Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd December 1824.
Reference Number: 18241202
Reference Number: f18241202-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; On THURSDAY, 2d of DECEMBER, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. JOHN GARRATT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN GARRATT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq., and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

Thomas Haggard ,

Samuel Carpenter ,

John Boucher ,

Samuel Paul Pettit ,

John Coventry ,

James Drage ,

Robert Ash ,

Robert Wm. Keat ,

Jonathan Stratton ,

John Smith ,

John Bamfield ,

Milton Ariant .

2nd London Jury.

Edward Compton ,

Humphrey Lightley ,

John Page ,

Edward White ,

James Perkins ,

Richard Johnson ,

James Williams ,

John Prentice ,

Henry Woolrich ,

Benjamin Rose ,

John Mitcheson ,

James Jones .

1st Middlesex Jury.

George Hunter ,

Wm. Yates ,

John Campion ,

Wm. Bullock ,

Robert Brix ,

Wm. Gregory ,

Wm. Shepherd ,

Henry Thorn ,

Matthew Horsley ,

Wm. Bower ,

James Beale ,

Simon Hart .

2d Middlesex Jury.

Edward Lawrence ,

Griffith Todd ,

Henry Sarjeant ,

Thomas Morgan ,

James Norris ,

Samuel Ames

James Price ,

Zachary W. Perks ,

Darcey Drake ,

Thomas Lovelock ,

Wm. Smith ,

James Chub .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Treadway ,

Thomas Bray ,

Wm. Bertrand ,

David Thompson ,

James Palmer ,

George Davis ,

Jonathan Titcoe ,

James Greenaway ,

Edward Brown ,

Joseph Andrews ,

Wm. Hawkes ,

John Thresher .

4th Middlesex Jury.

Robert Perkins ,

Wm. Taylor ,

Isaac Couchman ,

Charles Lambourne ,

Children Sholbridge ,

Abraham Ogle ,

Wm. Brice ,

Charles Shaw ,

Joseph Greathead ,

Wm. Barlow ,

Wm. Bell ,

Henry Barrett .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 2, 1824.

GARRATT, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18241202-1

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1. JAMES HALEY was indicted for arson . MESSRS. BRODRICK and LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DUNDEE . I occupy some premises in Argyle-place, in the parish of St. James , and am in partnership with Thomas Gerald Elrington - we hold a lease of the premises, from George Thompson . The prisoner occupied a shop on the ground floor, a little room which joins that shop, and a kitchen under his shop, on the basement story. This model (examining it) is a correct plan of the premises. The premises occupied by him have no communication whatever with my dwelling-house, nor any other part of the premises. While they were building there was a communication from his kitchen to mine, but that was stopped up four years ago, before the building was complete: it was a doorway, and was stopped up on my side, by a brick wall as thick as the party wall, except the width of the door. The door between his shop and parlour has six or eight panes of glass in it. On the night of the 31st of October I and my family were all in bed by ten o'clock. Between half-past one and two I perceived a slight smoke in my bed-room; my wife awoke me - she is unable to attend here, being near her confinement. I attributed the smell to our night lamp being badly trimmed, but it gradually increased: I opened my bed-room window, and got into bed again; I had then been awake half or three quarters of an hour. A few minutes after half-past two, finding the smoke increase, I opened my room door, proceeded to search the house, and found smoke in every part of it. I went into my drawing-room, which is over the prisoner's shop; there is no carpet down - I ran across the floor; I had no shoes on, and I think I made sufficient noise for any one to hear below. I spoke to my family as I went into the different rooms. As I ran over the house I heard the shutters of the prisoner's room forced into the street; they are outside shutters, and fell completely into the street. I called to my family to hasten down, for Haley's premises must be on fire; we all left the house, and proceeded about fifty yards, to Mr. Illman's house, in Argyle-street; he took the family in, and I returned in two minutes, and perceived smoke issuing from over Haley's shop door, which is at the corner of Argyle-place and King-street. I also saw smoke ascending from the area grating in Argyle-place. I told two men to break the door open, and I ran for water, and on my return I found the shop door open, and saw fire burning in one corner of Haley's shop, over the covered way of the kitchen stair case; there was very little fire but much smoke - it was soon put out; there was still a very heavy smoke, but I could not tell where it proceeded from. I took some firemen with me, and went to examine my drawing-room floor. The ceiling of his shop is not plaister, but the joists are covered with wood, and is plugged, and the drawing-room floor is wood. I returned to the shop in three or five minutes, and observed a heavy smoke coming from the kitchen, up from the stair-case door, and from a hole which somebody had cut in the floor. I called to know if any one was below, and was told that two men were - it was half an hour before I saw anything but smoke, and in that interval I had gone to Mr. Illman's, and was backwards and forwards repeatedly, during which time I saw nothing of the prisoner. When I was over at Mr. Illman's, a person ran to say the fire had broken out again; I went to the premises, and saw fire issuing through two distinct places in the shop floor, close to the stair head, but five or eight feet below the place where I saw the first fire, for that was over the stair head, not inside it; I saw none inside the stair head - it was about a yard from it: I ran to assist at the engine, and in three minutes saw fire burst out through the shop window in Argyle-place, in every direction; the fire did not issue through the floor till half an hour after the fire on the top of the stair head was put out. The shop window frames were burnt out. Supposing the floor to be an inch board, about half or three quarters of it was burnt on the upper surface; the flame having come through the two holes. I saw the wooden ceiling of the shop on fire - the shop walls are partly wainscoated; the other part was only whitewashed, with shelves against it. The wainscoat extended to the ceiling; it was burnt inside, but not through. The kitchen stair-case was burnt, and nearly all of it fell in.

Q. In January last had you any dispute with the prisoner - A. In November preceding I had; he has been in the house three years; we both went into the premises together, and in November 1823, we took our lease, and a day or two after we had signed the lease, the prisoner knocked at my door about eight o'clock in the evening, and demanded to see me; I heard violent language, and went down, and in consequence of what the servant said, I went to Mr. Thompson, next door, and went with him to the prisoner, and told him that his conduct was improper

- his wife pulled him in doors, and I saw no more of him. I saw him next morning, and told him his conduct was improper in making a disturbance at my door, and I hoped he was sensible of his error - he said he was not, and I made a complaint at Marlborough-street; a warrant was issued against him. I went to his shop with the officers two or three times, but could not find him; he afterwards confessed his error, and I declined proceeding. I have seen his wife dressed in a brown bombazeen gown, but never in silk; her dress was plain, and consistent. I think I could even define her dress, for she was so particular in wearing three gowns - I scarcely ever saw her in any others. I saw her daily, and must have observed if she had frequently worn silk. The prisoner dealt in wood, oysters, fruit, and green grocery , and was in a small way of business.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What is your business - A. A wine merchant. I ship to various parts. My stock on the premises is worth about 20,000 l. I do not call the prisoner a fruiterer - he is more of a green grocer; he served some very respectable families, and I have heard him mention a nobleman who dealt with him; I saw his wife when she was in her business, and have seen her on Sundays, but not when she went out. He paid 52 l. a year for his premises; I had not received his rent. I awoke my family before I walked over the drawing-room floor. The first fire I perceived was over the stair head; there is a press bed under the same stair head, and under the stair case is a closet; whether the fire which came through the floor came from that closet I cannot say. There were bundles of fire wood over the stair head - I saw smoke issue from there, and a little fire. After the second fire was out the prisoner came and stooped down by my side, as I was looking down into the kitchen.

WILLIAM SHARROW . I am a watchman of St. James's. On Sunday night, the 31st of October, I was at my station opposite to the prisoner's house; he came to me about ten o'clock, and said, "Watchman, it is a wet and cold evening, here is sixpence for you, go and get yourself a glass of stiff grog;" he had at times given me 3 d. for calling him, but never gave me money before for grog. I remained on my beat, and as I was calling two o'clock, in passing his shop and parlour window, I heard their child crying, in the parlour where they sleep, and on my return, between two and half-past, I heard somebody speaking very loud in the parlour. I went into my box at a quarter to three o'clock, and in two or three minutes heard their parlour shutters falling on the pavement - I went over, and saw the prisoner, his wife, and his daughter, Mary, standing inside the parlour window - his wife screamed, and said, "Watchman, for God's sake - there must be fire somewhere, for we are almost suffocated." I put my head towards the window, and saw a glimmering light, apparently by the bed side; Mrs. Haley said it was a rush light, and I believe it was so, but I could hardly perceive for the smoke. At that instant an infant in its night gown was put into my arms; I stepped into the middle of the street, and did not see Mr. and Mrs. Haley come out. Four or five watchman had collected on hearing the shutters fall. I went for the engine, and sprang my rattle; three engines came. The alarm ceased, and some of the neighbours went to their beds, and in half an hour there was another alarm. I saw the flames burst from the shop window - it was soon extinguished.

Cross-examined. Q. He had given you money several times before - A. Yes, 3 d. at a time, for calling him. Six penny worth of grog would not make me tipsy - I did not get it; if I had gone for it, it would not have kept me off my beat two minutes. The first alarm I heard was from the prisoner and his wife; I did not see either of them after they gave me the child; his wife was not dressed: he was in his shirt, and I think had drawers on.

COURT. Q. There were several watchmen there who could have got into the room - A. Yes, my Lord. No fire had broken out then: it was not discovered for full ten minutes after the shutters were forced down. I believe some firemen were there before the fire was discovered.

NATHANIEL NIXON . I am a watchman. I was at the corner of Marlborough-street and Argyle-place, about a quarter to three o'clock, with Fowles, another watchman, and perceived a smell of smoke or wood burning; we went to Argyle-place, and before we got to the house we heard the shutters fall, and on arriving opposite to the prisoner's window, in Argyle-place, I saw smoke coming through the shop door, and up the area grating; I gave an alarm, and perceived the prisoner getting out at the window, in his night cap and shirt; I saw his wife and child standing in the room, behind him. I ran for an engine, and on returning attempted to break open the shop door, but could not: I assisted the fireman in taking the shutters down; the door was opened from within by somebody, but the smoke being so strong the fireman could not go in; he went in once or twice: the smoke abated, and I followed him in again, and saw fire at the top of the frame work, over the stair-case - I assisted in putting it out, and found that it was fire wood, and apparently old fruit baskets had been burning. I still perceived smoke, which appeared to originate from below, and about half an hour after I saw fire coming from below - the engines came and extinguished it. I saw the prisoner there - he appeared distressed. I did not see him take any part in putting it out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him when the fire over the stair head was being put out - A. He was at the shop door; he had drawers and shoes on. The first fire was easily put out. Several people and firemen were present. The shutters could not be got down without the inside pins being unfastened. I saw the prisoner in the shop eight or ten minutes after I entered the shop, and I saw his family in Sharrow's box; they only had a few clothes just slipped on.

JAMES STAPLES . I belong to the London Union Insurance Office. On this morning, about three o'clock, in consequence of an alarm I went to these premises; I saw smoke coming out of the crack of the door, and the shutters; I was going to break the door open, but the prisoner opened it - he had a lighted candle or rush light in his hand; I think it was a candle; he was in his shirt and night cap, and I believe had drawers on. I could not go into the shop for the smoke and heat of the fire. I went to the window in Argyle-place, and broke it open with my pole-axe, to clear the room from smoke; I got into the shop, and unfastened the shutters of that window, inside, let out the smoke, and perceived fire on the top of the stair

head - I raked down the fire wood and orange boxes, which were on fire, and extinguished it; it appeared to me that all the fire in the house was put out - I left the house safe, as I thought, and went to acquaint our foreman, as is usual. I did not examine the top of the stair head, to see if it was burnt through or not. I had not seen any smoke come from below. I was not there at the second fire. There was a bedstead in the stair head, an old quilt and a bed were on it, but there were neither sheets nor blankets.

Cross-examined. Q. How much water put the first fire out? A. There were a dozen or two pails thrown on it. The fire would more than fill a bushel basket. The firemen had links in their hands, which make a smoke - there was a smoke when I left, but I thought it was from the links.

JAMES GEORGE SMART . I am engineer of the County Fire Office. I was informed of the fire and took an engine; I got there about three o'clock, and assisted in putting out the fire over the stair head; it was nearly out when I got there - about half an hour after that it was quite out. I attempted to go down stairs upon seeing a smoke. I tied my handkerchief over my nose and mouth, and went down three times before I could get to the bottom, in consequence of the smoke; two holes were cut in the floor to let it out. I then went down backwards and threw a pail of water at the cupboard door under the stairs, as I felt that the heat proceeded from that direction - I went up stairs; Westwood and I then crawled down with a link, and when we got to the cupboard door it was buttoned - I could not unbutton it. Page lowered us down a pole-axe, which I wrenched it open with, and a great body of fire rushed out with a great noise; it forced me backward, and as soon as I recovered myself I escaped up stairs, and the blaze followed us; it burnt about twenty minutes before it was put out.

Q. Now being acquainted with fires what is your judgment - were these two separate fires, or did one communicate with the other? A. The stairs were between the two fires - there was no fire on the stairs; in my judgment they were two distinct fires. The fire in the cupboard must have been burning some minutes. I do not conceive that there could be any place, by which the fire below could communicate with that on the stair head, or I should have seen it.

Cross-examined. Q. The stair-head, as you call it, is a sort of closet, inclosing the stairs from the shop? A. Yes; the top of it forms a shelf; the fire was on that shelf, and rather more over the shop than the kitchen closet. I cannot say whether the closet was wainscoated or bare walls.

COURT. Q. Could you judge what there was in the cupboard below? A. No, my Lord; there is no doubt but the fire had been in the cupboard for a considerable time; I cannot say how long. If it had been combustible materials it would very soon have burnt out. I could not turn the button of the door because it was so hot I could not hold it; but I think there must have been another fastening.

RICHARD WESTWOOD . I am a fireman of the Royal Exchange Assurance. I got to the premises before Smart, and saw the fire over the stair-head - it burnt quite through the back part of the wainscoat. I looked at the press-bed place - there was nothing in it but the bed, and that was on fire; there were no blankets or sheets; it did not appear that any one had slept there - it seemed shook up. I continued on the premises, and went down stairs with Smart, about half an hour after the first fire was put out. I cut the holes in the floor to let the smoke out.

Q. When the ticking was on fire, was the fire being raked from the stair-head? A. Yes; the fire might have fallen off the stair-head on to the ticking. As far as my judgment goes, I think the fire on the stair head, and in the cupboard, were distinct fires.

COURT. Q. The wainscoat at the back part, was burnt through - could, therefore, a spark drop down between the wainscoat and wall, into the kitchen cupboard? A. I do not conceive that it could, for the wainscoat is close to the wall; there was not above three or four inches of the wainscoat burnt through.

JOHN HORNSBY PAGE . I am engineer to the Royal Exchange Insurance office, and was present when the first fire was put out, and about twenty minutes after some of the skirting-board was taken away, by the bedstead, and we found an effusion of smoke issuing from the wainscoat. It appeared to me to be two distinct fires - there was a counter in the shop and some fixtures.

COURT. Q. There must have been fire behind the wainscoat, as the fire came from there? A. I conceive that it came from below. I did not go below. If part of the wainscoat was burnt through, fire might drop below, and set fire to any thing there.

JOHN SMITH . I am a bricklayer, and was employed by Mr. Thompson to assist in building these premises. I have examined them since the fire; there is no hole through the stair-head enclosure; the wainscoat above it is nailed close to the wall. It is not possible for any thing to drop between them. I am not certain whether the wainscoat goes down further than the bulk of the stair-head. It is impossible for fire to fall from the top of the stair-head, or from the wainscoat, into the cupboard under the kitchen stairs; it must fall on the stairs before it could fall to the cupboard. I cannot conceive any means by which the two fires could have communicated.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you undertake to swear that it is impossible? A. I conceive it quite so. I made this examination on the 1st of November, by desire of Mr. Thompson. The stairs above the cupboard were not burnt - part of the shop floor was burnt, but whether it was burnt through I cannot tell, I will not say that there was no space through which fire might not fall.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not say that the wainscoat above the stair head, was nailed to the partition - A. Yes; to the wall, between the two houses - I could perceive no space between them.

COURT. Q. Is the wainscoat nailed to the wall all along? A. Yes; my Lord, there are two nails in the space of four or five inches; wood is placed between the bricks, to nail it to. I have not examined the place where the hole was burnt, to see if there was any space - if there was, anything would fall on the stairs; the cupboard is only plaistered, and the plaister is all sound. If water had been poured down the place it would not have gone into the cupboard; the wharping of the wainscoat by the fire might have drawn the nails out.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I live in Argyle place. The premises in question belong to me. Elrington and Dundee hold a lease under me. I built them myself; and examined them after the fire: it is very improbable that fire could have fallen from the hole which was burnt behind the wainscoat, into the kitchen cupboard; but it would be difficult to say that it is impossible. The basement is a nine-inch solid brick wall, but higher up there is a set off of two inches on each side; the wainscoat only extends to the floor of the shop; the staircase is lined with boards, to keep the plaister from being broken. The bottom of the kitchen cupboard is fourteen feet from the top of the stair-head; the cupboard is plaistered up to the stairs. I was called down one evening about the prisoner making a noise before Mr. Dundee's door, and told him it was extremely improper: he called him a swindler, or something of the kind, and complained of his taking the shop over his head.

COURT. Q. On what day was the prisoner apprehended? A. I believe on the Thursday. I suppose the parties had not made up their minds that there was sufficient suspicion to take him before. The solicitor for the prosecution was out of town at the time of the fire.

MR. LEWIS CROMBIE . I produce the lease of the premises, dated the 30th of January, 1824. I am the subscribing witness to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Since the execution of the lease has not the prisoner offered to pay you the rent on account of Thompson, but not on account of Dundee? A. Yes.

MR. LAW. Q. Had you any conversation with him, in which he said any thing of Mr. Dundee? A. Repeatedly. I have endeavoured to prevail upon him to give up the premises without litigation; he said, on one occasion, that if all his family went to the workhouse, he would spend every sixpence he had in contesting the point, and that he considered Mr. Dundee his greatest enemy, or a very great enemy. The last interview I had with him was on the 27th of October, when he tendered the money.

Cross-examined. Q. He, at the same time, expressed a determination to keep the premises? A. That was at other times; there were four quarters rent due besides what he tendered; we had distrained for three quarters, and it was replevined.

THOMAS WITHY . I am clerk at the Beacon Fire Office. The prisoner came to me on the Tuesday or Wednesday after the fire, and brought this paper as his claim for the loss. (Looking at a policy), this was found by one of the firemen.

The claim made by the prisoner was here read as follows: -

"Cash, 95 l.; wearing apparel and books, 100 l.; table linen and sheeting, 20 l.; loss of fruit and vegetables, 15 l.; loss of furniture, glass, and china, 30 l.; loss of my business, 100 l.

JAMES HALEY."

JOHN YATES . I live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. On the 24th of October, 1823, the prisoner instructed me to execute a policy for him, at the Beacon Office - I believe the policy produced to be the one which I effected; it did not come into my hands afterward - the amount was 400 l.

THOMAS GOLDING . I am secretary to the Beacon Fire Office, and am subscribing witness to this policy. The Directors are Henry Jas. Bouverie , Wm. Southerby , and David Laing . When a policy is renewed a receipt is given, but in this case an alteration is made; the stock was insured for 100 l. and that is taken off - this was done on the 16th of September, 1824.

Cross-examined. Q. If it had been presented as a policy of 400 l. it would not be paid? A. No; it is now only a policy for 300 l.; we do not insure cash.

ARCHIBALD SCOTT . I am an auctioneer, and was employed by Mr. Crombie to levy a distress on the prisoner's goods in July; my clerk made an inventory of them; I compared it with his goods on the Wednesday after the fire, when I was directed by the Insurance Company to assess the damages. I saw the prisoner, and asked if he would give me an inventory, to the best of his knowledge, of the goods which were destroyed; he said I was in possession of the inventory taken under the distress. I shewed it to him, and asked if it was correct; he said it was; I asked if he claimed any thing besides; he said, No; nor so much; for he had sold some of his furniture to carry on the lawsuit - (the replevin.) I asked why he sold his furniture when he had 95 l. in the house; he said that was part of the produce of the goods he had sold. The value of the furniture in its perfect state, without fixtures, is 20 l. I asked him for an inventory of the wearing apparel; he said he must go to his wife and get one, which he afterwards brought me; he said the wearing apparel was in the kitchen closet under the stairs, in a hair trunk, and had been consumed. I examined the closet particularly, and could find no remains of the trunk, or any ashes of such articles; there were the remains of a quantity of old stockings and shirts; one of the firemen took them out - they were in a very bad state from wear.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after the fire was this interview? A. On Wednesday; he had delivered an inventory at the Office before. I think he could replace the furniture in the same state as before for 20 l. I think if there had been six silk gowns burnt there would be some traces of them - there was no trace of the trunk or any thing.

A list of the wearing apparel given in by the prisoner, was here read: it consisted of common articles, except one silk gown, two poplin ones, and two of bombazeen, lace caps, and a cloth and silk pelisse; and stated that his daughter had lost about the same articles.

JOSEPH HARTLEY . I am engineer to the Beacon Insurance Office. I examined the closet on Monday morning, and found some shirts and stockings burnt half through; the feet were all worn out, and the shirts much worn at the back; they were about the centre of the cupboard. I found no remains of a hair trunk, nor any silk or woollen; there were ashes of stockings. I stripped down part of the wainscoat, where it was burnt, and could see no space for any thing to go behind. I cannot say that it is impossible.

Cross-examined. Q. You mean that you do not think it likely? A. No. There had been a great deal of water thrown into the house, and a great many people had been in. I saw the prisoner after the engine had done playing, and asked where his property lay; he said, "All in this closet," and that he had lost his pocket book from the small room; I could not find it. I asked where his policy

was; he said, down in the hair trunk in this closet - I went there, and found it, with the remains of two account books, but no trunk. The floor of the closet was burnt quite through. I found the policy in a drawer of the counter. The cupboard runs under the stairs.

Q. Suppose the trunk to be in front, the rush of air would have caused it to burn more than what was under the stairs? A. I think there must be some remains of it.

COURT. Q. Could you from the ashes judge what had been in the cupboard? A. There was the remains of the wood of the staircase which had fallen in.

JAMES FOSBURY . I know the prisoner - he called on me ten days before the fire, for the loan of 10 l. for ten days, saying it would be of great assistance to him, as he was in great distress, and he would give me 1 l. for the loan. I live in Oxford-market, but work just by his house - I did not lend it to him.

MARTHA TULLEY . I live in Union-street, Bond-street, and know the prisoner by sight; he came to me a week before the fire, to borrow two sovereigns; I said I had none to lend.

PRISCILLA REDMAN . I live in Carpenter-street, Westminster. Some of the prisoner's children came to my house, on different Sundays, about a month before the fire, and on the Saturday before it happened two of them came and slept at my house, and on Sunday afternoon, at five o'clock, a boy of his came, and all three slept there that night; they never slept there for two nights together before.

Cross-examined. Q. You nursed his son John - A. Yes, and had a great regard for him. The prisoner has six children. I have known his wife ten years; she was always respectably dressed when she came to me; I have seen her in a silk gown. I did not see her at times for two years together.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had there been a quarrel between your husband and the prisoner - A. There was some differences because we would not be bound for a debt. The children came to me a month before, but did not sleep there. It was some years ago that I saw his wife in a silk gown, and she had a silk scarf.

GEORGE NOAH . I am a tailor, and live in Bruton-street. I called on the prisoner about August last, respecting one of Mr. Dundee's clerks - he advised me to have nothing to do with Dundee, for they were a set of bad fellows.

JOSEPH EASTON . I belong to the Beacon Insurance. I saw these premises after the fire was extinguished. The prisoner directed me to a door place in the kitchen, and said that there was access to Mr. Dundee's premises, and the fire might have occurred through there, and that he might set the place on fire as well as anybody else. I found the door was nailed up, and there is a brick wall on the other side.

COURT. Q. Was there any fire near that door - A. About a yard and a half from it; the door was not burnt, but some old rags near it were.

WILLIAM REEVES . I am clerk to Messrs. Dundee and Co. In November, 1823, I remember the prisoner calling one evening and abusing Mr. Dundee very much - he d - d him, and said he was a scoundrel and villain - that he had been kicked out of a dozen regiments, for bad conduct, and that he would knock or kick his brains out if he met him.

The following witnesses appeared for the prisoner.

JAMES REDMAN . I am husband of the witness Priscilla Redman, and have known the prisoner ten or eleven years - his children were in the habit of coming to our house, and staying for a day or a week together. I had not spoken to him for the last twelve or eighteen months, but the children still came. On Saturday evening two of his children, John and Mary, came to go with me to Streatham Wells on the Sunday, but it turned out wet, and Tom came on Sunday afternoon, with Mary, his eldest daughter, to fetch them home; but they did not wish to go, and we desired them to stop, as it was wet - Mary left the children, as my wife said she would take them home on Monday. When I used to see the prisoner's wife she used to dress creditably. I think I saw her in a silk gown two or three years ago.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had any of his children slept there for sixteen months before - A. Yes, John slept there a month before. The children were always welcome.

MARY HALEY . I am the prisoner's daughter, and am sixteen years old - I keep my father's books, and make out his bills; the bills are generally made out on Sunday evenings, to deliver on Monday. I sleep in the shop, and sometimes in the kitchen; some of the children sleep in the shop, and some in the kitchen. On the night in question I slept in the bed in the shop; nobody slept in the kitchen, as the children were at Mr. Redman's - I had gone to fetch them home that afternoon; my brother Thomas went with me, but it being wet Mrs. Redman said they had better stop, and she would bring them home next day. I got home between five and six o'clock, and was making out the bills in the kitchen. My father and mother went to bed between nine and ten o'clock, and left me up, making out the bills, and about half-past ten I put the bills and books into the closet under the stairs; I put them on one of the shelves - it has no fastening, but a wooden button; there was a large hair trunk in the closet, which had part of our wearing apparel, and 95 l. in Bank notes in it - I saw the notes in the trunk on the Saturday - several customers had paid large bills just before, in July and August, and some in September. Lord Aberdeen , Colonel Lowther , Mr. Coke , of Norfolk, Lady Mary Sheppard , Lord Glengall , and several other respectable persons deal with us - their bills are 2 l. 3 l. and sometimes 4 l. a week; Mr. Coke's bills are 4 l. or 5 l., and sometimes 7 l. a week - they have fruits and vegetables which are out of season. My mother had a silk and a poplin gown, two bombazeen ones, a black silk and a cloth pelisse - a large silk and two cotton shawls, and some sheeting in the trunk. My father had a suit of black and blue clothes, shirts and stockings, in good condition. I was about as well clothed as my mother. I was awoke by a suffocating smell, which made me almost insensible; I could not tell the time. I felt round the shop, and pushed open the door where my father and mother slept; I fell down two steps, and screamed out: my father went and opened the shutters - the two little children were in bed with him; one is three years old, and the other between fourteen and fifteen months; my father called the

watchman; my mother handed the child to him - my father went out with the little boy - the children were in their night clothes. I was naked all but my shift - my mother had her night gown on; the watchman helped us out. I had perceived no fire, only the suffocating smell; we went into the watch box opposite; my father came over with us, then returned, and when the shutters were down I saw him inside the shop, running about. Mr. Jupp sent his son with clothes for us, and took us into his house.

Q. Was there any thing in the closet besides what you have mentioned - A. My mother put some old rags and linen in as a store, in case the children had burns - it was in a basket under the stairs at the back of the closet; part of my father and mother's wearing apparel hung on pegs in the closet. Wood and old orange boxes were kept on the staircase enclosure; there were some sieves and bottles over my bed.

MR. LAW. Q. What is the size of the cupboard - A. It is large and high, and runs under the stairs, and has two shelves; the hair trunk was a large one - it had a lock and handles at the end; our apparel was not put in separately; the money was in a red pocket book at one corner, at the bottom of it. On Friday, the 19th of November, I was in the kitchen and saw a bit of the hair trunk - it was the part near the handle - I picked it off the floor - my mother saw it. - I might be five or ten minutes before I could find the door of my father's room. I never said it was half an hour; the piece of the trunk was left in the kitchen. I did not know that the officers had been searching for the remains of the trunk; my father burnt a rushlight or candle that night; when I forget to fetch a rush we burn a candle; the 95 l. consisted of 5 l. and 10 l. notes. I had not counted them, but my father said there was 95 l.; there is glass to the door of my father's room, but I was too much flurried to notice the light.

COURT. Q. Was your mother's silk gown new or old - A. New; the poplin gown was nearly new, and both the bombazeens, and the black silk pelisse was nearly new; she had bought the silk gown five or six months before, and the poplin twelve months, but did not wear them much; she bought the silk in Titchfield-street, and the silk shawl at Mr. Brown's, in Parliament-street. I had a silk gown, a poplin, and three bombazeen gowns; we had a chest of drawers, but they were sold six or seven months ago; we sold a mahogany bedstead and table and other things at the same time, as our bills did not come in fast enough, and my father wanted a great deal of ready money - we had two hair trunks, one was in the parlour.

BENJAMIN NEAVES . I am shopman to Mr. Butler, chemist, Regent-street. I sleep opposite to the house occupied by the prisoner. On the night of the fire, I was awoke about half-past two o'clock by the shutters falling. I looked out of the window, and saw the watchman taking a child out of the prisoner's house - he sprang his rattle, and I sprang one twice; the family got out of the window before I was dressed. I came down, went over, and saw nothing coming out but smoke; the shop windows were unloosed from inside; I do not know by whom.

JOSEPH JUPP . I am a hatter, and live in Regent-street. I was present at the fire. I did not see the prisoner till he was in the watch-box; my son took the family some clothing, and brought them to my house; the prisoner came in a few minutes after, and staid there most of the time after the fire was put out, but I was so flurried, I do not know what he did - the family were nearly naked; he had his great coat on part of the evening, but whether at first I cannot say.

MR. LAW. Q. Did his wife dress consistent with her station - A. Yes; plain and neat. I have seen her in a brown gown, whether silk or stuff I cannot say. I never saw her on a Sunday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-2

NEW COURT.

(1st DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2. MARK ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 8 lbs. of sheet copper, value 3 s., and 2 lbs. of nails, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Forest .

SECOND COUNT stating them to belong to Simon Dancer .

THIRD COUNT stating them to belong to Henry Fletcher and Joseph Fletcher .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

SIMON DANCER. I am commander of the Brig Nelson , belonging to Mr. Thomas Forrest. On the 15th of November, she laid in Mr. Fletcher's dock, Lower Shadwell , to be coppered - Mr. Forrest found the copper. I was on board on the 15th of November; there was a quantity of copper and nails there.

- RICHARDS . I belong to this Brig. On the 15th of November I was on board while the shipwright's went to dinner at one o'clock, to watch that no person took anything. I saw the prisoner abaft the vessel. I went forward, and when I came back he was gone. I heard a jingling of the copper under the ship. I looked round and saw him going up the ladder from the bottom of the dock. I asked him why he had been in the dock - he gave me no answer. I saw a sheet of copper in his hand, and sung out "Thief, here is a man stealing copper;" he ran away, and Mr. Hope stopped him. I saw him heave the copper down a sawpit - I jumped down and picked it up. I gave it to the steward - he was quite a stranger.

RALPH HOPE . I was in the dock-yard, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the prisoner running towards the gate followed by Richards; he had a sheet of copper which he threw into a saw-pit. I took hold of him, and the boy jumped into the saw-pit, and took out the copper - it may be worth 5 or 6 s.

JOHN VEARY . I was mate of the vessel. I took the prisoner at the gate with Mr. Hope; he begged me not to be too hard, as he had a wife and family. I took him on board - he attempted to jump over the quay; we struggled, and his hat fell off - a quantity of nails fell out of it; they were the same sort as are used for vessels. I saw the copper, it was such as was in the yard.

DANIEL BLYTH . I am a police surveyor; the prisoner was given to me with the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor working man, and have been at sea all my life time.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-3

3. JOHN DWYER was indicted for stealing, on the

26th of November , two printed books, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Yarrington .

HENRY YARRINGTON. I am a bookseller , and live in Peter-street, Wardour-street . On the 26th of November, I saw the prisoner outside my shop-window; two or three other persons were with him. I saw him take two books from the window and run away. I pursued, and he threw them down about two hundred yards off. I picked them up, and took him back to the shop; he begged of me to pardon him.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 11. Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-4

4. CHARLES EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 10 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. the goods of Richard Moseley .

RICHARD MOSELEY. I am a butcher , and live in Kingsland-road ; at eight o'clock in the morning of the 12th of November, I missed a piece of beef, which was in the shop the night before, lying on the block - the prisoner was in my service. I went to my stable and found it locked; and when it was opened, I saw the meat on a truss of hay in the loft, slightly covered with hay. I left it there, and saw him about twenty minutes after, coming home from market with the horse and cart. I told him to get out of the cart and take the mare away - he went to the stable, and I followed him with an officer. I found him in the hay-loft, and called him down. I then told him to fetch the piece of meat down: he said, he would not; and I gave him in charge, and went to the loft; the meat was not then where I had seen it before, but the prisoner went up and found it behind three trusses of hay a little further off. I had not sold it to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. - Q. Was not the hay to feed the horse - A. Yes; there is a space of about six feet from the roof of the stable, and the top of the partition which divides it from the next stable; he had an opportunity of taking it away in the morning - he asked me to forgive him, and said it was his first offence.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner take the beef from the stable; when I took him to the watch-house he cried very much - said it was the first time in his life, and he had got bad advisers.

GUILTY. Aged 20. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Fined One Shilling .

Reference Number: t18241202-5

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

5. JAMES RYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , two shillings , the monies of Francis Graham Goddard .

FRANCIS GRAHAM GODDARD. I live at No. 61, South Molton-street . On the 7th of August, at half-past 10 o'clock at night, the prisoner (who was a stranger to me) came to hire a lodging for W. L. Peel , Esq. I showed him our apartments; he said, they would perfectly suit the gentleman, and he would enter the next morning: he then asked me to go with him to fetch the gentleman's luggage; we went to Vere-street, and he asked me to wait an hour in the public-house at the corner of Henrietta-street, while he went to fetch a porter from the Thatched-House Tavern, where the gentleman was, who, he said, was the brother of Sir Robert Peel. I said, I could not wait an hour; he said, "Then wait ten minutes;" and as he did not return, I went home in about twenty-five minutes. I did not see him again that night, but I saw him afterwards at a friend's house where he came to take a lodging for a gentleman.

CAROLINE ISABELLA GODDARD . I am the wife of Mr. Goddard. I was at home when the prisoner came to take our lodgings; my husband's statement is correct; after he and the prisoner had been gone ten minutes or half an hour, the prisoner returned, and asked me to let him have 9 s. 6 d., as they were in want of some silver to pay the porterage of the gentleman's luggage; that Mr. Goddard did not happen to have any silver in his pocket, and had told him to run back to me for some. I am quite certain he said it was for Mr. Goddard to pay the porter. I gave him 2 s., which was all I had. I did not see him again.

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-6

6. SUSANNAH SADLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , four yards of stuff, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Sowerby .

THOMAS SOWERBY. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Chiswell-street . On the 2d of November, I observed an obstruction of light at the door, and on going towards it, I saw the prisoner walking away, and folding something in her apron. I followed her, and took this stuff from her.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable. I took her, and received this stuff from Sowerby; she seemed in great distress, and had no money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-7

7. JOHN BONE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , seven pair of pattens, value 4 s. , the goods of Walter Pitman .

WALTER PITMAN. I am a shoemaker , and live in Chiswel-street . On the 25th of November, as I sat at my desk, I heard my shopman say, "Young fellow, what are you doing with those pattens." I went to my door, and found him coming back with these pattens in his hand; the prisoner was brought in by some gentleman about five minutes afterwards.

GEORGE LOVELAND . I am shopman to Mr. Pitman. On the 25th of November, I saw the prisoner reach his arm in, and take the pattens off the door-post within the shop. I pursued, and caught hold of his coat; he dropped them, and I fell over them, and let go of his coat, and he got away. I took the pattens up and returned; he was brought back in about five minutes. I am convinced he is the man.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I was at the next house but one, and saw the prisoner put his hand in, and take the pattens. I called Stop thief! and pursued; he was taken in Finsbury-square. I never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-8

8. GEORGE BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value

1 l., and a key, value 10 s., the goods of John Sawyer , from his person .

JOHN SAWYER. I am an engraver . On the 28th of November, about six o'clock, I was going up Long-acre , to chapel; the prisoner met me, and rushed up against me, and at that moment I felt the watch drawn from my pocket; I am certain of his person; he ran away, and I after him, to the corner of St. Martin's-lane - he was taken in that lane. I came up to him, and some one picked up the watch, and gave it to me. I took him to St. Martin's watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WALTON . I live with my father, in Castle-street, Long-acre. I was in Long-acre on Sunday night, and saw the prisoner run up against Mr. Sawyer, who immediately cried Stop thief! I ran and seized the prisoner by the collar; he had thrown something behind him, but I do not know what it was - it appeared white. I saw some person give Mr. Sawyer a watch case. I never had my eyes off the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to dine with a young man, and on returning through St. Martin's-lane I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran, and three or four gentlemen laid hold of me, but I am totally innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-9

9. EDMUND OVERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a window blind, value 10 s.; a door latch, value 4 d.; a brass knot, value 1 d.; two deal boards, value 1 s.; two brass racks, value 2 d., and a lock, value 3 d. , the goods of Joshua Ramsey .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Thomas Cooper .

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 10th of November, while I was executing a search warrant at a marine store shop in Bethnal-green-road, the prisoner brought in some blinds and other things, for which he wanted half a crown; I was looking through a door between the shop and back parlour: the mistress of the house seemed rather confused, and tried to put him out of the shop. I then went after him, and said I would give him 1 s. 6 d. for the things: he said, "Oh! I know you, you are one of the officers of Worship-street, and I am done;" I said I should wish to know where he got the things - he said he got the blinds from a gentleman named Pitcher. I said I would go with him to his house, and as we were going he said, "It is of no use, what I told you is a lie - they are the property of Mr. Ramsey - if you will let me go I will give you the blinds;" I said I would not for 5 l.; he then said he would give me any sum to let him go.

JOSHUA RAMSEY. I am a builder . The prisoner had been in my employ about nine days, as a carpenter . I can swear to the whole of this property; it had been in Mr. Thomas Cooper's chambers.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-10

10. CORNELIUS DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 18 lbs. of sewing cotton, value 3 l. , the goods of John Wreford .

WILLIAM DUNSTAN . I am in the employ of Mr. John Wreford, of Aldermanbury; he is a haberdasher . On the 12th of November I packed up sixteen parcels of sewing cotton, each containing 10 lbs.; I invoiced them to Mr. Turner, Crown-street, Finsbury - our carman was to take them on the following day; I did not put them into the cart. I afterwards heard that two parcels had been taken away.

HENRY YEOMANS . I am carman to Mr. Wreford. Mr. Dunstan told me to take some parcels to Mr. Turner; I cannot say how many there were of them. I went about half-past four o'clock on the 13th of November, and went straight to Mr. Turner's door; I did not get off the cart till I got there. On Monday, the 15th, I was told by Mr. Turner that these two parcels were missing.

JOHN DONOVAN . I live in Crown-court. My father is a bricklayer's labourer. Mr. Turner's house is at the corner of our court. I saw a tilted cart at his door on the 13th of November, about four o'clock - the prisoner and three or four more were there. I saw the prisoner step up the step of the cart, and take a parcel out - he gave it to another, who gave it to a third, and it got to the prisoner again; he then walked by me, and asked what I was looking at - I said nothing; he gave me a blow in the face, which made my mouth and nose bleed; I had seen him before, and knew his person. The parcel was about twenty inches square.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I live at No. 97, Long-alley. I saw the prisoner, (whom I have known four years) pass my window about five o'clock, on the 13th of November - he had nothing with him; he went towards Crown-street, with four or five others, and returned with a paper parcel, about twenty inches square, under his right arm. I looked after him that night, but could not find him. I apprehended him on Monday morning, at the George public-house.

BRANSBY TURNER . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury. I received one hundred and fourteen parcels from Mr. Wreford's, on the 13th of November; the invoice was for one hundred and sixteen. I did not miss the two parcels till I had seen the invoice.

THOMAS ATTFIELD . I assisted to apprehend the prisoner on Monday, the 15th of November, at the George, in Bishopsgate-street. He wanted to get rid of this handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-11

11. FREDERICK CRUMP was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-12

12. ANN ALLMARK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , two half-crowns, the monies of John Ruth , to whom she was servant .

JOHN RUTH. I am a basket maker , and live in Church-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner had lived with me as servant about three days. On the 14th of November, about eight o'clock, we went to bed - my wife threw her pockets across the back of a chair; they had two half-crowns in them, which I had seen at tea time. We awoke about ten o'clock, and my wife said to the prisoner, who was still up, "Why don't you go to bed;" she said she was not in a hurry, and asked if she might go down stairs - she went

down, and never returned. My wife missed the money from her pocket.

ANN RUTH . I have heard what my husband has stated - it is true; we had been asleep, and when we awoke it was between nine and ten o'clock.

CHARLES CASTLES . I am an officer, and took her into custody.

GUILTY. Aged 14. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-13

13. GEORGE SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a package, containing 14 lbs. of thread, value 20 s. , the goods of Francis Ullathorn .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to Richard Worster and Matthew Stubbs .

JOHN WHEELER . I live in Macclesfield-place, and am carman to Richard Worster and Matthew Stubbs. On the 16th of November, I was driving their waggon to Middle-row, Holborn. I had a parcel for Francis Ullathorn. I was in Holborn about half-past twelve o'clock at noon, and saw the prisoner get off the waggon with this parcel on his shoulder. I went to him and said he was the man I wanted. I had noticed him watching the waggon, and therefore did not go into any house, but put the parcels in at the doors where I had to call.

WILLIAM HILL . I am an officer. I was going up Holborn and saw the prisoner and the carman struggling in the road. I took him to Hatton-garden with this parcel, which contained thread.

GEORGE HOLT . I am clerk to Messrs. Richard Worster and Matthew Stubbs. I sent the carman with this parcel to Mr. Francis Ullathorn, it contained shoemaker's thread.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-14

15. CHARLES BECKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , a tea-caddy, value 20 s., and a sugar basin, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Burgess .

JAMES PENDERGAST . I was in the Vale of Health at Hampstead (on the 29th of November.) I was near Mr. Burgess's house, which I serve with hardware. I saw the prisoner at the front parlour window in the little garden before the house - the window was open, and he took out the caddy in his arms. I rang the bell - he came running out of the gate. I collared him, and he collared me and got me down - I cried "Murder;" a man came up and he was taken; the caddy was dropped in the struggle.

SAMUEL COOK . I keep a horse and cart, and was passing the Vale of Health about two o'clock. I heard a cry of murder - I ran up and saw Pendergast on the ground, and the prisoner upon him. I took the prisoner and delivered him to a constable.

ELIZA WALTON . I am servant to Mr. Henry Burgess. I heard our gate-bell ring, ran out, and saw the prisoner and Pendergast struggling on the ground; the caddy was safe half an hour before in the dining room, close to the window - the prisoner was quite a stranger; our house is close to the road, but there is a garden before it as large as this Court.

THOMAS HUNT . I took the prisoner and property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out selling a few shirt buttons. I went up to the gentleman's house to see for hare-skins, and as I was coming out this witness stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-15

15. JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 25 lbs. of rags, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Souby .

JOHN UPTON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I met the prisoner on Monday, the 1st of November, a little after seven o'clock in the evening, in Fox-court, with a bag on his shoulder. I asked what was in it - he said rags, which he had got from a woman in Leather-lane, to sell for her, and he was to have 6 d. for his trouble; that he did not know the woman, but she lived at No. 47. I took him into a public-house and searched him. I found a glass in his hat. I sent my brother officer to Leather-lane to find the woman, but he could not.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer, and was with Upton. I stopped the prisoner, and went to Leather-lane to No. 47, and No. 37, and all the No. 7's in the Lane, but could not find the woman he described. I returned and asked him where he was to take the money - he could not tell.

JANE SOUBY . I am the wife of Thomas Souby. I have a shop No. 3, Lamb's Conduit-passage . I sell rags and phials . I fastened up my shop on Saturday night, the 30th of October, and left in it a bag of rags, containing about 25 or 26 lbs. I received information on Sunday, that the door had been opened - I went and found it so. I missed the bag of rags, and a number of phials.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Leather-lane, when a woman asked me to take the rags to sell for her, and she would give me 6 d.; she said she lived at No. 47.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-16

Before Mr. Recorder.

16. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a coat, value 30 s. the goods of Robert Roberts .

ROBERT ROBERTS. I have a shed in Covent Garden market ; I lost a coat from there two years ago last July - I think it was about the 22d. I was somewhere about the shed at the time, but did not see it taken. I met the prisoner about twelve months ago, under the Piazza, with the coat on. I said "You have got my coat still on;" he said, "Yes." I said, "I will thank you for it." He got away, and I could not pursue him. I did not see him again till he was taken up a few days ago. He was in the habit of waiting for little jobs in the market.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me to keep me warm and dry, more than once, twice, or thrice? A. No; I never gave you leave to put it on; I have often told you to put it off.

MARY ANN ROBERTS . I saw the prisoner three or four days after he had taken the coat, with it on his back. I pursued him and he got away; he told Sir Richard Birnie that he had worn it out.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you had lent me the coat? A. No, I never did; I saw you pass my stall, and

I said "You are my prisoner." - you said "You are mistaken in the person."

RICHARD WALL . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner on the 9th of November, from Mrs. Roberts. She never said in my hearing that she had given him the coat. He said, in the office, that he had taken the coat, and worn it out.

GUILTY Aged 52. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-17

17. JAMES CLEARY , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a coat, value 10 s. the goods of Benjamin Levy .

BENJAMIN LEVY. I keep a clothes shop in Plumbtree-street, Bloomsbury . On the 24th of November I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner come into the shop twice, and take nothing; he came in a third time and I went to see what he wanted, and saw him go out of the shop with this coat, which he had taken off the counter; he dropped it in the street; I took him.

ANN HALL . I am servant to Mr. Levy. My master called me down stairs and gave me the child. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, take the ticket off the coat, roll it up, and go away with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop and walking fast; I heard the cry of Stop thief! he took hold of me, and said I was the person. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-18

18. THOMAS CHINEY and WILLIAM RAMSDALE , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a coat, value 20 s. the goods of Thomas John Probyn , and a table cloth, value 3 s. the goods of Charles Fallon .

THOMAS JOHN PROBYN. On the 9th of November my coat was on the sofa in my back dining room, which looks into my garden, and some fields; my garden has palings round it, and a wall. I heard, in the evening, that some person had been taken up - I sent my servant to the watch-house, where he saw the property. I went to Kentish Town next morning and saw the two prisoners there.

JAMES CONNER . I am in the service of Mr. Probyn; I laid the coat on the sofa at half-past one o'clock. I missed it in about ten minutes. I went to Kentish Town in the evening; between six and seven o'clock, and saw the two prisoners in the watch-house; the table cloth was on the table.

RICHARD DEYKIN . I am constable of Kentish Town . On the 9th of November I went out to see if I could apprehend Chiney. I was returning on the coach, about twenty minutes before two, and on the bridge between Somers Town and Kentish Town I saw the two prisoners, Ramsden had the coat in a handkerchief, and Chiney had the table cloth under his coat. I got off the coach and saw them turn up a street; I followed and took them; they said they had found the things in a ditch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RAMSDALE'S Defence. I met this lad, and as we were passing a dry ditch, we saw the bundle; we opened it and he took the table cloth, and I the coat; we were coming to the first watch-house with them and were stopped.

CHINEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

RAMSDALE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-19

19. THOMAS TEAGLE and JOHN DAVIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , seven knives, value 2 s., two pairs of pinchers, value 2 s., a size stick, value 1 s. an awl, value 3 d., a fore-part iron, value 6 d., a rubber-stone, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Anthony .

DAVIS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOSEPH ANTHONY. - I am a shoemaker , and have a little shop by the Coach and Horses, in Welbeck-street . I had seen this property safe a little after 9 o'clock on the evening of the 4th of November, in the shop. I was called up between one and two that morning, and told that my shop had been broken open; it had been secured by a lock and a bolt; the lock had been forced open by some instrument on the outside; it could not have been opened by the hand; the prisoners were then in the watch-house.

JOSEPH ELSHAW . I am a watchman. This shop is on my beat. I saw the prisoners on the morning of the 5th of November, at two o'clock - they passed the corner of Wimpole-street; I went round, and met them again once or twice: I then went to look after them, and saw them coming up the mews with this property, about eighty paces from Anthony's shop; the serjeant of our watch took Davis, and I took Teagle; we found the tools upon them at the watch-house: we then went back, and found the shop was broken open. We gave notice to Mr. Anthony; he came and claimed the goods. The door appeared to have been broken open with a screw-driver.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see either of us searched? A. Yes. I saw some of the tools found, and then I went to inform Anthony.

JOSEPH USHER . I am serjeant of the watch. I took Davis, and Elshaw took Teagle, a few paces down the mews, on the same side as the shop. We took them to the watch-house, and found the tools, some on one, and some on the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TEAGLE'S Defence. I was called up to go to see my sister who was ill - I happened to hear some knives drop at the corner of the mews, where Davis was; I went and asked him where he got them; he said they belonged to him, and he thought he had put them into his pocket. As we got to the top of the mews we were taken.

TEAGLE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Both Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-20

20. THOMAS GURLING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a wooden image, value 20 s. , the goods of John Lewis .

JOHN LEWIS. I live at No. 39, Goodge-street . I sell tobacco and snuff . I lost a wooden image on Saturday, the 6th of November, from my door-post outside the house; it was safe about seven o'clock in the evening, and I missed it about ten. I had not seen the prisoner near my house. I found it at Marlborough-street on the Monday; he was then in custody.

PHILIP RYLEY . I am a patrole of St. Giles's. I met the

prisoner in Tottenham-court-road, near St. Giles's, with the image on his shoulder. I followed him to see what direction he took; he was going towards the interior of St. Giles's. I asked him where he got it; he said, it was his own. I said, "I ask where you got it?" he said, from a man in Oxford-street. I said, "What man; where can I find him?" He then said, "I will tell you all about it. I am a very poor boy, my father and mother have left me, and I stole it."

GUILTY . Aged 14. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-21

21. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 8 lbs. of brawn, value 15 s. , the goods of William Pocknell .

WILLIAM POCKNELL . I am a fishmonger , and live in St. Martin's-lane . I lost some brawn, on the 8th of November, from the shop window, about half-past twelve at night. I was gone to the Strand. I saw it again at the watch-house a quarter of an hour afterwards; the prisoner was then in custody. I was certain of the property; it was part of a collar I had cut that day, and weighed 8 or 10 lbs.; it cost me more than 15 s.

JAMES ARDEN . I am servant to Mr. Pocknell. On the 8th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was shutting up the shop, there was a gang of five or six persons round the window. I did not notice the prisoner, but as I was turning out of the shop with the shutters, I missed the brawn from the window; a person might have reached it from the outside before the shutters were closed. I ran down St. Martin's-lane, and saw three persons running. I called Watch! and a gentleman collared one of them; he struck him in the face and got away: while I was running towards Charing-Cross, I was knocked down by some one, but I cannot tell who. I afterwards saw the brawn at the watch-house, and the prisoner in custody. I am sure it was my master's.

SAMUEL JERRAND . I live in Peter-street, Westminster, and am a musician. I was in St. Martin's-lane on the 8th of November. I saw five or six young men loitering about Mr. Pocknell's shop. I did not distinguish either of them. I got beyond St. Martin's Church, and heard the cry of "Watch!" and "Stop thief!" on the other side of the way, where there were four or five persons in company running; the prisoner came by me with the brawn under his arm; he said, "Halloo! out of the way." I pursued him to the bottom of the lane; he crossed opposite to Northumberland-House. I saw him lay the brawn under the rails. I went up to him, and said, "My friend, this don't look well." I called Watch! and laid hold of him, while a person who was with me took up the brawn; the prisoner said, "For God's sake let me go, and do not say any thing about it." The watchman came up and took him. I went to the watch-house, and heard Mr. Pocknell claim the brawn.

RICHARD HODNOTT . I am a watchman. I took charge of the prisoner at Northumberland-House; a friend of Jarrand's delivered me the brawn, which was claimed by Mr. Pocknell.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street; my shoe came untied, and I put it down while I tied it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-22

22. HENRY MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , three pair of boots, value 30 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a pair of breeches, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d., and two stable dresses, value 10 s. , the goods of David Abraham .

DAVID ABRAHAM. I live with Mr. David Burgess , at the Holly Bush, public-house, Hampstead . On the 13th of November, I left these articles in the stable, which I locked at eight o'clock at night I came there again at a quarter past seven next morning, and they were all gone; the stable window had been knocked in, and four squares of glass broken - a man might have got in at that opening; there is a door to the stable which opens into the yard. I saw one pair of my boots on Morgan's feet, on the Sunday week after he was taken; another pair was produced before the Magistrate. I have seen one of the stable dresses. I had seen the prisoner frequently at the house.

BENJAMIN PIGGOT . I am ostler at the Holly Bush. I had been at Mr. Burgess's stables between nine and ten o'clock on the 13th of November, and left them locked and the window safe. I went there again at seven o'clock in the morning, and it had been broken; the space would have admitted any one into the stable. I saw the prisoner in custody at Highgate, about eight days after.

WILLIAM TOOLEY . I am an officer of Finchley. I saw the prisoner on the 19th of November, near the Queen's Head, public-house, about a quarter before five o'clock with a bundle. I had had some information from the landlady, and I stopped him; there were some articles in the bundle which were taken up to the Magistrate's.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am an officer of Hampstead. I have brought some things which I found concealed under the watch-house; they were afterwards claimed by Abrahams.

CHARLES ADAMS . I am an officer of Hampstead. I searched the prisoner in the watch-house on the Sunday after he was taken; this handkerchief was round his waist- - he did not say how he came by it.

THOMAS HUNTER . I am a constable. I have a pair of boots which I found in Duck Wood, Finchley - the prisoner shewed me where they were hid; they were claimed by Abrahams.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and picked the bundle up. I kept it till I was taken into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-23

23. ANN ROLPH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a pair of drawers, value 2 s. , the goods of John Gregory .

JOHN GREGORY. I keep a shop in Queen-street, Ratcliff . I saw the prisoner leaving the door with these drawers, which had hung on the door post - I went after her, and took her, seven or eight doors off, with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and kicked something before me; this gentleman came after me, and asked if I had picked up a pair of drawers - I said, "Yes, here they are." I have five children.

GUILTY. Aged 36. Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-24

24. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Godfrey , from his person .

CHARLES GODFREY. I am a musician , and live in Buckingham-street, Pimlico. On the 10th of November, about two o'clock in the day, I was in the Strand , going towards Charing-cross, and felt something pulling at my coat pocket, and immediately missed my pocket handkerchief, which I had used two or three minutes before; I turned to my left, and saw the prisoner crossing the road, and followed him, because I thought his step seemed rather hurried. I collared him, and charged him with having stolen the handkerchief - he denied it, but I saw him shuffling at his left hand inside coat pocket, and insisted on knowing what he had there; I pulled his hand out, and the handkerchief was in it. I was taking him to the watch-house when the constable came up.

ALEXANDER RYAN . I am a clerk, and live in Ball-court, Giltspur-street. I was proceeding along the Strand, when my attention was directed to the prisoner and another person, making an attempt at Mr. Godfrey's pocket. I was on the opposite side of the way, and was about to proceed across to inform Mr. Godfrey of it, when I saw the prisoner crossing with the handkerchief in his hand. Mr. Godfrey turned round, followed, and collared the prisoner in the middle of the road. I saw the handkerchief found in his hand, which was drawn from behind his coat.

HENRY GODDARD . I saw the prisoner in custody, and took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing down the Strand I saw the handkerchief on the pavement, when Mr. Godfrey came up to me, and asked if I had a handkerchief - I said, "Yes, here it is," and gave it to him.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-25

25. NICHOLAS CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Thomas Barber Beaumont , Esq. , from his person .

JOHN THOMAS BARBER BEAUMONT, ESQ. I live in Regent-street. On the 26th of November, about a quarter past five o'clock, I was passing Fullwood's-rents, Holborn - I had a silk handkerchief in my pocket; I had used it shortly before. I felt it being drawn out of my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner near me, apparently in the act of gathering it up in his hand; I collared him, and said, "You scoundrel, you have my handkerchief;" he said, "I have not;" I said I was sure he had. At that time two other men, who were in company with him, came at my back, and pressed against me, but as they saw me determined, they ran away; the prisoner said "I suppose those men have stolen it;" I said I was sure he had it, as he had not had time to pass it to any others - I then pulled his hand and his coat, and wondered where it could be, when a gentleman, who came up, found it on the ground, at his feet. I have not the least doubt of his being the person who took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent. There were two other persons close by the gentleman at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-26

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

26. CAROLINE SPEARING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a watch, value 40 s.; a seal, value 10 s., and a key, value 1 d., the goods of John Lett , from his person .

PHILIP RYLEY . I took the prisoner last Thursday, and produce a watch given to me by Jane Clarke; the prisoner said the watch was her own.

JANE CLARKE . I gave the watch to Ryley last Thursday night, about eleven o'clock; the prisoner had come to the eating-house where I live, and asked for a basin of soup, and in a few minutes a man joined her, and pulled out some silver, (I believe 15 s.;) he asked her to have the money for the watch; she said she would not take less than 18 s.; she knew he wanted to rob her; she then said to me, "Will you keep this watch for me till the morning." I thought it was not properly come by, and I called in Mr. Ryley.

JOHN LETT. On Thursday night last, about seven o'clock, I was at the Red Lion, public-house - the prisoner was there, and said she thought she knew me; I got talking with her for some time, and we went on towards my home. I went to a room with her - I had had my watch in my hand just before I went in; she left the room, and said she would come back again in a minute. I put my hand to my fob, and missed my watch; I went out but could not overtake her. I saw her put something into her bosom. I was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. We went into the room together. He gave me his watch to keep till the next night, and said if I would meet him on Westminster-bridge he would give me 5 s.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-27

27. RICHARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of William Abbey , from his person .

WILLIAM ABBEY. I was in Oxford-street on the 21st of November, about twenty minutes before six o'clock, going towards St. Giles's; I felt a pull at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my-handkerchief in his hand; this is the handkerchief - I can swear to it - (producing it.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Oxford-street, and picked it up.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-28

28. WILLIAM JORDAN was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS WELCH . The prisoner was in the employ of James Williamson and William Wass - he was to receive money, and to account to me for it; he never accounted to me for 5 s. 6 d., for a cask of beer sold to Mr. Lightfoot , on the 1st of November. He accounted for other money, but not for that at any time.

WILLIAM GARDNER . I am in the service of Mr. Lightfoot. On the 1st of November I paid 5 s. 6 d. to the prisoner for Mr. Lightfoot - the prisoner gave me a receipt for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-29

29. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a pair of breeches, value 12 s., three handkerchiefs, value 6 s., a hat, value 5 s., and two sixpences , the property of Samuel Ball .

SAMUEL BALL. On the morning of the 8th of November, I saw the prisoner at the Ship, public-house, Charles-street, Westminster. I was in his company four or five hours, and then went with him to a lodging-house in Orchard-street . I slept with him in the same bed. I put my clothes under the pillow; there were two sixpences, and a snuff-box in the pocket of the waistcoat, a handkerchief in my coat pocket, and my hat was on the shelf. I awoke about seven o'clock and he was gone, and my things also, except my coat and one of the tops of my boots - there were two men and their wives, and a child in the room - they were not there when we went to bed - the prisoner came again about five o'clock in the afternoon - I said, "What have you done with my clothes?" he said, he had taken them to my brother's in Smithfield. I have no brother in London - he then went to bed, and said, I should have them in the morning - he pulled my clothes off himself, and I called for the watchman and gave him in custody - when we got to the watch-house, he said, I should have my clothes in ten minutes if I would give him 5 s., which he had paid for what we eat and drank the day before.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a watchman. On the 9th of November, while I was crying half-past five o'clock - I was called by the prosecutor. I went to No. 66. Orchard-street. and took the prisoner there in bed - he got up and pulled the waistcoat off, and a pair of white stockings, which the prosecutor owned - he then said, the two sixpences were gone out of his pocket. I then said, he had better let him have his things - but, he said, he would be transported for life rather than let him have his things without he gave him 5 s., which he had expended upon him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-30

30. MARY TYACK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , four pillows, value 8 s., a blanket, value 2 s., and a bolster, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Mann , in a lodging-room .

SAMUEL MANN. I live in Chapel-street, Somer's-Town ; my wife let a room to the prisoner and her husband - they lodged there some time, and the things were all gone but the drawers and bedstead.

ANNA MARIA MANN . The prisoner took a furnished apartment in my house - her husband was not with her - he did not sleep there more than two or three nights - on the 5th of November, we missed every article that was moveable - they had not then left the room. I missed five chairs, a table, some fire-irons, a saucepan, a tea-kettle, two blankets, four pillows and a bolster - we found the tickets in the room.

RICHARD SKINNER . I am a constable. I searched the room, and found some duplicates. I took the prisoner into custody.

THOMAS COOMBS . I live with Mr. Smelly , a pawnbroker. I gave out these tickets myself to the prisoner. I know her to be the person - here are the articles which she pawned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The blanket was not Mr. Mann's; but a butcher's wife in the neighbourhood got me to pawn it for her - she then asked me if I knew any one who would buy it of me. I did not - she went to Bristol, and said, I might keep the ticket, as she owed me 6 d. Mrs. Mann was very urgent for her rent, and I was forced to pledge the things to raise it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-31

31. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Woolley , from his person .

JOHN WOOLEY. I was in Piccadilly on the 4th of November - between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the officer, Dorrington, asked me if my pocket had been picked. I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before; he had the prisoner; and I saw the handkerchief taken from his coat pocket.

ANN DORRINGTON . I am the wife of Frederick Dorrington . I saw the prisoner in Piccadilly on the 4th of November; a person was with him. I saw him and his companion take something out of Mr. Woolley's pocket. I could not tell what it was. I told my husband of it.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON. In consequence of what my wife said, I took the prisoner into custody. I then went and told Mr. Woolley of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-32

32. THOMAS BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Uriah Davis , from his person .

URIAH DAVIS. I lodge in Holborn. On the 22d of November I was informed that I had lost something while I was passing Red Lion-passage . I felt in my pocket and missed my handkerchief, which was safe about two hours and a half before; I saw it in the hands of the person who stopped the prisoner.

JAMES WILDE . I saw the prisoner on the evening of the 22d of November, walking behind Mr. Davis and another young man. The prisoner made several attempts at the pocket, and at last he got the handkerchief out. I ran and took hold of him; as I was taking him to the watch-house several persons came round me.

WILLIAM FRUNING . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner running, and Wilde pursuing him. I went to the watch-house, and took charge of him.

FREDERICK COOK . I saw the prisoner attempt to take the handkerchief out of Mr. Davis's pocket. I cried Stop thief! and saw him taken.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-33

London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

33. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-34

34. HUMPHREY MARKS , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a watch, value 4 l., a chain, value 1 s., two seals, value 1 l., and a key, value 6 d., the goods of James Hooker , from his person .

JAMES HOOKER. I am a Custom-house officer . About eight o'clock on the morning of the 15th of November, I was in St. Mary Axe , a horse had fallen down, and the prisoner was standing there; the passage was narrow, and I said to my brother officer, who was going on duty with me, "We had better go singly." He went first, and I after him. The prisoner came up to me and snatched my watch out of my pocket; I seized him by the arm, and called Thief! thief! My partner could not come to my assistance, but I held the prisoner, and he threw down the watch to make use of his other hand, to push me aside; he then made his escape, and lost his hat in the scuffle; he ran through several streets, and we pursued, but lost sight of him; he was, however, taken in a street in which there is no thoroughfare.

JAMES MAYER . I was in St. Mary-axe on the 15th of November. I heard the cry of Thief! and saw the prisoner and the witness Hooker, struggling together. The prisoner got away, but he had thrown the watch down at my feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had thrown it down, it must have broken the glass.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-35

35. EDWARD NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Mee , from his person .

JOSEPH MEE. I live at Northampton. On the 30th of November I was at the bottom of Newgate-street , and felt a pulling at my hind pocket; I turned and saw the prisoner near me; there was a considerable crowd - the prisoner had my handkerchief in his hand. I took hold of him, and he dropped it behind him. I believe he had it in his hand when I seized him.

Prisoner. The witness caught hold of me and said, "You have got my handkerchief;" I said "No;" and the handkerchief was a yard and a half from me.

Witness. No; it was close at his heels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-36

36. WILLIAM SYDNEY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , five hempen sacks, value 7 s. 6 d. ; the goods of William Marchant .

WILLIAM MARCHANT. I am a corn-dealer , and live at Bagnigge-wells . I found my coach-house door broken open, on Sunday the 14th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning, and missed some sacks, but could not tell how many - my servant had left them there.

WILLIAM ADDINGTON . I am a constable. I went to No. 2, Gloucester-place, on the 14th of November, and found these sacks - the prisoner was there; he said he was going to take them to Mr. Marchant's from a Mr. Jessup's; he was taken into custody.

GEORGE STRIPLING . I went to No. 2, Gloucester-place, and found the sacks which I delivered to the City officer; the prisoner said he had brought them from a Mr. Jessup's, and had had them ten days.

CHARLES ALDWINKLE . I received the sacks from Stripling.

THOMAS HASELWOOD . I am in the service of Mr. Marchant. I left these five sacks at one o'clock on Saturday afternoon in a cart in the coach-house. I heard that the coach-house had been broken open; when I got there I found the five sacks were gone; two of them are marked"W. Marchant," one "W. O.," and I believe the other two are plain - I know these to be the sacks.

Prisoner's Defence. They were left at my lodgings by a young man, who told me to take them to Mr. Marchant's, which I intended to do on the Monday morning, as I was taken on the Sunday; my father lodges at Mr. Marchant's, and works there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-37

37. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a wooden cask, value 2 s., and 30 lbs. of ground white lead, value 5 l. , the goods of William George Watson and George Tynell .

MR. WILLIAM GEORGE WATSON. I have a cellar under my house, at the corner of the Poultry . I know nothing of the transaction, but the cask of lead is my property.

WILLIAM EVANS. I am in the service of Mr. Watson. About half-past five o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of November, I was in the cellar, and heard a rumbling noise in the passage. I went up stairs - there was no one in the passage. I saw the prisoner and another person - they had got the cask as high as their knees, and seemed to be lifting it on the prisoner's shoulder. I went and took the prisoner, saying, he was the person I had been waiting for: he said he was pushed in - he was then taken before the Magistrate.

JAMES CARPENTER . I was sent for take the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was walking down the street, going to my sister, being short of money; a man asked me to give him a lift with this cask, and he would give me 6 d.; I came to the passage and took the cask, and while we were getting it out, the witness came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-38

38. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a piece of silk handkerchiefs, containing five, value 35 s., the goods of Thomas Bond , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BOND. I am a linen-draper , and live in St. Bride's-passage . On the 1st of November, while I was at tea, my servant called me down, and said there was something in the prisoner's hat. I kept him from going to his hat, and my servant took out a piece of handkerchiefs containing five handkerchiefs.

JOHN M'KALLER . I saw the prisoner come in about five o'clock in the evening, with another boy; they asked to look at some coloured silk handkerchiefs: while I was shewing them, the prisoner put a piece in his hat, which I saw when he was taking out his handkerchief, to wipe his

nose. I called Mr. Bond, and gave him charge of the prisoner while I ran out after the other boy; these handkerchiefs had been in a drawer which I took down to show them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop with another, to buy a handkerchief. I pulled off my hat, and took out my handkerchief to wipe my nose; a piece of handkerchiefs hung over the counter, and as I was pulling my own handkerchief up again, the piece caught to my hat.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-39

39. HENRY SPYRING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , twelve pairs of stockings, value 22 s. , the goods of William Kipling .

JAMES BRASSINGTON . I am shopman to Mr. William Kipling, of Cheapside . In consequence of information I followed the prisoner, and collared him about ten doors off. I brought him back, and I missed a dozen of Angola stockings from the door, which I had put there about ten minutes before - they were about a foot inside the shop; a person might reach them from the street.

GEORGE WRIGHT . I am a letter carrier. On the 19th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Cheapside, and saw the prisoner take the stockings from Mr. Kipling's door; he gave them to another person, who made off with them very quickly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Covent Garden-market, and was passing this house when the gentleman came and took me up. I never did any such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-40

40. HENRY MOIER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of George Davy Stibbard , from his person .

GEORGE DAVY STIBBARD. On the 26th of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Bartholemew-close, coming to Smithfield ; I felt a pull at my coat; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - I pursued, and he threw it down at the corner of Cloth-fair - I lost it, but caught him.

Prisoner. The gentleman asked me where the handkerchief was, and I told him I did not know - Witness. I asked him, and he said he would take me back to the place; as we were going back he loitered behind for a minute; there were ten or twelve more round us, and then he denied the theft.

ANTHONY BECK . I was with the prosecutor; he turned round suddenly, and said to the prisoner, "You young rascal, you have picked my pocket." I did not see anything in the prisoner's hand; I followed, and did not lose sight of him, except for a moment when he turned. I am sure he is the boy. When he was taken he said he would take Mr. Stibbard to the place.

Prisoner's Defence. If the gentleman saw me throw the handkerchief down, what need had be to ask me where it was? and how can he tell that it was his handkerchief.

MR. STIBBARD. I felt the handkerchief going from my pocket, and saw it in his hand immediately.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-41

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

41. DAVID LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , six shirts, value 2 l. 5 s., the goods of Samuel Bannister , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD HERRING . I am shopman to Samuel Bannister, a hosier , who lives in Middle-row, Holborn . On the 3d of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was outside, cleaning the brass of the window, and saw the prisoner and another man going out of the shop; the prisoner had a parcel under his arm - I took hold of them, and brought them in. The other got away, but I secured the prisoner with the parcel; he struggled a little, and it dropped out of his hand; it contained six fleecy hosiery shirts, and was taken from six feet within the shop.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not replacing it? A. No; he was outside the shop with it - nobody else was in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been married but six weeks, and used every means to procure an honest livelihood, as a bonnet-presser, and was delivering cards round, and called at this shop for that purpose. I accidentally knocked the parcel down, and was picking it up when I was seized.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-42

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

42. MARY ANN GATES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , in the dwelling-house of William Thorn , a purse, value 6 d., six sovereigns, a guinea, and a 5 l. Bank note, the property of Mary Forsyth .

MARY FORSYTH. I live at Aberdeen, in Scotland. On the 4th of November I was at Miss Gordon's, who lives at Mr. Thorn's, in John-street, Oxford-street - I had gone there about eight o'clock the evening before, and slept there; my purse, containing six sovereigns, and a 5 l. note, was in my reticule, which was in my muff. I missed the purse, and money at three o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th; I had left John-street at ten o'clock - I immediately went to my lodgings in Duke-street, to search, but could not find it. I did not go to John-street. The prisoner was servant at Miss Gordon's. I took my muff into the bedroom when I went to bed. I have since seen a purse like mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You looked at home for your purse - I suppose you are not sure that you had it at Miss Gordon's? A. No.

JOHN GORDON . On the 4th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was at my sister's, and saw her find 16 s. or 17 s. in the coal scuttle, on the first floor landing place; I asked the prisoner what she was doing with the money in the coal scuttle; she said it was the change of a sovereign which she had received from her mother, and she had bought her child a hat with the rest. I sent for a constable.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I and Westcoatt were fetched to Miss Gordon's about six o'clock - I went up into the drawing room: Miss Gordon said a lady who had slept there the night before, had sent' to say that she had lost her purse; they shewed me the silver which was found in the coal scuttle. I asked the prisoner how she became possessed of the money - she said that on Tuesday, when she came to her situation, her mother gave her a sovereign - that she had been to her mother-in-law at Somer's-town, that morning, and she had given her a half-sovereign. I then took her up to the attic, and searched her box, and found a wedding ring, apparently new; she said it was hers. We went into the kitchen, and found a sovereign and a guinea on a hand basket on the table - any one in the kitchen could see it; she said she knew nothing of it; there was a little servant girl in the house, who also had access to the kitchen. I asked her a question on the 9th of November, after she had been in custody; Westcoatt had been with her before that.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I had been with the prisoner when she was in confinement. I made her no promise or threat.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw her on the 5th? A. Yes; and had her stripped and searched by a female turnkey.

Q. After that did not you say "Well, Yates, don't you think yourself a pretty creature? I have been to your mistress, and make no doubt but you will get over it if you confess the truth?" A. No; I said I had found out that she had passed a sovereign at Mr. Atkin's, for a gown and shawl - she made no answer. I then said, "You have been to purchase a bonnet at Mrs. Lacey's, in Oxford-street, for 32 s. and left a sovereign there." She said, "Yes." I said nothing whatever to induce or frighten her to confess. I then asked her "Have you left the 5 l. note in the same kind of way as the sovereign?" She said "No." I said, "What have you done with it?" She said, "Why the ring you found in my box I bought at a silversmith's in Monmouth-street, and paid 11 s. 6 d. for it." I asked what she had done with the change. She said, "Where you found the money last night, there you will find the remainder, for I threw it down in the kitchen," I went to the kitchen but could find no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you regularly employed at Marlborough-street? A. Yes; for nearly four years, and was at Bow-street before that. I frequently ask questions of prisoners, when I think I have a clue to a robbery. I said nothing to her about telling the truth.

THOMAS CLEMENTS re-examined. On the 9th of November I asked her what she had done with the change she received out of the 5 l. note, when she bought the ring - she said "You will find it where you found the sovereign and guinea." I said "I cannot find it there - have you not left it in the purse, and put it away somewhere." She said, No, that she had thrown it into the dust hole. I went to her mistress's, and, after stirring the dust about, found a purse which I produce.

Cross-examined. Q. This was six days after the first examination? A. Yes; what I said to her was in consequence of what I heard from Westcoatt.

MISS FORSYTH. The purse is like mine, but I cannot swear to it. I had never minutely examined mine. I called at several places on that day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-43

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

43. LOT CARTLIDGE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of David Jones , about seven o'clock in the night of the 17th of October , at St. Andrew, Holborn , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, thirty-nine pieces of ribbon, containing, in length, 713 yards, value 5 l., five yards of lace, value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 7 d. his property .

ELIZABETH JONES . I am the wife of David Jones. We live at No. 36, Leather-lane , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, and rent the house. I am a dress-maker and milliner. On Sunday, the 17th of October, at five minutes after six o'clock in the evening, we went out. I fastened every window and door of the house - it was nearly dark; we had a candle before we went out. I returned a few minutes before eight - I unlocked the door - we went into the kitchen for a light, and found the clothes all over the kitchen - they were all right when I went out. I missed some lace, ribbon, and three pieces and a half of Irish cloth, from the shop - it was Urling's lace - I cannot state the value of that or the Irish, but the ribbons were worth 8 l. I lost six handkerchiefs of one sort, and five of another. I found the windows all fast - the persons must have entered at the front door by a false key - they could have got in no other way. I found some of the property at Bow-street, a week or a fortnight after. (Examining a bundle of ribbons produced by William Shires ), these are mine. I had only bought them on the 13th. I know one piece by having cut three yards off it - and another I cut one yard and a half from - another I only bought four yards and a half of, and cut one and a half off. The papers, which had marks, are taken off them. Here is another piece, which I bought in Holborn, to trim a cap; and a piece of white, which I bought at a different place - here is a narrow piece, which I bought at the warehouse, and two pieces of brown, and one piece which I bought for an order. Here are other ribbons; I can partly speak to them all - here is a piece of lace which I bought in Holborn; and the handkerchief they are tied in, is exactly like a piece, of six, which I lost; it is new now, and not hemmed. None of them have my mark now, but are all similar to what I lost - the value of the ribbons here is 5 l. or 6 l.; all that I lost cost me 8 l., and I lost a great deal more lace.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you lived in Leather-lane long? A. No; I know that it is in St. Andrew's parish; our part is not in the city, or we must take up our freedom. I left nobody in the house - we went to chapel, and took the servant with us. I saw the goods on Saturday night, and had not been out on Sunday morning; we just went down the lane in the afternoon, but it rained, and we returned - the servant was at home then. My mark is taken off every one of the things, - here is one piece which I marked S, on the block, but it is scraped off - the rest were marked on paper. I know nothing of the prisoner - we left the house a little after six o'clock. I cannot say whether there was sufficient light then to discover a man's features.

THOMAS HOWELL . I am a cabinet maker. I have a piece of sand-paper which was found in the bundle with these ribbons. Shires gave it to me. I had been making the fixtures of Jones's shop, and left it there a week before the robbery - here is the word "feet," written on it in my writing - it is not so plain as when I first saw it, and it has the dust of the wood on it which I was working with - I know it by the colour of the dust.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say at Bow-street, when it was much plainer than now, that you could not swear to it? Yes; but when I looked at it, it was as plain as the alphabet. I said I did not wish to swear to it; I was rather in a flurry, not having been before a Magistrate before; but when I examined it it was very plain - I was sure of it. I know the dust as plain as the writing. I told the Magistrate I could not swear to it - I had not noticed the dust then - here is a piece of the wood which I had been working on.

WILLIAM SHIRES. I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 18th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in Goswell-street-road. I knew him before, and said, "Lot; I want you;" he said, "My name is not Lot." I said, "Your name is Cartlidge;" he said, "No, you mistake me." I said, I should take him to Bow-street - he asked what I took him for. I said, on suspicion of a robbery which took place at Margate. I left him at the office, and afterwards took him to the Queen's-Head public-house, and there searched him, and found all the property produced in his right hand coat pocket - he said, they were what he had bought - the piece of sand paper was in his pocket, with the ribbons and lace.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say who he bought it of? A. No - he said nothing about one Lowndes. I never recollect the name being mentioned. I swear I never heard it mentioned. I saw Howell before the Magistrate, and asked him if he could identify the writing - he said, he could not - we were ordered to make haste before the Grand Jury, fearing they would break up; and his name was not put on the bill, because he could not identify the writing - he said, next morning, it was very clear to him that it was his writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him in the office who I had them from; and Mr. Smith, at Bow-street, took down the person's name, and the public-house where I said I had bought them. Shires was present at the time. I stated to him that I had not had them in my possession a quarter of an hour, and that I had them of a person named Lowndes - that I had not wholly purchased them; but had paid part of the money down, as I thought I could find a customer for them. Lowndes told me he had bought them at a sale on the Friday before - Mr. Smith and Ellis were present at the time - it was at the public-house that I told him most of this; and as to my committing the robbery, I had been out of the way three days, for fear of being arrested for a debt which I owed to one Murray.

WILLIAM SHIRES re-examined. When I searched him, he had 1 s., and a few halfpence; he said, he had a sovereign, but I did not find it.

ANDREW CHISHOLME . I keep the Bull's-Head, Peter-street, Cow-Cross, which is about a quarter of a mile from Leather-lane - the prisoner slept at my house on the nights of the 15th, 16th, and 17th of October - he came in on Sunday night a few minutes before or after eleven o'clock - Mr. Bartram, who lives next door but one to me, came with him - he had gone out about eight or nine o'clock that morning.

ROBERT BARTRAM . I live at No. 15, Peter-street - the public-house is Nos. 16 and 17. I keep a sheep's head shop; and have known the prisoner sixteen years. I always heard his character to be that of an honest upright man. I know no other character of him - he dined with me on the 17th of October, about ten minutes or a quarter past one o'clock, and did not leave my house till a quarter to eleven, when I went with him to the Bull's-Head, where he slept; and he breakfasted with me in the morning. I took the lodging for him, as he said he was in debt, and wanted to keep out of the way for two or three days, as he was in fear of being arrested.

COURT. Q. Did you go out at all on Sunday afternoon? A. No; I and my wife were there; nobody else; we all three staid at home. I was taking a pipe and some porter with my friend Cartlidge, till tea time; and after tea we had some more - he was never out of my place for five minutes - I do not think it was half five minutes - he was out of my presence for about three minutes; but I think he went down into the cellar. I have lived four years in the house, and have been twenty-seven years in the neighbourhood - we did not go to church.

ELIZABETH BARTRAM . I am the wife of the last witness. On Sunday, the 17th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and breakfasted with us; and dined with us at a quarter-past one - my husband accompanied him to the next house about a quarter to eleven o'clock in the evening - he was not out of my sight from dinner time till then.

COURT. Q. Had he left the house after breakfast? A. He went out about twelve o'clock, and returned before one - we sat in the back parlour.

Q. Was you never out of the room? A. I might be in the shop; but never went out of doors - my husband fetched the porter from Chisholme's - there is no back door to the house - he could not go out without coming through the shop - he breakfasted with us on Monday; and staid till half-past ten o'clock. I heard of his being taken up next day - we did not go to Bow-street - we were not sent for - we did not know where he was till the Saturday following. I heard of his being taken up next day; but did not know where he was till Saturday, when he was in Coldbath-fields.

ROBERT BARTRAM re-examined. I heard of his being taken on the Tuesday; and on the Saturday I saw him at Newgate - his son came to tell me he was there. I went to see him - this was on the Saturday following the Sunday on which he dined with me - he said, he was fully committed. On the Sunday before, he dined with me, I think a relation from Whitechapel, or my niece, dined with me - I cannot say which - Saturday is a busy day; but I went to him about twelve o'clock, which is a leisure time with me.

WILLIAM SHIRES. He was taken before the Magistrate on Monday, the 18th of October, and again on the 20th - he was fully committed on the Friday week; not before - he never stated that he had been at Bartram's.

MRS. JONES. I went to Bow-street twice - the first time on the Friday after the robbery.

Upon referring to the prison books, it was ascertained that the prisoner was committed to Newgate on Friday, the 29th of October.

ELIZABETH BARTRAM re-examined. When I heard he was in custody, I heard that he was at the Old Bailey.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering .

Reference Number: t18241202-44

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

44. MARY ANN RYCROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone , two gowns, value 5 l., and a shawl, value 1 l., the goods of Caroline Clarke , spinster, in the dwelling-house of Charles Clarke .

CAROLINE CLARKE. I am the daughter of Charles Clarke. On the 12th of November, we lodged at Mr. Morell 's, No. 20, Great Titchfield-street . Morell is the landlord, but did not live in the house - it is let out in tenements - my father had two rooms on the third floor. On the 12th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting at work in my mother's front room - my mother went out on the landing-place, and called out, "Caroline! Stop thief!" I ran out of the room, and saw the prisoner running down on the second floor landing - I ran after her; my mother was on the top landing, the prisoner could hear her call. I pursued, calling Stop thief! the street-door was on a spring - she opened it, and it banged too again of itself. I opened it, and saw her running in the street, and pursued, calling Stop thief! and only lost sight of her in turning the corner down Union-street - she was not out of my sight for a moment, and was still running. I saw her turn into Wells-street, caught sight of her again immediately, and saw her come down two or three steps from a leather cutter's shop in Wells-street. I caught her at the corner of Mortimer-street, and asked what she had taken from No. 20, Great Titchfield-street; she said she knew nothing of me, and if I thought she had taken any thing, I might search her. I wanted her to go back, and while I was talking to her, Mrs. Graves came up, and wished her to go back; she went within a door of our house; a woman came up, and said in her presence that my things were thrown into a leather cutter's shop, and the apprentice came up - I left her with Graves, and went to the shop, and Mrs. Bruce gave me my things; it was a puce silk dress, a poplin skirt, and a shawl; which I knew; I had seen them that morning, in my box - they all belonged to me. I had made the silk dress for a lady; it was in my care. The box was in a back room, on the same floor, as we were sitting - the door was not locked. They are worth 6 l. altogether. When I came from Bruce's I saw the prisoner at the corner of Monmouth-street, and followed her a long way; the street keeper and constable came up, and took her. The house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone.

ELIZABETH CLARKE . I am the last witness's mother. On the 12th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the passage, and saw the prisoner on the same landing place as me; there is no floor higher than ours - she must have been to our room: there are only two rooms on that floor. I asked twice whom she wanted; she made no answer: I asked her a third time, and she said she wanted a person, but I do not recollect the name she mentioned; I asked what she had got under her arm; she ran down stairs as fast as she could - I called my daughter, who ran down after her: I called "Stop thief! stop that woman." Graves lodges on the second floor; he ran also, and I followed him. I saw Mrs. Taylor, (who lives on the first floor,) with the body of my daughter's gown.

ESTHER HARLEY . I was in Wells-street, between three and four o'clock, on this afternoon, and saw a woman running very fast up the steps of a leather cutter's door, and pull a bundle from under her arm, under her shawl, and throw it into the passage: it was loose, not tied up - one of the things appeared green; she ran down the steps, and down Wells-street. I stood at the shop, and saw some things picked up in Bruce's passage, in about two minutes; it was the same things as the woman had thrown down. I saw the prisoner afterwards in the prosecutrix's custody, and am sure she is the woman.

MARY GRAVES . I live in Titchfield-street, with Mr. Sherrin, in the same house as Clarke. On the afternoon of the 12th of November, between three and four o'clock, I was in the second floor back room, somebody rang the bell - I went down, and found the door open; the prisoner was in the passage, pretending to wipe her feet: I am sure of her person - she passed me, and went up three pairs of stairs. I went into my room, and in ten minutes I heard Mrs. Clarke call out - I went out, and caught a glimpse of the prisoner's shawl as she passed the staircase window; she had a blue shawl on. I went out, and saw her turn the corner of Union-street and Wells-street, and saw her taken by Miss Clarke and Mr. Graves. I am certain of her; we got her round into Titchfield-street: a man came up, and said that was not the woman; I said I was sure it was - he said, "It is not, let her go;" she was not let go.

GEORGE GRAVES . I was alarmed by the cry of Stop thief! when I was in the second floor front room, and ran out, I saw Caroline Clarke opening the street door; I went out, and saw the prisoner at the corner; I assisted in taking her - she denied being the person. I brought her to the house. A person held up a gown body - she denied having taken it, and got loose from me. A man hindered my securing her again, but Graves and Clarke followed, and took her.

EMMA BRUCE . I live at No. 30, Wells-street; my husband is a leather cutter. There are five steps leading up to our passage door, which is always open. On the 12th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a cry of Stop thief! in the street; I hastened through the shop, and on opening the shop door, in the passage I saw a puce dress, a plaid skirt, and a shawl. I gave the same things to Miss Clarke in a quarter of an hour.

CELIA TAYLOR . I live on the first floor of this house; I heard a cry of Stop thief! on the stairs - I opened my window, looked out, and saw the back of a woman; she was only in my sight for two minutes. I saw the prisoner in custody afterwards; she was dressed the same as the person I saw. I went down stairs directly, and picked up the body of the plaid dress behind the street door, and gave it to Mrs. Clarke.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I took the prisoner in charge, and produce the things which Mrs. Clarke gave me.

CAROLINE CLARKE. This is the puce dress, the poplin skirt, and shawl; I know them all: I received them from Bruce.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and was soon laid hold of; the woman said, "You have robbed me;" I said I did not know her, and had nothing belonging to her - she insisted on my going with her; I said I would not for she might search me. I was treated very roughly. I know nothing whatever of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be her first offence .

Reference Number: t18241202-45

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

45. CHARLES METZGER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , at St. George, Hanover-square , two sovereigns, the monies of Frederick Green , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT the same, only stating the house to be the dwelling-house of Mary Green , widow.

JOHN LINDSEY WESTCOTT . I live with Mr. Frederick Green, an auctioneer , in David-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; the house belongs to him - he does not sleep there, but his mother, Mary Green does; she is a widow; one of my master's servants sleep there - he pays her wages. On the 16th of November I was in the office; the prisoner came in, and said he had brought a paper, and was sent by a gentleman a little lower down to shew it to Mr. Green. I said he was out of town, but took the paper out of his hand, and looked at it; he asked me to shew it to the lady of the house, saying that it was a passport, and he wanted to get a little money to take him to his own country. I think he said to Hanover. I gave him 1 d.; he said he had been a long time raising money. I said if he called to-morrow, I would endeavour to get him some, and if he went to the Mendicity Society they might relieve him; he remained in the office, and produced some duplicates and a watch - there were seven sovereigns on the corner of the desk where I sat - I did not see him touch them, but the moment he went out, I missed two. I immediately went out, and saw him just turning the corner of Brook-street, Grosvenor-square. I called Stop thief! a gentleman endeavoured to stop him; he was taken, and gave up one sovereign to me in Grosvenor-square. I took him to Marlborough-street - he was searched there, and the watch which he was had produced, and 5 d. found on him - Mr. Emery, who stopped him, gave me another sovereign.

JOHN EMERY . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, and endeavoured to stop him as he passed me; he dropped a sovereign, I picked it up - I am sure he dropped it. I held it in my hand, and gave it to Westcoatt: when he was stopped; he turned round, and gave him the other - he had two birds in a handkerchief.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. I received him in charge, and found a watch on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I got one sovereign from a German, who was in the same regiment as my father. Captain Miller gave me 8 s. 6 d.; a Lieutenant gave 3 s. 6 d.; Mr. Ackerman , of the Strand, gave me 4 s. 6 d., and a man in a public-house wanted change for a sovereign, which I gave him. I wanted the money to go to Germany. When I was in this house, I had three birds in a handkerchief - one of them flew out. I was running after it when I was stopped.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18241202-46

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

46. GEORGE EDMUNDS and JANE HOBY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Berridge , on the 2d of November , and taking from his person, and against his will, six sovereigns and nine shillings, his property .

CHARLES BERRIDGE. I am a law-writer . On the 2nd of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I left the Green Man, public-house, Ship-yard, Carey-street . I had been there from five or six o'clock, in the bar, with the landlord - I had some wine with him, and drank some liquor also, and was rather the worse for liquor, but not drunk. I left the house for the purpose of supping at an a-la-mode beef shop, at the end of Ship-yard: and when I got nearly to the cook shop, a man called out "Charley, give us some gin" - that was George Davis - two other men were with him. I knew them all three. John Bennett and the prisoner Edmunds, were the other two. I knew the prisoner by sight, but not to know much of him. I have known Bennett some years - I knew Davis from his apprenticeship. I was not in the habit of drinking with either of them - I may have had a glass with Davis. I said "I shall not give you any." Edmunds directly said "Then d - n him, we will have what he has got;" he immediataly struck me on the head with his fist - he gave me two blows on the head - I staggered against the wall; he immediately put his hand into my breeches pocket, and took out all my money, except a sovereign. I immediately called out Watch! and said to Edmunds, "I know what you are after, you intend to rob me;" he took seven sovereigns, and some silver out of my pocket; when I called Watch! part of the money fell out of his hand on the pavement - it happened close to the a-la-mode beef shop; Mrs. Marlow, the landlady, came out - his hands were then in my pocket; be put the money which did not fall, into his pocket, and was stooping to pick up the rest. Marlow said "What are you doing with that money, my man, it is not yours;" he replied with an oath "What is that to you, if you don't go in I will serve you the same;" he picked the money off the pavement, struck me another blow on the head and ran off - Jane Hoby was standing by at the time. I did not see her till he had robbed me. Davis stood close by, but did not interfere - Bennett stood close to us also, and on seeing him, I endeavoured to lay hold of him; he struck me a blow, which I returned, and knocked him down; he got up, and we had a struggle, during which time Edmunds and Davis got away - Hoby laid hold of me by the neckcloth, and said to Bennett "Now run off as fast as you can:" he immediately ran away, and as soon as I could extricate myself, I struck at her - my foot slipped, and she got off. I told Mrs. Marlow what I had lost, and shewed her the sovereign which was left in my pocket; the second blow which Edmunds gave me, knocked me down - my pockets were rifled between the two blows. I was knocked down by Bennett afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Edmunds struck you, and took your money? A. Yes; Hoby was not near me then to my knowledge. I have always given the same account of this. I told the Magistrate and Grand Jury,

that neither Bennett nor Davis did anything till afterwards. I was at the time in the employ of Messrs. Hanson and Duncan , of Bonverie-street, and had received the money the night before on their account. I was at the office next morning.

Q. Why not pay it over? A. It was not indispensably necessary. I had 30 s. a week. I had passed the previous evening at the Apple-Tree, in Cursitor-street, and left there perfectly sober. I might have drank three glasses of gin, and a pint of ale or more; and I had a glass of rum at another shop. I received nine sovereigns and 6 d. for my masters. Mr. Duncan was not in the way next morning; and I had to receive 12 s. from him for overwork. I always settled with him. I spent about 30 s. of the money. I dined at an a-la-mode-beef shop in Holborn, on the day of the robbery, between three and four o'clock, and did not go to the office again. I was drinking with Johnson, and a man named Friend. I might drink six glasses of gin, and two bottles of wine with them. I paid for some ale. I paid 15 s. or 16 s., including the wine. I was not drunk. I was at three or four public-houses that day - before I went to the Green Man, public-house, I went to a house to get a bed; but could not. I believe it was to a bad house - nobody was with me. I was not sober enough to go to the office. I laid my head on the table. I had a little sleep up stairs. I was not turned out because I was drunk. I have not been to the office since; but have been writing for my master at home. I saw Mr. Duncan next morning, and told him I had lost the money.

Q. I think they said, that unless you convicted somebody of stealing it, they would transport you for embezzling it? A. They did not say that exactly - he said, he must know whether I had been robbed or not, or he would take me before a Justice. I complained at no office till after that; for I was not well enough. I have done business for Mr. Ford, a law-writer, several years ago - we had some misunderstanding about money, which, he said, I had not accounted for. I understood one McLain was in our company that evening; but I did not see him. I had him apprehended, as he had admitted that he stood by, and had part of the money. I went to Bow-street two days after the robbery, but Edmunds was not taken for six days. I was taken into custody about the money, while they sent to inquire of Mrs. Marlow .

COURT. Q. You knew all three of the men? A. Yes; and told Mrs. Marlow their names. I have always said, that I knew them all - my examination was taken down at Bow-street, and I signed it - it was read to me.

Q. You say, in your deposition, "I got up; and the female prisoner came up and held me by the collar, till Edmunds and the three men ran away; and in the last scuffle the strange man got off. I know Edmunds and Davis; but not the third man?" No Answer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-47

London Cases - Second Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

47. CHARLES MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a handkerchief, value 7 s. the goods of John Hamilton , from his person .

JOHN HAMILTON. On the 27th of November I was walking along Fenchurch-street , and at the top of Philpot-lane I felt a slight pull at my coat; I turned round quickly, felt in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. A person pointed down Philpot-lane, to the prisoner, who was running quickly. I followed him, calling Stop thief! and overtook him in less than half a minute, and said "You have got my handkerchief" - he put his hand into his breast, gave it to me, and began to cry; he begged I would not prosecute him.

WILLIAM WORCESTER . I am an officer. I was coming by and received him in charge. I found another handkerchief between his shirt and waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Billingsgate - my father gave me the handkerchief to bring something home. I saw this gentleman's handkerchief laying down, and picked it up; he hallooed after me. I had it in my hand and said "Here is your handkerchief."

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-48

48. SAMUEL DEVOLL was indicted for that he, on the 30th of October , at St. Mary, Colechurch , in and upon Mary, his wife, a subject of the King, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and leaden shot, wilfully did shoot at her, with intent, of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intention to be to disable, or to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MARY DEVOLL . I am the prisoner's wife; we were married eleven years ago. On the 30th of October, about a quarter to nine o'clock at night, I was in Bucklersbury , and saw him; he called me - I turned back, and saw that it was him; he called me by my name, Mary - I turned round, and he then presented a pistol at me, and fired it off. I put my hand up to keep it from me, as much as I could, and I think the balls must have gone over my head. When he had fired it he knocked me down, and beat me with it, and was going to load it again, but I took hold of it. I took hold of it when he first presented it, to keep it off, and my hand was black with the powder.

Q. What was he going to load it with? A. He was going to take something out of his right hand pocket. I tried to get the pistol out of his hand, but he knocked me down, and beat me on the head with it. I was taken to St. Bartholomew's hospital for the wounds I received on the head.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you saw him with the pistol, you turned it out of the way? A. I put my hand up. I must have touched it with my hand; the point of the pistol was directed towards me - I put up my hand, diverted it, and it was fired over me. I did not touch it till he was going to reload it. I cannot say whether there were any balls in it.

GEORGE HINDE . I am a watchman of Wallbrook. I was crossing the end of Bucklersbury, and heard a female scream, and immediately heard the report of a pistol. I went into Bucklersbury, and saw the prisoner violently beating this woman. They both fell to the ground, and as they arose, I laid hold of him, and asked what he had done - he said he was satisfied in what he had done - that she was his wife, and had been treacherous to him, and he

had shot her. He made no resistance, but gave himself up. I delivered him to Cecil: it happened nearly opposite to Mr. Banks's door.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not come up until the pistol had been fired? A. No.

JAMES CECIL . I am a patrol. On the 30th of October, about a quarter to nine o'clock, I was going my rounds, and heard a woman screaming. I ran forward and Hinde, who was holding the prisoner, delivered him to me. He said he would go any where with me, where I liked to take him, for he was quite satisfied in what he had done. I gave him into Smith's charge.

Cross-examined. Q. You only saw him for a short time? A. No.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in - I searched him, found some powder in a tobacco box, some shots in a paper, and a knife in his pocket. I very particularly examined the shutters about the spot, and all about Mr. Banks's house; there was no appearance of shots having lodged there.

Cross-examined. Q. What shot are they? A. Very small; I think No. 2; such as birds are shot with. I took him to the Compter that night.

CHARLES MAYGER . On the night in question, about nine o'clock, I searched the area of Mr. Banks's house, a hatter, in Bucklersbury, and found a pistol, which I produce, in the state in which I found it; the lock is down - that is the only particular appearance of its having been fired.

MR. NEVILLE BROWN . I am a City marshal. I saw the prisoner in the watch-house after he was in custody, and asked him if the pistol was loaded with ball; he said No, for he could not get ball; that it was loaded with shot.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not his words "I could not get ball, but I have got shot?" A. No; he said it was loaded with shot. I was about half an hour with him - he appeared inebriated, but besides that, from his appearance, I thought him insane.

COURT. Q. What led you to think so? A. Merely from his manner and expressions. He said he was extremely happy in what he had done - that he felt quite easy in his mind in having attempted to destroy her; he only wished it had taken effect. He spoke but little, only when he was spoken to; he was not at all violent in his manner, but sat down quietly in the corner of the watch-house.

MARY DEVOLL re-examined. I cannot say whether the pistol is the same, or like it - I did not notice it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How much of the eleven years have you lived with him? A. Not long at a time - he sold my furniture several times, and I was obliged to leave him. I never went by any other name but his, and my maiden name, Mills, and that was at his request.

Q. Have you ever gone by the name of Clayton? A. Yes. I was married before I married him; it was his wish that I should go by those names. I never passed as Barnett. I lodged with a man named Wells, and people, who chose to make a mistake, called me Mrs. Wells - I lodged with him, but did not live with him. I never heard of the prisoner's hanging himself. He told me about three years ago that he was going to a situation at Brentwood; I got his things ready; he got into a coach, and said, "I am going into the country, you will not see me any more," and with that took out a knife and stabbed himself. I have every reason to believe that he is not in a right state of mind, for he has been confined as a lunatic.

NOT GUILTY, not being of sound mind .

Reference Number: t18241202-49

49. ALEXANDER WHITE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Joseph Bowyer , about one o'clock in the night of the 23d of November , and stealing four pieces of stamped paper, each denoting the payment of 8 s. 6 d. to our Lord the King, value 33 s.; three other pieces of stamped paper, value 18 s., six other pieces of stamped paper, value 30 s., nine others, value 2 l. 0 s. 6 d., a bill-case, value 3 d., a bag, value 1 d., two half-crowns, nineteen shillings, and two sixpences, a bill of exchange for payment of, and value 30 l., and one other bill of exchange for payment of, and value 15 l. 10 s. 2 d., his property .

MATTHEW BOWYER . I am the son of Joseph Bowyer, a carpet manufacturer - his warehouse is in St. Mildred's-court, Poultry . I manage his business, and sleep in the house; and did so on the night of the 23d of November, and on the morning of the 24th - when I came down, at a quarter to seven o'clock, I found the counting-house in confusion; the drawers pulled out of their regular places; and the cash drawer broken open. I missed a bill-case, containing a quantity of blank bill stamps, indorsed "Joseph Bowyer," ready for drawing bills; and two bills of exchange for 30 l., and 15 l. 10 s. 2 d. I have a copy from the bill-book, merely to refresh my memory as to when they were due; but I know the amount of them without that. I saw them in the case on the night of the 24th. I also missed a canvass bag, containing silver; and on looking over the premises, I found a door leading to the leads at the top of the warehouse, broken off its hinges by force, and the bell-wire, which leads to my bed-room, cut to prevent an alarm - the prisoner had been in our employ for two months; but was discharged about two months previous - here are all the stamps and bills, and the pocketbook in Court; also the bag. I know them all.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who lives in the house besides yourself? A. My wife. I was up last, and saw the house fastened - it had been light some time, at a quarter to seven o'clock - the bills are not due. I am not in partnership with my father. I only sleep there as his servant.

JOHN SALMON . I am a baker by trade; but have not followed business for some time on account of ill health. I know the prisoner; he came to my house sometimes; and on the 24th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he came to my stall in the New Kent-road, and asked if I could go home, for he had some things to shew me at my house. I went with him; and under a tureen on the sideboard, I found this bill-case, with its contents - he took the bills and stamps out, and shewed them to me - there was a 1 l. Swansea note among them; and the prisoner said, if I could get it changed, he would give me 10 s. I asked where he got the property - he said, he had robbed Mr. Bowyer - that he got in at the public-house; and on the privy, made a spring and got over the wall; and got in, and was obliged to remain there all night, till six o'clock in the morning, when the watchman went off duty; as he could not get back the same way, the public-house being shut

up - he did not say at what time he got into the house; but said he went to the public-house between nine and ten o'clock on Tuesday night. He counted over 25 s. in half-crowns and shillings; put it into his pocket, and told me to change the note, and burn the papers, and he would meet me - he went away. I said, very well; but immediately went to Mr. Bowyer with the bill-case and papers, and told him they could find him at a cheesemonger's in Old Kent-road, where he lived. I took the officer there, and he took him between seven and eight o'clock that evening.

Cross-examined. Q. He lodged at your house? A. No; I was not at home when the bill-case was brought - he seldom came to my house - my son was not taken up about it. I went out about a quarter before seven o'clock on that morning.

JOSEPH SALMON . I am the last witness's son. On the 24th of November, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, the prisoner came to my master's yard, in Thomas-street, Lock's-fields, and gave me this bill-case and canvass bag; he told me to take them in to my father for him to look at. I could not go then; but I went at eight o'clock (breakfast time) and put them under the tureen till my father came home - the prisoner told me to put them there. I went to work at half-past eight o'clock. I asked him no questions about them.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long? A. No; only by his coming to and fro to his brother's, when I was on the turnpike-gate. I am eighteen years old. I am sure I did not give him the things. I was not accused of it.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am a City officer - Mr. Bowyer sent for me about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 24th of November. I found Salmon, senior, at his house, and went with him to Old Kent-road; waited there till about half-past seven o'clock, when he pointed the prisoner out to me. I followed him into a shop, and took him, and found a canvass bag, with two half-crowns, 19 s., and two sixpences upon him. I told him to be cautious what he said as it would he given in evidence against him, and told him the charge - he said, the devil was in him - he could not tell what induced to do it; and that the money was Mr. Bowyer's property.

BENJAMIN HERRING . I have the property; I received it from Mr. Bowyer.

Mr. BOWYER. I was awake at six o'clock in the morning - it was light enough to see a man's face then.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing the bag, silver, and bill-case only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-50

50. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , two pieces of rough Irish linen, value 2 l. 1 s. 5 d., the goods of Thomas Darke Allen and Thomas Shepparson , his masters ; and JOHN CODAY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LANDALE . I am apprentice to Thomas Darke Allen and Thomas Shepparson - Cooper was in their service - his duty was to shut up the warehouse, and keep the keys. On the 23d of November, as we were shutting up, he said he had lost one of the screw nuts of the door shutter, and must go into the lower warehouse, where he cleans the shoes, to a bag of straw, and look among the rubbish which he had put into it, to make it look larger - he went down, and I did not see him again that evening, and cannot say whether the nut was found. I kept the keys that night, and at half-past six o'clock in the morning I let him into the warehouse - he opened it, and I went into the lower warehouse. I saw the straw bag in the place where he cleans his boots and knives - he came down and fetched his broom, and went up again. I went away, returned in a short time, and the bag was gone. I suppose Cooper was in the upper warehouse; he came down to clean his knives - I did not speak to him about the bag; he could have taken it from the lower warehouse without my seeing or hearing him. I spoke to Wood about it.

JURY. Q. Where are the rough linens usually kept? A. In the warehouse below, a few yards beyond the bag.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At what time in the morning did you see the bag? A. About twenty minutes to seven o'clock. There are five apprentices, one warehouseman, and Cooper. The bag is kept between the two lower warehouse; I was in one of them; the other apprentices were in bed. Wood came down nearly at seven o'clock, after the bag was moved.

WILLIAM WOOD On the night of the 23d I had the key of the lower warehouse, and gave it to Landale at ten o'clock. I was not up when Cooper came in the morning; he told me overnight that if Landale should ask for the nut to say he had found it. Landale spoke to me in the morning about the bag, after Cooper had been below - I had observed nobody else go below; persons might have gone down without my seeing them. Cooper was the porter - the straw was his perquisites; he used to sell it to Dimmock.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am an officer. On the 24th of November I was desired to watch these premises, which are in Cheapside, and about ten minutes before seven o'clock! saw Coday go into the house; I could not see who opened the door - he came out in about a minute, with the bag of straw upon his back. I followed him to Noble-street, Falcon-square, and there stopped him, and asked what he had in the bag; he said, "Straw;" I said, "Have you got nothing else;" he said, "Not that I know of." I searched the bag, and found these two pieces of Irish, about the middle of the straw; he said he did not know they were there; I asked who, or where, he got it from, I do not know which - he said he did not know, but he would go and shew me. I took him to the Compter, and then went and took Cooper. The linen weighs 18 lbs. or 20 lbs., and the straw about 16 lbs.

THOMAS PRENTICE . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors, and know the linen by a private mark. Mr. Dimmock is our dyer. I had ordered nobody to deliver them out. Cooper had no authority to do it. Johnson always gives the orders about them.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I am apprentice to the prosecutors. No order was given for the linen to be sent out. I slept in the house that night, and got up at half-past six o'clock, but did not go down till half-past seven. Cooper used to send the straw to Dimmock, by Coday.

WILLIAM WOOD. The other apprentices are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-51

51. JAMES COUSINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a handkerchief, value 8 s. 6 d., and a great coat, value 37 s. , the goods of Joseph Oxley .

MARTHA OXLEY . I am the wife of Joseph Oxley. On the 15th of November, in the morning, this coat and waistcoat were safe in my room, hanging behind the door, when I went to market - I left the prisoner to mind my stall, and when I returned I found he was gone. I went home, and missed my coat and handkerchief; I had not sent him for them. I saw him again last Saturday - he said he would take me to where I could get them; he took me to George-yard, Whitechapel, but I did not find them.

HANNAH GOFFE . I am servant to Oxley. On the 15th of November the prisoner came, and said I was to give him my mistress's silk handkerchief, and great coat, as she had sent him for them. I gave them to him.

GUILTY . Aged 13. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-52

52. BENJAMIN NASH was indicted for embezzling a half-crown, the money of John Stanton , his master .

SECOND COUNT, charging him with stealing the same.

JOHN STANTON. I am a wire-drawer , and live in Shoe-lane ; the prisoner was my apprentice . On the 24th of November , at one o'clock, I saw a half-crown behind a tin case, and left it there, after marking it, and at five o'clock it was gone. I sent for an officer, and told the prisoner to walk into the room, and give the officer the half-crown; he said he had not got one, several times - the officer searched him, and at last found it in his fob. I knew it by the mark.

JOHN CORBYN. I am an officer. I found it upon him.

GUILTY. Aged 15. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Five Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-53

53. JOSEPH PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a coat, value 15 s., two pairs of shoes, value 9 s., a shirt, value 4 s., and two pairs of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Grindley .

THOMAS GRINDLEY. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me, and on the 9th of October, when I called him up, he said he was ill. I went to work, leaving him there about six; returned at nine, and found the bedroom door shut, but not fastened. He was still in bed. I came home to dinner and found it locked. I went to work, and at night still found it fastened - I got in at the window, found my box broken open, and these clothes gone. I found him in a public-house last Sunday evening; he said he had robbed me, and was come to make it up.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-54

54. GEORGE HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of James Read , from his person .

MR. JAMES READ. On the 9th of November, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I was on Blackfriars-bridge , and felt a touch at my pocket. I turned round and caught the prisoner putting my handkerchief into his breast, and gave him in charge, and took it from him.

WILLIAM MASON . I am an officer. I received him in charge, and found two handkerchiefs on him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-55

55. WILLIAM ELLMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a drawing box, value 10 s., twenty-one cakes of water colours, value 7 s., a pair of compasses, value 3 s., a rule, value 6 d., two pens, value 2 s., a semicircle, value 9 d., a slab, value 6 d., three cakes of ink, value 9 s., twenty-two pots of water colours, value 2 s., a pallet knife, value 2 d., two pencils, value 2 d., a piece of India rubber, value 2 d., and an ounce of oil colours, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Matthews .

HENRY MATTHEWS. I am a furniture broker , and live in Budge-row ; here is a box of colours, containing the articles stated in the indictment; it stood on a table within three yards of the front of my shop, on the 5th of November.

RICHARD GATHERCOAL . On the 5th of November, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner going into Mr. Matthews's shop; he came out without any thing - went in again, and brought this box out under his arm. I stopped him at the corner of Dowgate-hill - he said he had bought it of a woman. I took him back, and Matthews claimed it.

BENJAMIN SINCLAIR . I took him in charge, and found 3 s. on him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-56

56. JOHN OLDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown , from his person .

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 9th of November, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner on Blackfriars-bridge, and saw him take this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and put it under his blue apron. I seized him by the arm, and took it from inside his flap. I lost the gentleman in the bustle of the crowd. I took the prisoner to the Compter, and found a blue handkerchief in his hat.

Prisoner. - I picked that off the ground - it was all over dirt - Witness. There was no dirt on it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-57

56. JANE LESLIE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , a shirt, value 6 s., and a scarf, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Glover , her master .

HENRY GLOVER. I am a silversmith , and live in Leadenhall-street . The prisoner was in my service. About nine o'clock on the night of the 20th of November, I saw her in Leadenhall-street, and followed her to Little George-street. She did not see me - I saw her hustling about her clothes, and in a few minutes she came round the corner towards me, with this scarf in her hand. I asked what she was going to do with it - she was confused and said she hoped I would forgive her - she was going to pawn it, as she wanted a few shillings. I told her to go home, which she did, and I sent for an officer. She was about a month in our service.

JOHN PYFINCH . I took her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character; one of whom engaged to employ her.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18241202-58

58. ELIZABETH WHITTINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , an umbrella, value 5 s. 6 d. the goods of Joseph Pryor , John Rutter , and William Rutter .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to James Woollams .

JAMES WOOLLAMS. My wife is employed by Messrs. Pryor and Co. On the 18th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our room, where I was at work, and a quarter of an hour after she was gone I missed an umbrella.

MARIA WOOLLAMS . I am the last witness's wife. The prisoner came to our room and asked some questions about having an umbrella made; she walked up and down the room, and after she was gone, I missed an umbrella from a chair at the back part of the room. I immediately went to the pawnbroker's, and found her in a court in Long-lane, and next morning found it in pawn. She denied it.

JOHN ADCOCK . I am shopman to Mr. Blackburn , a pawnbroker. On the 18th of November the prisoner pawned this umbrella for 2 s., between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

WILLIAM BUSHNELL . I received her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I pawned it for a person but did not steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-59

NEW COURT.

(2d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

59. LYDIA PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a pair of boots, value 8 s., the goods of Robert Wenborn , her master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Five Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-60

60. THOMAS HUDER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , three pewter pots, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Gardner .

THOMAS GARDNER. I keep the Globe public-house, in the Mile-end road . I have lost some pots which are now here.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner on the 19th of November, about half-past two o'clock, with a bag on his shoulder, and asked him what was in it; he said, "Bones and rags;" upon looking into it I found these three pots. I then searched his lodgings and found a tin, in which lead or pewter, had been melted, and this file, to file off the names.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was looking into the ditches for hemlock, I found these pots at the back of the rope ground.

GUILTY. Aged 79. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18241202-61

61. SARAH BERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a cap, value 7 s., the goods of William Harris , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HARRIS. I am a haberdasher , and live in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 16th of November, I went up stairs, and on coming down I saw the prisoner in the shop, looking at some caps; she approved of one, but thought the price too much, and that one with less work would be more suitable. She said she was in no hurry, and would look in again; she went out, and my daughter told me that she missed a cap. I went out and saw her crossing the road, about thirty-five yards off, and turning round, as if undecided which way to go. I beckoned to her - she turned, and went in an opposite direction, quickening her pace. I went and told her to come back to my shop. She said "You cant want me." I said "My daughter wants to speak to you." I then saw something compressed in her hand; she then gave the cap to me, and said "This, I suppose, is what you want."

MARIA HARRIS . The prisoner came to my father's shop. I missed the cap before she left, but thought I had better let her go before I told my father. He then pursued her and brought her back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD MANNING . I am an officer, and took her into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-62

62. JAMES GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 3 lbs. of cheese, value 2 s. , the goods of William Morton .

CHARLOTTE MORTON . I am the wife of William Morton, and keep a chandler's shop in Charter-house-lane . On the 20th of November, I saw two boys in the shop - I turned into the back parlour, and saw a boy going out with something under his coat. I called to him to stop; but he went out. I followed to the corner, and called Stop thief! I picked up a piece of cheese under the window - it was of the same description as that I had in my shop, but I could not swear to it.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a constable. I was coming past this house, and saw the prisoner run and drop this cheese from under his coat, under the window - he ran away - the prosecutrix cried Stop thief! and Thompson pursued and took him. He said his brother had taken the cheese, and he had taken ding of it.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrol. I heard the cry Stop Thief! pursued and took the prisoner - he said another boy had taken it and given it to him.

ELIZABETH TOWNSEND . On the 20th of November, towards evening, I saw the prisoner come from Morton's shop door and run. I heard Mrs. Morton cry Stop thief! twice; I saw him take a piece of cheese from under his coat, and throw it under the window. I am certain he is the boy who dropped it. I did not lose sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-63

63. MICHAEL RUBY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 8 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Pearce .

THOMAS PEARCE. I am a cheesemonger ; and live in

Whitechapel-road . On the 5th of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I heard that I had lost a piece of bacon; Mrs. Bryan gave me the information - when the prisoner came back with some bacon, I took him into custody - he had gone in a different direction to my door.

Prisoner. I came to the window, and took the bit of bacon, and went to the door to ask what it was per lb. Witness. - No; he had taken it quite away.

MARY BRYAN . I saw the prisoner go up to Pearce's window, and take a piece of bacon. I raised an alarm; and he came back after he had got five or six yards.

RICHARD MEADOWCROFT . I am an officer, and took him into custody - he asked me the price of the bacon; but he had got five or six yards from the door before that. I was close to the door at the time - I searched him, he had not a farthing about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not any idea of stealing it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-64

64. WILLIAM BATH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a portmanteau, value 10 s., a coat, value 20 s., two books, value 6 d., a shirt, value 1 s., a neckcloth, value 1 s., and a piece of sponge, value 3 s. , the goods of Anthony Sharpley .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the Duke of Leinster .

ANTHONY SHARPLEY. I am coachman to the Duke of Leinster, and lodge at the prisoner's mother's, Snead's-court, Piccadilly - in the early part of November, I saw the prisoner in my room, with my portmanteau open - he had no business there - he did not speak to me; but went away - the portmanteau, a surtout-coat, two buckles of the Duke of Leinster's, some straps, and two books were all taken away - soon after, his mother gave me some information, in consequence of which I asked him if he knew anything about the things - he said, no; I said, my suspicions rested very much upon him.

RICHARD CHARD . I am in the employ of Mr. Wheeler. On the 5th of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went with a horse to a pond, near Cadogan place - the horse tumbled down over a portmanteau. I took it out of the water, and gave it to Howard.

JOHN DENTON . I am a labourer. I saw the prisoner near the Cannon brewhouse, with a great-coat and a portmanteau, going towards Sloane-street - it was on a Tuesday evening, about half past six o'clock; but I do not know the day of the month - he had another lad with him, who took the coat and the portmanteau from him. I had seen the prisoner once or twice before. I asked him where he was going - he said, he was carrying it for a gentleman's servant. "I said, I suppose you have taken it from some one;" he made no answer. I heard either him or his companion say, "We must go and get a knife;" they went up Sloane-street.

WILLIAM HOWARD . I received the portmanteau from Chard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-65

Before Mr. Recorder.

65. GEORGE MASTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , twenty-six bushels of potatoes , the goods of William Gunner and Richard Gunner .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH CARPENTER . I am servant to Mr. Gunner, a farmer , who lives at Teddington , about a mile from the prisoner's house, which is on Twickenham Common - these potatoes were in a pit, covered with oat-straw and a little earth, except just at the top. I missed some of them the beginning of last month; the pit is in a field near our garden - the field has a hedge and is about twenty yards from the road - the prisoner buys and sells vegetables - he keeps a horse and cart. I told Mr. Gunner that I missed the potatoes on Friday, the 12th of November - we went to the pit; there might have been half a dozen sacks taken or more - we traced the foot-marks of three persons from the potatoe pit over the hedge; and towards the road we found some tracks of a cart wheel - we followed the tracks, and they led us to Twickenham Common, and right into the prisoner's yard - we found his cart there - we could not discern any footsteps along the road by the side of the cart; this was about eight o'clock in the morning - we got a search-warrant; and about nine o'clock my master, I, and the constable, went with the warrant - the prisoner was at home. I saw the potatoes found in a little place adjoining the stable; there were twenty-six bushels; he said, he had bought them. I thought they were master's. I believe them to be his; there was some straw about them loose, and some whips of straw; there had been some whisps of straw with master's potatoes, which had been put in the holes of the sacks, and had fallen into the pit - we found some pieces of string, which I am certain had been used to tie Mr. Gunner's sacks. I had not observed any pieces of string in the pit before. I had ordered the man to cut the string in the evening when it was dark, and I did not see any in the pit; the cart wheel had what is called a cut-tire; the width of the rut in the road agreed with that which the wheel would have made; we found breaks in the rut, which the cuts in the tire would have made; they measured two feet seven inches. I am satisfied it was the same cart which had been on the road; there was a place which showed where it had turned on the road, near the potatoe pit.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is this the high road leading from Teddington to Twickenham? A. Yes; there are a good many carts on that road. I did not go beyond his house to trace any further - I did not go into the premises till we had got the search-warrant: the cart was traced up to his gate, which is close to the road; we saw the cart at eight o'clock, but did not get the warrant till nine. The tire of the wheel is not broken, but is in different pieces, such as most old carts have - the wheels of old carts are mostly of the same breadth; there was not any mark which showed that the tire had been broken, that I know of - oat straw is generally used with potatoes; these potatoes were champions, which is a very common sort. I have known him some time as living at that house, and know a man of the name of Love, who works for him.

WM. GUNNER. I am a farmer and live at Teddington. The business is carried on for the joint benefit of my brother Richard and myself; he is underage; the property belongs to

us. These potatoes were in a pit, with some straw; they had been shot out of sacks - the sacks were not tied when I saw them. There were seventy or eighty sacks of them in the pit. Carpenter came to me - I went with him, and we traced some footsteps over my own field, and two others, about 2 or 300 hundred yards to the road; they appeared to be the steps of three persons, and in the road we saw the track of a cart, very plain - there had been much rain in the night, and there were no other marks so early in the morning. The cart had come from Twickenham to our premises, turned round, and then led us to the prisoner's premises. In his shed there were two carts, but the one which had been used was the outside one; I examined the tire of the wheel, and compared it with the marks in the road; it corresponded so exactly that I believe it to be the same; the tire was quite wet, and bright; if it had been all night without going out it would have been rusty. We got a search-warrant, and went to his house; I described the potatoes to the constable before I saw them. I have not the least doubt that they are mine. I found among them some oat straw, and some string; the pit is under a walnut tree, and we found some walnut leaves among them; these circumstances make me more certain about them; there were some whisps of straw, such as had been put in holes in the sacks. He said he bought them between five and six o'clock on the evening before, of a man, coming across the common, with a cart - that he called to him, "Mate, what have you got there?" he said potatoes; the prisoner said he would buy them if he could, and he bought them at 5 s. 3 d. a sack. I said if he could produce the man he bought them of I should be satisfied; he said he did not know where he came from, nor who he was - that he had a lad who helped him to unload them. I had been at my potatoe pit on the evening before, after four o'clock; it would have taken three persons more than an hour to have got that quantity of potatoes out, and taken them to his house. The road is very public. We were selling those potatoes at 7 s. a sack at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your father living? A. No. I am one of the executors under his will; my brother, Richard, is thirteen years of age. My mother is executrix - she and Richard live at home with me. We growed the potatoes. I carry on the business, for the benefit of myself and Richard. The potatoes have a remarkable thin smooth skin; they are not champions that I know of: but I do not pretend to know the different sorts; they may be called champions, but I should not call them so. I think they are a little more round. Carpenter has been in the habit of growing potatoes some time - he knows them pretty well.

RICHARD BROWN . I work for Mr. Gunner. I live in the field. I had worked till dark the evening before the potatoes were stolen; I left work at five o'clock - they were all safe then. My cottage is twenty or thirty yards from the pit: three men could not have come into the field, before five o'clock, without my seeing them; there were some whisps of straw among the potatoes in the pit, which had been put in the holes of the sacks; these strings are some that I had given out of my pocket, because they had not got enough.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the potatoes belong to the ground? A. Yes; the ground is Mr. Gunner's - the potatoes had been put into the pit on the 11th of November, in the evening, near five o'clock; they are early champions - they are like my master's.

JOHN SIMMONDS . I am a constable. I have known the prisoner two or three years; he goes about, with a horse and cart, selling potatoes and other things; he keeps a little cottage on the common. I went with Mr. Gunner to his premises, with the search-warrant. I saw the cart, and measured the tire with a rule; it quite satisfied me that it was the cart which had been on the road. I brought away the potatoes - there were six sacks of them. I have brought two samples of potatoes - one taken from Mr. Gunner's pit, and the other from the prisoner's shed. I did not find any marks of a cramp iron in the track of the cart.

CHARLES SMITH . I am a watchman of Twickenham - my beat is at a place called Cross Deck. I know where the prisoner lives, and the field where the potatoes were stolen from; my beat is half a mile from it. About two o'clock in the morning I saw a horse and cart, and a man, going towards Mr. Gunner's farm. - I spoke to him, but did not know him; he did not answer. The horse was a black one, and the man had a straw hat on. I saw it but once. I had seen the prisoner many times before, and have seen him wear a straw hat - his horse is black.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen him in the course of the week? A. Yes; he sometimes wore a straw hat, and sometimes a black one; it was quite moonlight. I could tell a black horse from a dark brown one, and I could have seen his feet if I had noticed them.

MR. BRODRICK called

WILLIAM LOVE . I was in the prisoner's employ for about 3 weeks, but not at the time he was taken up - I was then at the house of Mr. Harris. The prisoner got me to mind his business while he was away; I helped him on the day before, at Twickenham common, between five and six o'clock in the evening, to unload some potatoes - I do not know the man he had them of, but he was coming along with them, and I was standing by Harris's corner, and Mr. Master's said, "What are you loaded with;" he said, "Potatoes: I am going to take them to town, to try to sell them;" the prisoner said, "What do you want a sack for them?" he said 6 s. The prisoner said, "That is as much as I sell them for." The man then said, "I will let you have them for 5 s. 3 d., as it is a wet night." Masters asked me to go and help unload them, that they might get them in as soon as possible, being a wet night - the man had some sacks, and some oat straw over the top of them; they were put into Master's little shed, next to his stable. The man said there were twenty-four bushels, and the prisoner gave him two sovereigns and two shillings for them.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where do you live? A. At Twickenham Common. I work in gardens, or do any thing I can get to do. I worked about a year and a half for Lord Waldegrave. I left there about two months ago - he lives at Strawberry-hill; my father is a gardener at Lord Waldegrave's. I was at Mr. Harris's, having a little beer with my brother. Masters had not been there, but while I was standing at the corner, he called to me - his house is about a hundred yards from there. I know where old Mr. Brown

lives, but I do not know the potatoe pit; the man had a long frock on; and a straw hat, with a white ribbon, or some ribbon round it. I did not notice his neckcloth - he was a middle aged man, and did not say where he came from. I was on the top of the cart, and took off the straw - it took us about a quarter of an hour to unload them; there were eight sacks; the man, the prisoner, his wife and myself unloaded them - there were three carts in Masters's shed, but the cart the potatoes were in, stood outside. I slept with my brother, at my father's house. I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock; the prisoner's horse is a black one, with a bit of white round one hoof. I go with his cart every day - his name is on it. I was at work next day in a garden, and Mr. Simmonds and Mr. Gunner fetched me. I have seen the prisoner at Clerkenwell - he never sent me to look for the man he bought the potatoes of. I should know him if I saw him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Why did you leave Lord Waldegrave? A. Because he went to France. I had been at Mr. Harris's all that afternoon; the cart was about six yards from the corner, so that I could hear every thing that passed - my brother was inside the house - the prisoner deals in potatoes, and it is very common for him to buy them in this way.

COURT. Q. Where was the cart driven to? A. To the prisoner's stable door - it was unloaded within a yard of the shed where they were deposited. I have never been desired by the prisoner, or his wife, to look after the man he bought them of. I told them I should know him again. Mrs. Masters gave the money to Mr. Masters, and he gave it to the man - the cart went into Masters's yard. I had not been there that afternoon; the cart went a short distance down a road opposite Harris's, and then returned: it was a great deal larger than Mr. Masters's. I did not notice the tires of the wheels when it had delivered its load, it went back again - it came in a contrary direction to Mr. Gunner's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-66

66. WALTER PATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a watch, value 10 l.; a gold chain, value 1 l.; two seals, value 2 l., and a key, value 5 s. , the goods of John Rattray .

JOHN RATTRAY. I live at Milton, near Gravesend; I have been a baker . On the 7th of October, about five o'clock in the morning - (I had come from Chelsea the night before, and was going down in the country that day.) I had been up all night, and was a little intoxicated. I had had a friend with me, but he had left me before this happened - my watch was safe in my pocket a quarter of an hour before; a man at the Ship, public-house, in St. James's-street, Covent-garden , and myself, had some words, when I had been in the house about an hour. I did not see the prisoner there, but the man who knocked me down - there might be six or seven people in the tap-room. I went out, and went to bed; but when I was knocked down some persons helped me up, and took my watch, but I cannot tell who it was. I went to Bow-street before I went to bed.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. What had you drank? A. Some brandy and water. I had had three or four glasses. I will not swear I did not take five; when I was knocked down, I believe I got up myself, to the best of my recollection. I came away from the Ship, public-house, about five o'clock in the morning. I appeared before the Magistrates once. I believe the prisoner was brought up before I was sent for.

JAMES SIMMONDS . I live at No. 8, Northumberland-mews, and am a manufacturer of mineral water. I was at the Ship, public-house, on this morning, about five o'clock. I was quite sober - I had been to the Surry Theatre, and when I went home, I could not get in. I walked about till about five o'clock, when I saw this house open, and went in. I saw Mr. Rattray in the tap-room - he had a watch, for the chain and two seals hung out; he was disputing with a coachman: they went to fighting, and in the struggle, (being a little in liquor,) he fell upon his face on a bench, on the right-hand side going in: the prisoner stooped over the bench, and under pretence of lifting him up, took his watch out, and went away immediately. I had noticed the prisoner there with a woman before the robbery. I said "Sir, you have lost your watch:" he put his hand on his fob, and said "I have." I said "The man is gone out:" the landlord was at the other side of the bar. I went to Bow-street, and saw two men there; they said we had better come again at eleven o'clock. I went again and gave the information. About a month afterwards, as I was coming from Chelsea, I saw the prisoner standing looking at the soldiers relieving guard at St. James's. I saw two persons coming down the street, and gave them information - they took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were there? A. Six or seven. I was perfectly sober. I saw the fight, and saw Mr. Rattray knocked down; the prisoner pretended to pick him up, but when he got him up half-way, he left him, and two other persons helped him up. I was before the Magistrate four or five times. I was asked if I knew the prisoner before - I said I did not. I never said I would not swear to him till I had seen the prosecutor. I lived with a Mr. Badger - he employed me to collect money for him, which I did - it was but a few shillings. I gave it to him. I was to have half for getting it. I did not abscond with any. I have lived with a Mr. Briant. I went for him to canvass for subscribers for a map of Northamptonshire that was to he published. I returned with the map and the order book. I went again to Essex, but did not return the book and map to him; when I returned from there, I was not arrested on a charge of felony, I positively swear.

WILLIAM BOND . I am one of the conductors of the patrole at Bow-street. I received information of this robbery from Mr. Simmonds and Mr. Rattray together. Simmonds gave me the information, and a description of the prisoner, which corresponded. I was present when he was apprehended. Simmonds swore positively to his person, and said, if he saw him twelve months after he should know him - the watch has never been found; he was brought up several times before Mr. Rattray came to town.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-67

67. WILLIAM CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Perring , from his person .

JOHN PERRING. I am a hatter , and live at No. 413, Strand. On the 21st of November, about seven o'clock in

the evening, I lost my handkerchief, between Windmill-street and Panton-square . I had it in my hand a few minutes before, and I am sure it was safe in my pocket; it rained very fast. I had an umbrella in my left hand. I felt some one at my right-hand pocket. I turned round suddenly, and missed it, I saw the prisoner close upon me; he looked rather confused, and ran across the road to the opposite side of the way. I pursued him, and took hold of his collar; he was alone. I accused him of having taken it; he said, he had just picked one up; if it was mine I might have it. I then lifted up a blue apron which he had on, and discovered my handkerchief with my initials on it, and the mark of the Steam Washing Company; he resisted very much; but I got the assistance of a person, and took him to the watch-house.

SAMUEL WINDSOR . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-68

68. WILLIAM RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a shawl, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Bowtell , from the person of Mary, his wife .

MARY BOWTELL . I am the wife of Thomas Bowtell, and live at No. 14, Fitzroy-place; he is a clerk at Clement's-Inn. On the 12th of November, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening. I was returning from Piccadilly. I was alone, and the shawl was about my neck; a man came suddenly behind me at the corner of Greek-street , and snatched it off; he ran before me. I called, Stop thief! and ran as fast I could, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped by the patrole and watchman - they brought him back to me; and I said, "That is the man who robbed me of my shawl;" he had taken it from his coat, and given it to the watchman. I claimed it immediately.

Prisoner. When I met this woman, she asked me to do her the favour to give her a glass of gin. - Witness. I never put any such question to him.

WILLIAM CUMMINS . I am a watchman; my stand is at the corner of Market-street. I heard the prosecutrix cry Stop thief! I looked up Grafton-street, and saw the prisoner running towards there; she was running after him. I caught him by the corner of Hayes-court; he said, "What are you going to do with me?" I said, "You are the man who has robbed the woman;" he put his hand into his bosom and gave me the shawl; she came up and claimed it directly.

Prisoner. Q. Did not she desire you to let me go? - A No; she insisted upon your going to the watch-house - a wet gown was found in his hat.

SAMUEL WINDSOR . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on this charge; a bit of tape hung out of his hat which we took off, and there was a gown and a piece of linen in it; he said, he kept the woman, and that they were his property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. All that has been said is false. I found the bundle in the street. I met this woman and another drunk; she came and asked me to give her a glass of gin, and said she would leave her friend; she came my way, and asked me again for some gin - when I met the watchman, he stopped me, and the woman came up and claimed the things.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-69

69. JAMES TUCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 6 lbs. of lead, value 18 d., the goods of George Colvin , and fixed in a court-yard belonging to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed in an outlet.

GEORGE COLVIN. I live in Kentish Town; the house where this lead was stolen from is in St. Pancras ; it was a pipe which supplied water to all the people in the yard; it rose about seven feet from the ground. I had seen it on the 21st of November, about ten o'clock in the evening, and about seven next morning it was gone. I saw it at the watch-house, and compared it with what remained; it matched exactly. I certainly think it formed a part of it - there was a cock to it.

JOHN CHITTY . I live in Kentish Town. I heard a cry of "Stop him!" I went to my door, and saw Mr. Deacon turning round by the wall with the prisoner. I saw a bag lying in the middle of the road, about thirty yards from him, with the lead in it. I took it, and gave it to Mr. Deacon.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a bricklayer's labourer, and live at Kentish Town. I saw the lead and the bag thrown down by the prisoner, when Deacon had got hold of his companion.

RICHARD DEACON . On the morning of the 22d of November, I was standing by the watch-house gates. I saw the prisoner and another man coming along, each having a bag. I suspected that things were not right - they got on as far as Willow-walk, and turned down there (his companion had been used to come to the town to get rags). I followed them, and beckoned Fowler to follow me. I took hold of Sturn, who was discharged; and the prisoner flung down the bundle and his hat, and ran down towards the Assembly-house - he was pursued and taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I gather water-cresses . I was coming along, and saw this lead laying down near a gateway. I picked it up, and said, the first opportunity I had I should lay it down again.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-70

70. MARY ALABASTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , four yards of Holland, value 2 s. , the goods of William Sharp .

WILLIAM RAY . I am in the employ of Mr. William Sharp, tailor and draper , No. 249, Shoreditch . The prisoner was a stranger - I saw her go out of the shop with the Holland; she had not asked for anything. When she had got to the next door I told her to come back - she came back, and I took the property from her; it had been on the counter, near the door.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I took her and searched her; she had no money about her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in very great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36. Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-71

71. CHARLES TAVERNER was indicted for stealing,

on the 12th of November , a saw, value 5 s. , the goods of William Oxley .

WILLIAM OXLEY. I live in Hungerford-street, Strand , and am a carpenter . On the morning of the 12th of November, about six o'clock, I found my shop door broken open, and my saw gone. I saw the prisoner lying under the bench; the saw had been hanging up in the shop the day before. I went for an officer, and when I came back he was gone; he had been in my employ ever since June - we went to look for him, and found him in Stanhope-street, Clare-market.

Prisoner. I wish him to pay what he owes me - Witness. When I took him into my employ I promised to pay for his breakfasts. I have had several applications, and have kept 15 s. of his wages, to pay them, and I now have to pay debts for him to the amount of 1 l. 4 s.

FRANCIS KAIN . I am apprentice to Messrs. Lamb and Gideon, pawnbrokers, Stanhope-street. I received a saw in pledge, between eight and nine o'clock, on the 12th of November, from the prisoner, in the name of John Millar, for 1 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer. Oxley called on me on the 12th of November, and said his shop had been broken open, and the prisoner was lying on the shavings; we went there, but he was gone - we found him, with a duplicate upon him. I asked if he had sold the saw; he said No, he had pawned it not far off - he said if his master had paid him he should not have done it. The door of the workshop had been broken with a chissel, or a large knife.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-72

72. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a candlestick, value 2 s.; an extinguisher, value 6 d., and a pair of snuffers, value 6 d. , the goods of William Everett , Esq .

FRANCIS HAYLEY . I am servant to Mr. Everett, of Norfolk-street, Park-lane . On the morning of the 10th of November, these things were stolen from the pantry. I did not see the prisoner till he was at the office.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner in the Edgware-road, about ten o'clock on the morning of the 10th of November - I had first seen him in Cumberland-place, trying to put something under his jacket; I watched him to the corner of Seymour-street - he then ran: I overtook him with this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the candlestick behind a door in Cumberland-street - I picked it up, and when I saw the officer I began to run.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-73

73. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a trunk, value 10 s., two leather straps, value 1 s., and five gowns, value 5 l. , the goods of Emma Wilbraham , spinster .

WILLIAM BOYDE . I live in Lower Brook-street, with Miss Emma Wilbraham. On Saturday last, the 27th of November, her trunk was taken from behind her carriage. I was on the box - it had been strapped on, with a chain and belt. The carriage was coming into town from Cheshire - we had changed horses at Barnet - the trunk was safe before we got to Whetstone - we missed it when we got to Colson's hotel. The chain has not been found, but the straps are found, and they are cut - I did not see the prisoner at all. There are five gowns in it.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a servant to Lady Guildford. I was sitting on the box of her carriage on Saturday night last, about half-past five o'clock, in Princes-street, Hanover-square - I saw this carriage go by, and two persons following it in the road. I could not distinguish them at that time. I saw them take a trunk from behind the carriage when they were about five yards from me - they drew it over to Brunswick hotel, and one of them knocked or rang at the door - they then assisted each other in putting it on the prisoner's shoulder, who was one of the two persons who took it from the carriage. I jumped from my box, and followed them. I never lost sight of them - they went together into Hanover-square - I then stopped the prisoner with it on his shoulder - he threw it down, and pointed to his companion, who had ran away. I took him back to the Brunswick Hotel - he was not known there - and was taken into custody. I left the trunk at the hotel - it had a brass plate, with the name of Miss Wilbraham upon it - he said the man who ran away asked him to carry it - I said I should not let him go after him. I gave information to a relation of Miss Wilbraham's, in Stratton-street. The prisoner then said it was no interest to me, and I might as well let him go.

Prisoner. He said, at Marlborough-street, that there was only one person at the carriage. - Witness. No; I said as I have now.

JOHN TOLLER . I am a chemist and druggist, and live in Conduit-street. On Saturday evening, between five and six o'clock, I was in Princes-street, Hanover-square, and saw the two persons carrying a trunk between them to the rails of Brunswick Hotel - they then lifted it on the prisoner's shoulder - I followed them to Hanover-square, and saw Williams secure the prisoner.

THOMAS SHORTER . I am a patrol. I was out, and heard of the circumstance, I took the prisoner to the watch-house - the trunk was left at the hotel. We afterwards went back to look for the straps, and found them; and found two keys and a knife on him.

JOHN COLE . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in, and saw him searched.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-74

74. TIMOTHY LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 36 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of Abraham Burstall and Edmund William Burgess , his masters .

EDMUND WILLIAM BURGESS. I am a builder , in partnership with Abraham Burstall. The prisoner was in our employ about four years. I was repairing a house in Park-lane - I called there on the 9th of November - the plumber was just finishing his work, and said he should like to have all the cuttings taken away, as he thought they would not be safe. I said I would call in the evening, and take them in the seat of my chaise. I saw about

1 1/4 cwt. I called as I came back, and it was brought down and put into the seat of the chaise. I said to the prisoner "Have you put in all the lead?" He said "Yes; this is all I know of." I took it home, and put it safe. He was stopped the next evening by the patrol, with some lead in his possession.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What were you doing at this house? A. I was making some alterations, and found the lead - the plumbers were only journeymen.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, with a basket on his shoulder, which seemed very heavy. He passed me - I went after him, and stopped him - I asked what he had in his basket - he was then in Harford-street, May Fair - he threw down the basket, and said lead, which he had brought from a building just above, and if I would go back he would show me. I asked him if any person gave him the lead - he said "Yes." I went to Mr. Burgess's with him. I then asked the prisoner where he was going? he said, to Wardour-street, where his master lived. I took him to the watch-house - the lead weighed 36 lbs.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He took you back to this house, where Mr. Burgess was at work? A. Yes; he then said he was going to take it to his master's - that a great quantity was taken away on the night before, and his master authorised him to bring that home.

JAMES SMITH . I am a patrol. I asked the prisoner where he got the lead - he said, from the house in Park-lane, and that a quantity had been taken the night before.

MR. BURGESS re-examined. Q. If your servant had found any more lead would it not have been his duty to have brought it to your house? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. It was always my duty to bring things home - I found these cuttings the night after he had taken the lead home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-75

75. TIMOTHY KITE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , eighty pieces of woollen cloth, value 3 l., the goods of William Maynard , privately, in his shop .

MARGARET MAYNARD . I am the wife of William Maynard. We live in King's-street, Golden-square, in the parish of St. James . He is a tailor - we keep a shop , which I attend to - he goes out to work. On the 1st of November, about half-past five o'clock, a young man, of the name of Norton, came in, and asked for a skein of silk, and while I was getting it, the prisoner came in and asked for a penny-worth of buttons. I said I did not make a penny-worth, he had better have half a dozen, which would came to one penny farthing. Norton was still engaged with the silk, and the prisoner went out, saying he would come in again for the buttons. These pieces of cloth were in two bundles in the window, near the prisoner. I got the buttons ready for him - he came back and I gave them to him - I said "I have to give you a farthing," (as he had left three half-pence;) he said "Never mind, that will do another time." He then went away - a gentleman came into the shop soon after and said, "Have you lost any thing" - I looked in the window and the cloth was gone. I saw him again next morning in custody, with four pieces of cloth - one of them had a mark of 1 s. 6 d. on it, in my husband's hand-writing. I am sure it had been in the window shortly before the lads were in the shop - the cloth would have brought us in between 3 l. and 4 l.

ABRAHAM BROWN . I am a tailor. The prisoner brought four pieces of cloth to my shop on the evening of the robbery, about six o'clock, and offered it for sale. I had heard of the robbery, and detained it. I took the cloth to Mr. Maynard's, who claimed it. The prisoner went away - I did not see any writing upon the cloth.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of November, at the Luke's Head, public-house, in Pulteney-street - he said the cloth was given to him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me by a young man named Smith, to sell for him. I took it to Mr. Brown; he said, Mr. Maynard had been robbed of some. I said "If it is his I will leave it, and come again in the morning;" but I was taken before I could come.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-76

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

76. WILLIAM FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 11 lbs. of soap, value 5 s. the goods of James Darke .

ELIZABETH DARKE . I am the wife of James Darke, and live in London-street, Somers-Town . On the 26th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the room, near the shop - I heard a noise in the shop, and saw a boy crouch down at the end of the counter - my husband opened the room door, and the boy ran out - my husband pursued, and when I got to the door I found four bars of soap in the street, about a yard from the door. The prisoner was brought back in about five minutes. I knew him again, as I had seen him twice at the window, about half an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was he doing when you first saw him? A. Trying to get out of the shop, crouching down with his back towards me.

JAMES DARKE. I was sitting by the fire, and heard a noise at the door - I turned round and saw the boys cap - he ran out - I pursued and took him. I saw the soap, and know it to be mine. I did not lose sight of him at all.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13. Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-77

77. MARIA ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a quilt, value 14 s., two blankets, value 12 s., two sheets, value 12 s., and a bolster, value 12 s., the goods of William Humphries , in a lodging room .

SARAH HUMPHRIES . I am the wife of William Humphries, and live in Marshall-street, Golden-square . The prisoner hired one room in the early part of October - the articles stated in the indictment, were let with it - she was to pay 5 s. 6 d. a week. She staid nearly five weeks. She took another lodging at Mr. Shaw's, and they had her taken into custody. I went into the room and missed the sheets, blankets, and bolster - she then owed me three weeks rent.

ALEXANDER TATE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet and two blankets, which were pledged by the prisoner in the name of Sharp - the sheet was pawned on the 2d of October, one blanket on the 5th of October, and the other on the 6th.

MICHAEL TURNER . I am a pawnbroker - I have a quilt and two sheets pawned by the prisoner.

THOMAS PERRING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street, Soho - I have a blanket, but I cannot say who pawned it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to give up the room till I had redeemed them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-78

78. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , two sheets, value 7 s.; two blankets, value 6 s.; two pillows, value 4 s.; a bolster, value 5 s.; a counterpane, value 8 s., and a curtain, value 2 s., the goods of Benjamin Oseman , in a lodging room .

CHRISTIANA OSEMAN . I am the wife of Benjamin Oseman. We live in Wellington-street . The prisoner hired my lodgings for her daughter; and took my back room for herself, a fortnight afterwards, at 4 s. 6 d. a week. She continued there six weeks and a day - she then left without notice. I had pressed her for the rent, and she said I should have 15 s. 6 d. if I would be quiet. I went up on the 30th of October, and found the door locked - I opened it, and missed my property, which I had let to her with the lodgings.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me liberty to take some of the things to pledge? A. I never did upon my solemn oath.

ROBERT MOSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Goswell-road. I have a hearth-rug pawned by the prisoner, to the best of my knowledge, on the 21st of September, in the name of Ann Smith.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Somers-town. I have a sheet pawned (I believe) by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Smith.

JOHN ABETHELL . I am a pawnbroker, and have two pillows, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner.

THOMAS BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce six different articles, pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Smith.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SANDERS . I apprehended the prisoner in Hatfield-street. I found twenty-one duplicates on her, relating to this property.

Prisoner's Defence. My daughter was ill, and I was in distress. I took the key, and intended to return, but I heard she had a warrant against me, and was afraid to return.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-79

79. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , twenty pins and centre bits, value 5 s.; a square blade, value 1 s., and a saw-set, value 1 s. the goods of Edward Roberts .

EDWARD ROBERTS. I am a carpenter . I was at work in Tavistock square , at a new house - I left my tools locked up in a chest, at half-past five o'clock, on the 5th of November - a labourer, who was there, was to lock the room. On the 6th, at half-past six, I found my tool chest open, and the tools taken out - some were left about the room - the articles stated in the indictment were gone.

CORNELIUS MCMAHON . I am a private watchman. I was in this house, on the 5th of November, about half-past five; and about two o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise inside - I went in, and saw the prisoner stooping upon the chest - I asked him what brought him there; he said he wanted some of his own tools, and said to me "You thief, do you want to rob this place?" I took hold of the door, and he took hold of it, and pulled it open - he took hold of a saw, and attempted to strike me with it - I defended myself with a stick, and in the struggle I lost one of my teeth.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought to me about two o'clock - I searched him, and found four centre-bits; a square blade, a saw-set, and some other tools, were found in a handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-80

80. GEORGE HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , a pair of tongs, value 4 s., and a candlestick, value 1 s. the goods of George Brown .

GEORGE BROWN. I keep the Duke of Wellington, public-house, Spring-gardens . The prisoner came in on the 22d of November, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and had a pint of porter in the parlour - he went backwards, and went into the parlour again, and staid about five minutes - he then went out, and I thought I saw one of his pockets stick out - I looked over the curtain and missed a candlestick - I ran out and took him in New-street - I found the tongs in his hand, and the candlestick in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-81

London Cases - First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

81. HENRY SAMUELS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-82

82. THOMAS EGLESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 8 lbs. of paper, value 2 s., the goods of Richard Taylor , his master .

RICHARD TAYLOR. I am a printer , and live in Shoe-lane . The prisoner was six weeks in my service, as an errand-boy . I know nothing of this case.

JAMES COGLAN . I am errand-boy to Mr. Taylor. Charles Austin told me that the prisoner and himself, had taken some paper. I informed the foreman of it.

CHARLES PARFORD . I am errand-boy to Mr. Taylor. On Saturday evening, the 13th of November, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner take some paper down stairs; I did not see what sort of paper it was, but he had his cap full. Charles Austin went down soon afterwards; the prisoner came back to the office after that, and soon afterwards we went home.

CHARLES GYDE . I am overseer at Mr. Taylor's. I was informed by Coglan that the boys had been stealing some paper - I went and found some at Mrs. Ford 's, in White's-alley, and some at Mr. Hawkins 's, a cheesemonger, in Fetter-lane; I knew it to be Mr. Taylor's; it is not allowed for the boys to take any paper away. I think I found about 8 lbs. at Mrs. Ford's.

MARTHA LOWE . I am servant to Mrs. Ford, who keeps a pork-shop, No. 8, White's-alley. The prisoner came to our shop on the 12th of November, and asked if I bought waste paper. I asked him what he wanted for it; he said he had sold some at 2 d. per pound; I put his bundle of paper into the scale, and it weighed 12 lbs. I bought it of him for 2 s. I asked him where he came from; he said from Mr. Taylor's, Printers'-court, Shoe-lane, and that it was the perquisites of the boys, for cleaning out the office, which was to be pulled down for the new market, and that the money was to be divided among the boys. The overseer came on the following Wednesday, and I gave him the paper.

WILLIAM EXALL . I am a pork-butcher, and live with Mr. Mills , in Fetter-lane. The prisoner brought 6 lbs. of paper to me about a month ago, which I bought of him at 2 d. per pound; part of it is now in Court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MIZON . I am errand-boy to Mr. Taylor. The prisoner came in one evening with 2 s. - he said he had got ever so much money: I asked him where he got it; he refused to tell me at first, but afterwards told me that he had sold some paper. I afterwards met him and Charles Austin, and went with them to sell some paper, at Mrs. Cliff 's, for which we got 3 1/2 d.

Prisoner's Defence. One day, as I was going up stairs, Charles Austin was looking at some paper, and he said, "Thomas, here's some paper going to be burned, come and sell it." I said I did not want to have any hand in it - he said I was a fool; he took some of it at dinner time himself, and gave me half the money. After that, he gave me some to take, and I took it and sold it - I gave him half the money.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-83

83. JOHN WILKS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , two seals, value 10 s.; three watch keys, value 1 s., and a gold ring, value 2 s., the goods of John Bishop , from his person .

JOHN BISHOP. I am principal turnkey of Newgate . On the 7th of November, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, I was returning home, under the walls of the new prison, Giltspur-street - the prisoner ran against me, and snatched my watch; the chain broke. and he ran off with the seals; I ran after him, and he held out his hand, and said, "Here is your property;" Pike came up and took him.

WILLIAM HENRY YOUNG . I was near the place, and saw the prisoner running - I stopped him; he knocked me down with his fists, with a violent blow at the back of my head. I turned round, and collared him. My head was cut on the edge of the pavement.

THOMAS PIKE . I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was driven to it by distress. I had no money to pay my lodgings, and could not go home. I took the desperate resolution of doing what I did.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-84

84. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William John Willett , from his person .

THOMAS ALLOWAY . I am a porter. On the 1st of November, about a quarter past eight o'clock at night, I was by Mr. Waithman's, at the corner of Bridge-street : I saw Mr. Willett come down the street, and I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of his pocket, and then turn down Bride-court. He was taken directly by the gentleman, and then he got away, and was taken in Bell's-buildings.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not the prosecutor take some other person first? A. Not to my knowledge - he went up to another man; I said, "That is not the man." It is a great thoroughfare, and the prosecutor had been waiting some minutes to get across. I told him he was robbed, and said, "There is the man." I had never seen the prisoner before - he turned his back upon me, and ran away.

WILLIAM JOHN WILLETT. I am an attorney . I was in Bridge-street on the day stated - I did not feel any one at my pocket; Alloway told me of it, and that the man was gone up Bridge-court: there were two young men, several yards apart. I went up to one of them, and Alloway said it was not him, but the other; I went up to the prisoner, and charged him with it; he resisted, but was secured; he denied it all the time. I do not know that I had used it after I left Essex-street. It has not been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-85

85. RICHARD JONES and JOSEPH CHAPMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a coat, value 2 s. , the goods of John Dorrington .

THOMAS CHESHER . I am an officer of Norton Falgate. On the 17th of November, about five o'clock, I was passing down Sun-street , and saw the prisoners in company with another. I watched, and saw them go close behind a truck, which the prosecutor and another were drawing. I saw the one (who is not in custody) take the coat out of the truck, and throw it on the ground. Jones took it up, and tucked it under his arm. I crossed the way, and let them go down Ram-alley, and they met again in Bishopsgate-street. Jones had then got the coat on, and his hands in the pockets. I let them walk together some distance; then went up to Jones, and said, "You have got a coat on that don't seem to fit you; where did you get it?" he said, he had picked it up. I said, "I know you did; but who threw it down?" he denied all knowledge of that - Chapman ran away. I took Jones to the watch-house, and then apprehended Chapman in Long-alley.

JOHN DORRINGTON. I am a labourer . I was with the truck, and had a coat there. I asked a man with a cart to give me a lift, by tying the truck to the tail - my mate asked me if I had lost my coat - I went round, and found I had. I saw it afterwards at the watch-house on the prisoner, Jones. I had not noticed either of them near the truck.

JONES'S Defence. I was walking down Sun-street, with a young man named Williams. I saw the coat lie in the road - there was a cart and a truck going by - the young man said, "Here is a coat." I took it up, and put it on; and when I got into Bishopsgate-street, the officer met me and stopped me. I told him I found it in Sun-street - we overtook the truck. I said, "Perhaps that is the truck which it was dropped from" - the officer called out "Mate, have you lost any thing;" one of the men said, "I have lost a coat." I said," I have found one; perhaps this is it."

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

CHAPMAN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-86

86. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , two half-crowns, eighteen shillings, and three sixpences , the monies of George Strohhecker .

GEORGE STROHHECKER. I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. On the 18th of November, I parted with two gentlemen at the corner of St. Martin's-le-Grand , between twelve and one o'clock. I was not quite sober: but knew what I was doing. I had not parted with them half a minute when this woman took hold of me, and asked me to go with her. I said, No; I was going home - she wanted to pull me up a court - she got her hand into my trowsers' pocket, and got all my money. I seized her hand, and part of the money fell on the ground - the watchman came up, and took her into custody. I picked up 3 s. I had 24 s. 6 d. in my pocket.

JOHN GUPPY . I am a watchman: and was on duty on the night in question. I saw this gentleman come down St. Martin's-le-Grand - this woman met him, and took hold of his arm, and they went up the court. I followed them - when they had been in the court two or three minutes, he charged her with the robbery. I saw him pick up 3 s., and I picked up 3 s. 6 d. I took her to the watch-house.

JOHN LOVELL . I was the officer of the night - the prisoner was brought in. I searched her, and found in her pocket seven shillings, two half-crowns, and a sixpence; she said, it was the change of a sovereign which she had got from a gentleman the night before - the prosecutor was not sober - he was fresh.

Prisoner. When the prosecutor came to the watch-house, he said, he had either two or four half-crowns, he did not know which. - Witness. Yes; he said, he had two or four half-crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to go with him. I said, I could not, as it was so late; he then went up the court; he said, he would give me some silver, and took his money out of his pocket - he was so drunk that he reeled against the wall, and dropped his money - he then charged me with the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-87

87. SAMUEL CROWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of David Farrow , from his person .

DAVID FARROW. On the 5th of November, I was passing Blackfriars-bridge , about eleven o'clock in the morning. I had a silk handkerchief in my pocket. I felt something behind me. I put my hand to my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone. I turned, and saw it on the ground, and the prisoner near me. I made a catch at his collar, but missed him - he then crossed over, but was brought back again in two or three minutes - he was out of my sight for a short time; but I had such a view of him, that I could not be mistaken in his person.

WILLIAM WIFFEN . I am a tailor. I was on Blackfriars-bridge, and saw the prosecutor coming towards me. I saw the prisoner make a sudden move, and saw a silk handkerchief in his right hand - the wind blew it up, and I saw it distinctly - he put it behind him to another person, but they saw I noticed them, and dropped it on the ground. I said to the gentleman, "Have you not been robbed; this chap has just picked your pocket?" the prisoner then crossed the road, and seemed not to know which way to go - he then ran off, was pursued, and brought back again.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the handkerchief. I was walking over the bridge, and was laid hold of, and accused of the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-88

88. MATILDA M'DOUGALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , nine shillings and two sixpences, the monies of John Stanley , from his person .

JOHN STANLEY. I am a smith . On the 2d of November, I met the prisoner in Fleet-market, about one o'clock in the morning - I believe it was on a Tuesday. I had not drank more than two or three pints of beer - I was going home from Clerkenwell, where I had been to see some friends, at a public-house. I had left work at five o'clock, and walked about till eleven. I had had two or three pints of beer at different places with some other persons. I was quite sober when I fell in with this girl - she asked me to go with her, and I went to George-alley, Fleet-market . I went up stairs to her room, and was with her about a quarter of hour. I lost nine shillings and two sixpences before I came out. I gave her in charge to the watchman - he found the money on her.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. I heard Watch! called - I went over and took the prisoner; as I was taking her to the watch-house, she tried to put something into my right hand. I would not take it, and she called me an old fool. When she got to the watch-house, her hand was opened, and the 10 s. were found in it.

EDWARD COUSINS. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found the 10 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I had just been with a friend of mine, who gave me 9 s. I met this man, and he asked me to go with him, and we went to Mrs. Smith's, in George-alley. I had the silver in my hand, as I do not wear pockets. I laid it on the table while I poured out the gin. I took the 1 s. 6 d. which he gave me, and put it with the 9 s. on the table; he said, if I did not stop with him, he would swear a robbery against me, as he saw what money I had; he then took me down stairs, and gave me in charge - he has since sent me word, that if I would send him the 10 s. he would not file a bill against me.

PROSECUTOR. I never said so.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-89

89. THOMAS HAINS and THOMAS EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a handkerchief, value 6 d., from the person of a man whose name is unknown .

CHARLES BALLARD . I am a wine-cellarman to Mr. Ridley . On the 9th of November, I came over Blackfriar's-bridge , at the time the procession was passing; I saw these prisoners trying to pick different person's pockets - I am sure they were in company together. Evans picked a gentleman's pocket of his handkerchief, and Hains received it of him, and poked it down his apron; they walked on, and I followed them - they tried several other persons pockets, and got another handkerchief, a blue and white one, half way out of a person's pocket, but did not take it. I believe it was a silk one; when they got to St. Paul's. I saw an officer - he took Evans, and I took Hains; he tried to throw the handkerchief away, but I caught it.

LEWIS FACHE . I was on duty in St. Paul's Churchyard. Ballard pointed out the prisoners; while I was searching Evans, Hains dropped this handkerchief behind him.

HAINS'S Defence. I was looking at the procession, and accidentally met this young man, at the corner of Fleet-market. We came up Ludgate-hill together, and the first witness had a handkerchief in his hand - he seized me, and struck me several times.

EVANS'S Defence. I was in company with this young man, and the witness came and knocked him about, and knocked off his hat.

HAINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-90

OLD COURT. THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

90. MARY ANN CAMPLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a 5 l. Bank note, the property of Daniel Serjeant , her master .

DANIEL SERJEANT. I am a lighterman , and live at Cockhill, Ratcliff - the prisoner had been nearly three years in my service. On Saturday, the 6th of November, I received two 5 l. notes from Charles Howard , of Kingsland, and as I came home I paid one away to Mr. Rayner , in Whitechapel, and when I got home I pulled my coat off, and gave it to my child to take up stairs - whether I shifted my pocket-book to the pocket of the coat, which I then put on, I cannot say; I did not miss the pocket-book till the next Friday. I saw the 5 l. note in possession of my wife last Sunday. I had made no mark on it, but I know it by a mark, which was on it.

PHOEBE SERJEANT . I am the prosecutor's wife; he complained of missing his pocket-book, but did not tell me there was any money in it, as he did not wish to fret me; he said there was a 57 l. bill in it, which could be recovered. Last Sunday afternoon I looked into the prisoner's box, which was open, and found in her pocket a purse, containing a 5 l. note. I got an officer, who shewed her the note; she said it was her own - that she had had it five years, and received it from her former mistress. The officer asked her how she got it into a note - she said her former mistress gave it to her for small cash.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am an officer, and took her into custody last Sunday, at Mr. Serjeant's; she said she had saved the note out of her wages, and had given her mistress, Mrs. Godfrey , of Tavistock-row, Covent-garden, change for it. I told her it was dated 1st of October, 1824, and that was impossible; she made no answer.

CHARLES HOWARD. I paid Sarjeant two 5 l. notes, I cannot say whether this is one of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-91

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

91. JOHN CLARK was indicted for arson .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

The following documents were put in and admitted by Mr. Alley, (the prisoner's counsel,) without the usual formal proof - viz. "A policy of Insurance, effected by the prisoner, with the Country Fire Office , dated Midsummer, 1823, insuring his furniture, &c. at 50 l., and stock in trade at 300 l.; this was cancelled, and another policy, dated 5th of July, 1824, insuring his dwelling-house, situate and being No 21, Mount-pleasant, for 250 l. - household goods, books, linen, apparel, plate, wine, &c. 50 l. - stock and utensils in trade 600 l. - also the lease of the house, granted by John Burge , to the prisoner, for thirty-two years.

Mr. Brodrick put in the statute (54th Geo. in. chap. 11.) empowering the Insurance Company to prosecute in the name of the Managing Director; also the enrolment of John Thomas Barber Beaumont as the Managing Director .

CHARLES ACKLAND . I am surveyor to the County Fire Office. On Tuesday, the 12th of October, the day after this fire, I visited the prisoner's premises, and saw him there; I asked him if he could in any way account for the fire; he said he could not account for it. I have since taken a regular survey of the premises; here is a correct plan of the shop - it is about two hundred and thirty-five superficial feet: the length from the front to end of the original wall of the house is twenty-one feet three inches; besides a small part taken in behind, which is five feet and a half - the breadth of the front is fourteen feet eight inches and a half, clearing the walls. The back at the further end is fifteen feet seven inches, that is the breadth of the whole building; there is a staircase.

Q. When he said he could not account for the fire, did he state any thing else? A. He said he had been having some candles in, and observed to the man who brought them, that there was an unpleasant smell, and the man said he thought it must be the gas, and that shortly after the tallow-chandler's man left, he was behind the counter, and the fire rushed out of the cellar stairs, and he jumped over the counter and hurt himself; and that he lost his senses. Rather more than a fortnight after, he called at the Fire-office, and delivered in his claim - I saw him - he said there that it broke out in the cellar - that there was a hogshead of kitchen-stuff at the foot of the stairs, a barrel of pitch, a barrel of lamp-black, and a carboy of turpentine on each of the barrels. I understood him on the hogshead also. He said he had a few articles up stairs- 10 lbs. of ginger, 6 lbs. of pepper, and some colours. I saw him again a third time, and he stated, that Mrs. Egward,

who lived at No. 22, had come in shortly before the fire, and said she smelt turpentine, and he told her he also smelt it. He stated that he had been down twice in the dark, to see where it proceeded from, but could not see any, and the last time he went down was while Mrs. Egbert was in the house - that he had been having candles in, and the tallow-chandler's man went into the cellar with him, and held the candle while he (Clark) removed the casks to see where the leakage or smell proceeded from - that his own boy, at the time the fire broke out, was gone over the way for a lantern, and that he was alone in the shop when the fire broke out. When I saw him on the premises he said he considered that he was insured for 1000 l.

Q. Were these two papers handed in by the prisoner, at the office, as the particulars of his loss? A. They were (examining them). I have summed up the number of barrels, and different things enumerated in them - there are ninety-seven hogsheads, and barrels, of different descriptions, and one hundred and thirty gallons of pickles. I was present when Mr. Beaumont questioned him about the pickles, on the 29th of October - he said they were his own making - here are 469 1/2 gallons of oil, 17 1/2 gallons of ketchup, 27 cwt. of white lead, 9 cwt. of kitchen-stuff; the hogsheads and barrels are merely charged as such, and their contents charged afterwards. The amount of his claim for stock only, is 660 l. 5 s. 10 d., and 50 l. for furniture.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Where misfortunes of this kind happen, a man must make his claim from memory, if his books are gone? A. Yes; the house was burnt down to the ground floor. He describes some casks as barrels, some as hogsheads and firkins. When I examined the premises I found a room had been built over the yard - he said he had built it since he took the lease - a person recovers nothing for good-will or loss of trade.

SOPHIA WOOD . I have gone by the name of Bird for four or five years, having lived with a person of that name. I live at No. 4, Dorrington-street, Coldbath-square - the prisoner lives on Mount-pleasant , about one hundred yards from where I live - he keeps an oil shop , and sold every thing in that line - I have dealt there. On the night of the fire, at ten minutes past eight (as near as I can say), I was going to the Cheshire Cheese public-house, for a pint of beer - his house is nearly opposite - there is a lamp on his side of the way. I was between the parlour window and the door of the Cheshire Cheese, and was crossing over to Mrs. Pearson's, next door to the prisoner's, on the right hand side of his house (before I went in for the beer), to look at a bonnet which hung in the window (I had been there in the morning), and, as I crossed, I saw Clark standing at his door, looking up and down, as if for somebody. I was close to the Cheshire Cheese - Clark went in at his door as I crossed the street, and I saw a very great flare of light on the Gray's-inn-lane side of his parlour door, which was the further side from me - the light was in the shop - I stood and looked at it, right opposite the shop door, and instantly saw Mr. Clark put his hand over, and the side by Coldbath-square, was instantly alight - I saw something alight in his hand - it appeared to be a piece of coarse brown paper - he was at this time standing inside his parlour door, close to his shop - the parlour is at the end of the counter. I saw the fire instantly run into what I call his putty shop, which is near the parlour, beyond the shop. I immediately hallooed out very loud "Fire, fire! good G - d! Clark has set his house on fire!" The people instantly collected - I ran home to alarm the people in our house, but I saw Webster running, and went to tell him, but he got into Mrs. Egbert's house, before I could overtake him, and the door was shut. Egbert lives next door, on one side, and Pearson on the other.

Q. Did you communicate this to any one? A. I told Mr. Bird of it, and I told Mr. Beaumont of it, before I was taken to Bow-street - that was a long time after the fire - I gave no information to the Fire-office till inquiry was made of me - I was summoned to Bow-street next day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you a married woman? A. No; Bird is a married man. The prisoner's shop was open when this happened, and the door open - many people are generally passing there - the lamps were lighted, and there was a light on his counter. I believe I was standing between the two windows of the Cheshire Cheese, when I saw him at his door. I do not recollect saying that I was crossing the way.

Q. Putting Bird out of the question, how long was it after the transaction that you told this to any body? A. I told Mrs. Pearson of it, next morning, but did not tell her the particulars - I told several people next day - I told two or three in at Pearson's, and said it was wilfully done. I did not say I had seen it done - they did not ask me - and Mr. Bird told me not to name it. I did not tell Mr. Beaumont till he had called on me three or four times; he was going to take me before the arbitrators, and then I said I thought I had better tell him the truth, That Clark set the house on fire. I had told him several things before. Mr. Bird deals in guns and pistols - he keeps no stock, but when he has orders he sends to Birmingham - I believe he is agent for some house there - he has not had any thing up for the last six months - he has within twelve months - we have lived in Dorrington-street all the time I have lived with him - he has been discharged under the Insolvent Act, for accepting bills - he was in Whitecross-street - I know a Mrs. Armstrong, but do not know much of her. I never caused a letter to be written to her. I said at the office that I was the wife of John Bird - I do not know whether I swore it. I have been into Clark's shop - there were a good many things about.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you ever gone by the name of Bird? A. Yes; ever since I have been in the neighbourhood; there are particular reasons why he cannot marry me. I did not know that he had a wife till I was informed of it by Mr. Roper, after I went to live with him - there was not a person passing when I stood at the Cheshire Cheese, public-house. I made no secret of its being wilfully done.

ANN PEARSON . I am the wife of John Pearson , a saddler; we live on Mount Pleasant, next door to the prisoner. I went to his shop for something a few days before the fire; but cannot say whether I saw him - he came to my house the evening after the fire, and shook hands with me. I asked him to sit down, and then said, "Mr. Clark, can you give any account how this happened?" he said, I was standing behind the counter, counting up halfpence; I

had tied up 35 s. worth, and was going to tie up 5 s. worth more, and a spark from the candle, I suppose, must have dropped into the saltpetre; he said, it exploded, and hit him a dreadful blow on the side, and how he got out he could scarcely say; he said, "You know, Mrs. Pearson, some time before this, I had very much reduced my stock; but about a month since, I had an immense stock in;" - he had told me, in the course of last summer, that he thought he should he obliged to leave the neighbourhood on account of his ill health. I spoke to Mrs. Bird the day after the fire about it.

Cross-examined. Q. You and her often talk together? A. Yes.

MARY ANN PATTERSON . I live at No. 15, Mount Pleasant, exactly opposite to Clark; my husband is a cooper. I was at home on this night, and saw a light through the curtain - went to the window, and saw the back of Clark's shop all in a blaze. I directly saw Clark come out of his shop to the step of the door, with a light-coloured coat and a hat on - he directly turned himself round, went into the shop again, and leaned across the counter near the shop window. I could see his hat through the window, and directly two men came up, pulled away the mops or brooms, and threw them into the shop as if to put the fire out; and the other rolled a barrel into the kennel. I ran down stairs to inform the people, and on my return, a great many persons were collected. I had been to the shop within three weeks of that time for bees-wax, and one pennyworth of ketchup, but could not get them; Clark was not present.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The public-house is directly opposite? A. No; No; it is opposite Pearson's - mine is next to the public-house - it is in the narrowest part of the street; when he ran back to the shop, he appeared to be trying to save something.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a corn-dealer, and live at the corner of Liquorpond-street. On the night of the fire, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Burge's parlour - about half-past ten o'clock; he came into have a bed, and was very much agitated; they gave him some brandy and water; and after a few minutes, he was a little composed, but much the same in agitation. I asked him how the fire happened; he said, there was a carboy of turpentine burst in the cellar - that he was going down stairs with a candle in his hand, and a canister of gunpowder, and it blew up. I said, "I should consider that you would be blown to atoms, or that your hands would be very much disfigured;" he made no answer - a friend said, I had better ask no more questions, as he was not in a fit state to answer - he had a blow on his right hand, which was rather swollen - it did not appear black - there did not appear to be any marks of fire on his clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was so agitated he hardly knew what he said? A. He was dreadfully agitated; I do not think he knew what he said.

THOMAS WEBSTER . I live at No. 6, Mount Pleasant, in sight of the prisoner's house, and am constable of St. Andrew, Holborn. I heard a cry of Fire! and went to it, but did not see him there. I entered, and saw it was impossible to extinguish it. I then went to Egbert's, next door, to assist in taking care of the property. I saw Clark about a fortnight after, and believe the first words I said to him were, "Mr. Clark, I understand you mean to sweat me;" he said, he thought it hard that a neighbour should say any thing to his prejudice, as we had been on good terms before - he alluded to something I had said about him. I said, I respected him as a neighbour, and asked why he did not alarm his lodgers, and get them out - he said, that there was an explosion took place so suddenly from a barrel, or something, that it knocked him down, and he was taken away by two gentlemen, and did not exactly know what he was doing.

THOMAS EGBERT . I am a working jeweller, and live at No. 22, Mount Pleasant. I saw Clark on the ruins the morning after the fire, and said, "Mr. Clark, this is a bad business;" he said, it was. I said, "Where was you, and what was you about when you first found the fire;" he said, he was behind the counter counting his money. I asked, where he saw the fire - he said, on the opposite side of the shop, next the stairs; his counter is opposite the stairs. I said, "For God's sake, when you went out of your house, why did you not knock at my door and your other neighbours, and alarm your lodgers;" he gave no answer. I asked where he went to when he left his house; he said, over to the Cheshire Cheese, and was so frightened that they kept me there.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Had he not made his yard into a room? A. Yes.

ANN BROOKSBANK . I live next door to the prisoner, and dealt at his shop. I went there between the 17th and 20th of November, for pickled girkins, and onions - he produced a jar of cucumbers - they were mouldy, as if kept a long time. I said, they would not do - and asked if he had pickles of this year's, for I should be obliged to him to let me have some of this year's; he said, he had none - before I went out of town, which was on the 4th of June, he had been very unwell, and meant to move on account of ill health. I was in his shop about an hour, or three quarters, before the fire - the usual light was in the window; I suppose it was a lamp. I do not think there was any light on the counter. I went for mould candles and soap - nobody but him was serving in the shop. I was kept there five or six minutes, as two or three customers were there. I looked round, and was rather petrified to see the state of it - for before, it being a small shop, when I went in, I could hardly walk for the number of tubs and things that were about, but on this night there was a great vacuity. I had been in the habit of seeing a very great stock there; but there was so great a difference I thought I had mistaken the shop.

JURY. Q. Were you always on good terms with the prisoner? A. Always; I always dealt with him; for I felt for his being ill; being an industrious man, I have endeavoured to get him custom.

COURT. Q. Were there no casks on the floor on this night? A. I do not say that; but there was a great emptiness in the shop, and he turned his back to me for some minutes, and seemed in a kind of petrifaction - he never spoke a word.

RICHARD GLANVILLE . I and my wife lodged at Clark'S, and on this night, about half an hour before the alarm was given, as I went in at the private door, I perceived a great smell of turpentine, as I thought; an alarm was given about eight o'clock - it appeared to come from the street. I put my wife out on the leads, at the second

floor back window - then returned to save some of my goods; the fire encreased, and I got out of the front window, and climbed on a sign-board - I was burnt a good deal, and was in the hospital above a fortnight - Clark was in the shop at the time. I went in at the private door. I did not see him for a fortnight after, when he came to me at the hospital; there was no stock kept on the leads, except a stone bottle or so.

SARAH GLANVILLE . I am the wife of the last witness. I smelt something like turpentine, at two or three o'clock in the afternoon on this day - the smell continued. I escaped with some difficulty; the prisoner's wife had left the house a week or a fortnight before the fire; he kept a shop boy, whom I have not seen since. I was in Clark's bed-room two or three months before the fire - I did not observe any boxes of candles there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you speak to him about the smell? A. No.

ANN DAVIS . I live in Dorrington-street. About half an hour before the fire happened, I was in Clark's shop, and noticed a very strong smell of turpentine, and asked him, if he was not afraid of fire - he said, he was. I then asked why he did not look, he said he was afraid. I said "Have you any gas?" he said No. I left the shop, and in half an hour heard an alarm of fire.

JAMES ABBOTT . I am an auctioneer, and was arbitrator about the losses at this fire; the prisoner stated, that he had about four gallons and a half of picalilly; a quantity of girkins, cucumbers, French beans, and walnuts; that the girkins, beans and cucumbers were all pickled this year, except about four jars of girkins.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were the arbitrator appointed by the office? A. Yes; we only had one meeting.

JAMES SMART . I am engineer to the County Fire-office. On the 11th of October, at twenty-minutes, or half-past nine o'clock, I arrived at this fire - the roof of the house had fallen in. I did not leave till the next evening, and gave charge of the ruins to Cohen - nothing of any bulk was moved while I was in charge.

CHARLES COHEN . I took charge of the ruins after Smart was gone, and remained till Friday morning. Clark came on Tuesday morning, and asked who put me there; I said my master; he came next morning with another man, and a watchman, and began to turn the ruins over. I asked who empowered him to do it; he said he was empowered by the office; he took away two grates, some lead, and feathers, which were partly burnt, and there was a cask of pitch which stood before the door, and a fender and copper. I went into the cellar - the ruins covered the cellar stair-case; the foot of the stairs were burnt. I saw four casks there unburnt, in the front cellar - I saw no remains of carboys; there were four chairs in the front shop unburnt. I saw nothing else.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The whole of the house fell in? A. Yes; part of the shop floor was unburnt; there were some coals in the cellar under the ruins.

RICHARD BURLE . I received charge of the ruins from Cohen. The shop floor was not entirely burnt through, only one spot about large enough for a man's leg to go through. I found some empty casks in the cellar, and there was some pumice stone in a cask, about I cwt. of soap in another, and some treacle in an eighteen gallon barrel; it was about half full - there was also a child's cradle, and some empty casks. I saw no carboys; there was not a chaldron of coals left, Clark said that when they came in there were two chaldron; there was some salt on the shop floor, and some casks with stuff in them, and four or five casks of white lead - they were a little burnt; there were not ten casks altogether; some would hold ten gallons - the largest were in the cellar - some things were moved before I went.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Part of them were burnt? A. Yes; the white lead was scattered about the ruins.

COURT. Q. How many casks had anything in them? A. About three; they were not burnt at all. There were no remains of casks in the cellar.

JOHN UPSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on the 18th of November. I found a pocket-book upon him, containing papers.

Some of these papers were here read - viz. "A bill from F. Forest, for twenty-two dozens of candles, delivered between the 19th of June, and the 16th of August, 1824. Two orders for powder and candles, and a bill from Messrs. Charles Price & Co, for goods from January to June, amounting to 59 l. 14 s. 7 d., and giving him credit for several hogsheads, carboys and casks returned - also another bill of 11 l. 2 s. 2 d., from May to July, for goods bought of Walton and Son.

JOHN THOMAS BARBER BEAUMONT, ESQ. I am managing director of the County Fire Office. Mr. James Sedgwick is also a director.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. It was agreed to refer this matter to arbitration? A. Yes; it was seventeen days after the fire before he presented any claim. We paid the demand for the building, as Mr. Burge, the landlord, was a joint claimant.

MR. ADOLPHUS to SOPHIA WOOD . Q. While the fire was burning was you at your window? A. Yes. Bird, and a person named Turner were there. I was in the habits of friendship with her then. - I have had no words with her since, but I went for some milk one morning, and she did not speak to me as usual.

Q. On that night did she not say to you, "Mrs. Bird, what a shocking thing fire is, I can scarcely believe any one can be so depraved as to set a house on fire, for when it begins no one knows where it will end?" A. She did not - the only observation she made to me was, "There is a looking glass going along in the street - if any one should throw a stone, what a smash it will make."

Q. Did you say to her, "God bless my soul, I don't know much of Mr. Clark, but he appears to me quite a different man; I should not think he would set his house on fire?" A. I did not. I never named such a thing to her, indeed; she sat in one window, and I in another; she did not come near me; there was nobody else in the room but Bird. I did not tell Turner that I heard Clark call out Fire! I have not heard that Turner has given out that I had this conversation with her. I never applied to the parish for relief.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he should be able to prove Wood's evidence incorrect; that his business was continually increasing, which compelled him to enlarge

his shop, and increase his insurance; but in consequence of ill-health, his medical attendant advised him to relinquish the business, and he was in treaty for a public-house, at Bagshot, and his wife went down before the fire, to pay a deposit for it - but on the day after the fire, considering he should be unable to re-build the premises, and re-establish the trade, to dispose of it, he sent his boy down to his wife, which would account for his absence - he should prove he had recently refused 300 l. for the lease and good will of the premises alone; it was therefore unlikely he should wilfully destroy them, when he could not recover so much. All he remembered of the case was that, when behind the counter, he perceived flames issue from the cellar, and called out Fire! caught hold of his desk, and took it over to the public-house, returned for his till, when an explosion took place, which knocked him down, and on recovering found himself in Mr. Underwood's parlour. His policy being saved was occasioned by having fetched his cash-box (which contained it) down in the morning, to give his landlord change.

JOHN ELLAM . I live with Mr. Dyton , a tallow-chandler, who supplies the prisoner with goods. On the night of the fire I was there between seven and eight o'clock - I took twelve dozen of candles there, and while I was in the shop it was in a kind of a smother: I asked Clark what was the cause of the smoke; he said he could not tell, and we both went together, and looked over the shop - it was very full of things. The smell appeared like turpentine and smoke - we could not discover where it came from. I examined three or four carboys. The place was very full of goods: there was hardly a place for me to put the candles down.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were these candles ordered? A. Yes, some days before. I was there after seven o'clock; there was a smoke in the shop then; I was there but a short time, being in a hurry. The shop was all in a smother, but I cannot say whether it increased or not.

Q. Did you not go for any assistance? A. I could not stop - I was not there more than two minutes. I did not tell Clark what the smell was; it appeared as if something was burning. I did not go into the back parlour, nor down stairs. I call it a middling sized shop.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you know anything of the prisoner, except from going there by your master's order? A. No.

DAVID KNELL . I am apprentice to Mr. Clark , oilman, St. John-street: I believe the prisoner is related to him - he deals with him partly, to a considerable amount. I was in the prisoner's house about a quarter to 8 o'clock on the night of the fire, and smelt a very strong smell of turpentine, and asked him what it was - he said he thought there might be a carboy of turpentine burst, for he had had one come in by mistake. I saw three or four carboys in the shop; it was very full of goods. I had to walk sideways to pass; nobody could suppose the shop to be in an empty state on that night. I told him he had better not go down stairs with a light, for fear of igniting it. I staid there about five minutes - there was no search made to find out where the smell came from. I said I thought it proceeded from below, but he had better not go down. He dealt in turpentine, oil, soap, candles, and other things. There was a box of candles just by the door; there was lamp black and pitch there. I went away, returned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and the flames were bursting out of the shop. I saw Clark at the Cheshire Cheese in about an hour, in a strong fit - my master was with me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You live with the prisoner's uncle? A. Yes. I first went to the shop about a quarter to eight o'clock, and saw candles there - he said he had had them in that evening. I observed no smother, when I said there was a smell, he said he should not go down to see about it till the morning; I advised him not, as I thought turpentine had escaped, and it would set it on fire; he did not say anybody had been into the cellar. I returned to the shop because a woman told me the house was on fire. I went that evening to tell him we had some herrings in fresh; he dealt in them. My master desired me to go.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it usual to let customers know when herrings come in fresh? A. Yes; he could not go into the cellar to examine without a candle, which I thought dangerous.

COURT. Q. Were you ever in the cellar? A. Once; it was in the day time; twelve months ago. I think it was light enough to see without a candle.

MARY ANN PAULIN . I went to the prisoner's shop for a candle on the night of the fire - I was there five or ten minutes - after I had been there some time there was a great smell of turpentine; the prisoner served me with the candle. I saw the flames while I was in the shop; they broke out at the back of the shop, from the stairs, while he was serving me. He did nothing to cause it that I saw.

Q. Had he any lighted paper, or anything in his hand? A. No. I took up my candle, and ran out of the shop. I saw a gentleman run into the shop.

Q. Before you went away from the place did you see anything happen to the prisoner? A. Something burst out through the boards of the shop, and I believe it threw him down. I told my father of it as soon as I got home.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what time did you go into his shop? A. Between seven and eight o'clock; I do not think that it was eight, but I am not sure; I had come straight from home - my father had sent me there. I live at No, 15, Great Warner-street; I was not five minutes walking there. I staid in his shop about ten minutes; there was a gentleman in the shop, talking to Mr. Clark, and a person being served with soap. I did not remark the smell to him, but a gentleman said there was a smell, and Clark said he had sent the boy for a lantern, and he would go and see. I was in the shop when the boy went for the lantern.

Q. What did Clark say when the flames burst out? A. I did not hear him say anything; he was behind the counter, and I stood by it. I saw the flames come up the stairs. I did not see him jump over the counter. I did not see him tying any halfpence up. I do not know the name of the gentleman who was in the shop; he was talking to Clark when the flames burst out. I did not observe a smother over the shop. I do not know the gentleman; he was speaking to Clark about paint, I believe. I did not smell any thing till about five minutes - I said nothing about it, I am sure. The gentleman said there was a smell of turpentine, and Clark said Yes, he had sent the

boy for a lantern, to go and see. The gentleman was in the shop when I went in.

Q. Did you not say a minute ago, that you was in the shop at the time the boy was sent for the lantern - now, how could that be, if the gentleman was in there before you, and yet Clark told him he had sent for the lantern - must not the gentleman have heard him send for it? A. Yes, he did. The boy came up stairs from the cellar, and looked frightened - Clark asked what he had been doing - he said nothing; he told the boy he was afraid he had been doing mischief, and he must go and get a lantern for him to see what it was, because he looked frightened. The gentleman observed this, and while the boy was gone he observed about the smell.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have been asked if he was tying up halfpence, what he was doing before you went in you cannot say? A. No. I went out the moment I saw the fire. I have no acquaintance with the prisoner.

EDWARD TURNER . I was in the prisoner's service - I came to town, having a bad eye - I am a relation of his - I was in the shop, but at the time the fire broke out I was gone for a lantern. Mr. Clark sent me for it for him to go down stairs, to see if there was any thing the matter. I went to Mr. Underwood's, and two or three other places, to borrow one, and just as I got one at the shoemaker's, over the way, next door to the public-house, I heard Mr. Clark halloo out Fire! - I put the lantern down, and ran to see what was the matter - I saw Mr. Clark run over the way with his desk, into Underwood's - he came back again to the shop, and I did not see him afterwards. I went up to the corner, by Mrs. Ings to get out of the way, and, as soon as the fire was over, I saw Clark at Underwood's. He was very bad - I saw the last witness in the shop when I went out. I do not remember any one else being there.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are the prisoner's brother-in-law? A. Yes; it is a smallish shop - it was as full of goods as it could hold - it was difficult to pass backwards and forward.

Q. Then if there had been a grown up person in the shop, would you not have seen them? A. I took no notice - I run out for the lantern - I do not remember that any body was talking to master.

Q. What part of the house had you been to before you went for the lantern? A. I had just come in from Mr. Crossley 's, of Goodge-street - master asked if I smelt turpentine - I said Yes; and went across to the cellar stairs - I cannot remember that I went down.

Q. Then you had not been into the cellar for half an hour before, had you? A. No; I cannot remember seeing a gentleman with master, but am sure I saw the little girl - she came for a candle - I did not see her come in. I went about forty miles into the country next day - I have been there ever since. I came to town last Sunday.

Q. When had you been in the cellar before? A. I cannot remember whether I had been in it all day.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What part of the country have you been to? A. Hampshire; with my friends - I had no where else to go. My master has been down there since. I passed behind the girl when I came in, and when I came from the stairs master spoke to me - it would appear to her that I had come from the cellar. I felt alarmed about the turpentine, as I thought there was something the matter.

COURT. Q. What did you bring from Crossley's? A. I went there with some oil which had been ordered.

JOHN PAULIN . I sent my girl for a candle, and when she came home she told me what she had seen in the shop.

WILLIAM HOSKINS . I am a coachmaker - I did not know the prisoner before the fire. I saw him afterward. Having heard that he was taken up I went to him, to tell him what I had seen. I work in Gray's-inn-lane, and was coming from work about eight o'clock in the evening, and going home by the prisoner's house, and as soon as I came opposite his shop door, my eye was attracted by a flame of light, proceeding from the right hand corner of the shop. I immediately ran into the shop, and cried out Fire, fire! The prisoner then proceeded from the back part of the shop, and met me at the door - he clasped his hands together and cried out, "Oh, my God! Fire, fire! Water, water! or words nearly to that effect. I said secure your papers, if you have any. He then sprang across the shop to the counter, and wrenched the writing desk from the counter and ran into the street. I do not know where he went.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you came up, the shop was on fire? A. Yes, the prisoner came from the back part of the shop - whether any one else was there I cannot say - I did not observe any body. I did not observe the size of the shop, but it was completely full of goods, hanging on the ceiling, and round the shop - if there had been a man and woman between me and the prisoner, I must have seen them.

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD . I keep the Cheshire Cheese public house, nearly opposite the prisoner's house; my attention was first drawn to the fire by Clark coming into my house with a desk, exclaiming "For God's sake, help, Mr. Underwood, my house is on fire!" I went over to his house, and saw fire in the back part of his shop, near a place where he makes his putty, near the cellar stairs - the shelves of the shop were not on fire. The shop was very well stocked, and so it was generally - I think the stock increased towards the time of the fire. I know that he built over his yard, six or eight months ago, and I should think that it cost him a good deal, for there was a deal of lead work. I do not think that a person could see from my door what was being done in his shop. I suppose my house is a yard and a half lower than the prisoner's shop, and the goods being piled up in his shop would hinder a person from seeing - there are goods in his window. The prisoner returned to his shop - the fire was increasing - he complained very much, when I met him, of having hurt his hands, and I caught hold of him, and prevented his going into the back shop - he was just at the door of the front shop - after he brought over the desk I saw him go back to the shop, and when he came out he complained of having hurt his hands, and I prevented his going in again. I took him back into my house - he complained of his side; and his hands were very bad and bleeding at the time, and he was in a very deranged state of mind - his principal cry was for his lodgers and the boy - he remained in this state three-quarters of an hour, or an hour, insensible - he was distracted, and appeared like a deranged man - he swooned away, and was quite insensible for a long time.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Could a person at your door see a person come out of the shop and look about? A. Yes; a person six yards from the shop, and looking in, could see to the end of the shop. I did not perceive any black mark on his hands - a person bathed them for nearly half an hour - they bled, and were much swollen - they were better next day. I saw a few little places in his hands next day, which appeared as if they had been bleeding - there were some places. I do not say that there were many - they appeared to be a scratch or two - two persons took him over from my house about one o'clock to Mr. Burge's - he was somewhat recovered then.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw him next morning? A. Yes; I asked him how his hands were - he said, much better.

Q. Are you sure a person could see into his back parlour six feet from the shop? A. Not through the window - the gentlemen asked if they could see through the door. I know Mrs. Wood. I did not see her that night.

THOMAS HALL . I am an engraver. I was at Underwood's on this night - the prisoner came running in with a desk under his arm. I went out, and saw him in a stooping position, as if he was picking up a desk - he called out, "For God's sake, help! my house will be burned!" I went over, and took up a mop to poke away what I thought was gunpowder in the window. I was in the shop for a minute and a half - the back of it was on fire, nothing else - there were goods on the shelves. I returned about half way between the public-house, and Underwood came over with the prisoner leaning on his arm; I assisted in taking him into the public-house - we sat him down in a very helpless state - he continued so for three quarters of an hour - a person at the public-house door could not see what was doing in Clark's shop - there is a great declivity - there were several other persons in the public-house. I applied vinegar to his temples, and when he recovered, he wished to know if his lodgers were safe, and inquired about his boy - the shop was very full of goods indeed, and the window was full.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Suppose a person stood at the public-house door, and a person came out, and stood at the prisoner's door, could he not be seen? A. Not to be known, I should think. I do not think that a person crossing could see through the door to the back parlour; they might, if the door was open, and they within five yards of it. When I came back to the public-house, I found him sitting down quite insensible, and the maid-servant and a man standing by him. I was a quarter of an hour with him bathing his temples - he did not recover while I was there - he seemed anxious about his boy, and complained of his hand being burnt, and it seemed to me to be scorched, as if powder had gone off in it - he said, some had gone off in his hand, which he went to clear away from the fire - the palm of his hand looked scorched. I persuaded him to put oil to it.

Q. Why, he was insensible? A. I considered that he had recovered, but found he had not; he told me of the powder blowing up in his hand three quarters of an hour after. I had not observed any thing the matter with it before.

Q. Did you stay in the house three quarters of an hour? A. No; I went out, and did not see any thing applied to his hand. I was in and out, once or twice for three hours.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a brass-founder, and was at work at No. 4, Dorrington-street. I heard a noise, went out, and saw fire on the right hand side of the shop at the cellar-stairs - there was no fire on the shelves, or any where else. I saw Underwood taking the prisoner into his house; he appeared as if he could not walk by himself - the shop was very full of goods.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You were at work where Mrs. Bird lives? A. Yes; I have been there eight or nine years - she happened to be at the door as I came out - she said, "For God's sake, Clark's house is all on fire!" and went up stairs.

JURY. Q. Had she any beer in her hand? A. No; she had what appeared to be a box or bundle; it was about a quarter past eight o'clock.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . I am a brass-founder, and work with Smith. I went out, hearing a noise in the street - Mrs. Bird was standing at the door - she said, "For God's sake, Mr. Clark's shop is on fire." I ran over, and saw fire in the shop - it had not burnt the shop; but was ascending form the parlour door towards the shop; it appeared to be getting over very fast towards the ceiling - the fire was all on the right hand side by the parlour door, and appeared to be coming from the cellar. I did not see the prisoner; I do not know him. I saw a man jump out of the second floor window. I got out a few brushes and things, and took them over to Underwood's.

COURT. Q. Was the shop well supplied with goods? A. The shelves appeared to be loaded with things, and there were tubs of size and colours on the floor - it appeared very full of all kinds of goods.

SAMUEL MARTIN . I was at the public-house, heard a cry of fire, went over, and the fire was then breaking out in the parlour. I took down some brushes, took them over to Underwood's; and on returning, the fire had extended to the roof. I was afraid to go in; there were plenty of goods there; the fire was only on the right hand of the shop at first - none of the shelves were burnt.

THOMAS FARNS . I am a waiter. I was at my lodgings, No. 4, Mount Pleasant; heard an alarm, went to the spot, and the first thing I saw, was the prisoner rushing into the shop - he attempted to cross the counter, but something exploded, and knocked him down. I saw that myself - he recovered himself, came into the street, and staggered into the road. I caught hold of him, and asked if any body was in the house - he could not answer at first; but at last said, the lodgers were. I got a ladder, put it to the window, and a man got out. I assisted him down; the body of the fire appeared to be confined to one corner of the shop, on the right hand.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not see the shop in flames? A. Yes; that part of it - he was attempting to cross the counter when the explosion took place - it did not make a particular noise. I was on the curb stone, five or six feet from the shop - it burst like a train of gunpowder, and the flames increased - he fell on the counter, but recovered almost immediately, and rushed out - he appeared almost insensible - he was crying - somebody else came up, and I left him - he must have gone very near the flames to go round the counter.

ROBERT DAVIS , JUN. - I am a surgeon, and attended the prisoner's family - he was in a very had state of health last

summer in consequence of his business, and I recommended him to go into the country. I was often at his house, and passed it daily, and always thought he had a very respectable stock - the shop was very full. I attended him two or three days after the fire - he had a considerable pain in his side.

JOSEPH JAMES FORD . I have known the prisoner about two years - there was a treaty about disposing of his shop three weeks or a month before the fire; he wanted 400 l. for the lease and good will; I offered 300 l., which he would not take. I delayed, thinking he would take less, but I would have advanced to 350 l., but no further - this was without the stock or fixtures; his shop was very heavily stocked.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where do you live? A. In Rawstone-street. I had been in the oil business. I was to take his stock and fixtures at a fair valuation, and pay money down. I am a working goldsmith, and was going to leave that business. The money was left me by a relation; I can show you the stock receipts for it. The legacy was 237 l. 3 per cents., and 250 l. 4 per cents., and I had another legacy in the 4 per cents. I could borrow what else would be wanted. I dealt with him, and had asked if he knew of a business to suit me.

ROBERT RAWES . I am a traveller for Messrs. Hodson, Brothers, and Co. I was at the prisoner's shop a short time before the fire, and should think his stock worth about 600 l.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you take an inventory of it? A. No. I looked round, as I had a customer to take the business. I asked what his stock would come to - he said about 600 l., and I thought it worth that.

Q. Was that including the good-will? A. Yes.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you mean to say that the goodwill was to be included? A. He said nothing about goodwill; he said that was the value of the fixtures and stock. I have called on him often for orders, but he has looked round, and said his stock was so full he could not order - he said his health was bad, and he must leave the business.

COURT. Q. Do you think there might be 600 l. worth of stock and fixtures? A. I should think so. I had a person in view, but did not enter into the particulars, meaning to come down with my friend, who has now taken an oil-shop at Battle-bridge, but the fire happened; I have known him fourteen years, but really do not know his name, except that it is John - he used to live at Selby's over the water.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a builder, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. In 1823, the prisoner employed me to enclose his yard, and convert part into a small room, and take part into the shop, and other work; my bill was 28 l. 7 s. 2 d.; it would take about 300 l. to put the house in the state it was in.

JOHN BURGE . I am landlord of the house; the prisoner expended a good deal on it, and enlarged it. I was frequently at his shop - his business increased a good deal. I called on him on the morning of the fire for change of a 1 l. Romford note, and I think he fetched his box down to get it - he has often fetched it down to give me change - he was in a bad state of health. I advised him to leave the business.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you see him after the fire? A. Yes; I do not know how he was dressed. I saw some clothes on the premises after the fire, and there was a great coat lined with silk; he was present when they were found, and asked me if he should take them; a person belonging to the office said he had better take them, and allow the the office a salvage.

ROBERT IKINS . I am a tailor. I repaired some clothes for the prisoner, which had been damaged by fire - it was a black coat, trowsers, and a great coat.

GEORGE CLARK . I am an oil and soap dealer; the prisoner is a distant relation of mine, and dealt with me. I was at his shop every Friday pressing him for orders, and used to look round his shop, to see what he had got; his stock in the shop amounted to between 3 and 400 l. at least. From April to June, I supplied him with 16 l. worth of goods, and from July, to the 24th of October - my account was 68 l.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you see him last? A. On the Friday before the fire, and pressed him for orders; he said he was scarcely in want of any thing - his stock was then worth that amount.

Q. That is supposing the drawers and casks were full? A. Yes; there was a hogshead of linseed-oil untouched in the shop then, and he gave me an order for a cask of seal-oil worth 5 l. I do not calculate upon any stock in the cellar.

WILLIAM SCOTT DIGHTON . I am a wholesale tallow-chandler, and live in Cow-cross; the prisoner dealt with me for candles ever since he has had this shop - his business increased considerably towards the time of the fire. In April, May, and June, I supplied him with ninety-six dozen and 6 lbs., and from July to the 4th of September, with fifty-three dozen, and from that time till the fire, with one hundred and two dozen - candles burn better for being kept in store. October is a good time to lay a winter stock in.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What quantity used you to send him at once? A. One, two, three, or four boxes - a box contains twelve or thirteen dozen. I sent one on the day of the fire containing thirteen dozen.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an oilman, and live in St. John-street; the prisoner dealt with me for many articles; my account from December, to the 14th September, is 126 l. 19 s.; he has not done quite so much with me lately, as before, for he complained that I charged too high; he lived in my service eight years. I know that he used pickle himself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you related? Q. I am his first cousin; the amount of goods supplied from the 5th July, to the 4th of September, is 28 l.

Q. The first item is a balance of 99 l.? A. I was rather anxious to serve him, and his things were placed to the next half-year's account; the whole were supplied from December.

JAMES NICHOLS . I am clerk to Messrs. Price and Co. who deal in turpentine, pitch, tar, &c. The prisoner dealt with them. I have a copy of his account, from June to October; the amount is between 30 l. and 40 l. - the six months prior amount to about 60 l.; there is more demand for our goods in the spring.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it his practice to sell his stock before he ordered more? A. I suppose so - he did not deal with us entirely; as prices vary, they frequently lay in a larger stock.

JAMES TURNER . My brother is a farmer, and lives at

Harford-bridge. I sent the prisoner some bee's-wax at the end of September, or beginning of October - it came to 13 l. 10 s. I saw his wife in the country, on the Sunday week before the fire - she came to prevent the deposit money being paid for a public-house; she returned the day after the fire. I saw her pay 28 l. - the boy came down the day after the fire.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. His wife is your sister? A. Yes; I saw the wax put into the van to go to him.

EDWARD TURNER . I saw the hamper come, and opened it - it contained honey and wax.

THOMAS BENNETT . I am in the service of Messrs. Yallop and Co., colourmen; the prisoner dealt with them; he received goods in July, August, and September - the amount was 58 l. odd; it is an increase to what he had before; from January to July his account was 57 l.

THOMAS WALLACE . I am a colourman. I supplied him with varnish - my account for this year is 11 l. 2 s. 2 d. - there is an increase of 3 l. in the last six months.

MARY QUAINT TURNER . I am the wife of H. Turner. We live in Red Lion-court, and sell milk. On the evening of the fire I was in Mrs. Bird's room - she and her husband were there - I said to her "What a shocking thing fire is; I can scarcely believe persons can be so depraved as to set a house on fire, for when once it commences no one knows where it will end." She answered "God bless my soul, I don't know much of Mr. Clark, but he appears quite a different man: I do not think he would set his house on fire." She said nothing about a looking glass. I mentioned this to Mr. Swan; Mrs. Bird and I had an altercation since the fire.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where were you when you made this long speech? A. Sitting in her window - there are three windows in her room - she sat in one and her husband in another - we were looking at the fire, and talked about it at different times. Mr. Bird heard the conversation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-92

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

92 RICHARD MINARD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , twelve bridle bits, value 3 l., the goods of Richard Unite , his master, in his dwelling house .

RICHARD UNITE. I am a bridle bit maker , and live in Lisle-street . The prisoner came into my service in March last. Some bridle bits were produced to me by the pawnbrokers. I knew them to be mine - one of my workmen had given me some duplicates, which were found in my shop, which led me to the pawnbrokers.

WILLIAM HARYETT . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. I have six bridle bits pawned at different times - the prisoner pawned one on the 29th, and another on the 30th of October - the value of a single one is about 5 s. 6 d.

CHARLES KELL . I am servant to Messrs. Barber and Co., pawnbrokers, Borough. I have two bits pawned by the prisoner in October, for 4 s. and 1 s. 6 d.

GEORGE WEBLE . I am servant to Mr. Newby , pawnbroker, Drury-lane. - I have five bits pawned by the prisoner in August and September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner begged for mercy, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 32. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241202-93

93. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a gelding, price 3 l. , the property of Thomas Cochin .

JOSEPH COCHIN . I am the son of Thomas Cochin, a cow-dealer . We live in Wilstead-street, Somers-town. On Wednesday, the 3d of November, between 12 and 1 o'clock, I turned our poney into a Mr. Curtis's field, in Maiden-lane . I did not go to the field again till the 5th, about one o'clock, and it was then gone. The field is enclosed with a hedge and gate. I saw James Day riding it in Maiden-lane on the 22d, and in consequence of what he said, I went to Wood, who lives in Duval's-lane. Wood went to Smithfield to my father, and gave the prisoner up.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Day is not here? No; My father has since sold the poney for 3 l.

CORNELIUS CHARLES WOOD . I live in Hornsey-road. On the 4th of November, about half-past four o'clock, I was passing by the Maiden-head, public-house, Battle-bridge, and saw a poney in a cart, which the prisoner was driving - another person was with him, but the prisoner had the reins. A young man was asking if he would sell the poney; the prisoner said "Yes, for 3 l.;" the man offered 2 l. which they refused. I went up to the prisoner, and asked what he wanted for it - he said 3 l. - I bid him 2 l. 10 s.; he hesitated, and then said, I should have it. I paid him the money - he went into the public-house, and brought out half a pint of liquor. I am positive of his person - they put the harness in the cart, and dragged it towards Tottenham-court-road. I took the poney home, and in about four days, lent it to Day, as his own horse was ill - he was riding it, and it was claimed. I went to Smithfield, and delivered it to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I work as a bricklayer, and also as a labourer. I do not call myself a horse-dealer. I have bought four poneys within the last two years. I was in Mr. Stansfield 's service, and was dismissed for bad conduct, and for getting drunk. I worked for Mr. Smith , in the Hornsey-road, for a fortnight, and then went to Mr. Mullett - his garden was robbed, and he said very likely I might have had a hand in it - I was not sent away for it. I saw several witnesses attending for the prisoner at the office - one offered to swear that he was at her house at the time.

JURY. Q. Were you acquainted with him before? A. No, nor the other man. I have since seen the other man in Golden-lane; he ran off, and I after him, but he got away.

THOMAS COCHIN. My poney was brought to me at Smithfield; I sold her for 3 l. to Mr. Morgan , of Kentish-town.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner last Friday week, in a cart, with three or four more. Wood gave charge of him; he said he never had a poney in his life.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him, and was never near the place where he says he bought it.

PHILIP WALKER . I keep the King of Denmark, public-house,

Queen-street, Borough. On the 4th of November the prisoner came to my house, about eleven o'clock in the evening, and staid there till eight or nine o'clock in the morning, except for half an hour, from two till half-past. I had a bill drawn on that day, which enables me to recollect that it was on the 4th - he fetched a red herring, and I cooked it for his dinner; he had several pints of beer. A man was in his company. I have known him nine months - he keeps a donkey, and sells apples; and bears an excellent character. I went before the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. Were you examined? A. No. I went because the man who was with him said he was taken up.

THOMAS JEFFS . My mother is a cow-keeper, and lives in Great Guilford-street. On the 4th of November I was at the King of Denmark, with the prisoner; he had apple-pie and salt beef for dinner, and when I went in there was a red herring cooking. I was with him from eleven o'clock in the morning till eight at night, except from two till half-past, when I went out.

COURT. Q. What day of the week was it? A. Thursday. I have no trade - I only work for my mother, and had nothing to do on that day. My duty is to take money, and pay it away; my mother keeps sixteen cows. I had been doing nothing for three days before. I was walking about at different places. I take a walk, and then come in if there is anything to do. I go home to my meals. I was at the King of Denmark two or three hours on the Wednesday.

ENOCH BOSWELL . I am a bricklayer, and live in Duval's-lane. Wood has been in my employ - I would not believe him on his oath.

COURT. Q. Why not? A. I owed him 15 s. or 16 s., I cannot say which: I was summoned to Kingsgate-street, for 26 s., and would not pay it unless he took his oath, and he swore to 26 s.

CORNELIUS CHARLES WOOD . I left him because I could not get my money, and was obliged to summons him.

JAMES PEARSON . I am hostler at the Maidenhead. On the 4th of November a gentleman was thrown out of his chaise, which makes me remember the day. My duty is to attend out of doors all day; I am frequently obliged to take my meals at the door. On the 4th of November I saw no dealing about a poney; I saw this one at the office. I did not see it at the Maidenhead on the 4th of November.

COURT. Q. Did you pass all day in the street? A. Nearly all day, waiting to take horses which came up. We have no stables; I do not serve in the bar. I wait outside to water the horses, from morning till night. A bargain for the poney could not take place without my seeing it. I keep my hay outside, and seldom leave the door.

JOHN CARLISLE . This man was in the room before the Magistrate, and when the prisoner denied being there, and fetching the gin, the witness said, "No, he did not fetch the gin, for I fetched it out myself."

JAMES PEARSON . I was not examined at all, and never said so; they would not let me speak a word.

MR. BUTLER. I am clerk to Mr. Harmer, and attended at the office for the prisoner. The prisoner denied being there - Pearson was called in at my particular request but the Magistrate declined examining him. I asked Wood who served him with the gin? Pearson made no reply.

COURT. Q. Could he not have said what the officer has stated without your hearing him? A. If he had spoken as loud as I do I must have heard it. I was within six feet of him, and was not absent at all.

JANE SMITH . I am the prisoner's mother. On the 3d of November, about one o'clock. I went with him, and my sister to Plumbstead; I met him about twelve o'clock; we went from the Sugar Loaf, public-house, Bermondsey, and went from the Bricklayers' Arms, in a go cart, and left Plumbstead at nine o'clock in the evening; he was not out of our company for a moment.

SARAH DAVIS . I went with Smith and the prisoner to Plumbstead; we left about half-past nine o'clock; he was in our company all the time. I parted with him at twelve, at the Bricklayers' Arms.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am not related to the witness. I drove her, the prisoner, and his mother, to Plumbstead, on the 3d of November, from the Bricklayers' Arms, about half-past one o'clock, and got back about half-past eleven. When they got there they went to their friends, and left the prisoner with me; they returned, and took us to their friends to tea.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-94

NEW COURT.

(3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

94. GEORGE GUNBIE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , sixty yards of velvet, value 25 s. , the goods of James Neale .

ANN NEALE . I am the wife of James Neale, who is a cabinet-maker , and lives in Liquorpond-street . On Thursday, the 4th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was at the farther end of our shop, with my back towards the window; I heard one of the workmen tap at the manufactory window - I turned round towards the street door, and saw the prisoner with five pieces of velvet in his hand, which he had taken from our window; I had seen it about five minutes before. I ran to him, and took them from his hand, and asked him how he dared to take them out of the window; he said, "Do you want anything in this way - I am in the fringe line, and should be glad to serve you." He seemed confused, and stammered out something like how dare I to call him a thief; he ran away, and two men ran after him, and secured him. I kept him till Mr. Neale came home, when we sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody. The velvet was about three yards from the door.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am in the employ of Mr. Neale. I was in the work room, behind the shop, on the 4th of November, about half-past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the parcel from a chair, about three yards from the door. I alarmed my mistress, ran down stairs, and secured him.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. The velvet was given me by Mr. Neale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I entered the shop with the sole view of getting employment, as French polisher of furniture, &c. At the back part of the shop a female appeared to be writing; I knocked with my foot on the floor; she turned towards me, and I stated my business, adding also that if she wanted anything in the velvet trimming line, a young man whom I knew would supply her; the lady not appearing to understand me quite perfectly, I took up some velvet from a chair in the shop, and endeavoured to explain to her - when she accused me of an intention to steal the article, and said, if I did not leave the shop immediately she would send for an officer, and give me in custody. I accordingly left, but had not proceeded above a hundred yards, when I was laid hold of by two shopmen, who said I must return with them, which I most cheerfully agreed to.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-95

95. ROBERT WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , two pint pots, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Rollinson .

THOMAS ROLLINSON. I am a victualler , and live in Hill-street, Berkeley-street . In consequence of some information, on the morning of the 27th of November, I went into Charles-street, and found the prisoner with two pint pots under his coat; I asked him if he had any pots of mine - he denied it. I lifted up his coat, saw one, and took it; I then took him to the watch-house, and the beadle found another on him.

HENRY TERRY . Last Saturday morning I saw the prisoner take two pint pots from Hill-street, Berkeley-square, near the iron rails. I told Mr. Rollinson of it.

ROBERT TURNER . I am the beadle. I took charge of him, and a pot; I found the other on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 30. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-96

96. MARY MARTIN and ANN WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , forty yards of ribbon, value 12 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, charging Wilson with stealing, and Martin with feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen.

WILLIAM CALF . I am shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross. About three o'clock, on the 8th of November, Ann Wilson came to our shop, and asked to look at some black sarsnet ribbons. I shewed her the drawer - she looked at them a long while, and purchased one yard and a half of very narrow ribbon. I saw her take a piece from the rest, and put it in a corner of the drawer, and as I was turning to put the drawer away, I missed that piece. I mentioned it to a fellow shopman - she then left the shop. I followed, and overtook her about twelve yards off. I said, I wanted to speak to her; and as we crossed the road, the prisoner, Martin, met her, and took something from under her shawl; I could not perceive what. I took Wilson back - Martin was brought in by Dudley; but I did not see her till she was in the watch-house.

JOSEPH DUDLEY . I am in the service of the prosecutors - Calf said something to me. I went to the door, and while he was bringing back Wilson, I saw Martin receive a piece of ribbon from her. I went out, and laid hold of Martin - she dropped the ribbon, which I picked up.

JOHN PROCTER . I am an officer. I received them in charge, and found the ribbon in Martin's pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON'S Defence. That is not the ribbon that was shown at the watch-house.

MARTIN'S Defence. I was going to look for work, and a poor woman came up with two young children, and said to me, "Mistress, hold this for me." I took it, but did not know what was in it.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-97

Before Mr. Recorder.

97. JOHN CULLEN and GRACE CULLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a sheet, value 5 s., the goods of Eleanor Simpson , widow , in a lodging-room .

ELEANOR SIMPSON. I am a widow, and I keep a lodging house in St. John-street, Wapping . I let a furnished room to the two prisoners on the 6th of November - the articles in the indictment were in it - they denied all knowledge of their being gone.

THOMAS JUDD . I was sent for to Mrs. Simpson's. I saw the two prisoners, and asked them what they had done with the property; the man said it was pawned. I asked for the duplicates - the woman said, they were in the drawer - the man said, she had pawned them by his desire. I found twenty-three duplicates.

JOHN DELBRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldgate; this sheet was pawned with me by the prisoner, Grace Cullen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CULLEN'S Defence. I was employed at slop work , and had my wages on Saturday. I gave my wife permission to pawn the things till I got my money. I did not get it till late, or I intended to have replaced them.

J. CULLEN - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month .

G. CULLEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-98

98. PATRICK McCUE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 40 lbs. of lead, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Nixon .

HENRY NIXON. I am a carpenter , and live in Warwick-lane. On the 26th of November, I was repairing a house, No. 25, Old Change - the prisoner was a labourer on the premises. I saw this lead safe in the attic at eleven o'clock on the Friday morning. I received some information next morning at nine o'clock. I then went to Worship-street, and saw the lead and the prisoner there. I am quite sure it was mine - we compared it with what remained.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Were you present at the time it was matched? - A. Yes; I had no private mark on it, but know it from its fitting the rest on the premises - a man of the name of John Hackman was taken up, but discharged.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended the

prisoner on Friday, the 26th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, in Playhouse-yard, Golden-lane, close to an iron shop door - Attfield took him first, and he threw some lead away, but not this. I then searched him, and round his body I found this lead, which was afterwards claimed by Mr. Nixon. I went to the house, and compared it - it matched exactly.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it cut straight across? - A. Yes; Hackman was taken up, and the master said, he thought he was the worst man of the two.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner near the iron shop, and went over to him. I found this lead under his jacket. Gleed found some more round his body - they were both claimed by Mr. Nixon.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he got the lead from Hackman? - A. Yes; Hackman was taken up, but discharged, as there was no evidence against him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The lead was given me by the bricklayer, who said it was his own.

GUILTY. Aged 24. Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-99

99. CHRISTOPHER FRENCH was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WELCH . I am in the employ of Messrs. James Williamson and William Wass , brewers , who live in Oxford-street . The prisoner was in their service - it was his duty to deliver beer, and receive the money for it - he was to book the beer and pay the money to me every evening. On the 26th of October he went out with some beer for Mr. Wright, a grocer, in Oxford-street. I have the book here in which he ought to have made the entry, but there is no such entry, nor has he paid me 5 s. 6 d. as received of Mr. Wright on that day. He was taken into custody about a fortnight afterwards - he had not made any mention of this circumstance - there are entries of beer delivered to other customers but none to Mr. Wright.

WILLIAM BESLEY . I am in the employ of Mr. John Wright , grocer, Oxford-street. The prisoner came to our house on the 26th of October, with some beer. I saw him paid three separate shillings, and half a crown. I saw him sign this receipt for the money paid.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of November, and took him to the counting-house, by desire of two of the gentlemen - one of them said to him "You have been playing this trick, in a number of ways; we have a number of cases against you." He said, he considered it a perquisite, and that, in one case, he filled up a cask to a customer, in Wimpole street, a confectioner, and left the cask at Mr. Wright's, which he had not accounted for, because he filled it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I always make my beer right every night.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-100

100. PETER GODFREY was indicted for embezzlement .

JOEL TILKE . I am a baker , and live in St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner has been eleven months in my service - he carried out bread , and was to receive money and give an account of it every night. He has not accounted to me for any money received from John Smith , on the 2d of November . He was apprehended on the 20th.

SARAH CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Smith. On the 2d of November I paid the prisoner 3 s. 9 3/4 d. I gave him three separate shillings, a sixpence, and the rest in copper; he did not give me a receipt for it, as the book was in the kitchen - he has receipted all the other entries.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer, and took him in charge. As we went to the office he stated, that he was deficient, but he did not think to more than 2 l. I said his master charged him with the amount of 10 l. - he said, when his master searched his books he had no doubt he would find it was not more than 2 l. I understand he has a wife and six children.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day this was found out I went home to tell my wife that it was found out. I booked my bread and sent the money by my wife - she gave it to Mrs. Tilke. My master came to me soon after, and asked me what was the meaning of it. I said I was very sorry for what I had done - he said he should be sorry to hurt me. I told him I would pay him 5 s. a week - it was paid on the following Saturday, and next week he hired a man unknown to me, and on the following Saturday, when I came home, he said there was a man at the door to take me.

JOEL TILKE re-examined. The 5 s. which I had of him on the Saturday, after I had charged him with the robbery, was for some other money which he had taken - there were 1 s. due to him when he was taken, which I have not paid him.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-101

101. WILLIAM CARROL and JAMES COX were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a watch, value 30 s.; a watch-ribbon, value 6 d., and two keys, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Poole .

SECOND COUNT stating it to be the property of William Squire Foster .

WILLIAM SQUIRE FOSTER. I am a watchmaker , and live at Acton . I lost a silver watch from my shop on the 17th of November - it had a ribbon and two keys to it. I had seen it hanging in the window about an hour before it was taken - the window was close shut down. I did not see either of the prisoners. I missed it about half-past four or five o'clock, and saw it again on the following Saturday in the possession of the constable. The prisoners were in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was this a watch which you had to repair? A. Yes; I keep a book in which I enter the numbers of those I have to repair.

SOPHIA FOSTER . I am the prosecutor's wife. My husband went out about three o'clock. Mr. Poole's watch was in the shop on the counter. The prisoner Carrol came to the shop and gave me his watch, and asked me what would be the expense of having something done to it - I said I could not tell. Mr. Poole's watch was within his reach - I had put it on the counter - he went away and said he could not come again. No other person had been in in the mean time.

Cross-examined. How long afterwards did your husband come home? A. About an hour. I had taken the watch out of the window to shut the shutters - there was another on the counter. I did not see him again till he was in Newgate - he was not more than five minutes in the shop.

THOMAS POOLE. I had left my watch with Mr. Foster to repair. I have seen it again in possession of the constable.

JOSEPH BAILEY . I am constable of Kensington. I took the two prisoner into custody, on Wednesday, the 17th November - Mr. Wheatley stopped them. I found a watch on Cox, which was afterwards claimed by Mr. Foster, and Mr. Poole.

CHARLES EDWARD WHEATLEY . I am a watch-maker, and live in King-street, Hammersmith. I saw the two prisoners on Wednesday evening, the 17th of November, about ten minutes before six o'clock, in a cart, in Phillmore-place, Kensington, about two miles from my house - I was looking after them. I thought it would be improper for me to take them myself, and I applied to some persons passing the road to assist me, as I suspected they had robbed my shop; they drew up the cart by the road side, and Cox got out - some persons took him. I got into the cart, and took Carrol - the watch was found on Cox.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. On Wednesday, the 17th November, I went in company with Mr. Foster to Hammersmith, and from there to Kensington; where I saw the watch, which answered the description given by Foster, in the possession of Mr. Bailey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COX'S Defence. I had been out looking for work. I was tired, and asked this young man to give me a lift. I got out, and saw a poor man showing this watch to a man - I asked the price of it; he said 16 s., which I gave him. I then got into the cart, and got a little further, when I was stopped.

CARROL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

COX - NOT GUILTY . - Vide 5th Day.

Reference Number: t18241202-102

102. JOSEPH BALL and JAMES SUMPTON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , four store pigs, price 2 l. 8 s. , the property of Peter Thorn the elder .

PETER THORN , JUN. I am the son of Peter Thorn, who is a farmer , and lives at Ealing - he keeps pigs in his yard, close by the road side; we lost four out of a litter of ten; we missed one at the beginning of October, another about the middle, and the last was about the 6th of November. I received some information from my servant, on Monday, the 8th of November, and saw one of our pigs in the possession of Ball, at his cottage on Ealing-common - he is a labourer in our employ. I knew it to be ours, but cannot say that it was the last one stolen; he ran away, but was taken in about a quarter of an hour - he said he had bought it at Brentford market for 16 s., but could not say of whom; 16 s. is perhaps more than it was worth.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time did you see Sumpton? A. The same day, but nothing was found on his premises - he lives about a mile from Ball.

BENJAMIN SPITTLE . I am headborough. I went to Ball's with a search warrant, on the 8th of November - he knew me; the door was fast, but I got admission by sending my fellow officer round to the back door - Ball was no at home. I found the pig in the stye. I saw Ball afterwards - he had got across two or three fields, and was getting over a gate to the turnpike-road; he said "Do you take me for some money I owe you?" I said "No, for taking a pig of Mr. Thorn's;" he said he had bought it at Brentford market.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a labourer. On Tuesday afternoon, the 2nd of November, about three o'clock, I saw Sumpton go towards Ball's house, and in the course of ten minutes, he returned with something under his arm like a sack; about a quarter before five o'clock, I saw the two prisoner's coming together from Mr. Thorn's with something in a sack.

SARAH HUGHES . I am the wife of the last witness, and live next door to Ball. I heard the crying of the pig, and then saw Ball and Sumpton put it into the stye, between four and five o'clock, on Tuesday, the 2d of November - there was no pig there before.

BALL'S Defence. I bought it at Brentford for 16 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-103

103. SARAH CONNER , was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a cloak, value 20 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; a shawl, value 2 s.; an apron, value 2 s., and six napkins, value 3 s. the goods of John Armstrong .

FRANCES ARMSTRONG . I am the wife of John Armstrong, a labourer , who lives at No. 1, Flask-row, Chelsea , in the first floor room. On the 18th of October, I left home between three and four o'clock, and returned between six and seven. These things were then gone from my drawers - they were safe when I went out. The prisoner lived on the second floor - she was at home when I went out, and when I returned I accused her of having taken my clothes - she immediately quitted my room for a few minutes, and then returned with a lighted candle, and said, if I suspected her I might search her room. I said it was of no use, for, no doubt she had put them away. I had left my room door locked but it was broken open, and the bed had been set on fire in three different places - the drawer had been likewise on fire.

MARY RHODES . I keep the house in which the last witness and prisoner live. I let the room furnished. On Monday, the 18th of October, I was going to tea, about four o'clock, when a neighbour came with a violent knocking at the door, and said the house was on fire. I ran up stairs to the top of the house, thinking the children had set it on fire - I looked into the prisoner's room - she was at tea, and said "I have no fire." I then came down to the prosecutrix's room - the door opened easily - the bed, the window blinds, and the drawers, were on fire - there was no fire in the grate - I cried out for the people to save my bed. A man came up with some water, and the fire was put out. The prisoner then sat in my kitchen for about two hours; she said "I will not go up stairs till Mrs. Armstrong comes home, for fear she should say she has lost any thing, as her room has been full of people." Soon after the water came running through the ceiling. She said "I would go and wipe it up but I don't like to go alone." I told my son to go with her, which he did. She then went out, and bought a candle, and when she came back, she said "The loss will not be your's." The man who had put the fire out said, "This has been done on

purpose." A bundle was found in my yard that evening, with a cloak and two gowns in it. When the officer came next morning, I said to the prisoner, "Either give the woman the things, or tell the truth;" she said, "I put the things in the bundle, and threw them out."

FRANCES AMSTRONG re-examined. I saw the bundle with the cloak, two gowns, and the napkins (which a man produced), while the prisoner was telling me I was welcome to search her apartment. I had not had a candle before I went out, nor a fire after two o'clock, when my husband came home to dinner: the prisoner's window looks into the yard, where the bundle was found. I have no family.

ALICE RHODES . I am the daughter of Mary Rhodes, and was at home on this day. We live under Mr. Armstrong's room. I did not hear her go out, but about seven o'clock that evening. I found the bundle in the yard, into which the prisoner's window opens. I saw the bundle opened - it contained Mrs. Armstrong's property. I did not go up when the alarm of fire was given.

JOHN COLES . I am a constable, and live about one hundred yards from the house. On the following morning, about eight o'clock, I went to this house, which I heard had been on fire - I went up stairs, and looked round the room - I said it must have been set on fire. I did not see any marks of violence on the door - the lock must have been picked; there was a chest of drawers in the room, and I could see that there had been fire in the top drawer but one. I inquired who was in the house, and they said no person but Mrs. Rhodes and the prisoner. I then took Conner into custody - she denied the charge. I then stepped out, and left her in custody of Armstrong's husband - while I was gone she confessed the theft to Mary Rhodes.

MARY RHODES re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner confess the theft to you? A. Yes; on condition that we would forgive her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This lady went out at three o'clock - I was the last person who saw her before she went out - she came into my room, and asked me what I thought of her dress - she then went away, and said she had tried the door three times, to see if it was locked - at four o'clock the fire took place. I can say upon my oath, that she had a fire in her room, and she said she would light a candle and leave it, as her husband was very unhandy in striking a light. When she came back she accused me of the robbery - I said I knew nothing about it. The next morning they brought a constable and took me up. They asked me if I would confess it; I said if I knew any thing of it I would confess. When the knock came at the door to tell Mrs. Rhodes her house was on fire, I tried to go down three times, and could not for the smoke. When I did get down the room was full of people, and the fire was put out.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-104

104. GEORGE SCRAGG was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a pewter pot, value 15 d. , the goods of William Gerrish .

WILLIAM GERRISH. I keep the Joiners' Arms, public-house, Westminster-road . I lost a pewter pot from a customer's house. I saw the prisoner at the Thames Police, where the pot was shewn to me.

THOMAS GRAY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, at Westminster, about two miles from Mr. Gerrish's house; he was carrying a bundle, with two pint pots, marked "Three Compasses, Lambeth Marsh," and a quart pot of Mr. Gerrish's. I asked how he came by them; he said he had taken them from different person's doors, and was going to melt them down, and sell them, to get some provision for his wife - he gave me his direction in Pepper-street, but it was a false one.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-105

105. FRANCIS LING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , ten shillings, the monies of Richard Harris , from his person .

RICHARD HARRIS. I live at No. 11, North-row, Grosvenor-square, and am a hackney coachman . On the 3d of November I went to the Plough, public-house, Oxford-street , about two o'clock, and stopped till about five; I got a little in liquor. The prisoner was there, and said he was out of place; I gave him some victuals and beer, and then I laid down to sleep. I had 11 s. when I went into the Plough; there were 4 s. or 5 s. in shilling pieces. I had known him before, and went into the house with him; he was in the same box with me: no other person was there. I had paid 1 s. before I went to sleep, and when I awoke some person told me I was robbed, and desired me to turn out my pockets - I did so, and found all my money gone. The prisoner had left the house, but returned and was there then, in the same box; he was taken to the watch-house, and three shillings, two sixpences, and three penny pieces, found upon him; it had been in my left-hand pocket, and he sat on that side.

JOHN MILDENHALL . I was in the tap-room when Harris and the prisoner came in; they were both sober. I did not see any person in the same box with them - Harris laid his head down; I saw the prisoner put his hand into Harris's left-hand pocket, draw something out, and put it into his own pocket; there was no other person in the box at the time. Harris awoke in about half an hour; no other person had come into the box.

GEORGE PEPPETT . I am a waterman. I saw these two persons in the tap-room; Harris was sober when he came in - I did not see any one but Ling with him; they sat down in the same box together - there was another sat down on the left side afterwards. The prisoner was nearest to Harris; I sat opposite them. I saw the prisoner put his hand into Harris's pocket, draw something out, and put it into his own left-hand waistcoat pocket. I told Harris of it about half an hour afterwards. When the prisoner had taken the money he remained there for some time - the other man remained there likewise. I did not continue to watch them.

ROBERT TURNER . I am a constable, and was sent for to take the prisoner. I found three shillings and three sixpences on him. He said, "Don't let the others go," but I forced the two men who had seen the transaction to go.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Charles-street, and saw the prosecutor - he told me to attend to his horses while he went to sleep, and next day I found him at this public-house, drinking with Mr. Becket's relation; he told me to go and attend his coach and horses; I did not go into the house for more than half an hour, but when I did go in I found him, Mr. Becket's relation, and two or three others, drinking together. I had a pint or two of beer, then went out, and put the bags on the horses. I went in again, and in about ten minutes they accused me of robbing him; he had been with a girl all night in the coach; he was in a state of intoxication all that day, and the day before.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-106

106. JOHN RUSSEL and JOHN GRIFFIN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , one hundred and forty sheets of printed music, value 12 s. , the goods of William Wybrow and Stephen Wybrow .

WILLIAM WYBROW. I live in Rathbone-place , and am in partnership with my brother, Stephen. I lost one hundred and forty sheets of printed music on Monday, the 15th of November - I had seen it at the door the same afternoon. I left home about a quarter to five o'clock - I went into Soho-square: I was sent for home about a quarter before six, and found the prisoners in custody, and the music in the possession of the officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a painter and glazier, and live in New Church-court, Strand. I was near Mr. Wybrow's shop a little before six o'clock - I saw Russel put his apron over a bundle of music, which lay outside the window - he took it away, and ran down Rathbone-place, and down Percy-street; I ran after him, and laid hold of him - he let it fall from under his apron.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAM . I was in Rathbone-place. I saw the two prisoners in company, standing at the shop window; they went away, and came back again twice; I saw Russel put his apron over this bundle of music, and then run away - Griffin staid about half a minute, and then went away, to meet Russel - I took hold of him.

RUSSEL'S Defence. I was going on an errand, and stopped to look at a caricature in this window; I heard a noise behind me, turned round, and saw the paper on the ground.

GRIFFIN'S Defence. I was going on an errand, and stopped to look at this caricature; I had walked away a short distance when I was taken.

RUSSEL - GUILTY. Aged 19. Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

GRIFFIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-107

107. WILLIAM ROYSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of John Rouse .

GEORGE ROUSE. I am the brother of John Rouse, who is a shoemaker , and lives in St. John-street, Smithfield . I saw the prisoner and another, walk by the shop, about half-past five o'clock, on the 20th of November; when they returned they came on the step of the door, and took a pair of shoes from the window - I ran after them, and cried, "Stop them;" they threw the shoes down about three doors off. I lost sight of the prisoner before he was stopped - he was brought back by the constable; I am quite sure he was the person I saw with the shoes.

PHILIP SWENGLES . I am a patrol. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - I tried to stop him, but he ran by me; my brother patrol stopped him. I did not see his companion.

JOHN FORBES . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner; he said he had done nothing. I took him back; Mr. Rouse said he was the person who took the shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-108

108. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a crown piece, and three shillings , the monies of George Sanson .

GEORGE SANSON. I live in Vauxhall-road , and am a stone-mason . The prisoner was working at my house, as a carpenter . I kept my money in a small box in the room where he worked - there was one crown, and three shilling pieces; I had seen them safe on Monday, the 15th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock; my wife came into the room about two, for some money, and it was all gone; she charged him with the theft: he denied it; the constable was sent for - he was searched, and the same crown piece was found upon him, with three shillings, and two sixpences. I know it by its being black on the dragon side; he had shown it to me at the distance of the table, before the constable came. No other person had been in the room.

SARAH SANSON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went to the box to put a bill in, and missed the money: I had seen it a quarter before one o'clock; no one had been in the room but the prisoner; the crown-piece was found upon him.

AMOS LINCOLN . I employed the prisoner on the Saturday. I had paid him two half-crowns, which made up what was due to him. I had no other person at work at the house but him. I was present when the constable searched him, and saw the money found. Mr. Sanson declared it to be his property.

JOHN WHEELER . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner, and found one crown, three shilling, three sixpences, and 2 1/2 d. in copper, on him; Sanson did not claim it at first, because it had been made brighter while they had sent for me. I said the matter looked very black against him, and he said, "Well, I suppose I must give the money up."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-109

109. WILLIAM TURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , an iron weight, value 2 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR. I am a broker , and live in Charterhouse-lane . I lost an iron weight from the front of my shop, on Saturday, the 13th of November; I heard the alarm, and went to the door; the prisoner was pointed out to me, I pursued, and never lost sight of him till I

took him, with it under his arm. It was an iron weight - 1/4 of a cwt.

JOHN FORBES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody; he had no money. He said he took it through distress, for he had been a whole day without any thing to eat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-110

London Case - First Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

116. BRIDGER LIDBETTER was indicted for that, certain persons whose names are unknown, on the 26th of October, at St. Michael, Wood-street, six thousand, four hundred, and thirty-five yards of silk, value 700 l.; thirty-five pieces of silk handkerchiefs, containing two hundred and forty-five handkerchiefs, value 45 l.; twelve dozen black silk handkerchiefs, containing one hundred and forty-four handkerchiefs, value 20 l.; twelve crape handkerchiefs, value 6 l.; six crape shawls, value 15 l., and a bag, value 3 s., the goods of John Charles Crampin and Bryan Charlesworth , feloniously did steal, and that afterwards the prisoner, on the 8th of November , at St. Martin, Ludgate , under pretence of helping the said John Charles Crampin and Bryan Charlesworth to their said goods, so as aforesaid feloniously stolen, feloniously did take and receive of the said John Charles Crampin, thirty sovereigns, the monies of the said John Charles Crampin and Bryan Charlesworth, he (the prisoner) not having apprehended, nor caused to be apprehended, the felons who feloniously stole the said goods, nor caused them to be brought to their trial for the same, nor given evidence against them .

2d COUNT, the same, only charging a certain person with stealing the said goods.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CHARLES CRAMPIN. I entered into partnership with Mr. Bryan Charlesworth, in September last; we had taken the whole of the upper part of the house No. 22, Wood-street, Cheapside. We had placed there silk goods of all kinds, to a very considerable amount; there were 6435 yards of silk amongst them, worth about 500 l., thirty-five pieces of silk handkerchiefs, and other goods - the whole of which were worth from 800 l. to 1000 l.; a part of this stock was stolen from that warehouse on the night of the 26th, or the morning of the 27th of October, to the amount of upwards of 800 l.; we had bills printed offering fifty guineas reward for the discovery of the property, and information was given in the morning at the Mansion-house. On the day after the robbery, my partner introduced the prisoner and Salmon, the Bow-street officer, to me - we had some conversation about the robbery, but very little - the prisoner made no proposal at that time in my hearing. I saw him afterwards on the following Saturday, at his own house, the Dolphin, public-house, on Ludgate-hill; he then said he was in hopes our property would be recovered for us. I cannot exactly state what he said, but I remember his saying if the goods were in the hands of regular thieves, no doubt they would be got for us, for he should be able to get them for us; he did not state any thing about his knowledge of where the goods were; he said he should see the party most likely on the Sunday, that Ikey Solomons was one, and old Crowder was frequently mentioned as of the party; he said Ikey Solomons kept a regular fence house, and old Crowder was a notorious thief. I saw the prisoner again on Sunday, at Salmon's house, in Tavistock-street - nothing particular was stated then, but! was to call again in the evening. I did call, and Lidbetter was gone. I went to his house, and saw him; he said he had got into a hunt, and we should be sure to have the goods back again. I made no observation, but I felt pleased at it. I asked him if he felt confident; he said there was no doubt of it, and he would be 10,000 l. to 10 l. that we had the goods back, but we must take stock, and let him have the account by eleven o'clock the next morning; the list was supplied to him, containing the exact description of the goods, and the amount of them. I do not remember any money being paid him then, but I paid him thirty sovereigns myself. I asked him what they were for - he said, they were for the purpose of recovering the goods: but I do not exactly recollect what the words were. I think this was on the Monday. I said "If you give this 30 sovereigns to the thieves, perhaps they may run off with them, and we may be that out of pocket as well?" he said "Oh! No, we have got them too fast for that, they can't run off," or something to that effect; he said he should see them on Monday. Ikey Solomons was mentioned, but I do not recollect that he mentioned any body else. I think he said he was to meet Solomons at the Cumberland, or Northumberland Coffee-house, in the Strand. I do not remember seeing him on the Tuesday, but I saw him several times afterwards; he told me he had seen Ikey Solomons, and had shewn him our list - that there was a deficiency in the number of yards in their list, and in the number of Bandahas and shawls; that their list was 1000 yards of silk less than ours - he said we could have the goods back for 450 l. I said it was a great deal of money to give; he said "Don't be too much in a hurry, you'll get them back for less." I asked him for what, and he said about 200 l. I have seen him several times since about the goods; he said he thought he had been misled, and had been upon a wrong hunt, but he should not give it up yet. I heard from my partner that he had sent a bill to our warehouse; this is the bill. (looking at it.) I have seen him since on the subject of it. I asked why he charged 10 l. for services; he said he did not intend to charge any thing, had it not been for the conduct of a gentleman I took to his house. I do not remember that he stated the name of the gentleman. I did not make any enquiry of him about the 30 l. at that time, but I afterwards took a friend with me for that purpose. I then asked what he had done with the 30 l.; he said he had got it, and should keep it till such time as his bill was paid; he went out of the room shortly after that, and we sent for him again; my friend, Mr. Shaw, then asked him what he had done with the 30 l; he snapped his fingers in his face, and said "What's that to you." I have seen him since, and he said, that though his expenses were stopped, he should not give it up - he thought there was something very black in it, and he should like to get to the bottom of it. I shortly afterwards went to a Magistrate to state the circumstances, and then he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have not a

very accurate recollection of any phrase used by yourself or the prisoner; your mind was a good deal disturbed? - A. Yes; it was very materially so, but I recollect some things particularly. I wrote down some things that Lidbetter said to me, by the advice of my friends. I did so to make my memory more perfect. I do not know that I have here a copy of what I wrote. I took a copy of it; the original was kept at Guildhall. I would as soon swear from my memory as the paper. I believe he was well known to my partner - who introduced him to me, and I have heard that he used to go to his house to spend his evenings. I have heard my partner say so in Lidbetter's presence. Salmon, and the other officer, took their refreshments there, but I did not know that a bill was going on at Lidbetter's house for the refreshment of the parties who were endeavouring to detect the thieves - it was not by my authority, and I never heard that my partner gave orders for it at Lidbetter's house; but I will not swear that he did not. I never made any charge against Lidbetter of a criminal nature, till he presented his bill for charges at his house - it was presented shortly after the 6th of November - it had been delivered several days before I made the charge. I do not remember that I had been grumbling about the charge of 10 l. for services in that bill; but I had asked the advice of my friends about it. I had not before then said to any human being, that Lidbetter had been obtaining money on a false pretence of getting the stolen goods. I do not know that I should have complained, had it not been for the charge in his bill - he never, in all his conversation, said that the 30 l. was given for the expence and trouble they were at in endeavouring to find the thieves. I have heard him say, that Ikey Solomons was a great receiver, and he had no doubt he had some of the goods. I do not remember his saying, that he knew the thieves who had committed the robbery. In speaking of Solomons or Crowder, I did not understand him to say more, than that they were likely persons to lead to a discovery of the thieves - not a word was ever said about the 30 l. being employed under the direction of the officers, Salmon and Perry, to use all their ability to detect the thieves. I did not tell him when I gave him the thirty sovereigns, to what use they were to be applied. I asked him what he was going to do with it - his answer was, it was to give to the thieves, and I understood that Ikey Solomons was one - it was to get the property back. I did not understand that any thieves were then found or known, but that Solomons was to get the goods back. I have heard him say, that he knew who the parties were; but I do not know what he meant by that - he mentioned old Crowder's name, and said, he had no doubt he was in it. I thought it very likely he might be one of the thieves. I had been given to understand that his son was in the robbery. I know that the officers went to his house - a woman of the name of Beckwith was taken up, in consequence of some letters which came by post - one was directed to a Mr. Jones - it was not through Mr. Lidbetter that the woman was apprehended. I gave the letters into the hands of the city officers. I always thought Ikey Solomons was a receiver of the goods from what I have heard the prisoner say. I did not direct the officers to take him up. I did not know that Solomons was in the power of the officers, and could have been apprehended any day within the last fortnight. I do not think Mr. Lidbetter ever had a knowledge of the thieves. I believe he did all he could for us, trying to do all in his power to bring the thieves to justice, and get the goods - he told me the goods were to be had for 450 l.; I do not know whether I would have given that or not. I said, had we not better give that than lose all our property - my mind was in that state - perhaps I should have done it; but not without consulting my partner - he said, he thought they might he got for less - the officers employed, were Salmon and Perry. I was perfectly satisfied with the good behaviour of the officers - they co-operated with Mr. Lidbetter, and he with them - their bill was 24 l. odd, and we gave them a check for 30 l. I do not know how many days Lidbetter was employed in endeavouring to discover the thieves. I should think, eight or ten days. I did not think from his being a friend of Mr. Charlesworth's, that he would charge for his trouble. It was in consequence of what Mr. Charlesworth said to me, that I handed the thirty sovereigns to Lidbetter. Mr. Charlesworth was examined before the Alderman on this prosecution - the City Solicitor was there advising the Magistrate, and Charlesworth was examined as a witness - he is not here - we are not on friendly terms. I do not know that it was Mr. Lidbetter's request, that Mr. Charlesworth's deposition should be preserved - the prisoner said, on one occasion, that they had got into a hunt, and they should soon find the goods. I did not know whether they had found the thieves or not, or whether any person was in custody.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You went to the City Magistrate to ask his opinion, not making any application for a warrant? - A. No; but to take his judgment respecting the bill. I did not take out any warrant - the prisoner was taken in consequence of my going to ask the Magistrate's opinion. I was surprised at his being committed. I was not aware there was such a law in existence - it was not upon my application that he was taken into custody.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not Mr. Lidbetter attend on a summons? A. Yes; he was not taken into custody.

COURT. Q. When were the goods safe? - A. They were all safe on Tuesday night. I left no one on the premises. I took the keys of the two doors. The street door was open which leads to Mr. Jones's warehouse, as well as our's. Mr. Jones's warehouse door was open, and his porter was standing there. I asked the porter if Mr. Jones was there; and he said, No. I went the next morning a little before nine o'clock, and saw our porter, whose name is William - he came to me, and said, "Good God, Sir, we have lost every thing!" the warehouse was stripped of all the best goods - the porter had been there before me.

JOHN SHAW . I am a friend of Mr. Crampin's. I accompanied him, on one interview with the prisoner, when he demanded from him an account of the thirty sovereigns - this was at the Dolphin. Mr. Crampin said there must be a dissolution of partnership between his partner and himself, and he desired to have back the 30 l. I do not recollect the exact answer, but Lidbetter said there was a bill of 10 l. or 11 l. which was not settled. Lidbetter said to Mr. Crampin, "If I have got fools to deal with you have not." After that I said "As Mr. Crampin's mind is

uneasy about his partnership, I think you had better return the sovereigns." He said "What's that to you." Lidbetter then took Mr. Crampin aside, and shewed him a list which he read to him. I heard something about Ikey Solomons and old Crowder, and a woman who, if she had been kept in custody, something more would have been found out. He said nothing more about the thirty sovereigns, but that he had got them, and would keep them. I did not see him afterwards, till he went to Guildhall, because Mr. Charlesworth wanted more money for Lidbetter and the officers, than Mr. Crampin was willing to allow. The Magistrate granted a summons for Mr. Lidbetter, and he was committed, greatly to our surprise and against our inclination.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Mr. Charlesworth at the house when you got there? A. No; he came afterwards - he was present when the demand was made for thirty sovereigns. I do not know whether he concurred in it or not. I cannot tell whether there has been a dispute about it. Charlesworth took no part in the demand of the sovereigns at Lidbetter's house.

RICHARD BUDDLE . I was in the service of Messrs. Crampin and Charlesworth. I went to their warehouse on the morning of the 27th of October, and took an account of the property lost. There had been a great quantity of silk handkerchiefs, shawls, &c. stolen. I was not at Mr. Lidbetter's house more than twice. I merely called to know if Mr. Charlesworth was there. I knew that he spent his evenings there sometimes, and was known to Mr. Lidbetter.

The bill alluded to contained a charge of 10 l. for the prisoner's trouble, and several items for refreshment, &c., which were not read.

Evidence on behalf the Prisoner.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I have been there nearly twenty years. In the course of that time I have bad great experience in hunting thieves and finding them. Mr. Charlesworth and Mr. Lidbetter came to Bow-street together on this business. I had occasion afterwards to see Mr. Lidbetter, almost every day for eleven days - we used his house on these occasions - there were never any orders given in my presence, but I took refreshments without paying for them. I have seen Mr. Crampin there several times, in company with his partner. I told them every circumstance as it occurred, relative to the discovery of the thieves. Mr. Crampin never expressed any dissatisfaction at what Mr. Lidbetter had done. Lidbetter never said that he had discovered who the persons were that had committed the robbery. The name of Ikey Solomons and old Crowder, were first mentioned, in consequence of the receipt of two anonymous letters. I heard at the house, where Beck with lived, that she had been apprehended. Mr. Lidbetter, in my judgment, was doing all he could to discover the thieves. I never saw a person do more to discover a robbery - he never represented to me, or to any one in my hearing, that he knew who the thieves were - I heard him say he would use every endeavour, and, if possible, he would find them. Mr. Crampin never charged him with having obtained money to help him to the stolen goods, to my knowledge. There was an appointment to meet at Charing-cross, in consequence of these two letters. We then went to White-street, to endeavour to see Beckwith - we found she had been there, but was taken; but if we went to Crowder's it would be for the service of this gentleman - we had an interview with him. We had an appointment to meet the next day, at another house, to find Ikey Solomons - it was never understood that Solomons or Crowder could do more than lead to information of the goods. I have not the slightest idea, from Mr. Lidbetter's conduct, that he was in collusion with the thieves to get money.

PETER PERRY . I have been a Bow-street officer nearly thirty years. I moved hand in hand with Salmon in this transaction. No course could be pursued more adapted to discover the thieves than that pursued by the prisoner. If goods, of considerable value, are stolen, it is a natural and usual course, to discover the goods, by finding the takers, and I have no doubt that that was Mr. Lidbetter's object as well as ours. He said he would do his endeavour to get at the goods, and then at the thieves. At the time he met Ikey Solomons we were to be by in case we were wanted. Lidbetter had no power to have helped this gentleman to his goods by means of 30 l. - he never pretended or said, that for 30 l. he could help him to his goods. There seems to be nothing extraordinary in the bill running up to the sum it did. I think the charges for brandy and rum, and other things, are not extraordinary. I do not think 10 l. was too high a charge for what he did - if I had been a publican I would not have taken the trouble he did, and walk about as he had, for less than 10 l.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had not Salmon a bill likewise? A. Yes; he had a bill for costs, coach-hire, and travelling expenses, which came to 20 l. odd, and they gave us 30 l., they were so well satisfied with us. We never knew that Lidbetter had the 30 l.; but I think the eating and drinking at his house, and the labour he had, well deserved it. Our bill was quite distinct from his. We got our 30 l. for our trouble in endeavouring to obtain the property.

EDWARD FLACK . I live in St. Paul's church-yard. I know Mr. Lidbetter very well. I have seen Mr. Crampin at his house once. The subject of this robbery was then brought up - I heard Mr. Crampin and Mr. Charlesworth express themselves satisfied with what Mr. Lidbetter had done; he appeared to me to have done all he could to detect the thieves. I heard Mr. Charlesworth speak of the bill, and he said he thought it was too little - Mr. Crampin expressed himself very well satisfied. I do not know what Mr. Lidbetter did in the business, but from what I have heard I thought it was very little. I believe Mr. Lidbetter to be a very honest man.

BENJAMIN YOUNG . I am a waiter at Mr. Lidbetter's house. I have seen these two gentlemen at my master's house, repeatedly. I have seen this bill; I made it out myself - I know that part of the things were had by the officers and the other gentlemen, and I believe the rest of the things were had by them. When my master was engaged in this business he appeared to act like an honest man.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you ever see a person at your house whom your master called Ikey Solomons, or that he spoke of as Solomons? A. No. I saw one person there, but I do not know his name, nor when it was.

The Rev. Robert Crosby, and ten other respectable persons deposed to the prisoner's good character.

GUILTY. Aged 36. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his good character.

This case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges .

Reference Number: t18241202-111

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

111. MARY PERKINS and ELIZABETH WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a piece of sarsnet, containing sixteen yards, value 3 l., the goods of John Limbert and William Limbert , in their dwelling-house .

THOMAS GIBBONS . I am shopman to John and William Limbert, linen-drapers , Oxford-street . On the 4th of November, between four and five o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop, together; Perkins wanted some childs' socks - I asked them to walk to the end of the shop, gave them seats, and fetched some socks, which I showed to Perkins; they were not the right size, and while I was gone for another paper I looked towards them, and saw Watson knock a piece of sarsnet off the counter, with her hand; I took no notice, but shewed them more socks, which did not suit, and I got a third paper, and shewed to Perkins. I then saw Watson stoop down, and put the silk under her petticoats. Perkins bought a pair of socks, which came to 6 d., and they were walking out when Mr. Limbert desired them to walk into a back room, and as they walked along I heard the silk fall from Watson.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your's is a house of great business? A. Yes. They came in together, and talked together. Watson knocked it down purposely - it was not near the edge of the counter; she was walking out with Perkins, and had not asked to look at anything.

MR. ALFRED LIMBERT . I am a surgeon, and was in my father's shop, and in consequence of what Gibbons said to me I noticed the prisoners; Watson sat down, and was fumbling at her pockets; I told my brother, who told them to walk into the back room, as they were going out; I walked behind them, and saw the roll of silk drop from Watson - I picked it up; she had been sitting close to Perkins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PERKINS'S Defence. I bought two pairs of socks, and was a good way from this woman. I did not see the silk.

WATSON - GUILTY. Aged 68. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

PERKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-112

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

112. LEVI ABRAHAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Fraser , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the 28th of November , at St. Clement Danes , with intent to steal; and burglariously stealing therein, a silver spoon, value 20 s., his property, and a shawl, value 20 s. , the goods of Mary Ann Easton , spinster .

MARY ANN EASTON. I am servant to Mr. Fraser, who lives in Norfolk-street, Strand . On the 28th of November, I went to bed with my fellow-servant at a few minutes before eleven o'clock - we went up from the kitchen to our bedroom, which is in the passage; adjoining the front parlour; master and mistress went to bed just before us. I fastened all the doors and windows myself. I left a shawl in the kitchen, and a silver table spoon in a basin on the tray, on the dresser, on the left hand side of the kitchen. I was awoke by the dog barking very violently - it was in the passage by our room door, or the street door. I could not tell the time. I quieted him twice, and he laid down on the mat near the stairs - it was a little terrier - there is a long partition of glass, which parts the stairs from our bedroom; and in about two minutes after he had made the noise. I saw a strong light go up stairs, and somebody appeared to snatch the dog off the stairs - it made a noise as if it was snatched up violently - the light then left the passage, and went down to the kitchen. I heard no noise then. I sat up in bed, and at first thought it might be master come down to quiet the dog; but in a minute or two I got out of bed, opened the door, and went down the passage a little way, and saw a full light in the kitchen through some windows on the staircase, and heard some one in the kitchen say "Hush." I went back to my bed-room door, and screamed out "Murder! murder!" I then closed the door, held it firm, and told my fellow-servant to get out of bed and call Watch - she got out, opened the shutter and the window, and called Watch - we both kept screaming all the time - two gentlemen came by, and said they would send the watchman. I could not see them because I was holding the door - the watchman came to the door. I turned my head round as I held the door, and saw a man standing in the areas with his back towards our window - he was taken by the watchman, but not in my presence. I do not know whether the prisoner is the man or not - one gentleman assisted another to get in at the window, and he opened the street door. I followed the watchman and them down into the kitchen - the watchman brought my shawl, and the spoon from the area - the dog laid in the kitchen with its head nearly cut off - a gentleman took a knife from the dresser, and shewed it to me - it was bloody - it was after two o'clock when all this was over - a little boy slept in the kitchen. I went up, and awoke master and mistress.

REBECCA THOMAS . I am servant to Mr. Fraser. I was awoke by the dog barking; we quieted him, and laid awake. I saw a light in the passage, and the dog made a shocking noise; after the light left the passage, I heard no noise - it was not there above a minute; my fellow-servant went into the passage, and hallooed "Who is there?" and called Murder! I opened the window, and called Watch! - two young men came, and asked what was the matter - they went away before the watchman came, and I saw a man getting up out of the area - there is a gas-light near the house. I saw him taken; it was the prisoner. I first saw him climbing up from the area with his hands on the rails - there are no steps - the watchman took him as he stood on a stone inside the rails - he said, there was a man down there, for he had been down to see. I am sure the prisoner is the man who I saw down in the area. I saw him taken, saw his face, and swear that he is the man; some gentlemen came up, and told me to open the door. I said, I could not - one of them got in through the window, and opened the street door. I accompanied them down to the kitchen - the two dresser drawers were open; the kitchen door, and the window were both open; they

were both shut when I went to bed; the shawl and table spoon were gone from the kitchen. I had seen the spoon on the dresser the night before, and thought of washing it to take it up stairs: but did not - the dog lay in the kitchen, with his head nearly cut off, and the carving-knife was bloody.

ROBERT NEWMAN . I am a watchman; early on the morning of the 29th of November, I was at the bottom of Norfolk-street, heard a shrieking, and on coming up to this house, I saw the prisoner inside the area, on the stone which separates the two houses. I ordered him to come over the rails, and immediately collared him, and told him if he made any resistance, I would knock him down - the parlour window was open, and the last witness stood there. I sprang my rattle - two gentlemen came to my assistance - one of them got in at the parlour window, got a light, and let another in; and in a few minutes two watchmen came. I gave him in charge of one of them, while I went down to search. I went down first with a candle, and found the dog lying bleeding, with his head nearly off; and on the dresser was this dark lantern (producing it;) the kitchen door stood open. I went into the area, examined the coal-cellar - nobody was there; and in the area, nearly under the spot where I first found the prisoner, was this shawl and table spoon. I returned, and took him to the watch-house - the constable searched him in my presence; and on his waistcoat pocket was a small piece of wax candle, a comb, some silver, and a blue striped handkerchief, which appeared to have spots of blood on it, and there were marks of blood on the back of his right hand. I produce the shawl and spoon.

Prisoner. Q. Was there a mark of blood on the back of my hand? A. There were marks of blood; I think there were two marks.

Q. Was the handkerchief wet with blood - A. I cannot say whether it was wet, but it was bloody.

GEORGE WHITAKER . I am a watchman. I went to this house, and found the prisoner in Newman's custody; he had then got over the rails; two gentlemen stood by the rails - one got over, and let me in. I went down stairs with Newman, leaving the prisoner in charge of another watchman - I was the second or third who entered the kitchen; the door stood open, and one of the windows. I produce the carving knife, which was wet with blood; it laid on the dresser. I found a crow-bar in the area, and on the right-hand dresser I found the door of a dark lantern. I afterwards returned to the house, and found two center bits. The window shutters were broken open, and the crow-bar exactly fitted the marks on them. I have no doubt but that the window was forced open by that crowbar.

GEORGE GRIFFEN . I am a watchman. I heard a rattle spring about one o'clock; a person came up, and I went to this house - Newman was holding the prisoner, and gave him in my charge; two watchmen and some gentlemen went into the house. I assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house. A candle and 6 s. was found in his pocket.

MR. WILLIAM FRASER. I live at No. 37, Norfolk-street, in the parish of St. Clement, Danes. I was disturbed by the cook coming into our room, after it was all over. The table spoon is my property - it has my initials on it, and had been used by my brother-in-law, who slept in the house that night. I found the house full of watchmen and people. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, and saw blood on the back of his right-hand, and said in his presence, that he was the murderer of my faithful dog.

MARY ANN EASTON. I know the shawl to be mine - I have had it two months; and know the spoon to be any master's.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentleman; if I was to say I was not an accomplice, I should only be adding falsehood to crime. I came to London four weeks ago, and was looking for work; I went into a house, and met a person, whom I thought was a gentleman, and he led me away. I went with him to this house, and I am afraid that if I enter fully into a statement now, it may be prejudicial to the ends of justice hereafter. I was led away by men who are old in crime. I was in the area, but not in the house, and never saw the dog; I heard the noise, but never touched him. I have been affected with a bleeding at the noise, for eighteen months, and that is what caused the blood. I put my hand to my nose, and there was a bit of a mark on my hand. There has always been blood issuing from my nose; the surgeon can satisfy you of that being the case since I have been committed. I throw myself on the Mercy of the Court. My parents live at Manchester, and I have not the means of bringing friends here.

JURY to MR. FRASER. Q. How deep is the area? A. It must be about twelve feet from the curb of the pavement, and there are rails at the top, which makes an addition to it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18241202-113

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

113. WILLIAM SERJEANT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a gelding, price 20 l. , the property of Richard Baker .

RICHARD BAKER. I live at Laystock, in Surry , and am a farmer . On the 5th of November, I missed a black gelding from a field behind my house - I had seen it safe on the 3d. I found it at Hatton-garden on the 12th, in possession of Read, and am sure it is mine. I took it home the same night - it knew the stable well - it was bred in that field, and would never leave its company - there were six or seven horses in the same field, and if it was put two or three fields off, he would break through to get to them; it must have been taken through the gate, for I examined the fence all round. I had offered to sell it for 27 l.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had any of its company got out of the field? A. No.

RICHARD EVANS . I am hostler at the Horse Shoe, public-house, St. John-street, Clerkenwell. On Thursday, the 4th of November, about six o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my stables in company with another man; the prisoner rode a black mare, and the other man came driving this black gelding in a cart; the other man (I think) desired me to take care of the black gelding, for they had driven him very fast; the prisoner said, it was of no consequence what stable I put the mare into; they went away, and came back together about the middle of the day, and asked if I had fed the horses - I said Yes; the prisoner himself went and fed the mare with corn, which they had in a sack. I afterwards found the sack in the

cart - I did not see him feed the gelding; the other man came up the yard at night, in company with Cowderoy. I did not see the prisoner then. Cowderoy had the horse out, and ran him up and down, but said it was too late; next morning, the prisoner and the other man came to the stables, and looked at the horses, and the other man observed, that they looked fresh. I asked him the price of the horse; he said the gentleman he had brought the night before, he dare say would buy it, and did not tell me the price - he said the man was coming up to try him in harness next day. I saw them together next day, (Friday) the other man asked what there was to pay for the horses. I said 6 s. the two, which he paid, and asked the prisoner to lend him 1 s., which he gave me for myself; he then said he had sold the gelding to the gentleman who had been to see it, and desired me to get the mare ready. I asked if the gentleman came for the gelding, who was to deliver it; he said "If I don't come myself, this man will;" meaning the prisoner, who was in the yard, and I believe within hearing - they went away together; the prisoner came back just at dusk with Cowderoy. Read was in attendance, and took them both.

Cross-examined. Q. All the way through, the man treated the gelding as his? A. Yes - I considered him the owner. I have since heard that he is called Charley - he is not to be found.

JOHN COWDEROY . I am a cow-keeper, and live in Brook-street, Ratcliff. On the 4th of November, I was coming down St. John-street, and a man whom they call Charley, asked if I wanted to buy a horse. I had seen him in Smithfield before. I went to look at it, but it was dark. I did not see the prisoner then - on Friday afternoon, I saw Charley in Smithfield - he told me to call at the Castle and Falcon, and stop for him. I went and found him there, and wanted to know the price of the horse; he said he should not say till I had tried it, and said to the prisoner, "Will you go with this gentleman, and shew him the black horse," and that he would stop there till we returned. I walked behind the prisoner, and never exchanged a word with him. Read and his son were there, and took the prisoner; young Read asked if I knew where the other man was: we went to look for him about the market, but could not find him.

Cross-examined. Q. All the prisoner did was to do what Charley asked him? - A. That was all; Charley is a horse-dealer. I have seen him at Smithfield a number of times.

R. EVANS re-examined. Q. The mare seemed much in the same state as the gelding? - A. It was very lame in the fore feet, and appeared to have come the same distance; but it is hard to say, as some horses sweat more than others.

Cross-examined. Q. The mare had been a good deal worked? - A. Yes; driven hard in the course of her life; the horse being fresh from grass. I should think would not he more liable to sweat - the mare could scarcely stand to eat - they were both very much fatigued.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I received information, and waited at the Horse Shoe, public-house - the prisoner and Cowderoy came for the black gelding. I asked the prisoner how he came by it - he said, it did not belong to him, but to another person. Cowderoy said, the person was at the Castle and Falcon. I secured the prisoner, and my son went with Cowderoy. I questioned the prisoner - he said, he came from Heston - that he had seen the other man before; but knew but little of him - he believed they called him Jem - that he met him in St. John-street early on Thursday morning, with this black gelding, and he gave him 5 s. to let him put the gelding in his cart to try it in harness - he said, he was a butcher. I saw the cart; it had the name of "Hesther, of Heston," on it, and had two saddles on it.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to ask these questions? - A. I generally ask questions when I take men; it is not altogether to give evidence against them. I did not ask them to trap him. I did it for the good of the public - he told me all this without being asked questions. I only asked where he came from, and he told me all the rest voluntarily. I asked where he met him, and what he was, and what he knew of Jem.

Q. Is it true then, that you only asked where he came from? - A. I asked those questions.

COURT. Q. Did you give this account before the Magistrate? - A. No; for my son gave his evidence first.

RICHARD BAKER. I think Heston is twelve or thirteen miles from here.

WILLIAM READ, JUN. I went with Cowderoy, but could not find the man. I asked the prisoner before my father came, if he knew the man - he said, he saw him a little before six o'clock in the morning - the horse was brought there, and that was all he knew of it. I found that the prisoner lived at Heston.

Prisoner's Defence. When this man came to pay for the corn, the hostler wanted to charge 9 s.; he gave him 6 s., and I gave him one to end the dispute. I told the hostler when I went, that the cart and harness was mine, and that was all - that the collar and black horse were not mine - he wanted to cut my collar, which was on the mare. I would not let him. I had a quartern of split peas, and two handfuls of bran, which I brought from home, and gave it to the mare. I stopped at the Queen's Head, public-house, St. John-street, that night alone, and next morning went to see my mare, and overtook the man going into the yard. I afterwards saw him and Cowderoy together, and he asked me to go and shew him the horse.

COURT to EVANS. Q. Did the prisoner tell you what belonged to him? A. He did not; the collar on the gelding was cut. I only charged 6 s. for the corn - we had no dispute.

SAMUEL DRAYTON . I live at Heston; the prisoner lodged with me - the last night he slept at home was Sunday, the 3d of November - he went out at four o'clock the next morning.

JOHN HESTHER . I am a publican, and live at Heston. I lent my cart to Charley on the Monday morning, at Heston. I saw him go away with it - he had a chesnut mare, or gelding. I believe the prisoner had a horse at my stables at the time. I did not get my cart again, till it came from Hatton-garden; but Charley might have brought it back, for the prisoner had leave to use it whenever he chose, without asking me. I think he was at my house on Wednesday night. I never saw him and Charley together; my collar and harness always went with the cart. I saw the mare in my stable on Monday morning - it then belonged to one Champness.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-114

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

114. JAMES PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a silver milkpot, value 3 l.; a watch, value 10 s.; a gown, value 1 l., and a scarf, value 10 s., the goods of Aaron Cochran , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN COCHRAN . I am the wife of Aaron Cochrane; we live in Woolberry-street, Hackney-road - the prisoner is a journeyman shoemaker in our employ. On the 24th of November, about half-past two o'clock, we went out, and left him alone in charge of the house; we returned about half-past six o'clock - the door was shut, and he was gone; my husband got through the next house, and let me in. I missed this property from a drawer in the lower room, and had left him in the next room - there is a door between them, which was left open. Last Saturday week, two children came to my door, and gave me a brown paper parcel, which contained the silver milkpot and watch.

SOLOMON COHEN . On the 24th of November, I lived in Petticoat-lane. I came home at half-past ten o'clock at night, and found the prisoner (who is a stranger) in my room; with James Till , and my wife. I asked what they did there; they said Till was only come to see his child, which was at nurse in the next room. I said it was time to go home; they asked if I would have any thing to drink. I was angry at seeing such company there, and said they had better go. Till went first, and then the prisoner. Next morning between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came and asked if Till had been there. I said not, and asked his reason for giving my wife things to pawn or sell, and how he came by them; he said "I stole them from my master." I asked what he had stolen; he said a silver milkpot, a silver watch, a gown and scarf; and that Till had persuaded him to do it. I said I should be forced to give charge of him; he said "Tell me the way to Paddington, that I may be off:" but I fetched an officer - he remained in my room while I went, and might have left if he liked. I was not gone above four minutes, and did not tell him that I was going for one, and I left my wife in the house.

Prisoner. Q. Is she your wife? A. We have lived together for four years.

SUSAN WEBB . I live with Cohen, as his wife. The prisoner came to my room with Till, (whom I knew before,) on the 24th of November, at five o'clock in the afternoon; Till came to see his child; the young woman in the next room was out, and had left it with me. The prisoner was down stairs, and did not hear what Till said to me. I pawned a silk gown and scarf for Till, and when I returned gave him 10 s.; he went down, and shortly after brought up the prisoner; they sat down, and shared some money - Till gave him 13 s. and odd - for after I gave Till the 10 s. he produced a silver milkpot and a watch, and went to sell them; he asked me to sell them, but I refused - he went down, and brought the prisoner up in half an hour, and gave him the 13 s., and said he had sold the milkpot and watch for 1 l.; the prisoner said nothing to it. When Cohen came home he seemed angry, and they went away; I told him what I had done. Next morning the prisoner came and asked for Till; Cohen asked why he had brought me the things to pawn, and where he got them from; he said he had robbed his master of them; Cohen went down and got an officer.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Price , pawnbroker, Wentworth-street. I have known the last witness six years - on the 24th of November she pawned a silk gown and scarf, for 10 s. in the name of Ann Bonham, and said they were not her own. I would advance 40 s. on the milkpot.

MICHAEL MORDICA . I am a headborough. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he had robbed his master of a silver milkpot, a watch, scarf, and gown.

Q. Did you ask him no question? A. I asked if he had stolen them, and he said Yes; he confessed it without my asking him any question whatever. I said I should take him before a Magistrate, and he said he had stolen them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Till came to the house about a quarter of an hour after master went out, and asked me to take a walk; I said I did not mind, as I did not expect them home till nine o'clock; he stopped in the room for half an hour, while I put my things on - he then took me to see his child, and told me to wait at the door: he went up for a quarter of an hour, and then came down, went out, returned in half an hour, and asked me up to see his child, and presently he gave me some money; I did not know what it was for - we sat there all the afternoon, then Cohen came home, and drank with us till between twelve and one o'clock, and about nine I went and asked if Till was there; he asked me to breakfast, and said he would go and look for Till, returned, and said he could not find him. He then asked if I knew any thing about these things; I said No; he said he should send for an officer if I did not tell him - I said he might.

PROSECUTRIX. I believe that Till has entrapped him, for I have left him several times, and never missed any thing. I would take him into my employ now if he is liberated.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Strongly Recommended to Mercy. Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-115

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

115. JOSHUA PENNIALL was indicted for that he, on the 23d of November , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order, for payment of money, as follows - "Sir John Perring, Bart., Shaw, Barber, and Co., pay Mr. Bell 261 l. 18 s. 5 d., George Capper and Nephews," with intent to defraud Sir John Perring , Bart. , Benjamin Shaw , and Stephen Nicholson Barber .

2d COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud George Capper , John Capper , and Samuel James Capper .

3d and 4th COUNTS, for offering a forged order, with the same intent, knowing it to be forged.

5th and 6th COUNTS, for disposing of and putting away the said forged order, with like intentions.

7th and 8th COUNTS, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with like intentions.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. OLIVER VILE . I am managing clerk to Sir John Perring, Bart., Benjamin Shaw, and Stephen Nicholson

Barber, bankers , Cornhill. George Capper and Co. keep cash at our house, and had considerably more than 261 l. in our hands on the 23d of November - on which day, about three o'clock, the prisoner presented this cheque at our banking-house; immediately on taking it into my hands I doubted the authenticity of the signature, but being very dubious at making any demur at a cheque of Messrs. Cappers, I placed it on the book, and entered it for payment, proceeded to the Bank note drawer, and took out 260 l., but I requested Mr. Matthews, another clerk, to look at the signature, and by the time I had entered the notes, Matthews came up, looked at the draft, and said it was all right. I handed the prisoner the 260 l. and while I was preparing the odd money, Matthews suggested a doubt about it. I either asked the prisoner then, or previously, if he received it for, or of Messrs. Cappers; his answer was, for, or of Mr. Purdy , of the Commercial sale rooms; Mr. Matthews went to Messrs. Cappers', to ascertain the authenticity of the cheque. I believe I had told the prisoner that there was a difference in the signature; he was near enough to hear the conversation between me and Matthews, and a few minutes after Matthews was gone, he said he thought, or was afraid that there was something odd about the cheque, and began to state that he was out of employ, and had given the porter at the Royal Exchange a shilling to stick up a bill, but that bill was not written large enough - he had written another; he was stating something further about the bill, but my original suspicions being confirmed, I asked him to give me back the note, which he did. I requested him to walk into a private room; he then resumed the conversation, and stated more clearly about the bill, and that, after the second bill was stuck up, a very respectable person asked him if he was out of employ, and if the bill was his writing. After some conversation they went to the New York coffee house, and after some conversation there, the person sent him to receive this draft. I then asked who he had lived with - he said, Mr. Williams , a tea-broker, of Jewry-street, and that while he was there a very unpleasant circumstance occurred at Messrs. Williams, the bankers. Being aware that 200 l. had been improperly obtained from Messrs. Williams, I said "Do you allude to the 200 l. being obtained from them?" I do not recollect his answer, for about that time the conversation terminated by the arrival of Mr. Matthews. I think he then, or had previously requested, some one might be sent to the New York coffee-house; for he said there was a gentleman sitting there at the time he was sent, and probably he might be there now. About this time, I think, Mr. Matthews and Mr. Capper, arrived - I requested an officer might be sent for - the prisoner still urged the propriety of sending to the New York coffee-house, but I and Mr. Capper thought it expedient to wait till the officer arrived; who took him there. I and Mr. Capper followed; the waiter, who did not seem to have any distinct recollection of the circumstance, except that there had been a person sitting in the place to which the prisoner pointed. He was kept in custody, and examined before the Lord Mayor next day.

COURT. Q. How long had he been with you before he said he had received it from somebody at the New York coffee-house? I think nearly five minutes. Mr. Matthews went out at the front door to go to Messrs. Capper, and returned with Mr. Capper, and gave the cheque to me - it has not been out of my possession since.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Did you doubt merely on account of the signature, or because you thought the account overdrawn? A. Solely on account of the signature. I think I handed him the money before I asked where he got it. I rather doubt whether I gave him the money first, but have a difficulty in determining which. There was no variation in his account, only the conversation in the private room was rather more detailed - he urged me twice or more to send to the coffee-house - he left the banking house in custody - if any one had been waiting for him they would have seen that he was in custody. I did not give him the 1 l. 18 s. 5 d.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS . I am clerk at Sir John Perring and Co.'s banking-house. I have heard Mr. Vile's statement. From the manner in which he requested me to look at the cheque I considered that he doubted the signature, and as I wished to do it with a good deal of caution, I merely took a glance at it, and thinking that I saw a private mark, which is usually on Messrs. Capper's cheques, I considered it right; but on looking more minutely at the filling up, I suggested a doubt to Mr. Vile, and told him, in the prisoner's hearing, that he had better not pay it - (There had been a complaint of Messrs. Capper having lost a cheque of a different amount). Mr. Vile said, I had better step to Messrs. Capper's, to inquire if they had drawn the cheque, which I did, taking it with me. They live in Crosby-square. I returned in about a quarter of an hour, and delivered Mr. Vile the cheque, and I think Mr. Capper declared it to be a forgery - the prisoner was present and in hearing - I fetched an officer. The amount of the cheque lost was 61 l. 18 s. 5 d. - the figures being the same as in this, except the figure 2, but I think it was payable to Mr. Bashel, or some such name; it was lost in July.

Cross-examined. Q. Glancing your eye over it, you considered it correct by a private mark? - A. Yes; it is two lines on the side of the cheque. I have no reason to suppose, that the prisoner ever saw the lost cheque - there was no understood private mark between us; but most of their cheques were so marked, and have a letter and folio, which is wanting in this.

MR. LAW. Q. Are you in the habit of paying their cheques? - A. Yes; and believe it not to be their signature; it is a close imitation. I at first looked at it at a distance of full half a yard, and said, it was right; but on taking it into my hands, I immediately doubted.

FREDERICK PURDY . I attend the Commercial sale rooms, and never delivered this cheque to the prisoner, or ever saw him to my knowledge, till the day after the transaction.

JOHN FRANCIS GERMAN . I am clerk to Messrs. George, John, and Samuel James Capper. I am well acquainted with the hand-writing of the different partners. I believe this cheque not to be in the hand-writing of any one of them. Mr. Bashel lives in Ireland; the lost cheque has never been found. We know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH STUART . I am clerk to Messrs. Capper. I believe no part of this cheque to be in the hand-writing of any one of them. Mr. George Capper signs G. Capper and Nephews.

Cheque Read.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I took him into-custody; he requested me to go to the New York coffee-house with him, which I did; he looked about, and said the gentleman was not there. At the Mansion House he said a person, representing himself as Mr. Purdy, of the Commercial sale rooms, gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 23d of November, in the morning, I went to the Exchange, to have a bill posted for a situation in a counting-house; the porter demanded 1 s.; I went several times in the course of the morning, to see where he had posted it, but could not see it, and at three o'clock the person to whom I had given it was pointed out; he said he had not put it up, not considering the letters large enough - he gave it to me back, and I promised to bring another in the morning. I was reading the bill, and a gentleman asked me if it was my writing; I said Yes - he asked where I had lived: I referred him to Mr. Williams. He said his name was Purdy, of the Commercial sale rooms - that he wanted a clerk, and would employ me; he took me to the New York coffee-house, and questioned me as to my abilities, in the presence of a strange gentleman, and after asking at what time he could see my former employers, he said, "Will you take this cheque to Perring's, get it cashed, and bring the money here;" I went, and received 260 l. - another gentleman came up - they did not like to pay the money; I gave them the address of the supposed Mr. Purdy - the clerk was sent with the cheque; I remained outside the counter for ten minutes, and could have escaped with the money, but I stated how I became possessed of the cheque, and within two minutes repeatedly urged the necessity of sending to the coffee-house. The officer went with me after half an hour had elapsed - there was nobody in the room; the waiter remembered my being there with a gentleman, and that another gentleman was sitting where I pointed. I wrote to Messrs. Perring and Co. to cause enquiry to be made, and they have sent word to the Governor that they had ascertained who the gentleman was, and that he was at my service; it was Mr. Trigoni: it is through the influence of Sir John Perring that he is here. If the porter had stuck up the bill this would never have occurred: it is all owing to his negligence.

JOHN HARRISON . I am a porter of the Royal Exchange. I cannot speak to the prisoner, but I remember a young man bringing me a bill, which I did not stick up, because I thought his address was not legible enough. The prisoner may be the person. He came in the afternoon, and I gave it him back with the shilling - he said he would bring another.

Mr. LAW. Q. Is it the nearest way from the Change to this banking house, to pass the New York coffee-house? A. No; the banker's is not a minute's walk.

JOHN TRIGONI . I am in the employ of Messrs. Lawrence and Co. Watling-street. On the 23d of November I was at the New York coffee-house. I saw a young man there, but had only a side view of his countenance. The prisoner is precisely the same in stature. A well-dressed person was with him, dressed in a drab coat. I was near enough to hear what passed, but my back was towards them. They came in while I sat there, and commenced a conversation - the elder one said, "You tell me you have lived two years with so and so, "(mentioning a name which I don't recollect). The reply was, Yes. He said, "Pray, at what hour shall I call on them, for a reference as to your character." The prisoner replied, "They are on Change now, but if you go at half-past five or six, you will be sure to find them at the counting-house." The other man said, "Very well; I will go, but, in the mean time, Just step to Perring's with this cheque, and bring the money back." He said, "I will;" and left, and in the course of a minute the person went out also, and I left shortly after - I heard of the prisoner being taken up, and thought it was my duty to come forward.

MR. LAW. Q. The person left the room about a minute after? A. Yes; the conversation was in rather a loud tone which induced me to look round once or twice. I was reading the paper in a box near the window, and they stood at the fire - it is a very small room. I believe the waiter was the only person who came into the room; the conversation was in rather a load tone for persons conversing on business - this circumstance did not strike me then, but it has since.

Q. Was it unnecessarily loud, as if it was intended to be heard? A. I think if I had been talking upon business, I should not have spoken so loud - the tone of the elder person was loudest - they called for nothing.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You were the only person there, and could hear better than if others were there? A. Yes; a moderate tone of voice could be heard - it was not a whisper, nor a very loud tone - they were close to each other; they must have seen me.

EDWARD LAMBERT . I have known the prisoner and his family many years; his father worked forty-seven years for mine: the prisoner was clerk to Mr. Williams nearly opposite our house, and bore a very good character, till the late business occurred. I was at the first examination into that matter; my opinion is, that he was innocent, because he was discharged - he left their service then.

MR. LAW. Q. What was the nature of the charge? A. Getting 200 l. for Messrs. Williams, bankers, through a letter which came to Mr. Williams the broker - it happened six weeks ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-116

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

116. WILLIAM LILLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone , twelve silver spoons, value 4 l., the goods of Daniel Bazalgette , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH EMMETT . I am cook to Mr. Daniel Bazalgette, who lives in Nottingham-terrace, Regent's-park , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 8th of November I put a dozen spoons into the kitchen cupboard, and saw them there at eleven o'clock in the morning, and missed them at half-past one - I was at home all the time - the area gate was not locked; a person could come down there to the kitchen. I found them at Hatton-garden on the Saturday week following; they were four table, two dessert, and six tea spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Does your master keep the house? A. Yes. I cannot exactly spell his name.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. On the 8th of November, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner

in Wilderness-row, Clerkenwell, in company with another person; I suspected him - I followed them, and took the prisoner; he ran away, leaving his hat in my hands, and in it were these twelve spoons. I followed him two hundred yards, and he was stopped. I asked him where they came from - he said I should soon find out.

Cross-examined. Q. You met him a great way from Mary-le-bone? A. Yes, three miles - another person was with him.

SARAH EMMETT. I know these spoons to be my master's, by the initials M. M. C., which are on all his plate; I do not know why. I have lived five months with him.

THOMAS LEWIS STILES . I am a silversmith and jeweller. These spoons appear to be silver, but I would not swear that they are so - (breaking one.) - Yes, they are silver, but of a very inferior sort. I suppose them to be made abroad; we dare not sell such; they have not got the hall mark. I should think them worth 4 s. an ounce; the largest weighs about two ounces; the dessert spoons about half an ounce, and the tea spoons about a quarter of an ounce.

Cross-examined. Q. Which is there most of, silver or alloy? A. Silver. I must assay it to tell the exact quantity of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up - the officer immediately came and laid hold of me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18241202-117

117. HANNAH HARRIET BURTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Robinson , spinster , about six o'clock in the night of the 29th of November , at St. Margaret, Westminster , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, two silver spoons, value 1 l., and two silver ladles, value 1 l., her property; a watch, value 14 l., and three silver forks, value 30 s., the goods of Edward Hanson .

MARY ANN ROBINSON. I am single, and live at No. 9, Manchester-buildings , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster - Mr. Hanson lodges in my house. On Monday afternoon, the 29th of November, I went out at a little before four o'clock, leaving my servant Collins in the house; my place was then safe. I returned just at six o'clock; the servant, and several of the neighbours, were at the door. I went up to the first floor, and missed from the sideboard, two silver tureen ladles, and two silver table spoons of mine; also three silver forks, and a gold watch of Mr. Hanson's; all of which was safe there when I went out - the watch had formerly been mine - I gave 25 l. for it, and sold it to Mr. Hanson. I employed the prisoner about a month before that to do some needle-work in the house, for nearly a fortnight - she had left nearly three weeks.

MARY COLLINS . I am servant to the prosecutrix She went out about four o'clock. I was at home, and in the kitchen, most of the time. I did not let her out - but exactly at twenty minutes before five, I was up in the drawing-room, and looked at the watch to see the time. The property was all safe then. I went up again at half-past five, to lay the cloth, and it was gone. A tradesman's wife had called about four o'clock, after mistress had gone out, and I latched the door after her, but did not lock it: she waited till mistress came home. I was alarmed on missing the property - went and found the street door half open. I am sure I shut it after letting the tradesman's wife in - it could be opened outside with a latch key.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS, Q. How long before that had your mistress gone out? A. At about a quarter to four o'clock - I did not see the prisoner that night.

JOSEPH JONES . I am servant to my uncle, David Jones , silversmith, Broad-street, St. Giles's. On Tuesday morning, the 30th of November, at nine o'clock, the prisoner came in, and looked round the shop. I thought she wanted to pawn something, and shewed her the passage door; she said, she did not want to pawn any thing, but that about five years ago she had sold us some spoons, and wanted to sell something more - she produced three silver forks. I questioned her about them; she gave her name as Harriet Green, living at a coffee-shop, No. 4, Oxford-street. I asked if she brought them on her own account; she said, No; for Mrs. Robinson, No. 16, Great Russell-street. I went there, and could find no such person, and then sent for a constable, who took her, with the forks, after I had marked them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she sober? A. No; rather tipsy.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Levy , pawnbroker, London-street, Fitzroy-square. I produce a pair of sauce ladles, pawned by the prisoner for 1 l., on the 29th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - she was sober.

JOHN GREEN . I am beadle of St. Giles's. I was fetched to Jones's, and took the prisoner; before I attempted to search her, she pulled out of her bosom a gold watch. I found a latch-key on her, which open the prosecutrix's door, also a sovereign, and 2 s.

JAMES DRY . I am shopman to Mr. Sherino , pawnbroker, John-street, Golden-square. I produce two table spoons, pawned on the 29th of November, in the evening, by the prisoner, I believe.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am a beadle. I assisted Green in going round to the pawnbrokers, and tried the key to the prosecutrix's door.

EDWARD HANSON. I lodge in this house, and believe this watch to be mine. I left it in the drawing-room. I paid the prosecutrix 16 l. for it, five or six months ago.

Cross-examined. Q. She gave 25 l. for it - did you get it for 16 l.? A. Yes. She is not married, nor am I. She pays the rent and taxes. I pay her forty-five guineas, and have the drawing-room and bed-room; she had had the watch many years; I wanted one, and she sold it to me - she shewed me a bill of it bought of Mr. Hawley for 25 l.

MARY ANN ROBINSON. I know the watch. I had had it ten years - the dwelling-house is mine. I pay the rent and taxes - the spoons and ladles are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave 25 l., for the watch, were you in distress to sell it for 16 l.? A. No; I bought it ten years ago, and considered that watches are greatly reduced, and as Mr. Hanson wanted one. I said he might have it for sixteen guineas, as I would rather go under than over.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very drunk on that day.

NATHANIEL LEVY . I am a collector of water rents; the prosecutrix's name stands in my books as Mary Robinson.

PROSECUTRIX. My name is Mary Ann; my servant gave my name to this person - if a tax gatherer had asked me my name, I might have said Mary. I am not married.

I am called Mrs. Robinson out of respect, not being young. I am just thirty years of age.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Reference Number: t18241202-118

118. GEORGE ORCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a watch, value 10 s., and two sovereigns, the property of Ann Orchard , widow , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Nassane .

ANN ORCHARD. I lodge at Paddington . I do not know what parish the house is in; the prisoner is my brother-in-law - he came to see me on a Wednesday evening, three weeks ago, and said, he was in great distress - he slept in my place three nights. I went out on the Saturday, leaving him there; and, on returning, he was gone, and I missed two sovereigns and a watch from my drawer, I expected him to stop till Sunday - he was taken on the Friday following.

EDWARD MORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Greaves , pawnbroker, Bulstrode-street. On the 6th of November, a watch was pawned for 6 s. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. On the 12th of November, I apprehended the prisoner, and told him I took him for stealing a watch and two sovereigns - he said, it was true; he was very sorry for it; but was driven to it by the greatest distress, and if he had not been apprehended, he should have made away with himself. I found a duplicate of the watch on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded extreme distress, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 20. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-119

119. THOMAS BOARDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a watch, value 44 s., two seals, value 12 s., and a key, value 3 s., the goods of James Edge , in his dwelling-house .

ELEANOR EDGE . I am the wife of James Edge - we live at Poplar . On the 6th of November, the prisoner came to lodge with us, and on the 15th, he went away without warning; and in about three quarters of an hour I missed this watch, which had hung in the kitchen where he sat.

Prisoner. Q. Did you lend me any money? - A. I lent him 2 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial Road. On the 15th of November, the prisoner pawned this watch for two guineas; and on the 22d, he called to ask if I would advance him any more on a sextant which he had pawned, and I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM FOSTER . I received him in charge - he gave me the duplicate of the watch.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated his intention of returning the watch which the prosecutrix had lent him - he had pawned it on hearing of a situation at Gravesend; and the moment he returned, went to the pawnbroker to get more advanced on a sextant, in order to redeem the watch.

ELEANOR EDGE re-examined. I had lent him 2 s. 6 d. on the Sunday, as he said he could not pay for his lodging till he got a 20 l. note changed. I never lent him the watch - he very much admired a watch of mine, and said it had a shabby key - he left his trunk, containing his wearing apparel, behind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-120

120. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a watch, value 40 s. three seals, value 18 s., a key, value 1 s., and a ring, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Shaw , in the dwelling-house of James Slater .

RICHARD SHAW. I am a groom out of place . On the 4th of November I lodged at James Slater's, the Two Chambers public-house, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - the prisoner had lodged there about a month, but had no business in the house that night - he slept in the same room, but in a different bed. I went to bed about eleven o'clock on the 3d of November, and put my watch under the bolster - he was in bed then. I got up about a quarter to eight o'clock - it was then safe. I went out, leaving it there, returned in an hour, and missed it - he did not sleep there after; but on the morning of the 6th, he came to me, and said he understood that I charged him with it, and he was come to clear his character, I gave him in charge - nobody but him and the pot-boy slept in the room - he told the officer he had pawned it in Whitechapel, and lost the duplicate.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. On the morning of the 4th of November the watch was pawned for 2 l. I believe the prisoner to be the person.

JOSEPH FROST . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said, he had pawned it in Whitechapel, and lost the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-121

NEW COURT.

(4th DAY.)

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

121. WILLIAM REYNOLDS and JAMES MOSS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a waistcoat, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Essen .

ROBERT COX . I am shopman to Robert Essen, a pawnbroker , who lives in Aldersgate-street . On the 24th of November, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner Moss, near the shop door for about ten minutes. I saw no other person with him then, but in two or three minutes I saw the other prisoner - they went away several times and came back. Moss stood by the window - Reynolds took a waistcoat, which hung on a line near the door, and gave it to Moss - I ran out and secured Moss. I pointed out Reynolds to some other persons, who took him. I hear that he bears a very good character.

J. W M. HARRISON . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoners and waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

REYNOLD'S Defence. I work for Mr. Lee , Falcon-square. When I got to the warehouse door that morning, there was a gentleman there, and I had to wait. I went to the end of the street, and saw two or three persons looking at this window. I returned to the warehouse door, but found it still fast - I then went back, and saw the other prisoner

near the door, and Cox running after him. I was taken.

WM. REYNOLDS - GUILTY. Aged 25. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Two Months .

J. MOSS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-122

122. WILLIAM GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , six deal boards, value 8 s. the goods of Henry Peto .

THOMAS GRISSELL . I live in Little Britain, and am clerk to Henry Peto. These boards are his property - They were safe in his premises on the Saturday previous to the robbery. I have examined them, and know them by a knot that runs through them. I did not miss them till the Monday morning.

THOMAS BROWN . I am watchman of St. Sepulchre's. On the morning of the 21st of November, I was in Cow-lane, at two o'clock, and saw the prisoner with the boards. He said he was going home with them to make tables of them - that he had bought them in Old-street for 7 s. I said "You must go to the watch-house with me" - he put them down and said he should not take them any further - I could not get any assistance. I told him to take half of them to the watch-house, and I took the others - we were not far from Mr. Peto's.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITH . I am constable. I compared one of the boards with Mr. Peto's. It matched exactly.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am inspector of the watch. I compared the boards - they corresponded exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the boards to the watch-house. I picked them up in the road, and did not steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 32. Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor, on account of his appearing deranged. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-123

123. EMMA CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a watch, value 2 l.; three seals, value 20 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; a key, value 3 s.; a gold pin, value 10 s.; four half-crowns, and six sixpences, the property of John Henry , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-124

124. WILLIAM POOLE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JAMES GREY . I am clerk to Messrs. Richard Preston Pritchard and John Pritchard , warehousemen , of King-street, Cheapside . John Lewis and Son are customers of theirs. On the 6th of November , a man named Stiles brought an order for a piece of black bombazeen, and a piece of stuff, signed "John Lewis and Son." I gave him the articles; but suspecting that it was forged, I got an officer, who followed him with the porter and myself; he took the goods to his own house, where they were to be delivered to the prisoner, who was not there, and Stiles came out again.

JOHN LEWIS, SEN. I am a draper, and live in Oxford-street - my son is in partnership with me; we never wrote this order, not was it written by any one whom I know.

WILLIAM STILES . The prisoner gave me this letter on the 6th of November, to take to No. 27, King-street, Cheapside. I asked him what his name was, and where he lived: he said that was of no consequence, he would meet me at my house. I had seen him once before, when I was in service. I delivered the letter to Mr. Grey, who delivered me the goods; the officer was sent for, and Mr. Grey came to my house; the prisoner was not there, but he came in about an hour: the officer and Mr. Gray were then gone. I told him to wait, and sent my wife for a constable: he could not be found, but the prisoner went with me and another man to Mr. Pritchard's, where he was given in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. Having been in a respectable way of business, but reduced to work as a porter, I was employed by a person to go into the City, and deliver this note, and he back by eleven o'clock. I did not like to take the note, as the people knew me; but of any knowledge of its being a false order I am innocent. In the interval I had a job to go to the George and Blue Boar, which was the reason I did not get there sooner: when I heard that they wanted me, I went there readily; the person told me he lived with Mr. Lewis, in Oxford-street, but he had to go to Somers-town.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-125

125. JOHN WORLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-126

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury. Before Mr. Recorder.

126. WILLIAM KIMLEY and GEORGE FENN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 138 lbs. of sugar, value 3 l. 10 s. , the goods of Benjamin Severn , Frederick Benjamin King , John Severn , and Thomas Bishop ; and JOHN JAMES alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for that he feloniously did incite, move, procure, aid, council, and command the said prisoners to do and commit the said felonies .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EVANS . I am foreman at the West India Docks. On the 22d of September, I weighed four hogsheads of sugar, in No. 8, Warehouse. I delivered them at Messrs. Severn and King's waggon - here is the dock ticket, which I made out, and delivered with them: the hogshead, No. 20, weighed 16 cwt. 3 qr. 23 lbs., marked "D. E." and there was a country number of "41" on the hogshead. I did not know the man who was with the waggon, nor those who assisted.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you count the weights yourself? A. Yes - I am certain this was the weight.

THOMAS HORNE . I am a foreman at the West India Docks. I remember the loading of this waggon; the prisoner Williams alias James drove it: he, with the assistance of another man, whom I do not recollect, put the hogsheads into the waggon - this is the ticket which was delivered.

JOHN EVANS , JUN. I am a jiggerman. On the 22d of September, I assisted to load Severn's waggon - it was driven by Williams - a young man came from No. 9, warehouse, and helped to load it - he got up in the waggon; the prisoner Williams was in the waggon first. I noticed that the hogshead in front of the waggon was loaded in a different way to what carmen generally do - it was placed gun wise, instead of across - this would allow a person to pass at the side of the cask to the sample hole.

HENRY WINNING . I am carman to the prosecutor. I

was at the docks on the 22d of September, with another waggon of theirs. I saw the waggon in question - one Fowler ought to have driven it, but I did not see him there. I was standing at No. 3, warehouse, and saw the waggon at No. 8, warehouse - Kimley was with it. I saw it go out of the dock with five hogsheads in it, but I could not observe their position. When I saw Kimley first, he was driving slowly, but the nearer he came to me, the more he whipped the horses, and I saw that the front of the waggon was covered with a tarpauling, which came down to the shafts - it was a fine day, and no tarpauling was required: if it had been a wet day, that tarpauling would not have covered the sugar, as it was so much over the shafts.

WILLIAM GREEN . On the 22d of September, I was carman to Mr. Drake. I am now in the service of Mr. Briant. I was coming up the Commercial-road , following Mr. Scudder's waggon, which was first, and Edward Fowler was driving it - that was about twenty poles from Mr. Severn's waggon: the second waggon was driven by George Fenn - Mr. Severn's waggon stopped at the corner of Grove-street. I saw Edward Fowler come to Mr. Severn's waggon, by the sign of the King's Head, public-house at the corner of Grove-street. Kimley came to the tail of the waggon, and took a load from Fowler - Fenn was then by the side. I heard Fenn say "Ned don't do it, you'll be seen by somebody." Fowler said,"It must come out, and shall come out," and then Kimley took it on his back - Fowler and Fenn went into the public-house. Fenn said nothing more that I heard. I saw Fenn next day at the dock, and said "Why do you keep such company you'll get into trouble as sure as you are alive;" he said, "I only went to have half a pint of beer."

Cross-examined. Q. When carts have been at the Docks for things, do they not come five or six together along the road? A. Yes; and the drivers talk and drink together. I was about six yards from the waggon at the time of the transaction - Fenn did not touch it. Fowler and Kimley did it. Fenn said "Don't do it by daylight, you'll be seen." Fenn was then close to the tail of the waggon. He did not appear angry. I did not say any thing to them till the next day, when I spoke to Fenn.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it not known the next day that this had been done? A. Yes; but I do not know that Fenn knew it. I am a sugar carman - the regular way to load a waggon, is to let the first hogshead go in crossways, the next two long ways, and then one across: a chain goes across to keep them tight, and if there is a fifth hogshead, it goes at top, and is called a rider.

HENRY WINNING . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Benjamin Severn and Co. On the 22d of September this waggon came from the docks, driven by Fowler; I assisted in unloading it - the first four hogsheads had nothing particular about them; but on the fifth being put into the warehouse, I knocked off the tin, and put in the drawing-iron, and was surprised to find that there was no sugar near the hole; it was marked D. E., No. 20. I went to the show room, and fetched the dock ticket to see what was the weight; I then weighed it, and it weighed only 15 cwt. 2 qr. 23 lbs., making a deficiency of 1 cwt. 0 qr. 26 lbs. I immediately acquainted Mr. William Severn of it, and it was again weighed, in his presence. I have never seen Fowler since; he had given us no notice of his being about to leave. This was on a Wednesday, and they generally leave on Saturdays.

WILLIAM SEVERN . I saw the cask weighed; it weighed 15 cwt. 2 qr. 23 lbs. I saw Fowler about an hour afterwards - I questioned him on the subject of the deficiency; he said he knew nothing about it: I told him to attend me the next morning; he said he would come at eleven o'clock, but he did not, and I have not seen him since. The value of the sugar deficient is about 70 s.; there were three days wages due to Fowler - he has never called for them. Neither of the prisoners were ever employed by us.

WILLIAM WOOD . I now drive Fowler's waggon. On the third day after Fowler was gone I found, on moving the puncheon beds in the waggon, a handkerchief, a knife, an adze, a small crow-bar, a piece of hoop, and a rope: they would be of use in raising up the tins of the hogsheads, and nailing them on again.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I was employed to finding the prisoners; I took Fenn at his master's, on the 20th of November; I had no difficulty in finding him.

JOHN WINNING re-examined. Some weeks after this affair I saw two men, whom I suspected were concerned - I waited till they came up the road; it was Fenn and James, in conversation together; I got within a few yards of them, and Fenn held his head up, then spoke to James, and went away - James came to me; they must have seen me before they separated; there was a dray by the side of the road - James passed behind the dray, and I went round the front, to meet him - James then ran away; I called Stop thief! and two men stopped him.

KIMLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

FENN - NOT GUILTY .

JAMES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-127

127. JANE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , six knives, value 2 s.; six forks, value 1 s., and a decanter, value 2 s., the goods of William Cornelius Offley , her master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. On the 8th of November I was employed to watch at Mr. Offley's house, in Henrietta-street . I saw the prisoner come out about nine o'clock in the morning, and go towards Chandos-street; I followed, and stopped her under the gateway of the Key, public-house, leading to Vine-street, and found in her apron six forks, and a decanter; I then told her I was an officer - I took her to a public-house, and found six knives in her pocket, and a salt spoon; she requested to go round the corner, which I would not allow - the things were claimed by Mr. Offley.

WILLIAM CORNELIUS OFFLEY. I am the proprietor of the Burton Ale rooms, Henrietta-street - these are my goods - here is my name on them: the prisoner had lived with me about five weeks. I had a good character with her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A fellow servant of mine at Mr. Young's (where I had lived,) who was going home to Ireland, was to have a party, and I was to bring her a

few knives and forks, and other things. I took the liberty of taking these, intending to return them next morning.

GUILTY. Aged 26. Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-128

128. JANE TAYLOR was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a decanter, value 1 s. 6 d., and a candlestick, value 18 d., the goods of William Cornelius Offley , her master ; and HARRIET TIRMODY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM VASSIE . I am head waiter at Mr. Offley's. The prisoner Taylor lived there in November. I took stock about a fortnight after she came, and missed three decanters, one of them was chipped at the top. I sent my wife and John Weller , on the 31st of October, to follow her.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When had you taken stock? A. On the day before the prisoner came to the house. I took it again fifteen days afterwards. I can speak to the decanter from its general appearance. I never saw any like it but what we had.

JOHN WELLER. I live in Bedfordbury, and am a woollen draper. On Sunday, the 31st of October, I watched about Mr. Offley's house, and saw Jane Taylor come out of the house, about twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the morning - she was holding her apron up in her hands - there appeared to be crockery or glass in it. She went into No. 6, Vine-street, which is Mrs. Tirmody's - it is a little dirty house - they sell rags - I saw Mrs. Tirmody speak to her - I passed by and came back again.

HARRIOT VASSIE . I am the wife William Vassie. I went with Weller on Sunday morning, the 31st of October, and saw Jane Taylor with her apron up in her hands - she had either glass or crockery ware in it, and went into Chandos-street, and under the archway.

CHARLES TOWELL . I am an oyster man, and serve Mr. Offley. I saw Mrs. Tirmody at her shop, and asked her for some rummers - she said she had none at present, but had had some on Monday, and should have more in a few days. This was on the Wednesday or Thursday after Taylor had been there. I went again on the day Taylor was apprehended, and asked her if she had any glass - she said "No; when I have I will let you know." I had not told her where I lived.

SAMUEL LACK . I searched the house of Tirmody, and found the decanters in the back parlour, on the mantle-piece - I found a candlestick in the first floor front room, in the cupboard - she said she had bought the decanter for old glass, and had it ground down - she said she had sold the candlestick to her son or son-in-law.

JOHN MOTE . I live in Tirmody's house. This candlestick was in my possession. I bought it of her for 10 d. seven weeks ago - it was all over dirt and verdigrease.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-129

129. HENRY SALES was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BROWN . I am a coal-dealer , and live at New Brentford - the prisoner was in my employ - he was to go out with coals , and give an account every evening of the coals he delivered, and the money received. I had a customer of the name of Hayter, a smith, at Wimbledon - the prisoner never accounted to me for 2 l. received of him - he had no dealings with any person himself to my knowledge.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you recollect that you sent a receipt by me to Wimbledon to Mr. Hayter, and told me to tell him you should be glad of the money which I delivered to you? - A. Yes; but that was in August. I never received any money from Mr. Hayter but that 2 l.

HENRY HAYTER . I am a smith, and live at Wimbledon. I have taken coals of the prisoner, and have paid him money at different times. On the 2d of October , I wrote this receipt - (looking at it) - and he made a cross under it. I paid him two sovereigns. I had paid 2 l. in August - that was one sovereign and 1 l. in silver. I supposed the coals to be Mr. Brown's, because they came in his cart. I never gave any order to Mr. Brown himself.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I sell you ten sacks, which I said I had paid for out of my wages? - A. I never had ten sacks of you in my life. I never heard him say any thing about them being his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the money for these ten sacks of coals, and my fellow-servant was there, and helped me to unload them.

MR. BROWN re-examined. Q. Did he ever buy any coals of you for the purpose of selling them? - A. No; I never stopped any thing out of his wages. I never heard of his buying coals of any other person.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-130

130. JAMES MEAD was indicted for that he, on the 3d of November , at Chelsea , 60 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., belonging to our Lord the King, and fixed to a certain building, feloniously did rip, cut, and break, with intent to steal .

2D COUNT, stating it to belong to the Commissioners of the Royal Hospital for soldiers, at Chelsea , and fixed to a building of theirs.

MR. MEREWETHER conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL GRIMLEY . I am employed at Chelsea Hospital as a bricklayer. On the 2d of November, about half past three o'clock, I went upon the powder magazine - there was some powder there at the time. I found two pieces of flashing - one was pulled up, and a part of it fastened to the wall by wall hooks. I took a part of it, which laid along the roof, away, and put the other down - at seven o'clock next morning, I again found the lead disturbed in two separate places, one on the hip - it was not broken, but lifted up from its hold, and turned up about three inches, not ripped - it had been laid down on the hip, and pressed down on the tiling. I did not perceive that it had been injured or torn. I did not take so much notice of it - it was disturbed from the place where it had been before - it was indented to the shape of the tiles, and over it another piece, which was let into the wall. On the 2d, I had found the piece of the flashing ripped from the wall.

PATRICK FLAHERTY . I know the Powder Magazine; there is powder generally there. On the 3d of November I was acting as watchman - between twelve and one o'clock I saw the prisoner on the top of the magazine, ripping the lead; it was quite moonlight - I took a stone and threw it at him - he then laid down on the roof; I got on

the wall, and secured him. I called out loudly, and the men answered me.

CHARLES MIELL . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was under the magazine wall, on the outside, and heard the watchman call for assistance; I went round, and saw the prisoner in his custody, and found two knives upon him - I then went on the building, and missed a piece of lead, and found another on the hip, lifted up. I saw marks of some person having climbed on the outside of the wall, to get to the top of the magazine; the lead which went into the wall had been removed from the building; a part was lifted up, and a number of bricks had fallen. One of the knives appeared to be covered with lead, as if it had been used in cutting it.

MARK KELLY . I am porter at the Royal Hospital. The prisoner was brought to me on this night, by the patrol. The whole of the square is within my charge, and is locked up every night. I examined the magazine, and found a great part of the lead ripped from the top of the magazine wall: it lies on the slates - it cannot be nailed: it is fastened by mortar, and soldered down. It was entirely ripped up from the mortar and solder, and weighed about 60 lbs. It was about ten feet by eighteen.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Cobourg Theatre, and when I got home I was too late, and could not get in. I got upon the railings to go to sleep on the top of the building - when I saw the watchman, and he called me; I came down immediately, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-131

131. JOHN McINTIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a ham, value 13 s. , the goods of John Goodrich and Simon Goodrich .

EPHRAIM RAINBOW . I am in the employ of John and Simon Goodrich, who live at Fulham . On the 26th of November they lost a ham, between four and five o'clock in the evening - I had seen it about two hours before; I did not see it taken, nor see the prisoner near the shop; I heard that it was stolen, pursued, and took the ham from the prisoner, about a quarter of a mile from the shop, with it concealed under his coat; he gave no account of it. I delivered him to a constable. It had hung on the door-post, inside the shop.

EDWARD EDGSON . I received the prisoner in custody - he said he saw a boy drop the ham, and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys running, as if they were pursued - they dropped the ham, which I picked up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-132

132. JOHN HEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 5 lbs. of starch, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Rickett .

HENRY RICKETT. I am a grocer , and live in Shoreditch . On the 25th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a paper of starch; he put one arm and one leg into the shop; I pursued, and stopped him thirty or forty yards off; he had dropped the paper.

BENJAMIN POCOCK . I received him in charge, with the paper of starch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24. Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-133

133. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , a watch, value 40 s.; a chain, value 2 d., and a key, value 2 d. , the goods of James Wilson .

JAMES WILSON. I live in Saunder's-court, Great Peter-street, and am a shoe-maker . On the 27th of November, about twelve o'clock, my watch hung on a nail in my stall, a little higher than my head; I did not see it taken. The prisoner came to my stall, pulled off his shoe, and wished me to mend it; I said I could not do it while he waited - I was giving it to him again when he returned it, and pointed out another job: I said I could not do it then; he put on his shoe, and said he would get a slipper, and bring it again. I saw a kind of shadow over my head while I was looking at the shoe, but I did not know what it was. I missed the watch half a minute after he was gone. I went to several pawnbrokers to give information - he was taken the same night. I am quite sure he is the person who came to my stall.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL I am an officer. I went in search of the prisoner, and found him by the description the prosecutor gave me - he denied the robbery, and said he lived at No. 52, Pye-street; I went there, but he did not live there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near his place on that day: I was at Mr. Williams's, at Chelsea.

JAMES WILSON re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner come into your stall? A. No, but he was near enough to reach the watch. The stall is under the Elephant and Castle, public-house ; persons passing by might easily see the watch hanging up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-134

134. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , a pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of James Paine and George Henry Bassington .

JOHN BENNET . I am in the employ of James Paine and George Henry Bassington. On the 3d of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to enquire if we had a waistcoat for sale - he went out, returned again, asked the same question, and went out; a little boy told us he had taken a pair of boots from the door; they had hung too far in for any person to get them without coming into the shop. I sent the apprentice after him - he was brought back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

J - YEOWART . I pursued after the boy - he had got one house off, when I laid hold of him, with the boots under his jacket.

JOHN DALTON . I searched him, and found 1 1/4 d. on him - he said some man had promised him 1 s. to take the boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no parents. I came from Northampton, and am in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 13. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241202-135

135. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN CHEW . I am a baker , and live in Carnaby-market - the prisoner was my journeyman ; he was to receive the money from my customers, and to settle with me every evening. I had a customer named Baker - on the 23d of November the prisoner left my service; he had been with me about nine months.

MARY ANN HARDING . I am servant to Mr. Baker, who lives in Albermarle-street. The prisoner used to bring the bread every morning - on the 22d of November I paid him two shilling pieces, and 4 1/2 d. in copper; Mr. Chew came to our house on the Wednesday, and we found this out.

JOHN CHEW re-examined. I went on Wednesday morning, and asked Mr. Baker for 4 l. 18 s. 4 d., which I thought he owed me; he said he never missed a day on which he did not pay the prisoner.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of November, at his father's, in Aylesbury-street; he said he had not defrauded his master of any other money but Mr. Baker's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-136

136. JANE MILNE and SAMUEL TIBBLES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , from the person of Samuel Vardy Read , a watch, value 30 l.; a chain, value 5 l.; two seals, value 4 l.; a key, value 15 s.; a pencil case, value 5 s.; a comb, value 2 s.; a purse, value 4 s.; four sovereigns, and two 5 l. Bank notes, his property .

SAMUEL VARDY REID. I am a master mariner , and live at No. 15, Commercial-place, Commercial-road. On the evening of the 25th of November, between nine and eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner Milne, between Leadenhall-street, and the Minories - I was intoxicated. I went with her to No. 2, Hairbrain-court, Blue Anchor-street, Rosemary-lane , and slept there the whole night. I had a gold watch a chain, and two seals attached to it - I am sure I had it when I went into the room with her. I cannot say where I put it - there were no other persons in the room that I know of. I had a purse in my pocket, with two 5 l. notes, and four sovereigns in it. I awoke about half-past six o'clock in the morning, she was then gone. I missed my watch, chain, seals, purse, silver pencil-case, and pocket comb - I did not hear her leave the room. I cannot be positive whether any other person was in the room. I gave information, and she was taken into custody that day.

Prisoner MILNE. Q. Did you not give me the watch to take care of, till you asked me for it? A. I cannot tell whether I did or not; but if I did, it was only in trust till the morning. I cannot say that I did not give her the purse and notes.

THOMAS MEAKIN . I am an officer of Billingsgate Ward. I know this house, it is in the parish of Whitechapel. On the 26th of November, about one o'clock in the morning, I was at the Queen's Head, public-house; the two prisoners came in to get something to drink - they were served at the bar, and then it was made known that there was a bed wanting; the landlady said "Who is it for;" Tibbles said "For my daughter, I have married her mother:" the landlady then said "Do you want a bed too," Yes, said he; Tibbels was feeling for money to pay for the two beds, and pulled out this watch. I stopped them both - the watch, seals, and chain were claimed by the prosecutor two days afterwards. I found no purse, but found the pencil-case, and comb, and one sovereign in the bosom of the female prisoner; the watch, a 5 l. note, and a double sovereign on the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MILNE'S Defence. He gave me these articles to take care of till he asked me for them, and I gave them to this old man to keep, as I was much in liquor. Tibbles then asked me to give him a glass.

TIBBLES Defence. I met Milne on Tower-hill, and she gave me the watch to take care of. We had a glass of brandy. I lent her some money to pay for it - she said she would take a bed there - I thought I had better get a bed there too, and give her the property in the morning.

MILNE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

TIBBLES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-137

137. DEBORA HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , a shawl, value 3 s.; two pieces of carpet, value 1 s.; a piece of fringe, value 2 s., and a piece of bed linen, value 6 s. the goods of Edward Green , her master .

MARY GREEN . I am the wife of Edward Green. The prisoner has been in my service since the 16th of October. I had a character with her. I had been out of town, and when I came home I found she had been making some inquiries about the neighbourhood. I spoke to her about it, and she absconded without asking for her wages, I missed the articles stated in the indictment, on the 20th of November. I saw them again on the 27th - they were left at the house where she lodged.

MARY HOOK . My husband is a paper-hanger, and lives in the Hampstead-road. The prisoner came to live with me about four months ago - she then went to Mrs. Green's service. She had been in the habit of coming in and out, and one evening she brought a bit of carpet for my little girl, and said she would bring her a bit of fringe. I saw her with a shawl on, but I don't know whose it was.

SAMUEL WARNER . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner at a house at the end of the New Road, and upon Mrs. Green's complaint I took charge of her. I found the shawl on her person.

ZACHARY ALLNUTT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a duplicate of a ring which the prisoner took from Mrs. Green's, for an article which she had pawned - it has been redeemed by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Parker, the landlord of the house at No. 2, Conway-street, came in and told my mistress that I had reported every thing that was bad of her; my mistress also charged me with it. I took her the shawl, by her desire, to wear while I was going to Mr. Parker to ask him what I had said. I found the ticket of the ring in the ashes. I put it into my pocket until I went to my landlady and gave it her. I pledged my shawl to obtain the ring, and since I would not give her the ring for the 1 s. I owed her, she came to Mrs. Green's and told her that I had robbed her of several things.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Five weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-138

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

138. JOHN AINSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a saw, value 3 s. , the goods of John Ledwick .

JOHN LEDWICK. I am a broker , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 5th of November I received information from a little boy - I went into the street, and saw the prisoner, about four doors off, with my saw; he said, "What do you want with me, I was only going to play tricks with the boy; I did not mean to take the saw; here it is." It had hung against the middle post of my window.

THOMAS LEDWICK . - I am ten years old. I am the prosecutor's son. I saw the prisoner take down the saw and walk away with it - he did not say any thing. I told my father, and we ran out. When he saw me, he said he was only playing tricks, to see what I should do.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I took him into custody - he said he did not care what became of him.

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-139

139. JOHN GANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a ham, value 6 s., the goods of Francis Hornby , and John Hornby , privately in their shop .

THOMAS HILL . I am shopman to Francis and John Hornby, who keep an oil and Italian warehouse in the Strand . On the 16th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was standing behind the counter, and a woman came in with some meat in a cloth. I served her a pennyworth of twine - the prisoner came in and spoke to her, and then turned out immediately - shortly afterwards, the other two witnesses brought him back. I examined the hams, but cannot say whether there was one short or no. I cannot be positive as to this, as we have so many.

ALFRED IVE . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Hornby. I saw the prisoner going out, and putting a ham under the flap of his coat. I inquired if it had been sold. I then went after him, and overtook him within about one hundred yards. I asked where the ham was - he said, he had not had one - he had none got it then. I had not lost sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me have any property at any time? - A. Yes; you was putting a ham under your coat at the door.

REUBEN GILL . I am porter to Messrs. Hornby. I went with Ive, and took the prisoner within one hundred yards of my master's shop. I saw him with a ham in his hand, before we came up to him - he took it from under his coat twice, and returned it - when we took him, I found it lying about a yard behind him - he might have dropped it without our seeing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken to the watch-house, this gentleman said, I should not be prosecuted; but I had had a knife to grind, and in consequence of some dispute about that, I have been prosecuted.

GUILTY. Aged 59. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-140

140. GEORGE ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a shovel, value 2 s. , the goods of William Earl .

WILLIAM EARL. I am a brickmaker , and live at Mile End. On the 26th of November I went to dinner, and left my shovel; on my return I missed it, and found it laid on the top of some bricks under some straw. I let it remain till about five o'clock, when the prisoner came and took it up. I took him into custody when he had got a few yards off - he had worked in the field once.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am the night constable. I produce the shovel, and took the prisoner into custody - he said he took it through hunger, having had nothing to eat for two days.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-141

141. THOMAS BRIANT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. , the goods of Charles Roles .

SAMUEL FIELD . I am a shopman to Charles Roles, who lives in Wentworth-place, Mile End . On the 11th of November I was in the shop, and saw a piece of printed cotton suddenly slip from a rail behind which I was standing, about six feet inside the shop. I went to the door, and saw a witness beckoning me - he said, "Come this way, and you'll have him;" we went, and met the prisoner, but he had got rid of the print.

SAMUEL BALLAM . I live in Dog-row. On the 11th of November, I met the prisoner in the act of putting a piece of print under his coat - Mr. Bromage said, Stop him! I beckoned to Field, and we went down a lane at the back of the house, and met him.

CHARLES BROMAGE . I saw the prisoner run by me, trying to put the print under his coat. I thought he had stolen it, and cried Stop thief! I gave a signal to Ballam, and he was stopped - the print was found over a wall, six feet from where he was taken.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer. I took him into custody with the print.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Red Cow-lane, a gentleman came and said, "That's the boy!" - they accused me of stealing the print. I said, I knew nothing about it, and when they got me to the shop, they began to beat, and knock me about. I had but just left my master's.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-142

142. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a shawl, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Burchett .

CHARLES EDWARDS . I live in Paddington-street, and am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Burchett. About five o'clock in the evening of the 6th of November, I was told that a shawl had been taken from the door. I went out, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand. I called Stop thief! and some persons stopped him before I lost sight of him. I saw him try to throw the shawl down.

WILLIAM PIKE . I saw the shawl hanging at the door; the prisoner stood within the door-cill, unpinned the shawl, and walked away. I went after him, and he threw it down.

Charles Edwards pursued him, and while I was stooping to pick it up, he cried Stop thief! - I left the shawl and took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I am in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-143

143. SAMUEL GILLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a basket, value 1 s., and eight loaves of bread, value 7 s. , the goods of John Wrighton .

GEORGE GRAY . I am a journeyman baker, and live near Portman-square. On the 12th of November, I stopped the prisoner in Baker-street, with a basket, and several loaves in it. I asked if it was his own - he said No, it belonged to James Watts, of Windham-place. I said I would take him there, but I could find no such person, I then took him to the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Had I the basket when you came up? A. No; I followed you a long way with it, and then you put it down.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am in the employ of John Wrighton. On the 12th of November, about one o'clock, I left my basket of bread, to go to some customers. I went about two hundred yards, and when I returned it was gone. I saw it again in about an hour at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. A man named Watts gave it me to carry for him, which I did.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-144

144. FREDERICK THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 3 lbs. of soap, value 1 s. 9 d. the goods of Charles Lahee .

CHARLES LAHEE. I am a grocer , and live in China-walk, Chelsea . On the 8th of November, the patrol brought in some soap which I knew to be mine. I had seen it safe not ten minutes before, some distance within the door.

CHARLES MIELL . I am a patrol. I was in China walk and saw the prisoner go to the front of the shop two or three times - I and Baker followed him, and found the soap on him.

ISAAC BAKER . I was with Miell, and saw the prisoner put something down from under his arm, which was a quartern loaf. We went over to the shop and took him, soon after with the soap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-145

145. PHILIP CHAMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a table, value 20 s. the goods of Paul Mullett , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-146

146. JOHN DOYLE and JOHN ROSE were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a table, value 25 s. and a desk, value 30 s. the goods of William Sadgrove , their master ; and WILLIAM PEARSON and MARY, his wife, were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ROSE pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

DOYLE pleaded GUILTY . Aged 41.

WM. PEARSON pleaded GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Mr. Alley, on behalf of the prosecutor, declined offering any evidence against Mary Pearson , who was consequently acquitted .

Reference Number: t18241202-147

147. JOHN ROSE and JOHN DOYLE were again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a carpet, value 4 l. 10 s., the goods of William Sadgrove , in his dwelling-house ; and WILLIAM PEARSON and MARY, his wife , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

There were five other indictments against the said prisoners, upon which no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18241202-148

148. PHILIP CHAMBERS was again indicted for stealing a bookcase, value 2 l. 10 s., and a carpet, value 4 l., the goods of Paul Mullett , his master, in his dwelling-house .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-149

149. THOMAS NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a stove, value 12 s. , the goods of George Betson Thompson .

GEORGE BETSON THOMPSON. I am an ironmonger , and live in Oxford-street . On the evening of the 30th of October, about seven o'clock, I was going down Dean-street, Soho, and met the prisoner, and another man, about two hundred yards from my own house, he had a stove on his shoulder. I suspected that it was mine - I walked after him, and then put my hand on it, and said "I want to look at this stove." He put it down and ran away. I pursued Norman, and a man took the stove to the watch-house - it had been in my warehouse not half an hour before, in a kind of lobby.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner, and stove.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to carry, and when the gentleman stopped me I was frightened, and began to run.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-150

150. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a gown, value 15 s.; four yards of stuff, value 4 s.; two shirts, value 11 s. 6 d.; a shift, value 1 s.; a towel value 6 d.; a napkin, value 1 s.; nine aprons, value 9 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. , the goods of Francis Bocock .

ANN BOCOCK . I am the wife of Francis Bocock - he is a coach carver . We live in a back room in Ray-street, Clerkenwell . On the 12th of November, I was in the front room with a fellow lodger - I heard a noise at my own door - I had put the hasp on the staple - I went into my room and found my silk handkerchief was out of my box - I looked in and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I looked out of the window and saw a woman turning from the court, dressed in a black gown, a black bonnet, and red shawl. I went out but lost sight of her. I found one gown at Mr. Stafford's, the pawnbroker's; which I had seen in my box that morning.

JOHN FITCH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Stafford, pawnbroker, St. John's-street. I produce a black gown, pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of November, between four and five o'clock. I did not know the prisoner before, but I am certain of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-151

151. ELIZABETH CLARK was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a curtain, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Benham .

ANN BENHAM . I am the wife of Thomas Benham - we live in Saffron-court . About half-past two o'clock in the afternoon of the 5th of November, I missed a curtain from my bedstead. I had seen it in the morning, between ten and eleven o'clock - the doors are left open by day - there were three children in my room - the eldest is not six years old.

JOHN ADCOCK . I am shopman to Mr. William Blackburn , pawnbroker, Saffron-hill; this curtain was pawned by the prisoner, between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 5th of November, in the name of Clark - I am certain of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in the habit of going to that pawnbroker's, and I was stopped there, when I was taken into custody. Witness. I detained her on the 9th of November, because Mrs. Benham had given us information. I sent for her, but she did not come for some time, and I let the prisoner go - she said she had bought the curtain.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the gentleman I had bought the curtain of a woman at the corner of Peter-street - he asked if I could describe the woman, and if she had a cut in her finger - I said Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-152

152. JAMES BEACHAMP was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , a round frock, value 6 s.; a waistcoat, value 4 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 5 s.; two shirts, value 3 s.; a pair of breeches, value 4 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; a canvas bag, value 1 s.; a half-crown, and two farthings , the property of John Weston .

JOHN WESTON. I live at Belfont . On the 3d of November, at six o'clock in the morning, I went to work. I left my trunk in my bed-room, at Mr. Sherborne's house, about eleven o'clock on the same day. I heard something about my trunk - I went home, and all the things were gone out of it. I missed a smock-frock, two shirts, two pair of stockings, one waistcoat, a pair of breeches, two handkerchiefs, a half crown, and two farthings, which were in a canvass bag; they were all safe on the night before, when I went to bed. I saw them again the same day before the Magistrates.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am a carpenter, and live near Belfont; a man named John Latan brought the prisoner to a public-house with a bundle, and told me he thought he had got a thief. I asked the prisoner where he got the bundle; he said, out of a bed-room at Belfont, and if I would go with him he would shew me the box in a plantation - that he had broken it open, and that was the contents - it proved to be Weston's box; the prisoner is a farmer's man , and used to live there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-153

165. ELIZABETH BOSLEY and CAROLINE MOLINEAUX , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , at St. Margaret, Westminster , four sovereigns, sixteen half-crowns, thirty shillings, and nineteen sixpences, the monies of Benjamin Beverstock , in his dwelling house .

BENJAMIN BEVERSTOCK. I live at No. 26, Castle-lane , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. I am a tin-man and brazier - on the 16th of November, about a quarter past; three o'clock, the two prisoners came to my house, and enquired for some tin plates. Bosley had had some of us before. I told them we had none at present, but should have some in a few days. I then desired Bosley to go to our back shop and fetch a little charcoal, as the fire was getting low; in the mean time, a lady came in and asked to look at some articles - she staid a long time looking at them, and said she was about taking a lodging in the neighbourhood, and wanted to buy some stoves, iron saucepans, and other things - the prisoner Molineaux was in the shop all the while. I at length said to the lady, "I will thank you to be as quick as you can as my fire is going out." The lady went into the passage where there were some stoves, and at length went away, and took a saucepan with her which came to 8 d., but she had but 7 d. - I said it was of no consequence; when I returned to the shop, I heard Molineaux say to the other prisoner - "Come, Betsy, let us go, you know where we have to go." They then went away, and in a short time Bosley came back to my shop, and putting her hands together said, "Oh Lord! oh Lord! that girl has robbed you." I said, it cannot be - she said, she has indeed. I then ran into the room and took a canister in which we keep some money - I thought there was the same money in it as before - Bosley then said, "Come to me at the Black Horse public-house, for that girl has four sovereigns" - it then struck me that we had been looking over our money on the Sunday, and had put away four sovereigns and some silver which made up 7 l. 19 s. 6 d., which we had been collecting towards a bill - I then went to a drawer where the money had been deposited, and found it opened very easily - I cannot swear that it had been locked - I looked in the drawer, and found that the money and the box that contained it, were gone - I then proceeded with Bosley to the Black Horse public-house in York-street, where we found Molineaux with a bundle - the landlady said, "Master, if you will look in that bundle you'll find some property of yours" - I looked in and found the four sovereigns and the box, but the little plated mug, where we keep the silver, I found in the room; but Mr. Rose was there, and he said, "You had better fetch her back." I did so, and then went to Mr. Friend; the other articles in the bundle were mine - there is some solder which I believed to be mine, but cannot swear to it. The money had been in the second drawer, in the nest of drawers in the bed room near the shop - we had seen it safe on the Sunday evening, and this was on the Tuesday. Molineaux was in the shop, but I cannot swear that she was there all the time Bosley had been sent

to get some charcoal, but she came back and they were both in the shop for five or six minutes. I had known Bosley by visiting my shop, and knowing her parents I trusted her.

JOHN BROOKS . I live at the Black Horse public-house, in York-street. About half past three o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of November, I was in the yard, and heard two girls disputing in the privy, as if they were quarrelling about dividing some money - I got upon some things to try to see them, but could not - I thought there might be a man there, and broke open the door - I found the two prisoners with something tied up in a silk handkerchief, and blue apron - I said, "Where did you get those things." Molineaux said, "They are things I got out of pawn for my mother;" there was a shilling lay there, I said, "Whose is that?" she said, "It is my mother's." I then found two promissory notes. I let Bosley go, and detained Molineaux - I ran up to Bosley again, and said, "Where did you find these bills?" she said, "In the Broadway." I let her go - a person said I had better fetch her back, which I did, and then went to Mr. Beverstock's, but he had by that time got to the Black Horse public-house.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable - I went to the Black Horse public-house, on the 16th of November, between four and five o'clock; the prosecutor and the two prisoners were there; he charged them with robbing him - I said, "Of what?" he said, "Of this money here." he then put it in this box, and delivered it to my custody - the moment the girls saw me they knew me, and one accused the other of the robbery; when I got them to the watch-house, Molineaux said to me, "Bosley took the money out of the drawer, and she will tell you so." Bosley then said, "Yes, Mr. Timbrell I took it." I said, "My good girl you must not say any thing to me." the prisoners were then both together, I don't know whether they were both together at the time the money was taken.

BENJAMIN BEVERSTOCK. Here is an apron and handkerchief this bundle which are mine.

MOLINEUX'S Defence. Bosley asked me to go to Beverstock's house, and ask if he made cast iron tea kettles, and to see if there was a woman there. I went in and told her No; she then went in and came out again, and took me to the end of the street, and told me to wait there - she then went back and I followed her. A man then came round with some beer. Mr. Beverstock then took us into the room, and gave us some beer, and wanted to take liberties with us; he then gave us 2 d., and told us to come again in half an hour. He then told us if any body came we were to call him uncle. The lady then came; we were in the room, and the drawer was open; Elizabeth Bosley took the box and put it in her pocket.

BENJAMIN BEVERSTOCK re-examined. Q. You have heard what the prisoner has stated. Did you ever attempt any thing of the kind? A. I never did - I never gave them 2 d., upon my oath - I never attempted to take liberties with either of them; they were not more than once at my house on that day to my knowledge. Molineaux might have come there in the morning, but I did not see her, my wife was at home, but I was out.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL re-examined. Q. When Molineaux was taken up did she say any thing on this subject to you? A. No, she said nothing about it that day, but the next morning she mentioned something of the kind.

BOSLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

MOLINEAUX - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Reference Number: t18241202-154

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

153. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , at St. Mary-le-bone , two coats, value 2 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., and a hat, value 8 s., the goods of James Maslen ; two coats, value 2 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 l., and a waistcoat, value 10 s., the goods of Richard Scott , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Storey .

JAMES MASLEN. I am a carpenter , and lodge with Samuel Storey, at No. 185, Earl-street, Lisson-grove , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - he keeps the house; the prisoner is a shoemaker , and lodged in the same room. On the 22d of November, in the morning, I went out, leaving two coats, a pair of trowsers, a waistcoat, two handkerchiefs, and a hat, on the tester of my bed, and left him in the room. I returned at twelve o'clock, and they were gone; he never returned: his week was up on that day. On the 29th, when I was at work at Lisson-grove, he went by, and I took him.

RICHARD SCOTT. I lodge in the same room with Maslen, and went out with him, leaving a coat, waistcoat, trowsers, and great coat, safe - the prisoner was then in bed. I returned at twelve o'clock, and they were gone.

GEORGE CULL. I am a constable. Maslen gave the prisoner in my charge. I found a silk handkerchief, a night cap, the prosecutor's hat and trowsers, and three duplicates upon him.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am apprentice to Mr. Attenborough, pawnbroker, Crown-street, Finsbury. I have two coats, and a black silk handkerchief, pawned on the 22d of November, by a young man. The duplicate I gave him is one of those produced.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Redcross-street. I have a suit of black clothes, pawned by a young man, on the 22d of November. One of these duplicates is what I gave him.

WILLIAM MAINWARING FENNER . I am shopman to Mr. Knight, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. I have a drab coat, pawned on the 24th of November, by a young man, whom I cannot identify. The duplicate I gave him is one of those produced.

JAMES MASLEN. The value of my things is 3 l. 13 s.

RICHARD SCOTT. Mine are worth 3 l. 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18241202-155

154. JOHN WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , six yards of gingham, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Hartley .

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am servant to Joseph Hartley,

linen-draper , Ratcliff-highway . On the 30th of November a person gave me information - I ran to the door, and missed this gingham, went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner come out of a court in Pennington-street, and secured him, with it under his coat; he said he picked it up; it was quite clean, and the streets were dirty.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man go up the court, and drop it; I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 77.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-156

155. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Covell .

WILLIAM COVELL. I am servant to Mr. Cox. On Saturday last I was in Oxford-street , with my cart; I ran on to ask a question of Carpenter, who was before, but on turning round I saw the prisoner pull my coat off the cart - he ran between the coaches with it; I ran between the coaches, and caught him, and said, "You have stolen my property:" he immediately dropped it, and said, "You have got your property, pray don't hurt me." I secured him.

Prisoner. Q. How far was your cart from Carpenter's? A. Not far; I saw you take it, you pulled it twice; it was a wet morning - it could not have blown off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I received him in charge; he said at the office that the coat was all over dirt, which it was not.

Prisoner's Defence. The coat blew off, and I picked it up. I declare solemnly that the mud was on it at the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-157

156. ELEANOR HARTNELL and SARAH EASTERBY were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a watch, value 4 l.; a chain, value 6 d.; a seal, value 1 s., and a key, value 2 s., the goods of William Donne , from his person .

WILLIAM DONNE. I live in Charlton-street. On the 13th of November I fell in with the prisoners in Castle-street, Gray's Inn-lane - I was neither drunk nor sober. I went to three public-houses with them and a young man, and after stopping at the third house sometime Hartnell snatched my watch out of my pocket, and ran out instantly - Easterby followed her; the young man stopped, and said it was all right, but the watchman was sent for. I have not found it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you not quite drunk? A. Not very. I had some ale with them; I do not know how much. We went to two houses of ill-fame.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-158

157. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for stealing on the 12th of November , a sack, value 1 s., and three bushels of potatoes, value 5 s. , the goods of John Rains .

JOHN RAINS. I am a salesman . On the 10th of November, I had purchased some potatoes, which were at Fox under the hill wharf, Ivy Lane, Strand . I was moving them to my warehouse, which is also in Ivy Lane, the fruit meters land them - the prisoner is employed by them - Brook's wharf is about twenty yards to the right of Ivy Lane - a person bringing the potatoes had no business there; it is out of the way - I saw the prisoner carrying a sack of potatoes - he shot three sacks at my warehouse - I had bought all that were at the wharf; when I came to Brook's wharf, in about half an hour, I found a sack of potatoes there, in my own sack, this was about 5 o'clock. I am certain they were from the same bulk as what I bought.

JAMES SILVESTER . I am a salesman. I saw the prisoner carrying a sack of potatoes in a contrary direction to Cox's warehouse, he went through the folding gates of Brook's wharf, and put them down by the saw-pit, behind the gate, and came out. I shewed them to Rains, they were of the same bulk as his.

(Sack produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I fell down with the sack, and most of them fell out - I gathered them up, and took them to this wharf, intending to pack the rest up, but the witness saw me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-159

158. SARAH LAFOY , was indicted, that she on the 20th of November , a certain male child, of Mary Skinner , of the age of twenty-one months, maliciously, and feloniously, did take, and carry away, with intent to deprive her of the possession of the said child .

MARY SKINNER. I am a single woman . I had no particular acquaintance with the prisoner; we used to speak - I sell fish and vegetables in the street , and she has come to the door and taken my child for half an hour, with my consent, for a fortnight before; but on the 20th of November, she came in and said, she wanted Joey for company - I said, I did not approve of his going out on such a wet morning.

Q. Did you not know that she had been begging about with him? A. No - I did not know how she got her living; she was seen begging with him - I refused to let her have him; but she took him out of the chair about 12 o'clock, and while I was talking to the landlady's daughter, she took it out - I turned round, and she was gone, and do not know which door she went out of.

Q. Did you call for assistance? A. Why I did not know what she intended to do with it - I did not follow her; the child was absent from Saturday till Friday, she was taken begging about with him, eight miles from St. Albans.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it into my hands? A. I did not.

ANN SIMPSON . I live in Rosemary Lane. On the 24th of November, I found the prisoner at the Black Bull public house, in Harfordshire, feeding the child with bread and milk; she did not wish to let me have it, but I took it from her.

EDWARD CLAYTON . I live in Whitechapel. On the 24th of November, I met the prisoner six miles from St. Albans, with the child; my wife asked her whose it was, she said it belonged to a woman who was either behind or before.

Prisoner's Defence. She frequently gave me the child

with a hat on, and said, "When you are going up the street you can get a caster (a hat) for the child." I have frequently taken it into a cook shop, and fed it, and have taken it off the floor when she has been beastly drunk; she gave it to me, but not to take into the country - I have had six children, and am in the family way now, it is not likely that I should steal a child.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-160

159. JAMES COX was indicted for feloniously receiving a watch, value thirty shillings, a ribbon value 6 d., and two keys value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Poole , whereof William Carroll has been convicted of stealing, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

2d. COUNT. Stating them to belong to William Squire Foster .

The record of the conviction of William Carroll was put in and read.

THOMAS POOLE. I am a labourer . I gave my watch to Mr. Foster to clean.

WILLIAM SQUIRE FOSTER. I am a watch-maker , and live at Acton. On Saturday, the 13th of November , Poole gave me his watch to clean. I went out on Wednesday the 17th, about half past three o'clock, it then hung in my window; returned at half past five o'clock, my wife gave me information - it was gone.

SOPHIA FOSTER . My husband left me at home. After he went out, I took down two watches, and put them on the counter. Carroll came in, and wanted a watch repaired. I said, I could say nothing about it; he put it into his pocket again, and went out, and in about ten minutes, I missed Poole's watch, I never saw the prisoner.

ELIZABETH WHEATLY . I live at Hammersmith, with my brother, who is a watch-maker and jeweller. On the 17th of November, about half past five o'clock in the evening, I was out, and as I returned, I saw the prisoner sitting in a cart. I found Carroll in the shop, talking to my sister; he said he wanted to see a gold seal, she told me to fetch my brother, which I did, and in coming back, I met them both in the cart together.

CHARLES WHEATLY . My sister fetched me: when I got to the shop, nobody was there - I missed a gold chain, she mentioned about the cart - I pursued and overtook it at Phillimore Place, Kensington. Carroll and the prisoner were in it, I got assistance. Cox jumped out and was secured; I took Carroll, and a watch was found on each; the one found on the prisoner was claimed by Poole - he told the constable to take care of his watch, and said, he knew nothing of Carroll, and denied having been in the cart with him; but said, he was walking on the path, and two men took him.

JOSEPH BAILEY . I am constable of Kensington. I was sent for, and took the prisoner. I found a watch on each of them. Poole claimed the one found on the prisoner, he said he did not know Carroll.

DANIEL DARVEL . I am hostler to Mr. Ives, the Red Lion public-house, at Acton. Foster lives opposite our house. On the 17th November, the prisoner and another man brought a horse and cart to our house; I bailed the horse about the middle of the day; they went away together, between three or four o'clock, I think; they both helped me to unharness the horse, they dined there, and went out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-161

160. WILLIAM SMART was indicted for the wiful murder of Henry Smith .

MR. PHILLIPS (on behalf of the prosecution), called Messrs. Hugh Lewis and Robert Jeffs , surgeons who deposed that having opened the body of the deceased, they were quite unable to state whether he died from apoplexy, or external violence, and under these circumstances, Mr. Phillips declined offering further evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-162

161. MARY MOORE and MARGARET MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , three shawls, value 24 s., the goods of Edward Handley , privately in his shop .

EDWARD HANDLEY. I am a linen-draper and live in King-street, Soho . On the 4th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop together, and bought some trifling article, amounting to about 6 s. I sent for a constable the moment they entered, as they had both been to the shop several times before. Three shawls were produced, which are mine.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I was fetched to the shop - the prosecutor said he had been robbed on two previous evenings, and as I took the prisoners to the watch-house, I saw Margaret, with her left hand, shuffling under her clothes - something fell from her, and Arlington produced three shawls.

ANN ARLINGTON . I was following behind the prisoners, and saw Margaret put her hand under her gown - I immediately picked up three shawls - I did not see them dropped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY MOORE'S Defence. I went to buy some shifts; he said he had a charge to make against my sister, for stealing shawls, with other girls I said it could not be her.

MARY MOORE. My sister is quite innocent.

MARY MOORE - NOT GUILTY .

MARG. MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-163

162. JEFFERY ALDERFIELD , was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , a shawl, value 3 s., the goods of Margaret Onwhyn , widow , from her person .

MARGARET ONWHYN. I am a widow, and live in Pear-street, Westminster , and am an unfortunate woman. On the 3d of November, at half-past eleven o'clock, at night, I was standing at my door in Pear-street, where I then lived, when the prisoner came by and snatched my shawl off my neck, without speaking a word. - I did not know him before; he had a white coat on - he ran away, and I followed him into a public-house next door - I followed him up to the first floor back room, and asked him for my shawl. He said it was down stairs in the back parlour. I went down, and a parcel of girls were there, whom he might have given it to. I asked for it - they said there was no shawl there. I went and staid on the stairs till two, crying for it, as it was the only one I had. I fetched a watchman at two o'clock - he went up to the room - I found the prisoner there in bed, with a girl - two or three girls

were in the room, and his white coat was there. I knew him without that. I have not recovered it.

THOMAS PAYNE . I am a watchman. The prosecutrix came to me at two o'clock, and said a man had snatched her shawl. She took me to the back room, first floor, of this house, where I found the prisoner in bed with two women - I looked for the white coat, but could not see it - it was found next morning, and answered the description she had given of it. She charged him with stealing her shawl - he said he was in bed at the time - she said he was the man immediately she saw him.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not another man in the room? A. No; she was sober.

ROBERT HAYES . I am a constable; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - the girl was sober, and told this story; as she said he had a white coat on I searched the room in the morning, and found a white coat; the girl in the room would not let me have it, but she brought it to him at the office, and I detained it.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home with my coach, about ten o'clock, and went up to bed; a girl came to me about twelve o'clock, so drunk, that she fell out of the window; they called for me. I went down, and helped her up, and in about two hours, this woman brought the constable, and said she had lost her shawl. I said "Your shawl is not here, it is down stairs;" she brought the watchman - there was another man in the room - she said "I don't know which of you it is, but one of you have got the shawl,"

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-164

163. MARY MINSHULL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a watch, value 5 l.; a seal, value 5 s.; a key, value 5 s., and a ring, value 5 s., the goods of John Duncan , from his person .

JOHN DUNCAN. I am a carman . On the 4th of November, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was by Whitechapel-church , and met the prisoner, she asked me to go home with her - I went to George-yard - she asked me to sit down, which I did for a minute or so. I asked, why there was not a candle in the room - she said she would go and get one. I did not feel my watch taken, but I know it was safe when I entered the house, for I felt it - she had been feeling about me, but I did not feel her take it. I missed it - she did not bring the candle, and I came away.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. The patrol brought the prosecutor to me; and about two hundred yards from the house, I found the prisoner - she had 14 s. 6 d. under her arm-pits, but no watch.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241202-165

164. ALEXANDER BURGESS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Lewis , about the hour of two in the night of the 30th of November , and stealing a waistcoat, value 8 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 8 s.; a pair of pocket steel yards, value 6 d.; a half-crown; three sixpences, and the sum of 4 d. in copper monies, his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-166

NEW COURT.

(5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

165. SARAH HILLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of Luke Spurgeon .

ELIZABETH SPURGEON . I am the wife of Luke Spurgeon, and live in Lambeth-street, Whitechapel . I had a gown to wash for Mr. Foley. I hung it up in the passage on Thursday, the 19th of November. I heard some person come down the passage, and go down the kitchen stairs about twelve o'clock, and saw the shadow of a person who crossed the road, and went into a chandler's shop - it was the prisoner. I missed the gown immediately. I followed her, and took it out of her lap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very wet, and very much distressed. I went in the passage out of the wet, and seeing the gown, I took it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-167

166. MATTHEW FITZPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a silver spoon, value 5 s. , the goods of William Frederick Duncan and Elizabeth Thornton , spinster .

THOMAS WINTER . I am a waiter at the St. Alban's coffee-house, Charles-street - it is kept by William Frederick Duncan and Elizabeth Thornton. I saw the prisoner on the 24th of November, between four and five o'clock, in the coffee-room. I was in the passage looking through the window, and saw him taking a spoon - he went out, and then went into the United Service Club - he asked for some gentleman's address, which I did not hear - he then went into Regent-street, and crossed the way. I followed, and stopped him. I said, he must go back with me to the St. Alban's coffee-house - on our way back, he said, he had got the spoon, and hoped Mr. Thornton would forgive him, as he was in distress - the spoon was found on the sideboard after we brought him back.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I would go back and be searched; but I had not got the spoon. - A. No; you confessed that you had got it.

Prisoner's Defence. The waiter is under a mistake respecting the spoon - when he followed me and accused me of it, I was agitated, and do not know what I said - when we got back, there was nobody in the coffee-room but us; there was a great deal of exasperating language between us. I approached the table where their tea-tray was, and said, "You said, there were two spoons, and there they are." I have not taken one. I took up one of them; but I had not had it before - we were both in a state of exasperation, and what language I might have made use of, I do not know - the spoon was on the cloth, not the sideboard.

THOMAS WINTER re-examined. There was no exasperation at all - the spoon had been taken from a saucer on the table, where I had not put it more than three minutes - there were two spoons - the other was in the sugar basin. I missed the spoon, and immediately followed him into the street - when the prisoner was taken, he gave the name of Burgess.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined 1 s., and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-168

167. THOMAS HOLEAND was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , three seals, value 30 s., and two watch-keys, value 12 s. , the goods of Solomon Moseley .

SOLOMON MOSELEY. I live in Whitechapel, and am a hawker and pedlar . On the 19th of November, I went to the Grapes, public-house, in the Borough , between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day. I was in the parlour - the prisoner called me into the kitchen, and said, he wanted to buy a gold seal and key - there was a young woman there dealing with another woman for caps - the prisoner shut the door, and told me to open my box - there were no other persons in the kitchen; he then told me to open my box; he took out several things, and asked me the price - he said he should like such a one, but did not buy any of them - she said, she wanted to exchange a pair of ear-rings, which she did; but I made no bargain with the prisoner. I left the box while I put in the ear-rings. I might be there about half an hour, and went away. I did not look in the box again that day nor the next, but I looked into it on the Monday, and missed several gold seals and keys. I went into the country, and on my return, I told the landlord of the public-house of my loss - the officer went with me to another public-house - last Monday week we saw the prisoner, and he said, he would serve me out for giving charge of him for such a thing - when the officer had taken him about two hundred yards, he told the officer to stop, and he would speak to me - he then asked if I would be satisfied if I got my property back. I said, Yes; the officer has got three seals and two keys.

JAMES ANSLEY . I am a wheelwright, and live in Blackfriars-road. On Wednesday or Thursday week I saw the prisoner at the Grapes public-house; he offered to sell his watch to me; I bought it for the ticket of my own watch, and his key and seal with it.

WILLIAM SHIRES . I am a constable. Between five and six o'clock on the 29th of November, I found the prisoner at the Shakespeare's Head, public-house, Percival-street; I charged him with this robbery; he said he knew nothing of it. I took him to the office, and in going along he asked me to stop as he wanted to speak to Mr. Moseley, and asked if he would be satisfied if he got his property back - he said Yes. He said the property was in Addle-street; I went there, and a young woman came to the door, she gave me two seals, and one key - the other key and seal I got from Ansley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked if he would be satisfied if he got his goods; he said Yes. Then he said if I would satisfy the officer he should be satisfied; I said, "I have no money;" he said, "You have got a watch, go and pawn that:" I said I did not like to do it myself, but I sent it by another man - it was pawned for 1 l.; they kept the 1 l., and said they would be with me in the morning; they came again, and wanted another pound, which I could not raise.

WILLIAM SHIRES re-examined. When the prisoner had given up the seals he asked if we were satisfied; the prosecutor said, "No, I am not." The prisoner pawned the watch - he kept the duplicate and the money. The prosecutor was not willing to prosecute him, and asked me what he should do - I said I had nothing to do with it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-169

Before Mr. Recorder.

168. GEORGE SWAINE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , nineteen yards of kerseymere, value 7 l., and a wrapper, value 6 d. , the goods of William Giles and Thomas Hooper .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of Joseph Bush .

3d COUNT, stating them to be the property of Thomas Sergeant and others, his partner.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas Sergeant and Co., Trowbridge. In November last I took a truss, containing kerseymere, to the waggon of Messrs. Giles and Hooper, of Trowbridge; I packed it myself - it contained about nineteen yards, and was worth seven guineas; it was directed to Mr. Joseph Bush, of Newark.

WILLIAM BOULTER . I am clerk to Messrs. William Giles and Thomas Hooper. I received the truss, containing the kerseymere, from Stevens, on Monday, the 15th of November; I put it into the front part of the waggon, to come to the King's Arms, Snow-hill, London. Christopher White is the driver; Walter Picket was to drive the waggon into London.

WALTER PICKET. I am a waggoner. I drove Mr. Hooper's waggon the last stage into London, on the night of the 17th of November - about eleven o'clock I stopped to give my horses some hay and water at Hounslow; I went into the tap-room, and saw the prisoner just at the door; I had known him, as he had been guard to this waggon for three years. He went out in about a minute after we went in; I did not see him again that night. We got to the King's Arms at five o'clock the next morning.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am book-keeper to Mr. Hearn. at the King's Arms, Snow-hill; this waggon came there on the 18th of November; the truss was not in it.

ROBERT COOPER . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 18th of November, about three o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Long-acre, with this truss; he said he had been sent from Mr. Hearn's office, to overtake the waggon in which this parcel was put by mistake.

JOSEPH HEARN . I keep the King's Arms, Snow-hill; the prisoner was in the service of Messrs. Gilles and Hooper, and left them in September, 1821; I had paid him his wages while he was there. I never gave him any directions about this truss.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to bring a little way for him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241202-170

169. MARY BURROWS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , two blankets, value 8 s. , the goods of Jane Crispin , widow .

The prosecutrix did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-171

170. JAMES COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a saw, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Johnson .

HENRY JOHNSON. I am a carpenter . On the 6th of November I left my saw in a building, at Bayswater , on the basement story; there was a door to the house, but I

cannot say whether it was locked, as I was not the last person there; the prisoner had been working there on that day, and for five or six weeks previous, as a carpenter. I left work on the Saturday about five o'clock in the evening - I went on the Monday morning, and missed the saw - the prisoner was then at work, but I did not charge him with having stolen it; I made known that it was gone; he said nothing about it. I found it at a pawnbroker's.

JOHN HOLDSWORTH . I am servant to Mr. Ross, a pawnbroker, and live at Paddington. I have a saw, which was pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, for 2 s.; he said he bought it from his father, and gave the name that was stamped upon the saw. On the Monday morning the officer brought him to our shop; he said I was the person who took it in of him. He did not then say that his father had given it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-172

171. EDWARD CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a jacket, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 7 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 12 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; a pair of breeches, value 6 s., and a pair of drawers, value 2 s. , the goods of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN. I am a seaman . I was on board the Posthumous on the 1st of December - I had been there about a week; my things were in the forecastle, locked up in a trunk; the prisoner was a mariner on board the ship; it was outward bound. I saw my things safe on Wednesday, the 1st of December, at five o'clock in the afternoon, and at eight next morning I missed them; the trunk had been forced; the prisoner slept on board that night, but I had slept on shore. When I returned in the morning, at eight o'clock, he was gone. I saw some of the things again on board the ship, in possession of the officer; he had the jacket, waistcoat, two pairs of trowsers, and the handkerchief; the prisoner was then in custody. The ship lay in the Export Dock.

JAMES HESSELTINE . I am a Thames Police officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of December, at a quarter past seven o'clock, going out of the West India Export Dock ; he had a pair of shoes in his hand - I asked how he came by them; he said he was going to get them mended. I observed that he looked bulky, and asked what clothes he had on; he said none but his own; he had three pairs of trowsers on, two pairs of which were claimed by Green - he had two jackets - one of which Green claimed. He had three waistcoats, and in the jacket pocket there was a handkerchief, and a pair of braces; the prisoner said they were all his own - but I did not believe him. I asked what ship he belonged to; he said the Posthumous; I took the things, and went on board the ship. Green swore to them. I saw the chest in the forecastle, which had been broken open, and an iron instrument lying near it, which corresponded with the marks on the chest - in the long boot, by the side, there was a red night cap, which Green claimed; also the shoes on the prisoner's feet; the shoes in his hand were his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to get my shoes mended. I found the things on the ship's deck, and put them on; if I had found any person who owned them I should have given them to them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-173

172. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , five handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of Matthias Forward .

JAMES BARRY . I am a tailor, and live in Whitcomb-street, Leicester-square . On the 1st of November, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the door of Mr. Forward, which is two doors from my house, on the other side of the way - he put up his hand, took down the handkerchiefs, and walked away - they had been pinned outside the door - I gave an alarm, and he was taken in about half an hour. I am certain of his person - there was another little boy, about twelve years of age with him - they ran away together.

MATHIAS FORWARD. On the 1st of November I lost five handkerchiefs, which were tied to each other, and hung by the turn of the door, within the shop - I was not at home at the time, but I saw the prisoner in custody at Bow-street, about eight o'clock in the evening.

JOHN DAWSON . I am a cooper. Barry gave an alarm while I was at work at his door; I pursued, and overtook the prisoner just at the corner of the street, and followed him to Bedfordbury; I never lost sight of him. I cried Stop thief! and some persons stopped him. I saw him throw the handkerchiefs into a coal-shed - a man called me in, and gave them to me as I came by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. At the corner of Leicester Square, I met three boys whom I had a slight knowledge of, but never knew them as bad characters. I accompanied them and in passing by the shop, they took down some handkerchiefs and ran - I heard the cry of stop thief - I then saw the dangerous situation I was placed in, and the only thing that occurred to me was to run also; we were pursued - I was taken, and being dressed, and exactly in appearance to one of the thieves, I was charged with the robbery.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15. Recommended to Mercy . Whipped, and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-174

173. GEORGE HOVER was indicted for stealing on the 3rd of December , a live tame rabbit, value 3 s. , the property of John Rondeau .

JOHN RONDEAU. I live at No. 4, Bethnel-green-road , near the George public-house; the rabbit was in a hutch in the yard by the side of the door for sale - I had seen it not three minutes before it was missed. I saw the prisoner in custody, three quarters of an hour afterwards with it: he is a neighbour's child, he is a weaver, and can earn 16 s. or 18 s. a week.

JOHN BARBER . I deal in poultry, the prisoner came into my shop with a rabbit, between four and five in the evening of the 3rd of December. Mrs. Rondeau had been to my house, and said she had lost one. I stopped the

boy, and sent for Rondeau. I live near a quarter of a mile from him.

THOMAS COOPER . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner and rabbit; his father is a very honest man - I asked him, why he did not take the rabbit home, he said, if he had, his father would have broken his legs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. If you will be so good as to forgive me I will go home and work.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and discharged .

Reference Number: t18241202-175

174. RICHARD MOORE was indicted for stealing on the 20th of November , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Brooks .

THOMAS BROOKS. I am a butcher , and live at Winchmore-hill, Edmonton. I was at Tottenham , at my father's on the 21st of November. I saw the coat safe in the cart, which stood in the yard about three o'clock, and missed it about half past five. I was in my father's tap room, and saw the prisoner come out of the yard, and come into the room, he had not the coat with him then; when he had been gone about an hour, I missed it; he was quite a stranger to me.

JEREMIAH CROSS . I am the prosecutor's father-in-law, he was at my house on this day - I took the prisoner with the coat on his back, about a quarter past six that evening at a house out of the main road - I took him to the constable - I know the coat to be my son's, it has been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of this gentleman's house, and a man said to me "If you will take this coat to the Bird Cage public house, I'll give you 6 d.," the man's name was Turner, at whose house I was; he asked me to go in, and have a cup of tea - I had put the coat on because it rained.

JEREMIAH CROSS re-examined. Q. Was the prisoner in the road to London? A. No; in a place quite out of the way to come to London; the man whose house he was at, was not at home.

GUILTY Aged 26.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-176

175. JOHN SANDERS and JAMES PECKHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a frock, value 6 d.; an apron, value 2 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Robert Richards ; a shift, value 2 s., the goods of Maria Turner, and four aprons, value 2 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Layton .

ELIZABETH LAYTON. I live in Chiswell-street, and am nursery-maid to Mr. Rickards, the auctioneer . On the 10th of November I lost four aprons and 2 handkerchiefs, from the kitchen. I had seen them in the course of the day before. There was a frock, apron, and handkerchief lost at the same time. We had been washing, and they were on the table, or in the window, dry, ready to fold. Maria Turner is a servant in the house - a shift of hers was missing. I saw my things a fortnight afterwards, and Mr. Rickard's; but not the shift. The prisoners were quite strangers to me. Our door is open sometimes in the day - there is a school in the house - the kitchen is on the ground floor.

MARIA TURNER . I had assisted in this wash, and saw the things that afternoon. I missed my shift between four and five o'clock - there were many other things in the wash. On the day of the robbery, the two prisoners came to master's house, with some potatoes, and I let them in - they put the potatoes in a cellar - I lighted them down - they could have got into the kitchen without my observing them, because I went up stairs.

VALENTINE WATKINS . I am a pawnbroker. - I have all the things mentioned in the indictment - they were pawned at my house on the 10th of November, about four in the afternoon, by the prisoner Peckham, for 3 s. - he was in the shop about five minutes. I am sure of his person. I asked how many there were before I untied them - he said he did not know, for he had them from his sister, who had folded them up, and told him to bring them. I did not see the other prisoner at all.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I apprehended Peckham on Sunday, the 4th of Nov. Sanders had been taken before by Attfield, the officer.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I apprehended Saunders on Thursday, the 11th of November; he said he had nothing to do with it, but in taking off his handkerchiefs. I found this handkerchief, the undermost of three, and Mr. Rickards said it was his. I could not perceive that it had any initials on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PECKHAM'S Defence. The prisoner Sanders called and asked me whether I would assist him in carrying some potatoes to Chiswell-street, and said that he would give me something for so doing, and in Globe-lane, he met his sister. I went on with the potatoes, so that I could pay no attention to their conversation. We arrived at Chiswell-street with the potatoes, which we carried down stairs; he carrying one portion down, and myself the other. After coming away, I proceeded on while Sanders followed with the barrow - I turned round, and could not see Sanders. I went back a little distance, and there saw him sorting some things, but whose they were, and what they were I have no knowledge, nor can I form any idea how he became possessed of them; he requested me to pawn them, which I refused; he said I was a fool not to take them, as they were his own. I at length consented, not doubting but they were his own.

SANDERS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

PECKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241202-177

176. ELIZABETH M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas George Sizer .

THOMAS GEORGE SIZER. I live with Mr. Kennedy, pawnbroker, Shadwell . This coat is my own - it was on a side counter. On the 6th of November, the prisoner came to pledge a hammock. I did not see her take the coat, but I had seen it two or three minutes before she came in. I missed it about two hours after she was gone. On Monday morning, the 8th of November, the constable brought it to me - she was then in custody.

GEORGE FLACK . I live with Mr. Campbell, a pawnbroker, Shadwell, about twenty doors from the prosecutor. On Saturday, the 6th of November, between eight and

nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought in this coat. I knew her before, and advanced 7 s. upon it - it was claimed by Mr. Sizer at the office, on the Monday.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of November, at Shakespear's-walk, Shadwell - she denied having been in Sizer's shop, I took her to the watch-house, and sent for Mr. Kennedy. who said he heard that the coat was pawned at Mr. Campbell's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to pawn my son's hammock, and about twelve o'clock, as I was coming by Mr. Kennedy's shop, I met a woman coming out with the coat in her lap - she asked me to go and pawn it for her. I took it to Mr. Campbell's, and she gave me a glass of liquor for my trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Five Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-178

177. GILES WALLIN STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two shirts, value 5 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker and live in Ratcliff Highway. I have two shirts which were pawned on the 17th of November (I think in the afternoon) by the prisoner, whom I have known three or four years, for 3 s. 6 d.

JOHN TAYLOR. I am a waterman , and live at Limehouse - these two shirts were taken from my house on the 16th of November by the prisoner, who was a fellow-lodger with me. I had seen them on the 15th, about eight o'clock in the morning, in a cupboard, which was not locked. I went to Gravesend on that day, and returned on the 20th. I laid an information against the prisoner. I went to Gravesend again, and returned on the following Saturday - he was then in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did any other person lodge in the same room on the night of the 14th or 15th? - A. Yes; my partner did on the 14th, but not on the 15th. I saw them safe on the 15th.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am night constable - the prisoner was given into my charge. I found the duplicate of the shirts in his pocket-book.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 31st of July, I bought them at Chelmsford, in Essex.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Ten Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241202-179

178. WILLIAM SPARKES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , a ladder, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Pettit .

ELIZABETH PETTIT. I am the prosecutor's sister - his name is Thomas Hall Pettit . NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241202-180

179. CHARLES SMITH and MARY ROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , four pewter pots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Theakston .

JOHN THEAKSTON. I keep the City of London, public-house, Union-street , Middlesex Hospital - these pots were brought to me by the street-keeper on the 23d of November - they have my own name and sign on them. I never saw the prisoners before they were in custody - the pots were in their usual state - one is quite new.

PHILIP RILEY . I am street-keeper of St. Giles's. I apprehended the prisoner in consequence of information, in Lawrence-lane, St. Giles's, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the evening of the 23d of November - the man had a pint pot under his jacket, and under the woman's shawl there were two pots - one in her hand and one under her arm. I asked, where they got them; they seemed quite alarmed. I do not know the answer they gave. I took them to the watch-house; and in the man's hat. I found two more pint pots, which make six in all - four of them were Mr. Theakston's, and two of them another person's; I asked, if they knew where they belonged to; the man said he could not read, and he had found them.

CHARLES SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

MARY ROSS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241202-181

180. WILLIAM WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , two coats, value 30 s. , the goods of Henry Collen Johnson .

HENRY COLLEN JOHNSON. I live in Sun Tavern Fields, St. George's in the East - these articles were stolen from a gig in Galway-street , on the evening of the 8th of November, while I was gone into a house, where I staid about twenty minutes - there were three coats, a whip, and a rug; the door of the house was open, and a little boy, three years of age, was standing there. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I came out, and saw the prisoner as I ran up the street - he was not running then - he had dropped the coats on the ground, about twenty yards behind him - Ferris had stopped him before I got up to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were they your coats? - A. No; one was my father's.

THOMAS FERRIS . I live in Colebrook-place. I was in Galway-street, and saw the gig at the door of No. 1. I saw the prisoner cross the road, go to the gig, and take the coats - he ran towards me. I was on the same side as the gig was, about fifty yards from it. I stopped him, and he dropped them - there had been no cry of Stop thief! then - he did not say any thing about them - the prosecutor came up, and took him - the coats were picked up by a boy, who ran out with Johnson.

Cross-examined. Q. If he had intended to steal them, would he have thrown them away before any alarm was made? - A. I do not know.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the street, on an errand. I saw a youth run along, and drop the coats. I picked them up - this young man stopped me, and cried Stop thief! - the prosecutor came up and took me.

THOMAS FERRIS re-examined. Q. What time was this? A. Between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. I saw two young men together - one went away; the prisoner took the coats out - it was very dark.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241202-182

181. ELIZABETH WAINWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a shirt, value 9 s. , the goods of John Lewis .

ELIZA LEWIS . I am the wife of John Lewis - he lives in New Peter-street, Westminster , and is a chair-maker . I lost a shirt from the yard behind the house, on the 30th of October - the door stands open - the prisoner lived in the same house. I had washed the shirt, and hung it out about ten minutes before - it has not been found. I heard the prisoner go into the yard. I am positive it was her, the street-door was open at the time - no one came in from the street - there was no other person in the house. I saw her go past my window, and missed the shirt in five minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was there no other person in the house? A. Yes; there was one other person in bed.

SOPHIA LICKISH . I live near the house. On the 30th of October, the prisoner brought me a wet shirt to iron, a little after twelve o'clock. Mr. Lewis came to me and asked me if I had seen a shirt - the mark of "C. S." was on it.

THOMAS LICKISH . I delivered the shirt to the prosecutrix I did not take any notice of it.

ELIZA LEWIS. I had made the shirt for a young man of the name of Charles Savage .

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of taking things there to wash, and did so that morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: o18241202-1

REX v. ROBERT BALL , Convicted of Arson.

On the 1st day of the Session Mr. Justice Bayley delivered the opinion of the Twelve Judges upon the above case - Vide 7th Session, Waithman, Mayor, page 511. The Learned Judges were unanimously of opinion that the dwelling-house was correctly stated, as being in the possession of John Fearn ; the prisoner accordingly received sentence of Death with the other convicts.


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