Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th January 1825.
Reference Number: 18250113
Reference Number: f18250113-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, 13th of JANUARY, 1825, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons: and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1825.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir George Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudias Stephen Hunter , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Crowder , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

Edward Weggins ,

George Cockburn ,

Edward Edwards ,

Robert Glover ,

Edward Peppercorn ,

Thomas Reynolds ,

Ralph Rod. Bassett ,

John Seabrook ,

Thomas Wake ,

Wm. Edden ,

Wm. Watson ,

Wm. Meeson .

2nd London Jury.

John Godfrey ,

John Hodges ,

Wm. Moore ,

Wm. Rees ,

Charles Wilson

Wm. Beesley ,

Edward Dunsby ,

John Llewelin ,

Richard Loader ,

Joseph Somerfield ,

John Meadows ,

John Keen .

1st Middlesex Jury.

John Lovegrove ,

George Archer ,

Philip Lewis ,

John Wilson ,

John Brassey ,

Robert Hendrew ,

Wm. Davis ,

Thomas Smithson ,

Hugh M'Devi ,

Robert H. Hallewell

Timothy Hobbs ,

John Fairey .

2d Middlesex Jury.

John Goodwin ,

Wm. Gurling ,

Thomas Shade ,

John Cock ,

John Ford ,

Wm. Fosbrook ,

John Battis ,

John Shaw ,

Dennis Hine ,

John King ,

Henry Lee ,

John Barnard .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Bowen D. Meredith ,

Thomas Oakey ,

John Torey ,

Wm. Smith ,

Richard Haddon ,

John Poole ,

Wm. Brandon ,

George Jackson ,

Jacob Warwicker ,

Thomas Davis ,

George Mason ,

James Telton .

4th Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Gagan ,

Samuel Shelly ,

Thomas Marshall ,

Thomas Hill ,

Thomas Lawrence ,

Wm. Daniels ,

Wm. Ashley ,

Wm. Deacon ,

Wm. Sorrel ,

Wm. Conset Wright ,

Thomas Masterman ,

Richard Levitt .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 13, 1825.

GARRATT, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18250113-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

182. MARY LLOYD and MARY LARKIN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Allen , on the King's highway, on the 4th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a gold pin, value 2 s.; a shilling, and a sixpence , his property.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL ALLEN. I am in the service of John Adolphus , Esq., the barrister. On the 4th of November my master went to a party in Harley-street, and about a quarter to twelve o'clock I was directed to procure him a coach; I went to Mary-le-bone-street - there was none on that stand; I was going to Paddington-street, and at the corner of Little Chesterfield-street I saw the prisoners talking to a man; Lloyd followed me down Little Chesterfield-street, and asked me to go home with her; I refused - and opposite to the door of a house in that street she suddenly pulled hold of me by the arm, and pulled me very hard into a passage; the door was open, or ajar; she shut it with her foot or arm. I endeavoured to get away - she told me not to be in a hurry: she pulled me along the passage, and I fell upon my head down the kitchen stairs - she was pulling me up, and at the same time tried my breeches pocket; she pushed me into the kitchen, and bolted the door, and then asked if I was going with her - I said I would not; she demanded 1 s. 6 d., and in order to get away to fetch the coach I gave it to her - she then demanded 2 s. 6 d.; I said if she would return the 1 s. 6 d. I would give her half-a-crown - she did so, and I said as she was so imposing I would not give her any thing. I endeavoured to get out: she called to Larkin, and unbolted the door to let her in. When Larkin came in she put the light out; the door was bolted again. I struck several blows at them, and got to the door, and pulled it open, and was rushing up stairs - my head then came in contact with something; Larkin then came and caught hold of my coat - I got from her, and got up; she followed, and caught me round the waist, and put her face to mine; I shoved her back; she caught me by the cravat, and took out my gold pin. I got to the door; she endeavoured to catch hold of me again - I pushed her into the street, called watch, and she was secured; she denied having my pin, but produced it at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far did you walk with her before you got to the house? A. She ran after me, and took hold of my arm about six yards from the door. I was sober. I could see no watchman. I had my hands in my pockets, or I could have got from her, if I had been aware of it. She said she would let me out directly.

Q. Did not Larkin say she had a pin, and if you described it you should have it? - A. No; she denied having it.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and took Larkin to the watch-house. When the watch-house keeper was writing the charge she produced this pin, and asked the prosecutor if it was his - he said it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say,

"I have found a pin on the ground, and if it is your's, here it is?" A. Not that I heard, but I did not particularly notice what passed. As we went to the watch-house she asked if he got his pin would he make it up - he insisted upon her going to the watch-house.

The prisoner Lloyd put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had accosted her, and accompanied her to Larkin's room, where they remained half an hour, when he gave her 1 s. 6 d., having promised her half-a-crown - that he took the 1 s. 6 d. from her in consequence of her complaining to him; words followed, and Larkin came in and turned him out. Larkin's Defence was to the same effect, and stated that she had found the pin on the floor of the room, and he must have dropped it in the scuffle with Lloyd.

DANIEL ALLEN re-examined. Larkin caught me by the cravat, and took out the pin, I am certain - and when I got to the street door she denied having it.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you ever say to any one that you might have dropped the pin? A. I never did, nor any thing to that effect. I saw Peter Hill at the office; he offered me 10 s. to say I had lost the pin when I was in the yard of the police office; I said I would have nothing to say to him - that is all that passed between us.

PETER HILL . I live at No. 1, Lawrence-street, Bloomsbury. I was at the office when this man made his charge - I cannot say whether it was taken down in writing or not. I heard the Magistrate order the prisoners to find bail for an assault. I had a long conversation with the prosecutor at the office; he said he did not know, but he might have dropped the pin, and that he should not have appeared against the prisoners, but from his master's compulsion.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you? A. I live on some little property, left me by my father, who died last Michaelmas twelvemonth. I have known Larkin from her infancy; I met her sister, who told me she was ill custody. I never offered the prosecutor 10 s. to say he had dropped the pin, I swear that. I offered him no money.

Q. What occasion had you to talk with him? A. I wished to know what she was charged with.

Q. Did you say to the Magistrate when the prosecutor gave his evidence,

"Why, this man has just told me that he might have dropped the pin?" A. No, I have no recollection of saying so. I am sure they were ordered to find bail, for I attended with bail in the evening. The Magistrate approved of them, but a whispering took place between the officer and Magistrate, and he then required time to enquire.

DANIEL ALLEN. (Looking at the depositions taken before the Magistrate,) these are the examinations; I signed them that morning - there was only one examination.

PETER HILL re-examined. Q. Did you hear what Allen stated to the Magistrate? A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him say,

"When I got into the passage Larkin held me round the waist, and then I felt my shirt pin wrenched from my breast?" A. I cannot recollect the particular words - he made a charge of taking a pin. I did not tender myself as a witness. I lived in Chesterfield-street last Session, in the same house in which the robbery happened, but at the time of the robbery I lived in New Tuthill-street; I moved to Chesterfield-street on the day after the robbery, as their lodging was vacant; I had lived there three or four weeks before, for about two months. I moved to Lawrence-street three days ago. I have done no work since this property was left me - I may have changed my lodgings ten times since I received my legacy. I was not within two miles of Chesterfield-street on the night of the robbery.

The prosecutor's deposition being read was precisely to the same effect as his evidence in Court.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-2

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

183. WILLIAM JOHN PEARCE and JOHN SCARCE were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Wilberforce , on the night of the 16th of November , and stealing a coat, value 3 l.; a cloak, value 5 l.; five pairs of stockings, value 1 l.; a tea pot, value 10 l.; seventeen silver spoons, value 7 l.; ten silver forks, value 2 l., and two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , his property.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WILBERFORCE, JUN. ESQ. I live on Onslow-terrace, Brompton, in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington . On the 17th of November, rather before seven o'clock in the morning. I was called up by my servant, and found the window of a room on the ground floor, looking into the garden, open; the fastening was wrenched out of the wood work, to which it had been screwed. There was a dirty footmark on the bed, which is immediately under that window. About two hours after, upon looking, I found two small matches in the room; the window was propped up by an iron instrument. The plate closet was broken open, and the plate which was in use all gone; most of my plate had been previously sent to my father's. I missed the articles stated in the indictment; some of the stockings were ribbed, and some plain - they were marked with my name at full length. I went into the garden about nine o'clock that morning, and saw footmarks immediately under the window, but the ground being hard they were not distinct. I saw some very distinct impressions about one hundred and fifty yards from the window; they were measured in my presence, with a stick - they were measured again a fortnight after, and a notch cut in the stick to mark the size of the smaller one; the other was the length of the stick.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The only footsteps you measured were at some distance from the window? A. Yes, but I could trace them up to the window. The garden is about three hundred feet long. I traced two distinct footsteps, from the bottom one hundred and fifty yards up, till they came to the lawn, on which of course there were no marks. I traced them from the lawn to a soft bed, under the window. The impressions were nearly two inches deep.

ELIZABETH PEARCE . I am in Mr. Wilberforce's service, and fastened the catch of the window between five and six o'clock the evening before the robbery, and locked the room door when I went to bed; I have the care of my master's linen - he had some plain and ribbed silk stockings; the ribbed ones were marked, in silk, with his name in full. I missed three pairs of ribbed, and two pairs of plain. The garden door was forced open - I had fastened it the night before, and the bed-room door was forced open, to enable them to get to the plate closet; nobody slept in the bed-room.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you shut up the bed-room? A. Between five and six o'clock; I do not think that the shutter was screwed quite tight, as it is difficult to fasten. The hasp of the window was wrenched off; I had fastened it, and barred the shutter. I did not lock the room door till about eleven o'clock - the stockings were in a chest of drawers in that bed-room.

ANN GAVERICK . I am cook to Mr. Wilberforce. On the 16th of November I fastened up part of the house, and tried the bed-room door after Pearce. I was the first person up in the morning, and found the door open, and the garden door also. The plate cupboard was broken open.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 29th of November I and Shelswell searched a house at Chiswick; we found Pearce in a back room, on the first floor; Shelswell went up first; I was down in Scarce's room, on the ground floor. I found a variety of house-breaking implements in his room - I then went up to Pearce's room, and saw a hat box, with three pairs of silk stockings in it; I took out one pair, and Shelswell two; we did not examine them then, but at the second examination I could distinctly make out the name of Wilberforce, which had been picked out. Mr. Wilberforce gave me a stick at Queen-square: I went to Tothill-fields prison, where the prisoners were in custody, and measured Pearce's shoes or boots - I think he wore boots; they were exactly the same length as the stick; Scarce's differed about 1-8th of an inch from the notch.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear that the name is

not Wilkinson? A. I read it Wilberforce. Their feet are about the usual length. When Pearce saw that the length corresponded, he said they were too tight for him, as he had had them mended.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I was with Burridge, and went first to Pearce's room; his wife was in bed. I found two pairs of silk stockings in the box. I believe Scarce is landlord of the house.

(Stockings produced and sworn to.)

PEARCE'S Defence. On the Thursday or Friday before my apprehension, Scarce and his wife were out, a man came and asked me to recommend him to some apartments - I said my landlord talked about letting a room; he said he was going to Brentford, and would call about six o'clock - he left these stockings, tied in a handkerchief, with two oranges, till he called, but never came.

SCARCE'S Defence. I found the house-breaking tools buried in my garden.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-3

184. WILLIAM JOHN PEARCE and JOHN SCARCE were again indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Fair , on the night of the 27th of August , and stealing two blankets, value 24 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; a tea tray, value 5 s.; a caddy, value 2 s.; two decanters, value 8 s.; three wine glasses, value 2 s.; a hat, value 18 s.; four coats, value 6 l.; five waistcoats, value 1 l.; four pairs of trowsers, value 30 s.; a pair of boots, value 10 s.; three shirts, value 20 s.; two tablecloths, value 7 s.; two breast pins, value 6 s., and three sovereigns , his property.

WILLIAM FAIR . On the 27th of August I lived at Shepherd's bush, Fulham ; I went out about eight o'clock at night, after securing the house, and left nobody there. I returned at one o'clock in the morning, found the door forced open, and missed wearing apparel and furniture, worth 19 l.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you pay the rent and taxes of this house? A. No. I am a horse patrol of Bow-street, and they are paid by the conductor of the establishment. I have it entirely for my own use, and live in it alone. I have so much a week, and a house to live in; it is not used by my employers for any purpose whatever.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . On the 29th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning. I searched Scarce's house, and in the front parlour, (which Pearce said he rented). I found a small skeleton key and three common keys, and behind a box in that room I found a waistcoat, and on the opposite corner a pair of trowsers; Fair came to the house - we found a shirt collar in the hat box, which he claimed.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I searched Scarce's bed-room, which is the back parlour, and found a phosphorus box, a skeleton key, and two centre bits - and there was a shirt collar between the sacking and the bed.

JOSEPH DREW . I am an officer, and accompanied the other officers in this search, and in Scarce's back parlour I found two skeleton keys, three chisels, a centre bit, a punch, and a file.

WILLIAM FAIR. This is my waistcoat; I had had it three years: the trowsers are also mine, and the shirt collars. I lost the articles stated in the indictment.

PEARCE's Defence. I bought the waistcoat and trowsers four months ago, of a man named Lawrey, who the officer knows is now dead.

JOSEPH DREW. He said this at the office. I understand Lawrey has been dead this three months.

SCARCE's Defence. I borrowed the collar of Pearce's wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-4

185. WILLIAM JOHN PEARCE and JOHN SCARCE were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , five saws, value 1 l.; sixteen planes, value 2 l.; a stock and center bit, value 10 s.; three screw drivers, value 18 d.; a bevil, value 3 s.; a square, value 2 s.; two gauges, value 1 s.; two chisels, value 1 s.; two hammers, value 18 d.; a pair of pinchers, value 18 d., and a basket, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Ezard .

HENRY EZARD , JUN. I am a carpenter, and live at Brentford. On the night of the 9th of November, I locked up these tools in my father's work-shop (his name is Henry) and next morning missed them. On the 17th of December some of them were produced at Queen-square; the tool chest was wrenched open. The shop door must have been opened by a skeleton key.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . When I searched the prisoner's house I asked Scarce if he had any duplicates - he went to a cupboard in the back parlour, and gave me some from under a cup; I said,

"Have you got no more? these are not all;" he then gave me a few more from another part of the cupboard - and one of them led me to Courtney's - Drew gave me some duplicates, which led me to Debenham's and Graham's.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I am apprentice to Messrs. Courtney and Page, pawnbrokers. I have two saws pawned on the 10th of November, by Scarce, to the best of my knowledge, for 4 s. - he pawned ten planes and four squares at the same time, for 4 s. The duplicate produced is what I gave for the saw.

JOSEPH DREW . I accompanied Burridge to the house, and asked Pearce if he had any duplicates; he gave me three from his pocket, and I found one on the mantel shelf. I marked them, and gave them to Burridge.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Dutton, pawnbroker, Queen-row, Pimlico. On the 10th of November I took in six planes, a saw, a spoke shave, hammer, screw driver, two chisels, two gauges, and a square, for 7 s.; I have no recollection of the person, but I gave him one of the duplicates produced.

LEONARD NEEDS . I am shopman to Messrs. Graham and Stocks. Here is a duplicate which I gave to a person who pawned a stock, fifteen bits, a screw driver, a bevil, and a center bit, on the 11th of November, for 3 s., in the name of William Smith - I believe Pearce to be that person, but cannot be positive.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PEARCE's Defence. I was working at Roberts's, at Westminster, and in returning I went into the Bag of Nails, public-house, at Pimlico, where a man, calling himself Smith, said he was going to work at Windsor Castle, and I bought these duplicates of him, for 3 s.,

having a brother a carpenter, I intended to give them to him.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 32.

SCARCE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-5

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

186. ZACHARIAH PERMAN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Simmonds , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 18th of December , and stealing a coat, value 40 s.; two pairs of shoes, value 12 s.; a tablecloth, value 5 s.; a napkin, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 10 d. , his property.

JOHN SIMMONDS. I live at Finchley . On the 18th of December I went to bed last at night, and bolted the bakehouse door with three bolts; next morning, about a quarter to eight o'clock, I found it broken open, and the property stated in the indictment stolen. I found the prisoner in custody on the 22d, with some of my property.

JOHN LANGAN . On the 22d of December I and Wake were in a lane, leading from Colney Hatch to East Barnet - the prisoner was running out of a shed, and threw off a pair of wooden shoes, that he might run faster. About ten o'clock that morning I found in Mr. Rayfall's barn a great coat, a tablecloth, a pair of shoes, and a napkin, and gave them to the landlord of the King of Prussia, public-house - he gave them to Simmonds.

ROBERT WAKE . On the night of the 21st of December, about twelve o'clock, I found the prisoner sleeping in Rayfall's barn, and on the beam of the rowing mow I found a pair of shoes and a dagger - he was covered over with the rowing; there are two large and a small door to the barn, and instead of coming out at the small door he escaped over the large one, which was open above; I returned with a light, and found his hat, and a handkerchief which Mr. Simmonds claimed. The prisoner had left my service a week or ten days before. I was with Langan next day, about two o'clock, and saw him in a shed, three miles off - I said,

"There he is;" he immediately ran out, and I after him, for two miles, and then took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SURRETT . I am Mr. Simmonds's servant. I got up at a quarter to eight o'clock on this morning - it had been light for half an hour.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lay down in this barn, but did not know that anything was there.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing only . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-6

London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

187. GEORGE BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , a chest, value 2 s., and 84 lbs. of tea, value 22 l. , the goods of Peter Palmer .

2d COUNT, stating them to belong to James Pickman .

JOHN LINAN . I am a constable. On the 7th of December, about a quarter past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Angel-alley, Bishopsgate, and saw the prisoner and another man cross the street, with a chest of tea between them - I immediately ran up, and laid hold of the prisoner - he slipped from me, and ran across the way; the other ran down the alley. I got a man to mind the chest, while I secured the prisoner, who was never out of my sight. I then returned, and took him and the chest to the office.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not at first see only one man with it? A. No, both were carrying it between them. The man who I left in care of the chest is not here - I was absent about two minutes. A carman came up and owned it. I took notice of it, but not so as to know it by any mark.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am carman to Peter Palmer, of Somerset-street. On the 7th of December, about a quarter past five o'clock, I was in Bishopsgate-street, and about ten yards from Angel-alley I missed a chest of tea from my cart, and found it in two minutes. I had six chests, and was taking them to Mr. Pickman, and had a permit.

PETER PALMER . I am a ticket porter , and keep a cart. On the 7th of December I sent Roberts with nine chests of tea, to deliver to different persons. I know this chest by the number - the permit is not here.

Cross-examined. Q. You speak to it from your memory? A. No, from the number of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-7

188. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I live at Salford, in Manchester, and was present at Christ-church, Manchester, when the prisoner was married to Alice Wigans , on the 16th of January, 1815; I gave her away. I saw her in December last, alive.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. She was a stranger to you at the marriage? A. Yes; but I saw her afterwards at the prisoner's house, several times, and know her well.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Look at this - is it an extract from the parish register? A. Yes; I examined it myself - (read.)

MARY STEVENS . On the 5th of December, 1819 , I was married to the prisoner at St. Bride's, Fleet-street - he represented himself as a bachelor.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known him? A. Nearly twelve months. I am a widow. He lodged at my house in New Cut, Lambeth. We were married at St. Bride's because I was married there the first time. He came to me as a journeyman carpenter and a bachelor, and said it was useless for a man to be in business without a wife, and that he was forty years of age, and had come from Liverpool - that he had a mother, but no other relation. I lived with him till about two months ago, when he turned me out of doors at twelve o'clock at night. I did not hear of his having a wife till after I left him. I never told any one that I knew of his previous marriage; my son is nineteen years of age - he was not the cause of our separation.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did that son ever give you any uneasiness? A. Never. I have had three children by the prisoner - they are dead. He had 580 l. with me at our marriage. He referred me to his mother, as he called her, at Liverpool, to prove that he was single; I got an answer to my letter - he said he hoped I was now satisfied as to his

being single - I said I was. I have said to him since our marriage that it was strange he had no letters from his mother - he said she was offended at his marrying in London, and my having part of my property settled upon me - that she had never acted a mother's part by him, and he did not care for her. He has treated me very bad for the last year, and frequently stood over me with a quart pot, threatening to do for me. We both belong to the Westleyan Methodists.

DANIEL HARRIS . I apprehended the prisoner, and told him it was for bigamy - he said it was no such thing - that he had no other wife but the prosecutrix - but they might make it a breach of promise.

Prisoner's Defence. She was well aware of my being married before we went to church; she said she would look over all that as I was steady. When I lodged with her she took unbecoming liberties with me. I was completely drawn into her snare.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-8

189. JACOB MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a great coat, value 20 s. , the goods of William Watson .

WILLIAM WATSON. On the 8th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in Mr. Johnson's shop, at Aldgate - my great coat was in my cart, and seeing somebody on the shafts I ran out, and saw a man running with my coat; I called Stop thief! and he dropped it - I picked it up. The prisoner was brought back, but I cannot speak to him.

WILLIAM RILEY . I am an officer. On this evening, between five and six o'clock, I was going toward Petticoat-lane, and saw two men - I watched them; the prisoner was on the opposite side - one of them went and spoke to him: he then got on the shaft, and ran off with this coat - he dropped it, and I secured him without losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road, and ran to avoid a coach - a man ran from the cart, and dropped the coat; I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-9

190. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , sixteen shillings, and ten sixpences , the monies of John Donovan .

JOHN DONOVAN. I am pot-boy at the George, public-house, Gough-square . This money was in a paper in my waistcoat pocket, which was in a drawer in my bed-room, unlocked; I saw it safe on Friday, and on Saturday it was gone. The prisoner lodged in the house, and was in the room on Friday morning.

THOMAS GARLAND . The prisoner is apprentice to a shoemaker , and lodged at the George. The landlord told him in my presence that some money was lost from the pot-boy's room, and asked what business he had there; his master was called down, and examined him. I was talking to his master, and saw two boys in the street, beckoning - his master made him throw up the window and beckon to them; they returned it, but he said he did not know them. I opened the door to go to them, but they ran off. I took one, and asked him in the prisoner's presence what he wanted - he said to buy a ship of the prisoner; who said he was making one, but not for sale - he denied having the money, but on a constable being sent for, he said,

"If he has been stealing money I will not hold it any longer," and handed over a purse, containing 15 s. in silver - the prisoner then said he had taken it on Saturday, to spend on Sunday.

DANIEL KNIGHT . I live in Great New-street, and have known the prisoner for three months. On Sunday he gave me 15 s. to mind for him, saying he had received it as Christmas boxes, and if his master knew he had got it he would take it from him. I gave it up to Garland.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . Whipped , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-10

191. JAMES LIGHTFOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Isaac Deeley .

ISAAC DEELEY. I am a butcher . On the 27th of December, about twelve o'clock, I left the prisoner in care of my cart, in Warwick-lane , as he offered to mind it, and I knew him about the market. I gave him my coat, and told him not to go away. I returned in five minutes, and he was gone with the coat, but had left the whip; I waited for an hour - he did not return. On the 3d of January I saw him in the Fortune of War, public-house - he ran out, but was soon secured, and afterwards acknowledged selling it to a Jew.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-11

192. ELIZABETH LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , ten sovereigns, the monies of Benjamin Applebee , from his person .

BENJAMIN APPLEBEE. I keep a chandler's-shop . On the 5th of January, about ten o'clock at night - (I had been calling on several tradesmen to pay some bills, and was perfectly sober) - I saw the prisoner standing against a door in Gracechurch-street , and as I passed her she ran against me, as if intoxicated; she caught hold of my arm; I disengaged myself from her, and heard a sovereign rattling in her pocket with some copper - she went away immediately. I felt in my pocket, and missed ten sovereigns out of fifteen. I followed, and never lost sight of her; she crossed the road: I caught hold of her, and said she had robbed me. I took her down the street to a watchman - she put seven sovereigns into my hand, and said,

"Don't hurt me;" I said,

"Justice must be done;" I took the sovereigns in my hand to the watchhouse, and said,

"Before she is searched I will see what I have about me; here are seven - I have five left, and three are missing;" they began to search her; she took out three sovereigns, a shilling, and some halfpence from her pocket - they made up what I had lost.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take me up Leadenhall-market, and give me as I thought 4 s.? A. It is false. I never spoke to her, nor she to me.

JOHN FIELD . I am a constable. About a quarter past ten o'clock the watchman and prosecutor (who was sober,) brought the prisoner to the watch-house - he said,

"This

woman has robbed me - I have seven sovereigns which she has returned, but I should have fifteen;" he found only five in his pocket, and said she must have the other three - she put her hand into a small pocket in her stays, and gave me three sovereigns, a shilling, and some halfpence. She did not deny having taken it.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I had nothing but what he gave me, and I thought they were shillings. He said if I would send to him by any friend he would not appear against me, as he did not care for his 40 l.

PROSECUTOR. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-12

193. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a pair of boots, value 11 s. , the goods of Thomas Bowtell .

HENRY BAKER . I am shopman to Thomas Bowtell, a boot-maker . On the 1st of January, about eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner step about a yard into the shop, take a pair of boots off the floor, and walk out with them - I secured him with them three doors off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against them, and picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-13

194. ELIZA BROMETT and CAROLINE EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , a watch, value 22 s.; two seals, value 5 s.; a key, value 2 s., and a chair, value 6 d., the goods of Richard Nesbitt , from his person .

RICHARD NESBITT. I am a stamper at Somerset House. On the 7th of January I was at the Hole in the Wall, public-house, Fleet-street, with a friend, very much intoxicated, but knew what happened. I was going home about eleven o'clock, and in Smithfield , or that neighbourhood, I was accosted by two women - a pause of about two minutes took place, and they ran suddenly from me. I missed my watch, and by the light of a lamp I saw a woman running; I followed, and just as I came up to her the watchman came up, and we were both taken to the watch-house. I cannot swear to the woman.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. I was in Giltspur-street, and saw Edwards running - I followed; she got against the wall, into a nook, and looked towards Smithfield; I then saw Nesbitt following Bromett on the opposite side - I crossed, and took her.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. Bromett was brought to the watch-house. I went out and took a woman answering Edwards's description, but he said she was not the girl; she said the prisoners lived together in Peter-street; I went there and found Edwards in bed, with the watch under her holster - this was half an hour after. - Nesbitt was in liquor, but knew what he was about - he gave me an exact description of the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE GODFREY . I am inspector of the watch. I went to the watch-house between twelve and one o'clock, and found Nesbitt there; he said the shorter prisoner accosted him, but he did not like her, and preferred the other - that at last both ran away, and he missed his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-14

NEW COURT.

(1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

195. WILLIAM KEATS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , three shirts, value 6 s.; thirteen handkerchiefs, value 16 s.; two pieces of silk, value 2 s., and a waistcoat, value 6 d. , the goods of Francis Roper , his master.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-15

196. BENJAMIN WOLFE was indicted for feloniously receiving seventeen yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l. 10 s.; twenty-four shawls, value 9 l., and a wrapper, value 6 d., the goods of Zachary Langton and others, his partners, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BRODRICK (for the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-16

197. MARTHA BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , two sheets, value 10 s., and a pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Hall .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250113-17

198. WILLIAM BROWN and JOHN SIMMONS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 15 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. , the goods of George Cross .

GEORGE CROSS. I keep a butcher's-shop in the Strand, nearly opposite Catherine-street . I had a piece of beef stolen from the stall board in front of the shop, on the 21st of December. A person going by could have taken it.

WILLIAM DOMINICO . Between six and seven o'clock on the 21st of December, I saw the two prisoners together in the Strand; they were walking backwards and forwards before Cross's shop. I saw Brown take the beef from the window and give it to Simmons - they walked up the court, across Maiden-lane, and into several other streets. I followed after them, but there was no person handy to assist in taking them. I overtook them in Seven Dials, and took them with the beef in about a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS KENDRICK . I took charge of Brown.

JOHN GOODCHILD . I took charge of Simmons with the beef - it was afterwards taken to Mr. Cross's shop, but the man would not own it.

BROWN's Defence. I met this young man in the street - I asked him if he could tell me where to get a lodging; he said he could, and as we were going along we were stopped.

SIMMONDS's Defence. I found the beef near Mr. Cross's shop.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SIMMONS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-18

Before Mr. Recorder.

199. THOMAS LUSHINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a watch, value

20 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d., and a key, value 1 d. , the goods of Robert Sunman .

ROBERT SUNMAN. I live at No. 15, Princes-street, Pimlico , and am a carpenter . I had a watch hanging over my fire-place on the first floor, on the 12th of November; the street door is generally kept shut; it was stolen between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw it again at Queen-square - the prisoner was then in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At what time had you seen the watch? A. Between twelve and one - I don't know the number of it, nor the maker's name - it has been in my possession fourteen years.

JANE SUNMAN . I am wife of the prosecutor. The prisoner came to our house on the 12th of November, a little after two o'clock; he was in my parlour, where I was ironing - he said he was cold in his feet - that his master had sent him the evening before to his washerwoman, who was dead, and he had recommended me - I got a chair, and set it before the fire for him to warm himself - the watch then hung over the mantel-piece - he got up and put his foot on the bar, reached up his hand, and took it down - he put it towards his bosom and then rushed out of the house, saying he would bring his master's card at six o'clock. I pursued him - he ran into Warwick-place, and on his seeing me he got behind some houses, and I lost sight of him before he was stopped - in a moment he came in a direction towards me - I collared him, and accused him of taking my property - he said he had not got it - I told him he had flung it away. It was found in a lady's garden close at the back of the houses. I am quite sure it is ours. My landlord's son came up, and took him into the house till the officer came.

Cross-examined. Q. The man said he was coming back at six o'clock, but you did not wait to see if he would? A. No. I knew him before - he got a long way before me when he was running.

WILLIAM CAIN . I am the son of the landlord of this house. I heard a disturbance in the street, went out, and saw Mrs. Sunman holding the prisoner - she charged him with stealing the watch - I took him to the house till the constable came - I saw the watch - there were four or five other persons.

MARY YORKE . I live at No. 2, Warwick-row. I found the watch in my garden between two and three o'clock. I do not know how it got there. I heard Mrs. Sunman making a noise in the street at the time. I delivered it to Drew, the officer.

JOSEPH DREW . I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, but found nothing on him - he said he was innocent - I have had the watch ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I was in the house I did not see a watch - I wished Mrs. Sunman good afternoon, and she did so to me - she said nothing about a watch then.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-19

200. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a book, value 6 s. , the goods of John Porter .

JOHN PORTER. I live with my father, at No. 75, in Pall-mall . We lost a book from the shop counter on the 6th of January, about one o'clock. I was not there at the time, but Mrs. Porter raised an alarm, and I followed the prisoner, who had got to No. 99 - I came up with him - it was a Court Guide, quite new. He took it out of his pocket when he came back to the shop.

ABSOLAM GINN . I am door-keeper at the exhibition in St. James's-square. I was coming up Pall-mall and saw Mr. Porter running after the prisoner; I caught hold of him, took him back to the shop, and saw him pull the book out of his pocket.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. He was delivered into my custody; he had no money at all about him; he appears to be a very good scholar - I found some very excellent writing about him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope mercy will be extended to me - I did it from necessity, after a long trial for work; I came from Lancashire.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-20

201. JAMES FOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a watch, value 7 l.; a seal, value 1 l., and a key, value 6 d., the goods of William Cox , from his person .

WILLIAM COX. I live in Stafford-place, Pimlico, and am a surgeon . On Saturday, the 18th of December, I was on the point of entering Warwick-street, Charing-cross , going to the house of a friend, and observed, a little to my left, on the pavement, on the same side of the way, two men together, but I did not notice them particularly - they were advancing towards me - I expected they would pass me, but contrary to my expectation of their passing behind me, one of them came in front of me, and snatched my watch out of my fob. From his great dexterity he must have been, I think, an old practitioner. He took to his heels and ran away - I immediately followed him and cried Stop thief - I kept sight of him for some time - at that moment a witness, who was standing opposite to Mr. Shepherd's glass-house, pursued him, and another witness, who was a little forward, joined in the pursuit, and he was taken in about two minutes. A constable, who happened to be in the street, stopped him, and he was taken to St. Martin's watch-house, but the watch has not been found. From the general appearance of the prisoner and from one or other of us not losing sight of him, I think he is the man. I had lost sight of him for a few moments while he was turning the corners. It was a metal watch with a gold seal, and had cost me about 9 l.

RICHARD TOMKIN SMITH . I am an engraver, and live in Oxenden-street. I was in Pall-mall and heard the cry of Stop thief - I saw the prisoner turn the corner pursued by some persons. I also pursued, but lost sight of him for a few moments while he turned round Pall-mall East. I am sure he is the same person - he had got into St. Martin's-street before he was stopped; I did not see his face but from his general appearance I have no doubt of him.

JAMES BARTON . I am a painter, and live in Compton-street, Soho. I was in Whitcomb-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was then running, pursued by other persons - there was no one before him; I did not

lose sight of him till I caught him in St. Martin's-street - he asked what I was going to do with him - I said he had stolen something, but I did not know what. The officer then came up and took him. Mr. Cox came up and charged him with stealing his watch - he said he was innocent; but run because he saw other persons run.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home from Westminster - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and a man came and took hold of me - he said there was something stolen, but he could not stop with me as he had left some fruit - then the witness came and took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-21

202. CATHARINE FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , two sheets, value 12 s. , the goods of James Jones .

JAMES JONES. I keep the Peacock public-house, Clare-market . I lost two sheets from a bed in my attic on the 22d of December. I saw the prisoner in my house about twelve o'clock at noon on that day - she came for a glass of liquor - the stairs come down into the passage, and a person could go up them before they get to the tap-room. I had seen them safe about ten o'clock, and missed them while she was in the house. I went to Mr. Cameron, the pawnbroker's, about one o'clock, and found them.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am in the service of Mr. Cameron, pawnbroker, Strand. I took in two sheets for 6 s. about half an hour before they were claimed by Mr. Jones. I am pretty certain it was the prisoner who pawned them; she brought another pair the next day - I accused her of having stolen those she brought the day before - she denied it, and I thought from her denying it so strongly, that I might be mistaken, but I have no doubt she is the person; they were pawned in the name of Jane Mitchel , Drury-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD HEWIT . I am a stable-keeper. On the 22d of December I was in my yard, at the back of the Peacock, about ten o'clock in the morning of that day, and saw the prisoner go in at the back door, which opens into my yard. I did not see her come out again. I went into the Peacock about twelve o'clock; I then saw her taking a glass of liquor at the bar. I had heard of the robbery about eleven o'clock - I told Mr. Jones I had seen her go into the house before, while she was drinking her glass of liquor. I have seen her a hundred times before, and have known her these ten years.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I took charge of her on the 23d of December, for stealing another article at the Three Jolly Butchers, in Gilbert-street, Clare-market.

The Prisoner put in a written defence, which related to another indictment.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-22

203. ELEANOR THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a sovereign and four shillings, the monies of Frederick Mappen , from his person .

FREDERICK MAPPEN. I live at No. 13, Rose-street, Long-acre, and am a file-cutter . On the 1st of January, about ten minutes before nine o'clock in the evening, I was in St. Martin's-lane - my money was in my coat pocket - I was quite sober; I stopped to buy some nuts, and the prisoner saw me pull my money out of my pocket - I had never seen her before. I had 1 l. 10 s. 3 d. She came up in about two minutes, took me by the collar, and asked me to give her some gin - I endeavoured to get rid of her, but she kept hold of my collar. I then felt her hand in my coat pocket - she took the money out and ran up Star and Garter-court - I followed, and laid hold of her, and she flung down 3 s. 6 d. and said,

"That is all your money that I have got;" I called the watchman, who took her. I had not offered to join her company - there was 4 s. more found on her, but the sovereign has not been found - we heard it drop but could not find it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you offer to give me 3 d. to go up the court with you? A. No, I did not.

ISAAC PYKE . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and charged with stealing this money - she denied it - I searched her; she said what she had about her she had got for work; she did not say the prosecutor had offered her 3 d.

WILLIAM ROTTENBURY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with having robbed him. I heard some money drop; we went with a candle and lantern and found the silver, but not the sovereign; there were several other persons about the place.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work, and this man came up and said he would give me 3 d. to go up the court; I said there were some persons about; he then came after me, and said he would give me 3 d. more to go up the court - we did so, and he took out his money and dropped it himself.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-23

202. MARY WARDLE and MARY MOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , two sovereigns, a sixpence, and a tobacco-box, the property of Edward Powell , from his person .

EDWARD POWELL. I am a coal porter , and live in Vine-street, Westminster. On the 4th of January, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I had two sovereigns and 11 s. 6 d. in silver. I met the two prisoners in Oxford-market. I had been to receive my pension - the prisoners were quarrelling with another young woman; I stepped up to see what was the matter. I had two or three of my comrades with me; we left the women in the street, and went into a public-house. We did not get very intoxicated, but were a little the worse for liquor. We left the public-house about half-past two or three o'clock. I then met the prisoners again - Mott wished me to go with her, which I declined; she still followed me, and asked for something to drink - Wardle was then gone. I went into a liquor shop at the top of the Haymarket, and gave her a glass of gin; I then came down to the Broadway, and gave to Mr. Fox, a poulterer, one sovereign, to take 7 s. 6 d. which I owed him. I had then two sovereigns and 14 s. in my pocket. I told Mott I did not wish her to go with me; we then went to Strutton-ground , into a little street which leads to Duck-lane; I went to a house with her; to a room on the first floor, and staid there half an hour. I gave her 1 s. to fetch a pot of beer - she left me in the room. She said it was her own room. Three or four other

young women came in soon after she had fetched the beer; they pushed me down on the bed and cut my pocket off. I cannot state which of them it was, but I think it was Mott - they ran off and I after them, but could not overtake them; they ran into a house in the same yard. I went for a constable but we could not find them. I am quite sure that Wardle was one of the women who came into the room - she said

"Cut the b - r's pocket off," and they scratched my hand.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. I was applied to by Powell, about five o'clock - he said he had been robbed in Duck-lane by some of the women, and he would take me to the house; we went, but there were no women there. He then took me to another house, where he said he had been, but we found no person there. He described the women, and I took them up in consequence of his description. He appeared as if he had been in liquor but had recovered. I took Wardle on the following morning, about half-past four o'clock, in the same house, in the next room. As soon as the prosecutor saw her he said she was one of them; there was another woman in bed with her but he did not accuse her. I asked him if Wardle was the woman who took the money; he said No, she held him down - his hand had a scratch.

MOTT'S Defence. I had not seen the man before he came to me.

WARDLE'S Defence. I had been out and met a gentleman, who took me to a house in the Almonry, and next morning the officer took me. I had not seen the prosecutor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-24

205. JOHN MASTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , ten handkerchiefs, value 50 s., the goods of Giles Redmayne and Thomas Redmayne , privately in their shop .

JAMES SUMMERS . I am in the employ of Messrs. Giles and Thomas Redmayne, linen-drapers , New Bond-street . On the 9th December, the prisoner came about ten yards inside the shop, and asked for a yard of galloon, which would come to about 1 1/2 d.; he was served by Nightingale; one of my masters was in the shop at the time, but he is not here - the prisoner then went to a part of the counter, where the handkerchiefs were, but did not stand there long; Nightingale had given him change, and he found he had given him a halfpenny short; he saw the prisoner hurrying out of the shop, and followed him to the door; I saw these ten handkerchiefs at the office; they had our mark upon them, and are worth about 50 s.

WILLIAM HENRY NIGHTINGALE . I was serving the prisoner with a yard of galloon; he gave me 6 d., and I gave him change. I did not notice any handkerchiefs near him - I said he must owe me a farthing, as I had not one, and then I found I had given him a halfpenny short - I went after him to give it him, and saw him go behind a coach; I did not then know that he had taken any thing; I went up to him, and he ran away to the next street - I still followed him, and saw the handkerchiefs on the ground near him; they could not have fallen from any other person - I took hold of him; he was too strong for me, and got away; I pursued him, and did not lose sight of him, except for a minute, while he turned the corner - I am certain he is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was full twenty yards from the handkerchiefs; I was running down a turning, which is no thoroughfare, and was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-25

206. JANE HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a pelisse, value 1 s.; three frocks, value 1 s. 6 d; two petticoats, value 1 s.; two pinafores, value 8 d.; two spencers, value 1 s. 6 d.; two caps, value 10 d.; a shirt, value, 3 d.; a napkin, value 6 d., and 8 oz. of soap, value 3 d., the goods of William Rabbeth , her master .

CHARLOTTE MARIA RABBETH . I live at No. 15, Carey-street , and am the wife of William Rabbeth, who is a law-stationer . The prisoner was in my service for about eleven weeks - I did not miss these articles, till she had left; I did not suspect her, but her fellow-servant missed some of her clothes, and said she suspected Jane; she had left her box behind her, which I told her I wished to search; she behaved with great rudeness - the box was opened by the constable, Scott; she was not present - I found in the box, a nankeen frock, a white pinafore, a piece of soap, a napkin, a stocking, and sundry pieces of cotton, a napkeen pelisse, two spencers, two petticoats, a pinafore and two night-caps, which were afterwards produced by the constable.

WILLIAM RABBETH. I went with the constable, and found the things; I had met the prisoner by accident and asked her where she lived? she directed me to the place where she slept, but the things were found in a cellar in Eagle-street, to which I had been directed by another person.

HANNAH MOORE BOND . I live in Eagle-street; the prisoner did not lodge there, but left a bundle there; I have known her two years; the constable and Mr. Rabbeth came and took away the bundle which she had left there, about three days before; she gave me three little caps, and one or two little shirts, which she said her mistress had given her.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable - I went to Eagle-street, and found the things, which I have brought here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-26

207. JANE MILLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , three spoons, value 8 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s., and a pair of breeches, value 2 s., the goods of James Lake , her master .

JAMES LAKE. I live at No. 2, Porter-street, Westminster . The prisoner lived in my service nearly three years - I thought her honest; she went away on Sunday, the 12th of December, and did not return - I missed my spoons from a drawer in the kitchen; I was obliged to go to my employ the next morning, and gave orders to a nephew of mine to go to a constable; she was taken on the Monday - the spoons had been pawned; I found the waistcoat and breeches in pawn; she always had her money as it was due - we paid her 2 s. a-week, and her board and lodging occasionally.

THOMAS BATTY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a silver spoon, pawned on the 11th of December, a waistcoat on

the 10th, and a pair of breeches on the 6th, by the prisoner - I knew her before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL HASLOCK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I produce two tea-spoons, which were pledged on the 4th and 6th of December, in the name of Jane Millin; the prisoner is like the person who brought them, but I cannot be positive to her.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and found twenty-six duplicates on her; she owned her fault - I have known her some years, and considered her very honest, till lately, when she had got connected with some women who have led her to drinking.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-27

208. RICHARD SLEE was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS BUTLIN . I live in Whitcomb-street, Charing-cross, and am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money due to me; on the 2d of October, Mr. Watkins, of No. 6, Queen-street, Haymarket, was indebted to me to the amount of 2 l. 5 s. 8 d. - I asked the prisoner if he had received any money from them - he said they would pay in a short time, but they had not paid him any then; he left me on the 12th of October; he ought to have accounted to me for the money, as he received it - I applied to Mr. Watkins, after he had left, for the 2 l. 5 s. 8 d., and he disputed that amount; the prisoner was apprehended some time after - I told him Mr. Watkins said, that he owed me nothing; he could not deny it, because I had the bills and his own receipts - they are in his hand-writing; these are receipts for about 34 s. or 35 s.; he left me without notice, but on the day before he left me. I told him he must leave me in three or four weeks.

MARGARET WATKINS . I am the daughter of Mr. Watkins, of Queen-street, Haymarket. We had our bread of Mr. Butlin; the prisoner generally delivered it; Mr. Butlin applied to me for the 2 l. 5 s. 8 d. - I shewed him the bills, which were all receipted; there was nothing due on the 2d of October - I paid him this bill of 7 s. 6 1/2 d. - I saw him write a receipt at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-28

209. LEWIS ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , a watch, value 10 l.; four seals, value 2 l.; a locket, value 5 s.; two broaches, value 4 l.; a pair of ear-rings, value 5 s.; nine gold rings, value 18 l.; three pairs of buckles, value 10 s.; a child's coral, value 4 l.; a watch-chain, value 2 s.; a scent-box, value 2 s.; three shields, value 10 s.; four silver buttons, value 4 s.; two combs, value 1 s.; a watch-key, value 1 s.; a gold barrel, value 15 s.; a trunk, value 1 s.; two guineas, and twenty coins, value 40 s. , the property of William Henry Briant .

SARAH ISABELLA BRIANT . I am the wife of William Henry Briant. We live in Holloway-terrace, Mile-end-road; he is a coal-merchant ; the articles stated in the indictment, were in a small trunk, and were worth about 100 l.; the prisoner was quite a stranger - we were moving at the time, from Cannon-street-road, to Mile-end, and the trunk was put into the waggon, which did not reach Mile-end, till about five o'clock in the evening; it left Cannon-street-road between one and two - the box was taken from the waggon in Cannon-street-road , before we had finished packing up - I saw all the articles on the same day, at Lambeth-street Office; the prisoner was then in custody.

JAMES COWDEROY . I am Headborough of St. George's. I saw the prisoner run by my shop, in Union-passage, Duke-street, about a quarter of a mile from the place where Mr. Briant was moving from, with the trunk under his arm - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and pursued him - I found the box on a fire, at No. 29, Albion-street; it had been broken to pieces, and the articles taken from it - the prisoner was then at the next house; he escaped from there, and was taken in Bedford-street - I have the pieces of the box now here - the articles were found in Albion-street, and have been identified by Mr. Briant - I saw the prisoner go into No. 29, Albion-street, with the box under his arm; he was taken about ten minutes afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had but a short opportunity of seeing the man who passed? A. No; but I had seen his face, and am certain of him, as I had seen him before that day.

JOHN HORTON . I am an officer of St. George's, and live in Duke-street. I saw the prisoner pass my house, with the box under his arm - I was called to search the house for the property, and found it on the premises.

EDWARD TORPIE . I am a plasterer. I was working in Chatham-street, on the 9th of December, and saw the prisoner going by with the box - I stopped him afterwards in Stepney-fields - I had seen him come out of the house, next door to No. 29, Albion-street.

JAMES HUGGINS . I am the waggoner. I placed this box in the centre of the van; I did not see the prisoner near.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-29

210. ELLEN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , two sheets, value 3 s.; two pillow cases, value 1 s.; two blankets, value 1 s.; a pillow, value 6 d.; a quilt, value 4 d., and an iron, value 4 d., the goods of John Gaddis , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH HINCKES . I live in Mr. John Gaddis's house, in Long's-court, Leicester-square . I let the back attic to the prisoner on the 22d of December, at 4 s. a week, ready furnished - there was a flat iron among other things; she left on the Saturday week following; she has not made any payment, nor given notice. She left the room locked, and took the key; we opened the door, and the room was stripped of almost every thing. The articles stated in the indictment were let with the lodging. Last Tuesday week I met her in St. Giles's, and brought her down to Mr. Gaddis's house - the officer was sent for.

ANN ALLEN . I keep a clothes-shop. The prisoner brought me a piece of an old blanket, an old quilt, and a pillow - I bought them of her for 2 s., on the 30th of December; she said her mother had given them to her, and she did not want them, as she was going to Scotland. I have known her from a child, and she had a good character.

Her father was in the Custom House, but he is gone to Scotland.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL TURNER . I live at Mr. Norman's, a pawnbroker, No. 51, Princes-street. I have one sheet which I took in, in the name of Thompson, on the 23d of December, for 2 s. I cannot swear to the person who brought it.

THOMAS BATTEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, a sheet, two pillow cases, and a flat iron, pawned at different times, in one name, but I cannot speak to the person who pawned them.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she said she was very sorry for what she had done, and if the person would give her time she thought she could replace the things.

Prisoner's Defence. My work was very bad, and I hope to get into work in a short time, and replace them.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-30

211. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , from the person of Joseph Preston , two promissory notes, for payment of 1 l. each , his property.

JOSEPH PRESTON. I am a labourer , and have seven children - I came up from Market Drayton, in Shropshire, to London, on business. I lost two notes at the Pheasant, public-house, in Gray's Inn-lane - I had gone in there to get a glass of liquor, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning of the 15th of December - I had seen the prisoner overnight on Holborn-hill. When I went into the house that morning I had three notes in my pocket - two Birmingham and one Stafford; the prisoner went into the house with me, and asked me to give her a glass of gin. I was very ill-treated on the night before, and that morning likewise; I suspected she had robbed me on the night before, and I wished to try if I could recover what I had lost by her means; I told her I had been robbed on the night before - I had not been in the Pheasant many minutes before she robbed me of two notes by force - there was no one else there but the landlord's brother - I gave him a Birmingham note to get change; the prisoner said to the landlord,

"Put it by, and let him call again for his change;" I said,

"I must have my change." She then violently took the other two notes from me, in the sight of the person at the bar; I tried to prevent it - I did not tear the notes, but I held her fast, and shouted for assistance - no one came for some time, (perhaps half an hour;) the landlord's brother opened the door, and pushed us both out, and the prisoner made her escape into the Fox, public-house - she went along parlour, and wanted to make her escape the back way - the landlord of the Fox brought her back - I then held her till the officer came and took her.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not meet me between three and four o'clock in the morning? A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you not treat me then with some rum? A. No. I did not see you from the evening before, till half-past eight o'clock in the morning.

SAMUEL CRANE . I am not in any business at present. I was going to my lodging, at No. 10, Gray's Inn-lane, on the second floor, and saw the prisoner running up Gray's Inn-lane, and the prosecutor after her, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - I asked what was the matter, and he said he had lost all his money; I said she was running to a public-house - I saw her go in; I do not know the sign; I did not go into the public-house, but the prosecutor did, and I saw them come out. The prosecutor caught hold of her by the bosom, and she put some kind of papers into her mouth. I fetched the constable.

GEORGE KEY . I am an iron plate worker. I went to the Pheasant on this morning, to get a glass of gin, and saw the prisoner and the prosecutor struggling together, inside the door - the prosecutor was crying murder; I stopped a moment, and they were pushed into the street; I did see not what became of them afterwards. I went in, had my gin, and read the paper; the young man at the bar showed me a note that the prosecutor had left. When I went out I saw the woman in the custody of an officer; I told the officer there was a 1 l. note left at the bar - he said,

"We will go back and see about it." I saw the woman searched, and two notes were found in her mouth - they were country notes. I saw her take them out of her pocket and put them into her mouth.

JOHN MORANT . I am the brother of the person who keeps the Pheasant. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner come in on the morning in question; they called for a quartern of gin, and a pint of beer; they were there some time. The prosecutor put me down a 1 l. Birmingham note; I did not like to take it, but I kept it on the shelf till my brother came down; I believe my brother returned it to the man. I did not see any thing pass between the prosecutor and the prisoner, nor hear that the prosecutor was robbed till Weldhen came. I had heard the prosecutor cry murder, but he was so intoxicated he could not tell me for what; when he cried murder I went and asked what was the matter - he still kept hallooing out murder; I never heard that he had been robbed; the woman and him were quarreling, and he kept crying murder; I asked him what was the matter, but he could not tell me. I did not know that the prisoner was absent from our house one moment; she was taken from our house by the officer. I did not see her searched. When my brother came down he told me to go out of the shop - I did not see what took place afterwards. I had asked the prosecutor what was the matter, but he gave me no answer. The prisoner was in the room, but was not taking hold of him at all.

GEORGE KEY re-examined. I heard the cry of murder, and saw the woman. I cannot say that he was intoxicated. I saw the woman over his back, hitting him on the face, and she bit his hand - Morant could not avoid seeing that.

SAMUEL CRANE re-examined. I saw the woman about fifteen or sixteen yards on this side of the Pheasant - the prosecutor told me he had lost all; he did not appear to me so intoxicated but that he knew what he was doing.

JOSEPH PRESTON re-examined. I had had nothing the night before but a pint of porter, and had nothing that morning but a glass of gin, and a part of a pint of beer, which was not drank.

Prisoner. Q. We had three quarterns of gin and two pints of porter - Witness. No; one quartern of gin, and one pint of porter was all.

MATTHIAS WELDHEN . I was sent for to take the prisoner. The prosecutor did not appear to be intoxicated; he had got hold of the prisoner, and was covered with blood. I said to the prisoner,

"You have been doing something wrong" - she said,

"This old man says I have robbed him, but you know I would not." I took her into the Pheasant, and searched her; I saw her take her hand from her pocket, and put two notes into her mouth, which we took from her. I thought she had swallowed something else, and I took her to the doctor's shop, intending to give her an emetic.

(Notes produced and identified.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday morning I met the prosecutor at the corner of Hatton-garden - he asked me where there was a public-house, for he had left a sovereign, and could not find the house again - I told him there was no house open, but the watering house at the corner of Bartlett's-buildings, where he took me, and we had several glasses of rum - he then requested me to remain with him till day light, and he would pay me for my trouble, as he wanted to wash himself, for he was covered with blood; some one had cut his eye, and very much ill-used him. We went to several public-houses, till at last we came to the Pheasant, when he offered a country note, but the publican did not like to change it - therefore he left it, giving me two more to hold till we went to the coach office to get them changed. Before we left the Pheasant he forgot what he had done with his notes - when I told him I had got two, and the publican one, he insisted on having his notes, and called out murder, and said he would have it back from the publican, but I told him it was impossible till we had been to the coach office. By this time there was a number of people collected together, and I lost him. When I found so many people round me, and not having any pocket on, I put the two notes into my mouth for safety, as I found myself the worse for liquor. The man who took me brought me to the prosecutor, who then swore I had robbed him, but he was so much intoxicated he had entirely forgot giving me the notes to hold.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-31

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

212. SAMUEL M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , three tablecloths, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 5 s., and two shifts, value 5 s. , the goods of John Knight .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

CHARLOTTE KNIGHT . I am the wife of John Knight - we live in Griffin-street, Shadwell . On the 31st of December some linen hung to dry in the yard - I was sitting in the back parlour, and heard a noise, which induced me to go to the window; I saw that a person was taking the linen off the line - I cannot say who it was; it was taken away.

JOHN BADDEY . I live in Shadwell-market - I was coming by Shadwell-dock; Mrs. Knight gave me some information, and I took the prisoner with a sheet, and some other things under his arm. He was coming the back way from Mr. Knight's yard.

JOHN OLIVER . I am an officer. Baddey delivered a sheet to me, which I have here.

(Sheet produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the lane, and heard the alarm given; the things were thrown over the pales - I took them up, put them under my arm, and was going round to the place where the alarm was given - I was stopped.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-32

213. FRANCES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a blanket, value 3 s., and a pillow, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Freeth , in a lodging-room .

MARY FREETH . I am the wife of Thomas Freeth, and live in Queen-street, Lower-road, Islington . I let a lodging to the prisoner seven weeks ago; she remained there one month. Three days after she was gone I opened the door, and missed the pillows and blanket. I had given her leave to go, as she could not pay her rent.

JOHN BROWNING . I am shopman to Mr. W. Smith, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these articles, (to the best of my belief,) in the name of Ann Smith, on the 26th of November.

ROBERT WOOLEY . I am a Bow-street patrole. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of January, and found this duplicate upon her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250113-33

214. CHRISTOPHER ANGELL and THOMAS MANNING were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , two loaves of bread, value 2 s. 10 d. , the goods of John Morris .

JOSEPH TANNER . I am a painter, and glazier, and live in Punderson's-gardens, Bethnal-green. I was in Lamb-street, Spitalfields, about half-past twelve o'clock, on the 23d of December - I went into the street on hearing the alarm - I went to Red Lion-court, and saw the two prisoners, with each of them a loaf, walking up the court; I ran after them - they dropped the loaves, and set off running. I followed them, and overtook Manning, and another person took the other. Morris was pursuing them.

JOHN MACDONALD . I was in Brick-lane, and took Angell - I did not see any loaf near him; I heard the cry, and stopped him in Flying Horse-yard; I brought him back to Church-street, and then the loaves were lying on the ground.

JOHN MORRIS . I live in Lamb-street. I found the loaves in Brick-lane, at the corner of Church-street; I cannot say how many I had on the counter; I had several loaves. I was not in the shop at the time they were taken. I am certain they were mine.

THOMAS HART . I am an inspector of the watch. The two prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I asked them whether they went behind the counter or not - they said No, they went to the end of the shop, and being very hungry, they each took one.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-34

215. JOHN ALLIGAN and WILLIAM TAYLOR

were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two planes, value 2 s. , the goods of John Wooll .

JOHN WOOLL. I live in Silver-street, Edmonton . On the 18th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in my yard, and these articles were there - next morning I saw the door of the out-house open, and missed a box of tools.

CHARLES DUNKWORTH . I am a carpenter, and live at Edmonton. I had known the prisoners some time; Alligan came to my house on the 25th of December, and asked me to buy two planes - I asked him how long he should be before he brought them; he said about five minutes; he went and got them - I gave him 1 s. 6 d. for them - he wanted 2 s. 6 d. I had heard of the robbery, and gave information immediately.

HENRY WILSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoners on Monday morning. I have the planes here. Alligan said he found the planes in Sweetbrier-walk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ALLIGAN'S Defence. I had been to Edmonton poorhouse, and saw the planes in the ditch.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I met him with the tools in Silver-street; he asked me if my father would buy them; I said No, but some of the journeymen carpenters would buy them of him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-35

216. MARGARET HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , two sheets, value 5 s. , the goods of John Daish .

ALICE DAISH . I am the wife of John Daish - we live in Glass-house-yard, Aldersgate-street . On the 13th of December, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the first floor-stairs - I asked her who she wanted; she said, a person of the name of Edwards, a boot and shoe maker; there is no such person in that house, or in the next; my daughter-in-law came up at the time - I asked the prisoner what she had in her pockets, she said, it was a pair of shoes - I then thought she looked large round the waist, and my daughter said,

"Mother, you are robbed;" the sheets were found round her person; an officer was sent for; the sheets had been taken from a young man's bed in the house - I had seen them safe on the night before, and know them to be mine.

FRANCES DAISH . I am daughter-in-law of the last witness - I took the sheets from the prisoner; she at first said she found them on the stairs, but afterwards, that she took them off the bed.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am an officer. I took her into custody, and have the sheets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman named Taylor, sent me up; she said she would give me sixpence, if I would go and get the sheets, and if any one stopped me, to say I was going to a man of the name of Edwards.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoner has been tried three times before.

Reference Number: t18250113-36

217. JOSEPH HANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , six waistcoats, value 10 s.; three pairs of trowsers, value 9 s.; a jacket, value 6 s.; two shirts, value 5 s.; a gold pin, value 8 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; a sheet, value 3 s.; a table-cover, value 7 s., and a hat, value 1 s. , the goods of Isaac Phipps .

ISAAC PHIPPS. I am steward of a West Indiaman, commanded by Capt. Cook; the prisoner came on board in November, being recommended to the mate - I missed him from the ship, on the 12th of December, and on the following evening I missed the articles, which are here, and some others; the table-covering was not in my chest, it was in a drawer - I had seen them safe on Friday, and missed them on Monday.

JOHN JACOBS . I am a clothes-salesman, at Rosemary-lane. On the 13th of December, the prisoner brought three old waistcoats, and a pair of trowsers to me, and said he was in very great distress - I bought them of him for half-a-crown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-37

218. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Henry Gilpin , from his person .

HENRY GILPIN. About twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 18th of December, I was in Oxford-street - I was returning home with two companions; I observed three boys loitering before us; the moment I passed them I felt some person at my pocket - I extended my right arm, and took hold of the prisoner, and saw the handkerchief in his hand; he extended his left hand, and tucked something under his waistcoat - I searched under his waistcoat, but could not find it - I asked him who the boys were, and my friend pursued them; his companions came back, and one of them offered me a handkerchief, which was nor mine; they then got away, and I gave the prisoner in charge.

SHEARMAN CHESTERMAN . I was with Gilpin, and saw him seize the prisoner - I saw the prisoner pass a handkerchief to a companion on his left; and the other two companions walked down Charles-street; the prisoner called to one of them,

"Jemmy," who immediately pulled off his hat, and shewed a handkerchief, and said,

"Is this the gentleman's, if it is, he may have it?" but it was not; I then looked to see, if he had another, which he had not; I then went after the third boy, but he got away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from the Coburg Theatre, and got into conversation with the other two boys; the gentleman took hold of me, and said I had robbed him, but I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-38

219. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , a coat, value 20 s. the goods of James Lanworn .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250113-39

220. CHARLOTTE JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , an umbrella, value 5 s., the goods of Mary Robinson , and a bonnet, value 10 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Mortlock .

MARY ROBINSON. I am servant to Mr. Faint, of Nottingham-place . On the 22d of December, I was coming into the kitchen, while the prisoner was going up the area

steps; I saw the window open, and missed my umbrella - I called the man servant, and sent him after her - he brought back the umbrella immediately.

CHARLES WILSON . I am servant in the same family. I pursued the prisoner, and found her at York-gate, about two hundred yards from our house; I saw her put the umbrella at the door of the house, No. 11 - I took her back with it.

JOHN WILKIE . I saw the prisoner run up the street with two more girls, who said,

"She has got it" - I did not know what it was, till I saw the footman come back with her. I saw her throw this bonnet over some rails - I fetched it up myself.

ELIZABETH MORTLOCK. I am in the service of Mr. Faint. This is my bonnet, which was on a table in the kitchen.

Prisoner's Defence. It was done through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-40

221. HENRY ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , five gallons of oil, value 9 s.; a jar, value 2 s., and a basket, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Grace and Joseph Freeman .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am one of the City patrol. On the 16th of December I saw a cart going down the Minories, and two persons following it - I went after it to East Smithfield - I then missed the cart, and the persons who were following. I turned round, and saw the prisoner with this basket on his shoulder, which he said some man gave him to carry to a Mr. Davis - I asked him if he had a bill of parcels - he said No.

Prisoner. A person came to me, and asked me to carry it to the Four Awls, public-house, Four Awls-court, and the man took my hat - the witness then stopped me, and asked me who I was carrying it for; I pointed to the man, but he took me to the Compter directly - Witness. I do not recollect his pointing to any man: there were five or six persons round him. He used to drive the Woodford coach.

JOHN SIMMS . I am carman to Thomas Grace and Joseph Freeman - they are white lead manufacturers. I was sent with some oil from their premises to Lower East Smithfield; I got there about five o'clock. I had ten bottles of oil and two of turpentine - I had seen them all right at the top of the Minories; when I got to East Smithfield one of them was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-41

222. WILLIAM RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 80 lbs. of butter, value 4 l., and a cask, value 6 d. , the goods of Henry Harben the elder, and Henry Harben , the younger.

DANIEL TIBBLES . I am carman to Messrs. Henry and H. Harben, who are cheesemongers , and live in High-street, Bloomsbury. I delivered some tubs of butter for them on the evening of the 6th of January; I went to the off side of the cart, upon hearing a noise in the cart - I then saw the prisoner with a cask of butter, about four doors off; he threw it into the road, and ran away - I followed crying Stop thief! and did not lose sight of him till he was taken. I am quite sure of his person.

RICHARD CANN . I keep a chandler's-shop in Honour-street. Tibbles was delivering some goods at my shop, about six o'clock in the evening - we heard a noise in the cart - we both ran out; I went on the near, and be on the off side. I saw the prisoner with the tub of butter; Tibbles cried Thief! and he threw it down - we followed him to the top of the street - I then returned, and took up the butter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a chimney sweeper - there was a chimney on fire, I was running to it, and saw a man throw the cask down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-42

223. WILLIAM RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , an iron boiler, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Reynolds the elder, and Joseph Reynolds the younger.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS. I am in partnership with my father - we are tinmen and braziers , and live in Cromer-street ; I saw this boiler at our door on the 18th of December, at nine o'clock in the evening, when a person came in to buy a saucepan. The prisoner was brought to me the same night; I asked how he came by the boiler - he said he never had it.

EDWARD LAY . I am a carpenter, and live in Wood-street, near Cromer-street. I saw the prisoner at Edward's shop, loitering about; I waited a few minutes for my partner, and then we crossed the street, and watched a man come out of the shop, he and the prisoner went away together; they returned, and the prisoner took the copper on his shoulder, and walked away - I followed, and charged him with having stolen it; he said, he had not taken it, though I had detected him with it.

JAMES LESTER . I was with Lay, and saw him lay hold of the prisoner - I took the boiler to Mr. Reynolds', and asked if it was his; he said

"Yes" - I had seen the prisoner lurking about the door; we crossed over to watch them; his companion came out of the shop, and went away, he then returned, and the prisoner took the boiler on his shoulder, while his companion was standing at the door.

DAVID SIMPSON . I am the watchman, and took him in charge; he told me he had never seen the boiler - he seemed to be sober, but was rather violent.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to fetch a pot of beer, I met a man whom I never saw before, nor since - he said,

"Can I get you to carry a copper for me, to Leigh-street, and I will give you sixpence;" we went to the door of the shop, and he went in, and came out, and gave me sixpence, and the copper to carry to No. 6, Leigh-street.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-43

224. JANE CROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , a purse, value 4 d.; a half-crown, a foreign silver coin, value 6 d., and a penny, the property of Eleanor Eliza Hill , from her person .

ELEANOR ELIZA HILL. I am single . On Sunday night, the 5th of December, I was at the Standard, public-house, in Whitechapel ; I saw the prisoner there, selling oysters. I ordered 6 d. worth of them, and gave her 1 s. out of my purse - she refused that, and I gave her another; I was sitting at the table at which she was selling the oysters - I put the purse into my lap, and missed it when I rose to get up - I asked if she had seen it - she said No. I then told the landlord - he said,

"Call in the patrol." There was a half-crown, two shillings, a sixpence, and a small Spanish piece, and a penny piece, with a hole in it. The purse was found near the window, with the penny piece in it, and a button - but the silver was gone. I had been in the house about an hour, and had taken only one glass of rum and water.

Prisoner. You gave me half a crown, and I gave you 1 s. 9 d.? Witness. No.; I had but sixpenny-worth of oysters, and gave her 1 s.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send me for a quartern of rum, and pay for it? - A. No.

ROSETTA MURRAY . I was at the Standard, public-house, on this night - I saw Hill eating some oysters, and heard her say she had lost her purse, and while she was gone out of the room the prisoner took the purse from her pocket, and put it behind the board - I went and took it - there was only a penny piece with a hole in it, and a button without a shank. I saw her searched at the watch-house, and saw her put her hand into her bosom, and slip it down by the side of her; I mentioned it to the person who searched her, and we found half-a-crown lying by her side.

JOSHUA HALL . I am houseman at the watch-house in Wellclose-square. I searched the prisoner, and found two shillings, a sixpence, 3 s. 4 d. in copper, a Spanish piece, four shillings, and two sixpences - I found the half-crown by the side of the seat where she had been sitting.

PHILIP STIEBER . I am a constable. I have the money, which was given me by Hall.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have had that piece eight or nine months in my pocket - I got it from a sailor in East Smithfield.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250113-44

225. JAMES DEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , a pocket-book, value 3 s.; a reticule, value 1 s.; twenty-one sovereigns, eleven shillings, and four sixpences, the goods of Charlotte Cooper , from her person .

CHARLOTTE COOPER. I am single , and live in Fountain place. On the 7th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going along Old-street , towards home - I saw the prisoner near Golden-lane; he came round me, and snatched my reticule, which I had twisted round my finger - he ran up Norway-street - I followed, and cried Stop thief! I never lost sight of him; I saw him stopped by the witness - the reticule was then on the ground; Mr. Edwards took it up. There was a pocket-book in it, containing twenty sovereigns and eight shillings - one sovereign and five shillings were loose in the reticule. I had received the money at the Bank of England about an hour and a half before. He was stopped about one hundred yards from where he took the reticule.

ADAM EDWARDS . I was crossing Norway-street - the prisoner ran down the street, right against me; I stopped him - there was no person before him. I laid hold of him by the shoulder. I saw a quantity of silver at my feet; I stooped down, and found my hand upon the reticule - I put it into my pocket, and the prosecutrix came up and claimed it. There was a mob behind the prisoner. I am quite positive he was the person who was in front of the mob.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a headborough. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran up, and saw the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran to the place, and the witness laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-45

226. CHARLES FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , from the person of William Fitch the younger, a sovereign, and a promissory note for payment of and value 10 l. , his property.

WILLIAM FITCH. Last Friday week I received from my father a 10 l. note and a sovereign, and came to town; I got on the coach a mile on this side of Romford - the prisoner was on the coach, and I sat against him, behind: we talked as we came along. He said he was going to get off at Stratford, and wanted me to get off, which I did not - as we got on this side Mile End turnpike he got off, and said he meant to stop at the Two Bells, public-house; I got off there, and we had some mutton chops, some bread, and a pint of porter. He then asked me where I was going; I said to White's-place, Pimlico - he said he had a brother who lived near there, and he would go with me: we did so - he then said he was going to Doctors' Commons. We then went to Oxford-street, and into a gin-shop, and had a glass of gin. I had paid for the bread and beer at the Two Bells, and he for the chops. In Oxford-street he went into a baker's shop, and called me in; he asked me what money I had got; I told him, and showed the money, and the baker's wife asked me to leave it there - I said no I would not. I took the money in my hand, and when we got into the street again he asked me if I had got my money all right; I said Yes, and then I felt for it, and it was gone. We then went to North Audley-street, and he got me a lodging. When I told him my money was lost, he said some girl had taken it; I had no girl with me, but he had - the girl he had with him snatched a cane out of my hand which I had, but I had the money in my pocket after the girl was gone; he did not sleep in North Audley-street - I do not know where he slept; he ordered a night's lodging for me, and a pint of beer, which he paid for - he came there the next morning, and said he had been with a girl all night, and he had lost his watch; he then had his breakfast, and was looking at the paper, and said he saw a place, which I went after, he appointed me to meet him at twelve o'clock, at the same place, which I did - he then had a girl with him, and was half tipsy. He was taken into custody that day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where did

you come from? A. I came from Ingatestone, to get a place. I have told all the story which I told to the Magistrate. The prisoner borrowed 5 s. of me, and I had his watch to keep. I never was in London before, further than Whitechapel. I did not go into either of the parks; I was not in any house with a young lady, nor walking in the park with any. I was in a house where there were some young ladies. The prisoner asked me if I had lost anything after we came out of the baker's-shop - the girl had joined us in Holborn - the baker's-shop is in Oxford-street. I never said the girl had robbed me, and if I could catch her I would cut her throat. About four or five minutes after we came out of the baker's I put my hand into my breeches pocket, and missed my money, but I did not use that expression. I do not know the number of the note; I only know the red mark of

"16" on it; I am sure there is no other red mark on it: here is

"81" in a red mark on it, but that was put on when I was at the Police Office. I considered some time before I gave an answer, but I did not say I was not quite sure about it.

COURT. Q. Did you return the watch to the prisoner? A. Yes, on the same evening, in Oxford-street, because he said his brother would want to know where it was. I had only one sovereign with me; I did not tell the Magistrate I had five - my evidence was read over to me, which I signed. I had some other sovereigns, which I paid at Brentwood, before I saw him - I had but one when he came on the coach. I was not with any girls till I got to town; he took me to some house - that is where he borrowed the 5 s.: we did not stop there more than a quarter of an hour. He went out of the room with a girl, and left me there with several other girls; I sat still, and had no particular conversation with any of them. I know I had the money when we went to the baker's-shop, because I showed it there.

ROBERT MANDER . I live with Mrs. Adams. On Saturday morning, the 1st of January, I took two half gallons of porter to Great York-mews - the prisoner paid for it with a 10 l. Chelmsford note; the porter came to 1 s. 8 d. I took the note to my mistress - she could not change it, and I took it to Mr. Harper. There was a tear, and a red

"16" on it. I knew the prisoner before, by his coming to the house.

WILLIAM HARPER . Mander brought the note to me - I gave him change, and put Mrs. Adams's name on it.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Tothill-fields prison; he stated that he had left his place two or three weeks before, and said he had 5 l. or 6 l.; I asked him if that was all, and said he had left a 5 l. note at a public-house, at the corner of East-street and Paddiagton-street - he said No; I said he had, and I should bring the parties forward to prove that he had left it there. I then asked him to recollect himself, and he said if he had he had worked hard for it, and it was his own. He then said he had got it in Scotland, but could not tell the name of the place, and had had it eight or nine months.

WILLIAM HARPER re-examined. This 5 l. note I gave in change for the 10 l. note. I gave the change on the Saturday, and received the notice of the robbery on the Sunday.

THOMAS AUSTIN . The prisoner called at our house at the corner of Paddington-street, on the 1st of January, and paid this 5 l. note to me - I marked it.

THOMAS CANDIE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 1st of January - I searched him, and found four sovereigns and some silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Scotland with my master, and had taken 27 l. I had received this 5 l. note in Scotland, and changed it with a coachman who was going to the North.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-46

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 14. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

227. MATTHIAS FAGAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Teresa Peart , widow, about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of January , (no person being therein) and stealing a pair of boots, value 3 s., and four pairs of shoes, value 12 s. , her property.

TERESA PEART. I rent a shop and parlour, in Charlton-street, Somers-town . The prisoner visited a lodger on the second floor - I had missed goods from time to time: in consequence of which, on Sunday, the 2d of January, I tied a string across my door, inside the shop, to ascertain if any one went in, while I was out; it is an inner-door - I went out at three o'clock, returned before five, and found the string removed, a pair of boots, and four pairs of shoes gone - I had seen the prisoner in the kitchen that afternoon.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Sunday I was desired to watch this house - I placed myself in a house opposite, and saw the prisoner let in about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, by somebody - next morning about nine, I saw him come out, and followed him into a shop in Cromer-street - I went in; he was talking to a woman - I found a pair of women's boots in one of his pockets, and two pairs of shoes in the other, another pair in his hat, and a key in his coat-pocket, which opens Peart's parlour-door, which leads to the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-47

228. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , at St. Margaret's, Westminster, twenty-three sovereigns, seven half-sovereigns, one hundred shillings, eight half-crowns, six sixpences, and two bags, value 2 d., the property of George Dawson , in a certain outhouse belonging to the dwelling-house of Sarah Walton , widow.

2d COUNT, stating them to be the monies of the said Sarah Walton .

GEORGE DAWSON. I am hostler to Mrs. S. Walton, who keeps livery-stables in King-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . The counting-house is at a short distance from the dwelling-house, which she inhabits, in the stable-yard, and is all in closed in the same wall with it; on Monday the 27th of December, in the

evening, I had twenty-three sovereigns, and seven half-sovereigns, in a bag, and one hundred shillings, eight half-crowns, and six sixpences in another bag; they were locked up in a desk in the counting-house - I saw it safe about seven o'clock in the evening - the prisoner was a helper in the stables, and had been so for six months - it was his turn to be left in care of the yard that night - I went out about seven o'clock, and returned about nine, but did not go into the counting-house; the gates had been shut two hours before I went out - strangers come in by ringing the bell; it was his duty to open the gate - I had left the counting-house locked, and had the key in my pocket; about nine o'clock that night, Moody shewed me the desk; it had been broken open, and the money was all gone: I went to the counting-house, and there were marks of some instrument being used to open the door - I could not get an officer that night - I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about it; he said he did not - I said it was strange, that any one should come in and break the desk open, without his knowledge; he said he might have been asleep in the stable; it was his duty to leave at ten o'clock - next morning I went and got Dew the officer; he is since dead; on the Wednesday, Dew and I searched the stables, and found the bags and money concealed under two bricks in the stable; it was the prisoner's duty to work in that stable; he was in the next stable when it was found - the officer told him of it - he said nothing to it; there were 27 s. in silver missing.

JANE TERRY . I am servant to Mrs. Walton. On Monday, the 27th, I went out, and saw the gate open, and shut it - the watchman was then going past nine; the gate could not be opened outside - there were no marks of violence on it - I heard it opened afterwards, but did not go to see who it was; when I found it open, I did not see the prisoner on the premises.

WILLIAM MOODY . I am a porter, and live in Gardener's-lane, King-street, Westminster. On the evening in question, I picked up this desk, about thirty yards from my door, and forty or fifty from Mrs. Walton's - I fetched Dawson to look at it.

WILLIAM WOODBERY . I am an officer of Queen-square. I was with Dew on the 29th of December, at Walton's, the White Horse stables, King-street; the prisoner was called to me - I searched his lodgings, and finding no clothes there, I asked where he kept them; he said in the stable - I went to the stable, and in his box I found twenty shillings and four half-crowns; he said he had received 16 s. 6 d. from Dawson, on the Saturday night - I went over to the counting-house, and found the desk had been broken open; it had the impression of a shoe tip on it - I took off the prisoner's shoe, and the heel matched the mark exactly; it appeared to have been knocked in with his feet; I then searched the stable, and found the bags of money as Dawson has stated; Dawson gave me a pair of scissars, which I compared with the door-post, there was an impression which tallied with them.

GEORGE DAWSON. There were some half-crowns among the silver; I know the bags and money; here is a memorandum of the money in one bag, in my own writing - I have known the prisoner seven or eight months; he was as good a servant as I ever knew, and never drunk.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his good character .

Reference Number: t18250113-48

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

229. CORNELIUS WOOD was indicted for a rape .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250113-49

London Cases - First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

230. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a sable cap, value 1 s., the goods of William Edwards , from the person of William Bearr Edwards .

WILLIAM BEARR EDWARDS. I am the son of William Edwards, a butcher , who lives in Aldersgate-street. On the 11th of January, at one o'clock, my mother sent me on an errand, and before I got three doors off, the prisoner ran by, and snatched my cap off my head, and ran away with it - I called, Stop thief! and Payne took him, before he got out of my sight.

JOSEPH ROWBOTHAM . I met Edwards, and saw the prisoner run towards him, and take his cap off - I lost sight of him myself.

ROBERT PAYNE . I am a watchman. I was on the opposite side of the street, and saw the prisoner snatch Edward's cap off - I thought he might know him, and had done it in a joke, but Edward's called Stop thief! and he threw it into a pawnbroker's shop; I followed him into the square, and was surrounded by a parcel of bad characters; he swore what he would do, if I followed him, but I secured him.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I was passing; the prisoner was resisting, and I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I ran down Fann-street; took his cap off in a joke, and threw it into Fothergill's shop.

WILLIAM BEARR EDWARDS. He did not offer to throw it away, till I called Stop thief! and followed him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-50

231. JOSEPH HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a great coat, value 5 l. , the goods of Thomas Richards .

ROBERT PAYNE . I am a watchman of Aldersgate. On the 4th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was coming out of the watch-house, and saw the prisoner, and another man, in Little Britain, behind the Birmingham coach; I concealed my lantern, that they should not see me, and saw the other man drag the coat off the guard's seat, and give it to the prisoner, who was behind him; he threw it over his shoulder, and walked down towards Aldersgate-street - I told the guard to follow me; and in Falcon-square the prisoner threw it down, and shewed fight - Coram secured him; I had not lost sight of him.

THOMAS CORAM . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! - the prisoner was running; I crossed over and took him; he up with his fist, and shewed fight; we took him to the Compter.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am guard of the coach ; my great-coat hung on the seat - I stood up to blow the horn, and missed it; I got down, and in Falcon-square saw the prisoner drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If he saw the other man give it

to me, why not stop me with it. I picked it up in the middle of the road; no one was with me - I heard a cry in Falcon-square, and threw it down; I ran, being frightened.

THOMAS RICHARDS. It could not have fallen down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-51

232. ELIZABETH REGEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a coat, value 3 l., and a shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of John Chesterman .

ALICE CHESTERMAN . I am the wife of John Chesterman - we live in Clark's-court, Bishopsgate-street . On the 26th of December, I went out about four o'clock, returned about six, and missed these things; I live on the ground-floor, and had locked the door; I found a door which leads from the cellar had been opened; the prisoner lodges on the first floor, and was in my room that afternoon; the shirt then laid on a chair; she asked if I had got to iron it; when I returned, I found a hole cut in the door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not in the habit of leaving the key for your husband? A. Very seldom, but did not on that day - only two persons lodge there. I had a good opinion of her. She told me herself that she was in the house alone for twenty minutes.

JOSEPH NOTLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Notley, of Bishopsgate-street. On the 17th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner pawned this shirt, in the name of Barnes.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any more shopmen? A. Only the manager - he took it in - I wrote the ticket, and gave her the money; she was three or four minutes in my view.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-52

233. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a wooden box, value 2 s. 6 d., and 74 lbs. of candles, value 2 l. 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Birks the elder, and Thomas Birks the younger.

WILLIAM CROCKETT . I am carman to Messrs. Thomas and Thomas Birks, tallow-chandlers , of Chelsea. On the 17th of December I was carrying some candles in the waggon to different places, and in Grub-street a box was stolen; I missed them at the corner of Moor-lane, when Javerly spoke to me, and in about an hour I found them at Guildhall.

KEZIAH JAVERLY . I was at the corner of Moor-lane, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - a man stood there - I saw the prisoner coming towards him - the waggon was a few yards off at the end of the lane; I heard the man say to the prisoner,

"Go on, go on;" the prisoner then went on before me to the tail of the waggon, and attempted to take a box - I stopped to talk with a person, and saw him go over the way, and stand still for a moment, he then ran across, snatched the box out, and run away to the corner of Aldermanbury; it appeared too heavy - he let it slip from his shoulder, and endeavoured to throw it into a waggon which was going on, but did not succeed; the other man ran, and lifted it on his shoulder, ran after the waggon, and threw it into it; the waggoner turned round, and the prisoner said,

"I have thrown a box in which is very heavy - I will give you a pint to give me a lift." I returned and told Crockett, and in half an hour I was fetched to Guildhall. I am certain he is the man.

THOMAS HUNT . I was writing in the counting-house when this woman came in, and said a man had stolen a box from the waggon - I went out, and followed the waggon, which she pointed out, to Jewin-street, and saw the prisoner taking the box out of it - he put it on his shoulder, walked into Aldersgate-street, and I seized him. He said he was carrying it for the waggoner - I said he had stolen it; he immediately threw it down.

STEPHEN LAWRENCE . I am the prosecutors' servant - the box is their's, and contains about seven dozens of candles.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-53

NEW COURT.

(2d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

234. MARY DAVIS , JANE DAVIS , and MARY SAVAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , ten yards of Norwich crape, value 11 s., the goods of Simeon Brown , privately in his shop .

JOHN NEWMAN . I conduct Mr. Simeon Brown's business - he is a linen-draper , and lives in Holborn . I saw the three prisoners come into our shop on the 21st of December - Mary Davis wanted to purchase a yard of cambric muslin, which came to 1 s. 2 d.; they all three stood in a row, one behind the other. They were afterwards going away, and Savage said her skirt was loose; this made me suspect they had taken something. I went round the counter, and took from her person a piece of Norwich crape - I then looked on the counter, and found it had been taken from there - it was worth 11 s. I had seen the prisoners in the shop twice the day before, and another person with them. Mary Davis had been about five minutes making her purchase. Our shop is much frequented, but there were not many persons there.

WILLIAM ADDINGTON . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAVAGE'S Defence. I took it, and the others knew nothing about it.

SAVAGE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

JANE DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-54

235. MARY BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , eight yards of bombazeen, value 10 s., the goods of Shadrach Spurrett , privately in his shop .

JOHANNA SPURRITT . I am the wife of Shadrach Spurritt - we live in Vere-street , and keep a sale shop . The prisoner came to our shop about one o'clock on the 14th of December, with another woman; she asked to look at some baby's bed gowns - she did not buy any; I perceived a confusion in her countenance, and went round the counter, and missed the piece of bombazeen; I had seen it in

the window the moment before - they went down the steps of the door, and I followed close after them, and did not lose sight of them at all. I took hold of the prisoner, and asked her for the piece of bombazeen - she denied it, but I saw her hand confined under her clothes. I pressed her down, and the piece fell - I took it up, and still followed her, while she ran, till she was taken.

JOHN SCOTT . I took the prisoner at the prosecutor's house, and produce the piece of bombazeen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-55

236. CAROLINE REDDISH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a watch, value 15 s.; three thimbles, value 9 d.; a breast-pin, value 18 d.; a scent-box, value 6 d.; a brooch, value 3 s.; a clasp, value 3 d.; two Foreign silver coins, value 3 d.; five pairs of ear-rings, value 4 s.; two rings, value 1 s.; a pair of spectacle-glasses, value 1 s., and five seals, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Maginie , her master.

SAMUEL MAGINIE. I am a watch and clock maker , and live in Princes-row, Pimlico . On the 31st of December, I gave the prisoner leave to go out; she came home a little after ten o'clock at night, with a bundle under her arm, and next morning I called her into my parlour, and said,

"Caroline, I have lost various articles, at different times, and having no one, but yourself in the house, I strongly suspect you have taken them;" she declared she knew nothing about them; I mentioned several things which I had lost, and told her, I thought it best to search her boxes - I did so, and found a watch, unfinished, some earrings, several other articles, and some spectacle-glasses, sealed up - I sent for a constable; she fell on her knees, and begged for mercy, and said it was her first offence - I had a good character with her; she had been with me about two or three months.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH OTTERWAY . I am a patrol. I was sent for, and saw the prisoner on her knees, in Mr. Maginie's drawing-room, begging for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-56

237. ANN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a shawl, value 5 s., and five shillings , the property of William Evans .

MARTHA EVANS . I am the wife of William Evans. I never saw the prisoner before, I lent her the shawl, and five shillings, which was on the evening of the 4th of November, when she came and took some lodging for her brother-in-law, and promised to come back that evening - she did not return - and I have not seen the shawl since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-57

238. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , seven silver spoons, value 12 s.; a brooch, value 2 s.; a ring, value 2 s.; two seals, value 18 d.; a watch-key, value 1 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; three cravats, value 1 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; two shirts, value 3 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of Martha Nantz , widow .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of different persons.

MARTHA NANTZ. I am a widow, and live in Fetter-lane . I have known the prisoner for years, and loved him as my own son; he came to me about two o'clock, on the Monday after Christmas - my son and I were having some pancakes - I went out and got to St. Paul's, about ten minutes before four o'clock - the prisoner had left me, and told me he thought he should see me again, before I went into the city - I had locked my room, and took my key - I returned about twelve o'clock at night, and found my door open, and the drawers were in a very disordered state - I missed seven silver spoons, some seals, and other things.

CATHARINE BROWN . I live on the same floor with Mrs. Nantz. I saw the prisoner on the 27th of December, in the morning, and again about five o'clock in the afternoon - Mrs. Nantz was then out - I heard some person at the door of her room - I opened my door, and saw the prisoner; he asked me if the key was left there - I said No; he said he wanted to get some books - he took my key, and opened Mrs. Nantz's door - I gave him a light - he remained there about a quarter of an hour - when I went to see if he was there, he was gone, and the door was open.

WILLIAM NISBIT . I arrested the prisoner, near the Olympic Theatre - he told me where the things were. I found the things at Mr. Rees', at the corner of the Angelgate, where he lodged - he had not disposed of any of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-58

239. HENRY WIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 50 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., the goods of Charles Innes , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

2d COUNT, stating it to be the property of George Thompson , and fixed to his dwelling-house.

GEORGE THOMPSON. I rent the house, No. 3, Church-street, St. Giles in the Fields . It is a finished house and has lead on the roof of it - I went on Friday, the 4th of December, to see if the lead was all right, and missed some from the roof - the prisoner acknowledged that he had taken it, at the Office.

MARY MORGAN . On the 3d of December I was sitting in this house, and heard a noise, and saw this man's foot come through the ceiling - I knew him before. I then went out, and saw him get off the trap-door; I asked what he was doing there; he said, playing at hoop - and he said he would mend the ceiling which he had broken: he came afterwards, and brought some laths to mend the ceiling, but could not; and he then said he would send some person to mend it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me there; will you swear it? A. Yes, I will; and some person with you.

JOSEPH DALE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner sign this examination.

"The voluntary statement of Henry Wire - On the 3d of December I went upon the roof of the house, No. 3, Church-street, and ripped about 50 lbs. weight of lead off, which I

afterwards sold at a a marine store shop in Short's gardens, one piece for 2 s. 6 d., and another for 1 s. 3 1/2 d."

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-59

Before Mr. Recorder.

240. MARTIN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , two whittles, value 10 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s.; a frock, value 1 s.; and two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Attenborough .

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH , JUN. I am nephew to Richard Attenborough, who lives in Crown-street, Finsbury-square , and is a pawnbroker . The goods in question laid on the counter in the shop. On Friday, the 3d of December, between four and five o'clock in the evening, (there was another person in the shop as well as myself,) the prisoner came in about a saw which he had pawed the night before; he came up to the counter where the articles were lying; there was no other customer in the shop but him. I had occasion to go out for a few minutes, and left him there. When I returned the prisoner was gone, and the goods likewise; I had been out about five minutes - I have seen the goods at Worship-street; the prisoner was then in custody; I know them to be our goods; the value of the whole might be about 1 l. I am certain of the prisoner's person.

ANN FRANCES TURNSTALL . I live at the King's Arms, public-house, Whitecross-street. The prisoner came there on Friday, the 3d of December, between five and six o'clock; he asked me to take care of the two whittles, and a child's frock, for a few minutes, which I did, but he did not call again. Vann came to me on the Sunday following, and I gave them to him.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street; I received a pair of stays from the prisoner on the 3d of December, in the after part of the day.

THOMAS VANN . I received two whittles and a frock from Mrs. Turnstall on Sunday, the 5th of December; they were afterwards claimed by Attenborough - I took the prisoner at Attenborough's shop, where he had detained him; I found a pair of stockings in his breast-pocket; I also found on him a duplicate of a pair of stays, pawned at Matthews's for 1 s.; he told me where he had left the whittles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that another person who came out of the shop gave him the property to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-60

241. ROBERT ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of John Buttery .

JOHN BUTTERY. I live in Charles-street, Curtain-road , and am a watch and clock-maker . On the 11th of December I was in the shop, and heard and saw the window broken, and this watch was drawn out by a person outside. I went in pursuit of the party - I did not lose sight of the prisoner - I ran after him, and caught him - I did not see any companion with him; the watch was found in the street on our return, in the direction which he took, he pointed to it himself, and my brother took him to the Office.

TIMOTHY BUTTERY . I was in my brother's back-yard; I heard my brother cry Stop thief! and joined in the pursuit - my brother had taken the prisoner before I came up to him; the prisoner pointed to the watch, and we took it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you state at the Police Office that there was a little girl near the place at the time? A. No.

THOMAS PARNELL . I was passing by Charles-street, and stopped to observe some placards; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned my eyes towards Charles-street, and saw the prisoner, pursued by Mr Buttery; he overtook him, and brought him back - I followed them, and heard that a watch had been snatched from a window - I saw the watch laying down, and picked it up - I gave it to Timothy Buttery.

Prisoner's Defence. The first witness said he never lost sight of me; how could he open the door without losing sight of me?

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-61

242. WILLIAM FRANCIS and NICHOLAS SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 80 lbs. of iron, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Pewter .

JOHN PEWTER. I live at Ball's Pond, and work upon a dust-hill ; this iron was in a shed in Mr. Scott's yard about nine o'clock on Friday night; I missed it about seven next morning - I have seen it since at Worship-street; there was 3/4 of a cwt.; I am certain it was mine. The prisoner Scott had worked for me about three months; Francis worked in the same field, but not under my employment.

HENRY ISHMAEL . I am one of the dismounted patrole. I stopped the two prisoners, in company, in Ball's Pond, road, about two hundred yards from the shed with the iron, which was claimed by Pewter. Francis had the bag of iron on his back, and Scott had Francis's hat and a frying-pan in his hand.

SCOTT'S Defence. We found the iron on the hill at different times - we did not break into the shed.

FRANCIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-62

243. CHARLES LOVEDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a pencil-case, value 1 s., and seventeen sovereigns, the property of Frances Carley , widow , from her person .

FRANCES CARLEY. I live in William-street, Lisson-green , and am a widow; I take in washing for my living. On Friday, the 12th of November, at a quarter before four o'clock, the prisoner came and knocked at my door; I looked out at the window, and he asked for Mrs Carley - I said I was the person. He asked me if I had not a son abroad; I said Yes, I had, at St. Helena; he said, should I like to hear from him? I asked him to walk in, and he went into the back-parlour, and said, should I like to see my son? I said, undoubtedly, nothing would give me greater pleasure; my son had been absent twenty-two years. He asked if I should know my son - I said

"Yes, I did think I should, indeed; I said I know I

should; he told me to consider twenty-two years made a great alteration in a man's appearance. I said it was true, but I was sure I should know him; he asked what made me so positive? I told him, from a mark I gave him before he came into the world. He then told me that the yellow fever removed the marks on the body, and asked me where the mark was? I told him in a very curious place; he then with his right hand pointed to his cheek, and said

"It was here." My son had been marked there with an apple - I had not told him where the mark was. He then said

"Are you positive you should know your son?" I said

"Yes, quite positive; but I fear that is a happiness I shall never have more in this world." He then said,

"You say you are positive you should know your son, but I see if you do know me you won't know me; I may as well go." He took his cane up to go - I then said,

"you are not my son." He said

"Yes, my dear mother, I am your son; why will you not know me?" I then asked him if he was come to stay in England? He said he was come to consult with me respecting his discharge, which he had to buy from the East India Company's Artillery (which my son was in). I said,

"What will your discharge cost you, child?" He said 22 l. and if I could let him have the money till Monday, he would repay it, as he had 583 l. to take. I told him I had not so much money as 22 l. in the house. I asked him to take some refreshment; I then believed that he was my son. I sent my lodger to get some brandy, and he had some cold beef; he then spoke of occurrences which had taken place in my family - such as my having two children christened together at St. Mary-le-bone church; which induced me to believe that he was my son. I then asked him to go up stairs - I opened a drawer, and said,

"Here my dear son, is the funeral bill of your late brother;" he said,

"Oh! poor Joe, I wish I could have seen you once more before you died." I then showed him a pair of spoons I had bought with some of his late brother's clothes which I had parted with - he then said,

"Oh! mother, I have promised to make these spoons a present to our captain's lady, who has been such a kind friend to me." He did not take them, because I objected to it; there was a silver pencil case in the same drawer; he said,

"Oh! mother, let me have that - it is just what I wanted;" I told him he might take it if he pleased, as I bought it on purpose for him: he took it. I then opened the drawer where my money was, and took out a small tin box, which had the money in it; there were seventeen sovereigns in it: I counted them, and said,

"My dear, I have got but 17 l.;" he said,

"Is there no more mother?" I said, No. He said,

"Let me count them:" I had them in my left hand, and he took them out of it, protended to count them, and put them in his pocket. I then showed him some handkerchiefs which had belonged to my departed son, which I had saved for him, as I supposed - he said,

"Give me one of those silk handkerchiefs:" I said,

"Take both child if you want them:" he took one of them which was orange and blue. He then came down stairs, and then was in a great hurry to go, as he said if he did not see his captain that night, he should not be able to get his discharge for nine days; he said he would return that night to sleep, if possible, at my house. I then asked him whether he would sleep in my bed or in the parlour: he said he would sleep in the parlour, because he had come from a hot climate, but if he did not return that night by ten o'clock, he would be with me at ten the next morning, to breakfast: he then said,

"Don't detain me, my dear mother, let me go, for the sooner I go, the sooner I shall be back;" he then shook hands with me at the door, and told me not to fret, he would be back as soon as possible. He had taken the seventeen sovereigns out of my hand, and said he would return them on the Monday. I never saw him again till a fortnight ago, when he was at the Police Office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This money you gave him, believing him to be your son? A. Yes, undoubtedly; I wished for it again, being my all. I told him to take the pencil case and handkerchief: I did not object to his taking the money out of the house, as I expected it would be returned when he took his money. I have never seen any of the things since.

JURY. Q. Would you have lent the money to the prisoner if you had not believed he was your son? A. No. I expected he would return it, and he told me I should do no more work.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of December, on another charge of a similar nature. I know nothing of this.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lent me the money to buy my discharge.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18250113-63

244. CHARLES LOVEDAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a watch, value 25 s. , the goods of Martha Oakham , spinster .

MARTHA OAKHAM. I live in Yeoman's-row, Brompton. On the 14th of November, the prisoner came to my mother's house, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; we enquired who was there - a neighbour said,

"Here is a person who wants to see you" - I got out of bed, and opened the door, and the prisoner came in, and said to my mother,

"Mrs. Oakham, have you not got a son in the army" - she said Yes: he said,

"Do you think you should know him" - she said,

"He has been gone eleven years, and I don't think I should know him;" he then said,

"What have you done with your milk-walk, and your cows?" - my mother replied," I never had any cows, I hired them, and my milk-walk I had failed with, before my son went away" - he said,

"Do you think you should know your son" - she said

"No; I don't think I should" - he said,

"If he was to come home from abroad, how is he to get back again?" my mother said,

"I don't know, What would it cost?" he said 5 l. - my mother said,

"I have not got 5 l., nor 5 s., nor anything for myself" - he replied,

"Your son is now in England" - my mother said,

"Pray do tell me where, Sir" - he said,

"You can't get to him to night" - she said again,

"Pray do tell me where my son is" - he said something about her not knowing her own flesh and blood; my mother said to me, as I sat in the bed,

"Surely, Martha, this is not your brother" - I replied,

"Mother, I can't see any likeness between him and me, or any of the family" - he said

"Yes; I am your brother; and mother, it is strange you don't know your own son." (I don't know anything of Mrs. Carley) My mother then asked him to sit down, and asked him, if he would have anything to eat, such as she

had got in the house - he sat down, and sent my mother for a pot of porter - while she was gone, he came to my bed-side, and my watch was lying on the chair - he took it up, and said,

"Whose watch is this?" - I replied,

"It is mine" - he said,

"Where did you get it?" - I said,

"I bought it, when I was in service" - he said,

"I shall have this watch for one of my little boy's" - I replied,

"No. Tom, I can't spare it" - he replied,

"What, not give it to your brother, who has been gone so many years; for a keep-sake?" - I said,

"No, Tom, I can't spare it" - he replied,

"I will bring you a cuckoo clock for it" - I said,

"No, Tom, the clock is of no use, if I go away to service, I can't carry the clock, the watch I can take any where" - he then took the ribbon and the seal off, and gave them to me, and said he should take the watch - I said,

"Tom, I will not part with it." My mother then came, and gave him some refreshment - he stopped there all night, and went away between seven and eight o'clock, the next morning - after we had given him a breakfast, I said to him, while he was getting up,

"Tom, give me my watch, and I will give you a gold pin for it" - he said a gold pin was not worth a d - n to a soldier; he then went away, and said he should come down to tea, at five o'clock, but never came to us again - he took the watch away with him - my brother belonged to the 83d Regiment of foot, which was gone to Ceylon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not all breakfast together, next morning? A. Yes; my brother and sister-in-law went with him to a public-house, and had something at his expense - I expected he would return with the watch; we had some gin and peppermint; my brother went with him, as far as Hyde-park-corner - I should not have let him taken the watch if I had not believed him to be my brother; he had a handsome watch of his own.

Prisoner. Did I at any time in the course of the night, or in the morning, tell you, I was not your brother?

Witness. No, you did not.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-64

245. JOHN PLUMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , a spade, value 3 s. , the goods of William Oliver .

WILLIAM OLIVER. I live in Claremont-terrace, Pentonville, and am a builder . The prisoner was not in my employ when the spade was taken; he had been discharged, on the 8th of December - I had seen the spade that day, about one o'clock, at the back of the houses - one of my labourers told me, in the evening, that the prisoner had been stopped with it.

JOHN KAIN . I was in the employ of Mr. Oliver. I saw the prisoner with the spade under his arm, about half-past four o'clock, on the 8th of December - I cannot say whether he had worked with it on that day - he ran out through one of the houses, and I ran out through another after him - I had seen the spade that morning, in one of the houses - I stopped him, and took him to the watch-house.

PATRICK O'KELLY . Kain called me, and I saw the prisoner with it under her arm.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to me. I have kept the spade.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work at Mr. Oliver's, and the day before he discharged me - I went out to speak with another man, and had this spade with me, which is not Mr. Oliver's.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-65

246. FREDERICK THELWALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , twelve yards of stuff, value 5 s. , the goods of John Dent .

JOHN DENT. I live in Crawford-street , and am a linen-draper . The stuff was at my door - I did not see it taken - I saw it again between five and six o'clock that evening, in the hands of the officer; the prisoner was then taken.

WILLIAM HENRY TEMPLEMAN . I live in Crawford-street, and am a cheesemonger. About half-past five o'clock I saw the prisoner step into the shop, and take this stuff; I ran to him: he knocked me down, and fell on me - I cried Stop thief! and my master ran out. I never lost sight of him; he dropped the bundle before he was stopped. The officer took him back to the shop.

HENRY STOWELL . I am a constable. I heard the alarm of Stop thief! I was not far from the shop, on the opposite side of the way - I saw the prisoner running towards me with a bundle, and dropped it in the middle of the road. I stopped him before I lost sight of him - Templeman came up, and charged him with having stolen the property; I took him back to the shop, and showed the stuff to Mr. Dent, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my master for some work - I ran against Templeman, and threw him down. I got up, and the officer stopped me; Templeman came, and said I had committed a robbery.

WILLIAM HENRY TEMPLEMAN re-examined. The prisoner knocked me down by a blow with the board in the middle of the stuff.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-66

247. OWEN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , an umbrella, value 6 s. , the goods of John Jackson .

JOHN JACKSON. I live in High-street. Shadwell . On the 10th of December I lost an umbrella from a rail inside the shop - I had seen it safe about a quarter of an hour before: I was in a back parlour when it was taken. I saw it again in about ten minutes, when the prisoner was brought back with it. I had seen him repeatedly, with other boys, in the neighbourhood.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I saw the prisoner and two other boys near Mr. Jackson's shop - the prisoner went in, took the umbrella, and ran off with it: I pursued, and took him with it in his hand. I brought him back to Mr. Jackson's shop, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy took the umbrella. and laid it down; I took it up, and was going to the shop with it when the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-67

248. HANNAH POUND was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a watch, value 1 l.; a seal, value 5 s.; a key, value 6 d.; a hat, value 9 s.; a coat, value 12 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s., and a pair of boots, value 7 s., the goods of John Hussey , from his person .

JOHN HUSSEY. I live in Tottenham-court-road, and am a carpenter . On the 5th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner, at the corner of Great Russell-street, Tottenham-court-road; I was sober; she asked if I would take a walk with her - I made no reply for some time, but I went with her to No. 10, Jones-court, Bainbridge-street, St. Giles - I staid there all night - when I awoke, in the morning, she was gone, and my clothes were gone too - I had nothing to cover me - I had a light in the room, and am certain of her person; there was no other person in the room after I bolted the door - I have received the duplicate of my watch, seal, and key, but not the clothes; she was taken up about five days afterwards - I was quite positive to her person.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you a wife? A. No. I have been in London three years; but I swear I did not know her to be a woman of the town - I had been taking a pot or two of porter, in the course of the day - I had dined at a friend's house in Bishopsgate-street, and drank about two pots of half-and-half - I had not more than three or four pots of beer and half-and-half - I had been a little in liquor, but was perfectly able to do any business - I met the prisoner, and another with her, in Tottenham-court-road; they both went to the house with me - there were no other women in the house; the prisoner got a light - I bolted the door, because I did not like the appearance of the place - the prisoner might have got out of bed, and gone away, and another person have come in and robbed me - I did not awake till five, or half-past - I saw the prisoner's sisters at Marlborough-street Office, and have seen her mother; I did not follow her sisters, and tell them, if they could not raise 8 l. I would prosecute the prisoner - I did not say to Mrs. Hart, that unless she could get money, I would come forward, nor to Mrs. Kirby, nor to any other person; that I swear positively - I went with her mother to have a pint of porter, while we were waiting till the trial came on; her mother and sisters seemed to feel much for me, and said, they would make every effort to find where the things were pawned; I called on her mother the Monday after, but I did not tell her 8 l. must be raised, and if I could get that, I would take care the girl should not be convicted.

RICHARD TATE . I am shopman to Mr. Bartlet, pawnbroker, Crown-street, Soho. I have a seal and key, which were pawned by a young man, on the 6th of December, about one o'clock, for 4 s., in the name of J. Willis.

JOHN HUSSEY re-examined. I think I can swear to the seal and key; I can swear positively to the key.

ROBERT BURCHETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street, Lisson-green. I produce a silver watch, which I received on the 6th of December; I was present, but did not take it in; it was offered in pledge by two girls, and the prisoner was one; I do not know which of them offered it; my servant lent 1 l. 0 s. 2 d. on it, it was pawned in the name of Mary Peters, 32, Mitchell-street.

Cross-examined. I should not have recollected the date, had it not been for the duplicate. I recollect seeing the girls come to the house on Monday the 6th, and pawning a watch, but I could not tell it was this watch, but for the duplicate. When I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street she had the same bonnet and dress as when she came to my house. I could not swear to her being the person.

(Watch produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WILSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of December, at No. 3, Regency-place, Crown-street; she was concealed in a turn-up bedstead - the prosecutor was with me, and said,

"That is the girl:" he charged her with having robbed him. I took her into custody, and she was searched, but no duplicate found on her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the person in the room say,

"That is not the girl you want?" A. Yes; the prisoner neither admitted nor denied the charge.

MR. BRODRICK called the following witnesess: -

MARTHA POUND . I am the prisoner's mother. I saw the prosecutor a fortnight ago yesterday; he came to my lodgings, and said if I would make it up he would not appear. I said what would it be? He said 8 l., and he would move his lodgings, as he was a single man, and it was immaterial where he lodged. I told him we had considered, and did not intend to give any money. He rose up and said he would prosecute the girl, and take up two more. I cannot tell how he came to find my lodgings. I had seen him on the day the prisoner was committed, before she was committed, and told him I should wish to make it up if I could, rather than have her prosecuted. He said he was agreeable to make it up, but would not give me any satisfaction, till she was committed to Newgate, and I thought then I had no right to interfere; but I had made the proposal, in the first instance - I did not tell him where I lived.

JANE SANDERS . I am landlady of No. 1, Mary-place, Duke-street, St. Pancras. Martha Pound lives with me. I remember Hussey coming to Mrs. Pound, a fortnight ago - I did not hear what he said to her.

- HART. I am the prisoner's sister. The first time I saw Hussey was at Marlborough-street; and after that he ran after me and my sister in Piccadilly; he said if we would meet him on Tuesday, 8 l. would make it up. We were then sitting on the Brentford coach - we had not proposed to make it up. He said he could vary his story more here than at Marlborough-street. When we were at Marlborough-street, we went to a public-house, and the officer wished us not to speak to Hussey; it was at the public-house that he said he could not swear to the robbery; and if we would give him some money he would make it up - that was after the second examination. The officer came there, and Hussey said the officer was afraid he should not get a higher situation, and therefore he would not leave him with us. I did not hear my mother make a proposal to him to make it up. I had heard my sister say she lived in Crown-street; I live at Kew - my husband is one of the King's gardeners.

ELLEN KIRBY . I live at Kew. My husband is a painter. I was on the Brentford coach when Hussey came up and said, if 8 l. were produced he would make it up; this

was after the prisoner was committed; I was at the police office with my mother and sister - Hussey then said he would make it up for money - that it was of no consequence to him; he was single, and it was no consequence to him where he worked - he could get a place in the country, and if I would make up 8 l. he would take it and say no more about it. He said,

"When you come before the Grand Jury it is quite different to this place; I will vary it there." He said, over and over again, that he could not swear to the robbery - three times in two or three minutes - the first time we met at Marlborough-street - my mother made no offer to him till he proposed it to her - as far as I can recollect she was not the first person who proposed to make it up - I will not swear that she was not.

HUSSEY re-examined. Q. Did you ever propose to either of these persons to make it up for 8 l.? A. No; I never said any thing of the kind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-68

249. JOHN CALLIHER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Daniel Thomas Malloney , from his person .

Mr. DANIEL THOMAS MALLONEY. I live in Sidmouth-place, and am a physician . On the 17th of December, at a quarter before six o'clock in the evening I was in High-street, St. Giles's - my handkerchief was safe three-quarters of an hour before - it was in my outside coat pocket - I did not miss it till I wanted it, and it was gone - I saw it at the office about an hour after. I had not observed the prisoner near me.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner with two others, following two gentlemen (one of them was smaller than himself) - they were following Mr. Malloney, and trying his pocket; they went a little further, and tried again, and then went into the road - they went back into Dudley-court. I took hold of the prisoner, and took the handkerchief from his bosom - I made him run along with me, and overtook Mr. Malloney; I asked if he had lost any thing - he said yes, a handkerchief, and claimed this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down High-street, and took notice of the two boys. I saw the handkerchief lying on the pavement; I took it up, and put it in my bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-69

250. MARY EDGINTON was indicted for that she, on the 20th of August , a certain male child, called James Burke, (about the age of ten days,) maliciously and feloniously by fraud, did take and carry away, with intent to deprive James Burke , and Ann, his wife , the parents of the said child, of the possession of it .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ANN BURKE . I am the wife of James Burke. I had a male child - it was born on the 8th of August - I went out a fortnight after being put to bed; I was going to the parish workhouse in St. Giles, for medical assistance - I sat down on a stone, near a coach-yard, in a court, leading to Broad-street; while I was sitting there the prisoner came to me, and asked me did I know Mrs. Harrage, a midwife, in Church-street; I said I did not; she then went a little way, returned, and said I looked very ill, and she would give me some porter - I told her I had not had my breakfast - she gave me 6 d.; I then went with her into a public-house in Broad-street - I do not know the sign; she called for a pint of porter, gave me a biscuit, and took the child out of my arms; its name is James. She asked me what my husband was - I said he was a poor dealer. She said if she knew where I lived she would call in the afternoon, and bring me some things for my child; I told her I lived at No. 16, Church-street; she then went away - I took the child, and we parted about half-past nine o'clock. She came to me in the afternoon, soon after one o'clock - my landlady and Ann Miers were in the room. She brought some flannel, and some wine to make pap for my child, and something to make a cap; she staid about an hour - I am sure she is the same person. She took my child again out of my arms, and said he was a sweet little child, and she knew a respectable lady who kept a society in her place, and she would take me to her, and she would give me some assistance to help me to keep my child - she said she would come again to me on the Friday - this was on the Wednesday. She came on Friday, late in the evening, after three o'clock - my landlady and Ann Miers were there at the time. I was not ready, and she ironed a pinafore for the child, and a cap for me; she dressed the child while I was cleaning myself to go out - then she rolled the new flannel about him to keep him warm; she told me she would carry the child herself, as I was weak. We went out - when we got to Broad-street she took me by the arm, and we came down to Little Queen-street, she carrying the child all the time. She then said she had to call in Lincoln's Inn-fields, where she should stay but a little time, and then we should be time enough for the lady - we went into Gate-street, to the Sun, public-house; she called for a pint of porter - she took a little of it, and I had some more; she said there was nothing sold there but liquor, and if we had a bit of bread and cheese it would help us on our journey - she gave me 2 d. for bread, 1 1/2 d. for cheese, and 1/2 d. for onions, which she sent me for. I left the child with her while I went, and when I came back she was gone; I was not a quarter of an hour gone. I enquired about her, but could not find her; I had not been in the house long with her - I made a complaint at Bow-street next day or the day after - the child has never been found since. I saw the prisoner again three days before Christmas. (I had used every possible exertion to find the child;) I met the prisoner then in Newgate-market; it was before ten o'clock; I believe she was alone, I had been selling some thread and tapes - she saw me, and went away very smartly; she was coming out of the market, and I followed her across Paternoster-row into St. Paul's Church-yard - I got up to her before she got to a shop; I asked her how she did - she said,

"My good woman, I don't know you." - I said,

"You do know me, you gave me 6 d. in St. Giles's." She said I mistook her, and turned into a butter shop close by. I looked out for an officer to take her up. She came out of the shop, and said,

"My good woman, what are you waiting for?" I said I was waiting for some person. I turned my back, and she left the shop, and went on very quick to Paternoster-row - I had my little basket,

and could not run so fast as her - I called out,

"Hold that woman!" The more I hallooed, the faster she ran. When she came to the end of Paternoster-row, she was going up again to Newgate-market; I kept her in view - she then got into a baker's shop, and went into his parlour - I had not told her what the charge was against her; I only said she had given me 6 d. - I caught hold of her mantle, and said she should not go till I had got an officer. A young man saw her running from me, and he ran after us to know what ailed us. She then said she lived at the Old Change, in Cheapside; we went to her house, and then got a man of the name of Jackson, an officer, to take her - two men there said I was an impostor, and wanted to extort money from her; she said the same, and then Jackson would not take charge of her. The men desired me to beg her pardon, and they would let me go; and, as Jackson would not take her, I came out, and said I would go to Bow-street for an officer - I ran very fast, Jackson followed me, and brought me back; and said, it would be a very fit thing to take me before a Magistrate. I was taken to Guildhall; I was put in the bar there, and the two men charged me with being an impostor, and wanting to extort money; and the Magistrate said I ought to be sent to Bridewell; then I went on my knees to the magistrate, and begged he would send to Bow-street, and he would find I was no impostor. The Magistrate then told Jackson to take me to the Compter, till the next day, at twelve o'clock. One of the men then said,

"No; set her at liberty, if she will promise not to do so any more;" but the Magistrate sent me till next day - I was liberated on Christmas-eve, and the prisoner was taken last Saturday. It was my husband who went to Bow-street; and they said they had nothing to do with it, as it happened in the City. I went to Bow-street, and gave the testimony there; on my solemn oath she is the woman who took my child.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you always said that she was the woman? A. Yes; I have always said that was the woman; but I should not know my child. The first house I went to was in Broad-street - I was there half an hour - I saw the woman of the house there; she had an opportunity of seeing me and the prisoner too; there were two men sitting in the tap-room, but I did not know them. I should know the house again, it was opposite the workhouse. On Friday, the 20th of August, the woman came to my house, about three o'clock - I cannot exactly tell how long she staid; she was ironing a pinafore and a cap for the child, and a cap for me; I believe it was about an hour - then we went to the public-house, in Gate-street; we did not stay there long - it must be more than four o'clock. I am sure that when I went to Bow-street I gave a particular description of the woman who had taken my child - I said she had a fair round face, and had the remains of a mark under her left eye; a person who looked in her face could see it at once. After the Alderman had heard the cause, at Guildhall, I went to her house, and took two witnesses with me; and she gave me a direction, and said if any person wanted her she might he seen at her master's house; and begged that any one who could recognise her might come to see her. My landlady said she was not the woman, at Mr. Evans's, and Mrs. Delany said she was not the woman - I fell down on my knees and begged her pardon, for fear she should lay hold of me.

MARY BARRY . I recollect going with this young woman to the house where the prisoner lived. I saw the prisoner, to the best of my knowledge she is the woman who had the child at that time. I said she was not the woman.

ANN MIERS . I recollect going with the prosecutrix to the house of the prisoner - I said she was not the person; to the best of my knowledge she is the person. I only said so, because I wanted to have nothing to do with it - I said at Mr. Evans's that I knew the woman so well I should know her fifteen years to come.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-70

252. WILLIAM CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , a half-crown, two shillings, and a sixpence, the property of Stephen Marshall , his master .

STEPHEN MARSHALL. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Whitechapel-road. The prisoner was employed by me. On Saturday, the 11th December, I went outside the door, and saw him take this money out of the till - I had some marked money in the till; there was 1 l. in silver there, when I left the shop - I had made a cross on the head of the silver; there was nobody in the shop, but him - I saw him go behind the counter - I did not see him take the money; but I came into the shop, and saw the till partly drawn out - I had left it close, when I went out - I examined the till, and found only 15 s.; I had left 20 s. in it - I charged him with it - he denied it; he then said, if I would not tell his father, he would deliver the money to me; he pulled out a half-crown, two shillings, and a sixpence - they had the mark which I had put upon them; no customer had come into the shop, from the time I left it, till I saw him go behind the counter - I sent for a constable, and gave him in charge.

DANIEL PARRY . I was sent for. The prisoner owned that he had taken the money, and had taken 5 s. in halfpence, the same morning - I have the money here.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury and the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-71

252. ELIZABETH BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , twenty yards printed cotton, value 1 l., the goods of George Drake Sewel , and Thomas Cross , privately in their shop .

EDWARD DUDLEY . I am in the employ of Messrs. George Drake Sewel, and Thomas Cross, linen-drapers , Frith-street, Soho . On the 13th December, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the print on the counter; the prisoner came in; she said she wanted some black stuff - I showed her some on the same counter, where the printed cotton was; she was within reach of it, she bought a yard and a-half of black stuff, for 1 s. 6 d. - there were several other persons serving in the shop - I missed the print before she left the shop - I informed one of our young men, at the top of the shop - he came down, and asked her if she had any thing which did not belong to her; she denied it; he then asked her to walk to the end of the shop - I walked after her, and saw the cotton fall from under her clothes; it was twenty yards, and worth about a guinea - she said she did not know how it got there; it was not possible it could have dropped, in the way it did, unless she had taken it.

JOHN PROCTER . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner - I knew her well before - I have had the print ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-72

253. EDWARD YORK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , two pairs of boots, value 8 s., and a pair of shoes, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Bonham , privately in his shop .

HENRY BONHAM. I am a shoemaker , and live in Dean-street, Soho . On the 8th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, there was no one in the shop, but the apprentice boy, who rang the bell; I came down, and a man who came in with prisoner sat down in a chair, and had his shoe off; he asked for a pair of shoes; the prisoner stood behind the chair - I knew they had been in my shop before, and said I would not show him any shoes, for they had robbed me before, and if they would go about their business I would forgive them; the prisoner ran out of the shop - I pursued him, and took him ten yards off, with two pairs of boots, and a pair of shoes, in his pocket; the other man ran away - they were my property, and had my mark upon them - they were close to the prisoner, while he stood in the shop; the apprentice ran after the other one, but could not catch him - I did not see the prisoner take anything that morning.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge, and have the goods.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-73

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

254. WILLIAM BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 34 lbs, of lead, value 5 s., the goods of John Newman , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JOHN NEWMAN. I keep the Sun public-house, in East Smithfield . On the night of Tuesday, the 8th of December, I went up stairs, and found the roof untiled, and the lead taken off the gutters; I went to enquire about it, and one of the police-officers produced some lead, which I compared with mine; it fitted the place exactly; I had seen it all safe, about seven o'clock that evening.

OWEN SULLIVAN . I am a watchman. On the night of the 8th of December, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner going along Cable-street, with a bundle under his arm - I asked what it was; he dropped it, and ran away; I cried Stop him! - I picked it up, and followed him - I cannot say who stopped him; but this is the lead he dropped - I took it to the watch-house, and gave it to Cartwright.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am the watch-house keeper. Sullivan gave me this lead - I took it down to the Sun, next day, and compared it with the lead on the top of the house, it matched exactly.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-74

255. RILEY BATEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a till, value 2 d.; thirteen penny pieces, and fifty-two halfpence , the property of Martha Pursell , widow .

MARTHA PURTELL. I am a widow. I keep a bottle and phial shop , at No. 4, Ellis-street, Sloane-street . On the evening of the 8th of January, the prisoner came to my shop; he asked me for change of half-a-crown - I remarked him by a particular waistcoat he had on - I could not give him change, and he pulled the door too, and I turned to go into the parlour, but heard a noise in the shop; I returned, and saw him lying across the counter, with his hand in the till; as soon as he heard me he ran out; I looked to see if he had got the box, with the halfpence, and it was gone; I ran after him, and met Maybank, at the end of the street; in about half an hour the till was brought back by Mr. Maybank; it had some money in it - but I cannot say that it was all mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not say, you were not sure he was the man? A. Yes - I only noticed his waistcoat; he had the same waistcoat on at the Office.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. Between eight and nine o'clock, last Saturday night, I was in Sloane-street - I saw the prosecutrix; she gave an alarm; I pursued the prisoner, who ran by me in a direction from Ellis-street. The prosecutrix then came out and said -

"They have got my till." I pursued the prisoner down Sloane-street. I found the till, with part of the copper, and the remainder in his waistcoat pocket. I then took the till to the shop. The prosecutrix said it was her's; the waistcoat was a fustian one, with pearl buttons in the front.

(Till produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Woodman, public-house, and got a pint of beer. I afterwards saw a young man place this box against a plumber's-shop - I took it up, and went down Sloane-street.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-75

256. JOSEPH TITMUS and THOMAS HATT were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a box, value 10 s.; two pieces of patch-work, value 5 s., and a writing desk, value 2 s. , the goods of Emma Jones , spinster .

2d and 3d COUNTS, charging Titmus with stealing, and Hatt with feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen.

EMMA JONES. I am single, and live at No. 87, Lisson-grove. I had a box, with some patch-work and a writing desk, which I left about the end of May, at Oswestry. I have seen them since at Marlborough-street.

JOSEPH MOBBS . I was in Piccadilly on the evening of the 3d of January, about half-past nine o'clock, near the end of Down-street - I saw Titmus take this box from the roof of a coach, and put it into a chaise, which was following the coach; the coach was still going on. When he had done that he pursued the coach again; Smith followed: I stopped him, and asked where the box was; he denied all knowledge of it. The prisoner Hatt was driving the chaise. The box was locked at the time, but the key was with it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where was you

at the time? A. I and Smith were walking down Piccadilly; there was one person on the coach besides the coachman. I did not see the guard; it was the Hibernian Holyhead coach, coming to London; it was quite dark, and I was walking on the pavement; we stopped the gig about twenty yards from the coach; they were going the same way, and the gig followed the coach. We stopped it about three minutes after it was taken. Wilson took Titmus by the side of the coach, the second time he went to it; it was not a quarter of a mile from the White-horse cellar.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What distance were you from the chaise? A. I was about twenty yards behind it. When I saw Titmus place the box in the chaise I did not see who was in the chaise; I came up to the chaise in two or three minutes, and saw Hatt in it. I know by their dress that Titmus was the man who took it from the coach; he stood on the spring, and removed it from the off side. I did not see any other person behind the coach.

WILLIAM WILSON . On the evening of the 3d of January, about half-past nine o'clock, I received information from Mobbs - I then saw the prisoner Titmus follow the coach, and get up, and ride about two hundred yards - he then got down, and I apprehended him. I found on him a white handkerchief, and a silver tooth-pick - he had a dark frock on. I asked what he had been doing; he said he had been doing nothing. Down-street is the next turning to Park-street.

RICHARD TRIPP . I am guard to this coach. I was sitting on the top, with my back stooping down, because it rained so fast: my back was towards the roof. I had put this box on the top of the coach myself, at Birmingham - it had a small piece of string round it, and a key; the strap was over it, but it might be taken out.

Cross-examined. Q. How is it possible for a man to take a box off the coach without you seeing him? A. He could get up on the off side without my seeing him, as I was looking rather towards the near side - when he was on the spring he could get the box off without my seeing him. I was not asleep. I turned round about half way up the hill, and missed the box. I joined the coach at Shrewsbury, and put this box on the coach myself.

JAMES SMITH . I was with Mobbs on the 3d of January. I did not see the box taken from the coach, but saw the man with the box on his arm; he took it to a one-horse chaise, and put it in. I had seen him twenty or thirty yards before he got to the chaise, very distinctly. I looked out for that man afterwards, and can swear to his person it was the prisoner Titmus - I had seen him for three or four minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was walking on the pavement - I did not see him get from the chaise, but saw him come from the coach with the box; I saw his features plainly: I was about fifteen yards from him. I have been a Bow-street patrol twelve months. I can swear to his person; I was not six yards from the gig when he put the box into it. His coat was a dark one, but I cannot tell whether it was blue or brown. Who else was in the gig I cannot say. I am quite certain Titmus was the man.

TITMUS'S Defence. I had been looking for a situation, and was returning home to my family when the officer stopped me, for a crime which I am totally unconscious of.

Two witnesses gave each of the prisoners a good character.

WILLIAM WILSON re-examined. Q. Had Titmus an umbrella with him? A. No. I am quite sure he is the person who came down from the coach - I was not five yards from him. It was Lincoln and Mobbs who stopped the gig.

JOSEPH MOBBS re-examined. Q. How came you to stop the gig? A. Because I saw the parcel put into it.

TITMUS - GUILTY . Aged 25. Of stealing.

Transported for Seven Years .

HATT - GUILTY . Aged 20. Of receiving.

Reference Number: t18250113-76

257. THOMAS HATT was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a saddle, value 3 l.; a bridle, value 1 l., and a martingale, value 5 s. , the goods of James Cranston .

JAMES CRANSTON. I am a coach proprietor . On Monday, the 3d of January, I lost a saddle, a bridle, and a martingale, out of the hind boot of my coach. I came from Walton and Usher. I had seen them safe in the boot at Brentford , about half-past six o'clock - I missed them on this side of Sloane-street ; some person hallooed to me that my hind boot was open. I found the things in the possession of the officers at Marlborough-street, on Thursday, the 6th of January. I had not seen the prisoner, nor a gig near my coach. I missed the things about half-past eight o'clock in the evening.

JOHN LINCOLN . I am a conductor of the patrol. On Monday evening, about half-past nine o'clock, I was going down Piccadilly, near Down-street, an officer came and told me something - we stopped a one-horse chaise, and found the prisoner in it; Mobbs, the officer, got in and searched the chaise, and found the saddle, bridle, and martingale. I found on the prisoner a key, which opened the boot door of Cranston's coach.

JOSEPH MOBBS . I was with Lincoln, and took the property from the gig.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-77

258. THOMAS READ was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a time-piece, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Preston .

CHARLES PRESTON. I am an appraiser , and lived in Stanhope-street - the prisoner lived in my house. On Monday, the 20th of December, I missed my time-piece from a bracket over the back parlour fire-place; I had not noticed it for perhaps a week before - my wife missed it before me. I saw it again on Tuesday, the 28th of December.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WEIBLE . I am shopman to Mr. Newby, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. On Friday, the 24th of December, this time-piece was brought to me by the prisoner, I believe; the officer, who came to me, told me there were several persons in a room, and I went in and saw him.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Martillo, a tailor. I saw the prisoner at my master's shop on Thursday and on Friday - on Thursday, the 23d of December,

he brought a time-piece to our house, No. 10, New-street, Covent-garden; I did not notice it particularly - it was mahogany, and round at the top; he offered it for sale to the men at the shop; he had formerly worked there; he left it from Thursday till Friday.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-78

259. MARGARET POYNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 8 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Wier Smith .

ROBERT WIER SMITH. I keep a cheesemonger's-shop . On Saturday night last, a little before eleven o'clock, I was in my shop - there were some persons in the shop. I heard something fall on the opposite side; I looked over, and saw the head of a flat had fallen down, and a piece of pork was taken off it - I then looked, and saw the prisoner with it under her arm.

SAMUEL WINGRAVE . I am shopman to Mr. Smith. I observed the prisoner going out at the door, with a piece of pork under her arm.

JOHN ROBERT HARRIS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this pork.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-79

260. JOHN MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Newberry .

CATHERINE NEWBERRY . I am the wife of Thomas Newberry, and keep a shop at No. 9, Moon-street . The prisoner came in on the evening of the 24th of December; I did not see him till he was in the shop - there was a man standing behind him. The prisoner asked to look at a handkerchief in the window; I showed it to him; he took it, and turned his back to the middle of the shop to look at it; the man behind him snatched it out of his hand, and ran out of the shop. I detained the prisoner, because he was the person I gave it to.

JOHN PROCTOR . I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody - he had 1 1/4 d. in his pocket. I had seen him and two others together about an hour before, going to different shops.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear the other young man was along with me? A. No: I cannot say they were together.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 6 d. in my pocket. I had looked at the handkerchief, and was about to leave the 6 d. for it: I laid it down for a moment, and then it was taken from the counter. I could have ran away if I had been disposed.

PROSECUTRIX. There was a number of persons round the door. A butcher's man stopped the prisoner at the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-80

261. EDWARD LIANAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , nine bottles, value 18 d.; and a horse-cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of William Hurvey ; and JOHN HUDSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am a constable of St. Pancras. I searched the prisoner Hudson's premises on Christmas-eve - he deals in phials and rags, and other things. I found there some bottles, which he said he had bought of Lianam, for 1d. a piece, and that he had bought some other things. I took the bottles away; and he said if there was any thing else he would use his best endeavour to bring it forward: in the evening I took another person up, who was discharged.

WILLIAM DOSWELL . On Christmas-eve, about nine o'clock, I went into the garden of Mr. William Harvey, where I live: I missed some bottles, which I had seen in the rack three quarters of an hour before. I called for a light, and Harvey came - we found no one in the garden, but traced some persons over the summer-house into a lane. As we were going round we met Lianam, coming from the rag-shop, near a place where four or five bottles were standing. Master then went to the rag-shop, but I did not go with him. I saw Lianam come out of the rag-shop, and asked him to go with me to master's.

Prisoner HUDSON. Q. How did I conduct myself on Christmas morning? A. Very well; you gave up what you had, and asked if there were any other articles lost - I said there was.

HUCKLE HARVEY . I went with the last witness to the garden, and missed the bottles; I went round to the alley and found the bottles standing there - I do not know that Lianam put them there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-81

262. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , four yards of kerseymere, value 30 s. the goods of Thomas Lingham .

HENRY RICHARD HARDWICK . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Lingham. I was in a room at the end of the shop - I heard the shop-door open very gently, at the same time an errand boy, who was chopping wood up stairs, gave me some information. I went into the shop, but did not miss any thing. I stood at the end of the counter for seven or eight minutes, but no one came in. A person then stared into the shop, and I thought he was coming in. I went out at a back door, and up a passage - I saw the prisoner go into the shop. I looked through the side-window, and saw him walk up to a row of shelves, behind the counter - I did not see him take any thing, but he came out soon after, with this piece of kerseymere before him - I took hold of him, and took him back to the shop.

SAMUEL SANDERS . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday, the 29th of December, I was coming towards the New Church, in the Strand, inquiring for a person named Gordon, a person ran up against me with the kerseymere in his hand - he dropped it; I took it up, and was looking at it, when I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-82

263. EDWARD EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a waistcoat, value 5 s. the goods of Henry Boulderson .

HENRY BOULDERSON. I belong to the ship Creole . On

the 31st of December I saw the prisoner come on board from the ship John - my waistcoat was safe in my chest about seven o'clock - I think he came on board about eleven - I did not miss the waistcoat till the officer came on board.

JOHN BISHOP . I took the prisoner with this waistcoat on the 31st of December. He told me he had taken it from the ship Creole, out of the cabin. He at first said it was on board the John; I went there, and could not find an owner for it - I then went on board the Creole, and this lad owned it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-83

264. ABRAHAM COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , four planes, value 6 s.; a square, value 1 s.; a saw, value 1 s., and a hammer, value 6 d. , the goods of Daniel Clarke .

DANIEL CLARKE. I am a carpenter , and live in Shoreham-street, Edgeware-road. The prisoner came into my service last Tuesday fortnight, in the morning only, and on Wednesday I missed the planes, square, and a saw, from a building in Black-lion-lane, Bayswater .

WILLIAM TAIL . I am a pawnbroker and live in Edgeware-road. The prisoner brought these tools to my house to pawn on the 22d of December - I had known him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning of Wednesday two shopmates called on me, and I got tipsy, or I should not have thought of taking the tools.

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-84

265. ELIZABETH COPE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 2 s.; a chain, value 1 s., and a key, value 2 d. , the goods of Jane Jones , widow .

JANE JONES. I am a widow, and live in Silver-street, Carnaby-market . I missed my watch from a mantel shelf in my kitchen; the prisoner was an acquaintance of mine - she used to call now and then. This was on the 10th of September - I went for my milk - I returned about five o'clock in the evening, and missed the watch about nine at night. The prisoner had called in at her dinner hour; I saw the watch safe at one o'clock, when I was going out to milk. I found it at the pawnbroker's - it has a little crack by the side of it.

JOHN PEARSON . I took in this watch in pawn on the 10th of September, from a woman, who I believe to be the prisoner - it was brought in the after part of the day.

THOMAS COOKE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of January. She denied any knowledge of Mrs. Jones or the watch. She afterwards said she had pawned it at the corner of Hanway-yard, but she did not know the pawnbroker's name.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250113-85

266. PHILLIP NATHAN and HENRY BARNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a basket, value 1 s., and six goblets, value 10 s. , the goods of John Ducroz .

WILLIAM BLACKFORD . I live in Cock-lane, and am in the service of Mr. John Ducroz. On Friday, the 17th of December, my master sent me out with a cart. I was in St. John-street in the cart - it had a basket in it which had six cut goblets in it. I observed two men behind the cart, and I thought they were about to take the basket - I turned round and it was gone.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a patrol. On Friday, the 17th of December, I was in St. John-street , and saw the two prisoners and another man, going after a cart, up that street. I saw the third person who was with them, come out of the road, with this basket, on to the pavement; they all three closed together, and the two prisoners put their hands into the basket, to feel what was in it. I gave the two prisoners to my partners, and ran after the third, but I did not take him. On searching the basket I found six cut goblets.

WILLIAM MERRY . I was with Waddington, and saw what he has described. I seized one of the prisoners and Smith the other.

RICHARD SMITH . I apprehended Barnett, and took this apron from him, which he was putting round him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NATHAN'S Defence. I was in company with Barnett, and coming along St. John-street the officer seized me; there was a basket some distance off. I have a wife and three children to support.

BARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

NATHAN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-86

267. MARY WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a gown, value 6 s. , the goods of Ann Foley , widow .

ANN FOLEY. I am a widow. The prisoner lodged with me. On Tuesday, the 13th of November, I missed my gown, which had hung behind the chamber door, that morning at eleven o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MURPHY . This gown was pawned at my master's shop, for 1 s. 6 d., in the name of Ann Williams. I do not know who brought it.

JOHN WRIGHT . I received charge of the prisoner on the 21st of December. I told her she must go with me to the watch-house, and by the description of the person who pawned it, she must be the person. She then began crying, and admitted that it was her.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in very great distress. I have been out of a situation nearly five months, and have two children. The woman said, in the morning,

"Walker, don't come here to sleep to-night if you don't bring something to pay for your lodging." I returned home very much distressed - I took the gown and thought I should be able to return it in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-87

268. THOMAS MATHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a box, value 1 s., and eight books, value 10 s. , the goods of John Brown .

2d COUNT stating the box to belong to Harriet Westley , and the books to Basil Stewart and Andrew Panton .

JOHN BROWN. I keep the Cheshunt errand cart . I had my cart at Mr. Jermer's door, (the Orange-tree public-house, Bloomsbury ), on the 11th of January, and had a box in it which I had got from Harriet Westley, of Cheshunt. I left the cart at the door about eleven o'clock, returned in about twenty-five minutes, and found the box in possession of the officer.

WILLIAM JERMER . I am the landlord of the orange-tree, in Bloomsbury. Brown was with his cart at my door about half-past eleven - I saw some person get on the shafts, take a box out of the cart, and give it to the prisoner, at the corner by my house. The prisoner walked about twenty yards down King-street - he then began to run - I took him and the box, and gave him to the officer at my house. He said he was going to Holborn, to the Bell and Crown.

CHARLES REEVE . I took the prisoner, and searched the box - it had eight books in it.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-88

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 15. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

269. PATRICK CRAWLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jeremiah Squires and Charles Steane , about ten o'clock in the night of 8th of January , at All Saints, Poplar, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 72 lbs. weight of lead and tin, mixed together, value 1 l. 7 s. , their property.

2d COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Jeremiah Squires only.

JEREMIAH SQUIRES. I am in partnership with Charles Steane. I reside on the premises, but he does not; the rent is paid out of the concern - we are plumbers and glaziers, and live in the parish of All Saints, Poplar . On Saturday night, the 8th of January, I fastened up the shop, and about eight o'clock in the morning I found the wall broken down; and missed about 1/2 a cwl. of lead and tin mixed together; I saw it again that night, and know it to be ours. I know nothing of the prisoner. I found the wall at the back part of the shop broken down, by which means they had got in. It was dark when I locked the shop up. I was in the back parlour with my family till I went to bed.

WILLIAM RIDER . I am headborough of Poplar. On Saturday night, the 8th of January, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another at the corner of Bow-lane, Poplar, nearly a mile from the prosecutors' - each carrying a pig of lead; they saw me, dropped it, and ran off. I secured the prisoner twelve yards off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a hard working boy all my life. I was going to see after a ship, and in Whitechapel I met a man, who asked me where I was going - I said home to Bow-lane; he said he would give me 1 s. to carry a parcel; I said I could not carry both, and so he carried one - and when he saw this gentleman, he said,

"There is an officer, drop it; and we must go away."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18250113-89

270. WILLIAM PEAKES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Sadler , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of December (no person being therein,) and stealing a waistcoat, value 15 s., and 3 lbs. of beef, value 18 d. , his property.

JAMES SADLER. I live at Paddington-bridge . On the 28th of December, about half-past three o'clock, I went out, leaving nobody at home - I fastened up the house, returned about five, found the door ajar, and the bed-room shutters forced in. We missed a piece of beef and a waistcoat.

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Gideon, of Stafford-street, Lisson-green. On the 29th of December this waistcoat was pawned in the name of Bates; I cannot say who by.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 3d of January I apprehended the prisoner - he denied the charge. I took him into a house, and said it was of no use denying it, as the waistcoat was found; he said he should tell no more lies - that he did the robbery, and gave the waistcoat to his brother, to pawn for 6 s., and he had torn the duplicate up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-90

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

271. THOMAS GOODERHAM was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth , his wife .

Mr. John Hamilton and Mr. Edward Grimstone , who had attended the opening of the deceased's body, stated it as their opinion that she died in consequence of a miscarraige, and there was nothing to lead them to suppose that it had been brought on by external violence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-91

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

272. JOSEPH ELDRED was charged on the Coroner's inquisition only, with killing and slaying Ann , his wife .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

John Conquest , Esq., M. D. and Mr. J. S. Hartness, surgeon, deposed, that having attended the opening of the deceased's body, they could discover no bruise or mark of external violence; her death might have been caused by accident or natural causes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-92

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

273. SAMUEL HUNT and GEORGE FIELDER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Henson , about six o'clock, in the night of the 5th of January , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three pairs of boots, value 12 s., and fifteen pairs of shoes, value 3 l. , his property.

JOHN HENSON. I am a shoe-maker , and live at No. 1 Little College-street, in the parish of St. John, Westminster ; the shop is part of my dwelling-house. On Wednesday evening, the 5th of January, about six o'clock - I was at tea in the room adjoining the shop, and thought I heard a noise at the shop-door - I sent my daughter out, and went into the shop; I saw the window open, and shoes

hanging out; it is a sash-window - I had left it quite shut down, but do not think that it was fastened - I found it had been lifted up, but not broken; some shoes were put under it to keep it up, or it would have come down again - it was quite dark - I missed about fifteen pairs of shoes, worth 3 l., and three pairs of boots, worth 12 s. - I ran out, and along Great College-street, towards Black Dog-alley, and saw three men running out of the alley, in a direction from my house - Hunt was one of them; I knocked him down, and secured him, but found nothing on him; a witness came to my assistance, as he endeavoured to get away; he said I had got hold of the wrong man; I was taking him to Queen-square, and met the officers, who took him - I sent the witness down the alley, and he brought me three shoes - twelve boots and shoes altogether were picked up, but not in pairs - they are worth 1 l.; I don't know that the parish has any other name, except St. John.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. This was about six o'clock; when had you seen the window safe? A. Twenty minutes, or half-an-hour before; I am certain it was quite shut down - I have five children, they were all in the room with me; my wife was ill up stairs - I know Hunt by seeing him before - I cannot say whether Fielder was one of them.

GEORGE FITZGERALD . I am eleven years old. (This witness appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.) I live at No. 3, Oliver's-court. About six o'clock in the evening, that the prosecutor's shop was robbed; I was playing at hoop with Roger Ryan up and down Little College-street - I knew Hunt before, and one Dignum, and saw them both standing at the prosecutor's window; they both went over, and lifted up the window - Dignum took some shoes out from inside the window, and Hunt held an apron, which they were put into; there were three men's shoes - I saw them take a great many shoes, and an odd boot - I only saw one boot; they took them out as fast as they could, and put them into their aprons - Dignum threatened to throw a stone at me, but did not - they did not see us looking at them, as we went away; and when we came up the street again, they were still at the window, and Dignum offered to throw at us, and told us to go away, and we went; when they had put the shoes into the apron, they all ran down the street; there were three of them altogether; Fielder was the third man; he was standing at the corner of the street, about ten yards off, looking at them, and when he saw any one coming, he whistled; I did not know him before, but am sure of him; there was a lamp at the corner, so that I could see his face - Henson's eldest daughter came out; but I did not see him come out himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you call any body to look at them? A. No; there was only us, and my two little brothers - I knew they were stealing, but if I had gone to tell, they would have knocked me about - Dignum picked up a stone, and said,

"Get away with you" - we went round the street, and met nobody; I was standing by Fielder - it was a dark night; I saw them cross over, and go to the window; I saw their faces - a woman came out of her house, and told us to go away, and Hunt said

"Be off, be off" - Hunt stood by her door; it was rather a dark street; there was a lamp at the corner, some distance from the shop; there was no light in the shop; we went by them, and Dignum told us to be off - we were going in to tell, when Henson's daughter came; she came out and asked if I had seen the men, and asked, why I did not come in to tell, but Dignum had threatened to hit me.

ROGER RYAN . I am eleven years old. I was playing with Fitzgerald, and saw Dignum and Hunt at Henson's window - Hunt lifted up the window, and held it with one hand, and held his apron with the other - Dignum pulled the shoes out of the window, and put them into his apron; I only saw him take three men's shoes out; Fielder whistled, and they ran down Great College-street; Fielder had been standing at the corner, under the lamp; they all three ran away; Dignum had threatened to throw a stone at us, and told us to go away; I did not know them before, but I saw their faces, about six o'clock that evening, when they stood by a public-house, where there was a light - the public-house is only a few yards from the prosecutor's - I have no doubt of them being the same men.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give no alarm? A. Not till the prosecutor's daughter came out.

GEORGE FITZGERALD re-examined. Q. Did Fielder whistle? A. Yes, when they had been about ten minutes at the window, before they put the window up; people passed on the other side, but did not know what they were at.

WILLIAM CLEWLEY . I was near Dean's-yard on this night, and the first thing which drew my attention was Henson holding Hunt down - he begged of me to assist him, which I did; he asked me to go down Black Dog-alley, to look for some shoes; I went, and found three men's shoes, which I gave to Henson; he gave them to a young man to take care of. A young man lighted me with a candle when I found them.

JOSEPH OTTERWAY . I am a Bow-street officer. Henson gave Hunt into my custody, about a quarter past six o'clock; I found nothing particular on him. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. John the Evangelist - I have heard it so called. I took Fielder in about half an hour, and took him to Ryan and Fitzgerald, who identified him. Henson delivered me these shoes and boots; I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain of the name of the parish? A. I have heard it most frequently called St. John, only.

THOMAS SHELTON , ESQ. The parish is always described in indictments as St. John the Evangelist: some years ago I prepared the indictments for Westminster, and it was always so called.

JOHN HENSON . The shoes and boots are mine. The three shoes which Clewley picked up I gave to the officer. I had given them to a neighbour to mind while I went to the watch-house, but am certain they are the same - he returned them to me in a quarter of an hour; the others were picked up in the street, and brought to me by my neighbour while I was returning with the officers. The three men's shoes are worth 10 s., and the others 10 s.; they are my own make - I have the fellows at home.

HUNT's Defence. I was going to Mr. Lambeth, a butcher, in Abbingdon-street; the gentleman laid hold of me and said I had robbed his shop - I said he had got the wrong man.

FIELDER'S Defence. I had not seen. Hunt for a fortnight. I was talking to a man by the Green Man when the officer took me.

HUNT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

FIELDER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250113-93

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

274. ELIZABETH HAYDON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Norman , about six o'clock in the night of the 6th of December , and stealing two coats, value 3 l.; two pairs of trowsers, value 1 l., and two waistcoats, value 3 s. the goods of John Hazell ; and a handkerchief, value 18 d. , the goods of Michael Powell .

CATHERINE HAZELL . I am the wife of John Hazell; we lodge in Baltic-street, St. Luke's , on the first floor - Thomas Norman, the landlord, lives below. On Monday, the 6th of December, about five o'clock, I went out, leaving nobody but the prisoner in the house; she lodged on the second floor. I locked my door, and took the key with me. I went to a neighbour's house, and at six o'clock I was fetched, and found my door open, and missed my husband's coat and trowsers, and my son's suit of clothes - his name is Michael Powell; the clothes had all hung over one chair; - it was getting dusk when I went out, but there was sufficient light to see a person's face; - my son is twenty-four years old, and finds his own clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Is there not another man besides Hazell who claims a right to you? A. I was married to Mr. Gough nine years ago, but he freely gave me up.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. On the 6th of December, about six o'clock, I went to Hazell's room; her door had been forced open by some instrument. I went again just before nine and met the prisoner coming up stairs; Hazell charged her with this - she stood quite amazed, and never said a word. I found a handkerchief on her, which Powell claimed; and in one corner of it was 20 s. 6 d., and in a purse, the duplicates of two suits of clothes, pawned that day at Cross's, Turnmill-street. I found a pair of pinchers in her pocket, which seemed to fit the marks on the door. She seemed so confused I had a hard matter to get a sight of her face. I went to her room; she seemed in the greatest distress - there was only a handful of fire in the place, and the children round it appeared literally starving; there was not half a loaf in the place, and hardly a bed to lay on - I understand her husband is a drunken fellow.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am shopman to Mr. Cross. I gave the duplicate produced to a woman who pawned a coat and trowsers for 30 s. between five and eight o'clock on the evening of the 6th of December. I do not know her.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character; they stated her to have been in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only, and not of burglary. Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-94

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

275. DAVID COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , in the dwelling-house of William Lee , two 10 l. bank notes , his property.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LEE. On the 27th of November I lived in Whittington College , which are alms-houses, built by the Mercers' Company, at Highgate; I occupied the house alone, and superintended the workmen; the prisoner was employed in the building for about five weeks. On the 18th of November I changed a 50 l. cheque at Messrs. Curtis and Co.'s banking-house, and received four 10 l. notes, and ten sovereigns. I put the notes into a spectacle case, which I put at the bottom of my chest, under my clothes, in my bed-room, on the first floor. On the 27th of November I went to my chest, and on opening the spectacle-case I missed two of the notes - I have the other two here. The prisoner continued at work till the 4th of December, when he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. On the day you lost your notes, did you not bring a small table to the alms-house gate; and were you not so intoxicated you could not carry it? A. I took a table there one day, but cannot say when - I was never in liquor in working hours.

WILLIAM MONIES . I am servant to Mr. Ockley, at the Cross Keys wine-vaults, Blackfriars-road. On the 27th of November, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked for change for a 10 l. note. I took it to Mr. Ockley, who came to him with it in his hand, and asked some questions, which I did not hear, and afterwards gave him in change. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN OCKLEY . I gave change for a 10 l. note, but cannot recollect the prisoner's person - I asked the man his name, and who he worked for; he said for Mr Booth; I asked if he meant Mr. Booth in the City, and whether it was the builder or surveyor; he said the builder - that he himself lived at No. 15, Holland-street, and his name was Jones, which I wrote on the note.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have a 10 l. note, No. 15,058, dated 23d March, 1824; it was paid in on the 2d December, by Messrs. Esdailes, the bankers - I also produce No. 14,948, dated 5th of October, 1824, paid in on the 6th of December, by Messrs. Smith, Payne and Company.

MR. OCKLEY. The note No. 15,058, is the one I changed.

WILLIAM BRACKELL. I am clerk to Messrs. Curtis and Company; I gave the two notes produced in part payment of a cheque for 50 l., drawn by George Smith.

WILLIAM STILES . I am a silversmith, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 3d December, the prisoner paid me this note, No. 14,948 - I asked his name; he gave me no answer, but took the note, and wrote on it,

"G. Cox, 15, Holland-street, Blackfriars-road" - which I copied on the other side.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. On the 4th of December. I apprehended the prisoner, at the counting-house of his master, Mr. Ward, in Water-street, City; he denied all knowledge of the notes; I then asked if he had changed a 10 l. note on the Saturday previous, at the Cross-Keys; he said he had been there, but had not changed a note; I found a sovereign, and eight shillings on him, and asked, if he had any more money about him; he said he had not, but I found a 5 l. Banknote in his fob; he began saying something about a ring, but suddenly stopped, and said he would say no more; he gave me his address in John-street, Waterloo-bridge; I found that he did live there.

WILLIAM LEE re-examined. I slept at the alms-houses, to take care of them, while they were building, but did not have my victuals there; I was foreman of the works, under the direction of Mr. Smith, the architect - I was not put there by the company - the building is now finished, and the chaplain lives in that house, and I lodge at a tavern; my living there made no difference in my wages - I had no family there.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly have acted very indiscreet; but solemnly deny the charge of robbery; the prosecutor is addicted to drink, which was the case when I assisted him with the table, about an hour before I found these notes - I seriously deplore having appropriated them to my necessities.

The Court ruled, that this could not be legally called the dwelling-house of the prosecutor, he having been placed there for a special purpose only.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing only . - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-95

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

276. THOMAS GURRY was indicted for stealing on the 20th of December , thirty-three sovereigns, and a half sovereign, the monies of Daniel Etherington , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Swale .

MR. BRODERICK conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN ETHERINGTON . I am the wife of Daniel Etherington. On the 20th of December, we moved from Tyler-street, to a lodging, at Mr. Swale's, Marshall-street, Carnaby-market , on the attic story; and my husband put thirty-three sovereigns and a half, under the carpet, in the inner-room, for security; they were wrapped in a piece of rag; the prisoner came to put a bed up in that room: my husband was in the room with him, part of the time - I saw the money under the carpet, as he came up stairs; he was there about half an hour - I was in and out with him, and was either in that, or the front room all the time; my husband asked if he would have anything to drink; he said if he would give him 2d., he could get it when he went out - I missed the money about a quarter of an hour after he was gone - nobody but him had been in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have two rooms? A. Yes; and was in one or other of them all the time, and the door between the two rooms open; the house is full of lodgers; another person has a third room on that floor; the money was put there about three o'clock, and he came about a quarter past; it had been brought from our other lodging, in a box - I have never said that I had not seen it under the carpet, or that I was sorry I had said so.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When had you last seen the money? A. Not since the 19th; but I saw the cotton it was wrapped in, under the carpet, when he was coming up stairs; he could have taken it without our observing him; both rag and money were gone.

DANIEL ETHERINGTON. Our goods were moved to Marshall-street, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning. I took the money out of the box, but did not open the cotton - I put it on the mantel-shelf, and put it under the carpet, about three o'clock, and have no doubt of the money being in it; and in a quarter of an hour the prisoner came to put up a bed - I helped him, but left the room, about four times; he was nearly half an hour there; and when he left, at tea-time, we went to look for the money, and missed it; nobody but him and us had been in the room - there is no door to that room, on the landing-place.

Q. When did you drink tea? A. About a quarter to four o'clock; we had not left the room at all - I went after him immediately, and found him at his master's shop, about a quarter of a mile off; no money was found upon him, or at his lodgings.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor bought a bedstead, at my master's - I carried it home, and fixed it up; there was no carpet in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-96

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

277. THOMAS BOOTH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 4 1/2 lbs. of opium, value 5 l. 12 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Butler , his master.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-97

278. JAMES ANTHONY LEDGER was indicted for embezzlements, to the amount of 253 l. 19 s. 11 d.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-98

279. ANN MARGARET WRIGHT alias ANN LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , at St. Botolph without, Aldersgate, three sovereigns, forty half-crowns, eighty shillings, and forty sixpences, the monies of John Keen , to whom she was servant, in his dwelling-house .

SARAH KEEN . I am the wife of John Keen - we keep the Britannia, public-house, Little Britain, in the parish of St. Botolph's, Aldersgate . The prisoner came to us on Monday, the 1st of November, as servant of all-work - my husband was taken dangerously ill on the Wednesday, and was confined to his bed - I attended to him. On Saturday, the 6th, between six and seven o'clock, I counted up 24 l. in the bar; it consisted of crowns, half-crowns, shillings, sixpences, and three sovereigns; I can swear there were forty half crowns and eighty shillings; I placed it in the corner of one of the drawers; the prisoner was in the kitchen, which faces the bar at the time, and must have seen me count the money and put it there - my husband sent down stairs to say he was much worse; she heard the boy bring that message - and I had scarcely got up stairs a moment, and poured on this medicine, before I heard the bar door open, which I had left on the spring lock. I gave my husband his medicine, hurried down, and the prisoner was then gone; I had left her in the kitchen, and no one else there. I called her four or five times, but could get no answer. I had left her busy washing the tea things; she had left them unfinished, and had brought part of them into the bar, as an excuse. I found the whole of the money gone - it was all we had. We are young beginners, and had collected it to pay away; she had given us no warning. I did not see her again till the 10th of December; and have only recovered 5 s. 8 d.

Prisoner. I did not take it out of the drawer, but out of a little tray, and put it into my lap.

SOPHIA BROWN . I live opposite to the Britannia - the prisoner was servant there. On the 6th of November, between

six and seven o'clock, I saw her coming out of the house; she met me on Keen's steps as I was going in with a bundle, to a lodger there; she had a black bonnet with light ribbons on; her apron was folded on her arm; it hit against me as I met her, and sounded like money in it. I went up to the lodger, came down, and Mrs. Keen had lost her money.

JOHN KEEN. The prisoner came into our service on the 1st of November; I took to my bed on Wednesday, and on Saturday was informed of this robbery. I heard she was gone towards Leeds, and sent an officer after her - on the 6th of December I found her at Wiggan, in Lancashire - I got a constable; she was brought to me; I said,

"What could you be about to behave as you have to me; what do you deserve?" she said,

"I don't know what - I deserve hanging;" she pulled off her rings, and said she had bought them with my money, and had spent the rest in clothes, and riding about - she had but 5 s. 8 d. left.

THOMAS LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I sent a letter to Leeds, and traced the prisoner to Lancashire, and afterwards received her in charge at Keen's house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250113-99

280. HENRY KELLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a coat, value 10 s., and a knife, value 1 s. , the goods of John Cruix .

JOHN CRUIX. I am a waggoner . I was at the King's Head, public-house, Pudding-lane - I hung my coat in the tap-room on the 8th of December, and went out for about five minutes, and left the prisoner in the room - when I returned it was gone. I saw a knife, which had been in my pocket, a week afterwards, when he was in custody.

WILLIAM TILLIER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to pawn this knife for 6 d. - I refused to take it in; he said he would sell it for 9 d., as he wanted to get a dinner, and I bought it of him. I gave it to the officer a few days after.

WILLIAM NATION . I am an officer. On the 14th of December I apprehended the prisoner; the prosecutor said he was the man; he then voluntarily acknowledged that he had taken the coat, and sold it to a Jew, and had pawned the knife.

(Knife produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-100

281. JAMES EASTON and JOHN CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Boyes , from his person .

JOHN BOSTON . I am a journeyman coach-maker. On the 8th of December, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Cheapside, and saw the prisoners standing about - I watched them into Fleet-street; they continued together, and near Shoe-lane Easton put his hand into Mr. Boyes's pocket, took a handkerchief out and put it into the flap of his breeches - Clark was close to him, and must have seen it. I seized Easton with the handkerchief; Clark came up afterwards, and I took him also. I had a struggle with Clark, and Easton broke from me, but I secured him immediately, without losing sight of him. Mr. Boyes took the handkerchief from the flap of Easton's breeches.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you often given information on these subjects? A. Yes; whenever I see a robbery - I had not seen one for twelve months before. I have been a witness here several times. I make boot-jacks and things at home, and live at No. 34, Henry-street, Hampstead-road.

JOHN WELSDALE PEEL . I am a printer. I was passing, and saw a mob - Mr. Boyes had a handkerchief in his hand, and said he had taken it from Easton's small clothes. I saw Boston take Clark, who put himself in a fighting attitude, Easton ran from Mr. Boyes, but was taken afterwards.

THOMAS BOYES. I command a ship in the East India trade. On coming from the coffee-house, Boston said I was robbed; I felt, and missed my handkerchief, turned round, and he had hold of Easton, whom I took by the arm, and took my handkerchief from his breeches. He ran away, and an officer secured him in St. Bride's passage.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK'S Defence. I met the other man in Cheapside, left him in Fleet-street, and soon after, seeing a mob, I went up, and this man collared me.

EASTON' Defence. I picked the handkerchief up.

Easton received a good character.

EASTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-101

282. MARY GAMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , four yards and three quarters of woollen cloth, value 34 s.; six yards of calico, value 4 s. 9 d.; a yard of shalloon, value 2 s. 3 d.; a quarter of a yard of Marseilles, value 1 s. 3 d.; 4 ozs. of thread, value 9 d.; half an oz. of silk, value 1 s. 2 d.; a watch, value 30 s.; a key, value 5 s., and a seal, value 25 s., the goods of James Chamberlain , from his person .

JAMES CHAMBERLAIN. I am a tailor , and live at Tottenham. On the 29th of November I bought these goods in Bishopsgate-street, and about four o'clock in the afternoon went into the Sun, public-house, with them - the prisoner was there. I had a pint of beer, and fell asleep, and on awaking the bundle was gone, and she also - I missed my watch; I went out directly, and informed Hill, who afterwards produced the shalloon and Marseilles.

NATHANIEL HILL . I am a constable. The prosecutor stated this case to me; a person named Browning was brought to the watch-house, and after that the pot-boy directed me to the prisoner's lodging, in Angel-alley - I found her in bed with a man, with the shalloon and marseilles under her pillow, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came into the Sun, and got in company with a female - they drank ale and gin; he went out with her for half an hour, and was quite drunk. The female knew my room - whether she took him there I do not know. I went about eight o'clock to put my child to bed, and thought somebody had been there; - I went home about eleven.

HENRY TORF . I live at the Sun, public-house. The prosecutor came in about one o'clock, and had a pint of ale, then went out, returned about six, and Mary Browning made friends with him. His parcel fell down two or three times, and she would not let me take it to the bar for safety. The prisoner came in after that with her child - the prosecutor let the child play with his watch two or three times. The prisoner then went home with her child; I had to carry some beer that way, and walked with her. I left Browning there laying on the parcel; when I returned the prosecutor was quite tipsy - he could not stand, and missed his parcel. My master and mistress were gone to the play.

JAMES CHAMBERLAIN. I was neither drunk nor sober - I had had rather too much beer. I did not leave Tottenham till after one o'clock. I met a patrol at the door of the public-home; he took me to Hill's house - we found her at the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-102

283. CATHERINE M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , two gowns, value 10 s.; a pelisse, value 10 s.; a scarf, value 20 s.; a lace cap, value 5 s.; a yard and a half of flannel, value 1 s.; a petticoat, value 3 s. 6 d., and a pinafore, value 6 d. , the goods of William Graham .

CHARLOTTE POYNARD . I live at Mr. William Graham's, Angel-court, Throgmorton-street . On the 12th of January, about twenty minutes to three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming down the second flight of stairs, and asked who she wanted - she said she had been to a gentleman - I followed her, seeing her with a parcel, and asked if she got those things up stairs; she threw them out of her apron, and ran out; I took her just outside. The house is let out as counting-houses.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-103

284. THOMAS COLLINS and JOSEPH SAUNDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Abrahams , from his person .

WILLIAM ABRAHAMS. On the 14th of December, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was on Ludgate-hill , and felt a handkerchief drawn from my pocket - I turned round and saw Saunders passing it to somebody behind me; I saw it in Saunders's hand-he had two persons in his company, and Collins was the nearest to him, but I will not swear that he received it. I collared them both, and sent for a constable, but could not find it.

JOHN SNOW . I took them in charge.

SAUNDERS'S Defence. The gentleman charged the other with it first, and then charged me.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

COLLINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-104

285. MARIA LINSCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , two handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; two knives, value 6 s.; a spoon, value 6 d.; three yards of lace, value 3 s.; two frocks, value 6 s.; four bed gowns, value 8 s.; four shirts, value 1 s.; three night caps, value 1 s.; three yards of nankeen, value 1 s.; three yards of glazed cotton, value 3 s.; three drawings, value 1 s.; three remnants of figured silk, value 3 s.; a sovereign, and two shillings , the property of Richard Cleobury , her master.

ELIZABETH BOURNE CLEOBURY . I am the wife of Richard Cleobury, a tailor ; we live in Cheapside . The prisoner was in our service seven weeks. On the 26th of December, between five and six o'clock, in consequence of suspicion, I left nine marked sovereigns in my work-table drawer, which was in the second floor room. I returned soon after eight, and missed a sovereign, and two marked shillings. I sent for an officer next morning, and she produced a purse, containing the marked sovereign and shillings.

BENJAMIN HERRING . I am inspector of the City Police. I was sent for on the 27th of December, and told the prisoner to produce her money; she produced a purse, containing a sovereign and several shillings; Mrs. Cleobury said her sovereign and shillings had a mark on the nose, which I found correct.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you have inquired into her character? A. Yes, and find that previous to this it was unimpeached.

JOHN MARTIN. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box at her mother's house; she gave me the key of it. I found the articles stated in the indictment in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-105

286. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , two shawl handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 8 s. , the goods of Michael Coulter , his master.

STEPHEN WRITAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-lane. On the 11th of January, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in to pawn two shawls - I asked where he got them; he said he found them on the right-hand side of Oxford-street. I gave him in charge.

EDWARD STONE . I am a patrol, and took charge of the prisoner with the shawls.

GEORGE POTTS . I am warehouseman to Michael Coulter, who lives in Friday-street. The prisoner was his errand-boy , and had been so for about six weeks. These shawls are my master's property.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am an officer. I went into the watch-house, and the prisoner immediately said he would tell the truth; he said voluntarily that he and another boy in Mr. Coulter's employ had agreed to take a shawl each when they left at night, which they did, and the other boy gave him his outside to pawn.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-106

287. EDWARD GANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a hamper, value 3 s., and nine geese, value 25 s. , the goods of John Bloomfield .

CHARLES HAMLIN . On the 22d of December, about six o'clock in the morning, I was at Newgate-market , with

John Bloomfield's clerk - I left the cart for a short time, and on returning saw the prisoner take this hamper out, and put it on his shoulder; he ran down Warwick-lane, and seeing me in pursuit he threw it down, and ran away - I caught him without losing sight of him, and am sure he is the man. I returned and took the hamper up, and delivered it according to the direction.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How do you know that it came from Bloomfield's cart? A. Because I had the care of it, from the Rose, Fleet-market - it contained nine geese.

BARTHOLOMEW SINCLAIR . I am a watchman. I was London-house-yard; heard a cry of Stop thief! and met the prisoner running along the passage, from Paternoster-row - he joined in the cry himself, but being the first man I stopped him - he tried to avoid me.

JOHN CASTLE . I am servant to Mr. Ward. The hamper was directed to us, and contained nine geese.

JOHN BLOOMFIELD . I keep the Rose Inn, Fleet-market - the hamper was consigned to me.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men came up - one asked which way I was going, and asked me to take that basket to St. Paul's church-yard; he took it off the cart, and put it on my shoulder, and when I had got five yards he said,

"Throw it down, and run;" I followed him up the alley, and the watchman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-107

288. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a wrapper, value 1 d., 10 lbs. of bacon, value 8 s. 4 d.; two shirts, value 4 s., and twelve apples, value 2 d. , the goods of Nicholas Brown and Algeron Wallington .

ISAAC BOWDEN . On the 10th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I was in the office at the Castle and Falcon; the prisoner came in, and enquired for the Abbingdon waggon; I referred him to the New Inn, Old Bailey. I saw him leave the warehouse with something under his arm - I stopped him at the gate; he said it was a parcel which a gentleman in a smock-frock had given him in the yard; nobody was in the yard. It is a parcel which had come by Nicholas Brown and Algeron Wallington's waggon, directed to Hickman.

WILLIAM HICKMAN . I can swear to this parcel by the direction.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Williamson, my master, sent me there, and as I came out a gentleman in a smock-frock asked me to carry that parcel.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-108

NEW COURT.

(3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

289. JAMES ADDINHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , three cups and balls, value 8 d.; a string of beads, value 3 d.; two velvet figures, value 4 d.; a trunk, value 10 d.; a book, value 1 s.; two cricket balls, value 1 s.; six screw cushions, value 2 s.; a work box, value 4 d.; a pocket-book, value 4 d,; 1 lb. of twine, value 1 s.; a hammer, value 2 d., and thirty-six cakes of paint, value 18 d. , the goods of William Everton and William Spirton , his masters.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-109

290. GEORGE STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Pender Luke Stooke , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-110

291. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , sixteen hats, value 2 l. , the goods of Mark Marks .

MARK MARKS. I am a hatter , and live in Crown-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner lives opposite my workshop, which is No. 18. On the 1st of January I went to my workshop, about half-past twelve o'clock, and found the place in confusion - sixteen hats, which had been safe the night before, were gone - I likewise lost a bag. In consequence of what I heard I went to White's house, and saw his mother, but he was not there. When his mother saw me on the Saturday she said he should tell me all about the robbery; I went again, and then saw the prisoner in the kitchen - he said, if I came with any pig man he would knock my head off, but as I came alone he would tell me. I had not said anything to induce him to tell me; I had given the mother 6 d. to get some gin, but she did not have it till it was all done. I asked him who the parties were, and he said if I wanted to know that, he would not tell me anything - he then said they were sold to Philips, in Windmill-street, and went with me; he did not tell me that he was one of the party.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The information was not true; you did not find any hats there? A. No; I had given a quartern and a half of gin, between me, his mother, and him.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am a patrol. I went to Marks's shop, and saw some marks upon a wall, which appeared as if some person had got over from the adjoining yard - I took up White on Sunday, and took him to the watch-house; he absconded the same evening - I cannot say whether the watch-house door was shut.

CHARLES READ . The prisoner escaped from the watch-house, but was taken afterwards.

LEWIS PHILIPS . I live in Little Windmill-street, Haymarket. I never bought any hats of Collins, or of White.

WOLFE COLLINS . I am a hatter, and live in Compton-street. I know Lewis and Barnard Philips - I know nothing more of this business.

BARNARD PHILIPS . I live at No. 11, Little Panton-street, Golden-square. I never received any hats from the prisoner - Wolfe Collins came past my house, and I gave him a hat to make smaller - I know nothing of the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny all knowledge of the robbery; the prosecutor made me drink two glasses of gin, and then I did not know what I said; he then offered me five sovereigns if I would lay it to Aby Collins.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-111

292. JOHN PARKER and SARAH PARKER were

indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , eleven brass cocks, value 12 s.; four curry-combs, value 1 s.; a screw-plate, value 6 d.; two hammers, value 3 s.; two axes, value 4 s.; a chisel, value 8 d.; six files, value 2 d.; two hells, value 3 s.; a lock, value 2 s., and thirteen keys, value 2 s. , the goods of Augustus Septimus Braithwaite .

AUGUSTUS SEPTIMUS BRAITHWAITE. I am an ironmonger , and live in Bishopsgate-street within . The male prisoner came into my service in August, and left in November - I was not then aware of having missed anything but a rule, which I have seen since at the Office - I have looked at the things here produced, and believe them to be mine - I looked over my stock on the 30th of December, and missed articles of this description; he was in the habit of working at the back of my premises, where these goods were placed on shelves, in papers - I am sure I had not sold them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were they marked? A. They were all marked with my private mark - I discharged him on the Saturday night: he came every day in the ensuing week.

JOSEPH BERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Mullins, a pawnbroker, Upper North-place, Gray's-inn-road; these brass cocks were pawned with us on the 30th December.

JOHN DELPH . I live at the Castle public-house, Tothill-street. I called on the prisoner, in John's-place, Gray's-inn-lane; he and his wife lived together; he said he had got a fresh lodger coming, and would be glad if I could stow away a box or two for him, to make room; I took a box away; it was corded, and locked - on the 30th of December, I understood some officers came to my house, but I was not at home; in consequence of their coming, I took the box to Hatton-garden Office, and gave it to Edwards, in the same state in which I received it.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I apprehended Parker on the 29th of December, at the Castle public-house - I found some keys on him, and one of them opened the box, which he gave to Edwards and in that box we found these articles; they are all ironmongers' tools; the prisoner said, he found the key, and as it was of no use to me, he wanted me to give it him again.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I got the box from Delph, after going with Limbrick, on the 29th; it was sent the next day to the Office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Fourteen Days .

SARAH PARKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-112

293. SARAH PARKER was again indicted for stealing, on the 29th December , a clock, value 16 s., and a key, value 6 d. , the goods of John Prosser .

WILLIAM PROSSER . I am the brother of John Prosser; he is a smoke-jack manufacturer . On the 8th of February last, a fire happened; Parker was then in our employ - he was employed the whole of the next day, and his wife came backwards and forwards; there was an old clock, which we supposed to be destroyed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-113

294. WILLIAM KEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , two planes, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Thomason .

THOMAS THOMASON. I am a carpenter , and live in Twister's-alley, Bunhill-row. I was employed, at No. 5, Grenville-street, Hatton-garden , on the evening of the 16th of December; I left there about five o'clock. I left some planes on the first floor, returned next morning, about half-past seven, and they were gone - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's-Inn-Inne. These planes were brought to our shop on the 17th of December by the prisoner - we did not take them in, as we had some information about them - I was not in the shop when he brought them, but I went for an officer, and saw him come out with the officer.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I went to the shop on Friday, the 17th of December, and found the prisoner, and these two planes on the counter. He said a strange man, in a white jacket, gave him them to pledge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the Swiftsure. I left her about five o'clock to meet a young man of the name of Wray, in Cash-street. I saw a young man pass the shop, and he asked me to take the planes in and pawn for him, in the name of Bellinger. When the officer came I told him this story - we went out, and the man was not there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-114

295. WILLIAM GEORGE HERITAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , twenty-eight yards of stuff, value 30 s. the goods of Thomas Prall .

EDWARD WICKINS . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Prall, of Tottenham-court-road . On the 10th of January I saw the prisoner come to the door and take a piece of stuff, which could be reached from the street, by putting one foot into the shop. I followed him down Percy-street - he dropped it, and I picked it up - I did not lose sight of him before I overtook him.

WILLIAM BOND . I am the officer who took him into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-115

296. GEORGE FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of William Morgan .

WILLIAM MORGAN. I am a labourer , and live in Prince's-street, Lambeth. I was at work at Whitehall , and had left my coat on the stones, in the street where I was M'Adamising, about half-past three o'clock; and my master told me of its being gone soon afterwards.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a dismounted patrol. I produce the coat - I did not see the prisoner take it, but I had seen him just before without it, and saw him afterwards walking fast away with it - Mr. Bull stopped him, and I took it him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-116

Before Mr. Recorder.

297. MARY ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a spoon, value 2 s.; a napkin, value 6 d.; and a shirt, value 5 s. , the goods of James Powell , her master.

JAMES POWELL. I live in Great Coram-street . The prisoner was in my service from the 11th of May to the 13th of December - these articles were missed before she left; I saw them again at Mary-le-bone Office - she had been secured on another charge. We had a good character with her from a lady in Doughty-street.

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square. I have a spoon, which was pawned on the 3d of June - I believe by the prisoner; I advanced 1 s. 6 d. on it. On the 27th of May a napkin and an apron, were pawned for 1 s. 3 d.; I believe by her, but I cannot be certain.

HENRY BARR . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. I took in this shirt on the 22d of December, from a female, and in the name of Mary Davis.

EDWARD LORIMMER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and searched her, and found the duplicates in her box, of which she gave me the key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-117

298. JOHN COOKSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , three live tame turkies, value 15 s., and three guinea fowls, price 15 s. , the property of Stephen Keene .

WILLIAM WEST . I am a watchman, of Twickenham. On the morning of the 22d of December, about three o'clock, I heard a noise - I went to the place, and asked who was there? - no one answered. I went up the lane, and there laid hold of the prisoner, with this bag in front of him, and his coat over it - he got from me and ran away - I pursued him, and took him. I then took up the bag, and it had two turkies in it - I saw one turkey and two guinea fowls on the ground, as I was running along - they were dead, but quite warm.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He appeared to be a fisherman, did he not? A. Yes; I could not hold him because my hands were full - he got from me, and made himself foolish. I could not get a word from him - he ran about, half-double, and cried

"Bah! bah!"

CHARLES DAWSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Stephen Keene, who lives at Teddington Common . On the morning of the 22d of December I went to feed the fowls, and missed three turkies and three guinea fowls - they were all safe the night before; I saw them afterwards at a public-house on the common, in the possession of Mr. West - I am quite sure they were Mr. Keene's - they roosted in a cart-house in the yard, which is fenced from the road.

Cross-examined. Q. What kind of fence is it? A. It is a paling that a person might easily get over - I had cut the right wings of the guinea fowls, to prevent their flying over.

WILLIAM PINES . I am watchman to the Baroness Howe. I was on duty on the 22d of December, and heard a noise in the lane by the Baroness's premises - I went down and saw some persons at a distance, but lost sight of them; and as I was going back I found one turkey and three guinea fowls in the path of the lane; they were claimed by Mr. Keene's servant. The prisoner lived just on the spot. There was another man with him, but I do not know who he was.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-118

299. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , fourteen pairs of shoes, value 20 s.; a shoe, value 6 d.; five pieces of soap, value 6 d.; a coat, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a shirt, value 1 s.; a hat, value 6 d.; two towels, value 6 d.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; a knife, value 6 d.; a hammer, value 2 d.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; and a pair of trowsers, value 6 d. , the goods of the Trustees of the Poor of the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch .

2d COUNT stating them to be the property of the Overseers for the time being.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS MEAK . I live in the poor-house of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, at Enfield , where they support the infant poor. On Sunday, the 19th of December, I had been to chapel in the evening and returned to the poor house - the prisoner let me in, and we went together to the kitchen, and sat down a few minutes by the fire, and he went out of the kitchen. I went up to bed and perceived that he was not in his own bed - we had usually slept in the same room - I thought he might be gone some other way, and I went to bed, but did not go to sleep - I then got up and dressed myself, and I found he had quitted the house, and left the gates unlocked and the keys in them. I alarmed the mistress - he had taken his own clothes away.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a watchman at the lower end of Tottenham. On Sunday night, the 19th of December, I saw the prisoner about a quarter past eleven, with three bundles and this stick; two bundles were on the stick and one in his hand. I said

"What have you got there" - he said

"I deal in horse-hair;" I said

"I don't feel any horsehair here - here are some shoes;" he said,

"I came from Enfield:" I said,

"Who do you lodge with?" he said,

"With Mr. Cox, a labouring man, and am going to sell these things in Rosemary-lane." The bundles contained the articles stated in the indictment.

THOMAS FRANCIS . I am a shoemaker, employed by the parish of Shoreditch to teach the boys to make shoes - I made these shoes - they have my hand-writing upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. The things were partly my own - two pairs of the shoes were mine, which I had had for sixteen weeks - the others I bought of a poor man, and got them mended.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-119

300. THOMAS HAYDON and GEORGE FIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , four live lame geese, price 10 s. , the property of Samuel Odle .

SAMUEL ODLE. I live at Enfield , and am a labourer . I kept my geese on the road by day, but they were locked up in a shed at night. I saw them safe on Monday morning, the 27th of December, about six o'clock; they were locked up on Monday night by my wife - I was not at home - she went out at a quarter after nine; we returned together about ten, and found the shed open, and the geese gone; I saw them next morning in a sack - they had been killed. The prisoners came by my house

together, about five o'clock next morning, and I had them taken up on suspicion; one of them lived next door to the other, just by; the geese might be worth about 10 s. - they were store geese - I know them to be mine.

FRANCIS EWINGTON . - I saw the two prisoners in the act of taking the geese; I tried to stop them but they went another way. I saw Field outside the shed - I was looking out at my garret window, and saw Haydon getting over the hedge with a bag; I saw him by the light which came from my window; I could see them both very well - I told Odle of it, and he desired me to stop them, which I did next morning; they had bid the bag in a hedge in a field just by - they told the constable where it was.

JOHN MEAD. I am a constable. I apprehended the two prisoners, and found the bag in a field behind their house. Field told me he came out of Kent; I told him he had better have staid there than come and steal at Enfield. He at first denied it, but afterwards said he should not have done it if it had not been for Haydon, and then told me where the bag was.

HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

FIELD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-120

301. SAMUEL COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel March Phillips .

DANIEL AMIER . I am in the employ of Mr. S. M. Phillips, who lives in Upper Gower-street . The plate is kept in the butler's pantry - there is an area before the house, and a gate to it. I saw the spoon about three minutes before it was stolen; about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. I heard a square of glass broken, and ran to the window - the spoon had laid near that window - I ran out and saw the prisoner; he asked me if I had any hare skins - I told him No, and he ran off immediately; I had some suspicion of him, and I counted over the spoons and missed one; I told my fellow servant of it, and the prisoner was brought back in about five minutes, with the spoon. I am certain it is my master's.

SAMUEL SHACKLE . I am a journeyman jeweller. I was passing along Upper Gower-street, and saw three men looking down the areas - the prisoner was one of them - an organ was playing in the street; I saw the prisoner pointing Mr. Phillips's house out to the others. I went about one hundred yards to the end of the street, and then returned; I knocked at Dr. Moore's door, which is opposite Mr. Phillips's, and asked the servant to let me go into the parlour, and she could witness what I should myself. I took off my great cost and put down my umbrella. I saw the prisoner go down the area, and another waited to receive what he brought up. I had the door left ajar - I heard the glass broken - then went to the door, and saw the prisoner running - I secured one of his companions, and gave him to another person; I then pursued the prisoner, and caught him before I lost sight of him. When I came up to him he gave the spoon a squeeze, and threw it over a wall on the top of some stables; I held him and he insisted on knowing who I was - as I was not an officer he would try who was the best man. I held him till a gardener brought the spoon to me. I tied a handkerchief round the prisoner's hands, and took him back, and gave him to an officer - the person I had given the other to let him go again.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw the spoon away? A. Yes; you had a white hat on and a blue apron round your waist, which you let down as you came up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent on an errand to Somers Town. I staid to hear the organ a little; I was then going on, and turned down a street, which I thought was a thoroughfare; the witness came up and said

"You d - d rascal, you are the cause of many servants losing their places;" I said

"If you are not an officer what right have you to stop me?"

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-121

302. JOSEPH BENNETT and GEORGE WORTLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , seven muslin dresses, value 3 l., and two wrappers, value 2 s. , the goods of Josiah Highfield .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Lainson and Henry Lainson .

JOSIAH HIGHFIELD. I am a Deptford carrier . A parcel was delivered to me from Messrs. J. and H. Lainson's, at Rotherhithe, on the 22d of December - it was to go to Mr. Daris, in Newgate-street. I put it inside the cart. I did not stop till I got to London. I then went round the west end of the town, and stopped at several places. I stopped first in Drury-lane - I sat on the front of the cart, and no one could have got in without my seeing him. I did not miss the parcel till I got to Newgate-street - it had a direction on it - I found it at Worship-street next day, when the prisoners were in custody; it was opened at Worship-street, and contained muslin dresses. I got to Newgate-street about seven o'clock in the evening.

THOMAS RODGERS . I am apprentice to Messrs. John and Henry Lainson, they are linen-drapers, at Rotherhithe. I delivered the parcel to Highfield on the 22d of December, about half-past one o'clock - it contained five coloured muslin and two flounce dresses to be taken to Davis's, in Newgate-street; I saw them next day at Worship-street - the value of the property is between three and four pounds.

ROBERT LOCKE . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I was in company with Bee, in Golden-lane, St. Luke's, between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I saw a man at the end of Playhouse-yard. I said to Bee,

"Something is going forward, let us look out." In two or three minutes I saw the two prisoners come across Golden-lane; Wortley had this parcel under his arm, they were in company together; we ran after them - they went into a house in Playhouse-yard, and we went in - Wortley laid the parcel on a table - the house is kept by one Benjamin. I took hold of Wortley, and asked what he had got there? Benjamin, jun. was there then, and he and his mother laid hold of me, and begged me to let him go; I did not, but took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Is Playhouse-yard a thoroughfare? A. Yes; they came from Golden-lane end, not from Whitecross-street. Wortley had the parcel. JOHN BEE . I am an officer. I was with Locke in Golden-lane,

and saw the two prisoners, with the bundle - Wortley was carrying it. We followed them into a Jew's house, of the name of Benjamin - I bolted the door, and secured them and the parcel; we handcuffed the prisoners, and took them to the watch-house. Mrs. Benjamin and young Benjamin offered us money to let them go - they offered first two sovereigns, and then one more.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WORTLEY'S Defence. I live in Whitecross-street. I got off my shop-board at six o'clock, and went into Playhouse-yard to get a piece of cloth. I went into Benjamin's shop, and the other prisoner came in after me. In about a minute the constables came in, and asked what we had got there? They took the parcel, which I had never seen before, and said we had brought it in.

BENNETT'S Defence. I left home just after six o'clock to get a hat. I came down Golden-lane, and went into the first shop I came to; when I had been there about a minute the constable came in and said

"What have you got here?" I said

"I have got nothing." He looked round and took this parcel off the table, and said we had brought it there.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WORTLEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-122

303. MARY WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , fourteen spoons, value 39 s.; a shawl, value 3 s.; three sheets, value 10 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s.; a scarf, value 8 s.; and a quilt, value 6 s. , the goods of Edmund Humphries , her master.

EDMUND HUMPHRIES. I live at No. 1, Southampton-buildings, Pentonville . I am an agent and arbitrator ; the prisoner was in my service more than two years. I missed some property, and had her taken up. I found the fourteen spoons, the shawl, and the other articles in pawn.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you had any conversation with a gentleman on the subject of this charge? A. Yes; Mr. Manning - he asked whether I thought this was laid out in dress for the poor girl? I told him that she had not a shift to her back that was not full of holes, and therefore it could not be laid out in dress. I never told him I had questioned my wife about it; and was surprised to find that she had sent her to pawn eleven table-spoons, nor any part of the property - I never said any thing of that kind. I did not live on good terms with my wife through my servants. I owed her a quarter' wages on the 14th of November. She was apprehended on the 1st or 2d of December - she had applied for her wages, and I told her on account of my things being gone I would not pay her till I had made inquiry. She still remained in my service.

SARAH HUMPHRIES . I never gave the prisoner permission to pawn any of these articles.

Cross-examined. Q. What clothes has she? A. She has scarcely a stitch of clothes to her back - I was not present when she applied for her wages.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable, and was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; she said she had lived with him some time for something - Mr. Humphries then came up and said, he wanted his things, and would have them; if she would tell where the property was, he would not prosecute her; she denied it for an hour and three quarters - I then got Mrs. Humphries to search her - the prisoner then went to the yard, and I sent a young girl with her; she then came back, and said she wanted to speak with her mistress - I went to the privy, and found thirty-seven duplicates down it; twenty of them are out of date - I then searched her again, and found the duplicate of a silk handkerchief, which Mr. Humphries claimed - it was pawned on the 29th of September.

HENRY BOUCHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battle-bridge. The prisoner has pawned articles with me, for the last fourteen or fifteen months; the last she pawned, were a pair of shoes, which are not Mr. Humphries's property; the last she pawned of his property, was a quilt, on the 26th of October; they were all pawned, in the name of Mr. Ward, of Battle-bridge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Witness for the Defence.

JAMES MANNING . I am a bootmaker, and live at Bermondsey. I have lived there sixteen years - I have known the prisoner ten years; her character has been that of a very honest woman, she lived two years with me, and behaved so well that I got her a situation in a gentleman's family - I have seen the prosecutor once; he told me he had questioned Mrs. Humphries, and she confessed she had directed the girl to pawn some of the spoons; he said his wife knew where eight spoons were; he left word at my house, for me to call on him - I called, but did not see him - I saw his wife; she asked me how she had behaved with me - I said she had a good character - Mrs. Humphries said,

"To tell you the truth she was quite a favourite with Mr. Humphries, and I left the house, three weeks, on that account;" she asked what Mr. Humphries wanted to do with her - I told her I had not seen him, and I should not like to see him on the business - I saw Mr. Humphries last week; he then said he had questioned Mrs. Humphries, and she confessed that she knew where eight of the spoons were - I asked him if he meant to prosecute, he said

"Yes; for if I don't. I shall have all Mrs. H.'s friends upon me, and I am obliged to prosecute." - Mrs. Humphries did not tell me, that she knew where eight of the spoons were - it was Mr. Humphries.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-123

304. SAMUEL MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at St. Sepulchre, 28 lbs. of lead, value, 5 s., the goods of Joseph Ford , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOSEPH FORD. I lost 28 lbs. of lead, from a building of mine, in Bowling-green-lane; it is in the parish of Clerkenwell .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-124

305. ELLEN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , twenty yards of print, value 20 s., the goods of Samuel Pope , and Richard Pope , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Samuel and Richard Pope, who are linen-drapers , and live in Holborn . The prisoner came to the shop, with another woman, about six o'clock, in the evening of Tuesday,

the 11th of January; two young men were serving in the shop, besides myself - they applied to another young man, and then came, and asked me for some stockings - they both looked at them; the prisoner's companion purchased one pair at 1 s. 6 d., which she paid for before they left the shop - they then asked to look at some very fine ones; they objected to them, and looked at some other white stockings, and bought another pair at 1 s. 6 d.; they then asked to see some prints - I asked them to walk to the part of the shop, where the prints were; there was one piece lying on the counter, which they objected to, on account of its having some red in it - I shewed them some others, which covered the piece they had refused - I believe there was no other customer in the shop at that time - they did not buy any prints; they staid about ten minutes, and then asked if I would give them a pattern of one - I said I would warrant the washing of it, and I would change it, if it did not; and while I was cutting them a pattern, one said to the other, something about bombazeen, and that they had money to the amount of a guinea; they then changed their minds, and did not look at any; they asked what the stockings came to, and paid 3 s. for them - I then put up the stockings, and they left the shop; there was no other customer there then - as they were leaving the shop I turned the prints over, and missed the piece of red print, which they had objected to - no other person had been near enough to this red print, to have taken it - I jumped over the counter, and went after them - the prisoner's companion was standing by the door - she had a shawl on - the prisoner was about half a dozen yards off - I pursued her, and under her cloak I felt the print - it dropped from her, at her feet - I then took it up in one hand, and the prisoner in the other, and brought her back - while I was pursuing the prisoner, her companion got away.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am a Bow-street officer. I was coming by the house - I took the prisoner, and the property - I found six rings on her person.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-125

306. SARAH HOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , six sheets, value 30 s., two necklaces, value 12 s.; two pillow cases, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s.; a tablecloth, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; a pinafore, value 1 s.; two bolster cases, value 2 s.; six napkins, value 3 s., and two yards of nankeen, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary M'Clellan , her mistress.

MARY M'CLELLAN. I live at Hackney , and am a widow . The prisoner was my servant - she had been with me not quite three months. I missed property from the day she entered my service - I have seen it since, at different pawnbrokers.

MARY FOX . I live with the prosecutrix. I saw the duplicates taken from the copper hole in the back wash-house.

MARY M'CLELLAN re-examined. She confessed her crime after I had told her I was conscious of her having stolen articles. I had sent for an officer - she expressed great surprise at that; I had before that looked into her boxes - three of them were open, and the other was locked: I took her keys, which laid in the kitchen, and opened her box. I found a pocket with a pair of silk gloves, which I had missed for some time; I looked further, and found a silk pocket book, in which was a number of duplicates. I replaced the book in the pocket, and sent for an officer. I called her into the kitchen, and in the presence of the officer told her she knew I was in the habit of missing various articles, and while I had other persons about me I had not suspected her, but now I had no one to accuse but her. The officer then told me to search her boxes, which I did - but the duplicates had been removed. I said,

"Where is the brown silk needle book?" she persisted that she had no such thing - I said I knew it was there, for I had had it in my own hand; she still persisted in not having such a thing; I then said,

"It will be unavailable for you to conceal it, you and I shall appear in another place, and you will there be compelled to produce it." The officer then left the room, and she burst out crying, and asked if I would forgive her - I said,

"I will make no promise - the law must take it's course; I fear you are a wicked girl;" she then, after some time, confessed that she had thrown the duplicates into the copper-hole in the back wash-house: I called the officer, and told him the duplicates were found. I went with the officer to the pawnbrokers, and saw the property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How came you to take the girl into your service? A. From a knowledge of herself and her family; I have known them four or five years: her sister had lived as servant with me. Her father lives about half a mile from my house. She had eleven guineas a year, but had had no wages; there was not any due.

JOHN HALL . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Mitchell, in the Hackney-road. I have two sheets and three shifts, pawned on the 12th of October, in the name of Ann Hobbs, but I cannot swear whether the prisoner pawned them or not. I knew her and her family well. I advanced 8 s. on the whole. I have known the prisoner for some time, as a customer, and thought her and her friends rather superior to our general customers.

RICHARD CARPENTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Hackney-road. I know the prisoner. On the 13th of October a necklace was pawned with me, for 6 s., in the name of Mary Hobbs, Mercer's-place, but I cannot say who by. On the same day there was a sheet, a gown, and napkin pawned, in the same name. The sheet only was claimed by the prosecutrix. On the 25th of October I took a remnant of cotton, a remnant of nankeen, and six napkins in, for 6 s., in the same name.

THOMAS PEARSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. I have a coral necklace, which was pawned with me on the 8th of October, by a female, in the name of Mary Hobbs - I am not certain the prisoner was the person.

MRS. M'CLELLAN re-examined. The necklaces belonged to two of my pupils; they live in Leonard-square - I do not know that they had not given them to her. I did not see either of the necklaces after the beginning of October.

JOHN GARDNER . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, about three weeks ago. I found the duplicates in the copper-hole, by which the articles were found. There were some other duplicates of things not claimed.

WILLIAM LEWIS JOHNSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Miller, pawnbroker, Kingsland-road. I have two sheets, two pillow-cases, a petticoat, and a handkerchief, which were pawned at our shop on the 13th of October, in the name of Ann Hobbs. I cannot swear that they were pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Six persons gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-126

307. JAMES HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , twenty-nine yards of dowlas, value 28 s., the goods of Mary Coles , widow , privately in her shop .

MICHAEL SMITH . I live with Mary Coles, who is a linen-draper -she is a widow, and lives in Grace's-alley, Wellclose-square . On the 8th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I missed this dowlas, which had been on a chair in the shop, about a yard from the door; I had seen it about three or four minutes before it was taken: I came to the door a minute or two after, and missed it. I looked out at the door, and saw the prisoner going down the alley; I pursued, and stopped him with it - I brought him back, and he asked me to have mercy upon him, as he had not had anything to eat for a day or two.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said he took it from distress - he had not a farthing about him. His apparel seemed to bear every mark of poverty.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded urgent distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-127

308. MARY GALE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , ten yards of muslin, value 15 s., the goods of John Nicholson , privately in his shop .

JOHN NICHOLSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . I saw the prisoner in my shop on Monday, the 10th of January - I did not notice any one with her; I was engaged with another customer: there were two other persons serving in the shop. Pain served the prisoner; I did not see her take anything.

THOMAS HUGHES PAIN . I was in the service of Mr. Nicholson. I saw the prisoner coming in, alone; I served her with a quarter of a yard of muslin, for 4 1/2 d. - she did not look at anything else. There were a great many pieces of muslin in the same wrapper. In about two hours Spooner brought the prisoner back, with part of two pieces of muslin, about ten yards and a half; I looked into the wrapper, and missed the two pieces. I am certain I did not see her take them. My master and a lad were serving in the shop at the time - I do not think either of them saw the prisoner take it; it is worth about 15 s.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner about three o'clock on Monday, the 10th of January, at a public-house in Shadwell: I had received the property from Brown. The prisoner had 1 s. and some copper about her.

JOHN BROWN . I am a linen-draper, and live at Shadwell. I took the prisoner in my shop, between two and three o'clock, I believe. I found two pieces of muslin in her apron - they were afterwards claimed by Mr. Nicholson; I asked where she got them - she told me it was no business of mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop, and was in such distress I did not know what to do; these pieces of muslin laid on the floor, and I took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-128

309. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Aylesbury , from his person .

THOMAS AVLESBURY. I live at No. 8, Blandford-street, Portman-square, and am a valet . On the 9th of January, about ten minutes past twelve o'clock at noon, I was in the Spanish Catholic chapel - I had my handkerchief in my coat pocket. I saw the prisoner in the chapel about ten minutes before I lost it: he appeared to be listening to the sermon; I felt a push against me, and found my handkerchief gone - the prisoner was close behind me. I went out, and fetched a constable - when I returned he was still there, and was taken into custody, and as he was going to the watch-house it fell down, inside his trowser - he said he had not got the handkerchief about him; he had one of his own. which he took out of his pocket, and said that was the only one he had.

SAMUEL BELTON . I am a constable. I tapped the prisoner on the shoulder, and he came out with me. He took out a snuff-box and a knife, and I believe a handkerchief, and unbuttoned his waistcoat to shew me that he had no handkerchief about him. As we were going to the watch-house it fell down his trowsers, and got round his aucles; he said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the chapel.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-129

310. GEORGE FILES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a hat, value 10 s., the goods of Joseph Russell . from his person .

JOSEPH RUSSELL. I am a carpenter , and live in St. George's-row, Hanover-square. I lost my hat last Tuesday night, between seven and eight o'clock - I was in Queen-street, Pimlico ; a man came behind me, and took my hat off - I saw the man crossing the road with it - I pursued him, and did not lose sight of him - another young man stopped him, when I cried Stop thief! he had thrown down the hat, and it was found by the watchman, near to where he was stopped, in Ebury-street.

Prisoner. Q. How did you know me in the dark, when you had never seen me before? A. I saw you going with the hat.

THOMAS FRANCIS . I am a labourer. I had been down Chelsea, and as I returned I overtook Russell and his wife - I saw the prisoner come up, and take Russell's hat off. I pursued, and he was taken before I lost sight of him.

JAMES WARREN . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! about one hundred yards from my box. I made up to the place, and saw the prisoner, who was stoped

about one hundred yards from my box, and found the hat about two hours afterwards, about ten yards from the place where he was stopped; it was claimed by Russell. The prisoner did not seem intoxicated; he said next morning that if he had done such a thing he was very sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18250113-130

311. LEWIS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , two sovereigns, the monies of William Weatherly , from his person .

WILLIAM WEATHERLY. I have a second name, which is Henry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-131

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

312. JAMES COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a crown, four half-crowns, three shillings, and a sixpence, the monies of Thomas Tomkins , from his person .

THOMAS TOMKINS. I live in Camden-town. On Monday the 6th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in the New-road - I knew him before. We went to the Buffalo public-house, near Mary-le-bone church - we had a pint of beer, and a quartern of gin; I paid for that with halfpence, which I had loose in my waistcoat pocket. We then had some more at the Portland Arms public-house, which I paid for in silver. He said at the Buffalo, that he had only 6 d. in his pocket. I had changed a sovereign, and had a crown, four half-crowns, and some silver. I put it in my right hand breeches pocket in his presence; there were several other persons at the Portland Arms. I did not know them - we were all talking together, and they drank with us - they sat in the box facing - I laid my head on the table and went to sleep; when I awoke they were pulling me about - I cannot exactly say who was pulling me about - they had got some vinegar, which they wanted to give me, but I would not have it. The prisoner was in the same box when I awoke, but I do not know whether he shook me. I put my hand into my pocket and found I had only the empty purse. I said,

"I see I have lost my money." He said,

"It cannot be here." I said I had it when I came into the house, and some one of the company I thought must have it. He said he had not got it, nor had he seen any one by me to take it. Nicholls the pot-boy was there, and he told me something. I went for a constable - and told the constable I had lost my money, and what the person in company had told me.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had not he and you been very good friends before that? A. Yes; we had drank together very often, and sometimes got tipsy. We met about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and it was about ten when I awoke - the people were treating me as if I was drunk. I found the empty purse in my pocket. I said

"Jem, I have lost my money." He said

"No one here has taken it." He said afterwards

"Well, I have taken your money; and if you like to take me up, do - here it is." He was pretty well tipsy as well as me. He said

"If you wish to take me up about this joke, do." When we went before the Magistrate we were so tipsy the Magistrate would not hear the charge, till we got sober. After the money had been produced we were sitting down, pretty good friends, and if it had not been for the constable I do not know that I should have had him taken.

MARK NICHOLLS . I am pot-boy at the Portland Arms. I remember the prisoner and prosecutor being there. The prosecutor was asleep, and I saw the prisoner take some money out of his breeches pocket - he rolled up the purse and put it into the pocket again. The prosecutor awoke in about a quarter of an hour, and said he missed his money, and one of these three men must have it. The prisoner was awake then, but did not say any thing about it. I told Tomkins what I had seen, and he went for a constable - that was about half an hour after he awoke.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not they both very tipsy? A. Yes; I saw the prisoner take the money, but I did not say any thing about it, because it appeared to me that he was taking care of it till the other got sober. I saw the prosecutor lying on the table, and they got some vinegar to awaken him up to do his master's business. There had been a good deal of talk about the money. I did not hear the prisoner say

"If you are going to be serious about this money, take me at once before a Magitrate." He seemed as if he wanted to give the man his money again - he did not seem pleased about being taken.

Re-examined by the COURT. I told Tomkins that Cole had taken the money, and he went for a constable - I spoke it quite loud, and Cole might have heard it.

JOSEPH FELLOWS . I am a constable. I went to the Portland Arms on the 6th of December and saw the prisoner there - he was charged by the prosecutor with having robbed him. I beckoned Cole out - I told him what charge I had against him; and he said he had a crown piece, four half-crowns, and four shillings - that he had received 25 s. for work, at several places. He did not say that he had taken the money from Tomkins. I took him to the Magistrate, and he postponed the hearing till next day.

Prisoner's Defence. I said it was the prosecutor's money at the time he took me. I thought I had more money about me when I was taken, which made me say I had 25 s.

THOMAS TOMKINS. Q. Did the prisoner say at the Buffalo that he had only 6 d. in his pocket? A. Yes; at the Portland Arms, I paid 1 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-132

319. JOHN SOUTHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , a bridle, value 10 s., and a collar, value 7 s. , the goods of John Garry , his master.

JOHN GARRY. I keep a livery-stable in Gray's Inn-lane . I have missed saddles, bridles, and harness, from time to time. The prisoner was my confidential servant , and lived with me about three years. I was informed by my son that he was in custody.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I took the prisoner and found two pair of overalls, a bridle, and a duplicate of a collar on him.

ROBERT BLISSETT . The prisoner gave me this bridle to take to pawn - I took it to Mr. Nicholls's, and gave the money and duplicate to the prisoner.

JAMES HART . I paid the prisoner for a collar which my man bought of him - this is it.

ROBERT KENDREW. I live at Mr. Nicholls, the pawnbroker's - Blissett pawned this bridle at our house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did send that young man to pawn the bridle. The collar was throwing about the harness room, and I considered it useless. Mr. Hart's man had the collar some time, and I believe Mr. Hart gave me 2 s. 6 d. for it.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-133

314. THOMAS FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , one fixture (i.e.), a copper, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Windsor , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

ROBERT WINDSOR. This copper was taken from No. 2, White-hart-court, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's . I am a brazier ; I let the bottom of the house to the prisoner's father and mother. I did not miss the copper till his father came and told me it was gone; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the morning when it was taken away - it was safe the night before.

ROBERT LOCKE. About half-past 7 o'clock on the morning of Christmas eve, I saw the prisoner with something before him. I went over to him, and found it was a copper; it had a bit of a sack covered over it. I took him, and Bee, (my brother officer.) took the copper. I tried the copper and found it fit the place exactly.

JOHN BEE . I have the copper, which I took from the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-134

315. MARY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 3 lbs. of soap, value 18 d. , the goods of William Sykes .

ELIZA SYKES . I am the wife of William Sykes, who is a tallow chandler , and lives in East-street, Manchester-square . On the 30th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, and saw some one turn out of the shop; Mr. Spencer came by and said something to me - I looked into the box and missed one cake of soap.

JAMES SPENCER . I was near Mr. Sykes's premises, standing at my own door; the prisoner came to my door; I went out and saw her walk towards Mr. Sykes's; she came out immediately with a cake of soap; Mrs. Sykes came out just afterwards, and I said

"This woman has just come out of your house with a cake of soap." I had known her person before. The prisoner dropped the soap when I took hold of her arm - a boy picked it up and gave it to the officer.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am one of the officers of Mary-le-bone - I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I am sorry that I did it.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-135

316. BENJAMIN BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Goodland .

CHARLES GOODLAND. I was at the Court house, Wellclose-square , on the 5th of January; I left my gig there and my great coat in it. I went into the Court and remained there some time. I came out several times and found my coat safe. After the business was over I came out, and the prisoner was gone and my coat also - he had the care of the horse and gig.

WILLIAM DOCKEFT . I am thirteen years of age. I live with my father in North-east passage, Wellclose-square. I was near the Court-house on the 5th of January, and saw the prisoner minding the horses and gigs which were there - he said if we did not go away he would kick our b - it - s.

BENJAMIN GOULD . I am thirteen years of age. I saw the gigs at the Court-house; I did not know the prisoner before that day - I saw him then at the corner of Grace's-alley, with some coats on his arm.

SARAH WILSON . I live near Wellclose-square. I saw the prisoner there on the 5th of January; I saw him take the coat half out of the gig; a man came up the street, and the prisoner walked away - I did not see him do any more.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Whitechapel; I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of January - I found no coats nor duplicates upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was minding the gig for near half an hour; I was walking about as it was a cold morning, and an ostler came up and told me to go about my business; he asked me if I knew the little boys - I said No; he said,

"I dare say you do know them, and if you don't go away I will make you - I went away. That is all I know.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18250113-136

317. LAWRENCE CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a landau let, value 120 l. , the goods of John Messer .

2d COUNT stating it to be a coach.

3d COUNT calling it a carriage with four wheels.

JOHN MESSER. I am a coach-maker , and live at No. 9, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. I know the prisoner. On the 4th of September he came, and said he wanted a carriage for a fortnight - he looked out one; I said it would be 2 l. per week; he hired it for two weeks certain, and was then to bring it back again; he told me his name was Lawrence Campbell; that he lived at Croydon, and was the son of General Campbell. I asked him if he could refer me to any one for a character - he said he used to live at Mrs. White's Margaret-street - I went there and asked if he had lived there - she said he did and paid his lodging; he came into the house in the mean time, and I asked him what he was going to do with the carriage; he said to go into the county of Kent, and to treat some ladies - I asked him if he had the means - he said he had 700 l. per year. I cautioned him not to make too free. He had the carriage out on Sunday, the 5th of September - it went away with post horses; at the end of a fortnight the carriage did not come back - I gave him another week, and then made what inquiries I could. I went to Brighton but could not hear any thing of him. I found the carriage in the fourth week at Mr. Dixon's, in Barbican - I asked for it and Mr. Dixon would not give it up; the Lord Mayor gave me a warrant and I got it back. I never saw the prisoner

again till he was brought before the Lord Mayor - it is worth 120 l. or 120 guineas.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had it four wheels on when it went out? A. Yes. I have heard that the prisoner is the son of General Campbell, and I have no doubt of it. The bargain was that he might have the carriage for two weeks certain, but not beyond that. He did not say that for every week he kept it afterwards, the money was to be sent to me. He never asked me about his keeping it longer.

THOMAS SEARS . I live at Mr. Dixon's. The carriage came on the 9th of September; the prisoner came with another person; the other person said

"This gentleman has a carriage to sell, and he wishes an advance on it;" - he then stated that it was at Mr. Sadler's, in Goswell-street - I sent down, with a horse, for the carriage - they did not say how long it had been there - the carriage was brought round and I agreed to lend him 34 l. upon it - we advance money on carriages for sale. Mr. Messer came and claimed it afterwards - it was backed for sale at 100 l.; the prisoner gave me a receipt for the money, in the name of Lawrence Campbell. I asked who it belonged to, and he gave me a note, which purports that it belonged to Mr. Joseph Page, of Eltham. We did not make any further enquiries of any one.

(Note read.)

"Mr. CAMPBELL. - You will have the goodness to bring my carriage from Eltham, and leave it at a Repository, for sale; and you will do me the favour of getting as much money advanced upon it as you can till the sale takes place. I will not take less than 100 for it. By doing this you will oblige your friend

JOSEPH PAGE .

"N. B. I mean to say, I want 100, clear of all expenses. - Eltham, Sept. 4th, 1824."

"To Mr. Campbell."

Prisoner's Defence. I hired this carriage of the prosecutor for a fortnight, and if I kept it longer I was to remit the money for it, (2 l. a week.) I hired it for a person of the name of Page, at Eltham; when I got down he was not there; I came to town and then saw him, and he said he did not want the carriage, I must go and get him some money upon it. I then spoke to a friend, who took me to Mr. Sadler's, and they would not take it - I then went to Mr. Dixon's - they told me to come again in about an hour - I called again and then the clerk said he could not advance the money till he had seen Mr. Dixon - I went again. and then they wished to know whose carriage it was - I shewed the note, and they agreed to allow 34 l. for six weeks, and if not redeemed then, it was to be sold.

WILLIAM HART . I am in the employ of Mr. Wright, the solicitor. The prisoner is the son of General Campbell, who is dead - the prisoner is engaged in a Chancery suit, and if he gains the suit he will be entitled to some property, not so much as 700 l. a-year. The prisoner's mother is at the Cape, where his father died.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-137

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 17.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

318. THOMAS CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , a purse, value 1 d., eight sovereigns, three half-crowns, and five shillings, the property of Edward Wilder , in the dwelling-house of James Tyllier , and Richard Blunt Tyllier .

EDWARD WILDER. I am servant to Messrs. Tyllier, farmers, at Harmondsworth. The prisoner was my fellow-servant . I had saved up eight sovereigns, three half-crowns, and five shillings, and put the silver into a mole-skin purse, which was in my trunk, and the eight sovereigns at the bottom of my trunk, which was locked, and I kept the key; it stood in my bed-room, in master's house; the prisoner, and ten more men slept there. On Tuesday, the 21st December, about half-past five o'clock, in the evening, I found the trunk wrenched open, and the money gone - I had put my clothes away, on the Sunday; the purse and silver were then safe, but I had not seen the sovereigns since the Sunday week - I informed my master of my loss, about half-past 8 o'clock that night, when he came in; the prisoner was down stairs, when I missed the money, and I told him of it; he finished his work, and went to bed - my master searched all the men down stairs, but found nothing; the prisoner was then in bed, and the purse, with 12 s. 6 d. in it, was found in his breeches-pocket, which were under his head; the trunk had not been broken open on the Sunday.

MR. JAMES TYLLIER. I am in partnership with Richard Blunt Tyllier; we both reside in the same house. I heard of this robbery on the Tuesday night, and found the purse in the prisoner's pocket, with three half-crowns, and five shillings in it; he said voluntarily that it was Wilder's purse, and he had taken it out of the trunk; that he only had 12 s. 6 d., and knew nothing of the sovereigns - I gave him in charge.

EDWARD WILDER. This is my purse; only eight sovereigns were taken - I had not seen them for nine days before; they were in one corner of my trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the purse.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing 12 s. 6 d., and the purse .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-138

319. ANN HIPWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , nine yards of silk, value 27 s., and twenty yards of linen-cloth, value 30 s., the goods of Charles Brooks , and others, his partners, in the dwelling-house of the said Charles Brooks .

GRIFFITH THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Brooks, who is a linen-draper , and is trustee for his younger brothers and sisters, who have a benefit from the concern - I cannot say whether they are partners. On the 15th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in, and one of the shopmen shewed her some Irish linen - I was passing her, and she remarked to me, that the linen she had bought of me, the week before, was not sufficiently fine for her son's collar, she wanted some finer - the young man, who is not here, went for some - I suspected that she had something under her cloak, but said nothing; she bought some galloon, and went out - I followed, and found the Irish, and a piece of silk, under her cloak; she fell on her knees, and begged for mercy for herself, and seven children.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-139

Before Mr. Justice Gaseles.

320. JOSEPH PIERCE was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying John Taylor .

Messrs. Hugh Lewis and J. W. Fitzpatrick, surgeons, deposed, that having opened the deceased's body, they attributed his death to natural causes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-140

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

321. JOSEPH WILSON and JAMES STEVENS were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Slater , about seven o'clock, in the night the 2d January , at of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a watch, value 3 l.; a ring, value 10 s.; a box, value 3 s.; twenty-five sovereigns, a half-sovereign, a guinea, three half-crowns, five shillings, ten sixpences, one 20 l., seven 10 l., and three 5 l. bank-notes , his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD SLATER . I am an upholsterer , and live at No. 22, Queen's-buildings, Brompton-road, in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington . I rent the house. On Sunday, the 2d of January, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I and Mrs. Slater went out, leaving Mary Wakeman, the servant, at home - I returned, as near as I can guess, about eight o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is not the name of the parish, St. Mary Abbotts? A. Yes; it is at Kensington; my receipts are headed St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington.

MARY WAKEMAN . On the 2d of January I was in Mr. Slater's service, and was left at home; about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, the bell rang; it was then quite dark, and I was alone in the house - I went into the area, and saw the two prisoners standing at the door; they asked if Mr. Slater was at home - I told them, No; they said they wanted to see him, that they had come from Brighton, and asked if they could wait till he came in - I went up and opened the door - Stevens walked into the passage, and said he must write a note, or wait till Mr. Slater came in - he asked me for a pen and ink - I said it was locked up in the counting-house; he asked Wilson for a pencil, which he gave him - he then asked me for a bit of paper - I said I had none; the prisoners then both walked down into the kitchen - I had two lighted candles there - Stevens pulled off his hat, and he said,

"I am sorry to tell you, but we are come to rob the house" - be then took his hat, and a candle off the dresser, and went up stairs - I saw no more of him - Wilson remained down stairs with me, and told me to sit down, and make my life happy; and said,

"If you don't make any alarm, we shan't hurt you, we don't intend to do it; but if you make any alarm, we have things about us that will do it, and we shall do it" - he then laid a pistol on the table - I sat in a chair, and remained quiet; he sat on a chair on the opposite side of the table; he asked me where Mr. Slater kept his money - I said I believed he carried it about with him; he said they only wanted the money, and asked if the doors up stairs were locked - I said Yes; he said I had better give him the keys - I said I had not got them; and he said he supposed they were in the door then - we sat talking, and about eight o'clock I heard the bell ring; he asked me what bell it was - I told him it was my bell - he then took the pistol off the table, and went out of the kitchen with it - I saw no more of him; the bell only rang once - Stevens was up stairs all this time, and had a candle with him, and I heard the doors being broken open - I went up stairs, when my master came in, and found the counting-house door broken open - the counting-house is at the bottom of the shop, and is part of the dwelling-house - the counting-house door was locked, when they came in - I had never seen the prisoners before.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw Stevens for a very little time? A. Yes; I had a light in my hand in the passage - I am sure he is the man - I have not mistaken one person for another; if I had seen him six months after in a crowd, I could have picked him out; he took his hat off in the kitchen, but took it up stairs with him - I am sure I am not mistaken in him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How soon afterwards did you see him? A. On Monday morning - I was always sure of his person.

MRS. MARY ANN SLATER . I am the prosecutor's wife. I came home with him - I rang the bell, as Mr. Slater was rather behind, paying a coachman - I rang the bell, and waited nearly three minutes, and then the prisoner Stevens opened the door, I saw his face, and am certain of his person - I asked what business he had there; he and another man directly ran out of the house, without answering me - I then saw my husband about two doors off; the two men ran towards him, and then attempted to cross the road, seeing him coming - I called Stop thief! and he pursued one of them; I was too much frightened to know what happened afterwards - I searched for my children, who were out with us; my husband entered the house before me.

Cross-examined. Q. When the door opened, was there any light in the passage? A. None; but there is a strong gas-light opposite our door, on the same side of the way, and it reflected strongly in Stevens' face - I am quite sure of him - I did not see the other's face.

MR. SLATER re-examined. Upon coming home, I saw the two prisoners run out of the house; the pathway is much higher than the road, you must either jump off, or go a good way down to get to the road - I saw them come out of the house - Mrs. Slater called Stop thief! and they ran towards me, and crossed from the pavement, into the road; I followed them - Wilson turned short to the left, Stevens took to the right, towards town, and I followed him, he crossed the road, and I struck at him, but missed him, and struck against a post, but still had him in sight; he ran in the direction of Knightsbridge-green, ran towards a saw-pit, and threw himself down by the side of some logs of timber - I hesitated for a second, then got over the timber, and collared him; he lay flat on the ground, behind the timber - I brought him back to my house; and found Wilson in custody - I said they had got the right man - I found that the wainscot, between the passage and shop had been broken down; two or three persons, who were with me, began to search the prisoners, and while so doing, the prisoners' backs were towards a table; they were both shuffling their hands behind their coats, and on the table was found a pistol, and screw-driver - I then said

"It has been desperate - I will look at the counting-house, and see if that

is all right" - I found the counting-house door broken open - I had locked it the morning before, and had the key in my pocket; the counting-house is at the end of the shop; and communicates with it internally; the first thing I observed was my tin cash-box, turned upside down on the table - I had left it locked up in a drawer, under the desk, which drawer had been wrenched open by some instrument, and the desk had been broken open; violence had been used to the cash-box, but they had not succeeded in getting it open; it was about three feet from the drawer, in which I had left: it contained a 20 l., seven 10 l., and three 5 l. Bank-notes, twenty-five sovereigns, a half-sovereign, a guinea, a gold ring, three half-crowns, five shillings, and ten sixpences - I missed a silver watch, which I had seen on the counting-house mantel-shelf that morning - I have not found it; on my return from the counting-house other things had been found on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure that the cash-box had been left in the drawer? A. Quite so; I did not loose sight of Stevens at all, there was nobody else on that side of the way, till I had taken him; four persons came up afterwards - I am positive of both of the prisoners; there is no door leading from the counting-house to the street, you must go through the shop to it - there are marks of violence on the box; an experienced thief might have taken box and all.

THOMAS KNIGHT . I keep the Swan tavern at Knightsbridge. On Sunday night, the 2d of January, I was going by Mr. Slater's, and saw the two prisoners run by me; Mr. Slater was following: some person said

"Stop those two men; they have robbed the house" - they ran into the road - Wilson separated from Stevens, turned short to the left, and came back under a shallow wall; he came opposite to where I was standing on the pavement - I then walked towards him; he crossed the road, I followed, and took him by the collar - I took him back into Mr. Slater's warehouse - Mr. Slater had then returned with Stevens - they were searched; a pistol and screw-driver were found on the table, behind then - I am sure Wilson is the man.

JAMES ROGERS . I am a linen-draper, and live next door to Mr. Slater. I heard the alarm, went in, and helped to search the prisoners; the pistol and screw-driver were given to me; in Wilson's pocket I found a small screwdriver, and in Stevens's pocket, a small quantity of gunpowder; the pistol was loaded with small shot, and primed - it would hurt, but not destroy.

MARY WAKEMAN . It was such a pistol as this, which was laid on the table.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoners, and asked them about a watch; but in such a manner as might be considered an inducement.

Prisoner WILSON. It is useless to make a defence. The evidence, I am sorry to say, is greatly against me; several things have not been stated altogether correct.

WILSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

STEVENS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18250113-141

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

322. JOHN LAUGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , at St. Luke, five watches, value 10 l., the goods of Samuel Henry Leah , the elder, in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL HENRY LEAH. I live in Bath-street, City-road, in the parish of St. Luke . About a fortnight before this robbery the prisoner requested that he might sleep in my house, till he could get a situation which he had in view. I gave him leave to sleep with Jackson, who slept there for protection. I am a watchmaker . On the 28th of October, about nine or half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I missed five watches from a drawer in my iron chest. I had not placed them there myself, but saw them safe in the window the day before. The prisoner was then gone out, and did not return; I did not know that he was going away.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you give him leave to sleep there for any particular time? A. No; he could go whenever he pleased.

Q. He married your daughter, did he not? A. I do not admit the marriage - he was married to her three years ago, without my consent - she was in the house at the time, I supported her - she and him have carried on business together, but she slept in my house all the time - the house is my own.

Q. How long has your daughter lived with you? A. Ever since the marriage - he said he had a situation in view, at Gravesend.

MARIA LEAH . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the 27th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I put the watches into the iron chest, which I locked, and put the bar across them, padlocked it, and put the key in the parlour closet; next morning, about eight o'clock. I looked for the key, and it was gone. I went to the iron chest, and nine or ten watches were gone - they were chiefly silver. The prisoner was out - I did not know he was going to leave.

Cross-examined. Q. He was to go away when he pleased? A. I believe so - he had not mentioned any particular time that he was to stay.

EDWARD BULWORTHY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. I have a watch pawned by the prisoner on the 28th of October, about ten minutes past eight o'clock in the morning, as near as I can remember; for 25 s. in the name of Jackson. I am certain of his person - he said it was his own.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you remember every pledge which is brought? A. By referring to the book I tell - but I have a perfect recollection of this; he came into the shop, not into a box, and was there about five minutes - no other customer was in the shop; I never saw him before - I looked at him to see who I was taking the watch of.

COURT. Q. When did you see him again? A. Nearly two months after.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Birmingham. I have a watch pawned on the 2d of November, in the name of H. Smith, for two guineas, by the prisoner. I am certain of him - I never doubted about him.

JOHN FITCH . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker, who lives in St. John-street. I have a silver watch, pawned on the 28th of October - I do not know who by.

JAMES WATTS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield. I have a watch pawned on the 28th of October,

in the name of Jackson - I do not know who by; I gave him a duplicate.

ROBERT STUPART . I am shopman to Murray and Co., pawnbrokers. I produce a watch, pawned on the 28th of October, for 20 s., in the name of Jackson - I do not know who by.

JOHN JACKSON . I sleep at the prosecutor's house - the prisoner slept in the same bed with me on the night of the 27th of October. I got up about seven o'clock next morning, and left him in bed; I did not know he was going away. I did not pawn any of these watches (looking at a letter); this is his writing, I received it from him.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am headborough. I took the prisoner into custody on the 15th of December. I asked what it was all about. He said it was a family affair - that he had married Leah's daughter, and since that she had married again. I told him I took him for felony - he said nothing more.

MARIA LEAH . I know this letter to be in the prisoner's hand-writing.

SAMUEL HENRY LEAH. The watches are mine - I received some duplicates which tally with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive them from the prisoner? A. No; from his mother.

Q. And after that he came himself to your house, and you had him taken? A. No; he sent for a person out of my house - he was apprehended three hundred yards off. I am told that my daughter is since married.

The letter was here read, as follows: -

London, Nov. 8th, 1825.

MR. JACKSON,

"Dear Sir - Though I do not think myself worthy to address you now, I think it my duty to return my sincere thanks for your kindness, expressed for me and my safety. Believe me, Sir, it will ever he remembered with kindness. There may come a time when I may have an opportunity of returning it; but, oh! when I think upon what I have done, it chills my very soul. What could I think of - but it is past - God have mercy on me. Once I was respected by every one who knew me - beloved by all my relations, what am I now? - hated, cursed, and shunned. But there is another world and a better one, where I hope you and I shall meet again, if we can meet no more in this. May heaven protect you through this world; may you be prosperous and happy, and may you and your intended spend many a happy year in comfort. For Mr. and Mrs. Leah's kindness to me, I hope, if I have not an opportunity of rewarding them, heaven will. It is impossible for me to express my feelings whilst writing this letter. Ah, it is past. Once I thought I should have been happy. If the news has not reached Gainsborough all may be well-if it has, then all is over. I do not mind about Mansfield - I could not be in my senses. Pray give me love to Matilda - and give my thankful remembrance to Mr. and Mrs. Leah; also to Maria. I must now conclude - and, if it is for ever,

Farewell, dear friend, unfortunate

LAUGHTON.

"N. B. My cousin, B. Robinson, I understand, has said a deal about me, without occasion; he is a bad character amongst the worst of women, I can safely swear, though he took them to a house where he said I frequently went to, it is false - I have known none but Matilda since we made it up. - ADIEU."

Prisoner's Defence. It is a malicious prosecution, carried on by my father-in-law. My wife has not only committed bigamy, but has been guilty of very bad conduct - a gentleman offered me a situation, and this is the reason the charge was brought against me.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

WILLIAM WHEELER re-examined. The watch he pawned with me I lent two guineas on - it is capped and jewelled - it would sell for six or seven pounds. Every watch here is worth more than 40 s.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor and Jury on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18250113-142

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

323. WILLIAM SNOOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Buxton , about seven o'clock in the night of the 17th of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty-six-yards of linen cloth, value 2 l. 16 s. his property.

EDWARD DAVID LEWIS . I am shopman to Mr. James Buxton, a linen-draper , who lives in Pitfield-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the evening of the 17th of December. I was in the shop, and placed this piece of Irish in the window, about half-past six or seven o'clock, and about a quarter past seven I stood near the window, heard the glass break, and saw the person put his hand through the window and take the Irish out. I saw him cut his hand in taking it out, and saw his face - it was the prisoner. I ran round the counter and went in pursuit - ours is the corner house but one - he turned the corner and I after him for some distance, and then lost sight of him. I did not see him again till he was stopped by Hazard; my master was also with him; it was dark - we have gas lights in the shop - I saw him take the cloth and cut his hand in drawing it out. I found it in Mr. Buxton's possession. There was light enough in the shop to enable me to swear to him.

THOMAS HAZARD . I am a smith. I was coming down the street about half-past seven o'clock, and met the prisoner running very fast; he passed me on the other side of the way; he was a hundred yards from the prosecutor's house; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and turned round and followed him; I lost sight of him twice in turning the corners, but caught sight of him directly again. Just as I got up to him he stopped, seeing that I was close to him; I took hold of him. Mr. Buxton, who was in pursuit, came up directly; I said

"Come back with me;" he said,

"What are you going at?" he was very much out of breath; he was taken back to Mr. Buxton's; the cloth was picked up two or three yards from where I stopped him. I had not been ten minutes following him, I am sure. He is the man I first saw - there was nobody else in sight.

JAMES BUXTON . I live in Pitfield-street. I was in my back parlour and heard the window smash; I instantly went into the shop, jumped over the counter and ran out, but did not see the prisoner till I caught hold of him when he was in Mr. Hazard's charge. The cloth was found on the ground, a few yards behind him; I brought it back; I examined his hand; it was cut and streaming with blood; it appeared to have been cut with glass; he said he did not know what we brought him there for; I told him, and he said he was innocent. A little boy, who had been following

us, gave me the cloth - I saw him pick it up about a hundred yards from the shop; the cloth is marked also with blood.

THOMAS HAZARD . When I stopped him he had passed the spot where the cloth lay; I had not seen him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. (Written). I came at about half-past seven o'clock quietly by Britannia-walk, when one of the witnesses seized me - he came one way and I the other. An accident had occurred which I feel convinced, must be the cause of my being committed for trial: I happened to have a stick in my hand, which I made two notches in, just as I heard some one call out Stop Thief! this caused me to cut my hand slightly - I threw the stick away, and as the witness came up, stood still, to make way for him; for a few moments before, just as I first heard the cry of Stop Thief! a young man came running at a great pace, and the witness almost immediately after him. The witness stopped short, challenged me, and said I was the person he had pursued. I informed him that I knew nothing of what he was speaking, and probably no notice would have been taken of me, only for the unfortunate and very suspicious circumstance that some little blood was seen on my hand, from the cut of the knife, and, as I was afterwards told, some blood was found on the piece of linen picked up in the street. I told the witness that would they only go a few paces back, they would find the notched stick, but this they refused. My prosecutor stated, at the office, that he would swear to my face, because about ten minutes before the robbery had been committed, he heard a sort of knocking at the window, like that of an umbrella coming against it, which induced him to move the things from the window, and he was thereby enabled to see my face clearly: after I was apprehended I was taken back to the shop - it was well lighted up, and the night was very dark, so it must have been difficult to have seen distinctly any one outside. My prosecutor seemed much offended with me, because he had, several nights before, lost a shawl from the window, and said that, no doubt, I was the rascal who stole it - he would, therefore, do all in his power to punish me. I am sure that the witness who first seized me, cannot, in justice say, that I am the person whom he saw running - I am certain that some other man came by me at full speed, just before he came up, and had he pursued a little further, he must have heard the man run; but as the piece of linen was found, as he said, about a dozen yards from where he took me, he said he was sure that I must be the thief. Could I have persuaded the parties to have gone a little further back, the stick must have been found; and would any one examine the cut in my hand, it would easily be seen that it is so very slight that it must have been done in the way I say, with a knife. The knife was blooded when taken from me, and I held it in my hand when the witness came up.

THOMAS HAZARD. He had no knife in his hand when I overtook him, nor did he desire me to look for a stick.

JOHN KING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge in the prosecutor's shop - I saw a knife taken from his pocket - his apron was bloody and so was the cloth.

EDWARD DAVID LEWIS re-examined. About half an hour before the window was broken I heard a noise, and it being a wet evening, I thought somebody had knocked an umbrella against the window - I moved nearly all the things out of the window to shew a gentleman, so that it was clear of goods; the Irish laid by itself - it was the prisoner's left hand that was cut - the Irish is worth 36 s.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing that he had been led by others to commit the offence .

Reference Number: t18250113-143

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

324. ELIZABETH DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , fifty-eight pairs of stockings, value 40 s.; fifteen handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; six yards of flannel, value 8 s.; nine yards of linen, value 9 s., and six yards of cotton, value 3 s., the goods of George Morris , to whom she was servant , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE MORRIS. I keep the Dundee Arms, public-house, at Wapping . The prisoner lived with me as chambermaid. Some hosiery and other goods were placed under my care about Michaelmas - I was answerable for them; I placed them in my bed-room, and kept the door locked: the key was in my pocket, except when my sister went to make the bed. I discharged the prisoner the latter end of November, without warning. While she was in my service I missed several dozens of stockings and handkerchiefs, some Irish linen and flannel. The door must have been opened by a false key to get at them. I generally looked the goods over every day, and at one time I missed a quantity of stockings. On the 28th of December the prisoner called at my house, and next morning twenty-four duplicates were delivered to me by my sister. I went round to the pawnbrokers, and found my property.

ELIZABETH FENWICK . I am servant to Mr. Lecuse, a neighbour of the prosecutor's. I found these duplicates in a bag, under the gateway of the Dundee Arms, on the 28th of December - I took them home, showed them to Mrs. Lecuse, who said I had better take them to the Dundee Arms, as somebody had lost them - I gave them to Miss Morris.

EDWARD RUBERY. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Anchor and Hope-alley, St. George's. On the 13th of November the prisoner pawned nine pairs of stockings and three handkerchiefs, for 10 s. in the name of Elizabeth Haley; she might say Daly. I asked if they were her own - she said Yes, she had just bought them; she gave her address at Green-bank, and said she lodged there. About a fortnight afterwards she brought another parcel of stockings to pawn, for 5 s.; I said she had a parcel of stockings already, and were they her own - she said they were: I refused to take them in. The counterpart of my duplicate is in the prosecutor's possession.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old Gravel-lane. On the 10th of November the prisoner pawned some linen, cotton, half stockings, and handkerchiefs, for 16 s.; the duplicate I gave her is among those produced. I asked her name - she said Sarah Anderson; that they were part her own, and part her husband's property. She pawned another parcel at the same time, for 16 s., and on the 23d of November she pawned eleven pairs of socks, for 3 s. - she said she lived in Wapping-street. Morris's house is in that street; my three duplicates are among those produced.

ANDREW M'DONALD . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker,

who lives in High-street, Shadwell. On the 30th of October some stockings, socks, and four handkerchiefs were pawned, for 7 s., in the name of Ann Daly. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Cordey, of Ratcliff-highway. On the 22d of October three pairs of stockings were pawned by a woman, and on the 20th of November, six pairs. I have seen the prisoner at our shop, but cannot swear that she pawned these.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Reference Number: t18250113-144

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

325. ELIZABETH DALY was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , at St. John, at Wapping, a coat, value 20 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; eleven shirts, value 30 s.; seven pairs of stockings, value 7 s.; sixteen handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; two pairs of drawers, value 2 s.; a pair of gloves, value 1 s.; two caps, value 1 s.; two brushes, value 6 d.; a trunk, value 5 s., and a wrapper, value 6 d., the goods of John Hays , in the dwelling-house of George Morris .

JOHN HAYS. I am a ship owner , of Newcastle. On the 28th of December, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I came to the Dundee Arms, public-house, in a coach, with my trunk, containing the articles stated in the indictment - the trunk was set down by the bar; I missed it in ten or fifteen minutes - having been travelling two nights, I was tired, and had been taking some bread and cheese in the bar the while. I ran to the office, which is within one hundred yards of the house; the officer came with me, and on returning to the house in half an hour I found the prisoner in custody with it.

GEORGE MORRIS . I keep the Dundee Arms, which are in the parish of St. John, at Wapping . On the 28th of December, at night, Mr. Hays came to my house, with his trunk, which was put in the passage, opposite to the bar, near the stairs. The prisoner had left my service three weeks or a month, she came to my house about ten minutes after Mr. Hays came in, while he was in the bar, and asked for a Christmas box; I told her I gave no money, but what she liked to eat and drink in the house she was welcome to; she said she wanted nothing, and I left her at the bar door; I do not know what had become of her. The box was missed in a quarter of an hour - she was then gone. I went to the office, and gave information, and met my warehouse-keeper as I returned, and in consequence of what he said, I looked after the prisoner, and found her in about twenty minutes at the lower part of Old Gravel-lane, about three hundred yards from my house, near Hillyer's-court - she was coming towards my house: I told her she had been robbing our house of a trunk - she said,

"Good God! how could you suspect me?" I said,

"I have more reasons than one for suspecting you - I have pretty good proof of it, and shall give you in charge;" the watchman was within hail. She said,

"For God's sake don't do that, nor make a noise in the street, and I will tell you about it:" she then led me towards Hillyer's-court, away from the watchman, and when we had got a little distance from the watchman she refused to tell me, saying she knew nothing of it: I said I would not be baffled in that way, and gave her in charge. The watchman was bringing her towards my house, and at the corner of Brewhouse-lane, within sight of my house, she called after me, and said,

"For God's sake take me away from this man - I want to speak to you." I asked the watchman to retire: we went up Brewhouse-lane together; she said she would shew me where the trunk was, but when we got nearly out of the watchman's sight she said she wondered how I could suspect her, what a bad thing it was for her, and she was an innocent woman. I brought her to the watchman, partly by force; they took her to my house, and then to the office. When she came to my bar the trunk was behind her, within two yards. I remained in the bar with Mr. Hays, and cannot say if any one else came in, or when she went out. I thought she was gone into the tap-room, which joins the bar; there might be twelve or fifteen people in the taproom: the trunk could not be seen from there. Hillyer's-court is three hundred yards from my house.

SAMUEL GOODWIN . I am a watchman; my stand is near the Dundee Arms, about fifty yards from it. On the night of the 28th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw a young woman pass by on the opposite side, with a trunk, covered over - she turned up Brewer's-lane, which leads to Hillyer's-court; I thought it was a servant going to her place, and in about ten minutes I heard an alarm of a trunk having been stolen. I met Harding, the officer, and told him which way she was gone - he followed, and in about ten minutes returned with the box. I have been ten years on that beat, but did not know the prisoner. I believe her to be the person who had the trunk, for I saw her afterwards. I cannot swear to her.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am an officer. In consequence of an alarm being given I inquired of Goodwin - then went up Brewer's-lane, and into Hillyer's-court, and found the trunk laying on the pavement - I took it to the office. I returned to the same spot in about half an hour, and found the wrapper about ten yards from where the trunk was - I have had both ever since. The trunk had not been opened, but uncorded. The prisoner was afterwards taken, and denied the charge.

RICHARD ANDERSON . I am warehouse-keeper at the Dundee Arms. On the 28th of December, after ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Brewer's-lane, with a trunk, like the one produced - it had something white covered over it. I knew her before, as she lived servant at the house, and am certain of her. I said nothing to her - I was going to the Dundee Arms, and when I got there I heard the alarm.

SAMUEL GOODWIN . I believe this to be the wrapper.

MR. HAYS. This is my trunk, and the wrapper also - it contains the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above 4 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the trunk.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18250113-145

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

326. MARY ANN LAWRENCE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Taylor, in the forenoon of the 27th of December , (Mary

Unwin and others being therein) and stealing two gowns, value 12 s. , the goods of the said Elizabeth Taylor .

ELIZABETH TAYLOR. I am a widow , and live in Albion-street, Commercial-road . The prisoner lodged at my house. On the 27th of December I went out at nine o'clock in the morning, and locked my room, which is a back room, on the ground floor; I had shut the window quite down. I returned at half-past eleven, unlocked the door, and missed these, two gowns from my box. I hallooed out that I was robbed, and at that time the prisoner ran out with the property - she was brought back by Cowderoy. Any person in the yard could open my room window and get in.

MARY UNWIN . I lodge at Taylor's. I was in my own room, with the door open, and heard her call out that she was robbed. I saw the prisoner running from the house, about ten yards off, with a basket in her hand, containing these two gowns; I ran out, calling Stop thief! Cowderoy went and took her, and brought her back; he took the gowns out of the basket. She said she was sorry for what she had done.

JAMES COWDEROY . I heard an alarm, and the prisoner was given into my care, with the gowns; I did not see her till she was brought back to the house; she had the basket in her hand, with the gowns in it.

MARY UNWIN re-examined. Cowderoy ran after her, and brought her back.

JAMES COWDEROY . It is false - I did not go after her I was sent for, and found her standing in the passage. Unwin had brought her back, as I understood.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The constable would not take a young man who was with me. I picked the basket up in the passage.

JAMES COWDEROY . Taylor would not give the man in charge. The prisoner did not desire me to take him; he was ill-using her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-146

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

327. THOMAS LEA was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FITZGERALD . I am in the employ of Mr. Perkins, stationer, Thames-street. On the 8th of December I bought at the prosecutor's warehouse five reams of paper, of the prisoner; it was carried home by Lucas, to whom I paid four sovereigns and six shillings; he brought a bill, with a receipt at the bottom.

ROBERT LUCAS . I am porter to the prosecutors. Mr. Fitzgerald paid me four sovereigns and six shillings, which I gave to the prisoner; he had given me the receipt which I delivered to Fitzgerald.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you give the money to the prisoner? A. At the warehouse door, on the same day. I gave him the same money, for I had no other about me.

MR. JAMES NATHANIEL LEWIS . I am in partnership with Richard Simpson and William Lewis . The prisoner was our clerk ; this receipt is in his hand-writing (read) - he never accounted for this money.

Cross-examined. Q. Would he not account for it by an entry in your book? A. That is the way he should account for it; the books were in the counting-house then, but since the 18th I have had them at Brixton, in consequence of a discovery. They came to the warehouse every morning.

COURT. Q. How ought he to have accounted for this money? A. He should have entered it in the cash-book, which I have examined, and there is no such entry - he never said anything about it. Mr. William Lewis resides in the country.

MR. RICHARD SIMPSON. I occasionally attend the business in town. The prisoner never accounted to me for this money.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not a general account, in which he might account for it? A. There was a running petty cash account, out of which he paid small sums - I think it possible that this sum might have been paid in that account, though not brought into the books: I think it possible that if he made up his petty cash-book it might appear. We had great confidence in him.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Who pays the attorney on the other side? A. I do not know; it was his duty to account to Mr. Lewis.

MR. LEWIS. The petty cash-book which the prisoner has, is merely for the weekly disbursements of stamps, wages, & c. I repeatedly asked him for the account, and before the books were taken to Brixton - he always had an excuse to make. Money received should not be entered in that book. The last entry in the books is on the 18th.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no doubt but the entry was made in the day-book on the 8th of December: if I received the money I have forgotten to enter it - but a petty cash-book account has been running from the 10th of February: I repeatedly requested Mr. Lewis to settle it, but he always put it off. Ever since the books have been removed I have had no opportunity of seeing whether my accounts are correct or not - I am therefore unable to meet the charge, as I otherwise should.

JURY to MR. LEWIS. Q. Was he authorised to use money which he received, by making petty disbursements? A. He generally received a cheque for that; he was always desired to pay over all the money he received, but he has at times been allowed to use money which he has received for petty disbursements; it is possible that he might use this so, but not probable; we have not blamed him in that case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-147

328. THOMAS LEA was again indicted for a like offence .

EDWARD HARPEN . I am in the employ of Mr. Emmett, of Holborn-bars. On the 25th of September I bought a ream of square cartridge paper of the prisoner, at the prosecutor's warehouse, for 1 l. 18 s. I paid the porter who brought it home.

ROBERT LUCAR . I carried this paper home - Mr. Hooper paid me a sovereign and eighteen shillings in silver, which I gave to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Where did you receive it? A. At Mr. Elliot's - I have delivered paper there three times,

but the rest amounted to different sums; I gave him the same money as I received. I generally put my master's money into a separate pocket from my own. The prisoner met me as I was going into the warehouse, and took the money - he has met me in that way once or twice; I do not know what he did with it. I was asked about this about Christmas.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You delivered Harper the bill and receipt which you had from the prisoner? A. Yes. That is the only time I received money there.

MR. LEWIS. This receipt is in the prisoner's writing: he has never accounted in any way for the money, nor told me that he had received it.

Cross-examined. Q. The same course of petty cash payment was going on then? A. Yes. There is no entry in the journal of this money, nor in the cash-book which is here; he receives weekly cheques for petty cash: his duty was to gave me all money which he receives, and to enter it in the cash-book.

MR. SIMPSON. He has never paid this money to me, nor accounted to me for it.

Cross-examined. Was he in the habit of paying small sums for you? A. For the general account he was. I cannot say that he has not laid out this money for us. His salary was 2 l. a week.

Prisoner's Defence. This case resembles the former. I have had a great deal of business to transact, with very little assistance; it is possible for mistakes to occur. I certainly have no recollection of the circumstance; the witness says he did not give me the money in the counting-house - I was very likely to forget to enter it. There is an entry to Harper in the day-book,

(pointing it out.)

MR. LEWIS. This is an entry of a ream of cartridge, 1 l. 19 s. to Harper, on the 25th of September, but not of any money being received. Mr. Emmett's sum is 1 l. 18 s. There are two or three entries to Harper, which the prisoner, only can explain. There is no entry of the money; it should be entered in the cash-book.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it unusual to take off 1 s. discount? A. No. I once heard the prisoner say that there was a customer named Harper. Here is the cash-book; most of the entries are in his writing.

Six witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-148

329. JOSEPH FREEMAN and THOMAS PARKER were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a pair of trowsers, value 8 s. , the goods of William Cording .

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am apprentice to Mr. William Cording, pawnbroker , Aldgate . On the 3d of January between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Freeman looking through the window: I went to the end of the counter, and saw Picker walking back wards and forwards; I watched them for three quarters of an hour, lost sight of them, and soon after saw a hand pull the trowsers down, and is two minutes I missed them entirely. I went out, and found the prisoners in one of the private boxes, with the trowsers laying close at their heels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREEMAN'S Defence. I was returning from Stratford; the gentleman came out, and knocked me into the passage.

PARKER'S Defence. I was stopping up but of the rain.

FREEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-149

330. ELIZABETH MESSER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Dixon on the King's highway, on the 9th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two gowns, value 9 s.; two aprons, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and a quarter of an ounce of cotton, value 1/2 d. the goods of John Dixon .

ANN DIXON. I am servant to Mr. Faulkeaer, of Nagg's-head-court, Gracechurch-street. On the 9th of December, about three o'clock, I left my master's house, and about a quarter to nine I fell in with the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street. She came up and pleaded distress to me, saying she was in want of refreshment. I said it was not in my power to relieve her, but she was welcome to a drop of poster. She took me into a house in London-wall, where we had a pint of beer. I came out, she followed me - I had a bundle containing the articles stated in the indictment, which belonged to John Dixon, my husband. We walked a few yards from the house - she then made a snatch at my bundle, but did not succeed - I got my gown torn in the struggle. I thought she was gone - but when I was not prepared for her she came and made a sudden snatch, and got it, without using violence; she ran off with it. I gave an alarm, and the officer took her on the spot, before she got out of my sight. I am certain she is the woman.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me to hold, and then tell me to run after a man who was your fellow-servant? A. No; it is false.

CHARLES STAPLES . I am an officer. I was there accidentally, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - several persons were running; they said the prisoner was gone through Pitcher's-court, and I found her there, in the corner of a large dust-hole, with the bundle under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-150

331. GEORGE FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , fifteen bound books, value 15 s. , the goods of George Cockburne .

WILLIAM DRAME . I am a comb-maker, and live at Aldgate. On the 15th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was coming to town, and saw the prisoner running before me - he went up Duke-street, Aldgate, with a parcel of books in his apron. I saw Mrs. Cockburne come out and look about; she said she had lost some books. I went down Mitre-street, and caught the prisoner at the corner of Gravel-lane, with the books in his apron.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. Drane gave me the books.

GEORGE COCKBURNE . They are mine - and were placed on a pile at my door, tied round with tape.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-151

332. THOMAS RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM MARCH . JUN. I am a fishing-tackle maker, and live in Fleet-street. On Sunday evening, the 9th of January, I was in Salisbury-court , and saw the prisoner cross the road and follow three gentlemen; he put his hand into one of the gentlemen's pockets, took out a handkerchief, and put it into his trowsers. I seized him, he threw it from his trowsers, knocked me down with a violent blow in the breast, and got away. I described him to the street-keeper, and am confident he is the man. I knew him before by having seen him attempt gentlemen's pockets - the gentleman got away in the crowd.

JOHN MARCH . I was with my brother, and saw the prisoner with another cross and follow three gentlemen - he took a handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket - my brother collared him, and he threw it down - knocked my brother down, and got off - I picked it up.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am the street-keeper, and apprehended the prisoner. Mr. March had described him, and pointed him out to me.

WILLIAM MARCH , SEN. My son mentioned the prisoner to me by name - I met him and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18250113-152

333. MARY EARLE and JOHN EARLE were indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM ROPER . I am a brass-founder, and live on Snow-hill. The male prisoner came to my shop with about 20 lbs. of brass chucks and other articles. Chucks are very valuable in machinery, but useless for any thing else. I suspected something, and told my clerk to put them by - we paid him 6 d. or 8 d. a pound for them - they came to 15 s. or 16 s. He came again two or three days after. It was about the middle of November - all our dealings were within the space of nine days. I desired the property to be put aside, and put one chuck into my pocket; and as I went about, inquired of different people if they belonged to them. A few days after he came again with about 40 lbs. I asked him where he lived - he said in Creed-lane, and that his name was Earle. He came a third time, with about 90 lbs. of most valuable things to the parties they belonged to - they were manufactured for making parts of machinery. It was eleven o'clock. I desired my clerk to say we had no time to weigh them, and if he would call again at two o'clock they should be weighed, and he should be paid for them. I immediately went to different places, and was directed to Mr. Dollond, as the only person likely to belong to them. I produced them there, and they identified them, by their matching the machinery. The foreman came to my house with an officer, and when the prisoner came he was apprehended. He did not say how he got the goods. I am not in the habit of buying things, but bought these to detect the thief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He came to you in the middle of the day? A. Yes.

JAMES WELLS . I am servant to Mr Roper, his account is correct.

MATTHEW BANKS . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Roper's, and found John Earle there, and asked how he came by the brass, he said he brought it from No. 2, Creed-lane, from Mrs. Earle - I said we suspected it was stolen, could he tell how she came by it; he said she dealt in old copper, and had bought it - I asked where he lived; he said he was a shoe-maker, and had a stall under her shop, and was in the habit of carrying goods for her, as a porter - I took him to the Compter; he said his name was Earle - I asked if he was related to Mrs. Earle; he said Yes - I asked him what relation, over and over again; he refused to tell; I went to Creed-lane, to Mrs. Earle, she keeps a chandler's shop; there was no appearance of her dealing in metal - I asked her where the man was who worked in the stall below; she said he was gone out, but she expected him very soon - I asked if she knew where he was gone; she said to Cock-lane, Smithfield - I asked if she knew what he was gone for; she hesitated for some time - I said I had a particular reason for asking; she said

"He is gone to sell some old metal for me" - I asked what kind; she said old brass and copper - I said

"Do you deal in old brass and copper, mistress?" she said Yes - I asked if she had any more by her; she said she had sent it all out - I asked where she kept it; she said in an old tub in the cellar: she went down, and shewed me an empty tub - I could find no metal - I returned to Mr. Roper's, and after some conversation with Godfrey, I returned to Mrs. Earle, and asked her if she knew a person named Godfrey, who worked for Mr. Dollond; she said she knew his father, but had no knowledge of the son - I told her I was given to understand she had bought the metal, which John had taken to Mr. Roper's, of Godfrey, Mr. Dollond's boy: she hesitated some time - I said I was certain of it, for I had proof that she had given 4 d. a pound for it; she said she had given more than 4 d.; she did not then deny having bought them of Godfrey - I said she must go with me: she said she should be forthcoming at any time, and wished me to let it stand over - I took her in charge; she said Godfrey's son had told falsities - I told her several things which he had said: she said

"I suppose I must go after Old Maggs, and be transported." Cock-lane is near Mr. Roper's; one Barnard, a dealer in old metal, lives there.

Cross-examined. Q. When you told her you must take her, she said she supposed she must be transported? A. Yes; I had told her what Godfrey had stated.

JAMES THOMAS GODFREY . In November last, I was in the employ of Mr. Dollond, optician, of St. Paul's churchyard; my father, who is also in his employ, then lived in St. Martin's-le-grand; when my mother was alive, we dealt at Mrs. Earle's - I have known her five or six years; I went into Mr. Dollond's employ, in October - I went to Mrs. Earle's for a pint of small beer, and she asked where I worked; I said at Mr. Dollond's, with my father; she asked at what part of the business; I said in the brass way: she said if I would take her any, she would give me 3 d. or 4 d. a pound, according to the value of it - I said nothing then - I saw her two or three times after, and she repeated the same words, and at last I took her some chucks - John Earle was then in the shop, and looked at them; she weighed them, and gave me 4 d. a pound for them - I received 3 s. - John Earle took it out of the scale,

and observed, that it was not brass, but a mixture of pot met - I took some joints of telescopes soon after; John was present, and saw her buy them; there was a person in the shop, and she beckoned for me not to put them in the scale, while the person was there; when the person was gone I put it into the scale, the son looked at it, and said it was only a mixture of pot metal - I had 2 s. or 3 s. for that, and she told me, never to put any thing into the scale, while any one was there - I went there seven or eight times, within five or six weeks, and always took them with me - I took some stick brass, the third time, (her son was present,) and she told me, there was a person opposite, and not to make a noise with it, for the person opposite was worse than officers, that she had bought some bottles of a boy, who worked at Mr. Ellis, and the person opposite had told Mr. Ellis, who turned the boy away, and took the bottles from her; and, if any body saw me take it, to say. I never took any before, and to be sure I never let any body see me come into her shop; her son was present at this conversation; all the property which I took her, I had stolen from Mr. Dollond. These dealings went on till Mr. Roper went to my master - I received 16 s. or 18 s. in all, from her - some of the brass was rather old; but most of it new.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you come from goal now? A. Yes; I spent the money in different things, not in drink - my father did not know a word about it.

Q. Why do you give evidence here; is it to save yourself? A. My master asked me if I had stolen it - I said I had: it is not altogether to save myself, but to tell the truth - I do not know whether I am to be prosecuted - I am nineteen years old - I never stole any thing before - I used to go to their shop at breakfast time - I sometimes took it in my apron, and sometimes to my pockets - I had 15 s. a-week - I do not know whether I am to be prosecuted.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has Mr. Dolland, your father, or any one told you, that you will not be prosecuted, if the prisoners are convicted? A. Mr. Harmer said, I might get off, if I told the truth, but did not positively say I should. If my father had known it, he would have told my master directly - I should not have thought of it, if Earle had not set me on - the property produced is what I sold her.

MR. GEORGE DOLLOND . These things are my property - I know them perfectly well - Godfrey had access to them; it would cost me a guinea each to replace many of them - the things will not amount to less than twenty guineas.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your other Christian name? A. I have no other - Huggins is my surname; but I am always called Dolland, and have that name by priest - I am known by an other.

MARY EARLE - GUILTY . Aged 48.

JOHN EARLE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-153

NEW COURT.

(4th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

334. WILLIAM DAVISON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d, of December , a pair of buckles, value 6 s.; a spoon, value., a shirt, value 10 s. three coats, value., two waistcoat, value 10 s. three pairs of breeches, value 30 s.; a sovereign, four half-crowns, and 13 s. 6 d.; the goods of John Bolton , in the dwelling-house of John Parker .

JOHN BOLTON. I live in Yates's-court, Carey-street , and am a Tailor . I live in the house of John Parker. The Prisoner came one Saturday night, about the 18th or 19th of December, and took the back, room behind mine; on the day he was taken I saw one of the shirts, marked T. W. at the watch-house. I think the property was taken at different times. He was taken up last Saturday week; he had left the lodgings on the Tuesday, without giving any notice. I missed the articles stated in the indictment before he was taken up. I have seen the shirt, the spectacles, and two handkerchiefs since.

- BOLTON. I am the wife of the last witness. This property was locked up in a drawer; the coats were in a box; the money was there when I went out on Tuesday: there was one sovereign and twenty-three shillings in sil ver - I think there were four half-crowns: I cannot tell whether the waistcoats or the breeches were there on Tuesday - I am sure the shirt is one which I had had to wash. When I came home on Tuesday the prisoner was in his own room, and I said

"Hey, hey what is all this about;" seeing all the things scattered about. He said

"I want a sheet of writing paper" - I went to my drawer to get it and he went off.

EDWARD SEYMOUR . I live at the Cock and Magpie, Drury-lane. The prisoner lodged there about ten nights; he was taken at my house last Saturday week - two handkerchiefs were found at his lodgings at my house. I brought the things down and showed them to the watchman at the watch-house.

ROBERT THOMPSON . I am a watchman; I took the prisoner on the 8th of January, at a quarter past ten o'clock in the evening - the property was brought to the watch-house; there were fifteen handkerchiefs found; eleven of them were down the privy at Mr. Sermour's, and four others were picked up outside - they did not belong to Mr. Seymour.

JOHN LANGFIELD . I am a constable; the prisoner was delivered to my charge. I have kept the property ever since; some of it was delivered to me by Mr. Seymour. and some by Barber; a part of it was claimed by Bolton; I found 9 s. 6 d. on him.

HENRY ASHMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Strand. I have a pair of spectacles which were pawned with me on the 21st of December for 6 s. I believe the prisoner was the person who pawned them - the duplicate of them were found in his box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first time I was ever before a Court.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Reference Number: t18250113-154

385. WILLIAM DAVISON was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , six spoons, value 15 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s.; a coat, value 30 s. and a

crown piece, the property of Charles Kidd , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES KIDD. I live at Cobourg house, in the Fulham road . The prisoner came to lodge with me on Thursday, the 2d of December; he took the second floor back room, and was to pay 5 s. per week; he left on Wednesday, the 7th, without any notice: I missed this property, which was locked up in a drawer in my bed-room, adjoining his room. I had seen the drawer safe locked on the Wednesday, and I found it broken open and the property gone next morning; the coat was in my first floor front room. I went up to clean myself at ten o'clock on Wednesday morning, and the prisoner opened his door, and put his boots out, and said

"Will you get my boots cleaned?" I locked my own door and went down, and gave the boots to the servant. I went up again to my room - the drawer was then perfectly right; he did not leave the house before I left on Wednesday morning - he went out afterwards; the coat had been in wear ever since last May - it was a great coat; I was at home about two o'clock, when the prisoner came home, and asked the servant to get him a mutton chop for his dinner, for which he gave her 6 d.; she went and got a beef-steak; I went out, then returned, and found the steak in the front of the fire - I asked why it was not gone up, and the servant said the gentleman is gone out.

Prisoner. The room on the first floor was often open.

Witness. It was always locked when no person was there - I am certain it was locked on the day he went away.

MARY ANN KIDD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I had not opened the door on the first floor; it was locked, unless the servant had left it open. I missed all the articles the day after the prisoner went - the spoons are here.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Cameron, a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. I have six teaspoons, which were pawned at our shop on the 31st of December, by a person very much like the prisoner - this is the duplicate I gave of them (looking at it).

JOHN LANGFIELD . This duplicate was found in the prisoner's box, which was delivered to me by Mr. Seymour.

(Spoons produced and sworn to.)

MRS. KIDD re-examined. We had two other lodgers in the house who did not leave it till last Friday.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-155

336. SAMUEL WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a gallon of rum, value 10 s. , the goods of John Rock .

2d COUNT stating it to belong to Thomas Lucey and Charles Lucey .

3d COUNT stating it to be the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HOPKINS . I am an import officer of Excise. On the 5th of January, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I gauged ten puncheons of rum in the warehouse No. 2, at the West India Docks ; one of them was marked No. 21; the import mark on that was H. W. - the export mark was W. R. No. 13, the contents were 119 gallons; it was full when I left it, except two samples, which were allowed to be drawn. I saw it quite filled at three o'clock - there was a sample taken out for the Excise, and another for the merchant, which reduced it about a pint and a half - it was then hanged up and turned. I delivered that puncheon to James Johnson, with nine others; on the 6th of January I was sent for to Mr. Field, the surveyor of Excise; about ten o'clock, in the forenoon I went on board the craft called the Charles, in the export dock; and saw the ten puncheons there - I reguaged No. 21, it then only contained 117 gallons.

JAMES JOHNSON . I am an Excise extra watchman. On the 5th of January, I received charge of ten puncheons of rum from Hopkins; they were pull into the Charles, which belongs to Lucey, the lighterman; they were to be exported; samples of them were to be drawn, and taken to the Excise office; the puncheons were to go into Limehouse basin, and I went there, after they had arrived, and took charge of them, about a quarter to four o'clock into afternoon; they continued in my charge till six o'clock. I then gave them up to the prisoner - it was all safe then; he was to watch them till six o'clock, next morning. the lighter was lying on the north side of the basin. I went about ten minutes before six next morning to take charge, and then found the lighter on the opposite side - the prisoner was there. I asked why he had moved the craft? he said he did not know - he came out of the craft - I asked if the charge was all safe - he said yes, and went away. Soon after some persons came down - I heard somebody call Johnson - I went and found it was one of the police officers; in consequence of what they said I remained in charge till the puncheon was regauged by Hopkins.

ALEXANDER LUKE . I am a Thames Police constable. I was stationed at the West India Dock gate, on the morning of the 6th of January, and saw the prisoner about six o'clock - he was coming along the basin side toward the gate; I took the key of the gate out of my pocket to let him out, and said

"Have you got any thing about you;" he told me No. That is a question we commonly ask. I said I wished to examine him before he went out; he said I was welcome; he opened his great coat; I felt him all over till I came down to his legs, where I found a bladder; I asked what that was - he gave no answer - it contained one gallon of ruin. I found a small gimblet in his coat pocket; I told him to stop in the police box and unbutton his trowsers and let me have it out. I asked him afterwards where he got it, he said he picked it up just ahead of a barge which was laying in the basin; there was only one barge laying there; she had discharged her cargo and was going out. I asked where he got the gimblet; he said he picked it up just by the rum. I asked where his charge was - he said

"There it is, astern of the brig;" I lodged him in the guard-room, and went to examine the craft astern of the brig, on the south side of the basin - I found Johnson, the watchman, close by it.

JOHN FIELD . I am a surveyor of the import dock. On the 6th of January between nine and ten o'clock; I was called to the brig Charles, belonging to Thomas and Charles Lucey; she had ten puncheons of rum on board. I examined No. 21, and found a spill in it; it appeared to be newly bored, and it was a deal spill, those used by the Dock Company or by the revenue, are

beach; a gimlet was shewn me and I have no doubt but the hole was bored with that; the import mark was H. W. and the export mark was W. R. No. 13; it wanted two gallons of being full.

JOHN FOY. I am the principal of the police. On the 6th of January the prisoner was brought to me, about six o'clock in the morning, charged with having a bladder of rum in his possession - he said he found it a-head of the brig Diana, which laid in our basin; that he was on charge there, and had found it on the Quay. I asked where he got the gimblet, he said he found it near the rum, but more a shore. Luke stated in his presence, that he had examined the prisoner's charge but could not find any cask that had been plundered; I went on board and found the spill in the puncheon; I went to Mr. Field and we raised the bung, and found it two inches dry; the spill was cut off, but evidently not by a cooper; it was wet and smelt of rum, and was not the same description of wood. I took some rum out of the cask and compared it with that in the bladder - it seemed to be the same.

Mr. JOHN RUCK . - I am a merchant and live on St. Dunstan's hill. I sold ten puncheons of rum to Maurin and Andrew's. I was to deliver it for them on board the Sir Charles M'Carthy for Sierra Leona, in Lucey's lighter.

CHARLES LUCEY . I am in partnership with my brother Thomas - the Charles belongs to us.

Prisoner's Defence. I had ten puncheons of rum in charge, and the night being very cold, I went into a constable's box, near the side of the basin, till about half-past four, and then on walking round the basin, toward my charge, I found a gimblet, and saw a small bladder, containing liquor; I went to my charge and found all right. My only motive for concealing it was because I thought some of my fellow servants would lose their places.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-156

337. JAMES LENNARD, now called JAMES THOMAS LENNARD , was indicted for that at the General Sessions of the Peace of our Lord the King, holden for the City of Rochester, on Monday, the 14th of October, in the 3d year of his present Majesty's reign, James Lennard was in due form of law convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged to be imprisoned in the gaol of the said City, for the space of One Year, and that he should find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more, to be computed from the end of the said Year, and that he having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, to wit, on the 2d of December last, one other piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, as, and for a good shilling unlawfully and feloniously did utter to Nathaniel Entwistle , well knowing the same to be false and counterfeited, against the statute .

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. I have a record of the conviction of the prisoner at Rochester, on Monday, the 14th of October, 1822, which states that James Lennard, late of the parish of St. Margaret, within the City of Rochester, labourer, on the 27th of August, did put off a piece of money, of the likeness of a good shilling, to William Hughes Scraggs , and the same day to one James Russell did deliver a piece of false and counterfeit money, made like unto a piece of good money, called a shilling, to which the verdict is, guilty - and the prisoner was sentenced to be imprisoned one year, in the gaol of the said City, and to give securities for his good behaviour for two years.

JOSEPH BONE . I am keeper of the gaol at Rochester. The prisoner was convicted at Rochester, on the 14th of October, 1822 - he was in my custody for one year. I am certain of his person.

NATHANIEL ENTWISTLE. I keep the Crane, public-house, in the parish of St. John, Hackney. The prisoner came to my house several times before the 2d of December - he came about eight o'clock in the morning of that day, and called for a glass of gin, which came to 2 d; I served him, and he gave me a shilling: I gave him change - I then went back towards the light, and found the shilling was a bad one; he was then walking out: he got out - I went after him, and found he was gone. I took care of that shilling - I wrapped it up, and kept it by itself: and have kept it ever since. He came again about eleven o'clock the same forenoon, for a pint of beer, which came to 2 1/2 d.; he gave me a shilling, and I gave him change: this was in the tap-room, which is lighter than the bar, and I saw that it was bad. I went out, and sent a man for Garva, the constable - he came, and we went into the taproom; I showed him the two shillings, and gave charge of the prisoner. Garva marked the two shillings, and gave them back to me; they were never out of my sight. Garva searched him, and found one shilling and a sixpence, in his pocket, some halfpence, and a bit of beef steak.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody on the 2d of December - Entwistle showed me two shillings; these are them, (looking at them;) I put a mark upon them, and gave them to Entwistle. I found 1 s. 6 d. in good money in the prisoner's breeches pocket, and in his waistcoat pocket 4 1/2 d. in copper. I searched him further, and found under his arm a bag, which came round his neck, and hung under his shirt - I told him to pull off his coat; he would not: he made a sad resistance when he found I had got hold of the bag. I pulled it from under his shirt - it contained twenty-three good sixpences and there were five bad shillings wrapped up in a piece of paper, and wrapped up all separate in the paper; they appeared quite fresh. I found 3 s. 5 d. in copper, and a piece of beef steak in his pocket, and some cheese, and four onions, all in his coat pocket. I asked him where he got the money, and he said more misfortune to him.

RICHARD FRANKLIN , JUN. I am one of the moneyers of his Majesty's Mint. This shilling is a bad one; it is made of base metal - the other is had also; these five are all bad, and are all made from the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I was driven to it by starvation - my wife and family were starving.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18250113-157

338. MARY BOSWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October, two shifts, value 2 l.; a tablecloth, value 5 s.; a spoon, value 10 s.; a decanter, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; a gown, value 10 s.; two shirts, value 10 s.; a coat, value 2 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 30 s.; an

opera glass, value 1 l.; a nutmeg-grater, value 10 s., and a piece of Foreign gold coin, value 3 l., the goods of Matilda Townsend , to whom she was servant, in the dwelling-house of Sophia Liggins , widow .

MATILDA TOWNSEND. I live in Craven-street, Fitzroy-square , and am single . The prisoner lived in my service for seven months - I never gave her authority to pawn these articles - here is a gold doubloon, a nutmeg-grater, a decanter, an opera glass, two shifts, a tablecloth, and other things - they were locked up in boxes in the garret, where the prisoner slept; I live on the first floor. Mrs. Liggins keeps the house - I cannot tell her Christian name - I left home the beginning of June, and returned the first week in August.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not on your going into the country leave me one sovereign, and tell me if I wanted more, to pawn those things you least wanted, and you left me the keys of your boxes? A. No; I left her board wages sufficient for her living. I have paid some bills since, which she has run up while I was gone; I was not quite five weeks gone - she had 2 s. 6 d. a week, and the use of my furniture; she appeared to be perfectly satisfied with what I left her. I have paid 1 l. for some coals she had in while I was gone.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham Court-road. The prisoner pawned this shirt and frock on the 31st of July, for 5 s. - the gown was pawned on the 3d of August, for 1 s. 6 d. Here is a suit of clothes, and shirt, pawned on the 24th of August, a shirt on the 11th of September, an opera glass on the 7th of September, for 6 s., and a decanter on the 11th of October, for 3 s. - they were all pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM MURDOCH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of October - I took her to Marlborough-street, and left her there till the prosecutrix came; she asked me to let her go to get some beer, and she got away - she was not taken till the 5th of December. These duplicates were found upon her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutrix had desired her to pledge property if she was in want of money during her absence.

Prisoner to MATILDA TOWNSEND. Q. Were you not compelled to part with some things when you returned to town? A. Certainly I was, but not the articles stated in the indictment. The prisoner had pawned the chain which is round my neck, for 4 l. - I was obliged to pawn another chain for 6 l., and I took this out again; she never gave me the 4 l. which she had pawned the chain for.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-158

339. ANGELO BENEDETO VENTURA was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GEORGE PAUX . I am parish clerk of Mary-le-bone. I produce the book of the registers of marriages, by which it appears that the prisoner was married on the 21st of August, 1813, to Frances Henrietta Cockburn , widow , by William Mead, curate - it is signed by the Rev. Wm. Mead. Here is the register of marriages in 1819 - on the 14th of February that year, the prisoner was married to Caroline Bartlett , widow - the prisoner is described as bachelor in both cases.

EDWARD PRITCHARD . I lived with Mr. Treachey, an attorney, in Clement's Inn. Both these registers are signed in the prisoner's hand-writing; Mr. Treachey's daughter is one of the witnesses to this last register. There were some proceedings instituted by Lady Cockburn, to recover some money settled upon her on her separation from Sir James, supposing that Sir James was dead, but when she heard he was living, the proceedings were abated; this was shortly after her marriage to the prisoner - I take this account from what she, herself, said. I have often seen her and the prisoner together. The proceedings were stopped afterwards.

SOPHIA SINGLETON . I knew the prisoner and his wife nine years and a half ago - they were living together. I heard her say that she had been Lady Cockburn. I saw her about ten days ago; I do not know where she is now, upon my oath - she called at my house, and begged I would attend the examination at Marlborough-street; I do not know where she lodged: I have not been at her house or lodgings this nine years. I do not know where she lived, and have not seen her since Friday week.

CAROLINE BARTLETT. I married the prisoner at Mary-le-bone church, in February, 1819. I was a widow then. I had the prisoner taken up on a charge of bigamy about two months ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You had been trying your hand at a divorce before that? A. No; I do not recollect that I had - I applied to Mr. Green, an attorney, for some redress from the ill-treatment I had received. I know Mr. Metcalf and Mr. Green, I employed them to try to get redress. I sent for the prisoner to give me lessons on the guitar - I was recommended to him - that was not the recommendation of Miss Boswell - I do not know her. He had been giving me lessons about four years before we married.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, did you not know he was living as a married man with Lady Cockburn, and notwithstanding that you married him? A. I did hear of it, but it was cleared up before we were married - his solicitor cleared away every doubt - I was informed it was a void marriage, and it was not till after that that we were married.

Q. You had been to his house while Lady Cockborn was living with him? A. Yes, I had; but the matter was left to the care of Mr. Treachey, and I relied on that.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mr. Treachey was Mr. Ventura's attorney? A. Yes; and I was given to understand that there was something illegal in his marriage with Lady Cockburn. The prisoner obtained landed property by his marriage with me - it still remains. I have sold one house since I was married and we had jointly the produce of it.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not have the whole of the money yourself? A. No; so far from it, I had to apply to him for 6 d., and was refused. The estate produced 300 l. per year or more.

Q. Before he married you was not be in possession of 400 l. or 500 l. a year, which he gave up? A. Yes, he did; but it was not entirely by my desire; we went to live together in the country - my furniture and effects remain

with me, but the plate has been parted with - he sold some, and I did endeavour to have some for myself.

Prisoner's Defence. When I married Lady Cockburn she deceived me - I met her in great distress, and gave her a few shillings. I then lent her 20 l. or 30 l.; and then she contrived to drive me to marriage; a day or two afterwards Mrs. Bartlett came to my house to buy an instrument - I was not at home - she and Lady Cockburn were in the parlour some time, trying instruments; and then she came again, and met me at home, and begged me to play and sing. She has often been with Lady Cockburn and her brother to play. I then went to Kensington to give her some lessons, and they gave me some Spanish cake to take home to Lady Cockburn. In about two years I found that Lady Cockburn had been married to Sir James Cockburn; I received information that Sir James Cockburn was in Scotland, and desired her to se- separate from me directly. After a year or two Sir James Cockburn came to London, and I went to him - I told him all the particulars. I parted with Lady Cockburn, and met with Mrs. Bartlett, she knew the whole of these particulars.

SIR JAMES COCKBURN . I am a Baron of Nova Scotia. I have been in the army, and a great deal abroad. I married in 1791 to Miss Frances Green, in Ireland, on the 19th of May, to the best of my recollection. I married her as a single woman. In consequence of certain occurrences we were separated; and proceedings in Chancery were instituted. I understand she is now living, but I have not seen her since 1793, when I embarked on board Lord Hood's fleet.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was there any other Sir James Cockburn at that time? A. Not that I know of. I cannot tell her age - she might be nineteen or twenty. We were married at Limerick, in Ireland, at the parish church, where she lived.

Q. You talked at Marlborough-street of producing the brother of the lady, Mr. Green, who was a Magistrate of the county, and that he would come immediately to attest the matter of the marriage? A. I did not say so - I said I understood he was a Magistrate, and possessed 3000 l. a year. I never corresponded with him in my life, nor have I seen him since 1793 - he was a trustee to a deed which I made.

JUSTIN FITZGERALD . I am an attorney. I have been the solicitor of Lady Cockburn, sixteen years; she is the lady who married the prisoner; she introduced Mr. Ventura as her husband. In 1822, she applied at my house to request I would open a correspondence with the trustee, under the marriage settlement of Sir James - I transacted money business between Sir James and her on one occacasion, in 1822 - Sir James and Lady Cockburn were at my house the same day, but not together, and signed a release - Lady Cockburn came first, and signed an authority to me, which I have in my hand.

SIR JAMES COCKBURN re-examined. I have not seen Lady Cockburn since 1793 - I transacted the business just alluded to - I know this paper is her writing - I am positive it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-159

340. MARY CONNOR , MARY SMITH , and ANN MALONEY were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , at St. James, Westminster, twelve rings, value 10 l., and a tray, value 1 s., the goods of Joseph Vining , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA VINING . I am the daughter of Joseph Vining; he is a jeweller and silversmith , and lives at No. 120, Pall Mall, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . On the 10th of January, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, Connor and Smith came into our shop - Maloney was standing outside the window - Connor asked to see some seals; I showed her five - Smith was by her side, and said they were too dear; they were about 18 s. or a guinea each - Connor then asked me to let her go backwards; she went into the back parlour - I went with her, and left Smith in the shop; my mother was standing by the parlour-door - I asked her to look to the shop, when I going into the parlour - Maloney came into the shop, and said to Smith and Connor,

"What a time you are, are you not coming?" Connor staid backward, about three minutes - they then said the seals were too dear, and they would go outside and point to some which might suit them - Maloney pointed to a seal in the window; they then went to the further end of the window, and then ran away - I am quite certain they ran off, they did not walk - I had some rings in a glass case on the counter, five minutes before; as soon as the prisoners ran away, my mother came into the shop, and said

"I think those girls are thieves" - I then saw the door of the glass-case open - I had not opened it, while they were there, and no person could have opened it, but the prisoners - I missed a case from it, containing twelve rings, which cost my father upwards of 20 l. - I ran round the corner, and saw the girls all running together - I ran after them; a gentleman was passing, whom I requested to assist me; we went into Warwick-street, and they were walking very slowly - I said,

"If we walk slowly, we shall take them" - we came up to them, and I said

"You have stolen a case of rings" - Connor said

"I have not" - I saw her endeavouring to secrete something under her stocking; she had seven rings in her hand - they had thrown the case into the road, at the corner of Warwick-street - when I got home, we found two rings in the shop, which were dropped - Connor was searched at Bow-street, and one was found down her clothes; two of them are entirely lost - I am sure the ten which are found, were taken from the glass case - Maloney escaped, but she was taken the next day - I am sure she was one of the three - I described her to five or six officers.

DAVID JONES . I am an officer in the Navy. I was walking down Pall Pall, between twelve and one, o'clock, on Monday last, and saw Miss Vining coming out of her door; she begged me to run after three girls, who had robbed the shop; she pointed them out; I am sure two of them are the prisoners - I pursued them; they got into Warwick-street - I lost sight of them, as they turned the corner - I laid hold of Connor - they seemed to be consulting together, and were walking slowly - I took hold of her left hand, she was putting something behind with her right - Smith got away, and was stopped at Mr. Gilbert's, at the corner of Warwick-street - Maloney got away - I cannot identify her - I did not go back to the shop - I took the rings from Connor, and gave them to the officer.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am beadle of St. Martin's - I did not see the prisoners till they were brought back to Mr.

Vining's shop - I have got the seven rings, which were sealed up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL LACK . I am a constable. I got a woman to search Connor at the watch-house; she did not at first find anything upon her, but I saw her wink her eye, and said the woman should search her again, or I would myself; on the second search this ring fell from her bosom.

WILLIAM RYLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended Maloney about a quarter past five o'clock, standing against a public-house window, in Church-street, St. Giles's; she denied it, and said she knew nothing about the rings.

CONNOR'S Defence. I went into the shop to look at some things; another person came to the shop door - (it was not Maloney nor Smith;) she put something in my hand - I did not know what it was - I had not seen Maloney all that day.

SMITH'S Defence. Maloney was not in the shop while we were - it was another young woman.

MALONEY'S Defence. I was not in the shop, and did not see these girls all that day, nor had I seen them since Sunday morning.

One witness gave the prisoners Connor and Maloney, a good character.

CONNOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

MALONEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18250113-160

341. JAMES DEWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Brown , spinster , on the King's highway, on the 31st of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a reticule, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; two veils, value 30 s.; a pair of ear-rings, value 4 s.; a thimble, value 2 s.; a purse, value 6 d.; two half crowns, and a crown piece , her property.

MARY ANN BROWN. I am single and live with my mother, who keeps a fruiterer's shop, at No. 1, Merlin's-place, Spa-fields. On the 31st of December I went home with some tambour work to Hoxton-square, about half-past five o'clock - it was then dark; I was returning home, and got to Tabernacle-square; I was going to Tabernacle-square, to call on my brother; I turned down Short-street and two persons came up to me, one of them snatched my bag out of my hand; I did not see him come to me, nor see his intention - the string of the bag was twisted round my finger once or twice; he gave my hand a wrench, and got it away; he pulled about twice before he got it - I screamed out Stop thief! there was a shop on each side of the street, lighted up with gas, which gave a very strong light - I did not see the face of the person who took the bag - the prisoner came up to me immediately I cried Stop thief, and knocked me down. I am certain he is the person, I saw his face plainly - he and his companion then got away - a gentleman came to my assistance and advised me to go to Worship-street - the prisoner was not taken till about a week afterwards, when an officer called at my mother's - I went to the office on Saturday, the 8th of January and saw the prisoner standing, with four other persons - I pointed him out immediately - no one had pointed him out to me - the Magistrate remanded him till the Tuesday following - no one appeared on his behalf at that time - I saw him again on the Tuesday, and was quite certain he was the person - my bag had two white veils in it, worth 90 s. a white pocket handkerchief, and a purse, containing a pair of ear-rings, two half-crowns, and one crown - the property was all mine but the two veils.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I live at No. 4, Short-street, with my father, who is a packing-case maker - I was at home, about a quarter before six o'clock, on the 31st of December - it was dark - I heard the cry of murder - I ran out directly and saw two men running down Wood-street, calling out Stop thief! I followed after them and turned into North-street - I saw that the prisoner was one of them - he seems the same height - I did not see his face - he had a fustian coatee on, and a pair of corderoy or fustian trowsers - I followed him nearly to the top of North-street - he made a turn to the left, and we all lost sight of him; I saw the prosecutrix afterwards - her dress and her bonnet were muddy. I saw the prisoner next day week at the office - there were two persons brought out to me - the prisoner was one - he was dressed exactly as I saw him on the night of the robbery.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a coach and furniture carver and live at the corner of St. Agnes'-circus and Short-street - I heard the cry of murder from a female voice, while I was reading by the fire-side - I went out and saw the prosecutrix in the mud - she gave me a description of the man who knocked her down - I do not know the person of the prisoner, nor did I see either of the parties who were concerned in the robbery - I took the prosecutrix to Worship-street, to give information.

FRANCIS BAKER . I am the son of the last witness - I heard the cry of Stop thief and murder - I ran out and saw the prosecutrix at the corner of Short-street, up to her knees in mud - I heard her give a description of the person who had knocked her down - it applied to the person of the prisoner - I thought from the description she gave, that I had seen two such persons about our house. I went with my father to Worship-street.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I received information of the robbery on Friday, the 31st of December, a little after six o'clock. The prosecutrix appeared to have been knocked down, and was very muddy. The prisoner was brought down on another charge on Friday. the 7th of January - the prosecutrix attended next day and saw him - the description she had given of him exactly corresponded with his person - he had a fustian coatee on - I brought out four prisoners who were locked up, and she immediately pointed him out as the person who struck her - no person had pointed him out to her - it was entirely the result of her own observavation. Wright saw him, and by his dress recognised him.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am headborough of St. Luke's - I apprehended the prisoner on another charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work at the time of the robbery, and am innocent of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18250113-161

342. JAMES LEEDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , at St. Clement Danes, four pieces of stuff, containing in length eighty yards, value 4 l., the goods of Owen Morris , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MATHEWS . I am in the service of Mr. Owen Morris, who is a silk mercer , and lives at No. 6, Picket-street

Temple-bar - his shop and dwelling-house are the same. On the 13th of January, about half-past one o'clock - I saw a boy, whom I believe to be the prisoner, going out of the shop; I had seen these stuffs on the counter shortly before; I looked at the counter, and missed them. I went out, and saw the prisoner with them - he dropped them, and I followed him. They are worth 4 l. - they cost as much as that, or more. He had got out of my sight before he was stopped, but from his size and appearance I believe him to be the same - he was brought back in two or three minutes.

RICHARD RUSSELL . I live at No. 82. New Bond-street. I was going along the Strand, towards Charing-cross, and saw the prisoner running from this shop, with these goods under his arm - he was called after, and dropped them; he ran into a house, and was brought out from there. I have not the least doubt he is the person who dropped the goods - he did not say anything.

WILLIAM NESBET . I am street-keeper of St. Clement's. I brought the prisoner out of the house, but I had not seen him before he got in there - he was charged with stealing these goods, which were claimed by Mr. Mathews. He said he was in distress - he appeared so to be. I searched him, and he had not a halfpenny about him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, and I did it through distress.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a very good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, by the Jury, on account of his distress, and his former good character .

Reference Number: t18250113-162

343. CATHERINE SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , three gowns, value 50 s.; two shawls, value 15 s.; a scarf, value 6 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 5 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; a shift, value 2 s., and a pocket, value 6 d., the goods of Catherine Malcolm , widow , in the dwelling-house of Jane Russell .

CATHERINE MALCOLM. I am widow, and lived with Mrs. Russell, who is my mother-in-law, in St. Catherine-square - I have slept there since I came from Scotland - it is a public-house. My clothes were in a trunk in the club-room. I had some of these clothes on on the Sunday, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening - I had one of the gowns on that day. On the Monday the prisoner was there, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and staid till a quarter past ten, with a party of about thirty persons - I missed them while the company were there, having received information from a little girl, who saw the prisoner and another come down the stairs, very bulky. I went, and found the lock taken off my box - the prisoner was then gone. She was taken up in a few days. I am certain she was there.

HENRY WADE . I am servant to Mr. Williams, pawnbroker, Cable-street, St. George's. I have a shawl, which was pawned by the prisoner, on the 21st of December, for 2 s. I know her very well.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I took the prisoner on the Friday after the robbery, at the Royalty Theatre - I told her the charge: she denied having pawned the shawl, but she afterwards acknowledged it.

Prisoner's Defence. I attended a raffle at this house, and after most of the company had left I went out with the remainder, and about two yards from the door my foot touched something, which on my picking up proved to be a shawl - I enquired whether it belonged to any of the parties present - they did not claim it, but advised me to keep it. I am aware I was reprehensible in so doing.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-163

344. JOHN PRITCHARD and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , an adze, value 1 s. 6 d.; nine planes, value 15 s.; seven chisels, value 4 s.; two gouges, value 18 d.; two bevils, value 4 s.; a spoke shave, value 18 d.; a saw, value 1 s.; two screwdrivers, value 1 s.; a hammer, value 1 s., and a gauge, value 6 d. , the goods of Hugh Bewsey .

HUGH BEWSEY. I am a carpenter . On Sunday, the 5th of December, my tools were in a building, in Mary-street, Hampstead-road . I saw them safe that morning, at en o'clock - I fastened the door, and left all the things stated in the indictment safe; there was a bolt on the inside of the door. When I came on Monday morning, about seven o'clock, the door was closed as I had left it, but the articles were gone. The two prisoners had been there on Saturday, to purchase shavings. I saw my tools on the Saturday following at Hatton-garden.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. I saw the two prisoners about a quarter past five o'clock on Sunday night, in Tottenham Court-road, crossing into Russell-street; Pritchard had a basket - I went, and asked what he had there; he hesitated for a time, and at last said,

"I have got tools - I am a carpenter." I said I thought Sunday night was an odd time to go to a job. Pritchard pulled out a rule from his pocket, and said,

"Now will you believe me?" I secured them. Smith said he had been taking a walk round Camden-town, and met accidentally with Pritchard.

GEORGE JENNINGS . I am a Bow-street constable. I was with Read, and saw the tools taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PRITCHARD'S Defence. I went out for a walk, and met this young man - we took a walk round the Park, and as we were coming home, we saw a young man with these tools on his shoulder, and I took and carried them down Tottenham Court-road, and the person said he would go on first - he turned down Russell-street, and then the officer took us. I told them, but they never looked after the man.

PRITCHARD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-164

345. ELIZABETH NEILD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a coat, value 2 l.; two waistcoats, value 1 l.; two pairs of breeches, value 2 l.; a pair of boots, value 10 s.; and a hat, value 10 s.; the goods of Edward Witt , in the dwelling-house of Eliza Clarke .

HARRIET WITT . I live in the house of Mrs. Clarke, in Great Marlow-street, Mary-le-bone. The prisoner was employed as a nurse. Mr. Edward Witt hired the house,

and I had the care of his property, his wearing apparel was in a chest of drawers in the front parlour - the prisoner attended me for a fortnight; and on Monday, the 10th of January, I was much worse. On Tuesday, she came about eight o'clock, but she did not usually come till about ten. I went to sleep, and did not awake till half-past ten - I then found the chairs in a litter, and the drawers loose - the property stated in the indictment was safe the night before. She did not come again after I saw the house in confusion. I had paid her what was due to her on the night before. She was taken up on the Thursday following.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. You have answered upon your oath that your name is Witt - is that your name? A. It is the name I have gone by - I have lived with Mr. Witt as his wife, he is a groom. I did not swear before the Magistrate that I was his wife. I have sent the prisoner to the pawnbroker's several times with clothes of Mr. Witt's - I sent her the night before, with a great coat to pawn, because Mr. Witt was out - I might have sent her three or four times to the pawnbroker's, and I expected her the next morning - she did not give me the duplicate of the articles, but left it on the drawers - I saw it, and went to the pawnbroker's. Upon my oath I did not send her to pawn these articles.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat, two pairs of breeches, and two waistcoats, pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of January, for 4 l. She had pawned articles of Mr. Witt's before - the greater part of them were redeemed the night before from my shop, and nearly 4 l. paid for them. They were pawned in name of Mr. Witt.

JAMES GIBBS . I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 12th of January. Mr. Witt brought the ticket to the office, and I went and traced the prisoner to an empty room - she had absconded from her former lodgings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of taking letters to persons for the witness, and taking money to several of her men near St. Giles's church, and she gave me the things to pawn, which I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-165

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

346. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 98 lbs. of leads, value 15 s. , the goods of William Wright .

2 d COUNT stating it to be the property of Edward Lord Suffield .

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a plumber , and live in Adam-street, Manchester-square. I am in the employ of Charles and Robert Gerard. I was at Lord Suffield's on the 31st of December, repairing the offices - there was a quantity of lead found in the prisoner's room, under his bed and about his room; it was old lead, which had been taken from Lord Suffield's offices - he was clerk of the works, and had charge of the lead and all the works; the lead was found under the bed, behind the bed, and in his boxes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you the man who has obtained the prisoner's situation since he went away? A. No. The lead was not all in one place; it was not under my care.

WILLIAM FUDGE . I am a Bow-street patrole. I was going along Bond-street where I saw the prisoner and his wife - the prisoner had a parcel on his shoulder, and his wife a bundle under her arm - I stopped him, and asked what it was? he said lead, and that it was his own; that he brought it from Park-place, and he was foreman of the works. When he got to the watch-house, he said he brought it from Lord Suffield's - he said to his wife

"My dear, I told you honesty was the best policy."

JOHN WEBSTER . I went and made enquiries, and found that Lord Suffield's name was Edward. I saw his name in the Directory.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-166

347. HENRY DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a piece of oak timber, value 5 s. ; the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a carpenter and live in Middleton-street, Clerkenwell . About five o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of December, I saw the prisoner eight or ten yards from my house, with this piece of timber on his shoulder - I called to him - he threw it down and ran away - I lost sight of him, but he was brought back in about two minutes. I am positive he is the man.

JOHN KEMPSTER . I saw the oak timber safe at two o'clock that day. I am in the employ of Mr. Smith, and know it to be his property.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the street - I thought it had fallen from some cart.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-167

348. MARIA GANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Bannister .

EDWARD HERRING . I am in the employ of Mr. Samuel Bannister. I saw two women going out of the shop on the 13th of January - I followed them, and missed some handkerchiefs - they had come in at the front door and taken them off some rolls of flannel - the prisoner was one of the women - she passed the other who stood behind - I caught her - she struggled and took the handkerchiefs from under her shawl, which I took from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ADDINGTON . I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. He said he believed had he lost four, and then he said five.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-168

349. ELIZA HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 3 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. 6 d. and 4 lbs. of pork, value 2 s. , the goods of John Stokes .

JOHN STOKES. I am a butcher , and live in Aylesbury-street . My apprentice brought the prisoner to my shop on the 8th of January, with a loin of pork and some beefsteaks, on Saturday week, about nine or ten o'clock in the evening.

JOHN AYRES . I am apprentice to Mr. Stokes. I saw

the prisoner come by the window, which was open, and take the steaks - I took hold of her and she threw them down. I brought her back, and we found a loin of pork on her.

JOHN DAVIS . I took her into custody. I searched her house, and found her two children in bed, covered with a horse-rug, and her husband without a shirt - they appeared to be in the greatest distress.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-169

350. CHARLOTTE LION was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a pelisse, value 8 s. , the goods of John Burgess .

JOHN BURGESS. I live in Old-street-road, and am a pawnbroker . The witness Elderfield lives opposite to me - on the 8th of December, she gave me information; I went out and saw the prisoner running - my man followed and brought her back - I found a pelisse on her which had hung at the door.

MARY ELDERFIELD . I live opposite to Mr. Burgess. I saw the prisoner take down the pelisse and run away with it. I gave the alarm and she was stopped. It had hung just within side the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress, and two witnesses gave her a very good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-170

351. SARAH MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a gown, value 2 s., and an umbrella, value 1 s. , the goods of Catherine Brown .

CATHERINE BROWN. I am a widow , and live in York-court, Mary-le-bone . On the 10th of November the prisoner came and took a lodging at my house - she occupied the back room first floor, and staid five weeks; she left without giving me notice. I got a man to get into her room - I missed a gown and an umbrella; the gown I had lent her for half an hour, but not the umbrella.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Paddington. I produce this gown, which was pawned at my shop.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Lisson-green. The umbrella was pawned at our shop, in the name of Ann Thompson, for 1 s. I do not know who by.

Prisoner's Defence. I know what I have done is wrong. but the things were lent to me, and I intended to replace them.

HENRY BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates on her.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Of stealing the umbrella only .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-171

352. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , a coat, value 30 s., the goods of John Grant , and a shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of John Campion .

JOHN GRANT. I live at Laytonstone. On Saturday, the 18th of December, I put my horse and chaise up at the Nag's Head, Whitechapel - I left my great coat in the chaise about ten o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS LEWIS . On Saturday, the 18th of December, about a quarter before five o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner as I was coming into the gateway, with a great coat, and he dropped something; I told him he had dropped something - he said,

"Thank you Sir," and picked it up - he was going out - I called him back, and the ostler told me he had stolen the coat, the shawl, and a pair of shoes. I took him and the goods to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT COOMBS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and found this shawl in his hat, and a pair of shoes. I asked how he came by the coat - he said he should give me no answer - he should tell the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, and I throw myself on your mercy.

Four persons gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-172

353. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a tea-tray, value 5 s. , the goods of Edwin Alderman .

EDWIN ALDERMAN. I live in Barbican . This tea-board hung outside of my window, eight feet from the ground, on Saturday, the 8th of January - I was informed of its being removed - it was dark, but I do not know the time.

JOHN BEE . I am a headborough. About half-past nine o'clock, on Saturday the 8th of January, I saw the prisoner with another person - he turned up a gateway - I collared him, and asked what he had got there; he said he did not know - I said, I must know, and took him to the watch-house; he had this tray, and said there, that a man employed him to take it to the Minories.

JOHN OSBORN . I am shopman to Mr. Alderman. I hung out the tea-board about eight o'clock in the morning, and saw it at seven in the evening. I was out when it was stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. It was impossible for me to reach a tea-board at that height.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-173

354. HENRY BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , two coats, value 3 s. , the goods of Jonathan Robinson .

JONATHAN ROBINSON. I lost two coats, on the 22d of November, from my master's stable, in New-street, Bath-street . I had put them in the riding-stable, and left them there, at eight o'clock in the evening; the horse-keeper locked the door - we came away together - I went in the morning, about six o'clock, and the coats were gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN FELL . I am a headborough. I was sent for last Wednesday morning to take the prisoner - when I got him to the watch-house, he told me the coats were at an old clothes-shop, in Chick-lane; he went with me, and we found them there - he had sold them for old rags, but the man stopped him, and did not pay him for them.

STEPHEN RICHARDS . I am a stick-maker. About

eight or nine weeks ago, the prisoner came to my house, as Great Saffron-hill, and laid these coats on the floor of my shop I said,

"Who sent you to sell them?" he said

"A man in New-street" - I said

"Where?" he said

"In Old-street" - I suspected they were taken from some coach-box; he ran down the steps, and got away.

Prisoner's Defence. The door was open in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-174

355. PATRICK CAROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; a hat, value 20 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of William Wilkins .

WILLIAM WILKINS. I am a tailor , and live at Fulham . On the 13th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard a person in the front of the shop, while I was at the back of the house - I supposed it might be some one stepping very softly - I went to the door, but saw no one in the street; it struck me that some one had concealed himself close by; I looked at my next neighbour's, which is a linen-draper's; and at the next house, the prisoner was standing up without his hat - I spoke to him, but he would not answer - I asked where he came from; he said from Chelsea - I collared him, and said

"You are the person who has been robbing my shop;" he had got the trowsers and the hat in front of his knees, as he stood before the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TEASDALE . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-175

356. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a quilt, value 2 s., and a bed-tick, value 3 s. , the goods of John Jackson .

SARAH SMITH . I live in Church-street, St. Giles . I heard the cry of Stop thief! on the stair-case, on the 8th of January, while I was sitting in my own-room - I went out, and met the prisoner coming up the stairs with this bed-quilt; he had slept there one night before, and laid in bed all day; he threw the quilt into the room, and ran down stairs again; it belonged to John Jackson - I had made it for him - I missed the bed-tick; the feathers were lying about the room - I gave an alarm, and he said, if they would let him go, he would give them the tick.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, about five o'clock - I found the tick in the room, where he was, and the quilt was brought down to me - I had taken him to Marlborough-street; he denied the charge.

SARAH SMITH re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner say in your hearing, that he would give the bed-tick up? A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing the bed-tick only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-176

357. JOHN HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a hat, value 9 s. , the goods of Martha Gardener .

THOMAS DANIEL GARDENER . I am the son of Martha Gardener; she is a hatter . On the 10th of January, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the hat from a rail, at our door, and put it on his head, he ran off - I pursued him, and when I got within two or three paces of him, he threw it into the gutter - I sent for a constable, and secured him.

JOHN BEE . I am a constable, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18250113-177

358. JOHN IVES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , forty-eight squares of glass, value 28 s. , the goods of John Brander .

JAMES BROWN . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 6th of January I was with Waddington at the corner of Wilderness-row, and saw the prisoner going up there. We went up to him and said

"What have you got there?" He said glass, which he was going to take to Mr. Abel's, in Baldwin's-gardens, to repair some lamps for Mr. Wood, the contractor of St. Luke's. I left him with Waddington, and went to Mr. Abel's.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was with Brown, what he has said is correct.

CHARLES FISHER . I am foreman to Mr. John Brander - the prisoner was his lamp-lighter. When a lamp was broken it was his duty to bring it in, and have fresh glasses put in their places. On Thursday, the 6th of January, he brought in four lamps only, all the glass had been cut out of them by some instrument. I have seen the glass which the officer has, and it seems to correspond with the sides of the lamps. I cautioned the prisoner and the other men, and told them the glass must not be cut out, and I would inform my employer. Last Monday week I gave the prisoner six broken lamps to replace, he brought me but four, and said the other two were stolen.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to these lamps? A. Yes; I put them in a separate place, to shew them to my employer.

THOMAS WOOD . I never sent the prisoner to any such person as Mr. Abel, in Baldwin's-gardens - nor do I know the man. I have not sent him with any lamps for five or six weeks past.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the glass of a man who came to me while I was lighting the lamps, and was going to sell it again. I was timid when the officer came, and do not know what I said to him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-178

359. THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , nine live tame fowls, price 20 s. , the property of Francis Brewin .

FRANCIS BREWIN. I live at the Rectory-house, Parson's Green, Fulham . On returning home, about half-past one o'clock on the morning of the 13th of January, I was told by my brother that some fowls were missing. I went to look, and found nine were gone. I cannot say when I had seen them all together. Suspecting persons were in the lane, I took a different route. Hearing some voices, I returned, and placed two patrols at the end of the lane. The prisoner and another were together. I secured the

prisoner myself, with two of the fowls hanging on his shoulder - they were quite warm. I gave him to the patrol, but he got away from him.

THOMAS HOUNSEL . I am a patrol. Last Thursday morning, at half-past one o'clock, I met Brewin - he told me if I should see any persons to stop them. He returned and told me some persons were in the lane, and to stand at the corner and he would go down and meet them. He went down and met the prisoner, and secured him. I tried to stop the other, but could not.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. The prisoner escaped from the patrols, and I took him next day.

BENJAMIN STAPLES . I am a patrol. I have known the prisoner some time. Here is one of the fowls.

(Fowl produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence, I was going to my brother's. I saw these fowls in the lane - I picked them up, and at the top of the lane the gentleman and two patrols came and collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-179

360. WILLIAM MACRAE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a saddle, value 10 s.; a bridle value 6 s.; a collar, value 6 s.; a pair of hames, value 4 s.; a pair of traces, value 2 s.; and a pair of reins value 2 s. ; the goods of David Rice .

DAVID RICE. I am a pawnbroker , and live in the Commercial-road; I brought these things with my horse and gig from Lambeth to my mother's door, and left them in the care of a man who keeps a stable opposite; it was then between five and six o'clock in the evening; I came out in about three quarters of an hour, and they were gone; the horse and cart were found the same evening, but not the harness - I saw it at the Thames Police Office,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LACEY . I was minding this horse and chaise at Mrs. Rice's door; I went to get some tobacco, and left it for about ten minutes, when I came back it was gone; about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the chaise by the side of the road; I fetched Mr. Rice to see if it was his.

Prisoner. Q. Did you tell Mr. Rice you had been for some tobacco? A. Yes, I did.

JAMES FOGG . I saw the prisoner on the night in question, in Whitechapel, with the harness on his shoulder; I followed him to Wellclose-square, he turned and asked me the way to Whitechapel. I asked where he got the harness, he said it came from Twickenham in an errand cart to the Three Tuns or Three Nuns public-house, and he was going to get it repaired; I took him to Whitechapel to enquire, and as we was going along, he said it was of no use for he bought it at Moulsey, at the fight; I then took him to the office, and he said the man would wonder what was become of the horse; I said

"Why did you not take the horse:" he said he never took the prad because that would touch his life.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at the Three Nuns in Whitechapel, and had been drinking, and as I came down the gateway, I met a man with the harness on his shoulder; it hit met and I said

"Friend, keep the harness to yourself," he said

"You may have it if you will give me a price;" I said I would give him 2 l. for it; we went on together, and finally it was agreed that I should give him 3 l.; I had but 2 l. 14 s. about me, but I told him if he would give me credit for 6 s. I would have it; I gave him my address, and was to see him the next morning.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-180

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

361. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of John Junix , and Robert Impert , in the night of the 24th of November , and stealing therein a smith's-vice, value 10 s., the goods of James Rose , and another vice, value 10 s. , the goods of Dorothy Hart .

The Prosecutors not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18250113-181

362. HENRY PITHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , at Finchley, one sheep, price 20 s. , the property of William Parbery .

2d COUNT, for wilfully and feloniously killing a sheep, price 20 s., the property of William Parbery, with intent to steal the carcase, against the statute.

JOHN DEVKIN . I superintend the watch of Kentish-town. On Tuesday, the 14th of December, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was standing at the watch-house gate, at Kentish-town, and saw the prisoner carrying a sack across his shoulder - I crossed over to him, and asked what he had in that sack; he said he had got meat - I asked where he brought it from; he said from his father, who lived at Hendon - I asked if his father kept sheep; he said Yes; he said he was taking it to Tower-street, Seven-dials - I asked where the skin was; he said at his father's - I asked why it had been killed; he said it had been had for two or three days - I let him go, went back, locked up the gates, and then met Davis, who followed him with me to Camden-town, in a chaise-cart, overtook him with the sack, and stopped him - took him into the Britania public-house, and had the meat laid on the table; it was a sheep cut up, and quite warm; it was cut into joints, in a mangled state, not cut as a butcher would cut it - I asked Davis (who is a butcher) in the prisoner's presence, if he thought that sheep was killed in good health, or not; he said he thought it was; it was fat; there was two legs, a saddle, and other joints, cut in a mangled way - I found a knife on him, with blood on it, and it has fat on it now - when I first stopped him, I asked if there was any mark on the skin; he said

"Yes; a P.;" we got a chaise-cart, and took him to Hendon, to the Swan public-house - I enquired after his father, and found he had left there, about two months, but still there was a person in care of the house; a sheep-skin was produced, about half an hour after - part of the breast was left, on the skin, on the side, and tallied with the rest - the head was also left in the skin, and corresponded - I saw the meat fitted to the skin.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose you do not understand much about sheep's flesh? A. No;

there were the two fore and two hind legs found in the sack - the breast was to the skin; there were three parts of the carcase in the sack, part of the breast; the head and neck were left in the skin; they made the whole carcase complete.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN DALTON . I am watch-house keeper of Camden-town. Deykin brought the prisoner to me, about seven or eight o'clock, with the sack, containing meat - I produce the bones of the meat found in the sack, and what was found with the skin - I went to Hendon with the prisoner, to Oldershill, where he said his father lived; he said the sheep belonged to his father - we found his father had left there about two months - on looking about the father's cottage, I found some wool - the prisoner said he had been to his father's that night; we got information, and found the skin laying in a grass-field, near the house, open and wet, and the neck and head left in it - I fitted the meat in the sack, with the skin - it fitted when it was warm - I have no doubt of it being the carcase, belonging to that skin.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see a skin fitted before? A. No; this was not a lamb; it was about three years old - I have not seen his father.

SAMUEL EVERS . I live at Hendon. I was coming from Finchley, and my dog found a sheep-skin in the water, in Mr. Eady's field, about half a mile from the prosecutor's farm, on the day the prisoner was taken - Shepherd, the postman, came by, and we pulled it out - the neck, part of the breast, and the head remained in it - it was marked P.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A bricklayer. I do not know much about sheep - my dog found it in the brook.

JAMES TOW . I am a constable of Hendon. I know the prisoner, he has been living in London lately - he has not lived at Hendon to my knowledge for some time. I found the sheep skin in Mr. Eady's field - Mr. Parbery rented the after-grass of that field; the head, part of the neck, and breast were attached to the skin - I saw the rest fitted to it; it tallied in my judgment - the lights, liver, heart, and entrails, were found in the skin.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was the skin from his father's cottage? A. About two fields - I found it close to the brook of the river Brent.

WILLIAM PARBERY . I live at Finchley, which joins Hendon. I rented Mr. Eady's after-grass. I had seven sheep, marked P. grazing in his field - there is a brook in it. I received information from the Magistrate on the evening the prisoner was taken, and then missed this sheep. I had seen it safe about ten o'clock the morning before. I examined the skin which was found, it had my mark on it - I took my marking instrument with me, and have no doubt whatever of the skin - part of the breast, the neck, and head were attached to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do the names of any other farmers in the parish begin with the letter P? A. I know one Pope, nobody else. I have seen the prisoner's father here.

COURT. Q. Do Pope's sheep graze with your's? A. No; quite in a different part of Finchley. I had brought this sheep up from a lamb.

ISAAC KEMPTON . I am a butcher. I saw the meat, it was mangled about strangely, not cut up, as a butcher would do it. I have no doubt of its being one and the same carcase.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18250113-182

363. BENJAMIN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, two rings, value 3 l., the goods of Ann Sansum , widow , in her dwelling-house .

JAMES ROBERT CASSELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. On the 20th of December, about one o'clock in the day, the prisoner brought a ring, and asked me to lend him 3 s. on it. I asked whose property it was; he said it was his own - that he bought it at Port Royal, in Jamaica - that his wife bought it, and he believed gave two dollars for it. I sent for an officer and gave him in charge. It is a brilliant diamond ring, worth from 50 s. to 60 s.

ANN SANSUM . I am a widow, and rent a house in Castle-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . This ring is mine, and was locked up in the drawer in my bedroom, at the top of the house. I also lost a garnet ring, worth 11 s., which I have not recovered. I always kept the key of the drawer myself. On the 17th, 18th, and 20th of December the prisoner was working at my house as a bricklayer's labourer, and went through that room to get on the roof - they left on the 20th; and on the 21st the ring was brought to me - I had not missed it. I found the drawer still locked - it must have been opened with a false key. I had worn the ring on Sunday, the 19th.

MARY SMITH . I live at Mrs. Sansum's. On the morning the men came to work I saw her open her drawer, and the rings were both safe - she locked it again. The prisoner went through the room several times.

JAMES MACKIE . I am a jeweller. I enlarged this ring for Mrs. Sansum in March, and know it.

JAMES BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Peters, a pawnbroker, of the City-road. On the 20th of December the prisoner came to our shop to pawn this ring. I asked how he came by it - he said he found it in Coleman-street. I would not take it in.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it - I never went to the drawer.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 51.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18250113-183

364. JAMES SIMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Walton , in the night of the 13th of December , and stealing therein three aprons, value 1 s.; two frocks, value 1 s.; three pincloths, value 9 d.; two pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; a tippet, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a night gown, value 6 d.; a shirt collar, value 6 d.; a pocket, value 2 d., and a shift, value 4 d. his property.

JOHN THOMAS . I am a watchman. On the 13th of December, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at Back-row, Shadwell with a bundle; he said it was his wife and children's clothes, and that he was going on board the Rambler, at Blackwall. I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did he appear in liquor? A. I think he was a little so.

ROBERT WALTON. I am a musician , and live in Shakespeare-walk, Shadwell . On the 13th of December I had dancing and music at my house - the prisoner was there. I left my house at half-past nine o'clock, returned about half-past eleven and missed these things from up stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you keep dancing ladies in your house? A. No; no women live there. I cannot say how many were there that night.

ELIZABETH WALTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. We had a merriment at our house - there were sea-faring men and ladies dancing - they come in at times. The prisoner was rather drunk. I lost property like this, but will not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking there - I picked up this bundle in the street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-184

365. ROBERT CUMMINS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Harris and John Cotton , about seven o'clock in the night of the 3d of January and stealing 18 lbs. of wax candles, value 3 l. , their property.

JOHN HARRIS. I am in partnership with John Cotton; we are tallow-chandlers , and live at Kensington , and occupy the house jointly. On the 3d of January these candles were in our window; a pane of glass had been cracked before, but was not broken. Ladbrook came in and alarmed me - I then found the glass broken, and 18 lbs. of wax candles gone; they were in three parcels, of 6 lbs. each. The glass must have been forced in. I found the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE KNIGHT . I am a stone-mason, and live in Exeter-place, Chelsea. On the 3d of January, between 6 and 7 o'clock in the evening, I was going by the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner and another against the window - it was quite dark; they were close to a pane of glass which was afterwards broken. Ladbrook was with me; we went to the Swan, public-house, which is about one hundred yards off, to call Snowsell, and as we came out, the prisoner and the other passed by, in a direction from Harris's - we had been gone about four minutes. Snowsell ran after them; the prisoner threw a bundle of candles over an area, and ran off; Snowsell called Stop thief! and I collared him by Exeter-street; the other escaped. Snowsell got the bundle from the area.

JOHN FRANCIS LADBROOK . I was with Knight, and saw the prisoner with another close to the window; the other stood at the next door - the prisoner was going to and fro, and looking in at the window - we fetched Snowsell; they then came by in a direction from the house; we pointed them out; they looked behind, saw us, and both set off. The prisoner threw his bundle into an area; it was wrapped in a handkerchief. The other had something in his apron.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am an officer. The witnesses fetched me, and pointed out the prisoner and another who passed - both ran off: the prisoner was taken about one hundred yards off, without my losing sight of him: he threw his bundle down the area of No. 8, Sloane-street: I got it from there.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lose sight of me? A. Not till after you had thrown it away. I knew you well before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-185

364. WILLIAM KILPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , fifty-three gold seals, value 10 l.; eighteen watch keys, value 7 l.; four rings, value 7 s.; three brooches, value 18 s.; three lockets, value 30 s.; a necklace, value 5 s., and twenty-three gold pins, value 22 s. the goods of Alexander Macbeth , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER MACBETH. I live in Ryder's-court, Leicesrer-square , and am a jeweller . The prisoner was nine months in my service as shopman .

Cross-examined. Q. Were not his wages due? A. Not till Christmas - he had about 20 l. a year - he had not applied for them.

ELIZA MACBETH . On the 18th of December, I was dusting in the shop, and moved the prisoner's desk; it came open accidentally; some silver thimbles and pencil-cases fell out. I told my husband the prisoner was out; he came home, and slept in the house, and left in the morning, and never returned; he was taken on the Tuesday.

JOHN FOUCH . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker; I have three seals, a key, and two rings, pawned by the prisoner on the 23d of November.

Cross-examined. Q. They seem to be quite new? A. Yes, we do not take such things in unless they give a proper account of them - he had brought things before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Several witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-186

367. GEORGE WREN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Mann , on the King's Highway, on the 24th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a handkerchief value 2 d.; three half-crowns, and two penny pieces , his property.

RICHARD MANN. I am a bricklayer , and live in Saunders-court, Great Peter-street, Westminster. On Christmas morning, about one o'clock, I was passing down Great Peter-street , returning home from a supper, which master had given us at the Marquis of Granby public-house; I was perfectly sober, and as I came by the Duke's Head public-house, with Barrett, there were a party of fifteen or twenty men round the Duke's Head, some of them were ringing hand-bells, and as we came up, one of the party struck me a blow over the hat and knocked it over my eyes, and as soon as I put it up, they knocked it off - I picked it up, and they knocked it off again; I then held it in my hand, and they all fell upon me, and beat me in a violent manner; some of the party took three half-crowns and two penny pieces out of my trowsers pocket; they pulled my pocket out; and took a handkerchief from my coat pocket; I endeavoured to get away, and the

prisoner followed me out of the mob, and struck me in the right eye, by the lamp-post, he had a woman's bonnet on, I looked under it and said,

"I shall know you again;" he said,

"Will you, you ***" and struck me again in the right eye, I got up Saunder's-court, till they got by, then went and told the watchman, and told him Barnett had run away - I had seen the prisoner among the mob, and he followed me out. I cannot say which of them took the property; it happened just under a gas-lamp, at the corner of Perkins'-rents; he was taken in five minutes, about fifty yards from the spot. I had a black eye for a fortnight, and my thigh was very much bruised, where they had kicked me. I cannot say whether I was ill-used before or after I was robbed.

JOHN BARRETT . I am a bricklayer's labourer, and had been supping with Mann. I live in Great Peter-street; we were going home together, and by the Duke's-head, there was a party, with bells; we attempted to pass them, on our way home. I was struck on the nose, and both my eyes were nearly closed - I got away as well as I could, and cannot say whether the prisoner was there.

JOHN DEMPSEY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor came to me; he appeared sober, and was bleeding at the nose and mouth; he said he had been knocked down by the bell-ringers, and had his pocket picked; he said the party were up the street. There were six bell-ringers: the prisoner was not one of them, but was standing by them, with a bottle in his hand - I found him with them, about sixty yards off - I held my lantern up to his face, and Mann immediately pointed him out - I said,

"You are given in charge for ill-using this young man;" he said he had done nothing to him. I took him to the watch-house.

ROBERT HAYS. I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found only 1 1/2 d. upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-187

368. JAMES AYLWARD was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of Frederick Lewellen , in the night of the 7th of December , and stealing three pairs of trowsers, value 2 l.; three waistcoats, value 1 l.; a coat, value 2 l.; three jackets, value 3 l.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l., and part of a coat, value 1 l., the goods of the said Frederick Lewellen and James Aylward ; six tea-spoons, value 1 l., and a pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of the said Frederick Lewellin, and a hat, value 10 s. , the goods of John Aylward.

FREDERICK LEWELLEN. I live in Newmarket-street, Wapping . I am married to the prisoner's sister-in-law. On the evening of the 7th of December, he was visiting at my house, and left about twelve o'clock at night - I was the last person up, and saw the house fastened up; about about one I heard the dog barking, as if it was being carressed; the prisoner was acquainted with the dog - when I got up at eight o'clock in the morning, and found an entry had been made in the cellar flap, which was found open; it was shut down the evening before, but he had been in the cellar, while he was in my house - I missed the articles stated in the indictment, from the shop-window - I went to the prisoner's lodgings that morning, and found part of the property, and the officer found a phosphorus-box in the prisoner's trunk, with part of the property; it was all safe when I went to bed; the whole is worth 15 l.; the prisoner's brother John, is my partner; the rent and taxes are paid out of the profits of the concern.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you sure this was not done in a joke? A. Yes.

JOHN FIELD . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found part of the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-188

369. ROBERT HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , a coat, value 30 s.; a waistcoat, value 7 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 12 s., the goods of William Brown , in the dwelling-house of Frances Sansun .

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a cooper , and lodge at Frances Sansum's, at Limehouse . The prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 18th of December, I went out about half-past eight o'clock in the morning - I was fetched home between one and two, and missed this property, which I had not seen for a week before - I never gave him leave to pawn any of them.

JOSEPH TEMPLES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lucas-street, Rotherhithe. I have a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, pawned I believe by the prisoner, on the 18th of December. for 2 l. 5 s.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge: the prosecutors gave me a letter, which the prisoner acknowledged to be his hand-writing - it enclosed the duplicate of this property.

This letter was here read; it simply expressed the prisoner's contrition, for having committed the offence, and promised to recompense the prosecutor for his loss.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Strongly recommended to Mercy.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-189

370. MOSES ADAMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Arbuthnot Harvey , and Timothy Waddington , at St. Giles, in the night of the 4th of December , and stealing two waistcoats, value 20 s. , their property.

GEORGE BASHAW . I am shopman to John Arbuthnot Harvey, and Timothy Waddington, who keep a sale-shop , in the parish of St. Giles . I sleep there as their servant; the rent and taxes are paid by the concern. On the 4th of December, about nine o'clock in the evening, I heard the window break, ran out, and saw the prisoner in custody, with one waistcoat in his hand, and the other under the window.

PHILIP RILEY . I am the street-keeper of St. Giles. I was turning out of the street, and saw the prisoner's hand go through the prosecutors window, and take a waistcoat out - he ran across the street, and I after him - I took him; he said he was very poor, and wished to be transported - I saw him break the glass.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was starving, and in a dying state, and had nothing to eat for several days.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing only. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-190

371. WILLIAM WARE , ELIZA WARE , and SAMUEL NEWSON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , two pewter pots, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Wright ; a pewter pot, value 1 s., the goods of Ann Hewitt , and a pewter pot, value 6 d. , the goods of James Crooks .

ROBERT WRIGHT. I keep a public-house in Dorset-street, Manchester-square . I lost two pots, which are here.

ROBERT MANDER. I was near Mr. Wright's in East-street, and saw the prisoners packing up pots. Eliza Ware took one off a rail; the two boys held the bag open for it; William Ware carried the bag - I ran to the Fortune of War public-house - Jennings and I ran after them - I caught William Ware, with the bag, containing three quart-pots, and a pint-pot.

CHARLES JENNINGS. I pursued Newson, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM WARE - GUILTY. Aged 10.

ELIZA WARE - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy .

Judgment Respited.

SAMUEL NEWSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18250113-191

London Cases - Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

372. ANN BUTLER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ANN HILL . I am the wife of John Hill , who is coachman to Mrs. Matam of Throgmorton-street. We live in London Wall. On the 3d of December the prisoner came to enquire for an apartment, I said I had only half a bed to let; she said that would do, she wanted a bed for her brother who lodged at the second public-house in London Wall, that her name was Smith - she went up, looked at the bed, and liked it very much, and said her brother had lived three years with a gentleman, who she would refer me to; she then said she was awkwardly situated, that her husband had promised to meet her, but had not, and she had a parcel at the coach-office, with 5 l. odd in it, but they had refused to give it her, because she had not the money to pay for it; that she never was at a pawn-shop in her life, having just come from the country, and if I would have the goodness to lend her 3 s. she would leave her wedding-ring with me, till three o'clock, when she would return for it. I told her to walk in, as my husband would be in shortly; I did not like to do such things and without his leave; she said

"No, don't tell your husband, on any account, for he knows my husband, and may tell him" - so I let her have the 3 s. I said

"I hope this ring is gold" - she said

"Certainly it is, look at the stamp inside; and pray take care of it, for it was my mother's" - I went for her brother's character, but they knew no such person; she said she lived at No. 6, Swan-alley, which I found to be false. I am certain she said it was a gold ring.

RICHARD JOHN BOYCE . I took the prisoner in charge, and have the ring; it is not worth 4 d. I have served thirteen years to the jewellery business.

Prisoner's Defence. I never left it for gold.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-192

373. JOHN WORLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM CARRINGTON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. On the 17th of November the prisoner came to my shop, and bought cheese, which he paid 18 s. 11 d. for - he was unknown to me till then. On the 19th he came again, and asked if I had got any old Cheshire cheese - I shewed him two; he selected one, which weighed 59 lbs. He then selected two new cheeses, weighing 51 lbs. I shewed him another, which weighed 10 lbs., which he also bought - he asked me to send them to the same place as I had the others, and he would return the money for them; they came to 4 l. 11 s. 6 d. I sent my man with them, and a bill, in about two hours, to No. 13, Fetter-lane, and told him to bring back the goods or the money; he was not to leave them without the money. The man returned with 11 s. in silver, and sixteen paper parcels, which I supposed to be 5 s. papers of copper, but they contained lead; eight having a penny piece at each end, and the other eight a halfpenny; I did not find it out till next day, and then went to Fetter-lane, but could hear nothing of him. I found him in Old Gravel-lane, Borough, a week afterwards.

EDWARD LIPPARD . I am the prosecutor's shopman. On the 19th of November I went to No. 13, Fetter-lane, with these cheeses, and was not to leave them without the money - it is a front room on the ground floor. I found the prisoner there, and took the goods in; I saw these parcels laying on the window, and said,

"I see you have got a load for me to take back, as well as to bring here" -

"Yes," said he

"4 l. worth of copper;" I expected that they were for me, seeing them lay there. I said my master did not like coppers - he said,

"You may have either silver or copper, which you please;" I said,

"I will thank you to let me have silver then." I waited some time, and he said all at once,

"You must take these coppers." I asked why he had not got his shelves and counters fixed: he said he could not get a carpenter. He gave these sixteen parcels into my hand, four at a time - he lifted them on my head. Nothing more passed. I took them home.

MR. CARRINGTON. I did not open the parcels, but paid eight of them away to Mr. Tully, of Leadenhall-market, next day; he sent them back that afternoon - I then opened the rest, and found they contained lead.

JAMES GREY . I am in Mr. Carrington's service, and went with Lippard - he said,

"You have got a load for me to take back;" the prisoner said,

"Yes, I have got 4 l. worth of copper:" he handed them into his hand, four at a time - Lippard put them into his flat; he had said he would rather take silver - the prisoner hesitated, and then said,

"Now, come, are you going to take these coppers." I swear that he said there was 4 l. worth of copper.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in Gravel-lane - the prosecutor was with me; he was in bed, and a quantity of cheese was in the room, which the prosecutor claimed, and under his bed was four paper parcels of the same description, with halfpence at the end.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-193

374. JOHN STRAUGHN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

SAMUEL BURGESS . I am a bookseller , and live in White Heart-court, Coleman-street. John Edmonds deals with me. I was publishing a book called

" Lazarillo de Tormas ," in numbers. I had seen the prisoner in Mr. Edmonds's service; on the 25th of September he came to my shop, and said,

"I have come from Mr. Edmonds for four dozen numbers of Lazarillo de Tormas;" I delivered to him fifty-two numbers, in consequence of that representation, and about the 15th of December I discovered this.

GEORGE EDMONDS . I am a newsman and bookseller, and live in Little Bell-alley, Coleman-street. The prisoner was in my service on the 25th of September, but I never sent him for these books, or any numbers of that work, and never had them. I turned him away on the 3d of November.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in Mr. Burgess's shop.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18250113-194

375. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HORWOOD . I am master of St. James's workhouse - the prisoner was a pauper there, and was employed with others in M'Adamizing the road in Portman-square. Mr. M'Adam was to pay me for the men's work; I never wrote any letter, or gave the prisoner authority to receive money for the men's work - he was only a workman as others. I never saw him after the 6th of November till the 8th of December, when he was apprehended.

MURRAY ANDERSON . I am in Mr. M'Adam's service, and superintended the works in Portman-square. The prisoner applied to me to know what quantity of work was done, that the account might be made out - I told him, and on the 6th of November he brought this order to Mr. M'Adam's office, and said he was come from Mr. Horwood, for the money - 2 l. 19 s. 6 d. was paid him in my presence.

HENRY RICHARDS . I am paymaster to Mr. M'Adam. I paid the prisoner 2 l. 19 s. 6 d.

(Order read.)

Sir, Please to settle with the bearer for the labour performed by the stone breakers of St. James's,

JAMES HORWOOD .

Prisoner's Defence. I applied to the master for the wages due by Act of Parliament - he said I was to get an order made out, which I presented, and received the money, which was spent among us all.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18250113-195

376. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18250113-196

377. JOSEPH WILLIAM TRUST was indicted for a libel .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18250113-197

NEW COURT.

(5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

378. JOHN STEERS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a grindstone spindle and handle, value 30 s. , the goods of John Hester .

JOHN HESTER. I am a victualler , and live at Hendon . This grindstone and spindle were safe on my premises at six o'clock on the night of the 27th of November, and were missing next morning. My yard is enclosed - I could see the place where they had been lifted over. The prisoner lives about a mile and a half from me - I saw him and two others there on the evening of the 27th, going up the road to the barracks.

JOHN BROWN . I am in the service of Mr. Hester. I saw this property safe on the evening of the 27th of November, and missed it next morning.

JOHN COOK . I am a constable. On the 22d of December I searched the prisoner's father's house, at Twickenham, and found a grindstone, but no spindle or handle. - It was concealed in a shed, under some hay and rubbish. I asked the prisoner how he came by it - he said he had had it two years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there any iron work about it? A. No. Mr. Hester said his grindstone had iron about it - it was in an open shed. The prisoner lives with his father and his brother, about two miles from Mr. Hester's.

JOHN STUDWICK . I am an officer, and was with Cook. I heard the prisoner say, that the grindstone was his, and he had had it a long time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My father had one about two years - I bought another one, but did not know which was stolen; I do not know which of them I told Mr. Cook I had had about two years - I thought it was the one we had had the longest.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18250113-198

379. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a shawl, value 5 s., the goods of Margaret Ryan , and three sheets, value 7 s. , the goods of Richard Skinner .

RICHARD SKINNER. I keep the Crown and Anchor, King-street, Westminster . About half-past nine o'clock in the evening of the 13th of January, I came home, and found the prisoner in the tap-room - I saw her passing the bar, and heard the girl call out,

"Stop the woman" - the girl ran after her; I followed them, and saw the girl about three doors off, taking something from the prisoner. She told me she hoped I would forgive her, as she had a husband in the hospital, and some young children.

MARGARET RYAN. I am servant to Mr. Skinner. I saw the prisoner go out of the house - she had come down the stairs, with a bundle - I said,

"Stop the woman;" I ran after her, and took it from her - there were three sheets and a shawl in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated - my husband had left me in a very improper state a fortnight before. I had gone out to see where he was, and got intoxicated. - I have two small children, quite unprotected.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-199

380. CHARLES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , at St. George, Hanover-square, two coats, value 2 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 4 s.; a hat, value 4 s.; and four handkerchiefs, value 9 s., the goods of Joseph Allison ; and a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; four shillings, and two sixpences, the property of William Bicknell , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Froud , widow .

JOSEPH ALLISON. I am a coach wheel-wright , and live at No. 4, Swan-passage, Grosvenor-square . The prisoner came there on the 11th of December, and took a lodging; he was alone - he slept in the same room with me; another young man, named William Bicknell, slept with the prisoner. I was awoke on Tuesday the 14th of December by Bicknell, who told me something about the prisoner. I looked at my box, and the lid was open. I had put my clothes in the box the night before, and shut it up. I looked into the box and missed two coats and a pair of blue trowsers, they were worth about 2 l. 10 s. I missed a waistcoat from the box, and lost my hat, a black silk handkerchief, and three other handkerchiefs. I gave notice at a public-house about it, and saw the prisoner again in Mary-le-bone watch-house on Sunday, the 2d of January.

WILLIAM BICKNELL . I slept in the same bed with the prisoner on Monday, the 13th of December. On Tuesday morning he got up early - when I awoke, he was going out at the door - it was dark, I could not see him - he spoke to me, and said his master was going to York, and he must go to the coach-office. He asked me how he should get out; I told him to draw back the bolt. I heard him go out, and shut the door. I went to sleep again, and awoke about seven o'clock. I then found my things tumbled about, and missed 4 s. 6 d. from my breeches pocket, and a pair of stockings. The prisoner had left his own stockings in the room.

ANN LYELL . I am the wife of William Lyell. I live opposite to where these persons lodged. On the morning of the 14th of December, as I was opening my shutters, I saw Wood coming out of their door, with a large bundle tied up in a handkerchief.

FREDERICK DORINGTON . I was requested by a witness in another cause, (Henry Birt,) to go and search the prisoner at the watch-house on the 3d of January, as he thought he had got his shirt on, but he had not. I asked him where he sold Allison and Bicknell's goods - he said first he sold them to a Jew in the street, and afterwards that he had sold them at a shop in St. Giles's.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know the person.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18250113-200

Before Mr. Recorder.

381. JOHN MORIARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a quart pot, value 18 d. , the goods of William Winder ; and HENRY WORMS and MORRIS WORMS were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM WINDER. I keep the Fox and Peacock, public-house, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 23d of December, between 4 and 5 o'clock, the prisoner Moriarty came to my house for a pint of porter, which I served him with; he took that away, and came again for another pint of beer, which I served him in a quart pot. I asked him for the other pint pot, which he did not bring back. I said

"Where is that pot, you have taken it away." He said he had not. He then came a third time, for half a pint of beer, and I said

"You have taken that quart away." He said he had not. I served him with half a pint in another quart pot, he took that into the tap-room - I do not know where he had taken the others. He drank that porter. A person said to me

"That man has taken the pot away." I have known him for these two years - he has frequented the house occasionally. I went to his house, in Fox-court, immediately, but the house was in darkness, and I did not go in. I came back for a candle to go to his house, but I thought I would go to Henry Worms's shop, which is a marine store shop, about sixty yards from my house, in Fox-court. I went towards the shop, and saw Moriarty standing there, shaking hands with Henry Worms, and heard Worms say to him,

"I will make it all right." They could not see me. I then went into the shop, and told Moriarty they had got my pot. They said they had not got it. I told Worms I would search the place - and he said I should not do it. Morris Worms was then behind his father, and he took up the pot and ran to another shop, where they melt the mettle. I attempted to run after him, and the father stopped me, and said I should not go. I pushed him aside, and followed the boy, and saw him throw the pot under the grate - I took it up, it had my name and sign on it. I took Henry Worms out of the shop, and gave charge of him and Morris. I then went to search for Moriarty, who had left the shop, and found him sitting in my tap-room. I went for a constable, and gave him in charge. I have not found the other quart pot, or the pint. I then took Mr. Mayo to the house where Worms was in charge, and we went down to his shop - we found a very large fire, three melting pans, and some pewter, which had been very lately melted, in the pans.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many pots were missing? A. Three, in less than two hours. I did not see any of them taken - I did not look in at Worms's window. I looked down a passage leading to his house. I could not see what was passing in the shop, but I saw Moriarty inside - the door was open - there was a light in the shop; I could not see who Moriarty was with, but when I went in I saw old Worms, he had his hat on, but he had not just come in, or I should have seen him - he told me he had just come in, and knew nothing about the matter. It is a private house, the shop lies back - there is a board up, with

"Dealer in Marine Stores" on it; there is a back-room, which I call the other shop, where they do their business. Worms did not buy his beer of me, nor did any person in his house. The pot was found in the first room. Henry Worms stood before me, and Morris behind him - I saw Morris take it into the back-room, and put it under the grate - I heard him take it up from the counter. I took Morris because he had the pot in his hand, and the father, because I saw him shake hands with Moriarty. The pot was very good, I gave 1 s. 6 d. for it: when I exchange my old pots for new, I am allowed a half in exchange - in the state it was then in it was worth more than 1 s.

JOHN GODWIN . I am a currier, and was in Mr. Winder's house on the 23d of December. I saw Moriarty there about half-past six o'clock - the gas was alight - he called

for a pint of beer - I cannot say whether he drank it or not. I saw him take a quart pot off the table and put it under his blue jacket; he then left the room: I told the pot-boy of it, and Mr. Winder went after him. In four or five minutes Moriarty returned again; he had left the room before - when he returned he was taken. I am certain of his person.

MATHIAS WELDEN . I am a constable of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the 23d of December, soon after six o'clock, Mr. Winder sent for me. I went into Fox-court, and saw a number of persons at Worms's door. Mr. Winder was there, and gave charge of Worms and his son, for receiving a pot, which he delivered into my hands. He said he had lost three within two hours, and if I went into Worms's premises he was convinced I should find the others. I went into the shop, down the open passage, and at the further end of the shop there was a strong fire, and three melting pans by the side of the fire; one, if not two of them, had pewter in them; which appeared to me to be recently melted, and felt very warm. I took the prisoners into an adjoining house till they were taken before a Magistrate. It is a marine store shop - no one can avoid seeing the name of Winder upon the pot, and the sign of the house. Here is the pot in the state in which I received it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the person who Mr. Winder desired to break some metal which you found there, and which was not pewter:? A. Unquestionably - it is what is called type metal, but I have no hesitation in swearing that the metal in the pans was pewter - it is my firm belief. I heard old Worms say that he knew nothing of the matter - he had but just come in, and if any one was to blame it was not him.

Prisoner WORMS, SEN. Q. Did not a woman in the house tell you I had but just come in? A. I have no recollection of that. I heard you tell the boy to say nothing but the truth, and that repeatedly.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was desired to take charge of Moriarty - I asked him where the pot was - he said he had sold it to a Jew, for 4 d., pointing towards Fox-court; I do not know any other Jew, but the prisoners, keeping a shop there. I found 2 1/2 d. on his person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY WORMS'S Defence. I was at the White Hart tavern, in Tower-street, at four o'clock - I had a ticket to go to the play that night, in Wych-street, Strand. I have some persons here with whom I had been in company till half-past five o'clock; I went home, and found Moriarty drunk, in the shop, and making a great noise - I said,

"Go away, I want to go out, and if there is any thing wrong come in the morning, and I will set it right" - he said he would not go; I said,

"I will shake hands with you." The boy has always been cautioned by me not to buy goods when I am out.

MORRIS WORMS'S Defence. I was in doors, sitting by the five - a man came in, and threw the pot under the fire; I said I would not buy it, and he swore, and said,

"I will leave it" - I said,

"You must not leave it:" he swore again and said he would hit me on my head; he was going out of the shop and met my father, who had just that moment come in.

LEWIS WORMS . I am the prisoner's son. I went to my father's house, on the day in question, about ten minutes before six o'clock; my father was not at home. I went to Baldwin's-gardens, and was detained there about five minutes - when I got home to my house, in Cloth-fair, my sister told me what had happened - there was some type-metal in my father's house, but it was not pewter - there was no melted pewter, and when I was there, there was a fire; it is the room in which my father eats, drinks and sleeps. I had called to borrow some money - there were two melting pans, and one ladle there - I did not examine the metal, but I sat so close, I could see that it was not pewter - I believe there was an ingot there - Winder was not there. I had a watch in my pocket, and I looked at it a few minutes afterwards, because I was under the necessity of parting with it, in Baldwin's-gardens; it was then about six o'clock - it is a good watch, and keeps time very correctly - I did not see the constable at my father's house, I cannot swear that there was no pewter there when he was there.

WILLIAM HENRY RAWLINGS . I know Mr. Worms, Sen. I was in his company, on Thursday the 23d of December, from about half-past four o'clock, to a quarter past five, or thereabouts. I parted with him, at the White Hart, in Tower-street - it would take a man pretty near half an hour to get from Tower-street, to where he lives - a Mr. Rochester pulled out his watch, and said it was half-past five - Worms had then part of a glass of gin and water, standing before him, and Rochester would not let him go, till he had drank it.

JOSEPH STOREY . I was at the public-house, in Tower-street, and saw Worms there, drinking some gin and water - I heard nothing said about time; but I left the house at five o'clock.

Three witnesses deposed to the good character of Worms, and three to that Moriarty.

HENRY WORMS - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MORRIS WORMS - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

JOHN MORIARTY - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18250113-201

382. HENRY DURHAM and JAMES LINTOTT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Fraser , about one o'clock in the night of the 28th of November , at St. Clement Danes, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a silver spoon, value 1 l. his property; and a shawl, value 1 l. , the goods of Mary Ann Easton .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN EASTON. I am servant to Mr. William Fraser, who lives at No. 37, Norfolk-street, Strand . On Sunday, the 28th of November, I went to bed with a fellow-servant of the name of Rebecca Thomas , in the front parlour, I had secured the house before I went to bed in the usual manner; I went into the room first, but she followed me in two or three minutes, it was then about ten minutes after eleven o'clock - we both went to sleep and were alarmed by the barking of our little dog. On the night before I had left a table-spoon in the kitchen which had been used for gruel, and a shawl; the spoon was silver and was my master's, the shawl was mine. When

the dog harked I spoke to him, and quieted him for three or four minutes; he came again, and harked very violently, he went as far as the street door; it laid on the mat at the bottom of the stairs, and between the stairs and our bed-room there is a partition of glass, through which I perceived suddenly a light, I think it was about one o'clock - all the persons in the house were in bed; I heard some one catch the dog up very violently and he made an uncommon noise between the first alarm and the second. I opened my door and went to the top of the kitchen stairs. I saw a light and heard a person any

"hush," it sounded in the kitchen - I went a little backward and called out

"Who is there?" I then screamed out Murder! several times. I then went into the room, shut the door, and held it firm because there was no lock; my fellow-servant opened the window by my direction and called Watch! I staid at the door: Before the watchman came there were two men who appeared to come down the street from the Strand - I was not at the window, but Rebbecca Thomas was, I heard them say

"I will send the watchman," but they did not. I afterwards looked out and saw a man standing in the area, with his back towards our window, I suppose he had got up from the kitchen window and then on the coal-house door, and then upon the stonework on which the railing rests; he was on the stone-work when I saw him. A gentleman got in at the window to us, and went and opened the street-door for us, they got a light from the gas, and the watchman went down into the kitchen before me, I went down afterwards, and was very anxious about a little boy who slept in the cupboard in the kitchen, but he was safe and asleep. A gentleman took up the carving-knife which was all over blood, and the little dog was lying weltering in his blood, with his head cut off all but a bit of skin. Newman the watchman came into the kitchen with the spoon and my shawl, he brought them both in together; they had been in the kitchen the night before when I went to bed, the carving-knife I am positive I had put into the knife-box, it was then lying on the dresser, I alarmed the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did this happen? A. I think it was about one o'clock, because I looked at the watch after the watchman had come in, and it was then about two. I had fastened the house myself, the persons had come in at the kitchen window, the shutters had been forced, and the window raised. I had fastened the shutters myself and the window was down the night before - there was only one person within the rails. I gave an account of this transaction in this Court before - I did not then know any thing about these prisoners being concerned in the robbery. I believe I heard something about them from Mrs. Abrahams on the Tuesday following the robbery, which was a week before I gave evidence here - Mrs. Abrahams mentioned the name of Lintott, I think, but I do not recollect the name of Durham; she said it was two former servants of Mr. Frasers who had been concerned with her husband in the robbery, she mentioned two names I know, but I do not recollect the name of Durham: I think Durham was the name of the other but I cannot say.

MR. LAW. Q. She said she believed they had been servants of Mr. Fraser's, but had known them but a short time? A. Yes; I am confident I heard some person below say

"hush," the voice proceeded from the kitchen and not from the area - Mrs. Abrahams said her husband had told her that they had been servants of Mr. Fraser's; and her husband had been led into it by them.

REBECCA THOMAS. I am fellow-servant with the last witness. On the 28th of November I lived with her at Mr. Fraser's; I went to bed with her about ten minutes after eleven o'clock, the house was then safe and quiet, we were awoke by the dog harking; there is a glass partition in our room, and we saw a light through it, my fellow servant left the room and returned, I got up and opened the window, and saw two young men come by when I was screaming; I think it was the tallest of the two prisoners who spoke to me, that is Durham; I have no recollection of the other person, he did not speak, but I know he was shorter than the one who spoke; the tallest of them held the top of the rails and looked down into the kitchen but gave no assistance - I believe Durham to be the man but I cannot exactly be sure, because my fright was so great; the shortest one only stood by the side of the other but did not offer to give any assistance; the tall one was dressed in black I am pretty sure; I saw Durham before the Magistrates about a week afterwards, or between a week and a fortnight; he was then dressed in black, I had not then any doubt that he was the same person: while he was at the rails he asked what was the matter, I said there was some one in the kitchen, he said he would call the watchman: I begged and prayed of him not to go away and leave us, but they both went away without calling the watchman. I continued to give an alarm, and the watchman came up, Abrahams got up the area to the stonework within the rails, he was taken before he got over - one gentleman came in at the window, and got us a light and we went down stairs, the kitchen was open, it had been shut over night and fastened up, I saw the dog laying dead in the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. With respect to the shorter man, (Lintott,) you have no recollection? A. No; the other was in my sight a little longer than you have been speaking to me. There is a gas light on the other side of the way, nearly opposite. The person I spoke to had a hat on, he was standing side-ways, with his face more towards me than the gas, but I was very near to him - the area is narrow, and I was leaning out at the window - they came in a direction from the Strand; if they had been inclined to have gone into the Strand, they need not have come so far as our window. He did not say any thing more to me than what I have mentioned. I said

"Pray don't go away," several times. I will not swear that Durham is the man - but I have no doubt he is. I am not quite sure that if I had seen him any where else than in custody I should have believed him to be the man.

MR. LAW. Q. Unless you had seen him there, you would not have thought any thing about him at all? A. No; I had a good view of his face from the gas light - I was so near, I was nearly touching him. I did not see them till he spoke to me - whether they had been from the house, or not I do not know; they came momentarily to me. The area is not more than three feet wide - there is a gas light on our side also, and they both give a good Our house is nearer the Strand than Howard-street.

JOHN BACHELLOR . I am a coal-porter, and live in Milford-lane,

in the Strand. I was returning home about twelve o'clock at night on the 28th of November; and coming through the court into Arundel-street, which court runs into Howard-street, I saw a man pass me in a dark coat, well dressed; but I cannot swear to the colour of his clothes. He ran round the corner from Norfolk-street - I heard the screams of a woman crying Murder! - they came from Norfolk-street. I saw the prisoner Durham before the Magistrate, and believe him to be the man whom I met - he was then dressed in black - I believe him to be the man; he met me as I was going to Norfolk-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you meet any other persons in that passage? A. No; only one - he was coming round the corner of Norfolk-street. I know where Mr. Fraser's house is - the passage he was in was nearer the river than Mr. Fraser's house; he went up Arundel-street toward the Strand - he was only in my view while we passed; he had run round the corner, but he did not run as he passed me, but then ran on. We were both near a gas light, my face was towards the gas - I can swear to the man any where. I had been at my relation's, and I had stopped there rather late, and could not get in at my lodgings. I had passed all that time without drinking any spirits. My relation lodges at the top of Ship-yard, Temple-bar, his name is Aldridge, he is a painter. I came home at eleven o'clock to the public-house where I lodge, in Milford-lane. I went back to my relation's, and could not get in - I had walked about till between twelve and one o'clock. I did not swear positively to him before the Justice. I was examined there and said his appearance led me to believe he was the man - but I did not say positively that he was. I went to the Office the next morning, but did not see him there then - I saw Abrahams there with the watchman, but did not see Durham for some time after; I saw Mrs. Abrahams that morning, at the Office, and three or four other times - I never saw her any where else, and never had any conversation with her about swearing positively to a person, in order to serve her husband, or with any body else.

MR. LAW. Q. You went the next day and saw Mrs. Abrahams - you went again, and again, and saw her there? A. Yes, but I saw her no where else.

ROBERT NEWMAN . I am a watchman of St. Clement Danes - Mr. Fraser's house is in that parish. On the night of the 28th of November my attention was called there; I heard a scream from a female - I went there, and saw Rebecca Thomas at the window. I apprehended a person named Abrahams in the area. I afterwards searched the house, and found the dog slaughtered. I found a dark lantern on the kitchen dresser, and the shawl and silver table spoon in the area. I found the stock of a centre bit in the area - the shawl was claimed by the servant, and the spoon by the prosecutor. I had not heard any one call Watch! but I heard the screams of this young woman. I was at the lower part of Norfolk-street, about seven or eight doors from the house.

GEORGE WHITAKER . I am a watchman of St. Clement Danes. I was attracted by Newman's rattle; I went to No. 37, Norfolk-street, and found in the area three centre bits, a small iron crow, and an iron stock. I found the door of the dark lantern in the kitchen, separated from the lantern. I applied the iron crow to the marks on the kitchen window shutters, and they appeared to be made by that crow. I am certain they were made by some crow.

JOHN PURTON I am a Bow-street patrol. I know the Fox and Goose, public-house, King-street, Seven-dials. - On the 28th of November I staid there, in company with two brother officers, till about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock; I do not know Mr. Fraser's house; it might take up about ten minutes to get to Norfolk-street from there. I saw the two prisoners together there, in company with Abrahams; they were all in company, and drank together.

Cross-examined. Q. I wish you particularly to recollect the time of night? A. We went there after eleven o'clock at night, and had to meet at twelve, at the top of Drury-lane, to separate: it was about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes before twelve when I saw these persons - they were there when I went in, and Abrahams showed me a paper of Life in London: he asked me to drink out of his pint of porter. I am not positive that Lintott was there when we went away, but I am sure the others were; it would take about a quarter of an hour to get from there to Norfolk-street.

SARAH VANDEVELDE . I am the wife of John Vandevelde - he is a biscuit-baker. On the 28th of November I lodged at Mr. Chappel's, No. 25, Great Earl-street; Abrahams and his wife lodged in the same house at that time. On the 28th of November I dined with them: a person of the name of Shaw dined there too, so did Durham; we dined about a quarter after one o'clock; Durham went away about two: he came back between four and five, and staid to tea, and afterwards Abrahams and Durham went up into Abraham's room; we had dined in Abrahams's room, and drank tea in mine. Mrs. Abrahams asked her husband for a shilling, when they came down, and he gave her 6 d. Durham then asked what she wanted; she said a shilling, and he immediately gave her one: they then went out together - Mrs. Abrahams said,

"Abrahams, return the shilling to Henry:" they left the house, about half-past 5 o'clock. Abrahams did not return that night. On the following morning Mrs. Abrahams came to me and seemed very much agitated. I was in company with her, and we were going out to see if we could find Mr. Abrahams - as we went out we met Durham at the door - Mrs. Abrahams said,

"Where is Abrahams;" he said,

"Hush, go up to your own room;" she said,

"No, not till I have seen Abrahams:" he took her by the arm, and they went across the road together. Earl-street leads into King-street where the Fox and Goose is - we went down Queen-street, which is the adjoining street; Mrs. Abrahams asked again,

"Where is Abrahams?" Durham said,

"He is in St. Clement's watch-house;" she said,

"What for?" he said,

"The fact is we broke into a house in Norfolk-street, Strand, and a dog's head was cut of, but Abrahams did not do it - I held the dog, and Linton cut his head off;" we afterwards got to the Fox and Goose, and Mrs. Abrahams fainted away - Mr. Newman's servant fetched a glass of water, and Durham gave her a small glass of brandy - when she got better Durham told her to go to Bow-street, and she would, most likely, meet her husband coming from the watch-house. I went to Bow-street, and Abrahams was there. Mr. Shaw was in the house when we

went out to look for Abrahams - he was not at the door when we went out; he was going down the kitchen stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the wife of Mr. Vandevelde? A. Yes; we were married on the 17th of August, 1823, at Mary-le-bone New Church. I never had any other husband; I know a person named John Williams - that is my husband; he is in confinement, under that name, in the House of Correction - he has been there since last April; he was tried here. I cannot be answerable for his conduct - I believe he had been in prison before he was married. I was never in prison; I have been obliged to do as well as I could since he has been there - I have got my living as other unfortunate persons do: I did not get my living so before I was married. I had known Mrs. Abrahams about a month before her husband was taken. Half-past five o'clock on the Sunday afternoon was the last time I saw these persons. I do not know how Abrahams got his living. I did not mention anything to any person about this business till Mr. Moore came to me - he keeps Serle's Coffee-house, in Carey-street; that was after Abrahams had been tried. I had not consulted Mr. Moore on the subject till he came to me, and asked if I knew Mrs. Abrahams - I said I did. I was told at that time, and have been told since, that giving evidence against these young men might be of service to Abrahams; Mrs. Abrahams did not say that I was to say anything more than was true; she did not tell me to be positive in saying that this young man was present at the transaction, as that would do her good, but she desired me to tell Mr. Moore what I knew, as it might be the means of saving Abrahams's life - this was after I had seen Mr. Moore; I then stated to her what I had heard. When Durham crossed the way he said,

"Hush, go in doors" - she said,

"No, not till I have seen Abrahams;" she then said,

"Where is Abrahams?" and he said,

"In St. Clement's watch-house" - he said,

"The fact is, we broke into a house in Norfolk-street, and there was a dog's head cut off." I saw Mr. Moore on the Wednesday following the day on which Abrahams was tried - I said nothing about this till after he was tried. Durham staid with us two or three minutes that day; I did not see him again before Abrahams was tried. I never told this story till I saw Mr. Moore. I did not then know that Durham was in custody for something else.

Re-examined. I saw no more of Durham till I saw him in the House of Correction. Mrs. Abrahams lodged in the same house with me. Mr. Moore came to me on the business - Mrs. Abrahams told me to be particular in telling the truth, because it would be an advantage to Abrahams.

JOHN SHAW . I live at No. 20, High-street, Bloomsbury. On Sunday, the 28th of November, I was at the lodging where Abrahams and the last witness live Durham was there - we all dined together. Durham went away with Abrahams after tea. Next morning I saw Mrs. Abrahams and Mrs. Vandevelde going down stairs, and Mrs. Abrahams was crying - I saw Durham at the door, but I did not hear him say a word - this was about half-past ten o'clock. I had gone away the night before about six.

MARY ANN ABRAHAMS . I am the wife of Levi Abraham . I came to town with him, in November; we lived at Mr. Chapples, No. 25, Great Earl-street, on the 28th of November; before that day, I had seen my husband drinking with Durham several times, at the Fox and Goose public-house - on the 28th of November, I dined in my own room - Mr. Shaw, my husband, Mrs. Vandevelde, and the prisoner, were of the party; the prisoner drank tea in Mrs. Vandevelde's room, with the same party, and the landlady - my husband left the house, it might be about half-past seven o'clock; but I am not certain - Durham wore a black coat, a black waistcoat, and black trowsers, which appeared particularly full; his clothes appeared rather worn - Durham and my husband went up stairs together; they came down, and I asked my husband for 1 s.; he gave me 6 d.; he said that was sufficient - Durham gave me 1 s.; they then went away together - I went on that evening to the Fox and Goose, and gave my husband there the latch-key of the door, while the watchman was going half-past ten o'clock; my husband was called out to speak to me; he did not return that night, and in the morning I went out with Mrs. Vandevelde, to go to look for him - Mr. Shaw was then in the house - when I got out, I saw Henry Durham, he appeared very pale - I went, and put my hand on his arm, and asked if he could tell me where Abrahams was; he said

"Hush, go up stairs" - I told him I should not go in doors any more, till I had seen Abrahams; he said

"Don't make a noise before people, come round here" - I asked him again where my husband was, and he said in St. Clement's watch-house - I said, on what charge; he said,

"The fact is, we broke into a house, in Norfolk-street, in the Strand, last night, and he poor fellow has got taken, and I fear it will go hard with him - there was a little dog's head cut off" - I said,

"Oh dear, Mr. Abrahams never did that to it" - he said

"No; I held it. while Lintott cut its throat" - he pulled up his sleeve, and showed me some of the stains of blood on his shirt - he said Abrahams was not in the house; he did not say on what part of the premises he was taken - Mrs. Vandevelde was in hearing, but she was rather behind, while he pulled up the cuff of his coat - she heard him say,

"Look here" - but I do not know that she saw the cuff of his coat pulled up - I went to the Fox and Goose - I there fainted; Durham gave me a little brandy, and said

"Don't fret - I will do every thing I can for Abrahams, and get Counsel" - he said, if I would go down to Bow-street directly, I should see him brought up from the watch-house, I went, and Mrs. Vendevelde with me - I made enquiries at the Office, and learned that a Jew, named Abrahams, was taken into custody - Durham had told me to come back and tell him how Abrahams got on with his examination, but when I came back, he was gone, and I did not see him again, till he was in custody - I do not when that was; it was after Abrahams was tried - I stated this conversation to Mr. Ford, at Bow-street - I was not in the Office, but outside the door - he was fully committed the first time - I did not say

"Here is a woman, who will say that she heard a person say my husband was not in the house at all" I was present when my husband was tried here, but I was so agitated, that I could not give any information till now; after he had been in custody at Bow-street I gave this information to Mr. Welford, the solicitor - I had stated this several days before his trial - I went before a Justice, about a week after my husband

was tried; but I had given information before he was tried - I was married on the 23d or 24th of February, at Bath, in my mother's room; there was several persons of Mr. Abrahams persuasion there - I am not a Jewess, but I was married according to his religion.

JOHN NEWMAN . I keep the Fox and Goose, King-street, Seven Dials, I know Durham particularly, and I have seen Lintott a few times - Durham lodged in my house for a few nights - I have no doubt of his person at all - I remember going to Chelsea, on Sunday the 28th of November - I left Durham in my house, when I went out, but I did not see him when I came home, which was about nine o'clock - I went to bed about half-past eleven, or a quarter before twelve - I heard he was in the house, but I did not see him.

Cross-examined. Q. You came home, about a quarter past nine o'clock, and went to bed about eleven? A. Yes; Durham had slept in my house three or four nights - I did not see the patrol in my house that night; there were a great number of persons drinking in the parlour - my house was shut up, about half-past eleven, or a quarter before twelve o'clock - whether Durham was there or not I do not know.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on the look-out for the prisoners, after the apprehension of Abrahams, before he was tried - I saw the prisoners in custody, by the names of Preston and Thompson, at Marlborough-street, and was present when Durham was identified as Thompson, and Lintott as Preston - I went to the Fox and Goose, in King-street, Seven-dials, on the 10th of December, and went to a room which Newman pointed out to me.

JOHN NEWMAN re-examined. I know Cousins. I pointed out a room to him, on the 10th of December; Durham had slept there two or three nights; there are three beds in the room; there were some drawers in the room; I never opened those drawers, but Cousins did, with a key which I gave him; the key had been sent to me by a stranger, to get a shirt out of Durham's box; the drawers were opened in my presence - I had not seen Durham, after the day on which I went to Chelsea, till he was in custody; there were two keys in these drawers, which the officer called skeleton keys - I had not been in the habit of seeing them; there was no linen there. Cousins found some linen in a box, which was opened by a key I gave him - there was some shirts and stockings; the marks on the shirts, were

"H. D." I do not think the stockings were marked at all - I saw Lintott at my house once or twice, while Durham was there Abrahams was at my house the day before he was apprehended - he was there when I went out to Chelsea, but I did not see him in the evening - I went about six o'clock in the evening, and returned about half-past nine - I did not hear of the robbery for two or three days afterwards. I have never said that I heard of it that night; the box which was opened, was Durham's.

Cross-examined. Q. Durham had slept there for about a week before the 28th of November. A. Yes; Two strangers, who came from the country, of the name of Taylor, had slept in the room, and one man regularly slept there. I never gave Durham leave to put any thing in the drawers - his linen was in his own box.

WILLIAM COUSINS re-examined. I went to Newman's house, and in the room I found a box, which I opened with one key out of a bunch of three which Newman gave me. There was a variety of linen shirts and stockings - they were not taken away that day, but the next. I found two keys in the drawer, which are large skeleton keys. On Friday, the 10th of December, I examined the box, and brought away the two keys, and four duplicates which were in the box, in the name of Preston. I afterwards went on Saturday morning to a house kept by Mr. Winwood, Blackhorse-court, Fleet-street, and there found a pair of stockings, and a shirt marked

"H. D. No. 9." - the stockings are marked with ink

"H. D." I went there in consequence of information, but I do not know of my own knowledge that they were Lintott's lodgings. Mrs. Winwood was there then. I was on the look-out for both the prisoners, but could not find them.

Cross-examined. Q. When was Abrahams apprehended? A. On Sunday night. He was taken to Bow-street on Monday, and tried on the Monday following. I did not know that the prisoners were in custody till the Wednesday after Abrahams was tried. I had been to Newman's on the Thursday or Friday before to look for them, but could not find them.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am a Bow-street officer. I went with Cousins to Newman's house - I saw him search and find some of the articles. I went with him to Winwood's. Lintott had been taken out of that house, but not by me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. FRASER. Durham never lived in my service, but Lintott was a servant in the house previous to my marriage.

DURHAM'S Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. After the very able manner in which my Counsel has conducted my cause. I can have little to say, and I hope the good feeling and candour of the Jury will excuse any appearance of feeling on my part, on my addressing such an assembly, and being placed in so awful a situation. I am aware I stand charged with a most serious crime, my life is at the issue of your determination. The evidence brought forward to substantiate the charge, I hope you will give your most mature consideration to. I am implicated according to this evidence with an individual now under sentence of death for the same offence, your judgment will dictate in what way this implication should be received; the wife of this unfortunate young man is the principal evidence adduced against me. I allow having met her on the morning after Levi Abrahams was taken into custody, when she informed me of his misfortune. I commiserated with her, and seeing her faint, I gave her the liquor in question, but I most solemnly declare that nothing else ever passed between us, and that I was not aware of the robbery till she herself informed me of it, is it likely if I had been concerned in the robbery that I should have informed women? (strangers to me, only having seen them once before;) would any person of common sense act as they stated I did? if I had been guilty, should I have placed my life in the hands of these women? No, God forbid! Then look, Gentlemen, as to the character of the woman she brings forward to corroborate her evidence, she makes no observation as you will recollect to facts Gentlemen, it is not from malicious motives on my part that I bring forward these facts, I do it most unwillingly, but my own life being at stake, I am in duty bound to lay them before you now, I am confident you cannot nor will not place any reliance upon the evidence of such persons, so utterly devoid of credit; upon this evidence my prosecution is rested, and any other observation from me would be but superfluous, as your judgments

will dictate in what way it should be received. Now Gentlemen, I wish to state that I never before was placed in a similar situation, and that I have an affectionate and respectable parent, (for unfortunately I have but one), waiting with breathless anxiety, the result of your decision. Parents, picture to yourselves the distress you would be in if one of your children was placed in a situation like me, no doubt you see the motives for my being placed here your own discernment will show you it is done by the friends of an individual now under sentence of death, with an intent of saving his life. I now await your decision with calmness, being confident a British Jury will never willingly find an innocent man guilty.

LINTOTT'S Defence. I just wish to say, that I have been in custody six weeks, and I did not know that it was on this charge, till yesterday morning; therefore I cannot contradict it in the way I should wish.

One witness gave Durham a good character.

DURHAM - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 19.

LINTOTT - NOT GUILTY .


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