Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th October 1824.
Reference Number: 18241028
Reference Number: f18241028-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On THURSDAY, 28th of OCTOBER, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the king's Commission of the peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Jonathan John Smith , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Charles Smith , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Venables , Esq.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

John Healey ,

John Mowstt ,

Thomas Reeve ,

Edward Joyce ,

Job Elliott ,

Job Orton ,

John Proctor ,

Thomas Driver ,

Abraham Agar ,

Thomas Clark ,

William Wagley ,

Thomas Goad .

2nd London Jury.

Wm. H. Suthern ,

Samuel Gilbert ,

George Stowaker ,

Philip Dushaw ,

Edmund Brown ,

Samuel Webb ,

Jacob Russell ,

William Morgan ,

Henry Case ,

Charles Brown ,

Robert Booty ,

John Russell Case .

1st Middlesex Jury.

William Holmes ,

Peter Patterson ,

William Alley ,

Samuel Cluse ,

Christpr. Metcalfe ,

John Bishop ,

John Gibbs ,

James Smart ,

William Branston ,

William Wilson ,

Aaron Stunt ,

Richard Burton .

2d Middlesex Jury.

William Gregg ,

William Hall ,

Thomas Coventry ,

Henry Borrell ,

Edm. Collingridge ,

Robert Roberts ,

Henry Rickett ,

John Thornton ,

Daniel Walters ,

William Hudson ,

Wm. Morrow ,

Matthias Marshall .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Richard Holman ,

John Patmore ,

Caleb H. Brookes ,

Thomas Pickmore ,

William Gosling ,

John Harford ,

John Seeres ,

Francis Homan ,

John Hems ,

John Reece ,

Robert Stewart ,

Joseph West .

4th Middlesex Jury.

James Gregory ,

John Redfern ,

Rob. Blumerhasset ,

Joseph Ezra Tibbs ,

Edward Wix ,

Thomas Chubb ,

Thomas Keen ,

Robert Williams ,

John W. Graham ,

Robert Pritchard ,

Jeremiah Perry ,

Thomas Montague .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 28, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18241028-1

1524. WILLIAM OLIVER was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hepburn , on the King's highway, on the 21st of August , at St. Margaret, Westminster , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 30 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; a seal, value 1 s.; a key, value 1 d.; a snuff-box, value 1 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , his property.

WILLIAM HEPBURN . I keep the gate at Richmond-terrace . On the 21st of August I lodged in Princes-street - about a quarter before eleven o'clock at night I was at the corner of Delahay-street and Duke-street , in my way home; I was alone, and quite sober: somebody gave me a back handed blow, which knocked me down on the ground, and made me quite senseless - I could not see. I heard a woman's voice behind me. When I recovered a little I felt a man draw my watch out; I also lost a French snuff-box, and a cheque handkerchief. I saw the watch three weeks ago in the possession of Harris.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the evening of the 10th of September the prisoner pawned this watch, for 15 s., in the name of John Jones , No. 36, Orchard-street. I had seen him several times before. I heard that it was stolen about a fortnight after. I am quite certain that he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Is it not common for persons to pawn in fictitious names - A. Yes.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of September, in Duck-yard, Duck-lane, Westminster, not on this charge; I searched, and found three duplicates upon him - one for a watch, pawned on the 10th of September, in the name of Jones, No. 36, Orchard-street. I asked if he had pawned these things for himself - he turned to me, and looked at the tickets, and pointed out this one and another for a handkerchief, and said that George Turner had pawned those two for him. I am sure he said Turner had pawned them for him.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. When the prisoner was apprehended I asked him to account for the possession of the duplicate of the watch - he said he had purchased the watch about three months ago (this was on the 24th of September,) of a man in the Abbey church-yard: I asked his name, which he could not tell, nor where he lived, or what his business was. He said that nobody was present.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. I was present when the prisoner was apprehended, and heard what he stated to Pople. I agree with his statement.

WILLIAM HEPBURN . This watch is mine. I have had it thirty years: the maker's name is Charles Mortimer .

Prisoner's Defence. On the very spot where he says he was robbed there is a watch box; they say he laid senseless in the street for a quarter of an hour, and yet the street is a great thoroughfare.

WILLIAM HEPBURN re-examined. There is a watch box, but there is seldom a watchman there. I cannot say how long I was senseless. I gave a man 6 d. to help me home.

EDWARD RICHARDSON . I am a costermonger, and live in Duck-lane, Westminster. I have known the prisoner six months - I saw him buy this watch of John Turpin , in Peter-street, Westminster.

Q. Was any other witness present - A. John Edmunds was. I do not know the day of the month; it was in September - I think on the 9th or 10th; it was early in the month. He paid 13 s. for it, and was to pay 2 s. more.

Q. What were you doing there - A. I was at the corner of Pye-street, and this William Oliver asked me to go with him to buy a watch, and we went together to Duck-lane, and turned to the left - I believe the house is the second from the corner.

Q. Who did you see there - A. I saw John Turpin and John Edmands . I had seen Turpin before - the prisoner asked him to shew him the watch which he had got; he shewed him one. Turpin deals in old iron: he still lives there and keeps the shop. I saw him on Saturday last. I know the watch by its being rusty in the inside case - I opened it myself. I told Turpin that I was coming here, and told Edmunds so. I do not know whether either of them are here.

JOSEPH COOPER re-examined. Both the other duplicates found on the prisoner are for things pawned at Harris's.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18241028-2

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1525. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Weaver , on the King's highway, on 3d October , at St. Mary-le-bone , putting him in fear, and taking

from his person, and against his will, an umbrella, value 7 s. , his property.

JOHN WEAVER . I now live at Knights bridge, but on the 3d of October I lived at the sign of the Compasses public-house, at the corner of Great Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone. I was a gentleman's servant , but had been out of place for about three months - I lived with Lord Kinnard, as under butler , in Scotland, for about three months. On Saturday night the 3d of October I had been supping in Davis-street, Berkley-square, with a wheeler; I was there about three hours, and had part of two small jugs of ale, and a glass of gin and water - I was perfectly sober. I had got about three quarters of a mile on my way home, and as I turned the corner into Westmorland-street the prisoner stood there, with another man. The prisoner caught hold of my umbrella, struck me, and desired me to give it up, and said,

"What money have you got, you b - r." he struck me in the throat: I struggled with him for the umbrella, but the handle came off, and he got the umbrella forcibly from me. I called Watch! the other ran away, and Bussey, the watchman came up - the prisoner had then got my umbrella. I gave charge of him for demanding my money, taking my umbrella, and ill-using me - he struck me four or five times in the throat. The watchman took him: he then threw the umbrella away, and said if the watchman would let him go he would walk quietly to the watch-house, and as soon as the watchman let him go he turned round and said,

"This b - r wanted to give me 1 s. to ** me," he then struck me again in my throat. The watchman then took him. I am certain he is the man. I never lost sight of him - he has a wooden leg. Nothing passed except what I have stated. I made no proposition to him, nor offered him any money. I had got about 1 s. 4 1/2 d. about me.

Q. Did you in any part of the transaction propose to give him 1 s, for the purpose he stated - A. Never, my Lord.

Prisoner. You said you lived at Mayo's. at the Compasses, and that is where I first saw you - Witness. Mayo keeps the Compasses. I never saw him till I was at the corner of Westmorland-street.

BENJAMIN BUSSEY . I am serjeant of the watch at St. Mary-le-bone. On the 3d of October, about a quarter past one o'clock in the morning I heard a call of watch four or five times, and ran into Westmorland-street. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner standing together, arguing - he immediately gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him of his umbrella; I took him; he threw the umbrella away, and said he would walk quietly. I let him go - he turned round, and called the prosecutor a ** - and b - r - he had said nothing of that kind till he had asked me to let him walk alone, and had walked a hundred yards. I have seen him on my beat before, sometimes alone, and sometimes a person or two were with him.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18241028-3

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1526. WILLIAM DALTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Berry and John Reid , about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 9th of October , at St. George, Bloomsbury , (the said John Reid and other persons therein being,) and stealing therein two pieces of silk, containing fourteen handkerchiefs, value 5 l. , their property.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a saddler, and live at No. 222, High Holborn. Messrs. Reid and Co's. shop is right opposite mine. On the 9th of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner with his hand through a pane of glass, and moving something in their window. I crossed the road, took hold of him, and took him to the door, which I found fast - one of the young men opened it. I asked the prisoner what he was about - he said he was doing nothing. I asked what he was doing with the piece of silk handkerchiefs which I saw him moving; he said I was mistaken; he was doing nothing.

Prisoner. Q. Where was you - A. Standing in my door-way, with the door open. I saw nobody else near him. He did not move from the spot till I took him.

Q. When you crossed the road did not you look back to see if there were any carriages, for fear of being run over - A. No.

JOHN REID . I am in partnership with Francis Berry ; we are linen-drapers , and both live at No. 121, High Holborn . One of our young men called me - I found the prisoner in Gibbs's custody. I found a square of glass broken, a piece of handkerchiefs entirely gone, and another piece moved from its place. I had placed them in the window twenty minutes before - the glass was then safe. They are Bandana handkerchiefs - the piece which is gone cost me 65 s., and the other 38 s. I had put six pieces in the window; five were left - one of which was moved, and one was quite gone. The piece removed was tumbled about, and laid five or six inches from the broken pane. The hole was large enough to admit a man's arm. There were other persons in the house beside me; it is our joint dwelling-house.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure your shopmen had sold none of the handkerchiefs - A. I am; no customer had been in.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge about nine o'clock - I found the blade of a knife and a small hook upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of going out every morning to look for work. I was coming by this shop, and saw a boy about my size going away - I had not been there half a minute before a gentleman came and took me. I hope you will consider that this is in a wide part of the street, where carriages are passing, which is very deceiving to the eye. If you consider that there is sufficient evidence to find me guilty, do so. No doubt the gentleman lost sight of the lad as he crossed.

MR. GIBBS. I saw nobody with him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18241028-4

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1257. HENRY FERRIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Lindsey Holland , about eight o'clock in the night of the 8th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a box, value 2 s.; a bag, value 2 d.; four sovereigns, forty-eight half-crowns, two

hundred shillings, one hundred sixpences, and a bill of exchange, for payment of and value 580 l., his property, against the statute .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS LINDSEY HOLLAND . I live at No. 12, Cornwall-terrace, Regent's-park , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. The prisoner was eight months in my service, as footman , and quitted me five weeks previous to the 8th of September, upon which day I left home about five o'clock in the evening - I left the secretary in my front parlour, locked; there was a cash-box in it, containing a bill of exchange for 580 l., about 19 l. in silver, in a canvass bag, and some loose silver besides, and four sovereigns at least - there might be ten. There is an area under this parlour window. I returned home about ten o'clock, when one of the servants directed my attention to the secretary: I found it had been wrenched open, apparently by a chisel; I immediately missed my tin cash-box, containing this property - also a bond for 3,400 l., and another bill of exchange for 580 l. also.

FRANCES WESTON . I am cook to Mr. Holland. On Wednesday night, the 8th of September, between eight and nine o'clock, I was sitting in the kitchen with my fellow servant, and heard a noise, which appeared like somebody trying the area door; I spoke to my fellow servant about it, but we did not move - sometime afterwards there was a ring at the bell: I went to the door, thinking my fellow servant was up stairs, but I found she had answered the door. I had a candle, and the wind blowing very strong I took it into the parlour, and set it upon the secretary, and then went to the door, and upon returning saw that the secretary had been forced open - the bolts of the lock were standing out, and the top of the drawer splintered. I informed my master on his return. I had swept the area on the morning of the 8th, and on the morning of the 9th, between eight and nine o'clock, when I went to unlock the area gate I found the top of a button at the bottom of the area steps. I picked it up, and gave it to Cork, the housemaid.

HANNAH CORK . I am housemaid to Mr. Holland. I was in the kitchen with Weston, and heard a noise - it is my business to fasten the house: I shut the parlour shutters at nine o'clock that evening - after I had heard the noise - the sash was shut down all day, but not fastened with a catch. I did not notice the sash, but I shut the shutters. We found the secretary open about a quarter past nine - I then opened the shutters, and found the lower sash about an inch open. I have heard Weston's evidence; it is correct. I found dirt on the window cill, and on the wainscoat under the window, as if a person's heel had rubbed against it in getting in. Weston gave me a button, which I gave to my mistress.

COURT. Q. Could a person standing on the area steps jump up to the cill of the window - A. Yes, my Lord, by going up the steps; there is a short curtain to the window, which was drawn as usual.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that it was at half-past seven - A. No.

MRS. LUCY FARNOOMB HOLLAND . I am the prosecutor's wife. Cork gave me a button, which I gave to Mr. Holland.

MR. HOLLAND. I gave it to Staples.

CATHERINE HEATWELL . My husband is coachman to Mr. Holland - we live at his stables, behind his house. On the 8th of September, in the evening, about half-past eight o'clock, the prisoner came to the coach-house door, and asked me if the coachman was at home - I said No - he asked what time he would be at home; I said I did not expect him till twelve o'clock; which was true - he went away, but returned in five minutes, and asked if he would be at home by the time he went to Alpha-cottages and back - I said No, and asked his name; he said his name did not signify, for the coachman did not know his name.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a stranger to you - A. Yes. I saw him in custody next night; I should have known him if I had met him in the street. I had a candle in my hand. He had a blue coat on, which fitted him very tight. I believe him to be the man.

COURT. Q. How long was he with you at first - A. He asked the questions: I answered, and he went away. The same person came back, and then only staid while we had the conversation. My husband came into the prosecutor's service the day the prisoner left, so that I did not know him before.

WILLIAM BUSH . I am a watchman - my box stands against the next stable to Mr. Holland's. I know the prisoner. On the evening of the 8th of September, between eight and nine o'clock, he came to my box, and asked which was No. 12's stables; I said it was the next stable. I saw him go there, and speak to the last witness, and saw him talking to her again afterwards. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before - A. No. No. 12 stables belong to No. 12, Cornwall-terrace - he applied to me as if he was ignorant of where it was.

MR. HOLLAND re-examined. He knew my stables very well; there is a communication from them to the house.

SARAH BROWN . I am the wife of Frederick Brown - we live at No. 3, Little Chesterfield-street; the prisoner boarded, but did not lodge with me. On the morning of the 9th of September he came to me, about half-past nine o'clock. I said,

"Henry, there has been a young woman after your mother;" he asked what clothes she was dressed in - I told him what I had heard, as I did not see her myself; he said directly that he had heard Mr. Holland's house had been robbed, and by the description I gave he supposed the woman who had called was one of Mr. Holland's servants. He did not say who had told him of the robbery - he said he had heard of it, and had seen the washerwoman's daughter also.

Q. Did he say what had passed between the washerwoman's daughter and him - A. No; he said to me,

"Mrs. Brown, I will go and give myself up to Mr. Holland;" I said,

"Then Henry you must be a fool, don't give yourself up - if Mr. Holland wants you he will send for you." He said he would shave himself, and then said,

"No, I will not shave now, I will go out to Mrs. Hayward's, and if anybody wants me I shall be home about half-past two o'clock." He came home about that time, and took his coat off to shave - the officer came in.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he had seen the washerwoman's daughter, and there had been a report that the house had been robbed - A. Not that the washerwoman's daughter had said so.

COURT. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that he

said

"Mr. Holland's house has been robbed; I have seen the washerwoman's girl, who told me of it" - A. No, I did not say that.

JANE HICKS . I am eleven years old. (This witness upon being questioned appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.) I live in Warren-street, with my mother who washes for Mrs. Holland. On the morning after the robbery (Thursday) I met the prisoner about eight o'clock, at my mother's door - he desired me to remember him to my mother - I had not heard of the robbery then, and said nothing to him about it. I saw him on the Tuesday before that, and he asked if Mr. Holland had got a servant; I said Yes: he asked if he was dressed in black; I said Yes. I am sure he is the man; I knew him in Mr. Holland's service.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I received the top of a button from Mr. Holland, and in consequence of information about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 9th of September, I went to Mrs. Brown's; the prisoner stood at the looking glass, shaving, his coat was off - I asked if his name was Henry; he said Yes; I asked where his coat was; he said,

"My coat?" and looked round as if surprised, and pointed to it: it hung over a chair; I asked if he had any other coat; he said No - I took it up, looked at it, and told him to put it on, and come with me (I observed the shank of the button on the left hip sticking up) he did so. Mrs. Brown said,

"Are you going to be taken away" - I said Yes. Another female in the room said

"What have you done" - he said nothing. One of them (the prisoner's mother I believe) said.

"If you had kissed your mistress this would not have transpired." I took him to the office close by. I first asked where he was on the previous evening; he said that from six to eight o'clock he was at Mrs. Brown's, and from eight till nearly eleven he was in Hanover-street, Hanover-square - that he did not know what number, but that he went there to take home an umbrella to a young woman, or to fetch one. I then asked what he had done with the top of the button, which was off his coat; he said he had lost it at Tottenham-court Theatre the night before, in the pressure of the crowd; I said I had found it in the Regent's-park - he said that was devilish odd that I should find it such a long way off. I produce it; it fits the shank, and corresponds with the other buttons - the inscription in the inside is the same as on the others - it is not a livery button. About an hour or two after his apprehension I asked how he had heard of the robbery - he said he had heard it from Mrs. Hicks's girl, the washerwoman's daughter.

Cross-examined. Q. He seemed surprised at your asking for his coat - there was only one coat there - A. No.

WILLIAM PASSMUCH . I am in the employ of Mr. Williams, button-maker, St. Martin's-lane. I have compared this button with those on the coat - it is of the same manufacture, same size, appearance and wear, and fits the shank - it is very remarkable, for there is a little bit torn off the button, and that hangs to the shank - it would not have fallen off if it had been properly soldered, which appears to be the case.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Six witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character.

MR. HOLLAND. I had his character from his uncle, a grocer, whom he had lived six years with.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18241028-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1258. WILLIAM THATCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a gelding, price 30 l. , the property of Charles Eyston .

WILLIAM CASTLE . I am servant to Charles Eyston , who lives at East Henley, Berks. On the 7th of October, about six o'clock in the evening. I put his gelding into a field, and missed it between five and six o'clock next morning. I had fastened the field. I found it on that day week, at Kensington Gravel-pits, and know it to be my master; it is worth 30 l.

THOMAS PAGE . I am a farmer's man. On the 8th of October I saw the prisoner standing by the Feathers, public-house, Kensington Gravel-pits, with a horse in his hand; a man on a pony came up to him, and asked the price of the horse - he asked 18 l.; the man offered 15 l.; he sold it to him for 16 l. 10 s.: 2 s. was paid as a deposit. The prisoner took the horse to the Coach and Horses stables. The man said he would go to Turnham Green for the rest of the money. I staid with the prisoner the while, as I thought the horse was sold under value: the man told the landlord that if he did not return by eight o'clock to let the prisoner have the horse and 2 s. I fetched Dawes, the constable, and gave the prisoner in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. You staid with him because you thought it was sold under value - A. Yes. I heard the bargain made. I said nothing to the prisoner about it; it was all done publicly - he was detained before the man came back.

SAMUEL BYE . On the 8th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going towards Turnham Green; the prisoner passed me with a horse; I asked if it was for sale - he said it was - I asked the price: he said it was worth a score. It had a cold, and was thin. I said it was not worth that, but I would give him 15 l., which he refused. I agreed to give him 16 l. 10 s.; we put it into the stables at the Coach and Horses, Notting-hill. I went to receive some money at Turnham-green, leaving 2 s. with the landlord, and said if he waited there till eight o'clock I would pay him, or he was to have the 2 s. and go away. When I returned he was detained. I have not seen the horse since.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not attempt to escape - A. No. I would not give above 20 l. for it now.

GEORGE HULL . I am a constable. Dawes brought the prisoner down to me - Page was with him.

THOMAS PAGE re-examined. I saw the same horse in the stables of the Coach and Horses, and was present when Castle saw it.

WILLIAM CASTLE . Hull pointed the horse out to me at the Coach and Horses - I know it to be my master's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-6

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1259. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Joseph Naylor , on the night of the 25th of September , and stealing therein a whittle, value 4 s; a watch, value 15 s.; two gowns value 10 s.; a coat, value 14 s.; a hat, value 7 s.; three blankets, value 3 s.; two bed-gowns, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; three frocks, value 3 s.; a pinafore, value 6 d.; a quilt, value 7 s., and a sheet, value 6 s. , his property.

JOSEPH NAYLOR . I am a labourer at the Gas Works in Peter-street, and rent a parlour of Mr. Harris's house St. Ormond's-hill, Broadway - it is let out in three different apartments - he does not live there, the street door is open from six o'clock till ten at night. On the 26th of September, about eight o'clock I left home to go to work, leaving my boy who is seven years old asleep on the bed. I locked the door and gave the key to my wife, who sat in the Broadway, selling vegetables; she fetched me about half-past eight o'clock. I found the door wide open, and the drawers also - the lock appeared to have been forced open, and this property was gone.

MARTHA NAYLOR . I am wife of the prosecutor; he brought me the key about eight o'clock, and told me to go home soon, and in about ten minutes I went, and found the door wide open; when I first came in I saw a man about three steps from the street door. I came out finding my child safe, and followed the man to the top of the street, he then asked what I was looking at, I said, at him, for my place was broken open and I suspected him as he was near the door; he said he would go any where with me; we went into a public-house - he turned out his pockets and had nothing - it was not the prisoner; on returning I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How many lodgers are there - A. Two - they are not here.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. On the 27th of September, as I and Pople were going to the prisoner's house, we saw him and his wife crossing Great Tothill-street into Dartmouth-street; his wife had a bundle - we stopped them, and said we were going to execute a search warrant, and they must go back with us; the wife said she suspected they had got what we were going in search of, and they were afraid they should get into trouble about it when they bought it; we went to the house, and asked who they bought the property of - the bundle was then open, but we did not know the things in it, not having heard of this robbery. Naylor afterwards claimed them, the wife said they had bought them of a man named Morgan; the prisoner agreed with her, and said his wife had given a sovereign for them, and before she agreed to pay for them had called him down stairs to ask if they were worth the money, and they agreed to give the 1 l., and that it was on the Saturday night previous. I asked the prisoner if he had not given more, and who paid the money, the answer was that they gave 1 l. on Saturday night, and he himself gave the man 2 s. 6 d. more on the Sunday morning; we afterwards found Naylor who identified the things; they knew that I was acquainted with Morgan. I have since taken him, but they could not satisfy the Magistrate that they had them from him.

GEORGE POPLE . I am a constable. On Monday, the 27th of September, I and Cooper were going to execute a search warrant at the prisoner's house - we met him on the road with his wife; we said we were going to search their house for stolen goods, the wife said

"I dare say I have got what you are going to look for, I dare say we shall get into trouble about it;" he said

"I dare say we shall;" she said she bought the things of a young man named John, and described his person which answered to one Morgan, and when they got to their house; they recollected that his name was Morgan, and said they bought them of him on Saturday night, and I think they said it was about nine o'clock; that Morgan brought them there and left a dark lantern, that they gave him 1 l. and a half crown. I found two dark lanterns in the shop, one on the mantle piece - he keeps an old iron shop. I opened the bundle, and asked if any thing else was brought with it, she said a silver watch which she pulled out of her pocket and gave me, and said that was all, and they had given 1 l. 2 s. 6 d. for the whole - all this was in the prisoner's hearing; we took them into custody, and on making a second search half an hour after I found a shirt in the drawer answering the description of one lost. I went and shewed it to Mrs. Naylor with a cotton bed-gown - she claimed both. Morgan was taken that afternoon, and I think Mrs. Naylor said she had seen him about the neighbourhood.

JOSEPH COOPER re-examined. I ascertained that Morgan had bought the dark lantern for 4 s. on the Saturday before. I had no account of the other one.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-7

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1260. WILLIAM WICKENDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , a watch, value 3 l.; a seal, value 8 s., and a key, value 7 s., the goods of William Gulliver , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZA GULLIVER . I live in New Tothill-street, Westminster , and am the wife of William Gulliver , who rents the house. On the 16th September some sweep s came to sweep the kitchen chimney for a woman who lives there. I said they could not do it; they came again next afternoon between three and four o'clock, and swept my back parlour chimney; there was White, the prisoner, and another. I am sure the prisoner was one of them - his face was black; the little boy went up the chimney, and while he was up, White the master came to me and said the soot was falling down another flue - I was in another room and told him it was no such thing, for I had lived in the house many years and it could not be. I went up stairs with him, leaving the prisoner sitting in the back parlour window - the watch laid on the drawers in the front parlour, and the door between the two parlours stood open. I did not miss the watch till half-past nine o'clock, when I went to wind it up. I am sure of the prisoner's person.

WILLIAM GULLIVER . I am husband of the last witness. I saw the boy go up the chimney and left the prisoner in the room. I am sure he is the boy. I went out of the room up stairs to work. I missed the watch about nine o'clock. I saw the seal on the following morning in the possession of Irving, and on the evening of the 21st, a woman came to me and asked if I had lost a watch, and if I had it back with the expences I had incurred, she hoped I should not proceed further. I said I could not promise any thing: she then gave the watch into my hand, and under it was 10 s. I have not seen her since.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of September, in company with White and a boy about the prisoner's size - they were sweeping a chimney; they all denied knowing any thing of the watch. I took them to the office, the boy was discharged, but the prisoner and White were committed for further examination. While I was at the house where I took them somebody

called out that there was a seal found. I was down stairs, and it was given to me in Irving's presence.

ROBERT IRVING . I am a boot-closer. On the 18th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning one Dunn came to my father's house, and asked if I had stitched the straps on his boots; he said if I would do them he would give me a seal; he gave me this seal, I cleaned it and went to see if it was gold, I gave it to Gulliver's daughter - she is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-8

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1261. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , a handkerchief value 3 s., the goods of Francis Janvrin , from his person .

FRANCIS JANVRIN . I am a merchant . On the 30th of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I was in Lime-street , and felt a person at my coat pocket. I turned round and seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he cried and begged for liberty.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He held it openly in his hand - A. Yes; he had not time to conceal it, for I turned round instantly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said I had picked it up; some boy went off directly. I never asked for mercy.

MR. JANVRIN. He had not time to pick it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-9

1262. HENRY HIGGERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a silver snuff-box, value 12 l., the goods of John Henry Koch , from his person .

MR. JOHN HENRY KOCH . I am a merchant . On the 29th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Cornhill, turning into Bishopsgate-street - my snuff-box was in my coat pocket. I was standing for the carts to pass, and felt it taken from my pocket, and on turning round saw the prisoner putting it it into his bosom. I ran after him, and saw him throw it away. A gentleman stopped him, and I gave him in charge.

JOHN STEVENS . I am an officer, and have the snuffbox.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-10

1263. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , forty yards of flannel, value 35 s. , the goods of Samuel Knight .

ROBERT AUGUSTUS AMOS . I am apprentice to Samuel Knight , linen-draper , Duke-street, Smithfield . On the 28th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take a roll of flannel out of the bin, about a yard from the door, and run out with it under his arm - I immediately pursued, and he was taken by a man, without my losing sight of him; he let it fall; he said he was not the person who took it. I picked it up.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you quite positive of him - A. I am: he dropped it in a dark place - I did not see it fall, though I never lost sight of him. There are two gas lights in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-11

1264. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 28 lbs. of sugar, value 14 s. , the goods of Henry Hoole .

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 19th of October, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Thames-street, and saw a man drawing a truck, and the prisoner following it - it turned into Bristow-street, and in a moment he came from it with this parcel of sugar on his shoulder, and I secured him.

WILLIAM IDLE . I am servant to Mr. H. Hoole, a grocer. I was in Thames-street with eight parcels of sugar in a truck, and in Bristow-street I missed one, and found Herdsfield holding the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work - a man asked me to carry it - I thought he was behind me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-12

1265. SAMUEL BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Augustus Walford , from his person .

MR. ROBERT AUGUSTUS WALFORD . On the 9th of October, at nine o'clock at night, I was on Holborn-bridge , and felt a pressure at my pocket - I then felt, and my handkerchief was safe. I walked about six yards, and felt a pull at my pocket; my handkerchief was gone. I turned round, seized the prisoner, and charged him with stealing it - I moved him a little way, and presently saw it laying close at his side; I let go of him to pick it up, and he ran off - I called watch, and at the corner of Field-lane he was secured, and said he would never do so again if I would let him go. I am certain of him.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the watch-house that another boy threw it down - A. I did not.

DAVID DAWES . I was in my shop, heard a cry, ran to the door, and saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner, who threw himself down, and said,

"Pray forgive me, I will never do so any more." I assisted in securing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had just left my mother, and was going home - the gentlemen turned round, laid hold of me, and gave me a shove, and I ran away - he picked up something, and called Stop thief! I immediately stopped, and he accused me of taking the handkerchief. I said I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-13

1266. JOHN CONNELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , thirty-three yards of cotton cord, value 30 s. , the goods of William Atkinson .

WILLIAM PROSSER . On the 7th of October I was servant to Mr. William Atkinson , Manchester warehousman , King-street, Cheapside. About a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning I was in the warehouse - I saw nobody

come in, but saw the prisoner going out with this cotton cord under his arm - I called to him, and asked where he was going - he ran out; I saw him turn into Mr. Mosey's warehouse, next door. I went in after him, and found the cord thrown down behind a truss - he said he knew nothing about it, and ran out, but was secured.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man dealing in old clothes - he told me to go in and bring out the cord, and he would give me some halfpence: it was so heavy I went into the next house, and laid it down. I ran out to see for him.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-14

1267. JOHN COOK , alias COOKSON, alias JACKSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Stott , about one o'clock in the night of the 17th of October , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate , with intent the goods and chattels therein being feloniously and burglariously to steal .

JOHN STOTT . I am an oilman , and live at No. 119, Bishopsgate-street , in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, without - it is in the City. On Sunday, the 17th of October, about half-past one o'clock in the night, Baker, the watchman, rang the bell - I got up looked out of window, and saw him at the door with his assistant; we had all gone to bed. I ran down, and let two watchmen in; we went into the shop, and found the prisoner in the cellar, under the house, took him into custody, and searched him, but found nothing upon him. I found some picklock keys, and a crow-bar in that cellar, after he was gone to the watch-house. We tried the keys, and found they would open the street door, and every door in the house. I had seen the cellar shut up on the Saturday night - it is never opened on a Sunday: the outer iron grating is fixed into an oaken cill, with five iron spikes, and is never open - we found that wrenched open with a crow bar, and the cellar window was pushed down; this must have been the way he got in. The grating was safe on the Sunday night, about nine o'clock; if it had been wrenched open then, I must have seen it.

JOHN BAKER . I am a watchman of Bishopsgate ward. On the 17th of October I was calling half-past 1 o'clock, and heard a noise at the corner of Skinner-street, against Mr. Stott's house, and on turning round saw a man on his hands and knees, against the cellar railing - I thought him drunk, and went to his assistance, but he got up, and ran off. I perceived the grating half way off. and saw the prisoner coming out of the cellar: I said,

"What business have you here," and struck him two or times; he retreated into the cellar again - I closed the grating, and shut him in, and alarmed Mr. Stott, who came down. Field, I, and another watchman went in, and took him behind some casks, in the back part of the cellar.

JOHN FIELD . I am an officer. About half-past one o'clock I went into this cellar, and found the prisoner there. I produce the sixteen picklock keys, and a crowbar.

HENRY NEWMAN . I am a watchman, and assisted Baker.

THOMAS MANNING . I found the crow-bar in the cellar.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my aunt's, and on passing this area a man rushed out, and caught hold of me: I fell in, and was getting up when the watchman drove me down.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18241028-15

1269. MARGARET VARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a watch, value 2 l.; a key, value 4 d.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; a ring, value 1 d.; four half crowns, and a shilling, the property of William Blackman , from his person .

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am a bargeman , and live at Newberry, in Berkshire. On the 13th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I came to town, and about seven at night, I went into a public-house in Bride-lane, Fleet-street, and changed a sovereign. I went out and met the prisoner in Fleet-market, and by her persuasion, I went to George-alley with her - she pulled me up stairs, to the third floor, and called the servant up, who demanded 2 s. for the room - the house is kept by one Day. I paid the 2 s.; the prisoner afterwards said she would have something to drink, and the servant fetched some gin; we each had a glass - I paid for it, and we went to bed. I wound my watch up and put it into my fob - I then had four half crowns and a shilling in my pocket - I put my trowsers under my head. I awoke between three and four o'clock in the morning and she was gone. I felt and missed my watch and money - I could make nobody hear me. I went down stairs as soon as it was light; I knocked at the parlour door, a woman came out, who said she was mistress of the house, that the girls were not about, but if I called about twelve o'clock no doubt I could get my watch. I called at twelve o'clock and saw the prisoner, who said, if I would call at three o'clock I should have the watch without expence or trouble, if I would go no further in the business. I said I knew she had taken it, and expected that she would find it, and the money also. I left and called at three o'clock, and saw her - she called me aside and asked for 2 s. and said she would redeem the watch directly. I gave her 2 s., she went down, returned in a quarter of an hour, and said she had not got it, it would not be long, and I must give her 6 d. for something to drink - I did so; she went down, and in ten minutes brought me up the duplicate of the watch, pawned for 12 s. I said she must fetch it out, or I would trouble her about it; she said she would not and abused me - I left her, keeping the duplicate; she had put 4 d. in copper into my purse on the night of the robbery in the room of the silver. I had her taken next night - I was perfectly sober, I never gave her the watch. I had given her 3 s. 6 d., besides 2 s. for the room.

EDWARD MOORE . I am a patrol of St. Brides. I apprehended the prisoner about eight o'clock on the 14th; the prosecutor had described her to me, and gave the same account as he has now.

EDWARD PRICE . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me the duplicate.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am servant to Mr. Cross, pawnbroker, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell. On the 14th of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, a young man pawned this watch, the duplicate produced corresponds with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner in a long and indecent defence stated, that

the prosecutor, who was intoxicated, had no money, and gave her the watch, telling her to pawn it if he did not call before twelve o'clock.

ANN FOX. I am servant at this house; the prosecutor came in with the prisoner, and gave me 1 s. to fetch some gin, and when I came back, he said he had no more money, he wound his watch up, and said

"I will leave this watch for 12 s., you pawn it, and I will call for the ticket in the evening;" the money was 9 s. for her, and 3 s. for the room; she gave it to a young man to pawn. I do not know his name. The prosecutor did not pay me for the room. I went to bed at three o'clock - the young man brought the money for the watch between seven and eight; the landlady of the house had been out all night.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241028-16

1269. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a pair of shoes, value 9 s. , the goods of William George Bragg and Thomas Luckin .

THOMAS LUCKIN . I am in partnership with William George Bragg , we are shoemakers , and live in Bartholomew-close . On the 15th of October, the prisoner came in for a pair of shoes, I reached him three or four pair, which he tried on, and then desired me to try on a pair, he looked at them, and said if I would stretch them, he would call next morning for them and went out.

GEORGE LUCKIN . I am Mr. Luckin's son. While he was trying on the shoes his back was turned. I saw the prisoner put his hand into the glass case, take a pair of shoes, and put them under his jacket; he said he would call for the shoes next day, and walked backwards to the door. I went up and laid hold of him - he ran across the close, and I saw the shoes fall from him - he was secured.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I wanted to pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-17

1270. JAMES DEWELL and JAMES JESSUP were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two silver handle frames, value 38 s., and a pocket telescope, value 7 s. 6 d., the goods of John Bleuler , privately in his shop .

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 16th of September, about ten o'clock in the morning I met the prisoners together at the corner of St. Paul's Church-yard; they saw me looking at them, and seperated. I took Dewell, and found two pairs of silver hand spectacles on him. I took Jessup in about two hours, but found nothing upon him.

MR. JOHN BLEULER . I am an optician , and live in Ludgate-street. On the 16th of September, about ten o'clock, Jessup came into my shop, and asked to see a small telescope, which I reached him from the glass case, where these spectacle hand frames were, and in the mean time Dewell came in, and wanted to see a measuring tape - I turned my back to them both to reach a telescope for Jessup. Dewell said he thought the tape too dear, but would tell his friend, and away he went. Jessup had not enough money to pay for a telescope which he fixed upon, and said he would call again for it, but never did. In about ten minutes I missed two hand frames, and a telescope. The officer produced the frames.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How do you know them - A. By their appearance. One has glasses and the other not: there is something about them by which I know them, but which I cannot describe. I have no doubt of their being mine. The prisoners appeared not to know each other.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear to Dewell - A. I certainly will not swear positively to either of them, but have no doubt of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-18

1271. JOHN COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a silver ladle, value 5 s. , the goods of William Roe .

SOPHIA LEICETER . I am servant to William Roe , furrier , Little St. Thomas Apostle . On the 2d of October the prisoner came through the scullery into the kitchen, with pens to sell. I said I wanted none - he turned away immediately, and we missed a silver ladle from the scullery sink; I followed him into the street, and called after him: he ran very quick, but was caught and brought back.

FRANCIS COOKSON . I saw the prisoner running in Bow-lane - Leicester said he had stolen a ladle; I followed and secured him, and took him to Mr. Roe's - he stumbled in the scullery, and reeled towards the sink. I saw him take the ladle out of his pocket, and throw it into the sink: I said,

"You have just dropped it;" he said,

"No, I have never seen it."

JAMES WILKINS . I was at the corner of Red Lion-court, and saw Leicester following the prisoner, who crossed the road - he was stopped; and in the scullery he reeled towards the sink, and I saw the ladle fall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The sink is in the passage; I called to know if they wanted any pens, and came out; I was brought back, and put against the sink. The servant charged me with it, and on looking behind a saucepan they found it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-19

NEW COURT. (1st Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1272. WILLIAM CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a pair of trowsers, value 25 s.; a waistcoat, value 20 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of John Morgan .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-20

1273. JOHN CRAMER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , two shawls, value 5 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-21

1274. JAMES HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a watch, value 2 l., and two seals,

value 50 s. , the goods of Joshua West and others, his partners.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-22

1275. PHILIP BUCHANAN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 25th of June , two quires of paper, called outside foolscap, value 1 s., and one hundred and twenty-five sheets of paper, called outside foolscap, value 3 s., the goods of Henry Garrett Key and John Key , well knowing the same to have been stolen, and of which William Hooper has been convicted of stealing .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 25th of June last, about ten minutes before nine o'clock in the morning, I saw William Hooper in the City-road, near Wesley's Tabernacle. I was examined on his trial in this place, when he was convicted - he had a parcel under his arm. I followed him to the corner of Chiswell-street, where he met the prisoner; they walked together down Finsbury-street, and Hooper gave the prisoner the parcel at the corner of Chiswell-street - they separated in Finsbury-street: Hooper went away. I followed the prisoner - I saw him put the parcel into a bag; I followed him till he got to White-street, and then said,

"What have you got there; he said, paper to make a book of, which he had received from a man, a friend of his, but he did not know that he should know him again. The parcel had not been opened. I took him to the Mansion House - he there said he was going to take the paper to be ruled, but I cannot tell who he said he was going to take it to.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been at the prisoner's house - A. Yes; it is about half a mile from where this transaction took place, and about three quarters of a mile from Messrs. Keys. I examined the prisoner's house, and saw book-binding implements there. He has been at large since last Session - I met him in Little Moorfields; I did not take him up. When he took the parcel from Hooper he walked with it on his arm, in the public street.

JOHN KEY , ESQ. AND ALDERMAN. I am in partnership with my brother, Mr. Henry Garrett Key. I was present at the trial of William Hooper . I saw this paper - it is our manufacture. Hooper was in our employ as porter for many years.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not sold a considerable quantity of this paper before this transaction - A. Yes; I cannot tell in what direction it went - it might be sent out in town or country after it left our premises; it is made for printing on - it is not fit for books: it might be made into a book, but would not answer the purpose. The prisoner was discharged two Sessions ago, and has had an opportunity since of making his escape.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the paper to make a book of from a man whom I had seen before, at the Crown public-house, Chiswell-street; he called me to him at the corner of Chiswell-street, and walked with me - we were going to a man who was to rule it, when the officer saw us, and took me into custody. I was taken to the Mansion House; the officer went to my house - he saw bookbinding tools, and nothing else: I was taken at my own house. I have lived fifteen years in the parish. I was drinking in the public-house with a gentleman, who is here and heard the order given to me to make the book. I have ever since worked for Mr. Lee, in the City-road.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I know his residence: I called on him once before; he was not at home the first time I called; I went on the Thursday afterwards, and took him at breakfast; his house had the appearance of a bookbinder living there. I went with Forrester when he searched the premises.

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-23

Before Mr. Recorder.

1276. MARY ILETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , a pie, value 1 s. 4 d., and a cake, value 2 d. , the goods of John Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN . I am a baker , and live in Middlesex-place, Hackney-road . About half-past nine o'clock on Saturday evening, the 17th of July, the prisoner came into the bakehouse, where I was, and said she came for a cake belonging to her pie; she looked at the cakes, and took one from the board, which she put on a pie, and took away - the cake belonged to Mr. Sergeant, and the pie to Mr. Rutland. I have paid 1 s. 6 d. for them; I did not know her before. I saw her at the office about a month afterwards, and am certain of her person.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-24

1277. MARY ILETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a pie, value 3 s. 6 d., and a cake, value 2 d. , the goods of Edward Straw .

EDWARD STRAW . I am a baker , and live in the Kingsland-road . On Saturday, the 31st of July, a little before nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and said she wanted a large pie, in a white dish - there was one on the counter - I said,

"Is that your's" - she said,

"Yes, it is;" I said,

"Be particular," and she said it was hers; there was a cake by it, which she took with it: she paid 1 1/2 d. for them; they belonged to Mr. Hudson, who sent for them about five minutes afterwards. My wife made them another pie and cake, which cost us 3 s. 6 d. I had seen the prisoner before, and I saw her again in my shop on the 8th of August, where she was brought by another baker. She has seven children, and her husband allows her 17 s. a week.

GEORGE SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of August.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18241028-25

1278. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , twenty gallons of wine, value 10 l., and 6 lbs. of jam, value 6 s. , the goods of John Tatham , his master .

JOHN TATHAM . I live in Golden-square, Westminster . The prisoner had been in my service for eighteen months. I left London with Mrs. Tatham the latter end of August last, for Wales, and left her with a female servant, who is rather deaf, and a confidential clerk in the house. The clerk did not sleep there; his chief business was to take charge of the papers. I ordered the prisoner not to leave the house on any account. I have three cellars of Foreign

and British wines. I had some Madeira, Port and Sherry, besides liquors. I locked the wine-cellar door myself, and put the key into my writing desk, in the office, with some money and other things of value. The desk was locked, and I took the key of it with me. I returned on the 30th of September. I found the key of the cellar in my desk, and when I looked into my cellar, I found a bottle of Madeira, with a glass by the side of it, which I never put there. The prisoner had been in the cellar with me, but never had been trusted by himself. I am positive the glass was not there when I left London. The number of bottles were evidently diminished, and I taxed him with taking it. When the officer came on the 6th of October, I said to the prisoner,

"You have used me ill, you have been to my cellars," he said voluntarily that he had, and had taken two or three bottles. He had taken the key out of my desk, with an iron hook, which is used for taking the heater from the fire. There is a slit in the side of the desk, out of which he had got the key. The officer and the clerk were there at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you a dealer in wine - A. No. I had other servants in my house. I had left a few shillings in a purse, in my desk. I had spoken to the prisoner before the officer came, about the cellar being opened; I said he must explain it to his mistress. I said, on the following Sunday after I came home.

"I am afraid you have been doing something very wrong, I wonder you are not ashamed to look me in the face, I did not say he should be punished for it, or any thing of the kind.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I was present on Wednesday, the 6th of October, when the prisoner spoke on this subject; no promise or threat had been held out to him, he said he had taken two or three bottles, and showed his master in my presence, how he had got the key.

JOHN TATHAM re-examined. Q. What was the whole quantity of wine you lost - A. Two or three dozen were missing. I believe some had been drank in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-26

1279. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , three shillings , the monies of Richard Lamb , to whom he was servant .

RICHARD LAMB . I am a butcher , and live in King-street, Hammersmith. The prisoner was in my employ; I had some suspicion that he had robbed me, and on the 23d of July, I put forty shillings in the till, which I had marked about five o'clock in the afternoon, he was not in the habit of going to the till, it was kept locked. I left home between five and six in the evening. I have a lad in the shop also. I returned between nine and ten and gave my horse to the prisoner and went into the shop. I opened the till, and missed four of the marked shillings; they were all marked with a small cross on the check of the head. I went for a constable; the prisoner was then in the house; I called him, and said, I had a suspicion of his robbing the till, he denied it. I then told the constable to search him - he found 1 s., and a few half pence, but it was not my shilling. I asked him what he had done with the money I had paid him on that afternoon; he said, he had bought some clothes of a neighbour, of the name of Pooley, to the amount of 10 s. 6 d. I went there and we found 3 s., marked as those were in my till.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I have heard what Mr. Lamb has said, which I know to be true. Mr. Pooley is a Quaker and would not attend.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-27

1280. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a carpet, value 3 l., a and set of bed furniture, value 30 s., the goods of Sarah Peck , widow ; and six knives, value 6 d.; six forks, value 6 d., a flat iron, value 6 d.; a toasting fork, value 2 d.; and a broom, value 3 d. ; the goods of William Hamilton .

SARAH PECK . I am a widow, and live at No. 2, Marsham-street, Westminster. I keep a toy shop . On the 28th of August, William Hamilton , my brother-in-law , was living in my house. The prisoner came and said, he was sent from my sister's to fetch some flower-pots, a hair broom and some other articles which I gave him, with the bed furniture and carpet; he went away with them. I did not see him again till he was taken into custody; on the 27th or 28th of October; he might be in my sight about ten minutes; and when I saw him again I was quite certain of his person; I had seen him once before. My sister's name is Mary Ann Hamilton .

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When had you seen him before. - A. On the day before he had removed some articles for my sister, and I thought she had sent him for these; he took them away in my presence.

MARY ANN HAMILTON . I am the wife of William Hamilton , and sister of the last witness. I did not send the prisoner on the 28th of August, for a carpet or bed furniture, nor for any article on that day, or the day before. I heard of the loss on the 28th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with an old shop mate, and we had some porter, we went on towards Pimlico, and had some more liquor, and fell asleep, and do not know what became of me.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-28

1281. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a gold pin, value 4 s. , the goods of John Francis Borley .

JAMES ETHERIDGE . I am shopman to Mr. John Francis Borley , who lives in Sidney's alley, and is a jeweller ; Last Monday fortnight, about ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to look at some gold shirt pins; there were two gentlemen's servants in the shop at the time; the pins were marked 7 s., 6 d., but I told him he should have one for 6 s. I took one out for him and stuck it on a paper, and while I turned round he snatched it up and ran away: saying,

"I wish you may get it." I pursued and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He had enquired about the price. - A. Yes. I had abated 1 s., 6 d. I have since ascertained that he lived with Lord Morley, and have heard he is a little wrong in his head.

JOHN PROCTER . The prisoner was delivered to me at the watch-house. I searched him and found no pin, but 1 s., 10 1/2 d., in money upon him.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-29

1282. ANDREW WATTS and ELIZABETH TURPIN were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , four planes, value 12 s.; two saws, value 12 s.; two screw-drivers, value 3 s.; a hammer, value 1 s.; a square, value 1 s.; a bevel, value 4 d.; an umbrella, value 1 s., and a basket, value 6 d. , the goods of George Booth .

GEORGE BOOTH . I am a carpenter . On the 4th of October, I lost some tools from a new house in the Five-fields, Chelsea . I left them safe about half-past five o'clock on Saturday evening, in a basket on the first floor; the doors were not in at the bottom of the house, nor the windows - they could not be seen by any person passing the house; when I came to work about seven o'clock on the Monday morning they were gone - they were worth about 3 l. I believe some other workmen had been there before me, but they had not missed any tools. I saw a side pillaster and a plane of mine in a house in York-street, on the Saturday following - the prisoner Watts lives in York-street, Westminster. I live at No. 7, Knightsbridge-terrace.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 9th of October, I received a warrant to search the house of Watts - Booth was with me; we found a great many carpenter's tools which Booth claimed as his property - the female prisoner was in the house at the time; we understood that they were husband and wife till they were asked the question before the Magistrate - they said they bought the tools of a man who was a carpenter, and appealed to each other to recollect the man's name - it is a sort of old iron shop; part of the tools were exposed for sale - there are two sliding sashes in the window, and they were lying in the window, any person might have seen them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WATTS'S Defence. The goods were all bought fairly in the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-30

1283. ANDREW WATTS and ELIZABETH TURPIN were again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , an auger, value 1 s.; a saw, value 2 s., and a chisel, value 1 s., the goods of William Dance , and a saw, value 2 s., and a plane, value 1 s., the goods of John Arnold , and a saw, value 3 s.; three chisels, value 2 s., an oil stone, value 1 s.; a hammer, value 6 d.; a square, value 1 s., and two gimblets, value 4 d., the goods of William Parrott , and an adze, value 2 s.; a square, value 1 s.; two pair of compasses, value 1 s.; two files, value 6 d., and a basket, value 1 s., the goods of Robert Rummings , and a towel, value 1 s. , the goods of Francis Shepherd .

WILLIAM DANCE . I am a carpenter , and was at work at a building in Pimlico - I left some tools there on the 25th of September, about six o'clock in the evening; and on Monday morning about six I missed them. I had locked the door, and found it broken open. I found the auger on the 9th of October at Watts house, concealed in a tub. Arnold, Parrot, and Shepherd were all at work at the same building, and we all left together on the Saturday evening.

JOHN ARNOLD. I worked with Dance at this house I left about the same time on Saturday, and on Monday found the door wrenched open, and my saw and plane were gone. I saw my saw again on the 8th of October in Watts's shop.

Cross-examined. Q. The door had been fastened. - A. Yes, and I think it must have been more than a woman or a man could have done to open it, without an instrument; as I passed Watts's shop I saw the saw hanging there. I went in and looked at it.

WILLIAM PARROT . I was a fellow workman with Dance. The door had been broken open by some strong instrument; all my tools were gone; I saw one plane at Watts's house when it was searched.

ROBERT RUMMINGS . I was at work in the house; I left my tools there, and when I returned on Monday I missed them. I saw some of them afterwards at Watts's house.

FRANCIS SHEPHERD . I was at work there. I missed a trowel which I saw again at Queen-square Office.

EDWARD HARE . I am a tailor, and live in Palace-street, Pimlico. I was passing Watts's shop on Saturday, the 9th of October, where I saw this saw and bought it; as I was taking it home I was told it was stolen; I paid 2 s. 6 d. for it; I think that the full value.

WATTS Defence. The charge is an error. There is no tub in the shop; there was a half bushel measure, and some corks in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-31

1284. ANDREW WATTS and ELIZABETH TURPIN , were again indicted for stealing on the 9th of June , two saws, value 7 s., two planes 4 s., and two squares 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Tribe .

THOMAS TRIBE . I lost my tools from a building in Five-fields, Chelsea , on Wednesday, the 9th of June, while I went to breakfast, about eight o'clock in the morning; I saw them again the 9th of October, at Queen-square.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-32

1286. FOWLER BOWDLEY & JOHN FRANKS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 7 lbs. of solder, value 2 s. , the goods of George Earl of Egremont .

HENRY HERRINGTON . I was employed as clerk of the works at Lord Egremont's house, No. 4, Grosvenor-place, St. George's, Hanover-square , they had been under repair. Mr. James Osborne was the master of the works; before the 23d of September, there had been great repairs of plumber's and carpenter's work - the prisoners were plumbers , and had been taking up old lead and putting down new; the old lead was to be brought into my possession, and placed in a coach-house, after being brought into the work shop by them. On the 23d of September, I got into the hay-loft and removed some boards, suspecting that the plumbers had stolen lead - I placed myself in the loft at a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, and on looking through a hole I had made in the lath and plaster, I saw Franks with his waistcoat partly unbuttoned, and a piece of lead in his hand, which he concealed between his waistcoat and breeches, he then buttoned his waistcoat over it; I then saw Bowdley do the same; Connell, another man, was treading on a piece of lead to bring it into a small compass. I went down and called Mr. Osborne - he went with me to the shop, and there we found the two prisoners. Connell was at that time shut in a cupboard; I shut the room door, and said, I suspected they had lead about them, and insisted upon searching them before they left the room - they denied it; I then went up to Franks and unbuttoned his waistcoat, and found this piece of lead in his possession - I put my hand to it, and then he took hold of it and pulled it out. I then went to Bowdley and said, I insisted upon searching him; he opened his waistcoat, and gave me out his piece of lead. I then went to the cupboard, and found Connell - I said,

"Have you got yours about you;" he said No - but I found a piece on the floor in the corner. Mr. Osborne and I took the lead into my room, and kept it there till the Tuesday following, and then took it to Bow-street. I discharged the men, and told them that was all I could do, but should inform Lord Egremont of it, and he might do as he pleased.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there a house adjoining belonging to Lady Marsham - A. Yes, the workmen were stripping that house as well; the old lead from the two houses was mixed together in the work shop - we had no private mark on the lead which came from one or the other house - I could not tell which they came from; Lord Egremout paid for the repairs; he is the proprietor of both houses. Lady Marsham is his tenant; the lead had been brought from her house, No. 3, on that day.

JAMES OSBORNE . I am master of the works - the two houses belong to Lord Egremont; he employed me, and I have workmen there. On the 23d of September, Herrington came to me, and I went with him to a room which we call the plumber's shop; it is over one of the stables at No. 4 - we saw the prisoners there; the clerk searched the prisoners and found the lead on them. I then saw Connell in the cupboard, and found a piece of lead by him, but none on his person.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a Bow-street Officer. I produce some, the lead was given me at Bow-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM TYLER . I am steward to George Earl of Egremont. The two houses belong to him - Lady Marsham is his tenant.

BOWDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 34.

FRANKS - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-33

1287. ANN ROACH was indicted for stealing on the 28th of September , four silver spoons, value 2 l., two silver forks 1 l., and a sheet 7 s. , the goods of Benjamin Warren , to whom she was servant .

SARAH WARREN . I am the wife of Benjamin Warren , we live in Eaton-street, Pimlico - the prisoner was my servant of all work; she had been with me about three months - we occupy the upper part of the house; my husband is a traveller - the lower part is occupied. I missed some silver spoons, some forks, and a sheet, on the 22d of September between eleven and twelve o'clock. I enquired of her if she knew any thing about them, she denied it; I saw them again at Marlborough-street the same evening. I had sent for a constable, but she left the house before he came without giving me any notice - the articles might be worth about 3 l.

THOMAS PITCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Barnes, pawnbroker, Panton-street, Haymarket. I have two table spoons, two tea spoons, and two forks, which were pledged by the prisoner, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 22d of September, she stated that her mistress wanted a small sum of money, and we advanced 2 l. on them. I am certain of her, she pawned them in the name of Price for Mrs. Fleming, of Piccadilly; I saw her in custody on the same evening.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, in Lower-street, Pimlico - I took in a sheet of the prisoner on the 31st of August for 2 s., with a shift.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN COLES . I am a constable. I found the prisoner in Westminster - she told me where she had pledged the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-34

1288. EMMA ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a coat, value 3 s.; a pair of shoes, value 1 s., and a hat, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Palmer , from his person .

THOMAS PALMER . I am a labourer , and live at Paddington.

On the 27th of September, about twelve o'clock at night, I had been at my brother's, in the Borough, and met the prisoner in the Edgware-road, on my return; we talked together, and I asked her if I should go home with her - she said she had no apartment; I then asked her if she would go with me, which she did, to my master's hay loft - when we had been there a little while she complained of being cold, and I threw the coat over her. I had my shoes, hat, and coat off. I went to sleep between twelve and one o'clock, and awoke between three and four - she was then gone, and my things also. I saw her at the watch-house with them about six o'clock that morning. I had given her what money I had.

JOSEPH GILCHRIST . I am a watchman. The prosecutor came to me about four o'clock, without coat, hat, or shoes, and asked if I had seen a woman pass with them - he said he had been with her, and she had taken his things. In about half an hour I saw the prisoner with the coat, and asked her where she got it; she crossed over; I went to her, and said a man had complained of being robbed of his coat, hat, and shoes - she threw down the coat, and said.

"Let me go;" she afterwards told me where to find the shoes and hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in the Edgware-road; he asked me if I would live with him, and asked if 18 s. a week would keep us; I said with the little I earned it might do - he gave me some halfpence to get some liquor, and gave me the coat to put on. I went to the Waterman's Arms, public-house, and there the watchman saw me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Five Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241028-35

1289. MARGARET BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , five pieces of ribbon, containing thirty-five yards, value 20 s. , the goods of Anslem Shears .

CHARLES QUICK . I am in the employ of Mr. Anslem Shears , silk-mercer , Regent-street . The prisoner came to the shop on the 25th of September, alone, and asked to look at some ribbon; I showed her some, and she purchased two quantities of a yard and half of each, they came to 3 d., or 4 d. The drawer of ribbon was on the counter, within her reach: before she paid for it, she asked to look at some muslin; I showed her some, and while I turned to put in its place again, she took the ribbon. Mr. Dumeford took hold of her, and led her to the middle of the shop. I did not see her take them, but saw them in her hand; there were two pieces, each containing about thirty yards, the constable was sent for, and she was given in charge.

ROBERT DAVEY DUMEFORD . I am shopman to Mr. Shears. I saw the prisoner take the ribbons from the drawer, I took hold of her directly; she said, she was sorry that she had taken them, and hoped we would forgive her, as it was her first offence. I fetched the constable and gave her in charge.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. I was sent for and found these ribbons on her, with a duplicate, and some money, which I returned to her.

Prisoner's Defence. I took these ribbons to look at them; the gentleman came and took me into custody

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-36

1290. HUGH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a watch key, value 2 s. , the goods of Isaac Harsh .

ISAAC HARSH . I live in Gravel-lane, Houndsditch, and sell jewellery . On the 22d of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning I was in a public-house at Wapping ; a man asked, if I had a key to sell; I showed him one, and he dropped it on the floor, the prisoner picked it up and went away with it; I followed, and said,

"Give me my key;" he said, the landlady's child had picked it up.

SAMUEL CROMARTY . I am a constable. Harsh came to the office, and said the prisoner had robbed him of a key. I took him into custody, and he said the landlady's child had picked it up; I said.

"We will go back and see for it," and as we went along I saw him put his hand into his pocket, take out the key, and try to throw it in the docks.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-37

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1291. MATHEW JOHNSON , and ROBERT CLAPTON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of James Peachy .

JAMES PEACHY . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Goswell-street . On Saturday, the 2d of October, Mr. Nelson told me that something had happened: I went out and two gentlemen pointed out Johnson, whom I secured; my young man went out and took Clapton; we then examined the premises, and found a shawl had been taken; which hung on a partition inside the door.

THOMAS JONES . I am an upholsterer. On the 2d of October, I was crossing from Wilderness-row, and saw a man throw something from Mr. Peachey's door: I saw Clapton take it up and go away with it. Mr. Peachey's young man came out, and I directed him to the prisoner.

Prisoner CLAPTON. Q. Why did you not stop me - A. I was not near enough.

EDWARD WASHINGTON . I am a feather maker, and live in Goswell-street. I saw Johnson in Mr. Peachey's shop, taking down the shawl; he threw it out to Clapton, who put it under his coat and walked away. I have no doubt of their persons.

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I am a watchman. I saw Mr. Peachey's young man running after Clapton; I took him to the watch-house. I took him to the Pitt's Head, public house, where he attempted to make his escape; he pushed me on one side, and ran out of the door; I pulled him back.

MARY NELSON . I live in Noble-street. I was going into Mr. Peachy's shop and saw the prisoners at the door, they were strangers to me, but I saw them so as to know their persons. Johnson said to Clapton,

"Which is it your wife wants, a shawl or a handkerchief?" Clapton said

"A shawl." Johnson went into the shop, pulled it down and tucked it under his jacket - I gave notice to Mr. Peachy immediately.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLAPTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-38

1292. JAMES LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 16 lbs. of twine, value 15 s. , the goods of Richard Cooper Gray .

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am in the employ of Richard Cooper Gray of Newington Butts , he is a rope, line and twine manufacturer . On the 15th of October, I was at work, and left about eight o'clock in the evening; on the following morning I missed a parcel of twine which I had seen by the side of my walk the night before; there were some sticks gone with it. I saw it on the Monday following in the officer's possession.

THOMAS HARMAN . I am a constable. I was on duty in Bell-lane, about half-past eight o'clock on Saturday, the 16th of October, and saw the prisoner with a bag. I asked him what he had got, he said some twine. I asked where he got it, he declined answering, and I took him to the watch-house and found this twine upon him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-39

1288. MARGARET DISSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a pelisse, value 25 s. , the goods of Charles Robert Wissett .

THOMAS BAILEY . I am assistant to Mr. Charles Robert Wisset , of Upper York-street . On the 23d of October, between five and six o'clock, we received information from a gentleman; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner going down the street, about twenty or thirty yards off; I followed, and took this pelisse from her; I had seen it safe about three hours before. She said she hoped we would forgive her.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I took her into custody; she said she did it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress - I have eight children, and never was in such a situation in my life.

GUILTY. Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 14 Days .

Reference Number: t18241028-40

1289. JAMES BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a writing desk, value 30 s. , the goods of John Stuart .

ELIZABETH LEWIS . I am laundress to Mr. John Stuart , of Lincoln's Inn . On the morning of the 21st of September I opened the windows of the chamber, and saw the desk in its usual place - I went into the ajoining room, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked out of the window, and saw a crowd of people running; I then went into the square, and saw the people at No. 6 - they came on to our chambers, and asked if I had lost anything: I said No; they said I had better go in and see. I went in, and missed the desk. The window had been pulled down so low that I could not pull it up again; it pulls down, but will not go up; there were footmarks upon it.

ANN WARMAN . I am laundress to Mr. Lees. I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Stuart's window, with a desk under his arm.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you seen him before - A. Yes; I had seen him that morning, walking about the square, with two other persons. When he got out of the window his back was towards me, but I had seen his face before.

GEORGE WEAR . I was at the door of the fruit shop in Lincoln's Inn-passage, and saw the prisoner with a desk under his arm - I followed him, and saw him put it into the passage: I went after him - a man came up and collared him; they scuffled, and I believe the prisoner struck him - he then ran away, and was caught by another person.

Cross-examined. Q. This occurence did not take up more than a moment - A. No; he stopped in an instant to put down the desk, and I lost sight of him while he turned the corner of Serle-street.

MARY WILKINSON . I keep the shop in Lincoln's Inn-passage. I saw the prisoner put the desk down - it was brought into my shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-41

1295. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a copper, value 35 s. , the goods of Robert Crump .

JAMES ANDERTON . I am shopman to Mr. Robert Crump . I put a copper boiler in the street, opposite our window, on the 9th of October - I was out at different times; I saw it safe about six o'clock that evening - I saw it again at the watch-house on the following Monday.

SAMUEL GROUT . I am the patrol. I stopped the prisoner about ten o'clock on the evening of the 9th of October, with this copper on his shoulder. I asked him where he was going; he said to Paddington, that he had moved all his things but this copper, and he was carrying it himself, as it was expensive to hire a person to carry it; a woman was with him, carrying his hat - she went away. I took him at the end of Charlton-street; two or three hundred yards from the prosecutor's house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked by a lady if I saw a person who had been carrying a copper; she said she had given him 1 s. to get some refreshment, and did not know what was become of him; she then asked me if I would carry it; she then spoke to the man who keeps the gate in Judd-street, and he let us through, and then the watchman came and took me.

GUILTY. Aged 88.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-42

1296. ROBERT CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a saddle, value 10 s.; two bridles, value 10 s., and a pair of reins, value 4 s. , the goods of John Allen .

JOHN ALLEN . I keep a nursery in the King's-road. I missed a saddle, two bridles, and a pair of reins on the 19th of September: I had left them in the care of Mr. Kirkham.

THOMAS PACE . On Monday, the 20th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, as I was going along Peter-street, Westminster, I saw the prisoner in Duck-lane with a bag, which appeared very wet - I asked what was in the bag - he made no answer: I asked a second time, and he said it was his own property. I saw the plated harness shining through a hole in the bag, and said I thought it was not his, and took him to the watch-house. I found the harness in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to look for work. I went into some fields, and saw a bag in a ditch, with the harness in it - I went about to see if anybody would own it; the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241028-43

1297. THOMAS COOLNAY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a gown, value 20 s. , the goods of Mary Mead .

GEORGE RICHARDSON . I keep the White Hart, public-house, Clifton-street. On the 18th of October, in the afternoon, as I was coming in with my pots I saw the prisoner coming down the stairs; he went into the yard - I followed him; he turned round and came out again: I stopped him, and saw the gown under his apron; I opened the parlour door, and said,

"I have got a thief;" he said a girl had given it to him; I called my servant, and he said she was not the girl.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a seal skin manufacturer. I was at Richardson's house, in the parlour; he opened the door, and said,

"Collins, I have got a thief;" he had the prisoner in one hand, and the gown in the other. He left the prisoner with me while he went for an officer - he said the servant gave it to him: we called her, and she denied it.

MARY MEAD . I was in the service of Mr. Richardson on the 18th of October; my master called me, and showed me this gown - I had had it on the day before, and left it in my room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked the girl to lend me 1 s. - she said she had no money; I said,

"Could you not ask your master for some - she said she did not like, but if I would go to her room at the top of the house I might take one gown, and bring it to her again in a day or two.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-44

1298. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 6 lbs. of tea, value 48 s.; 3 lbs. of coffee, value 10 s., and 6 lbs. of sugar, value 5 s. , the goods of George Davis .

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a tea-dealer , and live in Queen's buildings, Knightsbridge. I saw the prisoner in my shop on the 16th of September; he said Mr. Thomas Gold , of the Cambden Arms, public-house, had given him an order for grocery, and if I would give him part of the profit he would give it to me - I agreed to do so, and sent it by my young man, with orders to bring back the money, or the goods.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You gave credit to the representation of the prisoner, and agreed to let him have part of the profit - A. Yes; I sent the goods by my young man. I made out but one bill of parcel, and that was in the name of Mr. Gold. I did not say that the payment did not matter for a day or two.

GEORGE HURST . I am shopman to Mr. Davis. The prisoner came to our shop; Mr. Davis gave me a parcel to take to the house of Mr. Gold - when we got near the house the prisoner took the parcel, and told me to wait for his coming out, but as he did not come I went in, and asked if he had been there; they said No: I then went down a lane, but could not find him.

ABRAHAM HOUTON . I am a patrol. I received information of this on the 17th of September: the prisoner was soon afterwards taken into custody. I produce the tea and sugar.

THOMAS CLEMENT GOLD . I keep the Cambden Arms, Kensington. I saw the prisoner at Queen-square, but never before.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Davis gave me credit to sell the goods in the course of a few days, and return him the money.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-45

1299. HENRY HALL was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , twenty-four yards of silk, value 5 s. , the goods of Ann Sharman , spinster.

The Prosecutrix's name being Ann Alice Sharman , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18241028-46

1300. WILLIAM KEYS was indicted for bigamy .

HANNAH ANDERSON . My name was Gaskins. The prisoner was married to Martha Anderson at Stony Stratford, on the 25th of December, 1816; they lived together as man and wife there - I was present at their marriage, and signed my name to the book. I have seen her just this moment.

RICHARD ANDERSON . I know the prisoner - he married my sister; they lived together as man and wife sometime, and then separated, but I do not know why: it was about three months after their marriage; there was some property left my sister, but it was not on that account that she came to town.

SARAH ASLING . I became acquainted with the prisoner at Newark: he described himself as a batchelor, and married me there on the 12th of October, 1820 . I have a son by him: he left me at Lincoln, chargeable to the parish.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-47

1301. JAMES FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a jacket, value 10 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a bricklayer . I lost a jacket about three weeks ago; I had it in the morning about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock; I pulled it off to load some scaffolding, and put it on some stones in Mr. Stratwood's yard, and left it while I went a short distance, to put some more poles in the cart - I was absent about ten minutes when I heard it was stolen; some persons were running, who cried

"Smith, here is the man:" they had got the prisoner, who they charged as the thief.

JOHN DAVIS . I saw Smith put his jacket on the stones in the yard - I saw the prisoner go in and take it, and come out with it; I went to him, and he threw it down on the stones - my master took hold of him by the collar.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-48

1302. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing

on the 16th of September , two sedan chair poles, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Brown .

RICHARD BROWN . I am a chairman; I have a sedan chair and two poles: I missed the poles on Thursday, the 16th of September, about eleven o'clock; I had seen them about four days before. They have a mark on them, by which I know them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you know a person of the name of Munro - A. Yes; the prisoner had been a partner with him, and was forced to give up in consequence of a sprained leg. My poles were at the Albany; there was another old chair by the side of mine, which had not been used for some time. I do not know that it belonged to Munro; it had been standing there ever since I knew the place. I have been working with Munro within the last twelve months.

JOHN CROSSLEY . I am a painter. I was at work in the Albany, and saw the prisoner go through there with the two poles; he went into Piccadilly - that is all I know.

Cross-examined. Q. This was between ten and eleven o'clock, in broad day light - A. Yes.

JOHN DORSETT . I live at New Brompton; my chair stands at the Duggin Arms, public-house. I bought these poles of the prisoner, for 7 s., one Thursday, about six weeks ago; he said they were his own, but did not say who he bought them of.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner as working a sedan chair for some years - A. Yes. I saw him first on this business one Monday; he asked me to buy a pair of poles - I said I had no money. He came a few days afterwards, and left them at my house, and then he came to me at the Duggin Arms: we walked together to my house, and I said to him,

"These poles are marked, are they your own;" he said,

"Yes, they are" - they were cracked, and I gave him 7 s. for them.

Prisoner's Defence. Munro and I are still partners in some poles; I did not know the difference between these and my own; we have two pairs of poles, which stand just behind the prosecutor's. My partner changed a pair of poles of ours with one King, and I did not know but these were them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-49

1303. RACHAEL BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing on the 23d of September , a gown value 16 s.; a shawl value 16 s.; a scarf value 1 s.; a ring value 5 s.; and a cap value 2 s. ; the goods of Thomas Dixcee , her master .

THOMAS DIXCEE . I live in Newman-street, the prisoner was in my service about six weeks - she left between the evening of the 22d of September, and the morning of the 23d. In consequence of some information I went to a waggon office, and watched a waggon from there to the Gloucester warehouse in Oxford-street; I waited there, and saw the prisoner come out with a man with a trunk and a box, which I knew to be hers; I told her I wanted to speak to her - I asked her how she could do what she had done; I then told Jones to do his duty, and he took her into custody.

CHARLES JONES . I am an officer. I was with the prosecutor at the Gloucester warehouse - I took the box and trunk. I found this ring and two duplicates on the person of the prisoner, and the scarf in her box.

JOHN FITCH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Stafford, St. John-street - this gown was pawned in the name of Ann Blackwell .

JAMES WALTER . I am shopman to Mr. Fothergill. I took a shawl in pawn of the prisoner; I am certain of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241028-50

1304. CHARLES CARR and SAMUEL DUPREE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a watch value 10 s.; four pieces of copper coin, value 4 d.; and three pieces of copper coin, value 1 1/2 d., the property of James Wood , from the person of Joseph Wood .

MARY WOOD . I am the wife of James Wood - I sent my son Joseph to Mr. Wadmore's for a watch, on Saturday, the 16th of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning.

JOSEPH WOOD . I am nearly ten years of age - I was sent by my mother to Mr. Wadmore's in Tottenham Court road for a watch; I saw the two prisoners in Kentish-town as I was coming back with the watch; I stopped at a place called Birmingham-walk , but not long - the watch was in a little bag with four penny pieces and three halfpence - the prisoners were with me while I stopped. Carr snatched the bag and they ran away; I went and told Mr. Peet; he went on horseback after them. I saw the property again on Sunday morning.

EDWARD PEET . I live in Crescent-mews. I was in a field near Highgate; on the 16th of October I saw the little boy and the two prisoners; I heard him cry out that he had lost his father's watch; I went to his assistance - I rode after the prisoners as far as Mansfield-wood - I could not get further with my horse, but I got off and saw them running; I saw two men and called Stop thief! - one man took hold of them; I came up and took them - I did not see the property till it was at Bow-street.

JOHN CONWAY . I saw Joseph Wood on the afternoon of the 16th of October; he said he had been robbed; I sent Kirby one way, and I went another. Kirby brought the prisoners to me, and Carr said, if we would go with him, he would show where the watch was - we went that night, but could not find it - it was found next morning.

THOMAS VENABLES . I was with Conway, and heard what Carr said.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I went with this little boy, and Mason gave the two prisoners into my custody.

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 14.

DUPREE - GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-51

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1305. JANE M'DONALD and MARY ANN SMITH were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Humphreys on the King's high-way, on the 18th of October, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a purse value 2 d., a half crown, thirteen shillings,

and two promissory notes, for payment of and value 1 l. his property.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS . I am guard to the Birmingham coach . On the 18th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going to my lodgings; I was perfectly sober; I had been off duty about two hours - I saw the prisoners together at this end of Goswell-street . Smith seized me round the waist and held me, put her hand into my left hand pocket, and took out my purse; it was done instantly; it contained two Birmingham 1 l. notes, and 15 s. 6 d. in silver - I felt my pocket, turned round, and seized her right hand. M'Donald was about ten yards from me; I asked Smith for my money - she said she had not got it; I wanted to look into her left hand - she would not let me; she put the purse between her legs and let it fall - I picked it up, and called the watchman. M'Donald tried several times to pull her from me, and tried to rescue her from the watchman. Smith bit my thumb several times - I gave them in charge - Brown was with me, and M'Donald had gone after him.

JOHN BROWN. I am the Birmingham coachman, and was with Humphreys - the prisoners were together, and both stopped him; Smith put her hand round his waist; I walked on about ten yards. M'Donald then came after me - I told her to go about her business - Humphreys called out that he was robbed; I went back and saw the purse on the ground - M'Donald tried to rescue Smith; but she was with me at the time the purse was taken.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I heard a call of watch, and went up and took Smith in charge - Humphreys said he was robbed of his purse which he produced. M'Donald endeavoured to rescue Smith.

THOMAS WATSON . I came out of an eating-house, and saw the purse drop from between Smith's legs.

SMITH'S Defence. As I came out of the eating-house, I saw the prosecutor with some females round him; he took hold of me, and asked if I would drink, and gave me 6 d. I was obliged to get from him, as he wanted to take indecent liberties with me - I called the watch as he would not leave me; he then gave me in charge; he pulled the purse out of his pocket.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence

M'DONALD - NOT GUILTY . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241028-52

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1306. EDWARD SYERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Maria Galyardo , on the King's highway, on the 24th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a handkerchief, value 2 d., a half crown, 1 s., and a sixpence , her property.

MARIA GALYARDO . Last Sunday night, about twelve o'clock, I was crossing Titchbourne-street into Coventry-street , with Mary Phillips , and accidentally dropped my handkerchief, containing this money - I stooped to pick it up, but the prisoner rushed before me and took it up. I held one corner of it; I do not know which got hold of it first - I held him by his sleeve, and asked him for it, but he ran away; he was stopped, and the handkerchief and money in it found on him; it was Phillips's handkerchief and money - we live together, and are in partnership; we have one common fund; she was present.

COURT. Then it should have been laid as your joint property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-53

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1307. HENRY VERNON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Philip Dare , on the King's highway, on the 8th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, part of a watch chain, value 1 s., and a seal, value 1 s. , his property.

PHILIP DARE . I am an inspector to the Chartered Gas Light Company , Brick Lane, and live in Church-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 8th of October, about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty in Goswell-street , about ten doors from Old-street, standing in the street looking at my lamps; a person rushed by me, and gave me a shove, and with that shove made a snatch at my seal and key; he came down from Old-street way, rather behind me; the shove and snatch were done both together - it rather pushed me to the left, but not to hurt me; the chain broke, and he ran off with the seal and three keys - he was brought back in about five minutes, and had been out of my sight as I did not follow him; the prisoner is the person who was brought back - but whether he snatched my watch I cannot say - I saw my property at Hatton-garden on the 11th of October.

JAMES MALLIN . I am a smith, and live in Ironmonger street. On the 8th of October, about a quarter past seven o'clock, I was in Goswell-street, talking to a friend, and saw the prisoner make a rush at the prosecutor, and run down a turning; I followed him till he was taken, which was in about three minutes, and never lost sight of him. Woodward stopped him when I was about a yard from him - he was taken back to the prosecutor, and detained. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM HOWLETT . I keep a millinery warehouse in Goswell-street. On the 8th of October I was standing near my door, talking to Mallin, and saw the prisoner rush against the prosecutor - he immediately ran away; we followed, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken. I was not two yards from him, and am certain of him. Several people were running behind, but none between us and him.

CHARLES WOODWARD . I am a labourer, and live in Attfield-street. I was returning from work, and at the corner of Baltic-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running violently towards me, and stopped him; nobody was running before him. The two last witnesses were within two yards of him. Next morning, about six o'clock, within a yard of the very spot where I took him I picked up a seal, three keys, and part of a watch chain, and gave them to the officer.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was on duty under Charterhouse-wall, and saw the prisoner on the opposite side of the way, and directly heard a cry of Stop thief! I instantly ran over, and pursued down the court, behind Mallin and Howlett, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped - I knew him before. I have the seals and keys.

WILLIAM MERRITT . I am a Bow-street patrol, and was with Waddington; he made a remark to me, and I

saw the prisoner. There was a cry of Stop thief! immediately; we pursued, and never lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was making the best of my way from Smithfield to Banner-street, and running through these courts, which have seven or eight turnings, leading to different parts.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241028-54

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1307. HENRY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , a looking-glass, value 8 l., the goods of William Rivett , in his dwelling-house .

MARY RIVETT . I am the daughter of William Rivett , who lives at No. 30, Crown-street , St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 30th of September, I was in the parlour behind the shop with my father, who is an upholsterer ; and saw a man take a looking glass. I alarmed my father who went out, and the prisoner was brought back with it - the shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long afterwards was he brought back - A. In three or four minutes. I never said it was a taller man. I did not see sufficient of him to say so; the glass was about three yards inside the door, but he was going out when I saw him.

WILLIAM RIVETT . I rent this house, it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 30th of September, at three o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting in the parlour behind the shop with my daughter; she said something and I ran into the street, and saw the prisoner thirty or forty yards off with the glass on his shoulder walking very leisurely. I ran and overtook him, looked at the glass and knew it. I secured him and brought him back in three or four minutes - it has my private mark on it; the selling price is eight guineas - it cost me 7 l. 14 s. and is quite new. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was it from the door - A. From three to six yards - it hung up; he had to go round several pieces of furniture to get at it. I asked how he came by it - he said it was given to him to carry by some person - it is too large to run with, it is 3 ft. 9 by 2 ft. 9.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am an officer. I was sent for and took the prisoner. I found a silver watch and 17 s. on him; the glass is not here.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you that a person gave it to him - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Sun-street, and saw John Smith , a carver and gilder, who used to live in Bath-street, City-road - he stood next door to the prosecutor's with this glass on his knee - he called me over, and said he had been fresh gilding a glass and could not carry it, it was so heavy, and asked me to carry it to Bishopsgate-street. I took it, and the prosecutor came and tapped me on the shoulder, and asked where I got it, I said a man gave it me to carry, and made no resistance - my friends have endeavoured to find Smith.

WILLIAM RIVETT re-examined. There was not time for any man to give it to him. I do not know Smith, I asked him the name of the person who gave it to him, he was perfectly silent.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury on account of his youth and character .

Reference Number: t18241028-55

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1310. JOHN PASSENGER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone , a watch, value 10 l., and two sovereigns, the property of Elizabeth Baldwyn , spinster , in the dwelling house of John Fisher .

ELIZABETH BALDWYN . I am housekeeper to Mr. John Fisher , who lives at No. 3, Dorset-square , St. Mary-le-bone. On Sunday, the 5th of September, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I went into the housekeeper's room. I had seen my watch, two sovereigns, and a sixpence, on the mantle piece four or five mornings before; I missed a sovereign, and went to the door to enquire who had taken it; but as I crossed the room I saw the prisoner rising from the end of the sofa, and said,

"I suppose it is you that has taken them?" he made no answer. I called Enock, and said,

"Here is a gentleman who I know nothing of," he asked him what he had got; he began to pull things out of his pocket. I saw the watch, a sovereign, and sixpence in his hand. A constable was sent for and he was secured. I had not missed the watch.

WILLIAM ENOCK . I am servant to Mr. Fisher. The housekeeper called me into her room, and said, there was a young gentleman who had been taking property; I asked him what he had done with it; he said it was in his pocket. I called in Buckeridge, who took him. I saw the prisoner take the watch out of his pocket, and saw the sovereign and sixpence on the table.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable. I was fetched, and stripped the prisoner to find the second sovereign, but could not: but after the second examintion I found a place in his jacket, which appeared as if something had been concealed in it.

Mrs. BALDWYN. Here is my watch, it is gold, and was given to me by a friend four years ago; it cost seventeen guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very hungry, and went down the area to take these things to buy victuals.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18241028-56

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1311. HENRY JOHN WALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , at St. Mary-le-bone , a tea-pot, value 4 l., the goods of Eliza Peters Washington Parker , widow , in her dwelling house .

ALITHEA EDWARDS. I am a servant to Mrs. Parker, a widow, who lives in Portland-place , Mary-le-bone. On the 1st of October I took the silver tea-pot into her bed room, at breakfast, and brought it down at half-past nine o'clock, on the tray, and left it on the shelf by the pantry door, down stairs. I went for the tea things in the evening and it was gone; I had left the tea leaves in it.

JOHN GREEN . I have been sixteen months in Mrs. Parker's service; her Christian names are Eliza Peters Washington. On Friday, the 1st of October, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went to look for the tea pot and it was missing. I had seen a man go up the area

steps, between half-past nine and ten o'clock that morning, but thought he had been to the house on business, and did not notice him. I afterwards saw the tea pot in the possession of Waddington.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Friday, the 1st of October, I was coming out of a house in Jerusalem-court, Clerkenwell, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner and another man coming along as fast as they could walk; their shoes were very muddy, it was a wet day; they were going towards Sutton-street: I was about one hundred and fifty yards off at one time, but got closer. I saw the prisoner look round after me; I went up to him, he had a blue apron round him; I laid hold of him, and the other immediately ran through Cross-street, into Wilderness-row. I found this silver tea pot in the prisoner's apron, wrapped in a handkerchief; there were tea leaves in it, and it appeared warm. I said,

"You have been a good way to get this, have not you?" he said it had been given to him, but did not say by whom; I said it was given you by your pall I suppose. I asked him a second time where he got it; he said he had picked it up.

Prisoner. I was passing down London-street, he laid hold of me, and said,

"What have you got?" I said I do not know, I picked it up; he took me into a public-house, and took me to Clerkenwell, by the Sessions-house, gave me a glass of gin, and said, if I would give him the property he would let me go - Witness. As we crossed Clerkenwell-green, a man asked me to go and have something to drink; I said

"No, I want nothing - but give it to this man," and he gave him some gin. I said nothing what ever about his giving me the tea pot.

ALITHEA EDWARDS. This is my mistress's tea pot, I have been in the habit of using it for fourteen years.

JOHN GREEN . It is all silver and worth above 4 l.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18241028-57

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1311. EDWARD WHITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , ten silver spoons, value 3 l., and a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Frederick Henley , in his dwelling house .

CHARLES FREDERICK HENLEY . I am a clerk in the Excise , and live in Barrosa-terrace, Cambridge-heath . On the 10th of October I was shaving myself in the back-room ground floor where I sleep, and heard a spoon gingling on the side board, in the front room; I ran into the room and saw a person escaping through the window; I opened the street door and pursued; he walked at first, till I cried

"Stop thief!" nobody else was running in that direction; I secured him, without losing sight of him, it was the prisoner; he threw this property out of his hat into Brett's face; there were six tea, two table, and two salt spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs.

EDWARD BRETT . I am a carpenter. On the 16th of October I was going to breakfast, and saw the prisoner running in a direction from Henley's house, about nine doors off, and never lost sight of him; when I came up to him, he took off his hat and threw the spoons into my face; I took hold of him.

GEORGE BLAKE . I am a constable. I was in my shop about twenty houses from Henley's, heard the cry of

"Stop thief!" ran out, and saw the prisoner running across the road from Henley's house. I was very near him when he pulled his hat off; and threw the plate at Brett; it was picked up and given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-58

1312. EDWARD HARRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Drew , spinster , in a certain open place, near the King's highway, on the 3d of October , at St. John, at Hackney , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a shawl, value 10 s.; an umbrella, value 7 s.; a purse, value 1 d.; a crown piece, two half-crowns, seven shillings, and a sixpence , her property.

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

SARAH DREW . I am a servant to Mr. Hale, a silk-manufacterer , who lives at No. 9, Wood-street, Spitalfields. On Monday, the 27th of September, his house was robbed, and on that day I saw a person come into the entrance of the door, before the robbery. I communicated this to the police officers; and Hanley directed me to go after the man, wherever I should see him. I accompanied Hanley and Attfield two days after the robbery, (on the 29th of October,) to a ground where there were a great many men, tossing half-pence. I saw one of the officers there put his hand on the shoulders of the prisoner at the bar, and say something to him, which I did not hear; my attention was directed to the prisoner. In consequence of that, I looked at him, and observed him particularly, and afterwards had some conversation with the officers about him. I did not know him before. I told the officers that he was not the person I had seen in my master's house; I saw him again half an hour afterwards in the same ground; the officer had taken me somewhere else in the interval; we returned again and saw the same man there; I observed him again as the other officer was talking to him then; and I think he said

"Kiddy, how came you here?" I was still of the same opinion that he was not the person I had seen at my master's house. On the Sunday afternoon following (the 3d of October) I went to Shoreditch-church to hear a charity sermon. I had a five shilling piece, two half crowns, eight shillings and a sixpence in my purse. I left the church soon after five o'clock, and gave one shilling to the charity, leaving seventeen shillings and sixpence in my purse. I had my umbrella and a shawl when; I came out of the Church, I saw the man whom I had seen in the entry of my master's house on the day it was robbed; he was outside the church-rails, holding the rails with both hands; the officer had desired me to follow him if I should see him; (he had not said so on the ground.) I followed the man a little way down Hackney-road, and then up a turning over into a field, over the canal, and then down a turning, and over the canal again, and up a turning which took me into the * London fields ; it was day light; I could see perfectly, it was very light; I kept the man in view at the way, and when I got into the London fields, the prisoner at the bar took me by the arm and asked me if I knew him; he came behind me; I looked at him and said -

"I do not know you Sir." I did know him very well, but said so from fear; I knew him from seeing him

in the ground; he then beckoned to another man who instantly came up to me, and instantly took hold of my other arm. I still saw the man going down the path of the field - the prisoner told the other man to put his hand over my mouth, that I should not halloo; he put it over my mouth, and held it tight - he had nothing in his hand, but when we got a yard or two further, the prisoner crammed some bay into my mouth, and said to the other man,

"Now hold your hand over this;" he did so, and the man whom I had been following, when he saw the other two holding me, crossed over and said,

"Oh, d - n her, make her take off her pattens, that she may go on faster." I put them off with my feet, each man holding me by the arm, and left them there - they walked me along as fast as they could to the end of the field, still holding me all the time, and when we came to the end of the field, they took me down a lane, with a hedge on each side; it leads down to a pond: as we went along the lane, the man who I had been following said,

"Oh! d - n her drag her down faster" - and when I came to the pond the prisoner at the bar took the umbrella out of my hand and my shawl off; he pulled out a rope about a yard and a half long from his pocket, and said

"I will hang her and she cannot swear against us then" - (the prisoner said so,) the man who held my other arm, told the prisoner to search me, to see what I had - he said

"Search her and see what she has" - the prisoner searched my pockets and took out my purse, which had the money I have mentioned in it, and I saw him put it into his left hand waistcoat pocket - and said

"D - n the b - g - rs they cannot swear to money" - then he (the prisoner) took hold of my shoulders, and the other man who held my arm, held my feet and they threw me over a rail; I rolled down into the pond; there was a great deal of water in the pond; every part of me except my head was in the pond; the man who I had been following, then said

"D - n her, poke her down under the water" - the prisoner said

"Oh! she won't rise any more."

* The witness often mentioned Hackney-fields, it is London-fields.

Q. Before you were thrown into the pond, did the man you had followed say anything - A. He came up to me and gave me a blow in the breast, and I fell back against the rail of the pond - I was thrown over the rails with force: when I was in the water, I heard one of them ask if my shawl was all silk; another said it was all silk; it was made with hard silk; another said

"We won't have anything that belongs to her, because there may be a mark on it, which the b - g - s can swear to" - the prisoner came to the edge of the rails and said

"Here goes," and threw the umbrella and shawl into the pond.

Q. What became of the hay - A. I pulled it out of my mouth in the pond. I heard one ask the other how much he had; another said 17 s. 6 d., and they said

"Now she is gone, we will go to the White Horse at Hackney and regale ourselves

"they went away. I remained in this situation for a minute or two after I heard their voices, fearing that if I came out too soon they would poke me into the water again, and then I crept out of the pond and sat by the edge of it. I heard two men talking, I peeped up to see who they were, and asked them to help me; they helped me over the rails - I was all wet up to my neck, and muddy. I asked them to take me home to my father - they said I had better go to an alehouse at the end of the field. I walked behind them to the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton public-house.

Q. What prevented your hallooing as you went along the field - A. The man held my mouth all the way with the hay in it. The landlord got me a coach, and I went to the office.

Q. Look at the prisoner attentively, and state whether you only believe, or whether you have any doubt of his person - A. No; I am positively sure of him - I described him to the officer.

Q. Had you an opportunity as you went along the field of seeing his features - A. I had. I saw him all the way along for twenty minutes I dare say. I was face to face to him when he drew the rope from his pocket. I have not the slightest doubt of his being the person. I afterwards saw the officers who had accompanied me to the ground, and communicated it to them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What time of day was it when you saw the man at your master's house - A. About eleven o'clock in the day - it was not the prisoner. I was not alarmed then; it was about four o'clock in the afternoon when the officers took me to the skettle ground; there were a good many men there. I always go to Shoreditch church. I did not see the prisoner when I came out of church - my way home was towards Bishopsgate-street.

Q. When you saw the person, did it not occur to you that it would be wise to take somebody with you - A. No, there was nobody there who knew the man but me. I knew none of the people about and said nothing to them; people were passing in the road - I did not ask for assistance there - the man walked as any one else would. I noticed his dress. I do not know the name of the lane which he turned down - it is a public lane and persons were passing. I was never there before - there was not a soul passing in the field at the time the two men had hold of my arm. I did not see any one pass me in the field where they took hold of me. I was in the pathway of the field when they took hold of me, but nobody was passing. I could not call out because I was alarmed, and the prisoner beckoned to the other, who instantly came up. I had not time to cry out. I had not presence of mind to call out, I was so alarmed. I pulled my arms to get from them, but they held me so fast I could not, and as soon as the other man came up, he put his hand over my mouth, and the hay was put in.

Q. Now mind what I ask you, did you not in your way to the pond pass several persons - A. No, I did not, not one. I have never said that I did pass persons.

Q. Did you not say at another place, when giving this account that if you had seen persons you would not have mentioned it, for they might have noticed you - A. No.

Q. Did you not say that if persons had passed they might have supposed you were walking arm-in-arm with the men - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that persons did pass you after the three men were in your view - A. No. I passed some houses - I could not call for help; the man's hand was over my mouth, and the hay in it. I must have seen persons if they had passed. I was alarmed when they caught me by the arm, but I should have seen if any person passed in the pathway; nobody did. My alarm continued

till I got to the pond. One side of the pond is open to a field - one side has a fence, and the other a hedge. I was thrown over the rails; it has rails along; I could have got under them. When the man said he would hang me I thought I should have died.

Q. Then the alarm increased I suppose - A. Yes. I did not lose my senses at all. I laid in the pond, and heard their conversation. I was holding by a piece of wood in the pond, to keep my head up.

Q. There was a part of the pond where they might have put you in without throwing you over the rails - A. No; the part that was open is in a field, not where we were; they could not put me in where we were without throwing me over. I have been to the pond since. I heard and remembered all they said. I have told this story at the office, and at Hick's-hall. I have not talked to my friends about it, for every time I think of it, it hurts my mind. I have not described the pond as 680 yards from the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton.

MR. LAW. Q. You have an impediment in your speech - A. I have.

COURT. Q. You have been asked why you did not communicate to people that you were going after the man; you was told if you saw him to watch where he went to - A. Yes; not to have him taken, I was to watch where he went, and the officer would make enquiry. The man saw me when I saw him in my master's entry.

JURY. Q. Can you state where you last saw anybody walking too and fro - A. By the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton; that is a great way from the pond.

JOHN BRADSHAW . I am a labourer in the East India Company's service. On Sunday afternoon, the 3d of October, about ten or twenty minutes after six o'clock, I was crossing the London-field, with Field; it was just getting dusk, and after we got across the field, and were right opposite the pond, I heard the call of a female in distress; she said,

"For God's sake gentlemen give me assistance, for I have been robbed by two men, and thrown into this pond;" Field jumped over the rails, assisted her up, and I helped her over into the pathway; it was the prosecutrix - she was in a dreadful state; the lower part of her was all covered with mud, and she was wet up to the breast; she was close to the edge of the pond, not in it. We took her to the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton, which I should think is nearly half a mile from the pond.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose she was agitated and alarmed - A. Yes. The fields are much frequented on a Sunday, but we had particularly remarked as we came along that we did not meet a single person, except two men, whom we met coming in a direction from the pond, towards the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton.

COURT. Q. Did you make any observation of these two men - A. Not at all; they were about a hundred yards from the pond. I should not know them again.

ELIAS JAMESON FIELD . I was in company with Bradshaw, crossing London-fields, and met two men within about seventy yards of the pond, coming towards the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton, in a direction from the pond. I went towards the pond, and heard a female crying out for assistance - I looked towards the voice, and saw the prosecutrix standing by the edge of the pond, wet up to her arm pits; her legs appeared to be muddy; we assisted her to the public-house.

COURT. Q. Before that did she propose to go elsewhere - A. She wished to go to her father to Wood-street, Spitalfields.

SARAH DREW re-examined. The person is not my father, but acts as such, as I have not a friend in the world; I call him father.

CHARLES ROGERS . I keep the Shoulder of Mutton and Cat, London-fields. On the 3d of October, between ten and twenty-five minutes past six o'clock in the evening, Field and Bradshaw brought the prosecutrix to my house - she complained of having been robbed, and thrown into the pond. I got a coach, by her desire, to take her to Worship-street Office.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 29th of September I accompanied the prosecutrix with Hanley, to a ground behind the Princess of Wales, public-house, in Wentworth-street, to see if she could identify any person who she had seen about her master's premises on the day they were robbed; there were thirty or forty persons there; she looked about, and I saw a person there whom I knew very well; and while she was looking I went up to the prisoner, whom I knew - I put my hand on his shoulder, and said,

"Ah! Kiddy, what brings you here?" the prosecutrix could hear that. I told him I understood he was in constant employ now; he turned on his heels, and made some observation, which I did not hear. The prosecutrix recognized nobody there. We came out of the ground, and went to the City of Norwich, public-house, Wentworth-street, for the same purpose, and in consequence of somebody I saw there we returned with the prosecutrix to this ground again - we had been absent three or four minutes. I did not myself observe the prisoner there when we returned: we remained there two or three minutes; this was on Wednesday. I saw her again on Sunday night, the 3d of October, at Garton's house, about half-past seven o'clock - she complained of being robbed by three persons, and gave me information, which led us to apprehend the prisoner - Hanley took him at the Princess of Wales, (behind which is the ground we took the prosecutrix to) on Monday, the 4th of October. On Tuesday I went with Joshua Armstrong to the pond, expecting to find the pattens, but Wood produced them, and gave them to me after marking them. I have one and Armstrong the other.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know George-street, where it is said that the prisoner lived - A. I know George-street, Brick-lane; I should think it is a mile and a half from the pond, or it may be more.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went with Attfield and the prosecutrix to the ground behind the Princess of Wales, public-house, on the 29th of September - I saw the prisoner there and spoke to him, and called the prosecutrix's attention to his person; were-turned to the ground in a quarter of an hour, and I again called her attention to him. I was in conversation with him, and am certain that she saw him - she did not know him. We were in search of a person suspected of robbing her master. We directed her in case she saw the man suspected to watch his motions to see where he went to, and to come

to the office and give information. On Monday morning, the 4th of October, about eleven o'clock, four officers besides myself went to this gambling ground. I saw a woman run out of a house in a direction towards the Princess of Wales - I ran after her; she ran in at the corner door of the public-house; I went in at another door in Wentworth-street; one man ran out past me, and the prisoner followed him. I said,

"Stop Harris, I want to speak to you;" I laid hold him, and sat him down on a bench, and in two or three minutes Gleed and Attfield, the other officers came to my assistance. I told the prisoner I apprehended him on suspicion of robbing and ill-treating a woman in London fields, the evening before; he said,

"It is very hard, let what will be done amiss, I am sure to be charged with it;" I took him away; he went very quietly. On Saturday, the 9th of October, I accompanied the prosecutrix to the London-fields; I measured the distance of the pond from the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton - it is three furlongs and six yards.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you took him and he complained to you, did he not add

"I was at home all yesterday afternoon" - A. He did say so in the course of the day, but not at that time; he mentioned it at the office.

Q. Did he not mention it as he went along - A. We had another prisoner to take, and he said nothing to me going along. Vann and Armstrong had him; to the best of my recollection the first time I heard him say he was at home was at the office, in the course of the same day. I searched his house next day; he lived in Carter's-rents I think - George-street is just by the Princess of Wales; his house is a quarter of a mile or more from there; I know of no other George-street. I cannot exactly recollect the name of the place he lives in - I should think it is half a mile from Shoreditch church, & from there to the pond is one mile, four furlongs, and two hundred and nine yards. I think it is above two miles from where he lives to the pond. The prosecutrix gave me the shawl and the umbrella.

SARAH DREW . While I was in the pond I reached my umbrella and shawl out, and took them home.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 5th of October, I went with Attfield to the pond in the London-fields, and received a patten from Wood, which I produce. I was present when the prosecutrix charged the prisoner with this offence; he said,

"I can prove where I was; I was at home in bed yesterday from two o'clock in the afternoon till eight in the evening."

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What did he say - A. That he was at home in bed from two o'clock till eight. I took it down in writing at the time. I am sure he said he was in bed.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was in company with Armstrong when the prisoner said he was at home in bed from two o'clock till eight. I produce a rope which I received from Streeton.

JOHN STREETON . I am a gardener, and live in London-fields, Hackney. On the 20th of October I was pruning the black currant trees in my garden, which is about eight yards from the pathway in the London-fields, and sixty or seventy yards from the pond, I found a piece of rope among the black currant trees, and gave it to Vann at the office. I had cut the trees three weeks or a month before, the rope was not there then.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I received a rope from Stretton, and took it to the prosecutrix; I desired her to describe it before she saw it, which she did - her description agreed with it all but one end - she said it was unplatted at one end, and it was unplatted at both ends; she said she thought it was only unplatted at one end.

EDWARD WOOD . I am a cow keeper, and live at Dalston. On Sunday night, the 3d of October, about twenty-five minutes after six o'clock, I was in London-fields, and picked up a pair of pattens by the side of the footpath, leading from Dalston to the Cat and Shoulder of Mutton, about two hundred and forty yards from the pond - I took them home. I went to the pond when it was being emptied, and from what the officers said I went home for the pattens, and gave them to them.

SARAH DREW . The pattens are mine - the place where they were found is where I put them off.

JOHN BRADSHAW . The prosecutrix had her shawl and umbrella when I relieved her. I did not notice whether they were wet.

ELIAS JAMESON FIELD . I did not notice whether they were wet.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day she was robbed I was at home.

JURY to JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . Q. Where were you when you heard him say he could prove he was at home on the day of the robbery - A. At Worship-street office.

JURY to SARAH DREW . Q. Was your bonnet thrown off your head - A. No; it was wet at each end; I can shew the marks upon it now,

(producing it.)

Witness for the Defence.

ELIZA HARRIS . I am the prisoner's daughter; he lived in George-street, by Hanbury's brewhouse. I have a mother, a brother, and a sister - my sister does not live at home. I live with Mrs. Walker, in Carter's-rents. I heard of my father being taken up on the Monday morning.

Q. Now on the Sunday before that did you go to buy any apples - A. Yes; it was within five minutes of six o'clock - I had been taking a walk, and went to Mr. Marshall's in George-street to buy the apples; he lives three or four doors from my father, on the other side of the way, nearly opposite. I saw my father as I passed his (my father's) window; I saw him at the window in his shirt sleeves, with his hands leaning on something, taking something out of the window.

Q. He was taking something out of the window - A. Yes; his hand was on the rail; the window was open. I came Brick-lane way, and looked at Hanbury's clock, and it wanted five minutes to six.

MR. LAW. Q. How long had you been out walking - A. Ever since half-past two o'clock; I was alone all the time; I started from Mrs. Walker's, and went to Spitalfields Church, and stopped there about an hour and half, and walked round Shoreditch, up Bethnal-green road and down Whitechapel, and did not go home, but went by my father's window to buy the apples; my father's is about three doors from Marshall's, on the other side of the way.

Q. Had you not passed any other apple shop in your walk - A. I do not know, I generally buy my apples there

I only bought one penny worth, Mr. Marshall served me. Mrs. Walker was at home; she lives not many minutes walk from my father's.

Q. When you came from Spitalfields Church and along Whitechapel, would it be the nearest way home to go by your father's - A. No, it was out of my way; I went for the apples; I did not call at my father's; I had seen none of my father's family that day; I saw them two or three days before; I did not call to know how they did.

Q. Did you see your brother - A. I did not see any of them; my sister lived with me at Mrs. Walker's, but she had dined at my father's that day; they dine about one o'clock; I did not call for her; I do not know at what time she came home; Walker is a weaveress; I work and lodge there.

Q. How soon after you took your walk, did you see your sister - A. She came up at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - I met her in Brick-lane by accident; I was then going to Spitalfields Church.

Q. How much of the service was over when you got there - A. I cannot tell; I did not take notice whether the sermon had began or not - when I met my sister I said I was going there - she did not say where she was going: I did not see her after that, till she came to bed at ten o'clock.

Q. What time did you get home to Walker's - A. I was up there two or three times after I bought the apples: I went and sat on the steps of Walker's door till near nine o'clock - I got there just after six - I went straight back from Marshall's, and sat on the steps for three hours.

Q. Did you see your sister come in during that time - A. No; my brother lives at home.

COURT. Q. You said you went up to Walker's two or three times; and now you say you sat on the steps three hours - A. I got up, but was not off the steps two minutes; I only went up stairs - I continued on the steps from six o'clock till I went to bed. Spitalfields Church is not far from Walker's; Brick-lane is just at the end of the street.

Q. What were you doing from two o'clock till half-past three - A. Walking up and down Brick-lane. I think church was over about half-past four; there was a sermon I am sure.

MR. LAW. Q. Did Mrs. Walker go with you - A. No, she was at home all the evening, up stairs from six o'clock to nine.

Q. Had you left the steps when your sister came home - A. I was up stairs then, and in my own room I believe; she slept in the same bed as me. I went up for good to bed, at ten o'clock; I do not know at what time she came up.

Q. Did you get to church at prayer time, or sermon time - A. They were not at prayers, they were preaching all the time.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What garment did the clergyman wear, black or white - A. White; I do not know whether he changed it while I was there, for I sat behind in the gallery, and could scarcely see it.

COURT. Q. You can read I suppose - A. No. I can tell the time, it is now not quite twenty minutes to four. I cannot tell what the clergyman talked about, I cannot tell what he said at all; they sang once, as we came away, after sermon. My father generally goes to bed on Sunday afternoons - he was up at five minutes to six.

Q. Had he his waistcoat on - A. I could see nothing but his shirt; he was not very well. I do not know what had been the matter with him; he is a last and patten maker.

RICHARD MARSHALL . I live a few doors down the street, nearly opposite to Harris - his daughter Eliza often comes to my shop - I saw her on the Sunday before the prisoner was taken up: it was as near as I can say about five minutes before six o'clock, she bought one pennyworth of apples - I had not seen Harris that afternoon.

MR. LAW. Q. How did you know the time - A. I heard the clock strike a few minutes after; I was asking what o'clock it was, and soon after heard it strike; I asked because I wanted to know the time - I asked some people who were passing just before she came; nobody was at home with me.

EDWARD HARRIS , JUN. I am turned eleven years old, and work at winding silk. I cannot read or write. I go to Spitalfields church, and I can say my prayers - persons who speak false go to the wicked man - (sworn.) I remember my father being taken up on the Monday morning.

Q. Where was he on the Sunday afternoon - A. Why, my father was taken very bad, and obliged to lay down, and my mother told me to go to chapel after dinner; we dined a little after one o'clock; my father was taken bad about two. I went to chapel alone - it is at the corner of Wood-street; the service had began when I got there - the minister had a black gown on. I came out of chapel between five and six o'clock, and went straight home; my father was then at tea with my mother - nobody else was there; my father sat by the fire after tea till 8 o'clock and then told me to go to bed; we have got no clock, we go by Mr. Hanbury's clock - I heard it strike eight when I went to bed - my father was then in the room, and had been so from tea time. I suppose it was half-past five when we had tea.

Q. Are you sure that from the time you had tea till you went to bed your father was never out of the room - A. Yes. He had only his breeches, shirt, and waistcoat on at tea time.

MR. LAW. Q. He had got a violent cold - A. Yes; he sat in his shirt till I went to bed, without coat or waistcoat. It was Spitalfields church that I went to that afternoon. I did not see either of my sisters there. My sister Ann dined at my father's that day; I do not know what became of her - I went to church alone at two o'clock, and got there about ten minutes after two. The gentleman was in a black gown; church lasted till a little after five.

COURT. Q. Is the chapel in Wood-street what you call Spitalfields church - A. Yes; it is a chapel at the corner of Wood-street.

Q. There are no prayers there as there are at Spitalfields church - A. No.

Q. Did you go to Spitalfields church also - A. No; it is at the corner of Wood-street.

A JUROR. The chapel at the corner of Wood-street is shut up, and I believe is used with Hanbury's brew-house.

Q. What is the chapel called - A. It is called Spitalfields

church; the place I went to is not where there is a steeple and bells; they would not let me in there. I went to the chapel at the corner of Wood-street; it is near Hanbury's brewhouse; I do not know the name of the other street at which it is at the corner of. There is a chapel near there which has been shut up, but this is another.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you go to more than one church or chapel that afternoon - A. No; they call it Spitalfields church - it is not very large; I staid till service was over, and then went home.

JURY. Q. Can you from the chapel see a very large building - A. Yes, some large houses.

COURT. Q. Your father was taken ill unexpectedly; it is not usual for him to be ill of a Sunday - A. No. He does not go to church or chapel; he breakfasts in bed, and gets up about ten o'clock on Sundays, and dines with us.

Q. Then takes a walk and come homes to tea does he - A. Yes. I never knew him go to bed before on a Sunday afternoon. The bed is in the same room as we sit in. I saw my sister Ann after dinner, about eight o'clock, when I was going to bed, but not before.

ANN HARRIS . I am the prisoner's daughter. On the Sunday before he was taken up, I dined with him about one o'clock - my mother and brother dined with us; I staid there till three o'clock, and then went home to clean myself at Walker's, and then returned to my father's - my brother was told to go to chapel - I believe it was to Spitalfields chapel; when I returned from Walker's about half-past four o'clock, my father was asleep in bed, in the sitting room; he had his breeches on, but his coat and waistcoat were off - I then went to take a walk; I did not meet any of the family in my walk; I walked round Bethnal-green-road, and then back to Mrs. Walker's - I got there between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. Did you walk from the time you left your father's till between nine and ten o'clock - A. Yes; I was out three or four hours; and when I got back to Walker's, my sister was sitting on the step of the door - I went to bed about half-past ten. Spitalfields chapel is at the corner of Wood-street; I was never there - there is a chapel by the brew-house, which is shut up; it is in St. John-street - there is a chapel besides that, which is called Spitalfields chapel, you can see the church from it.

MR. LAW. Q. Had your father a violent cold that day - A. I think he had; he was very ill I know - I left his house about half-past four o'clock, and walked till half-past nine o'clock - I went up Bethnal-green-road, round Hackney; by the Jews chapel in Hackney-fields; down Hackney-road, and Shoreditch, towards home.

COURT. Q. Do you always spend your Sundays with your father - A. Not always - he often laid down after dinner - my brother lived at home, and was there more than me.

JURY. Q. You left your father's at half-past three o'clock, and returned at half-past four - now recollect well: during that time did you meet your sister - A. No; not till night, when I went home; I did not see her after leaving home before dinner till night - I think she was gone out when I went to clean myself.

THOMAS YARDLEY . I know the prisoner by sight - but am not intimate with him. I live at No. 1, George-street, and he lives right opposite - I can see his house from mine - I heard of his being taken up on the Friday; on the Sunday before that Friday I was at home all the afternoon, and went to my window about five o'clock or a quarter past, and saw Harris - I suppose it was him, but do not swear it; I saw a man who appeared as if he had just come off the bed, as his waistcoat and coat were off; he was in Harris's room; I believe him to be the man - I called my wife, and Norwood, my apprentice to the window.

Q. What made you call them to the window - A He being a notorious character, a fighting man. I called my wife and apprentice to the window, for the express purpose of seeing him - there had been something between him and my brother; I knew his person. I afterwards went to Newgate of my own accord, to see if I could identify him as the man I had seen at the window.

MR. ALLEY. Q. As you were not acquainted, what induced you to go to Newgate to look after the man - A. I mentioned it at the public-house; and hearing the case was a bad one, I thought I had better go. My house is about three quarters of a mile from Shoreditch church; I went to live there on the Sunday before. I had seen him before, but never in that house till the Sunday. I have heard people in the parish say that he was a noted boxer - I should not have known him if I had met him in the street; I will not swear that he is the man.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you believe him to be the man you saw at the window - A. Yes; I heard he was charged with committing a robbery about six o'clock, and believing I had seen him at that time, I went to Newgate to ascertain whether he was the man or not.

- YARDLEY. I am the wife of the last witness. I heard of Harris being taken up on the Monday - I had seen him on the Sunday about half-past five o'clock or twenty minutes to six. I was at our window, and he was at his window, in his shirt sleeves; he is the man - Norwood was there.

COURT. Q. Have you known him long - A. I never knew him before - my husband pointed him out to me; he said that was Kiddy Harris, the man who his brother was going to fight some time ago; his window was open; it is on the first floor - not even with the street. Our window was also open - it is a narrow street; three carts could not pass in it - nobody was at the window with him; I had seen him before, but never knew him by name.

JAMES NORWOOD . I know the prisoner by sight - I heard of his being taken up on Monday morning. On the Sunday before that I was sitting at Yardley's window about half-past five o'clock or twenty minutes to six, and saw him - master and mistress had been looking at him; I think he is the man, but should not like to swear it.

COURT. Q. You heard of his being taken up on the Monday morning - A. Yes; my master told me of it on the Monday morning; it was the next morning after I had seen him at the window.

JOHN JONES . I live at No. 4, Great George-street. My brother lived on the ground floor in the same house as the prisoner. I heard of his being taken up on the morning of the 4th of October; I had been to chapel on the Sunday at two o'clock; and after chapel I went round Brick-lane,

and then to my brother's; I got there about half-past five o'clock; looked in at the window, and saw Harris looking out of the window; he had no coat nor hat on. I went in and staid at my brother's till half-past six o'clock; the door of the room opens into the passage. I did not see the prisoner come down; I did not see him come down stairs; he could have gone out without my hearing him,

MR. LAW. Q. What chapel did you go to - A. The Sunday school at Bethnal-green chapel, in Spicer-street; the prisoner was leaning out of the window; it was open; I think he had a light waistcoat on; but cannot say - I am upon liking to my brother who make weaver's shuttles - there is no railing outside the house; nor in front of the first floor window - I had dined with my brother at half-past one o'clock.

ESTHER JONES . I am sister-in-law to the last witness - I and my husband live on the ground floor of the house. Harris has the first floor; no other man lives on that floor; he has been there nearly six months. I was at home on Monday when he was taken up; Jones dined with me on the Sunday before that; he went out about two o'clock, and returned at a quarter or twenty minutes past five to tea, and staid there till chapel time. I did not see the prisoner come down stairs all day; I could not see him unless my room door was open; it was not open; I was at home all day.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Reference Number: t18241028-59

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1313. THOMAS ROBINSON was indicted for stealing on the 24th of June , a pair of boots, value 24 s., three sovereigns, four half-crowns, and six shillings , the property of Richard Horne .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-60

1314. EDWARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , half an ounce of silver gilt with gold, value 8 s. 6 d.; thirty-four ounces of silver, value 8 l.; and two melting pots, value 6 d. ; the goods of Augustus Brown and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

BARWELL BROWN. I am in partnership with Augustus Brown and others; we are refiners and melters , and live in Wood-street - we missed property from time to time; the prisoner was in our service, but was dismissed a fortnight before we made this discovery, not having any occasion for him.

MARIA ROBERTS . The prisoner lodged with me. Hawkin's came and searched a box which I had lent him for the last twelve months, to put his clothes in.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. Last Tuesday week I searched a box at Roberts's house; I broke it open, and found two melting pots, thirty-five ounces of silver wire points; a lump of silver, weighing ten ounces, and some scrapings - all wrapped in a parcel of brown paper.

Mr. BROWN. These are our property. The melting pots we imported from Germany - we put them into the fire to kneel them, as we call it; and that turns them red; the silver is ours - we missed it all while the prisoner was with us - the wire tallies with the drawing machine - I had a very good opinion of him.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-61

1315. GEORGE SEAGER was indicted for stealing on the 11th of October , eleven quires of paper, called inside pot, value 5 s. , the goods of Edmond Richard Ball .

THOMAS ADAMS . I am servant to Edmond Richard Ball , stationer , Minories. On the 11th of October, I was in the shop, and heard a noise at the door; I ran out and saw the prisoner crossing the road with this paper under his arm, which I had placed near the door; he sat down on a street door, and put it behind him - but seeing me, he got up and ran off, leaving it there - I pursued and brought him back; the prisoner was brought into the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running on an errand; the gentleman took hold of me, and found the paper on the step; he said the boy who took it had run off, but that I was with him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-62

1316. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN HAYN . I am a wine merchant . The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money on my account. On the 2d of October, I sent him with a cask of spruce beer to Mr. Ransom, with a bill and receipt - he said Mr. Ransom had not paid him. I sent him on the 4th with another cask, he returned and said he had not paid him; each cask came to 19 s. On the Thursday he was going that way, and I told him to take Ransom's bill, but he absconded, and next day wrote me a letter, which I produce; it is in his writing; before that he had denied receiving the money; he owes me about two pounds.

Prisoner. Q. Is this your letter - (producing one). - A. This is the answer I sent.

The letters were here read: - that from the prisoner stated that he had been robbed of the money, and stated an account, by which he made 19 s. 11 d. due to the prosecutor. The prosecutor's letter desired the prisoner to call at half-past ten o'clock, and if he could satisfy him of his having been robbed he should not proceed, but if not he should advertise him.

ABRAHAM RANSOM . On the 4th of October I paid the prisoner 19 s., on account of Mr. Hayn; there were two half-crowns, a shilling and a sixpence among it.

Prisoner's Defence. On my return home my master was gone to bed - a person took me to the King of Denmark public-house, in the Old-Bailey, to get a bed; there was a crowd round the door - the man told me to push through them, and when I got in, he was gone with my money, except 3 s. 6 d. I went home in the afternoon and told my master I had had my pocket picked; but did not say it was his money.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18241028-63

1317. JOHN WRIGHT was again indicted for a like offence .

MR. HAYN. On the 2d of October I sent him to Ransom with a cask of spruce - he rang the bell at four o'clock in the morning, and on Monday I asked him if Ransom had paid him; he said No, and told a long tale about having had his pocket picked.

ABRAHAM RANSOM . On the 2d of October, I paid the prisoner 19 s., on account of his master.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-64

1318. RICHARD JOHNSON was indicted for killing and slaying John Appleyard .

JAMES DAVIS . I am a clerk to Messrs. Hall and Co., brewers. On the 16th of October, about six o'clock in the evening I was with their dray at the Red-Hart, Shoe-lane , delivering beer; the horses' heads were towards Fleet-street; the dray was drawn up on the near side; two men were letting down two barrels - the prisoner drove a waggon up, with four horses, from Fleet-street - he stopped the horses and called out that he wanted to pass; I said I thought there was not room to pass - he said he must pass immediately. I told him repeatedly that there was not room, but he drove on until the waggon got entangled with our dray, and drew it backwards till it came near to a post at the corner of Stonecutter-street . I had seen the deceased standing against that post just before; I stepped forward to take him out of the way, but before I could reach him the dray forced him against the post, and he fell backwards with his head towards Stonecutter-street - he was not in the road; I think it was impossible for the prisoner to have seen him before he was hurt - an alarm was given, and he stopped directly.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was your dray close to the curb - A. I cannot say; we cannot sometimes let beer down if it is - I told him he should pass in five minutes, as the barrel was then hanging by the rope.

GEORGE LARGE . I am one of the draymen. We had two casks to deliver - I cannot say whether the dray was close to the pavement; I said I would make room as soon as I had put the beer down - but the prisoner drove on; there was hardly room, and his wheels caught the dray - he stopped, and did not know what to do; the waggon pushed the dray along about five or six yards. I did not see the man knocked down it was quite dark. I heard him complain of his being hurt, but had not seen him by the post.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you move to give him room - A. No; he could not see the man at the post.

RICHARD WALPOLE . I am shopman to an oilman who lives in Shoe-lane. I saw the prisoner driving the waggon - he asked them to let him pass; he waited two or three minutes, then went on, and got entangled with the front of the dray - some one called out that there was not room; he drew on to about the centre of the dray and got entangled more, and pulled the dray back about thirty feet - a man stood at the post behind the dray, which struck him against the post and broke his ribs - he fell on his back, and was picked up: he said he was not hurt so much as I might think. I saw him after his death, and knew him to be the man; Mr. Ray saw him. I think the prisoner must have seen that there was not room - after the dray was pulled about thirty feet, the street is about three feet wider. He could not see the man.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not used to drive - A. No. As soon as the man fell he came back, but understanding that he was not much hurt he went on.

JOHN CHURCH . I am a broker. I heard a noise, went to my door, and heard somebody say,

"There is not room to pass." I found the waggon entangled with the dray; I went out, and saw the deceased standing up; he said he was not hurt so much as we might expect. I have seen a waggon pass a dray in the lane.

MR. SEPTIMUS WRAY . I am a surgeon. On the 16th I saw the deceased in bed, and found his side much injured, and several ribs broken; he lived till Monday evening. I opened him, and found several ribs broken, which caused his death.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to do the least injury.

- LACY. I am an engine turner. I was in Shoe-lane, and saw the dray; it was about nine inches from the curb; if it had been close there would have been room to pass, for the fore wheels did get by, but the hind ones caught. I heard some one say,

"You can pass," or

"there is room now," and I thought that there was room. I believe it was pure accident; he did not appear at all in an ill-humour.

COURT. Q. Did you hear persons say there was not room - A. Yes; but I thought the dray was moved a little for him to pass.

FREDERICK WILSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Shears, whom the prisoner drives for. I was passing Stonecutter-street at this time; he seemed drawing his horses on carefully to avoid the dray - the man fell and he stopped directly, and said he was extremely sorry - that the drayman would not move, and he was anxious to get on, and thought there was room. He had not whipped his horses - I saw him passing, and if I had thought there was danger I should have called to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-65

NEW COURT.

(2d Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1319. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , an image, value 2 s. , the goods of Benjamin Brookes .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241028-66

1320. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , twelve pairs of stockings, value 20 s. , the goods of Eliza Agnew , spinster .

ELIZA AGNEW . I live in Rupert-street, Haymarket . On the evening of the 25th of October I was up stairs: a little girl came into my shop, and called me, and as I came down I saw through a small window on the stairs a young man standing by the counter: he caught up a bundle of twelve pairs of stockings, and ran to the door, but, instantly returned, seeing Mr. Murray looking at him, through the window. I had got into the shop when he

came back, and he asked me what I would make him some shirts for. Mr. Murray came in, and said he had taken some stockings out of the window; he then ran out, but was pursued and brought back.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You do not know what had passed before you came down - A. No. I could not see who was outside the shop. I saw him take up the stockings and go out.

DAVID MURRAY . I was in Rupert-street on the 25th of October, and saw the prisoner enter this shop, pass his hand round the window, and take the stockings - he came out, and I met him, and stared him full in the face: he returned into the shop, and laid them on the counter; I saw him turn up his coat sleeves and show his wrist-band, and ask Miss Agnew some question - I then went into the shop, and said he ought to be taken up; he pushed by me and knocked off my hat, which Miss Agnew picked up. I pursued him, but lost sight of him; he was soon afterward brought back.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you passing the shop - A. Yes; it was seven o'clock in the evening; I did not see any other person there.

RICHARD HOWARD . I received the prisoner in charge from Sweet; he said he had done nothing but taken up the stockings and brought them to the door, and then put them down again on the counter. He asked forgiveness - he turned to an elderly gentleman who appeared to be a friend of the prosecutrix's and said he hoped he would look it over - he replied,

"Justice must be done."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he was in company with a young man - A. Yes, and that he took up the stockings and went to the door to bid him good night, then returned, and put them down.

GEORGE SWEET . I apprehended the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-67

1321. ANN WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , four caps, value 17 s. , the goods of Edward Jenkins .

SARAH JENKINS . I am the wife of Edward Jenkins - we live in the Commercial-road. The prisoner has lived servant with me twice; she was taken up on the 6th of October. Mrs. Headley brought me some caps.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She had lived with you before - A. Yes, and when she returned the last time she had scarcely any clothes upon her back, having been out of place some time. I sold her two caps - one for half-a-crown, and the other 2 s. Her wages were to be 6 l. per year.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CATHERINE HEADLEY . The prisoner came into my shop, and asked me to purchase some caps; I did not want them, but I bought them of her for 10 s. When I heard that Mrs. Jenkins had been robbed I went and gave them.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-68

1322. MARY WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s., and a spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Barnett .

ELIZABETH BARNETT . I am the wife of Thomas Barnett : we live in Adam and Eve-court, Oxford-street - the prisoner lodged on the same floor with me from April till July; she had access to my room. I missed a silver spoon and a handkerchief in May.

JAMES BASSET . I am assistant to Mr. Harrison, of Wardour-street. I produce a spoon and a handkerchief, which were pawned in the name of Ann Warren ; I do not recollect by whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-69

1323. MARY WARREN was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , two shirts, value 10 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of George Potter .

GEORGE POTTER . I live at the Grapes, public-house, Oxford-street, and am a goldsmith . I missed two shirts and a pair of stockings from my room; I had put them in a bundle on the 23d of August; I saw the shirts afterwards at the pawnbroker's - the prisoner told me where the others were.

THOMAS PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Adams, pawnbroker. A pair of stockings were pawned with us, and a shirt: the shirt was pawned by the prisoner. I do not know who pawned the stockings.

JAMES BASSETT . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison. A shirt was pawned at our shop, in the name of Ann Pearson . I do not recollect the prisoner's person.

Prisoner. I beg for Mercy; it is my first crime.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-70

1324. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a book, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Mason .

THOMAS MASON . I lost a volume of Shakespeare's plays on the 21st of September; I was not at home; my shop is No. 120, Holborn . I had seen it at one o'clock that day.

JOHN SMITH . I am fourteen years of age, and am in the service of Mr. Mason. On the 21st of September I saw the prisoner in the shop; he asked for Dryden's Virgil; I showed him one at 3 s.: he wanted one more handsomely bound; he said he wanted it directly. When I turned my head to see what the price was, I saw his hand on this volume of Shakespeare; and when I turned again it was gone. I then said

"Please Sir, will you stop till I knock for the person next door to come in and mind the shop while I go round to our other house;" he was then going away. I caught hold of his coat, and said,

"Stop a bit;" he then knocked me down, and ran up Holborn.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is it not a common thing to take books down and look at them - A. Yes. I never lost sight of him after he left the shop. I had seen a person standing outside when he put his hand on the book, but when he went out that person was gone. The prisoner was stopped at the top of King-street; no book was found upon him.

WILLIAM WOODS . I live next door to Mr. Mason. On the 21st of September Smith knocked; I went in to mind

the shop, and saw the prisoner just coming out at the door; Smith had hold of his coat; the prisoner knocked him almost down; I caught him. Smith told me to tell Mr. Gray, my master, and the prisoner ran up the street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner before he left the shop - A. Yes; but I lost sight of him afterwards.

THOMAS MOSES SALTER . I saw the prisoner on the 21st of September, in King-street, Holborn, running at a rapid rate. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw him strike a gentleman. I collared him; he resisted very much. There is a public-house near my shop, to which I took him, and he fought his way through the house to get out. I did not search him.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found no book, but two sixpences in silver, and some halfpence upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the shop to buy the book I asked for; the lad showed me one unbound; I walked round the shop, and looked at several books; he then asked me to wait while he went to his master's house - I said I had to fetch the money, as I had not enough about me, and I would call again; he came close to me. I did not strike him. I went up Holborn, and began to run, as I was in haste to send the book off to the country at two o'clock, and it was then past one. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went into a public-house to avoid the crowd. I never struck any one.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-71

Before Mr. Recorder.

1325. WILLIAM KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Poole .

CHARLES BRANNING . I am in the employ of Thomas Poole , haberdasher and hosier , No. 17, Clement's Inn . Last Saturday, about four o'clock, I was standing in the shop, and saw these stockings fall down; they had been hanging inside the door - I saw them as they fell, and saw the prisoner running away with them; I ran after him, and saw him throw them out of his hand; I picked them up, and pursued him - another person apprehended him. I lost sight of him for about a quarter of a minute, but am quite sure of his person.

SAMUEL LEEFLEY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Clare-street, Clare-market. I was in Clement's Inn, and saw the prisoner running with the stockings in his hand - he threw them down on his left side; I saw Branning pick them up. I pursued him, and when he saw that I must take him he threw himself into a nook of the dead wall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18241028-72

1326. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a saw, value 2 s., the goods of William Andrews ; and a square, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Fisher .

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a carpenter . I was at work at a building in Pentonville ; I left a saw there on Friday, the 10th of September - the door was locked; the other workmen went to dinner at twelve o'clock, and returned in about an hour; the door was still locked, but my saw was gone - the person must have got in at the window, by a ladder; there were several ladders about. A basket of tools was gone. I found the saw about three o'clock that afternoon, at a pawnbroker's in Old-street; it has no mark upon it. but I have used it for fifteen years, and cannot be mistaken in it; the prisoner is quite a stranger; he was taken on the Wednesday following, and I went to the office to look at some tools, which were not mine.

THOMAS FISHER . I was at work with Andrews, and left some tools in the house on Friday, the 10th of September, while we went to dinner - we returned at one o'clock, and several of my tools were gone, and a square among the rest. Those I lost were worth about 18 s. or 1 l. I have seen the square since at Mr. Capel's. There was a basket of other tools taken at the same time. The value of the whole was from 2 l. to 3 l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that there was a bricklayer's labourer who could swear to the person who took the tools, but he would not come without a summons - A. No.

WILLIAM PENNY . I live with Mr. Capel, pawnbroker, No. 98, Old-street. I was present when a saw and square were pawned at our shop, on Friday, the 10th of September, by the prisoner - I knew him as having pawned similar things before. I detained him on the Wednesday following, when he came to pawn another saw and square - those he pawned on Friday, the 10th, were claimed by Anderson and Fisher.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. I was sent for on the 15th to Capel's, where I found the prisoner; he had some carpenters' tools, which I have in my possession. Penny charged him with having pawned a saw and square four or five day before.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a carpenter, and have often used this pawnbroker's.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-73

1327. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , a coat, value 2 s. , the goods of William Adams .

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a cowkeeper , and live in Rutland-street, Stepney . On the 25th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning this coat was taken from my shop - I had seen it the night before. I found it again at the watch-house between nine and ten o'clock.

JOHN MAY . I am a sawyer and work close by Adams's house. I saw the prisoner about nine o'clock in the morning of the 25th of September, and another lurking about, and I watched them - the prisoner was two doors from Adams's house, and the other in front of the gate; the other nodded his head, and in about three minutes I saw the prisoner going from Adams's with the coat under his arm. I called out

"What are you going to do with that coat;" he ran away and dropped it, and was stopped by a plaisterer and taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that

you saw two persons run across the field but did not know who they were - A. I said the same then as I do now.

JOHN PRICKETT . I live with my father who is a bricklayer. I saw the prisoner running with the coat under his his right arm. I ran after him - May was crying Stop thief! I saw the other man - he ran round the sewer, the prisoner jumped across the sewer and dropped the coat in a hole in the field. I picked it up and gave it to May; when he was brought back he took out a wire from his coat and threw it away, May took it up and gave it to the constable.

JOSEPH DAY . I am a constable. I was at a small distance, and saw the prisoner running - some people stopped him and I came up - the coat and wire were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-74

1328. HENRY SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a piece of cotton containing twenty-eight yards, value 20 s. , the goods of John Cubley .

JOHN CUBLEY . I am a linen-draper . I had some printed cotton at my door. I saw the prisoner in the act of taking it, but he had not got it off the string.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-75

1329. WILLIAM CORNER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Barton , from his person .

JOHN BARTON . I live at No. 19, Norton-street, Fitzroy-square. On Saturday, the 23d of October, I was coming down Titchfield-street about half-past nine o'clock - there was a fire in Margaret-street - I went to it, and as I was going through the crowd. I felt a person press against my back. I turned round and found I had lost my handkerchief. I saw the prisoner running, and went to him, took him by the shoulder and found it in his hand, about three yards from the spot where I had felt the pressure - it had been in my outside coat pocket. I took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN NEWMAN . I was with Mr. Barton. I did not see the prisoner till Mr. Barton had lost his handkerchief. I was before him in the crowd, he called me when he had hold of the prisoner. I assisted him in taking him to the watch-house; he said he was very sorry, that he had never done so before, and never would again.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see the fire, and as I was coming back, two big boys came by me and put the handkerchief into my hand - I thought they were in fun.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-76

1330. ROBERT RIDOUT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 2 lbs. of tobacco, value 9 s. ; the goods of John Ryder Barras , and John Taylor , his masters .

JOHN RYDER BARRIS . I am a tobacconist , and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and am in partnership with John Taylor . The prisoner had been in our employ about six weeks. I delivered 2 lbs. of tobacco to him to take to John Griffiths , Palace-street, Pimlico on the 9th of September, he returned and we heard on the 14th that it had not been delivered, and then asked him what he had done with it; he said he gave it to a person of the name of Mary Rider , who appears to be a person he was cohabiting with, and lives in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles - we took her into custody, and she gave her name as Mary Lewis .

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I deal with the prosecutors. I left them an order for 2 lbs. of tobacco, in the early part of September. I never received it, nor my wife either - it was the first order I had given them.

DANIEL HALL . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner, who was charged with stealing 2 lbs. of tobacco; there was no threat or promise held out to him; I asked him what he had done with it - he said he had left it with a young woman in Bainbridge-street - we went with him to the room where she lived; she denied any knowledge of him - we found about 1 lb. of tobacco in a cloth in her room.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-77

1331. JOHN RINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Gillett , from his person .

WILLIAM GILLETT . I live in the Haymarket. On the 30th of September between one and two o'clock in the day I was in King-street, Bloomsbury , walking with a lady, and felt some person touch me - I turned round and felt that my handkerchief was gone. I saw the prisoner crossing the street close at my side; I followed him - he crossed the street again into Holborn - I then took hold of him - he denied having the handkerchief; but I found it in his breast.

THOMAS MASON . I was standing at my shop in Holborn, and saw the prisoner. Mr. Gillet was running after him - I took the handkerchief from the prisoner's breast, and have kept it ever since.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-78

1332. WILLIAM BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , two pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; and one silver coin, value 10 s. ; the property of Joseph Clarke ,

JOSEPH CLARKE . I am a seaman , and live at my mother's house in New Gravel-lane . The prisoner lodged there - my mother and I occupy two rooms; my room was in front. I went down to my ship at Blackwall about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 15th of September, and left my trowsers in my room - there was 10 s., in the pocket. I cannot say whether it was in shillings or not. I returned home about six o'clock, and the trowsers were gone - I have never seen them since; the prisoner was at home when I returned, and in about aquarter of an hour afterwards my mother asked me if I had been at home before; I said No, - she replied,

"Then somebody has taken your trowsers," and while my mother was gone for the officer, the prisoner told me he was sorry for it, and offered me 1 l. to make up the loss - the officer then came and took him.

ELIZABETH BAXTER. I am the prosecutor's mother. He left home on the morning of the robbery; I went out about two o'clock; I locked the door of his room; the trowsers were safe then; I returned in about an hour and a

half, and found the garden pots before my window had been thrown down - there were no other lodgers in the house at the time but the prisoner and his sisters.

REBECCA WARD . I live in the same house, on the second floor. Between three and four o'clock on that day I thought I heard a knock at the street door; I went down but saw no person there; I staid a few minutes, and heard something falling backwards - I went backwards and saw the shelf which had held the garden pots at Baxter's window, had fallen down, and the prisoner was putting it up again - the window was open; a person could get in by the assistance of the water butt. I did not see him with anything at that time - I asked him how it came to fall - he said he did not know.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am an oilman and live in New-gravel-lane. On the evening of the 15th of September, I was coming down the lane from the watch-house, a little after seven o'clock - Mrs. Baxter called me in; I went in and saw the prisoner in the back room; she gave charge of him, I said

"Have you been into the yard," - he said No - I then asked if he knew anything of the trowsers, he said

"No - but the truth will come out;" I then took him to the watch-house.

CATHERINE LEWIS . I live next door to Mrs. Baxter. I saw the prisoner get in at the window, and mentioned it next morning to Mrs. Baxter.

GUILTY . Aged 21

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-79

1333. RICHARD HORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , a coat, value 2 l.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; a shirt, value 5 s.; two neckcloths, value 2 s.; a pair of boots, value 10 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Gotthold Erdman Frederick Schwieger .

MARY ANN COOK . I lived with Mr. Schwieger at Highbury . On the 23d of September the prisoner came and rang the bell; I went into the area, and he said he came from Mr. Schwieger; I went up the stairs, and he said he had come for some clean clothes for him - I asked if Mr. Schwieger was hurt, he said Yes, in his foot, and he had torn his boot nearly to the top - but told me not to tell Mr. Schwieger that he was hurt. The housemaid came to the door and called him, and I saw him no more till he passed the window with a bundle; I saw him again at Worship-street.

MR. GOTTHOLD ERDMAN FREDERICK SCHWIEGER . I did not send the prisoner to my house for any clothes on the 23d of September; I met with no accident on that day.

MARY ANN PRAIL . I was housemaid to Mr. Schwieger. I opened the door and my mistress was in the passage; I went into the kitchen, and came up again into the hall in about four minutes - then my mistress desired me to go up stairs with her, and help her to pack up some clothes to send to my master; there was a coat, waistcoat, a pair of trowsers, a shirt, two neck handkerchiefs, and a pair of boots. I heard the prisoner tell my mistress that it was for my master to change his clothes, because they were dirty; I opened the door and he went out; I saw him on Monday fortnight at Worship-street.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. The prisoner was apprehended before I came to him - I made him no promise or threat; but I heard him say he had pawned the shirt in Whitechapel, and the coat and trowsers at Hoxton, for 10 s.; and that the two handkerchiefs were at his mother's in Blackbird-alley; the boots were on his legs.

HARRY RICE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody on the 3d of October, and put him in the watch-house. Gleed came and we found a pair of boots on his legs, which Mr. Schwieger claimed.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. This shirt was pawned at our house on the 23d of September, in the name of Richard Schwieger , by a man whose person I do not recollect.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Hoxton. I have a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, which were pawned on the 23d of September, in the name of J. Schwieger - I cannot recollect whether it was by the prisoner, but I think I have seen him in my shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of it till four o'clock in the afternoon.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-80

1334. MARTHA NIGHTINGALE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , a watch, value 2 l.; a seal, value 5 s., and a key, value 2 s. , the goods of John Harvey .

JOHN HARVEY . I live in Midway-street, Westminster. I lost my watch when in company with the prisoner, but I was so much in liquor, I do not know whether I gave it to her or not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-81

1335. MARY COURTNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a gown, value 10 s., and a scarf value 1 l. , the goods of Archibald Neill .

ELZIABETH NEILL. I am the the wife of Archibald Neill . We live in George-street, Battle-bridge , in the first floor front room. The prisoner came to my room on Monday, the 20th of September, and went away on Saturday about ten o'clock; she returned about one, and went away again about half-past one o'clock, I missed the things from my box soon after - she had sent me out for some tea for her on the Saturday, and when I came home the things were gone. When the prisoner came on the Sunday she put the duplicates of them on the table - I gave her no authority to pawn these articles, nor any thing except a waistcoat, to relieve her distress: she had pawned the scarf for 12 s., and the gown for 5 s. I had known her two years, and believe her to have had an honest character - I took her in out of charity. I found them at the pawnbrokers.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18241028-82

1336. GEOGRE DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September . 33 lbs. of filberts, value 30 s.; and a bag, value 1 s. ; the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM DUNCE . I am carter to Mr. William Smith . On the 29th of September, about one o'clock I was at Day and Martin's, No. 97, High-Holborn . I stopped to take out two empty casks - I had a bag of filberts in my cart, which weighed about 33 lbs. I was absent about a minute and a half, and when I got up into the cart, the horse was going on; but I saw the sheet had been moved. I stopped to look, and missed the filberts - they could not

have slipped out - I saw the bag at Bow-street the same evening about half-past seven o'clock.

THOMAS BATTY . I am a porter. I saw the cart standing at Day and Martin's - I saw the prisoner and a man in company with him, who pointed across the way - the prisoner then got on the shafts of the cart and took out the bag: it fell into the kennel - he then took them up: I followed him to the other side of Saffron-hill; he then pitched his load: I asked what he had got there - he said he did not know: I said I thought I knew, and he had better come back with me, I took him to Day and Martin's.

(Bag produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing by Day and Martin's - two young men came and said, did I want a job, and would I earn 1 s. - I said Yes, and then as I was going along with the bag I was stopped,

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-83

1337. SOPHIA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two gowns, value 1 l.; two petticoats, value 6 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; a night gown, value, 2 s.; a sheet, value 3 s., and a frill, value 6 d., the goods of Sophia Pritchard ; a gown, value, 5 s.; a petticoat, value 3 s.; a shift, value, 5 s.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. ; and the goods of Mary Pritchard .

SOPHIA PRITCHARD . I live in St. John-street road , and am single - my sister Mary was on a visit at my house - The prisoner was employed to wash for me. On the 16th of September she had two gowns, two petticoats, two aprons, a night gown, and a frill of mine to wash; and was not to iron them. I went out about eleven o'clock and left her there - I returned before twelve o'clock - my sister was at home, but the prisoner was gone, and the articles also, and did not return; she was taken up the next day. I have only got one apron back, which she had on at the time she was taken - her mother had washed for me before. I expected to have found her in the kitchen at the wash, when I returned.

MARY PRITCHARD . I am single. I was at my sister's. The prisoner had several articles of mine to wash; when my sister returned they were gone. The prisoner came up while my sister was out, and asked me to assist in folding a sheet to take to the mangler's; she went out, and never returned. All the articles might be worth about 2 l.

JOHN PRITCHARD . I am a carpenter, and brother to the prosecutrix. On Friday evening, the 17th of September as I was coming through Smithfield with my little boy - I met the prisoner and had her taken. There is no way to get at the back of my house.

JOHN HAYFORD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found this apron on her person, I have tried to trace the rest of the property, but could not.

(Apron produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wetted myself in washing, and took off my own apron and left it behind me, and put this one on when I went out.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-84

1338. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a sheet, value 3 s., the goods of John Reyburn ; and a piece of cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of Eliza Dunn .

ELIZA DUNN . I live at Mr. John Reyburn 's, Bedford-street, Mile End Old Town . On the 14th of October this cloth hung at the bottom of the yard, which has a wall round it - a person must have climbed over two walls to get it; I saw it safe at six o'clock in the evening, and was going to take it in at ten, when I missed it; the prisoner is quite a stranger. I saw him and the cloth the next day at Lambeth-street. Mr. Reyburn's sheet and a basket were taken at the same time.

GEORGE HARDING . I am a constable. On the evening of the 14th of October, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another at the back of the London Hospital, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Reyburn's house - the prisoner had a bundle; I stopped him, and asked him what he had got: he said he had met another man who said that he was very tired, and wished him to carry the bundle for him - that he had never seen the man before, and did not know where to take it to. I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-85

1339. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , six sheets, value 11 s., and a shirt, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Deacon ; a bason, value 18 d., and a curtain, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Deacon .

EDWARD DEACON . I live on Stepney-green. I lost six sheets and a shirt on the 4th of October, from my father's house in Cannon-place - his name is Charles Deacon .

LYDIA CARTER . I live with Charles Deacon . A curtain and a wash-hand bason were stolen from the house on the 4th of October; I had seen them safe at ten o'clock the night before. I went to bed about twenty minutes past ten, and got up at seven in the morning, The curtain and basin had been in the wash-house; the sheets and shirts were in the yard - the fence of the yard is higher than the wash-house; the wash-house door was broken open, and the bolt forced. I had not seen the prisoner about the premises. I have not seen any of the property since.

SARAH LAMBOURNE. I live at Mr. Edward Deacon 's. The sheets and shirt were in a tub at Mr. Edward Deacon 's house, where his father lives.

GEORGE HARDING . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was called up at a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, by the watchman, Thompson, and took the prisoner into custody in Bedford-street, and found the curtain in his pocket. He said he had found the things, but did not say where.

PETER THOMPSON . I am a watchman - my beat is behind Mr. Deacon's premises. I saw the prisoner about two o'clock on Monday morning, at the back of Mr. Deacon's; he then went towards Mile End-road; I saw him again at three o'clock, in Sidney-street, about fifty yards from Mr. Deacon's, and about five I saw him again, with a basket on his shoulder, going towards Mr. Deacon's. I watched him, and saw him go into a twine ground, next

to Mr. Deacon's premises, and saw him putting something into the basket; I went and asked him what he had got - there were six sheets, a shirt, and a pewter wash-hand basin, and in his pocket was a curtain.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-86

1340. CHARLES MACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , twenty loaves of bread, value 10 s. , the goods of George Morris .

GEORGE MORRIS . I am a baker , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green - the prisoner was in my service for about a month, and had lived with me before for about six months. I was absent from home at the time of the robbery.

JOHN MORRIS . I am father of the last witness, and was at his house while he was out of town. I delivered fifty loaves to the prisoner on Friday, the 10th of September, to carry to Mr. Bonham's; I counted the loaves as I gave them to him.

CHRISTIAN BONHAM . I live in Pelham-street, Mile End New Town, and am a customer of Mr. Morris's. I expected fifty loaves from him on the 10th of September - I received twenty-five between twelve and two o'clock: the others never reached me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you in the house all that day - A. Yes; I was in the shop, except at my meals; my wife attends to the shop when I am not there.

EDWARD REID . I am servant to Mr. Morris. I took five loaves from the prisoner in Brick-lane; he had more with him - I suppose twenty; they were on a board on his head. He told me to take the five loaves down Phoenix-street, to a chandler's-shop, kept by one Everett. I took them, and they paid me for them - I gave the money to him,

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell your master of this transaction - A. No; I told my mother of it on the day the prisoner was taken up and she told my father, who told Mr. Morris.

BARNARD GLEED . I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of September, at his master's bake-house, on a charge of stealing twenty-five loaves; I asked him what he had done with his master's bread, but no promise or threat was held out to him; he said he had sold it at a shop, at the corner of Vine-street,

EDWARD REID re-examined. Q. Did you know whose loaves they were - A. No. I did not suspect whose they were; I knew he was carrying out my master's bread. I did not know that he ever had any to sell again. I sold the five loaves for 2 s. 6 d.

GEORGE MORRIS re-examined. I sold them then for 7 1/2 d. a loaf; Reid must have known the price of them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-87

1341. HENRY PHILP was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a snuff box, value 15 l. , the goods of Manuel Rodriguez .

MANUEL RODRIGNEZ . (Through an interpreter.) I am a native of Cadiz, in Spain . I was a captain in the Constitutional Army ; I met the prisoner in London, and a conversation took place between us respecting selling a snuff box - he afterwards came to my house on the 10th of October, in Windmill-street, Haymarket; I said I wished to sell a gold snuff box, but did not wish to sell it too cheap; I should like to sell it to a private person, and as he was a native of London, he might know some one who would buy it - we appointed to meet again at eleven o'clock the next morning, at a public-house; I do not know the sign. He said he had made some enquiries, and would meet me there at seven o'clock that evening - I met him, and he asked if I had the box with me, I said No; he said

"Come to-morrow at eleven o'clock, and there will be the valet of a French nobleman here, to whom I have spoken about it, and no doubt he will buy it." I went next day at a eleven o'clock, and we waited till half-past twelve - the prisoner and a companion of his were there; as the valet did not come the prisoner said

"Let us go to his house," and we all three went together - after passing several streets, we came to a street, the name of which I do not know, but the officers does. The prisoner said

"This is the hotel," pointing to a large building about fifty paces off; a young man passed by well dressed, and without a hat - the prisoner and his companion called out

"That is the servant" - the prisoner called him and spoke to him in English; the servant said

"My master is at breakfast, but wait gentlemen in that public-house," pointing to one at the side of the hotel. After we had been in the public-house a few minutes the servant came to us, and after having something to drink and some cursory conversation; the servant asked to have the box to show to his master - I asked the prisoner whether he was a person who might be trusted; the prisoner assured me that he was. I told him I would not take less than 15 l. for it; I then gave the box to the servant, and thought he would return to tell us when his master had done breakfast; in a few minutes the prisoner's companion went out, and soon after the prisoner went away - saying that he had occasion to go out. I remained waiting for him an hour, walking about and looking for him in the street; I was engaged till seven in the evening, making enquiries for him, but he never returned to the public-house, nor his companion, nor the valet. I have seen the companion in the street since, but not the servant. I then went to Bow-street, and got an officer to apprehend the prisoner - he was taken at halt-past nine o'clock that night. I desired him to tell me where the snuff-box was, or to give me the money for it, and I would forgive him; I have not seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been in London - A. About eight months. I now live at a wine vaults in Windmill-street; I lived in King-street, Leicester-square for five weeks. I never desired the prisoner to write to a lady of the name of Thorpe; I left that house in King-street because my wife did not wish me to stay there, that was the only reason; there were many young ladies there, but no daughter of the lady of the house that I know of. I do not know the name of the lady of that house; I had been three days at an hotel, and eight days at another house - but I do not know the name of that landlady. I went from King-street to where I now live. The prisoner has written many letters for me at different times, to different ladies and gentlemen. I was not turned out of the house at King-street, on a charge of

seducing a young woman; there was never such a charge brought against me. I had asked him to sell a watch; the box was only in his possession a few moments - I would not have trusted the box with the prisoner - I gave it to the servant because I had no reason for distrusting him, but clearly on the representation of the prisoner. I have shown the hotel to the officer.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer of Bow-street. The prosecutor has shown me a public-house, which is the tap of Molloy's hotel in Bond-street, which is the place where he understood the French gentleman lived. I took the prisoner the same evening at a public-house at the corner of Grafton-street, and found this direction on him:

"John Somerset, valet to the Hon. Mr. Thompson, Molloy's hotel, Bond-street." I have made enquiries there and found it to be false.

Prisoner's Defence. I have known the prosecutor seven or eight months, and he employed me to write some letters for him; one was to Mrs. Thorpe, and another to her son, to know the reason why he was desired not to visit that house - the answer was he had disturbed the peace of the family - he then walked with me to Mrs. Shorter, and made me tell her exultingly that he had seduced her daughter, and he had got a ring and a snuff-box in his possession, which she had given him, and he would keep them. I then went into the country, and when I returned, he employed me to sell a box; the people laughed at us, because he wanted too much for it - we met again in the evening accidentally, and conversed on the subject; we met again the next morning in Newman-street, near Bond-street, and I saw a person who appeared to be a valet, and he asked me if I had not been trying to sell a snuffbox, I said I had - he said perhaps his master would buy it, and next morning we went there; we saw the pretended valet coming across the road; he said to us,

"My master is at breakfast, go into the tap and wait there" - we did so, and the prosecutor gave the valet the box to take to his master, and he went away with it.

GUILTY Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-88

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1342. ELIZABETH PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , three pieces of ribbon, containing thirty four yards , the goods of James Shoolbred , and John Fergusson .

SAMUEL MAYOSS . I am a shopman to Mr. James Shoolbred , and John Fergusson, Tottenham-Court Road . The prisoner with a companion came to the shop on the 10th of October; I saw her take some pieces of ribbon, and charged her with it; she at first denied it, but afterwards took two pieces from her pocket, and then another fell from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy some ribbons - the shopman was serving another customer, and I took some up to look at, and was taken up stairs before I had time to speak. I had half-a-crown in my pocket - nothing was found on me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-89

1332. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , three pieces of deal-wood, value 2 s. , the goods of William Fry and George Watkins .

ROBERT MARSTON . I am a Thames police-officer. On the 10th of October, at ten o'clock in the morning, I sent Williams into a house in East-street, Commercial-road. I remained outside, and saw the prisoner come into the Commercial-road, and look round about him - he then returned down the street; I went after him and saw him going from the house with a bag. I told him I was looking for him: he said he hoped I would let him go, as he had a wife and a large family - I said I could not; I found three pieces of deal-wood and a trowel in the bag - there was a quantity of wood on the premises.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I was sent into this house - I was in the cellar, and saw the prisoner come to the back of the house, but not into it - there was a parcel of wood at the back of the house.

JOHN POPE . I am foreman to Mr. William Fry and George Watkins . I cannot swear to this wood - it is like what we use.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he found the wood, and took it to burn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-90

1343. EDWARD CARTER and WILLIAM BRIGGS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , fifteen pieces of ribbon, value 10 l.; four cloaks, value 3 l.; fourteen shawls, value 5 l.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 l.; 18 lbs. of thread, value 4 l.; one hundred and eight pieces of tape, value 28 s.; 4 lbs. of cotton, value 1 l.; twenty pieces of ferret, value 30 s.; and twelve pieces of silk-cord, value 6 s. ; the goods of Samuel Worpell ; and EVE NATHAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS charging them to be the goods of Thomas Luck , Thomas White , and Thomas Castle .

SAMUEL WARPELL . I am a carrier from Ware to London . On the 12th of October I had a parcel for Joseph Pollard , of Ware - we received it at the Vine-Inn Bishopsgate-street; I was not in London - but when the cart came home on the 13th I had not this parcel which was entered on the weigh bill.

JOHN GARDINER . I drive Mr. Warpell's waggon. I received the parcel on Tuesday, the 12th of October, at the Vine-Inn, from Travell, the bookeeper - it was directed to Mr. Joseph Pollard , of Ware. I cannot read - I put it in the waggon and drove it to Smithfield, and then to the the Cherry-Tree public-house, Kingsland-road - when I got there I saw it safe. I went to get some refreshment after taking the horses out, and when I returned I put the horses in again, and had got on the road, about a quarter of a mile, when I looked over the waggon and found the parcel was gone.

TIMOTHY MOORE . I am porter to Messrs. Luck, White and Castle. I took a parcel for them on the 12th of October, to the Vine-Inn, Bishopsgate-street - my book was signed by William Travell , the book-keeper; I did not see it packed up - but I received it of Mr. Joseph Hodgson.

JOSEPH HODGSON . I am warehouse-man to Messrs. Thomas Luck , Thomas White , and Thomas Castle . I packed up a variety of ribbons, shawls, cottons, and various

other articles of haberdashery, and delivered them to Thomas Moore . I saw him put them into a truss, and gave it to Timothy Moore to take it to the Inn - it was directed to Mr. Joseph Pollard , at Ware.

WILLIAM TRAVELL . I received a parcel from Timothy Moore on the 12th of October; I gave a receipt for it, and gave it to the waggoner.

WILLIAM WELLS . I live in Wellington-street, Kings-land-road. I was at the corner of Caroline-street, between seven or eight o'clock on the evening of the 12th of October, and saw the two male prisoners coming up the road. I knew them by sight before. I saw Briggs get into a waggon on the opposite side of the way, near the Cherry-Tree. I then saw Carter get in - there was another person with them, who had got into the waggon before them, three different times; they were not all in at once, but one got in after the other got out. I saw Carter pulling at the luggage near the back of the waggon - I then saw one man standing with his back to the end of the waggon, and Briggs put a parcel on his back; the man brought it on to the other side of the way and walked on to Hare-walk. Carter and Briggs came with him - Carter had been standing at the end of the waggon while the parcel was getting out. I followed them to Playhouse-yard, which is more than a quarter of a mile from the Cherry-Tree; they took the goods into a house there - they had divided them into a butter flat, and a bag, in Hare-walk. I saw the two prisoners and the other person, whose name is Blackford, go into the house in Playhouse-yard, while myself, Taylor, and Archer were watching the prisoners in Hare-walk; the prisoner Carter said that if we did not tell he would give us 5 s. I said I did not want the money - he then said if we did not go away he would punch our heads; the goods were left in the house in Playhouse-yard. I did not see anybody there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you - A. I am a muffin baker. I know the neighbourhood of Hare-walk - they went down Turner-square to the King of Prussia walk, and from there to Hare-walk; I kept them in view all the time - it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; the till of the waggon was open behind; but I cannot tell whether it was up or not.

WILLIAM ARCHER . I was with the last witness - I saw Blackford get into the waggon twice - he brought out nothing, but when he got in the third time I saw Carter and Briggs at the end of it. I had known them by seeing them about the road. When Blackford came out the third time, he had a hat on his head, and a bundle under his arm. Carter took the bundle from Blackford. Carter and Briggs then got into the waggon, and then came out again - Carter then went in by himself, and then Briggs got in and lifted a pile on to a young man's shoulder - he took it into Hare-walk. Carter, Briggs, and Blackford went with him. I followed them while they took it into a house. Carter came out with a bag, and then Briggs came out with a butter flat, and he went to Turner-square, and put it on his head, and cried out

"Muscles" I heard Carter speak to Wells, but I do not know what he said; they then went into White Cross-street, and then into a house in Playhouse yard.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I was with Wells and Archer at the corner of Caroline-place, between seven and eight o'clock. I saw the waggon, and saw Blackford go into it twice - he then went into it again, and brought out a bundle; I saw Carter and Briggs walking about the house - I then saw Briggs get into the waggon and then come out and go round to the back part of it - he opened the flap of the waggon and took out a large square thing, which he put on the shoulders of another man. Carter, Briggs, and the man with the load then went down Hare-walk; I followed them, but did not see them go into any house; I stood at the corner of the walk, and they soon came out with the things in a butter flat and some bags; I do not know where they got the butter flat from; they came round to the corner where I was - Briggs had the butter-flat, and put it on his head, and cried

"Muscles." Carter went up Hoxton; I then saw them go into the house in Playhouse-yard. I heard them say they would give us 5 s. a piece if we did not tell, but I do not know what else was said: I did not follow them any farther, but went home and told my father of it, and he told the hostler at the Cherry Tree.

Cross-examined. Q. What trade are you - A. I work with my father, who is a bricklayer. I have known the prisoners by seeing them about the road before. I had heard Blackford's name because he used to go to a chair maker's by us.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am father of the last witness - he told me on the 12th of October what he had seen, and I told Mr. Smith of it.

GEORGE SMITH . Samuel Taylor sent for me to the Cherry Tree; I went with him, young Taylor, and Archer to Playhouse-yard, to the prisoner Nathan's - she opened the door; I said,

"You have got some things brought here by some young lads;" she said,

"These are the things;" they were under the counter. She passed by me to shut the door as I supposed, but she went out; some man gave me the things, which I took to the office: they were in a handkerchief, a cross handled basket, and a dirty bag. I went next morning to her again, and said,

"You have told me false, you have not given me all the things:" she said they was all - I searched, but found no more.

Cross-examined. Q. What age is Mr. Nathan's son - A. He appears to be about thirty years of age; I do not know that he has absconded. After she had been to the office she was discharged, and came back of her own accord.

GEORGE CHAPEL . I am hostler at the Cherry Tree. I went with the last witness to Mrs. Nathan's house, and got some property - I saw Smith take it.

THOMAS VANN . I have brought the property here by order of the Magistrate.

BARNARD GLEED . On the day after the robbery Archer took me to Hackney, where I found Carter, and took him into custody - Briggs was taken the same evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARTER'S Defence. Two of these boys are thieves, and go up and down Bishopsgate-street, picking gentlemen's pockets.

CARTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BRIGGS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

NATHAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-91

1344. JAMES WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a pair of boots, value 14 s. , the goods of Abraham Matthews .

ABRAHAM MATTHEWS . I am a blacksmith . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me, in Tottenham-street . On Thursday morning, the 7th of October, I went out about six o'clock, and left him in bed; there was a pair of boots on a box in the bed-room; I returned about eight o'clock in the evening, and asked him about my boots, as they were gone - he denied all knowledge of them.

JOHN HEYBOURN . I keep a coffee-shop. The prisoner has used my house for about a month; he came there on the 8th of October, in the evening, and asked me to take care of a pair of boots - I put them in the bar: they are here now.

WILLIAM FARRANT . The prisoner and the prosecutor were both lodgers of mine; I made the boots for the prosecutor, and on the night of the 7th of October he called me up, and asked if I knew anything about his boots - I said I did not, and he then charged the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I brought them out by mistake for my own, and left them at Mr. Heybourn's till I could take them back.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-92

1345. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a watch, value 10 s., and a seal, value 5 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Ridley .

ELIZABETH RIDLEY . I am single , and live in Bedford-place . I lost a watch out of my kitchen on the 21st of September; I had put it there a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, and missed it ten minutes past eight - it was afterwards given to me by a stranger.

JAMES COTTRELL . Rice gave the prisoner into my charge.

HENRY RICE . On the morning of the 21st of September, about eight o'clock, I was coming through Tavistock-square, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw some persons pursuing the prisoner; I crossed over to him, and about six yards before I got to him, I saw him throw this watch into the pleasure ground - I then seized him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far were you from him - A. About six yards; I could see that it was a silver watch, with a metal chain. I saw a man jump over the iron railing and take it up, while I had hold of the thief by the collar. I was on the foot path, and he was by the rails.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-93

1346. GEORGE BROWN and EDWARD TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a watch value 3 l.; two seals, value 12 s.; a key, value 5 s., and a chain, value 6 d., the goods of George Johnson , from his person .

GEORGE JOHNSON . I am a sailor . I was at the Star, public-house, in Whitechapel , on the 25th of October, at twelve o'clock at night, and as I was going out the prisoner Brown drew me down the passage, and took my watch; he then went out; I followed him, and just as I got to the outer door some other person knocked me down - that was about three minutes after I had lost my watch. I saw the watch again at the watch-house.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. Did you see me in the house - A. No, not in the house, but in the entry; I was not quite sober: I had been at another house before.

HENRY HAWES . I am a patrol. I heard an alarm at the Star, and saw the prosecutor kneeling on the ground, and Turner standing over him; I saw Brown with his coat off, and I pursued him. I saw three sailors coming up to meet him; I sprang my rattle, and a watchman came up - one of the sailors took hold of Brown; the watchman then gave his arm a jerk, and the watch fell from his hand; the watchman said,

"Look out, he had dropped the watch;" I took it up.

ROBERT BULLEN . I am a watchman. I saw Brown running from the Star, public-house; Johnson followed him, and Turner followed Johnson; Johnson fell down, or was knocked down, and Turner stood over him. Johnson called Watch! Patrol! I followed Brown - some sailors came up the street, and they caught Brown; Hawes could not stop himself soon enough, but ran by him. Brown had the watch in his hand while I held him by the shoulder. I said to Hawes,

"Look out, he has thrown the watch away." Hawes took it up.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. Did you see the watch in my hand - A. Yes, I did. There were some sailors coming up the street, but only one was round me when I took you - there were a good many persons in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BROWN'S Defence. I was coming out of another public-house, and heard the cry of Stop thief! about a dozen other persons came out; I ran with them, and was stopped by some sailors; a gentleman said he had got the watch.

BROWN - GUILTY Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

TURNER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-94

1347. ISAAC EVERETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a watch, value 5 l.; a seal, value 1 s.; and a ribbon, value 2 d., the goods of Jonathan Pearson , from his person .

JONATHAN PEARSON . I am a labourer at the gas works On the morning of the 10th of October I went to see a battle at New Haggerston ; there was a crowd. I saw the prisoner there; he took my watch from my fob, and pushed me by my shoulder; I saw it in his right hand, and stopped him - the crowd forced me from him. I had a good look at him, and kept him in sight till he was taken. I have not found the watch.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When was this - A. About a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning; the fight had not began; they were making the ring. I was outside the ring - the prisoner went opposite to me, and remained there till the officer came. I lost sight of him when the officer came, but not half a minute. I did not state that some man who got away had taken my watch, and that he staid three quarters of an hour on the ground. There was some confusion while they were beating out the ring.

PRINCE BURT. I am fourteen years of age. I was at the fight, and saw the prosecutor and the prisoner beating

out the ring. I saw the prisoner push the prosecutor by the shoulder, and take his watch - I saw it in his hand; he crossed the ring. I did not stop any longer, but went home with my father. I do not think there were any other persons there like the prisoner.

BARNARD GLEED . I took the prisoner into custody on Sunday morning, the 10th of October, at a fight at Haggerstone - I heard that he had taken the watch; he had lived at our office, as a porter.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob going into the field: I went in, and was there a quarter of an hour; they said the officers were coming, and the people dispersed. The witness came and said I was the person who took his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-95

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1348. MARGARET HAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , four blankets, value 2 l. 8 s., the goods of John Morran , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a watchman. On the 1st of October, about twelve o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in Whitecross-street, with a bundle under her arm, and asked what was in it; she said it was a pair of blankets - I took her to the watch-house. Morran afterwards claimed them.

CATHARINE MORRAN . I am the wife of John Morran ; we live in Playhouse-yard, St. Luke's , and keep a chandler's-shop . The prisoner is a stranger. I missed these blankets off the counter a few minutes before twelve o'clock on the night of the 1st of October; I paid 2 l. 8 s. for them six or eight months ago, but have never used them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Finsbury-square, and asked a man the way to Smithfield; he said, turn to the right, and said,

"Here, lay hold of this bundle while I go over the way." I went on till the watchman took me - I said a man had given them to me.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-96

1349. THOMAS HARVEY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Thomas Peters , on the night of the 28th of September, and stealing eight live tame rabbits, price 18 s. , the property of George Olding .

THOMAS PETERS . I lodge in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . I let the cellar to George Olding , who keeps rabbits . On the 28th of September, at half-past nine o'clock, I heard a noise in the passage; I went into the yard, and saw a tall chimney sweeper, who went away; my candle went out - I went in for a light, and saw the cel-window broken open. I stood at the door, and saw the prisoner come out of the passage, without shoe or stocking on, and something like a sack under his arm; he was taken next night.

GEORGE OLDING . I keep rabbits in this cellar. I missed eight on the 30th of September - some were afterwards found. I know them by their skins.

GEORGE LONDON . I am a patrol. The prisoner was described to me; I went to his lodging: he pretended to be asleep; he declared he had not been out that night. I said he was at the prosecutor's house a quarter of an hour ago - he said he was, but that he did not go into the yard, and that it was his frock which he had under his arm.

GEORGE POWELL . I am a file cutter. I found these rabbits in a bag at the back of the premises where the prisoner lives - he was in custody then.

Prisoner's Defence. My master lodges at Peters's house; I went there to know at what time I was to come to work.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-97

London Case, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1350. HENRY FAUNTLEROY was indicted for that he, on the 1st of June, 1815 , feloniously did falsley make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain transfer of a certain interest and share, to wit, 5000 l. 3 per cent. Annuities, standing in the name of Frances Young , of, and in certain Annuities established and made transferrable at the Bank of England, by certain Acts of Parliament, (the title of the first of which was set out, together with a copy of the said forged transfer,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

2d COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true - be (the prisoner) well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited, with the like intention.

3d and 4th COUNTS, the same as the two former, only refering to the Acts of Parliament mentioned in the first count, and stating the felony to have been committed with intent to defraud the said Frances Young .

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as the 3d and 4th, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud one William Flower , to whom the said stock was transferred by the said forged transfer.

7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th COUNTS, Similar to the first six, differing only in not stating the interest to be in Frances Young .

12 other COUNTS similar in form to the twelve first, except that instead of stating the title of the Act of Parliament, by which the funds are created; they only refer to the funds as established by force of the statutes in that case made and provided.

6 other COUNTS, similar in form to the first six, except that they state a list of the Acts of Parliament, by which the funds in question were created.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL, MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, and MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES TYSON . I was clerk to Messrs. Marsh and Co. bankers, at the time of their failure in September last; and

have been there seventeen years. In 1815, the firm was William Marsh , Sir James Sibbald , Bart, Henry Fauntleroy (the prisoner) George Edward Graham and Josiah Henry Stracey . The prisoner became a partner in the early part of the year in which I came, 1807 - his father had been a partner before. I always considered Mr. Fauntleroy as the partner; he conducted the principal business of the house, and Mr. Stracey sometimes acted. Mr. Marsh lived in Kent. Sir James Sibbald died in 1819 or 1820, Mr. Graham had been a Colonel. Miss Frances Young had been a customer of the house, and her dividends were received by the house.

Q. Look at this instrument (producing it) which purports to be a power of attorney for the transfer of 5000 l. Consols, in the name of Miss Young, there is the name of James Tyson to it subscribed as a witness - A. Yes, it is not my writing - I never saw Miss Young. I and John Watson are described here as clerks to Marsh, Sibbald and Co. Bankers, Berner-street. I believe this description to be in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing. I have been in the habit of seeing him write daily and hourly, and have no doubt of its being his writing - there was no other clerk named James Tyson in the house. I consider the date also to be in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing - it is

"The thirty-first day of May, One Thousand, Eight Hundred and Fifteen" in words.

Q. Now look at the back where there is a demand to act - A. (reads)

"I demand to act by this letter of attorney this 1st day of June, 1815, H. Fauntleroy." The figure

"1 June, 5 and H. Fauntleroy" are written. I have no doubt but the writing and signature are Mr. Fauntleroy's, the rest is in print.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. Q. Where did Mr. Fauntleroy live - A. He had apartments in Berners-street, but whether he lived there I do not know; he had no house in the City that I know of. I have heard of his having a cottage in Surry.

JOHN WATSON . I was clerk to Messrs Marsh, Sibbald and Co. for twenty-five years, up to the time of their failure; there was no other John Watson in the house while I was there: (looking at the power of attorney) the name

" John Watson " here is not my writing. I did not know Miss Young, and did not see her sign this. I am acquainted with Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing; the words

"Thirty-first of May," are his writing; also the words

"Clerk to Marsh, Sibbald and Co., bankers, Berner-street." The signature H. Fauntleroy, to the demand to act is Mr. Fauntleroy's.

ROBERT BROWNING , JUN. I am a clerk in the 3 per cent. Consols office, in the Bank of England - I have been at the Bank above twenty years, and was in this office in 1815, and for four years before.

Q. Look at this instrument under the words

"I demand to act," is your name subscribed as a witness - A. Yes. I saw this written by the prisoner at the bar, at the sixth divison in the Consol office at the Bank; it was signed by him on the day it is dated, 1st of June, 1815.

Q. Now refer to your ledger - had Miss Francis Young on that day any 3 per cent. Consol Annuites standing in her name - A. Yes, 5,450 l.; she is described as of Chichester.

Q. Now refer to your transfer book - have you there a transfer of 5000 l. 3 per cent. Consols in June, 1815 - A. Yes; it is a transfer of 5000 l. of her stock. The name of Henry Fauntleroy is subscribed here; he is described as attorney to Frances Young , of Chichester - it is transferred to William Flower , of the Stock Exchange: it was signed by the prisoner, in my presence, because I have attested the signature.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you sufficiently acquainted with Mr. Fauntleroy's writing to know that it his - A. Yes, I have frequently seen him write, and saw him sign this.

ROBERT BEST , ESQ. I am secretary to the Bank of England. I have the minute book of the Court of Directors of the 21st of October, 1824 - here is a minute directing 5000 l. 3 per cent. consols, to be purchased and transferred into the name of Frances Young , of Chichester, spinster; (reading it.)

MR. GURNEY. Q. Were you present when that order was adopted - A. I was not.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Was that minute afterwards confirmed by the Court - A. I read it myself to the Directors at the next Court, and they confirmed it; both on the 21st and 28th of October. I was present on the 21st before the Court broke up, and read it before they broke up, after it was entered, and they adopted it - it was copied into this minute book, and read on the 28th, and then confirmed.

COURT. Q. Then on loose paper you take down what passes; it is copied into a book, and read to the Court at the next meeting - A. Yes, my Lord.

MR. GURNEY. Q. On the 21st, in your absence the Court came to some resolution upon this subject - A. Yes; it was copied into this book by Mr. Watts in my office, on that or the following day; I did not read it from this book on the 21st - the minute was written by the Governor, and when I came into the room he handed it to me; I read it, and it was adopted - it was afterwards copied into the book, from which I read it on the 28th, and it was confirmed - the confirmation is entered in these words

"The proceedings of the last Court were read and confirmed."

MR. BENJAMIN COLE . I am a stock-broker, employed by the Bank. On the 22d of October, I was employed by the Bank to purchase 5000 l. Consols, and transfer it into the name of Miss F. Young, the amount paid for it was 4812 l. 10 s. I afterwards received an order from the Governor of the Bank for that money to be paid me - this is the order - (looking at it) - it is signed by the Governor. I received the money and paid for the stock; this is the stock receipt (looking at it).

MR. BROWNING re-examined. Q. Turn to the stock ledger; has Miss Young credit for 5000 l. 3 per cent. Consols - A. Yes; on the 22d of October, 1824.

Cross-examined by MR. GURNEY. Q. Is that the stock purchased by Mr. Cole - A. Yes.

ROBERT BEST , ESQ. re-examined. Q. Look at this release - has it the Bank seal - A. It has; I have an order of the Court for the release to be sealed, and was present when it was sealed.

This instrument was here read, releasing Miss F. Young from all claims respecting the transfer of the stock in question, and from re-payment of the same, in case the letter of Attorney should be proved to be a true instrument.

MR. GURNEY to ROBERT BROWNING. Q. From 1815 till the 22d of October, there has been no stock in Miss Young's name, except 550 l. - A. No.

JAMES WILLIAM FRESHFIELD , ESQ. I am a subscribing witness to this release (producing one.) I saw it executed by Miss Young, of Chichester, on the 27th of October, 1824, (read.)

This instrument released the Governor and Company of the Bank of England from all claim of dividends which Miss Young had upon the 5000 l. transferred on the 1st of June, 1815, &c.

MISS FRANCES YOUNG . I live at Chichester, and did so in 1815. Messrs. Marsh, Sibbald, and Co. were my bankers. I had 5450 l. 3 per cent. Consols at that time - they received my dividends for me. I bought 100 l. more not long ago; I have received the dividends on 5450 l. upto that time, and since that time upon 5550 l. from Messrs. Marsh and Co. I never authorized them or anybody to sell 5000 l. of that stock; I never executed this instrument - (examining it) - it is not my hand-writing. I was not in town in May, 1815, but at Chichester.

JAMES TYSON , re-examined. Mr. Marsh generally went to the Bank to receive the bulk of the dividends; it is usual before they are received for an alphabetical list to be made of the sums and the dividends to be received - I believe Mr. Fauntleroy generally made out that list.

Q. Look at this, is it a list of the dividends to be received in July, 1824, upon Consols - A. It is, and it is endorsed

"Three per cent. Consols, July 1824, Marsh, Stracey, and Co." The endorsement, and the whole list appear to be in the hand-writing of Mr. Fauntleroy, except the figures in red ink, which are made by the clerks at the Bank - the columns of names and sums are in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing. Miss Young's name is towards the end of it, and the sum of 550 l. is placed opposite to her name. When Mr. Marsh receives the dividend warrants, he brings them home, and gives them, I believe, to Mr. Fauntleroy.

Q. Who made out the account of sums received at the Bank - A. Mr. Fauntleroy made out part of it, and the rest is made out by the clerk.

Q. Have you the day-book for July, 1824 - A. I have; it contains an account of dividends received in July, 1824; the first twenty-four items are in Mr. Fauntleroy's handwriting, and the rest is entered by a clerk; the 23d entry which is in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing, is as follow: - (reads.)

"F. Young 5550 l. Consols, 83 l. 5. s" which is the half-yearly dividend purporting to be received. I have the day-book for July 1815 - here is an entry of Miss Young's dividend on 5450 l. - 73 l. 11 s. 6 d. in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing, with several other entries. I believe the property-tax is deducted. Here is an entry of the dividends received in January, 1816: the three first items are in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing, and the rest are by the clerk. Miss Young's dividend is entered for 5450 l., but not in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing; here is an entry for the same amount of F. Young's stock in July 1816, in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing and in January, 1817; the same dividend is entered on 5450 l. - 81 l. 15 s. in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing. In January, 1818, the same amount is entered in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing, and in July, the same sums in his writing also. In January, 1819, the same sum and dividend are entered in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing also, and in July, 1819, and in his writing. In January, 1820, the same sum and dividend are entered in the same hand-writing; and in July, the same sum and hand-writing; in January, 1821, and July, here are the same sums in the same hand-writing. In January and July, 1822, the same sums are entered in the same hand-writing; and in January, 1823, there is the same sum entered, and in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing. In July, 1823, the dividend is entered upon 5550 l. 83 l. 5 s. in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing; and in January, 1824, the same, and in his writing also.

Q. Turn to the day-book of the 1st of June, 1815 - A. There is a sum of 2953 l. 2 s. 6 d. carried to the account of H. F. - (which I presume to be Mr. Fauntleroy) - it is in the hand-writing of Watson.

Q. Now turn to the partners' private ledger, and look at the dates of June the 1st and 6th, there is an entry of the 6th of June, of one of the partners of 40 l. - A. Yes; it is Mr. Graham's writing - (reading) -

"Ryan 40 l. June the 6th;" there appears to have been an erasure at the extremity of the page, but the full amount is carried out in the next item - here is an entry of the 1st of June on the same line, but after the 6th of June,

"Cash 2953 l. 2 s. 6 d." - and in the extended line is 2993 l. 2 s. 6 d. - being the two sums added together, all the entry except

"June the 6th, Ryan 40 l.," is in Mr. Fauntleroy's writing.

Q. To whose credit does the whole of that line stand - Ryan's amount, and the whole of the identical sum - A. It stands to the account of Henry Fauntleroy ; the first sum had been credited to him by Mr. Graham, the rest is added by himself, and carried by himself to his own credit.

Cross-examined by Mr. GURNEY. This sum is placed to Mr. Fauntleroy's private account - A. Yes; the sums placed to that private account are very large.

Q. They amount in two pages to 50,000 l. - A. They may.

Q. Do not these sums finally find their way into the funds of the banking house - A. I do not know; that rests with themselves. I cannot tell that these sums were ever drawn out by Mr. Fauntleroy for his private account, for Messrs. Martin and Co. were our bankers in the City - there were large transactions with them.

Q. Was not every shilling of these monies applied to the funds of the banking-house - A. I do not know; the partners themselves can tell - but the clerks never had access to these books - it was customary to enter considerable sums to the initials of the partners.

Q. Were not many of the sums through Martin's house placed to initials, or called Exchequer-bills account - A. No, we were ordered to make sums received to the initials of the partner's names in the day-book; that is all we know.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. As far as these books go, this sum is carried to the private account of the prisoner - A. Yes.

JOHN HENRY SPURLING . On the 1st of June, 1815, I was clerk to Mr. Solomon; who at that time was stockbroker to Messrs. Marsh and Co.

Q. Look at this paper, and say whether on that day you sold 5000 l., Consols for Miss Young, of Chichester - A. Yes; this is my signature - the produce was 2956 l. 5 s., deducting brokage, it would be 2950 l. - but the sum to the bankers would be 2953 l. 2 s. 6 d., as they have half the

brokage. I paid that sum on the 1st of June, into the bands of Martin and Co. - this is the draft which I paid in for that amount (looking at it,) to the account of Messrs. Marsh, Sibbald, and Co. I delivered Messrs. Marsh and Co. a note of the sale; this is it - (read)

1st June, 1815. Sold for Miss Frances Young , of Chichester, by order of Messrs. Marsh Sibbald and Co. 5000 l. to William Flower , for - 2956. 5 s.

Commission - 6. 5.

2950

J. P. Spurling for Solomon

The Cheque for 2953. 2. 6 d. was here read.

Mr. SPURLING. The addition to the cheque of 3 l. 2 s. 6 d. is the half brokage allowed to the bankers.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am a police-officer of Malborough-street. On the 10th of September I apprehended the prisoner at the banking-house in Berner-street - he locked a desk which was in the room where I apprehended him after he knew what I came for; he locked it with a key which was suspended to his watch - I took the key from his watch in Malborough-street; I believe this to be it - (looking at it;) I delivered it to Mr. Freshfield - and in consequence of a message from Mr. Freshfield, I attended him at the banking-house, and searched the desk with Mr. Freshfield; it was opened with this key - there was a private drawer in the desk in which were some keys and some papers - I marked the papers after I brought them away - the prisoner was examined on the day - I kept the keys until after the examination, and then went to the banking-house, and found Mr. Freshfield there - he had two tin boxes in his possession; the name of Fauntleroy was on one of them - I do not know whether it was on the other. I tried them with the keys which I had found in the desk, and opened them with those keys - I locked the boxes again, and delivered the keys to Mr. Freshfield, who took the boxes away in a coach.

MR. FRESHFIELD re-examined. On the day the prisoner was apprehended I went to the banking-house of Messrs. Marsh and Co., and made a search - I received a key from Plank, which opened a private desk; and in that desk we found some other keys. I returned to the banking-house after the examination, and in a room at the back, of what I understood to be called the partner's room; I saw several tin boxes - one had the name of Fauntleroy on it, which I took possession of - there was another, either upon or under that box, without any name. I desired Plank to try the keys to it, that I might not remove a box belonging to any other person; he tried one key which opened it; and finding from the first paper that there was no doubt it must be Mr. Fauntleroy's, I locked it up and took possession of it with the keys - and in the course of that night I examined the whole of the box with the name on it; and about half of the other - that with the name contained deeds, probates of wills, letters of administration, and other official documents; the other was a great variety of memorandums, diaries, and stock receipts, among which was the sale note for the stock in question; also a paper which I now produce - I marked it.

MR. TYSON re-examined, (looking at the paper.) The whole of this is in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing. When there is a sale of stock as a regular transaction the sale note is put on a file, and copied into a book by one of the partners.

JAMES KIRBY . I was a clerk in Messrs. Marsh and Co's. banking-house. I have searched to ascertain whether a copy of this sale note is entered in the book - there is none; it is the regular course of business to make a copy.

MR. WATSON. The whole of this paper is in Mr. Fauntleroy's hand-writing, signatures and all.

The paper produced by Mr. Freshfield was here put in and read; it was as follows:-

De La Blache - 11151 6 4 - Consols.

E. W. Young - 5000 0 0 - Do.

General Young - 6000 0 0 - Do.

Frances Young - 5000 0 0 Do.

Jed Kerie , T. J Kerie, and H. Fauntleroy -

6000 0 0 - Do.

J. Kerie - 5841 9 8 - Do.

De La Blache - 4000 0 0 - Navy 5 per Cents

Lady Nelson - 11595 0 0 - Consols.

Mrs. Pelham - 20000 0 0 - 4 per Cents.

Earl of Ossory - 7000 0 0 - Do.

J. Bowen - 9500 0 0 - Do.

M. C. Parkins - 4000 0 0 - Consols.

Lord Aboyne - 61550 0 0 - 4 per Cents.

Elizabeth Fauntleroy - 3050 0 0 - 5 per Cents.

W. Reader and H. Fauntleroy - 7000 0 0 - Do.

Peter Moore and John Marsh - 21500 0 0 - 3 per Cents.

"In order to keep up the credit of our house I have forged powers of attorney, and have sold out all the above sums, without the knowledge of any one of my partners. I have given the different accounts credit for the dividends as they became due, but have never posted them.

H. Fauntleroy, Berners-street, May 7, 1816."

"The Bank began first to refuse our acceptances, and thereby began to destroy our credit - they shall smart for it.

H. F."

The power of attorney was then put in and read.

Prisoner's Defence.

My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. - Overwhelmed as I am by the situation in which I am placed, and being uninformed in what manner I should answer the charges which have been alleged against me, I will endeavour to explain, as well as the poignancy of my feelings will enable me, the embarrassments of the Banking house, in which I have been for many years the active and only responsible partner, and which have alone led to the present investigation, and although I am aware I cannot expect to free myself from the obloquy brought upon me by my anxiety to preserve the credit and respectability of the firm, still I trust that an impartial narrative of the occurrences will obtain for me the commiseration of the well-disposed part of the community. Anticipating that the Court will extend its indulgence to me, I will respectfully submit such observations as I think will tend to remove from influenced minds those impressions, which with sorrow I say must have been made upon them by the cruel and illiberal manner in which the public prints have untruly detailed an history of my life and conduct; hoping, therefrom, I may deserve your compassion, although I may be unable to justify my proceedings, and secure my liberation, by a verdict of the Jury, yet they may be considered, in the mercy of the Court and a discerning public, as some extenuation of the crimes with which I stand arraigned. With this object it is necessary that I should first state, shortly, the circumstances under which I have been placed during my connexion with Marsh and Co. My father established the Banking-house in 1792, in conjunction with

Mr. Marsh, and other gentlemen. Some of the partners retired in 1794, about which time a loss of 20,000 l. was sustained. Here commenced the difficulties of the house. In 1796, Mr. Stracey and another gentleman came into the firm, with little or no augmentation of capital. In 1800 l became a clerk in the house, and continued so six years, and although during that time I received no salary, the firm were so well satisfied with my attention and zeal for the interest and welfare of the establishment, that I was handsomely rewarded by them. In 1807 my father died; I then succeeded him; at this time I was only twenty-two years of age, and the whole weight of an extensive but needy Banking establishment at once devolved upon me, and I found the concern deeply involved in advances to builders and others which had rendered a system of discounting necessary, and which we were obliged to continue in consequence of the scarcity of money at that time, and the necessity of making further advances to those persons to secure the sums in which they stood indebted. In this perplexed state the house continued until 1810, when its embarrassments were greatly increased, owing to the bankruptcies of Brickwood and others, which brought upon it a sudden demand for no less a sum than 170,000 l. the greater part being for the amount of bills which our house had accepted and discounted for these parties, since become bankrupts. About 1814, 1815, and 1816, from the speculations with builders and brickmakers, & others, in which the house was engaged, it was called upon to provide funds to near 100,000 l., to avert the losses which would otherwise have visited it from these speculations. In 1819, the most responsible of our partners died, and we were called upon to pay over the amount of his capital, although the resources of the house were wholly inadequate to meet so large a payment. During these numerous and trying difficulties the house was nearly without resources, and the whole burthen of management falling upon me, I was driven to a state of distraction, in which I could meet with no relief from my partners, and, almost broken-hearted, I sought resources where I could, and so long as they were provided, and the credit of the house supported, no inquiries were made, either as to the manner in which they were procured, or as to the sources from whence they were derived. In the midst of these calamities, not unknown to Mr. Stracey, he quitted England, and continued in France, on his own private business, for two years, leaving me to struggle as well as I could with difficulties almost insurmountable. Having thus exposed all the necessities of the house, I declare that all the monies temporarily raised by me, were applied, not in one instance for my own separate purposes or expenses, but in every case they were immediately placed to the credit of the house in Berners-street, and applied to the payment of the pressing demands upon it. This fact does not rest on my assertion, as the transactions referred to are entered in the books now in the possession of the assignees, and to which I have had no access since my apprehension. These books, I understand, are now in Court, and will confirm the truth of my statement; and to whatever account all the sums may be entered, whether to that of Stock, of Exchequer Bills, or to my private account, the whole went to the general funds of the Banking-house. I alone have been doomed to suffer the stigma of all the transaction; but, tortured as I have been, it now becomes an imperative duty to explain to you, Gentlemen, and through you to the world at large, that the vile accusations heaped upon me, (known to be utterly false by all those who are best acquainted with my private life and habits,) have been so heaped upon me for the purpose of loading me with the whole of the obloquy of those transactions, from which, and from which alone my partners were preserved from bankruptcy. I have been accused of crimes I never even contemplated, and of acts of profligacy I never committed; and I appear at this Bar with every prejudice against me, and almost prejudged. To suit the purposes of the persons to whom I allude, I have been represented as a man of prodigal extravagance; prodigal indeed I must have been, had I expended those large sums which will hereafter be proved to have gone exclusively to support the credit of a tottering firm, the miseries of which were greatly accelerated by the drafts of two of its members to the amount of near 100,000 l. I maintained but two establishments, one at Brighton, where my mother and my sister resided in the season - the expenses of which to me, exclusive of wine, were within 400 l. per annum. One at Lambeth, where my two children lived, from its very nature, private and inexpensive, to which I resorted for retirement, after many a day passed in devising means to avert the embarrassments of the Banking-house. The dwelling-house in Berners-street belonged solely to my mother, with the exception of a library and a single bed-room. This was the extent of my expenditure, so far as domestic expenditure is concerned. I am next accused of being an habitual gambler, an accusation which, if true, might easily account for the diffusion of the property. I am indeed a member of two clubs, the Albion, and the Stratford, but never in my life did I play in either, at cards or dice, or any game of chance; this is well known to the gentlemen of these clubs - and my private friends with whom I more intimately associated, can equally assert my freedom from all habit or disposition to play. It has been as cruelly asserted that I fraudulently invested money in the funds to answer the payment of annuities, amounting to 2,200 l. settled upon females. I never did make any such investment; neither at home or abroad, in any funds whatever, have I any investment; nor is there one shilling secretly deposited by me in the hands of any human being. Equally ungenerous, and equally untrue it is, to charge me with having lent too loose and disorderly persons large sums which never have, and never will be repaid. I lent no sums, but to a very trifling amount, and those were advanced to valued friends. I can, therefore, at this solemn moment, declare most fervently, that I never had any advantage beyond that in which all my partners participated, in any of the transactions which are now questioned. They indeed have considered themselves as partners only in the profits, and I am to be burthened with the whole of the approbrium, that others may consider them as the victims of my extravagance. I make this statement, not with a view to criminate others, or to exculpate myself; but borne down as I am by calamity, I will not consent to be held out to the world as a cold blooded and abandoned profligate, ruining all around me for the selfish gratification of vice and sensuality, and involving even my confiding partners in the general destruction. Gentlemen, Ihave frailties and errors enough to account for. I have sufferings enough past, present, and in prospect, and if my life were all that was required of me, I might endure in silence, though I will not endure the odium on my memory, of having sinned to pamper delinquencies to which I never was addicted. Thus much has been extorted from me by the fabrications which have been cruelly spread amongst the public; that very public, from whom the arbiters of my fate were to be selected. Perhaps, however, I ought to thank the enemy who besieged the prison with his slanders - that he did so whilst my life was spared to refute them, and that he waited not until the grave to which he would hurry me had closed at once on my answer and my forgiveness. There is one subject more connected with these charges to which I am compelled to advert, and I do so with great reluctance. It is added to the other charges made against me, lest the world should think there was any vice in which I was not an adept. I have been accused of acting treacherously towards the female who now bears my name, having refused to make reparation until threatened by her brother, and of having deserted her at a moment when she had the greatest claim on my protection. Delicacy forbids me entering into an explanation on this subject further than to declare, that the conduct I adopted on that occasion was uninfluenced by the interference of any individual, and arose, as I then considered, and do still consider, from a laudable and honourable feeling on my part; and the lady's brother, so far from coming forward at the time alluded to, was on his passage to the West Indies. Could all the circumstances be exposed, I feel convinced that every liberal-minded man would applaud my determination, and I feel satisfaction in stating, that the lady in question has always been, and still is actuated by the best of feelings towards me. I have now only to apologize to the Court for having entered so much at length into the statement of my unfortunate case, and in conclusion I have to express my perfect confidence, that it will receive every favourable consideration at your hands; and I fully rely that you, Gentlemen of the Jury, will give an impartial and merciful decision.

The following persons, all of whom were of great respectability, deposed to the prisoner's previous character, as that of the strictest integrity - John Wilson , Esq.; Sir Charles Forbes , Bart.; Mr. Gray; James Burton , Esq.; Devie Robertson, Esq.; William Wadd , Esq.; James Lindsay, Esq.; Anthony Brown , Esq.; Benjamin Wyatt , Esq.; William Montrion , Esq.; John Montague , Esq.; James Vernon , Esq.; - Ross, Esq.; Joseph Bushnan , Esq; - Church; and - Yatman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40 - of Uttering only .

Reference Number: t18241028-98

Middlesex Cases, Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1335. EVAN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , at St. James's, Westminster , two coats, value 50 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 14 s.; a snuff-box, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a silver medal, value 4 s.; two curtains, value 1 s.; a pair of shoes, value 4 s.; two shirts, value 4 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; and four sovereigns, the property of Robert Noddin , in the dwelling-house of Jacob Cambage .

ROBERT NODDIN . I am a journeyman plumber , and occupy one room in the house of Jacob Cambage , No. 117, Edward-street , in the parish of St. James's, Westminster. I have known the prisoner many years - he frequently came to my room. On Sunday the 3d of October, he came about eight o'clock and breakfasted with me. I went out about a quarter to nine to get shaved, leaving him in the room, and my property all safe. I expected to find him still there, as he said he would wait; but on returning about ten I found him gone; my box was broken open and two coats, a pair of trowsers, a pair of shoes, stockings, a snuffbox, two shirts, two curtains, and a silver medal of King William gone. I found a knife of mine and a small bar close by the box - I had left it by the fire-side, as I use it for a poker. I found some of the property in pawn. I could not replace my property for 4 l. - it was well worth that.

JAMES CAMPER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 51, Whitechapel-road. I have two coats and a pair of trowsers. I believe the prisoner to be the man who pawned them on Monday morning the 4th of October, about eleven o'clock for 35 s. in the name of John Davis - they are worth 45 s. I saw him about a fortnight afterwards, and have very little doubt of him - I had seen him as a customer a month or six weeks before.

JOHN FITGH . I am apprentice to Mr. Stafford, pawnbroker, St. John-street. I have a snuff-box and handkerchief pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of October for 1 s.

JOHN CHUBB . I am servant to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, Skinner-street. I have a silver medal and a handkerchief pawned by the prisoner, on Monday the 4th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, for 5 s. 6 d.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 10th of October I apprehended the prisoner, and found several duplicates upon him, which led to all this property. I asked him who the property belonged to - he said it was his own. I took him to the office.

ROBERT NODDIN re-examined. I also missed four sovereigns from my box, which was locked, and I had the key; it appeared to have been forced open by the iron. The prisoner is a tailor, and frequently came to mend my clothes; all this property is mine.

Prisoner. I saw no sovereign, but I am guilty of taking the things.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Reference Number: t18241028-99

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1352. GEORGE IVORY and JAMES DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , a box, value 2 s.; ten sovereigns, sixteen half-crowns, thirty shillings, twenty sixpences, one hundred and forty-four penny pieces, and one hundred and forty-four halfpence, the property of Thomas Cunningham , in his dwelling-house .

MARIA CUNNINGHAM . I am the wife of Thomas Cunningham - we keep the Cheshire Cheese, public-house , Essex-street, Strand ; the prisoners frequented the house, and were generally in the parlour, which has no communication with the bar. On the evening of the 3d of September they were there, with two others, and while they were there I put ten sovereigns and 4 l. in silver into a cupboard in the bar. They went out about eleven o'clock, and I directly missed it - I had been in the bar all the time they were there: they did not come into the bar.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-100

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1353. ELIZABETH LEWIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jessup , on the afternoon of the 29th of September , (no person being therein) and stealing a watch, value 3 l., and a key, value 2 d. , his property.

ANN JESSUP . I am the wife of John Jessup ; we live in Eastfield-street, Limehouse - the prisoner's sister, Hannah lodges with us. On the 29th of September, between one and two o'clock, I went out, leaving her sister in care of the house. I returned at six, her sister was still there, but the watch was gone. The prisoner was taken on the same day.

JAMES LEA. I am an officer of Whitechapel. I took Hannah Lewis into custody; I afterwards found a duplicate, which led me to Ravenor's, where I found the watch, and apprehended the prisoner; when she saw her sister in custody she said her sister knew nothing about it, that she had committed the robbery herself. I was present when she made a statement to the Magistrate, which was taken down; I saw the Magistrate sign it in her presence - (looking at it) - this is it; (read.)

The prisoner says

"On Sunday last, about three o'clock I went to Mr. Jessup's house, went through the adjoining house, and took the watch from the mantle-piece, and pawned it at Mr. Ravenor's"

GEORGE RAVENOR. I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of September, in the name of Jessup, for 1 l.; it might sell for 2 l.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-101

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1354. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , nineteen pieces of paper, called cartridge paper, value 1 d.; two pieces of paper bearing a stamp, denoting the payment of a duty of 15 s. value 30 s.; seventy-five other pieces of paper, denoting the payment of certain duties, value 7 l. 9 s.; three half-crowns, and three sixpences , the property of Thomas Whitaker .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-102

1355. GEORGE GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of George Piggott , from his person .

GEORGE PIGGOTT . I live at Islington. On the 26th of September, about a quarter to nine o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-market , near the prison - I felt a book move in my pocket, and on turning round missed my handkerchief, and collared the prisoner with in his hand; he let it fall. I gave it to the officer. He was close behind me - two or three persons came round, and began fighting, but I kept hold of him.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I was in a public-house, and hearing of a robbery I went out, and found Mr. Piggott holding the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw several persons, and went to pass them; the gentleman came up and asked if I had his handkerchief; he said he had picked it up three yards from me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-103

1356. ANN JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, three half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences, the monies of Robert Anderson , from his person .

ROBERT ANDERSON . I live in Dyer's-buildings, Holborn. On the 2d of October, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner at the bottom of Chancery-lane; she asked if I was going home; I said, Yes, and suffered her to have my arm as far as Castle-street. I refused to go home with her. She left me suddenly. I put my hand to my watch pocket, and found I was robbed of this money. I found her at the end of Barlett's-buildings - she wished to get away. I gave her in charge, and in her stocking the two sovereigns and a half were found - the half-sovereign was quite new, which I had observed before.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I searched the prisoner, and found three half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences - the two sovereigns and a half fell out of her stockings; she then fell on her knees and begged pardon. She had denied having any gold.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-104

1357. PETER TARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a carcase of mutton, value 2 l., and one hundred and twenty pounds of mutton, value 3 l. , the goods of William Hailes and Thomas Brookes .

THOMAS BROOKS . I am in partnership with William Hailes - we are meat salesmen at Newgate-market .

RICHARD CHIVERS . I am a waggoner, and live at Longford. I unloaded some meat at three o'clock in the morning, and put it down at the prosecutors' stall - I went with a second package, and found the first gone. I afterwards found the prisoner in custody with it, at Cripplegate watch-house.

THOMAS OVERTON . I am a watchman. On the 16th of October, at a quarter past three o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Barbican, with this package on his shoulder - he said he had brought it from Newgate-market, and was taking it to Mr. Flax, of Whitecross-street - that a waggoner had employed him to carry it, and I might go and see if it was not right, but I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say that if you went he would shew you the man who sent him - A. Yes - Mr. Flax.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. Mr. Brooks came and said I should find a paper in the cloth, with the name of Parkins, which I did. The prisoner said he had left his hat in the market; I took him there, but he could not find it.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him where I brought it from and who employed me. I am a porter in the market - the man came as far as Butcherhall-lane with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-105

1358. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Pallister , from his person .

MR. JOHN PALLISTER . I live in St. Paul's Church-yard. On the evening of the 3d of October this handkerchief was stolen from my pocket; it was safe half an hour before. I know it to be mine, by the pattern and its appearance.

GEORGE LOCK . I am an officer. On the 3d of October I was in Fleet-street, and saw Mr. Pallister and two gentlemen just beyond Fleet-market ; the prisoner and another were following them. Mr. Pallister stopped just before he got to Old Change : I went up and asked if he had lost anything - he missed his handkerchief. I went and took them both, and while I was searching the other man at the Compter I saw the handkerchief at the prisoner's feet; I had not seen him take it for as they saw me; I kept behind, and pretended to be drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Limehouse; they searched me in the Church-yard, and found nothing, but at the Compter the officer saw the handkerchief under the table.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-106

1359. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a ream of post paper, value 18 s. , the goods of David Sandell .

DAVID SANDELL . I am a stationer . On the 16th of October, in the morning, when I went out, this paper was in my warehouse, near the passage door. I know it by the Excise mark.

THOMAS IZOD . I am warehouseman to Mr. Sandell. About a quarter to twelve o'clock I was in the counting-house, the prisoner came in and asked if I knew anybody who would employ him, I said I did not; he returned towards the door, and as he went out, I saw him take a ream of paper. I pursued him into Abchurch-lane, called Stop thief! and he dropped it from under his arm, and was secured up a gateway without my losing sight of him. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-107

1360. GEORGE HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Gilbert , from his person .

JOHN GILBERT . I am a hosier . On the 24th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Smithfield , and felt something at my right-hand coat pocket. I turned round and saw my handkerchief drop from the prisoner's hand. I picked it up and immediately collared him; he said

"I have not got your handkerchief."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. I could have got away, but knew myself innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-108

1361. THOMAS NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a trunk, value 14 s. , the goods of John Watson and William Elijah Hales .

JOHN WATSON , JUN. I work with my father John Watson , who is in partnership with William Elijah Hales ; they are trunk-makers , and live in Silver-street, Wood-street . On the 19th of October, about twenty minutes to six o'clock, I was in the shop; the prisoner and a trunk were brought into the shop by Bland.

SAMUEL BLAND . I was in Silver-street, and saw the prisoner take a trunk from this shop-window, and walk to a gateway, then cross over with it on his shoulder. I collared him and took him back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-109

1362. FREDERICK BIDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Bell , from his person .

JAMES BELL . I live in Bride-lane. On the 26th of September, I was in Fleet-street ; about a quarter to eleven o'clock at night, and felt a tug at my right-hand pocket. I looked over my shoulder, and saw the prisoner passing my handkerchief to another person. I immediately seized him, and took him to the watch-house - the handkerchief was gone. I am sure I saw it in his hand - it was safe ten minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along; he turned round and asked if I had his handkerchief - he immediately collared me, took me up Chancery-lane, and said

"Now if you will tell me if you took it, or who did, I will let you go.

MR. BELL. I said if he would tell me who he gave it to I would let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-110

1363. CATHERINE M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , a watch, value 1 l.; a key, value 1 d.; and a ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of John Wright , from his person .

JOHN WRIGHT . On the 15th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon I was coming over Blackfriars-bridge, and met the prisoner and another woman; they enticed me into George-alley, Fleet-market ; I was shoved about in the room - and before I could recover myself, both ran away; and the instant they were gone I missed my watch - I found it in pawn afterwards. I am sure of her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DAY . I am a watchman of St. Bride's, and live in George-alley, next door to this house. I was getting up on this evening between seven and eight o'clock to go on duty - I heard a noise - I went to the window and saw the prisoner run round the next court, and come down towards the market again, shewing a silver watch to some persons; I knew her well before. I was not dressed and could not go out. Her mother brought me the duplicate of the watch.

EDWARD PRICE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on the 17th of September. Day gave me the duplicate - the prosecutor told me the number and maker's name before he saw it.

- . I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of September, a man pawned this watch; and next day a female, but not the prisoner, had 3 s., more on it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman gave me the

ticket, and asked me to go to the pawnbroker's and get 3 s. on it - I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-111

1364. DAVID BONHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , an oil brush, value 6 d., the goods of William Tipton ; a smock frock, value 6 d.; a waistcoat, value 1 s., and two hempen sacks, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Saunders .

THOMAS GREGSON . I am a patrol. I found this property in a room, which I understood to be the prisoners - but never saw him there - and nobody here can prove that he lived there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-112

1365. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 50 lbs. of leaden pipe, value 12 s. , the goods of Edward Adcock .

EDWARD ADCOCK . I live in Old-Bethlem . This pipe is mine. On the 4th of October when I came home I found a crowd round my door - and the prisoner was in custody with it.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I live on Tower-hill. I saw the prisoner lurking about Mr. Adcock's shop - he then went in, and came out with this pipe on his shoulder - I ran on and made enquiries - then followed, and took him in two minutes with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man came up, and asked me if I wanted a job; he gave me the lead to carry to Houndsditch.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-113

NEW COURT, (3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1366. WILLIAM NICHOLS and SAMUEL TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a seal, value 30 s., the goods of William Strowager Simpson , from his person .

WILLIAM STROWAGER SIMPSON . I am a merchant's clerk , and live in Pinderson's-place, Bethnal-green. About the 10th of September, 1823, I was in Bethnal-green road ; a person approached me as I crossed a street, and snatched a seal hanging to my watch ribbon, and ran off; I pursued him a few paces, but seeing another person or two starting at the same time, I thought it prudent not to go further.

JOHN CLAYTON . I am a weaver. I live near Taylor, who lives at Bethnal-green. Nichols lives in George-street; I have known them ten years - I met Taylor by my own gate about eleven o'clock one morning last year - I cannot tell the month. - he said Nichols was coming with a seal, and they were going to Masters with it to sell. Nichols came up and produced a seal - they went together to Masters, who is a weaver, and called him out - I went with them; the seal had some letters on it; but I cannot tell what they were - I believe it was a gold seal - I believe they asked 25 s. for it. Masters said to me,

"Do you think it worth the money" - I said

"If it is a good one it is" - he did not buy it, and they went towards Brick-lane, to pawn it. I do not know whether they did or no. I was with Taylor about a week after in Bethnal-green road - a gentleman passed by, and Taylor said, that was the person they had flimped the other night; he did not say of what.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you had any quarrel with Nichols lately, and had him apprehended - A. Yes, about three weeks ago, for an assault - this conversation took place last year; I mentioned it at the office when he was taken up for the assault - I had mentioned it to Mr. Simmond the clerk, at the Thames Police-office, at the time of the robbery. I have myself been charged with a highway-robbery, in 1819, and acquitted.

CHARLES MASTERS . I am a weaver, and live in Bethnal-green. Taylor lived in the neighbourhood for two or three years, I was sitting one day last year at the end of my master's garden, eating my dinner - he came to me at the back of the pales, and said;

"Charles, do you want to buy a seal" I said why - he said, he had one to dispose of for a man in distress - he did not shew it to me; nor did I buy it. I went out after I had done my work, and Clayton came to me and said -

"What a fool you was not to buy that seal." Clayton has since told me that these men were innocent, and wanted me to swear false - he said he was sorry for what he had done, and wished me to agree in the same story to save himself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-114

1367. CHARLOTTE ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , nine shillings and six sixpences, the monies of James Webb , from his person ,

JAMES WEBB . I was at the Cape of Good-Hope public house, Titchfield-street, on the 4th of this month - I had eleven shillings and eight sixpences in a purse. The prisoner came in and sat by me. I had a bad cold, and she asked me what was the matter, and said if I would go with her she would get me some stuff that would do me good in twenty-four hours - we went out to another public-house - I took out my purse, and it had a hole in it - she said

"Give me your purse and I will stick a pin in it" - she took it, and I turned round and said

"I have lost a bundle from my side" she then took up my money, and put two shillings and two sixpences into the purse - wrapped it up, and said

"There is your purse, take care of it," we went out, and she said

"We will find the bundle in two minutes;" I lost sight of her in about one minute.

HENRY MERA . My father keeps the Anchor public house, in Oxford-market. The prisoner and prosecutor were there together - he said he had lost a bundle - the prisoner said she would go and look for. I did not hear any thing about the money - they had three or four glasses of gin and water; but were neither of them intoxicated.

JAMES SHIELDS . I took the prisoner into custody on the Thursday after - I found no money on her - but as we went to Marlborough-street, she said she had not taken the money; but it should be 3 s. or 4 s. in my way if I would let her go.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had his money nor his purse.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18241028-115

1368. SOLOMON JACOBS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Poyner , on the 15th of September ,

with intent his goods and chattels, from his person and against his will, feloniously to steal .

MATTHEW POYNER . On the 15th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon I was with my wife in Petticoat-lane , and saw the prisoner with two other persons on the opposite side of the way; I had seen him before, and knew his person. One Moses Solomon crossed over to me, and said he would cut my bl - y head off - this was in the prisoner's hearing; he was then crossing back to his companions, and one of them said

"Go back and slog him". I put the chain of my watch into my trowsers - Moses Solomon then crossed over to me, and struck me about the bead with his stick - he felled me to the ground, and made a grasp at my watch, and said it was stowed away. I could not see the prisoner at that time - I then received two kicks on the back of my head - but I cannot say who gave them - when I got up I saw the prisoner and Moses Solomon by me - one of them had got hold of my wife's bundle.

MARY POYNER . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw Moses Solomon kneel down, and put his hand to my husband's fob. I do not know what he did. I was beaten by some person - I believe this man. I did not see him do anything to my husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18241028-116

1369. ELEANOR NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a handkerchief, value 6 d., a petticoat, value 1 s.; a curtain, value 6 d.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; an ear-ring, value 1 s.; a thimble, value 6 d.; a necklace, value 2 s.; a brooch, value 1 s.; a ring, value 10 s.; two half-crowns, a shilling, and four sixpences , the property of Lewis Desermeaux , her master.

LEWIS DESERMEAUX . I live in Charlton-street, Somer's Town. The prisoner was in my service about three months - in consequence of the disappearance of some articles about the 5th or 6th of October, I expressed my suspicions to her - she offered to have her box and drawers searched my sister searched them in my presence; I can positively state that some of the things found are mine; the handkerchief I had had in wear; the ring is one my wife had worn. This curtain and this handkerchief were taken from her box - and the other things from her person.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did she come into your service - A. About July; my wife died on the 18th of last month. I cannot say at what time I had seen the things previous to their being found; she had the care of the things; I do not know that Mrs. Desermeaux did not give them to her; they are but of trifling value.

CHARLOTTE DESERMEAUX . I am the prosecutor's sister. I missed a small parcel of linen, which I enquired about; the prisoner said she knew nothing of it, but owned that she had seen it in the room where I had placed it. The box which was searched was in the prisoner's own room. Mrs. Desermeaux had then been dead a week or ten days, and during her illness the prisoner had to go to every drawer and place in the house. She offered to shew me her box if I suspected her; I believe the box had been locked, but she opened it, and took up the things very quickly; I then put my hand into the box, and felt three bottles of wine, which she said her father had sent her - I left them in the box. I then found a towel with the mark cut out, and a pocket handkerchief marked D., which had not been used since it was washed - it was tumbled; I believe it to be Mr. Desemeaux's; and in her drawer I found a muslin curtain, quite clean, and upon looking over my brother's curtains I missed one. I found a pair of stockings with the mark D. picked out; an ear-ring, which was Mrs. Desermeax's - a garnet ring, and a necklace, which I believe were her's and a broach, but of that I cannot be certain; there was some money found. When the officer searched her he asked whose the garnet ring was; she said her master's, and so were the broach and necklace; the petticoat she said was her own, but in taking one of my sister's out of the drawer it was precisely like it, and very different to the way in which a servant would have them made; she gave no reason for keeping the things about her person, but appeared much confused.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when she said the things were her master's - A. Yes. I did not say I would not prosecute her if she told the truth.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. I found the petticoat which Miss Desermeaux claimed in the box - the prisoner said nothing about that; I then searched her person, and found the ring, brooch, and necklace; the ear-ring had been found before I got there; these things were loose in her pocket. I asked the prisoner whose they were - she said her master's. They were all female ornaments - I found 23 s. on her person, which she said was her master's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The linen I had had two years; it was given to me by a young woman whom I kept company with; the handkerchief my mother gave me. The broach and necklace were not in the box; the handkerchief and curtain were taken into my room, because they were wet. Miss Desermeaux told me she would forgive me if I told all - I said I never stole anything.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-117

1370. WILLIAM JONES and CHARLES CONLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a picture, value 10 l., and a picture frame, value 2 s., the goods of William Peatt Lett , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Napier Sturt .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Thomas Lennox Napier Sturt .

MARY ANN SUMMERS . I have the charge of Mr. Thomas Lennox Napier Sturt 's house. On Sunday, the 17th of October, I opened the parlour windows; they were open till the afternoon - a shower came on about four o'clock, and I went and shut them; I then went down to the house keeper's room under the parlour, and while there I heard a noise in the parlour; the windows were closed, but not bolted; my brother was with me, and I said to him,

"That sounds like somebody over our heads, we will go and see, and shut the shutters" - we went to the stairs, and I heard the street door slam, as if somebody was going out; I am sure the street door had been locked. When I got to the parlour the door was wide

open; I had shut it when I went down, about an hour before - I looked at the windows, the sash and the blinds were then open, and a chair stood under the window, with wet footmarks upon it; an oil painting had been taken from a little recess. A chair had been moved to the sideboard, to enable a person to get it down. I went all over the house, but found no person, nor anything more gone. I have seen the frame of the picture since, at our house, when it was brought by the officer - as soon as I saw the frame I thought it the frame of that picture. I have lived there five or six years, and have dusted the picture and looked at them very often.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. On Monday, the 18th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to St. Giles's, after some persons, and on going up Bainbridge-street in a court on looking over a window shutter, the two prisoners, sitting in a room; I tried the door, and it was locked - I told them to open it, and they did so; there was no other person in the room. I observed this picture frame concealed under the bed: I questioned them concerning it, and they said they knew nothing about it. I asked if they lived there: they denied that at first, but Jones afterwards acknowledged that he lived there. Conley said he came in with a girl to drink tea with Jones; the tea things were set for two persons only. Jones was behind the door, and had got his coat off; he said he had been changing his shirt. I took them to the office, and took the frame to Mr. Sturt's house on the Friday following; I saw the mark where the frame had hung on the wall; it fitted exactly - I looked at it very attentively for ten minutes. The moment I took it to the house the last witness said that was the frame of her master's picture.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKRIDGE . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Sturt's house on the Tuesday after the robbery; I found footmarks on a chair, and on a small ledge under the window, and on the sideboard. I heard on the Thursday that the men were in custody; I went to Clerkenwell-prison, and asked them what they were there for; they said for bail. I asked Conley what he knew about the pictures - he said nothing; I then desired him and Jones to pull off their shoes, which I took to Mr. Sturt's, and they exactly corresponded with the marks of feet in the house. One pair of shoes has nails in them, and the other has not.

JONES'S Defence. Conley was not in my company five minutes on the day I was taken.

CONLEY'S Defence. I was very ill, and went to take a walk, and called on Jones - when I had been there about five minutes the officer came.

JONES - GUILTY. Aged 22.

CONLEY - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-118

1371. WILLIAM GALE was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT GLENDINING . I am a baker , and live in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. The prisoner was in my employ for eight months, and was entrusted to receive money from my customers, for which he was to account to me every day, unless I happened to be out of town. I had a customer of the name of Brown, who on the 21st of September owed me about 18 s. or 1 l. - he did not account to me for two half-crowns that Mrs. Brown had paid him on that day; he left me on the 7th of October, but he had never brought them to account.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I live in Upper Rathbone-place. I had employed Mr. Glendining as my baker. On the 21st of September I received a bill of 18 s. 3 d., for bread from him, by the prisoner. I returned the bill to him to get his master to rectify a mistake, and gave him two half-crowns on account: he gave me no receipt for it, and in about a fortnight or three weeks I received another bill from the foreman.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-119

1372. GEORGE BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , two pairs of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of Mary Arthur .

HENRY MORGAN . I live at No. 72, Cow-cross, and am a patrol. On the 5th of October, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner coming along Sharp's-alley, Cowcross. I went and asked him what he had got under his coat - he said

"Nothing at all;" I said,

"Yes, you have," and found two pairs of shoes on him; he then said it was his own work. I took him to Hatton-garden the same evening - the Magistrate let him go, because he said he could bring a person to prove that he made the shoes were detained; and were claimed three days afterwards by Mrs. Arthur. He was taken last Monday when I met him in the street; he had said he lived in White Horse-court, Chick-lane, but we could not find him there.

MARY ARTHUR . I am a widow , and live in St. John's-lane . I carry on the business of a shoemaker - I lost two pairs of shoes from my shop on the 5th of October; a person must have come into the shop to have taken them. I had seen them at three o'clock, and missed them a little after seven. The officer brought one shoe, and asked me if I knew it. I went afterwards to Hatton-garden, and saw two pairs of shoes, which I could swear to - there is the mark of P. A. on them, which are the initials of my husband's name, which was Philip.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. After I was put into the lock-up house, the beadle called the patrol a false swearing vagabond, and there seemed to be an argument between them which of them should prosecute me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-120

1373. WILLIAM MURREL and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , a piece of printed cotton, containing twenty-five yards, value 23 s. , the goods of Thomas Fenwick and Edward Evans .

THOMAS FENWICK . I am a linen-draper , and am in partnership with Edward Evans ; we live in Whitechapel-road . On the 30th of September, this piece of printed cotton was on a form in the front part of the shop, with about one hundred pieces more. I did not see it taken.

JAMES ROWLEY . I am a ham and tongue dealer, and live next door to Mr. Fenwick's. I saw the two prisoners near the door about a quarter before nine o'clock

that morning in company with two others. I watched them, and saw Murrell in the act of wrapping up the piece of print under his apron. I did not see Davis at that time, but I had seen him a quarter of an hour before. I let Murrell run about thirty yards, and then pursued - he dropped the print. I followed him and took him - there was another with him, but I could not identify him - he got away; a strange woman picked up the print.

ADAM RANWELL . I am shopman to the prosecutor's. I put this print at the door about a quarter of an hour before it was taken; the prisoner Davis came and asked the price of a handkerchief. and said it was too dear - this was about two minutes before Mr. Rowley brought back Murrell - I was hanging some goods up at the time; the piece of cotton brought back by Mr. Rowley, was the piece that had been in the shop.

SAMUEL GILES . I am a constable. I and Curtis were in Whitechapel. I saw Davis going along on the other side of the way, at a very quick pace, about three hundred yards from the shop - Murrell was then detained in the shop; we stopped Davis - he was very saucy, and said he would bring an action against my partner. Ranwell spoke to his having been at the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVIS'S Defence. As I was going up Whitechapel on an errand, I asked the price of a handkerchief, and the two gentlemen stopped me.

MURRELL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-121

1374. CHARLES CHRISTMAS MARRYAT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a bottle, value 4 s., and two quarts of Noyean, value 8 s. , the goods of James M'Gowran .

JAMES M'GOWRAN . I keep a wine vaults in Pall-mall. On the 25th of October, about half-past eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came in with two other soldiers and a woman - they had half a pint of gin; when I had served them, I went to the door, and while I was there the prisoner went out; my mother came to the door and gave me some information. I followed him, and saw the bottle of Noyeau in his possession - he ran. I called Stop thief! and pursued him down Pall-Mall; there are four soldiers opposite to Carlton Palace , and as he could not pass them, he turned back and threw the bottle at my head - it was broken to pieces.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am a leather manufacturer. I was at the door of the wine-vaults, and saw the prisoner go in and come out. I joined in the pursuit, and saw him throw the bottle at M'Gowran's head.

THOMAS SAVAGE . I am a watchman in Pall Mall. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run. I went to take him, and while he was on the ground, I put my hand to his side and I felt my hand cut. I said

"He has some sharp instruments about him." I found these two knives in his side pocket - he was rather tipsy.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect anything of it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-122

1375. JOHN CHEESEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , seven live tame chickens, price 7 s. and one live tame turkey poult, price 2 s. , the property of Stephen Chappell .

STEPHEN CHAPPELL . I live at Sunbury , and am a farmer . On the 5th of October, I had seven chickens and a turkey poult stolen from me - I had seen them the day before; they were kept in a shed adjoining my barn; missed them between five and six o'clock in the morning; there is a gate to the yard which was locked, and a person must have got over the gate to get them; I have seen the turkey since, in the possession of John Foot ; they were worth 7 s. or 8 s.

JOHN FOOT . I live at Worthing, near Guildford, about thirteen miles from Sunbury, and am a poulterer. I have a turkey poult, which I bought on the 6th of October, in Chertsey-market; I bought seven chickens at the same time of the prisoner; I gave 7 s. for the chickens, and 1 s. 6 d. for the turkey - I thought he did not come honestly by them, and had him detained, but the Magistrates let him go, because there was no owner for them. I killed the chickens, and sent them to Leadenhall-market; the turkey I kept alive. He said be came from Ashford, but he could not tell the name of any person who lived there, nor the sign of the public-house where he had been.

WILLIAM RUFF. I am a constable. I was in Chertsey-market, and the man who bought the poultry gave me charge of the prisoner.

JAMES BOLTON . I am a butcher. The prisoner was given into my custody on the 9th of October, with this turkey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had bought these chickens on the Tuesday before the market day.

GUILTY Aged 55.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-123

1376. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 49 lbs. of pork, value 30 s. , the goods of George Stieber .

HENRY MULL . I live with Mr. George Stieber , in Whitechapel ; he is pork butcher . On Tuesday, the 19th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner took a side of pork, while I was serving in the shop. I went with the officer and took him with it on his shoulder; it had hung on the inner part of the door post. I never lost sight of him till he was stopped.

THOMAS DREW . I am an officer. I was in the shop and saw the prisoner running with the pork, and took him with it.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-124

1377. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a whittle, value 3 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Metcalf , widow.

ELIZABETH METCALF . I am a widow , and live in North-street, Limehouse . I lost a whittle on the 2d of October, from a chair in my parlour, between ten and eleven o'clock - I saw it on the same day at the pawnbroker's.

LOWTHER JACKSON . I am shopman to Mr. Dickenson, of Limehouse. I have a whittle which the prisoner brought about twelve o'clock, on the 2d of October; I advanced 2 s. on it - the prosecutor's girl was in the shop at the time, and said her mother had lost a whittle; I ran

out after him about three hundred yards, and saw him dividing the money with a man. I took them both, and called some person to assist me; the man got away, but I gave a description of his person, and he was taken the same evening.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in charge to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the street, and the man said he would give me three-pence to pawn the whittle. I went and I took the duplicate and the money to him, and he gave me three-pence; they let the man go, and would not let me speak a word.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-125

1378. JAMES FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a watch, value 20 s., the goods of William Duffin ; two shirts, value 6 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Zachariah Styles .

ZACHARIAH STYLES . I live at Stanmore . I lost a watch belonging to William Duffin , and a handkerchief, and two shirts of my own.

ANN STYLES . I am the prosecutor's wife. The shirts and handkerchief were hanging up in my kitchen at a quarter before two o'clock, when I went to bed - the doors were not locked because the prisoner who lodged with us, was not come in; he had been with me about seven weeks. About three o'clock, Duffin called out that the black was robbing the house. I found his cap in Duffin's room; he got away, but was taken on the Friday following; he had never returned to my house.

WILLIAM DUFFIN . My watch was stolen on the same night - it had been in a basket by the side of my bed. I have never seen it since. I found the prisoner in my room, and in struggling, I caught him by the hair of his head; I am sure it was him, and no other. I gave the alarm, but he got away, and never came back - he had said that my watch was of no use to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I and the landlord were drinking together on the night before, and I found myself in a gutter next morning, without a watch or a shoe on my foot; I have said of Duffin's watch, what use was it, when it, did not go right, for us to go to work in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-126

1379. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 7 lbs. of iron-nails, value 4 s. , the goods of John Williams and Charles Williams , his masters .

JOHN LITTLE . I am an officer of the Thames-police. I apprehended the prisoner at a marine store-shop, in Cow-cross, on the 20th of October, with a bundle on his arm, with 7 lbs. of new iron-nails in it - I asked where he got them; he said from his own house, the Crown and Cann public-house, Clerkenwell. He said he had bought them in Long-lane - I asked the name of the person - he made no answer - I asked him to go and show me the shop - we set off; but when we had walked about a dozen yards, he said

"I will tell you the truth," he then said that he had taken them from his maste, Messrs. Williams, at different times.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did he tell you who his masters were - A. Yes. He was not offering the nails for sale - there were three or four customers in the shop.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am in partnership with my father John Williams . The prisoner has been in our employ for three years - these nails exactly correspond with what we had. He said it was the first time he had ever done so.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he a good character before he came to you - A. Yes. We lost a great quantity of nails; but had no suspicion of him. We had a man who left us about a fortnight before, on a charge of stealing a saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I had some of the nails before, which I bought.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Five Weeks .

Reference Number: t18241028-127

1380. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Law , on the 11th of October, with intent to rob him and his goods and monies from his person, feloniously to steal .

EDWARD LAW . I live at Enfield, and am a bricklayer . On the 11th of October I went to the Rose and Crown public-house, at Clay-hill, about six o'clock, and left about eleven at night; it was quite moon-light, and I was not at all in liquor - when I got to Enfield I saw three men against the new buildings - the prisoner was one; I had seen him before, and knew his name. I did not know the others - the prisoner seized me by the cuff of the coat, and dragged me against the poles - the other two men were gone forward - he did not speak to me, but gave me a knock on the head and kicked me - he then grabbed at my watch; I seized it, and the glass was broken in the scuffle - I asked him what he wanted - he said

"I want to rob you, what do you think?" I then ran away from him and got to my lodgings - he followed me; but when I rapped at the door he run back - he tried to get my watch and got hold of the ribbon; but I got it from him - he seemed to be tipsy; but he could run very well - I had seen him about a fortnight before that time - he was apprehended next day about two o'clock at the Rising-Sun public-house, at Enfield Town. I was not at all hurt, but my clothes were dirtied.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I heard of this transaction the next day - I took the prisoner at the Rising-Sun public-house - he said he knew nothing about it. I have known him from a boy - he said he left the public-house about half-past eleven o'clock, and went home with two men named William Hill and William Tapp , and never left them - they are not here; nor did they appear before the magistrates. Mr. Hill came to me the next morning - I said to him

"The prisoner says he never left your company."

"Yes" said he,

"he did stop behind for something, but I do not know what, and he overtook me again at the bridge."

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left my companions above six yards.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-128

1681. JAMES EVANS and ROBERT BERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , three half-crowns, eleven shillings and five sixpences, the monies of Henry Morgan , from his person .

HENRY MORGAN . I live in Harley-street, and am journeyman to Mr. Kelk, of Compton-street, a smith . I was locked up in St. Ann's watchouse, on the 24th of October. I was a little in liquor - a few words occurred between me and another man, who struck me - I gave charge of him and he of me. I had 23 s. about me when I was taken to the watch-house - there were three half-crowns; the rest were shillings and sixpences - it was Saturday night; and when I had been in the lock-up-house half an hour, I asked the watch-house keeper if he would take a guinea for my bail - he said he would not take any money, but would let me have a bed, for which I was to pay 1 s. 6 d. when he showed me the bed-room I gave him 2 s - he said he would go down and get change; I had got 6 d. and gave it to him - he gave me 1 s. back again - I went to bed, and awoke about five o'clock - I went to my purse and it was quite empty - I found the two prisoners in my bed-room - I did not charge them with taking the money, till I made enquiries of the watch-house keeper - they were searched in my presence, and had each of them 8 s. 6 d. about him.

Cross-examined. Q. This was on a Saturday night, and you had been to the pay-table, and had a little liquor - A. Yes - I was not drunk nor sober; I went very fast asleep in bed, and did not awake until five o'clock in the morning. The prisoners were not in the room when I went to bed; but I found them there in the morning - they had got locked up - I asked the watch-house keeper's wife whether I had left my money below or not - one of them is a hackney-coachman, and he was taken to the watch-house with his day's earnings as well as I with mine.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am the watch-house keeper. Morgan and the other man were brought in, charged by each other. Morgan was in liquor but not very drunk - he had a quantity of silver in his possession, and he offered to deposit to the amount of a guinea for his bail - the room he slept in was through my own bed-room. I saw him turn out his silver when he gave me the sixpence, I gave him back a 1 s. - he went to bed about twelve o'clock. The prisoners came in about a quarter past one o'clock, for furiously driving, and knocking a gentleman down - they wanted a bed; I said I could let them have half a bed, and they might accommodate each other - they then went into the room where the prosecutor was, and I locked them in. I did not hear of the loss of the money until about one o'clock, when my wife told me of it; the prosecutor had not then accused any person of it. The prisoners were charged with it about three o'clock, and denied it - when the prosecutor came out of his bed-room they came down with him; there were four or five other persons there; I was present when the prisoners were searched - there was 8 s. 6 d. found on each of them; one of them had two half-crowns, and the other shillings and sixpences.

Cross-examined. Q. Your wife is not here - A. No. I am constantly at the watch-house; the constable of the night takes down the charges - I am his deputy.

THOMAS MELLOWS . I was the constable of the night. I saw the prosecutor brought in with another man; they appeared to me to be both drunk; when he had been there an hour he said he would send for bail; I said

"I dare say they are in bed" - he then offered a guinea for his bail; I said I could not take it - he then pulled out some money, and asked for a bed - I cannot say how much he had; I did not hear of the robbery till three or four o'clock in the afternoon. I think there were six males and three females in charge that night; they were in separate places, and did not mix at all. I went down and searched the two prisoners - I found 8 s. 6 d. on each of them; one of them had two half-crowns.

EVANS'S Defence. The prosecutor about the middle of the day said he had left some money with the wife of the watch-house keeper; she said it was all safe if he had; that is all I know about it.

BERRY'S Defence. He had but half a bed, and I went into the room where the prosecutor was in bed, drunk and asleep; he said the next day that he had left his money with the watch-house keeper; I had taken a sovereign of my master, and it cannot be wondered at that I had 8 s. 6 d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-129

1382. THOMAS CRAVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a hat, value 11 s., the goods of Martha Gardiner , privately in her shop .

THOMAS DANIEL GARDINER . I am the son of Martha Gardiner , who keeps a hat warehouse in Chiswell-street . On the 4th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the shop with two others; they asked to look at a silk hat; I showed one to one of his companions - it did not fit him; I put that into the window, and went to the back of the shop for another; the hat was within reach of either of them - when I came back the prisoner was gone, and his two companions had removed from the window; they then bought a hat, and paid for it. I went to put away the hats afterwards and missed the one I had put into the window; there was no other person there at the time. I looked about, and saw an old hat at the end of the counter. I then went down White-cross-st. - and on coming back I looked up Playhouse-yard, and saw the two persons who had come with the prisoner, just turning into Golden-lane; I watched them into a court; and then lost sight of them. I got an officer, and saw the prisoner in about five minutes afterwards, in another court in Golden-lane, with the hat on his head; he said he had bought it of a Jew that morning, and had given his own in exchange, and 10 s. I am quite certain that it is mine; it has our private mark in it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. All the hats have the same private mark - A. Yes. I have sold a variety of hats corresponding in price and quality with this. I never saw the prisoner before that day.

JOHN TWEEDY . I saw the prisoner about twelve or one o'clock, and took hold of him and another; Gardiner charged him with having stolen his hat; be hardly made any answer, but on going down the alley he said he had bought it of a Jew for 10 s. and his old hat.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am a constable. Gardiner applied to me - I and Tweedy went and found the prisoner with the hat upon his head; there was another person with him, but not the one who was with him at the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a Jew, and gave him 10 s. and my old hat for this. It is not likely that I should take

a new hat from his shop to fit me without his seeing me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-130

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1383. JOHM BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , two looking glasses, value 17 s., the goods of Charles Danieli , from the person of Gusepe Spontini .

GUSEPE SPONTINI. I am an Italian . I sell images and glasses for my master . On the 23d of October I was carrying two glasses for the prisoner to Duke-street, Manchester-square; I went a little way, and we stopped at a public-house; the prisoner spoke to two other persons, whom I did not know - they called for a pot of beer, and the glasses were placed on the table; they told me to stop while the prisoner took the glasses out: I tried to follow him, but the other two held the door - I cried very much, and they let me out; I got into the street and saw the publican holding the prisoner.

THOMAS BOYLE . I keep the Robinhood, public-house, St. Giles's . I saw the boy with two glasses - the prisoner was with him; he ran out with the glasses, and I followed him. I looked round for a minute or two, and a boy told me where he was: I took him, and he said,

"What a fool the boy is, to make such a noise about it."

CHARLES DANIELI . I am an Italian . I sent Spontini with the glasses to Duke-street, Manchester-square. The prisoner came to my house to buy one, and I had sent the two for his wife to see them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-131

1384. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a dulcimer, value 1 l. , the goods of Thomas Knowlands .

JOHN SPENCER . I know Thomas Knowlands, he had a dulcimer which he put into my care on the 29th of September, at my room in Westminster. I left it there on the Tuesday morning, and missed it on Wednesday. I saw it again when the prisoner was taken - he lodged at my house. I had never given him any authority to take it.

Prisoner. I paid a guinea to Spencer for it - Witness. He never paid me, or anybody to my knowledge, anything for it.

ABRAHAM HOWTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at Turnham-green, and found the dulcimer upon him; he said he was going to pay Knowlands a part of the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-132

1385. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a watch, value 30 s.; three seals, value 7 s.; a chain, value 6 d.; a ring, value 1 s., and a key, value 2 d., the goods of James Pownall , from his person .

JAMES POWNALL . I am a coachman . On the 8th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was at the Rising Sun, public-house, Castle-street; I staid there till the evening, and then went to my own house, in Steven-st. - the prisoner and I had spent the day together - I was in liquor; he took me home to my own door, and then we went to another public-house. I sat down and fell asleep. I cannot tell where I lost my watch. I have known him several years. I cannot tell whether I lost the watch or gave it him in a generous mood.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned at my house, but the person who took it in has left my service.

GEORGE LEADBEATER . I was directed by the prosecutor to take Jones, I did so; he said

"It is about Pownall's watch" - I said it is; he then said he would return it, and that he had pawned it for 1 l. 15 s. I went back with him and got the ticket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-133

1386. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a saw, value 7 s. , the goods of William Forsyth .

WILLIAM FORSYTH. I am a carpenter . I was at work on the 16th of October in Park-street, Camden-town , at a new building. I left my saw and other tools there, while I went to dinner. I returned a little after one o'clock, and the prisoner was in custody with the saw - he was quite a stranger.

CHRISTOPHER WINGFIELD . I was at work for the same master on the 16th of October. I saw the prisoner in the passage of the house while the men were at dinner; he was coming out, but returned into the room, and stood close against the wall. I went and asked him what he wanted; he said he had heard that there was a man wanted. I said, if he would wait the men would return soon. I saw a plow lying down by his feet, and asked him if it was his - he said No. I then said

"Come into the shop and perhaps our master will want a hand;" we went into the shop, and I saw the saw under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Week and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-134

1387. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , three pieces of silk, containing in length twenty-four yards, value 5 l. , the goods of Ann Alice Sharman .

ANN ALICE SHARMAN . I am single , and live with my parents. On the 22d of October, about half-past six o'clock in the afternoon, I took a hackney coach in Gracechurch-street, to go to Devonshire-street, I was set down at my father's door - the prisoner was the driver. I know he is the same man. I had an umbrella, a cloak, and a parcel; the umbrella and cloak were taken out of the coach, but the parcel was left in - it contained the silk in question. I missed it in about five minutes after I got home. I went to the first coach-stand, and in a quarter of an hour, found the prisoner on the stand in Theobald's-road - he had just got on the stand. I asked if had put me down in Devonshire-street - he said Yes. I said

"I left a parcel in your coach;" he said

"If you did, it is there now, for I have not taken any one up since - you had better look into the coach;" he himself looked in and said

"There is not parcel there;" a friend (who was with me) then got into the coach, but there was nothing there; the prisoner then said

"You had better look into the pocket," which I did not, because I knew it was not there; he said

"If it is not in the coach you must have dropt it on getting into

the coach." I said I was confident I did not; the officer Thompson then came up and searched the inside of the coach, and said he did not see it, but he would look in another part of the coach.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know where these silks were got - A. No; they came from Exeter to me; upon my oath they are not French silks. I gave the parcel into the hands of my friend when I got into the coach.

WILLIAM GARDNER . I was with this young lady in the coach; she was set down in Devonshire-street. I put the parcel on the back seat of the coach. I rode with her, and saw the parcel on the seat - I forgot it when we got out. I saw it afterwards when the officer found it - it appeared to be the same by the outside of it. I heard her conversation with the prisoner in Theobald's-road; what she has stated is correct.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I was on duty, and saw two or three persons round the coach - I crossed to enquire what it was about, and the lady said she had left a parcel in the coach; the coachman denied it, and the gentleman and lady got in to look. I said

"Get me a light," and one of the watchmen got me one. I got up to the boot, and the prisoner got up on the opposite side, and attempted to cover the parcel which was in the boot with hay. I told Dodd to take him into custody - he did so. I found the parcel which the lady claimed as hers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took up the fare in Gracechurch-street; the gentleman brought the lady with some things on her arm - I do not know what they were; they got in and the gentleman gave me 2 s., before I started; as I was putting up the step of the coach, I saw a parcel in the road; I took it up, and put it into the boot. When they got out at Devonshire-street, the lady said to the gentleman

"Have you got all;" he said Yes. I went to the stand, and then they came and asked me if there was a parcel inside the coach; I said, not that I knew of, but they might look into the coach and see, themselves; they got in, and when the lady got out, she said her father would be very angry if she did not find it; she described the parcel, and I went to get it from the boot, when the officer came and seized it out of my hand.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18241028-135

1388. ANN WHITTAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a snuff-box, value 14 s., and two half crowns, the goods of Philip Smith , from his person .

PHILIP SMITH . I am a baker . On the 5th of October, I met the prisoner in James-street, Covent Garden, and went home with her to Church-street, St. Giles's . I had been up all night, and had been drinking. I staid about three hours; I took off my clothes; and when I got up, the articles were gone; she was there when I awoke, but she had been out, and got some gin - she awoke me, and asked me to have some; my money had been in my breeches pocket, which I had put on a chair by the bedside - my snuff-box was in my waistcoat pocket. I was rather the worse for liquor, but know that the property was safe when I went to bed. I told her of my loss, but she made no answer. I went home and told some friends, and we went to her room, and waited till she came in with the ticket in her hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been baking that day - A. No. I cannot tell how much I had drank, nor how many sorts of liquors.

HENRY FENNER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a snuff-box, which was pawned by the prisoner for 10 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-136

1389. WILLIAM KNOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a gown, value 10 s. , the goods of Ann Purdy .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18241028-137

1390. ELIZABETH MIDDLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , three waistcoats, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Wallace .

JOSEPH WALLACE . I live in Silver-street, Stepney , and am a tailor . On the 19th of October, at six o'clock in the evening, these waistcoats were in my shop. I went out and left them in the care of my wife. I returned at a quarter past eight, and they were gone.

THOMAS MARSHALL . I live with Mr. Mount, a pawnbroker, in Old Gravel-lane. I produce a waistcoat pawned by a girl, but not the prisoner.

WM. AUSTIN. I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Shadwell. The prosecutor left some patterns of waistcoats, which had been stolen with me, and I detained the prisoner with two, on the 20th of October, about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, she said a man had given her them to pawn.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am an officer. Austin sent for me on the morning of the 20th of October, and said he had stopped the prisoner with some waistcoats, which had been stolen; she said a man on the opposite side had given them to her to pawn, and she was to have a glass of gin for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl. I met a man who told me to pawn them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-138

1391. JOHN STRIBLING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a watch, value 40 s. , the goods of James Coote .

JAMES COOTE . I am a carpenter . On the 17th of October I went with the prisoner to Stratford ; we stopped and had some porter, and then I fell asleep for two hours or two hours and a half, I cannot tell exactly - when I awoke I missed my watch, and said I had lost it, but no one answered - the prisoner is the person who went with me; I told him I had lost it, and he said

"Give me the number and I will try to find it."

ROBERT KENDREW . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch which I received from a person answering the description of the prisoner. I firmly believe him to be the person - it was pawned on the 20th of October for 1 l., in the name of East; on the Tuesday following, the prisoner came and asked me if I had taken a watch in - I fetched it down, and said I had - he came the next day with an officer, and said his name was Stribling; he then denied

that he was the man who had pawned it. I have no doubt that he was the person.

SAMUEL EAST. I keep the Green Man public-house. I saw this young man come in with two others, at five o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of October; they called for a supper, and the prosecutor fell asleep; when he awoke he missed his watch; he was not sober; the prisoner appeared perfectly sober.

J - OSBORN. Last Sunday week I went into the Green Man. I saw the prosecutor take the watch out of his pocket, and give it to the prisoner to see what it was o'clock - he fell asleep afterwards, and what became of the watch I do not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-139

1392. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two shirts, value 14 s. , the goods of Thomas Gurling .

MARY LEE . I take in washing, and wash for Mr. Thomas Gurling ; I had some shirts of his on the 9th of this month, in my room in Cold Bath-lane. I saw them safe a quarter of an hour before I missed them - I have known the prisoner a great many years; she bears a good character, and is a neighbour; her husband has been lately out of employ, and they are greatly distressed; she went willingly to the pawnbroker's, and acknowledged that she had pawned them.

WILLIAM CARTER . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shirts which were pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of October: when she came with the prosecutor she told me that she was the person.

WILLIAM ALGER . I am an officer. I apprehended her - she said she was very sorry, and seemed greatly affected.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18241028-140

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1393. HANNAH BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a shift, value 5 s.; two pinafores, value 2 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; two towels, value 2 s.; two caps, value 10 s.; a pair of stockings, value 2 s.; twelve yards of bugle trimming, value 12 s., and a petticoat, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Backler , her master ; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a diamond pin, value 10 l.; a segar case, value 5 s., and a locket, value 30 s., the goods of Henry Pellatt , in the dwelling-house of the said Samuel Backler ; and MARY MURPHY was indicted for feloniously receiving a waistcoat, a petticoat, a handkerchief, and two pinafores, part of the said goods, she well knowing them to have been stelon .

MRS. MARY BACKLER . I am the wife of Samuel Backler , who is a cupper , and rents a house in Berners-street, Oxford-street - Barry was our servant. On the 28th of September, in consequence of having missed property I sent for Craig, who searched her boxes, and found a variety of property.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. On the 28th of September I searched three boxes, which Mrs. Backler pointed out to me; the prisoner was present; and before I searched them, I asked her if she knew anything of a diamond pin, and a locket which were lost; she denied it at first, and then said she had found the pin, but knew nothing of the locket; she went up stairs with us, one of her trunks was open, and another locked; the third was a small tea chest. I found two stiffners in her pocket; in the open trunk was the trimming, and several things, and in the other trunk several caps and articles of linen; and in her tea chest, I found the diamond pin - she said she knew it was in some of her boxes, but could not tell which. I forget whether the tea chest was locked. I went to Murphy's house with a warrant, and found a waistcoat, a petticoat, and other things; she was not at home, but her husband was. I afterwards saw her, and she said she had bought them of different people in the street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not know that to be a diamond pin - A. I am told that it is.

MR. HENRY PELLATT . I lived at the prosecutor's house. This diamond pin and locket are mine, and the waistcoat. I missed the pin and locket on the 27th of September; I had seen them two or three days before, and had left them in a box unlocked.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there any children in the house - A. Yes, one of them is twelve years old. I had put the property among some fishing tackle.

COURT. Q. How long had you lived there - A. Three years. I wore the pin every day; the prisoner must have known it to be mine. I paid 13 l. for it about six months ago, to Mr. Fletcher, a lapidary, of Marlborough-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BARRY'S Defence. The box which the things were found in is not mine - I had lent my mistress a trunk when she went into the country, and she gave me one of hers to put my things in. I never saw these things till they were found.

MRS. BACKLER. Two of the trunks belonged to her; some of the property was in them, and some in one which I had lent her, having had an accident with hers, and sent it to be repaired - the tea chest belonged to her, and was locked. and she produced the key of it after some hesitation.

MR. PELLATT re-examined. I have tried the pin, and know it to be a diamond.

BARRY-GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MURPHY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-141

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1324. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st October , at St. George, Bloomsbury ; a cloak, value 6 l., the goods of Robert Guthrie , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT GUTHRIE . I live in King-street, Holborn , in the parish of St. George's, Bloomsbury, and am a tailor .

On the 21st of October this cloak hung on a horse, about a foot inside my door, exposed for sale - I missed it at seven o'clock, and had seen it safe half an hour before. I saw it two days afterwards in possession of Tighe.

JOHN TIGHE . I am a shopman to Mr. Aldridge, pawnbroker, Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 21st of October, about half-past six or seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought this cloak to our shop - ! asked where he got it, he said, from Mr. Jones, of No. 10, Lamb's Conduit-street. I am confident of his person - I communicated my suspicions privately to Mr. Aldridge, who came out and questioned him, and asked if he had any objection to his going with him, he said

"Oh! it is all right." Mr. Aldridge said," I do not think it is, and you shall go;" he immediately darted out of the box and ran away. I pursued and overtook him at the corner of Theobalds-road; he said

"There is no occasion to trouble you about this, let this lad (meaning my apprentice) go with me." I said

"Very well let the boy go;" but I followed at a distance; he went in a contrary direction, and took him up a court; he then began to run - I followed; he went up a ladder, but finding himself closely pursued came down and ran into Holborn, where I collared him, and gave him in charge - I am certain he is the man. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner; he had asked for 1 l. on the cloak, and said

"Is it worth that." I said Yes, more; he said

"Well, give me 2 l." I thought it worth between 7 l. and 10 l., but understand it is only worth 6 l. I would have lent 4 l. on it.

WILLIAM MARLBOROUGH . Tighe gave me the cloak. I produce it.

ROBERT GUTHRIE . It is mine, and is quite new - it cost me five guineas - I should have asked 6 l. or six guineas for it. I have enquired about the prisoner, and believe he is rather weak in intellect. I know his father well, and have learned that when nine years old, a fall from a horse affected him very seriously, and he has been able to learn nothing. I understand he is the dupe of a gang of rogues who set him to plunder shops, while they share the profit of it. I believe he really is weak in intellect; his father who has seven children does not wish him to be at liberty.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18241028-142

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1395. ANN WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , at St. Martin, at the Fields , a watch, value 8 l.; a seal, value 1 l.; a watch key, value 10 s., and a ribbon, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Meyrick Feild , in the dwelling-house of our Lord the King .

MR. THOMAS MEYRICK FEILD . I hold a situation in the War-office , and am in the habit of leaving my watch on my desk when I am there. On the 21st of October, I had occasion to go from my room to the Secretary of States Office; I was not absent above twenty minutes or half an hour, and on returning I missed my watch off my desk; I know nothing of the prisoner myself. The head messenger and store-keeper reside at the office - they are paid by Government, and have the care of the building.

JOHN STEVENS . I am messenger at the War-office. I have seen the prisoner five or six times at the office; she came there respecting money, which she said was due to her at the decease of her father; she generally remained in the waiting room, and was there on the 21st of October; soon after one o'clock she came in, and asked if her business was likely to be settled - I said I would go and ask. I returned and told her she might call again in a few days, she cried, and wanted to call again the same day; she retired, and I thought she was gone, but one of the messengers came in afterwards, and I found she was not gone. I went into a room opposite to Mr. Feild's, and on coming out, I saw her standing against the door post of Mr. Feild's room, the door was partly open - this was ten minutes after I had given her an answer; I told her it was of no use to wait. I went away, and in about an hour heard of this watch being missed.

JOHN HOWISON . I am a watchmaker, and live at Knightsbridge. On the 21st of October, about a quarter past four o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked if I would buy a gold broach, with a cornelian stone - I said it was not good enough; she asked me to buy a necklace, which I also said was not good enough; she then asked me to buy a gold watch; she produced an engine turned gold watch, with a seal and key: I shut the door, and asked what she wanted for it; she said 1 l. I asked where she got it: she said a captain had given it to her - I asked what there was in her face to induce a captain to give it to her; she said she was an unfortunate girl. I went for an officer, and asked once or twice where she got it; she said she had taken it from the War office.

JOHN CANNING . I took her into custody with the watch.

MR. FEILD. It is mine, and is worth eight or nine guineas - I saw it safe at ten minutes past one o'clock, when I went to the Secretary's office.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, and Jury, believing her to be in distress .

Reference Number: t18241028-143

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1396, BRIDGET POLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , at St. Giles in the Fields , a glove, value 1 d.; three sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, eight half-crowns, and forty shillings, the property of John King , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN KING . I live in Middle-row, Broad-street , in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields, and rent the house. My wife was taken ill, and I applied to the workhouse for a nurse , and the prisoner was sent by the parish to nurse her: she was six weeks with us. I had two sovereigns, and two half sovereigns, with half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences, making in all 6 l. 8 s. in a black silk glove, in a drawer in my wife's room, and there was a blue cotton bag, with a sovereign in it, the same drawer, which was locked, and my wife kept the key in her pocket. I missed it all after my wife spoke to me.

ELIZABETH KING . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Monday, the 19th of October, at four o'clock, in consequence of suspicion I examined my drawer, and missed the glove and money. The prisoner had left at half-past three o'clock.

JOHN KING re-examined. Upon missing the money I went to Peter-street, and saw the prisoner there at nine o'clock the same evening; I took her back to my house, and saw her own son search her, and take the money from her pocket with the black silk glove - he delivered it to me, and I gave it to Lane the same night.

CATHERINE TOOMEY . I lodge at King's house, and saw the money found upon the prisoner.

TIMOTHY LANE , I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; King gave me the glove - it contained 5 l. 2 s. 1 ld. in all.

JOHN KING . I know the glove.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the glove on the floor of her room, and did not know what it contained.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 52.

Reference Number: t18241028-144

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1397. WILLIAM PERREN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ellen Connell , on the King's highway, on the 28th of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. , her property.

The prosecutrix did not appear

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18241028-145

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1398. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , in the dwelling-house of Christopher Crossman , his master , a pair of trowsers, value 14 s., three coats, value 4 l.; two boy's dresses, value 6 s.; a jacket, value 6 d.; and a frock, value 3 s. , his property.

CHRISTOPHER CROSSMAN . I am a tailor , and live in Sugar-loaf court, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner was my apprentice , and had been so for five years; I sleep in the front room on the first floor, and he in the back room. On Sunday morning, the 24th of October, between half-past four and five o'clock, he called to me from his bed-room to know if I heard a noise - I got up and went into the shop which is between my bed-room and his, on the same floor; I looked out of the window and thought I saw a man laying flat on the ground; the prisoner got a light and put his trowsers on - we went into the yard, and what I took for a man, was a bundle of clothes; I looked further and found the prisoner's hat, with pattern cards in it - we went up and dressed, and the boy went to the watchman - when we came up stairs I found my chest empty, and the lid open; it stood in the shop, and had contained the articles stated in the indictment, (besides what were in the yard) the day before; it was not kept locked - there was a pane of glass taken out of the shop window, so that a hand could be put through to open it. He went out the next morning with my leave, soon after breakfast; returned to dine at one o'clock, and went out about two, having leave to be out two or three hours; but I always told him to be home to his meals - he returned at half-past nine - I asked him where he had been; he said he had been to see a friend; I wanted to know where that friend lived - he hesitated, but in the morning he told me he had been to No. 3, Temple-street, but gave me no name. I went round to several pawnbrokers, but found nothing - I called at Temple-street about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw Hannah Middlestorb , and enquired if he was there; it appeared that he had been there all that time; I was coming away quite satisfied; but the girl said

"William Manon left a box here last night, will you take it home" - I said I had no objection, and her mother went up stairs with her and brought it down; but it being too large I could not carry it; I took Essex an officer there in the evening, and on searching the box I found the property produced, which I know to be mine; the box was locked; we broke it open - some are new clothes, and some old - I had seen them safe on Saturday afternoon.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a constable. I went with Crossman, and found the property.

DANIEL MIDDLESTORB . I live in Temple-street. The prisoner came to my house on Saturday night, and brought a box - he opened it to put his purse into it; I looked into it, and saw that there was clothes in it; a little boy assisted him to bring it about eleven o'clock at night. He called on Sunday afternoon, but said nothing about it; I had known him for about a month, and have known his brother for years; he said his master was so strict that he could not mend anything for his brother; and asked if he might bring his box, that he might come and mend them early of a morning. The officer searched the same box.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know at how many times I brought the clothes - A. I believe they came all at once with the box.

CHRISTIAN MIDDLESTORB . I live with my father. On Saturday night, the 23d of October, about eleven o'clock, a little boy came with the prisoner, and brought the box. Essex searched the same box.

ANNA HELENA MIDDLESTORB . On Monday or Tuesday fortnight the prisoner asked my father's leave to bring a box to our house, as his master would not allow him to do any jobs at home.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am servant to Mr. Dexter, pawnbroker, Whitechapel-road. On the 23d of October a pair of new trowsers were pawned for 14 s., in the name of West - I believe the prisoner to be the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-146

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1399. RICHARD COOK and HENRY BARTON were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Henry Gill , in the night of the 7th of October , and stealing a coat, value 10 s., and a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Richard Burr ; two yards of kerseymere, value 1 l.; two coats, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a knife, value 2 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; two shifts, value 4 s.: a tippet, value 6 d.; three gown bodies, value 3 s.; a spencer, value 5 s.; a pair of stays, value 2 s.; a cap, value 1 d.; a shirt, value 2 s.; a tablecloth, value 1 s.; a piece of calico, value 1 s., and a piece of jean, value 4 d. , the goods of Samuel Hople .

JAMES HENRY GILI . I live in Duke-street, Westminster , and am a bookbinder ; Hople rents my first floor, and Burr lodges in my parlour. On the 8th of October, about six o'clock in the morning, I came down stairs - it was just break of day. I found Burr's parlour door open - he sleeps in the garret. I found the kitchen in confusion, and marks of violence on that and on the parlour door also. The servant of the next house handed me some paper over the garden wall; I gave them to Hople.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not occupy the house - A. Yes, but I let part of it out. A square of glass was cut out of the kitchen door.

SAMUEL HOPLR . I occupy the ground floor and kitchen of this house. I went up to bed at half-past eleven o'clock at night: the kitchen and street doors were then fast; the back parlour shutters were not closed, by mistake; and I am not certain that the sash was down. The kitchen door is an inner one, and had marks of violence on it, and a pane of glass taken out. The parties appeared to have entered by the parlour window. I found all four dresser drawers open, and nearly empty. I lost a miniature set in gold, out of the kitchen; there were footmarks on the cill of the back parlour window, and footmarks also.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you fastened the kitchen yourself - A. Yes.

RICHARD BURR . I am a professor of music , and live at Gill's house. I went to bed about ten o'clock, and was called up between six and seven in the morning, and found that the parlour window had been entered, and a box in my room forced open. I cannot say how the window was the night before. I lost a blue coat and a cambric handkerchief; the coat hung over a chair the night before.

ROBERT FROST . I am a shoemaker, and live in Little Pulteney-street. On the 8th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was at work (one Phillips rents my shop and parlour); I heard a knock, looked out of the garret window, and saw a person standing at the door with a bundle under his arm; I heard the knock again, and then heard a disturbance in my passage - I ran down, and saw Cook in the custody of Yates, who had two bundles. I never saw him before.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. On the 8th of October, about twenty minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of Wardour-street, and saw Cook and another man, (whom I cannot swear to) coming up Little Pulteney-street; they each had a bundle. I crossed over to the corner of a court to watch them, and saw them go in at Frost's private door; I followed, and picked up a pen-knife which Cook dropped; I then shut the door, and collared him with a bundle in his hand; the other made his escape, leaving his bundle behind. I asked Phillips to assist me, but he would not. Cook said a man gave him 2 1/4 d. in the Haymarket to carry the bundle for him. In the pocket of one of the waistcoats I found some cards, by which I found out Mr. Hople.

Cross-examined. Q. Which of the two went in first - A. The other man; he did not say that was the man who had given him the 2 1/4 d.; he said he should know the man again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COOK'S Defence (written.) On the 8th of October, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I was going to my mother's at Knightsbridge, and was stopped by a man (not Barton;) he said he had two bundles, and would give me the price of a pot of beer to carry them, and as I was going into the house I was seized. The man escaped.

COOK - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

BARTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-147

1400. CATHERINE EMANUEL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a watch, value 20 l.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; two seals, value 2 l.; a ring, value 5 s.; a key, value 3 s.; a chain, value 1 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of Jacob Fletcher .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

JACOB FLETCHER . I live at Barton, near Manchester. On the 28th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner and another girl in Fleet-street, and went with them to a house in Shire-lane ; we drank a pot of porter, and in about half an hour the other girl left. I then locked the door, and remained all night with the prisoner. I put the key of the door into my trowsers pocket; at that time I had my watch safe; I put it into my trowsers pocket - my trowsers hung over a chair. I got up about nine o'clock, and found the door unlocked, but bolted inside. I went near the door, and the prisoner said the key was in the window, I replied

"No, it is in my pocket, I put it there last night." I found one key in the window, and one still in my pocket. I missed my watch and handkerchief. I went to the bed and told the prisoner she had stolen my watch - she denied it, and said

"I do not believe you had a watch," and insisted upon sending for the officers to search the house, and was very violent about it. I said if she would give it me back I did not mind giving her a few pounds; she said if I gave her one thousand pounds she had not got it;' and if I had lost it, the other girl must have taken it. I said as she knew the other girl, she had better look after her; she said she had never seen her before; but afterwards that she believed her name was Arnold, and that she lived in James-street, Blackfriars-road, but it was useless looking for her, for by that time she had either pawned or sold it. I said if it was pawned, she could get me the duplicate; she went out about ten o'clock with the landlady, to look for her, and about four o'clock brought me the duplicate of the watch, pawned at Wassell's, in Picket-street; the pawnbroker at first denied having it.

JURY. Q. Were you perfectly sober - A. I dined out and was rather fresh, but certainly not tipsy; we had only drank two bottles of wine among four of us. I did not bolt the door myself.

COURT. Q. Were you awoke at all by her getting out of bed - A. No; there is a key hole outside the door.

STANDLEY CROWDER. I am an apprentice to Mr. Wassell, pawnbroker, Picket-street. On Friday last about two o'clock in the afternoon, I received a gold watch, two gold seals, a key, and a ring in pawn, from a man in the name of H. Palmer, No. 22, Lincoln's Inn; I did not see the prisoner.

GEORGE B - . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 29th of October, between six and seven o'clock, I took the prisoner into custody at this house, she denied knowing anything about the watch; but when she found I was going to take her, she said she met Arnold on Waterloo-bridge, and received the duplicate from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. After taking some refreshment, I came down stairs, leaving him and the girl together, and as I came up I met her on the stairs with an ivory card case - I said I would not stop if she took it away; she gave it back to me; I put it on the table; she came back, and

was in the room for a quarter of an hour after he went to bed, and in the morning, he said he was almost as drunk as he was the night before, for he could scarcely see a hole through a ladder. I met the girl on Waterloo-bridge, with a man who was intoxicated - I said I would give her in charge if she did not give me the duplicate, and she gave it to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-148

Middlesex Case, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1401. ELIZA TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , two pieces of ribbon, value 2 s.; fourteen yards ferret, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 7 s.; and a pair of clasps, value 6 d. , the goods of Emanual Moses .

EMANUEL MOSES . I live in Bunhill-row . The prisoner was five weeks in my service - I missed these things at different times from a box behind the counter.

JOHN HANLEY . Yesterday morning about one o'clock, I went to Moses's house, and told the prisoner that she was suspected of robbing her master. I found some pieces of ribbon and a handkerchief in her pocket, but they have been out of my possession. I found part of a tiara in a closet; she seemed much affected, fell on her knees, and implored forgiveness; her master told her to go about her business, and I went away; but in a quarter of an hour after he gave her in charge, and gave me the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-149

London Case, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1402. JOHN MULLUE was indicted for a misdemeanor MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a clerk in the office of Dr. James Henry Arnold , Vicar-general, Doctors'-commons. The Archbishop of Canterburys name is Charles; it is in our department to grant marriage licences. On the 16th of August I remember the defendant applying for a licence. I took the instructions for the purpose of preparing an affidavit, which I filled up (looking at it) this is it - he gave his name as John Mullue , Jun., and represented that he had lived in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, for the last fifteen days, which was necessary to obtain a licence; the parties were both stated to be above twenty-one years of age; after being filled up it was read over to him - he signed his name to it, and I accompanied him to Dr. Daubeny, the Surrogate, where he was sworn to the truth of the affidavit. Dr. Daubeny has witnessed it - I returned to the office, and the licence was granted from the affidavit; under the seal of the Vicar-general - I delivered him the licence.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been in the office - A. Eighteen months. I saw the Surrogate sign the affidavit; he administered the oath - I read it over to the defendant previous to his taking the oath; I have repeatedly seen Dr. Daubeny act as Surrogate, and administer oaths for granting marriage licences.

The affidavit was here read, in which the defendant deposed that he and Catherine Cooper , both of the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, were both twenty-one years of age, and that his usual place of abode for the last fifteen days was in that parish.

MR. CHARLTON. I am record-keeper in the Vicar-general's office, and have been so nearly thirty years. Dr. Daubeny's Christian name is John. I have known him act as Surrogate for fifteen or sixteen years, and administer oaths to obtain marriage licences; the affidavit made by the defendant was filled in our office, I produce it from the file.

REV. - BLACK. I produce the original licence of marriage, granted to the defendant; I did not marry the parties.

GEORGE HICKS . I am sexton of St. Andrew, Holborn. I was present on the 16th of August when these parties were married; I have the register, which I have witnessed.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you seen the lady to day - A. Yes; I thought there was an unwillingness on her part, which made me notice them; I dare not interfere when there was a licence; I said directly as they went out of the church, that it was a run-a-way marriage.

The licence was here read.

GEORGE MUSSETT . I produce the will of Mr. John Cooper , from Doctors'-commons.

ROBERT BRETT . I saw that will executed, and have attested it - there are three witnesses to it.

The will was here read, appointing Sarah Cooper , Wm. Ransom , Wm. Pedder , and Jacob Brett , executors and executrix, and guardians of his children, under age, at his decease.

SARAH COOPER . I live at Hanson-hall, Suffolk, and am a widow. I have ten children, eight of whom are daughters - Catherine is seventeen years old next December; she lived with me, and under my care, up to August last; her other guardians had consented to that. I never saw the defendant or heard of him, until be brought my daughter back to me; I never consented to his marrying her, either by writing or words - I was not at home on Sunday the 15th of August, and had not heard of her having a lover; she is entitled to 500 l., upon coming of age, or being married, and about 500 l. more at my death, I suppose, but my son knows most about it.

JACOB BRADLEY . I am a trustee and executor to Mr. Cooper's will I knew nothing of the defendant paying addresses to Catherine Cooper . I do not know him; he never asked my consent; she is entitled to 500 l. when of age, and about 1500 l. more at her mother's death. I keep the accounts of the estate.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Her sister was marat the same time - A. Yes; I have indicted another man for marrying the sister.

WILLIAM PEDDER . I am one of the guardians named in the will. I do not know the defendant, and never consented to the marriage.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long were they absent - A. I believe they returned on Friday; their husbands brought them home. I have not given a partial consent since. I have said I wished it could be settled without going to law, but I was not the acting guardian.

WILLIAM RANSOM . I am one of the guardians named in the will. I do not know the defendant, and never consented to the marriage.

GEORGE MASON . I am a builder, and live at Ipswich; the defendant was my out-door apprentice, his time expired on the 26th of July last - he lived in the town all that time, and I saw him daily - he could not have been living in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. I saw him about Ipswich for a week or ten days after he left me.

ANN TAYLOR . I live at Ipswich. When the defendant left Mr. Mason, he came to lodge at my house - it was in July; he came on the Sunday, and staid till the Saturday week following - he slept at home every night; he left me on the 7th of August.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you mean to say that he had not been to town - A. Yes; for he slept at my house every night.

ANN TAYLOR . I am the last witness's daughter; the defendant came to my mother's house on the 25th of July, and left on the 7th of August; he slept at home every night, and was in and out all day.

SAMUEL MAHEW. I live at Wickham-skeath, Suffolk; the defendant came to lodge with me on the 7th of August, and slept at home every night till the 15th, and was at home during the day.

JOHANNAH ENNUE. I am the sister of Catherine Mullue , whose maiden name was Cooper. I first became acquainted with the defendant at Stowmarket fair, on the 12th of July, and saw him again on the 15th of August, but not between those times. I was often with my sister and never saw them together, except at those times. I never saw him at my mother's house. On Sunday afternoon, the 15th of August, I and my sister went to church; it was a rainy day; we were dressed in white muslin; we saw the defendant in the church-yard, while we were at church, and in a quarter of an hour we came out of church, we were walking in the fields, not going home; he came after us, and walked a little way in the fields, and it rained so fast that we turned back, and went into Mrs. Jarr's cottage; we had come out of church? between three and four o'clock - we sent for dry gowns to put on, and staid in the cottage, in the defendant's company, till about seven o'clock or later; it was getting dark. Before we left the cottage he went out, and returned in an hour: I do not know that he said anything to my sister, but she and him went out: I had heard no proposition made to her; we came out and walked a little way, and then saw a post chaise in the lane - I expected to see a pony and gig, not a post chaise. I saw my sister cry before she got into the chaise, but did not hear anything said to her.

Q. How came she to get in - A. He helped her in; he took hold of her arm, and the post-boy took hold of her arm too; they were close to the chaise when they took hold of her arm, to help her in.

Q. Was she willing to go in with their help - A. No, I do not think that she was. I was in the chaise afterwards - it drove to Ipswich; there were four of us in the chaise; they told us that they would not take us any farther than Stowmarket; we had an elder sister living there. Catherine wanted them to stop to see her sister, but the post-boy was told to drive on faster, and he drove to Ipswich - we got there between nine and ten o'clock - the defendant had a pistol, and said if any one came to the chaise to stop the horses, or meddle with us he would shoot them - we did not stop at Ipswich longer than a quarter of an hour. A coach came up which was going to London, and we were put on the roof of it. I sat next to my sister, and the defendant sat on the opposite side. We had no clothes but what were on our backs. We had no idea of going to town when we got into the chaise. The defendant carried the pistol to London with him; it was loaded. We arrived at the White Horse, Fetter-lane, about nine o'clock in the morning, and then went to the Bell and Crown, Holborn; went to church next day, and my sister was married to the defendant.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant; and called several witnesses who deposed to his good character.

GUILTY .

The Defendant gave sureties for his appearance to receive Judgment when called upon.

Reference Number: t18241028-150

NEW COURT,

(4th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1403. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , twelve yards of oil-cloth, value 30 s. , the goods of John Harverson .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-151

1404. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a set of fire-irons, value 5 s. , the goods of John Boulter .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-152

1405. WILLIAM TAYLOR and JOHN OVER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , nine iron chains, value 5 s.; two bolts, value 3 d., and a nut, value 1 d. , the goods of Jacob Hunter .

THOMAS RAIN . I live at Hackney, in the service of Mr. Jacob Hunter . About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th of October, I was in my room at Temple-mills, Hackney-marsh, and saw the two prisoners and another boy (I am certain of the persons of the prisoners,) they were going along in the water - Over had a basket on his left shoulder. I went down, and called them; they then went on faster. I went to get my horse out of the shed, and on casting my eyes round I saw Over throw something out of the basket into the water. I pursued them on horse back; Over threw down the basket, and ran away with Taylor, and the other went in another direction. I followed then about two hundred yards further, and then they got into an old building; I got off my horse, and and found them concealed in the fire-place. Over said,

"I have got nothing:" I said,

"You must go and find what you threw into the water;" he said,

"We will." - Taylor said nothing, but when we got to the water he asked me to let him go, and he would go quietly. When we got to the spot where the chains were, Over put his hand into the water, and drew out four chains. Taylor then said,

"Here are some more chains," and drew out five chains, two bolts, and a nut. I know the property to be my master's; they had been left in a barn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TAYLOR'S Defence. We were going blackberrying, and met a boy with the basket - he said he would go with us; when we saw that the water was so high, we went back into a yard, and the lady said,

"You had better go into the shed out of the rain." That boy put the chains into the basket, and gave it to Over. We went on together; he then said,

"The man is coming, you had better throw them into the water."

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Weeks .

OVER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-153

1406. HENRY WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , eight half-crowns, twelve shillings, and five sixpences , the monies of James Hulme , his master .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18241028-154

1401. HENRY NEAL and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , two bundles of worsted yarn, value 10 s. , the goods of Zachary Langton and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Holman .

JOSIAH MASON . I am foreman to Messrs. Brown and Co., carpet manufacturers, Kidderminster. On the 1st of October I saw a bale packed up to be conveyed to Birmingham, and from there to London; it contained fifty-two gross of No. 22, worsted yarn; it was in separate parcels, of about 6 1/2 lbs. each. I have seen the bale since, in London.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you swear to this identical yarn - A. No. I know No. 22 yarn, but cannot swear that it is the yarn which I packed; I marked the sheet, and saw it delivered to the Birmingham carrier, with a bill of parcels, to John Farmer ; they were put loose into a sheet, with no mark upon each parcel, but No. 22, on a small ticket; the maker puts that on - they are printed figures.

GEORGE HEXHAM . I am a carter to Messrs. Pickford and Co.; Zachary Langton is one of the partners. On the 7th of October I was employed to carry a bale from the City-road Canal, to the Tower Wharf, to go to Norwich - this is the bale - I put it into the waggon. John Holman is the carrier; the bale was in good condition - that was about four o'clock. I saw it the next morning, and it was then cut open at the end; a man could take out parcels from it very easily. I afterwards saw a parcel brought back by the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. You put this bale into the waggon in the afternoon, and saw it again the next morning about nine o'clock - A. Yes; it was then in the waggon - it had been to the Tower Wharf. I know it to be was the same - I know it by the mark

"178 and R.S."

JOHN HOLMAN . I am book carrier to Messrs. Pickford's. I drove the waggon on that evening to Iron-gate Wharf, in the City. I went down the Minories, and when I got to the wharf, I discovered that the bale had been cut; there appeared a large hole and something out of it. I brought it back and saw it weighed the next morning - it weighed 13 lbs. less. I saw one of the parcels weighed the next morning, which weighed 6 1/2 lbs.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police Surveyor; about seven o'clock on the evening of the 7th of October, I met the two prisoner on Tower-hill. I stopped Jones with a parcel of worsted yarn wrapped up in his apron. I asked him how he got it - Neal had a bundle likewise; they said they had brought it from over the water, from a person of the name of Watts. I asked if they had a bill of parcels; they said No. 4 said I should take them to the watch-house. I look Jones, and Fogg took Neal; they said they were going to take the yarn to Mr. Sims, Cow-lane, Mile-end. I went over the water, but could find no such person as Watts.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer, and was with Shields. I saw the two prisoners coming from Iron-gate Wharf. I stopped Neal with the bundle of yarn in his apron, and asked what he had got; he said he did not know, that he got it from Jones. I asked if he had been over the water with Jones - he said No; he met him on Tower-Hill. I told Jones next morning that he had given us a deal of trouble in going over the water, when there was no such person; he then said,

"I will tell you the truth, we bought it of an old lagger, and gave 5 s. for it;" they were then handcuffed together - both repeated the same words.

JAMES DELCOUR . On the 8th of October I examined this bale of yarn, when it was brought back; there was a gash across it, and it weighed 13 lbs. short of 3 cwt.; it would have made up the weight with these two bundles.

JOSIAH MASON . The yarn is spun in the same manner, is of the same wool, and is of the same appearance. I will not undertake to swear to it.

NEAL - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-155

Before Mr. Recorder.

1408. JOHN WHEELER and JOSEPH ABRAHAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a piece of woollen cloth, containing seventeen yards, value 5 l. 10 s.; twenty-four shawls, value 9 l.; and a wrapper, value 6 d. , the goods of Zachary Langton , and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Shaw .

ROBERT LAMBERT . I am a clerk in the employ of Messrs. Pickford and Co. ; Zachary Langton is one of the partners . I received a weigh-bill of some property which left Manchester for London, on the 28th of September; there was among other articles, the parcel in question, directed for Mr. Jardine, Nottingham-place, Whitechapel; it contained woollen goods; it arrived safe in London on the 4th of October.

JOSEPH HERBERT . I am porter to the prosecutors. On Monday, the 4th of October, I placed a parcel or truss in the cart, which had come by a boat from Manchester to the City basin; it was safe and entire when I put it in - it was for Mr. Jardine.

GEORGE TREADAWAY . I am book-carrier to the prosecutors - I go to see the delivery of the goods - I went with this cart on the 4th of October; we went through Aldgate, and when I got to the Minories, where I had a parcel to deliver, the truss was safe in the cart - we stopped at Morland's, an umbrella shop, in the Minories; and while

Shaw, the carter was getting out the parcel to deliver there. I saw the prisoner in the white jacket (Wheeler,) just behind me, and I put out my hand to keep the bale from falling upon him; I have since seen it at Lambeth-street office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The remark you made of the man was, that he had a white jacket on - A. Yes, and five hundred people may have a white jacket on. I believe Wheeler is the same man - I have a strong belief that be is the same man - we missed the bale five minutes afterwards, it was near seven o'clock in the evening.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street - I know a man by the name of Benjamin Wolfe , he lives at No. 2, Little Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields; I and Lee had occasion to watch his house, from about half-past six o'clock in the evening of the 4th of October, until half-past seven; we stood in an alley nearly opposite his house - I saw three men coming along, one with a package on his back - we drew back into the alley and he passed us, it was Abrahams; I am certain of his person. I had seen him before - when they got opposite to the alley, Wheeler ran and passed Abrahams, to Wolfe's door; Wolfe was standing with his door open; Abrahams followed Wheeler up to the door, and both went in; we went over and the third man (who was with them) ran away; when we got to the door it was being closed; I put my shoulder against it and pushed very hard - Wolfe said,

"Who is there, what is the matter?" I said,

"It is me;" he said,

"Who is me;" I said

"Foster," he then said

"Come in" - I went into a back-kitchen, and saw Abrahams taking the package from his shoulder; as I went to the back room I passed Wolfe and Wheeler in the passage, I took hold of Abrahams, and asked him what he had got; he said he did not know - he said a man gave it to him to carry, and he was to have 1 s. for carrying it - Lee then brought in Wheeler; I tied them together, and took them to the office. Wheeler said he came in to buy a hat, and said to Wolfe,

"I have been here this hour, have not I maser;" Wolfe said

"No, I know nothing at all about you;" I took the parcel which contained woollen cloth, and shawls, and found this invoice in the bale with the goods; they exactly corresponded with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Abrahams was the person with the package - A. Yes. Wolfe and Wheeler were not in the same room as he was. Wheeler had a white jacket on.

JAMES LEE . I was with Foster; when I went in Wheeler was coming out of the passage.

JOHN JARDINE . I had ordered these goods and expected them by that conveyance: they are the articles I expected.

WHEELER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

ABRAHAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-156

1409. GEORGE RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 11 lbs. of pork, value 5 s. , the goods of Stephen Warren .

GEORGE HYAM . I am shop-boy to Stephen Warren ; he keeps an eating house at Battle-bridge . On the 16th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a leg of pork from the bench outside of the house. I was standing to mind it; he went into the house a little way, and then came out - he shifted it from one hand to the other and walked away. I asked my master if he had paid for it, he said No, and I followed him; he ran away, but I never lost sight of him; he was taken with the pork.

WILLIAM COLTON . I live opposite to Warren's. I heard the cry of Stop thief! but the man had been stopped, and brought back before I saw him; some meat is set out every night, and the boy is set to watch it. The prisoner is a smith; he has four or five children, and is much distressed, and was a little in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18241028-157

1410. JAMES BROOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of James Watson.

JAMES WALTON . I live in Waterloo-place, St. Pancrass - the prisoner came to lodge in the same room with me on the 13th of October; I had seen my articles safe on the night before he came, but I did not see them after - they were on a chair by the bed side; there was no other person lodged in the room but him and myself; the landlady said he was a relation of her's, and asked if I had any objection to his sleeping in the room a night or two. and I said No. I missed my things about dinner time on Sunday, the 17th of October; he was then out and never returned. He had the trowsers on when the officers took him. I have not seen the stockings or the handkerchief since.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a street-keeper. Waterloo-place is the first turning out of Judd-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday evening about a quarter before twelve the same night, at the Griffin public-house, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square; he was then in bed, and I found the trowsers by his side; when he got up he put them on, and Walton claimed them at the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-158

1411. CHARLES GROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a writing desk, value 10 s.; and four shillings , the property of Rosana Saville .

ROSANA SAVILLE . I am a widow , and live in the Commercial-road . I am a grocer ; the prisoner is a stranger to me - this desk was on the counter in the shop with four shillings in it. I saw it safe at eight o'clock in the morning of the 25th of October; it was taken about half-past nine. I saw it at Worship-street on the Saturday following; I was in a little room behind the shop at the time.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday morning, the 25th of October, in Brown's-lane, Spitalfields, about a mile and a half from the prosecutrix's shop; he had the desk on his shoulder - another boy was with him who made his escape; seeing the desk about an inch open, I asked where he brought it from - he said from his father, who was a little broker at Bethnal-green, and the desk had been left with him to sell it. I enquired, but could not find his father; he said it was to be taken into the City, and he was to wait in Spitalfields-market for his father, at the

steps of a door. I took him into a house, examined the desk, and found some papers which led to the discovery; when I read the papers he began to cry, and said he was to have two-pence for carrying it for the other boy, and what he had said about his father was false; there were four shillings in it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young chap in Brick-lane, and he said if I would carry this box, he would give me a few halfpence; while we were going along the officer stopped us, and he ran away; and said if any body said anything, I was to tell them I carried it for my father.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-159

1412. THOMAS LATIMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , two chair cushions, value 16 s.; a cloak, value 10 s.; a silk net, value 5 s.; a thermometer, value 2 s.; the goods of Thomas George Street ; a coat, value 5 s.; the goods of Arthur March ; and a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Francis Walker .

FRANCIS WALKER . I am gardener to Mr. Thomas George Street, of Kilburn, in Middlesex. On the 22d of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I met March, and in consequence of what he said, I went to the coach-house, and found it had been broken open, with a screw driver or small chissel.

ARTHUR MARCH . I am under gardener to Mr. Street. I found the coach-house and stable broken open about seven o'clock in the morning. I had seen it safe about six on the night before; a jacket of mine and two chair cushions; a cloak, and a silk net, (which had been there the night before,) were all gone - one of the cushions was stuffed with hair. I have never seen the things since; but I have seen some hair and a cushion case. I do not know the prisoner.

JAMES I lived with Mr. Street as groom, but I was not with him at the time of the robbery. I know the cushions by some marks on them - this is the case of one of them.

JAMES MASON , I am a labourer. I have a piece of cloth and a towel, which I found in a field, about two hundred yards from Mr. Street's house, on the 22d of October, about six o'clock in the morning; it appeared to have had horse hair in it - there are some bits about it. I have seen the prisoner before, but had not seen him that morning.

PHILLIP WEBSTER. I am a patrol; my beat is on the Kilburn-road. I met the prisoner on the 21st of October, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, in company with another man - I knew him very well; he was going towards Mr. Street's house; I did not speak to him, but noticed him particularly; I did not see him again till next morning about half-past seven o'clock, when he was in Lisson-street, carrying a bundle into a person's house of the name of Lloyd. Shellswell followed him in, and I waited till he came out.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner on the Friday morning at Mrs. Lloyd's; he was then shutting the back door of a room behind the shop - I looked round, but could not see anything except some horse-hair in the scale, where Mrs. Lloyd was standing - no other person was in the shop. I made an excuse and came out. I did not open the room door - in the evening I heard of Mr. Street's robbery. I went on the Saturday to Mary-le-bone office, and met the prisoner on the Kilburn-road. I said he must come with me, and asked him where the remainder of the horse-hair was; he said

"I have sold all I had." I came on with him, and sent him on by Webster to the office. I went to the office and got a search warrant, and went with Stowel to Mrs. Lloyd's house and there we found some hair in a bag, which exactly corresponded with some that was given me as a pattern, which had been picked up; they appeared to be one and the same; the hair in the cushion cover was of the same colour as the bundle of hair.

SARAH LLOYD . I live at No. 48, Lisson-street, Mary-le-bone, and deal in Marine-stores. I bought 1 1/2 lb. of old horse-hair of the prisoner for 9 d.; he said

"I have picked up a bit of horse-hair, is it good for anything." I have seen him before, for my bricklayer had employed him to empty a well. I weighed the horse-hair, and the officer saw it in the scale; the prisoner never went into any room or cupboard; the officer is wrong about that - I think this is the same hair.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear that it is the same horsehair - A. I never did swear to it. I put the hair into a bag outside the door; I bought some more hair the same day; there came in a large chair-bottom of grey hair afterwards.

THOMAS DENNIS . I took a sample of hair which I found in a field, to compare with that at Mrs. Lloyd's.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up some horse hair in the out yard by a heap of dung - I took it to Mrs. Lloyd's.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-160

1413. GEORGE MAYDEW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a piece of printed cotton, containing ten yards, value 8 s. , the goods of John Filcher and Richard Smith .

JOHN FILCHER . I am. a linen-draper , in partnership with Richard Smith - we live in Great James-street , Lisson-groce. On the 19th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, this cotton had been at the side of the door, inside the shop; I saw it safe ten minutes before it was stolen, on a box, unfolded. I saw the prisoner take it, and followed him about two hundred yards from the door - I never lost sight of him; he threw it down - it was picked up by some other person, and taken to the shop; I am certain that it is the same piece.

JOHN SEYMOUR . I am a grover, and live in Little Newport-street, Soho. I was passing Mr. Filcher's shop, and saw the prisoner standing by the door. I saw him take the print, and ran after him. I saw him drop it; it was picked up by someone else.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-161

1414. BARNEY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , an umbrella, value 18 d. , the property of James Wood .

JANE WOOD . I am the wife of James Wood . Last Friday my umbrella was on a stall at the Dock gate, at Wapping, to keep the rain from the fruit. I went about 12 o'clock to a public-house, and as I was looking through the window I saw a boy take it away; I ran after him, and said,

"Stop him with the umbrella." He was pursued and brought back.

RICHARD CARTER . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner

with the umbrella, and heard the woman cry

"Stop him with the umbrella,"

"I saw him throw it out of his right hand - I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of the docks, down Hermitage-street; two men threw the umbrella down - I picked it up, and as I did not see any child about, I put it over my head.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18241028-162

1415. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a boy's cap, value 4 s., the goods of Samuel Jones , from the person of Samuel Jones , the younger .

SAMUEL JONES , JUN. I am eight years old . at half-past two o'clock last Saturday week, I was at the corner of Finsbury-square , going on an errand for my grandmother - three boys came to me; the prisoner was one of them; he said he would get some dogs' meat in my cap, and took it off; I snatched it out of his hand, and another took it off my head; this one ran away across the pavement, and the others ran away; I cried out - the others got away, but the prisoner did not - a butcher shoved him along, and said,

"Go and show him where his hat is" - I have never got it. He was taken up about three o'clock.

JOHN MILLS . I live in the Minories. I was coming through Finsbury-square, and saw Jones, who had got hold of the prisoner by his jacket; I asked what was the matter; he said the boy had stolen his hat - I asked why he did not give the child his hat; he said he had not got it, but if I would go with him he would show me where it was. I went a little way, but did not like to go any further.

MARY JONES . I live in Lower Chapman-street, Cannon-street-road. The prosecutor is my son - he had the cap when he went out; it has not been found since.

BARNARD GLEED . The prisoner was brought to the office by Mr. Mills.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had any thing to do with it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18241028-163

1416. JOHN INNES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 20 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. , the goods of James Daniels .

JAMES DANIELS . I am a watchman of Leadenhall-market . I left my son in care of this meant, which had been left by a salesman at Mr. Challis's.

HENRY DANIELS . I had the care of this beef which was hanging in the market. About two o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner come and take the beef off the hook, and run away with it; it was about 20 lbs. weight. I followed, and stopped him, without losing sight of him. I had not seen him about the market before; he had left his shoes and stockings behind him, but he went for them afterwards, to the door of the Cape of Good Hope, public-house.

JOHN RIGALSFORD . I took the prisoner into custody with the beef - it was claimed by Daniels.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-164

1417. RUTH MUNRO and EBENEZER FRAZER MUNRO were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , four hampers, value 3 s. 6 d.; eighteen baskets, value 10 s. 6 d.; five table mats, value 1 s. 6 d.; eight rush-door mats, value 4 s.; 14 lbs. of feathers, value 7 s.; five broom heads, value 2 s. 6 d.; twelve wooden taps, value 1 s.; two wooden twine boxes, value 2 s.; an ink pot, value 1 s.; a tea-pot, value 6 d.; a coffee biggin, value 6 d.; a child's chair, value 2 s.; three cut-glasses, value 1 s. 6 d.; a spice box, value 6 d.; and five sieves, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward White , the younger , their master .

The prisoners both pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-165

1418. RUTH MUNRO was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two silver-spoons, value 5 s.; a pair of sugar-tongs, value 2 s.; a tin box, value 2 s.; thirty-six sovereigns, nine half sovereigns, a crown, three half-crowns, one hundred and one shillings, thirty-three sixpences, and a 10 l. note , the goods of Edward White , her master .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-166

1420. HARTY HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , a wooden case, value 2 s.; and twenty-four umbrellas, value 5 l. , the goods of William Wakeman .

FRANCIS MORRIS . I am porter to Mr. William Wake-man ; he is a carrier from Manchester to London -he had

a wooden case entrusted to his care, which I loaded on the waggon at Paddington, to go to the White-Bear, Basinghall-street, on the 14th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw it at the Mansion-house about two or three days after; it had the same direction on then; as when I put it into the waggon,

"Mr. Abbott, of Shaftsbury" - Thomas Morris drove the waggon.

THOMAS MORRIS . I drove the waggon - I saw the case in the middle of the waggon between two large cases, and tied with ropes - we left Paddington about five o'clock, to go to the White-Bear, Basinghall-street - I did not miss the box till next day - I know that it was on the waggon when I was in Fore-street; I saw it again at the Mansion-house - I do not know where it was taken; I stopped at the corner of Moor-lane, Fore-street, and the package was safe then.

THOMAS FREEMAN . I am warehouse-man at the White-Bear - I was there when Morris's waggon arrived; I examined it some hours afterwards, and the package was missing; it was entered in the book, but was not in the waggon.

ROBERT BENSON . I am agent to Mr. Wakeman, and live at the White-Bear - this case was received by our people, at Manchester, and invoiced to come to London by the canal - I did not know what it contained; but I saw it opened at the Mansion-house, and it contained umbrellas, with an invoice.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 14th of October, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I and Hesketh were in London-wall; I saw a confusion with some people, and a man crossing the road; I ran after him, and when I got hold of him, I saw the prisoner about thirty yards before me, walking with a kind of trunk under a gas light; I went and collared him, and asked what he had got there; he said nothing, and threw it down - I took him to the Mansion-house - Hesketh took another man, but he was discharged. I afterwards opened the box, it contained umbrellas, and a bill of parcels, which I have in my hand - in consequence of the direction on the case, I went to the White-Bear, Basinghall-street, and found that it had been lost from there; he was going in a direction from Fore-street.

ROBERT HESKETH . I was with Forrester - I did not see him stop the prisoner, but assisted in conveying him to the Mansion-house with the package - I saw it opened, and the bill of parcels taken from it; he said a person had given it to him to carry; but he did not say who, or where he was to take it to.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man standing with his elbow on the case, and asked him if he was ill; he said he was very bad; and asked me to take the parcel to the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street, for 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-167

1421. HUGH GILMORE was indicted for stealing' on the 24th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Thompson , from his person .

MR. JAMES THOMPSON . I live in Billiter-square, and am a merchant . On the 24th of September, about two o'clock in the day, I was in Fenchurch-street , and felt some person pick my pocket; I turned round, and found the prisoner secreting my handkerchief in his coat - I seized him immediately - there was another lad with him, but he went away.

WILLIAM EARLEY . I took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Fenchurch-street, and this handkerchief was thrown on my shoulder; I could not see whether it came from a window, or from two lads who were passing by.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18241028-168

1422. RICHARD ARNOTT was indicted for stealing' on the 20th of October , the handle of a cruet stand, value 7 s., and an ounce and a half of silver, value 7 s. , the goods of Joseph Clementson .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18241028-169

1423. MARY BURK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a piece of handkerchiefs, containing fourteen, value 18 s. , the goods of Edward Malabone Watkins and Robert Jackson .

MR. EDWARD MALABONE WATKINS . I am a wholesale linen draper , and live in Watling-street - Robert Jackson is my partner . On the 11th of October the prisoner came into our warehouse, and took a piece of handkerchiefs, and put it under her shawl; she was accompanied by another woman - I was in the warehouse, but, perhaps, not in her sight. When I went to them either the prisoner or the other woman, asked the price of a shawl which was in the window; but having seen her take the handkerchiefs I sent for an officer; the prisoner dropped the handkerchiefs before the officer came.

JOHN WILLIS . I am a constable, and was sent for to take charge of this woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman who lives in the same court asked me to go with her to buy a shawl - we saw a piece of coloured shawls in the window, went in, and the gentleman locked the door - he told some person to fetch somebody, and the officer came. He said,

"It is of no use to go before the Lord Mayor, for the property was only moved." The officer said,

"Yes, it is" and then I was taken.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-170

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1424. WILLIAM HAMPDEN was indicted for a misdeameanor .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-171

1425. ANN HOLLINGSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a sheet, value 2 s.; a pillow, value 2 s., and a pillow case, value 1 s., the goods of Solomon Williams , in a lodging-room .

ANN WILLIAMS . I am the wife of Solomon Williams - we live in Great Montague-court, Aldgate . The prisoner took a furnished parlour in my house about seven weeks ago, at 4 s. a week; she paid her rent on the Saturday before the Monday, when she was charged with this offence. I missed this linen, and saw it again at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner. On the Wednesday I drank with her, and I said I had made use of her things; she said so long as I brought them back it was of no consequence - Witness. No, I never heard anything of it till she was taken up.

ISAAC HUGH PUGH . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. I have a sheet pawned for 2 s., on the 4th of October, by the prisoner. I do not know who brought the other sheet, but it is pawned in her name, and I think it was her. Here is a pillow, pawned on the 4th of October, by some person, in the name of Ann Collins , and another pillow, in the name of Morris.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HART . I am a constable. On the 11th of October, about half-past ten o'clock, I was sent for to Mr. Williams's. I heard a great altercation between the prosecutor and the prisoner, about some duplicates. Mrs. Williams let down a bureau bedstead, and said she had lost two sheets and a pair of pillows; I then told the prisoner that I must search her; she said she would give up all the duplicates. I found the duplicates for the articles produced. She did not say that Mrs. Williams had given her them to pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix came to me twice since I have been in confinement, and said she did not wish to prosecute me, but that the officer urged her on, because he should get 3 s. 6 d. a day.

ANN WILLIAMS re-examined. I never said so.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-172

1426. ELIZABETH TURNLEY was indicted for unlawfully receiving two promissory notes, for payment of and value 10 l. each, the property of John Gibbons and others, well knowing them to have been stolen .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Mr. Law, for the prosecution, strongly recommended the prisoner to Mercy, on the ground of its being her first offence .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18241028-173

1427. JOHN TURLEY was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-174

1428. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. NATHANIEL DAWSON . I am a glover and hosier , and live in Cornhill. The prisoner was employed by me on the 12th of July, to collect some small accounts; I paid him a commission on the accounts which he collected - but no weekly salary; he was not employed by any other person at that time; he had 5 per cent. for some sums, and 2 1/2 per cent, for others - he did not take orders. I had a customer of the name of Woodward; the prisoner was to bring the amounts to me as soon as he received them - it was so understood - but there was no regular agreement.

DRAPER BOWMAN WOODWARD . I was a customer of the prosecutor's. I paid the prisoner on the 12th of July 1 l. 8 s. 6 d., for Mr. Dawson. I gave him a sovereign and half sovereign; he gave me a receipt; I saw him write it.

MR. DAWSON re-examined. I heard about a week or ten days afterwards that this money had been paid, and asked the prisoner about it; he said he had received it, but had had a misfortune in the street, and fell down in a fit and lost it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-175

1429. SUSANNAH COLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a table cloth, value 8 s. , the goods of Barnard Grant .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-176

1430. RICHARD ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two half-crowns, eight shillings, and a sixpence , the property of Joseph Booker .

JOSEPH BOOKER . I am a corn-chandler , and live in Aldersgate-street . On Friday night last, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner come from behind my counter; I went into the shop, and asked him what business he had there - I then saw that the till was open. I took him back, and looked into the till, and there was but 4 s. 6 d. in it. I then took him into the back room, and found two half-crowns in his pocket, and 8 s. 6 d. in his mouth. I had seen the till about three minutes before, and there was then about 1 l. in it.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me - I searched him, and found 5 d. in halfpence upon him, and some boot laces.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18241028-177

1431. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS RICE . I am in the service of Messrs. Richard Hardwick and Robert Hogg , glovers and leather sellers, Cheapside. I never saw the prisoner till the 28th of September, between four and five o'clock in the evening, when he came to the shop, and said he came from Messrs, Clementi's, for a sample of the buck skins that a person had been speaking about; he was without a coat or a hat, and had a clean apron on, like a mechanic - I counted twenty skins, and he put them on his shoulder and went away. I should not have trusted him with them, but I gave credit to his representation - it is usual for musical instrument makers to have such articles. He returned in five or six minutes, and said Messrs. Clementi very much approved of them, and desired him to fetch the remainder. I had no doubt but that it was all as it ought to be, and counted out twenty-three more, which were all I had of the kind. I should not have parted with them if I had not been convinced by his representation, that he came from there. I then walked out at the door after him, and watched him across the way; he went over, and went about half way down a court, which leads to Clementi's back premises - he then turned back again. I went over, and laid my hand on the skins, and asked him what he was going to do with them - he said he was going to their back premises - he then went up Old Change, and then to the Bull's Head, public-house, and laid them down on the tap-room table. I said,

"Is this Clementi's;" he did not know what to say. I then said,

"The best thing you can do is to tell me where the others are" - he said he would, and we set off down Old Change, and Watling-street; he said he was going to Fleet-lane; I said I should not go there - I took him back, and gave charge of him.

MR. FREDERICK WILLIAM COLLARD . I am in partnership with Muzio Clementi, and my brother, William Frederick Collard . I do not know in the world of any other firm of the name of Clementi. We never sent for these skins.

THOMAS RICE re-examined. A person named Herbert had been looking at some skins about three weeks before, and took three skins over to Clementi's, and I thought the prisoner came for the same skins.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-178

1432. WILLIAM CARLTON and THOMAS SPENCER were indicted for a misdemeanor .

CHARLES CASTEN DICK . I live with Mr. Owen, of Fleet-street. On the 30th of September, between two and three o'clock, I was in Wood-street, Cheapside - I felt somebody at my right hand coat pocket, as I was walking very quick; I turned round, and saw the two prisoners about six yards from me - Spencer jumped back, and the other was behind him. I walked on a little way, and in two or three minutes the officer called me, and asked me if I had not felt some one at my pocket - I said I had, and he look them into custody.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I was going along by the end of Wood-street, and saw the two prisoners turn round after Dick - I saw Carlton put his hand into Mr. Dick's pocket, and then I saw the other prisoner put his hand in. I saw the handkerchief taken from his pocket; the young gentleman turned round, and I went up and took hold of Carlton, and then of the other.

SPENCER'S Defence. When the officer took us he said we had tried to take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, but we had not, and then the gentleman said he had felt his handkerchief going out of his pocket, but had not felt us at his pocket.

CARLTON - GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

SPENCER - GUILTY .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-179

1433. WILLIAM SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Frederick Augustus Maillards , from his person .

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS MAILLARDS . On the 30th of October, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, I was in Fleet-street ; I had a handkerchief in my left hand pocket; Sturgeon touched me on the shoulder as I was crossing Chancery-lane; he had hold of the prisoner, and said,

"This person has been picking your pocket." I then saw the handkerchief on the ground.

WILLIAM STURGEON . I am a printer. I was in Fleet-street, and saw the prisoner lift this gentleman's coat up, and take something out of his pocket, but I could not tell what it was; I seized him, and told the gentleman he had lost something - he said he had lost his handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing Chancery-lane; the gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said I was picking a gentleman's pocket, but I had not been doing anything of the kind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-180

1434. JAMES LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Ariell , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18241028-181

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2.

OLD COURT.

London Case, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1435. WILLIAM ENNUE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

Vide the case of John Mullue , page 632, the facts of which case are precisely the same as this. The defendant had at the same time, and by the same means, decoyed Miss Johannah Cooper (aged 15 years) to town, in the same post chaise with her sister, and married her at the same church. The affidavit made to obtain the licence was that both parties were of age, and that the defendant had lived in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, for fifteen days previous, which was contradicted by the like evidence as in the former case.

GUILTY .

Both defendants entered into their own recognizance of 100 l. each, and two sureties of 50 l. each, for their appearance to receive Judgment if called upon; the Court informing them it would materially depend upon their conduct to their wives .

Reference Number: t18241028-182

NEW COURT.

(5th Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1436. JOHN HAYNES and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , five frocks, value 25 s., four gowns, value 10 s., and a brass cock, value 6 d. , the goods of William Gerrald Leifchild .

ELIZABETH KNIGHT . I am servant to William Gerrald Leifchild , who lives in Baker-street, Enfield . On the 19th of October I hung some linen to dry on the grass plot at the bottom of the garden; I forgot to take them in before I went to bed, and at six o'clock in the morning they were all gone. The garden is about two hundred yards from the road, but there is a gate leading from a field to the garden, I found some of the linen at the office.

JAMES CLARK , I am constable of Hackney. On the 20th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was by the Cock and Castle, public-house, Kingsland-road, about eight miles from the prosecutor's, and met the prisoners together, with each a bundle; I asked what they had got there - Haynes said it was some old things which they had bought in the country; Smith said,

"Put them down, and let him see what they are." I examined them - the first bundle contained some wet towels. I asked if they bought such things for old things - they said Yes, they did. I said I should detain them on suspicion of not coming by them rightly, and took them to

the watch-house. The other bundle contained a copper, with some frocks and gowns.

GEORGE BUTTERFORTH . I am a constable. Clark delivered the property to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAYNES'S Defence. It was the other prisoner who put the first bundle down.

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18241028-183

1437. JOHN SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , a mare, price 10 l., and a cart, value 5 l. , the property of John Page .

JOHN PAGE . I live in Hornsey-road , and am a cheese-monger . I had bought a horse and cart, which I put into the stables opposite my house. On the 26th of October, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon; my little girl gave me information; I went over to the stable, and saw the prisoner, and told him to take the horse and cart at his peril; he said he was determined to take it by force, for he had been ill-used respecting it; he pretended to go with me to the office, but drove the cart and horse away. I have since heard that it has been his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18241028-184

1438. JOHN MAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , four fowls, value 8 s. , the goods of Thomas Chew .

THOMAS CHEW . I am a farmer , and live at Chingford . On the 27th of October, in the night, my fowls were stolen from under the shed. I found the prisoner in custody with four of them, at Acton: they were then dead. I know them by their plumage.

JOSEPH WOLLEN . I am patrol of Acton. I stopped the prisoner on Wednesday morning, about three o'clock, at Clapton, and asked what he had got - he said he did not know, but that it was a parcel he was taking for his master, Mr. Chew, of Chingford-hall, to the Green Dragon, public-house. He had four fowls in a basket, just killed; they were quite warm; and two geese in a cloth - he said Mr. Chew was to meet him at eight o'clock.

MR. CHEW. He was in my service, but left in May; I gave him no authority to take them - here are the wings. I am certain the fowls were mine.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18241028-185

1439. JOHN BLAZE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , a saw, value 8 s. , the goods of David Edwards .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.


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