Friday night. I was not at home on Saturday till nine or ten at night. I did not go to make any communication to him either on Friday or Saturday. The first officer I told of it was on Friday. I told the prisoner on Friday that an officer had been about them. I sometimes kill twenty or thirty sheep a week - I killed the two on Monday afternoon by desire of the officer, as they were not likely to live an hour, being ill. I am positive of his person.

JOHN FRITH . I am foreman to Mr. Rhodes, whose premises are at Islington - he has several fields there, and sheep in them. I lost twenty (looking at the skins) - I know these positively to be the skins of two of my master's sheep - I saw eighteen live ones at Broker's, on the 13th of January - they were the rest of a score which I brought from Tottenham on the 31st of December. I had not seen them since - they were brought from Tottenham and turned out into the field at Islington - I came part of the way from Tottenham with them, with the servant who took them to Islington - I had seen them at Tottenham at different times, from the 13th of November, and know them very well - they were in my care at Tottenham.

Cross-examined. Q. How many had you at Tottenham? A. Seventy-five or seventy-six. I know the skins by the ochre-mark, and by the face of the sheep - I swear to the live ones by their faces, and to the skins by the marks - all that flock had the same mark.

MR. LAW. Q. You have been long acquainted with sheep? A. Yes, ever since I was eight years old - I speak with certainly to them.

MR. JAMES RHODES. I had a quantity of sheep at Islington - the last time I saw these was on the 5th of January, about twelve o'clock in the day, in my field at Islington - I knew the eighteen when they came back, but cannot swear to these skins - I did not miss them till I saw them advertised on the 13th.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know these skins? A. I cannot say whether I should know them by the skins or not. I had sent Frith to pick them out at Tottenham - I should know all the seventy-five. I have no partner - my premises are about two miles from Kingsland-road - I do not see the sheep daily, and cannot say when they were stolen. My fields are at the back of York-place - there was plenty of grass for them.

MR. LAW. Q. When you saw the advertisement you missed them? A. Yes - I know them well - I bought them at Kingston fair on the 13th of November.

JOHN BROKER re-examined. The prisoner said he had got more money, and perhaps he might buy twenty more to-morrow - he did not say how he came by these - I did not know him before - he did not tell me his name; but on Friday morning he told me to book them in his name (Bishop) - that was after I told him there was something wrong in it. The bargain about killing them was made on Thursday evening.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. I knew the prisoner before this occurred - he lodged at the Basinghouse public-house. Kingsland-road. In conquence of information from Broker I went there to apprehend him on the evening of the 8th, after eight o'clock - I went again on the evening of the 9th and 10th, but could not find him. I had a communication from him afterwards, that he would surrender - I went to Cheltenham and there found him.

Cross-examined. Q. He surrendered himself? A. Yes. He has been a publican, and has lived at an eating-house. The Basinghouse is a mile and a half or two miles from Islington.

Prisoner's Defence. Is it feasable, that any man charged with such an enormous crime as I am, would surrender himself into the jaws of death, when one hundred miles off? Certainly, no man possessing common sense would give himself up as I have done.

HENRY RAY . I am hostler at the Basinghouse, and have lived there nearly four years. The prisoner lodged there - the last night he slept there was on Saturday night, the 8th of January - he slept there that night, and left on Sunday - I saw him on the Friday morning before at half-past six o'clock he drank with me at the bar. Palmer served us. I saw him again on the 6th, in bed, at half-past eleven at night - he slept in the next room to me - his door was open, and I saw him in bed. Slade slept with him. I saw him come out of his room at half-past six o'clock on the morning of the 7th.

COURT. Q. What business is he? A. When I first knew him he lived at a cook-shop. In January he used to kill pigs for the neighbours, and go to market and buy meat. He has lived at the place three or four months.

GEORGE PALMER . I am servant at the Basinghouse. On Friday morning, the 7th of January, at half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs. Ray was with him - they had a glass of beer together. I saw him at the bar between nine and ten the night before - he went to bed about a quarter past ten - I did not see him go to bed, for I went to bed and left him in the bar.

MORGAN JONES . I have known the prisoner two years. I went to Whitechapel-market with him on the 7th of January, from seven to eight o'clock - I do not know what he went there for.

Four witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38. Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, in consequence of his good character, supposing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18250217-121

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

505. GEORGE TYLER and RICHARD CLEMENTS were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John

Thomas Kent , on the night of the 27th of November , and stealing a jacket, value 3 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 16 s.; a handkerchief, value 4 s.; a shawl, value 3 s.; a gown, value 8 s.; a half sovereign, and thirty shillings, his property .

JULIA KENT . I am the wife of John Thomas Kent, and live at Brentford-end . On Saturday, a month before Christmas I went to town, at three o'clock in the forenoon, and in my hurry am not sure whether I latched my room door or not. We have lodgers. I returned about one o'clock, but did not go up stairs till four, and then missed this property. I have seen the prisoners about the neighbourhood, but did not see them there, nor till after Christmas, when they were apprehended, and my property was produced at Bow-street. I have not found the money - it was kept between the bed and sacking, tied in a stocking.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You have lodgers in your house? A. Yes, a woman, who went to town with me - her husband was in the country.

THOMAS GRAY . I am a Thames Police officer. On Saturday, the 27th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners in Beck's-rents, Rosemary-lane, sitting on a quantity of grass mats - they appeared bulky about the body. I went up to them, and asked Tyler where he got them from - he said they belonged to a boy - I searched Tyler, and found in his hat a gown, and in his pocket a handkerchief - he said they were his own. Carter, who was with me, found a shawl, and a pair of new blue trowsers on Clements. Tyler said he picked his things up on Ruthem-hill, which is on the Maidstone road, about nineteen miles from town - he said they had been down there looking for work, as brick-makers, and had made the mats on the road - that they lived at Uxbridge. I took them before the Magistrate - they were remanded, but I could not find the owner - they were committed for a month as vagrants, and were afterwards apprehended on this charge, I have had the property ever since.

RICHARD CARTER . I was with Gray - his account is correct. Clements said the things were his own. I found no money on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners received a very good character.

TYLER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CLEMENTS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-122

506. WILLIAM SHADE was indicted for that he, on the 2d of February , in and upon John White , feloniously wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously did strike and cut him, in and upon his right leg, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him, or to do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN WHITE. I am a broker , and live in Little Exmouth-street, Hampstead-road. On the 2d of February, I went to No. 12, Phoenix-alley, Somer's-town , to distrain for 2 l. 10 s. rent, due to Joseph Mason , by the prisoner - I knocked at his door twice - somebody inside said, "Father, there is a knock:" the prisoner then unlocked and opened the door - I went in, and told him I had called for the rent due to Mr. Mason, his landlord. I read him my warrant - he said, "Oh! I have got no money now" - I said if he would go and get it I would wait a little. - He said, "Oh! No, I shan't go out after it;" I said if he would, it would save the expences: he said he should not. I said if he did not I must distrain. I walked to the back of the room, put my hand on a work bench, and said, "I seize and distrain on this for, and towards 2 l. 10 s. due to Mr. Mason, your landlord, for rent - he then walked deliberately from the door towards me, and came up right behind me; I thought he was going to put his coat on to go out for the money, but as I put my hand in my pocket to take out my inventory he came behind me, took hold of my collar behind, kicked my feet up under me, seized an axe off the bench, and began chopping at my legs, and as I was down he continued chopping - I kept the blows off as well as I could, but finding I could not keep them off, I said, "Well, let me get up, and go out" - he said he would be d - d if he would, for I should never go out of the room again alive; he struck at my head with the blunt end of the axe - I caught the blow on my arm, and in struggling he thought that my hat saved the blows, and said, "That d - d hat is in the way:" he made a kick to kick my hat off, and in so doing lowered his body, which enabled me to catch hold of the handle of the axe; I got up - we struggled: my man came in, and one Munroe followed him, and we three, as well as we could, got him half way down stairs. The constable came, and we got the axe from him. My legs are cut in two or three places; it was done when he first began to chop at me, not in the struggle: if it had not been for my own activity I must have been cut in pieces. Mr. Dodd, a surgeon, attended me ever since; my leg is chopped direct across the shin bone. As I walked to the surgeon small bits of the bone worked out with the blood, through my stocking. There is only one wound on the bone - the other is lower down. I never touched him till he threw me down. There was no other goods there to seize.

RICHARD SMITH . I was standing at the door of No. 12, Phoenix-street - White's son ran to me. I went up stairs, and saw Shade and White struggling for the axe, each had hold of it. I seized the axe, and tried to get it away, but could not - another person came - we pulled the prisoner half way down stairs; a constable came, and we got the axe from him. When I first entered the room he said to White, "I will do for you."

RICHARD SKINNER . I am a constable. White's son fetched me. I found three persons holding the prisoner, I took an axe from him, which I produce.

JOHN WHITE . I am the prosecutor's son. I was passing this house, and thinking my father was a long time there, I went in. I heard a noise up stairs, and saw the prisoner with the axe, chopping at my father. I was so frightened I ran down, went to Smith, and fetched a constable.

ROBERT THASDALE . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to me. I asked why he had committed himself so as to cut the man's legs in that manner, and said he might have taken his life - he said, "D - n his life - his life is nothing to me," and he would do it again to any man who attempted to take his tools.

The prisoner, who had conducted himself in a very incoherent manner during the examination of the witnesses, upon being called upon for his defence, stated that he understood it was illegal to distrain tools, and entered into a very singular and unconnected statement, of his having received the Holy Spirit on the 23d of December, 1813, which came from Heaven as a flame of fire, entered his mouth, and burnt his stomach - that it prevented his working, and compelled him to preach and pray continually - that this happened when he was confined at Warburton's mad-house.

RICHARD SKINNER re-examined. I have known the prisoner five years: he lives next door to me - I always considered him to be in an unsound state of mind. Four or five years ago he came and asked if I would let him go up stairs, for there was somebody talking to him through our wall - my wife went up with him. He opened the cupboard door, and said there was something very bad going on, for there was always an evil spirit talking to him through the wall. I have heard him, through the wall, on Sundays preaching to himself; he has come into the yard, and said he was like our Saviour, and had fasted forty days and nights. He used to hold up a gingerbread twist in his hand, and say so. I always observed the same state of conduct; he has a wife and child, and is a very industrious man; he was called Bogie by the neighbours. I believe him to be insane. I have heard that he was confined in a mad-house. I saw his wife a day or two after he was taken; she said she had not been to him; they do not live together.

NOT GUILTY, Being Insane .

Reference Number: t18250217-123

507. WILLIAM PATMORE and WILLIAM THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a print, framed and glazed, value 2 l. 2 s., the goods of Peter Fremont , in his dwelling-house .

PETER FREMONT. I live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields . On the 26th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, this print was stolen from the center of my shop, while I was in the back parlour.

RICHARD JARMEN . On the 26th of January, a little after eight o'clock in the morning, I placed this print in the middle of the prosecutor's shop - I am his servant. I closed the street door, and went into the back room, returned in five minutes, found the door open, and the print gone. On the 29th, master directed me to go to the Bull Inn, Bishopsgate-street, and ask for Patmore - I went; the prisoner Patmore came in immediately - I told him I had come for the print: he said he had not got it, but knew where it was; he said he could not tell who took it, and asked if he had better go back with me to Mr. Fremont's about it - I said that would be the best way. He came back, and on the road said it was at a pawnbroker's - I asked where - he said very near, and he believed it was pawned for 15 s. - that he knew it was the one we had lost, because he was coming by at the time, and saw it come out of the shop. I asked why he did not stop the man; he said he followed him to the pawnbroker's, and went in with an excuse. When he got to master's he was taken into custody.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a street-keeper. I was at Mr. Fremont's when Patmore came in with Jarmen. He seemed agitated at seeing me, and stepped back. I thought he was going to run out, and shut the door. I asked what he knew about the print. He said, he saw a person go into the shop and take it, and he happened to be at the pawnbroker's when it was pawned. I said, it was very strange that he should see a person robbed, and make no alarm; and still more strange, that he should be at the pawnbroker's shop when it was pawned. He said it was true, and he would show me the pawnbroker's. I said, I thought he had better go with me to the watch-house, and I would endeavour to find the pawnbroker's myself. I took him there; he then said, he would tell the whole truth. I neither threatened or promised him. He said, another person, whom he mentioned, had committed the robbery, and told me where to find him, which I did. He said, that person gave him 1 s. for pawning it; that he had been out two or three times with him, but had never done any thing.

MR. FREMONT. Patmore had called at my shop to say he could recover my print, if I sent my lad to the Bull public-house. I sent him, he brought Patmore back. I called Adams out of the parlour; his account is correct.

JOHN GARRAND . I am shopman to Mr. Cameron, a pawnbroker. On the 26th of January, Patmore brought this print to pawn for one guinea. I offered him 10 s. He said, that was too little; he thought my employer would lend him more. I said, he would be in in an hour, if he would call again. He said he would, if I would give him 10 s. then, which I did. He said, it was his own; that his name was Patmore; but he would not take a duplicate till he saw whether Mr. Cameron would lend him more. He did not call again; but within an hour, Thomas came, and asked if I had taken such a thing in, and what the person had on it. I said, 10 s. He said, "Give me the ticket of it." Whether he said it was his, or he was going to buy it, I cannot be certain. I hesitated about giving him a ticket, till he said the person's name, who brought it, was Patmore, I then gave him a duplicate.

THOMAS HART . I am an officer. I asked Patmore, how he came to know the print belonged to Fremont. He said, he saw a man take it out of the shop. I said, if he had been honest, he could have stopped the man. He said, at the watch-house, that the man who stole the print had got him out of his place, as porter, at the Green Dragon public-house; and he had been a few days about the street, but had not done any thing.

PATMORE'S Defence, (written.) On the 26th of January, I was walking by the prosecutor's house, and saw a boy come out with a picture. I walked on: he came up, and asked me to pawn it for him, and he would give me 1 s. Is it seasible that I should go into the first shop I came to, if I had known it to be stolen. He waited at the door till I came out; I gave him the money, and he gave me 1 s. In the course of the afternoon, I saw Thomas, and told him what I had been doing; telling him, the ticket was at the pawnbroker's, if he liked to fetch it. I did not take the ticket, because they did not give me the money the boy told me to ask for. A few days after, I was uneasy about it, thinking it was stolen; I mentioned it to two or three people, who advised me to inform the parties,

and recollecting seeing a boy come out of this shop, I enquired if the prosecutor had lost such a thing.

PATMORE - GUILTY. Aged 23. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only. - Judgment respited .

THOMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-124

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

508. WILLIAM GUNNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , a gelding, price 5 l. , the property of the Right Rev. William Hawley , D. D. , Lord Bishop of London .

THOMAS MORRIS . I am coachman to the Bishop of London. On the 10th of December, I missed a horse from a field at Fulham : it was safe on the 9th. A hole was broken in the fence. I found it again on the 25th or the 28th of January, in a mews, in Queen-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields, and knew it. The officer then sent it to me: its tail was cut short, and the mane pulled thinner; but I knew it again.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am an officer. On the 23d of January, I apprehended the prisoner at his house, in Arbour-square, Commercial-road, and found four horses in his stable, where he was cleaning harness. I said nothing to him about them, as I did not take him about horses. I took them all four to the stables of Bishop, my brother officer, in Queen-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields, on the evening of the 23d, for safety. They were advertised. Morris saw one of them at Bow-street, and claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had not particularly noticed this horse? A. I rode it to the stable.

THOMAS MORRIS. I saw it at Bow-street, in possession of Ellis, who had taken me to the stable: he is not here.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the fence rather old? A. It was sufficient to keep the horse in; two others, which were in the field, remained there: it was old, and had done work.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th of December, I bought this horse at Woodstock fair, and left it at the Blandford Arms public-house for five weeks, as it was lame.

THOMAS WARD . I am hostler at the Blandford Arms, at Woodstock. On the 17th of December, I remember the prisoner buying a horse, in my master's yard, of a tall thin man: he paid for it at our bar: it was lame, and remained five weeks in our stables, when he fetched it away.

COURT. Q. Who is the tall thin man? A. I never saw him before nor since. It was a brown horse, with two white hind legs, and had a little white on the fore leg. I showed it out for the man. I do not know what was paid for it. I have seen it since in Morris's possession, and am sure it is the same. The tall thin man slept at our house that night, and left in the morning. I have lived there six years.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-125

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

509. JOHN BURT , JOHN SAWGOOD , and JAMES TAYLOR , were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Joseph Lee , on the night of the 10th of February , and stealing 45 lbs. wt. of beef, value 40 s.; two tongues, value 10 s.; eighteen polonies, value 1 s. 6 d.; twenty-four savaloys, value 3 s.; 100 lbs. wt. of ham, value 5 l.; 40 lbs. wt. of German sausage, value 40 s.; and two iron skewers, value 1 s. ; the goods of Charles Canfor .

HUGH BIDWELL . I am shopman to Charles Canfor, who keeps a ham-shop , in Plumber's-row, City-road . He does not reside there. The party-wall of Mr. Joseph Lee's house forms the side of the shop, which he rents of Lee; there is no communication between the house and shop; the back door opens into Lee's yard, which is inclosed with the shop by a wooden fence; there is no room over the shop, but Lee's cellars come under it. On the 10th of February, I left the shop, and bolted the front door inside, and fastened the back door outside by a secret way. I went to master's house, in Leadenhall-street, returned about eight o'clock in the morning, and found every thing gone. The front door was partly open, and the pannel broken. I missed the provisions stated in the indictment, which were all safe in the shop the night before they were worth 10 l. or 12 l. A shirt, which hung behind the door, was taken. I have since seen some hams, two tongues, and two skewers: one skewer had been in a round, and the other in a brisket of beef; I knew the skewers.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an officer. On Monday, the 14th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, Johnson called on me - I went with him to Sawgood's father's house, in Hoxton-market-place; I asked if the son was at home: his mother denied him, but I found him in the back room, with the prisoner Burt - we took from the table several German sausages, two tongues, a round of beef, and a piece or two of brisket - two skewers were in the beef; and Sawgood gave me some polonies and hams from the cupboard. We had only said that we wanted them; we took them to the watch-house, and about half-past 12 o'clock I took Taylor, at the Bishop Blaze, public-house, about half a mile from Sawgood's. Burt said he knew nothing about the hams - that he had asked Sawgood to let him sleep there the night before.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer, and went to Sawgood's in consequence of information. Birch's account is correct. We found nothing on Taylor.

THOMAS CROFT . I keep the Bishop Blaze, public-house. Burt was at my house about ten o'clock on the 11th of February, and I believe the other two were there, but am not sure. Next morning (Saturday) Burt came between nine and ten o'clock; whether either, or both the others were with him I cannot tell, for there were several of them together - they brought ham, cut into slices, with them, and remained there an hour or more; they had some porter - I took them some knives and a plate: they went away. Burt came again at night, and I think the others. On Monday, a little after twelve o'clock, in consequence of what my pot-boy said, I called Taylor out of the taproom, and showed him some ham which was left in the kitchen chair on Sunday night, and asked if he knew any thing of it (I had just then heard of this robbery) - he said it did not belong to him, but he knew to whom it did belong; I desired him to take it off my premises, as I suspected something wrong about it; he said he expected the young man there about dinner time. He went away with it, returned, and the officer took him.

JAMES ASHLEY . I am pot-boy at this public-house. - On Saturday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, Burt and several others were in the tap-room, eating ham;

I saw Burt and Sawgood in the tap-room that Saturday night, talking together; I heard them talking about some sausages, which they said they should bring down that night. On Sunday morning I saw Burt and Sawgood eating ham in the tap-room; they must have brought it with them. I saw Taylor on Monday morning - he told me that Burt and Sawgood were taken up for thieving ham; I asked him if what was in the kitchen was part of it: he said Yes; I said, "What must we do? it must not be in the kitchen" - he said, "No, put it away, and if anybody asks for it, say you don't know who brought it." He was taken up.

ELIZA ASHLEY . I am sixteen years old, and live at the Bishop Blaze. On Sunday se'nnight, in the evening, Burt and Taylor were there with several others: they came in together at eleven o'clock: Burt and several more were eating ham. Taylor gave me one ham, and part of another, in the tap-room, at eleven o'clock on Saturday night, to put into the kitchen for him till he went home - Burt and several others were there; I put them into the kitchen. Taylor came on Monday, and spoke to the pot-boy, who went and told master, who spoke to Taylor - he then took the hams away.

BENJAMIN SAUNDERS . I am foreman to Mr. Canfor. - I left the shop about half-past nine o'clock on Friday - the property was safe then. I know these skewers, one is bent, and the other has a broken point: I described them before I saw them. I have no mark on any thing else.

BURT'S Defence. I slept at home on the night of the robbery, and went out about ten o'clock in the morning, and met Sawgood - he asked me to have a pint of beer, and when I got there he had some ham and beef. I went there again between nine and ten o'clock, and had a pint of beer. On Sunday I was out nearly all day, and being late I went and slept at Sawgood's, as my father would not let me in. I went up, and saw the ham and beef - he said a man met him in the Curtain-road, and asked him to take care of it till morning. When I was getting up the officers came.

SAWGOOD'S Defence. On Friday night I was at the Bishop Blaze - I returned home about eleven o'clock; my father let me in - I remained there till morning, when I went out; I met Burt, and went to the Bishop Blaze, and had a pint of beer. I went there again on Saturday - a few words arose between me and Burt; I went home at night, and met a man, who asked the way to Old-street; and when we came to Boot-street, leading to where I live, he said he had a few things, and if I would take care of them till Saturday morning, he would satisfy me - I said I did not like to take things up stairs without my father's knowledge; he said, "Never mind, there will be no trouble about them" - he went, and brought me these things in a bag, and gave me a small ham, just out, for myself - I took them up, and placed them on a table, which would not hold them all - I put the rest in the cupboard, and on Sunday morning I cut some slices off the ham he gave me, and took them to the Bishop Blaze. I got Taylor to take care of a small one. Burt came and slept with me that night - he asked what these things were, and I told him. When the officer came in the morning my mother said I was not at home, she thought; but she called out, John, and I answered. The officer came and took the things off the table; I said there was more in the cupboard.

TAYLOR'S Defence. He left a ham in my care, and, as he did not come at night, I left it with the servant.

Six witnesses gave Burt a good character.

BURT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SAWGOOD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-126

London Cases, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

510. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s., the goods of John Loder ; a pewter pint pot, value 1 s., the goods of William Richardson ; also for stealing three desk cover tops, value 1 s.; thirty-eight pepper box tops, value 8 d.; thirty-five candlestick springs, value 1 s. 6 d.; two knives, value 8 d.; five hammers, value 9 s. 3 d.; two chissels, value 1 s. 4 d., and four soldering irons, value 6 s., the goods of William Robert Walleking , his master .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-127

511. JOHN EDWARD COX was indicted for embezzlement .

FRANCES WHITE . On the 27th of January I paid the prisoner two shillings, a sixpence, and 3 1/2 d., on account of Mr. Batten, and took his receipt, which I produce.

WILLIAM BATTEN . I am a butterman . The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money for me - he took out butter , and should bring the money back: he gave me no money on Mrs. White's account, on the 27th of January - I questioned him about this when it was discovered, and he immediately went away; this was on the 7th of February - I asked if he had received any money from Mrs. White; he said No, and left. I sent for an officer, who found him that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How often did Mrs. White have butter? A. Every day; he requested her bill might be made out up to the end of January - we made it out, and gave it to him. I asked him on Saturday if he had received the money; he said No. It seems she paid him every day, instead of which, 11 l. odd is booked to her. He has paid me no money on her account - he always said who he received money from, when he paid any.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer. I took him in charge, and found a bill on him for 11 l. 11 s. 1 d., addressed to Mrs. White.

COURT to BATTENS. Q. Between the 27th of January and the 7th of February, did he pay any money on White's account? A. I am confident he did not.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. If he took out a basket of butter, and brought you the money for it all, you would be satisfied? A. Yes; but every thing was booked, and what is paid is made paid. He does not go out to sell, but to deliver orders. He always went to White's separately.

THOMAS DREW . I am clerk to Mr. Batten. The prisoner accounted to me for what he received. He never gave me any money on White's account; I made out her

bill up to the 8th of January, of 11 l. odd, by his desire.

Cross-examined. Q. How much did he pay you from the 8th of January to the 7th of February? A. Perhaps 3 s. or 4 s. daily. On the 27th of January he had 2 s. 9 1/2 d. booked, as owing by White.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-128

512. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a pair of trowsers, value 24 s. , the goods of George Breacher .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK BREACHER . I am apprentice to George Breacher, a tailor , who lives in Little Bell-alley . On the 14th of February, about seven o'clock, a person came into the shop, and took a pair of trowsers. I only saw his back. I ran out, and cried Stop thief!

JOHN ELLIS . I was passing Breacher's shop, and saw the prisoner come out, folding something up; I am certain of his person. Breacher came out, calling Stop thief! I turned round; the prisoner ran into a dark passage: I ran by him, turned back right upon him, and secured him. I am positive he is the man - I saw his person plainly.

HENRY HUCKETT . I saw a man come out of the shop. I joined in the pursuit, and stopped the prisoner. I returned, and picked up the trowsers exactly on the spot where he was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Fore-street, and met twenty persons. The officer seized me, but they are quite mistaken.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-129

513. JOHN BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a square, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Francis Bryant .

FRANCIS BRYANT. I am a carpenter . On the 10th of February I was at work next door to the George public-house, West Smithfield - I left at twelve o'clock; my square was then in the front room, on the second floor. I returned at half-past twelve, when Rose produced it.

JOSEPH ROSE . I am a carpenter. On the 10th of February, I was at the George, next door to this building - I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoner enter the board, he went into the house, came out twice, went in again, and came out in about ten minutes, with this square - he placed it against an opening in the hoard. The foreman had gone out while he was inside, and fastened the door - I went and took him, and picked the square up. - He said he came there for a necessary purpose.

JOHN HARKER . I am a constable, and took him in charge. He said he went up two pair of stairs, for a necessary purpose, and saw the square there, but did not touch it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this building for a necessary purpose, and when I came out I saw the square there, picked it up, and laid it down again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-130

514. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , a wooden box, value 6 d., and 56 lbs. of figs, value 24 s. , the goods of John Dale .

JOHN DALE. I am a carman . On the 22d of January two boxes of figs were stolen off my waggon on St. Mary-hill .

DAVID BROWN . I put two boxes of figs into Dale's waggon, at our warhouse on St. Mary's-hill.

BENJAMIN WATTON . I am the waggoner. I missed the boxes at the bottom of the hill.

DANIEL FORRESTER . On the 22d of January I stopped the prisoner in Aldgate High-street, with a box of figs - he said he brought it from the other end of the town; I said where? he said from Rood-lane, and was taking it to Mr. Johnson's, near the Three Jolly Butchers public-house, Mile End. He said at the watch-house that a man gave it him to carry.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go to find the place where he said he was taking them? A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-131

515. JOHN ABEL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , a wooden box, value 3 d.; twelve knives value 20 s., and twelve forks, value 11 s. , the goods of, David Evans .

JAMES LLOYD . I am shopman to Mr. David Evans, furnishing ironmonger , Crutchet-friars . On the 22d of January, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the warehouse, and said he had come from Mr. Stratton, of Gutter-lane, for an urn at about 15 s. - I said that was a low price. I looked out some, and did not see him conceal any thing. There were several knives and forks near him.

WILLIAM THRESH . I am the prosecutor's potter. I put some urns into a basket, and went about six yards from the prisoner to get a heater, and saw him in the act of forcing a box with knives into the flap of his trowsers. I took them from him; he told me he had got the cramp; I said that would not do for me. He ran out, and I after him, and took him. I am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was with Mr. Stratton's apprentice - he said he was going to order some tea-urns: he was drunk, and sent me for them.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-132

516. THOMAS HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Beame , from his person .

ROBERT BEAME. On the 27th of January, I was in Smithfield , and felt a handkerchief drawn from my pocket. I turned round, and saw it in the prisoner's hand. I collared him, and he dropped it on the ground.

JOHN HARKER . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

GEORGE WOODHALL . I was with the prosecutor, and saw him collar the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming on a message from

my father. Two boys threw the handkerchief at my feet, and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-133

517. WILLIAM HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a coat, value 21 s. , the goods of Joseph Robert Baylis .

ISAAC HUGHES PUGH . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Robert Baylis, pawnbroker , Aldersgate-street . On the 29th of November, about eight o'clock, I hung this coat on the door inside the shop. About twelve, I heard a noise, ran into the street, and caught the prisoner, eight doors off, with it under his arm. I believe he was in distress.

GEORGE HENDERSON . I live next door. I saw the prisoner take the coat, and run away with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-134

518. HENRY ABRAHALL was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. JOHN HARVEY . I am a silk-mercer , and live on Ludgate-hill . The prisoner was my shopman , and entrusted to receive money on my account. His duty was to make the customer a bill, and take the money to the cashier.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You have a large business? A. Yes; but it is done in a systematic way: it is almost impossible for a mistake to happen.

ELIZABETH COURTENAY . Last Saturday week, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I bought twelve yards of ribbon, at 2 d. a yard, at Mr. Harvey's shop, of the prisoner. He gave me a bill: I gave him 2 s. without looking at the bill. (The bill, being produced, was "Twelve yards of ribbon, 1 s."

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not usual for another shopman to examine the bill? A. Yes; but I believe no other shopman was near.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am cashier. The prisoner brought me this bill with 1 s. I stamped it, which is a receipt.

Cross-examined. Q. He would bring the bill with the amount on it? A. Yes; we have twenty-three shopmen, a mistake might occur.

MR. HARVEY. He came into my service a week before this happened. I had a good character with him. I did not ask him to explain it; the thing spoke for itself. The customer sent me back the bill.

JOHN WILLIAMSON. He only brings one bill at the time. There is, in general, a great hurry in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. It must have arisen through mistake.

MR. HARVEY. When he was taken in charge, he might have said that it occurred in error; but I do not recollect it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-135

519. JOHN WILLIAM DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 102 hats, value 50 l., and 102 hoods, value 50 l. the goods of John Oakey the elder .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL PARSEY . I live in Hosier-lane, West Smithfield. The prisoner took my first floor two days before the officers came, but he did not sleep there. I gave the prisoner the key of the apartment. I was next door when Stone came to my house: he fetched me.

Q. You showed him all over your house, except one room? A. Yes; that room belonged to the prisoner. The officer opened it with a key, and found some hats, which were not there when I let him the room. I saw him there the day before, and on that day, (Wednesday.)

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know of any body being in treaty for a house near you? A. I had two to let; the prisoner had been in treaty for one of them some days; I did not let it to him, because it was not finished. I was apprehended on this charge, and detained from Wednesday night till Monday.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know any thing of him? A. Only from seeing him at the public-house next door. I was bound over to prosecute, and subpoened before I attended the Grand Jury.

JOHN OAKEY , JUN. I am son of John Oakey, a hat-manufacturer . On the 4th of February, some hats were stolen from his warehouse, in Little Swan-alley, in the City . I had not been to the premises for a week before.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. On Wednesday evening, the 9th of February, I went to the Ship and Star public-house, Rosemary-lane: it is frequented by persons who deal in wearing apparel and other things. I saw the prisoner there: he passed by the bar. I observed him go and lock the kitchen door: I had no opportunity of getting to the door. I waited a few minutes: he returned and unlocked the door. I followed him, and saw him take hold of a black bag, behind the kitchen door - he lifted it up. I said, I must take him and the bag. He said, he knew nothing of what was in it, and begged to be let go, which I refused. I left the bag, sealed up, at the house, and took him to the watch-house, and then to the Compter, and gave information to Mr. Oakey, having had previous information of the robbery. I found eleven hats in the bag, some with paper round them. I went to No. 30, Hosier-lane, in consequence of information; I opened the door of the first-floor front room with a key which I found in the prisoner's pocket, and found five dozen hats, and a basket, with T. O. C. on it - the hats are unfinished. The prisoner denied all knowledge of the hats found at the public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went to the kitchen, did you tell him why you apprehended him? A. I said, he must go with me, in consequence of the property there, and in consequence of information which I had received. This was about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening.

JOHN OAKEY, JUN. re-examined. I saw the hats found in the bag - they were our manufacture - part are finished and part not. We have a few customers who buy them partly unfinished; but some are in a state in which we never sell them: those were in the basket. I went with Stone to Hosier-lane. The basket is my father's - it is marked T. O. I saw our man mark it two years ago: we had never parted with it. I went to the warehouse on the morning of Saturday, the 5th, and observed about four dozen unfinished hats laying in the premises. No violence

had been used to the door. The stock was not kept there; it is where the men work.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You know nothing of the state of the premises, on the previous night? A. No: I will not swear that there are above three of the bats in a state in which we never sell them. I think I might safely swear, that there are three; they are in a particular state of finishing, in which they never are sold by any house in the trade that I know. They are branded with the letters T. O., my father's initials.

WILLIAM TATE . I am foreman to Mr. Oakey. On the morning of Friday, the 4th of February, when I came to the warehouse, I found the warehouse door, and the outer door which encloses the yard, open, and supported by an iron to keep it open. I missed about one hundred hats; several were in an unfinished state; we call them hoods: they are only dyed; about twenty of the hundred were hoods; we sometimes sell hoods to people, who finish them to particular sizes, but had sent none out for a month before. I afterwards saw some in a basket, at Guildhall, sealed up, and they are sealed now.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you miss them on Friday morning or Saturday? A. Saturday morning I missed the new work, which had been brought in a basket. I was there at half-past eight o'clock in the morning. The men left work at eight or nine the night before - I was not there then. One or two hoods may occasionally be sold. I was not the first person at the warehouse on Saturday morning.

MR. OAKEY. I went to the warehouse about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, being informed by my brother of the robbery. The iron had then been moved from the door.

JOHN GLEESON . I am a porter. I saw the prisoner, last Wednesday week, about three o'clock in the afternoon, at the Ship and Star public-house, Sparrow-corner. He said, he had a job for me, and asked if I had a case: I said, no. He asked if I could get one: I said, no. He went out himself, came in, and said he had got one, and gave me 5 s. to leave, as security for it. He took me to a house in Hosier-lane, with it, to the first floor - he sent me down, I went to the public-house next door - he brought the case down himself to me; it was an egg chest, about a foot and a half deep. He called me out of the public-house; I helped him into a truck with the case - I took it to the Ship and Star public-house, and do not know what was in it. I saw forty or fifty hats in his lodging; some in front of the room, and some on the other side - it was about half-past four o'clock when I was at his lodging. He sent me down stairs - I did not see what he put in the case - I put it into the back kitchen, at the Ship and Star.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am errand-boy to Mr. Oakey. On Saturday morning, the 5th of February, about a quarter past seven o'clock, I went to the warehouse - I was the first person there and had the keys - I was sliding opposite the yard - another boy ran by and shoved the door open - I found the warehouse door open - I had left the night before when the shop was shut, and fastened the door myself - about six dozen hats were gone - I went in with Mr. Tomlinson, and missed them: they were safe the night before. The doors had an iron against them, to keep them open. I believe some of the hats were unfinished.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many? A. I cannot say - there might be a dozen and a half, or more - they were black hats. I had the keys in my hand, and met the other errand-boy; he scolded me for leaving the doors open, but I had not been there.

WALTER LUTWICKE . I am an officer, and produce the property.

JOSEPH STONE. This is the property which I sealed up

WILLIAM TATE . These are called finished bats by the manufacturers, but not by the retailers. There are no hoods in the basket - they have Mr. Oakey's mark. Here is one in the first process: after the hood; we never sell them in that state.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a salesman, and in the habit of buying things of this description; if persons in my situation are to be prosecuted, they may be prosecuted hourly. I can prove Mr. Oakey himself sells hats in that state, and can prove that I bought these. I understood the person who sold them to me was in want of money to make up a bill. They only want binding and trimming.

JOHN CAMMELL . I have been a clerk in the East India House, and know the prisoner, and was with him in the parlour of a public-house in Hosier-lane; I think it was about a fortnight ago. Two men came in and asked for him; I saw them whispering a few questions to him, about raising some money for a bill, and heard him say, "Well, bring a sample." I did not hear what, but in half or three quarters of an hour, they brought in a hat; it seemed to be unlined. I heard no conversation after that. The man who brought the hat went away with it; he did not leave it with the prisoner. I stopped there for an hour or two; nothing passed till between three and four o'clock, when the man came in again; I saw him whispering to Mr. Dyer, and saw Dyer pay some money.

Q. Was it one of the same men? A. I believe it was. I saw Dyer pay him some sovereigns - I should think about forty, or more, for what I know - but I went home to tea immediately after.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. What department of the East India-house are you in? A. I was a clerk - I have an independence arising from my wife's money - I was in the naval department, as clerk, with Captain Thomas, in 1814.

Q. You were Captain's clerk in an East India ship? A. Yes. I have married since that, and have an independence - I have no employment - I live at No. 15, Thomas-street, Stamford-street, Blackfriar's-road. This happened about a fortnight ago - I think it was on a Tuesday, and I think on the 8th of February - I am certain of it.

Q. What, that the sample was produced to the prisoner on Tuesday, the 8th of February? A. Yes. I think I should know the persons who brought it. I heard the prisoner was in custody a few days after - I read it in the newspaper, and heard it mentioned.

Q. Did the prisoner go away after the sample was produced? A. No - he went into the passage, but did not leave the house to my knowledge. There were four or five persons in the room; it was at the Horse and Groom public-house. - I have seen one person here to-night who was there - I cannot tell his name rightly, for I do not know him intimately, and have not asked his name - I have talked to him here, but not a word on this subject. I

asked him how business goes on, and about the weather, and a hundred things; and if this trial was likely to come on to-night, as I did not like to wait; nothing more passed between us. I do not know how the people who brought the hats were dressed. I should think them from thirty to thirty-six years old; they wore black hats; I do not know the colour of their coats - one was rather stout, and the other about my size. The prisoner drank some porter with me - the other person who is here did not drink with us; he was not in the room at first. I went there about twelve o'clock with the prisoner - I had met him in Black-friar's-road; the other man came in in three or four hours. I left between four and five o'clock - the two men came in about two. The person who is here was not there then; he could see nothing but paying the money. The landlord and landlady came in and out - we had two or three pints of beer, and a glass of brandy and water - I had some bread and cheese there with the prisoner.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you in the habit of going to that house? A. No - I had been there once or twice.

THOMAS BURN . I live in Surrey-place, Kent-road, and am not in any business: my father was a lottery-office-keeper, in Cornhill. I was at the Horse and Groom public-house, Hosier-lane; I think it will be a fortnight ago to-morrow - it was on a Tuesday. I got there, I think, between three and four o'clock. I have known Dyer some time - he was there when I went in - I went to ask for Mr. Coleman, a builder. I had a glass of wine and water, and was there about an hour, or thirty-five minutes. I saw Mr. Dyer in conversation with a man - what attracted my notice was hearing money pass on the table; I looked towards them. I saw money being transferred from Dyer to the man - I heard him say, "Here is forty," and saw sovereigns on the table: there were three or four men round the table - I cannot say which he was paying it to.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see that gentleman there? (Campbell?) A. He was sitting at the opposite table to me; I think he was nearer to Dyer than me. I heard somebody say, "Here is 40 l." I heard no more, for I went away almost directly. I saw no hat there; there were three or four men round the table. I got there at a quarter past three o'clock, and left at four, to go to Charing-cross. I am sure I heard the words, "Here is forty pounds."

Q. When was your recollection called to this circumstance? A. When I returned from Tunbridge Wells, four or five days ago - I happened to read it in the paper. I went to Mr. Prentice's office, on business, and asked Mr. Lee if it was the Mr. Dyer whom I knew. I have known him seven or eight years, or more. I have been a coach proprietor; I drove on the Brighton road four years ago; I was a coach driver for three or four months. I now live on what my father left me; it was about 7000 l. - he died in 1816. I was a bankrupt in 1812.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where did Dyer live? A. By the Elephant and Castle. I always knew him to be a respectable man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you go to Horsemonger-lane when he was there? A. I never heard of his being there.

WILLIAM WOOTTEN . I have been a hatter. I sold my stock in trade to the prisoner two years and half ago; some were perfect, and some damaged - they were all finished. I sold him several dozens, and received between 20 l. and 30 l. from him. A man recommended him to me, as a dealer in hats.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did he live then? A. I do not know; he came to my house, looked my stock over, took an inventory, and bought it. I lived in Shoreditch.

WILLIAM BAKEWELL . I was clerk to Mr. M'Lane, of Lombard-street - I left him three months ago, and expect to go to a plantation in the East Indies, but have not settled who I am going with; I live at No. 31, Green-walk, Blackfriars. I was at the Rockingham Arms, public-house, by the Elephant and Castle, last Friday week, from half-past six o'clock, till half-past eleven at night. The prisoner came in about half-past eight o'clock, or later - I merely knew him by sight; I was not acquainted with him; he was there all the evening, till half-past eleven, when the house was shut up; he went out just before me. I heard he was taken up on the Wednesday or Thursday, in the following week - it was mentioned at the Rockingham Arms. I heard last Wednesday or Thursday that he was taken up - I had seen him at the Rockingham Arms on the Friday before that.

Q. Ten days ago? A. Yes, about that; it was the Friday before last - I am sure of that. I had seen him there several nights; he might be there two or three times a week.

Q. Did you see him there on any other Friday night? A. Very likely. Edward Smith was there on the Friday night that I saw him there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure the time you are speaking of was last Friday week? A. Yes, ten days ago - I cannot be mistaken. I never mentioned it to any one. I was subpoened here - I do not know how I came to be subpoened. Dixon, a corn-chandler, and Mr. Peak, a master bricklayer were there - we were in the parlour. - The landlord was in the house.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Now consider - are you mistaken in the Friday you are speaking of? A. No, I think I am right.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a carpenter, and live in Chapel-street, Stockwell. I have seen the prisoner and the last witness at the Rockingham Arms - I saw them both there on the same night - as near as I can recollect it was last Friday fortnight; I am almost positive it was on a Friday - I went there at half-past six o'clock, or seven; the prisoner was then there, or came in soon after. I staid till about eleven, and believe he was there all the time; I did not miss him: I was smoking my pipe.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How do you remember that it was on Friday? A. Because on Friday I came to town, and called at the Rockingham Arms; I sat there with Mr. Peake. Mr. Dyer, and two or three more were there, and there was a countryman there, who came to see one Allen, about some business, and he had a little bottle of Hollands, and gave it to Peake, who tasted it, and I tasted it, and gave it to Dyer to taste, but he swallowed it - I said if I had known what he was going about I should have taken a little more myself.

Q. You are sure this was no Friday fortnight? A. As near as I can positively say. I do not swear that it was on that night. I am almost certain that it was on Friday.

Q. Who sent for you to come here? A. I called at

the Rockingham Arms a week ago, or more, and they were talking about the countryman's Hollands, and I said I gave Dyer some of it. I think the landlord's name is Magnus - I do not know whether he is here. I slept at a friend's, in Thomas-street, about half a mile from the Rockingham Arms, that night.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you come from Stockwell on any other night that week? A. No. I returned next morning, Saturday. I am almost positive it was Saturday.

JAMES PEAK . I am a master bricklayer, and live in Meadow-row, New Kent-road, and frequent the Rockingham Arms. I know Dyer - I heard of his being in custody six or seven days ago. I have been in his company nearly every evening for the last six months. I heard that what he was charged with happened on Friday evening, the 4th of February; and about seven o'clock, or half-past six that night, he came into the Rockingham Arms, and stopped in the parlour till half-past ten; I left him there; Smith was there, and sat by my side - he lives somewhere close by: Bakewell, and Dixon, a corn-chandler, of Camberwell, were there. A countryman came in with one Allen, who belongs to the Court of Request; he wrote a letter for the countryman to take to Waterloo-road; the countryman sat by me, and said he had a drop of good stuff, and produced one of Daffy's Elixer bottles; he asked me to taste it, which I did, and it was Hollands: I handed it to Smith, who tasted, and handed it to Dyer, who poured some into his hand, tried it, and said it was very good, and drank the rest.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You go there every night - what fixes your memory to Friday night? A. I reckon it was Friday night more than any other, because it was the 4th of February, and I have not seen Dyer since - he came there four nights out of the six, at least - I went as usual, but did not see him. Smith lives somewhere close by me, I understand; I live in Newington parish; I understood so from him. I employed him one day to do a job for me; he went out for his tools, and was gone a very short time. Several people were there on the Thursday, the night before: that young man was there (Bakewell,) I think, but am not positive. Smith was there on Thursday. What makes Friday so remarkable was the gin bottle. Allen left as soon as he wrote the letter.

THOMAS DIXON . I am a corn-chandler, and live at Walworth. I was in the prisoner's company last Friday fortnight, at the Rockingham Arms; Peak and Smith were there. I went in at three o'clock in the afternoon, and remained till the house was shut up. Dyer was there; I remember his passing me: I struck him as he passed, in a jocular way; but he sat down, and felt much hurt - that was between eight and nine o'clock; he remained there till the house was shut up: I did not go out with him, but I went straight to Mr. Purcel's, the Surry chop-house, and met Dyer there - I wondered to see him there, as he did not go with me; it was between twelve and half-past - he was very tipsy indeed. I staid there till between two and three o'clock, and left him there - I did not speak to him, as he felt rather offended at me. I saw him sitting in the corner when I went out. I did not see the countryman at the Rockingham Arms - I was out occasionally.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What was the longest time you were out? A. Never more than a quarter of an hour. He felt offended at me, and mentioned it to Bakewell, and to Smith as well. I saw the man from the Court of Request, but did not see him write a letter. I saw no gin bottle handed round. I am sure it was Friday night.

WILLIAM KEYS . I am constable of the Surry New-road watch-house. I go to the Surry chop-house every morning, about one o'clock, to turn the company out; it is opposite to the Surry Theatre. I went there on the morning of the 5th of February, about two o'clock, and saw the prisoner there - I turned him, and all the rest out of the house. Shergold was there. I came out of the house in about ten minutes, and saw the prisoner walking away towards the London-road, with two persons.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That road would be very handy to go over the iron bridge into the City? A. I think not.

COURT. Q. How are you able to say it was the 5th of February? A. Because I went out later than usual that morning - I altered the time that morning, which made my patrols come later to the watch-house; it was only on that morning that I altered the time. I heard of the prisoner being in custody on the Sunday or Monday following, I think, and recollected seeing him there; it was the Sunday or Monday after the Saturday morning, not the Sunday week. It was mentioned to me the very next day, or the day after, that Dyer was in trouble.

Q. Can you call to mind whether it was the day before you heard he was in custody; or that day week? A. It came to my recollection that I had turned him out of the chop-house the day before, for I said at the watch-house, "Why, it was only yesterday morning that we turned him out" - I said so at the time; and another circumstance which makes me more certain, is, there was a black horse at the door, and a man went away with a woman on that horse, and the turnpike-man on duty that night was Lloyd - that happened on the night I turned them out of the chop-house. I have no doubt of having turned him out of the chop-house, and the day before I heard of his being in trouble.

JAMES PURCELL . I keep the Surry chop-house, opposite the Circus. I heard on the 6th of February, of the prisoner being in custody; I know it was on the 6th, on Sunday. Keys comes into my house every night; Dyer was there several nights; I heard he was charged with having committed an offence on Friday, the 4th of February, and that night Keys was at my house, about two o'clock, and turned Dyer out, who was very much intoxicated. - Shergold, the officer, was there - he is not here. I went out with Dyer, to a street behind the Fishmongers' alms-houses, to see him home - I saw him into a house there, on the right hand side as you turn down.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time did Keys come to your house? A. It was past two o'clock - it was not three.

Q. The very next day but one after that, you heard of his being in trouble? A. Yes, on the next day, Sunday - I am certain of that.

Ten witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-136

NEW COURT. (4th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

520. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 6 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER. I live in Monmouth-street, St. Giles's , and keep a chandler's-shop . I went out about half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 14th of January - I left two pieces of bacon about three yards from the door. I returned about eight - they were then removed; the prisoner was in the shop, in custody of Nash.

Prisoner. I went to the parish that day in great distress; and I did commit the crime.

SARAH NASH . I was passing the shop, and saw the prisoner come out with the bacon - I stopped her, and took her back.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-137

521. RICHARD DRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a plumb cake, value 5 s., and a shew glass, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Parrott .

JOSEPH PARROTT. I am a pastry-cook , and live in Cannon-street, St. George's East . On the 19th of January I was in my back parlour, and saw a person standing at my window; he then turned round, and took a cake and shew glass - I ran after him to Chigwell-hill, and then lost sight of him. The patrol took him - he had dropped them in the New-road, while I was pursuing him. I had seen him some time before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is your parlour from the window? A. About the length of this Court. My shop is lighted with gas.

DAVID DALBY . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner on the evening of the 19th of January, at the bottom of Chigwell-hill - he was running, and calling Stop thief! he came out of Ratcliff-highway, in a direction from Cannon-street. Parrott came up in a minute, and said, "I will swear that is the man."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you run after him? A. No; he came to meet me; some person pointed him out to me.

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18250217-138

522. VINCENT DOLLAND and MICHAEL YOUNG were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 35 lbs. of lead, value 4 s. , the goods of the parishioners of the parish of St. Bride , in the ward of Farringdon Without .

RICHARD EVANS . I am master of St. Brides' workhouse . The prisoners were paupers there. On the forenoon of the 31st January, they were sent to take some goods in a truck; - they brought the truck back, but I never saw them again. On the Tuesday week afterwards, in consequence of some information, I searched the cellar, and missed a piece of lead, which one of the prisoners had lifted into the cellar about a week before; it weighed 35 lbs.; it was loose lead; it had been against a wall, and was marked.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a police officer. On Monday evening, the 31st of January, I saw the prisoners coming up Cow Cross; Dolland had a bag on his shoulder. I went up to them, and Brown, my companion, asked what he had got there. I do not know what answer he made, but Brown said he had got lead. I secured them. They denied knowing each other, but afterwards Young said, Dolland was a cobbler. I think Dolland said he was going home to his master.

JAMES BROWN . I was with Waddington in Cow Cross; we took the prisoners. They said they were going into Shoe Lane, and had brought the lead from their master, but they did not say who he was.

DOLLAND'S Defence. A lad came from the doctor of the parish with a letter to carry to Salisbury Square; as I was going along, I met Young, who said he was going to take the lead home.

YOUNG'S Defence. As I was coming out of the gate of the Workhouse, I met a man with the lead; - he asked me to carry it for him, and when we got to Cow Cross, I lost sight of him, and was going to take it back when I saw the officers.

DOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

YOUNG - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-139

523. HENRY CHARNICK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , two coats, value 20 s. , the goods of Sir William Young , Bart .

ROBERT MINISTER . I am in the service of Sir William Young, of Wimpole Street . I missed two coats of his from the servants' hall, about ten o'clock in the morning of the 17th of February. I had seen them safe about seven.

SOPHIA WARD . I am in the service of Lady Young. On the morning of the 17th of February, I was coming out of the housekeeper's room, and in passing the door of the servants' hall, I saw the prisoner come from behind the door, with two coats on his arm, which I knew to be the footman's; - he went to the ball door, and I followed him; he ran up the area steps, and was stopped at the corner of Devonshire Street. I did not lose sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, nor was I down the area; I was going along the street, and a man stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-140

524. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , two pair of trowsers, value 12 s., and a razor, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR. I am a shoemaker , and live in Nightingale Street . The prisoner slept in my house, and left it on the 15th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning; - I got up about eight, and missed two pair of trowsers from my box, and a razor; I had seen them safe on the evening before. I went and found him between nine and ten o'clock; I found one pair of trowsers on him,

and the razor. I asked how he came to take them; - he said, if he had known they had been mine, he would not.

CHARLES STEVENS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the trowsers and razor upon him. He said he would not have taken them, had he known they had been the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left the house with two other young men, and went to look after a ship; I went on board one. I met the two young men when I left the ship, and one of them asked me if I would have the trowsers to keep me clean, and as I was coming up the street I met the prosecutor; - I said, if I had known they had been his, I would not have taken them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-141

Before Mr. Recorder.

525. WALTER M'LAUGHLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Charles Cresswell , from his person .

CHARLES CRESSWELL. I live in Lawrence Poultney Lane, and am a broker . On the 3rd of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, my handkerchief was taken from my pocket between Waterloo Bridge and Beaufort Buildings . I was going towards Charing Cross; I had a lady with me, who is not here. An officer came and asked if I had lost any thing; I then found out my loss. I have never seen the handkerchief since; - it was silk; - I had given 7 s. for it the day before. I saw the prisoner next morning at Hatton-Garden Office.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Islington. On the 3rd of February, about half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Chancery Lane, with a person whom I knew. I watched them, and saw Mr. Cresswell and a lady pass the end of the Lane, in the direction of the Strand. The prisoner and his companion crossed over to a print-shop, near which Mr. Cresswell was passing, and they followed him. I had met Reardon just before, and asked him to go with me. I kept up with them on the opposite side of the way, and continued to watch them. I saw the prisoner's companion take a handkerchief from Mr. Cresswell's right hand pocket; the prisoner was close by at the time, and his companion gave it to him; I crossed the road, but they saw me coming. The prisoner seemed not to know what to do with it. I made a catch at him, but they both got away; I pursued the prisoner, who ran by the side of the coaches, and saw him stopped at the corner of Beaufort Buildings. I could not find the handkerchief. I am quite sure he was with the person who picked the pocket.

DANIEL REARDON . I live at No. 22, Grenville Street, Somers-town, and am a plasterer. I was coming down Chancery Lane, towards Fleet Street, when I saw Colton. I saw the prisoner in company with another person taller than himself. I watched them for perhaps twenty-five minutes; - I did not part from Colton from the time I began to watch the prisoner; - he remained in company with his companion all the time. I saw Mr. Cresswell on the opposite side of the way. I went to the coaches, and looked through the wheel; - I saw the prisoner, or his companion, who were both quite close to Mr. Cresswell, take a reddish coloured handkerchief from his coat pocket; before I could get across the road, Colton cried out, "Stop thief!" I saw the other running, and I ran after him towards the City; I believe the prisoner ran towards Charing Cross. I could not see what became of the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking a walk, and saw the man who was with me - he asked me where I was going. I said, merely walking about to get myself round, having been ill. I know nothing of the robbery - it might be so, that he picked the pocket, but I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-142

526. JAMES ANTHONY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . In 1823, I was clerk to James Edmonds and Thomas Nichols , ale and beer brewers , Gray's-Inn-lane . The prisoner was foreman of the drays ; his duty was to call on the customers, whose names were on the list; and, provided any of those missed taking beer, he then called on others, whose doors he passed, and sold the beer, which he did not want: it was his duty to take the money for the beer: and, supposing he sold beer to persons whose names were not on the list, he was to write their names at the bottom. I have the list which was handed to him on the 24th of December, 1823 : there are a variety of names on the upper part of it, which were there when it was delivered to him: here are seven names at the bottom, of his own hand-writing; among them is one of the name of Taylor, in his hand-writing - here is no credit given to him. When the prisoner returned in the evening, he added up the list, and afterwards it was checked by the clerk. He was to pay the money he received in the evening. He remained in their service till the 21st of January, 1824, when he absconded. Eight shillings and sixpence was due to him for wages, and, I think, five shillings would have been the utmost that was due to him for perquisites - he was a weekly servant. We saw nothing of him till he was taken into custody this month.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did it not often happen in the accounts, that there was sometimes too much money paid, and sometimes too little? A. It has been the case, but it was a very rare occurrence; I cannot say that it ever happened in his account; it has happened sometimes, that a drayman has given too little, and then he has had the list returned, and told, "You ought to have paid more money," which he has done.

Q. Was any question asked him about this money before he went away? A. No.

Q. Was the accounts and the money laid on the desk that evening? A. I have no doubt but it was, and balanced in the usual way. I think, about a week after the prisoner left us, we heard of the 30 s. being received from Mr. Taylor.

COURT. Q. Has he accounted on the list for all the beer delivered that day? A. Yes; the casks are always counted.

JOSEPH BLACK . I am a clerk to the prosecutors. This list is in the prisoner's hand-writing. I have a book, in which I made an entry of the money received on the 24th

of December, 1823. This entry was made from a small piece of paper, on which I made a memorandum at the time. We make the entry on the paper while the prisoner is by - the paper is destroyed immediately. I do not know whether the entry was compared with his list, or not.

Q. His list corresponds with the entry in the book? A. Yes, exactly.

THOMAS NICHOLS. The prisoner was in our service, and quitted it, without notice, on the 21st of January, 1824. I gave information to Duke, a Bow-street officer, respecting the robbery. He was not taken till the present month - it was shortly after he had left us, that we received information of what he had done.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon, after you had received the information, did you go to Bow-street? A. I think, it was within a month. I told the officer, that he had lived in the service of Mr. Martel, and he possibly might be there, as I understood, that Mr. Martel had advanced him money.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When the prisoner left, had you another drayman? A. Yes: it was from him I received the information.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I lived in the Poultry in 1823, and was a customer of Messrs. Edmonds and Nichols. I have a receipt which I wrote, and the prisoner put his name to it: (it is for 1 l. 10 s.) on the 24th of December, 1823, I paid him a sovereign and a half-sovereign.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any recollection about the money you paid? A. Yes; it was a sovereign and a half-sovereign. The receipt is for six casks - I only had one on that day.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer of Bow-street. I had a warrant against the prisoner, on the 7th of February, 1824. I took him on the 3d of February, 1825. I told him, I had a warrant against him, for embezzling some money of his late master's, and held out no threat or promise to him - he said, he thought he had paid back all the money he had received; that it was a very bad job, but, if he had known I had been coming after him, he would have gone further off: he was taken at Madden's brewery.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect receiving the money; but, if I did, it was left on the desk in a bag, in which I carried money.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-143

527. WILLIAM WINTERBURY was indicted for stealing on the 7th of January , two handkerchiefs, value 8 s., and a stiffner, value 7 s., the goods of John Trotter , his master .

GEORGE WILLIAM TIBBS . I live with Mr. Nicholls, a linen-draper, in Jermyn-street. I delivered a parcel from him to Mr. Trotter, No. 13, Connaught-place , on the 25th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night; it had two black silk half cravats and one stiffner in it; but I cannot say to whom I gave it. I saw them at Marlborough-street about three weeks afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You sell a variety of articles of this description, and these had no particular mark on them? A. No; they have our shop mark on them.

WILLIAM LEEDS . I am butler to Mr. John Trotter, of Connaught-place. The prisoner was in his service as footman . I saw the parcel in my master's house, but did not see the contents till after it was found in the prisoner's box. It was delivered on the 25th of January, and, I think, on the 27th or 28th, an enquiry was made about it in the hearing of the prisoner. I heard him deny all knowledge of it several times. I think it was on the 9th of February that the things were found in his portmanteau - it was not locked - there were two black half handkerchiefs and one stiffner. The valet and I searched the box; we told Mr. Trotter of it, and he sent for an officer. The prisoner was out, but returned, and went into his own room before the officer came. Mr. Trotter called him down, and said there were some things missing, and he should search all the servants' boxes, and begin with his, as he was just come to the house. He and Mr. Trotter and I then went to his room: the box was searched, but the things were not there then. The officer came soon after, and Mr. Trotter desired him to search the prisoner, which he did, but nothing was found on him. The articles were found under the mattress of the prisoner's bed, in his own room, to which no one went, except the female servant to make the bed. I said, these are the two handkerchiefs; they came from Mr. Nicholl's: the prisoner said, "Yes; I acknowledge, Sir, they are your property - you may hang me if you like." He had been in the service about seven weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you said, you would hang him, if you could? A. I said, if it was my own brother I would hang him, if he were a thief.

Q. Did you say, on Saturday, you would hang the prisoner, if you could? A. No; I did not. I know Holt: I did not say so to him.

Q. Did you not say, that Counsel had better not cross-examine you, for you would hang him, if you could? A. I told him, that counsel had better not push me, for, if they did, I should state other things. Mr. Trotter is not here, nor the valet. The parcel was delivered on the Tuesday evening, and enquired for about the Thursday or Friday - the box was not locked; they were put in again in the same manner.

Q. This was on the 9th of February - are you quite sure you did not put them into the bed? A. Yes. He said he had seen that some one had been at his box, and he removed them to the bed.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a constable, and was sent for. I found the articles under the mattress, while the prisoner was standing by; he said, "I did take them, you may hang me if you like;" he repeated it again, and said, "I acknowledge I did take them." I told him they had been seen in his box, and asked him why he had removed them; he said he found his box had been interrupted, and he was afraid some one had been looking into it, and he removed them under the bed.

Cross-examined. Q. What had been said to him in the interval, you do not know? A. He said they had been laying behind the table in the hall, and he had taken them up stairs for his own use, and after enquiries had been made about them he did not like to produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The butler said he would do me

all the injury he could when I first came, and he threw my things into the fire.

WILLIAM LEEDS. I had some words with him, in consequence of some very indecent conduct on his part.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-144

527. WILLIAM PHEBY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a desk, value 40 s., and two sovereigns , the property of Thomas Fisher .

THOMAS FISHER. I live in Holling's-street , and am a medical student - I lodge in the 3 d floor front room. On the 10th of January I called a coach, of which the prisoner was the driver ; I put my desk with two sovereigns in it into the coach - I was going to Holling's-street from Castle-street, where I had been lodging before; the prisoner took me to Holling's-street - I took a trunk out, but left the desk in the coach; I paid him 1 s. 6 d. for his fare. I had forgotten I had left the desk in the coach. There were no persons about the coach door that I saw. I did not recollect that I had left it in the coach till the following morning; I then went down to the coach office in Essex-street, and stated my loss. I am quite sure the prisoner was the driver. I saw the desk again at a house in Westminster, on the 19th of January - the prisoner was not then in custody. I am certain of the property; the sovereigns were gone - the lock had been picked. I had advertised it on the 15th, and offered three guineas reward, as the papers in it were of great consequence; they were still in it, but the money was gone. The prisoner came to me, and said he believed he was the man who had driven me from Castle-street, to Holling's-street, and said by paying the three guineas reward, and 6 s. to the person at whose house it was, I might have it again; he represented the place where it was as his lodging; I went and examined the desk, and finding the two sovereigns were gone I did not give him the reward. The person of the house detained him while I got a Police officer. When I applied at Essex-street they knew nothing about it, but told me to call again in about four days - I went again on the 15th, and they said they had not seen it, and advised me to advertise. I did not know the number of the coach.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not state that the box was detained by the man who keeps the Punch Bowl, public-house, in the Strand? A. Yes, he did.

MARY UDALL . I am the landlady of the Punch Bowl. I recollect having the desk in my possession; it was not brought by the prisoner, but by a man who is called Yorkshire Jemmy; I think it came on a Tuesday, the 11th of January, and remained there till the Monday following; the person who brought it took it away again, but I do not know where. The prisoner came for it on the Saturday after it was left - I told him I would not give it to any body but the person who left it. The prisoner was a stranger to me; I am certain it is the same desk.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a carpenter, and live at No. 11, Lower Crown-street, Westminster. The prisoner lodged in my house till the 17th of January. On Tuesday, the 18th, Jemmy brought the desk to my house, in the evening; I took it into my front parlour, and put it into a cupboard. On Wednesday, the 19th, the prisoner came to my house in the evening; he said there was an advertisement respecting the desk, and he wanted to take it away; I asked him where he wanted to take it to; he said to Holling's-street, Wardour-street, and if one of my boys went with him, he would satisfy them for what he owed me - he owed then 5 s. for rent, and 1 s. for a latch key. I said I would go with him to see that it was all right, before I delivered it - I went with him, and saw Mr. Fisher; I told him I had the desk in my possession, and desired him to come to my house with the prisoner. I brought the desk to the door of my room, and said, "Is this it;" he said, "I dare say it is all right, and if you will go with me, I will settle with you;" I then stated that there was 6 s. due to me. The prisoner said to the prosecutor, "Pay him the 6 s., and I will settle with you presently;" he did so, and they went away.

CHARLES COX . I am in the service of Mr. Udall. I remember Yorkshire Jemmy coming about ten o'clock on the morning the desk was left, which was Tuesday, the 11th - while I was sweeping the parlour he asked me for the desk; I brought it out: he had a locksmith with him, and opened it. I saw him rout it about, and saw there were two sovereigns in it; he shut it up again, but did not take them out - I took it up stairs again.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of January, between nine and ten o'clock at night, at Mr. Fisher's lodgings. I asked him how he came not to take the desk to the coach-office, which he knew was a general thing - he said it was very wrong, but he took it down to the Punch Bowl, near Temple-bar, and gave it to another coachman, named Yorkshire Jemmy. I have apprehended Jemmy since then - he was discharged on his own recognizance, but he has not been heard of since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the box the day after I had found it, to go to the office; but just as I came by the Punch Bowl I was called off to a fare; I gave it to Jemmy, which I thought was the safest way. I called at the Punch Bowl for it, but they would not give it to me. I have not seen Jemmy since. I heard no more of it till I saw the bill up in a public-house - I said, "That must be the desk I left at the Punch Bowl." I then went and told the gentleman of it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-145

528. JOHN WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a shift, value 18 d.; two shifts, value 6 d.; four pillow-cases, value 1 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; five pincloths, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 6 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; a towel, value 3 d.; an apron, value 3 d.; a frock, value 9 d.; a bed-gown, value 3 s.; and a bag, value 3 d. ; the goods of Nathan Lomas .

NATHAN LOMAS. I live in Johnson-street, Sun Tavernfields , and am a dustman . I lost the articles in question from my house, on Saturday the 29th of January.

ANN LOMAS . I am the wife of the last witness. These articles were in two drawers, in the parlour, which were not locked. I saw them safe about six or seven o'clock in the evening; I then went out. We have no lodgers, except a young man, who went out with us. The prisoner

is quite a stranger. I came home about a quarter past nine, and the articles were gone. I had been with my husband to a public-house, where we have to pay the men their money. I left my house locked, and no person in it. I and the young man were the persons who first returned; we found the doors all open. I did not notice that the things were gone for some time. I went back immediately to my husband, to inform him of it. We then examined the premises, and missed the articles from the drawers; I saw them on Sunday evening, at the watch-house; the prisoner was then in custody.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman of Shadwell: my beat is about sixty yards from Lomas's house. On Saturday night, about ten minutes after nine o'clock, I stopped the prisoner as I was going on duty; he was coming from Lomas's house, with this bundle under his arm. I asked what he had got there; he said, clean things, which he had brought from his father's. I took him to the watch-house, and then asked him what the bundle contained; he could not tell me. I found it was women's and children's clothes. I asked again where he got it, and he said, he picked it up at the wooden bridge, which is near Lomas's. I searched him, and found this key upon him. I saw Lomas on the evening following. he claimed the things. The key was tried to his door, but it was too large.

Cross-examined by MR. ROBERTS. Q. Did not he tell you, it was a bundle he found? A. No; he did not.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I told him, I was going to my father's.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-146

529. JOHN HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two sovereigns and a shilling , the monies of William Cherry .

JAMES OVENELL . I live at Enfield-highway, and am a carter - William Cherry is a corn-chandler . On the 25th of January, he bought a load of straw at Smithfield - the prisoner was there with my cart - he is my servant . I received information, and had him taken up on the Monday morning - he had absconded on Thursday morning. He had returned home with the cart on the Tuesday, but I did not know he had had the money for the straw till Thursday.

THOMAS CHERRY . My father bought this straw in Smithfield, and sent it home by this man - I paid him 2 l. 1 s. 10 1/2 d. for it.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner in an out-building, at Enfield-highway. He said, "What! am I in it again?" I said, "Yes, you are." He said, "I suppose it is about that straw of Ovenell's."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-147

530. SARAH BADGER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , forty yards of ribbon, value 30 s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM CHARD . I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross. On the 1st of February the prisoner came to the door of the shop, and asked me to cut off some print; she bought that and several articles, amounting to about 5 s., which she paid for - she then asked me to show her some ribbons - I showed her some different drawers of ribbon, and she bought two or three yards of narrow. In one of the last drawers of ribbon which I showed her, she asked me the price of one particular ribbon several times; and, as I was putting that drawer back, I missed that ribbon - she had then left the shop - I pursued and brought her back. Mr. Sewell met her by the shop, and she gave him two pieces of black ribbon, and hoped to God he would forgive her; I immediately said, she had got some more; she put her hand under her cloak, and brought out the piece I alluded to, and that was all she had got. There were other persons serving in the shop. The ribbons which she stole had been in three separate drawers. I saw her searched - she had 11 s. about her, a few halfpence, and twenty duplicates.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am a constable. I found 11 s. 4 1/2 d. on her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 23. Of stealing, but not privately . Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-148

531. THOMAS PERKINS , JOHN JEFFERSON , and WILLIAM COWLING , were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , four live pigs, value 4 l. , the property of George Hart .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

HENRY WILLIS . I live with Mr. George Hart - he is a miller , at Stratford . It was part of my duty to look after his pigs - they were kept in the stye, close by the house. On Saturday, the 12th of February, I saw them safe about seven o'clock in the evening, fed them, and fastened the stye. I had had the care of them for ten days, and knew them well - I missed them about ten on Sunday morning, and traced the steps of two of them for about thirty rods, but no further; there is a ditch there, over which there is a plank; if they had crossed the ditch and the marsh, they might have got into Old-Ford road. I saw four pigs in the custody of Carter, on Wednesday, the 16th, and knew them to be Mr. Hart's pigs - they had been scalded. There was a very particular mark about the ear of one of the biggest.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. They had lost the greater part of their hair; my master bought them of Mr. Downer, of Romford. There are more store pigs in that neighbourhood; but I can swear to them - they had black marks, which I had seen while they lived.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were two of them larger than the others? A. Yes; and it was them I chiefly knew.

DANIEL REDFORD . I am a butcher, and live in High-street, Shadwell. Perkins came to my house last Monday, and asked if I wanted to buy any pigs; I said I should have no objection, but I did not care much about it, it being the beginning of the week - he said he had got four pigs. I asked where they were; he said they were at the Quaker's house, which escaped the fire at Ratcliff, in Butcher-row; I said I would go and see them. I went up in the evening and looked at them; I saw four hanging

up - I saw Perkins only; he asked me a crown a stone for them, without their heads and feet; I asked him what he would have for them with their heads and feet on; he said 4 s. 9 d.; I bid him 4 s. 6 d. for the two smaller ones - I asked him who they belonged to; he said to Mr. Jefferson, who was not there - I said if Mr. Jefferson would take that for them, I would have them. Perkins and Jefferson brought them down to my house that night - I paid him for them, and went to Mr. Seamon's to have them weighed - I hung them up in front of my shop that night, and put a clean cloth before them. Carter came next morning and took them away.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Jefferson? A. Yes; he has a good character, as far as I know; he was in my employ three quarters of a year ago; I believe he dealt in pigs and other things. Perkins said he supposed they were fed on pease, for there were pease in their inside.

JOSEPH SEAMONS . I am a butcher, and live in High-street, Shadwell, near Mr. Redford's. On Monday last, Jefferson and another man came to my house with Mr. Redford, to weigh two pigs; after they were weighed, the two men said they had got two more; I asked what they wanted for them; they said 4 s. 9 d. a stone; I said I would go and look at them. I went to a house, which they said was the Quaker's house, which was not burnt down at the time of the great fire. I saw the pigs in a stable; I saw all the three prisoners there - I asked them again what they would take for them; they said 4 s. 9 d.; I told them the most I would give was 4 s. 6 d. It was Jefferson who spoke to me, and I believe it was him who agreed to take it; he brought one to my house, and one of the other prisoners (I do not know which) brought the other; they weighed 12 st. 3 lb. - I told them to go to Mr. Ottey's, the public-house, and I would come and pay them - an officer came as soon as they were gone; I went with him to the public-house, and the prisoners were taken into custody. The pigs were fairish meat; what I gave was a very fair price - I did not ask how they got them.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer. I took the three prisoners into custody at Mr. Ottey's, the Coach and Horses public-house, High-street, Shadwell. Cowling had then a white smock-frock on; Jefferson had a long dark frock; Perkins had a white flannel jacket, velveteen breeches, and worsted stockings. I told Jefferson I took him on suspicion of stealing four pigs - he said he had bought them at Whalebone-gate, near Romford. I went and got two pigs from Mr. Redford's, and two from Mr. Seamon's shop. Willis saw them on Tuesday or Wednesday, and knew them at once, and swore they were his master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Perkins said he was hired by Jefferson to carry the pigs? A. Yes; Cowling said the same.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. Carter sent for me; I searched the prisoners, and took away the money, 2 l. 14 s., which Jefferson said he had received from Redford.

STEPHEN JOHNSON . I was at Stratford, on the 12th of February, about one o'clock. I am a labourer on Westham marshes; I saw three men walking jovially together smoking their pipes, between the Wide-way, Stratford, and Bow-bridge; one of them had an oil-skin hat, a long brown smock-frock, and blue trowsers; another, a short white smock-frock, and brown trowsers; the other, a flannel jacket and velveteen breeches. I did not observe their faces.

JEFFERSON'S Defence. I was at a pot-house till six o'clock at night, and then I went home.

PERKINS's Defence. I was desired by this man to carry the pig to the butcher's.

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JEFFERSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

COWLING - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-149

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

532. PHILIP TRAINOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , ten shillings, seven sixpences, and five penny-pieces, the monies of Susan Arnold , from her person .

SUSAN ARNOLD. I am a widow , and live in East-street, Mary-le-bone: I am a servant . On the 11th of February, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Back Lane , and met the prisoner, and asked him the nearest way to Mary-le-bone, where I lived; it is four or five miles from there; - he said he would show me, and took me across an open piece of ground. I refused to go, knowing that was not the right way. He then struck me, and knocked me down, and said, if I made any noise it should be the worse for me. I got up in a few minutes, as soon as I could: I complained of being cold, and he said there was a shed close by, to which he would take me. I walked there with him; - he had hold of my arm: - that was not in my way home; - there was no door to it. I went in with him; he pressed me to sit down, and he sat down by my side upon the ground for a very few minutes. I perceived his hand in my pocket, and asked him what he was doing; he said nothing: he then left me, and said he would return in a few minutes. He never attempted to be rude with me, or any thing of the kind; - he said I could sit and rest myself. As soon as he was gone I missed my money. I never stated upon my oath that he wanted to be rude with me: he never asked me to lay down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-150

533. ELIZABETH FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a sovereign and two half-crowns, the monies of Benjamin Lane , from his person .

BENJAMIN LANE. I work in the New Road, Holloway, for a Mr. Mortlock. On Wednesday evening last, about six o'clock, I was going along Sun Yard , towards the Stars public-house, to get a pint of beer, and saw the prisoner, who invited me up-stairs with her; I staid there about a quarter of an hour; she then asked me if I was going to the Stars; I said yes: she directed me to go to the Crown public-house; I went there, and staid about a quarter of an hour. She had appointed to come there to me; but as she did not come, I then searched my pocket, and found that a sovereign and two half-crowns were gone. I then went to the watch-house, and got an officer; and on her he found a paper, which had a sovereign and 1 s. 6 d. in it; she said, that was all she had got, for she had changed the two half-crowns to buy some things with - the officer said, that would not do; he must have more - and, as we

went to the watch-house, she said, she would make up the money. I do not recollect that I had told her what I had lost; but I told the people at the watch-house. I had not drank any thing before that, but the pint of beer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you think it was wrong to go with this girl? A. Yes; I own it was. I had 1 l. 10 s. when I went to her lodging. I drank nothing that day. I found her in the house where I had left her: it is adjoining the public-house. I told her where I was going - I had dined in Dean-street, which is five or six miles from where I work. I had 5 s. left in my purse when I went to her room. I had 31 s.; and gave her a shilling.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's room, and told her he accused her of robbing him - she said she had no money but the shilling he gave her, and two shillings in the drawer. I went to search her, and when I put my hand under her arm she drew back; I said I must do my duty - she then put her hand in herself, and took out this paper, containing a sovereign, and 1 s. 6 d.; she said if he would drop the charge she would give him the money to make up the two half-crowns; that she had been to market, and bought a bit of beef.

JURY. Q. Did the girl say in your hearing whether she had taken the money? A. She said she had changed the two half-crowns.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-151

534. ANN RUSSEL and CATHERINE FLEMING were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a watch, value 40 s.; a key, value 5 s., and a seal, value 1 s., the goods of Andrew Reid , from his person .

ANDREW REID. I am a hatter , and live in Orange-street, Leicester-square. On the 16th of February I had been with some friends, and was not altogether sober. I met the prisoners a little after twelve o'clock, near Covent-garden - I cannot exactly swear whether I spoke to them first, or they to me; they asked me for something to drink, and said there was a house open in Bedfordbury - we knocked at the door, and while we were waiting there they ran off - I felt for my watch, and missed it; I sang out, and the watchman stopped Russel. I swear these are the girls who were at the door with me.

THOMAS HENLEY . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and saw the prosecutor about half-past twelve o'clock, and the two girls, knocking at the door, wanting to get some drink; they could not get in - they walked down my beat as I was sitting in my box, and in about two minutes I heard watch called - I went out, and saw Russel running down a court - I caught hold of her; the prosecutor came up, and said, "They have robbed me of my watch - I give that girl in charge." I had seen them both together with him at the door, but I only saw Russel running. I cannot swear to Fleming.

CHARLES CONGDON . I was the night constable. Russel was brought to the watch-house - a third young woman came in, and asked if the charge was taken of Russel - I asked her who sent her; she said a young woman outside; I sent a watchman to fetch that young woman in, Fleming; she took off her shawl, and wrapped it round her left-hand; I said I must search her; she, with her right-hand, began to open her gown; I said I would search outside first. I then took hold of her left-hand, and found the watch in it. Russel was in the watch-house all the time, but not near her. The prosecutor was very much intoxicated, but he knew the girls when he saw them.

ANDREW REID re-examined. Q. How long before you met these girls had you seen your watch in your fob? A. Just a minute before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FLEMING's Defence. We met him in New-street - we went to a shop, and could not get in; he then said he would not have any supper - he would go to have something to drink; that he had no money but half-a-crown about him, but would leave his watch till the morning, in pawn with me, if I could tell him where to go. He was so drunk we did not know how to get him along.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-152

535. CHRISTOPHER LEADER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a carpenter's plough, value 1 l., and six planes, value 1 l. , the goods of John Christmas .

JOHN VANN . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I met the prisoner between six and seven o'clock on the evening of the 2d of February, in Whitechapel, with a basket of tools on his shoulder - I asked what he had got; he said, some tools, and was going to get money on them - it was near a pawnbroker's shop. I took the basket, and it contained carpenters' tools. I asked whose property it was - he said his own.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am an officer. I was in company with Vann - we met the prisoner with this basket; he said the tools belonged to himself, and he had worked with them two years.

JOHN CHRISTMAS. I am a carpenter . I lost my tools on the 1st or 2d of February, from an unfinished house in Durham-street, Hackney-road ; I had left the door nailed up about a quarter past nine o'clock on the evening of the 1st of February - they were gone next morning. The prisoner was a watchman on the premises.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the tools - when I left the premises in the morning I left all safe; I did not go home till the afternoon, and met a man, who asked me if I would earn 1 s. and pawn a basket of tools.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-153

536. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a watch, value 3 l.; a seal, value 15 s., and two keys, value 1 s., the goods of Alexander Davison , from his person .

ALEXANDER DAVISON. I am a groom , in the service of Levison Gower , Esq. I was in Piccadilly on the 7th of February, about half-past 11 o'clock at night, the prisoner accosted me in the street - I desired her to go about her business several times, but she followed me down Burton-street. I told her I should be under the necessity of charging the watchman with her if she did not go away; she got me to Burton-row , and fairly rammed her hands into my small clothes, and took my watch out of my fob; I raised an alarm of Stop thief! and pursued her. A woman was taken first, but it was not her. I went into Piccadilly,

and saw some watchman, to whom I told the circumstance. The prisoner had been with me about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; there were gas lamps alight. I saw her again in St. James's watch-house, on Friday, the 10th of February; I received information that she was there, from Mr. Smith - I went with him, and he asked me if I knew the woman - she came up with six or seven more; I said "Yes, that is the woman;" I still say I am sure she is the woman. I was quite sober. I have lived with Levison Gower five months; before that I lived with Major Ellison.

JAMES SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. The prosecutor complained of his losing his watch, on Friday, the 4th of February; he described the woman, and I took her up on Thursday, the 10th, about half-past nine o'clock at night. I put her with four or five other women - when he came I let the prisoner come up with several others; he pointed her out directly, and said, "That is the woman."

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him till I was at the watch-house.

ALEXANDER DAVISON re-examined. Q. Do you swear that she is the woman - she has a thick manner of speaking - a sort of half Irish accent. Can you swear to her voice at all? A. I can, my Lord. I felt her pull the watch from my fob.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250217-154

537. SARAH JARVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , two silver table spoons, value 28 s., and four silver forks, value 3 l. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT. I am a watchmaker and jeweller , and live in Tottenham Court-road - the prisoner was a servant in Thornaugh-street, at the house of a Mr. Manders's, who lets lodgings. She came on the 8th of January, and requested the loan of four spoons and four forks, for the use of the lodgers in the house; I consented to lend them, having known her previously, and delivered them to her. I applied for them repeatedly, and have only got one pair of spoons back; I lent them to serve the prisoner, as the mistress did not reside in the house at the time. I have not been able to get the others back.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 69, Charlotte-street. I had a pair of spoons, pawned on the 17th of January, by a person, not the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-155

538. SARAH JARVIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a suit of pearl ornaments, value 7 l. , the goods of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT. The prisoner came to me on the 10th of January, to request the loan of a set of pearl ornaments for a lady named Stevens. I knew Mrs. Stevens, who lived in the house which the prisoner had the care of. I lent them to the prisoner; she came as her servant; I lent them to Mrs. Stevens; I left orders at home, as I was obliged to be absent, for my young man to call for them: I have since found them in pawn.

EMMA STEVENS . I am single; the prisoner lived in the house where I live; I took my lodgings of her. I sent her on the 10th of January, at her own proposal, to hire a set of ornaments, as I was going to the theatre, to which I belong. She said, "I think you would look better with some ornaments." I said, "Very well, Sarah, go and get them." I put them on my table at night when I went to bed; in the morning, when I awoke, I missed them, and said to her, "Sarah, where are the pearl ornaments?" she said, Mr. Hunt had sent for them.

JOSIAH PEARSE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. I have some pearl ornaments, which were pawned for 4 l. 10 s. at my house, on the 11th of January, by the prisoner, in the name of Stevens. I am certain of her person; she said she brought them from Miss Stevens.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him to let me have some time to get them; but he would not take them back without the hire; it was 5 s. a day.

THOMAS HUNT re-examined. I lent them to Mrs. Stevens, and was to have 5 s. for the use of them for a day and a night. The prisoner said Miss Stevens wished to sit for her miniature, and they were to be worn on that occasion.

E. STEVENS re-examined. Q. Had you them for any other occasion? A. No, only for the theatre that night. I have known her about three months, since I have lived in the apartments.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-156

539. STEPHEN MIDWINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , five combs, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Brewitt .

THOMAS BREWITT. I live in Ratcliffe Highway , and am a comb-maker . The prisoner came to my shop on the 14th of January, about ten minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, to purchase a cup and ball; he went out and came in again in about five minutes with the cup and ball; another lad had come in just before; the prisoner put his hand round that boy, and took a parcel of combs. I cried Stop thief! he was pursued and brought back in a few minutes; the combs were brought with him.

TOBIAS MARTIN . I was in Mr. Brewitt's house, where I live; I heard him call out Stop thief! I ran out, and saw the prisoner running near Artichoke-hill; I took hold of him; he took off his hat, and dropped the combs; I took up one comb, and got a gentleman who came up to take him back.

JAMES FRASER . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran out. I enquired who was the thief, and a person pointed out the prisoner; he then ran down Artichoke-hill; I pursued, and saw him taken.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner - the cup and ball were found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking from Wellclose-square, when Frazer came with a number of people, crying Stop thief! I ran with the people.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-157

540. JOHN DONELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , seventeen iron bars, value 20 s. , the goods of John Wilson .

WILLIAM CUTBUSH . I am a surveyor, and live in Wilmington-street, Clerkenwell. On the 3d of February, I

saw the prisoner in a piece of ground, enclosed for an intended square. I saw him take a piece of iron railing from a wall, in the enclosure, and carry it about twenty yards; I was about twenty or thirty yards from him. He was not taken for some days.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he appear to be working there? A. Yes; he was working.

URIAH WILSON . I am the brother of John Wilson. This piece of land is his: there are some iron railings there. He uses the ground for the purpose of putting building materials there - the prisoner was at work in the yard for Mr. Cautelon, a plasterer: he had no business near the iron. I went to the yard about twelve o'clock that day - the railing had been there a few days before, but I do not know who took it; I have never seen any part of it since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-158

541. CHARLES LENISS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a pair of trowsers, value 7 s.; two pair of shoes, value 16 s.; and a cap, value 1 s .; the goods of James Kirk .

JAMES KIRK. I am a seaman . I was on board the Eclipse, which laid in the City Canal on the 1st of February. The prisoner was a shipmate of mine. I had this property in my bed-cabin when I went on board. On the morning of the 2d of February, about seven o'clock, I missed them. We took it by turns to be on board one night, and on shore the next. I had left them all safe on the night before: I saw the prisoner on board, and said, "Somebody has robbed me last night," and asked him how many persons had been on board; he said, four. I asked, if any of them had seen my things; he said, no. The mate called them all up at breakfast, and asked, if any of them had seen my things; but, at last, he confessed that he had taken them. We all went to Mr. Davis's, and there found them.

JOHN DAVIS . I keep the Black Horse public-house, Upper East-Smithfield. These things were brought to my house about six o'clock in the morning of the 2d of February, by the prisoner, and another person. They had some rum, and smoked a pipe - they asked, what time the London Dock opened; I told them - and they asked, if I would take care of the bundle till they called; I said, I would. About ten o'clock, the prosecutor and prisoner came, and said, they were stolen.

BOYD SYLVESTER . I am an officer of the Thames Police, the prisoner and the clothes were brought to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had worked on board the ship eight days; after the ship was loaded, we leaked two feet five inches of water, in five hours. I was in danger of my life, and I took my clothes on shore - I happened to take these things in mistake, being a little in liquor. Next morning this shipmate came on board, and enquired about his things; I told him what I had done, and said, if I had taken them, it was through mistake - he said, if I would return them, he would say no more about them. The mate had me put into confinement - I am a Swede, by birth.

KIRK re-examined. Q. Had the vessel sprung a leak at all? A. Yes; it used to leak about two feet of water in twenty-four hours. He denied taking them till all hands were called aft, and then he owned it.

GUILTY. Aged 26. Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-159

FIFTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

542. MARY MILDRAM was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Gray , on the 31st of January , and stealing therein a counterpane, value 3 s.; a sheet, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; two shawls, value 4 s.; three aprons, value 3 s.; a shift, value 3 s.; a tester cloth, value 1 s.; a jacket, value 10 s.; a shirt, value 3 s.; and three yards of cotton, value 3 s.; his goods .

ELIZABETH GRAY . I am the wife of William Gray; we live in White's-yard, Whitechapel , on the ground-floor. On the 31st of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I locked the front parlour door, and went out, taking the key with me, and left a light in the room. I returned a few minutes after seven o'clock, and found the parlour door ajar, but there were no marks of violence on it; I am sure I locked it. I missed this property from different parts of the room. I value them at less than 40 s. I went to Morrit's, and they produced the sheet to me. Three families live in the house. The prisoner is a stranger.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawn-broker, and live in East-Smithfield. On the evening of the 31st of January the prisoner pawned a sheet for 3 s. in her own name. I knew her before; she was in the habit of going on errands for people, and lived in Hearn's-court. She said she brought it from S. Lockwood, who, I believe, is her mistress. I heard of the robbery, sent for her, and gave her in charge.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am an headborough. On the 31st of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night, Hall sent for me, and gave the prisoner in charge for having stolen a sheet. She said a young man gave it to her to pawn for him. I asked where she lived; she said in Hearn's-buildings, and took me to the house, where she said she lived with Lockwood, who was sitting on the bed. I found by the bed side a pair of trowsers, a teaster cloth, a petticoat, a cap, a pair of gloves, and an apron. I found the counterpane at a shop in Rosemary-lane. She said she was Lockwood's servant.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. but not of the burglary. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-160

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

543. JOHN DEBENHAM was indicted for stealing on the 1st of February , at St. George's Bloomsbury , two coats, value 4 l.; two watches, value 2 l.; two handkerchiefs, value 7 s.; a ring, value 6 s.; a pin, value 3 s.; and a brush, value 3 d,; the goods of William Henry Titswell , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Ladds : and JOSEPH OWEN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, and at the same parish, the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

WILLIAM TITSWELL. I lodge at Elizabeth Ladd's, No. 8, Gilbert-street, Bloomsbury : she keeps the house; I sleep in the two pair of stairs room; the prisoner sleeps in the same room. On Tuesday evening, the 1st of February, in consequence of a message from Mrs. Ladd's, I came home to my lodging, and found my boxes broken open, and missed two coats, two watches, two handkerchiefs, a ring, a pin, and a brush. I had seen them safe at eight o'clock that morning, when I went to work. I left nobody in the room. Debenham had gone out. I have seen the coat and hat-brush since.

ELIZABETH LADDS. I am a widow, and live at No. 8, Gilbert-street, in the parish of St. George's, Bloomsbury. I rent the house. Debenham and the prosecutor lodge in one of my rooms. On the 1st of February, Titswell went out about nine o'clock in the morning; Debenham had gone out between seven and eight o'clock. He came in about six o'clock in the evening, and asked for a light to go up stairs to his room. I gave him one; he was up stairs about a quarter of an hour. I went up to ask him to carry a trunk to Oxford-street for me; he said he would in half an hour. I went into the room; he was doing nothing then; I spoke before I entered the room; he said he was going out, and would return in half an hour. He came down stairs in five minutes, and gave me the light at the door; he had nothing in his hands, and appeared to have nothing with him; only he had changed his clothes. The instant he had shut the door, I went up; lifted up the lid of the prosecutor's box, and found part of his property gone, for I had heard him say his box would hardly hold his clothes, and I found very little in it. I ran down immediately, and went down the street with my son, but did not see him. I sent my son another way, and afterwards sent for Titswell. Owen was taken directly. Debenham did not return.

GEORGE LADDS . My mother sent me to look after Debenham; I saw him and another man turn down a yard by St. Giles's church, they stopped about half way down; I immediately ran into High-street for a patrol just beyond the church, and gave them in charge. He found them where I had left them. Owen was the other man; he had a hat-brush stuck in his bosom, and a blue coat over his arm.

WILLIAM M'GREGOR . I am a patrol. On the 1st of February, about a quarter to seven o'clock I was in St. Giles's; Ladds ran up to me; I went and found the prisoners in conversation up Hampshire-hog-yard. I went up; Debenham saw me, and made off. Owen stood with his back to me; I collared him immediately, and asked what he had got; he said his own property; I asked what it consisted of; he said a pair of boots, a jacket, waistcoat, and a few other things. I said he must go with me, and let me see if it was so; he objected; I said if it was so, he had nothing to fear. I took him to the watch-house. He had a coat on his arm, and I found a hat-brush in his breast pocket. As I took him to Marlborough-street, he said he had been to Kennington that day, and coming up High-street, he fell in with the other prisoner, who asked him to be so good as to carry this bundle to the Red Lion public-house, Tottenham-court-road, and he would give him a pot of porter. I asked him what induced him to go up that dreadful place; he said, in consequence of Debenham having dropped a coat in the dirt, and he went up there cleaning it. I did not notice whether Debenham had any thing when he ran away.

WILLIAM TITSWELL . I am the prosecutor's father. I heard of my son being robbed, and went in pursuit of the thieves that night, but could get no intelligence. I had information, and apprehended Debenham next morning (Wednesday) about nine o'clock on foot, going through Kensington. I took him into a public-house, and told him I took him for robbing my son. He said he hoped I would shew him lenity. I said I had nothing to do with that, it depended on my son, but he had better tell where the property was. My son was behind, and gone for an officer. The constable found a pin and a silk handkerchief on him. We found a watch at Townsend's in Little Russell-street; a coat at Harrison's, Drury-lane; a watch, silk handkerchief, and ring, at Reeve's. My son is twenty-two years old.

GEORGE HULL . I am a constable. I searched Debenham at Kensington, and found a silk handkerchief in his hat, and a gold pin in a shaving box in his coat pocket; he had 31 s. in silver about him.

ANN BUCK . I live in Gilbert-street, and know Mrs. Ladd's house, and know Owen by sight. On Tuesday, the 1st of February, about a quarter past six o'clock, I came to the door, and on the opposite side of the way, where there are some coach-houses and stables, I saw Owen; he turned round to see if I was gone; this made me look after him. I saw him go opposite to Mrs. Ladd's house, and look up. I went in, shut the door, and soon after heard Mrs. Ladd's had been robbed. I never saw him before; but I recognised him at Marlborough-street, and am sure he is the man. He was dressed as he is now.

WILLIAM HENRY BARWICK . I am apprentice to Mr. Reeves, pawn-broker, Snow-hill. On the 1st of February, a silver watch, gold ring, and silk handkerchief, were pawned; the watch for 15 s. and ring and handkerchief for 2 s. each, in the name of Robert White, by a man. I don't know whether it was in the morning or evening, but rather think in the evening. I don't know Debenham. I took the watch in myself, but have no recollection of the person. The property is worth about 30 s.

JOHN GRINDLEY . I am shopman to Townsend and Page, pawn-brokers, Little Russell-street, Covent Garden. I have a silver watch, pawned on the evening of the 1st of February for 8 s. in the name of Butcher, by a man. I don't recollect either of the prisoners, and do not think it was either of them. It is worth 14 s. or 15 s.

GEORGE FROST . I am shopman to Mr. Hawkins, pawn-broker, Drury-lane. On the 1st of February a coat was pawned with me for 12 s. in the evening; in the name of Speed. I am almost positive that Debenham is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

OWEN'S Defence. I was walking up Gilbert-street, and saw a bundle, picked it up, went on, and in a few minutes the officer seized me.

ELIZABETH LADD re-examined. I have known Debenham from his infancy; he has lived two years with me, and bore an honest character. The property was

stolen from a front room, and was all thrown out of window, for if he had brought it down, I must have seen it.

DEBENHAM - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30. Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

OWEN - GUILTY . Aged 23. The Jury being of opinion that the property was thrown out of window, and that he was waiting to receive it. Judgment respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-161

544. EDWARD DAVID DUNN and JOHN EDMONS , were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles Cox , in the night of the 10th of February , and stealing twenty yards of woollen cloth, value 20 l.; eight coats, value 20 l.; ten yards of kerseymere, value 2 l. 10 s; one pelisse, value 2 l.; two waistcoats, value 1 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; and two hundred buttons, value 4 l.; his property .

Mr. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

HANNAH BIDPORT . I am servant to Mr. Cox, who lives in St. Martin's-lane . On the 10th of February I went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock at night, and secured the house; I was the last person up. I got up at a quarter past six o'clock; took a candle down, and felt a great wind. I found the back door leading into Chequer's-court open. I shut it and immediately alarmed master, who got up and discovered the robbery.

CHARLES COX. Bidport called me about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning; it was dark. I missed cloth, cassimere, and buttons, amounting to 50 l. which were safe the day before.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am an officer. In consequence of information I received, I went to Freeman's, in Strutton-ground, and found eighteen dozen and seven pearl buttons, a piece of cassimere, and a pair of new trowsers.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I live at No. 31, Strutton-ground, Westminster, and am a tailor. On the 12th of February the prisoner Dunn came to my shop with two others, named Rhodes and Nix, as I understand. I will not swear that Dunn had any thing; a bundle was left on the counter which was not there when they came in. I measured them all three for trowsers, which I made. They said there were some buttons and a piece of cassimere, and if they were of any use to me I might purchase them. Dunn said he had bought them. I said I did not want them, but the bundle was left on my counter. I made the trowsers partly out of some blue cloth which they brought, and part from my own; I did not cut the cassimere nor purchase it. On the 17th of February Morris came to my house, and took away a pair of blue trowsers, the buttons, and cassimere, and I have a frock coat which was cut out for them. Two pair of trowsers were taken away the day before Morris came, by a young woman.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. It is very difficult to identify cassimere? A. Yes; all the things were not to be finished till the 19th; the cassimere was left till they fetched the trowsers. I was taken into custody for five hours on this charge; my nurse saw them in the shop; she is attending my wife, and not able to come here.

Mr. CRESWELL. Q. Look at these trowsers, (produced by SMITH.) A. I made these for Rhodes, part is made out of the cloth they brought; they brought four yards and a half, and wanted a frock coat and each a pair of trowsers, the cloth was tied up with the cassimere.

WILLIAM SMITH . I found those trowsers at Edmond's lodging.

WILLIAM STEEL . I am foreman to Mr. Cox. I know this cassimere to be his property. I have cut several garments off it; I cut it about two inches, and then tear it across; I know it by that. We lost nine or ten yards of blue cloth, and a quantity of buttons similar to these.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not common to tear cassimere? A. I do it so, and have seen other tailors do the same. The trowsers are made from cloth of the same quality; I cannot see any difference in them.

Mr. COX. I have no reason to doubt about the cassimere. I have the list which I verily believe came off the same piece. I found it among my list at home. I have no other list of the same colour.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-162

545. MARY FORDER , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , one table-cloth, value 30 s.; one shirt, value 5 s.; two pair of stockings, value 4 s.; a sheet, value 3 s.; one napkin, value 1 s.; one towel, value 1 s.; and one apron, value 1 s.; the property of John Warwicker , in his dwelling house .

FRANCES WARWICKER . I am the wife of John Warwicker; we live in London-place, London-fields, Hackney . On the 31st of January, my servant was ill, and I employed the prisoner to do her work. She slept in the house three or four nights. On Sunday evening, the 6th of February, we went to chapel, leaving her alone in the house from six o'clock till between eight and nine o'clock. On Tuesday, the 8th of February, she left, as another servant came, and in about an hour I missed these articles from my drawers; it was all safe on Saturday.

JOHN WARWICKER. On Tuesday evening, in consequence of what my wife informed me, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, which are near our house. She was out. Vann, who was with me, found two duplicates in a box on the mantle-piece. We got information, went to Stratford, and found the prisoner, as we returned, just by Bow Church, in a public house. Several articles were found on her.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was with Mr. Warwicker. I found two pair of stockings in the prisoner's pocket, and a pair of silk stockings laying close to her, a shift and towel under her cloak, and the duplicate of an apron in her pocket. She begged for mercy.

RICHARD CARPENTER . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, Hackney Road. On the 5th of February the prisoner pawned an apron for 9 d.

JOHN BENNETT . I am servant to Payne and Co. pawnbrokers. On the 7th of February, a woman, whom I believe to be the prisoner, pawned a shirt for 3 s. 6 d.

JOHN SPENCER . I am servant to Mr. Watts, pawnbroker, East Smithfield. I have a table-cloth and napkin pawned by the prisoner for 10 s. 3 d. in the name of Mary Smith, for Mrs. Warwicker. She redeemed a shawl at the same time.

Mrs. WARWICKER. This property is ours. I never sent her to pawn any thing.

GUILTY. Aged 37. Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-163

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

546. THOMAS COCKRANE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peter Welsh , about two o'clock in the night of the 28th of January , at St. George , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one table-cloth, value 8 s.; two veils, value 20 s.; nine caps, value 9 s.; two pieces of lace, value 4 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; thirteen pieces of silk, value 30 s.; five shirts, value 10 s.; two scarfs, value 40 s.; three tippets, value 10 s.; one ring-box, value 1 d.; two pair of sheets, value 20 s.; and one shift, value 5 s.; his property : And JANE DAVIS , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, she well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen against the statute, &c. &c.

ELIZABETH WELSH . I am the wife of Peter Welsh, we live in Queen-street , in the parish of St. George, and keep a public-house . On the 29th of January, I went to bed at half-past twelve o'clock at night, leaving my husband up. I fastened the house up myself, and about half-past six o'clock in the morning, we were called by the witness Flynn. My husband went down first and I soon after. I found the doors opened, every thing gone from the bar, and the cupboards all open. They were not locked the night before. I missed property worth about 5.

PETER WELSH. I am the last witness's husband. I went to bed last, and examined the house. It was fastened up. I was alarmed between six and seven o'clock next morning by Flynn, it was before day-light; I could scarcely see him till I got a light. I found the back-door, which leads into a court, open. I think they had got in at the window, and opened the door. The window shutter was forced, and two squares of glass cut, to enable them to undo the fastening. There were marks of blood on the sash. The cupboards and drawers in the bar were open. I found a crow-bar on the bar table, several things scattered about, and the articles now in Court stolen. They were all safe the night before.

THOMAS DAVIS FLYNN . I am a Trinity waterman, and live in King-street, St. George's. I pass the prosecutor's house to go to work. On the 29th of January, about a quarter past four o'clock in the morning, I went by, but noticed nothing then. I was returning between six and seven o'clock; it was day-light; it might be after seven o'clock; and as I passed I saw the prosecutor's door open, but no shutters down. I thought he had gone to bed and left it open. I put my head in and called out "house" several times. Welsh came down in his shirt, and I went away directly, and did not look to see if the house was broken. I have lived in the neighbourhood fourteen years.

THOMAS LOVE . I am patrol of St. George's. On Saturday morning, the 29th of January, between four and five o'clock, I was in Hyam's Buildings, Bluegate Fields, about a mile from Welsh's house. I went to No. 3, and saw a light in the front room up stairs. I got on the opposite side of the court; continued there some time, heard somebody talking, and saw some person get up and go towards the candle, extending his hands out as if he had something which he was looking at. This was repeated several times; and presently I heard one say to the other, "I will have that!" - the other answered, "By G - d, you shall not have that!" I thought all was not right. A watchman was passing the Buildings; I told him to go and send one of our watchmen directly. Perry came, and waited while I went to the Inspector, to acquaint him. He told me to wait there till six o'clock. Perry and I stopped there some time. He went to the Inspector again; returned to me; and between five and six o'clock the prisoner Cochrane and another came out of the house and shut the door after them. Perry was nearest; he stopped them. I came up, and told them they must wait a bit. Cochrane went up to the top of the court to go into the privy; Perry went to see for the Inspector and an officer; I was alone with the two, and could not leave the entrance of the court, or they would have come out. Jeffery and Summers the inspector came. I pointed out the other man, and said the other was in the privy. We went to the privy to look for Cochrane, and the other man escaped from Perry. We could not find Cochrane in the privy: I have frequently seen him before, and am sure he is one of the men who came out of the house; it must have been nearly six o'clock when he escaped from the privy. I simply asked where they were going; they said, to work.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer. On the 29th of January, I went with Summers to Hyam's Buildings. Love pointed a house out; I went up stairs and found Davis in bed; before that, I saw a young man standing in the Buildings; Perry was with him. While Love and I went to the end of the court to look for the other, he escaped. I found Davis in bed - a candle was burning in the room. I found all the property there; part of it was between two beds, which were used instead of a mattress. On the top of the bedstead I found a white veil, and nine caps were wrapped in a black veil, and about the bed I found five shirts, a shift, two pair of sheets, two silk handkerchiefs, thirteen pieces of silk, a shawl, two pieces of lace, and other articles claimed by the prosecutor, and in the fireplace a ring box was among the coals, and under the grate a bill for wine, which Welsh claims; it is dated 1814. I found a phosphorus box and matches in a cupboard, and above the cupboard one pound of tobacco. I asked Davis who the people were who had gone out; she said she knew nothing about it. I apprehended Cochrane the same morning on another charge, and he was discharged.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am inspector of the watch. I received information, and went to this court to the bottom, leaving Perry with the other man. I found a place at the bottom where Cochrane could have escaped; I do not know where he lived. This is a house of ill fame; there are only two rooms in it, one on a floor; a young man was in the lower room, but Davis was alone up stairs; the houses are let out in tenements.

THOMAS LOVE re-examined. The property was found in the room I saw the light in. I only saw the reflexion of one person, but heard two voices - they were both male voices. I have frequently seen Cochrane, but could not recognize his voice; there was a curtain before the window so that I could not see what they had.

ELIZABETH WELSH. This property is all ours, and was all in the bar - nothing was taken from anywhere else. This is a bill which my husband made out for Mr. Connell; I saw it in a drawer in the bar the night before the robbery.

PETER WELSH. This bill I made out as a memorandum before I was in business, it was in the drawer the night before. I know nothing of the prisoners. Flynn called me in the morning, by singing out that the door was open.

COCHRANE'S Defence. The watchman said I was too tall for the man.

JEFFERY re-examined. Perry told the magistrate he thought the prisoner was rather too tall for the man who escaped from the privy, but Love immediately said he was the man.

COCHRANE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17. Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, as no personal violence was used .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-164

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

547. HENRY BARDEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Maria Moss , spinster , about eight o'clock in the night of the 11th of January , at St. Marylebone , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a bed-furniture, value 30 s. and a sofa cover, value 5 s. her property .

MARIA MOSS. I am single, and live at No. 9, Homer-street . On the 11th of January, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, I missed a set of bed-furniture and a sofa cover, which I saw in the washhouse at eight o'clock. I and a chairwoman were sitting in the kitchen; the washhouse was locked, but about a quarter past eight o'clock I found the door open; it leads into the yard, and is about twenty yards from the kitchen: the lock must have been picked. Persons could come in at the back door, which was on the latch, and get to the kitchen; the wash-house is across the yard. I am certain it was locked, and the key hung on the kitchen stairs; nobody could get to the key; the street door is always kept locked. Three boys came and knocked at the door, and gave us information. We have never found the property. I value the property at 35 s. - The wash-house is quite separate from the house, but is in the yard; we go to it without going into the street.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am servant to Mr. Tilner, at the King's Arms, Chelsea, but at the time in question I was out of place. I am a pot-boy. I and two other lads were standing at the corner of Hector-court, Homer-street, playing with some more boys, and about eight o'clock, or five minutes past, I saw the prisoner and another man standing at the corner of Hector-court. The other man had a sack under his arm; they looked very hard at us, and the prisoner said something to him, and in about five minutes they went in at the back door of No. 9, Homer-street, which leads into Hector-court; they were in there ten minutes or more, when the prisoner came out with a sack on his back, and something in it, which appeared to be so large, it would not go to the bottom. The other man came behind him; we said it could not be all right, and watched them nearly to the top of Homer-street, and then lost sight of them all in a moment. We returned to No. 9, Homer-street, knocked at the door and gave information. They went into the yard. I am certain the prisoner is the man; he is a baker; I have frequently seen him before.

Q. They looked at you? A. Yes; before they went in; the prisoner went in first, and the other after him. The door was shut. I don't know where he lived, but have frequently seen him smoking at the Castle public-house, at the corner of Chapel-street, New Road. The other boys described him to the watchman, and I was present that night when he was taken at the Castle. Beck told the watchman of it about a quarter of a hour after we saw him go away. I had been out of place nearly three months. I never quarrelled with the prisoner.

JOHN BECK . I live in Harcourt-street with my father who is a baker. I saw the prisoner and another man go in at the back door in Homer-street, with an empty sack, about five minutes past eight o'clock; the watchman had just gone eight o'clock. I had seen them there for about five minutes; the other man had the sack when he went in but the prisoner brought it out, full, in about ten minutes. Both went up Homer-street; we watched them nearly to the top, towards the New Road, then lost them. We went back and knocked at Mrs. Moss's door; I told her, and told the watchman. The prisoner was taken at the Castle public-house in about a quarter of an hour. I went in, thinking I might see him, as I often had. I sent the watchman to the Castle public-house; the other man was not there. We were playing by Mrs. Moss's. I have known Simmons about a year; the other boy lives in Shouldram-street; I have had no quarrel with the prisoner; they saw us when they went in, and when they came out, but did not speak to us. The prisoner had his working dress and a brown cap on.

PHILIP HILLSON . I am fourteen years old, and live in Shouldram-street with my father, who is a shoemaker. I was with these boys one evening; I don't recollect the date; it was the day before I was examined at the office. We were standing at the corner of Hector-court; I saw the prisoner and another come and make water against the wall; the other had an empty sack under his arm; they looked very hard at us: the prisoner went in at the back door, the other followed. They came out in ten minutes or more, the prisoner carrying the sack: it was so full, the things could not go to the bottom. We followed them nearly to the top of Homer-street, to see what became of of the sack, but they crossed the road and we lost sight of them: I could see no watchman. In about twenty minutes I saw Beck and Simmons coming down the street with the watchman, who had got the prisoner. We went back to Mrs. Moss before that, and told her. I am quite sure of the prisoner - I knew him before; he used to live in Homer-street where he was apprenticed: I never quarreled with him. He has an uncle - I don't know whether he has any parents.

MARIA MOSS. When these boys came to my door, I

went and missed the property. I did not go for a watchman. Nobody but the chairwoman being in the house, and being lame, I could not follow. I stood at the door and saw the watchman bring him by; the boys said he was the man: his uncle keeps a shop on the other side of the New Road.

EDWARD WYNN . I am a watchman. These boys came to me between eight and nine o'clock. I went to the Castle public-house, and took the prisoner. I took him to the watch-house, and then told him the charge, he said nothing against it. I took him by Mrs. Moss's, but did not stop, as there was a crowd.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18250217-165

London Cases. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

548. BENJAMIN WIFFIN was indicted for stealing on the 22d of December , a great coat, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH. I live at Eltham in Kent. I left my coat in my chaise at the New Inn, Old Change .

THOMAS BENNETT . I am book-keeper at the New Inn. I saw the prisoner take hold of this coat; he saw me, and let go of it; he had not moved it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-166

549. GEORGE NORMAN was indicted for stealing on the 2d of February , a sheet, value 6 s.; a napkin, value 1 s.; and a towel, value 1 s.; the property of George Palmer , in a lodging-room .

JOHN WESTEL. My mother, Mrs. Palmer, let the prisoner a lodging; she is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-167

550. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JAMES HOGAN . I am a colour-maker , and live on Saffron-hill. On the 5th of February , about half past twelve o'clock at night, I was with Mr. Ryland, and as we came from Aldersgate-street into Long-lane , Mr. Ryland came in contact with a man, who gave him in charge, and while we were remonstrating with the man, a crowd collected. I felt a hand in my pocket; turned round, and caught hold of the prisoner's hand in my pocket. I said, "I felt your hand in my pocket, and will give you in charge." I immediately received several blows, and was knocked down twice. I laid hold of him again; the watchmen were afraid to touch him; but at last one took him. I had two sovereigns, two shillings, and some half-pence in that pocket. I will not swear that the money was in his hand. I never lost sight of him.

JOSEPH NASH . I was with Hogan, and saw the prisoner strike him; he seized him, and called a watchman; two or three came but were afraid to touch him. I am sure he is the man. I never lost sight of him. The prosecutor was perfectly sober.

WILLIAM RYLAND . I was with the prosecutor, and was knocked down. I saw very little of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob; went up, and the prosecutor charged me with robbing him; he struck me, and I returned the blow; he was fighting at the time, and was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-168

551. GEORGE BOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , seven dwts and half of gold, value 30 s. the goods of Samuel Brees .

LAWRENCE CHILD . I am a refiner and live in Barbican. On the 11th of February the prisoner came to sell me two pieces of gold. I asked who he brought them from; he said from Mr. Brees. I asked if Mr. Brees had sent him; he said, Mr. Brees had not; but one of the young men in the shop had. I told him, if so, he must fetch a note from the young man; he went away leaving the gold behind him, and called again about one o'clock. I asked him if he had brought the note; he said, no; that the person had not time to write it. I said, I must call upon Mr. Brees, before he could have the money; he said he must have the money or gold. I said I was certain Mr. Brees never sent it for sale, and should call on him. He went away, and I called on Mr. Brees.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you call? - A. About three o'clock, and found him still there. He said he picked up the gold out of his master's forge.

SAMUEL BREES. I am a water-gilder , and live in Warwick-court, Holborn . The prisoner was verbally articled to me for five years. About half-past three o'clock Mr. Child called, and told me what had occurred. Having a very high opinion of the prisoner, I thought it impossible, and sent for him. Child said, "That is the young man." He immediately confessed that he had taken the gold for sale, and had often found a lump in one of the gilding forges. I remonstrated with him, and gave him in charge. It is impossible that he could have found it. I went with the officer to his lodgings, and found three melting-pots, which had melted gold, which were not mine, and a pair of scales. I have observed a great deficiency in my gold for some time. Child produced seven dwts. and a half.

Cross-examined. Q. You have no mark on it? - A. No; it is impossible that it could be in the forge. He bore an excellent character.

WILLIAM ADDINGTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge. He said he had dried the gold up from the quicksilver, and that the pots were at his lodging.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Recommended to mercy . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-169

552. WILLIAM SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Archibald Robinson , from his person .

MR. ARCHIBALD ROBINSON. I am a merchant . On the 4th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was by the Mansion House , and felt a pull at my right-hand pocket. turned round, and found my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, I took it from him. He said he had picked it up, which was impossible.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A lad was walking before me - he threw the handkerchief away, on my feet; I picked it up to give to the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-170

553. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a watch, value 11 l.; a chain, value 6 l. 15 s.; a seal, value 4 l. 10 s., and a key, value 2 l., the goods of John Grey , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH GREY . My father, John Grey, is a jeweller , and lives in Leadenhall-street . On the 7th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, he said he had just come into possession of property, and wished to purchase a gold watch; he selected a silver one, at 11 l., but said he intended to have given 30 l., but this had taken his fancy; he put his hand into his pocket, and took out a parcel, which he said contained forty-five sovereigns, which he had brought to pay for it. He then bought a gold chain, seal, and key; the whole amounted to 13 l. 19 s. - I attached them together, and handed them to him; he looked at them, and seemed perfectly satisfied. He then said he would take them to shew to a friend at the Blue Boar, and leave the sovereigns behind the while - I wished to open the parcel to see what was in it; he then said he would leave watch, parcel, and all: I said he should not leave the house till I had opened it; he caught hold of the parcel - I wrenched it out of his hand, and found it contained farthings, and immediately gave him in charge. I had sold him the watch, and given it into his hand - I considered the sale complete.

The Court ruled this to be no felony. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-171

554. THOMAS CURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a bed, value 16 s.; a bolster, value 2 s., and a quilt, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Brooks .

HANNAH BROOKS . I am the wife of Samuel Brooks - we live in Lower Whitecross-street . The prisoner lodged in the same house; he came to me on the 27th of January, in the evening, and said, "Mrs. Brooks, a man has been calling you in the yard, and says your husband has met with an accident" - I put on my bonnet and shawl, went to my husband, and found him as well as ever. I went home, and the prisoner was gone from his room. I found my door locked as I had left it, but my bed, bolster, and quilt were gone - it was a striped linen tick - the quilt was new patch-work and quilted.

SAMUEL BROOKS. I am the prosecutrix's husband. I never sent the prisoner to say I was ill.

MARY MILLAR . I keep a pawnbroker's shop, in Old-street. I cannot swear to the prisoner, but to the best of my knowledge he is the man who brought me a bed, for sale, the night before the prosecutrix came to me - he sold me a bed, bolster, and an old quilt, for 6 s. 6 d.; he said they were his own, and he lived in Lower Whitecross-street. I sold them in the morning, for 10 s. The quilt was patch-work and quilted.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250217-172

555. JOHN SEALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 8 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. 4 d. , the goods of Benjamin Hickinbotham .

JAMES STEVENS . I am servant to Benjamin Hickinbotham, butcher , Aldgate . On the 12th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner take an aitch bone of beef off our stall-board, and look at it - I was attending to a customer, and on looking round he was gone with it. I ran down the Minories, turned back, and met him with a basket - he said he had not got it, and would not be searched by me. I called a watchman, and it was found in his basket - I knew it to be master's; we had not sold it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it at a butcher's shop.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 52. Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-173

556. JAMES COLE was indicted for a misdemeanour .

FRANCIS CLAYTER. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Wilson and Co. , chemists and druggists, Snowhill ; they serve the London Hospital with drugs. On the 9th of February , the prisoner came and produced this order: I directed 20 lbs. of quicksilver to be put into a bottle, and got the opium for the warehouseman to deliver to him. I prepared them for him, in consequence of this order.

(Read.)

"London Hospital, 7th of February, 1825.

"Gentlemen, - Have the goodness to send, per bearer, for the use of the Hospital, 20 lbs. argent vir; 2 lb. opium.

"Yours, &c. JOSEPH WARD, Apothecary."

JOHN MONKMAN . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, and delivered these things to the prisoner. I told him not to let the bottle fall, or the quicksilver would fall about. He said he knew very well what it was.

JOSEPH WARD . I am house apothecary at the London Hospital. I never sent this order; it is not written by me; the prisoner is a stranger; the goods were not delivered to me; they are worth 6 l. 13 s.

- YATES. I am a wholesale druggist, and live in King Street, Snowhill. The prisoner came to me with an order on Friday; I gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave me the letter, and said he would give me 1 s., which he did, when I brought the packet to him.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-174

557. WILLIAM PAUL was indicted for a like offence .

THOMAS COCKING . I am warehouseman to J. Kirk , H Hearon , and B. Bright . On the 7th of February , about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came, and produced an order. I directed 20 lbs. of quicksilver to be delivered to him, and saw it delivered to him.

(Order read.)

Messrs. Kirk, Heron, & Co. druggist , Bishopsgate-street.

London Hospital.

"Gentlemen - Have the goodness to send per bearer, for the use of the hospital. 20 lbs. argent vir.

"Yours, &c. JOSEPH WARD , Apothecary."

WILLIAM CULLOCK . I delivered the quicksilver to the prisoner.

MR. WARD. I never wrote this order, nor sent for the goods, and never received them.

- PALMER. I am a druggist. On the 11th of February, the prisoner came to my shop - I gave him in charge, as he said he came from the London Hospital.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter . I was at the Globe coffee-shop, Fleet-street - a man came and asked me to go with this order, and told me to say, I came from the London Hospital.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-175

559. DANIEL KEITH and JAMES LEWIS were indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS HOOKHAM . On the 12th of January , about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-street , and felt something at my pocket, which contained papers of accounts - they were too secure to be got at. I turned round, and seized the prisoner Keith.

WILLIAM CLARK BLUNDELL . I was with Mr. Hookham, arm in arm, a few steps up Clifford's-Inn-passage. I felt somebody at my pocket, which contained a handkerchief and key - my pocket was lifted up, as it opened inside. I disengaged my arm, turned round suddenly, and caught Keith's hand in Mr. Hookham's pocket. Lewis stood close to him. I saw them distinctly, being within ten paces of two gas lights. Mr. Hookham seized Keith - Lewis ran away - Keith said, at the watch-house, that his father was a bricklayer, out of work. I was going to enquire about him, and met Lewis, and gave him in charge.

KEITH'S Defence. I was coming by the church, and saw three gentlemen, arm in arm; two of them rather in liquor; one struck me a blow, and said, I had attempted to pick his pocket.

KEITH - GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-176

560. THOMAS JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ROBERT HUGGINS . I am a brush-maker , and live in Monkwell-street. On the 20th of January, about eight o'clock at night, having occasion to come from the top of the premises of Messrs. T. and G. Kent, in Falcon-square . I went into the cellar with a light, and saw the prisoner there, endeavouring either to get in or out of the dust-hole - he was a stranger. I said, "Pray, what do you do here?" he paused, and then said, he came down for a necessary purpose - I went to lay hold of him, and he put the candle out, and used very bad language, and struck me once or twice. I said, "If I lose my life, you sha'nt get out." I called, Murder! and at last I was heard, and the men came, and we secured him - the officers found every kind of housebreaking implements upon him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I was fetched, and took him in charge. I found a phosphorus bottle, matches, six skeleton keys, and a wax candle, on him, and in the cellar was a crow-bar.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-177

561. MOSES KEYS was indicted for a fraud .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-178

NEW COURT. (5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

562. DENNIS SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two books, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Mason .

JOHN SMITH . I live with Mr. Thomas Mason, a bookseller in Holborn . On the 17th of January, the prisoner came in and asked for Robinson Crusoe; I showed him one; he said he wanted one bound; I showed him one in two volumes; he said he wanted it in one volume, and asked for Young's Night Thoughts; he told me to make the bill, and I saw him put two books into his pocket. I said, "Are you a bookseller?" He said, "Yes." I said, "I will knock for Mr. Mason, - he will take you a little off." He said, "Never mind;" and was going away. I took hold of him by the collar, and brought him back, and called for the person at the next house. I saw him take them out of his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said I would call again in a few minutes; he said I had got two books, which I declare to God I never had.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-179

563. WILLIAM SULLIVAN , JOSEPH FLOWERS , and WILLIAM PAGE , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a pewter bason, value 2 s.; three shifts, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; two shirts, value 2 s.; two caps, value 6 d.; six live tame fowls, price 12 s.; a live tame pigeon, price 6 d., and a rabbit, price 1 s. , the goods of Robert Read .

ELIZABETH READ . I live in William Street, Pimlico ; I keep some fowls in a yard close by Mr. Gibbon's yard. I got up at seven o'clock on the morning of Wednesday week, and missed them; I had seen them safe the night before. There was a place which had been opened for the person to get in. I lost six fowls, and found them in Mr. Gibbon's, the next yard: I lost a pigeon and a rabbit, and the articles stated in the indictment. I found all but

the pigeon: they were all taken from the yard: the linen were in a tub.

BENJAMIN KEMBLIN . I live near the prosecutor; I heard of the robbery; I went into a loft over Mr. Gibbon's cow-house, and found six fowls, some wet linen, the rabbit, and other things. I found Page there asleep; he had no right there: I said nothing to him. I found a crow bar there.

THOMAS GIBBONS . I am a cowkeeper, and live next door to the prosecutor. Page was a stranger to me, and had no right on my premises. Flowers was taken about half-past five o'clock in the morning of last Wednesday week, running out of my yard, by a witness.

GEORGE KEMBLIN . I was going into the yard, and saw Flowers and Sullivan run out of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SULLIVAN - NOT GUILTY .

FLOWERS - NOT GUILTY .

PAGE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Reference Number: t18250217-180

564. WILLIAM SULLIVAN , JOSEPH FLOWERS , and WILLIAM PAGE , were again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , a live tame fowl, price 2 s. , the property of Thomas Gibbons .

THOMAS GIBBONS. I lost a fowl; it was found dead in the loft where the prisoner Page was.

BENJAMIN KEMBLIN . I had fed the fowl the evening before, and found it dead in the loft by Page. I saw the other two boys at half-past six o'clock in the morning out of the yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PAGE'S Defence. I know nothing about that fowl, nor the others.

SULLIVAN - NOT GUILTY .

FLOWERS - NOT GUILTY .

PAGE - GUILTY. - Aged 12. Recommended to Mercy . Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-181

Before Mr. Recorder.

565. FRANCIS CURSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , a cloak, value 4 s. , the goods of Lawrence Kennedy .

JOHN JOSEPH GRIMSHAW . I live at Mr. Lawrence Kennedy's, High Street, Shadwell . The cloak hung inside the shop. On the 14th of February, one of the witnesses gave me information between one and two o'clock in the day; and I went to Mr. Salt's shop, and saw the prisoner and my cloak: the prisoner was a stranger, it was safe two hours before.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I live with Mr. Salt, pawnbroker, Charles Street, Back Lane, Shadwell. On the 14th of February, the prisoner came to our shop, between one and two o'clock, to pawn a cloak: we saw a private mark on the corner; we detained her, and gave information to Mr. Kennedy; - she said she gave 4 s. for it on the Saturday night before.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this woman and the property; it has Kennedy's name on it; the prisoner said she had bought the ticket of some other woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person who showed me the ticket to get the cloak; I met her again about two hours afterwards, and she said she had got it, and gave it to me to pawn for her.

GRIMSHAW re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner come to the shop to look at the cloak? A. Yes, she came and looked at it, and said she had not got money enough for it. I showed her another; she made some observation, and then went away. I am quite certain it had not been sold.

Q. Had any other person looked at the cloak that morning? A. No other person asked me the price.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 49. Recommended to mercy . Fined 1 s., and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-182

566. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Vicent Herreos de Tejada , from his person .

JOHN BRUMFITT . I am a porter at Messrs. Spode and Copeland, of Portugal Street. I saw the prisoner on the 24th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-Inn Fields ; he was alone. The prosecutor was going along; I saw the prisoner looking hard at his right-hand coat pocket: my suspicion was drawn towards him; I watched him about four doors, and saw him lift up the gentleman's right-hand pocket with his left hand, and draw the handkerchief out with his right. I took hold of his hand immediately, and said I would not let him go; he said, "Pray do, Sir." He did not get from me. I called to the gentleman to stop; but he could not understand me. I then collared the prisoner, and threw my basket into the Freemasons' Tavern, and told them to mind it: I kept calling after the gentleman, and the prisoner said, "I will show you the gentleman;" we overtook him in a short time; I tapped him on the shoulder, and told him he had lost his handkerchief; he could not understand me. We then met a gentleman who could speak French, I believe, and he made him understand. We all went to Bow-street, and the prisoner was given in charge.

GEORGE COST . I am a Bow-street patrol; the prisoner was brought to Bow-street, and given in charge.

VICENT HERREOS DE TEJADA. I was in Great Queen-street, and lost this handkerchief from my pocket; when I was apprized of it, I missed it; I saw the first witness, who presented the prisoner to me as the person who took it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, and I hope I shall find mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250217-183

567. MARGARET COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a tea-kettle, value 3 s. 6 d., and a pair of scales, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Elizabeth Mead .

ELIZABETH MEAD. I am a widow , and live in John's Court, St. George's in the East . I lost a tea-kettle and a pair of scales on the 15th of January, from my room; the prisoner slept with me; I sit with fruit at the door of the Crooked Billet ; I left the things in my room when I went out about four o'clock; I returned between nine and ten at night; she and the things were gone. She came home very much in liquor; she said she had scoured the kettle,

and put it in the corner: I found the scales at a pawnbroker's. She left my house next morning, and was taken on the 28th of January. She was supported on 5 s. a week, which she received from her husband.

BENJAMIN NICHOLSON . I am servant to Mr. Austin, pawnbroker, High-street, Shadwell. A pair of scales were pawned for 1 s. 6 d., on the 15th of January, by the prisoner.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a constable; I took the prisoner at a public-house; she said she had taken the things, and had offered the prosecutrix 1 s. a week to pay for them.

HENRY ASHFORD . I live with Mr. Anderton, a pawnbroker, in Cannon-street Road. The prisoner pawned the tea-kettle with me, on the 15th of January.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am an unhappy woman.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18250217-184

568. SARAH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a jacket, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Lacy .

The Prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-185

569. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a gown, value 6 d.; a pair of shoes, value 18 d.; a picture, value 1 s.; a bonnet, value 6 d., and and a blanket, value 5 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Turner .

ELIZABETH TURNER. I am a widow , and live in Thomas's-street, Bethnal Green . The prisoner is my son; I had seen my property all safe on Saturday week; I left my house a little before one o'clock; he was not there at the time. I returned a quarter before eight; they were then gone. I do not know that he had been in my house during my absence; he was taken into custody the same night; he generally slept there: I saw some of my things the following Monday at Worship-street.

JAMES MARLOW . I am shopman to Mr. Castle, a pawnbroker, of Church-street. On the 12th of February, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned a pair of women's shoes for 1 s.

GEORGE WESTON . I live in Punderson's Place, Bethnal Green, and am a pawnbroker. On the 12th of February, the prisoner pawned a blanket at our shop for 3 s.

JOHN ROBERT HARRIS . I am a headborough of Bethnal Green. I was on duty on Saturday the 12th of February; I heard the prisoner was taken up on a charge of felony; his mother came; I searched him, but found no duplicate on him. I found this picture at an old iron shop in Brick Lane; he told me he had sold it there about an hour before, and showed me the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I will never do it again.

GUILTY. Aged 13. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250217-186

570. RICHARD PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a half-crown , the money of David Parish .

SARAH PARISH . I have been at Isleworth for my health, and live in Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 16th of February I left my reticule on a mangle at my mother's house, at Hounslow , about seven o'clock in the evening, when I went to bed very ill; I came down about ten o'clock next morning - I found the reticule, but the half-crown was gone out of it. I had had two half-crowns and a sixpence in it. The prisoner lodged in the first floor front room - I had not marked it, nor have I seen it again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-187

571. GEORGE COLLERLY and JOHN COGLE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a brass cock, value 3 s. , the goods of John Glaysher .

JOHN GLAYSHER. I live in King-street, Hammersmith , and am a furniture broker . I was called by a witness on the 18th of February, who told me he believed I had lost something; we went in pursuit of the prisoners, and over-took them about two hundred yards from the house, in company - I asked if they had not got something belonging to me; Cogle said he had got something which a boy had given him - he gave me a brass cock; I took it home, and took them into custody. A person must have come into the shop to have taken it - it was on the counter.

CHARLES EDWARD WHEATLEY . I am a watch-maker: my house is near Mr. Glaysher's, on the opposite side of the way. I saw the prisoners with another person pass my shop, and look very hard at the window; I went to the door, and looked after them; they looked into every shop which they passed - when they came to Mr. Glaysher's, Collerly went up the steps into the shop - the third person stood at the end of the window; Cogle went a little way on; I saw Collerly come out in a short time, with something in his right-hand; he gave it to the third person, who put it under his coat. I immediately told Mr. Glaysher; we pursued them down the town, and took them altogether; Cogle had then got the cock.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable, and took the prisoners, and found the cock on them. I took them before Mr. Hanson, who acquitted the third lad next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COLLERLY'S Defence. I stopped to look at a shop window - these lads were at another window; the gentleman came up and took us: Cogle was asked what he had about him, and he had the cock.

COGLE'S Defence. I was going to see for work, and saw the cock laying in the road - the gentleman came and took me and the other lads, but I was not with them.

COLLERY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

COGLE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250217-188

572. ANN KING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a watch, value 15 s. , the goods of John Dell .

ELIZABETH DELL . I am the wife of John Dell - we live in Little Carlisle-street, Edgware-road . On the 16th of December this watch hung by the side of the fire-place - the prisoner had lodged in the house, but had left about five weeks. I had seen it safe at eleven o'clock in the morning. The man she lived with had brought in a bit of beef for me to take care of till the night following. I missed the watch between four and five o'clock, and found it next morning at Mr. Trail's.

WILLIAM TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in

Chapel-street, Edgware-road. On the 16th of December, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch, for 8 s.: I know her before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The prosecutrix said she would make it up with me, and took a bag of mine, with a ticket for a shawl in it, as part of payment.

PROSECUTRIX. She fell on her knees, and said, "Mrs. Dell, pray forgive me, and I will get your watch out of pawn" - I asked where she had pawned it; she said she did not know: she was very much in liquor. I saw no more of her for a month, when she was in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250217-189

573. MARY DURKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a pair of shoes, value 11 s. , the goods of Morris Corcoran .

MORRIS CORCORAN. I am a labourer . I had ordered these shoes of a journeyman, and had paid him 5 s. as a part of the price; I did not see them when they were brought home.

MARY CORCORAN . I am the prosecutor's sister - we live in Hopkins-street, Carnaby-market . I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes, belonging to my brother, from the table in his lodging: the shoemaker's wife had just brought them. I followed her to a public-house, and asked her to give them to me, but she would not - I had known her, but not where she lived; I am sure she is the woman; it was this day four weeks: I have never seen them since, and did not see her again till she was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I came in to see her aunt - the witness was sitting there, and the shoes came in; I said according to my country fashion, these shall pay the beverage, half a pint of gin; I put them into my apron, and went to the public-house, sat down, and said, "Shall I pawn them for half-a-pint of gin?" the woman, her brother, and another were there, and we went to another house - what became of the shoes I do not know, as I took a drop too much. I sent my child on the Saturday week following, and offered two half-crowns to pay for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-190

574. CHRISTOPHER HARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , two coats, value 50 s., the goods of Richard Henry Cox ; a coat, value 1 l., and a jacket, value 1 s., the goods of George White : and a coat, value 5 s., the goods of Anthony Joly , in the dwelling-house of Richard Henry Cox .

CHARLES JONES . I live in Grosvenor-place , in the service of Richard Henry Cox, Esq. - Joly and White are his servant s. On the 2d of February, about half-past three o'clock, I went into the hall, and missed four coats, which I had seen safe, on pegs, half an hour before; I went into the housekeeper's room, and told what had happened. I then went up the area steps, and saw a witness, who gave me information; we went together to Tattersal's yard, which is eight doors from my master's - we found a bag, with the four coats and a jacket in it; two of them were livery coats. The prisoner was taken in about five minutes; I do not know that the bag was his.

JOHN SMITH . I live in Mill-street, Hanover-square. I was coming up Grosvenor-place, and about three doors before I came to Mr. Cox's, I saw the prisoner with an empty sack on his back, and another man with him; I saw him go down the area; I was going down the steps, and he passed me, coming up again, with the sack still empty - I then went into the housekeeper's room, and while I was there an alarm was given that the house had been robbed by chimney-sweepers; I said if the house had been robbed by chimney-sweepers I knew the men. I came out, and went after them down Grosvenor-place, into Chapel-street, and into the mews, where I met the prisoner by himself, coming down the mews, walking very fast; he had nothing with him; I knew him to be the man I saw down the area: I collared him, and said, "What have you done with the sack you had on your shoulder" - he said he knew nothing at all about it. I said, "You shall go back and account for it," and just before I came to the door I met the constable and another person, who said he could identify the prisoner. I did not see the sack again till I saw it at Marlborough-street.

GEORGE BATES . I am a seaman. I was in Grosvenor-place, and saw the prisoner and another come up the area steps, with a sack on his back, which appeared to be full; I stopped at the steps, and told Jones - I had seen the prisoner go into Tattersal's with the sack on his back, which appeared to me to be the same - it was a dirty sack - he came up the yard without it, and then went another way. I saw it at the watch-house; it contained four coats and a jacket, which were claimed by Jones.

CHARLES REEVES . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge. I was present in Tattersal's yard when the sack was standing there - Jones claimed the coats as his master's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the mews, and the witness came and collared me, and said something about a sack - I know nothing about it.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-191

575. WILLIAM STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , two coats, value 50 s., the goods of Joseph Emerson , in the dwelling-house of Rebecca Ripley .

The Prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-192

576. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Henry Oyer , on the night of the 3d of February , and stealing a jacket, value 4 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s. 6 d.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a pair of braces, value 3 d., and a purse, value 3 d.; the goods of John Allen .

The Prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-193

577. SARAH STRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , nineteen yards of lace, value 2 l. 7 s., the goods of James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook , in their dwelling-house .

JAMES SHOOLBRED. I live in Tottenham-Court-road , and am a haberdasher . On the 9th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in alone: she was buying some trifling articles, and was pointed out to me by this young lady as having stolen a card of lace -

I detained her, but did not make any charge against her for five or ten minutes - the card of lace was in her hand rolled up in a handkerchief; she did not appear to be ill at the time. I took her to the watch-house myself, as I could not get a constable; I afterwards found she was very near her confinement; she was delivered in Newgate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not she pay for some things that she bought? A. Yes.

Q. Did not the poor woman say that she really did not know that she had it? A. I believe she did. I believe she was brought into Newgate the evening following, and confined almost immediately after she came in. I am in partnership with Gregory Cook.

MARY FAULKNER . I saw the prisoner in the shop, and saw her take the lace; I did not perceive she was near her confinement. The lace was taken up with a handkerchief that was laid upon it: it is worth about 3 s. a yard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about it: I was in great pain, and did not know that I had it about me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-194

578. WILLIAM CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , in St. Mary, Islington , a watch, value 4 l., the goods of James Drew , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. James Drew, a pawnbroker , who lives in Clarkes-place , St. Mary, Islington. I was in the shop on the 15th of January, a little before five o'clock in the evening; I heard the window break, I jumped over the counter, and saw the prisoner running to the right of the door, in a direction from the window which was broken - I followed, and cried Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him; the watch was found about three yards from where he was stopped, in a ditch; I picked it up myself - it is gold, and worth 8 l. it was marked 12 l.; the intrinsic value of the case was 7 l.; when I returned I saw where the window was broken, and the watch had hung just in that place; it was between the lights, but light enough to see a man's features.

JOHN WYLES . I am a constable of Clerkenwell - I was standing near Drew's door on the 15th of January, and heard the sound of glass breaking, and at that instant the prisoner came running by me, without shoes! I saw Thompsom come out, and cry Stop thief! there was no one pursued but the prisoner; I followed as fast as I could, and never lost sight of him; we took him into custody; I was the first person who laid hold of him; I saw Thompson produce the watch while I had hold of the prisoner - here are the shoes which he left behind him at the window.

Prisoner. Q. Were you the first who took hold of me? A. I was the first person who took hold of him; I believe a gentleman had stopped him before.

PATIENCE RENNARDSON . I live at the Painted Red Lion public-house; I was coming by this shop, and heard the window break; I turned my head and saw a man stand against the window - I thought he was one of the young men of the shop; he went a little way off, and then returned and took something out, but I could not see what it was; by that time Thompson came out of the shop; the man who took the thing from the window ran round the corner like lightning; I did not see his face - I saw the prisoner at Hatton-gardon; I said to a young man who came out of the shop, I think there is a pair of shoes under the window.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Holloway to seek for work, as a stenciller; I had been out of work several weeks; I was coming through Islington from the Coach and Horses public-house, where I lodge with my father, who is a labourer; I came by Mr. Drew's shop, and heard the glass break, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I pulled off my shoes in pursuit of a man who I saw run- when the gentleman came up and gave charge of me.

THOMPSON re-examined. Q. Was there any person near the prisoner at the time? A. No; no one near him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250217-195

576. JAMES FERGUSSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square , forty-two yards of kerseymere, value £16, the goods of Daniel Allen , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS LANGDON . I live at No. 53, Leicester-square, and am porter to Mr. East. I know Mr. Daniel Allen; he lives in Bond-street , St. George's, Hanover-square, and is a tailor . On the 8th of February, Mr. Allen bought a piece of Oxford mixed milled kerseymere at our house, and I delivered it to his foreman in the shop, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon. I know nothing of the prisoner.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I am one of the day-patrole of Bow-street. About seven o'clock at night on the 8th of February, I was going down Bond-street, with my wife; I met three men walking backwards and forwards by Mr. Allen's house - the prisoner was one of them: I went a little further down and returned back; crossed at the corner of Maddox-street; I found there was a fourth person stood talking to them. I passed close by them and went up Maddox-street, a little way towards the church, then crossed over, and then stood under the shade of a lamp, with my wife, In two or three minutes I saw them all in a bustle, near Mr. Allen's shop, which is the first house round the corner from Maddox-street. I saw two of them cross over to the opposite side of Bond-street, right facing Mr. Allen's shop - I then ran towards Bond-street; but before I could get to Bond-street, the prisoner turned round into Maddox-street, with a parcel under his arm; he was running towards me, but on the opposite side. I ran after him, and laid hold of him by the collar; he had the bundle under his arm when I took him, but I could not then tell what was in it. I kept hold of him, though he made a desperate struggle - I called my wife to lay hold of the property. The prisoner unbuttoned his waistcoat, and let down his coat and waistcoat as low as his elbows. I then took hold of him by the neckcloth, and took him back to Mr. Allen's shop - my wife followed me, and so did the shopman, who had come up. The parcel contained kerseymere; there was a number on it, but I cannot recollect what.

ANN DORRINGTON . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw my husband lay hold of the prisoner; he had a

parcel under his arm; I took the parcel to the shop; the prisoner made a great struggle. The parcel was claimed by the foreman of the shop.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am foreman to Mr. Daniel Allen; I have been there about ten months. I remember the kerseymere being brought from Mr. East's by Thomas Langdon, a little before four o'clock; it was put down in the shop, but not so near the door that any person could have reached it. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening I was at the back end of the shop, and I heard the door rattling, as if opening; I saw no one; I thought the wind had blown the door open; I then went on with my business, and presently after heard the rustling of paper; the kerseymere was in a paper, but was not behind the counter; I then went immediately to the door and missed it. I went to the corner of Maddox-street, and saw the prisoner and the officer struggling together, and saw Mrs. Dorrington with the roll of kerseymere. I assisted in taking the prisoner back to the shop. I saw the parcel opened, and it was the one which Langdon had brought; there was a number on it, and a bill of parcels, which was delivered to me; the value is about 17 l. or 18 l. The prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). Though I feel conscious of my innocence - though I know myself to be guiltless of implication or intentional aid towards the crime, - yet I confess myself to be culpable; inasmuch as I have lent my assistance towards its perpetration, in the unconscious haste and inadvertency of the moment, without reflecting whether the person who employed me to carry the property from the premises had a right to its disposal. I most humbly implore you to consider the time and the place when I was engaged to perform this service. At so early an hour, and on premises so apparently unguarded, was it possible that I should entertain any suspicion as to the honesty of the transaction? A man (of whom I declare myself ignorant) meets me in the street - engages me to carry an article for him for a mile or so, and promises an adequate reward. I received the piece of cloth, and so firmly was I convinced of the honesty of the procedure, that even at the moment of apprehension I was fearless of any consequences injurious to myself. I had only two or three days before quitted a situation. I had been on that and the preceding day among my acquaintances, in the hope that I might gain early intimation of another. Perhaps on that unfortunate evening my friends might have induced me to partake of more than was consistent with propiety.

One Witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18250217-196

580. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , eight spoons, value 30 s.; two fruit knives, value 4 s.; a fork, value 2 s.; and two wine labels, value 6 s.; the goods of Alexander Bartioli , in the dwelling-house of John Cale .

MARY ANN PURFORD . I live in Newman's-mews, Mary-le-bone. I know John Cale - he keeps the house where Mr. Alexander Bartioli lodges. On the 11th of February, I was Bartioli's housekeeper. I missed this property about two o'clock - I had seen them safe before; went up stairs to answer the bell, about half-past one - there was no other person in the kitchen but the prisoner: when I last saw them, I left them in the kitchen for about five minutes; I then missed them all - the prisoner had been in the house once before - I left her in the kitchen about half-past one - she had come in the morning about seven - she said she came to see me - I did not want to see her - I went down and asked what she wanted; she said, she was a dress-maker, and worked in Oxford-street - she staid in the kitchen till half-past one - she said she was not going to work, and wished to stay a bit with me - Mr. Cale keeps a servant, but she was up in the parlour with her mistress - I had been cleaning the plate, and came down to take it up to my mistress, I missed it, and enquired, if any one in the house had seen her go out; they said, no; I then ran out, and just got sight of her clothes, while she was turning into Newman-street; that was about 10 minutes after I had left the kitchen to go up stairs - I ran after her, and she went into Mr. Hill's, the pawnbroker's - I went to the door and knocked; she put her back against the door, that I could not open it - I got into the house, but she did not offer the plate there - I asked her how she came to do it; she said, she knew she had done it, and she would take me to the young woman to whom she had given it - I followed her to Homer-row, and there she ran from me - I saw her again the following evening, the 12th of February, when she came out of a mews in Tottenham-court-road - I saw the plate in the possession of the officer, and knew it to be Mr. Bartioli's.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am shopman to Mr. Jenkins, who lives in Crawford-street, Mary-le-bone. Here are three tea-spoons, two fruit knives, and one fruit fork, which were pawned for 10 s. by the prisoner last Friday week - she also asked, if I bought old silver; I said, yes. She went back, and returned with two wine labels and a cruet top, which I bought for 5 s. 6 d.

CHARLES CROOK . I live in Upper George-street, Edgware-road, and am a pawnbroker. I have a table-spoon and three tea-spoons, which were pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of February, for 16 s.

THOMAS SHELWALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250217-197

581. HENRY LUBBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , sixty-one yards of flannel, value 3 l., the goods of Benjamin Busby , in his dwelling-house .

BENJAMIN BALDWIN . I live with my uncle, Benjamin Busby, in Oxford-street , and manage his business. He does not sleep there himself - he pays the rent of the house. On the 1st of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the flannel was stolen - it had been about a foot within the door - I had seen it safe about a quarter before six - I saw it the same evening in the possession of the officer; the prisoner was then in custody - it has been measured since, and might not be worth so much as 40 s.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a constable, I saw the prisoner run from Mr. Busby's shop into Oxford-market - I pursued,

and raised the cry of Stop thief! - he threw down the flannel, and ran away - but was stopped soon after - I am quite sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lose sight of me at all? A. Yes; while the persons were gathering round you.

JOHN STAPLES . I live in Bartholomew-close, and am a hatter. I was passing Oxford-market on the night in question. I observed the prisoner run with a bundle of flannel under his arm. I did not hear the cry of Stop thief! or I would have stopped him; but I saw Martin pursuing him - I saw him drop the flannel in the kennel. I took it up, and took it into a respectable shop - I am quite certain he is the man who dropped it.

WILLIAM REED . I am a beadle. I pursued the prisoner, and saw him run across the street - I did not see the bundle - I heard a cry of Stop thief! - I ran near 100 yards before I got him - he had dropped the flannel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been looking for work and, as I was coming down Oxford-street, they said, I had stolen a roll of flannel.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18250217-198

582. GEORGE REYNOLDS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Townley , about eight o'clock in the night of the 19th of January , at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein seven candlesticks, value 16 s.; a pair of snuffers, value 1 s.; and a tray, value 1 s.; his property .

WILLIAM TOWNLEY. I live at No. 22, Curtain-road . I am married - my house was robbed on the 19th of January - I was out at the time, and was sent for.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am an attorney. On the 19th January, about half-past seven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner, in company with another lad, looking through the window of a house in the Curtain-road - it is a kind of broker's shop - I stopped nearly a quarter of an hour on the opposite side of the way, behind a timber carriage, till about a quarter past eight. I saw their hands repeatedly at the window, as if they were marking the window with their fingers, in the same direction as it was afterwards cut. I suppose they went to the window twenty times; if they saw a person approach, they walked away. I saw another person join them two or three times, but he did not stay with them. About a quarter past eight, I saw the boy who was with the prisoner, go away - he ran up the Curtain-road - I went in pursuit of him, and met the prisoner at the bar standing by an alley, near the shop window - I passed the alley, and then returned, and took the prisoner: I am certain of his person. Taylor had been watching with me; he passed the window two or three times, and had a good opportunity of seeing them. I gave the prisoner to Taylor, and went in pursuit of the other down the alley, but I lost him. I came round to the prosecutor's house, and found the prisoner there, and a number of other persons - he was charged with a robbery, and was endeavouring to conceal his hands. I took hold of his hands, and found one of his fingers cut, and the blood running down his finger - I asked him how it was done; he said, he had cut it with a knife. Some person asked him, where the knife was; he said, he had left it at a public-house, in the opposite corner of the alley.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I have heard Gray's evidence; it is all correct. I passed the prisoner several times, and saw him very clearly - I saw him with his hand in the window: I went over to Gray, and told him; a boy then went over and interrupted them. Two of them then made off, and the prisoner went into a court. Mr. Gray took the prisoner, and gave him to me; I took him to the shop: he said, he had cut his hand with a knife, which he had left in the public-house twenty minutes before - he afterwards admitted, that he had cut his finger with the glass.

JONATHAN VINSON . I am a headborough. About half-past eight o'clock on the evening of the 19th of January, I was sent for, and went to the house with the prosecutor. I found the prisoner there with Gray and Taylor. I took him into the parlour, and said, "You have got into a fine mess;" "Yes," he said, "I have; but, if you will not take me to Worship-street, I will take you to where the candlesticks are, and you shall have all the property returned." I then tied his hands, and took him to the watch-house - he then begged very hard to go with me, but I would not let him. I said, if he would tell me the number, I would go - he said, "I know why you won't let me go; you are afraid of a rescue."

ELIZABETH TOWNLEY . I am the wife of William Townley. On the 19th of January, I placed a candle and a candlestick upon a fender in the shop window. There were six pairs of brass candlesticks there, beside one odd one, two pairs of snuffers, and two trays: the glass of the window was quite whole at that time. I left the shop, and went down into the kitchen, leaving no one in the shop. I returned about a quarter past seven o'clock, or not quite so late, - I went to snuff the candles, and did not then observe any thing wrong or missing. I heard a knock at the shop door, between eight and a quarter past eight o'clock. I went up, and Mr. Taylor brought the prisoner in, and told me to take charge of him, as he had been robbing my window. He did not say any thing - I went and looked at the window; it was cut in two places: three pair of brass candlesticks were taken out, and an odd one; also one pair of snuffers and one tray: they were my husband's property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the street, and turned down the court, as I was going home, when I was taken by the gentleman; but I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17. Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18250217-199

583. GEORGE DANIEL LESLIE and WILLIAM EDDY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Dorothy Hill , widow , about 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the 11th of February , at St. Andrew, Holborn , ( Beatrice Hattersley and others being therein,) and stealing therein five sheets, value 10 s.; three spoons, value 6 s.; three gowns, value 20 s.; a shawl, value 6 s.; a cloak, value 10 s.; a table-cloth, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; a quilt, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 1 s.; a shirt, value 1 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s.;

a night-gown, value 1 s.; and a shift, value 2 s.; her property .

DOROTHY HILL. I am a widow, and live at 7, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. I occupy the house, and live in the front parlour. On Friday, the 11th of February, I went out to work, at ten o'clock in the morning, locking my drawers and my parlour door. There were five sheets, three silver tea-spoons, a table-cloth, a night jacket, and a shift unmade there. I was fetched back about six o'clock the same day. I found my son and daughter there; the door was open when I came home, and two or three people were there. I did not see any appearance of force about the door; it appeared to be unlocked; the drawers were broken open - I lost a cloak, three gowns, and a shawl. The prisoner Eddy's parents live in my first floor: I did not know him till I saw him before the Magistrates.

JAMES GRICE . I am a butcher and live in Eagle-street, opposite to Mr. Hill's. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 11th of February, I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner Leslie go into that house without any thing: he came out, in about ten minutes, with two bundles. I did not see any body ele with him, nor any one join him. I had before that seen a young man go in, dressed in blue, but I could not swear to him.

BEATRICE HATTERSLEY. I live at No. 7, Eagle-street. On Friday, the 11th of February, I was on the first floor, and heard a single knock at the door, at twenty minutes past three o'clock. I answered it, and a young man passed me, dressed in blue: he ran up stairs to the first floor back room; I do not know who he was; he knocked at the room door once or twice, but got no answer; he then ran down stairs, and I called to him and said, "If you please, Sir, have you any message;" he said, "I have no message, I will call again, bye and bye." I did not then know who lived in that room; but I have since heard, it was his father and mother. He went away; I heard the street door shut after him. As he was a stranger to me, I went down, and tried the street door: it was shut safe - Mrs. Hill's parlour door appeared to me to be all safe - I did not try it. I then went to my own room, which is up three pair of stairs - I did not come down again for an hour, when I came down with some dust, I then saw the street door open; I went to shut it, but I saw Mrs. Hill's parlour door open - I did not observe whether it had been forced open; I did no go in, but gave an alarm.

SARAH ANSLEY . I live at No. 34, Eagle-street. I was at Mr. Grice's shop about half-past three or four o'clock on Friday, the 11th of February, and saw a young man in blue go into No. 7; and, in about ten minutes, I saw a man of colour come out with two bundles on his shoulders; one bundle in a white wrapper, and the other in a yellow handkerchief: I then went out of the shop by the street door, and saw somebody who appeared to be the same young man, in blue going on before the man of colour - I watched them, and the one dressed in blue turned into the hair-dresser's; the other went to the bottom of Eagle-street, and turned into Red Lion-street - I do not know who the person in blue was, but believe it to be Eddy.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What do you mean by swearing, you believe it to be the prisoner? A. Because I saw him go into the house - I saw him again the next day. I was not told I should see him: it was between half-past three and four o'clock. I have lived in the neighbourhood some time; I have seen the prisoners before; they did not go together now in the street - the one in blue had nothing in his hand. I attended the Magistrates the next day, and another examination in the same week.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Did you see the man of colour go into the house? A. I saw him come out - I swear he is the person; I have seen him before.

BEATRICE HATTERSLEY re-examined. Q. You say you heard the knock, and a young man, in blue, came in, and passed you in the passage - can you tell who it was? A. I did not know him then, and did not see him when he came down; I only called to him. I am sure the person I saw at Hatton-garden is the person who entered the house. I went to Hatton-garden last Wednesday week. I am quite sure he is the same person - I marked him particularly, being a stranger.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. At the time you shut the door after him, did you not say that all was quite safe? A. Yes; it appeared so to me; it was an hour after when I came down with the dust, and saw the door open.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable. On Friday, the 11th of February, I took up the prisoner Eddy, at a public-house, in Eagle-street; he was committed to the New Prison, with two others, but he made his escape in a passage that goes to a New building. I had observed his person, and am certain of him. When he was takn at the public-house I do not know that we stated to him the nature of the charge: he was taken to the office the same night, examined, and committed.

WILLIAM THISELTON . I am a constable. I assisted in apprehending Eddy, at the Griffin, public-house, in Eagle-street, and three others. I took him again next morning, with Leslie, in Bell-court, Gray's Inn-lane; they were both together, with two women. Another officer found some things there in my presence.

WM. LEE. I am a constable. I took up the prisoners in Bell-court, on the morning of Saturday, the 12th February - I found between the bed and the sacking these things, with five skeleton keys, and three others; I do not know whose lodgings they were - there were some women there.

LESLIE'S Defence. I had but one bundle, and I believe the person is in Court who I had it from to take to Portpool-lane.

WILLIAM MEREFIELD . I live at No. 6, Red Lion-yard, and am a shoemaker. I have seen Leslie three or four years ago; I have entrusted him with bundles many times, to carry for me, which he delivered right, and returned me the money - he has been a servant.

Prisoner LESLIE. I was in company with this witness from two o'clock on that day till half-past five o'clock - I never was in the house that I was taken before in all my life.

WILLIAM MEREFIELD re-examined. Q. On the 11th of February were you in company with Leslie? A. Yes, at the sign of the Griffin, at two o'clock - he was there when I went in; I stopped there till a quarter before five.

Q. Did the prisoner stop all that time? A. He did go

out two or three times, but was not absent five minutes each time. I looked at the clock when I came away.

Q. Did you employ him to carry a bundle for you? A. Yes; he was to carry it to Portpool-lane; I gave him 6 d. to carry it - it was tied in this handkerchief - I left him in the public-house when I went away: he was to deliver the bundle to Mr. Jones.

Q. Did he deliver it? A. Yes, he did deliver it at the house.

Q. Were there any other persons drinking in the room besides him? A. Yes; three or four persons who I know, and have seen before, because I work for the house.

JAMES GRICE re-examined. Q. What was the colour of the bundles you saw? A. I did not observe them particularly - they appeared light.

SARAH ANSLY re-examined. Q. Did you notice the bundles particularly? A. Yes; one was yellow, and one was white.

Prisoner LESLIE. Most of the men that use that house were hackney coachmen, and have to work for their bread - they cannot be here two days running. Mrs. Hill has women of the town lodging in her house.

MRS. HILL re-examined. Q. What was the value of all your things? A. About 4 l.; that is a low and moderate value.

JURY to GRICE. Q. Can you swear to Leslie being the man who came out of the house? A. Yes; I have known him before - it was about four o'clock in the afternoon.

LESLIE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19. Recommended to Mercy .

EADY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250217-200

584. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , at St. Martin in the Fields , a knife, value 6 d.; a comb, value 2 d.; a piece of foreign gold coin, value 16 s.; six sovereigns, nine half-crowns, sixty-seven shillings, and ten sixpences; the property of James Willey , his master, in his dwelling-house ; - and JAMES HOYLE was indicted, for feloniously receiving the said goods and monies, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute.

JAMES WILLEY. I am an accountant , and live in Buckingham-street, Strand , in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields. The prisoner, Young, was an errand-boy in my service; he went away early in the morning of Friday, the 28th of January. I did not know of his going; there were some wages due to him, but he did not apply for them; he was brought back on the Sunday following. I have an iron safe where I keep books, papers, and a cash box: it is on the right-hand side of my desk in the front parlour. Young was to bring me the key of that iron safe to my room on the first floor, when the office was closed. I was at home on the 37th of January, till five o'clock; then went to the theatre: I returned, and found the key in the back room first floor, on the table, which was its proper place. Next morning, about nine o'clock, I gave it to my female servant, to take it down to my clerk; - soon after this, my cash-box was brought up to me by Anely, my clerk; it was broken open, and all the coin taken out of it. I can swear there were five sovereigns in it, which I put in immediately before I went out on the previous evening. The box was then perfect; I locked it, and kept the key of it: there was a piece of gold coin in it the evening before, called a Louis d'or; it was gone in the morning; the prisoner was brought to me on the Sunday following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not seen the prisoner's father before this - he was brought to you? A. Yes.

Q. Had you not promised, that if the Louis d'or were brought back, you would not prosecute him? A. No; his father brought him to me.

Q. Did no one in the boy's presence promise him that if the Louis d'or were brought back, he should not be prosecuted - or was any thing said, that if there was a confession made, he should not be prosecuted? A. No; I had not called on his father, nor did I send my brother to his father's house: I sent him with the officer to make a general search for the boy, and very likely he went to the father.

JOHN WILLEY . I am the prosecutor's brother. I went to look after the prisoner. I did not promise to the father, that if the Louis d'or were produced. I would not prosecute him: I said I would use my influence with my brother not to prosecute to death. I will be on my oath that I never said, if a confession was made he should not be prosecuted.

JAMES WILLEY re-examined. Q. What did you first say to him? - A. I asked him what could induce him to break open my cash-box? He said he was led on to it by another boy, and if I would go with him, he would point him out; and that he had not only some of the money upon him, but he had the Louis d'or. I desired him to wait till I sent for an officer; he did so, and the officer took him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any other person in the house to entrust with the locking up of your safe? A. Only during office hours. My clerk is a person of much more experience than the prisoner. My brother does not live with me; - the prisoner had lived two months and a day with me; - I told his father it was a very sad thing that his boy should be guilty of such a thing: he said he hoped I should be merciful; - I said, I would consider of it.

JOHN WILLEY re-examined. I live at Canonbury; - I assist my brother in his business, but at night I leave. On Thursday, the 27th of January, about a quarter past 7 o'clock I put one sovereign, nine half-crowns, twenty-seven shillings, and nine-pence in half-pence, in a bag in the desk. I had an office there, at the back, in which there was a comb and a knife. There are three rooms at my brother's house, and the middle room is my office. The knife was on the desk, and the comb in the drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know a lady named Capel? A. No.

Q. Did you say to the father at any time before the boy was taken up, that if the Louis d'or was returned you would not prosecute? A. No, I did not promise that if the father found the property, he should not be prosecuted.

ELIZA STUART . I am servant to Mr. James Willey. On Thursday, the 27th of January, the prisoner Young went to bed about a quarter past ten o'clock; next morning he went down about seven; I was not up at the time; we came down at half-past seven, and he was gone. We

had heard the door shut between seven and half-past seven. I looked into his room about half-past eight, and his things were taken away; they used to lie on a chair in his bed-room. There was a pair of shoes and an old comb left, that was all; - I missed his suit of clothes which he generally wore in a morning to do his work, and the others he had on. Mr. Willey gave me the key of his safe, after nine o'clock; I went and gave it to Mr. Aneley, the clerk.

SAMUEL NELSON ANELEY . I am clerk to Mr. Willey. - On Thursday evening I saw Mr. John Willey come with some money, which he placed on his brother' desk - it was in a bag. I left the house about a quarter past eight o'clock - the bag was on the desk when I left - I returned in the morning at nine; the last witness brought me the key of the safe, but it was not locked. The cash-box was broken open, and the papers hanging out on each side; I took it up in that state to Mr. Willey.

Cross-examined. Q. You stay till the business of the office is over? A. Yes; I could lock the safe - I have done it. The prisoner was a mere serving boy in the house - it was well known in the house that Mr. Willey kept his valuables in that safe - it would require some force to open it. Young was not there the next morning.

GEORGE LEADBITTER . I am a patrol. On the night of the 30th of January I went to Mr. Willey's, to take charge of the prisoner Young; and from the desk or table in the office, I took some silver, which amounted to 21 s. 6 d., and a comb. The prisoner Young had put it on the table before I got there; Mr. Willey said so in his presence. I took the knife from Mrs. Willey. In consequence of information, I went to take up the prisoner Hoyle - I found him in a street near Newport-market; I think Porter-street - I found on him a sovereign and a louis-d'or - he did not say how he came by them - he said he had given a boy, named Hobbs, three sovereigns to take back to the gentleman - he perfectly understood what I took him for - he had been talking about it before. When I first went, he said, "I did not persuade Young to do it. I gave that boy the money to take back to the gentleman." I took the money from the boy (Hobbs), who was standing by at the time.

JOHN HOBBS . I am fifteen years of age and live in Two Star-court, Broad-street, St. Giles. My father is a bricklayer - I know the two prisoners - on the last Sunday in January, I saw Young between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; he was with Hoyle in Lacell's-place, as I had heard of Young being in trouble, and he was taken into my house - his father was sent for, and he told his father not to be afraid, as he would go down to his master with him, and that James Hoyle had 6 l. of the money. Hoyle had been sent away - he went when my mother went out, and brought Young in. My father, Mr. Young, the boy, and Mrs. Young, I believe, went to the master's. I then took a walk down Drury-lane, and saw Hoyle standing against a door. I said, if he had any money, it would be better for him to go and give it up. He then gave me two sovereigns, and a Napoleon, as he called it. I told him Young had gone with his father and my father to his master. I did not tell him what Young had said - I told him, if he had any money, to go and deliver it up, and then he gave me those three pieces of gold. I kept them in my hand, thinking to go to his master; but when the officer came, I gave it to him - we were then talking at the corner of Porter-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Are you certain the boy gave you the Napoleon? A. I gave it to Lead bitter. Hoyle said, next morning he would go and get the rest.

HOYLE'S Defence. I did not persuade James Young to commit the robbery. I did not know that he had done it. Four witnesses gave the prisoner Young an excellent character.

YOUNG - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14. Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, and prosecutor on account of his former good character and the temptations put in his way .

HOYLE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged .


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