Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th September 1824.
Reference Number: 18240916
Reference Number: f18240916-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On THURSDAY, 16th of SEPTEMBER, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; John Garrett , Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

Harry Foster Mellin ,

Ralph Rossey ,

John Goddard ,

Henry Kemp ,

Benjamin Farrow ,

William Cork ,

John Thomas ,

Uriah Bryant ,

Joseph Orkland ,

John Phillips ,

James Jand ,

Thomas Finas,

1st Middlesex Jury.

Benjamin Hughes ,

Thomas King ,

Edward James Woodhill ,

Richard May ,

William Sherman ,

George Williams ,

John George ,

Evan Thomas ,

William Maw ,

Jacob Parcel ,

Thomas Botterill ,

William Love ,

2d Middlesex Jury.

John Dickinson ,

Thomas Langley ,

Henry Robley ,

Francis Hudson ,

Peter George Kinders ,

James Gennery ,

George Sturt ,

Thomas Beckworth ,

Thomas Woodward ,

John Crucklow ,

William Wright ,

William Townsend .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Benjamin Reed ,

Henry Mapp ,

William Pitt ,

John Wipple ,

Elias Chapman ,

Jacob Temple ,

John Bampford ,

William Hearn ,

Joseph Newport ,

John James Tilson ,

Wm. Parnell ,

John Watts .

4th Middlesex Jury.

Edward Cox ,

Joseph Coling ,

Joseph Cooke ,

Jeremiah Mann ,

Samuel Wood ,

Edward Jones ,

Charles Gold ,

John Cooper ,

Jeremiah Rigby ,

Thomas Shirley ,

William Gammon ,

John Lewis Howard .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18240916-1

1242. DAVID MORGAN and JAMES SESSIONS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a watch, value 10 l., the goods of Charles Edward Viner , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GRANT . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Edward Viner , a watchmaker , who lives in Bond-street . About the beginning of June the prisoners came into the shop, and wished to look at a silver watch at eight or ten guineas - they said they would point out one in the window, which they wished to see; they both spoke: one of them went out, and pointed to a watch: I said the price was twelve guineas, which they objected to, and wished to see some others. I shewed them a hunter, which they objected to. I rang the bell for Mr. Viner, who was at ten - he came out, and among others shewed them the twelve guinea watch, and agreed to let them have it for less, which they seemed satisfied with, and said they wanted it for a lame brother, who was going to India; they said they liked it, and as soon as they had consulted with their brother they would return and settle for it. Mr. Viner went into the parlour, and in about a quarter of an hour he returned to the shop, and sat down to work; and in a quarter of an hour after that he asked if I had moved a gold watch off the glass-case on the counter - I had not noticed one there myself: we looked about, but could not find it, and suspected the prisoners; they did not return to the shop; they were not there above ten minutes. Mr. Viner was about five minutes with them. Nobody came into the shop after they left.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Has your master any partner - A. Yes, I believe he has, but I do not know whether he has anything to do with the shop in Bond-street; but is in partnership with him at another shop in Sweetings-alley. I am the only shopman. They came between six and seven o'clock: they both spoke, and I think both went out to the window. I am positive they are the men. I found them in custody five or six weeks after.

MR. VINER corroborated the statement of the last witness; but it appeared that the property stolen was only part of a watch, being without dial or hands, and otherwise imperfect.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1243. DAVID MORGAN and JAMES SESSIONS were again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a watch, value 7 l., the goods of Charles M'Phale , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GENT . I am shopman to Mr. Charles M'Phale, a watchmaker , whose shop is in Chancery-lane - he lives in Pope's Head-alley: this is only a small shop; nobody sleeps there. On the 26th of June, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came into the shop to look at some seals which laid in the window - I took out about six: they wished to see some more, but bought none; they looked at other things, and at last chose a pair of ear-rings, upon which they paid 2 s. 6 d. as a deposit, and said they would call again in the evening, and pay for them; they came to 6 s. 6 d.: they said they were for their little sister, and they had not sufficient money about them, and had to go to Westminster. They were nearly half an hour in the shop; and just before they came in I had been winding up all the watches, and am positive that the watch in question hung upon a nail, within their reach, when they came in - it had come from a lady to be repaired a fortnight before, and she was to call for it that afternoon. I had would it up ten minutes before they came in, and missed it about an hour after they were gone; nobody but them had been in the shop; other watches were also within their reach. The shop is very small indeed. I am positive that they are the men - they had called at the shop three days before, and looked out 16 l. worth of goods, and what then occured induced me to notice them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had seen them before, had you any conversation with them relative to that matter - A. No. Mr. M'Phale had cautioned me about them, and I was afraid to say anything to them. The watch belonged to Mrs. Baring, of New Ormond-street: it has not been found. I saw them in custody five or six weeks after. I did not leave the shop till I missed the watch. They must have got behind me to take it. The shop is very small.

JAMES LEE . On the 20th of July I went to No. 8, Lambeth-marsh, and asked for two young men named Morgan and Sessions - the woman said two men named Brown and Williams lived there, but they were out; we went on the second floor, and saw a girl. I went on the roof of the house, and saw Sessions concealing himself, and took him; he had only his trowsers on: he dressed, and in going down stairs he rushed from me, and ran away,

and was stopped near Astley's Theatre. He had asked if I wanted him for broad, meaning cloth; I said Yes - he was secured. I took him into a public-house, and handcuffed him with difficulty, as he resisted. I took him to the coach stand, and found Foster there with Morgan.

Cross-examined. Q. He was on the roof attending to his pigeons - A. There were pigeons there.

- FOSTER. I am an officer. I went with Lee. I took Morgan at a plumber's-shop in Stangate-street - his wife denied him to me: I said I wanted him for the old game; he said,

"What, the broad;" I said, Yes.

MORGAN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

SESSIONS - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

See the 3rd Day.

Reference Number: t18240916-3

1244. LETITIA PICKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , at St. Luke, Chelsea , a gown, value 12 s.; a pelisse, value 30 s.; a bonnet, value 5 s.; a veil, value 5 s.; a tablecloth, value 5 s.; a parasol, value 7 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s., and a petticoat, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Brix , in his dwelling-house .

LUCY BRIX . I am the wife of Robert Brix , a pianoforte maker ; we live in Sloane-street , in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I have known the prisoner five years - her husband worked for us. She came to live in my house about the end of July, to take care of an insane lady who lodged with us: she was about three weeks with us, and left on Monday, the 16th of August; I did not know that she was going, but missed her about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I went to my drawers in the back room on the first floor, and found them empty; I had been to them the night before, and put a handkerchief in, and saw my child's silk pelisse there - but in the morning that and the handkerchief were gone: the drawer was not locked. I missed a white petticoat, a white muslin handkerchief, and a silk pelisse of my own, from the bottom drawer; also a silk gown, which she had put on the front room table the night before - my bonnet from a box in that room, and a bundle of clothes from a basket in the kitchen, which were safe the morning before: there was a white muslin dress in that bundle. On Thursday, the 19th, I met her in the custody of Cass, with this muslin dress on, also my bonnet, a handkerchief, and a collar, which I had worn on Sunday. I asked how she could treat me in that way, when she knew I worked hard for what I had, and she left me nothing to put on; she said she was ashamed to see me, for she knew she had done wrong - I asked her where my pelisse was: she made no answer. The constable said in her presence that she had given a pelisse to Mrs. Green, as security for some sheets; she made no reply. I went to the watch-house: he fetched the pelisse from Mrs. Green, and it was mine.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me leave to wear anything of yours - A. I lent her the dress she has on now, and a silk scarf, to appear decent in. I do not charge her with stealing them. I lent her none of these things.

MARGARET GREEN . I am a widow, and live in Rose-street, Long-acre. The prisoner took a lodging of me in June last (I think) and slept but one night there. On the 19th of August I met her in St. Martin's-lane: I spoke to her, and recognized her voice; she said she did not know me: I said she did - she then said,

"Let me go;" I insisted upon taking her to the watch-house, but she gave me a plumb coloured pelisse as security for something. I followed her, and was with her when Mrs. Brix met her. I gave the pelisse to the constable.

THOMAS CASS. I am a constable. I took the prisoner by Mrs. Green's direction - she gave me a pelisse, which I produce; I have had it ever since - she had a green veil on when I took her. She said she lived at No. 3, Phoenix-street, but did not say in what room.

MRS. BRIX. Here is the pelisse which I wore on Sunday night - I had only worn it four times - the silk cost me 2 l. 1 s. 7 d.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am a constable of Bow-street. I have a white dress and bonnet which the prisoner were at Bow-street.

MRS. BRIX. The dress is mine, and is worth 12 s.; the bonnet is mine, and is worth 5 s. I think she must have been in distress, for her family are respectable, and she bore an honest character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix .

Reference Number: t18240916-4

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1245. JOHN SHEEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Stephens , on the King's highway, on the 17th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 15 s., and a watch key, value 5 s. , his property.

JOHN STEPHENS . I am a cooper , and live in Oxendon-street. On Saturday night, the 17th of July I was coming out of the Opera House , and met two men - one ran against me, and the other, who was the prisoner was on my left side; he seized my seals, and pulled with great violence - it broke the ribbon from the watch, which was twisted in my fob: the seals and ribbon hung out; he ran across the street with them, and I after him, calling Stop thief! my foot slipped, and I fell, and at that moment the watchman caught him; nothing was found on him - he only ran across the road, and was not out of my sight at all, for the moment I slipped down the watchman called out

"I have got him." It was a fine night, not dark. The Opera was not much crowded.

PETER IVERS . I am a watchman. On this evening I heard a rattle sprung, and saw the prisoner running down the Haymarket, and people following him, calling Stop thief! I took hold of him. Stevens came up in a moment or two.

JOHN STEPHENS re-examined. He ran straight across the street, and then turned towards Cockspur-street, and there the watchman took him.

THOMAS LEWELL . I was on duty at nearly half-past 12 o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I crept under a carriage, and saw the prisoner on the opposite side; he ran into the hands of the watchman. Stevens came up in three or four minutes - he had fallen down.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the Haymarket. and hearing a cry I ran to know what was the matter - two watchmen stopped me. I was in their custody a quarter of an hour before the prosecutor was brought up.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-5

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1246. GEORGE SALES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , at St. Botolph without, Aldersgate , a time piece, value 42 s., the goods of Benjamin Davis , in his dwelling-house .

HANNAH SEBO. I am servant to Benjamin Davis , a tobacconist , who lives in Carthusian-street, Charter-house-square . About half-past ten o'clock in the morning, on a Saturday in August, I saw the prisoner coming out of my master's shop, which communicates with the house; there is no private door. I had just been on an errand, and saw him coming out of the door with a timepiece in his hand, which I had seen on the mantle-piece in the parlour that morning, about ten o'clock - it belonged to my master: he saw me, and ran up the street, and I after him, calling Stop thief! I saw him drop it in Red Lion-yard - I picked it up. A carman stopped him; he was brought into the shop, and given in charge to Hayne. The parlour joins the shop. I gave the time-piece to my mistress.

ROBERT HAYNE . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at the prosecutor's, and took him in charge with the time-piece, which I have had ever since. Mrs. Davis gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN DAVIS . I rent this house in Carthusian-street, in the parish of St. Botolph without, Aldergate; my shop communicates with the dwelling-house - The time-piece is mine, and worth 42 s. This happened on the 21st of August; I was out at the time: I saw it in the parlour, adjoining the shop that morning.

Prisoner's Defence. The girl said she never lost sight of me - there are six or seven turnings, and twenty or thirty carts standing in the yard. I went up the yard to see what was the matter, and she said it was me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240916-6

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1247. SAMUEL ROADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , at Hornsey , five sovereigns, eight half-crowns, and forty shillings, the monies of William Odell , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ODELL . I am the wife of William Odell , who rents a house at Highgate , in the parish of Hornsey, and is a milkman . The prisoner came to lodge with us last winter, and continued till the 18th of August, when in consequence of suspicion I went to my cupboard to unlock a small tea chest, and found it broken open - there had been 8 sovereigns and a half in one paper there; 5 of the sovereigns were gone. I had seen that paper safe two days before; I kept the key myself. The cupboard is in the room down stairs, where we sleep - the prisoner had his meals there. I missed five or six papers of silver from the same chest - I had eight papers, each containing 1 l. in silver. The prisoner had often seen me go to the chest and put money there. He went out that morning, and I expected him back, till Anderson gave me information.

Prisoner. Q. Was not your street door unlocked several nights - A. Yes, for him and other lodgers to come in, but I lay close to the door, and nobody could come in without my hearing them. They must move a table to get to the cupboard.

JOHN CONWAY . I am a constable. On Wednesday, the 18th of August I had occasion to look for the prisoner - I met him in Field-lane, and told him I wanted him respecting the robbery at Odell's; he said he knew nothing about it. I asked what he had done with the sovereigns he had been shewing at the Bull public-house at Highgate, that morning - he said he had no sovereigns, and knew nothing about any. I and Kirby took him into a public-house, and searched him after his making great resistance, and found in his pocket two sovereigns, three half-crowns, four shillings, and 6 1/4 d. in copper. I said he had better pull out what he had got, as I was determined to see; he then pulled out a sovereign, and one half-crown (I cannot say whether he produced any shillings;) he declared it was all he had - this was before I searched him; I then found one more sovereign and the silver I have mentioned. He said he would not be taken, nor give any account how he got the money. I was obliged to go to the office for assistance before I could take him along.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am a constable. I confirm Conway's evidence - I heard him say he had no money about him. Part of the money is at home, and part went towards paying the expenses of conveying him to prison.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am a farmer, and live at High-gate - the prisoner drove for me. On Tuesday, the 17th he took a load of hay to market, and came home late, and in liquor. He came to me next morning for his wages, which were 2 s. 6 d.; I paid him, and he said,

"Now I will quit your premises;" (I had heard him the night before ask my wife for 1 s., and say that he had not a farthing in the world) - he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out about 12 s., and said it was not for want of money that he had pressed me for his wages, for he had plenty of money. He was drunk both on Tuesday and Wednesday. He had been about a month with me, at 15 s. a-week - I paid him on Saturday night; he only worked one day that week.

JOHN ABRAHAMS . I am also carter to Mr. Anderson. On Tuesday the prisoner shewed me a few shillings - he did not say how he got them; but on Wednesday morning; about seven o'clock, he came to my house, and had a cup of tea with me, and pulled out two sovereigns, 17 s. 6 d., and some halfpence. He was drunk, and did not say where he got them.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not been in the habit of borrowing money when I have had it by me - A. I have known him borrow 1 s., but cannot say whether he had money by him.

ELIZABETH PARSONS . I live at the Bull at Highgate, as servant - our house is ten minutes walk from Odell's. On Wednesday, the 18th of August, about half-past 6 o'clock in the morning the prisoner came in and had a pint of beer, and paid me in halfpence - he called for half a pint of rum, and threw a sovereign on the table; I took it up stairs to my master for change; I came down, and gave him 19 s.: after that he had a pot of beer. I saw two more sovereigns in his hand. He was not very sober when he came in.

Prisoner's Defence. The door was left open from twelve to one o'clock frequently, for the lodgers, and she told Doctor Owen, the Magistrate that she could not tell

whether it was me or not; that she did not know how much silver there was, not having seen the box since the week before.

MRS. ODELL, re-examined. I did not - I said I had lost five sovereigns out of one paper, and 4 l. or 5 l. worth of silver. All the lodgers were at home but him on Tuesday evening - I heard him come in in the night, but do not know the time. I go out in the morning with milk, and left my little girl in the room; he breakfasted with me that morning - I left him in the room and returned in about two minutes, then went out with my milk, and thought he was gone, as I did not see him after I left him in the room.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18240916-7

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1248. ELIZABETH SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , four silver forks, value 3 l.; four silver spoons, value 2 l., and two silver ladles, value 1 l., the goods of James Willis and William Willis , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WILLIS . I am in partnership with my brother James; we keep the Thatched House tavern , St. James's; the prisoner was in our employ for about three months, as house-maid , and was taken into custody last Friday week. The plate is occasionally washed up in her room, and it is customary for the house-maids to fetch the tureens and the sauce ladles from the stone closet. We missed four dessert spoons, and two forks about the 2 d of July, and two more silver forks, and two sauce ladles between that and the 16th; I believe they were missed at different times. The bar-maid informed me of the loss.

Cross-examined by MR. FRENCH. Q. She came to you with an excellent character - A. Yes; I believe she was honest before this.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am shopman to Mr. Rushford, pawnbroker, Brewer-street, Golden-square. On the 5th of July I took two table forks in pawn from a woman, for 45 s.; on the 16th of July I received two more table forks, and two sauce ladles, for 35 s. - the first duplicate was brought, and they were put into one pledge, for 4 l. together. I have no recollection of the woman - whether the prisoner came on either occasion I do not know.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 3d of September I was fetched to Mr. Willis's; the prisoner was out - when she came house I took her in charge, and told her I was in possession of facts respecting the plate which was lost; she asked her master to make her a promise - I said none must be made in my presence; she then fainted. She called me aside after some hesitation, and said,

"I have not made away with the duplicates;" I said,

"Then where are they?" she took me to a room behind her bedroom, and under the floor in a hole she took up a wrapper with this duplicate and two others, and gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. The duplicates are not in her name - A. Yes, and Mrs. Willis's name is on the duplicate also.

WILLIAM FOSTER. This is the second duplicate which I gave the woman. The four dessert spoons and two forks are nearly of the same value.

MR. WILLIS. The spoons and forks are mine. I have heard that she has been led away by a young man, and has supplied him with money.

Prisoner's Defence. My intention was when my wages were due, which would be on the Monday, to redeem them, which was the reason I did not make away with the duplicate.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-8

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1249. MARY TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , eleven handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; three shawls, value 50 s., and one shirt, value 3 s., the goods of Adolphes Feistal , in the dwelling-house of Matthew Gosling .

ADOLPHES FEISTAL. On the 31st of July I lodged at Mr. Gosling's, Well-street, Oxford-street. The prisoner was my charwoman for about four months - I missed some linen.

WILLIAM DANIEL . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Oxford-street. The prisoner has been in the habit of pawning at our shop, for ten years. On the 26th of July she pawned a shirt, for 2 s., and on the 26th of July a scarf and five handkerchiefs, for 16 s.; they are worth 1 l.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I am an officer. On the 7th of August I took the prisoner in charge - she denied the charge. I found seven duplicates in her room; one for the shirt, but none for the shawl and handkerchiefs.

THOMAS PERRY . I am servant to Mr. Aldous. On the 31st of July the prisoner pawned a scarf and two handkerchiefs, for 12 s.

THOMAS HOGG . I am servant to Mr. Baylis, pawnbroker, Mary-le-bone-street. On the 31st of July the prisoner pawned a scarf and handkerchief, for 12 s.

MR. FEISTAL. I can swear to nothing but the shirt.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY. Aged 56.

Of stealing the shirt only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-9

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1250. JANE JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a watch, value 3 l., the goods of Hannah Farr , widow, in the dwelling-house of William Slater .

HANNAH FARR . I lodge at Mr. Slater's. The prisoner lodged with me for about a month, and was absent two months, then returned - she had part of my bed. On the 7th of September I went out, leaving her in my room about twelve o'clock, returned between three and four, and she was gone out; she came in soon after, and asked if I had sent a person for my watch: I said No - she said a woman had been for it, and she had given it to her; I said I was ruined for ever, for she had stolen my valuable property, and told her that before I went to bed I would know who she had given it to. I went out, returned between eight and nine, and said if she did not tell me who she gave it to I would have her taken up, and take her oath - she then said she had taken it, and was very sorry for it. I said nothing else to induce her to confess. My sister came in; she told her she had pawned it, and was sorry for it.

JOHN STUBBINGS . I am servant to Mr. Balfour, pawnbroker, Chandos-street, Covent-garden. On the 7th of September a watch was pawned for 25 s.; I believe

the prisoner to be the person. I gave her a duplicate with the maker's name on it; it is worth 30 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT TURNER . I am headborough of St. George's. I took the prisoner into custody. Farr handed me a duplicate.

HANNAH FARR . She gave me the duplicate.

JOHN STUBBINGS . It is the duplicate I gave for the watch.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-10

London Cases, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1251. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a wooden box, value 1 s.; a pelisse, value 3 l.; a cloak, value 20 s.; a shawl, value 10 s.; a tin box, value 2 s.; a tea-caddy, value 15 s.; a reticule, value 2 s.; a hearth brush, value 1 s., and a pair of sheets, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Holt and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Fuller .

WILLIAM FULLER . I am carman to Mr. Thomas Holt , who has other partners; they keep the Axe inn , Aldermanbury, and are carriers . On the 11th of September, about one o'clock in the day, I stopped for a few minutes with my waggon at the Three Tuns, public-house, Brook-street, Holborn, for refreshment; I was on my way to Somer's-town - I left a wooden box in the waggon; the landlord sent a boy out to look after it - he alarmed me; I went out, and missed the box from the off-side of the waggon, and in less than two minutes I saw it on the prisoner's shoulder; I stopped him in Fetter-lane with it, and asked where he was going with it; he said a gentleman asked him to carry it - he attempted to get from me, but I held him; he was alone.

WILLIAM BARKER. I am an agent. I know this box by its being sent from Holt's wharf, at Liverpool; my wife packed it up: I know the box, and several things in it. I have the key of it; I opened it, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment in it.

WILLIAM LOVELL . I am porter at the Three Tuns, and was directed to watch the waggon, and saw a tall man go away from it with this box; he was three or four yards from the waggon, but supposing he had come from the waggon I ran in, and told the man - we both immediately went in pursuit: I did not see him taken.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer, and received him in charge with the property. He said voluntarily that distress caused him to do it, but on Monday he denied saying so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter. A man came to me, and asked if I would carry it for him - I was going to put it on my knot, but he said he was in a hurry, and I had only to take it to a coach; he ran after me towards Fetter-lane, and then I could not see him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-11

1252. SAMUEL CROSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of George Read Hayward , from his person .

GEORGE READ HAYWARD . I am clerk to a wine-merchant on St. Mary-at-hill. On the 17th of August, about two o'clock, I was in Cheapside , and on turning into Newgate-street I felt something at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I seized the prisoner, who was close behind me, and I think I saw the handkerchief in his hand, but I picked it up close at his heels; nobody else was near enough to drop it - he denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing this gentleman he turned round, and charged me with picking his pocket, which I know nothing of.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-12

1253. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Richard Reckless and Joseph Reckless .

WILLIAM WORRELL . I am in the employ of Messrs. Richard and Joseph Reckless , hosiers and glovers , Cheapside. On the 7th of September, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner at the door, looking about in a very suspicious manner, and at last he took a pair of stockings, which hung rather outside the door - I followed him into Bow Church-yard, and took them from under his coat; he said nothing but

"Me, Sir, me Sir," and seemed confused.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-13

1254. WILLIAM LUTFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 5 lbs. of copper, value 4 s. , the goods of William Devy and Elizabeth Devy , his employers .

WILLIAM DEVY . I am a brass-founder , in partnership with Elizabeth Devy - we live in Shoe-lane; the prisoner was in our service. On the 10th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, when he left work I called him back, and sent for a constable, who found four pieces of copper in his bosom, and one in his pocket - I claimed it; he made no answer: two pieces had been marked.

JOHN MONDAY . I am foreman to Messrs. Devy. In consequence of suspicion I marked some copper, and placed it behind a wooden trough, where I had found it; it had no business there. I afterwards saw it found upon the prisoner. My master's account is correct.

EDWARD MOORE . I am a patrol. I searched the prisoner, and found four pieces of copper in his bosom, and one in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-14

1255. PHILIP FARROW and JAMES GRIFFITHS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , thirty-seven canvass wrappers, value 30 s. , the goods of George Leach and William Broadbent , their masters .

SAMUEL JOYCE . On the 21st of July I was warehouse-man to Mr. Lloyd, stationer, No. 116, Fore-street. The prisoners came to the shop together between four and six

o'clock, and brought some wrappers, which were put on the floor - I do not know who carried them; I asked if they were for sale; Farrow said, Yes if we would buy them - Griffiths was close by him: I did not hear him say anything. I said we were in the habit of buying such things. Mr. Lloyd came to me, and said,

"Be cautious what you are doing, and take the men's address" - I think they must have heard that. I asked their address; Farrow came to the counter, and said,

"No. 1, Castle-court, Lawrence-lane." Mr. Lloyd sent me down to enquire after the address; I think they were gone then, but am not certain. Lloyd paid 15 s. 4 d. to one of them - he is not here. I did not see him pay it, but heard him say,

"Here is 15 s. 4 d. in part payment." He desired me to go and give information to the prosecutors, which I did. I delivered the wrappers to Harrison.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you leave Lloyd the day after this occured - A. A few days after. He buys rags by the pound, or by the lot. I saw him to day at his own house, and told him he ought to come here - he made no answer. I only heard part of his conversation with the prisoners. Lloyd has been in trouble several times himself, which is the reason that he told me to be cautious.

MR. WILLIAM BROADBENT . I am in partnership with Mr. Thomas Leach ; our warehouse is in Castle-court, Lawrence-lane. The prisoners were both in our service, as porters . I went to Lloyd's warehouse, and examined a quantity of wrappers, which I know to be ours - the prisoners had access to them, and were not allowed to take them as perquisites.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has Farrow been in your employ - A. Above ten years; I had a good opinion of him once. (Looking at the wrappers;) they are ours - here are thirty-seven of them; they come to us with goods, and are charged to us if we do not return them; I know them by the numbers which the manufacturers put on them. Some of these we have paid for; I know one in particular. I believe Lloyd was bound over to come here. Griffiths was about nine months with us.

COURT. Q. You was fetched to Lloyd's - A. Yes, and found the wrappers.

FARROW - GUILTY. Aged 43.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy, having received good characters .

Farrow Confined Eighteen Months .

Griffiths Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-15

1256. JOHN SWANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 8 lbs. of brass, value 4 s. , the goods of John Warner and Robert Warner , his masters .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WARD . I am warehouseman to Messrs. John and Robert Warner , brass-founders , Jewin-street Crescent - the prisoner was a labourer in their employ for three years. On the 26th of July, in the evening, I was packing up some goods, and had occasion to move his hat, which was on some goods - it appeared heavy, and I found a handkerchief covered over some brass in it; I had seen him come from that place. I remained there, and in about ten minutes, after washing himself, he came to the place, but on seeing me did not attempt to take his hat, but in ten minutes he went and took it up carefully with both hands, and moved it five or six yards - he then waited about five minutes, took it up, stooped down, and put it on; he went into the street; I followed, and told him the clerk wanted him in the counting-house - he came bark, and Hale, the clerk asked him what he had in his bat - he said nothing - Hale told him to take it off, which he did, and I took this brass out of it; the handkerchief was not in his hat when I took it off his head.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said it was his first offence.

Prisoner. I throw myself on your Mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-16

1257. FREDERICK THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , a reticule, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a silver pencil case, value 1 s.; a pair of scissars, value 6 d.; a pen-knife, value 6 d.; a memorandum case, value 1 s.; two penny pieces, and six halfpence, the property of William Augustus Bartelot , from the person of Jemima, his wife .

JEMIMA BARTELOT . I am the wife of William Augustus Bartelot , who is a perfumer . On the 13th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop of Mr. Dowling, a haberdasher, in Newgate-street ; I sat by the counter - my reticule containing the articles stated in the indictment laid on the counter; my hand was upon it. The prisoner came in for a ball of cotton, and stood close at my left hand; he was served. I kept my hand on my reticule - he snatched it up, and ran out with it; I pursued him immediately, and did not lose sight of him till he was secured, and am quite sure of him. I saw him throw the reticule into an area - the servant of the house gave it me up. He ran down to the bottom of Bagnio-court.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is that court, two hundred yards - A. It may be; it was not dark - I was not much alarmed. The ball of cotton which he had bought was found upon him; a little boy came into the shop for some tape, but I think it was not while the prisoner was there. I saw him in the shop some time, for he changed the cotton. A gentleman stopped him.

COURT. Q. The person came into the shop close to you, and ran out with the bag - A. Yes. I became alarmed, but not till after he was brought back.

MARY ANN GLOVER . I was serving in Mr. Dowling's shop - Mrs. Bartelot was sitting there, with her reticule on the counter. The prisoner came in and asked for a ball of cotton - I served him, and saw him snatch the bag and run down Bagnio-court; Mrs. Bartelot pursued him instantly, and I ran out, but recollecting that nobody was in the shop I returned - he was taken immediately; I knew him to be the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not another boy in the shop - A. Part of the time; he was a much shorter boy. The prisoner was there full five minutes. I left Mrs. Bartelot to serve him.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I took him in charge, and found a ball of cotton on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-17

1258. DANIEL M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , 2 lbs. of jalap, value 7 s. , the goods of Frederick Andrews , his master .

FREDERICK ANDREWS . I keep a drug mill in Sun-street, Bishopsgate. The prisoner was in my service. On the 23d of July, having missed articles, I got an officer to watch, and in half an hour he called me; I found the prisoner in his custody, and saw him find 2 lbs. of jalap in his hat. He begged forgiveness, and said he was starving - he was about three years in my employ, at 16 s. a-week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you think he took it for his own use - A. I cannot tell. He behaved well in my employ, and I had a good character with him. I swear that it is jalap. He is married, and has four children.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I was concealed in the prosecutor's premises, and about three o'clock I heard Mr. Andrews call to the prisoner to stir up the jalap, which he did - he then went to the door, looked about, and then pulled off his hat; he took up this jalap, and put it into it, and went into the stable. I followed, took his hat off, and found it there. I found more at his lodgings.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-18

1259. JOHN CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , 7 lbs. of sugar, value 2 s. 4 d. , the goods of Robert Smith and Joseph Barber .

JOSEPH PAYNE . I am foreman to Messrs. Robert Smith and Joseph Barber , wharfingers . On the 3d of August I was on their wharf at Galley-quay ; there was a quantity of sugar there in bags. The prisoner had occasionally worked there, but not at this time. I saw him on the wharf, and was told he was taking sugar - I saw him come from the wharf with a hat full of sugar, about 7 lbs. He said he would go away and not come again if I would let him take the hat and sugar. I went to a bag, and found it cut open, and about that quantity gone.

Prisoner. The bag was cut before I went to it, and the sugar spilled on the ground - Witness. The sugar was quite clean. I saw him one yard from the bag.

MR. ROBERT SMITH . I am in partnership with Mr. Joseph Barber . The officer brought the prisoner to me; he acknowledged that he had taken it out of the bag, and wished me to let him go, but I was determined to make an example of him.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-19

1260. JAMES FENN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a coat, value 3 l., the goods of Robert William Turner , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Butcher .

ROBERT WILLIAM TURNER . I am coachman to Mr. Turner, coachmaster , of Harrow. On the 8th of August I was at the Bull tap. Holborn , and hung my coat across the settle; I saw the prisoner pull it off the settle on to the seat; he then rolled it up, and put it into another coat, and laid it by his side for five minutes - then rose up with it under his arm, and went out. I followed and collared him about three yards from the house, and took it from him. He was a stranger to me.

Q. Why not stop him in the house - A. I wished to see what he would do. I could not sell it for more than 30 s.

THOMAS HEMWOOD . I am a carrier, and was in the house, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the settle, roll it up in his own coat, and in about five minutes he went out with it. He appeared in liquor.

JAMES TARN . I am a watchman. I received him in charge - he appeared to be a good deal in liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-20

NEW COURT. (1st Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1261. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , twenty-four live tame pigeons, price 30 s. , the goods of James Davis .

JAMES DAVIS . I live in Bell-street, Westminster , and keep pigeons confined in my wash-house - I had thirty-five, and on Saturday evening, the 18th of July, about twelve o'clock, I saw them all safe, and locked the door. Blanshard called me next morning between four and five, and I then found twenty-four were gone - the tiles had been taken of the top, and the lock forced off the door. I saw them again afterwards; some of them were found in a bag in the privy, and some in a bag in the yard.

CHARLES BLANSHARD . I was called up on Sunday morning, the 19th of July, about half-past four o'clock - I went to my own wash-house, which is near Davis's, and saw a young man getting over the yard of an opposite neighbour; I then went over, and saw the prisoner's feet under a gutter of Mr. Davis's. I asked him what he wanted - he said he was waiting for a young man who was gone up stairs. I called to Davis, but he did not hear - I went up to Davis, and the prisoner ran away. I afterwards went down, and saw the watchman, to whom I spoke about it. The prisoner was taken about five o'clock, by the watchman, who brought the pigeons and the bags.

DANIEL COCKSEY . I am the watchman. At half-past four o'clock Blanshard asked me if I had seen a boy with a paper cap - I said I had not, but I looked round, and saw the prisoner coming from the back of the premises; he ran away - I pursued, and took him, and found the pigeons in the two bags. He said he had taken them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-21

Before Mr. Recorder.

1262. GEORGE COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. , the goods of George Newcombe .

GEORGE NEWCOMBE . I live at Hackney , and am a brick-maker . I lost a pair of trowsers from a shelf, within the door of my house, in the entry - the door was open. The prisoner was quite a stranger .

MARY NEWCOMBE . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I buy and sell old clothes. On the 16th of August, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another came to the house for a halfpenny worth of small beer. I had seen the trowsers safe on the shelf after they came in. I served them, and they went out - a man then

gave me some information, in consequence of which the prisoner was stopped - his companion had taken a contrary direction. I knew the prisoner before; he had been at my house; he had got a good way from the door before he was stopped. I afterwards saw the trowsers, and am certain they are the same.

WILLIAM PARROT . I live at Hackney. I saw the prisoner come out of Newcombe's house, about half-past four o'clock, with his partner; I saw a pair of trowsers under his arm - he covered them with his smock frock. I told Mrs. Newcombe of it, and then pursued about a quarter of a mile. I am certain he is the same person. Moore picked them up - when we overtook him he said he would not be handled. He worked in the same field as me, and for the same master.

ZACHARIAS MOORE . I found the trowsers - the prisoner was about one hundred yards off when I picked them up, going in a direction from Newcombe's house; I did not see him with them, but as they came back with him I gave them to them: they were claimed by Mrs. Newcombe. I did not see any other person going in that direction, except the persons who were pursuing him, and saw nobody before me but the prisoner.

GEORGE BUTTERFORD . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me - he said nothing to the charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-22

1263. DAVID FROST was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , a watch, value 20 s., and a key, value 2 d. , the goods of William Tarrant .

ELIZABETH TARRANT . I am the wife of William Tarrant - we live in Rawstone-street . I was up stairs; this watch had been hanging over the mantle-piece in the parlour; I had seen it at twelve o'clock, and the prisoner came in about half-past twelve; my street door was partly open. I came down in consequence of hearing it shut - the prisoner asked me to lend him 1 s. for his mother; I said I had none to lend - he said, what should he do, for his mother was much distressed; he then went away, and I missed the watch before one o'clock - I have not seen it since; he was taken up the same evening, and denied the charge.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner, but found no watch, nor duplicate of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-23

1264. JOHN BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Roope .

JOSEPH BELCHER . I live with Mr. Charles Roope , linen-draper , Sloane-street, Chelsea . On the 2d of September, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening this shawl hung in the shop, near the door - I saw it safe just before it was taken; I did not see who took it, but on missing it I came to the door, and saw the prisoner (whom I had not seen before,) within two houses of the shop; he was running, alone - I came up to him: I did not see him drop the shawl, but I brought him back to the shop, and he was charged with having taken it; he said he had not got it. A witness gave it to me as I was bringing him back.

THOMAS PARROTT . I live in Simmons-street, Sloane-square, and am a hostler. I was standing at the stable door, about one hundred yards from Mr. Roope's, and heard an alarm, and went into the street - I saw the prisoner drop a shawl, which I picked up. I delivered it to Belcher when he brought the prisoner back.

Prisoner. The witness said,

"If the boy has a cap on he is the boy that ran past me" - Witness. When I first saw him he had a cap on, but when he was brought back he had no cap.

JOSEPH BELCHER re-examined. When I first saw him he had a cap on, but when I brought him back he took it off - it was not on his head when the shawl was delivered.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he had just come from Jersey, and knew nothing about the shawl. I have seen him about the streets for a month before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of the street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I joined in the cry, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-24

1265. JAMES FLATTERY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , six shirts, value 2 l.; eleven handkerchiefs, value 1 l.; three pairs of stockings, value 5 s.; a necklace, value 5 s.; a seal, value 5 s.; a pair of buckles, value 5 s.; a compass, value 5 s.; three boxes, value 10 s.; a pin, value 4 s.; a knife, value 1 s., and two combs, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Hely Hutchinson , Esq. ; and LETITIA WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

COLONEL HENRY HELY HUTCHINSON. I live in Bulstrode-street - Flattery was my servant ; he had lived with me three weeks or a month; I was in lodgings when I took him. On leaving town for France about the end of June I left these articles in a trunk, to be carried to my uncle's house. I returned on the 1st of August, and missed them - my writing desk had been broken open, which was in the box, containing the linen; that box had been locked when I went away, and the lock had not been injured. I saw the prisoner on the 2d of August; I suspected him, and enquired when the trunk had been brought to my uncle's house, and found it had not been brought for three weeks after I left it. When I saw him I told him I suspected he had robbed me; he said he had not done me any injury; I then delivered him into custody. I have seen the property since, and know it to be mine. There were other things in the box, which he did not take. I cannot tell exactly how many articles I saw, but I am sure they were all mine, they were worth 4 l. or 5 l. I accompanied the officers to Fair-street, where the prisoner was in service, and in the pocket of a coat which he said was his was found a crystal box, which is mine.

Prisoner. Colonel Hutchinson never left me his portmanteau - Witness. I am quite certain I left it with him.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer, and took the male prisoner at Lord Hutchinson's, in Bulstrode-street. I went with the Colonel and the prisoner to his lodgings in Fair-street. On searching his coat which hung in the room I found this box, which was immediately claimed by the

Colonel - the prisoner said,

"I found it on your table Colonel." I then questioned the people of the house, in the hearing of the prisoner, and they said they had seen this box in the hands of a woman, called, the cook, but they did not know her name. I then went to a place where the male prisoner said she lived, but that was not true. I afterwards went to North-street, Manchester-square, and found the female prisoner; I told her James was in custody, showed her the box, and said, I was come for the rest of the things - she hesitated for a moment, and then put her hand into her pocket, and gave me two combs, a necklace, a pair of silver buckles, and two seals - they were claimed by Colonel Hutchinson. I went down to the kitchen, and in her box I found six shirts, eleven handkerchiefs, a compass, two other boxes, a silver pen, and a knife, which were claimed by Colonel Hutchinson. Most of the linen is marked H. H. H.; she said,

"All these James brought to me this morning, and has brought me into this trouble."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner FLATTERY. Some of this property is not Colonel Hutchinson's; some of it is my own - is this shirt the Colonel's? -

COLONEL HUTCHINSON. Yes, it is to the best of my belief; there is the remains of H. on it.

FLATTERY'S Defence. I lived with the Colonel about a month, and was discharged in consequence of his going to France - he took all his things except a portmanteau and a little writing case. He said,

"James, will you take this writing case to my Lord's," and I did so - the portmanteau was left in his bed-room; I suppose it was locked. There was afterwards some dispute about the rent, and I said it was right that the portmanteau should be fetched away - there were several other persons in the house. One night when I came home I found a bundle of these things in a corner - I tied them up in a handkerchief, but I did not like to say anything about it; it passed on for two months - I never opened the bundle, and did not know what was in it.

WRIGHT'S Defence. These things were brought to me about eleven o'clock in the morning of the day I was taken, by James - he said they were foul clothes. I had called on the female servant who lived in the house where James lived, and saw this little box, and she asked me if I would have it - I said I would not.

COLONEL HUTCHINSON re-examined. I am certain the writing-desk was locked in the portmanteau, and that all the articles were in it when I left. There were some rings and money in the writing-desk.

FLATTERY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

WRIGHT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-25

1266. THOMAS INCH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 7 ozs. of tobacco, value 2 s.; two half-crowns, three sixpences, and four halfpence , the property of William Brown .

FRANCES BROWN . I am the wife of William Brown , a tobacconist , who lives in Broad-street, Ratcliff . On the 20th of July this money was in the till in the shop; I was in the room behind the shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, and thought I heard a noise. I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner reaching across the counter - I said,

"You have robbed me;" he ran out, and I called Stop thief! he was taken immediately - he was alone. I had given change for a sovereign a few minutes before, and left two half-crowns, and 6 s. 6 d. When he came back there was but 3 s. 6 d. left - he gave up the money immediately, and there was 7 ozs. of tobacco loose in his cap.

JOHN WEBSTER . I am a headborough. I was called to take the prisoner - he had given up the money.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-26

1267. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 3 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Brown .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-27

1268. ROBERT BIGNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , two pairs of drawers, value 24 s., the goods of Robert Gobby , from the person of George Arnold .

ROBERT GOBBY . I live in Leicester-street, Regent-street, and am a tailor . On the 7th of September I delivered two pairs of drawers to my nephew , George Arnold , who was with me - we had been to take them home, and were taking them back for alteration. My nephew told me while we were going down Holborn that they had been snatched from under his arm; I did not see the parcel again till it was at the watch-house. I had not noticed the prisoner till the alarm was given; I then saw a man running, but lost sight of him. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, but cannot swear that he is the man who was running.

GEORGE ARNOLD. I am twelve years old. I had two pairs of drawers to carry for my uncle; they were under my arm, in paper. About half-past ten o'clock, just by Bloomsbury steps a man snatched them from me - I could not see who he was. I turned round, no one was near me, but we saw a man running, and pursued him - I did not lose sight of him till he was stopped by the watchman; it was the prisoner: he had not got them - they were picked up about twenty yards from where he was stopped. He did not say anything; I did not charge him with it. There did not appear to be any other person running in company with him when we were calling out Stop thief.

NATHANIEL WARREN . I am clerk to Messrs. Denton and Bartlet, of Gray's Inn-square. On the evening of the robbery I was in Kingsgate-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner, who appeared to be running from the cry, and several persons were pursuing him - I saw him stopped by the watchman, and went with him to the watch-house; I saw him throw the parcel down close at my feet - I picked it up. I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-28

1269. DANIEL RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , two sets of harness, value 6 l.; a saddle, value 1 l., and a bridle, value 5 s. , the goods of Christopher Armstrong .

CHRISTOPHER ARMSTRONG . I live at Islington . I had two sets of harness in a coach-house, in a mews, a few houses from mine; I saw them about 9 o'clock on the night of the 26th of July - the coach-house was bolted and barred. I went down again at half-past ten o'clock, and found two sets of gig harness close by the coach-house door, they had been taken off a peg in the coach-house; the door was then open, but it appeared to have been entered by the stable window, from which some bars had been sawed. The harness was worth 7 l. or 8 l. I saw the watchman in the mews with the prisoner in his custody; he asked for his hat, which laid inside the coach-house door.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you the person who was first in the coach-house - A. No. My servant had put the articles there, but I had seen them.

ROBERT ATKINSON . I am a watchman. The mews is at the back of my beat. I saw a light in the prosecutor's coach-house about a quarter past ten o'clock: I had no suspicion, but went on towards it, till I came about twenty yards from the door; the light then disappeared, and as I went on, about half way further, two men rushed out at the coach-house door - I sang out, and then ran; the first man ran to the wall, and got over - the prisoner was getting over, and I took him; he said nothing: he had knocked his hat off in coming under the bar which fastens the doors - the harness was lying in the door way. Mr. Armstrong came up, and the prisoner asked him for his hat; Mr. Armstrong said,

"You are a pretty fellow;" but I believe he gave no answer. As we were going to the watch-house he put his hand into his pocket, and said he was going to get his handkerchief to wipe his face, and with the handkerchief he drew out some skeleton keys; and at the watch-house a phosphorus bottle was found on him.

ROBERT BROWN . I was constable of the night, and took this phosphorus bottle from the prisoner's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-29

1270. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , a shawl, value 15 s.; a bonnet, value 4 s., a veil, value 4 s., and a plume of feathers, value 4 s. , the goods of Sarah Cook , widow .

SARAH COOK . I am a widow, and live in Denmark-street, St. Giles's . I carry on the painting and glazing business . On the 20th of July these articles were on a sofa in my room - they are worth 23 s. I opened the passage door, and saw the prisoner with them in her apron; she dropped them, and ran away - I went to the street door, and called to my man, who was at work opposite, to stop her; he pursued, and took her. I am sure she is the person who dropped them. The parlour door is always open, but there is a lobby or passage which is kept locked - hearing the street open caused me to run up stairs from the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long had you a view of this woman - A. But for a moment - I saw enough of her to know her again. I have a gentleman and a lady live in the house. I cannot tell how she got the things, but I saw them in her possession.

COURT. Q. When she came back with your servant did she appear just in the same dress and exactly to correspond with the person you had seen - A. Yes. I have no doubt that she is the same person.

WILLIAM SAMUEL SMITH . I am in the employ of the prosecutrix. I was at work opposite the house, and heard Mrs. Cook say,

"Stop that woman" - the prisoner was then running ten or twelve yards from the door: there was no other person running. I followed her down High-street, and never lost sight of her till I took her: she continued running. I brought her back to Mrs. Cook; she then fell on her knees, and requested forgiveness.

GEORGE KENDRICK . I am a constable. These things were delivered to me. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner. I asked where the key was to unlock the door - she denied having it, and we could not find any.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent. At the first examination a scarf was brought against me, and on the second examination a bonnet and a veil. I never was in the house, and never fell on my knees.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-30

1270. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , three half-crowns, the monies of Thomas Mitchell , from his person .

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am a sawyer . On Saturday evening, the 24th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock - I had come from the pay-table at the New Inns, public-house, opposite Tyburn turnpike, where I had received three half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence. I went into a public-house at the corner of Portman-street , with two men, who were strangers to me - I do not know that I saw the prisoner, but two men came round me, and took my money. I was going to pay for a pot of beer, and put my hand into my pocket, and found it was all gone.

WILLIAM PERCIVAL . I am groom to Mr. Thomas Ibbot . I was at the Earl of Delawar, public-house when Mitchell came in; he was a stranger to me: he appeared a little intoxicated, but got completely so after he sat down; a man came in with him, who is not here: he sat on the same side of the table, but another person sat between them; two persons came in with him, but one went away, and the other stopped. I was at the same table, but on the other side. I saw Mitchell pay for a pot of beer and a quartern of gin, and then the person who came in with him bade him good night, and left him; he then went and sat at the other end of the room; I removed, and sat opposite him: a young man whom I knew came in, and sat at another table - I saw the prosecutor then go to pay for a pot of beer for the prisoner and another to drink with him, but he could not get his money out of his pocket; I heard it chink: the landlord said,

"I shall take the beer back, you do not want it" - he took it away. A man of the name of Thomas then got up, and attempted to get the money from the prosecutor's pocket, but did not put his hand in - the prisoner then got up, and put his hand in, and when he pulled it out his hand was closed; he then went out of the room, and Thomas went after him; the prisoner then returned, and brought 1 s. - they ordered the beer to come in again, and said there was the money to pay for it. He then went away: I never saw the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-31

1271. GEORGE LESLEY and JOHN HOBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a hat, value 18 s., the goods of David White , from his person .

DAVID WHITE. I live at Knightsbridge, and am a carpenter . On the 1st of August I went out with a friend in the morning, and took a little drop too much - we called at several public-houses, but I do not know the signs. I was sitting on a step in Holborn , asleep, between eleven and twelve o'clock; a person came and told me my hat was gone; I saw it at the watch-house: I had paid 18 s. for it the night before - the maker's name had been taken out, but I am sure it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long had you been sitting on the steps - A. I cannot tell - I had not seen either of the prisoners. I had not been on the steps more than a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I took particular notice of that.

ROBERT FIELD . I live in Plummer's-court, Holborn. I saw the two prisoners and two others going towards the prosecutor, who was sitting on a step in Holborn; they appeared all in company; I had seen him before they came up to him: he had his hat on, and was asleep, and seemed intoxicated; there was no one with him; I saw Lesley take the hat off his head, and walk away with it; the other three walked away with him. I followed them to see if I could find a constable to take them up. I do not know what became of the hat, for they were not taken till half-past nine o'clock at night; when Lesley was taken he said voluntarily that Hobbs had get the hat, and he lived in a house in Ormond-yard; it was found there: we went and found Hobbs in bed - the hat was at Hobbs's sister's.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you do when you first saw Lesley at his house - A. I laid hold of him, and told him what I took him for; he denied it, but afterwards at the watch-house told where it was; he said it publicly and voluntarily; I say that upon my oath. The prisoners were not walking arm-in-arm. I was on the same side of the way, and about sixty or seventy yards from the place; it was very wet, and but few persons passing. I followed them up Kingsgate-street; they walked quietly away. The hat was not found in the house where Hobbs was.

MARTHA SMITH . I am a friend of Hobbs's sister, and am a servant out of place. I was just gone up to the room with his sister; Hobbs came up, and put the hat down, and went out - I did not notice whether he had a hat on or not. I lodge in Ormond-yard, but not in that house. The witness and the constable both said Hobbs should be liberated the next morning. I saw it found in that room, but Hobbs was not there then. I cannot be sure that it was this hat, or whether it was his sister's room; she was there; it was a sitting room.

CHARLES DOWNER . The hat was delivered to me by some person on the 1st of August, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock, in Ormond-yard. I took Hobbs to the watch-house - he said nothing to the charge. The hat was taken to the watch-house.

GEORGE STRIPLING . I am houseman at the watch-house. Lesley was brought there on a charge of stealing a hat from a man in liquor in Holborn. About an hour after Hobbs came in with the hat, which was claimed by White - there was no declaration made in my hearing by Lesley - if it had been said publicly I should have heard it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LESLEY'S Defence. I was very much in liquor all the day.

ROBEBT FIELD. He did not seem to be in a state of intoxication.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-32

1272. EDMUND LAKE was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HARVEY . I am a baker , and live in Charlotte-street, Portland-place. The prisoner was in my service, and was in the habit of receiving money from the customers. On the 2d of August he went out as usual. Mrs. Knox was indebted to me 5 s. or thereabout; she lived at No. 5, North Crescent, Tottenham Court-road. On the 2d of August he did not give me any money from Mrs. Knox, nor did he state when her name was called over that any money had been paid - he never paid me that money: he left me without notice on the 24th of August.

WILLIAM SHELTON . I am servant to Mrs. Knox. On the 2d of August the prisoner called - I paid him with my own hand 4 s. 10 d.; here is his receipt to the bill.

This receipt being read was dated the 16th of August.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-33

1273. EDMUND LAKE was again indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM SHELTON . The prisoner called on the 16th of August at Mrs. Knox's, and brought this bill - I paid him 4 s. 10 d.; I gave him two half-crowns, and he wrote this receipt in my presence.

WILLIAM HARVEY , JUN. I am the son of the prosecutor. I called over the customer's names to the prisoner on that day when he came home, and he gave no account of any money received on the 16th of August.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go into the country at the beginning of July, and stay till after the 16th of August; the shopman settled with me every day - A. I cannot swear whether I was in town on the 16th of August.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-34

1274. EDMUND LAKE was again indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HARVEY . The prisoner was in my employ on the 21st of August. Haslam owed me 1 s. 8 d, for bread and baking, which I never received from the prisoner.

MARY SARSFIELD . I am servant to Mr. Haslam of Grafton-street, On the 21st of August I paid the prisoner 1 s. 8 d. for bread and baking - I had no bill: he was paid every day. I gave him 2 s., and he gave me the change.

WILLIAM HARVEY , JUN. On the 21st of August the prisoner heard me call over the name of Mr. Haslam, among other customers; he booked them some bread, but did not give any money from them.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness paid me that evening after I had settled with my master for the bread. My master shut the books at five o'clock, and I took home some baking in the evening, and then she paid me. I forgot

to pay the money on Monday, and on Tuesday I never take out bread.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-35

1275. HENRY BENNET and JOHN GRADY were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Ebenezar Saunders , from his person .

JAMES EBENEZAR SAUNDERS . I live at No. 19, Lawrence Pountney-lane. On the 26th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening I was in the City-road, near the vinegar-yard - I had a silk handkerchief in my outside pocket: I felt Bennett's hand in my pocket. I turned round, and laid hold of him; I saw Grady close behind him, and the handkerchief was on his breast, as if it had been thrown from one to the other. My brother and myself secured them both.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I was with my brother and heard him call out. I turned round, and saw him attempting to secure the prisoners, and take the handkerchief.

ROBERT HENRY DAVIS . I am a fishmonger, and live in the City-road. I saw a crowd, and went to see what was the matter, and Mr. Saunders told me he wanted an officer; I took the prisoners into my shop, and sent for a constable - I took the handkerchief till the officer came, and then gave it to him.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am a constable, and was sent for, and took charge of them.

BENNETT'S Defence. I never picked the gentleman's pocket.

GRADY'S Defence. I was passing, and the handkerchief was thrown at me by somebody. I know no more of it than you do.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRADY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-36

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1276. PETER LEONARD was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN WHITFIELD . I am in partnership with my brother - we are cheesemongers , and live in Lamb's Conduit-street; the prisoner was in our service, and was entrusted to receive money on our account.

WILLIAM WHITFIELD . I am in partnership with my brother. On the 9th of July there was 13 s. 6 d. due to us from a customer of the name of Macauley; the prisoner never accounted for it.

WILLIAM HAMMOND. I am clerk to Messrs. Whitfield. The prisoner never accounted to me for the money; I keep the books, and it should have been accounted for to me.

SARAH DRAKE . I was in Mr. Macauley's service; he is a customer of Messrs. Whitfield's: I am in the habit of paying his bills. I paid this 13 s. 6 d. on the 9th of July to the prisoner, and he signed this receipt in my presence.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer, and produce this bill. Mr. John Whitfield charged him with embezzling various sums; he acknowledged he had, and said he would make it up if he had time granted; I do not think Mr. Macauley's name was mentioned, but he was remanded for a second examination, and then Mr. Macauley's cook was brought against him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to defraud my master of one farthing; I meant to pay them as soon as I got money: I offered to pay 10 s. a-week if I staid in their service, and to part with every thing I had.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-37

1277. PETER LEONARD was again indicted for the like offence .

JOHN WHITFIELD . The prisoner had been in our employ, and on the 16th July there was 6 s. 7 1/2 d. due from a Mr. Page which he never accounted for.

ANN CLARKE . I am in the service of Mr. Page who is a customer of Messrs. Whitfield. On the 15th or 16th of July I paid the prisoner 6 s. 7 1/2 d.; he wrote a receipt which I have in my hand.

WILLIAM HAMMOND . I am in the service of Messrs. Whitfield. The prisoner never accounted to me for this 6 s. 7 1/2 d.; this bill is my writing all but the signature, which is the prisoner's; he has a book in which he enters all the money he receives; he should enter it in this book and then pay it to me on the same day; he did not account to me for it at all - the latest date in his book is the 10th of July.

WILLIAM WHITFIELD . The prisoner never accounted to me for 6 s. 7 1/2 d. received from Mr. Page. We charged him with having received money which he had not accounted for on Monday the 22d of July; he said he had received different sums which we mentioned to him, and Mr. Page's was one of them. He never stated anything about it till we charged him with it, in consequence of Mr. Macauley's servant stating what she did.

Prisoner's Defence. I offered to sell every little thing I had and pay them what I could, and pay the rest afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-38

1278. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 120 halfpence , the goods of Aaron Dyke .

AARON DYKE . I am a baker . William Randolph is my servant . I gave him 5 s. in copper to pay away on 21st of July about three o'clock in the afternoon.

WILLIAM RANDOLPH . I took out 5 s. in halfpence with the basket of bread on the 21st of July, and met the prisoner at Brompton; he asked if he should go with me. I said he might if he liked - he did so, and I went into a house at the corner of New-street, Brompton, and left my basket at the door with the 5 s. in it - he was with it. I did not miss the halfpence till about half an hour afterwards when I looked for them to pay away; he denied having them. I said there had been no person at the basket but him and me, and I would have him searched - he then ran away. I pursued and took him about one hundred yards off - the basket was a covered one and on a two wheeled truck.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . On the 21st of July, I received the prisoner in charge from the last witness; the witness charged him with taking a 5 s., in copper. I did not hear what the prisoner said.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-39

1279. WILLIAM MAJOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 90 lbs. of lead, value 1 l., belonging to Daniel Jefferys , and fixed to a building of his .

DANIEL JEFFERYS . I have a house at Stepney , in a brickfield, in Bow Common Lane, near the Regent's Canal . I received some lead from Stearn, which was taken from the house No. 6, it corresponded with every nail on being compared. I have seen it re-fitted on the building, and it fitted exactly.

BENJAMIN STEARN . I am a watchman. On the 27th of July I saw four men in Mr. Austin's field, each man had got a load of lead on his shoulder. I came up and spoke to them - they threw down the lead and ran away - the prisoner is one of them. I took him in ten or twelve minutes. I took up the lead first. I lost sight of him while I secured the lead, but I found him again in a little market garden about one hundred yards off - they were all four in the garden and ran away. I pursued them, and the prisoner finding I came up with him jumped over a wall and got into a ditch, I jumped after him and secured him. I went with Jefferys to the house and tried the lead - it fitted exactly; there was all of it but a small piece in the middle of the gutter.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. This was about what time - A. About three o'clock in the morning - it was quite light enough for any body see to a face one hundred yards off; it had rained, but it was then quite fine. When he threw down the lead I was not more than twenty yards from him. I looked at them all at once. I do not know whether I should know either of the others.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am night constable of Mile-end. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house about five o'clock in the morning; there were some marks of clay on his jacket which corresponded with the marks on the lead - it appeared to have been thrown into some ditch. I went to the house, and compared the lead there; two pieces fitted every nail hole exactly - his clothes appeared as if rubbed by carrying lead; the morning was light enough to distinguish a person two or three hundred yards off.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Surrey Theatre. I then went home, and could not get in, I then went and got upon a brick kiln, and got down when the men were coming to work; there were many people passing, and the watchman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-40

1280. HENRY CROWHURST was indicted for stealing on the 29th July , a counterpane, value 6 s. , the goods of John Smith .

MARY ANNE SMITH . I am the wife of John Smith , and live at Wood-green . I wash for Mr. Frederick Gye . I received a counterpane from his servant on the 29th of July, and hung it in my drying ground, and about half-past eight o'clock in the evening I saw the counterpane safe - it was not quite dry. I went in doors with a basket of linen, emptied it, and then came back for the counterpane - it was gone; it was marked at the two corners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM PIZEY . I am a watchman. On the 29th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was near Islington church, and stopped the prisoner with a bundle. I asked him where he came from; he said from his aunt's at Winchmore-hill, and was going to his mother. I took him to the night constable, and gave the bundle to him - the counterpane was in it quite wet; he said it had fallen into a ditch, and that his aunt's name was Atkins. I looked at the initials, and they did not correspond.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-41

1281. THOMAS RATTAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , two coats, value 30 s.; two pairs of gloves, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s., and a cap, value 1 s., the goods of Prideaux Selby ; and a jacket, value 6 s. , the goods of John Bootheay .

JOHN BOOTHEAY . I am in the employ of Mr. Prideaux Selby, who lives at Hackney . On the 27th of July the articles stated in the indictment were in a harness room, attached to the stable. I went to the stable about half-past five o'clock in the morning, as we had a horse ill, and saw the things safe. I went away for about half an hour, and left the door unlocked - when I came back they were gone.

TIMOTHY READING . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 27th of July, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner coining from the back premises, about thirty yards from Mr. Selby's, with a basket, a bundle, and a blue cloth cap in his hand; I asked what he had been doing there: he said he saw the cap over there, and went to pick it up. I said,

"I am afraid you have picked up something else" - he said he had not, and that he came from Clapton: I said,

"What have you got in this basket;" he said,

"What is that to you" - I said,

"I insist upon knowing;" he said,

"Where is your authority, you shall not see without." I put my hand to the bundle, and we had a fall; I let him get up, and we then had another fall; he then drew a clasp knife, and said with an oath that he would be my butcher; he ran at me with it, to cut or stab me: I saw a man of the name of Thomas Dore , and called to him for assistance - the prisoner then ran to a bank: I told Dore to take care of the property. I pursued, and took him in about twenty minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the prisoner come straight up to you - A. Yes, he was about thirty yards from me; he could see me, and we both walked up to each other; he did not run away: he walked up to me, and we stopped. I had not got my patroles' coat on.

JAMES HANDS . I was going to my work about six o'clock in the morning of the 27th of July - I saw Reading and the prisoner: I came up to the place, and when he was taken and brought round to the place where Dore was I saw the property - there was not anything said about the property in my presence.

JOHN BOOTHEAY re-examined. The cap was in the field, near the harness room, but not in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I rose that morning about five o'clock, and have witnesses to prove where I live. (Producing a small pair of weavers' prickers;) this is what I had in my hand.

TIMOTHY READING re-examined. Q. Was it these prickers that he had in his hand - A. No; it was a clasp knife.

JAMES HANDS re-examined. Q. When you came to the assistance of Reading did you see a knife in the prisoner's hand - A. Yes, and while we were running I saw him throw it away, into a garden, opposite Hackney-terrace. I am a bricklayers' labourer. He was running before Reading, and Reading said,

"For God's sake mind, he has got a knife. When we secured him he was taken to the watch-house. I am sure it was a knife, and very different from those prickers.

TIMOTHY READING . I searched the garden for the knife, but could not find it.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-42

1282. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , nineteen yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. , the goods of Matthew Seymour John and John Fieldsend .

MATTHEW SEYMOUR JOHN . I am in partnership with John Fieldsend - we are linen-drapers , and live in Charles-street, Soho-square . About six o'clock on the 10th of August the prisoner came in, and bought one yard of printed cotton, for which she paid me - from her manner I judged she had got something: I put on my hat, and followed her out. As she passed the window I saw four or five more, about her age, ready to take anything of her. I brought her back, and she fell on her knees, and begged forgiveness; this property was found on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT MOORE . I am an officer. I took her into custody, and took the article which had been found on her. She cried very much, and said she had taken it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-43

1283. EDWARD WATTS and CHARLES WALKER were indicted for stealing on the 28th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Stephen West .

JANE BARNES . I am in the service of Mr. Stephen West , of Battle-bridge. On the 28th of July I saw the two prisoners by the door of the shop - they asked the price of a flute, and said they would call again which they did and Walker said,

"I am come about the flute;" I saw something move about Watts, and a young lady here gave me some information. Watts was taken by me, and the handkerchief found upon him.

AMELIA WALKER . I lodge at Mr. West's house. I saw the prisoners in the shop; Watts was taken in my presence, and the handkerchief found upon him. Walker ran out.

WILLIAM WATTS . I am a constable, and lodge in Mr. West's house. I was called down to take Watt's into custody, and as I took him to the watch-house he said Walker was in company with him, and told me where to find him.

WATTS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240916-44

1284. HENRY CHARLES PEPEROW was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , five half-crowns, and three shillings, the monies of William Vane , from his person .

WILLIAM VANE . I am owner and driver of a hackney-coach . On Sunday night, the 23d of August, I let down a fare on the Surry side of Westminster-bridge - I was a little intoxicated: as I returned I met a person who looked like a groom, and he offered me 6 d. to take him as far as I went. We had something to drink at a house in Long-acre. I think I had about 24 s. or 25 s. in my pocket. On the Monday morning I saw the prisoner at my house in Little Britain; he came about nine o'clock, and said he was one of the persons who assisted me in getting into the coach the night before, and that he was accused of having taking some money from my pocket; that he was innocent - but if it came before a Magistrate, as he was afraid it would, for he was spited by the other parties, it would be his ruin - but I could serve him very much if I would say I put the money on the seat of the coach. I told him I could not say what I had done with it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you not had other persons about you - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PRICE . On Monday morning, 24th August, about two o'clock, I was on duty in Broad-street, St. Giles, I heard a rattle sprung - I went to the place, and found several watchman and the prisoner at the bar, and another witness; they all stood round Vane: I enquired into the case, and the people said he had fallen from the box of the coach; I told them to take him to the workhouse doctor; I then lifted him up, and he seemed to talk; the waterman said he knew the man - we then took him to the coach, and I said put down his feet, and somebody get in the coach with him. The prisoner went in the coach and assisted in getting him in, there was a good light from the gas lamp; I stood with one foot on the step of the coach, and saw the prisoner put his hand into the waistcoat or breeches pocket of the prosecutor, and take it out again, and heard some silver larger than shillings, chink, I said

"D - n you, what are you about," I then took the watchman's lantern got in, and took the money off the seat of the coach, and said,

"See what my own fellow-servant has been doing."

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What situation is the prisoner in - A. He is a supernumerary patrol, and has been so about one year and nine months - I did not swear at the Police Office that his hand was in his waistcoat pocket; I said it was his waistcoat or breeches pocket; he had the man's body in his arms when he was helping him into the coach; there was quite light enough to see what he did; the prosecutors breeches were not loose, but I cannot tell whether the pockets were open or not - the prisoner was taken to the watch-house, but the night patrol did not take him in charge, but told us to go on our duty, and to appear the next morning at the office. He attended voluntarily at Marlborough-street; and said

"I was mistaken, for the money fell out of his pockets in getting him into the coach" - this happened about two o'clock in the morning.

WILLIAM SUTTIE . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 23d of July, I was in St. Giles's; I went to the coach, and saw the prisoner there among the rest; I heard Price say as he was standing on the coach step,

"What are you at," Price then got into the coach, and brought out five half-crowns, which he said he had taken from under where the prisoner had sat, on the seat of the coach.

when Price first got in, he said

"Here is money he has been robbing the man of," and he brought it out. Peperow said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Peperow say it had fallen out of his pocket - A. No, he said he knew nothing about it. I am a patrol, and have been so for three years; I never had a word with the prisoner in my life - he got into the coach first, and then helped to get the man in; I believe the man's feet went in first.

CORNELIUS BOWER . I am the beadle. On the morning of the robbery, Price said he had a curious charge against his brother patrol; I said

"This charge shall not be overlooked" I sent them about their business, and went to the coach, and saw a watch ribbon, I said

"We will have the man out and properly searched" - I then found that his watch was safe, and in one of his pockets 9 s. 1 3/4 d., which I have here; his pockets were both buttoned when I saw him.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When you looked at the man's pockets were they buttoned - A. I believe they were - I believe Price and the prisoner had been on good terms.

Mr. BRODRICK to VANE. Q. Do you judge of what you had in your pocket, by what you took out in the morning, and what you took in the day - A. Yes; but I do not know how much I spent with the man to whom I gave the ride; I might have drank some more afterwards - my box coat was taken from the box while I was drinking with that man.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely state that I requested Mr. Rowe to search me at the watch-house, which he refused to do; I was then called back and searched, and 3 s. 6 d. was found on me, that was all.

WILLIAM SUTTIE re-examined. Q. Did you ever say that you had had a quarrel with the prisoner - A. No. I never stated that I knew the different watchmen had a quarrel with him, and that they would injure him if they could, nor any thing at all like it.

J. GOVEY. I am a shoe-maker, and live in Wild-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields; I have known the prisoner seven years, and never heard any thing against him - I have heard Suttie say more than once or twice, that the prisoner was naturally hated by the patrols, by making himself too officious - he said so about two months ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-45

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1285. WILLIAM LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone , two silver butter boats, value 45 s., and four spoons, value 45 s., the goods of Thomas Allan , in his dwelling-house .

ANDREW ATKINSON . I am servant to Thomas Allan, Esq., who lives in Park-crescent , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 7th of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in my bed-room, which is on the area floor - he then came into the pantry, where I was; I immediately locked the pantry door, and asked him what he was doing there; he said if I would let him go he would not come there again: I refused, and took him into the passage; he pulled out two silver butter boats from his bosom, from under his shirt, and put them on the floor - I put them into my pocket: he then pulled out four silver spoons from the same place. He was a perfect stranger. The area gate was locked, but the area door open - he must have jumped over the railings. I took him to Marlborough-street. The butter boats are worth 45 s. or 50 s., and the spoons 45 s. also. My master's initials are on them.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer of Marlborough-street, and received the prisoner in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gate was open.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Reference Number: t18240916-46

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1286. JOHN HUSSEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Michael Delaney .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DELANEY . In June last year I and my deceased brother Michael lodged at the prisoner's house, in Cloth-fair ; my brother slept in the first floor back room. One Sunday morning, between three and four o'clock, I was in bed in the front garret, and heard my brother's voice down stairs, crying murder - I jumped out of bed, and ran down stairs, and in the passage I saw Hussey and his wife striking my brother - the prisoner, on seeing me, up with his fist, and knocked me down; Gannon, who was there, brought my brother up stairs, in less than two minutes, into the front garret - I followed him up, and on getting him into the room bolted the door - my brother was sitting on the bed, undressing, when I went in: I told him to take off his clothes, and go to bed, and we would leave the house as soon as the night was over. About ten minutes after I got into the room Hussey gave a blow with a hammer at the door, which opened, and he struck my brother with it on the left side of his head, over his eye, and knocked him down; he was on the bed, nearest to the door.

Q. After he entered the room did anything happen before he struck him - A. No, my brother said nothing to him, nor did anything; he only kneeled down, and was bleeding. The prisoner then came and made a third blow at me - I grasped at the hammer to prevent the blow: we were struggling in the room for ten minutes, and then both got into the passage, struggling for the hammer. The watchman was on the landing place. Hussey pushed me, and knocked me down, put his knee on my chest, and kicked me - he then let go of the hammer. When I saw my brother bleeding I was senseless, and do not know whether I gave Hussey in charge or not. I took the hammer into the street, and whether I gave it to the watchman or not I do not know. Hussey gave charge of me - I went to the watch-house. I had seen the hammer before; it was kept in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You came

down hearing your brother crying murder, how many others were crying out also - A. None. Gannon, M'Grath, and one Gallaghan were present, also Hussey and his wife - I do not know who else; there were six in all I think. I saw the watchman coming in when I went up stairs. It was ten minutes before Hussey came up to my room. My brother died on the Tuesday morning, about four o'clock. When my brother heard the blow at the room door he stood up - he was taking off his shoes; he had only taken his jacket off: he sat on the bed, and began undressing directly we took him up stairs; he had nothing in his hand.

Q. Was there an iron rod in the room - A. I do not know; I never saw it. I was in the Compter all Sunday; Hussey was at liberty. I saw no marks, or blood upon Hussey. I did not beat him - if there was any blood on him it was mine.

Q. I ask you one question, and tell you I have a witness to call - have you ever said,

"I do not know that Hussey did strike my brother first; but I will swear it, for I think it no harm to be revenged on him" - A. No, nor anything like it to any person. I know Conway, but said nothing of the kind to him.

Q. Have you ever said that if Hussey's friends would give you 10 l., you would go home, or to harvest, till this trial was over - A. No; I never said so to Green, nor that as they would do nothing I would do all I could against him, and give Green 2 l. to swear against him. I never spoke to him.

JOHN GANNON . I am a labourer. 1 June, 1823, I lodged at the prisoner's house, and slept in the back garret - there are two beds in the room. I and Grogan slept in one, and two men in the other. This happened on a Saturday night; I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock; all were in good humour then, drinking in the kitchen - Michael Delaney was one of the party; I left him down stairs when I went to bed. I locked my room door, and was disturbed between three and four o'clock, by Turvey, who called me up; it was day-light: I went down, and on the landing found the prisoner, the deceased, his brother, the prisoner's wife, and two or three others, who I do not recollect; they were pulling and mawling one another about. Mrs. Hussey sang out to me to take Michael Delaney up stairs to prevent the quarrel; I laid hold of him, and got him and his brother out of the mob, with a great deal of trouble, up to the first turn of the stairs. Thomas Delaney broke down under my arm, and went down - he wanted to go down again. I took Michael up to his room, but could not get in there, so I took him up to his brother's bed-room, and locked the door. One Galaghan who slept in the room was there also M'Grath - they were not in bed. I asked Michael to go to bed; he was very much intoxicated, and wanted to go down again, and said he would not go to sleep till he could be revenged on Hussey.

Q. Mind what you say, remember you have given an account of this before which is in writing. - A. I will mind; his brother came up, I knew is voice, and let him in, he locked the door. Catherine, the servant, came up after that, and told us all to go bed, for the watchman had entered the house, and if we did not, he would take us into custody; I went to bed then without opening the door to her. Tom Delaney stood at the head of the bed in his small clothes and shirt. I heard the door broken open in five or six minutes, and when I turned round, I saw that the deceased was on the floor bleeding, and Hussey in the room; he and Tom Delaney had both hold of each other; the watchman was in the passage, and both gave charge of each other. I saw nothing in Hussey's hand; I did not see him enter the room: the first thing I saw when I turned round in bed, was the deceased on the floor; I suppose he was knocked down, but I did not see him knocked down; the watchman took Tom Delaney into custody, the prisoner came back into the room, and I saw him kick the deceased either on his legs or thigh while he was on the floor. I got out of bed, and then the watchman came in and took Hussey away.

Q. Did Hussey say any thing when he kicked the deceased - A. He said there never was a man reared from his father that he would not serve in the same way. M'Grath (who is now in the hospital,) took the deceased into Mrs. Turvey's room, she attended to him; he was in a very bad state indeed, and said he should never get over it; the room was stained with blood; I observed a cut on his temple - I left the house directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did you first set down to drink that night. - A. Between ten and eleven I think - the two Delaneys and a few more of the lodgers were with us; I went to bed in about an hour; I suppose they continued there four hours after. When I came down, Mrs. Hussey begged of me to take the deceased up stairs, that there might be no more quarrelling, he was very violent, and so were every one of them; they were all in a great passion. Tom Delaney was as much inclined to fight as any of them, but he came up of his own accord afterward. I don't think one of them was sober. The deceased passion did not cool at all, when he got up stairs, and Hussey's passion seemed to continue. I saw an iron curtain rod in the room; I saw it in the deceased hand; he was doing nothing with it. I was sober when I first went down - Hussey was bleeding in the mouth. Tom Delany was down before me; the watchman came up with Hussey; I heard the door burst open; I could see the door from my bed, but my face was to the wall.

Q. What time passed between your hearing the door burst open and seeing Hussey in the room - A. Not three minutes; and I saw the watchman directly I turned round in bed; my bed was near to where he fell.

COURT. Q. Had the deceased the iron rod in his hand when the prisoner came into the room. - A. I cannot say my Lord.

ALEXANDER M'CROMBIE. I am a watchman. I was on duty on Saturday night in June, in New-street; my attention was called to the prisoner's house by a woman who lives there. I went, and saw three or four men, one on the top of the other on the passage floor. I endeavoured to separate them as well as I could; the landlord Hussey gave charge of one man, whom I took to the watch-house; Hussey accompanied me there; we returned to the house, the constable of the night and one or two watchmen came to my assistance. Hussey then came out of a little room with a hammer in his hand and went up stairs - we followed him up, and the first room he came to he burst open with the hammer; he looked in and said nothing, but went

up to a room on the second floor, and burst that open, looked in, came out, and went up to the third floor, burst the door open with the hammer, and went in, but did not stop any time, and I did not go in (I said

"Do not break the doors open, you should not do that;" he said the house is mine, and I can do as I please with it; this was while he was breaking the second door) he came out, and the deceased's brother and him were struggling, and fell down on the landing-place; we separated them, and took both down.

Q. At this time did you know anything of what had happened in the room - A. No; we took them to the watch-house, and were going to take them to the compter, they wanted some clothes; I returned to the house, went up to the same room, and found a quantity of blood.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You and the other watchmen followed him up - A. Yes, close behind, he knew we were following him. I did not observe his mouth and face.

JOHN ELLIOT . I was an officer on duty on this night, and took the hammer from Thomas Delaney , between the house and the watch-house.

MR. R. A. STAFFORD. I was house surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I saw the deceased there on Sunday the 15th of June, 1823, about five o'clock in the morning, when he was brought in. I found his scull fractured on the left side - it was about an inch long and one deep - he was sensible; he died on Tuesday morning. His death was occasioned by inflammation of the brain caused by the fracture; that could be produced by this hammer. I think from the external appearance of the wound that the sharp edge of the hammer had done it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Might not the wound be occasioned by falling against the foot of a bedstead - A. I think not. I do not think that the force of falling would do it; the inflammation would certainly be increased by intoxication.

Prisoner's Defence. The deceased and I were on good terms. I did not intend to do him any harm. I bore him no malice at all.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of manslaughter only . Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-47

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1287. MARY HARRIS was indicted for the wilful murder of John Simkin .

Messrs. ANDREWS & BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA POWIS . I live in Rosemary-lane . On the 2d of August, about 9 o'clock at night, I was in the lane and heard a cry of murder, and saw the prisoner abusing Mrs. Shanks, who lived with the deceased as his wife - she was treating her violently, and after that she crossed to the opposite side. Simkin came out of his own door, and asked her if she had struck his wife; she said she had, and would serve him the same, and gave him a blow, which did not appear to me to be of any consequence - he had not touched her. He was very much in liquor and fell immediately he was struck; a mob came round and picked him up, and I saw no more - he was taken in doors. She was sober - she had thrown Mrs. Shanks on the ground.

COURT. Q. The prisoner only gave him one blow - A. It appeared to me more like a push than a blow.

ANN SHANKS . I lived with Simkin, and had a family by him. On the 2d of August, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I had some words with the prisoner about our children; Simkin was sitting in his room, and was a little intoxicated. The prisoner began the quarrel - there was a cry of murder, which brought Simkin down to the door. Harris was beating me; I was down, a man took me up and supported me; Simkin said

"Don't kill the woman quite," and immediately the prisoner seized him by the collar, and gave him a push as he was coming to my help. She pushed him in the stomach, and said she would do the same to him if he came to my assistance. I did not see that it hurt him. I was taken up stairs, and saw him soon after in his own room: he went out, came home, and was in bed with me by ten o'clock, and next morning, when he awoke, he complained of a pain in his stomach. I got him some warm gin and water, which he drank. Mr. Jenkins, the doctor, saw him. He was ruptured, and had a gravel complaint; he died about half-past eight o'clock on Wednesday morning. I do not think the blow the prisoner gave him could have hurt him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What age was he - A. Sixty-three. He often complained of a pain in his stomach.

JOSEPH WILKS . I live in White Horse-court. On this night I was in Simkins's company at an ale-house for twenty minutes after this occurred; he was very drunk; he had been drinking all day, and was drunk the night before also. I saw him at ten o'clock on Tuesday night - he had been bled, twelve leeches were ordered by his doctor. Ann Shanks was with him. He had a very bad cough before this.

CHARLES JENKINS . I am a surgeon, and live in Rosemary-lane. On Tuesday, the 3d of August, about the middle of the day, I saw the deceased, he was labouring under an inflammation of the bowels, and died on Wednesday morning. He appeared to me on Tuesday to have been drinking the day before. I opened his body with Mr. Canstall. The first morbid appearance was an inflammation in the intestines, called the choler; upon opening which, we found about three pints of liquid, the consequence of mortification: this may have been produced by intoxication, or violence; my opinion is, that external violence was used; it is impossible to say the cause of his death; he was the most healthy subject I ever saw, considering his age. If external violence produced his death, it would happen within the time at which it is said he received the injury. His lungs were perfectly sound.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you form your opinion from your own observation, or from what you have heard - A. From observation; I don't allow him to have been a diseased subject. A cough could not produce such consequences. Falling on his stomach, in a state of intoxication, might produce it. I did not observe that he was ruptured; that would have no effect. If the inflammation was caused by violence, he would certainly complain of pain immediately. There was a blood-vessel broken.

COURT. Q. You have heard that he was ruptured, had a cough, and a complaint in the bladder; that he received a blow or push, not particularly violent, and fell, either from that or intoxication - Would a blow of that description produce the symptoms you saw - A. I think not. It

appears probable that external violence had been used, but such as described I consider not sufficient; and if there was no external violence, I consider that death must have arisen from internal causes. The liquor on his stomach appeared to me to be spirits.

JOSEPH WILKS re-examined. I was not more than twenty minutes with him. I heard no complaining.

NATHAN CANSTALL . I saw the deceased opened, and attribute his death to the inflammation of the bowels.

E. POWERS. I saw him fall; he fell on his back.

NATHAN CANSTALL. Then I think he must have died a natural death.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-48

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1288. ROBERT MARK was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife .

GEORGE THOMAS MARSHALL . I am a gun maker, and live in St. George's-place. On the 1st of August, a few minutes after twelve o'clock at night, I was returning home over the Chelsea Water Works bridge , and heard a conversation between a man and woman; I could only hear part of it, it was so low. I heard the woman say,

"Leave go my hand." I hallooed to know if any thing was the matter, and received no answer, but almost directly heard something smash in the water. I called the watchman; we proceeded to the spot, and found the prisoner leaning on the wall near the bridge; he said his wife was in the water, or words to that effect; we and some other persons searched in the water with a lantern, but not finding the body, we went with the prisoner to the watch-house; he was thirty or forty yards from where I was, when I heard the words which appeared to come from that place. I got up to him within a minute and a half or two minutes; he was leaning on the wall looking down to the water; it was too dark for him to endeavour to get her out; he appeared distressed, and was in liquor; he was secured directly. The woman spoke very loud, but not as if she was in distress or a passion. I heard it more than once.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where is this bridge - A. At the end of the Pimlico-road, over a creek. The wall is not part of the bridge, no body has any business there; a fence prevents people getting there. I hallooed to know if any thing was the matter; she gave no answer. There was quite sufficient time for her to answer before I heard the fall in the water.

JOHN JONES . I am a beadle. I was called up between three and four o'clock to look for the body. Cousins had just dragged it out.

JOHN MARLOW . I am a watchman. I was in St. George's-row, and heard a man hallooing very loud as if he wanted assistance. I sprung my rattle, and ran across the bridge, and found the prisoner and Marshall there. I asked what was the matter; the prisoner said,

"My wife is here, and she is drowned." I got on the wall and looked down the cut, but could hardly see the water. I could neither see the body or the water moving. I desired a stranger to lay hold of the prisoner. Cousins came up and took him. He said,

"There is my wife, she is drowned." He was sitting on the wall with his face towards the water; he seemed concerned, for he hallooed very much before I came to his assistance.

Cross-examined. Q. If he had not hallooed you would not have gone there - A. Yes,

RICHARD PAINTER . I am a labourer, and live in Flask-lane. On the last day of July, I was drinking with the prisoner and his wife, at the King's Head public-house, at the foot of Chelsea water-works bridge, from half-past nine to eleven o'clock; while drinking he sung a song, all but the last verse, and that his wife sung, he seemed angry at that, and just tapped her over the cheek with the back of his hand, but did not hurt her, or seem in anger afterwards; we sat drinking till a quarter to twelve, when Rope came by, Marks asked him to go in and have half a pint of gin, and at last persuaded him to go in; his wife went in with them, but I went home. He is a labouring man, and lives at Westminster. He told me that he had a barge load of stones to look after in the cut, to see that no other barge ran against it, and knocked the stones into the water.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose service are you and the prisoner in. - A. My father, who works under Messrs. Johnson and Bruce; the bridge was in his way to the barge; he must get over the fence to get to it, and could go home that way; he is a good natured man.

GEORGE HENRY ROPE . I live in St. George's row. About a quarter to 12 o'clock, I saw the prisoner and his wife with Painter at the public-house door; they asked me to drink, which I refused three or four times; but he and his wife with a sort of push got me into the house, and called for half a pint of gin; we staid there a quarter of an hour; there was no words between them. I parted with them at the foot of the bridge, and saw them got about ten yards up the bridge; he shook hands with me, and waited for her while she did so; she then went after him and threw her arms round his neck; I heard him say,

"Catch hold of my hand," but saw nothing more; as I went home. He was employed at Mr. Johnson's; works under Painter, who employs barges; he told me he should be out all night; I saw the body before the inquest; it was his wife.

Cross-examined. Q. Every thing was kind and affectionate between them. - A. Quite so - she offered to pay for the gin; he said

"Do not break upon your house money, I will pay it."

WILLIAM WHITTLE . I am a coal-merchant, and live at Bridge-wharf, Pimlico. On the night in question I was awoke between eleven and twelve o'clock, by a man calling out that his wife had fallen overboard; he seemed in great distress and anxiety. I went to my window, and saw several watchmen there - one of them expressed a disbelief of her being there, but the prisoner declared she had fallen in, and pointed out the place, and expressed a desire to get her out, or that they should get somebody to get her out.

Cross-examined. Q. He expressed great anxiety to be allowed to assist in recovering her - A. Particularly so.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I live at the foot of the wooden bridge, about forty yards from this spot. I heard the screams of a female; they appeared to come from where the prisoner was. I got up, and saw him in charge of the watchman. I did not hear a man's voice; I heard the the screams three times, close one after another. I heard nothing fall into the water.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a watchman. I was in Elizabeth-street about half-past twelve o'clock, and heard a dreadful shrieking and crying - I could not discern what it was, and while I was listening a rattle sprung - I immediately ran to the spot, and saw the prisoner in custody; I held my lantern over the wall, but could see nothing moving; I asked the prisoner if it was his wife; he said,

"Yes, she is gone, she is drowned;" he repeated that several times. I found the body about a quarter to four o'clock in the morning, in the creek, close under the wall, near the spot. I think there might be about five feet of water at the time of the alarm; when I took her out, she was covered with mud - there was so much mud the body would not be likely to rise at all; there is always water there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he seem distressed and anxious to search for her - A. He was in the hands of a stranger and appeared in liquor.

JURY to ROPE. Q. How high is this wall - A. From the foundation to the top it is eighteen feet; it is about eighteen inches or two feet from the ground, on the land side.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he desired his wife when they crossed the bridge, to go on and he would meet her, when he had looked after his barge, but she said he had no barge to look after, and caught hold of his hand, that he got from her, and soon after heard her scream out, and a plunge in the water; that he called out, and somebody caught hold of him, and would not let him look for her, saying that he would be drowned.

RICHARD PAINTER , Sen. The prisoner was in my employ; it was part of his duty to look after the barges , which lay on the water; he could go no other way than where he was, to get to the barge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-49

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1289. HENRY NAIREY was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with killing and slaying Thomas Whales .

THOMAS EDWARDS . I keep the Bell and Mackarel public-house, Mile-end . On Saturday, the 10th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; Thomas Whales was at my house; the prisoner was dancing before the window - he then went into the parlour, and was dancing there - he then went into the tap-room, and while there, the deceased came to the bar, and paid me for a pot of beer; and in five or ten minutes, the prisoner came out, and sat himself on the bench outside the door. Whales had a pint of beer, and went up and said something to the prisoner, which I did not understand - he, (Whales) at last said,

"I will make him drink" - he was there five or ten minutes; the prisoner then went away; Whales followed him, and was abusing him very much for going away: I heard Nairey say,

"I cannot fight, and do not want to fight" - they turned the corner, and got out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner was perfectly quiet at your house - A. Quite so. Whales seemed provoking him to fight, and he wanted to get out of his way.

JOHN HONOUR . I am collector to the East London water works. On the 10th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and Whales beginning to fight - each struck but one blow; the blow the prisoner struck knocked Whales down, as if he was struck by a cannon ball, he laid as if dead: but previous to the fight, I saw them on the Regent's canal-bridge; and the prisoner seemed reluctant to fight; he said,

"If I must fight, I will" - and when he knocked Whales down, he made an effort to get away, but was taken. I understand that Whales had previously struck him.

CHARLES STEWART . I live in Globe-street, Mile-end. I was at my master's door by the bridge, and saw Nairey and Whales standing together; and saw Whales strike him several times - the prisoner came away, and asked master to see him righted; master said, as he was in liquor, he had better go home. They both stripped and went to fight on the bridge; both were in liquor; the prisoner hit the deceased under the right ear and knocked him down; he got up, and the prisoner struck him again in the same place, and knocked him down; he then put his clothes on and went away. He did not want to fight, but was aggravated to it. I did not see Whales strike at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner walk away and the deceased follow him - A. Yes; and then they fought. When he came to master, he walked on the bridge, and the deceased followed him; it is not two steps from master's house; the deceased stripped first, and had somebody as a second; the prisoner had no friend.

JAMES STONE. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody; and took him to the deceased, who laid on the bridge. Nairey asked him if he had done him any harm, and put his hand out - Whales shook hands with him, and said, he had done him no harm, that it was a fair stand up fight, and it was his own fault - he appeared in a languid state. I took him to the Globe public-house; the prisoner was liberated, and surrendered to the Coroner's Jury.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know when he died - A. Seventeen days after; the prisoner appeared exceedingly sorry for it.

MR. ADAMS. I am a student at the London Hospital. The deceased was brought there on the 10th of July. One of the small bones of his leg was fractured, which was the only injury I could find. I attended him till the 23d or 24th, when he died. Symptoms of violent inflammation of the brain appeared about the second or third day, which continued till his death. I opened his body, and found marks of violent inflammation of the brain; he never complained of having received a blow on the head. I believe his death arose from the inflammation, whether that arose from a blow or a fall I cannot say; it might probably arise from a concussion of the brain, from a fall, which might be aggravated by his intoxication, or the the blow might produce it. I think the fracture of the leg with his intoxication might produce it, as it is always accompanied by fever.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not most probable that the inflammation arose from fever, created by the fractured leg, aided by intoxication - A. I think it most probable.

COURT. Q. The cause of his death was inflammation of the brain - A. Yes, my Lord; it might arise from the fever, caused by breaking the leg, the fall, or other causes.

I think the irritation of the broken bone, aggravated by intoxication, the most probable cause.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-50

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1790. GEORGE MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a watch, value 2 l.; a seal, value 6 d., and a waistcoat, value 1 s., the goods of George Palmer , in his dwelling-house .

JANE PALMER . I am the wife of George Palmer - we live in Long-alley, Moorfields ; I keep a clothes shop. On the 16th of August, about three o'clock, I stood opposite my door, and saw the prisoner come out of my parlour, and run through the shop - I had not seen him go in. I followed him, hallooing out,

"What do you want?" I was convinced that he had taken something, and pursued him for half a mile; he was brought back by a mob: I had lost sight of him several times - he called Stop thief! himself frequently. I returned to the shop, and missed a watch off a nail over the parlour fire-place - I had seen it safe at twelve o'clock, and I think at two. When he was brought back I said he was the man; I put my hands round him, and said,

"Give me my watch, and go about your business" - he said,

"I have not got it now," or

"I have not got it," and pulled a waistcoat from behind his coat, and said,

"There is a waistcoat I have taken, it is not worth above 1 s.;" it had laid on a bale of old clothes, on the left side of the shop. I think I have seen him at my shop once before, selling a pair of stockings; but am certain he is the man who ran out of the shop. I have not found the watch. I had been from the shop a very few minutes.

HANNAH ARNOLD . I was standing opposite Mrs. Palmer's, and heard her say a man had run out - she ran after him immediately; I stood at her door till she returned: nobody went in during that time. When the prisoner was brought back she felt about him, and said,

"Give me my watch, and go about your business" - he put his hand behind his coat, and took out a waistcoat, and said,

"Here is your waistcoat, it is not worth above 1 s.; I have no watch."

WILLIAM HILL . I am a constable. I heard the cry, but did not see the prisoner till he was taken. I found no watch on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The constable who brought me to Newgate said,

"The lady means to try you for your life - you have got into bad hands, for she is an old offender, and will do all she can against you." I was passing her shop, and seeing some phials in the window I went in to buy one. I picked up this waistcoat; rapped on the counter, and called out

"Shop!" but no one answered. I came out, and she said,

"There is a man come out of my shop; Stop thief!" I said I had stolen nothing - she followed me, and gathered a crowd. I met a friend, who said,

"What row is this;" I said I did not know, but would go back, as the waistcoat might be owned.

MRS. PALMER. I value the watch at 40 s.; I had had it six or seven years.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-51

London Cases, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1291. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Hammond , from his person .

MR. HENRY HAMMOND . I am a West India broker . On the 9th of September, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in Ball-alley, Lombard-street ; somebody called out that my handkerchief was stolen - I felt and missed it, and on seeing the prisoner running before me I followed, and secured him in Clement's-lane. He gave me my handkerchief from his bosom himself.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am street-keeper. I heard a cry, ran out, and received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief. He said hunger was a sharp thorn, and he had had nothing to eat for twenty-four hours.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I said no such thing. I saw the handkerchief on the ground, and picked it up; the gentleman collared me, and I gave it to him directly.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-52

1292. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of George Clark , his master .

GEORGE CLARK . I am a shoemaker , and live in Ludgate-street - the prisoner was an out-door workman . On the 19th of July, he brought home some work; a pair of shoes were missed off a chair: I asked him to come into the middle of the shop, and found them in his pocket - he said he had taken them out of distress, for his own use, which I really think was the case, as I have lent him money at different times, and he bore a good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had told my master several weeks that I wanted a pair of shoes for myself, but could not afford to pay for them yet. I took up these to see if they would fit me; the boy asked me to look for a shoe, and in order to do so I put these into my pocket, meaning to ask my master to put them by for me.

MR. CLARK. He had told me that he wanted a pair of shoes. I would willingly take him back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-53

1293. GEORGE WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 10 lbs. of lamb, value 8 s. , the goods of George Leyburn .

GEORGE LEYBURN . I am a butcher , and live in Leadenhall-market . I have iron bars at the top of my shutters to admit the air; and as I was continually having meat taken through these bars on a Saturday I set up, and on Sunday morning, the 8th of August, at half-past four o'clock, the prisoner jumped up, clung round the doorpost, and got up ten feet high - he put an iron through the hole over the shutter, and dragged this lamb out. I ran out of the counting-house; he dropped it, and was secured. He said a great man in a fustian coat had stolen it, and run off, leaving it with him.

HENRY REDMAN LEYBURN . I sat up with my father, whose account is correct. On opening the door we found the prisoner - he must have been the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a destitute sailor, and was

out of work, and sleep in different places. I did not take the meat.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, in consequence of his distress .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-54

1294. JOHN WINGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , a watch chain, value 1 s., and two keys, value 4 d., the goods of James Hill , from his person .

JAMES HILL . I am servant to Mr. Levy, who is an officer to the Sheriff of Middlesex . On the 23d of July, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I was turning up Jewin-street , and at a place called Redcross-square the prisoner came up, and snatched at my watch - I did not see him till he took it; my fob was twisted; the ring broke, and he got the chain. I sung out Stop thief! and he was taken a few yards off, without my losing sight of him, as there are three gas-lights there. - I am sure of him.

JAMES GREEN . I am a printer. I was in Redcross-square, heard Hill cry out, and seized the prisoner five or six yards from him, endeavouring to escape.

THOMAS TURNER . I was in the square, and saw the prisoner and the prosecutor - there was a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner ran towards me. Green came up and stopped him. I took him to the watch-house - nothing was found upon him, but as he ran I thought I saw him throw something away, and next morning some workmen gave me the watch-chain.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LOVELL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and next morning I received the chain and seal from Turner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to meet a young man, and being late I was running; there was an alarm, and two men stopped me. Two or three men ran by me as hard as they could.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-55

1295. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a pair of spectacles, value 10 s., the goods of Lewis Edward Wells , from his person .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-56

1296. MARGARET MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , forty-nine yards of printed cotton, value 3 l., the goods of John Bickers and Robert Nash , privately in their shop .

MR. ROBERT NASH , I am in partnership with John Bickers , we are linen-drapers , and live at Aldgate . On the 28th of July, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and waited some time, as we were busy. I went and served her with a small quantity of muslin, and thinking she looked bulky about the waist, I went round the counter, and desired her to step out and shake her clothes, which she did, and out fell two pieces of print. I had not seen her take them - she fainted and threw herself about.

Prisoner. I never saw it till he picked it up.

Witness. They dropped from under her clothes, they laid on her right hand on the counter, and could not have fallen off. She made no excuse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. How could he see them fall from me when he was on the other side of the counter.

GUILTY. Aged 51.

Of stealing but not privately . - Confined one Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-57

1297 JOSEPH HICKMAN was indicted for felonionsly assaulting Thomas Smith , on the 24th of July , at St. Sepulchre , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 4 d.; an apron, value 1 s.; part of a waistcoat, value 1 d.; one half-crown, three shillings, four-pence, and ten half-pence his property.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a carpenter and joiner ; I am married, and live in Burr-lane, Blackfriars-road. On Sunday the 24th of July, a little after one o'clock in the morning, I was in Fleet-market, and just at the bottom of Fleet-lane , a man came up to me, and caught me by my two waistcoat pockets, putting one hand in each of them; he then held me with his left hand, and searched all my pockets with his right; it was the prisoner. I then caught hold of him with my right hand, and gave him a very hard blow on the head with my left hand; then another man (who I had not seen before) came up from the wall, and said

"Bl - t. you we will have your money;" they then both caught hold of me and threw me down on my back. I am certain the prisoner is the man. I kicked at them, and beat at them as hard as I could. I saw another man standing on the edge of the pavement about five yards off, whether he was concerned I cannot say, but they all ran away together.

Q. When they got you down, what did they do - A. Before they could get at my money, they hove me about, my apron string broke, and they got my money out of my pocket. I got up and missed my hat. I looked about for it, and before I could find it, they were gone with my hat, apron and all; they had dragged me along till my waistcoat was torn off. I had a half-crown, three shillings, four penny-pieces, and ten half-pence, in my pockets, they took it all. I lost my hat and apron, and handkerchief out of my inside coat pocket. I hallooed out murder twice - they then ran away; one said to the other

"Come on, come on." I hallooed out when they were both on me; they gave me no blows, only knocked the skin off my back, by throwing me down; they caught hold of me and hove me up at arms length, and both came on me, the third man ran away with them; he is the man who said

"Come along"; he said that when I cried out, and away they all ran in a moment. I lost sound of them before I could get up, or I should have followed them. I looked about a little, and told one or two watchmen of it; they said it was a wonder they had not heard or seen something of it. I lost them for that night, and on the Thursday morning following, I had been to the Borough-market to look after them, as they appeared men who lay about the markets, and about a quarter before seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two more sitting asleep in the first recess on London bridge, nearest to the Borough, on the right hand side; I walked backward, and forward, looking at them, and was almost a mind to take the hat off the prisoner's head myself, I got up by the side of him, and

noticed the hat he had on, and knew it to be mine by a cut and a hole in front of it, I went to the bridge-keeper and described my hat, and he went up and took it off his head, and said in his presence,

"This is your hat sure enough" and gave it into my hand; and the prisoner went to snatch it from me, and said he had bought it on the Thurs day before, in Rosemary-lane, of a Jew. I had not lost it then.

Q. Did he mention the day - A. Yes, he said he bought it last Thursday, and this was on Thursday; I had not lost it till Sunday. I am certain he is the man, I should have known him if I had not found my hat on him, by his appearence, and a striped plaid jacket which he had on at the time, I firmly believe him to be the man; if I had not found my hat I should be of the same opinion; the other two made off directly. The bridge-keeper took the prisoner, and one of them was a little like one who was with him, but I was not certain of him, he had a black coat and waistcoat on, and was like the man who said " Bl - t. you I will have your money." I am convinced the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. If you had not found your hat, and met the prisoner at York, should you have said he was the man who robbed you - A. Yes; I saw his person by the light of the gas.

Q. Did you not swear to him before the Magistrate from the hat and his jacket - A. Yes; and his person too. I have a perfect knowledge of him without the hat or jacket. I first said I knew him because of the hat and jacket. The Alderman asked if I should know him without them; I said Yes, I could swear to him because I saw him by the gas light, and had a good look at him.

Q. If you were positive of him, why not say you knew his person - A. Because they did not ask me immediately.

Q. Your wife talked to you about being out late on that night; did she not ask you to account for the money you should have brought home - A. No; I always gave her a sovereign, and had been home and given it to her at half-past seven o'clock. I went out afterwards to meet a young man who was coming from the country, but he did not come. I had 7 s. 9 d. I was to meet him at ten o'clock.

Q. What were you doing from that time till two o'clock - A. I had a pint or two of beer and some tobacco - I had four pints of beer in all that night. By his appearance I thought him a chap who lays about the markets.

JOHN SALMON . I am keeper of London-bridge. On Thursday morning, the 29th, about seven o'clock, the prosecutor came and gave me some information. I was at the south end of London-bridge, and saw four men and a woman in a recess; he pointed the prisoner out to me, and pointed to his hat, which I took off, but before that the prosecutor had described it particularly; and when I took it off he said it was his (the prosecutor's). The prisoner said he had bought it in Rosemary-lane eight or ten days before, for 1 s. - that is what he said at the watch-house.

Q. What did he say at the moment - A. He said he was sure it was not the prosecutor's. I said I must take him; he said he would go any where. The prosecutor said he was the man - he really believed he was the man.

Q. When the prosecutor said the hat was his, what became of the two other men - A. They all went out of the recess, and were gone when I returned, but I did not see any of them run away. I cannot say whether they ran or went away leisurely. I have had the hat ever since - it is broken in several places, and has no lining.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not say he saw the man who robbed him, but he had seen a hat, which he thought was his, on a man on the Bridge - A. Yes, that is what he said. He spoke to the man's person at the watch-house. There is no maker's name in the hat, nor any marks but cuts and holes.

COURT. Q. When he came to you did he say there was a man who had his hat, or a man who had robbed him - A. He said there was a man who had got his hat, and he believed the same man who had robbed him.

ANN SMITH . I am the prosecutor's wife, and know this to be his hat, he had it about a year and a half - I swear that it is his. I recollect his coming home that night, he was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. You swear to the hat - A. Yes; it had a yellow silk lining, and the maker's name in it when he lost it; they are out now, but I know it by a cut in the corner - I saw him cut it with one of his tools when he was at work. He came home without one, and with his waistcoat all torn. He does not generally stop out late, except when he is out all night, and he has not done that for the last two or three years.

LYDIA BARTHARM . I am a married woman, and have lived at Smith's house for eleven months. I believe this hat to be his, for he shewed it to me about twenty minutes before he cut it with his adze, by accident, and there is a hole which he made by pulling it off a peg in a hurry.

THOMAS SMITH . It is my hat, I cut it when I was at work on the floor, to make the door shut - my wife saw me do it; this hole was made by reaching it off the hook - it had a lining in it when I lost it, with the maker's name,

"Tanner, Butt-lane, Deptford."

Cross-examined. Q. Would it not be more than the value of the hat to take the lining out and put another in - A. There was a yellow lining in. I told the bridge-keeper what name ought to be in it.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my counsel.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, but none of them had known him for the last six months.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18240916-58

1228. WILLIAM TRAY and THOMAS NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Vickers from his person .

JOSEPH VICKERS . I live in - square, City-road. On the 8th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was walking towards Finsbury-square, and at the corner of Short-street, Moorfields , a gentleman came up and said two men had picked my pocket. I immediately felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoners going down Short-street together, in company. I quickened my pace, and followed them; they saw me and ran up a stable-yard opposite I called Stop thief! - several people followed; they went round a court, and I thought they were gone; but I found they had been secured by the officer, who produced my handkerchief. I am sure they are the men who ran away.

WILLIAM BRADING . I am servant to Messrs. Hogarth

and Co. I was on the right hand of Finsbury-place, South, and saw the prisoners attempting to pick the prosecutor's pocket. I crossed, and watched them; they pulled open his right hand pocket, and seeing a handkerchief, they still followed him, and at the corner of Short-street, they pulled the handkerchief out - a gentleman told him of it; he pursued - I followed him; they ran up the stable-yard, and about ten yards up the yard, I saw the handkerchief laying down. I went round a court and met them coming round and took them. I am sure they are the men. Tray is the one who took the handkerchief - the other was close to him.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I was standing in my house, heard a cry of Stop thief! came to the door, and saw the prisoners run by my door; there was a turning on one side which leads to the place where they were stopped. I never lost sight of them till I secured Norris and saw Tray taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TRAY'S Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and was directed up the horse-road, and at the bottom of the place several people seized me, and said I was the thief, and the man behind me an accomplice; we were taken to a public-house, and in five minutes the witness brought the handkerchief.

TRAY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-59

1299. JOHN BEACON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Francis Chamberlain on the King's Highway, on the 23d of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 20 s.; a chain, value 10 s., and a seal, value 10 s. , his property.

FRANCIS CHAMBERLAIN . I am agent to the Chartered Gas Light Company , and live in Cotton-street, Poplar. On the 23d August, about a quarter to eleven o'clock at night, I had taken a place in the Blackwall-stage, in Leadenhall-street. I put a parcel in, but as it was not going to start immediately, I walked on for it to overtake me: and saw from four to seven men come out of the Cock, public-house, in Leadenhall-street ; four of them came round me, and supposing them rather tipsy, as they reeled towards me, instead of resisting them, I merely threw up my arms merely to keep them away; when the prisoner stepped from the rest, and drew my watch from my fob - he snatched it suddenly; there was no resistance, no force was used. He ran down Cree-church-lane, I followed calling Stop thief! the others put their legs out to prevent my pursuit; every obstacle was thrown in my way, and a very large dog, which must have been set at me, seized me and hung by my legs, for twenty yards, but I kept the prisoner in my sight, and he was taken without my losing sight of him for an instant. I am quite sure he is the man who took the watch - it was found near him.

JOHN BLOW . I am a watchman of Cree-church. I heard a cry of Stop thief! down the lane, and stopped the prisoner against a wall in Duke's-place - he ran against the wall as we came up to him; the prosecutor immediately said he was the man.

JOSEPH BOUGHTON . I am a watchman, and was with Blow, and took the prisoner at the corner of Duke-street.

ALICE HARTFIELD . I picked up the watch in the road in Duke-street, and gave it to the officer at the time of the alarm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Bartholomew-fair, heard an alarm, ran, and the gentleman took me. I was rather in liquor.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-60

1300. SAMUEL STONEHEWER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Nabbs .

JOSEPH NABBS . I am a weaver , and live in Grub-street . On the 4th of August, the prisoner came to visit me; he said he could get no work, he sat in my room for an hour, and after he was gone, about six o'clock, I missed my watch off the mantle-piece. I had seen it safe about twenty minutes before five. I found him next morning at the Golden Lion, public-house, Aldersgate-street, and said

"If you have pawned my watch, give me the duplicate;" he said he had sold it for 6 s. 6 d., and told us where; the man denied buying it, but the prisoner said

"You are the man who bought it," and then he gave it up - it is worth 1 l.

JOSEPH WALTERS . I keep a clothes-shop, at No. 9, Amphitheatre-row, Westminster-road. The prisoner brought a watch to my shop, and asked 8 s. for it; there was no outside case to it; he said the seal and key were both gilt. I gave him 6 s. 6 d. for it, and after he was gone, I found the key was gold - he said he was a distressed weaver.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Fined One Shliling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-61

1301. MARY DAVIS and MARY M'CARTY were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Seelie Ayton , on the 26th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l.; a seal, value 20 s.; a ring, value 6 s., and a watch chain, value 2 s. , his property.

JOHN SEELIE AYTON . I am a tailor , and live at the George, public-house, Old Bailey, with my mother. On the 26th of July, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I fell in with Davis at the end of George-alley, Fleet-market, and went with her to a house in George-alley , belonging to Mrs. Day - I believe it is No. 1 . She asked me to go and have some gin once or twice, and at last I agreed. A little girl came to the room door, and put a bottle of gin in - we were in a room on the second floor. She poured out a glass, and said

"I hope you are going to pay for this." I said

"No, you pay." I however paid, and drank a glass; she immediately knocked and shoved me down, and threw herself upon my right arm; she directly called to the other prisoner, whom I found in the room when we first went up - she was at the window; she said

"Sally, come here;" she came, and threw herself on my left arm, so that both my arms were secured. Davis then snatched my watch from me. I had a guard-chain round my neck, and felt the tug - it was broken, and the watch gone - she broke the chain forcibly. M'Carty immediately got off me. I seized Davis by the left hand, and said

"You have robbed me;" she said

"Go and hang

yourself, I have not." I said

"There is the watch in your hand now," and snatched at it, but she put her hand behind her, and gave it to M'Carty, who ran down stairs with it. Davis gave me a shove, got from me, ran down, and I after her, calling Stop thief! and saw them both turn into the next house; a watchman who lived next door came down to me. I went to Hatton-garden, and informed Read - they were taken in about a month on another charge. I had been looking for them during that time, with the officer, but could not find them. I was certain of them immediately I saw them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went with this woman at the first invitation - A. It happened so; I drank a little porter at dinner, and nothing after except a glass of gin in the room. I swear that I was perfectly sober. She said there were some young men drinking up stairs, which made the invitation stronger - I found nobody drinking there - she said,

"Never mind, they will be here presently." I went there to drink, and for no other purpose. I thought her a bad woman, but said to myself

"If there are any men there, very likely I shall be safer." I was not playing with them at all.

JOHN DAY . I lodge next door to this house, and am a watchman of St. Bride's. I was getting up to go on duty, and heard a running down stairs, flew to the window, and saw the two prisoners come out of Day's house, and run into the passage where I live; the prosecutor went down the court, and they went out of the house, into No. 12. I went to the window again before I finished dressing, and saw M'Carty going up the court, and the prosecutor running after her: he caught her just at the narrow part of the court - she said,

"You - I have nothing belonging to you," and pushed him away. I went to finish dressing and they were gone. I told Ayton that I knew them both - he appeared to me a little in liquor, but very little indeed. I have known the prisoners living in this court three or four years. I never saw them afterwards till they were taken.

Cross-examined. Q. It is a common house - A. Yes. The prosecutor was rather fresh; it was hardly observable. They were absent for a month - I used to see them going in and out daily before.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the afternoon of the robbery the prosecutor came and complained to me, and described the persons of two women; I did not think him at all in liquor - he wrote a description of them himself; his coat was dirty - he said they had tumbled him down in the street when he ran after them.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 14th of August I apprehended the prisoners in Bedford-row.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-62

NEW COURT. (2d Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1302. JOHN APPLEBEE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a watch, value 4 l. , the goods of James Jackson .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-63

1304. WILLIAM HODDER was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-64

1305. WILLIAM HAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a load of hay, value 6 l. , the goods of Henry Larman .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-65

1306. SAMUEL FLACK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , thirty-three yards of linen, value 55 s.; six yards of woollen cloth, value 3 l.; two yards of kerseymere, value 12 s.; a piece of nankeen, value 4 s.; two yards of shalloon, value 3 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; four pairs of stockings, value 6 s.; four yards of stuff, value 4 s.; three frills, value 2 s.; two pairs of gloves, value 2 s.; a yard of jean, value 1 s.; two yards of dimity, value 2 s.; six yards of lace, value 8 s.; thirteen papers of needles, value 2 s.; nine yards of binding, value 1 s.; eleven yards of muslin, value 17 s.; four yards of gingham, value 3 s., and six yards of plaid, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Railton , his master .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH RAILTON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Paradise-street, Chelsea . The prisoner had lived servant with me from the 16th of March. On Saturday, the 31st of July I went out of town, and came back on Monday, the 2d of August. He stated he was single, and had lived with a Mr. White. These goods are mine; they had been part of my stock - I cannot say whether they had been up stairs or not; they have my shop mark on them: I always mark the goods myself.

ELIZA MURRELL . I live with Mr. Railton. On Sunday morning, the 1st of August the prisoner asked me to go up stairs and fetch his box; I asked him why he could not bring it himself; he said it would dirty him, and desired me not make a noise in doing it - he said it had his clothes in it. I went up and brought it two-thirds of the way down the garret stairs; he then took it of me, and asked me to go and get the key of the door from Miss Railton - I told him to go himself, and heard him ask Miss Railton for it, but I do not know whether he got it or not. I have seen him use a handkerchief like one produced; it has no mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. What sort of a box was it - A. It was a blue paper cap box - the rope that was tied round it broke it.

MARY ANN RAILTON . I was in my brother's house on Sunday morning, at ten o'clock; the prisoner asked me for the key, and said he would let himself out, he had a large paper box with him, I went to let him out, and asked him if he was going to take those things away, he said

"What do you say?" my sister said,

"If you are, you must let us see them," he said,

"It is of no consequence;" the box was cracking with the weight of what was in it, he then took it up stairs, and said he would leave it till Mr. Railton came home, he was gone up stairs; our warehouse is up stairs. I called one of my brothers to see what he was about, my brother called him, I heard him call, and the prisoner said,

"I shall be a quarter of an hour," we sent for an officer, (Humphreys.) I did not go up with

him, but after he had searched, I saw the prisoner again, my sister, my brother, and Humphreys were then present - I saw no bundle there, but when I came down again I saw one tied up in this handkerchief, and a cord round it; it had been thrown out of window. I saw it opened, and examined the goods; they were my brother's - the prisoner did not say how they came there. There was some money which he said was his, and the other things he did not wish to see; the handkerchief was a little wet, but not the goods - it had been a rainy morning, and if they had been there long the goods must have been more wet.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Which of your brothers was it that went up stairs - A. My younger brother; he went up soon after the prisoner.

CATHERINE RAILTON . I did not go up to the prisoner's room, but as I was passing the stair-case window, I saw the bundle thrown down, when the prisoner came down, it was lying open before him, and I heard Mr. Humphreys say,

"There is some money," the prisoner said

"That is mine." The officer cut the strings of the bundle. The prisoner said

"Oh! Miss Railton do something for me, or I shall die."

ISAAC RAILTON . I saw the box when it was coming down stairs, and when I afterwards went up I saw it in the prisoner's room; there was then only a coat and a pair of trowsers in it.

JOSEPH HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and went up to the room. I saw the prisoner there, and told him I was sent for on suspicion of something being in his boxes; there were two boxes, one was a paper box with a pair of trowsers and a jacket in it. I looked out of the window, and saw the bundle tied up with a rope, on the leads of the next house. I sent the young gentleman to throw it down; when it was opened Miss Railton saw the goods, and claimed them as her brothers. The prisoner said there was 2 l. 10 s. in it, and I said

"You had better take it out for you know where it is;" it had been a very wet night, and it was evident that it could not have been there long - these things were in the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT STEERS . I am a neighbour, and was called in by the young ladies. I heard the prisoner say the money was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-66

1307. ELIZABETH FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , two coats, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 8 s., and a shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of John Anderson .

ANN ANDERSON . I am the wife of John Anderson , and live in King-street, St. Ann's . On the 12th of August, in the evening, I went out for about half an hour, and when I returned I missed the shawl, and next morning two coats. I locked the room door when I went out, and put the key under the carpet.

PETER TATE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Princess-street. I produce two coats, a waistcoat, and shawl, which were brought to our shop by the prisoner - the young man who took the things of her has left: she spoke to me for the money - this was on Thursday evening.

ELIZABETH MORRIS . I live on, the first floor of this house. I found the street door open in the morning; I thought I would watch to see who went out - I saw the prisoner, who lodged there, going out with a bundle between six and seven o'clock - I do not know whether Mrs. Anderson was at home or not.

REBECCA NODES . The prosecutrix was at home till seven o'clock, and then went out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-67

Before Mr. Recorder.

1308. THOMAS SALMON and JOSEPH SANDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a sovereign, seven half-crowns, eight shillings, a knife, value 3 d.; six silver tokens, value 5 s., and a purse, value 3 d., the goods of Nicholas Nash , from his person .

NICHOLAS NASH . I came from Limerick , and am a labourer . On the 16th of July I was at Finchley ; I had one sovereign and a half, eight shillings, seven half crowns, five Irish tokens, and a half token in my purse, and a knife in my pocket. I went to sleep in a shed about nine o'clock at night. The prisoners were fellow-labourers with me; we had been working for Mr. Wilkinson, a farmer . I went to the shed by myself; when I laid down to sleep, Linton brought me some hay to shelter me - I did not see either of the prisoners that night before I went to sleep. I took my purse and put it under me. I had been asleep some time, when Linton came and laid by my side was not so dark but that I could see him; he awoke me by feeling about me. I asked what brought him there, and would he not cover himself with the hay; he said he was warm enough; he asked me what brought me there - I said I had leave to be there; he said I should not be there, and gave me a shove. He had been at work as a haymaker. Some men then came round the shed, who had been at a public-house, and made a great alarm. Linton went out to them; some persons then came in and dragged me from where I had been lying. Linton was one of them, and assisted in pulling me out; I saw him searching under me. I could not distinguish who were the other persons. When we were before the Magistrate Linton was admitted to give evidence.

JURY. Q. Do you think Linton knew you had money - A. Yes, he knew it.

JOHN CONWAY . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoners, Salmon, and Linton, on the 16th of July. Linton was admitted to give evidence. I found a bag and some buttons upon Salmon, a crown piece, and six half-crowns - I never saw the tokens. I found the prosecutor's purse in a pond; and found a knife, which has not been identified - the buttons were identified.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am a constable. I and Conway apprehended Salmon and Linton in a field, at work with other labourers, on the 19th. They were taken before a Magistrate, and Linton admitted an evidence.

JOHN GURNEY . I am a constable. I took Sanders near Hitchin, in Herts, about three weeks after the robbery. but found nothing on him.

WILLIAM LINTON . I am a labourer on Mr. Wilkinson's farm. On the night of the robbery this man came into the rick-yard and enquired if he could sleep there. I said he might sleep in the shed. I generally sleep upon a rick.

I went on the rick first, and then into the shed - I do not know for what reason. I did not steal his money, nor do I know when it was taken. I laid down by the side of Nash, and felt all over him to feel if he had any money; he awoke, and said

"Who is here?" I appeared to be asleep, and he said

"You had better lay some hay over you." I then got up and went to the yard, and saw Sanders; I said

"Here is the Irishman," and then we went in, and I laid upon his feet and took hold of his hand, while Straw Joe (Sanders) tried to ram some hay into his mouth to prevent his crying out; and then the man in the glazed hat and Straw Joe searched his person, while I searched the hay; in the mean time Straw Joe struck him. Salmon was not then in the shed, he was outside. I then went out and met Salmon, and he went in and searched him, and I stood in the door-way - they came out; I went in, and Nash was enquiring for his coat; and as we were coming out Joe said to me

"I have his money." We then agreed to go to Totteridge. I did not know what money was taken from Nash, but the half sovereign, the purse, and the buttons were given to me by Straw Joe. The buttons which were found on Salmon were those that Straw Joe gave me. I put them and the half sovereign into my pocket, and threw the purse into a pond. I do not know how the buttons came in Salmon's possession - I did not give them to him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Is this your first robbery - A. Yes, I went into the shed of my own accord, and fumbled about the man, but I did not take the money. I went there to sleep and to rob the man; I went to do both. I cannot tell whether these are the buttons or not; I think those I had were bigger.

NICHOLAS NASH re-examined. I had some buttons in my purse; I am sure this button is one; it is one of my coat buttons; I can read, but I do not know what letters are on it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Linton was the man who came in and laid by you. - A. Yes, he shammed sleep; when I came out of the shed I saw the prisoners near it, and to the best of my opinion they had been in it; Salmon struck me when I came out.

SANDERS's Defence. What they have sworn is false - when I was coming down to the shed, Linton and another came out; I never saw the prosecutor, there were from twelve to twenty persons about the ricks and barns.

NICHOLAS NASH re-examined. I did not see the prisoners in the shed, but they were in the employ of the same master. I had seen them before that day among the rest. I had been working there some time, and had slept in the ricks or in a barn. I cannot tell what time of night it was. When I got out I went to a public-house at Whetstone, and enquired at the gate for a watchman, it might be between ten and eleven o'clock; it was not very dark; I could distinguish one man from another, there were a great many round the shed when I went away. I had been showing my money in the yard the day before. The shed had no door.

SALMON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

SAUNDERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-68

1309. JOHN SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Jarvis from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-69

1310. WILLIAM BITTENS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , five pieces of printed cotton, containing one hundred yards each, value 3 l. 17 s., the goods of Humphrey Sexton , from his person .

JOHN BOX . I live with Mr. Humphrey Sexton , in Ward's-row, Bethnal-green ; he is a linen draper . On Wednesday, the 23d of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, a witness came and gave me some information and directed me to go down the road; I did so, and saw a man running down Hart's-lane with these prints, which were not entirely covered. I could not get sight of his features sufficiently to identify him; I called Stop him! and he turned down Church row, threw down the prints and ran; there were five pieces, I had seen them in the shop four or five minutes before, upon a pile. I had not seen the prisoner's face, but I saw him at Lambeth-street on the 16th or 17th of July, and from his height, I have no doubt but he is the same man; they were on a chair two feet within the shop.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE . I am a cooper, and live in Bethnal-green-road. I knew the prisoner perfectly well before this happened. On the 23d of June, between four and five o'clock I came down Ward's-row and saw him standing with his back to a post, looking towards me; the moment he saw me, he turned round and looked towards the road. There was another person standing against the post looking through Mr. Sexton's window; that man held his head down, and I did not see his face; I turned down Squirrel-street, and had scarcely passed a minute, when I looked round and missed the man from the post; I then saw him come from the shop with some prints before him, he crossed the way, and the prisoner met him, took up his apron and folded up the prints, and said

"Come along;" the prisoner took the prints, and they both went up South-street. I immediately went into the shop, Box had turned round looking at the shelves; I told him to run on to Hart's-lane, and he would meet them; I followed, but could not run so fast; I saw the prisoner come out of Hart's-lane; he ran across the road and Box after him; he had a bundle. I did not see him drop any thing. On the 15th of July I saw him in custody. I am quite certain of his person.

Prisoner. Q. When you were at Lambeth-street did you not swear that the man came to me and asked me to give him the ends of his own apron. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work for a man of the name of Clarke; we were going to fetch some gravel, and some men were laying down some iron pipes, they said they would give us a pot of beer to go and get some pipe out of Poland's row; we then went and fetched the gravel, and I went on to my work.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not from the person . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-70

1311. JANE BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , three sovereigns, one half sovereign, three half crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence, the monies of Robert James Matthews , from his person .

ROBERT JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a mariner , and live at No. 4. Adam street, Rotherhithe. I had three sovereigns, and a half sovereign, three half crowns, a shilling and sixpence loose in my breeches pocket. On the 7th of August I saw the prisoner in Whitechapel, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I was perfectly sober, she invited me to walk with her. I went with her to George-yard , she went to the first house, and they told her to go to her own room, which she did, it was up one pair of stairs. I said about twenty minutes, and gave her one shilling, which was all she desired - I then felt her hand in my pocket, and heard the money chink; I laid hold of her hand, and she sung out, and twelve or thirteen women came into the room; one took up the poker; another said her father was coming up, and said

"Are you going to murder the girl;" some seized hold of me and dragged the prisoner from me - she then dropped a sovereign, which I saw another pick up; they then all got away, and I followed them down stairs; they ran out and shut the door, and one who remained bolted it; I got into the parlour and got out at the window - this was on a Saturday. I saw the prisoner again on Tuesday; I went with the officer in search of her, and am quite certain of her person. I lost all but the shilling I had given her.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me this information on Saturday; he was quite sober. I thought I knew the person, and said if he came in a few days, I should be able to find her. On the 11th of August, he and I found her with two others; he pointed her out at a distance.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man till I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-71

1312. SARAH BECK was indicted for stealing on the 18th of August , a watch, value 3 l., the goods of Samuel Smith , from his person .

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a brewer's servant , and live at No. 6, Little Windmill-street, Golden-square. On the 18th of August, about a quarter past twelve o'clock at night, I was crossing Long-acre ; I had been waiting at the New Coachmaker's Arms public-house; I was perfectly sober; Sarah Beck accosted me, and asked me to take a walk with her - her sister was with her. I told them I would not have any thing to say to them - they then asked me to give them some gin; I said, I did not know that I should; but if gin would do them any good they should have it. I went into a shop with them - I am certain when I went in that my watch was in my fob; they called for three glasses of gin, and handed me one; I put it to my lips but did not drink it. I gave the landlord a shilling to pay for it; he gave me the change, and I put the halfpence in my left hand pocket. I staid there about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes looking about, and thought it was a curious place; the girls wanted more gin, which I refused - but I gave them the halfpence. I went out as far as Windsor's the coachmakers' shop, about ten yards from the gin shop. Sarah Beck followed me out of the house - I told her I would call the watchman if she did not leave me; she did not go; and I got upon the step of Mr. Windsor's door, and told her to go away. I then went on the grating, and she came to me again - her sister was not with her then; I found she was very troublesome, and was feeling the outside of my pocket, and took hold of my watch to secure it - her sister then came out, and they both came round me, and Sarah Beck put her hand into my pocket along with my hand. I let go of my watch to take hold of her hand - they then got my watch and ran away; I followed them and stopped Mary Beck , and said,

"You have got my watch" -

"Me, you infernal villain" said she; I then turned round to look for the prisoner, and she was gone. I then secured Mary Beck , and she was taken to Bow-street, and there discharged - the prisoner could not have taken my watch, if the other had not helped her; I have never seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you sober - A. Yes; I never was drunk but twice in my life. I went that evening to the Coachmaker's Arm's public-house about eleven o'clock, and stopped there about three quarters of an hour. I had one glass of rum and water there; before that I had been at Mr. Gibbs's and had three-penny worth of oysters, one drink of porter - that might be about half-past ten; I had been before that in a public-house, in Brewer-street, Golden-square - I went there about twenty minutes past nine, and left at ten. I had 6 d. worth of rum and water before that; I have a tap at home, but I do not know whether I had tasted any that night - I had been at work till five or six o'clock, and to the best of my knowledge I did not eat or drink till nine o'clock - I was not at all in liquor. I was not going with them, nor bargaining with them - this girl had her hand in my breeches pocket, they then both ran away. I do not know how long it was before I took the prisoner into custody, it might be an hour; the robbery was committed upon Mr. Windsor's grating, there is a light there; I was rather in a flurry, and hurt to think that I had been robbed. I am certain I could not have mistaken one person for another; when I came back from the watch-house, this girl was a hundred and fifty yards from the spot - she said I was mistaken in the person.

JOHN BOYD . I am a watchman - my beat is in Charles-street, Long Acre: I was going my round at half-past twelve o'clock, and heard watch called; I went to see what was the matter, and Smith gave me a woman in charge, not the prisoner - the prisoner was not there; I thought Smith perfectly sober, but he seemed flurried.

REECE THOMAS . I am a watchman of Long-acre - Mr. Windsor's shop is on my beat; I saw Mary Beck taken to the watch-house - in my judgment Smith was not at all in liquor. I saw the prisoner about half-past one o'clock, and when Smith came back from the watch-house, he laid hold of her and said,

"This is the girl who robbed me with the other;" he said, he was quite positive, and would swear it a thousand times that she was with the other, that she had her hand in his pocket - she was taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. There are many girls of the town in Long-acre - A. Yes; the prisoner denied the charge, and said he was mistaken.

WILLIAM GARDINER . I am a watchman - Mr. Windsor's shop is on my beat; as I was crying half-past twelve o'clock, the prosecutor and a woman were talking together close against Mr. Windsor's premises, but before I

had gone my round I heard the alarm and I ran up; I went to assist with Mary Beck to the watch-house - another watchman came, and said they had found the watch.

Cross-examined. Where did he say the watch had been found - A. In Phoenix-alley, and they wished me to go back and seek for it; the prisoner was not then in custody - when I passed them together the prosecutor did not say anything to me; his language to them did not appear angry, or I should have ordered them away.

MARK GIBBS . I keep a shell-fish shop at the corner of Phoenix-alley - I heard the cry of watch at half-past twelve o'clock, and in about a moment the prisoner came running from Long-acre - Phoenix-alley is a thoroughfare; she stooped and picked up something - I only saw her stoop.

SARAH GIBBS . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 18th of August, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, I saw a watch with a key hanging to it against a spout in Phoenix-alley, it was picked up by a woman - I told my husband of it, but did not go in pursuit. I saw the prisoner at Bow-street, but cannot swear that it was her.

MARK GIBBS re-examined. Q. Your wife told you of a woman picking up a watch - A. Yes; I saw the woman - it was the prisoner; she looked me full in the face as she got up.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-72

1313. ROBERT CARELESS was indicted for stealing on the 25th of June , from the person of Eliza Guinle , a reticule, value 10 s., three sovereigns, one 20 l., and one 5 l. Bank note , her property.

ELIZA GUINLE . I live in Hoxton and am single . On the 25th of June, I was in the New North-road , between twelve and one o'clock, and had my reticule snatched from me - I was shifting it from one hand to the other. I had noticed the prisoner and another boy near me - the prisoner came beside me, pushed against me, and snatched it from me; I am certain of his person, and should know the other if I saw him. It contained a 20 l. and a 5 l. bank note; three sovereigns, and some silver; the one who was with the prisoner ran across the road, and the prisoner followed him - I ran after them, and never lost sight of them till he was stopped. I am certain of his person, and declare upon my oath that he is the person who took it from me - he escaped at the time, and I did not see him again for three weeks or a month at Worship-street. I recovered the reticule, it was taken from his hand while he was in my sight, but he got away.

JOHN JACKSON . I live servant at Mr. Martin's at the Prince Regent public-house, near the New North-road - I was going round with my beer, and saw this lady running very hard after some person; I told her to mind my tray and I would follow the boys - I got before the prisoner, and saw the reticule in his hand - I took hold of him, and got it from under his coat; he then got away, and I did not see him again till he was taken, in August.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner a few weeks back in the City-road; I told him I took him for taking the lady's reticule - he made no answer. Greening, his companion, was also delivered to me, and I took him to Worship-street, but the Magistrate let him go on his father's recognizance till the Sessions.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-73

1314. SAMUEL GRANT was indicted for stealing on the 6th of September , nine yards of linen cloth, value 5 s. , the goods of William Graham .

WILLIAM INGRAM . I am in the employ of Mr. Graham - On the 6th of September, I lost a piece of shirting, cotton and linen mixed.

The Indictment stating it to be linen , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Reference Number: t18240916-74

1315. JOHN GREEN and EDWARD WOODCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a purse, value 6 d.; two sovereigns, and three shillings, the property of William Newton , from the person of Jemima, his wife .

JEMIMA NEWTON . I am the wife of William Newton , of Chancery-lane - he is a land-surveyor . I was in Covent-garden-market on the morning of the 3d of August, at half-past ten o'clock - my money was in a purse in a basket in my hand; the two prisoners pushed by me, who were close together; I did not see Green do anything, but I saw the purse in his hand immediately he passed me - the lid of the basket was not fastened down. Woodcock was close by his side. I took hold of Green by the coat, and said,

"You thief, you have stolen my purse:" he said he had not got it; I saw him slip it into the hand of Woodcock. I said I knew he had not got it, for he had given it away - he got from me, and ran across the market. I cried Stop thief! Woodcock ran in a contrary direction, down Southampton-street. Green was secured within about a hundred yards of the place. Woodcock was taken on the Friday following - I had sufficient observation of his person to speak decidedly to him. When I saw them at the office I was quite certain of them.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a green-grocer at Covent-garden-market. I saw the prisoners one on each side of Mrs. Newton - they were strangers to me, but I thought they were doing something wrong: I watched them and saw Mrs. Newton take Green by the collar, and while I was putting down a basket I had in my hand, he got from her, and ran across the market - Woodcock ran in another direction - I followed Green, and secured him. I saw Woodcock at Bow-street, and am quite certain he was the person I saw with Green at the time of the robbery.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am an officer. I apprehended Woodcock at the Black Dog, public-house, Whitechapel-road; I told him it was about a robbery in Covent-garden-market, with Green; he denied it. I found nothing upon him.

GREEN'S Defence. As I was going through the market the lady took hold of me, and said I had taken the purse; I am innocent.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WOODCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-75

1316. HANNAH HAY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a key, value 1 d., and six sovereigns, the property of Robert Hollis , from his person .

ROBERT HOLLIS . I am a basket-maker , and live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. About ten or eleven o'clock on the night of the 29th of July I was in Ratcliff-highway - I had been having part of four or five pints of beer and a glass of gin, and was a little the worse for liquor, but knew what I was about. In coming from Lower Shadwell I had missed my turning, and enquired my way; I thought I had been directed wrong, and was leaning against an iron post; the prisoner came up and put her hand into my pocket - she took out a key and six sovereigns: I desired her to put me in the right way, but when she took the money she ran off. I tried to take hold of her, but she got away; I pursued, and took her within thirty or forty yards of the spot; four sovereigns and the key were found upon her. I do not know what became of the other two. We both fell down on the pavement; the watchman came and pulled me off her. Her mother has since made me a present of two sovereigns.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running from the prosecutor; they ran to the corner of Bluegate-fields, and were scuffling on the ground; the prosecutor got up and said,

"I have got one sovereign," and I saw some gentleman give him some others. He accused her of having stolen six sovereigns; she said she had not.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought in on this charge - she said she had not taken more than he had got back.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to see my cousin, and had taken a little too much in going home. I suppose I met that gentleman, but I do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-76

1317. JOHN SIMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a box, value 1 d., and a half sovereign, the property of John Elliott , from the person of Mary Elliott .

MARY ELLIOTT . I live in Mulberry-street, Commercial-road; my husband is a labourer at Messrs. Croft and Evans's . Between one and two o'clock last Saturday I was going to market in Union-street, Whitechapel ; I stopped to see a show, and had not been there two minutes before a gentleman touched me on the shoulder, and said my pocket had been picked - I felt, and my box was gone. I had not observed the prisoner near me, but he was laid hold of, and the box found in his hand - my half sovereign was in it.

JOHN GOODWIN . I am a coachman. I saw Elliott in Union-street, looking at some monkies - I saw the prisoner take his hand out of her pocket: I woman came and abused me for it. I took hold of him, and he had the box in his hand; Elliott claimed it. I took him to the office.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and the gentleman caught hold of me directly.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-77

1318. ANN SMITH and JANE HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , a watch, value 4 l., a chain, value 1 s., and a key, value 1 d., the goods of Joseph Lloyd , from his person ; and MARTHA YEWER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOSEPH LLOYD . I live at Knightsbridge. On the 15th of August I met Smith and Harris in Oxford-street, as I was returning from an errand in London, which was the reason of my being out so late; it was about ten minutes past eleven o'clock; they were strangers to me, but I am certain of their persons. They enquired where I was going - I said to Knightsbridge; they said they were going there, and should they walk with me. I agreed, and we went down Park-lane, as far as Hyde Park-corner; they then invited me with them; I went to No. 11, Pump-court , to a room on the ground-floor - we were all three in the same room, but no other person. I put my small-clothes under the pillow with the watch in them. I awoke about five o'clock, and found them both in the room, and charged them with stealing it, which they denied - the door was fastened inside. They then went out of the room, and I said that if they did not give me the watch I would fetch a constable. I got one in about twenty minutes, but the door was then padlocked outside. I saw them at the watch-house, and was certain of them. I had given Smith 2 s. I was perfectly sober - I had had a quartern of gin with them in Oxford-street; that was all.

Prisoner HARRIS. He gave me his watch to keep till morning - Witness. I am positive I did not.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I apprehended Harris and Smith in Pump-court, and Yewer in Duck-yard; there is a communication between them. I told them the charge, and they denied it - I found the watch in Yewer's possession; I took them on Sunday, the 15th. The prosecutor said at the watch-house that he did not care about his money if he could get his watch; Harris said,

"I will tell you where the watch is if you will go with me;" she then went to Yewer's, and said something to her, and Yewer gave me this handkerchief and the watch in it.

WILLIAM GUNTHORPE . I am a watchman. I met Lloyd at half-past five o'clock on the 15th of August - he said he had been robbed in Pump-court; we went there, and the door was locked. As I was going home I looked into Pump-court, and the prisoners were at home.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I know nothing about it, for soon after we got home I went out again, and did not return till morning.

HARRIS'S Defence. He gave me the watch instead of money till the morning; there were many lodgers in the house, and I took it to Yewer to mind till morning.

YEWER'S Defence. Harris brought me this handkerchief to take care of. I did not know what was in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-78

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1319. ELIZABETH THETFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a bag, value 2 d.; seven sovereigns, and a 10 l. Bank note, the property of James Lewis , from his person .

JAMES LEWIS . I am a grocer , and live in Hare-court, Aldersgate-street. I met the prisoner in Whitechapel, about half-past 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 29th of July - she asked me to walk with her to a place in Woodgate-alley, Wentworth-street . I had a 10 l. note and seven sovereigns in a canvass bag - I was on the bed with her when I felt her hand in my pocket; I charged her with it, when she jumped up, and ran out of the room. I went after her, but was intercepted on the stairs by some women. I described the court to the officer, as having only three houses in it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not charge some other persons with taking your money - A. No, not with having the money, but three women stopped me from pursuing her. I have been out of business since the 31st of May. I never saw her before - I was about six minutes in her company. This was on a Thursday, and I saw her in custody on Saturday morning. I felt the money in my pocket when I entered the room; I had some silver beside. I said I had no desire to prosecute, but the Magistrate said I was liable to an action for compounding felony if I did not. I have no doubt of her being the person.

JOHN LEE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 30th of July, at her lodgings in George-street. I found nothing on her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-79

1320. LUKE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a hat, value 5 s.; a shirt, value 3 s.; two pair of stockings, value 3 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Mitchell , from his person .

JOHN MITCHELL . I saw the prisoner at Chelsea , on the 6th of August, about eleven o'clock in the evening. He said he was in distress, and had left 30 s. in a man's hands and could not find him; that he belonged to a regiment , and wished he could pawn his instructions. I said

"You foolish man do not think of that," we went to try to get a bed and could not; we then went and laid upon the stairs. I was going to Chatham next morning, and had a bundle with me, in which were the articles stated in the indictment. I put it inside my jacket, and my hat alongside of it. I fell asleep about two o'clock in the morning; awoke about three, and missed him, the hat, and bundle. I made an alarm; I went out about three or four o'clock and he was in custody.

Prisoner. He gave me the things to sell or pawn, and and when I went out the officer took me.

SOLOMON TULL. I saw the prisoner about four o'clock; he enquired if there was a house open; I said there was, and I took him round by Chelsea-market; he had a hat on his head, and asked me to buy it for 4 s., and then he said 3 s. 6 d., and then asked me to give him a little beer upon it; I would not have it, and he went down a street, and I saw Stevenson putting the hat in a handkerchief.

JAMES STEVENSON . I saw the prisoner on the morning of the 7th of August, turning out of Jew's-lane, with Tull; he wanted him to buy a hat, but he would not, and then he wanted me to buy it; I said I did not want it, and I had no money. I said

"You had better not sell it, try if you cannot get a little for it from some of the publicans or pawnbrokers." He said he had given 9 s. for it; he had no bundle in his hand. I had got the hat when the officer and the prosecutor came and claimed it.

CHARLES MIELL . On the 7th of August I saw the prisoner, who had been described to me by Mitchell. Stevenson had the hat. I enquired what he had there - Taylor said it was his, and he would sell it to me if I would buy it. This is the hat.

JOHN MITCHELL . I did not give him the hat to sell.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing only . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-80

1321. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a watch, value 1 l., the goods of Joseph Hose , from his person .

JOSEPH HOSE . I am a fruiterer at Covent-garden market . I was in James-street on the 10th of August, about one o'clock, and saw the prisoner, and two others with him. I felt a snatch at my fob, and the watch was gone. I turned to the left, and the prisoner was within reach of me; I seized and kept him till the watchman came up, and gave him in charge. He swore at me, and said he had not got it.

Prisoner. When the witness gave me in charge, he said I was not the man. - Witness. I did not - I said

"If he has not got it, I dare say he gave it to a man that was running down the street." I had no person near me - I was quite sober.

HENRY LEATHER . I am a watchman of St. Martin's. As I was crying one o'clock I heard the prosecutor say

"I have lost my watch;" he held the prisoner by the arm. I took him to the watch-house - there was no other person near him but the prosecutor, and two others who ran away. Hose was quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was returning home up James-street, I saw the witness fighting a girl of the town, she ran away, and then he took hold of me as I was standing a little way from him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-81

1322. GEORGE BARNWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a pair of ear-rings, value, 8 s.; five half-crowns, and a shilling , the goods of George Stone .

GEORGE STONE . The prisoner was pot-boy at the Calthorpe Arms public-house , Gray's Inn-lane , where I live as waiter. On the 21st of July I put 1 l. 8 s. 6 d. in a drawer, in his presence, in half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences - I missed them next day. I put a pair of earrings in the drawer on the 2d of August, and missed them next morning; I went to the prisoner and asked him about them; he said he knew nothing about them. I found them at the pawnbroker's on the 4th or 5th of August.

JOHN ABBTHELL . I am a pawnbroker. The things were pledged at my shop by Davy.

JOSEPH DAVY . I was sent by the prisoner to pawn the ear-rings, which he said he had found.

JOSEPH CADLEY . I took up this lad, and found a key upon him which opened Stone's drawer.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-82

1323. CATHERINE CALLAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of Maria Whipham .

MARIA WHIPHAM . I am a widow , and live Portman-street, Portman-square . The prisoner lived with me for fourteen months, till last July. I missed a shawl the beginning of March. It was pawned by Mary Duggin , but she is not present.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-83

1324. MARY BRONISH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , two bedgowns, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; a night cap, value 3 d.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; three pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 d.; a towel, value 6 d., and two gowns, value 6 s. , the goods of Hannah Mary Ragan .

HANNAH MARY RAGAN . I am a widow . The prisoner came to my room on the 12th of July, about a quarter past twelve o'clock at noon - she had taken a lodging on the 29th of June, but did not come till the 12th of July; she remained there till about half-past one; she sent me out for a quartern of rum - I was not gone more than ten or fifteen minutes; when I returned she was gone with the property stated in the indictment.

Prisoner. I went to her house, and told her I was going to a new place, and should not stop but a night or two with her, in consequence of my husband's death. I had parted with all my clothes; she said she would lend me these things - the witness knew my character very well. - Witness. She did not ask me for them, and I never lent them to her - she had money in her hand. I never saw her but twice in my life, once when she came to take the room, and on the day of the robbery.

Prisoner. When I was in prison, she came and offered to my father to let me off for 6 l - Witness. Her father came to me, and offered me money to let her go. I said

"If you will come on Tuesday, I will give you an answer," and I was told I must not do it.

JOHN BUCKLAND . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of July. I was informed by the mistress she lived with in Berwick-street, that there were some duplicates in Little Titchfield-street, where I found them.

THOMAS BEESTON . I am a pawnbroker. This gown, petticoat, and two bed-gowns were pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of July.

CHARLES CLARKE . I am a pawnbroker. This cloak was pawned at my shop on the 15th of July, in the name of Brown, by a woman.

JANE HICKS . I received some duplicates from the prisoner for rent; they were sent on a Sunday morning, for me to keep till she could pay her rent.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I would leave the duplicates and the cloak with you, till I had been a month in place, and then return - A. She said, would I have the goodness to let her leave these things with me, and she would come and fetch them away; she first took a room with me, and then lived as a servant with me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18240916-84

1325. ANN CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing on the 8th of July , four shirts, value 16 s. two sheets, value 5 s., a waistcoat, value 2 s., a handkerchief value 1 s.; an apron, value 6 d., and a pinafore 6 d. , the goods of William Hayes .

WILLIAM HAYES . I left the prisoner in care of my room, and two children, on the 25th of July; my wife went out early in the morning, and I was out almost all day; between seven and eight o'clock in the morning I went to my box for a shirt, it was not there, she was in the room, but disappeared when I missed it. I found a duplicate of it; I then overhauled her box, and found six duplicates more; I did not miss any thing else at first.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DAVID SIMMONDS . These articles were pawned at my father's shop, between the 8th and the 22d of July; I received one of them, but do not know who I took it of.

MAURICE QUILL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday the 26th of July, at half past four o'clock in the morning. I live in the next room to her; she passed my room; I said

"Is it not a shame for you to commit such a robbery on poor people;" she said

"It is done now and cannot be helped."

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it; I certainly did it; I owed some money, and thought I would get them back again.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18240916-85

1326. CHARLES CURRY , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 26 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., belonging to William Smith , and fixed to a building of his .

There being no evidence of the lead having been fixed to the building, the prisoner was

ACQUITED .

Reference Number: t18240916-86

1327. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a basket value 1 s., a saw, value 2 s., a knife, value 6 d., and a drinking glass, value 6 d. , the goods of George Brown .

GEORGE BROWN . I live in the Colonade - I have a garden near Spa-fields ; I was there on the Wednesday in last week; this basket and knife, and several glasses were then in the summer house. I received information last Friday; I went to Hatton-garden and saw them there; I had left them locked up in the summer house.

SAMUEL DAVENPORT . I live in Middleton-street, Clerkenwell; I was in Hanmel-street on the 9th of September, and saw the prisoner in Mr. Mason's garden; I knew he had no right there; when he saw me he ran away; I got to the top of the field, and saw the articles now produced with some others, lying on the ground, they were not in his possession; in about ten minutes I saw him on the outside of the garden; (I had then taken the things home) he was coming back to the place where I first saw him; I called out, and pursued him, he was stopped in Middleton-terrace; he had a knife which Mr. Brown claimed.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable, and took him into custody - I found the knife which Mr. Brown claims; the prisoner said the articles were given him by another boy in the garden.

GEORGE BROWN re-examined. Q. How had the door been opened. A. I suppose by this hatchet which was taken from a neighbour's garden, whose summer house had been broken.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along the gardens, I saw a boy who said I might have the things if I pleased. The gentleman saw me, and said I had taken them, but I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-87

1328. SAMUEL FLEMING , JOSEPH RICKS , and JAMES SWEATHMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a silver spoon, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Gruniesen .

MARY GRUNIESEN . I am the daughter of Charles Gruniesen , who lives in Cummins'-street, Pentonville . On Wednesday the 24th of August, the constable came to our house with this spoon which I had put on the round table in the kitchen, near the window, on the evening before. The window opens to the area, and was open a long time. I did not miss the spoon till the constable brought it in the morning.

FRANCIS CHRISTOPHER GRUNEISEN . I am the brother of the last witness. On the morning of the 24th of August, I saw Sweathman in the area, about six or seven o'clock; he picked up a piece of brown paper; I asked him what he was about, he gave me no answer, but walked up and went away. I am certain of his person. I saw the other two prisoners at the corner of the street.

WILLIAM REYLOLDS . I am a constable. On Tuesday, the 24th of August, I saw the prisoners at the corner of Cummins'-street and Collyer-street. I saw Ricks and Sweathman separate from Fleming, and go into Cummins-street. I saw a person whom I knew, and desired him to stop; in about two minutes the other two came to Fleming and gave him a spoon which he put into his pocket; when they got to the top of the street, I told my friend to take one, and I would take the two others; Sweathman had this piece of paper in his hand when I stopped him.

FLEMING's Defence. I was coming home, and was standing at the post at the corner of the street, and saw the lad pick up the spoon, and I snatched it from him.

RICKS's Defence. I saw the gentleman take the two boys by the collar, and he took hold of me.

SWEATHMAN's Defence. I was going along, and saw it lay on the ground; Fleming snatched it from me. I know nothing of either of the boys.

FLEMING - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SWEATHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

RICKS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-88

1329. THOMAS GEEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a saw, value 3 s., and a chisel, value 6 d. the goods of John Rogers .

JOHN ROGERS . I am a carpenter , and live in Coram-place. On the 16th of July, I was at work at some buildings in Compton-street , and left my tools on the dining room floor while I went to breakfast; I returned in about twenty-five minutes, the saw and chisel were gone; I went to Mecklenburg-square about one o'clock, and saw the prisoner with a chisel in his hand, but did not see the saw.

Cross-examined. Q. He only had the chisel. - A. No. The house was not locked; any body might get up the ladder.

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I am a stone mason, and was at work at Mecklenburg-square on the 16th of July; I saw the prisoner there twice, he came into the kitchen where I was lying down, he had nothing in his hand that I saw, but I searched him and found the chisel in his coat pocket; I said

"What have you got," he said only a chisel, he never attempted to run away.

JOHN FAGAN . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner on the 16th of July, and found a two feet rule on him and a brush. As we were going to the watch-house, Rogers said,

"Where is my saw," he cried, and said it was up the chimney in the building, where the man had been at work; I went and found it up the kitchen chimney.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going across the fields, about one hundred yards from this place, and found this chisel. I was going into the ground floor of the house, and looking up the chimney, I saw the saw.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-89

1330 SAMUEL HARDY . was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , three hay forks, value 4 s., the goods of William Hobson , and one hay fork, value 1 s. the goods of Edmund Hodge .

WILLIAM TAIT . I am a labourer under Mr. Hobson - I know all his hay forks; these three forks are my master's and here is the iron they are branded with.

JOHN WEBB . I am a patrol. On the 20th of July, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I was near Stamford-hill-gate; I saw the prisoner at a distance from me with something on his back - he was coming towards town from Mr. Hobson's, who lives near Stamford-hill gate; I and my partner followed and overtook him just by the Coach and Castle public-house, at Kingsland; he said he was going with the forks to the other farm, but he would not tell me where he got them; he then said he was going to Mr. William Rhodes's; and then that three of them belonged to his brother and one to himself.

JAMES RAW . I am a patrol, and was with Webb - I saw the prisoner as he has described.

EDWARD HODGE . I was in the service of Mr. William Hobson at Tottenham - I know these hay-forks - three of them are Mr. Hobson's, and one is my own; they were at the stack over-night.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Tottenham I saw them lay near the five-mile stone.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-90

1331. JOHN MORGAN and ROBERT HINTON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , twenty-four quarts of currants, value 7 s., and two half-sieves, value 1 s. , the goods of James Watts .

JAMES WATTS . On Saturday morning, the 17th of July, I went with my cart to Covent-garden market , and left it with Wallis for about ten minutes, and when I returned the two half-sieves of currants were gone.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I am twelve years old; Watts left his cart in my care - it was standing at the corner of Mr. Butler's. I have known the two prisoners a good while; I was in another cart emptying a sack of peas; Morgan came up first, and then Hinton - one of them took one half-seive of currants and the other another - they went down Maiden-lane; I told Mr. Watts - he went after them, but they were gone,

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When was this - A. About half-past six o'clock in the morning; I did not call out, because I was afraid they would knock me down - there was no person near. I went to Mr. Watts as soon as he came to the cart and told him of it; I have never got into any scrape. They were taken about half-past three o'clock that afternoon.

Prisoner MORGAN. When you was at the office, you said Hinton took the first, and I the second, and that you jumped out instantly, and cried Stop thief! - Witness. I never said so at all at the office. I did follow them to the place where they put them, but did not cry out.

WILLIAM PACE . I am an officer. I took up the prisoners, but found nothing on them.

Prisoner MORGAN. Mr. Pace asked us separately where we had been between five and six o'clock. I gave an account of myself. and so did Hinton - Witness. I enquired where they had been; Morgan said in Westminster - Hinton said in the garden; he might have said he was with his mother buying fruit. I will not swear that he did or did not.

- HINTON. I am the mother of the prisoner Hinton. I was in the garden on the morning of the day he was taken up. I bought a round of raspberries about half-past five o'clock, and left him to mind it while I went to find my girl. I was then with him till seven, and then he went with me to sell them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-91

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18.

NEW COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1332. WILLIAM PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , four books, value 4 s.; eleven pamphlets, value 5 s.; three frocks, value 4 s.; two pinnafores, value 1 s.; a tippet, value 6 d., and a gown, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Ingham .

The Prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-92

1333. PETER GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , a cast-iron pipe, value 10 s., and a piece of cast-iron pipe, value 10 s. , the goods of the Imperial Gas Light and Coke Company , and JOHN DUNBAR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. SERGEANT ADAMS and MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

ISAAC PARKER . I live in Little George-street, and am employed by the Imperial Gas Company, to light the lamps. On the 5th of July, I met the prisoner Gardner in Bedford-street, Bedford-square, with two pieces of pipe on his shoulder, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, and followed him into Dunbar's iron foundry, in Tottenham-court-road. I then went into Charlotte-street, where some pipes were lying, which I had seen in the course of the day twice, and found two of them were gone. In about twenty minutes, I came up the road, went into Francis-street, and saw him come out of Dunbar's foundry, which is three doors from Francis-street, in company with some other person, who soon went away to the corner of the street; the prisoner then picked up a piece of pipe lying at the corner of Francis-street, and carried it into the foundry - he staid about five minutes; he saw me when he came out, turned, and went up Francis-street. I followed him, he walked at a good pace, and then went up Gower-street, took to his heels, and ran away up the New-road.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Charlotte-street is a good way from Dunbar's - A. Yes. The pipes had been lying there; a piece was carried to Francis-street, which is but three doors from Dunbar's house.

MR. LAW. Q. At that time the Imperial Gass Company were laying down pipes in the neighbourhood, and this piece you saw first in Charlotte-street, and then in Francis-street - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN THOMAS GLINDON . I am superintendant of the Imperial Gas Company, at the Pancras station. Some of their pipes have a fillet, or ridge, and others have the Company's initials - I have seen many pipes of other Companies, but never saw any with the ridge but their's - we were laying down pipes about that neighbourhood. On Saturday, the 10th of July I went to Dunbar's premises, and saw this piece of pipe lying in the foundry, exposed - when the officer came I directed him to search; we found nine or ten more; the bed-pipe was partly concealed amidst a heap of old iron, in a part of the premises nearest the street. All the pieces that were found had the fillet, and four of them the initials; they were all new. An iron-founder must know them from old pipe. They cost the Company about 10 s. per cwt.; the weight of this bed-pipe is about 1 cwt. Doubar came up while we were making enquiries - I challenged him with receiving stolen goods - he said he had bought them, and would buy them again; he said he did not know the persons who brought them, but thought he should know them if he saw them, and that he gave 3 s. or 3 s. 6 d. per cwt.; I cannot tell which. I know this bed-pipe, because a connexion was making with the pipes in Russell-street, and the pipes were all cut before they went out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell whether these pipes had been at Charlotte-street - A. No - there is no mark upon it but the fillet. There are fillets on all our pipes. What I call being concealed was lying amongst other pipes, in a mass of old iron - they were piled regularly in with the others. When Dunhar spoke of having bought pipes and said he would again I particularly spoke of this one. He said he had bought quantities of pipe from other Companies - I said,

"Have you not had bills of parcels of them;" he said, Yes - that they were broken pipes, and the perquities of the workmen. I think them worth about 10 s. per cwt. - old iron is worth about 2 s. 4 d. per cwt. Broken pipes are not the property of the workmen.

CHARLES LARK . I was one of the Company's labourers. On the 10th of July I went to Mr. Dunbar's foundry, and saw one of these pieces of pipe lying as you go into the store-room; and upon looking about I saw others in different places; I know them by either the fillets or initials.

I was talking to Mr. Dunhar, sen., and he said he had no such thing; the prisoner Dunbar then came up, and said,

"What is all this row?" one of the men said,

"These men have challenged us with receiving stolen goods;" he said he had bought them, and would buy them again.

DUNBAR's Defence. This man brought some iron to sell, and I gave a fair price for it. I went into the counting-house, got the money, and he went away - I then took the iron from the scale, and put it into the stack; we had a great quantity of iron at that time.

J - GOLD. I work in the foundry of Mr. Dunbar, sen., who is the prisoner's father; this young man is employed by his father. We melt about 18 cwt. of iron every day; it is principally old iron, brought from various places; we generally give 3 s. 6 d. per cwt. for it, and have on many occasions bought pipe from different Companies; we buy old iron of every description, and melt all we buy - we do not sell pipe at all, and have large piles of iron always ready for the furnace - we lay it one piece on the other, just to keep it up. I did not see this particular piece of pipe - I saw Mr. Dunbar weighing some pipe; the people were at work, and the gates were open; it was then about five o'clock, and we had not left work - we leave at six. The first witness came on the 10th; I was there: the iron was then on the heap, not a yard from the scale.

MR. SERGEANT ADAMS. Q. Can either part of your scales be seen from the street - A. Yes, both parts can be seen, but they can see rather the most of the scale with the iron in it. New iron is all in pigs; the moment it is cast we call it old iron. We buy all iron brought by strangers; we never notice anybody's mark. I do not know that the Imperial Gas Company's pipes have any initials on them. I have seen the marks on pipes in the yards, but never knew the meaning of them; I have heard of such a Company, but I do not know where their station is - I have heard it was at Battle-bridge.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Suppose I had furnished my house with cast iron grates yesterday, and brought them to you to day, what would you buy them as - A. Old iron. Some manufacturers have initials on their iron, and some have not - we often buy iron with initials upon it; country makers have their name at length.

T - STEVENSON. I am an Iron founder. The fair price for old iron is 3 s. 6 d. per cwt. or less, according to its quality - I know Dunbar, sen.; he is seventy-two years of age or more; I have known him thirty years in that same foundry; the gates are always open, and every person can see in during working hours. If this pipe had been brought to my foundry, I should have considered it old iron; it is mutilated and damaged in the cutting - I should have taken it in and weighed it; according to my judgment, they paid a full price for it - it has been made of inferior iron, and will not do for that purpose again. I should have bought long iron pipes like these of any dirty fellow that brought them, whom I did not know; if I gave a full price for it and in the face of day. I have bought great quantities of pipe from agents and other persons. I should have bought this piece of that man, because it is mutilated old iron.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That pipe being broken would have been every where considered as old iron - A. Yes; I should have no objection to buy a single piece of such a man.

GARDNER, - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

DUNBAR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-93

1334. EDWARD BOOTH was indicted for stealing on the 22d of July , a shawl, value 20 s. , the goods of Emily Gibson , spinster ; and EDWARD SAPSUD , was indicted for receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

EMILY GIBSON . I am single, and live in Gloster-terrace, Hoxton. On the 22d of July, a coach was taken for me by a friend in Sun-street, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner Booth, I believe, was the driver ; I did not see him, but I heard his voice, and recognized him when I went to the coach-stand as the same person - the coach took me home. I had the shawl on my shoulders when I went into the coach, but got out without it - it is possible I might drop it in getting out of the coach and going to my own door, because it was half off my shoulders and half on; I missed it within ten minutes after I got in door's, and I immediately went to the coach-stand at Shoreditch, to seek for the coach; when I got out my mother was at the door with a candle, and took the number of the coach; I then went to Shoreditch with my brother; my sister followed me. I found the prisoner at the Lying-in-hospital with his coach; I asked if he had seen my shawl, and said, I had left it in his coach; he recognized me directly, but said, he had not seen it, or words to that effect. I had not then left the coach half an hour; I left the coach after a little altercation, and saw the shawl again the same evening in my sister's possession - it is worth about twenty shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was the shawl out of your possession - A. Not more than an hour and a half. Booth recognized me when I spoke to him; I asked him if he had got the shawl - I do not recollect his saying anything about taking it to the coach-office, as the law directs. He had charged two shillings for his fare from Sun-street to Hoxton; the shawl is not here, it was the property of a friend who is gone to Ceylon.

ELIZABETH GIBSON . I am sister of the last witness. I live with her, and keep a boarding-school; I was in company with my sister on this evening - we got out of the coach, the fare demanded was two shillings. Mamma thought it too much, and said, if he charged her sixpence too much, she would summons him in the morning; this induced me to look at the man, and I saw it was a little old man, but I did not take sufficient notice as to enable me to say that Booth is the man. My sister missed her shawl in five or ten minutes; I did not go back with her, but in about five minutes I went to Shoreditch, and they told me to go to the Lying-in-hospital, and I found the coach at the watering-house; I asked for the coachman, and Booth presented himself; I told him I had left a shawl in the coach, and no doubt he had taken care of it; I would thank him to give it me. I think he said, he had not seen it or had not got it - he told me to look in the coach - a gentleman who was stepping into the coach

looked for it, but it was not found. I was coming away without it, and when I got about six yards from the place some one tapped me on the shoulder, and said,

"Come back, for the watchman has got your shawl;" I came back, and some person in the crowd handed it to me - I had asked Sapsud (who was the watchman) about it, and he said he had not got it - he said,

"Search me" - he opened his coat, and I saw his pistols which frightened me. I brought it home and gave it my sister; a man named Taylor was there, but he is not here.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your sister wore this shawl and left it on the seat - A. Yes; I saw the watchman who showed me his pistols which frightened me, and some person in the crowd gave me the shawl; the coachman did not recognize me, as I had worn a light dress, and changed it for a dark one - I did not hear him say, if any property had been left in the coach, he should have carried it to the coach-office, as his duty.

JOHN BUCKLER . I am a woollen-factor, and live in Basinghall-street. On the night of the 22d of July, about ten o'clock, I came by the end of Old-street-road, near the watering-house; the coach, No. 720, was standing at the door, and one of these ladies (I think the last) was having an altercation with the coachman about a shawl, which she said had been left in the coach - Booth appeared as the coachman, and denied any knowledge of it - I understood him to say he had taken up a fare since he took her, and that if a shawl had been left in the coach that fare must have taken it away. The young lady said it was impossible that could be true, as the time was so short. There was a gentleman with one foot on the coach step, who appeared to be getting into the coach, and the coachman said,

"If you suppose your shawl was left in the coach, you had better search;" I understood her to say she had searched before - I believe she searched it then; and just as she was looking into the coach the watchman Sapsud came up, I told him the nature of the charge, and pressed him to look into the business himself - he seemed rather unconcerned, but while the lady was looking into the coach I saw the coachman take off his hat in rather a peculiar way, drawing it down close to his breast - he then put it on again; by this time the watchman had got into the crowd, and stood at a little distance behind the coachman; while the coachman was putting on his hat again I saw his other hand pass behind him - a man named Taylor charged the coachman with having the shawl; he said,

"By God you have the shawl" - he replied,

"You had better search me, and see if I have got it;" I kept my eye upon them both, the watchman drew back at that instant, and went to a sort of shutter ledge, and placed his hand behind him in the same manner as the coachman had done before; though I had not seen anything pass between the coachman and the watchman, I felt convinced that the watchman had put something behind the ledge; I stretched my hand towards the ledge, and Taylor did the same, and we both took hold of the shawl at the same time - I gave the shawl to Miss Gibson. The two prisoners were charged with the offence by Taylor, but they were not taken up till afterwards. I have not a doubt of their being the men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The watchman was at liberty, was he not - A. He was at large at that time. I did not go to the office till I saw an account in the newspaper. Taylor was near the shutter; he is a sort of labouring man: he was as near the shutter as myself; there might be about two dozen persons there. I saw the account in the paper, and then went to the office. I saw Taylor there, and he was bound over to appear, but he did not appear at Clerkenwell.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the two prisoners. On the night of the 22d of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I went to the Star, public-house in the City-road, and there was some bustle, but I did not see it. When I came out the Taylor was accusing the watchman with taking a shawl, and hiding it behind the shutter; the watchman denied it - the young ladies were gone. Mr. Buckler was there, but I did not know the part he had taken in the business. Taylor was in the act of getting on a Paddington stage to go away; I said,

"You must come back and give me your name, you have accused a man on his duty;

"he then came back, and I said,

"Do you mean to say what you have said before;" he said Yes, and repeated the charge - the watchman denied it. I then took Taylor's address, as

"No. 20, Lisson-street, Lisson-grove, Paddington" - he was an entire stranger to me; he then went away - I told him to come to Worship-street next morning - I did not detain the watchman, as I knew he had been there seven or eight years, and knew where to find him. Nothing further passed that evening; the watchman remained on his beat; I told him I should make it known at the office the next morning, and did so. Taylor came down; I was ordered to get the coachman and the watchman to the office; I told the watchman he must bring the coachman, as I did not know where to find him - he did so in a day or two, and then Taylor did not come - I went to Paddington with a summons for him, he then came, and gave his evidence, and was bound over.

Cross-examined. Q. What is Taylor - A. He appeared like a carpenter; he did not seize the watchman. The cause was not investigated till a day or two after.

BOOTH - GUILTY . Aged 63.

Transported for Seven Years .

SAPSUD - GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-94

1335. RICHARD PEARSE and JEREMIAH SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a pair of trowsers, value 2 s., the goods of Francisco De Crux , and 70 lbs. of rope , the goods of Charles Brown .

FRANCISCO DE CRUX . I am a seaman . On the 26th of August, I left my trowsers in the forehead, on the starboard side of the ship Venus ; it was Sunday evening - I had been on shore, and returned the same night about ten o'clock, they were gone; the prisoner Pearse was employed about the ship , but was not on board when I left.

JOHN ROGERS . I am second officer on board the ship Venus - De Crux was the Cook ; Pearse came on board for employment some days before, and I told the cook to give him some victuals. I did not see the trowsers on board the ship that day, nor the prisoner - but next morning the officer came and enquired if we had lost any rope - I then perceived that there was some missing; the prisoner was in custody and had the trowsers on.

ROBERT MASTERS . I am a Thames Police-officer. I apprehended the two prisoners on Monday the 27th of August, in Preston-row, about seven o'clock in the morning; they were each of them carrying rope - Pearse said they got it from a lighter at Deptford, but it was gone; they did not tell me the name of it. I then made enquiry - when I got on board the Venus, Rogers claimed the rope; Pearse had two pair of trowsers on, and De Crux claimed the outside pair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PEARSE'S Defence. I was going down the City canal about five o'clock that morning, a lighterman came to me, and asked if I wanted a job, and I went down to the lighter and pumped for three-quarters of an hour; he gave me a shilling, and asked if the rope was of any use to me, and said

"Here is an old pair of trowsers." I came on shore, and saw this young lad, and told him I would give him nine-pence to carry part of the rope.

SULLIVAN's Defence. The prisoner came up and said, I will give you nine-pence to carry part of this rope.

ROGERS re-examined. The ship laid in the City canal - we had no lighter by the side of us, into which the rope could have fallen.

PEARSE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

SULLIVAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-95

1336. GEORGE RITSON and JAMES SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , two silver spoons, value 10 s. , the goods of Edward Hillier .

EDWARD HILLIER . I live in Cummins'-street, Pentonville ; Collier-street turns out of Cummins'-street; I never sold or disposed of these spoons.

ANN SMART . I am servant to Mr. Hillier; I remember four table spoons which he had in common use, one pair marked P. L., the other pair plain; we missed one of each pair about the 14th of August, and found them on the 28th of August at Hatton-garden; they were kept in the kitchen; the area gate was open on the day they were missed.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable of Pentonville. I saw the prisoners on Saturday the 14th of August, about half past two o'clock in the afternoon, coming up Collyer-street together, they turned into Rodney-street; I was induced to watch them, having frequently seen them about the place. I saw Scott draw this spoon from his bosom; I went up to them, and Ritson said

"Here is somebody coming;" I seized Scott and pulled him across the road, and then seized Ritson, they struggled, but could not get away. I found the marked spoon in Scott's hat, the other was dropped in the scuffle, and was brought to me as I was going to Hatton-garden. They had been together, and Scott seemed to be giving the spoon to Ritson, but seeing me, Ritson went across the road.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SCOTT's Defence. I was going along, and saw a bundle of wood and a spoon.

RITSON's Defence. I turned into Collier-street, and the officer collared this boy, I stopped to look, and he plunged upon me, and said,

"You are one."

JURY to REYNOLDS. Q. When Scott held the spoon to the other prisoner, did he offer to take it - A. No, he saw me so close that he did not offer to take it.

RITSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-96

1337. GEORGE WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a drawer, value 3 s.; a box, value 6 d.; three sixpences, and 2 s, 4 d. in copper monies , the property of William Swaisland .

ANN SWAISLAND . I am the wife of William Swaisland , and live at the Blue Anchor, public-house, Torment-hill, Westminster . The prisoner was in our house on Wednesday, the 18th of August, and this money was in the till, in a small box - the till is in the bar. I had gone into an adjoining room, and did not hear any one go into the bar, but having occasion to go to the bar for some beer, I found the till gone - the prisoner was in the tap-room when I left the bar and when I returned, he was gone; he had some beer with two other men - the others paid for it, and one of them left before the till was stolen - the other staid and paid for the beer. I saw the till and box at Queen-square, a short time after.

(Till and Box produced and sworn to.)

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a watchmaker. I saw the prisoner come into my house, and go up stairs. I went and found him in the yard - he was emptying the money out of this till. I sent for an officer and had him taken.

JOHN WHEEL . I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner. I found the till and box; and two sixpences in his hat, one sixpence in his side pocket, and 2 s. 4 d. in copper about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not buy any beer, for a man there asked me to drink, and then he said

"You had better go and do your job before you have any more beer." I did, and when I came back, I mistook the house, and went into this gentleman's house.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months and Whipped Publicly .

Reference Number: t18240916-97

1338. WILLIAM RUTLAND and JAMES BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a pair of scales, value 1 s.; four brass weights, value 1 s.; a pair of shears, value 3 s.; a pint of tincture of rhubarb, value 8 s., and five bottles, value 5 d. , the goods of John Inman .

CHARLOTTE INMAN . I am the wife of John Inman , surgeon ; we live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's . On the 10th of August, I was in the shop; the prisoners came in together, and asked for some liquorice-root. I said we had none, and immediately went into the garden. Mr. Inman tapped at the window, I returned, and saw him holding them.

JOHN INMAN . I was in my surgery, reading the paper. on the 10th of August, the prisoner Brown came to the door after Mrs. Inman had given them an answer, and asked when I should have any liquorice-root. I said in the course of the day. I then saw Brown take a bottle from a shelf; I ran out and seized them both outside the door. Rutland made a very great resistance, and I was compelled to let Brown go, but he handed the property to Rutland. I sent for an officer, who took Rutland, and found in his hat my scales, and in one of his pockets three of my weights. Brown was brought to my shop next morning - I knew him, for he had applied to me several times for a situation; he said they had hid the shears in a bank, and told where they had hid the drugs.

HENRY HADLOW . I am a surgeon. On the 10th of August, a person whom I believe to be Rutland brought three bottles into my surgery, which I bought of him for 9 d.

RICHARD CONSTABLE . I am a constable. On the 10th of August, I was sent for to take Rutland. I found the bottle in his hand, these scales in his hat, and the weights in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RUTLAND - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

BROWN - GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-98

1339. REBECCA BURTON and ANN CAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , a piece of printed cotton, containing fifteen yards, value 18 s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis and Charles Bevan .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a linen-draper, and live in High Holborn, within four doors of the prosecutors. On the 24th of July I saw the two prisoners in Chancery-lane, in company; one of them appeared to have something under her cloak - I believe it was Burton; I took notice of them - they ran away, and I followed; but before I came up to them I saw them pass the print from one to the other; they turned into Southampton-buildings, and in a court I took them into custody - the print was found on one of them.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoners in Southampton-court; the print was in Mr. Davis's possession, Burton seemed intoxicated - Campbell appeared sober, but said nothing.

CHARLES BEVAN . I am in partnership with Thomas Lewis - this property is ours; I came home about one o'clock, and then heard that it was gone - it was brought back in about an hour. Southampton-buildings is on the same side of the way as our house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CAMPBELL'S Defence. We had been drinking, but the liquor did not take the same effect on me as it did on her; how we got the property I do not know - there was another female with us.

BURTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

CAMBELL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-99

1340. THEODOSIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , four silver spoons, value 10 s. the goods of John Beales , her master .

SARAH BEALES . I am the wife of John Beales ; the prisoner came into our service on the 4th of September, and stated herself to be a widow ; I missed two table and two tea spoons about seven o'clock on Monday morning - she had left without giving me any notice, before I was up.

DAVID LORMIER . I am a watch and clock maker. About eight or nine o'clock on the morning of the 6th of September, the prisoner brought me a silver table spoon to sell; I asked her if it was her own - she said it was, and that her name was Williams - there was a W on the spoon; I bought it of her at 4 s. 9 d. per ounce as old silver, and gave her 8 s. 9 1/2 d. - I am sure she is the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-100

1341. THOMAS CARRINGTON was indicted for embezzling a half-crown, and sixpence-halfpenny in copper , the monies of his master , Henry Moss .

HENRY MOSS . I am a cheesemonger and poulterer , and live in Lamb's Conduit-street; the prisoner was about five months in my employ, and was entrusted to receive money for me - he was to account for it every evening; I had a customer of the name of Pewtress; he owed me three bills, one (was 2 s. 10 1/2 d.) which they were in the habit of paying regularly every week - this bill was due the 3d of July; his books were settled that evening as usual, but no money paid; he said nothing about it, nor have I ever received it - he left me on the 5th of August.

CAROLINE JUDGES . I am housemaid to Mr. Pewtress - I know the prisoner; I paid this 2 s. 10 1/2 d. to him on the Monday after Saturday the 3d of July; I think it was a half-crown piece and 4 1/2 d. in copper; I am quite sure I paid him some halfpence - he wrote the receipt in my presence.

GEORGE HASLAM . I am clerk to Mr. Moss. It was the prisoner's business to account with me for the money he received; I enquired of him early in July about Mr. Pewtress's bill - he said Mr. Pewtress was out of town, which was the reason it was not paid - he never settled it, nor said he had received it.

CHARLES JONES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Holborn, at a cheesemonger's where he was employed.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it with any intention of cheating him, for I have brought him pound and pounds since that of Mr. Pewtress; I wanted to make up a little money, and was obliged to pay it, and had not the power of making it up.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-101

1342. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , seven handkerchiefs, value 3 s. , the goods of William Sharman .

ROBERT STOUT . I am servant to Mr. William Sharman , Ratcliff highway , linen draper . On the 25th of August, a piece containing eight handkerchiefs, hung half in and half out of the door, an alarm was given; I went out and saw the prisoner twenty or thirty yards off - I stopped him with the handkerchiefs in his hand; I know them - he said distress drove him to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD SKINNER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and searched him - I found two duplicates, but no money on him.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-102

1343. JAMES BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a shovel, value 2 s., and a foot-iron, value 2 d. , the goods of Edward Page .

EDWARD PAGE . I am a labourer . I lost a shovel and a foot-iron, from Mr. Brown's tea gardens , near where I was at work - I put them there for safety; on the 29th of August, and next morning they were gone. I found the shovel in a sewer about a mile off; the prisoner had been at work with me for three weeks; I went to the public-house, and said to him,

"You have done a very

wrong thing - but if you will give up my things, I will think no more of it; he abused me, and said, he had not got anything of mine. I took him and showed him the shovel; he said it was his own, and that he had bought it - this is the shovel, I put a mark on it, that I might know it.

BENJAMIN NIBLETT . I live with a shoemaker. On Monday evening, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Brown's shed without anything with him, and when he came out he brought out a shovel, pick-axe, and foot-iron - I saw him walk up the road with them; he was taken up the week after.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office that you did not see his face, but knew him to be the man by his dress - A. Yes.

WILLIAM THISELETON . I am an officer. The prosecutor fetched me to a public-house, and charged the prisoner with stealing the shovel - he said first that he bought it at a shop, and then of a man at a public-house, at Battle-bridge.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-103

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1344. JAMES COUGHLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , fifteen planes, value 15 s., seven weights, value 7 s., and a castor, value 6 d. , the goods of Charles Wright .

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am a carpenter , and live in Rathbone-place; the prisoner was in my employ from the 14th to the 31st of August, during which time I missed fifteen planes; I enquired of him for a pair of planes which I wanted, he said he knew nothing about them, he pretended to look for them, and brought some others; I drew out the patterns of the planes I wanted, and he said he never saw them; I then charged him with having the others. and told him if he would tell me where they were, I would forgive him, if I got the whole of the property; he said he would if I would give him three shillings, which I refused; he then said he would if I would forgive him; he told me they were in Belton-street, Long-acre; I sent for a constable, and we went with him to a sort of smith's shop, and found three of my planes which I had seen a few days before; I paid for them, and took them away.

Prisoner. Q. On what terms did you engage me - A. He came to my shop and gave in a paper at my window, stating that he had come from an hospital, and was in distress. I enquired what work he could do, and told him to come next morning, he came, my wife gave him one shilling, and told him to go and get some refreshment. I agreed to give him a guinea a week, and find him tools.

JOHN GREEN . I am a constable. I was sent for, and went with Wright and the prisoner to Belton-street; Mr. Wright said he did not wish to hurt the man if he could get his property back.

HENRY HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street; this plane was pawned at our house on the 27th of August; I do not know who pawned it.

Prisoner's Defence Mr. Wright discharged me, and stopped 10 s. 3 d. for the tools.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-104

1345. HANNAH CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a gown, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and a cap, value 6 d. , the goods of Elizabeth Hawkins .

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I am a widow , and live in Sander's-gardens. I went into the country on the 20th of August, and gave Judith Kelly these things to keep till I returned: they cost me 16 s.

JUDITH KELLY . Hawkins gave me a gown, a cap, and handkerchief, to keep for her. I missed them on Saturday, the 21st of August; the prisoner lived with me at that time, and for three weeks before. She went out the night before, and did not return to sleep at home that night.

TIMOTHY KELLY . I am husband of the last witness. On Saturday night, the 21st of August, I saw the prisoner at Islington turnpike with the articles on and took her to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am an officer; I have a gown, cap, and handkerchief, which were taken from the prisoner at Hatton Garden.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the country with her to sell smuggled liquors, and she got intoxicated, and said she would send the officer after me for exposing the goods in the basket.

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I did not; I had none to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-105

1346. MARY CORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a pair of boots, value 1 s.; and seven pairs of stockings, value 20 s. ; the good of Henry Winter .

HENRY WINTER . I keep a shop , in Porter-street, Newport-market , and sell wearing apparel ; I only know this property to be mine.

PHOEBE HALL. I live at Mr. Winter's On the 2nd of August, the prisoner came to the shop and bought an old pair of stockings and a handkerchief. She came again, but bought nothing; when she was gone I missed a pair of boots and a pair of stockings. She came again next day, looked at some things, I missed a handkerchief before she got out of the shop and asked if she had it, she denied it several times, but at last gave it me from under her gown.

MICHAEL TURNER . I am shopman to Mr. Norman, a pawnbroker. On Monday, the 2d of August, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner pawned a pair of boots; the prosecutor and officer came next day.

WILLIAM BILES . I am a pawnbroker; these stockings were pawned at my shop by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-106

1317. JAMES CORBET and GEORGE DAVIDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , a plane, value 1 s., and an oil-stone, value 4 s. , the goods of George Strong .

GEORGE STRONG , I am a carpenter . On the 2d of August I left my tools in a house, partly finished, in the Edgware-road - when I returned on Monday morning at six

o'clock this plain and oil-stone, which were hidden behind some rubbish, were missing.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. On the 24th of August I was at a pawnbroker's, and saw Davidson bring this plane to pledge - I enquired if it was his own; he said No, but it belonged to a man where he lived; I told him I would see him. He then went out of the shop, and pointed to Corbet, who he said gave it to him - I left Davidson, and followed Corbet, and when I came up to him he had got this oil-stone, which he said he had had six months, and gave 9 d. for it.

CORBIT'S Defence. I had bought these things, and got this lad to go and pawn the plane for me.

CORBET - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

DAVIDSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-107

1348. JAMES CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a sovereign, a half sovereign, and nine shillings , the monies of John Herrick .

SARAH HERRICK . I am the wife of John Herrick . On Thursday, the 26th of August, about six or seven o'clock, I went to a drawer in my bed-room, and missed a sovereign, a half sovereign, and nine shillings in silver - I had seen them safe the Saturday before: the drawer was not locked: it was in a one pair stairs room; the door was locked, and I had the key in my pocket. I have since found that the key of the kitchen will open the bed-room door. I had left the prisoner in the house half an hour before I missed the property; he is my son, by my former husband.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN DALTON . On Monday, the 30th of August I apprehended the prisoner, and found this brush, a piece of soap, and a tobacco pipe on him - he said that was all he had left out of his mother's money.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-108

1349. CHARLES DODSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a gown, value 5 s., a counterpane, value 8 s., and a frock, value 3 s. , the goods of Daniel Dodson .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-109

1350. JOHN GILLMORE was indicted for stealing on the 12th of September , a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Taylor .

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am an apprentice on board the Herrington . This waistcoat was on board the brig, down in the forecastle; I missed it on Sunday morning. The prisoner worked on board - I asked him about it, and he said he knew nothing of it.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am a Thames Police officer. I stopped the prisoner at the West India Dock last Sunday afternoon, and found the waistcoat in his hat; he said he was going to take it to be cleaned for a boy on board the Herrington, and he would go and get the boy; but I told him I had seen the boy, and he denied having given it to him; he then said he had his hair cut, and his hat fell over his eyes, and he put the waistcoat in to keep it up.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-110

1351. WILLIAM ELTON was indicted for stealing on the 12th of August , an earthenware pan, value 2 s. , the goods of John Leach .

JOHN LEACH . I keep a chandler's-shop , in Pleasant-row, Camden-town . On the 12th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was fetched to a house in my neighbourhood, and saw the prisoner about five minutes after with one of my pans, which I had marked 3 s. 6 d. on the back of. I took him myself, and brought him back to the officer. When I got home I missed another - they were all right ten minutes before.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN DALTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he said he had taken one pan, and sold it for 2 s. in Somer's-town.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240916-111

1352. MARGARET HEADEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , two shirts, value 2 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; an apron, value 1 s.; a cap, value 6 d.; a gown, value 6 d., and a shirt collar, value 4 d. , the goods of Robert Evans .

JAMES MOORE . I am night patrol of Bow-street. I saw the prisoner take a child's cap out of her apron, and offer it for sale to a woman in the street. I took her into custody, and found the articles stated in the indictment on her; she said they were her mother's who lived near Golden-lane - there was another girl with her.

HARRIET EVANS . I am the wife of Robert Evans ; these things are my property - they were all safe at twelve o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the other girl in the street, and she sent me to this house for a woman named French: there was no such person, and when I came down, I saw the girl come from the bottom of the house with these things. I asked what she had got, she would not tell me.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-112

1353. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , 20 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the goods of James Graham .

JAMES GRAHAM . I am a nursery and seeds-man , and live in Camden town ; I had some window lead in my garden on the 23d of July, at seven o'clock in the evening; it was gone next morning; it had been at the end of the tool shed, it had been taken from an old frame.

SAMUEL BENJAMIN DALTON . I stopped the prisoner on the 23d of July, with a basket on his shoulder, containing old lead; he said a gentleman at Highgate gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some rubbish on the road, I had a basket in my hand; these bits of lead were among the rubbish.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-113

1438. JOHN HEDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of George Grisewood .

SARAH BURFORD. I am nursery-maid at Mr. Grisewood's, of Finchley. The prisoner worked there as labourer . I was at Barnet-fair last Tuesday week, and saw

him there with a handkerchief on his neck, which I could swear to - we named it to mistress next morning. I got a constable, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This gentleman has a family of children - A. Yes - I have seen them with handkerchiefs in the house and garden; they might drop them about, and they be picked up afterwards; we wash our own linen, and it is in my care.

JAMES FROST . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner in a building near the Green Man, public-house, Finchley-common; he was on a scaffolding, and had the handkerchief on his neck - I took it off, and saw G. G. on it - he did not say how he came by it. Finchley is about five miles from Barnet.

JAMES CONWAY. I went with Frost; when Frost called me to assist him, the prisoner knocked me down in the road, and swore he would not be handled by any man - the handkerchief was then taken by Frost.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not give him a twist or a wrench to make him retaliate - A. No. He did not strike Frost. I have laid informations before Dr. Owen and Sir J. Willis, as a common informer; they were done at their request.

Q. Do you mean that they were always at their desire - A. Yes, at all times - to the best of my belief.

JAMES FROST re-examined. Q. Did the prisoner strike you - A. No; he said he would not be handled by any mortal.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not resist you - A. No, but Conway attempted to take hold of him, and then he said he would not be handled; he showed no violence till he was taken hold of: I used no violence to him. I saw Conway fall, but I do not know whether he was knocked or pushed down.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the handkerchief, and had worn it several times by the house - if I had known to whom it belonged I should have returned it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-114

1355. JAMES PURSALL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a watch, value 1 l. , the goods of Charles Lucy .

ROBERT ASHTON . I work at Tottenham - this watch was my property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-115

1356. JAMES PULLEN and WILLIAM HOBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a truck, value 5 l. , the goods of George Swatton .

GEORGE SWATTON . I live in Artillery-passage, Spitalfields . On the forenoon of the 17th of August I used my truck, and left it for about ten minutes, at the corner of the passage, while I went for some goods - when my son went back it was gone. I had hand-bills printed, and in consequence of information I went to Dorrell's in East Smithfield, and found it pulled to pieces - it was at his door, exposed for sale; here is the axeltree - I have no doubt whatever of its being my property.

JAMES CRONIN . I live in Walker's-court, Ratcliff-highway, and am servant to Mr. Evans. I was at the door of my master's coal-shed one Tuesday in August, when the prisoners with another person came up to me, and asked where the shed was; I said, up the first gateway: they asked me to shew them, and I did; they tried to get the truck in, but could not - they then took off the wheels, springs, and axeltree, and put it in side-ways, and said they were going to put a pair of shafts to it, and drag it up and down Greenwich. They then took the springs in.

CHARLES DORRELL . One Tuesday in the middle of August the prisoner Pullen came to my house, and offered this axeltree for sale, for 5 s. - I gave him 3 s. 6 d.; I enquired his name and address; he said,

"Give me a bit of chalk and I will write it" - he wrote

" John Nash , No. 7, Mulbery-street, Whitechapel." He said,

"You need not be afraid, I have bought a pair of arms for it, and want to sell this to pay for them."

CHARLES SOAMES . I am apprentice to Mr. William Badger . One Tuesday in August I saw the prisoners and another with them, bring the truck up our yard while I was at the door, grinding ship-scrapers; they tried to get it into the shed, and could not - one of them said,

"What shall we do now;" they turned it up, and took off the wheels, and then the springs and axeltree, and then put it into Mr. Evans's shed.

PULLEN - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

HOBBS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240916-116

1357. RICHARD SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , a gown, value 9 s. , the goods of William Collyer .

MARY COLLYER . I am the wife of William Collyer . - the prisoner is my son. I lost my gown on the 9th of August, about twelve o'clock; I had seen it safe an hour before.

CHARLES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought this gown to my house, and said it was from his mother.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-117

1358. THOMAS STEWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , two tablecloths, value 3 s., and a shift, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Steward .

ANN STEWARD . The prisoner is my son ; he is seventeen years of age. I keep a mangle, and missed some tablecloths in May, and some shifts in February - I thought I had given them to people by mistake, who had not returned them, but I looked into my son's box promiscuosly and saw two tickets for tablecloths, I knew that they were not mine - when he came home from his weekly place I challenged him about it, and said I would send for an officer - he begged I would not, and he would never do so again, but soon after I found some more, and then had him taken.

JOHN SMALLSHOW . The prisoner pawned some things at my house in February, and some in May - his mother brought the duplicates to my house, and I filed them and gave her fresh ones. I have not got them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-118

1359. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a gown, value 16 s. , the goods of James Drew .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. James

Drew, pawnbroker , Newington . I hung a gown up on the 11th of September, on the left hand of the door, about eight o'clock in the morning - a person came into the shop about eleven or twelve o'clock, and said something; I then went out and stopped the prisoner; she had not got it; but I had seen her go towards a linen-draper's shop; I asked her what she had under her shawl, she said, nothing of mine, what did I mean by stopping her. I then went back to the shop where she had been, and found the gown lying in the door way - it was a stranger who told me about her taking it.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - she said,

"It is my first offence, for God's sake forgive me" - she was very sorry.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-119

1360. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a pair of shoes, value 8 s. , the goods of Matthew Tate .

MATTHEW TATE . I am a private in the guards. I live in the house of William Fryer - on the 18th of July, about one o'clock, I lost a pair of shoes from my knapsack; I saw them again about eight o'clock.

WILLIAM FRYER . The prisoner and Tate live in my house in Dorset-court, Charing-cross; their rooms are on the same floor - on the 18th of July, the prisoner came down with the shoes in his hand; he saw me watching him, and went to the privy. I said

"What have you got there;" I took his handkerchief and found these shoes in it; he had lodged with me for six months.

THOMAS CUFF . I took the prisoner into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240916-120

1361. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a bowl, value 2 d., and thirteen shillings in money , the the property of Thomas Catley .

THOMAS CATLEY . I live in Cross-street, Grosvenor-square - I sell bread ; on Friday, the 3d of September, my daughter called me up from below, and told me a person had run away with some silver out of the till; I ran into the street, and some person had got hold of the prisoner. Part of the silver and a bowl was returned to me by somebody in the crowd.

ANN CATLEY . I was sitting in the parlour, and heard a chinking, and saw some person with his arm across the counter - I do not know who the person was; I did not me notice him.

JOHN CHARLES RUSSELL . I was in Old Burlington-street, and saw the prisoner running from Regent-street - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a person running after him; he had something under his apron; he ran across the road near the coaches, and threw something away - I went up and found it to be a bowl; I did not pick it up, but followed him.

WILLIAM BELL . I was with Russell, and saw the prisoner throw away the bowl - I did not see it picked up; I followed him to the end of Burlington-street, and there lost sight of him.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I have thirteen shillings which I got from the prosecutor and other persons - I searched the prisoner, and found one shilling in his pocket, and another in his waistcoat; he said, he had taken the money because he wanted to look respectable, to get a place.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-121

1362. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , two coach lamps, value 10 s. , the goods of George Ingram .

JOHN HARRIS . I live in Middlesex-court, and am a coach smith - on the 31st of July, I was standing at Mr. Large's door, in Great Queen-street, and saw the prisoner go into Mr. Ingram's, the coachmaker , and go on the near side of a chaise, and take a lamp out, then come round on the other side, and take the other - I followed him to Drury-lane; and then told him, I thought he had gone far enough, and to come back, which he did, and put them into the chaise.

GERRARD M'KEAN. I live with Mr. George Ingram - these lamps were fixed to a chaise in his shop.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-122

1363. JOHN WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , two shirts, value 40 s., two waistcoats, 20 s., two handkerchiefs, 10 s., four pair of trowsers, 40 s., and a table cloth, 3 s. , the goods of Thomas White .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-123

1364. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , a piece of printed cotton, containing twenty-eight yards, value 20 s. , the goods of John Harris .

WILLIAM MASTERS CAMAC . On the 10th of August I lived in Dover-street - I was passing Mr. Harris's shop. and saw the prisoner take a piece of goods from a chair at the side of the door; she put it under apron, and walked off - I gave information, one of the young men came out, and we followed her to a court and took her.

GEORGE JAMES . I am a shopman to Mr. John Harris - I went in pursuit, and took the prisoner with this piece of cotton in her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-124

1365. WILLIAM WHITLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , a saw, value 2 s. , the goods of John Hughes .

JOHN BATMAN . I am in the service of Mr. John Hughes . On the 2d of August I saw the prisoner in White Conduit-fields, with a saw in his hand; I asked where he got it; he made no answer. I took it, and knew it to be Mr. Hughes's.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I took the prisoner, and asked him what induced him to take it; he said he would not starve; he had some meat in his hat when I searched him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-125

1366. WILLIAM HINSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a watch, value 20 s.; a seal, value 10 s.;

two keys, value 6 d., and a ring, value 1 d., the goods of Zaccheus Coates , from his person .

ZACCHEUS COATES. I live in William-street, Manchester-square. On the 29th of July I was in Bentinck-street , and saw two men in the middle of the street; they parted, and one of them came up to me, pulled out my watch, and ran away; I followed him as fast as I could, and thought that he turned down behind Hind-street chapel; I saw him again in a very few minutes in the watch-house, and thought he was the same person; I knew the colour of his jacket.

Prisoner. The watch-house keeper said,

"All stand round," and we did, and he said,

"Can you say which it was, and you said you could not speak to his face; you said you did not wish to give charge of any person. - Witness. Yes, I did so, but I knew his jacket, and can swear to him by that.

THOMAS ARMSTRONG . On the night of the 29th of July, I heard a cry, of stop thief! in Bentick-street, and saw the prisoner running on the opposite side, I tried to stop him, he rushed past me; I followed him, and at last overtook him in Fair-street. The prosecutor said he had lost his watch; I searched the prisoner, and found nothing.

J - BROMLEY. I saw the prisoner running down Bentick-street; I was standing at the corner of Hind-street; he saw me, and ran down Fair-street. He was given into my hands at No. 18, Fair-street, by Edwards, close to the rails of the area.

WILLIAM CROOK . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! we took the prisoner, and searched him, but found nothing on him. A gentleman told me to go back and look into the area; I went, and found a young man at the door with a light. I found the watch-case in one part of the area, and the inside in another.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I had taken the prisoner before the others came up. I was passing Hind-street, and saw him running; he attempted to go down Mary-le-bone-lane; he then ran by me; I caught at him, but missed my aim: he went down Fair-street, put his hand over the rails, and then deliberately laid himself down, and put his hands through the rails. I followed to see what was done, and said to the watchman,

"If you come with me I think we can find the watch." I went home with my wife, and then went to the watch-house, and it was too late; next morning: I went as soon as business would permit to the Magistrates, but it was too late.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Mary-le-bone-lane, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran, and in Fair-street the watchmen took me, and threw me on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-126

OLD COURT. (3d Day.)

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1367. WILLIAM SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , at St. Pancras , a watch, value 3 l.; three seals, value 15 s., and a watch key, value 5 s., the goods of Morris Dark , in his dwelling-house .

MORRIS DARK . I am a journeyman baker , and live in Phoenix-street, St. Pancras - I rent the house, and keep a chandler's-shop there. On Thursday morning, the 2d of September, about twelve o'clock, I missed my watch from the parlour mantle-piece - I had seen it safe at half-past ten o'clock; it was shewn to me on the Monday following. The prisoner is a stranger to me - I had not seen him about.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am an officer of Bow-street; on the 2d of September I met the prisoner in Oxford-street, in conversation with two others - I saw him nudge the one on his right hand, and take a watch from his pocket and shew it to them, observing that it was a nice one; I took him into custody, and the other two ran off; he said it was his father's watch, and he was taking it to his mother, at No. 22, Manchester-street; I asked where he brought it from - he said from the watchmaker's, in the middle of Long-acre. I said I should detain him and take him before a Magistrate, and as we went along he said he had stolen it from a house in Camberwell-grove, and then that he took it from a person in St. Pancras church; I had not threatened, or made him any promise to induce him to confess.

MORRIS DARK . It is my watch, and is worth 4 l. - the lowest value of the seal and chain is 1 l.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boys gave it to me - I pulled it out of my pocket to look at, and said it was a nice one.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18240916-127

1368. ELIZABETH PLATT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a shirt, value 4 s; two shifts, value 6 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s., and a pair of stockings, value 2 s., the goods of William Hardisty ; and a shawl, value 1 l. , the goods of Ann Eliza Hardisty .

ANN ELIZA HARDISTY . I live with my father , William Hardisty , in the Edgware-road ; the prisoner was employed to wash for us. On the 31st of July, just before she came, I put a handkerchief into the cupboard; I missed it soon after, and told her of it; she followed me up stairs to the closet, and pulled the things out. I saw her pull the handkerchief out of her pocket, with my father's shirt and stockings. I then looked into her bundle, and found a shawl and two shifts of my mother's - she said nothing.

THOMAS HURST . I took her in charge; she bears a very good character.

Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-128

1379. MARY QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Miller , her master , a brooch, value 1 l., and two gold snaps, value 2 l. , his property.

ELIZABETH MILLER . I am the wife of Joseph Miller ; we live in Picadilly , the prisoner was about three weeks in our service. On the 26th of August, Basset shewed me a gold brooch and snaps, which were mine. I had seen them on a drawer in my bed-room the morning before.

HANNAH PENDERGRASS . I live in St. James's - my husband

is a bricklayer. I saw the prisoner the day before this happened, and told her the family I worked for were going out of town, and asked her if she knew of a day's work for me - I met her within two or three yards of Mr. Harrison's - she gave me this brooch and snaps, and asked me to pawn them for 12 s.; I went in - Basset asked who owned them; I said the woman was outside: we went out, and she was waiting for me.

JAMES BASSET . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Wardour-street. On the 26th of August Pender-grass came to pawn a gold brooch and snaps, for 10 s.; I questioned her, then went out, and found the prisoner at the corner of Edward-street; she said she had sent the woman in, and that they belonged to her. I gave her in charge. They are worth 3 l.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. I took her in charge - she said she lived with Mrs. Miller, whose the property was, and that the drawer was not locked.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a mother to support, and not liking to ask for money so soon I took them, intending to redeem them when I got my wages.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-129

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1371. MICHAEL MOORE was indicted for feloniously uttering a certain false forged counterfeit receipt, with intent to defraud His Majesty : - which is as follows.

An account of the quantities of provisions (stopped grog, &c.,) saved by, and stopped from the Company of His Majesty's ship, Liverpool, out of their daily allowance between the 27th of February, 1818, and 31st of May, 1821; with the value thereof, at the prices settled for the payment of savings and short allowance, the Names of the Persons appointed to receive for each Mess; the signatures of the persons to whom the amount was paid; and the signatures of the witnesses to the payment; paid in full out of the necessary money due to the late purser, William Twynam , Esq., at his decease, 31st of May, 1821.

These are to certify, that the account of provisions specified on the other side hereof, is a just and true account of savings, or short allowance, due to the company of his Majesty's ship Liverpool, between the 27th February, 1818, and the 31st of May, 1821, amounting to viz.

s. d. s. d.

Bread 4554 Pounds at 0 1 1/2 per lb. 28 9 3

Spirits 546 1-8 Gallons at 2 0 per Gallon 54 12 3

Beef 147 1/2 Pieces, of 8 lbs. each (including flour)

at 1 6 per Piece 11 1 3

Sugar 450 3/4 Pounds at 0 4 per lb. 7 10 3

Total 101 13 0

The value whereof, at the prices settled for, the payment of the same amounts to One Hundred and One Pounds Thirteen Shillings.

Died on the 31st May, 1821, Purser - ROBERT M'DONALD.

MICHAEL MOORE , Succeeding Purser. - Purser's Steward during the above period.

These are to certify, that the aforegoing amount of monies due by the late Purser of His Majesty's Ship Liverpool. Mr. William Twynam , at his decease, on the 31st of May, 1821, for savings, or short allowance of provisions to the Company of the said ship, was actually paid to the respective persons, as therein expressed in our presence by Mr. Michael Moore , the succeeding Purser, out of the balance of necessary money due to Mr. William Twynam , aforesaid (at his decease, the 31st of May, 1821) which was drawn on the Commissioners for Victualling His Majesty's Navy, on the 22d of June, at Madras; and that we have every reason to believe the same is a just and true account.

Given under our Hands on Board His Majesty's Ship, Liverpool, in Bombay Harbour, the 30th of September, 1821.

F. A. COLLIER, Captain.

WILLIAM GOUDY , Master.

These are to certify. that the Purser of His Majesty's Ship, Liverpool under my command, has delivered to me two accounts of the same tenor and date with this; one of which I shall immediately transmit to the Commissioners of the Victualling, and preserve the other for the passing of my accounts.

F. A. COLLIER, Captain.

MESSRS. BOLLAND, ADOLPHUS, and PLATT, conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN FAUCETT . I am a clerk in the Secretary's-office in the Victualling-office. On the 15th of July, 1822, I received a letter, purporting to come from the prisoner, as purser of His Majesty's ship Liverpool. I hold it in my hand now; I think it contained an account, but am not certain - I made a mark on the letter with the account; if there was one in it, and it would be passed to the Medical, and Cash Committee of the Victualling Board, and would then go to the Impress department; it would be left in the board-room. I have no doubt but it contained an enclosure.

THOMAS RICHARDSON , Esq. I am chief clerk in the Impress Department. I remember seeing the letter produced at the time just mentioned - it contained an account and voucher, both of which I have here, (producing them) - they came to my hands on the 16th of July; I know them to be the same, as I immediately put a number on them. I am not acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing; I have several letters purporting to come from him - one dated November 28, 1823; another April 8, 1824.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The letters are opened before they come to you - A. Yes; I cannot say in what state they arrive.

MR. JOHN THOMAS BRIGGS . I am Secretary to the Medical and Cash Committee. There is a reference on this letter in my hand-writing, to Mr. Richardson, to report on subject matter of the account alluded to (looking at the account) - this is it. After the arrival of the prisoner in England I saw him; a letter had been written to him requiring the original documents - from which he professed to have made up this account; in consequence of which he came to the office, and desired to see me - he was brought into the Committee where I was sitting; he stated that having been called upon by the letter before alluded to for the original documents, he could not produce them, having destroyed them. I said he must give a written answer to the letter - the Board had written to him. The documents required are the original memorandums, which he states in his letter to have been found after the death of Mr. Twynam, whom he succeeded as Purser.

MR. JOHN SMITH GOULD . I know the prisoner's writing perfectly well - this letter is his writing (looking at the documents produced) - the signature to this account, and the heading are his writing, as also the letters produced.

The letter enclosing the document was here read, it stated, that Mr. Twynam had left his accounts in a confused state, but the account had been made out by the prisoner from documents, then in his possession.

MR. FAUCETT re-examined. I have made a memorandum on the letter of the date on which it was received - there is no mark of mine on the account; my belief is, that there was an enclosure, but I cannot identify it; if there had not been one, I should have noticed it, as I read the letter; I opened it on the 15th - Mr. Briggs has refered it on the 16th.

MR. BRODRICK to MR. GOULD. Q. I have not understood who you are - A. I was midshipman on board the Liverpool at the time the prisoner was there. I think the whole of the account is in his writing, except the signature

"J. B. Somerville." I was on board the vessel when Mr. Twynam died - the prisoner was at that time Admiralty clerk on board, and did the duty of Captain's clerk. Mr. Twynam was ill about ten days; and at his death the prisoner succeeded him - he also performed the duty of Captain's clerk, but had a person to assist him. He continued acting Purser nine or ten months - we were in the Indies all that time. I do not remember his being in bad health; he had the prickly heat, that is a sign of good health.

Q. I believe when grog is stopped from the men, there is much dispute between them and the Purser about their amount of stoppages - A. Not when they are correctly paid, when the Purser is a just man. They either put their name or mark to the settlement.

Q. If the duty of the ship calls them away, would not they say to the Purser

"Put down my name" - A. I never knew it; the men stand on quarter deck, and write their name before the Commanding Officer and others. If they cannot write, they make a mark, and the Purser puts their name.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. This is done publicly on quarter deck; did you see any account of this done on quarter deck. - A. Certainly not; the whole account should be in his writing, except the signatures, which should be made by the parties themselves. I certainly believe the names in this column of signatures, are in the prisoner's writing, a little disguised, but Walker is evidently in his writing not at all disguised.

" William Hodge " is also written by him.

MR. JAMES B. SOMERVILLE . In 1821 I was Lieutenant of the Liverpool; I joined her on the 14th of May. Mr. Twynam was then Purser; he died on the 31st of May; he was only ill five or six days. I was ill myself, and do not know who acted for him. About the 19th of September, an application was made to me as commanding officer. - A deputation of the ship's company came aft to complain that they could not get their short allowance money paid to them from the Purser; I sent for him twice or more, before he came, and at last sent a serjeant of marines with a file of men, who brought him on quarter deck. I was not present at any payment to the men after that.

Q. Look at the name of Somerville on this account, and say if it is your writing. - A. It is precisely like my writing, but I do not believe that I ever signed this document; I am unable to say whether it is my writing or not, the words Senior and Lieutenant are not my writing. I have no recollection of having seen such a document, or such a payment; had I witnessed it, I certainly should recollect it.

Q. Have you a knowledge of having signed any voucher or paper which the prisoner can have in his possession. A. I have a slight recollection of having signed some papers, but cannot say what they were; brought to me by him, and taken away.

Q. He would then be in possession of your signature - A. Yes, the signatures in the column all appear would be in one hands but some are more disguised. I saw none of these parties sign their names, nor make their marks.

Cross-examined. Q. You was senior lieutenant at the time

A. Yes, I had to sign documents in the Captain's absence, but not frequently.

Q. After the men made their complaint the allowances were paid. - A. I suppose so, as I heard no further complaint. I never witnessed disputes between the men and Purser. When I joined the ship Mr. Twynam was very busy in his cabin, at his accounts, and was told he would injure his health by confining himself so closely below. I heard him say every thing of material consequence was done.

Q. Is there a greater difference in the signatures than might be made by a man who wrote the whole account himself - A. Oh! Yes.

ROBERT M'DONALD. I was steward to Mr. Twynam until the 31st of May, 1821, when he died, and then remained as steward to the prisoner for about a month - it was my duty to keep an account of the quantity of grog retained by the Purser, and not served out to the men. Mr. Twynam settled with the caterers of the different messes about five months before his death I think - I was present at that settlement; I cannot say when it was to a month or so. When he died he left his books and papers in his cabin - the prisoner took possession of them after his death. I made out an account of money due for stock grog, by order of Captain Collier , and delivered it to the prisoner.

GEORGE LINDAY . I am clerk to Messrs. Knight and Jones, Solicitors for this prosecution. I served the prisoner with notice to produce certain documents, on the 11th of September, in Newgate. I have a copy of the notice here.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you that you had taken all the papers he had on shore, and all the rest were on board the Liverpool - A. No; he said he would attend to it.

The copy of notice for the prisoner to produce a variety of documents was here read.

ROBERT M'DONALD (in continuation). I do not think the account exceeded 30 l.; it did not amount to 40 l. I am confident. The money was paid the men by the prisoner shortly after Mr. Twyman's death. I believe the name

"Robert M'Donald" on the account to be my writing, but not

"Purser's steward," &c. I remember Welb's writing, and believe his name in the column is not written by him. Reynolds's signature may be his writing, for he wrote a good hand - he is now at Bermuda. When I left the ship all the documents were left with Mr. Moore; when I left him the accounts were made out fairly, that was a month after Mr. Twynam's death.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that at Mr. Twyman's death the accounts were fairly made out? - A. I do; the account due for stop-grog was 30 l. at his death; all payments should be entered in the Purser's book at the time they are paid. Mr. Twynam entered them himself, the prisoner had the care of the books and the key was in his possession.

Mr. PLATT. Q. The prisoner took charge of Mr. Twynam's papers - A. Yes; he told me he had a necessary bill of 106 l. of Mr. Twynams, and that the money-bill amounted to 207 l., or 280 l. in all.

CAPTAIN F. A. COLLIER. I commanded the Liverpool from 1818, to December 1821. The prisoner was Admiralty Clerk at the decease of Mr. Twynam; he had access to his papers. I cannot say who took possession of them; it is requisite for the Captain of vessels to certify documents as authentic.

Q. On this voucher are two certificates purpoting to be yours - A. Upon looking at the signatures only, they are so like mine, I should almost say they were mine; but on looking at the document and the dates, I should not put my signature to such a document, because it says it is a payment made between 1818 and 1821, and between those dates short allowance money for stop and sick grog, payments had been made by Mr. Twyman, and it is impossible that some payments should not be made without a man coming to me to know why they were not paid.

Q. There is a certificate of the money being paid by the prisoner in the presence of yourself, were those payments made - A. Certainly not; he made a small payment after Mr. Twynam's death, but certainly not to this extent.

Q. It states that the Purser has delivered you two accounts, &c. - A. He had the management of my accounts, and is the person who would transmit that account to the Victualling Office, he acted both as Purser and as my clerk.

Cross-examined. Q. You have known Moore some time - A. I knew him from his joining the ship in 1818; he was Admiralty Clerk, and I do not hesitate to say, that since I have commanded a ship (which is from 1805.) that I ever had so good a clerk, nor ever had so little difficulty in passing my accounts at Somerset House, and never had them kept so closely as by him - he has had thousands of dollars which I was answerable for, and money of my own, all of which I always found correct; I had the highest opinion of him, he came to me with the strongest certificate of character.

Q. When he left the vessel, were not his books left behind - A. I should think not; I do not know the nature of his accounts. I have signed some thousand documents while he was on board. During the time we were in India he was ill several times, and particularly after Mr. Twynam's death; we were sent to the Persian Gulph, and the illness was so serious he was alarmed, being a healthy man, and at times was quite childish, and crying; this was while he acted as Purser.

Q. Was his mind in that state, that in making up his accounts it was very easy to make mistakes - A. I cannot say.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. Were any accounts sent to government at the time you were in the Persian Gulph - A. No we had no means of sending; his illness was in August; we got to Bombay in September or October; then went to Penang, and there he left us; this was in November, 1821.

COURT. Q. Do you happen to know where it was that he made the small payment after Mr. Twynam's death - A. I think at Cochin.

JOHN ALDOUS . I am Serjeant Major of the Royal Marines, and have nothing to do with the Liverpool. I know Serjeant Stokes, and frequently saw him write. (looking at the account) I am sure the signature here is not his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you become acquainted with him - A. Fifteen or sixteen years ago. I often saw him write, seven or eight years ago, and for the last three or four months.

GEORGE HOUGHTON . I was a private marine on board the Liverpool, and am now a corporal. I know Serjeant Stokes's writing; the signature in this column is not his

writing. I know Reynolds's writing; the signature purporting to be his, is not writing. I know Lewis, and often saw him write his name, and John Longville , I have seen him write. I have seen Joseph Bates copying songs.

CORNELIUS JONES . I belonged to the Liverpool. I knew that Bates could write. I have often seen him write, also Jones. Longville and Murphy could write. Cox could not.

ROBERT M'DONALD. The account made out was only of stock-grog. I am confident it did not exceed 40 l.

The account was here read. - See Indictment.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer. On the 21st of July, I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings, No. 4, Thanet-place, Temple-bar. I searched his lodgings three or four hours after, and found some papers there, which I wrote my name on before I parted with them (looking at them) these are the same - they were all in his bed-room, in one drawer; among them is a piece of black tracing-paper, and a long strip of paper with names on it.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that it was his bedroom - A. He said he lodged upon the second floor, and sent me there, and received the linen which I found there. I believe some account-books were there. I gave him every thing but these papers.

MR. GOULD. I believe these papers to be Mr. Moore's writing.

These were three accounts, apparently duplicates of the one set out in the indictment, but in the receipt column, some signatures appeared instead of marks; the sums varied; also the totals, as follow: - Bread 30 l. 17 s. 10 1/2 d. Spirits 71 l. 15 s. 3 1/2 d. Beef 12 l. 0 s. 9 d. Sugar 8 l. 17 s. 2 d. Total 123 l. 12 s. 2 d.

MR. BRODRICK to MR. RICHARDSON. Q. Did you not in April last receive another document from the prisoner - A. Yes, (producing it) a letter accompanied it.

A bill for 333 l. 10 s. 4 d., drawn by the prisoner, from Madrass, at thirty days sight, was here put in and read.

The prisoner put in a written affidavit, stating the account first sent was incorrect, being only a copy intended for his own information, which there being errors of 9 s. 5 1/2 d., 5 s. 0 1/2 d. 2 s. 0 1/2 d., and an omission of 15 l. 3 s. 1 d., which with 6 l. for the gun room; mess omitted made the difference, but the accounts were made up at the Persian Gulph at the time he was ill. He had the double duty of Purser and clerk to perform, that Mr. Twynam's accounts were in a very bad state, and the vouchers much obliterated and illegible; and it frequently happened that he was ordered by the men to write their names for them when they were called away to attend their duty.

MR. RICHARDS. I received an account on the 28th of November, 1823, with 6 l. added for the gun room mess, the boys' savings are not added there; here is a letter I received on the 8th of April, 1824.

(read.)

This letter enclosed what is termed the nominal list, and stated that he had discovered the omission of the boys' savings, and requested Mr. Twynam's executors might be charged with the account, and that all the orders for the stoppage of grog being worn out, defaced, torn and rotten, it was found impossible to preserve.

The nominal list being examined, tallied with the account put in of the amount of 123 l. 12 s. 2 d., the difference of that and of 101 l. 13 s., being accounted for by 6 l., for the gun room mess, and 15 l. 9 s. 2 d., omissions.

MR. RICHARDS. The prisoner was apprehended on the 21st of July; enquiries had been making about his accounts from 1822. He knew the investigation was going on.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-130

London Cases, Before Sergeant Arabin ,

1372. LEWIS LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 d., the goods of John Edwards , from his person .

WILLIAM FISHER . I am a toll collector at Newgate market. On the 11th of August, a little before eight o'clock in the forenoon. I was in the market and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of Mr. Edward's left hand pocket; I collared him with it in his hand; he said it was not worth two pence.

JOHN EDWARDS . I was in the market, Fisher alarmed me, and I missed my handkerchief, he had hold of the prisoner with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was buying some fruit, and several people were passing; I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-131

1373. GEORGE REDBURN , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , two guineas, two half crowns, and two sixpences, the monies of William Mosley , from his person .

WILLIAM MOSLEY . On the 4th of September, about half past ten o'clock at night; I was at Bartholomew fair , there was a rush made behind me, and I felt the prisoner's hand in my breeches pocket; I turned round and felt him moving my purse towards his left; I caught hold of his hand while I kept calling for assistance; we forced him on to Giltspur-street, where Harrison met us and took him, and on his person was found my purse, containing two guineas, two half crowns, and two sixpences.

JOHN LYONS . I was at the fair near Mosley, and saw the prisoner draw the purse from his right-hand pocket. I immediately seized, and helped to take him out of the fair, and saw it found upon him.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I was on duty, and saw the prisoner trying to get his left hand into his pocket; I seized, and kept it in his pocket; pulled it out, and found the purse, with two guineas two half-crowns, and two sixpences in it; he said it was his own.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up; several people were pushing, I was on my knees when the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-132

1374. DANIEL MORGAN and JAMES SESSIONS , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a watch, value 40 l., the property of Isaac Leplastrier , privately in his shop .

ISAAC LEPLASTRIER . I am a watch maker , and live in Mark-lane . On the 13th of July, about half-past seven in the evening, the two prisoners came to my shop; I was in the yard; my son called me to them. Sessions was the first who addressed me; he wished to look at a good silver double-case hunting-watch. I asked if they were

particular as to a hunter; he said yes, it must be a hunter, for it was for his brother in the country. I shewed them some watches, among which was the new case of a huntingwatch, the works not being quite complete. At that moment a gentleman came in to have his watch regulated, and I asked them to take a seat. I altered the gentleman's watch, and he went away; they both spoke, and made observations on the watches, and fixed upon a hunter, and asked if I could get it done by 12 o'clock next day. I said I would do my endeavours. I removed the silver watches on to the work-board. Sessions then said he wanted a a gold seal, key, and a steel chain. I said I did not keep jewellery, but they wished me to get it for them, as if they had it from me, they knew it would be good gold; I said I would procure them something which they might depend upon; they then left the shop, and were to call in an hour and a half to see the jewellery - it wanted a quarter to seven o'clock; my son went out after the jewellery, and in six or seven minutes they returned, and said, they supposed I had not got the jewellery yet; I said No - but it would soon be in, as my son had only to go to Leadenhall-street. Morgan then said, his mother had fixed that it must be a hunter, for his brother was so particular, and that it was to go a hundred miles into the country; he then looked about him and said,

"My mother wishes to know if you have neat ladies gold watches - you seem to have some very nice watches." I took down the cases of two, the works of which were in a drawer, and said he could have one of those very soon, and I could recommend them. I then had a very fine double duplex watch in my hand; one of them observed, that it was a very handsome watch; he supposed it was gilt. I said it was gold, and the price 40 l.: they looked at it with the rest, and I put it down on my number-book, on the counter, with the two gold cases, and at that instant my son came in with the jewellery, and I removed the watch with the cases from the counter to the work-board, which is two feet eight or ten inches from where Sessions stood. I shewed them the jewellery; they said it was not what they wanted, their brother wanted a chased jud seal; my son instantly returned to fetch one, and at that time Sessions stood at the corner of the counter nearest to the work-board. Morgan placed himself at the end rather behind the counter, which I thought nothing of, as I had asked them to sit down before; and while my son was gone I proceeded to shew them the movements belonging to the gold cases they had been looking at. I had occasion to go about three paces from the counter to my desk; this gold watch, and some silver ones, were then behind me. I do not think I was at the desk more than a minute, when Morgan walked out of the shop. I saw him pass the window, but thought nothing of it, as it was a very opressive evening, I thought he went out for air. I proceeded to shew Sessions the movements of the watches; but instead of attending to it he said he was rather in a hurry, as he was going about some silk, and requested I would send the jud seal when it came, to their mother's, Mrs. Pratt, No. 1, America-square. I said if he would do me the favour to wait a few minutes, my son would be in, and he could see it himself; he said he could not wait, and walked out. My son met him on the threshold; he returned, and looked at the seal, and said it was just what was wanted, and if I could send it to his mother's; and saying,

"Mrs. Pratt, recollect No. 1, America-square - I wish you good night." He went out, my son came to the work-board, and we missed the gold watch. Nobody but them had been in the shop, and nobody else could have taken it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The place you moved it to was not convenient for them to take it - A. He could reach it with the greatest ease; it was between me and them when I went to my desk; his arm would have to pass me to reach it - it was a compleat watch; I have not found it. I never saw either of them before, but they were half an hour with me. I described them to a nicety to the officers. I went to Mrs. Pratt and found they knew nothing about them - if I had met them in the street I should have known them; I pointed them out in the lock-up-room mixed with others, six days after the robbery. My impression is that Sessions took it and handed it to Morgan as he went out.

WILLIAM LOUIS LEPLASTRIEA . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 13th of July, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in, and Sessions said, they were recommended to buy a second-hand silver hunting-watch - I immediately called my father from the yard; he shewed them several, and sent me to fetch one which he had lent to a gentleman; I returned and shewed it to them - Sessions said, if it was for him, he should prefer that; but his brother was so particular in his directions for a hunter, that he must have one. He mentioned about some gold seals, and then they left the shop. I went to fetch the seals, and on returning, they were both there - my father shewed them the seals, they wanted a jud one, and he sent me for one; and on my returning, Morgan was gone. Sessions was just going out, my father said,

"Here is my son." I went round the counter and shewed him the seals; be fixed upon one, and said, if we sent it to his mother, Mrs. Pratt, America-square, they would decide on them and left; I directly after missed a gold watch which we should sell for 40 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you candles lighted - A. No; it was not dark - it was lighter than twi-light; I am certain of them.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. On the 20th of July, I apprehended Sessions at Lambeth-marsh.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. On the 20th of July, I apprehended Morgan in Stangate-street.

MR. WILLIAM PRATT . I live at No. 1, America-square. The prisoners do not live at my house, nor is Mrs. Pratt their mother - I never saw them before.

MORGAN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

SESSIONS - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing but not privately . - Transported for Seven Years . - See Page 461.

Reference Number: t18240916-133

1375. WALTER NEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , two wooden chests, value 2 s., and 38 lbs. of tea, value 48 l. , the goods of Benjamin Clayton .

GEORGE FINCH . I am a servant to Benjamin Clayton , who live at Barnet, and is a farmer . On the 2d of September came to town, in one of his carts, and was going home with five chests of tea, which I received from Messrs. Bedwell, of Charter-house-lane, and was to take home to master - the

prisoner came to me on the top of Snow-hill, about twenty minutes to three o'clock, and told me to stop, for he had come from Mr. Bedwell; that I was to deliver him two of the chests, and he would give me two more in exchange; he said, his master had another warehouse in George-yard, Snow-hill - he took out two chests, and took them down George-yard. I waited a quarter of an hour, and as he did not come, I went into a warehouse in the yard, but could not find him - I saw him again next day, and am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What is your master - A. A hay farmer ; but he acts as carrier ; the tea was for Mr. Hopworth - I had an order to fetch it. I found it was an iron warehouse up George-yard - I did not doubt about the prisoner's person at Guild-hall; I only looked at him, and knew him directly.

WILLIAM OAKLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Bedwell and Yates. I delivered five chests of tea, to Finch on the 2d of September, to be delivered for John Hopworth of Barnet, by a written order - we usually sent it by Clayton's cart. I have not seen the tea since; we did not send the prisoner for it.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of September, in Grub-street.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am an officer. Field described two persons to me very minutely; I recollected seeing such persons in St. John-street, watching carts. I went next morning with him, and he identified the prisoner, who was there without his coat; he was desired to put it on, and then he had no doubt of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know that there was placards about, describing the person - A. There was some out after he was taken, offering a reward of 10 l., on conviction. I heard of the reward before I went to take him; I should have gone before, but I waited for Field to come and identify him.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-134

1376. ANNE BISSELL was indicted for stealing on the 25th of May , a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of Mary Hemmings .

MARY HEMMINGS . I am servant to Mr. Harris, of Shee-lane - the prisoner lodged in the same house; I missed a gown on the 25th of May, and found it in pawn, she had access to my room.

THOMAS WILLIAM STAPLES . I am servant to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, Fleet-market; on the 28th of April the prisoner pledged this gown.

GEORGE HANSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found a hundred and six duplicates in her room, one of which was for this gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-135

1377. TIMOTHY CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 21 lbs. of lead, value 3 s. 6 d., the goods of Henry Peto , and fixed to a stable of his .

The property not being fixed to the premises, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240916-136

1378. JOHN DUNCAN and RICHARD BUDD were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of James Tweeddale , from his person .

JAMES TWEEDDALE . On the 28th of August, I was walking up Holborn , and on turning up Fetter-lane , I felt a hand in my pocket; I turned round and saw Duncan with my handkerchief in his hand; he gave it to Budd, who put it under his arm pit. I seized Duncan, he said he had not got it; I seized Budd, and told him to give it up; he said he had not got it, and had never seen the other prisoner. I gave him a twist round, he put up his arms to get from me, and the handkerchief fell from him: I picked it up, and secured them both; a crowd collected, no body would send for a constable, and I conveyed them to the watch-house myself.

DANIEL LECAN . I was crossing from Leather-lane to Fetter-lane, and saw Duncan take a handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket and throw it to Budd, who concealed it under his arm pit; the gentleman turned round and collared both; Budd dropped it, and he picked it up.

DUNCAN - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

BUDD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, having received good characters .

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240916-137

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1379. WILLIAM SPARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th July , at St. Mary, Mattellon alias Whitechapel , one gelding, price 5 l. , the property of Daniel Hewitt .

DANIEL HEWITT . I am a rope-maker , and live in Albion-street, Commercial-road. I had a black pony, with a bald face - it was blind with one eye, and had a wall eye on the near side, and was eleven hands high. I had had him sixteen months. I turned him out at the back of the London-hospital, in an open field , where they are building. I turned him out there on the 18th July, and on the 19th I left him safe at half-past ten o'clock at night, and mis- it next morning about five, and have not found it - it was worth 5 l. I have made all the search possible for it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know the prisoner's brother Thomas - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him on the 16th of this month - A. I was coming by, and he called me. I did not offer to take 5 l. and give up this prosecution; he asked me what my loss was, I said, about 7 l.; he said

"Will you make it up." I said it was gone too far, and left him.

Q. Did you not say,

"If you will give me 5 l. I will make it up," and he said his brother was innocent, and he would have nothing to do with it - A. No; he said his brother was innocent, and his father could give nothing towards it; he called me to him as I was passing, I did not go to him. It was in an open field where there are several ponies.

EDWARD LEHUPE . I am a watchman. My beat is facing this field; between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the night of the 19th July, I was on duty there, and saw the

prisoner - I knew him before personally, and cannot be mistaken in him. I saw him with a black poney - it had a bald face, and was about eleven hands high - it had a full eye and a wall eye; he had a birdle on it, and was leading it - he was in Green-street, three hundred yards from this field, leading it from the field, towards the New-road. I did not speak to him. I did not know whose pony it was, and have not seen it since; when I heard of the prosecutor's loss I told him.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw it before - A. No. It was dark; I put my lantern up, and looked at the poney, so that I could pick it out from a thousand.

Q. Why not speak to him - A. His father and brother are in the habit of buying horses, I did not know but what it might be his.

Q. Why did you notice the poney - A. I knew him to be a suspicious character.

Q. Then why not instantly say

"Where did you get this poney" - A. I knew him well; I did not know whether it might be his or not: I did not speak to him. He came right past me, and I put my light right upon it as it passed by - he never stopped; my light shewed it as plain as possible. I did not know whether it was his or not, but I considered it my duty to take notice of it, in case it should be stolen.

Q. The prisoner's father could keep a poney in the field if he chose - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. What light had you - A. A bull's-eye light, which is a very strong light; the horse brushed me - I was close to it. There is a bar across the road, and he brought the pony on the foot-path; he knew me very well, and saw me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he not time to put it back again before morning, as he saw you. A. He had - when I heard the horse coming, I hid my light, so that he did not see me till he came up; I thought it strange for a horse to come along there, as it is not a public road.

JURY. Q. Which side was the wall eye - A. On the near side.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am an officer of Whitechapel; I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th July, at the Black Dog public-house, Mile-end; I cannot find the poney.

Cross-examined. Q. He was quite publicly about. A. No; he was out of the way; he lives a quarter of a mile off.

COURT. Q. When did you hear of the robbery - A. Two days after - I was looking for him, but could not find him before - I do not know where he lives - he worked with his father; I could not find him there; I only went once, which was to enquire about the horse.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, supposing him to have a good character, and that it was his first offence .

Reference Number: t18240916-138

1380. JOHN ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a gelding, price 10 l. , the property of William Waterhouse .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a farmer, and live at Sutton; on the 10th of December I bought a bay gelding of the prisoner; it was rather a dark bay - I gave him 10 l. for it - I have since shown it to Mr. Waterhouse and Mr. Holloway - I took a receipt for the money - this it (looking at it) read.

"Received of Mr. Cole, 10th December, 1823, 10 l. for a bay horse, by me, J. ENGLISH."

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How near to Hounslow do you live - A. About a mile and a quarter - I had the gelding in my possession a month or more before the receipt was given - I had this and another of him - I paid for it on the day the receipt is dated; they were first lent to me to use, as they were not fit for coach work; I kept them for their use - when I had no further use for them I returned this one, and then he proposed to sell them - the proposition came from him - be fixed 12 guineas on this, and 5 on the other - I only bought this, and used it as occasion required, publicly; I gave a fair price for it; Mr. Waterhouse claimed it about July; I have known the prisoner ten years.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the horse useful to you. - A. Yes, for slow work; I never communicated with Mr. Waterhouse about the sale of the horse.

MR. WILLIAM WATERHOUSE . I carry on business at the Swan with Two Necks as a coach-master; the prisoner was in my employ fourteen or fifteen years - he conducted my business at Hounslow, where I keep from 70 to 100 horses, to forward stages to the west of England; I have stables there for their accommodation; he had no general power or authority from me to dispose of any horses, but has occasionally been directed to sell horses when they were unfit for my work; I have on some occasions fixed a price on them - I always fixed a price on each particular horse, not on a lot; he had no authority to sell any but what I directed and fixed a price for; I saw a gelding in possession of Mr. Cole, and know it to be mine; I never authorized him to sell it, nor did I know that it was sold, till about the middle of June; he had never apprised me of it, or sent the money, to account in any way whatever; I had seen him at least six or eight times between Christmas and June; I sometimes went to Hounslow, and he at times came to town; I never staid any time at Hounslow, and was never at Coles's except when I went to see the gelding - the prisoner lodged in a cottage of mine in my yard at Hounslow.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you no partner - A. No, I have two sons who interfere in my business: they have no share in it. The prisoner was manager at Hounslow; there are six horse-keepers and two blacksmiths under him. I may have been there five or six times between Christmas and June. I did not miss any horse till June. My sons went down when I did not; but very seldom.

Q. Has the prisoner been allowed to take a horse in payment of wages - A. Never. I have his accounts here. I have authorised him to sell horses for hay.

Q. Look at this; is it one of your orders - A. It is; it authorises the sale of a horse for four loads of hay. I think he left me the first or second week in June; every thing was settled between us, except some fixtures, and a small account he had against me. I had information about this horse after that; he claimed, for fixtures and other trifling matters, 22 l. odd., which I have paid.

Q. Look at these papers (producing them) are they not claims existing at present - A. They are not due from me;

I have no knowledge of them. I have paid White several bills for drugs and things which English has brought me. I never saw these before, to my knowledge. Good hay in December was about 1 l. a load. I have seen Mr. J. White lately.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him respecting some hay, which was delivered for this very horse - A. I had not - I recollect finding some very bad hay in my loft at Hounslow. White said he understood I had had some hay for this horse; my answer was, that I knew nothing of any being delivered to me for that horse, but that I had seen some very ordinary hay in my loft, and that on asking the prisoner where it came from, his answer was, that he had bought it of some person from a place called Firmly, and for which hay I paid him 7 l. I told White I had since been informed that no Frimly waggon brought it, but that they believed it had been sent from English's own field. White said he understood hay had been delivered for the horses. I told him I had been informed by a man in my yard, that four or five little one-horse jobs of hay had been brought; but I knew nothing of it myself: but it was from hearsay, not from my own knowledge.

Q. Will you swear that you told White you had only been told of it, not knowing it of your own knowledge - A. I said my man had informed me.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not asked whether you had been informed of it, but whether you told White you had been informed of it - A. I believe I did - I told him I had been told of it.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was the management of the horses entirely in the prisoner's hands? - Yes, I went down five or six times to look over the stock, and see what condition they were in, if fit for work; but they were never all in the stable at once. I never enquired about those which were absent. The prisoner had 1 l. 1 ls. per week, and a house to live in; he frequently came to town for money; and if not it was sent down: he never told me he had sent this gelding to Cole, either to use or any other purpose. I paid him what he claimed after he left me; most of it was for fixtures, which he had bought several years ago in a house of mine. I have looked over his books; there is no account of any money received of Cole, or of hay being received and paid for by this horse. I never told him to swap the horse for hay. I have certain horses, but not this.

COURT. Q. How long is it since this book was in the prisoner's possession - A. I believe he had it up to May last. When horses were unfit for work, it was reported to me generally by the coachman - it was not his duty to report them; there were generally twelve or fifteen extra horses at Hounslow. I never received an account of this horse being disabled either from him or the coachman.

MR. COLE. I gave 10 l. for the horse, not hay.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I have been in the prosecutor's service twenty-four years, during that period I repeatedly sold horses, not only by desire of the prosecutor, but by the direction of his two sons. On the 1st of September, 1823, Mr. Joseph ordered me to sell the horse in question for four loads of hay, which were cut and sent from my place to the prosecutor's stable immediately after; not having immediate use for the horses, I sent them to Mr. Cole, who afterwards bought the horse in question.

JOHN WHITE . I am a grocer; I live at Hounslow; I had some conversation with Mr. William Waterhouse ; he came into my shop on the 16th of this month.

Q. Did he say to you that he had had four or five parcels of hay, but of what quantity of each he did not know. A. He said those words, he said it was for the horse, but for which he did not know; he told me he had received it of his own knowledge.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean to say that he said he had been there, and received it himself - A. No, he said he had received it, and knew it of his own knowledge.

I asked if he knew of his own knowledge that he had received four or five parcels for some horses - No number, nor any particular horse or time was mentioned.

Q. Now on your oath did he not say he had been informed that it came from Frimley - A. He did not, Frimley was not mentioned; my brother and two of my apprentices were present, they are not here. He did not say whatever the hay was, it was paid for.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Mr. Waterhouse come into your shop of his own accord - A. He did; I had heard that the prisoner was in custody. I knew at the time that Cole had horses which where Mr. Waterhouse's

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How did you know that - A. Cole was a friend of mine; I knew he had borrowed them, but do not think I had heard that he had bought them; until since the prisoner has been in prison. Q. At the time of this conversation, you did not know that any horse sold to Cole was in question - A. I did not.

STEPHEN SMITH . I am a labourer, and live at Lambton; I bound some hay for the prisoner last year, in his barn, at his farm. I think it was about Michalmas, and think I bound five or six loads.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it all bound at once - A. No, my son and I were there twice doing it; it was very fine hay. I did not notice the time, and cannot say whether it was before or after Christmas. I bound it on the prisoner's premises, which are about half a mile from the stables.

THOMAS FOREMAN . I was one of the prosecutor's horse keepers, and left in June; some hay was brought to the stables and I took it in; I cannot say where it came from, or where it was; some came in a two wheeled cart, Daniel Folbert brought it. I have lived there three times, and think I left in November.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You left in November, when did you go to live there again - A. The beginning of May.

Q. Can you say whether this hay was bought before you left in November, or after you returned in May - A. I cannot; it was called a job of hay, not a full load.

DANIEL FOLBERT . About the time of Kingston fair, last year, I assisted in unloading some hay which was brought to the prosecutor's stables at Hounslow; it was about a month after Michaelmas, there were two loads, as near as I could guess; I brought it from the prisoner's premises, and delivered it at Mr. Waterhouse's yard, at different times, sometimes in a single horse cart.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see Mr. Waterhouse there

at any of those times - A. No, to the best of my recollection he saw some of it: I did not tell him where it came from - it was very fair hay, and there was a few trusses of cares.

WM. BULMER. I have known the prisoner ever since he has been at Hounslow; he occupies several acres of land of mine; I do not know whether it is grass or arable; it is an enclosure on the heath.

Several witnesses who appeared to the prisoner's character, stated that he had hay on his land, which he himself had grown.

MR. ADOLPHUS called the following witnesses: -

JOHN HOLLOWAY . I saw a bay gelding in possession of Mr. Cole; it was formerly Mr. Waterhouse's; I had known it for several years; it run in the Regent coach, and was kept at Hounslow.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you see it at work. - A. It was working at Coles's last June; I don't think I had seen it before for near twelve months; it was not fast enough for the coach - I am foreman to Mr. Waterhouse.

Q. Do you remember in September eight or nine horses being reported as unserviceable. - A. I remember eight or nine coming to London for sale - this was among them - the prisoner brought them up; I believe he had an interview with Mr. Joseph Waterhouse about them, and this and another were taken back; I do not know that it was for sale.

Q. Do not you know that they were to go for four loads of hay. - A. I do not; Mr. Joseph is the only son who interferes in master's business - they were only unserviceable for the coach.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there any business about the establishment for them but the coaches - A. Yes, they draw corn and other things to Staines. English accompanied the two horses back - he had been repeatedly to Lad-lane to get them back to work on Mr. Waterhouse's farm at Hounslow, and they were sent back; they were at that time working in the Norwich van, and several applications were made for them to be sent, to draw the tares and things from the field.

MR. JOSEPH WATERHOUSE . I am the prosecutor's son. I have been subpoened here on behalf of the prisoner. I remember his bringing a bay gelding to town in September; he wished to take it back to Hounslow to do odd work at my father's farm, and it was to be worked as a stage horse if it was wanted. I did not know of its being sold; it was brought to town to be sold, but he wished to take it back with another, that it might not be sold, as he wanted it for odd work - he never told me that he intended to, or had sold it.

Q. Did he inform you that he had supplied your father with hay, and should take it for the hay - A. He did not. I did not learn that it was sold till after he left my father. My brother interferes very little, and has nothing to do with the Hounslow business, or with buying and selling of horses without my father's authority.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Will you swear that you did not know of a bay mare being charged to him in the accounts - A. I do not know of any mare being charged to him, or his being debited for one. I gave directions for the sale of a bay mare.

Q. Look at this book, whose writing is it - A. It is all in the writing of Mr. Emans, my father's clerk, except the initials at the bottom, which are my father's. I know of no horse being sold to Howe in November last; he has at times had a horse or two, but I cannot speak to periods. I had a conversation with the prisoner about the two horses; I do not recollect putting a value upon them - we do not fix a price, but send them to the Repository for sale.

Q. Did not the prisoner say if four loads of hay could be got for these two horses it would do - A. - I have no recollection of his saying anything of the sort, and have no hesitation in swearing that he did not. I should not have taken four loads for them, as I think them worth 25 l. or 28 l. The one Cole bought was worth 12 l. or 14 l. He never told me that he had disposed of this horse.

Q. Did you ever directly or indirectly empower him to part with it for hay - A. Positively not; it is almost impossible to charge one's recollection; but to the best of my knowledge, I never gave him such instructions.

COURT to MR. COLE. Q. How far from Hounslow was this gelding kept - A. About a mile and a quarter - it was kept in my stables; it has been out in the field for the last two months - the fields join the private road, which is much frequented, and I used it on the public road, five or ten times - I knew that it was the prosecutor's; he said he had no work for it.

MR. WATERHOUSE, SEN. When I wanted horses to be sold, I gave the prisoner directions for it. I have given him orders to sell five or six at least, while he has been with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-139

1381. ROBERT BALL was indicted for that he, on the 14th of August , at St. Clement Danes , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did set fire to a certain house, there situate ,

"then being in the possession of John Fearn ," with intent thereby to injure and defraud Charles Pole , then and there being; one of the subjects of His Majesty, and then being the Treasurer for the time being, of a Society or Partnership, formed and being under the name of the Sun Fire Office Company , against the statute &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omiting the words in italics, and substituting

" Thomas Preston " instead of Charles Pole .

THIRD COUNT, the same as the last, only with intent to injure the said John Fearn .

FOURTH COUNT, the same, only with intent to injure the said John Fearn and Michael Middleton .

FIFTH COUNT, the same, only with intent to injure Henry Dance .

SIXTH COUNT, the same, only with intent to injure William Skeel .

SEVENTH, EIGHTH, NINTH, AND TENTH COUNTS, the same as the first, second, third, and fifth Counts, only, stating the house to be in the possession of the said Henry Dance , and with intent to defraud the said parties respectively.

ELEVENTH, TWELVTH, THIRTEENTH, AND FOURTEENTH

COUNTS, the same as the four last, only stating the house to be in the possession of him, the said Robert Ball .

FIFTEENTH COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words distinguished by inverted Commas.

SIXTEENTH COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, a certain house of John Fearn , there situate, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did set fire to and the said last mentioned house, by such firing as aforesaid, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did burn and consume, against the statute, &c.

SEVENTEENTH COUNT, the same as the last, only substituting Henry Dance for John Fearn .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FEARN . In March last, I lived at No. 97, Strand , in the parish of St. Clement Danes. I paid the rent of the house to Mr. Thomas Preston , of Dean-street, Soho - it is partly let out in lodgings by me. I received the rents, lived and slept there, and do so now. I know the prisoner - in March last, he applied to me to let him have one room on the first floor, to place articles of his own trade in it - he is a builder, carpenter, and bricklayer ; he afterwards occupied the back-room on the third floor instead of the other; and had had that room about five months - he was not to sleep in the house; there was a common lock on the door; he put a padlock on himself, and had the exclusive use of the room. I saw some goods in the room four or months ago; there was woollen clothes and wearing apparel; and articles of his own trade, and carpenters tools. I think myself that all the property in the room then was worth 100 l., or a little more; this was about five months back. I had not seen the room for four months before the fire happened; I then saw these things in it - the fire happened on Saturday, the 14th of August, about ten o'clock at night. On the Thursday previous to that, I told him I wished to have the room to sleep in myself, and he must move his things to another apartment, or take them to his own lodgings. I said I should want it, and wished him to move his things on the Saturday; he said he could not take them to his lodgings. I said I had spare closets in the house, and he might put them there; he said the woollen cloths and things which he had would take up more room than I had, and the moths would get into them. It was at last settled that he should move them into some of the closets; he did not move any. This conversation took place at the Obelisk, in Surry, not on the premises. On Saturday evening, the 14th, I was at home, and saw him there. I went out about a quarter to ten o'clock, and left him there; he had been backwards and forwards for three or four hours in the middle of the day. He had been in the house one or two hours, when I went out at a quarter to ten o'clock. I returned about a quarter past ten: and in consequence of an alarm, went up to his room, and in the recess by the fire-place, was a jean coat on fire, and a sack on fire; the shelves, in the recess, were on fire, and the room full of smoke; one or two fireman, and others, were in the room. I assisted in extinguishing it, by throwing water on it, which people brought; I threw some into the recess near the fire-place. I observed the chimney jam, which is a partition of wood, close to the recess, and forms part of the room; that was burnt; the jean coat hung on a nail on the left hand side of the recess. I saw a sack on the chimney jam; that was nearly consumed; it was suspended from the jam by a bradawl. There were some oil and turpentine cans in the recess; nothing was in them, but I had used some turpentine sometime before, and knew that one was a turpentine can. There was a stone bottle, which appeared to have a mixture of oil and turpentine in the same recess with the cans. The room is about fifteen feet by twelve. I looked into the cupboard, which is in the cross corner, to the fireplace, and found a hat-box there, with smoke in it, and then I saw a waistcoat laying on the shelf, almost entirly consumed by fire; it had burnt the edge of the shelf. There was a loose board reared up from the floor to the edge of the shelf; that board was burnt, by being attached to the wainscoat, and the edge of the shelf. An oil cask was in the cupboard; it appeared to contain oil and turpentine - perhaps about a quart of it. The cupboard floor was covered with pieces of wood, shavings, and pieces of letters and papers, steeped in oil; there were a great many shavings and wood. I saw an apron in the cupboard about half-burnt; a sheet of brown paper was hung at the back of the apron, and partly behind, a pair of fustian trowsers, which hung up; the trowsers appeared to have been dipped in turpentine. The cupboard is on the side of the room near the staircase, and a crack in it was filled up with rag: if that had been left open any person could have seen a light in the cupboard if there had been one.

Q. Did you observe anything on the floor of the room - A. A pair of mahogany doors, which lay on the same side of the room, as the cupboard was scorched with rags, which had been laid on it, dipped in turpentine. There had been fire in the recess on the mahogany door, and the door of the room was blistered all over, but had no fire on it. There was also fire in the cupboard, and on the chimney jam. The four places where I observed fire were completly distinct from each other; a hole was boared in the ceiling of the room, four or five inches wide each way, and the laths exposed: there was a hole in the plaister in the side of the room, about the same size as the other, and the laths exposed.

Q. What was in the room - A. A saw, a few planes, locks, and nails; the mahogany door, one pair of nankeen breeches, and a coat; the value of the whole is about 5 l. That is all that was in the room. Part of the floor was burnt in the recess.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You yourself formerly lived in the Strand - Yes; I was unfortunate, and took the benefit of the Insolvent Act, and lived in the Rules of the Bench. I ceased to reside in the Strand in January. I was liberated in March, and then still lived at No. 97, Strand. This was about five months before the fire. I occupied all the upper part of the house. Wilkinson and Co., who were glass dealers, occupied the lower part of the kitchen; they continued there after I came back, till about two months before the fire. The prisoner did not reside with us; he had no other room, except that the fire was in.

Q. The prisoner had bought the lease of the house and the fixtures for you, had he not - A. No; I stated to my assignees that I had parted with the lease for 50 l.; it is returned in my schedule; it is held for 50 l., but with no assignment.

Q. Had you not sold the fixtures to the prisoner for

25 l. - A. No. I had not parted with my interest in the fixtures.

Q. Look at this receipt - A. It is not my writing; there had been an execution put into my house, Mr. Eddes was the broker employed; he sold the goods under the execution, and the fixtures; that was about five months before the fire. Mr. Preston the landlord did not live in the house. There might be 100 l. worth of goods in the prisoner's room in March.

Q. He is a builder, and without improper motives he would be in possession of oil-cans - A. They were in his possession for that purpose, and had been so for a considerable time.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You took the benefit of the act in March, and returned to No. 97, Strand directly - A. Yes, and it was after that time I had conversation with the prisoner about the room; I have lived there, and received the rents from the lodgers ever since.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not Ball give the receipts for the rent - A. Never; I always gave them. Wilkinson and Co. were to pay 130 l. a year, but never paid anything.

Q. Was it not understood that they were to pay it to the prisoner - A. Yes; because I employed him when I could not act myself to let that apartment to them; he was my agent, and was to receive the money from them if they had paid. Preston was the landlord.

WILLIAM BOND. I now live in Plumbtree-street, Bloomsbury. I work for Mr. Fearn, as a tailor. On the 14th of August I was working for him at No. 97, Strand, in the room over that in which the fire was; I had worked there a fortnight. The prisoner had the back room under where we work, and Miss Davis had the front. I saw the prisoner three times on the afternoon of the fire; he kept his room padlocked; I saw him first about two o'clock in the afternoon; he came up for a pair of pantaloons: he came up again about five o'clock, and staid with us half an hour each time; I cannot say whether he went into his room. He came up into the workshop again about eight, and said,

"Well you are hard at it;" he had no light with him - I asked him to go down and ask Mr. Fearn for some calico - he said he would, and I gave him a bit of brown paper lighted, as he said he must have a light to go down.

Q. Did he ask for the light before or after you desired him to go down - A. After; the paper was about six inches long; he went to the top of the stairs, returned, and said he must have another light, as that had gone out; I then gave him a strip of white breeches cord, about a foot long and two inches wide, twisted it round, and drew it through the candle, to make a sort of candle of it - I lighted it, and gave it to him - he went away, and I saw no more of him that night; he did not return with the calico. When he was gone we heard a rattling on the landing-place below; it was like a chain rattling; I remained at work till nearly twelve o'clock. About half-past ten my shopmate and I were very drowsy; I laid down on the board, and smelt fire and burnt wood - I got off, and looked under the board, thinking the fire was there, but it was not; I wrapped up my work, and was going down stairs: I saw Mr. Wood prizing the prisoner's room door open; I ran and brought up a pail of water: the door was then open. I did not go in, but ran and fetched another pail, handed it up to Wood or Skeel, and saw fire thrown out of the recess by some one.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. At what time did he come up for the pantaloons - A. About two o'clock. He asked for a light when I desired him to go down; that was a little after eight; I asked him to go. Half a pail of water put out all the fire that was in the room when I was there, but I had brought up two full pails before, and Skeel fetched two, and the watchman some. I stumbled and spilled half of my third pail.

ESTHER DAVIS . In August last I lived in the front room third floor of Mr. Fearn's house; the prisoner's room was on the same floor - I have lodged there nearly two years. The door of his room was kept padlocked on the outside. About ten o'clock on this night there was a smell of fire; I opened my door, and saw a light underneath the prisoner's door, and gave an alarm. Wood came up, and tried to break it open with a poker in two or three places before he succeeded; he went down for a pair of pinchers - Skeel came up, and at last they got it open; there was a deal of smoke. The people came up and put it out.

Cross-examined. Q. It was very soon put out - A. Yes.

JOHN WOOD . I lived at Mr. Fearn's at the time of the fire. I am a sculptor, and am Fearn's cousin. I came home about nine o'clock, and about twenty minutes past nine Ball came into Fearn's room, where I was - Mrs. Fearn was there; he spoke to her, and then came in and sat down near to her; she observed what a smell there was of turpentine; he said he had been cleaning his coat, but it was some hours since, and he thought she would not have smelt it; he remained in the room about twenty-five minutes altogether; Fearn came in when he had been there about twenty minutes, and said,

"Aye Ball, are you here non; at this time of night?" he said he had been to the coffee-shop five or six times that day, and had stepped in. Mr. and Mrs. Fearn went out of the room; he remained there, and said he wished he was where I had come from, meaning the Borough, where I work; he then went on the landing-place, and called to Mrs. Fearn to know if Mr. Fearn was gone out - she said he was, but he would return very shortly; he waited on the landing-place a few minutes, and then went up stairs.

Q. Would that lead to his room - A. Yes. He came down in six or seven minutes; I saw him pass the door of the room I was in: he went down stairs. I did not see him again till about two o'clock in the morning. An alarm of fire was given about ten, by Miss Davis; he had then been gone a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - I went up to his room, and saw a light under the door, which was padlocked; I got on my knees to look into the room to see if he was there, and saw fire in the room, and smoke came out. I got a poker from one of the lodgers, and broke it into three pieces in trying to open the door: I went down got some pinchers, and opened it - the two Mr. Skeel's came up with me. On opening the door I saw fire in the corner, and immediately got water up as fast as I could; the smoke was very great indeed. I carried up three or four pails of water myself, and Skeel brought up more; several persons were carrying water. We put the fire out. I perceived that the recess next the

chimney on the left side had been on fire, and several turpentine cans and oil jars there - the jam of the chimney and cupboard were burnt. When I opened the door I saw the jam, and the corner blazing. I saw a tub in the cupboard with a mixture of oil and turpentine; one corner of a wainscot was under the tub, and the other part hung down, and was completely burned. Some paper was in the cupboard dipped in oil, and a bonnet box was smoked in the inside, and appeared to have been washed in turpentine - it was a band-box, made of thin wood and paper. I saw an apron on the left-hand side of the cupboard; the edge of it was burnt, and a pair of trowsers in the cupboard appeared to have been steeped in turpentine. A large piece of wood stood up edgeways in the cupboard - it was burnt, if it set fire to at the bottom, it would lead to the shelf; some rag was found, steeped in turpentine. The property in the room was worth about 6 l.; there was a mahogany door, a saw, planes, and locks - there was no furniture, nor any woollen cloth or clothes, except an old coat. The cupboard shelf was burnt at the edge.

JAMES SKEEL . I am a boot-maker, and live in the Strand. I was in Mr. Fearne's house on this night - an alarm was given; I went up stairs, and broke open the door - the room was full of smoke; some water was brought to Wood; I took it from him, and threw it in, as I could see the chimney jam a light, though I could not enter the room for smoke; I threw it on the jam. I saw apparently a bundle of rags, or something nailed or hung on something against the wall, by the jam; they were a light also. I threw in one or two pails of water; the smoke then cleared away a little; we went in, and threw more water, and put the fire out. I looked into the closet; there was no fire in there then, but several marks of fire having been there - the cupboard door was shut - I saw some shavings; a painting brush was in the tub. I observed the room door - some of the stuff out of this tub appeared to have been smeared over it with the brush; I felt it, and it was quite wet, and came off on my hand.

RICHARD SKEEL . I was with my brother, and saw the jam on fire - his account is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. You mean the paint was scratched off - A. No, I saw it in flames.

CHARLES BANNISTER . I belong to the Westminster Fire Office. On the night of the fire, about ten o'clock, I was in the Strand, heard an alarm, and instantly fetched my engine - I got back in about ten minutes, and went up into the room - the fire was then out - I went to the recess, and found it very hot; part of it was burnt - two shelves in the recess were burnt; the chimney jam was burnt a good deal - I have it here (producing it;) the jam was about half a foot from the grate; there had been no fire in the grate, if there had been, an accident could not have caused the jam to be burnt. I saw the floor of the room in the recess; two boards of it were burnt; here is one of them - there had been fire in the cupboard; one place could not have set fire to the other; they were quite distinct. The things in the room were worth 4 l. or 5 l. Here are the remains of the trowsers, coat, and waistcoat; they were quite wet with turpentine, as if they had been put into it. A mixture of oil and turpentine was in the cask.

THOMAS EVANS , proved the service of a notice upon the prisoner and Mr. Harmer, his attorney, to produce a certain policy of insurance effected on the 30th of March, 1824, of fixtures &c. in his dwelling-house, No. 97, Strand; also the lease of the house and the assignment of the same.

(Notice read.)

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am a clerk in the Sun Fire Office, Craig's-court, Charing-cross. On the 30th of March application was made to me for the insurance of property on a house No. 97, Strand - I produce the order which was given; the figures are in the hand-writing of the person who made the insurance; the premium was paid at the time. The policy is made out by me; I enter it in a book, which I produce. Lawson enters the policies after they are signed by the directors.

JOHN FEARN (looking at the order,) I know the prisoner's hand-writing; the figures in this order are his. Here are 100, 150, and 300 all in his writing, but under the 100, which is struck out, are 100 again - they are not his.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You only speak to figures - A. No; there is no letters of his. I speak particularly to the figures 3 and 1, and the 150, and all the noughts - the noughts are very particular.

Q. Do you mean because one is not like the other - A. Yes. He did not usually make his figures one like another. He is a particularly bad writer, but I know his style of writing.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is it your belief that they are his writing - A. Yes.

CHARLES TAYLOR re-examined. All the paper except the figures are either printed or in my writing -

" Robert Ball , 97, Strand, dealer in wearing apparel," is written by me. I put

"Dealer" as I received those instructions; the

"30th of March" is not my writing.

Q. Now turn to the entry in your book - A. Here is the entrybook of the office made from the instructions - (reads) -

" Robert Ball , No. 97, Strand, dealer in wearing apparel, fixtures 100 l., household goods, &c. 50 l., stock in trade 300 l." When the policy is made out it is sent for the director's signature, and the names of the directors signing is entered by Lawson.

JAMES LAWSON . I am a clerk in the Sun Fire Office. I produce a book in which is an entry of this policy; I made the entry from the policy. Mr. Charles Pole is a merchant and Treasurer to the office.

The particulars of the entry were here read - it was in the name of Robert Ball , No. 97, Strand; the insurance was effected as follows: - on the fixtures in his dwelling-house there situate 100 l., household goods, wearing apparel, &c. 50 l. stock in trade 300 l. Total 450 l.

JAMES SKEEL re-examined. I lodge in the house, and sleep with my brother William, who occupies the lower part of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, it is unfortunate for any one to be accused of such a charge, even if found innocent, and if found guilty I am aware of the consequences, and therefore hope you will give the utmost consideration to the circumstances in which I am placed. The articles found in my room are articles used in my business; oil-cans and paint pots are common to every one who gets their living as I do - I brought nothing into the house clandestinely; what goods

I took out I took openly. It is not likely a man should insure six or eight months ago, and the goods of that nature, that keeping them would lessen their value - that I should keep them four months, and go to the office, and say,

"Such a place is burnt, and I have so much goods in it;" the first question would be,

"Where is a voucher - did you sell none of them?" would any office believe I could keep them six months, and never sell any. Mr. Fearn says I had 100 l. worth of goods, but I paid pawnbrokers 120 l. for these goods, and I sold them. The business I then intended to follow did not suit me, and when I had sold them I declined it. Now, about the things being sprinkled with turpentine; there were pots, jars, and all things; it was a lumber room, and it was not likely I should put broad cloth and clothes there when once moved out - but when they were moved, I put these things on; the reason I moved my goods from the premises was, that on the first night Mr. Fearn occupied the house I lost a cloth measuring fifteen yards; I sold the rest for fear I should lose more; I think the suspicion attached to their removal will be worn out in a great measure by the time I had them; I never pretended to have more - and therefore should never be such a fool as to attempt to impose on the Company, by saying I had such goods; the fire was discovered to have happened near the fire-place, and of all parts of the house that was the most unlikely to succeed; it is built of brick, and there is a small nook containing ironmongery, and this it is said I set on fire, when the other parts were timber; I was not in the room for two hours before it broke out, and the article described to be entirely consumed is a sack - is that a likely thing to be used for such a purpose? then a jean jacket is partly burnt - that paper was dipped in oil and mixed with shavings, and brown paper hung up; is it likely the waistscoat should be nearly consumed, and the paper at the back of it not touched, nor at all singed. Now it remains for me to account why the articles in the closet were burnt. - I built two houses in Bermondsey - and one evening a few shavings caught fire on the floor - to put it out I threw what first came in my way on it, and among other things, this apron and some other woollen things; a board is brought here from the closet - is it likely that it should be so much burnt, and the oil and paper among it not destroyed? - the fact is, they were brought from this house, and put into the closet; the oil and shavings, which are so easily ignited, are not burnt, and yet other things not so easily set fire to, are almost wholly burnt: I know nothing of the hole in the cupboard being stuffed up; the light was seen under the door, and any carpenter knows how to stop up the space under a door; although so careful in stopping the hole with rag, yet it seems I was so negligent as to leave the door where every one must see unstopped: when I got the light I went openly to the men who were going up and down stairs - I did not get a phosphorous box; they say they heard a chain jingle - when the asp of the padlock drops it will chink; I have been afflicted with rheumatism, and having left my stick in the room, I went in with this light for my stick: I blowed the candle out, and threw it towards the fire-place; if I had stooped to put it down, it would have inconvenienced me; in the fire-place were bits of cloth, which I had used to clean my clothes with, by rubbing them with turpentine: I used to sweep the pieces of cloth in, and seldom cleaned the fireplace - they being there, the fire might have ignited them, and the jam being only half a foot off, it could easily catch fire, and then set fire to the nook; but I positively state I had no such intention. As to the door beeing splashed, I had been in the habit of rubbing my paint brushes against it to get the oil off, when I wanted to clean them; the door and walls were rubbed in this way, and the brick work too - there was no wood work affixed to the jam, so that if it had burnt, the house could not have burnt; I now submit my case to your consideration, and declaring my innocence, I rely on your verdict.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a tailor, and live in New-court, Strand; I have known the prisoner nine months - I have seen him with cloth and wearing apparel at No. 97, Strand - there was one hundred and sixty yards of cloth and camblet, and a considerable quantity of wearing apparel taken out of pledge - he paid about 80 l. to get them out - they were worth considerably more.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What is he - A. A carpenter and builder - I saw the property there in March - I worked with Mr. Fearn in the house till April - I never saw any property there after March.

Q. Do you know whether he had pawned them or bought the duplicates of them. - A. I cannot tell.

CHARLES MAYNARD . I am a pawn-broker, and live in Clare-street, Clare-market. On the evening of the 24th of March, the prisoner redeemed some property at our house - I believe he had bought the tickets - he paid 38 l. 9 s 6 d; on the following day he redeemed property to the amount of 2 l. 2 s, making 40 l. 1 ls 6 d with interest; he took out one end of cloth for 7 l.; I should think it worth 14 l. or 15 l.; they were pawned in the name of Matthews, the last witness; he is the man who pawned them.

Q. Then the prisoner had bought the duplicates - A. I suppose so; I cannot state from memory what the transactions were, and I have not got my book here - I recollect his redeeming a large quantity of property - wearing apparel and cloth.

- VAUGHN. I am a pawn-broker, and live in St. Martin's-lane; I do not know the prisoner; I delivered some goods to Matthews on the 25th of March.

JOHN MATTHEWS re-examined. I was never employed by the prisoner to redeem goods from the witness's shop; I fetched some from Cameron's.

JOHN LOWE . I am a plasterer, and know the prisoner; I was at Bermondsey last March, and saw him putting some old clothes on a fire; but he had them in his hand afterwards, and said he might want them for something - they were partly burnt.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not help to load some pieces of wood and rubbish into Lowe's cart, and send it of by Matthews - A. Yes; there were oil jars, paint pots, a band-box with papers in it - it was about the latter end of March - I do not know where they went to.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I conveyed these things to No. 97, Strand; he moved them from Bermondsey, being obliged to clear the place.

GUILTY.

Reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges .

Reference Number: t18240916-140

London Cases, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin ,

1382. JOSEPH WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a coat, value 10 s., a waistcoat, value 10 s., and a pair of pantaloons, value 20 s. , the goods of Anthony Pattison .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-141

1383. FRANCIS JORDAN was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Strongly recommended to mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-142

1384. EDWARD SWIFT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Nesbit , his master .

THOMAS NESBIT . I keep a chop-house in St. Martin-le-grand ; the prisoner was my indoor porter - he had no no salary, but was paid by the inmates. On the 16th of July he absconded, and about twelve o'clock I missed some articles; he was taken on the 19th; the officer produced a handkerchief which was taken from the bar; I believe it to be his first offence - and he is very penitent.

ISAAC LEE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in the London-road, and found the handkerchief in his pocket - I asked why he robbed his master - he said it served him right, for he was going to turn him away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18240916-143

1385. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a pair of window sashes, value 25 s. , the goods of John Turner .

ROBERT JENKINS . I am foreman to Mr. John Turner , who has some unfinished houses in New North-buildings . On the 3d of August I saw the prisoner bring two sashes out of one of the houses - they are glazed; I took him into custody; he said his master sent him for them - I asked who his master was; he began to equivocate, and said somebody else sent him for them - he is a stranger; I know them to be master's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was so much intoxicated, I do not know what passed.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-144

1386. JAMES FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one hundred and twenty-one sheets of demy paper, value 6 s., and thirty-two sheets of printed paper, value 2 s. , the goods of Frederick Gye and Giles Balne , his masters .

WILLIAM ELLIS . I work for Messrs. Frederick Gye and Giles Balne , printers , Gracechurch-street ; the prisoner was their pressman . On the 8th of September I found three lots of paper in the cellar, and told Mr. Baker, who went and looked at it - I brought it up.

WILLIAM DUNN . I a compositor in the prosecutors' service; this paper was brought up stairs and put into the cellar again; I watched by the privies in the cellar - about seven o'clock in the evening I heard the prisoner coming down - he is lame - he passed me, went into the privies, came out, then went to the coal cellar, where the paper was, brought it out, went into the privy again, undressed, and I suppose was concealing it about him; I followed him into the street, brought him back, and found fifty-one sheets of white and thirty-two of printed paper in his pocket, his hat, and under his coat.

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I took him into custody, and found some paper round his body.

MR. GILES BALNE . I am in partnership with Mr. Frederick Gye ; we never allow men to take away paper; I believe this is his first offence.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-145

1387. WILLIAM WHITING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a truck, value 30 s. , the goods of Charles Bates .

AGNES BATES . I am the wife of Charles Bates - we live in Borough-road. On the 10th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner hired a truck of me for three hours, and said he was going to draw hardware in it - I said he must leave 1 s. deposit; he said he had not got one, but would go home and fetch one; that he lived at No. 15, Clifford-street, Blackfriars-road, and his name was Roberts. Seeing him a decent man I said,

"Never mind, bring it when you return the truck; it is 3 d. an hour." He took it away, and said he would return it in three hours.

JOHN BOSWORTH. I am a labourer, and live in Gray's Inn lane. On the 10th of November, between three and four o'clock, I was crossing Smithfield, and saw the prisoner by the Bear and Ragged Staff, public-house, with a truck, and asked him if it was for sale - he said he did not know, but he would call the person who belonged to it, and while I was speaking to him a man came up, of whom I bought it, in the prisoner's presence, for 15 s. The officer came up and took the prisoner.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB. I am an officer. I was in Smith-field, and in consequence of information I went up to this truck; the prisoner and Bosworth came out of the public-house; I asked the prisoner if the truck belonged to him - he said it did: Bosworth said he had just bought it; I said I must take the prisoner into custody, and at that moment the man who I understood had received the money, ran out of the public-house, and escaped. Bates claimed the truck - his name was on it.

Prisoner's Defence. The man who received the money persuaded me to borrow it for him.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-146

NEW COURT. (4th Day.)

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1388. THOMAS SNELLING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Ann Mann .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-147

389. JOHN BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on

the 30th of August , three silver spoons, value 14 s., and a pair of buckles, value 10 s. , the goods of Ann James .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-148

1390. ELIZA LOUISA EADY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , a shawl, value 10 s.; a scarf, value 2 l.; a veil, value 19 s., and a piece of net, value 1 ls. , the goods of Martha Clark .

MARTHA CLARKE . The prisoner lodged with me - she came on the 10th of June, and on the 15th I went out at two o'clock in the afternoon; I left her and my daughter Charlotte Reed, in the one pair back room: the prisoner was to wait for me to go with her. I returned about ten minutes before three o'clock, and missed her, and the articles stated in the indictment. I afterwards went to Knightsbridge, but did not see her till the 17th of July, when I met her in the Park, and asked her to give me my things, and I would not hurt her; she said she did not know what I meant. I then asked her to walk with me to Piccadilly; she made some objections, and then ran away - I overtook her, and she walked with me a little way; I took her to the Curd and Whey house, and waited for an officer. I asked her if she would give me the things or the duplicates - she said she did not know what I meant - I told her the things were worth 4 l.; she said she had not a quarter of that money; she had laid them in the drawer shortly before I went out, and pretended to lock the drawer, and gave me the key, but I found the bottom drawer was not locked. I took my gloves out, and then locked them - when I came back they had been wrenched open.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICH. Q. Where had the prisoner lodged before she came to you - A. With Mr. Shedding. I did not request her to come and lodge at my house - there was no application made by my daughter to her - my daughter did not ask me if she might come. I went out about two o'clock, and when I returned I was to go with her to meet some gentleman in Regent-street; I do not know his name; it was not Mr. Withnal. I came home about ten minutes before three o'clock. I found the drawer shut, but unlocked. I went to Knightsbridge, and saw Mr. Withnal, and told him to tell her to return my things, and that I would have some hand-bills printed if I could afford it, to have her taken up. I did not want her to give me 4 l., but I said the value of them was 4 l. I did not say at Marlborough-street, nor in the Park, that if she would give me 4 l. I would say no more about it.

CHARLOTTE REED . My mother left me with the prisoner in her house, and she said to me,

"Had you not better go home and see about the child;" she said so several times, and seemed confused, and at last I went - she said,

"I will lock myself in while you are gone;" I said,

"There is no occasion for that." When I went the key was outside the door, and when I returned it was inside.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you go - A. About 20 minutes after two o'clock; I was fetched back by my mother. I knew the prisoner had an appointment, but she was to wait for my mother to return to go.

THOMAS HENRY WITHNAL . I am in the Life Guards. The prisoner was in my company about three o'clock in the afternoon, by appointment, and in the evening I saw Mrs. Clarke, and she made some communication to me. I was to meet the prisoner in the evening and told her - the prisoner knew by that time that Mrs. Clarke had said she would take her up; she had nothing with her but what I had seen her wear for months before that.

MARTHA CLARKE re-examined. Q. What state was the door in when you returned - A. Shut, but not locked; there were others lodgers in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-149

Before Mr. Recorder.

1391. DANIEL MARNEY and EDWARD BRYANT were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s, the goods of Edward William Corry Astley , Esq. , from his person .

EDWARD WILLIAM CORRY ASTLEY , ESQ. On the 7th of September, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in Holywell-street, Strand , and had got about one-third of the way through the street; when I felt a pull at my pocket - I turned round, and saw Bryant with my handkerchief in his hand; Marney was close by him. I seized Bryant by the collar, and he dropt it. Marney remained close by him; it fell between them. An officer came up, and secured both; I picked up the handkerchief, and am quite confident that it is mine; it has my initials on it.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. I was crossing Holywell-street, and saw the prisoners and another person; I watched them; they were all in company together. I saw them follow the prosecutor, and make two attempts at his pocket. I saw Marney take the handkerchief out, and give it to Bryant. Mr. Astley had found it out before I got up to him, and had picked up the handkerchief, I took one of the prisoners and he the other. Their companion escaped.

MARNEY put in a written Defence, stating his total innocence of the crime.

BRYANT'S Defence. I saw the handkerchief lying down, and the gentleman took me. I never saw the other prisoner in my life before.

MARNEY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BRYANT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-150

1392. THOMAS SHIELDS , JOHN AVERY , and GEORGE BATTAMS , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a fixture (i.e.) a copper, value 12 s., belonging to John Haddon , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JOHN EORDHAM . I am a carpenter, and live in Bartholemew-walk, about three quarters of a mile from Mr. Haddon's house, in Winkworth buildings . As I was going to work about twenty minutes before six o'clock, in the morning of Monday, the 16th of August; I saw a man go into Mr. Haddon's house, and two other men stood waiting for him outside. I stood talking to a shopmate of mine, and the man came out of the house again with a copper tied in a brown cloth, and the three went away together. I am positive to the persons of all the prisoners. I think Shields was the one who brought the copper out, he was not in the house more than two minutes; they all went up Baldwin-street

together. I followed after them, but did not raise any alarm; by the time I got half way up the street they were returning without the copper. I did not see were they had disposed of it. I did not speak to them. nor give any information till night. When I left work I then went and enquired who was the landlord of the house, and told the people at the green shop of it, and then went to Mr. Haddon and told him, when the prisoners returned. Avery had the cloth under his arm, which appeared to me to be the same that the copper had been taken away in.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where were you while this was going on - A. I was in the causeway talking to Hook; he is not here. We, each of us, had a load, and did not attempt to stop them. I told my shopmates of the transaction, and the next day I saw Avery and Battams passing my shop, and had them taken up. If I had stop them that morning I must have put down my tools, and might have lost them. I swear that it was a copper; it was not tied so close but I could see that.

PHILLIP PROSSER . I am a warehouseman to Mr. Haddon; I was not in the house till the day after the copper was stolen, and had not seen it. I saw it applied to the place, and it appeared to me as if it had been taken out of that place; the mortar was broken round the edges; it seemed to fit exactly, as if drawn from the brick-work: the house is in Winkworth-building, in the parish St. Leonard, Shoreditch. Baldwin-street is on the other side of the road - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. You had nothing to do with the house - A. I knew there was a copper there, but had never marked it in any way. I saw it applied, and it fitted well into the brick-work; the edge of the copper was white with the plaster.

JOHN HADDON . I am a printer; I had a house in Winkworth-buildings; the copper was in the back kitchen - no person resided at the house at that time: I had left it about six weeks. I had not seen the copper for three weeks or a month. I saw it on the Tuesday or Wednesday after it had been stolen, in the possession of the officer; it is mine to the best of my knowledge: it evidently appeared to have been recently taken from the place; the prisoners are strangers to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you given up this building to any one - A. No, nor assigned it to my one. I did not see it fitted, but every copper would not have fitted the place, because there are some indentures in it, which I had seen.

JOHN SMITH . I am a coppersmith. A person brought this copper to me for sale; I believe it was this, but I could not swear to it: we had some other new ones, but not above one other second-hand one; the officer took away the copper brought by this person; it had the marks of having been fixed in mortar; we had no other so large that appeared to have been fixed; we gave 8 d. per lb. for it: it came to 10 s. I live in Old-street, about two hundred yards from Baldwin-street; it was brought between nine and ten o'clock in the day; I believe Shields to be the man who brought it. I saw him at the office two days after - I could not swear to him, but believe he is the man by his dress; he came by himself.

Cross-examined. Q. By what do you know him - A. I am only speaking to his dress, which was similar to the prisoner Shield's, but with a blue apron on. The copper had the same mark as any second hand copper would have had.

ARABELLA WILKINS . My husband is a coppersmith, and lives in Old-street. I was called on Monday morning about ten o'clock, by the last witness, to purchase the copper - he is my shopman - only one man came with it. I asked Smith if it was fit for use, he said No, it was only old copper; he then weighed it - it was near 16 lbs., but there was a good deal of dirt and soot, which generally adberes to second-hand copper. I paid for 15 lbs. at 8 d per lb. the person gave his address

"Jones, No. 13, Somerset-street. Whitechapel. I gave him a note of the weight - he took the money and left. I saw the prisoners after they were taken up, but do not recollect the person of any of them. Two hundreds yards is the extent of the distance of my house from Baldwin-street.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I am headborough of Shoreditch. I found the copper on Tuesday morning, about half-past eleven o'clock. I was at a public-house, in Teuter-row, City-road, and heard that two men were coming down who had taken the copper. Fordham was with me and pointed out Avery and Battams to me. I told them they were my prisoners, and the charge was about a copper; they said they knew nothing about it. I took them to the watch-house - Shield was not taken till the second examination I went to Mr. Haddon's house, and in the kitchen there was a lid of a copper; the carpenter put the copper into the place, there was a little bend in the top of it, he turned it round, and it fitted exactly.

Cross-examined. Q. The carpenter seemed to understand it very well. - A. Yes; the carpenter was at work, and the prisoner passed his shop, and then he came to me and told me of it: I saw the shopmate of the carpenter about a week ago, and gave him notice that he might be wanted here - he said he did not wish to trouble himself about it.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I apprehended Shields, who came down to the office to see the other prisoners, who had been examined: he had a blue apron on: I think Fordham was gone - but a person there pointed out Shields to me - I took a knife from him: Fordham came to the office on Monday, and told me of it.

Prisoner SHIELDS to FORDHAM. Q. Did you not say at the office, that the person who brought out the copper, had a blue coat and black trowsers - A. Yes, I did.

SHIELDS'S Defence. I was not up at the time - I never saw the two men before.

SHIELDS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

AVERY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

BATTAMS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-151

1393. ELIZABETH SMITH and EDWARD PULLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a handkerchief and stool, value 2 s. , the goods of Francis Baynes .

FRANCIS BAYNES . I live in Mary-le-bone-street, and am an upholsterer . On the 1st of August, Sunday morning, about one o'clock, I was going home, and was perfectly sober, and had the handkerchief round a footstool frame under my arm; I had had a friend with me who had returned

for his key, and I was stopping against a lamp post for him at the corner of Park-street and Oxford-street ; I dozed - which I am very apt to do, and was awoke by Lacey, who had got hold of the male prisoner with my property - he was a stranger to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERCAST. Q. Did you go to the watchhouse after this - A. Yes; they asked me if I ask was intoxicated; I was rather surprised that they should me - I have often been asked that when sober - I am a journeyman upholsterer; my friend had left me about ten minutes; I do not know that I ever fell asleep standing before; I was not intoxicated: we had had three pints of beer, and a small glass of gin and water it might make a little difference - but I was not intoxicated.

JOHN LACEY . I am a patrole. I was visiting my station, and found the watchman of the beat was not about; Harrison was with me; we were resting against a shutter stand; I saw the prosecutor against the lamp post; I saw the prisoner Smith slip the bundle from under his arm; Pullen was with her; she showed it to him - they then walked down Oxford-street together; we followed, and took Pullen with the property in his possession - and Harrison secured Smith; the prosecutor remained asleep; I said,

"What are you doing with that property?" the woman said, his name is William, and he gave it to me to take care of; I said,

"We will go back to William, and hear what he says;" I went and awoke him - he said it was his: Smith said,

"William, do not you know me?" but he would not be persuaded that his name was William.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did he say in the watch-house that he should not give charge of them - A. He said something of the kind; I said,

"Why did you bring them here;" I did not hear him say he could not say that he had not given it to her - he looked very stupid, and has been no in this Court; I was fifteen or twenty yards from them, where there was a gas light.

- HARRISON. I took Smith; I saw her take the property from the prosecutor; they had got about fifty yards when I took her; she said she knew him - that his name was William, and he gave the things to her; he said he never saw her in his life.

SMITH'S Defence. He gave me this bundle.

PULLEN'S Defence. I saw him give it to this young woman, and she gave it me.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

PULLEN - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-152

1394. MARY THOMPSON and AMELIA JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a half-crown, the money of Jonathan Morrison , from his person .

JONATHAN MORRISON . I am a labourer , and live in Wilson-street, Moorfields. On the 1st of August, about ten o'clock at night, I was in Featherstone-street, City-road - I was intoxicated - I had half-a-crown in my breeches pocket; I saw the prisoners in Featherstone-street - they took hold of me one on each side, and said they wanted some gin or some money; I said I did not want to have any thing to do with them; I did not go any where with them - I got rid of them, and went my way - they followed me, and began searching me; they staid two or three minutes, and then went away; I found my pocket turned inside out, and the half-crown gone - I went after them about a hundred yards, and asked them what right they had to rob me - they said it was not them; Thompson ran away, and I after her; Jackson staid; the watchman was near, and took them both: they both searched me - the money was on my right side, and Thompson was on that side.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What did you consider these women to be - A. Women of the town; I had not drank much - I had seen my half-crown at dinner time, but not after.

Prisoner THOMPSON. Q. Did you not first lay hold of me - A. No; I did not speak to her at all; when I was first before the Justice I did not say that she had put her hand into my pocket - I could not swear it.

JOHN COX . I am a watchman; I heard a cry of watch; I went to the spot, and saw a mob; I saw Morrison - I took Thompson; he had hold of her before I came up - I did not notice whether his pocket was turned inside out: he said Thompson had taken half-a-crown from his breeches pocket; I met another watchman, and sent him to take Jackson.

GEORGE GARRAT . I apprehended Jackson, who was standing still: they were searched in my presence, but no half-crown was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-153

1395. SAMUEL ADAMS was indicted for stealing on the 16th of August , 53 lbs. of lead, value 14 s., belonging to William Honeysett , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM HONEYSETT . I live at Dalston. This lead was taken from a house which I was finishing in Dowling-place, Kingsland-road ; I had seen it safe at dusk the day before, and at a quarter past five o'clock next morning, the 16th of August, it was gone, it was taken from the centre gutter, and weighed about 100 lbs.: while I was looking at the building, two watchmen came up to me, and asked if I had lost some lead: I said Yes - they said there was a person in Shoreditch watch-house who had taken some; I went there, and saw the prisoner, and about 53 lbs. of lead - I saw it fitted to the gutter, and it fitted exactly - but it was not all: I could swear to it.

EVAN JONES . I am a watchman of Kingsland-road. This building is about one quarter of a mile from my beat. On the morning of the robbery, about half-past five o'clock, after I had been to the watch-house and left my coat, I met the prisoner in Kingsland-road, about half a mile from the watch-house, going towards London, in a direction from the prosecutor's house, with something in a bag on his shoulder - he was alone: I collared him, and enquired what he had got; he said

"What is that to you" - I took him the watch-house: the bag had some lead in it, which weighed 53 lbs.: the edges were bright, as if fresh cut - it was afterwards claimed by Mr. Honeysett: I saw it placed in the gutter, and it fitted exactly: the prisoner gave no account how he came by it: there was some more lead found that morning; I had seen the prisoner at twelve o'clock, and again at three, with two others, coming from a ditch where some lead was afterwards found.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer; the watchman called

on me with the prisoner - I searched him, and found a knife in his pocket, which appeared to have been cutting lead: he told me that a milk boy was going along, and told him there was a bit of lead, and told him to take it up, which he did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my work about half-past five o'clock in the morning, by the Duchess of York, and saw a milk boy standing by the lead - he said

"Here is some lead which has been here this half hour, take it up, and come along with me to the watch-house." I took it up, and walked a little way; the watchman met me, and took me.

WM. CARPENTER. I live at No. 23, Caroline-place, Kingsland-road and am a fender maker. I have known the prisoner two years; he has worked for me - during that time; my business began between five or six o'clock in the morning; we use lead in our employ - he lives in Queen-square, Hoxton.

EVAN JONES re-examined. Q. Was the place where you took the prisoner in the way from Queen-square to Caroline-place - A. No, it was out of the way - it was a quarter of a mile farther than Queen-square.

ANN ADAMS . I live in Queen-square, Hoxton; my husband is a compositor - my son was at home on that Sunday night, about eleven o'clock: we sleep below, in the front room; the key of the house is hung just inside the door - my son goes to work sometimes at five o'clock in the morning - sometimes before; he sleeps in the upper part of the house - I did not hear him go out in the morning.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I live with my father and mother in Queen-square. I came home on this Sunday night, but I cannot tell at what time; my brother was in bed first. When I came home I let myself in, and asked my mother whether I should fasten the door - she was in her bed-room, but awoke, and answered,

"Yes, they are all in." I had been at Hoxton Academy-chapel, and then went with some young men to take a walk, and then met some young women, and went home with them; but I am certain I got home before twelve o'clock. I awoke the next morning, when my brother was dressing, and asked him what time it was: he looked at the watch, and said it was not five. I cannot tell whether he had been out before; I did not know of his being taken up till Wednesday or Thursday. I think it was my sister who told me, when I enquired on Tuesday morning why he had not come, she said he had slept at his master's. I came home on Tuesday night, they were all in bed: I did not enquire on Wednesday morning, because they were not up when I went out. On Wednesday night I asked where Samuel was; they began to cry, and then told me he had been taken up. I think it was impossible he could have gone out without my seeing him - I had double-locked the door, and put the key in my coat pocket; there are not two keys to the door.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-154

1396. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , two bushels of wheat, value 5 s., and a sack, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Allen .

JOSEPH ALLEN . I am a farmer , and live at Illington - James Grove has the care of my barn; after the prisoner had been before the Magistrate, he sent for me to speak to me; he said he was very sorry for what had happened, and hoped I would forgive him - he said

"It is a bad thing, I ask your pardon, and if money will purchase it I shall be glad to pay it." I said

"What is become of the sack?" he said

"it is very safe - you shall have it back again." He is a brickmaker, and earned 37 s. or 38 s. per week.

JAMES GROVE . I am servant to Mr. Allen; the barn was robbed on Monday night. I had seen it all safe the night before; between two and three bushels of wheat was stolen. I saw the prisoner the same night close to the barn; he appeared asleep - I had seen him about six o'clock in the evening, when I left the barn; it was locked outside, and pinned within - the thief got in at the window, which I found open.

THOMAS G - . On Thursday, the 12th of August. I found a sack in a ditch about two hundred yards from where the prisoner lived; I cannot tell what was in it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Allen came to me, and I said I knew nothing about the robbery - he perhaps might have the sack again.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-155

1397. ROBERT CASWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a carpet, value 20 s. , the goods of Samuel Ames .

SAMUEL AMES . I am an upholsterer , and live at Islington ; this carpet was in the fore part of my premises, which are open in the day time. On Monday, the 16th of August, it was taken away; I had seen it on the Saturday; it was second hand; about five minutes after I missed it, I took the prisoner near Islington turnpike; the carpet was in the road; he was stopped by a crowd, who gave him up to me.

JOHN CARTWRIGHT . I am a pork butcher, and live opposite Mr. Ames's, in Paradise-row, Lower-street, Islington. On Monday, at noon, while I was standing in my shop, I saw a man looking at this carpet as if to purchase it; he looked round as if to see if any person was watching him, and then took it on his shoulder, and walked away; I went and told Mr. Ames; I did not follow him; I had a slight sight of his face as he turned round, but could not swear to his person.

JOHN PUGH . I am porter to Mr. Ames - I heard that the carpet had been taken about a quarter past one o'clock. I ran in the direction Mr. Cartwright told me, and caught sight of the prisoner; when two hundred yards from my master's shop, he was then alone, and had the carpet under his arm; I did not lose sight of him until I stopped him, when I called Stop thief! he dropped it. I am quite sure I saw him drop it; I held him untill my master came up, and told him to take up the carpet and carry it back to the shop, which he did. I had seen it about ten minutes before in the fore court; he said,

"For God sake let me go."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. At the examination, the porter said he could not swear to my person, but he picked up the carpet; there were several persons running.

JOHN PUGH . I never said so; I said he came in contact with several persons, and I stopped him.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-156

1398. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , a watch, value 5 l., a seal, value 15 s., a key, value 4 s., and a gold ring, value 6 s., the goods of Edward Black , from his person ; and JAMES M'CARTHY were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

EDWARD BLACK . I live with Lord Harborough - On the 25th of July, about half past seven o'clock in the morning I was at No. 50, Whitcomb-street ; I had lodged there that night with the prisoner Brown, in a one pair of stairs back room; there was but one bed in the room; I was not acquainted with her before; my master was out of town and I got into company with her in the Haymarket, between eleven and half past eleven o'clock the night before; I was sober, and had a silver watch with me, worth 5 l. or 6 l., with a ribbon, and gold ring seal, and key, worth 15 s. or 16 s. more. I am certain I had it when I went there; I awoke about half past seven, and she was gone, and my watch also, which I had put under the pillow. I did not see James M'Carthy till he was at Queen-square; I saw the watch on Tuesday morning; I made known my loss in the house; I did not know the prisoner's name at the time, but I have no doubt that she is the person; I cannot exactly swear it. I spoke to no other woman in the house but her, the door was locked inside when we went to bed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time did you go there - A. About half-past eleven o'clock. I had nothing to eat nor drink there. I went to sleep soon after, and did not awake till half-past seven. I was sober enough - I had not had two pots of beer, nor any other liquor - I had had half a pint of ale; I was to sleep at my master's stable. I gave her 6 s. When I awoke the door was shut, but not locked, and she was gone. I cannot swear that the prisoner is the person I slept with.

MARY ANN WINSHIP . I live at No. 50, Whitcomb-street. The female prisoner did not live there. I had known her six months, and had seen her at the house several times. I saw her in the prosecutor's company on Sunday night, the 25th July. I am servant in the house. Mrs. Curry keeps the house. I showed them to a bed-room, and left them there. Brown went away about seven o'clock in the morning; I am quite sure she is the person who came with Black; - he went away about half-past seven o'clock, and complained of losing his watch. There was no other person in the house, and no one had been there from the time Brown went till Black complained of his loss. When he came in at night I saw the ribbon of his watch. There was no other person went in or out of the house from the time they came in at night till Brown went away the next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. What, are you servant of all work - A. Yes; there had been visitors in the house in the evening, before they came in. I sleep in the three-pair of stairs, and Mrs. Curry in the back parlour. I opened the house just before seven o'clock, and saw Brown go out. We shut up between eleven and twelve. There is no other door to the room. I have seen M'Carthy before, but not on that day. They have been to our house together before.

THOMAS GLASCOT . I am a watch and clockmaker, and live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster. About six o'clock on Monday afternoon, the 26th of July, M'Carthy offered me a valuable silver watch for sale; I do not think it had any appendages but a ribbon; he wanted five sovereigns for it; I told him I did not want it, and did not ask how he came by it. I have not the smallest doubt of his person; he was then in his regimental dress, as a drummer. I saw him in custody next morning, and was positive of him. I afterwards saw this watch at the Police-office, and have no doubt of its being the same.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster. On the 26th of July, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, M'Carthy came to my shop, and gave my son a watch. My son asked me to look at it; I asked what he wanted; he said 3 l. I said whose property is it? he said it was his own. I said I knew it could not be his own, it was stolen property. I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him. The watch was produced at Queen-square, and sworn to by Black. It is worth seven guineas and a half, or 8 l.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 26th of July I took in a seal in pawn for 7 s. of M'Carthy, about two o'clock. I have seen the prisoners together. They have often been in our shop.

HARRIOT FULLENER. I have a house in Fullner's-row, Westminster. The two prisoners lived in a room in my house together for about six weeks.

GEORGE POPLE . I am a constable. I took the woman on Tuesday morning, the 27th, and asked if she knew M'Carthy, the drummer; she said she did not. I asked where she lived; she said she would show me, and took me to several places. I searched her, and found twelve duplicates; one of them was for M'Carthy's Waterloo medal. I showed Brown to M'Carthy, and asked him if he knew her - they both said they did not know each other. She had a gown on, and when M'Carthy was searched at the Hoop and Grapes, public-house a piece of this gown was in his pocket, and in her box another.

BROWN'S Defence. I never saw the prosecutor on Sunday night at all.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

M'CARTHY - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-157

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1399. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a necklace, value 7 s., the goods of Daniel Gross , from the person of Amelia Gross , spinster .

ELIZA UNDERWOOD . I am servant to Daniel Gross , a publican , who lives in Virginia-row, Bethnal-green . On the 6th of September, I was near Mr. Isaacson's shop , with Mr. Gross's little daughter , Amelia - that shop is near my master's - Wilmore was with me. I saw the prisoner

come and take the beads from the baby's neck; he did not undo the snap, but broke the ribbon. He gave them to another man, who was two or three yards from him, and said,

"Here Sam!" they then walked away together; I went across, and took hold of him, and said he had the beads; he said he had not; I said he had given them to the other man - he said he would go back to him and see. I would not let him go, or he would have run away.

SUSANNAH WILMORE . I am twelve years old. I was with Underwood, near Mr. Isaacson's shop. I took the prisoner's hand off the child's neck - he had the heads in his hand. I saw him give them to the other man, who ran away.

JOHN ISAACSON . I am a Staffordshire dealer. On the evening of the 6th of September these two girls came to my shop, with a child in their arms - they had not left the shop more than a minute before I heard a screaming. I came out, and saw they had got hold of the prisoner's coat, and said he had taken off the child's beads, and gave them to a man who ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-158

1453. WILLIAM NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , two seals, value 2 l., a key, value 5 s., and a ring, value 20 s., the goods of John Middleditch , from his person .

JOHN MIDDLEDITCH . I was in Great Prescot-street on the 22d of August, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, walking with my wife; the prisoner came up suddenly - and gave me a sort of pinch; he darted from me. I missed my seals and ring from my watch, I followed, and cried Stop thief! three men followed him from the corner and ran after him; there was some communication between them, but I could not see what it was. I pursued him through several streets, and at last secured him. I have not found the property.

Prisoner. I was stopped by another person in Chamber-street - Witness. He was stopped by another person, but we were all close together. He made great resistance at first, and endeavoured to get away. I should have lost him, and been worn out with struggling if a patrol had not come up. I am certain he is the same person.

WILLIAM TURNER . Last Monday week I saw the prisoner make a snatch at the last witness's fob; he crossed close by me, but I did not follow him.

RICHARD SKINNER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody in Red-Lion-street - I took him to the watch-house; he said he knew nothing at all about it. He went quiet enough with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going out in an American ship. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and as I was running in Chamber-street a man put out his hand, and stopped me, and said I was the man. I said if I was the man I would go with him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-159

1401. THOMAS HOUSE and EDWARD DIXEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

JAMES WRIGHT . I am a brushmaker, and live in Berkley-street, Clerkenwell . On the 20th of August, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was in my first floor room, and saw the prisoners coming down the street - I saw Dixey walk behind a gentleman, take up his pocket, and take his handkerchief - he gave it to House. I ran down stairs, and cried Stop them! but they were both gone. In about ten minutes I saw them come down the street again, and try the pocket of another gentleman; I ran down stairs immediately, and cried Stop thief! they ran down St. John's-lane. I collared Dixey, and gave him to my son, and then followed House.

MATTHEW NEWMAN . I searched the prisoner House in the watch-house, and a handkerchief was taken from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-160

1402. THOMAS HOUSE and EDWARD DIXEY were again indicted for stealing on the 20th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

JAMES WRIGHT , I saw the prisoners about twenty-five minutes after nine o'clock pick a gentleman's pocket opposite my window; Dixey took out this handkerchief, and gave it to House; I ran down and followed them, and a gentleman was coming up Poppin's-alley to meet House; Dixey had been taken before - they were taken within six minutes of the time they took it.

MATTHEW NEWMAN . These boys were brought into the watch-house. I searched them, and found nothing but these two handkerchiefs.

SUSANNAH WRIGHT . I am the wife of the first witness. I saw the prisoners take up the gentleman's coat pocket, and take out the handkerchief; they were taken up momentarily. I have no doubt of their being the boys - it was the straw coloured handkerchief.

Prisoner DIXEY. Mrs. Wright said at the office it was the red handkerchief - Witness. No; I said it was the straw coloured one.

HOUSE - GUILTY . Aged 15. DIXEY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Two Months and Twice Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240916-161

1403. JOHN QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a watch, value 5 s. , the goods of William Beetham .

WILLIAM BEETHAM . I live in Austin's-buildings, Hackney . On the 17th of August, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I left my watch in my bedroom, over the mantle-piece - the prisoner was there at the time; he came to buy a pair of shoes. I returned about twelve at night, but did not miss it till next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Stoke Newington. On the 17th of August, about eleven or twelve or twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought this watch to my shop.

THOMAS PECK . I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-162

1404. JOHN MEMORY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , three sixpences, and a shilling , the monies of George Barber .

GEORGE BARBER . On the 6th of September, I was in my shop in Great Chapel-street, Westminster ; I went into the parlour, and while there, heard a footstep; I came

into the shop, and saw the prisoner behind the counter; I asked what he had been doing, he then threw three sixpences and one shilling from his hand, and begged for mercy.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not hear the prisoner striking the shilling on the counter - A. No.

Q. He did not speak about a jacket, or ask to purchase any thing - A. I did not charge him at first with taking a half crown piece. I sell jackets, but none was shown to him; he talked about one afterwards, I told him I would take him to Queen-square; he dropped three sixpences and the shilling. I saw him searched, and 7 l. 9 s. 6 d. was found on him. I have seen him at my shop purchasing before; I am positive that no conversation passed about his buying a jacket.

GEORGE POPLE . I am a constable of Queen-square - I took the prisoner and searched him, and found six sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and 9 s. 6 d. in silver on him; he did not state that he had gone behind the counter to pick up his money.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the Broadway and saw a jacket marked 9 s. 6 d., and went into the shop to buy it; I knocked on the counter with a shilling; it dropped at the end of the counter, and I then saw half a crown on the floor; this gentleman came and accused me of taking money from the till.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-163

1405. ELIZA COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a tea spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of John Varney .

JOHN VARNEY . I am a baker , and live at Somerstown . On the morning of the 12th of August, I was coming into my house, I found the prisoner who came and paid me 7 s.; when I went out there were two tea spoons in the back parlour; when I returned they were gone, and they have not been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-164

1406. JAMES JERRON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a half sovereign, four shillings and eight pence , the monies of John Basham .

JOHN BASHAM . I am a butcher , and live in Wardour-street . On Saturday, the 4th of September, the prisoner came into my shop about six o'clock; he asked me several questions; I cut him one pound and a quarter of mutton chops, and he desired me to cut off the fat, because his master was a curious cove; he said he lived with Doctor Parson ; he then asked me for something else, and told me to send a note; I sent a leg of lamb and the chops by my boy; the prisoner went with him, and in a quarter of an hour the prisoner returned, and said I was to put paid on the note, and send change of a sovereign.

CHARLES WILSON . The prisoner came to my master's shop, and my master gave me change to take to his master; at the corner of Wardour-street, he asked if I had got a bit of paper; he went into a fishmonger's shop and got a bit, and said

"Put the money in here, for my master is a gentleman, and would not take money out of my hand;" as we were going towards Portland-street, he said,

"I have a great mind to get it now;" I said what? he said,

"My coat it is at the tailor's," and then he ran away; I cried Stop thief! and he was taken.

HENRY BATES . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; I stopped him, and he put some money into my hand, wrapped in a piece of paper; I did not know what was in it, but I found a half sovereign, 4 s., and 8 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and saw a young woman at Doctor Parson 's door, and she asked me to go of an errand for her, and she would give me sixpence, As we were going along, I saw a boy, who the last witness said had struck him; I went to hit him, and then he cried Stop thief!

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-165

1407. THOMAS CRAVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , eighteen yards of lace, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Nathaniel Norton .

NATHANIEL NORTON . I keep a shop in Aylesbury-street . On Tuesday, the 31st of August, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked for some ribbon; I served him, and saw him putting something into his pantaloons; he then asked for some more ribbon - and while I turned to get it, he was endeavouring to put some lace into his pockets; he then tried to run away - I ran after him - he was taken into my shop, and a person who was there said she had picked up a card of lace.

HARRIOT RENNETT. I lodge at Mr. Norton's. I saw the prisoner in the shop, and saw Mr. Norton go out very fast after him - I went into the shop, and saw a card of lace lying by the door - I took it up and laid it on the counter; in a short time the officer brought the prisoner back; I had seen it in the window in the morning - I am certain as to his person.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-166

1408. CHARLES HOLYWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a saw, value 6 s., two planes, value 2 s., and a stock and twelve bits, value 7 s. the goods of John West .

JOHN WEST . I am a carpenter , and live in Strutton ground: the prisoner and his father worked for me; I lost a saw and some planes within the month of August.

JAMES BARNES . I am a pawnbroker: I have a saw pledged by the prisoner on the 23d of August; on the 29th a stock; and some hits, and two planes on the 30th, they were all brought by him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240916-167

1400. CHARLES HOLYWELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a watch, value 10 s., two shirts, value 10 s., a pair of trowsers, value 1 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Jordan .

ROBERT JORDAN . I am apprentice to Mr. West . On the morning of the 6th of September, a left a metal watch, a pair of trowsers, and a handkerchief in my box in my room - I returned at seven o'clock in the evening, and missed them - the prisoner was gone then.

JAMES BARNES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pledged this watch at our shop on Monday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work on Monday, and they were all out; the door was open; a number of carts stood there, and persons were coming in all day; I went in the evening to have a pint of beer, and a man asked me to go and pledge a watch for him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-168

1410. CHARLES GURCHIN and WALLACE LITTLETON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , thirteen gingerbread lumps, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Bailey .

ELIZABETH BAILEY . I am the wife of William Bailey . These gingerbread lamps were lying on our counter on the afternoon of the 13th of August; I did not see them taken, but they were brought back to the shop, and I knew them to be ours.

ANGELIANA BERTRAUM. On the 13th of August I saw the prisoners, and watched them as far as King-street, Seven-dials ; I there saw Gurchin go into the shop, and bring out the gingerbread; I ran and took him; he dropped it on my feet - Littleton ran away.

THOMAS ROBINS . I was with Beratram, and saw the prisoners; I followed Littleton, and took him.

GURCHIN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined for Fourteen Days and Whipped .

LITTLETON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-169

1411. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a shift, value 2 s.; three spoons, value 1 s.; a pocket, value 6 d.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a frill, value 6 d., a cap, value 6 d.; and a piece of lace, value 2 d. , the goods of Sarah Hartley .

SARAH HARTLEY . I am housemaid to Mr. Howel, of Acton . These things are my property; I saw them safe about three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, on the 1st of September, hanging in the orchard to dry; I saw them at the office next day.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am constable of Acton. On the morning of the 2d of September I was called up to take charge of the prisoner by the watchman; he had a bundle of wet linen; he said he would suffer himself to be cut into quarters before any thing should be taken from him; we were obliged to throw him on the ground before we could get it from him.

JOHN PALMER . I am a watchman. About one or two o'clock on the morning of the 2d of September, I met the prisoner about three hundred yards from Mr. Howel's orchard; he was loaded with a quantity of fruit and this bundle of wet linen; we had a great difficulty in securing him.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-170

1412. ROBERT CLAKE and JAMES WARREN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a hat, value 4 s. , the goods of William Mallett .

WILLIAM MALLETT . I live in Shoreditch , and am a hatmaker - this hat has my private mark upon it; it was hanging at my door at five o'clock on the 20th of August.

LUCY MALLETT . I am the wife of the last witness. At half past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a little boy take the hat from the door. I went forward, and saw him run down Magpye-alley; and when he got to Blossom-street he threw it away. I saw another boy taken, but he was not the one who took it.

GEORGE LAZARUS . I am thirteen years old. On the night of the 20th of August, I was near Magpye-alley, and saw the two prisoners standing together; I saw Clarke give Warren a kind of push, and then he went to Norton Falgate, to Mr. Mallet's shop, and snatched the hat: they both ran down Magpye-alley. I saw Clarke give Warren the hat. Mr. Mallett came out, and Warren dropped the hat in Blossom-street. I have known the boys for some time.

CLARKE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

WARREN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-171

1413. JEREMIAH CANE and EDWARD BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a scarf, value 5 s., and a shawl, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Robson .

JOHN WYLD . I am a haberdasher, I live in Rathbone-place. On the 20th of August the prisoner Bryan came to my shop; I followed him to the door, and the prisoner Cane joined him. Bryan then went into another haberdasher's shop and staid a few minutes - then came out; they joined again, and when they got to Well-street Cane took off his hat and Bryan took something from his apron and put it into the hat. I, with some assistance, took them into custody - and from Cane's hat I took this scarf and shawl.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen them before - A. I had seen Bryan, but not Cane.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Richard Robson , who lives at the corner of Berners-street ; this scarf and shawl are his - the scarf has been in the shop ever since I have been there; we had seen it, and missed it on the 20th of August - the shawl had come in with some others a few days before.

Cross-examined. Q. On what day did you miss these things - A. On the day the boys were seen in the street - there is no private mark upon them; it was on a paper which is rubbed off. I do not believe you will find ten scarfs in London of this sort.

JAMES GRIFFITH . I am an officer, and took the prisoners in charge.

CANE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-172

1414. THOMAS COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , 11 lbs. of cheese, value 6 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Staggles .

HANNAH RAY . I assist Mrs. Elizabeth Staggles in her chandlers-shop: last Saturday week I was putting up her shutters, and the prisoner came by me, put his hand in, took the cheese, and ran off - I pursued him, and called,

"Stop the man with the cheese;" the watchman stopped him - he dropped it, and the watchmen picked it up.

WILLIAM COOK . I am the watchman - I stopt him, and took up the cheese which he dropped.

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-173

1415. ELIZABETH WHITTINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a table-cloth, value 4 l. , the goods of William Allcroft .

EDWARD PIGEON. I am a waiter at the King of Denmark public house - I saw the prisoner in the tap-room on the 13th of September: about nine o'clock in the morning; I was sent out by my master, about ten o'clock, and did not come home till about five, and then heard that a table-cloth had been missing - I know nothing more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-174

1416. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , two coach glasses, value 5 s., and six leather braces, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Edges .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-175

1417. JOHN WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a sack, value 1 s., and 88 lbs. of fat, value 1 l. , the goods of John Hinxman and William Barge .

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable of St. Sepulchre. On the 2d of September, I saw the prisoner with another man, the prisoner had a sack of fat on his shoulder. I followed them up Sharpe's-alley - they rested under the gateway, and seemed to look to see if any one was following them. I saw the prisoner assist the other up with the sack - they went into White-horse-alley. I then stopped the other with the sack, and took hold of the prisoner, who struggled so, I was obliged to let the other go.

JAMES WHEATLEY . I am carman to Messrs. Large and Hinxman. On the 2d of September, I had a cart and horse, with seven sacks of fat, in Smithfield - I missed one of them. I received some information, and Taylor showed it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man asked me to help him up with a load, which I did - he rather forced his conversation upon me, and as we were walking together the constable came and took me; he kicked me very much, and said he would cut holes in my head with his staff.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-176

1418. HENRY OAKLEY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a sheet, value 2 s., two blankets, value 8 s.; a quilt, value 2 s., and an iron, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Cox , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS COX . I am a watchman , and live in Snow'srents . I let a room to the prisoner and his wife - she went away three days before him; they locked the door, and left the window open - they came in May, and were there about five weeks.

MARY DAVIS . The prisoner gave me a quilt, and two blankets to pledge at Neat.

LEONARD NEAT . I am a pawnbroker. I do not rememtaking these things in, but it appears by the ticket that I did; they were pledged on the 1st and on the 5th of June.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-177

1419. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , fourteen phials, value 2 s. , the goods of William Skinner .

JOHN THOMAS COLEMAN . I live with Mr. William Skinner . On Wednesday, the 8th of September, I sent the prisoner into the shop - his pockets projected very much; there had been thirty-three vials on the counter; when he had been gone about five minutes I missed eleven of them. I went and told an officer to watch him.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I received information, and followed the prisoner. I saw him leave a bottle of medicine, and then he went to Portpool-lane, to an old iron shop, and put fourteen phials on the counter; he said his mother was ill, and had sent him to sell the phials. I then went in and told him he had brought them from Mr. Skinner's; he then cried, and said he would take them back.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-178

1420. SARAH SQUIBB was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a counterpane, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Parr .

SARAH PARR. I am the wife of Joseph Parr - we live in Seven Dials . I missed my counterpane from the yard of No. 28 , with some other things, which I had put there about eight o'clock.

JAMES RUSSELL . I am a nephew of the last witness. Between eight and nine o'clock on the morning of the 28th of August, I saw the prisoner come out of the passage, and pass the door - my father told me to run after her; I did, and she had the counterpane, which she said she had taken through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in great distress, and have no friends nor relations in town.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-179

1421. GEORGE APPLEBY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , two live tame ducks, price 2 s.; a live tame fowl, price 1 s.; and a live tame pigeon, price 1 s. , the property of Charles Mason .

CHARLES MASON . I live in Piccadilly. I missed some ducks, and found the prisoner with one duck, one fowl, and a pigeon, sitting on a heap of mould, about three-quarters of a mile from our farm. He said he had bought them the night before on the road. The fowl was not plucked.

JAMES NICHOLS . I am in the employ of Mr. Mason. I saw the ducks all safe on the 14th of July in the duck-house at Copper Mead Farm, Edgware-road . There were three ducks, one drake, and forty fowls, and next morning I missed two ducks, a fowl, and a pigeon, which had been all safe the night before, except the pigeon. I saw no more of them till my master brought them back.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the duck and fowl on the road the over-night; I found the pigeon.

GUILTY , Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-180

FIFTH DAY, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1422. WILLIAM DAWSON was indicted for stealing on the 13th of September , at St. Andrew; Holborn , in the dwelling house of Alexander Sinclair Gordon , his master ,

thirty-eight silver spoons, value 14 l.; eight silver forks, value 4 l.; and a coat, value 1 l. , his property.

ALEXANDER SINCLAIR GORDON , Esq. I live in Ely Place , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, in the County of Middlesex. The prisoner was my footman, and general servant . On the 13th of April, I was sitting at dinner with my brother; who, being an invalid, invariably has pudding for dinner, and a desert spoon is laid to him only. The prisoner was in the room; I thought I would have some pudding, which I seldom take. I called for a desert spoon; instead of which he brought a tea-spoon; I said,

"Is there no desert-spoons in the house - what do you mean by this?" He went out of the room, and returned in four or five minutes, and laid a spoon on the table; which upon looking at, I discovered not to be ours; it belonged to Dr. Tweedy. I said,

"Hallo! what is all this? what have you done with the plate?" he immediately bolted out of the door without his hat, and ran off. I did not see him again till last Monday fortnight, when I found him at the sign of the Exeter Arms public-house. I had advertised him, and taken every step to find him. The moment he left, I examined, and missed plate to the amount of 20 or 30 l. at least. I have found most of it in pawn. I had given the plate into his care, when he came into my service.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. I believe Ely-place is extra parochial - A. It is considered so; we pay for lighting, paving, &c. ourselves, but we consider ourselves in St. Andrew's parish. They call on us occasionally for particular rates; we are exempted as belonging to the Bishop's Palace; Ely-place and Thaves-inn are both in the the same situation; we pay no poor-rates. The prisoner was about a year and a half in my service.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, pawn-broker, Snow-hill. On the 21st of February the prisoner pawned two spoons for 22 s.; on the 27th, eight spoons for 2 l. 0 s. 2 d.; on the 23d, two spoons for 10 s.; on the 25th, twelve spoons for 7 l.; also eight spoons and six forks for 6 l. 14 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you positive of his person - A. Yes. On shop is about four minutes walk from Mr. Gordon's. No single spoon is worth 40 s.

JOSEPH LLOYD . I am apprentice to Mr. Guest, pawnbroker, Fleet Market. I have two desert-spoons pawned on the 3d of April, by a woman.

JOHN FLOWER . I am shop-man to Mr. Cottrell of Shoe-lane. On the 28th of February, three table-spoons, four forks, and two tea-spoons, were pawned for 2 l. 10 s. in the name of Gregory. I did not take them in, the person who did, has left. On the 6th of March, four more were pawned for 30 s.

JOSHUA MORTIMER . I am shop-man to Messrs Gray and Co. On the 5th of March, a coat was pawned for 12 s. in the name of John Dawson . I cannot swear to the prisoner.

BROWN EDWARDS. I am an officer. On the 15th of April I searched the prisoner's bedstead in the pantry at Mr. Gordon's and in a drawer under it, found the duplicates of this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-181

1423. THOMAS HANNAM was indicted for stealing on the 6th of September , at St. Luke , ten sovereigns, the monies of Edward Scott , his master , in his dwelling house .

EDWARD SCOTT . I am a grocer , and live in Bath-street, City-road, in the parish of St. Luke . The prisoner was employed by me for two or three hours every day as a labourer . In consequence of missing money, I marked some sovereigns, half-sovereigns, and silver, amounting to 25 l. and put it into a box on my bed-room table, on the 6th of September, about seven o'clock in the morning. He had no business up stairs. I set Brooks to watch, and about half-past ten o'clock the prisoner was taken into custody.

HENRY BROOKS. I live next door to Mr. Scott. I concealed myself under his kitchen-stairs to watch about ten o'clock, and about half-past ten o'clock I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, down the kitchen-stairs into the yard, he began whistling very loud; he then came to the back door, and seemed listening; he then pulled off his apron and shoes and made off up stairs, I slipped out of the closet, and stood against the kitchen window. He came down to fetch his shoes from the yard, and I laid hold of him, and fetched an officer who searched him.

WILLIAM THISSEETON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner in the presence of Brooks and Scott. I found two sovereigns in his waistcoat pocket. I asked Mr. Scott to describe them before he saw them; he said there was a dot against the first figure in the date.

EDWARD SCOTT . These sovereigns are mine, and are part of the 25 l., I only missed two. I have a mark on them.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. He had an opportunity of taking them all? - A. Certainly. He was about twelve days in my service.

COURT. Q. Had he an opportunity of going up stairs twice, and taking a sovereign each time? - A. That is impossible; he came about seven o'clock in the morning; I was in the shop with him all the time, and kept my eye upon him all the morning; he was not out of my sight till he went down stairs, and in five minutes he was taken. My box was not locked.

Prisoner's Defence. (written.) No one can feel more contrition for an improper act than I do. I merely beg to represent, that I was never before guilty of such an act. I lived four years with Mr. Roper, a surgeon of Bunhill-row. I had 8 s. a week, which I always delivered to my mother, who is a widow.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by prosecutor and jury .

Reference Number: t18240916-182

1424. ROBERT SAMUEL WHITEMAN was indicted for stealing from and out of a letter in the General Post Office, in which he was employed, a half sovereign , the property of Ely Barry .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-183

1425. ROBERT SAMUEL WHITEMAN was indicted for stealing from and out of a letter in the General

Post Office, in which he was employed, a half sovereign , the property of Ely Barry .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18240916-184

1424. JAMES BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , at Ealing , otherwise Zealing, a gelding, price 20 l. , the property of John Rolfe .

SECOND COUNT stating it to be the property of James Rolfe .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ROLFE . I am the son of James Rolfe , and live at Wattleton Farm, Beaconsfield. On the 7th of September I had a bay gelding for which I gave 20 l. I was called up about one o'clock in the morning, and went to the meadow where my horse was placed overnight. I found the gate of the meadow broken, and the horse gone. I immediately went home, saddled a horse, and started instantly in pursuit of it. I took the London road, and came up with the prisoner on Ealing Common, 17 miles from Beaconsfield; he was riding my bay gelding, and leading a black poney; mine was the largest horse of the two. This was about half-past three o'clock; I had started from Beaconsfield at two; I had rode very hard all the way: the knees of my breeches were left unbuttoned in my hurry of dressing. I asked him if he was going to London; he said he was. I asked where he came from; he said from below Birmingham. He seemed to look a good deal at the knees of my breeches not being buttoned, and noticed me. He then began to say that he had not had the horses long in his possession; that a gentleman on an iron-grey horse put them into his hand. I asked where he was going to take them; he said to the sign of the Nag's Head, in Oxford Street. I had not told him that one of them was mine, as I wished to keep him in conversation until somebody came to assist me. He drew on one side of the road, and observed that he taken some beer at Uxbridge which did not agree with him, and he must get off. He jumped off the horse: I wheeled round and caught him by the collar. He struggled a good deal. I told him he had got my horse; he being on the ground, got me off the saddle; I continued to struggle with him, I was obliged to loose him, and while I was recovering my seat, he mounted the black pony and went off at full speed. I followed, and when he got about two hundred yards. I caught him by the collar. I drove him into Acton; he then turned to the left up a bye road. I caught him by the tail of his coat, and should have pulled him off the horse, but the tail gave way; his coat came off in my hands. He went off again at full speed, and got into the turnpike road again. I kept close to him all the way; I caught him by the collar about two hundred yards from Acton; he instantly dismounted and jumped over a hedge into a field; I got off my horse and caught him about forty or fifty yards off; and gave him in charge to the watchman of Acton. I am certain the gelding he was riding is mine, it is now at home. I bought it in August.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Do you live with your father? - A. I do. The horse works in his business, and eats his corn; but I bought it with my money, intending to sell it. It is mine.

Q. When you got up in the night did you see a parcel of horses running about the street - A. No; the man who called me said there were horses running about. My horse was too heavy to leap, and not likely to attempt it; if he did he might break the gate.

Q. Is it not likely if he heard horses about that he would jump over after them - A. He was not likely to leave the horses in the field which he was accustomed to. When I came up with the prisoner, he was going at a jog trot.

Q. Did he not say he was to have 7 s. for taking them the sign of the Nagg's Head public-house. - A. No. When I seized him, it was evident that I was going to take him into custody.

Q. Did he not tell you that if you enquired at the turnpike, you would find he had come through alone? - He said nothing of the sort in my presence. He said he did not know the man who gave him the horses.

RICHARD FISHER . I live at Mr. Rolfe's, and take care of the horses; on the evening of the 6th of September about seven o'clock, I put eight horses into my masters close; this bay gelding was one of them. About two o'clock the next morning, I went to the close, seven horses were there, but the bay gelding was missing; the gate was broken in two in the middle at the top bar; it was locked the night before. There is a high hedge all round the field.

Cross-examined. Q. The top bar was broken; if an awkward beast tried to get over, he was very likely to break it? - A. Yes. I saw the gelding again next day; it was brought home. Beaconsfield is on the Birmingham road.

JOHN POCOCK . I live at Beaconsfield. Mr. Rolfe lives about a quarter of a mile from the town. On Monday, the 6th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the White Horse public-house, in Beaconsfield; he had a basket full of something. I am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. Never. I don't know whether it was Monday or Tuesday, but it was on the 6th.

JAMES GODDARD . I live at Beaconsfield. On the 6th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in a meadow belonging to Mr. Hall of Beaconsfield; it was not much after seven o'clock; he was about half-a-mile from Mr. Rolfe's farm, and had a basket with him; I saw a bridle-rein hanging out of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there a foot-path in the field? - A. No. I am positive he is the man. I drank with him the same night.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable and took him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say if you enquired at the turnpike, you would find he came through alone? - A. No; he said a man employed him to take the horse and pony to the Tagg's or Nagg's Head public-house, he did not know which, and he was to have 7 s. for it. That he had never been in London but once, which was about four years ago. There is such a parish as Ealing or Zealing in Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Birmingham to town. I rode from Oxford to Wickham; the coachman

went on and left me there. I came on four or five miles in a cart, and then went and had some beer; it was seven or eight o'clock. I went on; a post-chaise overtook me, and I rode to Uxbridge - walked on about four miles by a hay cart; a gentleman overtook me, and we fell into conversation. I said I was a horse-dealer; he said he wanted to buy a horse; I asked him where he lived, and I would bring him one; he gave me his card. He left me, and up came a man with three horses, and asked me to take them on with the cart. I said I did not belong to the cart, but that man did; he said he would treat me with a pot of beer, and the man took some with me. He gave me 7 s. at the public-house door, leaving the two horses with me, and went on on an iron-grey one, and in about half an hour the prosecutor came up and asked about the horses, and when I got down he went to catch hold of me, and when he took me into custody, the watchman came; I said if they would let me stop outside the door, I would shew them the parties who could prove it when they came by.

JAMES CLARK . I am a carpenter and builder, and live at No. 5, Gloster-place, Vauxhall-walk. On the 6th of September I was coming from Uxbridge towards town, and overtook the prisoner; I believe he is the man; he was walking alongside a hay cart. I did not know him before. I got into conversation with him; he said he was a horse-dealer; I said I wanted to buy a horse, but was in no particular hurry. I gave him my card, and kept with him till he came to the toll-bar; he had no horse with him then. They called to a man to open the bar, but I walked on, and stopped at a public-house at Ealing, I think it was called the Green-man; and while I was in the room, the prisoner came up to the house; he took some beer out to a man who was there with two horses, and rode another; they had some conversation.

Q. Did you go out to see what sort of horses they were? - No; it was not my business. I was at the door, and had some porter with them there. I heard the man say he wanted the horses sent to town, and saw him pull out a red bag, and give the prisoner some money; the prisoner took the two horses. I walked on and saw no more.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the prisoner an old acquaintance? - A. I never saw him in my life before or since. He said he was coming to London, but did not say where.

Q. When you saw him with two horses, did you not say,

"You may as well let me ride one?" - A. No; I am not fond of riding bare-backed horses. I should know the man again who gave him the horses. They were talking together before I went to the door; but the moment he got the horses, he finished the beer and rode off. I had no further conversation with him. The other man went in the same direction. I have not seen the prisoner since until to-day. I gave him my card, and said I wanted a horse about thirteen hands high; and if he should have one, I would see it. The prisoner was by the side of the hay cart, and the driver on the top of it. I am a master builder. I wanted a horse to draw old materials. I had a cart and horse last year, and sold it in October, as it was a bad one; and was without one after that. I gave him a written card which I had about me.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is this the card you gave him? - A. (looking at it) It is my writing. I forgot to tell you, that the prisoner, when the man gave him the horses, told me he was coming to the Nagg's Head, Oxford-street.

COURT. Q. Did you not say a few minutes ago, that you did not speak to the prisoner after he got the horses? - A. I said not a moment after. I had the beer in my hand when the gentleman rode off; he then said he was going to the Nagg's-head; I wished him good bye, and walked on; he told me it was the Nagg's-head. When I first saw him, he was about a mile and a half from Uxbridge; he was then walking by the side of the cart. A man was laying down in the cart; he is not the man who gave the prisoner the horses. I walked with him by the side of the cart, about a mile; he had no horse then. I was in the tap-room of the public-house; he came into the passage; the gentleman was at the door, and did not come in. The prisoner came and asked me to come and have some beer with them; they were drinking at the door. They had been in conversation (before I came to them) about taking the horses to town; the man on horseback said,

"Very well then, it is all settled; and I now give them up to you." He then pulled out a bag, and gave him some money; I did not see how much.

Q. Had either of the two horses saddles on? - A. I do not know.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18240916-185

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1425. JOHN HUNTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Barrett Solomons , about ten o'clock in the forenoon of the 25th of August , at St. John, at Hackney , ( Rosa the wife of the said Barrett Solomons therein being,) and stealing therein two desert spoons, value 7 s. his property.

ELIZABETH SPRATLEY . I am servant to Mr. Barrett Solomons, who lives in Dalston Place , Hackney. On the 25th of August, about a quarter before ten o'clock in the forenoon, I was up in the back bed room with my mistress, whose name is Rosa. I heard Harrison, my fellow-servant, scream out. I went to the front room, looked out of the window, and saw her in the front garden holding the prisoner by the tail of his coat. I ran down immediately, but he had then escaped and got into the street. I ran after him, crying

"Stop thief!" until I lost sight of him. I then waited until two men, who pursued, brought him back, and in consequence of what Harrison said, I asked him where the spoons were? he said he had not got any. I returned home and searched the cupboard; two desert spoons were gone; I saw them taken from him at the watch-house; they were up the sleeves of his coat. There is a front garden to the house. The street door was latched, but not locked. I am sure it was latched ten minutes before, when I went up stairs with my mistress.

ELIZABETH HARRISON . I am a servant to the prosecutor. I was sweeping the parlour, and heard, as I thought, the rattling of spoons. I looked round to the parlour door, and saw the prisoner on the second stair. I went and seized him by the collar, and asked him what he wanted? he said he had come to do a job. I asked, what job? He said he had seen my fellow-servant, and she told him to go up stairs, and that his master was waiting outside. He went out of the

street door, which was open, and seeing the gate open, I rushed by him and shut it, and held it fast. He tried to escape over the railing, I seized by the tail of his coat. He then struck me over the left side of my face with his fist. I then called for assistance; he escaped over the rails; my fellow-servant then came to my assistance. The cupboard the spoons were in is in the passage, by the side of the parlour door. I had been in the parlour about ten minutes. The street door was shut then I am sure, and nobody came in, to my knowledge, after I saw it shut. He must have opened the front gate also, for my fellow-servant had come in five minutes before, while I was in the parlour, and she shut it. I opened the door to let her in, but that was not the front door. The prisoner came in at the side door; that was also shut, but has a latch outside, and he went out at the side door; it opens into the washouse. There is a door which shuts the passage from the washouse, and he came in there. He came first into the washouse, and then in at this door; the washouse door was open.

ELIZABETH SPRATLEY re-examined. I had been out to the coach-office, and came in about ten minutes before the alarm was given. I came in at the front door, and am positive that the side door was shut. I shut the garden gate, and tried it after me. As I came in from the coach-office, I passed the prisoner, he was on the opposite side; I did not speak to him.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a labourer. I was in the next yard to the prosecutor's, and heard the servants call out. I opened the gate, went out, and saw the prisoner just getting clear of the railing. I pursued and took him. I put him in the cage.

JOHN ADAMAN . I am patrol of St. John's, at Hackney. Dalston Place is in that parish. I received the prisoner in charge from Taylor, and found two silver spoons concealed in his coat sleeve; I gave them to Garva.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable. I came to the watch-house after the prisoner was searched. Adaman gave me the spoons, which I have had ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH HARRISON . I know the spoons to be my master's by a bruise; they are worth 7 s.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I was walking down Hackney in search of work, a man came up with a knife in his hand, and said if I did not stop he would run it into me. I picked up the spoons in a ditch, and throw myself upon the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18240916-186

Before Mr. Justice Littledate.

1426. GEORGE HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , at St. Pancras , a coat, value 30 s. the goods of John Richards ; a coat, value 1 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 8 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a shirt, value 4 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of William Cartwright , in the dwelling house of the said John Richards .

MARY RICHARDS . I am the wife of John Richards , we live in Rayleigh Street, in the parish of St. Pancras . The prisoner came to lodge with us on Tuesday night, the 31st of August and left on Saturday morning, the 2nd of September about seven o'clock. My husband had gone out about a quarter to six o'clock. Before the prisoner went out, I heard a noise in the room where he lodged, like a box being broken open. I got up, and went into the front parlour, and waited there until the prisoner came down stairs. I saw him at the foor of the stairs, with a large bundle in his hand, and asked him what it was; he said it was a bundle which he had brought with him the night before. I said he had brought none on the night before, for I had met him in the passage, and gave him a light and he had none. I took the bundle out of his hand, and on his turning to go out, I saw my lodger's waistcoat in his pocket; his name is Cartwright; he slept in the same room. I bolted the street door to prevent his going out. He went up into his own room, and I saw him take out of his pocket, Cartwright's handkerchief, waistcoat, and a pair of blue stockings; and he had Cartwright's trowsers on over his own; I saw him take them off. I went next door and got two young men to my assistance. There was two coats and a shirt in the bundle. One coat belonged to my husband, and all the other things to Cartwright, who had lodged nearly five years with us. I know his things; he had slept there, and gone out at half past six o'clock. I looked at his box, and found the lock broken open. I went for an officer, and gave the prisoner in charge with the property. My husband's coat had been in Cartwright's box. I had washed his linen several times and knew it well, and the coat.

Prisoner. Q. When I took the lodging did I not refer you to persons who knew me? - A. He referred me to his uncle, but we did not enquire till the day of the robbery. The property was in a box, which has a moulding round the edge of the lid; I believe it is called a lipping, which came about half an inch over. He made no particular resistance; he ran up stairs when I bolted the door. I saw the waistcoat hanging out of his pocket, and saw him take it out; also the handkerchief and stockings.

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT . I am a tailor and have lodged in Richard's house nearly five years. On the morning of the 2nd of September, I went out about half past six, and left the prisoner in bed; he slept in my room. I had a box there, it was locked on the Tuesday night; I did not try it afterwards. I had left a coat, trowsers, shirt, waistcoat, handkerchief, and stockings in it; and a coat of Richards's, which I had made for him: he did not want it, and so it was left in my box.

BENJAMIN PARRETT . I am constable of St. Pancras. The prosecutor's house is in that parish. On the 2nd of September, about seven o'clock, I was fetched and saw the prosecutrix who gave me this bundle, containing two coats, a pair of trowsers, a waistcoat, shirt, neck-handkerchief, and stockings. I have had it ever since, and now produce it in the same state in which I received it. I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

MARY RICHARDS re-examined. It is the bundle I gave him; all the things were in it then. Some were in his pocket, when I stopped him. I locked them all in the box on Tuesday morning, when the prisoner came. I had the key of the box in my possession.

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT . These things are mine, and are worth 35 s. Richards' coat is quite new, and is worth 30 s. I had not been to the box after Monday.

Prisoner's Defence. It was extreme distress, and I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18240916-187

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1427. WILLIAM TERRY was indicted for stealing on the 29th of July , a watch, value 2 l., the property of John Bell , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BELL . I live in Elm-street, Gray's-inn-lane , and am a clock-maker . The prisoner was my apprentice . On the 30th of July, I missed a watch: I saw it safe on the evening of the 28th I am certain, and think that it hung in my bed-room. I did not always wear it. He went out on Thursday evening, the 29th, and did not return at all. I found him at the watch-house on Saturday the 31st.

WILLIAM CREED . I am a pawn-broker, and live in Gray's-inn-lane. On the 30th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to redeem some articles, and pawned a watch for 20 s.; it is worth 30 s. We asked him if it was his own; he said it was.

GEORGE STRIPLING . I am house-man at Eagle-street watch-house. Between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 31st of July, Mrs. Bell gave the prisoner into my charge. I was going to search him; but he pulled off his shoe and gave me the duplicate of this watch, pawned in the name of Richard Thomas .

WILLIAM GREEN . That is the duplicate I gave him.

(Property produced and sworn to.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-188

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1428. WILLIAM WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a bag, value 1 d. and 14 sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Wild , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH WILD . I am a pipe-maker , and live in Featherstone-street, City Road . The prisoner is my son ; my object is to curb him from bad habits. On the 30th of August he assisted me in moving furniture from one room to the other. I went into the back parlour, and saw him with some paper in his hand; he went out into the street. I did not miss this money myself, but my wife said something to me. I went out and found him in Smithfield. I ran after him and caught him in Long-lane, and took a bag from his pocket, containing 13 sovereigns and 12 s. 6 d. I knew that some money was laid by for rent. I know the bag, but cannot say what was in it, as my wife takes money from it as well as me; she is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-189

1429. JOHN BONNIFACE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling house of John Rew , at St. George the Martyr , on the night of the 14th of July , and stealing a coat, value 3 l. his property; a pair of breeches, value 30 s. and a pair of drawers, value 2 s. the property of John Hardy .

JOHN HARDY . I am coachman to Mr. John Rew , who lives in Brunswick-square; his property was at the stables in Grenville Mews , about twenty-five yards from the house. There is a room above, where I sleep. I was at the stables about half past nine o'clock, on the 14th of July, and missed this property from my room. I had seen it safe between twelve and one: I had left the stables between eight and nine o'clock that night, and locked the door, and the room door; I had the keys in my pocket. The window shutter and the bed-room window were left open; the window below was shut. It was rather dark when I returned, it being a tempestuous night. I might distinguish a man's features without a light. No locks were broken.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. The property might be taken any time between twelve and nine o'clock. - A. If they had broken in. I left the window open when I went out; it was then light. The coat cost 10 l. I had worn it a year. The stable has no connexion with master's dwelling house. My sleeping in the stables is not considered as part of my wages.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am street-keeper of the Foundling estate. On the morning of the 17th I and Eagan apprehended the prisoner at two o'clock at the corner of Plumber-street, City Road, and took him to the watch-house; he wanted to see the coachman. This stable is in the parish of St. George the Martyr. I afterwards went to Monmouth-street with the prisoner and Eagan, and found a box-coat, a pair of breeches and drawers, and an old coat was with them, which the prisoner claimed.

FRANCIS EAGAN . I went with Cadby to apprehend the prisoner. We took him to the watch-house, and next morning he expressed a wish to see the coachman, who had seen him the night before, and told him, it would be best for him to say how he had disposed of the clothes. The prisoner afterwards took us to No. 9, Monmouth-street, where I found a box-coat, and a pair of breeches and drawers. he volunteered to go with us to point out the shop where the clothes were. It is an old clothes shop.

JOHN NEWBERRY . I keep a clothes shop in Monmouth-street. On the 14th of July, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought a box-coat, a pair of breeches and drawers, to my shop, to sell; he said they were his master's, Mr. Green, 67, Southamptonrow, but his master was going to France, and had given them to him to make money of, to pay his expences on the road, as he was to follow him. I gave him 32 s. for them. He gave his name as James Young .

Cross examined. Q. Had enquiry been made about them at your shop before. - A. I saw nobody till the officers came, and asked if I had bought such things. I said,

"Yes." I gave the full value for them. I never said, the prisoner was not the person who brought them.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only; and not of the burglary .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240916-190

London Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1430. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , a gelding, value 25 l. , the property of Sharrard Hart .

SHARRARD HART. I am a stable-keeper , and live in Coleman-street. On the 12th of July, I sent a gelding to grass at Mrs. Douce's, Colney-hatch . I was informed it was gone, and found it at the Ram-inn, Smithfield, on the 19th of August, and know it to be mine. Hill pointed it out to me.

JOHN MILLER . I live with Mrs. Douce, at Colneyhatch. I saw this gelding safe in the field on a Thursday night: I do not know the day of the month. I saw it at Smithfield four or five weeks after. I know it to be the same.

JOSEPH MARTIN. I am an officer. On the 20th of August, in the afternoon, I was in Smithfield-market about half past five o'clock, and was informed a man was offering a horse for sale, for less than half its value. I turned round, and saw the prisoner with a horse-dealer, and heard the horse-dealer say,

"I will give you all the money you ask for the horse, if you will go with me to the book, and bring some person who knows you." He then said, that a young man lived close by, who knew him, and he would fetch him. He was asked where he got the horse, and said his master sent him to sell it; that his master was George Hodging , Esq. of Islington hall, Hoston. I asked him where Hoston was; he said it was out at the West End of the Town. I said I should take it into my possession, as I thought it was stolen. He then went to fetch the person who knew him. Marchant, my brother officer, watched him. I met him and Marchant in St. John-street, about half-past eight o'clock, and he still gave the same account. I offered to go Islington-hall: but he said nobody knew him there. I locked him up. He was remanded to give him an opportunity of writing to his master, and at the next examination, he said a man, who he had met in the street, was to give him half-a-guinea to sell it. It was advertised, and owned on the 3d of September by Hart.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am an officer. I followed the prisoner. He went into the Ram and put on a long blue coat; he came out, and the hostler collared him in the pig-market, and demanded 1 s. I told him to let him go, and followed him to the Angel public-house at Islington. I then asked him where he was going; he said to Mr. Wilson's, a little farther on. I followed him to Highburybarn. I enquired, and found Mr. Wilson lived there. I rang the bell, and told him to ask what he liked, and instead of asking for Mr. Wilson, he asked for a servant who did not live there.

Prisoner's Defence. The horse was given to me by a man to sell.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-191

1431. SAMUEL alias WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for that at the General Session of the delivery of the Goal of our Lord the King, of Newgate, holden for the City of London, on 5th of December, in the 2d year of His present Majesty's reign, he was tried and convicted on an indictment against him for stealing a watch, value 6 l.; a watch-key, value, 10 s.; and a watch-ribbon, value 6 d. the goods of William Porter, from his person; and was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of his natural life; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 30th of August last, feloniously, without any lawful cause, was at large within that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, called Great Britain, to wit, at the parish of Allhallows Staining, before the expiration of the term for which he was so ordered to be transported, against the statute.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I knew the prisoner about three or four years, and understood that he was convicted here in 1821. I saw him by the Elephant and Castle; I made enquiry, and on the 30th of August I met him in Fenchurch-street, and apprehended him.

SAMUEL DAVIS. I was principal turnkey of Newgate. The prisoner is the man who was tried here in December, 1821, for the offence stated in the indictment I am certain he is the man.

The certificate of the prisoner's conviction and sentence was here put in and read.

(See indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. They have taken me for the wrong man; there are many men like me.

SAMUEL DAVIS re-examined. I know him well; and am certain of him. I was in Court when he was sentenced to be transported for life.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18240916-192

1432. HUMPHREY MARKS , and EMANUEL ALLEN , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value, 6 d.; and two keys, value 6 d., the property of Isaac Hawkins , from his person .

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a turner , and live in Grenville-street, Hatton-garden. On the 18th of July, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was coming from Mile end, and as I crossed the end of Black-horse yard, Whitechapel , a young man bounced suddenly upon me, and snatched my watch, and and ran up the yard as quickly as possible; I immediately followed, calling

"Stop thief!" Two young men followed after him; he turned to go into Petticoat-lane, and they also; and by the time I had got up, the two young men turned and said he was gone round another way into Whitechapel. While I was hesitating, an officer came up with Marks in his hand, but nothing was found on him. Next morning I found both the prisoners at the Mansion-house, and my watch also. I am certain that Marks is the man who snatched it; I never doubted about him; I could not see his face, but he was stouter than the others. There was nobody in the yard but them. I think Allen is one of the two who ran after him. It was dark.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. On the evening of the 18th of July. I was in Petticoat-lane, at the corner of Blue-anchor-yard, I heard a call of

"Stop thief!" Marks immediately ran up, and I stopped him; two others were behind him, and the prosecutor behind them. I took them to the watch-house; returned to the spot in a quarter of an hour, and saw Allen putting something into his breeches pocket. I collared him, and he dropped the watch, and said he had picked it up. The prosecutor said he could not positively swear that Marks was the man who had taken it; but he was the nearest man to him, and the person who ran from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-193

1433. MARTIN BULMER was indicted for stealing on the 6th of September , a gold pin, value 10 s.; the property of Thomas Fox , from his person .

THOMAS FOX. I am a printer . On the 6th of September, about eight o'clock at night, I was at St. Bartholomew

Fair ; the prisoner stood close at my side; I saw him snatch my gold pin out of my shirt, and hand it over to his companion, saying

"Here Jack." I laid hold of him immediately, and asked him to give it me; but did not say what; he said he never saw it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not accuse two or three others of it - A. No. My hands were confined, or I could have hundred him from taking it. I am certain it was him.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-194

1434 MARGARET VARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , a sovereign, of the monies of Richard Kitson , from his person .

RICHARD KITSON . I am a coach-maker , and live in Tothill Street. On the 29th of August, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I fell in with the prisoner at the top of Fleet Market. I had been to meet a friend at Somers Town, between ten and twelve o'clock, but he did not come till one o'clock. I was quite sober. The prisoner enticed me home with her: I said I only wanted to lay down to rest; she said if I gave her 1 s. I should sleep in her room as long as I chose. I gave her a 1 s.: she wanted more, and said she would give 4 d. towards a pint of gin, and was going out for it, but she turned round, and said, she could make more of the room, and I must give her another 1 s. I was going to give her a sovereign by mistake; I returned it to my waistcoat pocket. She said I had better give it to her; and in four or five minutes, she untied my apron, put her hand into my pocket, took the sovereign out, and run down stairs. Another girl came up and said she was gone. I ran part of the way down after her, but heard the cry of murder, and was afraid; the officer came after another girl, in a few minutes, and I told him.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am a watchman - I apprehended the prisoner about seven o'clock in the morning; 1 s. 6 d. was found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. He went to my room and paid me 2 s. I asked what he was going to give me; he said he had no more money. I refused to stop with him, and he said if I did not give the money back, he would swear I had robbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-195

1435. JOHN HOLDSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , a printed book, value 3 d. the goods of John Wayland , from his person .

JOHN WAYLAND . I live with my father at Hampstead. On the 3rd of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Bartholomew Fair ; the officer produced a printed book to me, which was in my pocket an hour before. The prisoner was taken two yards off. I had not noticed him

JOHN GARTON . I am an officer. I was at the fair and saw the prisoner take this book out of the prosecutor's pocket. I immediately seized him, and he dropped it.

JOHN TAYLOR . I saw the prisoner throw the book down, and found two handkerchiefs on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16. Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-196

1436. THOMAS BONNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , a shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Whittle .

MARY WHITTLE . I am the daughter of Thomas Whittle , who is a publican . On the 15th of September, between five and six o'clock in the evening, this shirt was stolen from the yard.

WILLIAM LEGGAT . I am an officer. On the 15th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner about six yards from Whittle's door, with this shirt.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-197

1437. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 21st July , an hydrometer, value 30 s. the goods of Richard Botheroyd .

WILLIAM PASSINGHAM . On the 21st of July, I was at work with the prisoner for Mr. Botheroyd, who lives in Golden-lane . This hydrometer was missed: I followed him to Harbord's shop; he saw me, and ran out; I collared him, and Harbord gave me the hydrometer.

RICHARD HARBORD . I live in Beech-street, Barbican. On 21st July, the prisoner came into my shop between eight and nine at night, and asked me to let him leave a small parcel, and before I gave an answer, he left the shop. He returned for it in a quarter of an hour, and seemed in great confusion; Passingham followed close at his heels, and said,

"What are you going there for?" He said,

"Nothing, sir." I gave the parcel to Passingham; it was an hydrometer.

RICHARD BOTHEROYD . JUN. My father, whose name is Richard, is a publican . This hydrometer is his.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-198

1438. THOMAS VERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , a gelding, value 6 l. , the property of Phillip Dudley .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-199

1439. DANIEL JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a shawl, the goods of Eliza Lawrence , from her person .

The prosecutrix was not in attendance .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-200

1440. HARRIET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , a handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of George Wellfare , from his person .

GEORGE WELLFARE . I am a cowkeeper . On the 17th of September, about half past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-market , and passed several girls at the corner of George-alley. One of them came after me, and said she knew me, and asked me to go into a public house, which I did. The prisoner was there; I gave them some gin, and came out; they wanted me to go home with them; I refused, and crossed over to leave them. I missed my handkerchief, they went into a wine vaults; I followed them and put my hand against the door, and called the watchman.

The prisoner wanted to get out; I would not let her. I then saw her drop my handkerchief.

JOHN FISHBURNE . I am a watchman; the prosecutor said one of the women had robbed him. I did not see the prisoner drop the handkerchief, but I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. He was very tipsy; he called for some liquor, and pulled out a bag of sovereigns. We came out, and went into another house; he then felt in his pocket and said he had been robbed. I never saw the handkerchief till it was picked up.

JOHN FISHBURNE . He was not drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-201

1441. SARAH MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , one pair of sheets, value 3 s.; two towels, value 6 d.; a shawl, value 6 d.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. ; the goods of George Anderson .

ELIZA ANDERSON . I am house-cleaner at the London Institution. On the 19th September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the area with a bundle belonging to my husband, George Anderson . I stopped her with it; it contained the articles stated in the indictment. It had laid, tied up, near the area door.

(Property produced and Sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-202

1442. JOHN MASTERS , JOHN HIGGINS , and JAMES FENN , were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , two hats, value 30 s. the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a hatter , and live in Compton-street, Brunswick-square. On the 7th of September, between seven and nine at night, I missed two hats, which were placed near the door, and between nine and ten, the officer produced them. I had not seen the prisoner about.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Were they finished hats. - A. One was finished, the other was not; I should call one a hat, and the other not.

WILLIAM BIDDELL . I am a hatter, and live in Field-lane. On the 17th of September, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners Fenn and Masters, came to my shop with two hats, one was finished, and the other only wanted ironing; they are both called hats. Fenn asked me to buy them. They produced them, and asked 30 s. for them, which is the trade price; but not knowing the boys, I said

"I will give you 16 s. for them," they went out; Masters then brought them in, and said

"Will you give 18 s.?" I said,

"No." He said,

"then give me 16 s." I then asked how they came by them: he said, they belonged to a boy. I went over for Marchant, who lives opposite. Fenn directly went away. Marchant came over and questioned Masters about them. He said, they belonged to the other boy. I said no doubt they were stolen, for the materials would cost more than what they offered them at. Marchant fetched Whitehead the officer, but just before he came, Higgins came in, and said,

"Will they do?" I said

"The hats?" I asked if they belonged to him. He said,

"Yes." I asked how he came by them. He said

"Very well." I thought that a strange answer, and said,

"Very well." He then turned his conversation, as if he had come to buy a hat. Whitehead came in and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Higgins was not in the shop with the other boys - A. While Masters was there he was. I had one of the hats in my hand when he came in, and said,

"Do these belong to you?" pointing to the other on the counter. I did not intend to buy them, and offered a low price; and thinking them not honestly come by, I sent for an officer. One of them only wanted ironing, the other is not finished, having no lining or binding.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am a beadle. Marchant fetched me to Biddell's shop. I found Masters and Higgins there. Biddell said they had come with another boy to sell the hats. I took them into custody. I received information, and found Fenn at the Cooper's-arms public-house, and said,

"How came you to have any thing to do with those hats?" He said,

"I had nothing more to do with them than the rest; we are equally concerned alike."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASTER'S Defence. I saw Fenn in Holborn; he said he would give me 1 s. to shew him where he could sell them. That is all I know.

MASTERS - NOT GUILTY .

HIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

FENN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-203

1443. JOSEPH ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of Samuel Briggs , from his person .

SAMUEL BRIGGS . I am a dyer . On the 18th of September, about half past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Cow-lane , and felt somebody at my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner close behind me with my handkerchief in his hand, and seized him; he put it behind him, but I took it from his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying by a butcher's block, and picked it up; I was swinging my arm behind me, and was going to pass the gentleman. I did not know that it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-204

NEW COURT, (5th DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1444. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , two sheets, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 6 s.; and a counterpane, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of William Simmonds , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA SIMMONDS . I am the wife of William Simmonds . We live in New Gravel-lane . On Saturday, the 14th of August I let a room to the prisoner, which was furnished with the articles stated in the indictment. She left on the following Friday without notice. I looked through the

key-hole of the door, and saw that the bed-clothes were gone. I met her next evening in Ratcliff-highway, and told her to give an account of my bed-clothes. She said she was going to look for some money. I took hold of her - she pinched my hand, and cut it with her nails. I held her till the constable came and took her.

WILLIAM SPOONER . On Saturday, the 21st of August, I searched the prisoner, and found duplicates of a counterpane and sheet.

WILLIAM MOAT . This counterpane was pledged at my shop on the 19th of August; I cannot tell who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I took them through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18240916-205

1445. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , a sheet, value 8 s.; a table-cloth, value 6 s., and two caps, value 3 s. , the goods of James Bowyer , her master.

JAMES BOWYER . I am a publican . The prisoner came into my service on the 14th of July, and on the 13th of August she had leave to go out, and never returned. She sent a person for her box next day, which I refused to send. She came on Saturday evening with a woman for it. I said I had missed some property.

MARY BURKE. I keep a fruit-stall in Carnaby-street. I generally go to the prosecutor's house every day. On the 13th of August the prisoner came to my stall, and wanted me to go on an errand; I said my little girl was out; she said it would do when she came back; she said it was to take a parcel to the pawnbroker's for a woman in the second floor. I asked if it was a ready-furnished room; she said No, - her own things, but the woman was ill, and could not go. She then brought this property to me.

Prisoner. That woman came and asked me to lend her some money. I told her I had no money, but if she would take these things she might; she took them, and kept the money and the tickets too.

JAMES GURNEY . I live with Mr. Morrit. Burke brought these things to pledge on the 30th of July.

JOHN WHALES . I took up the prisoner, and told her she was charged with stealing the table-cloth and other things. She denied all knowledge of them. I said I knew she had, and I knew who she sent them by. She then begged for mercy.

Prisoner. I told him I had lent the things to a woman, as I have to-day, and that is the truth. - Witness. She told me no such thing.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-206

1446. CHARLES TONBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a watch, value 14 s.; six razors, value 5 s.; three combs, value 1 s.; a pair of scissars, value 1 s., and a dressing-cloth, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Wingfield his master .

THOMAS WINGFIELD. I am a hair-dresser , and live in Fore-street; the prisoner was in my service - he quitted it on the 21st of August, and about six o'clock the next morning, I missed the watch and some money out of the parlour cupboard. I missed five razors, the strap and the other articles from the shop - they were in daily use.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am night constable. I found the prisoner in Globe Round, and found this box, money, and the watch in his fob, and the razors, combs and dressing-cloth which he had been using.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240916-207

1447. EARNEST JACOB CARL RODEWALD was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN GRANT , ESQ. I am an officer in the army , and live in Craven-street: the prisoner was in my service for about nine months - he was entrusted to receive money for me. I gave him a cheque for 29 l. 11 s. 6 d., and sent him to my bankers for the money - he never returned with it. I had taken him from the street in great distress, and paid for his board and lodging, and gave him clothes and money.

CHARLES WILSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Copeland of Whitechapel. The prisoner brought a cheque on the 29th of April from Mr. Grant, which was paid - we are his bankers.

CHARLES LUNT . I am an officer. I found seven sovereigns in the prisoner's boot; he had told me before that the goaler had got all his money. I believe there was something said about bringing one hundred and two dollars from Germany, and changing them for sovereigns.

ROBERT BENNET . I apprehended the prisoner at Gravesend on another charge. I searched him, and found a purse with three sovereigns. When Lunt came home, we searched further, and found nine sovereigns.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-208

Before Mr. Recorder.

1448. JOHN KENNEDY was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN THOMAS HATHAWAY . I am a manufacturer of Ostrich feathers - I live in Harey-street, Old-street; the prisoner was in my employ about three years. I entrusted him to receive money for me. I had a customer of the name of Mariner, who lived in Great Surry-street, Blackfriars; he was indebted to me 37 l. 3 s. 6 d. in the month of January last, for which the prisoner never accounted to me; it was his duty to account to me for what he received from day to day, immediately that he returned; he left me one Thursday in the latter end of March. I never saw him again till Wednesday fortnight - he was in my debt when he left.

CHRISTOPHER MARINER . I am a linen-draper. In the month of July last, I paid the prisoner 37 l. 3 s. 6 d. for Mr. Hathaway - here is his receipt for it. I am certain I paid him some sovereigns, but I cannot tell whether I paid him any notes or not. I have paid him several sums of money. I cannot say whether I saw him write the receipt or not.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost 40 l. from my side pocket, and thinking to overcome my loss, I sold goods for less than I ought to do, and intended to make it known to Mr. Hathaway, but he sent for an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240916-209

1449. JOHN KENNEDY was again indicted for a like offence .

JOHN THOMAS HATHAWAY . The prisoner never accounted for 25 l. 4 s. which he received from Mr. Mariner, on the 25th of February last.

CHRISTOPHER MARRINER . On the 25th of February last, I paid the prisoner 25 l. 4 s., partly in sovereigns - here is his bill and receipt, he wrote it and delivered it with his own hands.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-210

1450. MOSES SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously assaulting, Mathew Poyner , with intent to rob him and his goods and monies, from his person, violently and feloniously to steal .

MATTHEW POYNER . I live in Bull-court, Tooley-street, and am a frame work knitter ; I work for Mr. Thompson, in Spitalfields . On the 15th of September, at two o'clock in the afternoon, I and my wife were in Petticoat-lane ; we were going to work, the prisoner and two others were on the opposite side, and the prisoner crossed to me with a stick in his hand, and put his stick across my head, saying he would cut my bl - y head off; I had not spoken to him; I told him to go along about his business, he then returned to his companions, and one of them said,

"Go back and slog him;" I understood that to mean, ill use me; he was returning to me and I put my watch chain between my flap and my breeches, he then struck me with a stick across my neck, I was making a grasp at the stick, and he struck me under the ear, and knocked me down, and then made a snatch at my watch, one of his companions said,

"Have you got it;" he said

"It is stowed away;" I then received two violent kicks at the back of my head, there were two other persons near me, but it was the prisoner who felt for my watch; my wife came to my assistance, and I raised my body up; I should not think the attack lasted, more than five minutes; I am positive he is the person who attacked me; when I got up I saw both the parties assaulting my wife, I called for assistance but could not get it; when I saw my wife the prisoner had hold of her bundle, and one of the others was beating her, she cried murder, and they ran away; I should know one of the other two if I was to see him; I was following the prisoner when I was fetched back by a gentleman who said they would murder me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Could you not get any assistance - A. No, I do not know how many people might be there. I did not take out a warrant for a common assault, upon my oath. I told the officer that the prisoner tried to rob me, but the officers told the Magistrates that if they would give them a warrant for a common assault, they would take them easier; I was by the side of the wall of the East India Warehouses, opposite the house of a man of the name of Mendoza.

- HARRISON, the City officer was now sent with the prosecutor to ascertain whether the assault was committed within the City of London.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I have been to the spot, and find that where the prosecutor was first assaulted, was in the City, but the spot where they attempted to rob him, was about four feet within the Country; I have known the City boundaries these thirty years.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the wall in the City - A. Yes, the spot which is close against the wall is in the City, but the place where he fell is the corner of Tripe's-yard.

M. POYNER re-examined. I have described the place where I was knocked down - the second time I was assaulted, and the attempt made to take my watch.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you not say this occurred against the wall of the East-India warehouse - A. I said the first assault was made, but the attempt to rob me was in the kennel. I did not even return a blow; he did not complain that I had pushed him, or assaulted him at all; he said, at Worship-street, that I had rubbed against him, but he was on one side the way and I on the other - several persons came out of their houses - I know one of them, but he is afraid of his name being known. No attempt was made at the watch till I was down on the ground; my wife's bundle contained a pair of trowsers - it was in a yellow handkerchief. I had no money - I did not strike any body. I told him at the time of the first attack to go about his business - I had not insulted him.

MARY POYNER . I am the prosecutor's wife; a great many people came up, but none of them interfered till they were going away - my husband was going to follow the parties, but the people said,

"Whatever you do, do not follow them." The prisoner first came up to us, on the side of the wall, but my husband was not down till he got on the opposite side; we were walking along, and the prisoner threw mud in my husband's face: he told him to go about his business - the prisoner put his stick across my husband's face, and said he would cut his head off as clean as a whistle, and make mince meat of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the India warehouse wall, and the prosecutor pushed me off the footpath; I said,

"Don't do that again;" he said he would if he liked - he slapped my face, and I held up my stick - he knocked me down first.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-211

1451. SAMUEL LLOYD pleaded GUILTY to Five Indictments, charging him with embezzling various sums, amounting in all to 25 l.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-212

1452. HENRY OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on 18th of September , a purse, value 1 d.; a sovereign, a half-crown, four shillings, and four sixpences, the property of John Gregory , from the person of Lucy his wife .

LUCY GREGORY . My husband's name is John - we live in Water-lane, Blackfriars; he is a green-grocer . I was in Covent-garden market on the 18th of September, buying some things, and had a purse in my pocket when I entered the market; it contained a sovereign and some silver in it. I paid for some grapes; and just as I had put my purse into my pocket I felt something at my side; I said to my daughter,

"Sally, my purse is gone." I looked round, and saw a boy running; I cried out,

"My purse is gone!" my daughter and some others pursued him - he was followed, and stopped at the distance of three streets. I overtook him - I did not see him stopped; my purse was delivered to me with 1 l. 8 s. 6 d. in it - the prisoner was a stranger to me.

SARAH SMITH . I am the daughter of the last witness, by her former husband. I was with her about nine o'clock in the morning: I saw her buy some things, and put her purse into her pocket, and in an instant she turned, and said,

"My purse is gone." I looked, and saw the prisoner running away, and did not lose sight of him till he was stopped; there was another boy with him, who said,

"It was not me, it was the other." I held the other for a moment, but he bit my wrist, and I let him go, and pursued the prisoner. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped; he told the people who stopped him that he had broke a window, and they were about to let him go, I said,

"Don't let him go; he has got my mother's purse;" he said he had not, and turned out his pockets: there was nothing in them - he then pulled off his hat; one of the men said,

"You are surely satisfied?" I said I was not - he then put his hand into a pocket behind him, and took the purse out.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The purse was thrown at me - I picked it up; some boys threw a halfpenny at me, I thought it had broken a window, and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240916-213

1453. MARY ANN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , a 20 l. Bank note, the property of John Bradshaw , from his person .

THOMAS BRADSHAW . I live in Castle-street, Falcon-square. On the 19th of August I was accosted at half-past ten o'clock at night, in Bond-street, by the prisoner, and went to a room on the second floor of No. 7, Shepherd-street, Oxford-street ; I was quite sober. This 20 l. note was in my fob when I went into the room. I went to bed, and put my breeches under my head, and bolted the door. I was awoke about five o'clock by the servant of the house; the prisoner had then left the bed, and was dressed. I had given her money before I missed the note; the trowsers had been pulled from under my head, and lay on the top of the bed. I offered her a sovereign to give up the note - she denied knowing anything about it. I had written the letter B. upon it; it was produced at the office. I am quite sure I was sober at the time.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this woman about half-past six o'clock in the morning of the 19th of August. The prosecutor offered to give her a sovereign, but she positively denied having the note. I then searched her, and found it on her - it had the letter B on it; she gave no account of how she came by it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240916-214

1454. JOSEPH WHITE and JAMES OSMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a canvass bag, value 1 d.; a 20 l.; four 10 l.; and two 5 l. Bank notes, and a promisory note, value 5 l., the property of George Fullwood , from his person ; and CHARLOTTE OSMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving one of the same 5 l. notes, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE FULLWOOD . I am a baker , and live on Saffron-hill. On the 3d of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening. I was at the George, public-house; in St. John-street-road ; I rode there and left my horse at the door; I went into the parlour on the left-hand; a gentleman of the name of I Ifould was with me. I saw the two male prisoners in the parlour - there were two or three more persons with them, drinking together round a small table - Mr. Baker was drinking with them. Mr. Ifould made some application to me about discounting a bill before we entered the house; and when there we spoke about it in a tone that might be heard by others. I produced a canvass bag with 75 l. in notes; the parties round the small table could have seen it; we sat opposite them: there was a 5 l. Uxbridge note, signed Samuel Hull . We were talking about my horse - the other party joined in the conversation; I had given the notes to Ifould to count, and he put them into the bag again, which drew up with a string - I put it into my right hand breeches pocket, but one end of the string remained out of my pocket; the two male prisoners went out with me to the door; one was before, and the other behind me - the one behind me shoved me, and I made a little bit of a slip; the other pretended to save my falling; I did not see him pull the bag from me, nor did I feel it go, but I am certain I had put it into my pocket the minute before I went to the door - I came back to the room in about five or seven minutes, and missed my money soon after. I had received all the Bank of England notes from a person of the name of Jones, at the Coopers' Arms, public-house, West-street, Smithfield. When I returned into the parlour the prisoners were gone. On the Wednesday following I was at the Police office; I saw the three prisoners there. I heard Osman say that the woman was his wife. The Uxbridge note was 5 l.; there was one 20 l., four 10 l. notes, and two 5 l. Bank notes; the Uxbridge note had

"Five Pounds" in letters, in blue ink, upon the face of it - this note I have in my hand, for 5 l., No. 16,915, is one of those I had from Jones; it was in the bag. I got it last from the Bank of England, on the day the prisoners were examined - it has Jones's hand-writing upon it.

Cross-examined. Q. You produce this as a 5 l. note that was in the bag - A. Yes; I did not take notice of the number, but it has the name of Smirke in Jones's hand-writing. I know that note very well. I was not in liquor when before the Magistrates, but I was rather fresh on the night of the robbery; I was sober enough before I went into the house - but I got a little there. I was there an hour and a half before I went to the door. I had been in the parlour about half an hour before I pulled out my notes - I was not very fresh then. I put the purse into my pocket about an hour before I went to the door. I only drank with Mr. Ifould - I did mention his name before the Magistrate; there were four persons sitting together, and two of them went out to look at the horse, and I went with them - they went out with their hats on. There are two or three steps at the door. I was in the house after I went to the door for about three quarters of an hour. Mr. Baker was in the room when I came back, but he soon withdrew, and so did his companion - he was gone before I missed my money. There were other persons in the room - I suppose ten or twelve: it was the time of Bartholomew fair.

Baker did not tell me that night that he saw the notes taken. I missed my purse seven or eight minutes after I returned to the room. I am a discounter of bills, not jointly with others, but to serve a friend. Baker came to my house on Tuesday. I told the Magistrate it was Tuesday or Wednesday.

Re-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. I was not quite certain which day it was: Baker came down without my sending for him; I slipped on the top of the steps in consequence of the man pushing me - Baker was not at the door at the time I slipped: I did not go out at all with them - when I returned to the room Baker was there, and about two yards from the - he did not come nearer to me - I am positive he was not within arms' reach of me: I sat in the parlour, on the right hand of the door, and their table was on the left, where Baker was: when I came into the room, the table he was sitting at was about two yards from me, and there was a table between us - he appeared to be looking at the horse when I came in; there were curtains to the windows, partly drawn, but not wholly; he could see the horse through the aperture - I did not say that other persons went out at the same time, and one of them had a sustain jacket.

JOSEPH IFOULD . I am a brush-maker, and live in Goswell-street. On the 3d of September I accompanied Fulwood to the George public-house; there were persons at the top of the room smoking and drinking - and he pulled out a canvass bag; I cannot state that the prisoners were there then; I counted the notes - there was 75 l.; I recollect there was a 20 l. Bank note, and a 5 l. Uxbridge note; the others were Bank of England notes, but I cannot recollect what they were; I put them into the bag again, and returned them to him; it was a white canvass bag, drawn with a string; I was sober when I went in, but after taking a glass or two of gin-and-water, I fell asleep: I had counted the money before I went to sleep.

THOMAS BAKER . I am a pork butcher, and live in Golden-lane; I was at the George public-house on the 3d of September, and saw Mr. Fullwood there - the prisoners were there - I was in company with them; I saw Fullwood take a purse with some money out of his pocket - he pulled a bag out of another bag, and there was 75 l. in notes taken out of it; Fullwood was about three yards off; Ifould came to count the notes at the table where I was sitting, he first counted 85 l., and Fullwood said,

"You have made 10 l. too much;" he counted again, and it was 75 l; the top note was printed in blue ink - Fullwood remained there about an hour afterwards; the prisoner went out - White stood on one side of the mare and Osman at the hind part - they went out about five minutes before Fullwood: I was sitting close by the window, which was up, when Fullwood went, a man in a fustian jacket, who was with them, followed him to the door, and then gave him a push: Osman lifted up his right arm, as if to save the man - Fullwood was then just off the step of the door; White was four or five yards from him; the man in the fustian jacket laid hold of the bag, and whipped it out of his pocket, and then they all ran away together - the man with the fustian jacket was drinking with the prisoner before they went out, and seemed to be acquainted with them: I saw all the prisoners next evening at Barnet fair, and I saw Charlotte Osman tender a 5 l. Uxbridge note to a man of the name of Joseph Dixon, a publican who frequents fairs; she asked Dixon to give him change - I spoke to Dixon, and he did not give him the change.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What is the name of the man in the fustian jacket - A. I learnt last Friday that it is Mansel Evans - me are drinking together - but I never saw him before in my life; Mr. Fullwood came into the room after he lost his money; I did not tell him what I had seen - I did not know what company I was in that was my only reason; I did not tell him that the man was an entire stranger to me - I never said to a man of the name of Smith

"I know I am a thief, and live by thieving, and like to encourage rogues:" I never said so to anybody in my life, upon my oath - I did not speak to Mr. Fullwood at that time, because I have seen persons ill used for interfering in such matters: Mr. Ifould came to the table, and counted out the notes - I never had it in my possession, or I could have told it; Mr. Fullwood and his friend night have been in the room half an hour before they came to count the money; I will swear that the prisoners did not go out ten minutes before Fullwood - it was five minutes as near as I can tell - I saw the man in the fustian jacket at Barnet fair, beating and ill using a man - he had his fist up to knock a man's brains out; I have never seen him since that - I saw the two prisoners at the fair; I did not find them out on the night of the robbery, and demand money of them; I did see them at the Merry Carpenter 's public-house, in Old-street - I did say then that if they did not give me money, I would be up to them, on anything of the kind; I did not speak to them - I went into the Carpenters', but did not drink anything - I had a person with me who had been at the George public-house with me: he said if I said any thing we should be both floored; I said I would go and get a watchman - he said it would be dangerous, we did not remain there ten minutes; I cannot tell whether they had left when we came away - I did not give information to Mr. Fullwood till the Tuesday; when he came back into the George he went to his former seat, a little way from the door: I was sitting by the window, which was up, and the curtains drawn; the mare stood in front of the window - I think I staid in the house an hour after that, and when I went away I left him there; he seemed a little fresh when I went out; there was a gas-light near the door: I do not know my friend's name any more than Dick - I have bought a horse or two of him - I went out with him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you lived where you do now - A. Three years; Mr. Newton is my landlord: I pay forty-six guineas a year, and keep a pork butcher's shop; I went of my own accord to Mr. Fullwood, because he had given me his address, and said he had a hog weighing fifty stone.

WILLIAM BEVANS . I keep the Star public-house, in the City-road. On Saturday night, the 4th of September, about eight o'clock, White came in a hackney-coach, and offered a 5 l. note of the Uxbridge New Bank; it had the amount in large letters on the front of it in blue ink; I did not at first change it. He produced a 20 l. Bank of England note. I afterwards changed the 5 l. note. He came to my house again on the Monday morning, about ten o'clock, and said he came to ask what note he changed with me on the Saturday night, whether it was a 5 l. or 10 l.; the box

was searched to find it, and he said the person from whom he had taken it said it was 10 l., and he wished for the note to convince him that it was 5 l. He took the note, and gave me five sovereigns for it.

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I am driver of the hackney-chariot, No. 802. I was at Barnet on the first day of the fair. I took the prisoner White, and a man in a fustian jacket. They got in together at the Lying-in hospital. I agreed to take them there and back for 15 s., besides the chance of passengers on the road. I took them there, and brought back White and the man in the fustian jacket, and one other person. I got to Barnet between twelve and one o'clock, and returned about seven. I took them to Mr. Bevan's, the Star, in the City-road.

EDWARD JONES . I keep the Coopers' Arms, in West-street. I recollect giving Mr. Fullwood 70 l.; it was a 20 l., four 10 l., and two 5 l. notes; here is one of the notes, with my writing on it, No. 16,915; the name of Smirke is in my hand-writing. I gave them to him between the 12th and 20th of August.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How do you know this note. - A. By having written the name of Smirke on it. I never took but this and another from him. From the writing, and the note having been worn, I know that it was in my possession. I paid no notes to any one but Mr. Fullwood, from the 4th of August to the 1st of September; I gave him 107 l. in change for silver, and seven country notes.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Thompson , Aldersgate-street, linen-draper. I have seen the female prisoner. I took this 5 l. note of her on the 6th of September; I do not know what she bought. I wrote the name of Hollings, Chiswell-street, upon it, by her direction.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you quite positive about her person - A. Yes; I did not see the note again till after the examination.

WILLIAM REED . I am a constable. On the 8th of September I took the female prisoner into custody; both the male prisoners were then in custody. She and another came in a coach to the office, and she enquired whether there were two persons in custody. She would not give her address, but I had a search-warrant, and found where she lived. I got a key from her which opened her door, at No. 1, Lancaster-place, North-street, City-road, and found a bill of parcels in a drawer in her room.

ELIZA ALLEN . I know the female prisoner and Osman; I was their servant at No. 1, Lancaster-place, North-street, City-road, and they lived as man and wife by the name of Brown. I came away last Wednesday.

WHITE'S Defence. I am a country-dealer, and deal in poultry, pigs, &c. I sold two horses at Barnet fair for 35 l. When I came back to Mr. Bevan's, I asked him for change, as I have bought and sold at his door to the amount of 100 l. or 150 l.

JOHN SMITH . I am a master pork-butcher, and live in Old-street, and am acquainted with a person of the name of Thos. Baker . I have heard him say that he once was a regular prig, and lived by prigging; he told my man so, and the man told it to me and my wife and to two officers. He said it to me when I lived with him as journeyman, eleven or twelve months ago. I left him in January last. I would not believe him upon his oath, and no man in London would ever say that Mr. Baker would take an oath without it was a great falsehood. I left him because he charged me with stealing a pig's head, when I only asked him civilly for my wages; and he said, if I would confess it, and go away, he would say no more about it; I would not, and he then sent for an officer. I then lived with Mr. Robinson, in Brick-lane, about three weeks, and then set up for myself in Old-street, as a pork-butcher, about two hundred yards from Mr. Baker. I know nothing of either of the men at the bar; I do not think I ever saw them in my life. I never was in custody except on Baker's charge. I have seen Vann several times, but was never in his custody. It was not for stealing sausages that Baker turned me off; he gave me a character to Mr. Robinson nine years ago. The last time I was at Mr. Baker's is about six weeks ago; I saw him last night; I did not tell him that if he came to this trial I would try to transport him, but I told to Mr. Brough's man, and to Baker's man, that he once tried to transport me, and said if he came here to-day, I would be here, and tell the truth. I lived with Mr. Stoke's, of Aylesbury-street, and left him because I was sweeping the floor and found 6 d., and went with his nephew and spent it. Mr. Stokes did not charge me with robbing him of silk. I bought some, and gave it to his wife that he might give me a good character, which he did.

By the COURT. Q. When Baker charged you with stealing the pig's head, did you go before a Justice - A. Yes; but they dismissed the charge. Fordham was the officer that took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-215

1456. WILLIAM RICHARDSON , JOHN GREGSON , and WILLIAM NICHOLSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a writing desk, value 10 s., and a candlestick, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Stammers Alger .

THOMAS STAMMERS ALGER I am a miller , and live at West Drayton . On the 16th of July I lost a writing desk and candlestick from my breakfast parlour; I had seen them the night before; I received some information next morning at five o'clock, I saw the writing desk then but not the candlestick; I was coming to Mark-lane, and I set off and came through Hounslow; I overtook a cart just before I got to Smallborough-green; I got a patrol, and saw him take my candlestick out of the cart, the three prisoners were in the cart, and there were some carpets, and two ducks in it; Richardson and Gregson made great resistance, and said they would not be taken.

SARAH CHURCH . I am servant to Mr. Alger. On the 16th of July, I was at work in the breakfast parlour, at four o'clock in the morning, and I saw the candlestick and desk; I left the room, and on returning, I missed them; I went out and came in again, and found the desk wrapped in a blue handkerchief inside the window; I told my master what had happened; I saw this candlestick before the Magistrate, and knew it to be his; there is a railing before the windows, and a small space between the windows and the rails; I saw no cart near the place.

JOHN EMERSON . I am a patrol, and accompanied Mr. Alger; I apprehended the prisoner in a cart about seven o'clock in the morning; Richardson and Gregson seemed

to have the management of the cart; I found this candlestick in the cart, and found a bundle of keys on Gregson, also a knife and a bundle of matches, and in the cart were a saddle, two ducks, ten pieces of carpet, six pieces of baize, and two sacks, one with beans in it; the two men made great resistance, and threatened for a long time all the persons I could got to assist me; the lad made no resistance, they were taken at Smallborough-green, about five miles from Mr. Alger's; the name of

" William Barnet , Walworth" was on the cart.

Cross-examined. I told them to stop, they did; I said there was property missed, and wanted to see the cart. I took the candlestick, but I made no other search till after I got them handcuffed, because they resisted; Gregson pulled me thirty yards before I got him handcuffed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ARCHER . I saw these men on the morning of the 16th of August, about five o'clock; where I was at work at a gentleman's house, one of them came and asked me for the key of a gate of a bridge; I saw Gregson in the cart not twelve yards from Mr. Alger's; I did not see them go on for they stopped till I got some distance; I could not find the key of the gate; the way they wanted to go was a private road, leading directly to Mr. Alger's

ROBERT TAYLOR . I was in this neighbourhood on the 16th of July, at five o'clock in the morning; I saw Nicholson there, I did not see the other prisoners; the bridge is at the end of the mill, and Mr. Algers' is at the mill. I did not see them go into the premises or come out; I saw the young lad between the pales of the window and the breakfast parlour.

GREGSON'S Defence. I was coming along the road and fell in with Richardson, there was a man in the cart and I asked him to give me a lift, which he did; when we got to Hounslow the patrol stopped the cart and took us; I know nothing of the matter, nor of the prisoners.

NICHOLSON'S Defence. I am a poor lad, and was going to look for work, at hay-making; I got behind the cart, and then got in and rode a few miles.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

GREGSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

NICHOLSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-216

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1456. PATRICK HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a shawl, value 4 s., the goods of Elizabeth Pedley , from her person .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-217

1457. JOSEPH WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a whittle, value 3 s., the goods of Eliza Merrydew , from her person .

ELIZABETH MERRYDEW . On Sunday, the 25th of July, I was in Bell-alley , and saw the prisoner while I was talking to a young man; he came and snatched my shawl off; I knew him before; there was a light, and I am sure of his person; he ran away, and the young man who was with me ran after him, but he could not catch him; I saw the shawl at Worship-street.

Prisoner. I was in her company from nine o'clock till half past twelve. - Witness. He was not in my company.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker - I produce this whittle which was pawned by the prisoner in the name of James Smith ; I am quite positive of his person.

JOHN TWEEDY , I am an officer, I apprehended him on the 29th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn; we were all three drinking tea together, from nine o'clock till half-past twelve.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-218

1458. WILLIAM WEBB and FRANCIS CLAPHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , a coal-skuttle, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Moody .

JOHN PRICE . I am servant to Richard Moody , who keeps the Crown, public-house , Back-hill, Holborn . On the 23d of August I saw his coal skuttle in the dust heap, under the stairs - it was an old copper one. Clapham and the other came to take the dust out about twelve o'clock, from the heap under the stairs. The coal-skuttle was missed about an hour after they were gone.

JOHN CHRANTRELL . I was with Clapham when he took the dust - Webb was at the door, and asked me to assist his mate, because he was intoxicated. I saw Clapham go down stairs with the shovel and basket - he put the coal skuttle into the basket, and put it into the cart; I did not know whether he was doing right or wrong.

MORRIS WORMS . My father is a dealer in marine stores. The prisoners came to our shop on a Tuesday, about a month ago, and brought a basket of rags. I then went before the basket, and saw the coal skuttle - I asked if it was for sale - Clapham said Yes, what did I give a pound for it; I said 5 d. - the other prisoner said 8 d.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I took them into custody.

CLAPHAM - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days .

WEBB - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-219

1459. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Garland .

SAMUEL GARLAND . I am the brother of Richard Garland . On Thursday last, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner looking at some cotton, which hung at the side of the door. I saw her go away, and went after her, and took her about twenty yards from the door, with the cotton under her shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it by the door.

GUILTY. Aged 17 .

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-220

1460. JOHN WILLIAMS and JAMES DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a set of cruets, value 4 s.; a cruet stand, value 1 s., and three spoons, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Burge .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-221

1461. ESTHER TODD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , six sheets, value 2 l.; a basket, value 2 s., and a cloth, value 1 s. , the goods of James Noice .

JAMES NOICE . I am the father of Eliza Noice - I live near the Portman Arms, public-house, Mary-le-bone. On the 24th of May, three pairs of sheets had been given to my wife, on the week before, to wash - they were at my house on Saturday morning; my little girl came to me about twelve o'clock, and gave me some information.

ELIZABETH NOICE . I am near eleven years. My mother gave me a pair of sheets in a basket, to take to Mr. Wooley, in Piccadilly - there was a little boy with me, who had one end of the basket. When we were near Tyburn turpike this woman came and said,

"Where are you going?" I said to Mr. Wooley's; she said she had just come from there, and had been to my mother's with some dirty linen, and I was to give these things to her, as she could make more haste than I could. I gave her the basket, and watched her as far as I could down Park-lane, and then I went to my father. I never saw her before, but I noticed her, and am sure she is the same person. I told my father what sort of a person it was.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner last Monday week - I could not find her before. I found a list shoe in her lodging, which the little girl said she had on.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work all the morning, and at home all the afternoon. In the evening I was at chapel from seven o'clock till nine.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-222

1462. LUKE SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 2 lbs. of leather, value 4 s., and a pair of boots, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward O'Brien .

EDWARD O'BRIEN. I am a shoemaker , and live at Bethnal-green - the prisoner was in my service. On the 1st of September I went out in the evening, and left him in care of the house; there was a pair of shoes in the up-stairs room, and some leather. I returned about twelve o'clock. I knocked up a neighbour, and got in by their key - the leather and shoes were gone.

WILLIAM COX . I live in Shoreditch. The prisoner came to me with some leather, on the 1st of September, about seven o'clock in the evening - I bought it of him for 4 s. - here is the leather.

SAMUEL BUGLEY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Shoreditch. The prisoner brought me a pair of child's shoes, on the 1st of September between eight and nine o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor went out to sell some shoes, and left me some work, which I did; when he came home at three o'clock, he gave me 5 1/2 d. which he owed me, and in the evening at six, when he came home again, he gave me 6 d. to get a supper, and borrowed my shoes to go to the play.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-223

1463. MATTHEW LINCHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a jacket, value 7 s.; and a shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Goodman Solomon .

GOODMAN SOLOMON. I live in Field-lane, Holborn , and sell clothes . I employed a bricklayer, who brought the prisoner as a labourer ; he went away in the middle of the day, and I heard he was getting drunk. I then suspected that he had robbed me. I looked over my premises, and missed these things about twelve or one o'clock. I found him in a public-house, and found a ticket in his possession of the jacket - I then gave charge of him. I took him to the pawnbroker's, but he would hardly go in.

JAMES WHITEHEAD . I am a constable, and took the prisoner - he was very much intoxicated when I took him.

GEORGE HARDY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a jacket which was pawned for 3 s. by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-224

1464. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , a shirt, value 6 d.; a bed gown, value 6 d.; two aprons, value 6 d.; five handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 d.; a towel, value 6 d.; a chair-cover, value 6 d.; three caps, value 6 d., and two shirt-collars, value 6 d. , the goods of Ezekiel Black .

ANN BLACK . I am the wife of Ezekiel Black . On the 3d of August, I left my house in Cross-street, Soho , about six o'clock in the evening, and left some linen on the floor of the back parlour, which is at the end of a long passage leading to the yard - my husband was up stairs - the street door is always open. I did not stay out more than five minutes, and when I came back, my landlady gave me a bundle which contained the things I had left in my apartment.

ANN SCOTT . I am the landlady of the house. I saw the prisoner go out at the street-door, with a bundle under his arm, I followed and came up with him - he went into a stable-yard, which opens with folding gates. I took it from him and let him go. I brought the things back and gave them to the owner. I am certain he is the man. I looked in his face, and let him go in consequence of his age. I did not speak to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240916-225

1465. MARY FENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a frock, value 5 s.; four towels, value 2 s.; a cape, value 2 s.; four glasses, value 4 s.; five knives, value 2 s., and seven forks, value 2 s. , the goods of Philip Mose .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

PHILLIP MOSE . I am the proprietor of Furnival's-inn The prisoner was in my service, and left me on the 3d or 4th of June. In consequence of something I heard, I went to her lodging with Reed the officer, and found these things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. MOSE. I am the wife of the last witness - I know these towels and the frock by the work. This cape was my sister's - she had left it at my house. These towels are my marking - the prisoner left my house in June, and my husband went to her lodgings about a fortnight ago.

WILLIAM FLAXMAN . I am waiter to Mr. Mose; I know these glasses to be my master's - he has about fourteen dozen of them.

JOSEPH REED . I am an officer - I went to apprehend the prisoner, and found these things in her room - she was scouring the floor.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-226

1466. SAMUEL GRANT was indicted for stealing, on

the 6th of September , a piece of dowlas, containing nine yards, value 5 s. , the goods of William Graham .

WILLIAM INGRAM . I am a licensed Hawker - I had been travelling with my cloth, in a pack from Kensington to Hammersmith on the 6th of September; there were some navigators sitting on the side of the road at their dinner; they told me to let them see a piece of cloth, and the prisoner asked for a piece to look at; he said,

"Let me show it to this woman," and ran across the way with it. I could not run after him, as my pack was loose, and I was afraid the others would take the rest of the things - it was dowlas cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. What is your master's name - A. He has no other name but William Graham . There were many other persons there - I am quite sure it was the prisoner - I never charged anybody else with it. I never charged a man of the name of Taylor with it. When I got to the place with the officer I pointed him out.

WILLIAM GRAHAM . I sent William Ingram , my servant, on the 6th of September, to Brentford, and next morning he came to me drunk.

GEORGE HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge - the prosecutor pointed him out to me, and said he was the man who had run away with the cloth. The prisoner said

"I am not the man." I said.

"Perhaps you was in company with him; he said,

"I know nothing about it."

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the crime.

GEORGE NOAH . I was at work at Kensington, near Lord Holland's, with the prisoner, and near one hundred other men. I was sitting down, between twelve and one o'clock, having my dinner; the young man was coming down the foot-path, and one of the men asked him to let us look at his cloth, and he came and handed his cloth to me and another, and gave a bit to a man whom we called Lankey, he is about five feet ten inches high; he took it to show to a woman, and never came back - not even for his money; his money is now in Mr. Wood's hands - I saw the young man give the cloth into his hands - the prisoner was not there, he came a few minutes after.

WILLIAM INGRAM examined by the Jury. Q. Were you intoxicated - A. No, I was not at all - I had drank nothing but a pint of beer at my dinner. I lost a tablecloth at the same time, but I cannot say who took that.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-227

1467. MICHAEL GAHAGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a pair of trowsers, value 10 s., and a waistcoat, value 4 s. , the goods of Michael Mangan .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240916-228

1468. MARY ANN GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a cap, value 20 s. , the goods of Christopher Quin .

CHRISTOPHER QUIN . I am a seafaring man , but have lost my sight; a woman came into my parlour, at No. 14, Vine-street, St. Martins's , and said she came for some meat; my wife and I were at breakfast.

ELEANOR QUIN . The prisoner came to my house on the 12th of August in the morning, and went out and in several times in the evening: when she was going out she asked if I would left her put a little paint on her face at my glass - she then took a cap - I did not see her take it, but missed it the moment she was gone.

ESTHER HALL . I live at No. 4, Perkins's-rents: I met the prisoner on Wednesday; she had a cap on, but I did not notice it; a young woman came up and said it was Mrs. Quin's cap; she said it was her sister's.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Quin's on the 15th of September, and the prisoner was given to me, charged with stealing a cap; she said if we would go into Perkins's rents, we should find it at a house - we went and could not find it.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I would go and show a cap I had left at Perkins's rents; but it is not Mrs. Quin's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240916-229

1469. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , twenty-two yards of stuff, value 22 s , the goods of John Lloyd .

GODFREY LLOYD . I am shopman to John Lloyd . of Battic-street, Commercial-road ; I saw some person pulling at the stuffs which were hanging inside the door; I went to the door, and my brother asked me if there was a purple stuff at the door; I said there was not; I had seen it half on hour previous; I went out and saw the prisoner running down Baltic-street ; I ran after him, and he threw down the stuff; my brother picked it up, and brought the officer down; I never lost sight of him. He said he did not take it, but a man gave it to him; I said,

"You are the man who threw it down" - he said,

"It was a man threw it down to me." I did not see him take it, but saw him throw it down.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I singing out Stop thief - A. The people said so, but I did not hear him; there was no person running before him - he went quietly with me, and begged for pardon.

J - NORMAN. I took charge of the prisoner. Mr. John Lloyd asked him who gave him the stuff, and he said he did not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had taken it from the door I could have got away with it in that time. I am totally innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240916-230

SIXTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1470. GEORGE IDEN was indicted for stealing, on on the 24th of August , at St. Andrew, Holborn , a gelding, price 15 l. , the property of John Green .

JOHN GREEN . I live at Elsham, in Kent, and am a farmer. My gelding was turned out into my field; I saw it on my farm on Monday, the 23d of August, about eight

o'clock in the morning - next morning, about six my son gave me information, and I missed it. I came to town in search of it, and saw it that evening at the Ram inn Smithfield. The witness Hunter brought it to Hatton-garden; it is the horse I lost. I never saw the prisoner about my premises.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long had you had it - A. Five or six years. It was in care of the hostler at the Ram; he is not here. We took it to Hatton-garden - it is now in my possession, and is mine. I had not seen it after the afternoon of the 23d.

GEORGE HUNTER . I live in York-street, Castle-street, Saffron-hill, and am servant to Thomas White , a horse-slaughterer, whose premises are in Sharp's-alley - he lives in Coppice-row. On Tuesday morning, the 24th of August, about two o'clock I was in bed at my own house; the watchman called me up - I came down, and found the prisoner at the door, with a gelding, which was afterwards taken to Hatton-garden, and claimed by Green; I had never seen the prisoner before - he asked me to buy it; I asked what part he brought it from; he said out of Kent, from Tunbridge, and that he had another to bring. I asked his name; he said George Iden : I said I would not buy it at that time of the morning, but if he would take it away, and bring it at a seasonable hour, about nine o'clock, or so, I would buy it - he said he had no place to put it in, being a stranger in the neighbourhood; I said I would put it into my master's premises, and give it some hay - he delivered it to me; I put it into my master's stable. He took a bed at a lodging-house next door to me that night, and between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going to work, I saw him in the custody of Barnley.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him taken into custody - A. I saw him in custody. He said nothing about the horse; it was removed to the Ram. I saw nothing more of it till between eleven and twelve o'clock that morning, when it was at Hatton-garden. I swear that is the same horse by the marks upon it; there was a small star on the forehead. I had noticed it in the morning - there was a mark on the side of it, also a saddle mark.

COURT. Q. How long have you been in this business - A. About twenty years. I am a pretty good judge of horses.

RICHARD EYARS . I am a watchman - Hunter lives on my beat. On the morning of the 24th I saw the prisoner on the horse, on Saffron-hill; he asked me where Hunter of York-street, lived - I showed him the house, and heard the conversation between them about the horse - Hunter's account is correct. I went down to Barnley, and gave information - Barnley and I went and took him. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am constable of the Liberty of Saffron-hill. On Tuesday morning, the 24th of August, between four and five o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner next door to Hunter's. I neither threatened, nor made him any promise. I asked if the horse was his; he said it was not; I asked who it belonged to - he said to a man, but he did not know his name, nor where he lived - that he met with him on the Tunbridge-road, and he was bringing it to London, to sell it. I took him to White's place: Hunter gave me the horse at White's stables, in his presence, and Green saw it at Hatton-garden; it was then taken to the Ram inn.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by another man to sell it; the first time I saw the man was at the Bricklayers Arms, public-house; he had four horses. A coach passed, and two of them broke from the halter. He asked me to go with him, and I did - I left him at Hyde Park-corner, and on Monday morning I met him; he asked me to go with him to fetch a horse that was coming from Tunbridge - I did so, and met a man; he gave me a direction to sell the horse at Hunter's.

JOHN GREEN re-examined. The gelding is worth 15 l. and more; it was young and sound, only eight years old; it was a very serviceable horse, just in its prime.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it low in condition - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18240916-231

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1471. GEORGE LAKER was indicted for feloniously forging the name of J. D. Faulkener, to a certain bond, with intent to defraud .

MESSRS. GURNEY and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am inspector of letter carriers at the General Post Office; the prisoner has been a letter carrier for upwards of seven years - he entered into the usual bond, but his sureties having lately desired to withdraw, he gave as substitutes Edward Laker , his father, and John D. Faulkener , jeweller, Newman-street, Oxford-street. On Monday, the 19th of July, he called at the office to say that his bond was duly executed, and wished to be employed again. I went to the solicitor's office, and saw the bond. (looking at it;) it was executed as it is now. In consequence of suspicion Faulkener was sent to, and introduced to the prisoner at the solicitor's office, and Faulkener was asked if he had executed that bond - he said he did not: the prisoner said nothing, and was taken into custody.

PETER DOWLING . I am clerk to Mr. Parkins, solicitor to the Post-office; I received a paper with the names of the sureties from the prisoner, upon which I prepared a bond for execution; the prisoner executed it in my presence, on Saturday, the 17th of July, and stated that as Mr. Faulkener and his father resided at some distance, he would feel obliged if I would allow him to take the bond to them for their signatures; I gave it to him for that purpose, he said he would bring it back as quick as possible; and if I recollect right, he said he would bring it in the evening, and if I was not in the office, he would drop it into the letter-box, and on coming on Monday morning, I found it in the box - our office is in the General Post Office; it appeared to be executed by his father and Faulkener. Woods came in about two o'clock; I asked the prisoner if he had got that bond duly executed - if it had been signed by his father and Faulkener. The bond was then before him; he said he had, and pointed to Faulkener's signature, and said it was done in Faulkener's parlour, in the presence of John Giles . Faulkener was sent for; I asked him in the prisoner's presence if he had signed that bond - he said he had not, nor had he ever seen it. The prisoner stood mute.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am acquainted with J. D. Faulkener,

jeweller, of Newman-street, and am acquainted with his handwriting. The signature to this bond is not his writing; he generally signs with two initials, not at full length.

HENRY WHEATLEY . I am a jeweller, and live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital, and have dealt with Mr. Faulkener for several years. I do not consider the signature to this bond at all like his writing.

J. D. FAULKENER. I know the prisoner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He applied to you to become security for him - A. He did.

Q. I believe you rather led him to understand that you would - A. I believe he went away under that idea, but my wife disapproved of it, in consequence of which I afterwards refused. I said to him,

"I will not sign it, but anything I can do in your favour I will" - that I was very sorry to refuse him, and would do it with pleasure, but for family affairs.

Q. Did you say, that having promised your wife, you could not sign it, but if your name was signed by him you should not object to it - A. I gave him to understand to that effect.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Do you swear positively that you said that - A. I believe I did.

MR. GURNEY. My Lord, though I do not think this a legal Defence, still I think I shall best discharge my duty by not calling on the Jury for a verdict.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240916-232

Middlesex Case, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1471. GEORGE EVANI was indicted for feloniously, and with intent to defraud his creditors, concealing part of his estate and effects, to more than the value of 20 l., by which he was entitled before the Commission of an act of bankruptcy, amounting in value to the sum of 200 l. and upwards .

Messrs. ALLEY, ANDREWS & LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. CHARLES REEVES , solicitor, produced a Commission of bankruptcy awarded against the prisoner, dated the 15th of March, 1824.

MR. RICHARD COURTINE . I was solicitor to the Commission produced. I have the proceedings under the Commission. I was present on the 18th of March when the Commission was opened. The Commissioners present were James Trebeck , James Seton , and Edward Grosse Smith, Esqs.; I saw them administer the oath to each other. I have a memorandum of their qualification, and saw them subscribe their signatures to the proceedings. William Smith is the petitioning creditor.

JOSIAH SMITH . I am nephew to Mr. William Smith , of King's-street, Snowhill, one of the petitioning creditors under the Commission against the prisoner. I know of transactions between him and the prisoner. (Looking at two bills of exchange for 78 l. and 40 l.) These are drawn by my uncle upon the prisoner, whom I saw accept them. I gave him his account, and he gave the bills in consideration for that account. I know that my uncle furnished him with goods to the amount specified in those bills before they were accepted. I tendered his account to him, and wished for cash, which he could not give, and I drew these bills, which he accepted.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was the money due to? - A. My uncle, and his late partner, Mr. Ricardo. The debt was contracted during their partnership. They dissolved partnership after Christmas, 1823. I came into my uncle's service in March, 1819; I was articled to him only. I know that Mr. Ricardo was a partner; he lived in Weston-street, Pentonville. I manage the concern, and have seen their partnership agreement, though not read it. Mr. Ricardo acted as a partner, and was generally there every day for two or three hours. The partnership ceased in the beginning of 1824; I think about February or March; it was advertised in the Gozette. The goods for which the bills were given were sent to Hastings. I saw the prisoner look out about 78 l. worth, the rest were ordered of our traveller.

COURT. Q. How soon after you went into your uncle's service did you see Mr. Ricardo? - A. He became a partner about the beginning of 1823. He generally posted the books, as he knew nothing of the business, which takes some time to learn; - it is manufacturing portable desks, &c. We always sign bills, Smith and Co., which means Mr. Ricardo.

MR. LAW. Q. Did he act as partner? - A. He did; he had the management of the business. He ceased to attend about the beginning of March I think.

Mr. CONSTANTINE. I am solicitor to Mr. Smith. The partnership ceased the beginning of the year by a notice in writing signed by them both. I know that before that they agreed to dissolve. Mr. Ricardo assisted in winding up the books. They instructed me to prepare an advertisement for the Gazette, which I did. They signed a paper empowering me to do so. This was before the issuing of the Commission.

JOSIAH SMITH re-examined. The bills are endorsed by my uncle, Mr. William Smith ; they are still in his possession. I do not know whether they have been to any banker. I cannot say why they are all endorsed - they are sometimes endorsed before they are paid away. I cannot say whether they were discounted, or ever out of his possession. I wished to draw at six months for the amount, but he objected, and I drew at two and three months.

The bills in question were here read; they were payable to the drawer's order, and accepted by the prisoner.

ALFRED VIDLER . I am a plumber, and live at Hastings. I know the prisoner - he lived at Hastings, and in in his window were articles of jewellery, china, time-pieces and fancy goods - he managed the business, and his name was written at the side of the door, Evani, from Russia; I have seen him selling goods in his shop; I have known him in that shop, and at another at Hastings for two years, during which time he exhibited the same sort of of goods - he left Hastings on the 23d of February, and the shop was shut up - he has never returned - the shop was not opened before the Commission issued - I had reason to go to his house for Mr. Smith after he left, to enquire respecting money; there was nobody there; he only occupied the shop and two small rooms behind - his apartments were shut up.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often have you been there - A. Several times; there is only one entrance to his premises, and the door was closed.

COURT. Q. When did you go last - A. I went with Searle the messenger, who broke in - I shewed him the house. I followed him - nobody was there. I first went there about a week after he left Hastings - he lived in the room behind the shop, and slept there. I only know of his leaving in consequence of his not being seen there - he has been absent at times before, but his shop was never closed.

MR. COURTINE. I produce the adjudication under the Commission, and was present when the Commissioner signed it - it is dated 20th March, 1824 (read)

JAMES SEARLE . I am assistant to Charles Cutten , the messenger under the commission. The prisoner having absconded, I stuck up a notice in his premises at Hatings, for him to surrender to the Commissioners. I stuck it over the parlour mantle-piece - Vidler shewed me the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You stuck it in the parlour - A. Yes; the only entrance is through the shop. I took possession on the 22d March, and left on the 31st of May, by order of the assignee. I gave possession to Francis Runder , an assignee, and left the notice stuck up then. I had stuck it up the day I entered. I had broken into the house about ten or eleven o'clock. I made no endeavour to find the prisoner to serve him personally.

The notice was here read, requiring the prisoner to appear on the 27th of March, 3d of April, and 1st of May; also the London Gazette, containing the same notice.

MR. CONSTANTINE. I was present at the first meeting, on the 27th of March; the same Commssionrs attended as opened the commission.

MR. C. REEVES. I produce the proceedings under the Commissioner; I have a memorandum of the proceedings at the second meeting, the 3rd of April, the same Commissioners attended as before, and Mr. Hudson qualified that day in my presence, and has subscribed his qualification; the bankrupt did not surrender on that day. The same Commissioners attended the third meeting on the 1st of May, the bankrupt surrendered on that day and the meeting was adjourned; here is the order of adjournment - (read) adjouring to the 1st of June, the bankrupt not being prepared to disclose his effects.) The bankrupt had subscribed a request for further time at the third meeting. I was at the meeting on the 1st of June; Mr. Goulburn qualified then, and the Bankrupt appeared - (read) -

"F. Runder, one of the assignees, having stated upon oath that he had reason to suspect that property was not accounted for - this meeting is adjourned to the 15th of June."

Q. Now turn to the 15th of June - A. The bankrupt again surrendered, and subscribed his examination on that day, and delivered in accounts which are annexed to the deposition made by him; they contain a balance sheet, and an account of the disposal of his property.

The deposition made by the prisoner was here read, stating that George Evani having appeared before the Committee, on his oath, saith that the book marked A, produced and delivered up by him, together with the goods and things seized by and under the commission, and the effects and books delivered up, together with 2 s., do contain, and are a true disclosure of all his estate and effects, &c., except such as have really been sold or disposed of, and money laid out in the necessary expenses of his family, and hath delivered up all his goods &c., as are now in his custody, power, or possession, except wearing apparel, and has not reserved or concealed any property, books, or papers, with intent to defraud his creditors.

Signed

G. EVANI.

MR. REEVES. Here are his accounts; I have examined them carefully; the articles enumerated in the indictment are not mentioned in any of the accounts, to the best of my knowledge. Mr. Runder, one of the Assignees, had the book marked A.

The balance sheet was here referred to, and contained no account of the property in question.

JAMES SEARLE re-examined. I took possession of the goods at Hastings; there was no watches, lockets, bracelets, ear-rings, rings, brooches, or gold chains; there were some common seals and keys, but not gold ones; there were six or seven neck-laces, three or four of them gold, but no spectacles or eye-glasses, thimbles, nor musical snuff-boxes.

Mr. FRANCIS RUNDER , an assignee under the Commission here executed a release to the estate, giving up all his interest on any dividends, &c., under the same, and was then examined.

MR. RUNDER. I am an acting assignee under the Commission, and was present on the 15th of June, when the prisoner's last examination took place. I had two books in my possession - I do not know how they were marked. They were the same books as the bankrupt produced. I looked over them, to see if there were any small debts which could be recovered. They were produced to me four or five days before the, last meeting, and left at my house. I took them to the meeting, and gave them to my co-assignee, or Mr. Lewis's, the accountant. I did not look over them carefully - I do not know what has become of them.

MARK EDWARD LEWIS . I am an accountant, and was employed by the assignees to make up these books - the bankrupt attended me for that purpose; the accounts were made under his direction, from bills handed to me by the assignees. The books were not produced to me. I saw him produce a book marked A, at the last meeting. The last time I saw it was in Mr. Runder's possession - the bankrupt was asked for them at the examination on the 15th of June, and said Mr. Runder had them. Mr. Runder came without them, but went home and brought, I think, only one - it was handed in with the accounts. I sat within half a yard of the bankrupt - I do not know what became of the books.

MARY HUTCHINSON . I live at No. 5, Upper Eaton-street, Pimlico. Glasspoole is my cousin, and lived in Three Tunn-court, Borough, in April last, with her mother. On the 4th of April, at ten o'clock at night, she came to my father's in a coach, and brought two small boxes, covered with carpet. They were put into a cupboard under the china press, in our front kitchen - she went away; the carpet was sewed round them with pack-thread - one was moved into a closet under the stairs, and the other into a closet in the area. Three of the creditors and a messenger came on the 10th of August and fetched them away. I saw the prisoner three doors from my father's house, in the street, on the 10th of August, when he was taken. Glasspoole was at my father's house that morning, and Evani knocked at the door, which I answered; he asked for Miss Glasspoole - I said if he would walk a few paces from the door I would send her to him, but I said nothing to her - she went out. I did not observe where she went to - she returned in about five minutes. I did

not see Evani again - she staid about half an hour, and then left.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I am the last witness's brother. These boxes were taken away on the 10th of August. On the 13th, about half-past nine o'clock, I went to the Coach and Horses public-house, Dover-street, Piccadilly; and about half-past ten o'clock the prisoner came in - the officers were in waiting - he said to me,

"Sir, the boxes and property do belong to me."

Q. What boxes did he mean - A. I cannot say that he meant these boxes; they were then in possession of the creditors; I had never seen them in my father's house myself; he said the boxes belonged to him, and if I would give them up he would give me every satisfaction that they belonged to him.

Q. What had you said to him to produce this conversation - A. The boxes had been the cause of much conversation between Glasspool and me. I did not mention her name to him.

Q. Tell us how the conversation began - A. He addressed me nearly in those words: it was merely a plan for his apprehension; I therefore seemed to agree with his proposal; he inclined his head on the table, and said,

"Sir, my head is under your arm;" the officer with a creditor then came in and took him.

MARIA HUTCHINSON . I am the last witness's sister. On the 12th of August, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, when my cousin Glasspole was leaving our house, I saw the prisoner on the opposite side of the way; she had come about half-past eleven o'clock; and when she went out, he was standing opposite the door; she went down by the public-house to go down Arabella-row; he walked very slowly after her while I had the door open, but I pulled it open again, and saw him walking very fast after her, and crossing over: on the following morning, about seven o'clock, Glasspoole came again, and I saw the prisoner walking about for a considerable time, and about eight o'clock he knocked at the door: I was at the foot of the stairs, and heard him ask for Miss Glasspoole, my sister, who opened the door, told him if he would walk a few paces Miss Glasspoole would come to him; we went down and told her; she went to the door, and said,

"Where is the man?" my sister pointed to him, and she went out immediately: I saw the boxes on the night of the 4th of April, but was out when they were brought; I saw them next day in the china press, covered with carpet, and sewn with pack-thread; I saw Searle take the same away: I had moved them from the china press.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever see the boxes - A. They were covered with carpet, but I saw through the pack-thread; one was a black wooden box, and the other a hair trunk.

MARTHA HUTCHINSON . I am mother of the last witness. On the 4th of April, Glasspoole my niece brought two boxes to our house; soon after Christmas I was at Mrs. Glasspoole's, Three Tunn-court, Borough, and saw Evani there - and again on the 25th of February at tea; I merely called in for a rest; it was candle-light, and I stumbled over some boxes on the floor (on the 25th of February); he was in the room; Hannah Glasspoole made an observation about them, but he was not then present.

JAMES SEARLE re-examined. On the 10th of August I seized two boxes at Eaton-street, which I now produce; they contain watches, gold chains, lockets, bracelets, earrings, brooches, and other jewellery; I should value them at 1000 l.

MR. JOHN FURNESS , JUN. My father is a jeweller, and a creditor of the prisoner's to the amount of 220 l.; I was present at the sale and delivery of the goods to the prisoner on the 7th of January - here are about 90 l. worth of the same goods here - here are seven gold seals, worth 10 l. cost price - eight gold rings, worth 5 l.; a necklace, value 10 l.; six pearl lockets, value 9 l.; nine pairs of ear-rings, value 14 l.; five gold chains, value 20 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How do you identify them - A. By our private mark, which is on every article we sell; but we have not sold similar articles of this pattern precisely.

ROBERT WEST . I am shopman to Mr. Adams, watch manufacturer, St. John-square. Here is a watch worth full thirty guineas, in this box, which he sold to the prisoner in January - I saw it delivered to him; here is another, worth ten guineas, which was sold to him at the same time - here is another, worth