Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th July 1824.
Reference Number: 18240715
Reference Number: f18240715-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On THURSDAY, 15th of JULY, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Stephen Gaselee , Esq., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

William Greig ,

George Brandford ,

Robert Popplewell ,

Joseph Barnes ,

William Price ,

William Brown ,

Henry J. Parnell ,

John Fairburn ,

William Bright ,

Samuel Chapman ,

Richard Pothoot ,

John Alport .

2nd London Jury.

George Tringham ,

Thomas Hanson ,

John Gaunt ,

Jarvis Belshaw ,

Matthew Atherly ,

William Goodman ,

Robert Peel ,

William Lidyard ,

James Rutherford ,

Samuel Thompson ,

John Warner ,

John Evans .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Robert Matthews ,

William Baldy ,

Peter Thompson ,

Joseph Sharp ,

William Read ,

William Rigby ,

Goden Park ,

John Weatherell ,

George Taylor ,

James Scholer ,

Ormand Weatherill ,

John Young .

2d Middlesex Jury.

Alexander Japp ,

Wm. Smith ,

Stephen Ackerman ,

Wm. Binton ,

Wm. Cribb ,

Wm. R. Wadelove ,

Edward Wright ,

Thomas Booth ,

Henry Gwillam ,

Francis Corster ,

John Slater ,

Arthur Wormall .

3d Middlesex Jury.

Edward Farley ,

Robert Robinson ,

Thomas Sheriff ,

Peter Rigby ,

Wm. Bevan ,

Thomas Stanly ,

John Shepherd ,

Henry Williams ,

James Hogray ,

Charles Way ,

Joseph Reynolds ,

George Russell .

4th Middlesex Jury.

Francis Clarke ,

Richard Stagg ,

Robert Norris ,

James Griffith ,

John Vintner ,

Thomas Holland ,

Samuel Ellis ,

James Davis ,

Charles Roberts ,

Joseph Sanderson ,

George Green ,

William Marshall .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 15, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240715-1

1070. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , in the dwelling-house of our Lord the King, a 5 l. Bank note , the property of James Dawn .

JAMES DAWN . I am a medical officer, belonging to the 3d Dragoons , which were quartered at Hounslow barracks ; I slept in the barracks, and was in the habit of leaving my keys in the table drawer of my room - my writing desk was in the same room. On the 10th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went to the table drawer and took out my keys, and found I could not unlock the drawer of my writing desk, but upon pulling it it opened. I found it was unlocked; I had left it locked. I had left three 5 l. Bank notes there, and missed one. The prisoner was my servant; I called him up stairs in five minutes, and asked if he knew the key of my writing desk - he said he did not; I said I could swear that it had been opened, and a 5 l. note taken out; he said he knew nothing at all about it. I said nothing more at that time, but went to town on business, and took the two 5 l. notes with me. I returned next day, and on the road to the barracks met him going to Hounslow - he had been sent for my luggage - he saluted me and went on, and on getting to my room Hunt stated something, and when the prisoner returned with my carpet bag, I asked if he recollected what I had told him the day before, respecting my desk having been opened, and losing a 5 l. note; he said he did - I asked if he had never opened the desk, and seen any 5 l. notes; he said he could not read; I said,

"How can you tell such a falsehood, knowing as you do, that you have opened my desk, and have seen the notes" - he said he had forgotten to mention that circumstance to me the day before. I said, then probably he had forgotten something else, and had better recollect himself. He went to Hounslow that evening, and next morning, after having seen him, I went to Hester, the publican, and there saw a 5 l. note, No. 4752, which is mine, and one of the three which I had received from an agent; I know it by the number; they were not running numbers. I returned to the barracks, and told him I had discovered that he had changed a note with Hester - he seemed confused, and said nothing - he was then confined. I produce the note.

Prisoner. Q. You gave me a 5 l. note to get changed - A. That was on the 9th of May. I had originally received four 5 l. notes, and on the 9th of May gave him one of them to pay Hunt 1 l. 0 s. 8 d.; he brought me back four 1 l. country notes - and on the 17th I paid another of the notes to one of the officers. Between the 17th of May and the 7th of June I received another 5 l. note from an officer of the regiment, and put it into the drawer with the other two.

COURT. Q. How long before the 10th of June had you seen the three 5 l. notes - A. I cannot say my Lord. I think the third note was paid me about the 25th or 26th of May - the other two were safe then. I had no occasion to take either of them out afterwards.

Prisoner. You gave me a second note, and I brought you four sovereigns and silver in change - Witness. I gave him only one, and received no change but what I have mentioned.

ELIZABETH HUNT . I wash for the prosecutor, and clean his room. One day in April, about a month or five weeks before the note was missed, I was in the room; Robinson came in; he took the bunch of keys, and opened the desk - he tried several keys before he could open it - I believe he took the keys from the table drawer, but cannot tell; he opened the desk at last, and called me to look at the notes - I saw some 5 l. notes, but how many I could not tell; there was more than one. I begged of him to put them up again; he did so, and locked the desk as I thought. I mentioned this to Mr. Dawn when the note was missed. I did not see him at the desk at any other time.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I wanted a wafer from master's drawer - A. He said in the other room that he wanted a wafer. When I told him to put the notes up again he said there was no harm in looking.

JOHN HESTER . I keep a public-house at Hounslow. The prisoner came to me on a Saturday in June - it was a day or two before I saw Mr. Dawn; he came for change for a 5 l. note; I was very busy, and said I could not give him change, not having time to go up stairs - he asked me to give him part, and he would call for the rest on Sunday; I gave him 20 s.; he left the note, and had the rest on Sunday. I put the note into my desk; I had other 5 l. notes there, and do not know that from any other, as I had given a serjeant change for a 5 l. note on the same day, and cannot distinguish the two. Mr. Dawn came and enquired about it a few days after - I fetched him down all the Bank notes I had. I put three down; he said neither of those was his; I then put down two, one of which I received from the prisoner, and the other from the serjeant. I had put these two by separate from

the others, but I do not know which of them I had from the prisoner. Mr. Dawn claimed one of them - he had a paper with three or four numbers on it.

MR. DAWN. Here is the note; it is one of those I received, and I believe it is the one taken from my drawer.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240715-2

1071. THOMAS HABEN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Vaughan , about ten o'clock in the night of the 23d of June , and stealing twelve pairs of stockings, value 20 s. , his property.

WILLIAM HUNT . I am servant to Mr. John Vaughan , who is a haberdasher , and lives at the corner of Lamb's Conduit-street, in the parish of St. George the Martyr, Queen-square. On Wednesday, the 23d of June, about a quarter to ten o'clock in the evening, Seaton, the shopman alarmed me; I ran out to the shop door, which is in Lamb's Conduit-street , and round to the window, which looks into Theobald's-road - I found the window had been cut, and the prisoner standing close to it, with some stockings in his hand, rather behind his coat; he had a frock coat on - I could just discover something in his hand. I collared him, and took twelve pairs of stockings from his hand; I asked how he came by them - he said he picked them up. I took him into the shop. They belonged to Mr. Vaughan - I had put them into the window myself, about a week before. I know them by a private mark on one pair; they were tied in one parcel. He was given in charge. Seaton saw him in the shop. Mr. Vaughan took the stockings to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Upon your going up to the prisoner he immediately said he had picked them up - A. When I took hold of him he said,

"How could you think of my stealing stockings; I picked them up." They were delivered to Taylor. I saw nobody run away. We lost another parcel of stockings, and one of night caps, which have not been found.

JOHN SEATON . I am shopman to Mr. Vaughan. I heard the window crack, and immediately ran out to the front window, which had been broken, but seeing nothing I went in. I afterwards recollected the window in Theobald's-road; I went there, and missed a dozen of stockings, and a dozen of caps. I went outside, looked about, came in, and presently I saw a man's hand inside the window, taking this dozen of stockings out - I immediately told Hunt to run - I followed, got up to him in a moment, and the prisoner was then in his custody. I saw nobody else in the street.

Cross-examined. Q. What became of the stockings - A. They were given to us on the following morning, at Hatton-garden. The window had been cracked a little before, but was not broken. I heard him say he had picked them up.

MICHAEL LYON . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner in charge.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. The stockings were on the table in the watch-house - I took them to Hatton-garden, and delivered them to Hunt.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they not soiled - A. They were; it was a rainy night; they appeared to have fallen down - there was mud upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been walking with a friend, and coming home through Lamb's Conduit-street, I saw something laying under the window; I picked it up, and the young man came and collared me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-3

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1072. CHARLES WEST and JAMES SHEEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Russell , about the hour of four in the forenoon of the 15th of June , at St. Luke, Chelsea , (the said Joseph Russell and others of his family therein being) and stealing therein a coat, value 5 s.; a cap, value 6 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a mortar, 1 s.; a pair of boots, value 5 s.; a pair of shoes, value 5 s., and 9 lbs. weight of bacon, value 5 s. , his property.

JOSEPH RUSSELL . I am a yeoman , and live at Chelsea, in the parish of St. Luke. On the 15th of June, about four o'clock in the morning I was in bed, and was alarmed by a violent knocking at the door - my wife went down stairs, returned, and said something; I went down, and found the back kitchen window open - the sash was lifted up. We missed a piece of bacon, a mortar, a pair of high shoes, a pair of stockings, a coat, and other things - the value of the whole was 20 s. or 25 s. They were taken from both the kitchens, and the passage. I went to the watch-house, found some of the property there, and told Maybank that more was missing - he had the two prisoners in custody, and shewed them to me; West had my coat on; we then went to Sheen, and he had got my shoes on. Both the coat and shoes had been stolen that night with the other property. An old pair of shoes were left in the outer wash-house - Maybank fetched them, but I did not see him fit them to Sheen.

EMMA RUSSELL . I live with my father. We were alarmed at four o'clock in the morning, by the watchman rapping at the door. I went to bed at ten o'clock the night before - the window was then shut down; I found it open in the morning, and missed this property.

JOHN HAMILTON . I am a watchman of St. Luke, Chelsea. On the 15th of June, between four and five o'clock in the morning, a man came and gave me information. - On going towards the prosecutor's house I saw West throw part of a ham, and a brass mortar over the wall from Russell's yard; I said,

"You have been robbing the house; where is your companion?" he made no answer, but jumped over the wall. I took him into custody, and found a pair of high shoes in his pocket; I took him to the watch-house, returned, and found Sheen concealed in Russell's privy. Russell claimed the coat which one of them had on.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am an officer. A little after four o'clock West was brought to the watch-house - I locked him up, and went to the watchman - we found Sheen in the privy of the adjoining house. I examined Russell's premises, and on the border of the wall I found the marks of large nails of shoes or boots; Sheen had nails in his shoes; we took one out, and compared it with the wall, and I compared the shoe with the wall - the nails corresponded with the marks. Russell claimed the shoes Sheen wore, and the coat which West had on. Sheen had left his old shoes behind in Russell's wash-house - I gave

them to him afterwards, and they fitted him. Sheen had got West's coat on, for when I took this coat off, he said,

"Go to the other man and get my coat," which I did; he had a jacket on besides.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners made no Defence.

WEST - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

SHEEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240715-4

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1073. JOHN JAY alias NORFOLK , was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , at St. Andrew, Holborn , a gelding, price 25 l., and a mare, price 20 l. , the property of Daniel Poole , the elder.

DANIEL POOLE . I live at Upminster, in Essex , and am a farmer . On the 24th of June I lost a gelding and a mare from a pasture field, near my house - my son turned them out the evening before. I missed them between four and five o'clock in the morning; they were in an inner field; the outer field next the common was locked. On the following night, about eleven or twelve o'clock my son brought them back; they are the same as I lost - I had had them some time.

DANIEL POOLE , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. I turned the mare and gelding into the field at three o'clock in the afternoon of the 23d of June - I went again in the morning, a little after five o'clock, and they were gone. I traced them out of the pasture, and found the posture gate taken of its hinges; it had been locked. I came to town about eleven or twelve o'clock, and about one or two I found them at Mr. White's stable, Back-hill, near Hatton-garden. I am certain they are my father's.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a licensed horse-slaughterer, and live in Coppice-row, and have stables on Back-hill. On the 24th of June, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I was called up by the prisoner, to purchase two horses; he brought them to be slaughtered. I did not know him before. One was a young horse, between four and five years old, not fit for slaughter. He offered them both for 6 l.; I said they were too good to be killed, what was his reason for wishing them killed, and had he got any note? - he said the two horses had run away, and broken a child's leg, and were to be killed for that. He at first said they belonged to Mrs. Whittle, of Chelmsford, and then to Mrs. Wickham, of Rickle, Essex. I told him to walk down to my stables with the horses, which he did, and I called up Read, the officer, who lives opposite to my stables. I sent to the toll man at Whitechapel turnpike, who gave Poole information when he enquired about them.

WILLIAM ROLFE . I am servant to White. About half-past five o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner in Cow-cross, with the horses - he asked a man where there was a knacker's; I went up, and asked what he wanted, and told him they were too good to be killed; he said they must be killed. I took him to Mr. White. Poole's son saw the horses in my master's stable, and took them away.

MR. POOLE. The two horses were worth 40 l.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, and asked where he brought the horses from; he said he had them from Mrs. Wickham, at Rickle, and if I would let him go he would bring a note to me about them. I saw Poole, who claimed them. I went again to fetch the prisoner before the Magistrate, and said,

"You have been telling me falsehoods, for they came from Upminster, and it was there you took them from" - he said,

"Yes, I did; I think the devil was in me; I took them through distress." I found only 3 1/2 d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lady and gentleman; I had neither money or victuals - I was telling them my story; they gave me 1 s., and said if I would take these two horses to town, (and told me where to take them to,) and they would give me 6 l. I took them from Upminster-common. The gentleman told me to stop there till he fetched them. I brought them up, and the young man asked what I was to have for them; I said 6 l. I did not know what was to be done to them. I have had a hurt in my head, and am not quite so right in my mind as I ought to be.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

THOMAS WHITE. My Lord, I wish to recommend him to Mercy, believing him not right in his mind.

DANIEL POOLE . I never heard that he was not right in his head.

Reference Number: t18240715-5

1074. EDWARD COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , at St. Leonard, Shoredith , a clock, value 3 l., the goods of William Sadgrove , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HENRY SADGROVE . I am the son of William Sadgrove , who lives in Moorfields, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 3d of July this clock was missed off a hook at the back of the warehouse - I saw it safe two or three days before. The prisoner is a stranger. Upon missing it I went to Phillips, the maker, and found that it had been advertised. I went to Worship-street office, and found it there, and am certain of it - it has a private mark, in my father's hand-writing upon it. It cost my father 3 l. 5 s. to sell again.

Prisoner. Q. Was you the first person who missed it - A. No, Rose, the servant missed it first. I did not miss it till Friday last.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ROSE . I am servant to Mr. Sadgrove, who is a furniture broker. I missed the clock about ten o'clock one morning, about a fortnight ago. The shop is always open in the day time.

Prisoner. Q. How long was it before you mentioned it to your master - A. Three or four days after, as I thought at first that it was gone to be cleaned, or was sold. It hung at the bottom of the shop, six or eight feet high - we have more clocks, but not in the shop. We used this to tell the time by.

THOMAS GRENVILLE . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. On the 3d of July, about half-past twelve o'clock at night I was on duty - my brother watchman, Garret, brought the prisoner up, and asked me to assist in taking him to the watch-house, which I did - he had a bag in his hand, and gave it to Garret to carry, and at the watch-house we found the clock in it. He said there that it was given to to him at the corner of Coleman-street, City, to clean, but did not say when it was given to him.

Prisoner. Q. What has become of Garret - A. He is in prison, charged with felony.

JURY. Q. Did you see the prisoner give the bag to Garret - A. I did.

RICHARD CONSTABLE . On Saturday morning, the 3d of July, about a quarter to one o'clock I was going my rounds, as constable of the night - Grenville ran after me, and told me to make haste - when I returned I opened the bag, and found the clock in it; the prisoner was in custody there. Garret said in his hearing, that he had stopped him going into No. 11, James-street, Featherstone-street. I said to the prisoner,

"Whose property is this?" putting my hand on the clock - he said,

"It is mine." I asked how he came by it - he said,

"I am a jeweller; I have been doing a great deal of jewellery work for a person, and have taken this in part of payment;" I said, it might be so, but where did he bring it from; he said, from the Queen's-head, City-road. I asked the name of the man he had it from - he said from Delander. I asked where he lived - he said he did not know, and that his own name was Edward Cooke . I asked where he himself lived - he said,

"Has not the watchman already told you; they say I have been cohabiting with a common prostitute for this five or six weeks, which is false, for I have not been there above three nights." I said,

"Where do you live?" he said at No. 7, Tavistock-street, Covent-garden, and that he was a law-stationer. I asked where the office was that he worked at - he said, within two or three doors of Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane. While I was searching him I said,

"Now, where did you get this clock; was you standing or sitting" - he then said,

"At the corner of Coleman-street, City; I was standing." I asked what he was to do with the clock; he said he had it to repair; I said, it was already going, and did not appear to want repairing. Next day, as I took him to the office, I asked what part of it he was to repair - he said he did not know, for he was not to touch it till he met the man that evening, at the Queen's-head, public-house, City-road. I went to No. 7, Tavistock-street, which is a very respectable house; I found he was known there, and that his mother lodges there. I have not enquired at the law-stationer's. I enquired at the Queen's Head; they knew nothing of him. I found he had not been to Tavistock-street since January. The prosecutor's house is close to Broad-street-buildings, three hundred yards or more from Coleman-street. I could not find that he had ever been a clock-maker.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give you an account of a person named Delander - A. No; I did not state so to the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Queen's Head, City-road on the evening of the 2d of July; a person was there who I had met five or six times before, and when the house was closed we walked together as far as Finsbury; he said he was much involved, and could I lend him 2 l. to pay his rent, as he expected his goods would be seized, and would I wait there while he went and fetched me a clock - I was to bring it the following evening to the Queen's Head. I have sent there, and understand he was there, and sent in for me, but would not remain.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18240715-6

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1075. PHILIP SMITH alias LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , at St. George, Hanover-square , twenty-seven yards of kerseymere, value 8 l., the goods of John Jervis , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES GOULD . I am foreman to John Jervis , who lives at No. 47, Conduit-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 2d of July, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was standing at the further end of the shop; the prisoner came in, and took up a piece of kerseymere, which laid on a chair, three or four yards from the door - he went out, about sixty or seventy yards, and I after him; he walked leisurely, crossed the street, and went between two coaches on the stand - I followed, and lost sight of him for a moment, as he went through the coaches; I overtook him getting into the fifth coach, with the kerseymere under his arm - he struggled a little, but the waterman assisted me, and we took him back. The kerseymere is my master's property, and worth 8 l. He said it was a bad morning's work, that was all. I have no doubt of his being the man who took it out of the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long is your shop - A. About thirty-three feet. I did not see him come in, but saw him going out. I only saw his back in the shop, and do not swear that it was him in the shop.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence; but five witnesses gave him a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, in consequence of his Character .

Reference Number: t18240715-7

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1076. JOHN FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , at St. Paul, Covent-garden , three pieces of cloth, containing together eight yards, value 6 l., and two yards of drill, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Abbott , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH ABBOTT . I live at No. 35, Southampton-street , in the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden - mine is a private house. On Tuesday morning, the 6th of July, between eight and nine o'clock, I lost five yards of cloth, five yards of kerseymere, and two yards of drill off my parlour table. The value of the whole is 6 l. 17 s. I know nothing of the prisoner; the servant stopped him going out with the property.

LUCY SMALLWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Abbott. On Tuesday, the 6th of July, I went over to the oil-shop, leaving the door ajar - I came back and saw it open; the prisoner walked out with this cloth under his arm - he met me on the step of the door. I went in and asked my master if he had given a man any cloth; he said No, and I ran after him, and saw him down Maiden-lane. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped. I am certain that he is the man - I saw him drop the property when I called Stop thief! it was picked up and given to my master.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear I am the man who came out of the door - A. Yes.

MR. ABBOTT. The cloth was given to me in Maiden-lane, and is mine - it was picked up by somebody.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18240715-8

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1077. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , in the dwelling-house of Mary Miller , a gown, value 3 s.; seven napkins, value 10 s.; two bed gowns, value 10 s.; a tippet, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 6 s.; three pairs of stockings, value 12 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; three tablecloths, value 15 s.; four spoons, value 25 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; two pillowcases, value 2 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; three caps, value 3 s., and two pairs of cuffs, value 2 s. , the goods of the said Mary Miller , to whom she was servant .

MARY MILLER . I am landlady of Miller's Hotel, Jermyn-street . The prisoner was about three weeks in my service.

MARTHA SMITH . I am housekeeper at the Hotel. In consequence of information I went to the prisoner's box in her room - she unlocked it herself, by mistress's desire; she took out a shift, and put it on her arm, then took out a flannel petticoat, and covered it with it. I said,

"You have got a shift of my mistress's there" - she said,

"No, it is an apron" - I looked, and it was a shift. She then took out a pair of stockings, marked E. M., which belong to mistress's sister, and another pair of mistress's; also a dinner napkin, an apron, and several other articles. She begged of me not to tell mistress.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. Smith gave me the articles she has mentioned.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker. I have two pillow-cases, two napkins, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner.

GEORGE FROST . I have a tablecloth, a napkin, a teaspoon, a desert spoon, and a handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM MAINWARING FENNER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a gown, two napkins, a bed-gown, and a tippet, pawned for 10 s., in the name of Marriot. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JOHN MILES . I took her into custody, and found duplicates of this property upon her.

WILLIAM MAINWARING FENNER . Here are five duplicates of the property pawned with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I wish to ask my mistress if she did not make me any promise.

MRS. MILLER. I made her no promise. I said when I first suspected her that if she let me search her boxes it might prevent an exposure.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-9

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1078. GEORGE BRUNSWICK was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Catherine Bath , on the night of the 5th of May , and stealing two counterpanes, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 2 s., and a blanket, value 1 s. , her property.

CATHERINE BATH . I live in St. Catherine's . On the 5th of May, about eight o'clock at night I went out, and left nobody in my room - there were people in the house. I locked my room door. I returned about nine, and found it broken open, and the bed clothes gone - I was told a black man had taken them. I went to the prisoner's lodging about half-past eleven o'clock, and found them; I did not know him before.

HUGH PARSONS . On the 1st of May the prisoner took a furnished room at a house of mine, and remained till the Wednesday night, and then left. He came in on the 5th of May, about a quarter to ten o'clock, and asked my wife for a candle; she refused, and said she would go into his room, and see that all was safe - we went up, and the prosecutrix's property was in his room; he said they were his own. About eleven o'clock I heard of this robbery, and the watchman took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-10

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1079. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Isaac Harris , on the night of the 2d of July , and stealing seventeen pairs of breeches, value 2 l. 11 s.; thirty-eight waistcoats, value 3 l. 16 s., and thirty-nine pairs of trowsers, value 5 l. 17 s. , his property.

ISAAC HARRIS . I am a slopseller , and live in Clark's-buildings, Tower-hill. On the 2d of July, about seven o'clock, I shut up my shop, and returned between nine and ten - I then tried the door; it was safe. I unlocked it to go in, and heard a noise inside the shop; it was then dark. I unbolted the door, and opened it about a foot, and hearing a noise in the shop I immediately pulled it too, and somebody inside tried to pull it open, and forced the latch of the door out of my hand - three men rushed out of the shop - one ran towards the Minories, and two down Princes-street, which is nearly opposite my house. I followed them as quick as possible; some persons got before me, and pursued the prisoner; I cannot positively swear that he is one of those who came out of the shop. He said that was what he got by running after the thief. Upon going into my shop I found I had lost nothing, but the goods stated in the indictment were taken off the shelves, and put into sacks, ready to be carried away. The property is worth 9 l. or 10 l.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. You could not identify the prisoner - A. No. I locked the door when I went out.

JAMES RICHARDSON. I live next door to Harris. About a quarter before ten o'clock at night, I was knocking some nails into the ceiling of my shop, and heard a voice say,

"For God's sake come and help me; here are thieves in the house." I ran to the door, and saw two men run from the pavement across the road, and up Princes-street - I followed, and never lost sight of them till I secured the prisoner; I did not see him come out of the door - he is one of the two who ran from the pavement; other people were pursuing behind me, but I was first. He asked what I took him for; I said,

"For breaking into Harris's house," and at that time Harris and some neighbours came up, and took him from me.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not tell whether anybody ran before you got out - A. No.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found a

handkerchief round his hand, and one of his fingers were bleeding.

ISAAC HARRIS re-examined. When I got into the shop I found some squares of glass broken, but whether that was done before I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-11

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1080. DANIEL PIZZEY and JOHN PIZZEY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Harris , on the 28th of May , (no person being therein,) and stealing two hats, value 6 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , his property.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

MARY HARRIS . My husband's name is Joseph - we live at Greenford , and rent the house. On the 28th of May, I and all my family went out to work - I secured the door and windows. I returned between twelve and one o'clock, to fetch some victuals, and saw the window open - I went up stairs and found a hat box on the floor, and another in a chair; the hats were gone; also a pair of white worsted stockings, which were footed with grey. The prisoners lived next door to me.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. At what time in the morning did you go out - A. Between six and seven o'clock; I was the last person in the house. I took my husband and son's breakfast to them where they work. I hasped the window.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I went out to work at night, and did not return till night. Here are the two hats - they are worth about 3 s. each.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am an officer. On the 18th of June I apprehended the prisoners at their father's house, and found the stockings on John's legs. I found one hat in a box at his father's, and the other at his grandmother's. John said next day that he took the stockings by mistake one rainy day, when they hung out with some of his mother's things.

JOHN DANCE . I confirm Coleman's statement.

MARY HARRIS . These stockings are mine - they hung on a chair by the window where they got in.

JOHN PIZZEY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing the stockings only . - Confined Nine Months .

DANIEL PIZZEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-12

1081. DANIEL PIZZEY and JOHN PIZZEY were again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 2 lbs. of beef, value 1 s.; 1 lb. of dripping, value 5 d.; a handkerchief, value 1 s., and four penny pieces, the property of Joseph Harris ; a waistcoat, value 2 s., and a tobacco box, value 4 d. , the goods of Joseph Harris , the younger .

MARY HARRIS . On the 11th of May I went out to my labour with my family, and when I came home I missed some bacon, beef, dripping, a waistcoat, a silk handkerchief, and a tobacco box. I have since seen the waistcoat, and know it by a tear. The handkerchief was marked J. B., and was twilled.

JOSEPH HARRIS , JUN. Here is my waistcoat; I saw it on the prisoner Daniel's back one day, and tried to take him, but the constable had no warrant, and would not go into the house - it was found in a box at his father's house when he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear to it - A. Yes, by a mark which is on it. I spoke to him for full twenty minutes when he had it on, but did not charge him with stealing it, as I was alone. He was in a field adjoining my father's orchard.

RICHARD COLEMAN . When I apprehended Daniel I found an old twilled handkerchief on his neck, with the letter B. marked in the corner - I did not know that it was the prosecutor's, and let him put it on again, and in three quarters of an hour I found that he had another handkerchief on, which had been in his hat before; I could not then find the twilled one. I found the waistcoat in a box at his father's.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prosecutor with you when you apprehended him - A. No; he had been for a constable one evening, who would not take him without a warrant. It was a dark chocolate coloured silk handkerchief, and when I went to him again he had a cotton one on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL PIZZEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Nine Months .

JOHN PIZZEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-13

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1082. WILLIAM HILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , a watch, value 5 l., the goods of James Bowyer , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BOWYER . I keep a public-house in Norton-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 17th of June, at four o'clock in the afternoon I went out, leaving my watch hanging over the mantle-piece in the bar. I returned about seven, and it was gone.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 17th of June, about twelve o'clock at night, I was at the end of Cavendish-street, and saw the prisoner coming towards me; I suspected him, having received information - he ran away; I followed and took him in Norton-street, and before I said anything to him he said,

"I will tell you where it is; I pawned it in Drury-lane;" he could not say at what house. I took him to the prosecutor, and asked what he had pawned; he said the watch which he had stolen out of the bar. I found the duplicate of a pair of breeches upon him, which he said he had bought at the shop where he had pawned it, by which means I traced it to Hedges.

EDWARD DANIEL DORMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Hedges, Drury-lane. The prisoner pawned this watch with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-14

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1083. ELIZA BUCKINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a gold chain and locket, value 4 l. 10 s.; a coat, value 25 s., and two pairs of stockings, value 8 s., the goods of Nicholas Germain , in the dwelling-house of William Mills .

NICHOLAS GERMAIN . I lodge at Mr. Mills, Berwick-street, Soho . I am employed at the Opera House . On Saturday the 8th of May I left my apartments about five o'clock, and did not return till one in the morning - I then missed my great coat from behind the door, and a silk handkerchief

I was very tired, and went to bed, but in the morning I missed this chain and locket, with a number of other articles of jewellery, from my drawers. I had left the prisoner in the room when I went out; she had been in the habit of coming there for the last four months, to work for me, and go on messages, as I had been ill. I gave information at Marlborough-street, and she was absent for a month after that - I could not find her at her lodgings. I took her myself in Mary-le-bone-street, four weeks after, and asked what she had done with my property; she said she was innocent. The chain and locket were found at the pawnbroker's.

JOSHUA PEARSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at the corner of Hanway-yard. On the 8th of May, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, this locket and chain were pawned in the name of May - I believe the prisoner to be the person, but will not be positive to her.

ROBERT BIRD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, who lives in Long-acre. On the 8th of May the prisoner pawned a coat in the name of Breaker.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office, and denied all knowledge of the property - she had a child in her arms, which she said belonged to a person in Moor-street, Seven-dials, where I got information, which led me to the pawnbrokers.

NICHOLAS GERMAIN . This property is all mine.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you live with me as your wife - A. No. She slept twice in my room.

Q. Did you not promise me these things to go to Mrs. Wood's in Lisle-street - A. No. I gave her a note to recommend her to Mrs. Wood. I have dealt with Wood in jewellery for some years.

Q. Does not she keep a house of ill-fame - A. Oh! all the world knows who Mrs. Wood is.

Q. Did you not say she wanted a servant, and I was to take that note to her, and that I could go to the Opera or play with her every night - A. I recommended her as a servant. I know gentlemen go there, but she keeps four servants.

Q. Did you not say you took girls home to live with you, and then recommended them to Wood - A. It is false.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him one evening - he took me home, and said I was to call on him in a week's time, which I did, and lived with him for a fortnight; he then asked if I should like to go into service, and wrote me the note - he gave me this property to go there, and said I could wear them at the play. I did not stop there, because it was a house of ill-fame.

MARIA SEAWOOD . The prisoner lived twelve months with me, and worked for us: my husband is a tailor. I persuaded her not to go to the prosecutor's, but he pressed her. I went to him one day, and he told me that they lived as man and wife. He wanted to take indecent liberties with me, but I got out of his room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-15

Second Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1084. ELIZABETH MORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , three blankets, value 5 s., the goods of William Philpott , in a lodging-room .

MARTHA PHILPOTT . I am the wife of William Philpott ; we live in Pancras-place . On the 31st of May, the prisoner took a furnished back room on our first floor, at 4 s. per week; she was a month and five days there, and paid regularly. I missed a necklace about a fortnight before, and asked her about it - she said she knew nothing about it, and I must have sent it into the country with my child's things. I had her taken up, and missed three blankets from her room; they were found at the pawnbroker's. She said they were taken out of the room when she was out.

THOMAS PEWTRISS . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, pawnbroker, Somer's-town. I have three blankets pawned on the 29th and 30th of June, by the prisoner, in the name of Morley. I am certain of her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-16

1085. ELIZABETH MORLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , a necklace, value 3 s. , the goods of William Philpott .

MARTHA PHILPOTT . I missed a cornelian necklace from the drawers in the back parlour.

THOMAS PEWTRISS . On the 18th of June the prisoner pawned this necklace.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-17

1086. ELIZABETH CAVANAGH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a pewter pot, value 1 s. 3 d. , the goods of John Short .

JOHN YOUNG . I am waiter to John Short , a publican , who lives in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove . On the 10th of June, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and had half a pint of beer - she then went into the yard, where there were some pots, returned in about three minutes, and went into the street. I followed, and asked what she had under her cloak; she said a pot. I found a quart pot there - she was half way down William-street. She said my mistress told her to take it; I told her to wait at the door while I went in and enquired, and while I was gone she absconded with the pot. I found out her lodging, and found it there.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you where I was to be found - A. She said she was going to Devonshire-place, but did not say to what number.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's lodging - she immediately handed me the pot from the cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to get my child a little water.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-18

1087. EDWARD WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June, one hundred bricks, value 3 s. , the goods of John Wetherell , the elder .

JOHN WETHERELL . I am a bricklayer , and live in Richmond-street, Soho. The prisoner was not in my employ. On the 29th of June I was building a house, No. 105, St. Martin's-lane.

ROBERT LEE . I am a carpenter, and live next door to No. 105, St. Martin's-lane. I saw the prisoner loading his hod with bricks from this house: he threw them down, and ran away, but returned soon after, and took up as many as he could in his arms, and ran down Turner's-court, then came back, filled his hod, and carried it down the court. I observed this twice. The bricks were against a board. I informed the prosecutor, and am sure he is the man.

JOHN COLEMAN . I am a carpenter. I was at work at Mr. Lee's, and saw the prisoner take away two hods of bricks, and two arms full - he took them up Turner's-court, right opposite. I am quite certain that he is the man.

GEORGE LEADBEATER . I am a patrol of Bow-street. Wetherell informed me of the bricks being stolen. I went and waited in Lee's shop for the prisoner to return, but he did not. I went and took him in Oxendon-street.

JOHN WETHERELL , JUN. Lee said these bricks were stolen. I found a deficiency in the pile. I could not find them in Turner's-court.

Prisoner's Defence. Why not stop me when I was taking them?

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-19

1088. JAMES ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , a watch, value 4 l.; a chain, value 2 d.; a seal, value 2 d.; a key, value 2 d., and a foreign coin, value 3 d., the goods of Henry Marnham , from his person .

HENRY MARNHAM . I am a farmer , and live at Acton. On the 15th of June, I had returned from Ascot Heath races - I went into the Red Lion, public-house, Ealing , about ten o'clock at night - I was very much intoxicated. I remember leaving the house, and sitting down opposite the door - I am certain that my watch was then in my fob, for I pulled it out at the door, and put it back again; the prisoner was then standing outside the door; I knew him before by sight. Somebody came and pretended to lift me up - I spoke very sharp, and they went away. I fell asleep there in about a quarter of an hour, and missed my watch at five o'clock in the morning.

JOHN WILLIAMSON , I am a constable. On Saturday evening, in consequence of information, I went and found the prisoner at the Horse and Groom, public-house, Ealing; he was intoxicated - he said,

"I know you are come after the bl - y tatler," which means a watch. He afterwards said he had pawned the watch at Knightsbridge - I went and found it there.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am shopman to Mr. Kimber, pawnbroker, Knightsbridge. On the 18th of June the prisoner pawned this watch.

THOMAS MARNHAM . I am the prosecutor's uncle. I was at the public-house with him, and was sober. When I came out I saw the prisoner, and taking him for my nephew, I said,

"Henry, what are you doing" - he said,

"It is not Henry, he is gone on."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the watch up in the path between three and four o'clock in the morning, and not hearing any enquiry about it I pawned it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-20

1089. WILLIAM JONAS and GEORGE WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Bottrell , from his person .

THOMAS BOTTRELL . I am servant to Messrs. Ward and Co., hosiers . On the 29th of June, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Piccadilly , and had my handkerchief in my right hand coat pocket - I did not miss it till somebody ran after me; it was produced by Mr. Woolley. The prisoners were about a yard behind me; they were charged with it, and both denied it.

JOHN WOLLEY . I am a haberdasher, and live in Piccadilly. I was standing in my shop, and saw the prisoners following Mr. Bottrell, who had a lady on each side of him. I saw one of them take the handkerchief out of his pocket - I could not see which took it, but they were in company. I ran and collared them, and found it on Wilson, in his breast pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JONAS'S Defence. I was walking by the other prisoner, and the gentleman ran out, and caught hold of me.

WILSON'S Defence. This man was three or four yards behind me. I felt something at my feet, stooped down, and put the handkerchief into my breast.

JONAS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-21

1090. CHARLES GRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Eaton , from his person .

MR. RICHARD EATON . I belong to the Ordnance-office . On the 5th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Wardour-street ; my handkerchief was in my right hand coat pocket. I stood to let two persons pass, and felt a touch at my pocket, turned round, and seeing the prisoner near me I charged him with it - he denied it, but afterwards produced my handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD GOOK . I was in Mr. Eaton's company, and saw him collar the prisoner, who attempted to get from him. I saw the handkerchief in Mr. Eaton's hand.

Prisoner. I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-22

1091. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Minshull , from his person .

JOHN MINSHULL . I am a clerk to Messrs. Freshfield and Kay . On the 30th of June, about a quarter past four o'clock, I was in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell ; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand - I asked what he did with it; he said he had not got it, and never touched it; he dropped it as I collared him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, in consequence of his youth.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240715-23

NEW COURT. (1st DAY,)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1092. JAMES WARD and WILLIAM PALMER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Lewis Crombie , from his person .

LEWIS CROMBIE . On the 5th of July, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Carlisle-street, Soho , and felt somebody at my left-hand pocket, in which was my handkerchief and pocket-book. I turned round, and saw the two prisoners immediately behind me; no other person was within three or four yards of me. I collared them both, and found my pocket handkerchief between the coat and waistcoat of Ward.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM BALANTINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoners and the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WARD'S Defence. I was passing the square, and saw the handkerchief lying against the rails - I took it up, and put it into my breast; the gentleman came and asked me for it, and I gave it to him directly.

PALMER'S Defence. I saw the officer and the gentleman lay hold of him, and when I came up he took me. I know no more of this young man than a stranger.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

PALMER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-24

1093. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , a hat, value 10 s. , the goods of George Jellicoe .

GEORGE JELLICOE . I am clerk to Mr. Tomlinson . I was in the Court of Chancery on the 29th of June, and left between twelve and one o'clock. I had placed my hat on the table at the right hand of the bar while I was engaged in business, and upon coming away I found it was gone - I saw it afterwards at Bow-street.

RICHARD BURGESS . I am an officer of the Court of Chancery. On the 29th of June I saw the prisoner sitting within about two yards from the recess; he had no hat on - in about ten minutes he moved to the recess, and staid there about ten minutes; he then removed, and I followed him, and saw him go out with the hat. I asked where he got it; he said it was his own - I took it off his head; he then said he must have left his hat in the Court. I had seen him the day before with this paper cap on his head. I fetched Mr. Jellicoe, who claimed the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of the Court when I was taken. I do not deny having taken it. I went quietly with him.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240715-25

1094. MARGARET HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , a shift, value 18 d., and an apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Ann Stevens .

ANN STEVENS . I live with my father, in Drury-lane . Between five and six o'clock on the 18th of June I missed a shift and apron, which were safe in a box in the garret about half-past five. The prisoner had got from a passage into the garret. I found her between eight and nine the same evening, at Mr. Simmons's, pledging them. She said her mother had sent her to pledge them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I took her into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you a girl gave me the things - A. Yes; she said the girl was outside the door, but I did not see her.

Prisoner's Defence. A girl sent me with the things to pawn; my mother had sent me to get my brother's shoes. The girl ran away afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18240715-26

1095. JOHN IRON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , two saws, value 5 s.; a chisel, value 9 d., and a gauge, value 3 d., the goods of James Whittell Mead ; three saws, value 10 s.; four planes, value 10 s.; two chisels, value 1 s. 6 d.; a screw-driver, value 1 s.; a hammer, value 18 d.; a square, value 2 s., and a gauge, value 1 s., the goods of John Rowe Everett ; four planes, value 10 s.; a square, value 18 d., and a rule, value 6 d. , the goods of Stephen William Manes .

JAMES WHITTLE MEAD. I am a task-master . I was at work at the houses in Glaremont-place, Kensington Gravel-pits , on Monday, the 14th of June, while the men went to dinner; I was walking about the fields - when they returned about one o'clock I missed the tools from the front parlour of one of the houses - it had been fastened by one of the men when they went out. I recollect seeing the prisoner about the buildings that morning. I saws my saw about a fortnight afterwards at Marlborough-street.

STEPHEN WM . MANES. I am a carpenter . I was at work in the house, and left my tools on the bench when I went to dinner. I was the last person in the house, and locked it, and put the key in my pocket. I returned about twenty minutes before one, and found they were gone. I found the door in the same state in which I had left it; but the back sash was opened - a nail had been drawn, with which it had been fastened. I afterwards saw my tools at Marlborough-street.

JOHN ROWE EVERETT . I am a carpenter . I lost some tools from these premises. I had left them in the house when I went to dinner. I had met the prisoner in the morning at some distance in the fields; and think I have seen him before.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square. The prisoner tendered part of the tools to pledge at my shop. I questioned him about them, and, in consequence of his prevarication, I gave him in charge. I think it was on Monday, the 14th of June, about three o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had been guilty, why should I have stopped in the pawnbroker's shop while he got an officer?

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-27

1096. HENRY YEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , half a yard of cloth, value 5 s. , the goods of James Rowbotham .

JAMES ROWBOTHAM . I am a hat manufacturer , and live in Great Surrey-street, Blackfriars . The prisoner was my porter . On Monday the 14th of June a parcel was shewn to me on the desk of my counting-house, it contained a piece of broad cloth, which was mine, tied up in a handkerchief; it had been in a room above stairs, to which the prisoner had access. I told my shop-man to take it back again to where he found it, and I saw him do so. On the 22d of June I was at Mr. Perring's, in the Strand; the prisoner came there with something he was to bring - he was ushered in by my orders, and I asked him who were the boys he had been with on the road coming along; he had his hat in his hand, and I saw something in it - I asked what it was; he said his handkerchief. I found it to be the cloth which had been shewn me - he said it was a waistcoat which he had bought of a Jew in Union-street. I opened the cloth, and said,

"Is this a waistcoat?" He then said he intended it to be one. I had given him no orders to take it.

JOHN WYLIE . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody at Mr. Perring's shop, and found the cloth on him. I then went and searched his box, and found a hat-cover.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-28

1097. JOHN BOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a shawl, value 38 s. , the goods of John Williams and others, his partners.

JOHN BAGULEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 30th of June to pawn a shawl, which he said was his sister's. I asked where she lived - he said in John-street, Fitzroy-square. He afterwards said he was in the employ of Mr. Riley, a linen-draper. I sent to him, and the statement appeared not to be true. I sent for an officer, and gave the shawl to him.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a linen-draper . I have two partners. The prisoner was in our employ as a porter , for six weeks or two months. The officer brought the prisoner and shawl to me. I could not swear to it, as we have several others of similar patterns. He asked him if it belonged to his sister - he said no, it belonged to me.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I have the shawl - he told me he had taken it from the window.

COURT. Q. Had you made him any promise or threat - A. No

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WILLIAMS Cross -examined by MR. PHILLIPS. This boy had been with you nearly two months. - Yes, I had a character with him; he had conducted himself with great propriety. I have enquired, and find his character irreproachable. I should not object to take him again.

GUILTY - Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined One Shilling and delivered to his master.

Reference Number: t18240715-29

1098. WILLIAM PARMINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , one reticule, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Mary Ann Buckler , spinster , from her person .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Mary Bewley Buckler , widow .

MARY ANN BUCKLER . I am single. On the 28th of June, about half past nine o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Goswell-street with my brother Alexander. I was about to cross the road, when the prisoner came up close to me - he looked at me, and I looked at him; he snatched a reticule from my hand, and ran down Sutton-street; my brother followed him - he was brought back to me in about five minutes. I believe it to have been the prisoner.

ALEXANDER BUCKLER . I was with my sister, and had hold of her harm - she was crossing the street. I did not notice any person come near her; but when she said she had lost her reticule, I saw the prisoner run by me. I pursued him to the first turning in Sutton-street - he was then stopped - I had not lost sight of him - I saw the reticule in his hand as he was running; and when he was stopped I saw it just at his heels. I picked it up, and gave it to my sister.

Prisoner. Q. Could you see me when there was a mob round me - A. Yes, I was close to you.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am an officer of Bow-street. I saw the prisoner just as he was laid hold of - the last witness said he was the man, and that he had not lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - I ran, as others did, and was accused of the robbery; but am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for life .

Reference Number: t18240715-30

1099. THOMAS PUTTOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 3 lbs. of coffee, value 6 s. , the goods of the West India Dock Company .

FIVE OTHER COUNTS stating it to belong to different persons.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 52.

Strongly recommended to mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-31

1100. WILLIAM MAILL and JAMES FOX were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , a watch, value 1 l.; a seal, value 4 s., and a key, value 2 s. , the goods of Matthew Casey .

MATTHEW CASEY . The prisoners were in India with me, and we were going to Liverpool together, and took our places last Saturday week, at the Paddington canel, when I paid Mr. Wightman. I gave him my watch to take care of for me - the prisoner Fox went and got it, and pawned it, which I had not given him leave to do.

JOSEPH WIGHTMAN . I live at the Grand Junction Canal Wharf . Casey was going to Liverpool with the prisoner Fox on the 27th of June. Fox took the watch from Casey, and gave it to me to take care of for Casey, till the following evening; and about two o'clock on Monday the prisoners came, and Fox said he had been sent for it by Casey, who was very ill. I gave it to him. I did not see them till about ten on Monday night. Mail was lying on some straw, apparently drunk; Fox was drunk then, but he was sober when he came for the watch.

JAMES LUMLEY . I live with Mr. Flint, in the Edgware-road,

he is a pawnbroker. Maill pawned the watch on the 28th of June - he said his name was Mills.

MAILL'S Defence. I was at the Grand Junction Arms, public-house, on Monday the 28th of June. The prisoner Fox asked if I would earn sixpence - I said yes. He took me to Mr. Wightman's wharf, and we brought the watch to the Grand Junction Arms, and then Fox said he did not know where to go with it; but I shewed him, and we pawned it.

FOX'S Defence. I told Maills I had no money - but I said I was going to Mr. Wightman's, and asked him to shew me the way. I brought the watch, and the prosecutor told me to go and exchange the seal and key, and bring what I could for them. I told him I was a stranger, but Maills went to shew me the way. In the evening I told Casey I had got every thing ready for the voyage but liquor and bread; he then gave me the watch to get what I could, and told me not to ask less than 16 s.

JOSEPH WIGHTMAN re-examined. When they came to me again at night Casey was beating the others with his stick, and demanding his watch - the others were quite drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-32

1101. JOHN SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , a seal, value 2 l.; a key, value 10 s., and a chain, value 2 s. , the goods of William Loudan .

WILLIAM LOUDAN . I am a watch and clock-maker , and live in Great Surrey-street. The prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 23d of June the officer, John Wylie, asked me if I had lost any thing. I was not then aware that I had.

JOHN WYLIE . On the 22d of June I found this property on a boy of the name of Yewman, who said he had bought it of the prisoner for 5 s. On the next morning I took the prisoner into custody, and accused him of having stolen this property from his master; he said he had. I had not told him it would be better or worse for him. I produce the property.

WILLIAM LOUDAN . This chain and seal are mine; there was no watch attached to them - the value of it is about 3 l. I heard the officer ask the prisoner how he came possessed of it - he said he had taken it from me to give to Yewman, and he was to get a hat in return. He had been about six weeks in my service.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy enticed me to do it, and said he would get me a silk hat for it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-33

1102. MARY HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , seven penny-pieces, nineteen halfpence, a shilling, and two sixpences , the monies of James Webster .

JAMES WEBSTER . I am a publican , and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields - the prisoner was in my service. On the 27th of June, about half-past ten o'clock at night I marked eight shillings, eight sixpences, six shillings in penny-pieces, and six shillings in halfpence. I marked a few of them, and my son marked the rest - we saw each other do it - my wife and son saw them put into the till, when I was locking-up the house. I left the key in the till. When I got up next morning, about seven o'clock, I found my bar-door open, which had been locked on the night before, and the key taken up with me. It was evident that the lock had not been picked, but pressed open. I went to the till in the bar, and missed two sixpences and one shilling. I then called my son down, and, in the presence of him, I counted the copper, and missed nineteen halfpence and seven penny-pieces. I got the officer, and then asked the prisoner what she had been doing in the bar - she denied having been there that morning. I asked her if she had not taken some money - she said she had money, but not mine, it was what her brother had given her on the night before to buy shoes - she then pulled out her money, which was one shilling and sixpence and three halfpence, not marked, and all the rest she had was marked. I said I knew them to be mine - she said she wondered how I dare say so, she could not tell how I should know one piece of money from another.

JAMES WEBSTER , JUN. What my father has stated is correct. I remember his locking the door of the bar, he asked me to try it - it was quite safe.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I saw the prisoner take this money from her pocket - it has been in my possession ever since. Here is one shilling, two sixpences, seven penny-pieces, and nineteen halfpence.

JAMES WEBSTER re-examined. I had taken notice of the money that was in the till on the night before, and there was this money missing exactly - I know it by the marks.

The prisoner put in a written defence, throwing herself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-34

1103. WILLIAM TOPHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Reuben Piper .

REUBEN PIPER . I am groom to Mr. Holbrook, of Tottenham . On the 16th of June I saw my coat in the stable, about an hour before it was stolen - I saw it again in the yard, about ten minutes after I had missed it. The prisoner was a stranger , and had no business there.

JOHN BRADFORD . I live at Tottenham, and work for Mr. Holbrook. I saw the prisoner on the 16th of June come out of the stable. I said,

"Reuben, have you lost anything, for a man has just come out of the stable;" he said,

"Take the man," and just as he got out of the yard he dropped the coat, and said he hoped I would be his friend, and let him put it in its place.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-35

1104. JOSEPH WAYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , a shawl, value 13 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

CHARLES CROOSE . I live with Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , in Frith-street, Soho . On the 18th of June I was informed by a gentleman that some person had taken a shawl from the door - I went out, and saw some person running, but I did not see his face. I pursued till the prisoner was stopped in King-street - my opinion is that he is the same person I had seen running - I had lost sight of him for a minute; I found the shawl in his hat; it had been hanging on a nail, and if it had fallen

it must have fallen within a yard of the door, inside the shop. He said he picked it up.

JOHN VINE . I was in the shop at the time, and pursued the prisoner with Croose, on receiving the information - he turned round the corner, and we followed him from street to street till he was stopped, and the shawl was found in his hat.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I saw the prisoner with some others lurking about the shop, on the 18th of June. I looked after them - they then passed on, and about two o'clock I saw them again; they appeared to be in liquor. In about ten minutes after I saw the prisoner running with a shawl, and detained him. The two last witnesses came up, and claimed it; he had put it in his hat as he ran.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up just at the corner of Compton-street. I was so intoxicated that I was not well for a day or two.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-36

1105. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , a horse collar, value 4 s. , the goods of Benjamin Gould .

BENJAMIN GOULD . I live in Worship-street , and am a carman . On the 1st of July the prisoner came to the yard about eight o'clock, and was talking to the men - in about half an hour I saw him going out the back way with this collar - I hailed him; he stopped; I went up to him, and said,

"What are you going to do with that?" he said he did not know. I told him I should take him to the office - he said I might do as I pleased. He had formerly worked for me, but had no business there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-37

Before Mr. Recorder.

1106. SARAH WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a bonnet, value 10 s.; a gown, value 10 s.; a shawl, value 5 s., and a scarf, value 4 s. , the goods of Ann Donovan .

ANN DONOVAN . I am an unfortunate woman , and live in Kingsbury-place, in the Liberty of the Rolls . The prisoner had lived in the same room with me for about three weeks; she gave me no reason to believe she was going away, but on the 5th of May, in the afternoon, while I was asleep she went away. I awoke before it was dark, and missed the only dress I had to put on, also a bonnet, a shawl, and a scarf. I was so ill that I could not go after her for some time, but on the 20th of June I found her in Regent-street; she said,

"Oh! pray forgive me; I have robbed you." She did not appear in distress when I found her.

SARAH HANDS . I live in George-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner lodges with me - she came to me very much intoxicated on the 10th of May, and the next morning she had no money, but the ticket of this gown and shawl. I heard her say that Donovan had said if she would give up the things she did not wish to hurt her.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. On the 20th of June I found the prisoner in the watch-house. I have the scarf, gown, and shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutrix had lent her the scarf, and had sent her to pledge the gown and shawl, which she did, but met with some females, and spent the money - and was fearful of returning.

ANN DONOVAN re-examined. I never gave her leave to pawn them, on my oath.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-38

1107. JOHN FREDERICK METCALFE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 17 ozs. of tea, value 8 s., and 1 lb. of sugar, value 9 d. , the goods of John Rose , his master .

JOHN ROSE . I live in Lower Cross-street, and am a tea-dealer . The prisoner was in my employ about seven weeks; I had a good character with him; he was taken into custody on Sunday, the 20th of June - I did not examine my stock till the Thursday following, when I missed more than 4 lbs. of tea from a large cannister, which had had some taken from it for retail sale, but what had been taken out had been entered in a book. I had received information on the Saturday evening, that there was some tea in bags in the cellar; I looked, and found it there, but did not remove it. On Sunday morning I concealed myself, and saw him come down into the warehouse several times, and go up again - he came to brush his clothes, and clean his shoes. The cannister from which the tea had been taken stands in the shop. About half-past eleven o'clock he came into the cellar, and took a parcel of tea that laid on the ground in a bag, and another parcel from between the ceiling and the shop floor, in a paper, similar to what we put tea in. I let him go up stairs into the warehouse, and then heard him ask the servant to let him out. When he had got about one hundred yards from the house I pursued, and asked what he had done with my tea; he said he had got none. I sent for a constable when he got back to the shop, and asked how he could be so ungrateful. On searching him about 4 ozs. of tea was found upon him - I then asked where the other parcel of tea was, which he doubled up on the hogshead; he went into the privy, and brought it out from there - there was in the whole about 17 ozs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know whether he is a married man - A. I believe he is. Other persons have access to the cellar. The parcel on the ground laid so conspicuous that any one might see it. There was only about 4 ozs. found on his person.

SUSANNAH BAXTER . I am servant to Mr. Rose. About ten o'clock on Saturday evening, the 19th of June, I went down into the cellar, and saw a blue paper bag of tea on the floor - I took it up to my mistress; she told me to take it back again, which I did. Next day I let the prisoner out between eleven and twelve o'clock, by his desire; my master brought him back soon after, and asked what he had done with the tea; he said he had none.

Cross-examined. Q. If the tea had been stolen, would it not have been a foolish place to put it in - A. Very few persons go into our cellar; it could not be seen without a light.

SUSANNAH ROSE . I am the wife of Mr. Rose. Baxter bought me a bag with some tea; I told her to take a little out, and take it back to where she found it. I was present when the prisoner was taken the next day, and heard my husband say,

"Where is my tea you scoundrel;" he said,

"I have no tea of yours". Mr. Rose desired him not to deny it, and he then put his hand into his pocket, brought out the tea in the paper.

RICHARD GASCOYNE . I am shopman to Mr. Rose. I can swear to this bag; I always cut the bags for pasting, and cut off the corners - no other grocer in London does so.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. Mr. Rose produced these parcels of tea to me, and said he had taken them from the prisoner. I asked the prisoner if he had any objection to tell me where he took it from: he said from the Pekoe cannister, and he hoped Mr. Rose would not proceed against him.

The following witness appeared for the prisoner.

THOMAS BENNET. I have not been subpoened, but happened to be here on other business. These bags are not unusual among grocers coming from the country - there are a great many persons in London who use them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-39

1108. GEORGE COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a pair of boots, value 10 s., the goods of John Perry , privately in his shop .

JOHN PERRY . I live in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell . On the 3d of July, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me to make him a pair of dancing pumps; he staid in the shop about twenty minutes; there were two pairs of boots within his reach, but I had no suspicion of him - I did not leave him alone. About two hours after he was gone I was going to carry these boots home to a customer, and they were gone; no other person had been in the shop. I went to the direction he had given me, Jones, No. 22, Great Sutton-street, which proved to be fictitious. I met him about seven hours afterwards, on Clerkenwell-green - I told him he had stolen a pair of boots; he said if I would go with him he would get them - I refused, and gave him in charge. I afterwards found the boots in Portpool-lane, exposed for sale - I knew them to be the same. The prisoner did not say he had not the boots; he said I was mistaken in the man.

JOHN HAYFORD . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner - he said nothing. I took him to Hatton-garden, and he was remanded till the following Monday, and during the interval the boots were discovered in Mr. Allison's shop; I have kept them ever since.

Prisoner. When you came to Mr. Perry's shop, you asked him what was the charge, and he said nothing at all - Witness. He said nothing of the kind.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ALLISON . The prisoner brought the boots to my shop in Portpool-lane, on the Saturday night, about half-past ten o'clock - he said they had been repaired for him about three weeks before, and they were taken in so small that he could not wear them; he offered me his address, but I did not take it. Mr. Perry came to my shop, and claimed them.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to me, having never seen me before - A. Yes, I am positive you are the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240715-40

1109. EDWARD LEWSLEY was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY BENNET . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Store-street, Bedford-square. The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money on my account; he had been with me four days. He was sent to a customer of the name of Cole, on the 5th of June, to carry some goods; when he returned he said they were to be booked - he was to account for goods as soon as he returned - he said Mr. Coles had had goods to the amount of 1 s. 3 d.; I have never received the money. I went to Mr. Coles the same day, and then charged the prisoner with the offence.

JOSEPH COLES . I am a customer of Mr. Bennet's. The prisoner was in the habit of bringing butter and eggs - on the 5th of June he brought butter to the amount of 1 s. 3 d. - I paid him for it myself; I gave him a shilling and a sixpence, and he gave me 3 d.; this was about eight o'clock in the morning; I had seen him before several times, and could not be mistaken in his person. Mr. Bennet called in the evening, and I told him I had paid the servant.

Prisoner. It was near half-past eight o'clock, and you asked me for change for 1 s. 6 d.; I could not give it you - A. You gave me 3 d. in change.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-41

1110. SAMUEL WADKINS was indicted for embezzling, six shillings, which he had received on account of Abraham Simmons , his master .

ABRAHAM SIMMONS . I am a fishmonger , and live at Southgate, near Enfield. The prisoner was in my employ for eight months, and used to carry fish about the country, and receive money from the customers ; I had taken him without a character. Phoebe Shaw was a customer of mine, and used to have fish of the prisoner. On the 15th of April, when he returned in the evening he said Mrs. Shaw had had fish to the amount of 6 s., but it was not paid for. In a few days I found things were not going on right, and sent down to Mrs. Shaw, and heard of this circumstance; he had then left me, without giving me notice.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had known something of the man before - A. Yes; he was a neighbour of mine; he had been begging of me for work, and I took him out of charity.

Q. Had you some misunderstanding with him before he went away - A. No, not a word; I am sure of that. He always gave the money to my wife; every payment he made was entered in the book.

PHOEBE SHAW. I live at Enfield. The prisoner used to supply me with fish; I knew him as the servant of Mr. Simmons. On the 15th of April I paid him 6 s. for fish I paid him in shilling pieces, to the best of my belief - I am quite sure some was in shillings; it was for salmon. I am cook to Mr. Strange.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a good while ago, and can

you swear as to what coin you paid him in - A. I cannot say, but to the best of my recollection I paid him in shillings. I cannot swear that I paid him one shilling piece.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-42

1111. SAMUEL WADKINS was again indicted for embezzling, the sum of 2 l. 4 s., which he had received on account of Abraham Simmons , his master .

ABRAHAM SIMMONS . I had a customer of the name of Mary Martin ; she is servant to Mr. Mills. On the 28th of April the prisoner accounted with me for 5 l. 10 s., which he had received from her; there was more money owing; she owed 7 l. 10 s. in all, for several bills for fish - I had directed him to call for it, and he delivered the 5 l. 14 s. to my wife, as all the money he had received from there; I saw him pay it, and he stated that the reason he had not received it all was because the housekeeper's books were given in.

MARY MARTIN . I am housekeeper to Mr. Mills, at Potter's-bar - I pay the tradesman's bills. On the 28th of April I paid the prisoner 7 l. 14 s., which was due to Mr. Simmonds, for fish; the bill was 7 l. 14 s. 8 d.; I paid him seven sovereigns, and fourteen shillings in shilling pieces, to the best of my belief; I can positively swear that I paid him some shillings. In about a fortnight Mr. Simmons's brother called on me, and I told him what I had paid. I did not tell the prisoner that the books were gone in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have paid a great deal of money away - A. Yes, but at that time I had no other bills to pay. I asked if he could give me change out of a sovereign. To the best of my belief I paid him fourteen shilling pieces; I am positive I paid some shillings, and observed,

"You will take all my silver." When I went to Enfield they said he had paid five sovereigns and a half on my account, but I had not had a half-sovereign.

MR. SIMMONS. I was present when the prisoner paid five sovereigns and a half. I made the entry myself, from his directions.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you make all the entries in the book yourself - A. Yes.

SAMUEL FITCH . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody on the 7th of June, at the Cherry Tree, public-house, Southgate; he had then absconded for a fortnight.

Prisoner's Defence. My master said I absconded, but he put another man in my cart.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240715-43

1112. JOHN BROCKWELL and CHARLES SEWELL , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , five live tame fowls, price 10 s. , the property of John Benhote

JOHN BENHOTE . I live at Brunswick-place, Ball's Pond . I keep fowls in a fowl-house in the garden. I saw them there on the evening of the 29th of June, about seven o'clock. My garden is walled round about seven feet high. I discovered about eight o'clock the next morning that five of them were gone. I had not heard any person in the garden; but the wall had glass on the top, and there was some of it broken, by which I presume the persons had got over. I saw them next day at Worship-street, dead, and the two prisoners were in custody. I identified them by their plumage, and have no doubt of their being mine.

JOSEPH CLIFTON . I am a watchman - my beat is within half a mile of Mr. Benhote's house, in the direction towards London. I saw the prisoners about half-past three o'clock in the morning of the 30th of June, in Ball's Pond road, Brockwell had a bundle under his arm; there was another person with them, who ran away when he saw Waters and myself. I laid hold of one of the prisoners, and Waters the other; we asked what they had got - they said nothing; we looked at the top of their bag, and saw the plumage of fowls; we took them to the watch-house; there were five fowls, dead and warm; we asked how they got them - they said, the man who had ran away had given them to them. Mr. Benhote came and swore to the fowls at the office.

JOHN WATERS . I was with Clifton, and saw the three persons in company; as we got up to them, one of them ran away; I took Brockwell, and Clifton took Sewell; Brockwell had the bundle, which was opened at the office, and it contained a cock, three hens, and a chicken, which Mr. Benhote claimed.

ROBERT BROWN . I was constable of the night; I saw the prisoners brought to the watch-house, with five fowls; Mr. Benhote saw them at the office and swore to them.

BROCKWELL'S Defence. I got up that morning to go to bathe, but getting up sooner than I intended, I went to take a walk in Ball's Pond-road. I met a man with a round frock in his hand, and he said he had got into a place of work, and he would give me something to drink if I would hold that bag. I helped him to put his frock on, and at the same time held the bag; the other prisoner then came up, and said he was going to work at the docks.

SEWELL'S Defence. I belonged to the ship Cumberland; there were two other lads on board the ship with me, and I had been to see one of them up to Highgate; in returning to go to work in the morning, I fell in with those persons, and asked where they were going - they said to Goswell-street; I said I was going the same way - they said they were going to have something to drink, and I said I would go with them.

BROCKWELL - GUILTY . Aged 32.

SEWELL - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-44

1113. SAMUEL HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , a jacket, value 6 s. , the property of John Ledwick .

JOHN LEDWICK . I live in Shadwell , and sell clothes . On the 16th of June I lost the jacket, which hung at my door about ten minutes before; I saw it when the prisoner was stopped.

WILLIAM MAY . I live at Newington. At the time of the robbery I lived next door to Ledwick. I saw the prisoner about ten o'clock in the morning, at Ledwick's window, looking at this jacket; he then took it down, and walked away with it; I went after him and told him to walk back; he had it under his arm - he had got about five or six yards.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the jacket down to look at

it, but I never went away from the window at all. This man came and said,

"You are going to steal that jacket - come back with me;" but I had not gone away from the window.

WILLIAM MAY . I am quite sure he had gone the distance of five or six yards before I stopped him; there was no difficulty to his going into the shop if he chose.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-45

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1114. WILLIAM RODWAY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARTIN DREW . I am clerk and cashier to Mr. Hilder , of the Wellington brewery; the prisoner was his head drayman ; it was his duty to take money and account for it to his master. Mr. Johnson was a customer; on the 11th of June last I saw the prisoner, (who was engaged in his duty of delivering beer) bring an empty cask from Mr. Johnson's house, in Friday-street. He accounted to me when he came home for what he had received, and paid me 5 s. 6 d. for Mr. Johnson. I said,

"Is Mr. Johnson a customer of our's?" - he said, Yes, he had been, but he had discontinued his custom, and he had not left a cask of beer there for about six months. The prisoner had never accounted for any money received from Mr. Johnson, from the 26th of December to the 11th of June; he should account for it every evening, or the first thing in the morning. It was my business to receive the money - Mr. Hilder never received any.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY. Q. Have you the superintendance of the concern? A. If I am not there, no one takes the money - the prisoner keeps it till I return; since I have been there no one has taken money, or entered it, but myself; there never was any deficiency in his accounts, that we know of; when he takes out beer, and receives money, he gives a receipt.

Q. Where were you when you saw the prisoner with the cask - A. I was in Cheapside, and saw him at Mr. Johnson's door; I settled with him that evening for 5 s. 6 d., which he said he had received of Mr. Johnson that day; the entries in the book seemed to be correct; none was given him to deliver to Mr. Johnson, but he might have delivered him beer if he had any orders from him; I have received these bills and receipts from Mr. Johnson.

JOHN HANLEY . I am an officer - I took the prisoner into custody, and received from the last witness those bills which have just been produced; I showed them to the prisoner, and asked him if they were his hand-writing - he said they were.

HANNAH SCOTT . I am servant to Mr. Johnson, and lived there from the 26th of December to the 11th of June last; the prisoner used to bring beer there; he called every week, and I took beer of him about once a fortnight; I used to pay him when he delivered the beer, and had a bill and receipt of him; for this cask of the 19th of March I paid him 5 s. in shillings - I am certain they were shillings.

MR. DREW re-examined. Q. On your oath, on the 19th of March was Mr. Johnson indebted to you. - A. No - the prisoner had never told me of it; all that he took out to my knowledge, he accounted for. I took the account of what beer was returned, and found it tallied with the brewer's account of what went out.

Prisoner's Defence. The beer I took out was accounted for in the morning, and again at night - I was never deficient in any cask.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-46

1115. GEORGE BRICKLE was indicted for bigamy .

ELIZABETH SANDERSON . I was at the parish church of Hackney on the 12th of February, 1821 , and saw the prisoner married there to Christiana Massey , by banns. I do not know where she is now - it does not appear that they lived together after the marriage.

WILLIAM HUDSON . I have known the prisoner twenty years - he married Sarah Harding , at Bishopsgate church, in 1810 - I gave her away. I have known her since her marriage; and have heard that she left him, and lived with other men. She is still living.

REV. CHALLIS PAROISSIEN. In 1821 I was curate of Hackney, of which I am now the officiating minister. On the 12th of February, 1821, the prisoner, or a person giving in his name as George Brickle , was married by banns to a person called Christiana Massey .

REV. RICHARD HARVEY . I am the licensed curate of Bishopsgate - the prisoner was married there in 1810, by banns, to Sarah Harding .

Prisoner's Defence. In 1810 I married Sarah Harding, and for some years she continued as good a wife as ever man had - I do not believe any person could love a woman dearer - but she turned out every thing that was base, and has had children by other men. As she would not live with me any longer, I was obliged to do without her.

GUILTY.

Strongly recommended to mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-47

1116. GEORGE GARRETT and ROBERT FRANCIS were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , a pair of earrings, value 20 s., and a ring, value 10 s. , the goods of Cecilia Mordecai .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

ROSETTA HART . My father's name is Joel Mordecai. On the 1st of July I and my sister lived at his house, in North-street, and we slept that night on the ground-floor. About half-past one o'clock I heard some person on the first floor stairs, saying

"All is right." We got out of bed and called the watchman - Sampson came first, he sprang his rattle, and four others came. When they came i.e. two prisoners, (who are watchmen), Sampson and myself went into the first floor back-room, there were a pair of ear-rings and a ring in the front room on the second floor belonging to my sister - we afterwards missed them. When the prisoners came down stairs, I told them I thought the persons might have got between the bed and the mattrass - they said if I would stay down stairs they would go into the room themselves and search. They and Sampson went up; and when they came down they went away. After they had been gone about ten minutes, my sister said she was too frightened to go to bed - she would go up stairs. She went up, and said the things were gone. We waited till a watchman of the name of Cox was coming down the street, at two o'clock. I called him, and said,

"What a shocking thing it is that the watchmen

should have stolen these things;" He said, he would go and see. By that time the prisoner Francis came up and said

"Do you mean to charge me with the theft;" I said,

"I do not know which of you it was, but it must have been one of you." The next morning we went to the office, and they were discharged on their own recognizances. On the Monday following I attended the magistrates on some other business - I then saw the things, and knew them to be my sister's property.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was there any other jewellery in the room - A. Yes, there were two other articles, but they were covered with a silk skirt. Garrett went into the house the second time. My father is a plate-glass dealer - it is a house of good fame. I am married, but my husband has deserted me and is living with another woman. I have applied to the parish for relief, but do not now receive relief from them. After I had told the watchman I had been robbed, Garrett went up stairs and did his best to find the thieves.

CECILIA MORDECAI . I lived with my father on the 1st of July. I have heard what my sister has stated - it is correct. I missed the articles - I had seen them safe about half past twelve o'clock the night before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many houses has your father got - A. I cannot tell, he has several; I live in North-street - my father was going to Hampton Races , and had gone to my eldest sister's the night before. I never saw these watchmen before that night.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you get your bread in the streets - A. No, Sir; I do not - it is false.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you recollect the two watchmen coming to the house the second time - A. Yes, Francis went up stairs with me, and then went about his business - he might have absconded. We never had a quarrel with these men; I never saw them before.

WILLIAM RICE . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, the 4th of July, about half-past two o'clock, the prisoner Garrett called me over to him, and said there was something in his box not altogether agreeable. I went over, and found a piece of paper screwed up on the seat of his box - it contained a pair of ear-rings and a ring. We went down to the watch-house, and gave them to the officer of the night.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was he then on duty - A. Yes; some person might have put them into his box, which is in the public street, about three hundred yards from Mr. Mordecai's. It was on the 1st of July that Mr. Mordecai was robbed. Garrett said he thought there was some plot laid for him; and would I come as a witness to take them out.

JOHN COX . I am a watchman. My attention was called on the 1st of July by the alarm given by these young women. When I went to the house, the prisoners were there - they went up stairs with Sampson and Rosetta Hart - I was on the landing-place of the first floor. When they called us the second time Francis assisted me to look for the things. Garrett was not in our company then. On Sunday morning, at two o'clock, Francis walked down Featherstone-street, which is off his own beat, and towards Garrett's box.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREW'S. Q. What business had he off his own beat - A. I do not know. This house has been a house of ill-fame in Mordecai's occupation. - Garrett is diligent in his duty - I have known him ever since he has been a watchman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you were apprised that the house had been robbed, Francis might have been examined - A. Yes. Francis could have absconded if he thought proper; but he came the next day to the office.

Q. Had you any quarrel with Francis - A. Yes, and with all the others, because they blowed me up because I had not stopped at Worship-street to be bound when they were all there - but I certainly had had no quarrel with him on the night of the Saturday.

HENRY BAILEY . I am a watchman. I was called, and gave the ladies lights - that is all I know.

ISAAC NEWTON . I am a watchman of Chiswell-street. On Sunday the 4th of July Francis came to my box about half-past two o'clock. I said

"What brought you here." He said, he was very dry, and was going to the pump for some water. I told him I had some beer. I forget whether I or he introduced the subject, about how he should stand to-morrow. He said,

"I don't know how it will be, for the property is found in Garrett's box."

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How far is this from his beat - A. It may be about two hundred yards. I did not complain of his being off his duty - he has been a very respectable man; he had nothing to hinder him from running away; it is not unusual for a man to go two hundred yards to get beer; I have known him some years, and he has conducted himself like a civil honest good watchman.

JOHN ROE . I am head borough of St. Lukes. I received the ring and ear-rings from Rice and Garret. I have known Garret three years, and I do not think we have a better watchman in the parish.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GARRETT'S Defence. I never saw the property till I found it in my box. I then took it to the office.

FRANCIS'S Defence. Cox and Newton have taken a false oath. I am only a spare man, and have been there but two or three months. I was not off my beat; I went to Newton to get a drop of water. After they found the property they took it to the office, so that if I had put it in the box I could have got away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-48

1117. JAMES KILGALLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a loaf of bread, value 6 d., and 3 lbs. of ham, value 18 d. , the goods of James Hutchons .

JAMES HUTCHONS . I am a builder . The prisoner was in my service. I never authorized him to take any provisions from my house.

ANN ALLEN . I was in Mr. Hutchons's service. On a Sunday evening, the 7th of June, while master was out the prisoner came in, and went down the yard; he called to me, and said,

"If master comes in tell him I am in the back yard." Upon going up stairs I saw him come up the yard with an empty pail; he went into the wash-house - I thought him a long time there, and when he

came out I asked him what he had got; he said nothing; I said,

"Let me look;" he refused. I took a loaf from him - and said,

"How came you to take this;" he said he had taken nothing. I then went back to the safe, and found the ham was gone; he was then putting it into his pocket, but could not get it in for the knuckle.

Prisoner's Defence. She says very wrong; I had no ham, it was a red night cap I was putting in my pocket - Witness No, it was a ham - he had the night cap on his head.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18240715-49

1118. JAMES MUNYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of John Busby .

JOHN BUSBY . I live in Edwin-street, St. Pancras. On the 26th of June I was at the Castle and Falcon Inn, and had a portmanteau and bag; the prisoner carried them as a porter - he said he lived in Vine-street. When I opened the bag I missed the coat.

MOSES DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. The prisoner came to my house on the 26th of June; I was not at home, but he left the coat - he came again towards the evening, and said he was sent from a gentleman to sell it; he asked 30 s. for it; I said,

"I will give you a sovereign; take it to the person, and if he is not satisfied come again, and I will return the coat." I have known him twenty years.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a constable. I received this coat from Mr. Davis. When I took the prisoner he said he had taken the bundle as far as the Angel, when he got a better job, and sent them by another porter. I said,

"You have made a pretty job of it;" he said it was through drink.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-50

1119. ELIZA NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , three drinking glasses, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Godfrey Lloyd .

The goods being the property of Godfrey and Valentine Lloyd , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240715-51

1120. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , a truck, value 2 l. , the goods of Thomas Parrott .

THOMAS PARROTT . The prisoner came to me on the 17th of June, and said he wanted a barrow to move some drawers; I said I had not got one, but I had a truck; and hired that - he said it was for a Mr. Baker, of Islington - I said,

"Is it Mr. Baker, the cabinet-maker" - he said Yes. As he did not return I had some bills printed, offering a sovereign reward.

STEPHEN PALMER . The prisoner offered to sell me a truck on the 17th of June, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I asked where he got it; he said it belonged to a man who kept a green-stall in Brunswick-street. He asked 12 s. for it; I said I thought it too cheap - an officer came up, and I gave him in charge. We went to where he said he had got it, and found it was false.

DANIEL SEBBON BAKER. I am a cabinet-maker, and live at Islington. I never sent the prisoner for the truck.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-52

1192. JAMES RUDDICK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Nathaniel Soames , from his person .

MR. NATHANIEL SOAMES . I live on Ludgate-hill. On Saturday night, the 27th of June I was in St. John-street, going to Islington , and heard somebody say,

"You are robbed;" I found my handkerchief had been taken from my pocket, and laid within a yard of me, on the pavement - I think I picked it up myself, and an officer secured the prisoner; he begged to be let off, and said he hoped I would not send him to prison for a handkerchief.

LEWIS FATCHE . I saw the prisoner in St. John-street on the night of the 27th of June. I saw him put his hand into Mr. Soames's pocket; I collared him, and called Mr. Soames, who came back, and said it was his handkerchief. I took him to the office, and in going along he was nearly rescued from me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man with a heavy load upon his head; he asked me to give him a lift down with it, and while I was doing so a man came up, and said I had a handkerchief, which I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for life .

Reference Number: t18240715-53

1122. MARY ANN COCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , a sheet, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Dickinson , in a lodging-room , let to her and George Cocks , her husband.

PHOEBE DICKINSON. I am the wife of Thomas Dickinson . The prisoner and her husband took a furnished lodging in my house on Easter Monday - her husband left her a week before she left; to take some horses to Dover. On Wednesday, the 9th of June, she took a sheet from the bed, but did not leave the place till Friday, the 11th.

SAMUEL HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the sheet at my house on the 9th of June, for 2 s.

RICHARD COOPER . I am an officer. The prisoner stated to me that she had taken it through distress. I had to attend again at the office, and the prisoner was entrusted to give up the sheet, but the prosecutor would not accept of it.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240715-54

1123. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , three petticoats, value 6 s.; a cloak, value 10 s.; a tablecloth, value 2 s.; a shawl, value 1 s., and a bonnet, value 1 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Singleton .

ELIZABETH SINGLETON . I lodged with the prisoner and her husband. On the 5th of May, when I went out to market, before ten o'clock, I left them there, but when I returned they were gone - the door was open, and the clothes had been taken from my boxes, which had been

locked when I went out - I had the key of one of them in my pocket, and from that one had been taken a gown and shawl. I found the prisoner some time after with the bonnet and shawl on.

THOMAS JONES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner never pawned anything at my shop, but some things have been pawned by others.

JOSEPH LUCKING . I am a watchman. I received charge of the prisoner on the 13th of June. I found the bonnet and shawl upon her.

THOMAS WILSON . I went to the prisoner's lodgings with the prosecutrix, and found some of the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240715-55

1124. CHARLES DEALTRY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a watch, value 4 l., the goods of George Glassop , from his person .

GEORGE GLASSOP . On the 10th of June I was in Brick-lane, Spitalfields , about two o'clock in the morning - some young chaps came to me, and got into conversation with me - when the prisoner came up to me, and said,

"Can any gentleman tell me what it is o'clock?" I said, I can, and took out my watch; he snatched it from me and ran away.

Prisoner. Q. Was you intoxicated - A. I was a little in liquor, but I know as well as I do now who took it.

JOHN MILLAR . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running - he stopped when he saw me.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming down Brick-lane this man cried Stop thief! the watchman saw me run, and stopped me, but I had no watch. This man had been in Wentworth-street, gambling, and lost his handkerchief off his neck.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-56

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, JULY 16.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1125. THOMAS EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a mare, price 12 l., and a chaise harness, value 2 l. , the property of Samuel Bates .

SAMUEL BATES . I am a coal-dealer , and live in Ratcliff-highway. On the 7th of April, in the evening, the prisoner, who is a stranger, came to my house, and asked if I could let him have a horse and harness to go to Kingston on the following day, and he would return the same evening; I agreed to let him have one on the 8th; he asked what I should charge - I told him 10 s. for the day: I let it to him for that day only. I asked his name and address - he said,

" Henry Simpson , John-street, Cannon-street-road;" that is all that passed. He told me to bring the horse to Cox's stables, East Smithfield in the morning; he paid me the 10 s. and left, and in the morning I took it there, and delivered it to him in the yard, and gave him a ticket for the day - he said he should be back between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I have not seen him, the horse, or harness since, till the 16th of June: when I apprehended him on the race course at Ascot, and asked if he recollected my horse and harness; he said he did perfectly well, and was willing to pay for it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He offered to pay you 14 l., stating that it had been stolen from him - A. No; he said he had sold it to pay a debt, to avoid going to prison.

GEORGE CHARLWOOD . I am hostler at the London Dock stables. The prisoner had a horse in our yard the winter before last, by which I knew him. On the 7th of April he asked me if I would get him a horse to go to Kingston-on-Thames, to take his wife and child, and he should be back about seven or eight o'clock in the evening - he was to have it next morning. I took him to Bates; he paid him 10 s. for the day, and next morning I put Bates's horse into harness, and put it into a chaise of Mr. Cobb's, who keeps our stables. He put his boxes in, and went away with his wife and child.

Cross-examined. Q. He took you (who knew him) to the prosecutor - A. Yes; he went by the name of Simpson.

WILLIAM COBB . I have kept the London Dock stables for about twelve months. The prisoner hired a chaise of me on the 7th of April, and on the morning of the 8th Bates brought a horse; he was to keep the horse and chaise one day only, and said he was going to Kingston-on-Thames. I saw his wife and child get into the chaise with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Charlwood had been employed at your stables before - A. Yes. I understood that he knew the prisoner before. I had no horse to lend him. I have not found my gig.

EDWARD BURNETT . I am a constable. I was at Ascot Heath Races , and apprehended the prisoner in a booth, on Wednesday, the 16th of June. He said he had sold the horse to pay a debt.

Cross-examined. Q. You found him about publicly - A. No; he was in a booth, alone.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-57

1126. THOMAS EATON was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a chaise, value 6 l. , the goods of William Cobb .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-58

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1127. HENRY LEROY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , a clock, value 2 l.; two spoons, value 2 s.; a pair of scissars, value 2 d.; a knife, value 2 d.; a key, value 1 d.; four pictures, value 4 s.; a tablecloth, value 6 d., and a blanket, value 2 s., the goods of John Davis , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DAVIS . I keep a public-house in Church-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green . On the 12th of June, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was called up, and on coming down missed the clock from the bar; it was safe overnight. Gibbs came to me in about ten minutes - I then missed all the other property stated in the indictment. The clock is worth 2 l.; I gave 6 l. 6 s. for it two years ago. The other things are of little value, and were all taken from the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. Do you let lodgings - A. No. I saw the cloak safe at eleven o'clock, when I went to bed; my family sat up till three to iron.

THOMAS TOLLADAY . On the 12th of June, at a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I was working at my own door, at the back of Davis's premises; my brother gave me information; I looked, and saw a man coming across the garden of Hollywell Mount chapel, which I have the care of - I went to the gate; he came out; I asked what he was after there; he said he was after nothing. I said,

"What have you got under your arm?" he said, nothing belonging to me; I said,

"Then it must belong to the chapel." I lifted up a cloth, which was a shift, and under it was a dial. He went off. I put the clock down - my brother followed, and caught him; I came up immediately, brought him back, and Gibbs told us to bring him to his house, which was done, and on his person was found two silver spoons, a phosphorus bottle and matches, the key of the clock, a knife, and a pair of scissars.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say whether this is the clock - A. No; I gave it to Gibbs. I lost sight of him for half a minute, but I knew him before, and am positive that he is the man. He was in the prosecutor's service twelve-months ago for eighteen months.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I searched the prisoner, and found the property on him. The last witness gave me this clock.

JOHN DAVIS . The clock and other things are mine. I have had the clock three years.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the maker's name - A. I do not know; it is worn off partly.

CHARLES TOLLADAY . I was with my brother, and pursued the prisoner, who came out of the garden, I seized him, and brought him back to my brother.

THOMAS HART . On the 12th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was informed that a bundle of clothes were laying on the stair-case of a lodging-house in Rose-lane, which is nearly a mile from Davis's. I went and found a bundle there, which he claimed.

JOHN DAVIS . These things are mine - here are my pictures, a sheet, and a blanket; the pictures hung by the side of the clock the day before. Friars' Mount chapel garden is close to my house. My back doors were all opened without any violence. Tolladay lives fifty yards from me.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18240715-59

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1128. THOMAS FISH was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Watkins .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD LINTODD - I live in Cooper's Place, New-road. The deceased Thomas Watkins and the prisoner both lodged is the prisoner's father's house, in Salisbury Mews. On Tuesday, the 22d of June, about half-past six o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner and deceased in Salisbury mews, they both crossed the road into Quebeck-street North ; they stripped and fought there - I saw most of the blows given, and saw the deceased fall from the blows he received in the struggle. The last blow was struck in the left side of his neck - he fell against a cart and was incapable of fighting any longer, and was unable to speak for a second or so - they fought very fair, and by mutual consent. I saw him walk to the Portland Arms public-house, which is about fifty yards off - he was not led at all. I saw them shake hands after the fight.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you do all you could to hinder the deceased from fighting - A. I did, and several tried to prevent him - he was obstinate, and would fight; he drank at the public-house.

GEORGE CORFIELD . I was present at the fight - the deceased struck the first blow; they fought a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, quite fair. I saw the prisoner strike him on the left ear - he then fell against a cart-wheel; he got up and held by the wheel to support himself, and could not speak for a second or so - time was called, but he said he would fight no longer. He was a stouter man than the prisoner.

MR. MATHEW NORTON . I am a surgeon, and live in Globe-place, Portman-square. On the 28th of June, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was called to see the deceased at his house. I found him labouring under a violent pain in his bowels, which I considered to proceed from inflammation. He was in bed, and in extreme pain. I sent him opening medicine, not having been informed of the fight. I called again in about four hours, and was informed of the fight. I then examined his body; he had several blows on the upper part of his face and body, but none on his bowels. I found that he had a rupture, which he said he had had a long time; but I was satisfied that was not the cause of the pain. I bled him very copiously; he was extremely ill till evening, and was then getting better, till Saturday morning, when I called, he was then dressed, and wished to take a walk, which I strictly prohibited. I was sent for in the evening, and about one o'clock in the morning I found he had just expired. I examined his body, and consider that he died from inflammation and mortification of the bowels; the fight no doubt caused his death. I am perfectly satisfied that none of the blows on the upper part of his body occasioned it, for it was caused by inflammation in his bowels, which terminated in mortification. There was no blow on the stomach; he might have received one, and I not perceive it. I should have treated him the same, if I had known of the fight at first. He said he was not conscious of having received a blow in the bowels, but supposed he had received an injury from falling, while he was fighting.

COURT. Q. You could not discover that any blow he had received caused his death - A. No; after death I opened his body, and found his bowels much inflamed, and considerably mortified. I have not the slightest doubt but the inflammation existed from the Tuesday morning - if it had existed before, he would have felt great pain.

JAMES MARSHALL . I am a pianoforte-maker, and worked for the same master as the deceased. I was present at the three last rounds of the fight; I saw him hit the prisoner in the stomach in the second round - the prisoner struck him once and sent him down senseless, with his head against the cart-wheel, but his body came down gently; he received a blow in the left side of the cheek at the last round, and another on the right side, near the hip, and another on the left. He was at work the night before, and in good health.

MR. NORTON re-examined. Q. Could a blow on the side of the head produce a mortification in the bowels - A. Certainly not.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. If he had been drinking over night, might not that have caused the inflammation - A. Certainly; I am certain that the marks I saw were not the cause of his death. Bleeding often relieves the inflammation, and the patient often feels better; but inflammation still goes on, and may terminate in mortification. He was very sick the two first days, which is usually the case in mortification of the bowels. What he brought up had some appearance of blood.

MR. LAW. Q. Might not such a blow as the witness has described produce mortification - A. Yes; it had taken place near the hip, on the right side: he said he was not conscious that he had received a blow there.

A JUROR. Q. Suppose a man ruptured, and under the violent exercise of the fight was to retire and take cold porter, might not that occasion his death - A. No doubt of it: his rupture went up with ease; he was then laying down. The parts near the rupture were in a less state of mortification than the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from the stables; the deceased stood at the door and challenged me to fight. He struck me, and we went across to fight.

JOHN FISH . I am the prisoner's father. Watkins lodged with me. He came home between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, and was in liquor then; I saw him and my son go to the public-house after the fight; they drank one shilling's worth of cold gin and water together.

COURT. Q. Did you know of the fight before it happened - A. No; he challenged me to fight, and said he would fight some of the bl - y family before he left the premises. I had distrained him for rent about three weeks before, and wanted him to leave, as I could get no rent of him.

MR. THOMAS BUSHELL. I am a surgeon: in consequence of the deceased's family not being satisfied, they called me in. I examined his body, with Mr. Norton, the day after the inquisition: my opinion is, that he died from inflammation and mortification of the bowels.

Q. If he was drunk over night, and went out to fight, and after that took cold gin and water, would it bring on an inflammation - A. Certainly, it might. He had a rupture, and if the rupture was to come down, a man in the habit of drinking would be particularly liable to inflammation in the bowels; but from Mr. Norton's statement of the rupture, that certainly would not be the cause of inflammation. The exertion of fighting might bring the rupture down, and that would increase the inflammation.

MR. LAW. Q. Did Mr. Norton call your attention to his side - A. Yes, that part was a shade darker than the rest, but the whole of the bowels were in an extreme state of mortification: a blow there might occasion that, or it might result from the rupture. I should hesitate a long time before I attributed it to blows, but it might be the cause. I consider that there was a great deal of doubt as to the cause of inflammation - whether it was from a blow or the rupture. I have known a very bad rupture go up of its own accord.

MR. BARTHOLOMEW PARKER . I am a surgeon. I was called in with Mr. Bushell, after the Inquest had examined the body; the intestines were inflamed, and there were symptoms of a rupture; the inflammation might arise from that, with intoxication, and the exertion of fighting. The exertion might bring the rupture down; drinking gin and water might cause the inflammation.

MARY WESTON . I attended the deceased before his death, and heard a rattling noise just before he died. I cannot say where it proceeded from.

- WESTON. I saw the deceased about one o'clock, on the Sunday morning, just before he died. He pressed his hand very much to the lower part of his body. He appeared very much ruptured, and just before death I heard a rattling noise, but cannot tell from what part it proceeded.

MR. BUSHESL. A guzzling noise is generally admitted as one of the chief symptoms of the return of the rupture; it had returned when I examined his body. I believe the rupture must have had a great deal to do with his death.

MR. NORTON. I would not allow him to go out on Saturday, considering that the least exertion might have brought back the pain, and increased the inflammation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-60

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1129. WILLIAM BLISS was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance to a certain bill of exchange, in the name of William Mills , with intent to defraud Elizabeth Nichols .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with a like intention.

ELIZABETH NICHOLS . I am a broker , and live at Chelsea. On the 22d of October, 1822, the prisoner came to my house with a picture; he asked for my brother, who had some knowledge of him, he left the picture to be framed and glazed, and went away, and called again every day till the 1st of November, and on the following day he called, and took out a letter, which he said he had received from Squire Clark, stating that his father was dead, and he had a great deal of property left him, he said there were a number of things in my shop which he should purchase, he came next day and looked out a vast number of things which were put aside for him; he called again next day, and looked out in all 100 l. worth; he said that one Mills, whom he lodged with had 22 l. of his, but it was not convenient for him to settle it, but he would accept a bill. On the 1st of November, he called and took away 14 l. worth of goods, and produced a bill on Mills. I asked if it was Mills's acceptance he said it was, he then endorsed in it my presence - he called a porter who took the goods away with him - my brother was present when he gave me the bill, it has not been paid. I did not see the prisoner afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Cook. When did you first see him - A. On the 26th of October; my brother lodged with me, but had been absent just then, he had been in the House of Correction for twelve months, as a bill had been filed against him, by a man who wanted to extort money. Bliss was there with him - he had a bill with the goods. I did not give him the change of the bill as he had looked out more goods. There is a man named Mills, employed as a carver and gilder in my house.

COURT. Q. When he gave you the bill he had looked

out other goods - A. Yes, my Lord, to the amount of 100 l., and said he would write to me when he got home about sending them.

JAMES NICHOLS . I am the prosecutrix brother, and have lived at her house eight or nine years. I have known the prisoner nearly three years. On the 25th or 26th of October, 1822, he came and requested me to get a handsome gilt frame to a picture; he called day after day, and said there were several things in the shop he should like to purchase, and produced two letters, one from Mr. Clark, and the other from Mr. Goodman, stating that his father was dead, and that he was coming into possession of a very large fortune, and wished to buy several things to take down to Daventry, for his father had lately fitted up a new room, and he should handsomely furnish it. He said Mr. Mills had drawn 50 l. from his grandfather, who was also dead, that Mr. Mills had been to Daventry, to receive a legacy of 50 l., and he had given him a warrant of attorney to receive it, and there was a balance of 22 l. due to him - that Mills had applied the money to his own use, and given him a bill at a month's date; he produced the bill unaccepted, and next day called with the acceptance to it, and said it was accepted in the presence of Mr. Bishop. He endorsed it in my presence and gave it to my sister - he then looked out a quantity of goods, and ordered me to pack them up and bring them down to Daventry myself, and I should be paid the balance. He said he had stopped too long in town, and should like to take a few of the light goods with him to satisfy his assignees, to make things pleasant as they would think he had stopped too long in town. He looked out a set of china, some jars, a caddy and other things amounting to 14 or 15 l., and told me to send them to the coach office, to go to Steventry near Daventry. Northamptonshire, for William Bliss . He took the caddy and some plated goods away in a handkerchief, I got a porter to carry the rest with him, the porter returned without the goods. He had called at half-past five o'clock in the morning, after he had paid the bill, it was then that he took the goods away. I inquired at the coach office, and my suspicion being raised, I went to Mills. I did not see him again till this day fortnight, when I took him in Oxford Street, I went twice to Daventry after him.

Cross-examined. Q. It was true he had some property - A. I know that Mills had received a legacy of 50 l. from the grandfather. I purchase goods on commission, my sister keeps this shop, the goods are her's, I have been in the House of Correction suffering for two villains who were afterwards indicted. I never gave him the copy of a bill to draw or had any conversation with him about a bill, nor ever got any one to draw the copy of one. I never told him I could put him in a way of making money. I knew there was a Mr. Mills, who had received a legacy for him.

Q. Did you make any offer about destroying the bill it any money was paid to you - A. Mills said he would not have the man hung for 100 l. I said my sister only wanted the bill paid. I said nothing about burning it.

The bill was here produced, but nobody being present to prove it forged, except Mills who was an interested person the prisoner was

ACQUITTED

Reference Number: t18240715-61

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1130. JOHN STEWART was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Walter Hunter and William English , about ten o'clock on the morning of the 9th of June (no person being therein) and stealing a coat, value 5 s.; a waistcoat 4 s.; a handkerchief 1 s. ; the goods of Thomas Cherry .

MARY CHERRY . I am the wife of Thomas Cherry , we lodge at Bow . On the 9th of June, I went out at ten o'clock leaving nobody in the room. I fastened the room door, but the street door was left open for the workmen. I returned in twenty minutes, and as I went up the stairs, I saw the prisoner run out of my room, he ran up another pair of stairs - I asked what he was doing there, he enquired for some man - I told him he had opened my door, and been into my room - I called for assistance, a neighbour ran for an officer, and he was secured. I went into the room and found my husbands handkerchief spread on the floor with his coat and waistcoat laid in it, but not tied up, they were in a drawer when I went out.

CHARLES HUDSON . I was sent for and took the prisoner. I found a chisel on him which I compared with the marks on the door, where it had been forced; it completely tallied.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 67.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-62

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1131. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Umpleby , about three o'clock on the morning of the 2nd July (he and others being therein) and stealing two table spoons, 16 s.; 1 lb. of tea, 8 s.; seven sixpences; and 220 penny-pieces his property .

WILLIAM UMPLEBY . I am a publican , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 2d of July about six o'clock in morning, when I came down stairs, I found the bar shutter forced open, and about 40 s. worth of copper, and eight sixpences gone from the till, two spoons and a pound of tea were also gone. The prisoner was at my house once or twice about two years ago. I had fastened the shutter myself the night before.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. For what you know the property was stolen in the night - A. It was safe at twelve when I went to bed.

ROBERT LUNDEN . I am a watchman. On the 3d of July, about three o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner shut in the privy of a court, which is not a thoroughfare, and within two minutes walk of Umpleby's house - he said he lodged at Mr. Johnson's, just by; that he had been out late, and they were gone to bed, but as a lodger was coming out at four o'clock, and he could then get in, he did not wish to disturb them; he begged of me to let him stop there; and his appearance being decent I did not object. I went round at half-past three, and he was gone. I saw him in custody on the same day; he was then in a different dress. I went to Johnson's and found the dress which he had on when he was in the privy.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. Not to my knowledge. When he was in custody I recollected seeing him somewhere, but could not recollect where, his dress being altered, but remembered at last and said,

"Young man, I spoke to you in the privy in Round-court; he said,

"Yes, and you gave me leave to

stop till four o'clock;" I said,

"You had not that dress on then;" he said, No.

WILLIAM HOWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 2d of July, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner brought two table spoons to pawn for 1 l.; he said they were his own, that he lived in Well-street, Drury-lane. I had received notice of this robbery, and said I suspected they were stolen, and must detain him - he made no answer. I told my brother to look after him while I went for the street-keeper - my brother not understanding me let him go; he ran from the shop when I came back, and turned up some of the back streets - we followed, and secured him in Bosiers-court, Tottenham Court-road.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he is the person who came to your shop - A. Quite. I lost sight of him in turning the corners.

PHILIP RILEY . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. I pursued the prisoner with Hows, and stopped him in about three minutes, and in his coat pocket found three 5 s. papers of halfpence, in his waistcoat pocket eight sixpences, and in his hat about a quarter of a pound of black tea - he said at the watch-house that the watchman knew where he lived.

WILLIAM UMPLEBY . My halfpence were not in paper.

MRS. UMPLEBY. I know the spoons perfectly well - the smaller one is marked R. C.; I saw them safe just before I went to bed. I have the fellow ones here. I left a pound of tea on the bar table.

Cross-examined. Q. The letters R. C. is the silver stamp - A. Yes; I have the fellow ones; I can swear to them without the letters.

ROBERT LUNDEN re-examined. The mark R. C. is the maker's initial; she described the spoons to me before the prisoner brought them, and from her description I detained him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of one Jones that morning.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Of Larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-63

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1132. ALEXANDER FIDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Spencer and Robert Johnson Allanson , (to whom he was servant,) three seals, value 5 l. , their property.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH SPENCER . I am in partnership with Robert Johnson Allanson - we are jewellers , and live in Red Lion street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner came into our service on the 3d of May; we do not keep an open shop. On taking stock on the 23d of June we missed three seals among a great deal of other property; they were gold seals, and had been kept in a drawer in the warehouse. We found them in pawn. We can ascertain their description and value by our books.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did Mr. Allanson come into partnership with you - A. On the 1st of April; - it was the prisoner's duty to take out goods, which were given him to dispose of, but none but what were given to him - they were always given to him - he was to shew them round the trade; he had particular directions every morning - and I or my partner always examined the stock he took out - he was only to take such goods as we gave him, and was not authorised to open a fresh account without our knowledge, unless he sold for cash.

Q. Did he not express a desire that the stock should be taken - A. Never, till I told him there were many goods missing, and must have stock taken; he might have replied that he was anxious for it, I cannot tell. He absented himself one day, but returned the next - he continued in our employ till stock was taken, and up to the Saturday following. I told him we should not want his services - I produce his daily sale book - the first entry is dated on the 8th of April, and the last on the 23d of June. I have made a few entries in it myself, having sold some goods. We were two days taking stock - he was absent one of those days - I had told him we should not want him after that week.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you take stock in the regular course of business, or under suspicion that you were robbed - A. Suspecting that we had been robbed, I mentioned these seals to him as having been missed among other things - he gave no account of them. We finished taking stock on Thursday - he came on Friday. I asked him then, and repeatedly to explain about the seals - he gave no explanation. I paid him his wages, and discharged him on Saturday - we were not then sensible of the extent of our loss. He should enter in this book what he had done with the property he took out, I never ordered him to take these seals.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Here are many entries of seals in this book - A. Yes, but not of those in question. On the day he left he said there was some money he could receive from a person I did not know - I said

"Go and receive it." He returned and said he had not received it, but had lent the man the money to pay me (looking at three seals) these are them - two are worth 46 s. and the other 38 s.

WILLIAM BEARCROFT . I am servant to Mr. Wood, pawnbroker, St. Giles's. On the 17th of June the prisoner pawned these three seals for 2 l., in the name of John James .

MR. SPENCER. I had seen these seals a few days before we took stock - I know them by the workmanship.

MR. ALLANSON. I never authorized the prisoner to take out these seals.

Cross-examined. Q. When did the prisoner come into your employ - A. On the 3d of May.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about the partnership - A. Not till a few days before he left us - it was on the night of the 21st of June. I had said nothing to him, but he told me he knew I had borrowed money of my sister to open an account at a banker's, and he insinuated things against my partner - he said if I would look in the books I should find false entries made, and proposed my drawing part of the stock from the concern; and said I might command him in what way I pleased. I did not propose it to him - he said he would take the stock out as usual next day, and sell it as usual, and I would meet him at the Colonial Coffee-house at five o'clock in the evening; and I might enquire in the mean time into what he had said. I never myself desired him to take part of the stock out. I know Saunders - I went with him one day to search a house near the Cobourg Theatre, after the prisoner was in custody. I never told him I had engaged

with the prisoner to take away the most valuable part of the stock, to compel Spencer to dissolve the partnership, or any thing of the kind. I might have said I had agreed to meet him at the coffee-house, as it was publicly known then. I told him the prisoner was to wait me at the coffee-house with the stock which he had taken out to sell - he had advised me to secure the stock - I said I would consider of what he had said, and would meet him there. My partner had sent him out with the stock as well as myself. I related the circumstances to Saunders in the way I have stated.

Q. Did you tell him you had agreed to the proposition - A. I do not think that I did - I will not swear it. I called at the Colonial Coffee-house, and he was not there. I left word for him to stop, intending to call in half an hour, but did not. My father was going that way; I desired him to call and send him home. My father saw him safe into the house, and then left. I never expressed a dissatisfaction about the partnership, except from what he insinuated. I had no conversation with him at any other time about it.

Q. Did you draw any money out of the banker's on a particular account - A. Only to pay the partnership accounts. He was absent one day while we were taking stock. Mr. Spencer told him to come at nine o'clock, but he did not; he came next day, in consequence of my going to him.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How did you meet with Saunders - A. He came to me, at our house in Red Lion-street, in consequence of my calling at his mother's; he had been in our service in May; we sent for him, thinking he might give some information about the property. I never entertained the least doubt of my partner's fidelity till the 21st of June, when the prisoner suggested this to me; he suggested every thing to me. I appeared to acquiesce, but formed no opinion about it, wishing to inquire further; I only told him to take the stock out as usual. I told Mr. Spencer what had passed on the Thursday; after the stock came home. My sister demanded the money she had 1 nt, and I withdrew it.

COURT. Q. What stock did he bring home on Thursday - A. I do not know, my Lord, it was more than usual.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th, in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. I found seven or eight sovereigns on him. He said he knew there was a quantity of property missing, and he could explain it.

Mr. BRODRICK to MR. SPENCER. Q. Is there any thing in these seals to enable you to distinguish them from others of the same pattern - A. They are of a particular pattern; they were in a private drawer in the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. When I first entered their service, I supposed I was to do the out-door business alone; I was to have thirty shillings a week at first, which was to be increased as I sold more goods. When I went on Monday, to my surprise a youth named Saunders was there to be employed in the same way at half my salary. I found from my first day's business that there was not enough employment for me, and saw this youth was there to supplant me, when I had formed a connection. It may he said I have made false entries in my book. I have done so, but I have paid the money for the goods, which my book will prove, and their cash book also, which is the case with these three seals. Saunders sold a good many seals; I entered these and paid for them. Not wishing him to get the connexion. I saw these three seals in the warehouse, and told Mr. Spencer I wanted them to shew with others. There was never an account taken of what I took out after the first fortnight; I was authorized to take any articles which I could sell, I was very unsuccessful on that day, and entered these seals - two to Mr. Rossery, and one to Campbell; fearing Saunders would do more than me, I entered Campbell's as paid, and paid for it myself, and entered Rossery payable on a certain day, and paid it myself on that day.

MR. SPENCER. Here is on cash-book. The prisoner has entered in his book

"One seal 17th, 42 s., and one 34 s.," making 3 l. 16 d., discount 3 s. 3 d., paid - Campbell one seal, 34 s., discount 2 s., 1 l. 12 s., paid." We received the cash for these entries, but these are not the seals in question, and the seals he states he had from the warehouse was on the 18th; this entry is on the 17th. I am quite certain that it relates to quite different seals.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. How can you tell they are not the same seals - A. The price is very different, and these are three which were given to him, and accounted for, and of a different pattern. The price tells the pattern. Here is an entry in the cash-book of 1 l. 12 s. received from Campbell, on the 17th, and 3 l. 12 s. from Rossery, on the 22 d.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have the seals ever been delivered out of your stock to be offered for sale - A. Never; they are of quite a different price.

COURT. Q. Are your seals ticketed with the prices when you deliver them to him for sale - A. Yes, unless it is a common pattern, which he would have a sufficient knowledge of. I recollect his asking for the seals, which he has entered perfectly well - he did not usually take out seals, but he said he had a customer, and I gave him three, which he returned, as sold to Rossery and Campbell.

- ROSSERY. Q. Did the prisoner sell any seals to you on the 17th of June - A. No.

ARTHUR PHILIP SAUNDERS . I entered the prosecutor's service on the same day as the prisoner. The goods were selected for him at first, but he afterwards took what he thought proper - he entered them on a slate, and in the evening accounted for them. I left on the 24th of May. I checked his accounts every night. On the 1st of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning I had some conversation with Mr. Allanson, on Blackfriars-bridge; he said he had agreed with the prisoner to take out the best part of the goods by stratagem, and he was to meet him at the Colonial coffee-house at five o'clock that evening, and the goods were to be detained, to make Mr. Spencer settle accounts; he said he had taken legal advice on the subject. He said he went to the coffee-house, but did not meet Fidler.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you lived with any one since you left the prosecutors - A. No. I know the conversation was on the 1st of July, by a memorandum I have, of having been there on that day to cast up their books.

Q. How came you to leave the prosecutors - A. Mr.

Spencer told me on Saturday evening that he had no further occasion for my services.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-64

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1133. CHARLES ENGLEBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , at St. Giles in the Fields , nineteen yards of cloth, value 10 l., the goods of George Brough , in his dwelling-house .

NEHEMIAH GEORGE HARLE . I live in Half Moon-alley, Whitecross-street, with my mother - I am servant to Mr. George Brough , a tailor , who lives at No. 5, Great Turnstile, Holborn , in the parish of St. Giles. On Saturday morning, the 26th of June, I was at home - a young man came into the shop, and wanted to be measured for a suit of clothes - he went into the back part of the shop, and tried on a waistcoat; and while I stood behind him, tying the waistcoat behind, I saw the prisoner come in, and saw him leaving the shop directly with a piece of cloth under his arm; he was not in the shop above half a minute - he had taken the cloth off the counter, for I had seen it there shortly before he came in; he walked away with it. I ran out, and stopped him six or seven yards off with it. I asked what he was going to do with the cloth - he said it was his own. A young man stood by; I asked him to assist me; the prisoner then dropped it, and ran away, down Whetstone-park, but was taken before he got out of my sight - I am quite sure he is the man. The shopman was in the parlour, attending to the man who came in.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were engaged tying the waistcoat - A. Yes. My attention was directed to that till I saw him going out; several persons ran after him. He has always said that I am mistaken in his person that he was in pursuit of the thief.

COURT. Q. Did you not say that you saw him come into the shop - A. No; I saw him go out with it, and saw him drop it. I brought it back to the shop. I only saw his back as he was going out. I am certain it was him.

GEORGE BROUGH . This shop is mine. I was out at the time - I returned about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner in custody. Here is the cloth; it is mine - I know it by the number and mark; it is worth 10 l. I bought it two days before, and have had it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was merely passing through Turnstile, and was stopped all of a sudden by this lad; he said,

"You have got my cloth." A person stood by me, tying up his shoe, and he dropped the cloth and ran away - thinking I might be charged with it, I ran after the lad down Whetstone-park; I was taken, and he said I was the man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240715-65

1134. THOMAS WATTS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Pace and Frederick Pace , about four o'clock in the forenoon of the 13th of July , at St. Margaret, Westminster , (the said C. Pace & others of his family therein being), and stealing therein a time piece, value 1 l.; a coat, value 2 l.; a pelisse, value 2 l.; a shawl, value 3 l.; eight silver spoons, value 26 s.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s.; a hat, value 6 s., and twenty-four pairs of stockings, value 30 s. , the goods of the said Charles Pace .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES PACE . I live at No. 2, Lower Crown-street , in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster; my brother Frederick lives there with me - we occupy the house together, and pay the taxes jointly. He slept in the room over me, and Finch slept in the next room to him. On the 13th of July, between three and four o'clock in the morning, my wife awoke me; I heard a noise in the adjoining room to where I sleep, on the first floor - I got up, and knocked at that room door to alarm the parties; I heard a lock pushed back - I sprang my rattle, and then went into the room, and found the hat and bonnet boxes taken from the cupboard, and thrown about - there was a chisel in my secretary. I missed a time-piece, a coat, and a pelisse, worth 40 s.; a shawl, worth 3 l.; six silver spoons, worth 20 s.; a pair of sugar-tongs, worth 10 s.; a hat, and thirty pairs of stockings - property worth much more than 40 s. was gone from that room. The secretary had the bottom broken open by violence, and the coat, pelisse, and shawl taken out. My brother and Finch came down; we went to the back door, where I saw my wife's bonnet and part of the time-piece. Two hats were shewn to me by my wife; I think in the first floor, where the property was taken from; they belonged to nobody in the house. I went into the next street after dressing myself, and the prisoner was brought to the front door without his hat, in custody; he was examined at the watch-house; I did not notice his shoes.

COURT. Q. Was the property carried away, or only removed - A. The articles stated in the indictment were all taken away entirely. The thieves had come in at the back window, and must have escaped from the back entrance. I got out at the back door, as it was open. I have found none of the property.

JOHN JAMES FINCH . I lodged at the prosecutors' house, and was alarmed by the rattle. I went to his assistance, and on getting into the passage I saw two hats, which belonged to nobody in the house - I took them up to the first floor. The back door lock had been picked and a bar put in by force to open it, and the back window had been forced with a bar. We found a crow-bar on the copper in the kitchen, and I observed marks of a person having got up on the copper, by mortar being scraped off - the copper joined the window ledge; a person coming through the window would come in contact with the copper, the mortar of which was fresh, and there were marks of shoes scratching the bricks outside the window - there was the impression of a footstep on the fresh mortar of the copper. I went out into the yard, and saw a bonnet, a veil, a frill, and the feathers of the bonnet; they were taken into the home. I went into Crown-street, and found the watchman asleep - I stated the circumstances to him, but he never offered to move, and on going up the street I met the prisoner without a hat, knowing him before, I passed him, and turned after him; I followed him

to the door which had been broken open, and saw him put his hand upon the latch, but it had been fastened - he then returned into King-street; I called a watchman, who secured him. I saw mortar on his shoe, similar to that on the copper, and that in the yard; it was fresh. I saw one of the hats put on him; it appeared to fit him. Pople said at the watch-house, in his presence, that he had not the least doubt of the hat being his, for he had particularly noticed it when he was in his custody before. The prisoner said the lining of his hat had been torn out in Tothil-fields prison, and that his hat was at home, under the counter. The lining of the hat was quite out when it was picked up. He said he was merely taking a walk without his hat (it was between three and four o'clock in the morning); I first saw him in the adjoining street, about two hundred yards from the house.

Prisoner. You said at Queen-square that you saw me lift up the latch - Witness. Yes, I did. I was not round the corner.

FREDERICK PACE . I was alarmed at a noise in the house. I got up, and saw the two hats laying at the back door. I and my brother rent the house, and pay the taxes jointly, and both live there. I saw some rusty picklock keys laying on the first floor, by the secretary. I had seen part of the property in the room a night or two before.

GEORGE POPLE . I am a constable of Queen-square. I know the prisoner. I saw a hat on the Magistrate's table when he was examined - I have seen that hat repeatedly before, in the prisoner's possession; the last time I saw it it was on his head. I had examined it on a former occasion, and saw the inside of it, and am confident that it is the same. I was stating to the Magistrate that the lining was torn out when he was examined before; the prisoner said it was not, for it was done in Tothil-fields. I am certain it is his. I saw his shoes when he was at the office; one of them was very much covered with fresh white lime: he was endeavouring to rub it off with his feet as he stood at the bar.

Prisoner (producing another hat. This is the hat I wore.

[The prisoner was here desired to put on the hat found on the premises.]

Witness. I have no doubt of that being the hat he wore commonly. After the examination the hat which he has now produced was brought to him, with the ends of the thread hanging to it, as if the lining had just been torn out.

JAMES M'DONAUGH. On the day before this robbery happened I saw the prisoner about forty or fifty yards from the prosecutors' house - he had a blue coat on. I took particular notice of him, and particularly noticed his hat, and as soon as this hat was put upon his head at the office I knew it again; my attention was called to him from seeing him there. I have no doubt of its being the hat he then wore.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear to a hat you never saw before - A. I know it. or I would not swear to it.

MARY SCANNELL . I am servant to the prosecutors. On the evening before the robbery I was the last person up, and made the house secure. Next morning I found the kitchen windows open, and saw the mark of a crow-bar on the window, and the door was open - I had secured both the night before. A crow-bar was found in the kitchen. I had been on the first floor the day before; the property was all safe, and every thing secure when I went to bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I went on an errand, and going down King-street happened to look into this passage - this gentleman then called a watchman, and I was taken.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18240715-66

1135. JOSEPH FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , at St. Mary-le-bone , a coat, value 20 s.; two yards of woollen cloth, value 30 s.; a pair of breeches, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; five waistcoats, value 10 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; a watch, value 20 s.; two seals, value 20 s.; a table-cloth, value 1 s.; a watch key, value 1 s.; a bed hook, value 1 s.; a gold slide, value 1 s., and twenty shillings, the property of George Johnson , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Widdowson .

GEORGE JOHNSON . I am a carman , and live in the house of Thomas Widdowson , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. The prisoner lodged in the same room, and slept in the same bed with me for nearly nine weeks. On Thursday, the 17th of June, I got up and went out about five o'clock in the morning, leaving him in bed - I left my things in the room. My coat was worth 20 s.; two yards of cloth, worth 30 s.; a pair of breeches, worth 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, worth 5 s.; five waistcoats, worth 20 s.; four handkerchiefs, worth 4 s., a watch, and other things, worth above 5 l. altogether, were all locked up in my chest - I laid the key on a shelf over the door, under my hat-box, whether he knew that I do not know. I returned again between eight and nine o'clock at night, and missed my things next morning; he did not sleep at home that night; he had tied up his old dirty things, and old hat, and put them in the place where he used to keep his best clothes, so that we did not think he was gone. I did not examine my trunk till the Friday morning. I found the key where I had left it, and the trunk locked, but all the property gone. I had seen them all safe between eight and nine o'clock on Wednesday morning. He never returned - I have found none of my property. I found him in custody on the Saturday week following, and asked what he had done with my piece of cloth; he said voluntarily that he had sold it. I asked what he had done with the tobacco box, which was in my waistcoat pocket; he said,

"Was there one, if there was I have sold it altogether." I asked what he had done with an old half-crown, which was in the till of my box; he said he had sold it altogether to a Jew.

THOMAS WIDDOWSON . I rent the house. The prisoner is a coach-smith, and had lodged there about nine weeks - he paid regularly till Whitsuntide; his week ended on Saturday, and on Thursday, the 17th he left in the morning, without notice. I was in Hyde Park on the 26th, and found him there. I took him to the watch-house, and said

"Joe, can you get the things back again;" he said,

"No, I cannot, for I sold them all to a Jew." I said,

"How came you to rob the man;" he said he did it from want; I said he was not in want, for my wife had got a good breakfast and dinner for him if he had come home, and he had better have come and had it than rob the man. My

house is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. I pay the taxes;

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer. Widdowson gave the prisoner into my custody. I neither threatened him or promised him anything. I asked what he had to say; he acknowledged committing the robbery, and that he had done it for fear he should be in want, and through the persuasion of a woman called Mary, who walked Covent Garden, and had sold all the property to a Jew.

The prisoner made no Defence; but received a good Character from four witnesses.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18240715-67

1136. THOMAS ANDERSON was indicted for that he, on the 5th of July , in and upon John Wilson , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and did cut him in and upon his face and left cheek, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him, or do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN WILSON . I am a journeyman baker . I had known the prisoner about two months - he is a journeyman baker , and had hurt his hand; I worked three days for him, for which he owed me 4 s. 6 d.; we had no agreement about it - he paid me 1 s. 10 d., and on Sunday, the 4th of July I stood at the top of Bluegate-fields; he came home, and said,

"Will you have the half quartern loaf - I had quarrelled with him the night before, as he did not pay me. I said he need not have abused me so much, as I only wanted a few halfpence; I said I should only charge him 4 s. 6 d. - this was on Saturday night, the 3 d. He said if I called between three and four o'clock on Monday he would settle it. I went between three and four, with Davis - the prisoner lives in a kitchen; I went to the kitchen railing, and called him, and we went down to the Bluegate public-house ; he asked Davis to play at skittles; he said he had no money. I said,

"Tom, if you are going to settle with me I will play;" he said he be b - g - d if he would pay me if he had a pocket full of money - I went and sat down on the settle, without saying a word, and the moment I sat down he ran at me, and said he would cut my bl - y head off; he caught hold of me with his left hand, and lifted up his right to hit me - I said,

"Don't cut me Tom" - he said again,

"I will cut your bl - y head off," and struck at me directly in the left cheek, and the blood flew all manner of ways; he appeared to have a small pen-knife in the middle of his hand - I saw the point of a blade as he struck me, but not afterwards. The landlady ran out, gave me 1 s., and sent me to the doctor's to have it dressed. I then went to the Thames Police; he was taken that evening. I had not quarrelled with him, or struck him that night.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. Had you come from a public-house - A. I came from the Wellington, public-house. Davis had been there with me - I do not suppose that I had drank above three pints of beer between three of us. When he threatened to cut my head off I laid hold of a piece of wood, which lay on the ground, but did not raise it from the ground; I did not strike him at all, or propose to fight him; I only asked him civilly for my money. I might have said he ought to pay me, but nothing more. I saw the knife when he put his hand up, and said,

"Don't cut me;" he was jawing me, saying I had not done my work right. No knife was found on him.

COURT. Q. You did not say before that you snatched up a piece of wood, what sort of wood was it - A. A piece of pailing; I did not take it up, but only attempted. I took hold of it to defend myself, but did not raise it off the ground - he saw me stooping to get it, and then came up and cut at me.

JOHN DAVIS . I was at the Bluegate with Wilson, I did not see him drink anything, but he was the worse for liquor. He and the prisoner were wrangling; there was high words between them. Wilson asked for his money; he said he would not pay him just then, but would when he could - several words passed, and then the prisoner struck him; I did not see the blow given, but saw Wilson bleeding; I had seen him attempt to take up a piece of wood to strike the prisoner, but he did not take it up, as the prisoner collared him - he was bleeding at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was great heat of blood between them - A. Yes. They were both in a passion. It was a sudden quarrel - one was in as great a passion as the other.

ALFRED HAMILTON . I am a student at the London Hospital. Wilson came there on the 5th of July; he had a wound on the right cheek, about two inches long, and not above half an inch deep; it must have been made by a sharp instrument - it is now quite well. There was no danger from it; it was not a grevious bodily wound.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-68

NEW COURT. (2d DAY,)

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1137. JOHN SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , six quires of printed paper, value 10 s. the goods of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I am a printer , and live in the Strand. The prisoner was in my employ as a carpenter , for six or seven weeks. I lost some paper from a room behind the carpenter's shop; I mentioned it to my warehouseman, and afterwards found the paper at the shop of Mr. Knight; it is called deny paper, and had been printed in my house - it was in the same shape at Mr. Knight's premises - they were all Latin grammars, and I know there is not such in the world, besides we print them for the trade, and they were not completed for delivery, because the party whose name was to it had become a bankrupt - it was folded in sheets, fit for binding. I enquired about the prisoner, and found he bears the best of characters.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am a cheesemonger, and live in the Strand. The prisoner brought some paper in sheets to my house, and asked if I bought waste paper; I gave him 4 1/2 d. per lb. for 13 lbs, of it. Mr. Wood's son called upon me, and asked if I had bought any waste paper; I said I had - the officer came and took it to Bow-street. It was in printed sheets. He said it was misprinted, and to be sold as waste.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-69

1138. XAVER BLAYLER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN BERMAN . I am a clock-maker , and live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital. The prisoner was employed by me to carry home clocks, and receive the money for them. I gave him fifty-eight clocks to sell - he took them out, but I got very little money; some I got 1 s. 6 d., for and some 2 s. Some of them were worth 15 s.; and some 1 l. I have got a book of false directions which he gave me. I never had any money from him as paid by William Stone , or George Hoddy .

WILLIAM STONE . I went to Mr. Berman's for a clock on a Saturday evening; I saw the prisoner there, and Berman - I did not know but that they were partners. I said I wanted a clock; they said I could not have it that night, as it wanted regulating, but I should have it in the morning - I received it about eight o'clock in the morning, of Sunday, the 30th of May, and gave the prisoner a sovereign for it.

JOHN BERMAN . I have not received the money. He told me Mr. Stone had a watch to exchange, and I must call myself.

Prisoner. I gave him the money; I gave him 2 l. 5 s., and 6 s. the same afternoon - Witness. He paid me that on the 5th of June, for other accounts which were in the book; this is my writing, (producing a book;) here is Mr. Stone's direction, No. 17, Rathbone-place, but nothing is paid. I can swear he never paid me for it.

COURT. Q. But here is 4 l. 12 s. received on the 5th of June, is that true - A. Yes; he gave me 2 l. 5 s. 6 d., and I allowed him the rest for his expences, but he did not account for the sovereign received of Stone; I am quite sure he did not give me the sovereign he received from Stone on the 30th of May.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid him the 2 l. 5 s. 6 d. on that same Sunday.

JURY to MR. STONE. Q. Did the prisoner speak to you about exchanging a watch - A. Yes, but it was not until I had paid him the sovereign; I did not know before that they did exchange watches. I showed him my watch, and he said it might be worth 15 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-70

1139. WILLIAM PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , a coal, value 20 s. , the goods of George James Ihler .

GEORGE JAMES IHLER . On the 4th of June I lost a coat which I had left in the back parlour, at No. 4, Jewin-street , when I went out in the evening. I saw it afterwards at the Mansion House.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL FORRESTER . On the 5th of June, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and two others in the City-road - he had this coat on, and the other had this basket; the prisoner ran away, and I seized the one who had the basket, and found in it an old coat - I ran after the prisoner, and said,

"Young man, I think this coat will fit you best;" he took this off, and put the old one on.

THOMAS DAVIS . I assisted in taking the prisoner - he conducted himself most desperately all the way to the watch-house; and used most blasphemous language.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of the young man who ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-71

1140. JOHN PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. , the goods of Francis Ellison .

FRANCIS ELLISON . I am a linendraper , and live in Piccadilly. On the 31st of May the prisoner was brought to my house by Dorrington, and a piece of printed cotton with him - I could not swear to it, as I had not missed any of that description.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON . I saw the prisoner on the 31st of May in Piccadilly , near Mr. Ellison's shop - he and the two others took something from the door, which he put under his coat. I crossed over, and collared him in Bond-street, and found this piece of cotton on the ground, behind him - I took it back to Mr. Ellison's, and asked him if he had lost it; he said he believed it was his.

ANN DORRINGTON . I am the wife of the last witness. I was with my husband, and saw the prisoner drop the piece of cotton.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground when the officer took me - that is all I know.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-72

Before Mr. Recorder.

1141. JOHN STUART was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April a barometer, value 20 s.; a looking glass value 5 s.; a knife, value 1 s.; and a fork, value 1 s. ; the goods of John Cetti .

JOHN CETTI . I am a traveller, and sell barometers . On the 5th of April, I lost a barometer from the Bull's Head, public house, Hitchen, in Herts . I had left it there on the 30th of March, with a glass and a knife and fork, in a trunk. When I came to town on the 17th of April I heard they had been stolen.

JAMES REYNOLDS . My father keeps the Bull's Head, at Hitchen. Mr. Cetti had a box in our front room up stairs. I did not know what was in it. I saw the prisoner at my father's house, on the evening of the 2d of April; he was a stranger to me. He slept there on the 2d or the 3d, he was several times in the house, and went away on the 5th. I was not there when he left. The box was locked, and Mr. Cetti kept the key himself. He was in the habit of coming to Hitchen three weeks or a month at a time. On the 5th of April. I was at home, and my mother said,

"Come up stairs;" when I went up, I found the box had been broken open. I did not see the prisoner again till he was at Bow-street. I am quite positive of his person. Late on the night of the 4th of April, I saw him go up stairs with a lighted candle, he slept that night alone in the room, where the box was deposited.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear that the box was not open on the 3d of April - A. No, I cannot swear that.

JOHN CETTI re-examined. I left the box locked.

WILLIAM MARSTERS . I live with Mr. Turner a pawnbroker, at the corner of Russellrcourt, Drury-lane, these articles were pledged with me on the 5th of April, about nine in the evening; I believe by the prisoner, I saw him again at Bow-street, and believe him to be the person. I

advanced 23 s. upon them - they were redeemed on the 10th, but not by the prisoner - the barometer is here, and I believe it to be the same; it has the same general appearance, and the same maker's name.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know me before I pledged these articles - A. No - I believe you are the person you came into the shop, and then left, and came back and took the money I had offered you, so that I saw you twice.

WILLIAM DENNY . I am a broker, and live at No. 13, Shire-lane, Temple-bar. A woman brought the duplicate to me, and I took out the barometer - I think it was on the 10th of April, from Mr. Turners. I cannot be positive that this is the barometer. I sold it to Mr. Morris, of Clare-market for 10 s.

JOHN MORRIS . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Clare-market. I bought the barometer of Mr. Denny, and seeing the name of Cetti on it, I sent it to him to repair it.

JOSEPH CETTI . I am a maker of barometers, and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn. This barometer was brought to my house by Morris to be repaired; it was not in a finished state. I am no relation of the prosecutor's. I sell them to him unfinished, and he finishes them for sale - it would not be sold to a gentleman, without the inside tube was filled - it is now worth about 18 s.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 46, Parker-street, Drury-lane. I told him I had an order from Mr. Denny to take him into custody, the woman was with me who sold the duplicate - I did not hear what she said to him, but I believe she told him what the charge was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The house has many lodgers. The gentleman states I was there three nights, and during that time he does not say the box was locked, but there might be other persons come into that room. The pawnbroker stated at Bow-street, that he believed I was the man, but could not swear it.

JAMES REYNOLDS re-examined. When the prisoner left the house, he got out of the front room window into the street, the door was locked - I was called to break it open, and found the window open, and the lid of the box standing wide open.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-73

1142. ISAAC ISAACS was indicted for stealing on the 10th of July two half-crowns, the monies of Mary Black , from her person .

MARY BLACK . I live in Bird-street, Manchester-square. On Saturday, the 10th of July, about half-past twelve, I was in Hyde Park , at the review, and had two half-crowns stolen from my pocket - I had not been pressed by the crowd or hustled - I did not see the prisoner till Dorrington came up to me with him, and asked if I had been robbed - I had a sovereign, two half-crowns and a shilling loose in my pocket - I felt and thought I had lost all my money, but upon feeling again, I found the sovereign and the shilling - the two half-crowns were gone. The officer said he had taken two half-crowns from the prisoner, and showed them to me.

FREDERICK DORRINGTON. I am a constable of Bow-street. I was on duty in the Park on the 10th of July. - I saw the prosecutrix with a child on her right arm - I saw the prisoner in company with two others bigger than himself - I watched them, and saw him open the prosecutrix's pocket with his left hand, and put his right hand under it, he then put in his left hand and took something out, but I could not tell what. The other two were standing between him and me, he went away about twelve or fourteen yards, when I followed him, and collared him - he was looking at the two half-crowns, and dropped them when I took hold of him. I took him back to where I left the prosecutrix, and asked if she had lost any money. She felt in her pocket, and said

"Yes, all my money. I had a sovereign, two half-crowns and a shilling." I said

"I know nothing about it, but I have found two half-crowns." She felt again, and said she had lost two half-crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing by the soldiers among some other boys, when the officer laid hold of me; there were two half-crowns on the ground, he picked them up and said I stolen had them.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-74

1143. WILLIAM ROBINS , DANIEL HAGAN , and JOHN RICHARDSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Owen , from his person .

Mr. WILLIAM OWEN . I am an upholsterer , and live at Haverford-West, in Pembrokeshire. I was in London on the 9th of June, and had a handkerchief taken from me about twelve o'clock, while I was walking along Marlborough-street . I am quite sure I had it in my pocket when I went out, about half an hour before. As I was knocking at the door of the house I lodged at in Marlborough-street, an officer came and said

"You have been robbed." I felt in my pocket and my handkerchief was gone. I saw an officer take it from the prisoner Robins - two other officers had the other prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN. I am a special constable of St. James's. I saw the three prisoners in company in Wardour-street, and watched them - they went down Oxford-street, and towards Marlborough-street. At the corner of Poland-street, I saw the prosecutor going towards Marlborough-street from the Pantheon - they turned down Poland-street after him - a corner of his handkerchief hung out of his pocket, they followed him about five yards, and took it from him in Poland-street. I could not see which of them took it, as there was a dray in the street, and while they were passing that they took it. I was on the opposite side; just as Mr. Owen got to the head of the horses, I saw the hand of one of them lifted up above the wheel of the dray, they then walked on before the gentleman and turned down Marlborough-street, he stopped at a house, I believe No. 2. I went to him and said,

"Sir, you have lost your handkerchief." He said yes, while I was speaking to him Roberts seized two of the prisoners - I ran and attempted to seize the other, he ran away and was stopped by Green. Roberts took the handkerchief from him, and I have had it ever since. They were all in company when I first saw them, but Hagan stopped to look at something in the street, and then ran and joined them.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESSWELL. Q. Was there not

an organ in the street - A. Yes, and Hagan stopped to listen, and then joined his companions before the robbery was committed.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was in company with Bertraun, who pointed the prisoners out to me in Wardour-street; they were together at first, but Hagan stopped to hear an organ for a short time; he then ran and joined them near the Pantheon. I saw Mr. Owen turn into Poland-street, they were behind him - they turned after him and got close behind him; there was a dray standing near Marlborough-street; while they were passing that, Bertrand said they had taken the handkerchief, but I did not see them take it; he told the gentleman of it; I took hold of Robins and Richardson, they did not ask me why I took hold of them. Hagan ran away, and was stopped by Green within four or five yards. I found the handkerchief on Robins between his waistcoat and shirt.

Cross-examined by Mr. CRESSWELL. Q. Have you ever been in trouble yourself - A. Yes, for locking up two men - I was held to bail. I got into a row once, about ten years ago, one night in a public house, and there was a charge against me for felony, but the Grand jury threw the bill out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBINS Defence. As I was going down Poland-street, I saw the handkerchief and put it into my bosom.

RICHARDSON'S Defence. As I was going down Poland-street, and the others going before me, the officer came and took me.

ROBINS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HAGAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-75

1144. GEORGE BINT was indicted for stealing on the 15th of June , a sovereign , the money of Charlotte Underwood .

CHARLOTTE UNDERWOOD . I am a widow and live at Hounslow , and sell shoes and other trifling things . The prisoner, whom I had known before, called at my house on the 15th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning to see a lodger. I was then in the back room; a customer had been there a short time before for a pair of shoes, and gave me a sovereign. I had not got change, and asked my sister for change; the sovereign laid on the table when the prisoner came into the room, there were some mackerel on the table which the lodger had brought, and he said to the prisoner

"Bint, you may have some mackerel if you like;" the prisoner went round the table to smell it, and I saw him take up the sovereign with one hand, and the mackerel with the other. I said

"Bint, you are fond of sovereigns, are you?" he said rather; he then walked round the table to go out. I said leave the sovereign. he said if I would get the mackerel ready at one o'clock he would come and dine; he then went away, and I thought he would return the sovereign at dinner time. I called after him again, when he got into the street to leave the sovereign, he held his hand up but did not speak. I saw him no more till half past six o'clock, when he came to his lodgings, opposite to my house; he was then cleaned, and in company with a young woman; I went and asked him for the sovereign; he said he would give it to me in half an hour; I said that would not do; he said so help him God, he would bring it in half an hour, he was going to the Lion and Lamb. I did not see him again till half-past twelve o'clock at night, when the constable had charge of him. I have never got the sovereign again.

ANN REYNOLDS . I live at Barking, in Essex. I was at Hounslow on a visit to my sister, Mrs. Underwood. I saw her give change for a sovereign, and it laid on the table - the prisoner, who was a stranger to me, came into the room about ten minutes afterwards - I saw him take the sovereign from the table - my sister said he was fond of sovereigns; he said,

"Rather so." About eleven o'clock he came in, and asked if dinner was ready; he had promised the boy to come and dine. My sister asked him in the evening if he had got the sovereign; and she said he had not given it to her. I was with the person who took him at twelve o'clock at night. I asked him to give me the sovereign, and he said he had given it to my sister - the man who was with me was not an officer - he walked with us as far as Richmond, and then said he would be taken into custody - I enquired for a constable - he then said he would go back to Hounslow.

Prisoner. The witness met me, and questioned me about the sovereign; I said I would settle it with Mrs. Underwood.

Witness. I am quite sure he said he had given the sovereign to Mrs. Underwood - he said, upon his soul he had.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I took charge of him; he acknowledged that he took it, and changed it at the Cricketers, public-house, at Richmond Green - but said, that when he took it he did not intend to keep it. I had known him before - I believe his master had discharged him that day.

Prisoner's Defence. I came backwards and forwards to Mrs. Underwood that day and she never said any thing about the sovereign. I met her sister in the evening, and she said part of it was her's - I said I would go back and settle it. Mrs. Underwood said, before the magistrate, that she did not think I meant to steal it, and asked if I could replace it - I said I thought I could if I wrote to a friend. I was then asked if I had a watch to leave, which I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-76

1145. PHILIP CASTELOW and JOHN CRONIN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 66 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., the goods of William Richardson , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I live in Great Portland-street, Marylebone. This lead was affixed to a house I am building in Harley-street, Marylebone . I heard of the robbery the day after it was done, which was the 11th of June - the lead had not been removed away, but was cut up in pieces - it had been taken off the dormer window, and appeared bright at the edges, as if it was fresh cut - I think there was about 60 lbs. weight of it, but I have not weighed it - it exactly fitted the place, and was all there. I have seen these prisoners about there several times.

WILLIAM HERON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Allcroft, copper-plate printer, Oxford-market. I did not know the house which was robbed till these young men shewed it to me - I had known them before. On the 10th of June, about half-past six o'clock, I was standing at my mother's

door, in Peter-street, near Wardour-street, when Castelow came and asked me if I had seen Cronin - while we were speaking Cronin came up, and asked Castelow if he would go with him to Upper Harley-street - he agreed to go, and I went with him - Cronin said he wanted some money, and he would go and get some lead off those houses; and asked me to go with them - I went, and we got into the house about half-past nine o'clock; Cronin took us to the back of the house, and went up the ladder first, Castelow and I followed him - when Cronin got on the second floor he saw some carpenters' tools, and said he would have some of them - we then went on the third floor, and Castelow said he did not know how we should get to the top of the house; Cronin said he would find a way, he got a little ladder, and we all got to the top of the house. Cronin then pulled the nails out of the lead, and rolled it up - I believe it was new lead. He then cut a piece off it, which might weigh 14 or 15 lbs. - we heard the watchmens' rattles sprung, and Cronin said the watchmen had got into the house, for he could see their lights, it was then dark - Cronin then got away, but I do not know how - Castelow told me to follow him, which I did, and we went along the tops of the houses to the end of the street - Castelow then pulled off his shoes, and slid down the rain water-pipe - I tried to do so, but I fell down into a gentleman's yard; I laid there a great while, I do not know how long - a gentleman's servant came and asked me if any body was in the house; I told him no - he asked me how I got there, and I told him; he called the watchman, who took me.

Prisoner CRONIN. Q. You said, at the Police Office, that it was in Baker-street - A. I said I did not know whether it was in Baker-street or Harley-street - I did not know the street.

HUGH HINDES . I am a butler to the Marquis de-la-Belaney, who lives at No. 13, Harley-street; I found Heron lying in the yard - he said he had been stealing lead from one of the houses, but he did not say there were others with him - I gave him to the watchman.

JAMES VIALL . I am a watchman; my beat is in Upper Harley-street and Devonshire-street - Heron was delivered to me by Hindes.

JOHN GUDGE . I am a watchman; my beat is in Park Crescent, near Upper Harley-street. Pragnal came to me, in Upper Harley-street, and said some men had got into this building - I went with him, searched; and when we got to the attic we heard some persons on the roof - we could not distinguish what way they were going - when we got out, I saw a small piece of lead, and then two other pieces by the dormer, and a knife; the edges of the lead were bright, as if fresh cut - we left the lead there till Mr. Richardson came; there might be 60 lbs. of it.

WILLIAM PRAGNALL . I am a watchman. At half-past nine o'clock, on the night of the robbery, a young woman gave me information - I went in with Gudge, and found some lead, fresh cut.

AUGUSTA CARTER . I live with my mother, who has the care of a house, next door but one to Mr. Richardson - I saw the prisoners walking up and down, opposite the house, at a quarter before nine o'clock - I observed them, and know them again; Heron was with them; I can safely swear that they are the persons - they passed up and down about three times - I am quite certain of all the three - I saw one of them go down into the area - I do not know where the other two were when he went down. I told Pragnall of it - I saw them again on the 15th of June, before the Justice - then swore positively to their persons, I am certain they are the men.

Prisoner CRONIN. Q. Where were you when you saw the man go down the area - A. At the street-door; it was Castelow.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I found Castelow on the 11th of June, in a back room at No. 5, Monmouth-court, Monmouth-street. I told him I apprehended him for stealing lead from Mr. Richardson's; he said,

"I know it." I found Cronin the same day in Hopkins-street, leading into Peter-street, St. James's. I told him it was on a charge of stealing Mr. Richardson's lead; he said he knew nothing about it. I went to the house, and found some of the lead had been stripped off, and some recently cut.

CASTELOW'S Defence. He told me it was on a charge of stealing lead - I said I knew nothing about it.

CRONIN'S Defence. Heron told me the first time he had an opportunity of getting us into trouble he would, because we apprehended him for running away from his father and mother; he brought out a 4 lb. weight to do us some bodily harm, but his uncle took it from him.

CRONIN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CASTELOW - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-77

1146. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a shawl, value 8 s., and a shift, value 4 s. , the goods of Jane Elizabeth Ludford .

JANE ELIZABETH LUDFORD . I am a single woman , and live in Bluegate-fields . I had known the prisoner sometime. On the evening of the 23d of June, about half-past eight o'clock I saw her, she said she was without any lodging, as she had been out of the House of Correction but a week; I offered her a part of my bed till she got one - she went home with me, and I afterwards went to bed. There was a young man slept in the room, who was a visitor - the prisoner did not go to bed at all. I had a shift and a shawl in the cupboard. The patrol called me between one and two o'clock; the prisoner was then in the watch-house. In consequence of what the patrol said I looked into the cupboard, and missed them. The young man was then in the room. I went to the watch-house, and saw the clothes.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and prosecutrix going home with a young man, and in consequence of some altercation. I listened at the door - I then saw the prisoner come out, and run away: she had got five hundred yards or more when I stopped her, and asked what she had got - she said nothing. I found the shift in her lap, and the shawl round her shoulders. The prosecutrix said,

"How could you rob a poor girl like me;" she said she was going to pawn them. I asked the prosecutrix if she had given her them to pawn - she said No. I am quite sure she said she was going to pawn them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say I was going to

pawn them. We were both intoxicated, and I do not know what I said - Witness. She did not appear to me to be intoxicated; she ran faster than I could.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-78

1147. SOPHIA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , a pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Dutton .

JOHN FERRY . I am servant to Thomas Dutton , of St. Martin's-court - I am principal manager of the business. The prisoner came to the shop about nine o'clock in the evening of the 5th of June, and was looking at the boots - I went to the door, and asked her if any of them would suit her; she went away without giving me an answer, and about ten minutes after, (while the shop was full of of people) a person called out,

"Mr. Dutton, I have found a pair of boots on this person" - I went forward, and said I had seen her about ten minutes before; the boots were then gone from the door.

JAMES GRIFFITH . I am a constable. I was in St. Martin's-court on the 5th of July, and saw the prisoner go to several shops. I saw her take these boots from Mr. Dutton's shop - I stopped directly, and took them from her at the distance of one shop from Mr. Dutton's - I found a duplicate of a pair of shoes and a shawl upon her.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-79

1148. FRANCES, THE WIFE OF THOMAS HOWARD and SARAH BEARMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , two towels, value 2 s.; three napkins, value 1 s. 6 d.; and five knife-cloths, value 2 s., the goods of William Woolley Simpson ; a silk net, value 1 s.; two dresser-cloths, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s., and a chair cover, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Stoneham ; and THOMAS HOWARD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

MRS. ELIZABETH SIMPSON . I am the wife of William Woolley Simpson. The two female prisoners were my servants - Bearman has lived with me about three years, and Howard about six months. These articles were brought to my house by the officer last Saturday morning - they are my husband's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have these two women lived with you some time - A. Yes; I had no reason to suspect them.

THOMAS STONEHAM . I live with Mr. Simpson; he is a surveyor and auctioneer. I saw this property brought to his house on Saturday.

JOHN DANCE . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 9th of July I was on duty at Chelsea, and met the prisoner Thomas Howard , with a basket and a bundle in his hand - I stopped him, and asked what he had got there; he said he did not know. I said,

"Let me see what it is" - I took the basket from his shoulder, and opened it: it was about twelve o'clock, he was about two miles from Mr. Simpson's house. I found a bundle of linen, and some bread and beef in the basket. I took him to the watch-house, and searched him and the bundle: I did not make him any promise or threat - he said that his wife had given him the things; that she lived at Little Chelsea, with Mr. Simpson, and that he said he was going to the Old Kent-road, which I suppose is two miles and a half from there. I went next morning to Mrs. Simpson, who identified the property.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he told you at once where he got them, and it turned out to be all true - A. Yes. When I opened the bundle of linen I said,

"Did your wife give you this?" he said,

"No, the old cook put that into the basket" - that he was in the habit of going to the house at all hours, and never was stopped before.

MRS. SIMPSON re-examined. Q. What time did you go to bed on the night of the robbery - A. Not till about two o'clock in the morning. I did not know of his calling, but I heard the door open, and enquired of some of the servants (not the prisoners) what it was.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended the two female prisoners; Bearman was on her knees; begging mercy of Mr. Stoneham - I told her to get up, and asked her what was the matter; she said it was all her doings, and that Frances Howard (who was present) had nothing to do with it. I said I supposed she knew of Thomas Howard being taken - she said she did not: I said,

"He was taken into custody last night, on suspicion of taking things from this house" - she said she had given him the things herself; for him to take care of for her. I asked what they were; she said, one or two knife-cloths, she believed a couple of tea-cloths, and one or two printed pieces of cotton - she was too much agitated to tell me more. I had held out no promise or threat to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BEARMAN'S Defence. It is my first offence, and I hope you will forgive me.

FRANCES HOWARD 'S Defence. I know nothing of it but what she has said. I had a good place, and should have kept it.

FRANCES HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

BEARMAN - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Two Years .

THOMAS HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-80

1149. ANN HERITAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , eleven sixpences, five shillings, and six penny pieces, the monies of John Quinlan , from his person .

JOHN QUINLAN . I live in Drury-lane, and am a bricklayer's labourer . On Sunday, the 20th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I went for a glass of gin to a house in Broad-street, St. Giles ; the prisoner was there, and several other persons - she came with a parcel of flowers, and put them on my coat, slipped her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took out this money. I had not said anything to her before; but she offered to treat me with some drink; I did not take hold of her hand when it was in my pocket; she then turned round to the bar, and offered some money to the landlord; he said,

"Is this your money;" she said, Yes: he said

"I saw you very busy with that young man's pockets." The constable happened to come in, and I gave charge of her. I had

received this money on the Saturday night. I went to bed about eleven o'clock. I was quite sober.

JOHN GREEN . I am a constable. I went into the house, and saw the prisoner pulling the man about; there were other women of a low description there. I was speaking to the landlord when the prisoner came and asked him to take of 8 s. 6 d., and some copper, which she laid on the counter. Quinlan immediately charged her with the robbery; she said she had been out all night, and got the money from different people.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in another wine-vaults - when I got there the prosecutor was fighting with two men; I was then going out, but the landlord said,

"Stop till the piece of work is over;" the prosecutor then said he would give me 2 s. to go with him - he gave me four sixpences instead of two shillings - he then said if I would go with him and stay all day he would give me more, and asked me if I would have some gin. I was quite in liquor, and so was he; he gave me some more, but I was so intoxicated I do not know how much he gave me.

JOHN GREEN re-examined. Q. Did the man appear to have been fighting - A. No; he might have been drinking, but was not drunk. The prisoner made the same defence then that she does now.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-81

1150. AMELIA SAVAGE was indicted for stealing on the 29th of June , a frock, 2 s.; and a pinafore, 1 s.; the goods of Robert Winch , from the person of Caroline Winch .

SARAH WINCH . I live in Rose-street, Covent-garden. My husband's name is Robert, he is a shoemaker . My daughter Caroline is four years of age . On the 29th of June, about half-past five o'clock, in the evening, she went out with me for a walk; she had a pinafore and frock on. I did not see the prisoner till I saw her, with the child in her hand, at the corner of Russel-court. I was looking in at a shop window, and missed the child, and found her again. at Bow-street office about two hours after. About three quarters of an hour after I lost the child, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane with my child's clothes in her hand. I took hold of her and took the clothes away, and asked what she had done with the child? she said she knew nothing about the child. In a few minutes an officer came, and took her by the direction of Mr. Lawrence. I am sure the clothes are what my child had on; she gave no account of how she came by them.

Prisoner. Q. You asked me where I got the clothes - A. No I did not, I asked what you had done with the child.

RICHARD LAWRENCE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at the corner of Blackman-street. The prisoner came to my shop about six o'clock, and offered a parcel to my young man in my presence, as soon as he opened it a woman spoke to him, and he jumped over the counter and went to speak to the woman. The prisoner said she wished I would serve her as she had been there some time; I took the frock and pinafore and looked at them, she asked 2 s. for them, I offered her 1 s.; she would not take it - she said she had bought them but a fortnight, and they cost her 4 s. I then gave her the parcel back, and as she went out at the back door, my young man came in at the front door with Mrs. Winch, and told me of this circumstance, I ran out and took her at the corner of Clare-market. Mrs. Winch asked her what she had done with the child? she said she had not seen it.

WILLIAM WINDWOOD . I am a badge porter of the Inner-temple. On the 29th of June, in the evening, I was going into the temple, and saw two or three persons at No. 3, Pump-court, and the child sitting on the step crying without frock or pinafore. In consequence of the child's stating her name to be Caroline Winch , and that her father was a boot and shoemaker, I took her to Bow-street. I saw her mother at Bow-street. The father met me at the corner of Rose-street, and claimed her.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am a pawnbroker, and live with Mr. Turner, in Bridges-street. I saw the prisoner about half an hour after the robbery; she offered a frock and pinafore for 2 s. I had heard the prosecutrix say, those articles had been stolen, and I spoke to my fellow shop-man about the pattern of the frock - I then gave her back the things, and she went out - I saw her again at Bow-street.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Bow-street with these things. I have kept them ever since. I asked her what she had done with the child? she said she had not seen it; but found the things in Turner's passage.

ROBERT WINCH . I am the father of the child. I found. the child at the top of Rose-street, in the care of Windwood The frock and pinafore were gone. I am sure she went out with them on; I am certain of the property being mine; it is worth about 3 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out, in distressed circumstances, to sell a coat to get me some shoes; finding I could not sell it, I was taking it to pledge - I went from one pawnbroker to another, and picked these things up in the court; when I got to Drury-lane the woman stopped me, and said they were her's; I had not seen the child, and know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-82

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1151. SUSANNAH GOLLIKER , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , two sheets, 4 s.; and a pillow case, 1 s. ; the goods of Robert Joy .

ROBERT JOY . I keep the Grand Hotel, Covent-garden . I missed these articles on the 12th of June, about four o'clock, and found them at the Duke of Northumberland, public house, with the prisoner - I asked the landlord if she had brought any thing into the house - he said

"Yes, they are on the table" - I opened the parcel and saw my goods.

THOMAS KING , JUN. My father keeps an eating house in James-street, Covent-garden, near Mr. Joys - my father called me down stairs, to watch the prisoner - she was a stranger to me. I followed her down Long-acre, where she spoke to several apple women, she then went into St. Martin's-lane, and then to Little St. Andrew-street, and into a sale shop - I told my brother to watch her, while I went to tell my father; I then went and shewed Mr. Joy

the house where she was; but she was gone, and was found at a public house a few doors off.

THOMAS KING . SEN. This woman came to my house on the 12th of June, and asked my wife to buy a sheet, which she shewed her; she had some other things with her. My wife said to me

"This woman has a sheet to sell." I looked at it and said

"It is marked Grand Hotel, Covent-garden, we cannot buy it" - she then took it and went away, leaving a pillow-case behind her. I went to Mr. Joy and told him - I had sent my little boy to watch her; when he came back Mr. Joy went with him.

THOMAS THORPE . I am a publican, and live in Little Earl-street. The prisoner came to my house with a bundle, Mr. Joy came there and took her away with it.

THEOPHILUS BAILY . I am an officer - I went to Seven Dials and saw Mr. Joy and the prisoner, who he said had robbed him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent - I went to sell them but did not know they were stolen.

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-83

1152. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a crown piece, two half-crowns, and five shillings , the monies of Joseph Barr , his master .

ANN BARR . I am the wife of Joseph Barr , a carpenter , we live in Nassau-street, Marylebone. The prisoner was in our service, I gave him this money to take to Ann Kerrison , a servant girl who had lived with me, and left, ill - he did not return till the Monday following.

ANN KERRISON . I did not receive any money from the prisoner.

COURT. This cannot be called a felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-84

1153. WILLIAM RAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , nine loaves of bread, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Patterson .

JOHN DALZIELL . I am a baker, in the employ of John Patterson . On the 16th of June I left two baskets in Princes-street, Hanover-square. I went down to Lower Brook-street, and was not gone more than five minutes - when I returned the baskets were empty, and the prisoner was in custody - I saw the bread in the prisoner's basket.

PETER CATHEY . I was in Princes-street, Hanover-square, and saw the prisoner coming along with a basket - he put his basket down where the two baskets were standing, and took the bread out of these baskets, and put it into his own - he then put it on his back, and walked towards Hanover-square. I went up, and said

"How came you to rob a poor man" - He said

"I hope you will forgive me." I took him back - the officer was there and detained him till I found the man.

GEORGE JAMES JENNINGS . I am a patrole. I found the prisoner with the bread, and asked how he came to do it - he said he was in distress, and hoped we should forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of employ six months, and had been selling baskets - I was in great distress.

GUILTY Aged 24.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240715-85

1154. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , three pillows, value 3 s., and a sheet, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Seales .

ROBERT SEALES . I keep a lodging-house , in Whitechapel , the prisoner lodged with me on the 29th of June, he had been there about a month In consequence of some information I searched, and missed a sheet and three pillows from a bedstead - I had seen them in the morning.

WILLIAM GODDAY . I am a boot-closer, and lodged in the house - on the 29th of June I saw the prisoner come out of the house with a bundle, which he took out of the bureau bedstead - he was detected by another man, who had the care of the house - he said if I told he would give me a good hiding.

GLOVER PEARSON. I am servant to Mr. Seales. I met the prisoner on the 29th of June with the bundle, and told him it was not his property, and he must go back - he said he was going to pledge it. I thought it was Mr. Seale's, because he had no property of his own - I stopped him, and gave the property to the officer.

THOMAS DREW . I am an inspector of patroles. I took the prisoner into custody and have had the property ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather groggy, and was going to take them to pawn, to get a drop of beer; I should have taken them out next morning.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-86

1155. JOHN SHURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , six pairs of stockings, value 9 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d., and a half-crown , the property of Edward Moody .

EDWARD MOODY . I am a linen-draper ; and live in Old-street - the prisoner lived with me five months - on the 10th of July I marked some silver, and put it into my till, about nine o'clock in the morning; there was a half-crown among it - in the evening I looked, and the half-crown was gone. On Saturday evening I missed a silk handkerchief and seven pairs of stockings, which had not been sold, as we had taken stock on Friday morning - I sent for an officer, and searched the prisoner's box, and there found all the property; he was present, but did not say how he came by them - he said

"For God's sake, forgive me."

JOHN FELLS . I am an officer. I found the property in Shurley's box - I heard him praying for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence begging for mercy, and stating that he meant to replace the property.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-87

1156. SAMUEL LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a purse, value 6 d., and three shillings, the goods of John Andrews , from his person .

JOHN ANDREWS . I was at the review in Hyde Park on the 10th of this month, and had a purse, with some silver, in my trowsers pocket; I heard an alarm from the officer - I felt, and it was gone.

ANGELIUS BERTRAUN. I was at the review, and saw the prisoner standing close by the side of Mr. Andrews and as the horse soldiers were backing the people I saw him put

his arm against the prosecutor, and take something from his right hand pocket - I collared him, and he dropped the purse on the ground.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner with four more half an hour previous to the robbery; when they saw us they dispersed - I saw him take the purse from Mr. Andrew's pocket, and afterwards drop it from his right hand - I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the review - while I was in the crowd this officer stooped and picked up a purse by the side of the prosecutor, and asked him if I took it from him - he said he could not tell, but it was his purse - they then took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-88

1157. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Nathaniel Cox .

NATHANIEL COX . I am a tide-waiter , and was stationed on board the brig Diadem on the 7th of July and about half-past seven o'clock that morning, I took my watch from under my pillow and put it in the body of the bed where I had laid, and went on deck to wash myself - the prisoner was steward of the ship ; I had left him in the room where I slept - I returned in about three minutes; he was then gone, and the watch also - I went on deck and enquired for him, he was then gone - I saw him again the same evening about half-past eight o'clock, and saw the watch next day at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker and live in Whitechapel. On the 7th of July the prisoner came to my shops, between 10 and 11 o'clock, and pawned this watch, in the name of James Simpson , and said he lived at No. 17. Cross-street, Tooley-street - that it was his own property, his father gave it to him.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge about eight o'clock - I asked him about the watch; he said he had left it at the pawnbroker's - I went next morning to the pawnbroker's.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-89

1158. JOHN JAMES WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , three rings, value 20 s., and a pair of buckles, value 6 d. , the goods of James M'Cann .

JAMES M'CANN. I live in Pancrass-place . The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 5th of this month, and said his name was Jones, and that he was student to a barrister in Lincoln's Inn . I had three gold rings in a glass case in the parlour - he dined with us on the following Wednesday - I missed the rings about an hour after dinner - I said nothing to him, but fetched an officer, who searched him, and found 3 s. and a flash note, (apparently a 50 l. note, on him;) he had been out all that morning.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn Lane - On the 7th of July the prisoner brought me three gold rings and a pair of gilt buckles, which he pawned in the name of Robinson - I have no doubt of his person.

ROBERT PRITCHARD . I am a constable, and took him; I found a note and a card upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the property.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

See Fourth Day.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-90

1159. MARY HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a pair of scales, value 8 s., and a brass weight, value 2 s. , the goods of William Habgood .

WILLIAM LOCK . I am servant to Mr. Habgood, a grocer , who lives in Clerkenwell . The prisoner came in on the 13th of July and asked for half a pound of mottled soap - while I turned round for it, I saw her whip something off the counter, and put it into her apron - she then asked the price of the soap, and said she had not money enough - I followed her out, and found the scales and weight in her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-91

1106. ELLEN FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , five yards of printed cotton, value 5 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

JAMES BUTLER RIDGWAY . I am shopman to George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross . Last Tuesday, about half-past five o'clock I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards, outside the shop - I returned into the shop, when a person called, and said a woman had taken some print: I pursued, and took her to the watch-house. We found a duplicate and a piece of printed cotton under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PROCTOR . I took her in charge. The cotton had been found before I got there - she said she had taken it, and would not do so again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite intoxicated, and never did so before, and never will again if I have no food to eat.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-92

1161. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , an apron, value 6 d.; two pairs of stockings, value 6 d.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a shirt, value 1 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Neighbour , from the person of Eliza Bottomley .

ELIZA BOTTOMLEY . I am twelve years of age , and live in Dog-row. On Saturday, the 5th of June I was in Whitechapel-road , with a bundle; belonging to my cousins, Edward Neighbour - I was going to take it to my mother to wash. The prisoner came up from Black Lion-yard, and snatched the bundle: he ran down the yard again; I cried Stop thief! and he was caught instantly. The bundle was given to the officer.

EDWARD NEIGHBOUR . I had done up this bundle; there was a shirt, two pairs of stockings, a waistcoat, and an apron, of my property. I gave them to the child for her mother to wash.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL BATES . On the 5th of June I was near Black

Lion-yard, and saw the prisoner ran down there - he was stopped by a man coming up the yard: he had a scufflce with the man, and got away; I stopped him.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am a headborough of Whitechapel. Bates brought the prisoner to the watch-house; the prosecutrix came, and a man, a Jew, who said he stopped the prisoner, and took the bundle from him - the prisoner denied having taken it.

Prisoner. I have neither father or mother.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-93

1162. WILLIAM HENRY and HENRY HAITCHMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Antonio Bayon , from his person .

ANTONIO BAVON . I am a Swiss servant, out of place ; I had lived in Great Woodstock-street. On the 15th of June I was in the skittle-ground of the Waterloo Arms public-house ; the prisoners were there, and other persons - I put my hat on the bench, with a pair of gloves and a handkerchief in it. I came to the hat again, and the handkerchief was gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEPHEN ERRINGTON . I am a farrier. I was at the skittle-ground, and saw the prisoner Henry near the prosecutor: I saw him take the handkerchief from his side, and put it into his small clothes - he was next but one to where the prosecutor had sat. I then saw him go from there into the next alley; he stooped down - I could not see what he was doing; he came back in two or three minutes. I heard Bayon say he had lost his handkerchief, and told this story; he was searched, but nothing found on him. I saw Haitchman come to him once, but he was not there when he took the handkerchief.

GEORGE BISHOP . I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of June, about seven o'clock, Haitchman brought the handkerchief to our shop, with another boy (not the prisoner), and said he had it from a boy outside.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I took the prisoners into custody; Haitchman said the other lad had given it to him to pawn - the other denied it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-94

1163 WILLIAM LEATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , a handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of Thomas Lawrence , from his person .

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I am clerk to Mr. Rogers . On the 27th of June I was near the entrance of the great gate of the Park in Pall Mall ; some one asked me if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt in my pocket, and it was gone - I have never seen it since. I saw the prisoner in custody after that; he did not say anything about it till we got to Covent-garden; Yates, the officer then beckoned me, and the prisoner said he had taken the handkerchief, but hoped I would look over it; I do not know how he came to say so; I did not hear anything but that: I had been walking behind them. I went up to the office on Saturday week; Mr. Hoggins persuaded me not to go before, but I had a summons to go on that day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What the officer said to the the prisoner in Covent-garden, you were not near enough to hear, but the prisoner told you he had taken it, and begged your mercy - A. Yes. I have seen the officer since. On finding the bill by Mr. Stafford, the officer asked for 3 s. 6 d., and my father paid it; he had told me in the morning that I should have to pay 3 s. 6 d., and 8 d. - the officer sent me home for it; I got it, and paid it to him.

HENRY YATES . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner on the 27th of June, at the corner of the Park gate, Pall Mall; he was picking pockets when I saw him; I saw him make two or three attempts to do so; another was with him, who backed him up, and said,

"Take it." I then saw them follow Mr. Lawrence into Pall Mall - the prisoner took the handkerchief, and gave it to the other, whose name is Bowdler. I gave Leather to Cook, an officer, and took Bowdler myself, but he escaped; I then took the prisoner to the Thames Police - when I was in Covent-garden he said it was his first offence, and he hoped the prosecutor would look over it; the prosecutor said he would speak to his father.

Cross-examined. Q. You took both the boys, and gave Leather in charge to Cook - A. Yes; Cook is not here: I took hold of Bowdler; he escaped from me.

Q. How much money did Lawrence pay you when the bill was found - A. None, Sir.

Q. Did you not send the boy home to get any money - A. No. I paid 6 d. myself. I never sent him to get 3 s. 6 d. nor 8 d., nor any money.

Q. Have you seen his mother this afternoon - A. Yes, and have seen her before to-day, but I never drank with her since this period.

Q. Did you never induce the woman to go drink with you, or rather to treat you while you were drinking; and frightning her son - A. No.

THOMAS LAWRENCE re-examined. Q. My boy, was that the man who sent you to go and get 3 s. 6 d., and 8 d. - A. Yes.

HENRY YATES . Yes, that was before the bill was found - you asked me after the bill was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-95

1164. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a seal, value 20 s.; a key, value 5 s., and a piece of ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Thomas Moon , from his person .

THOMAS MOON . On Wednesday evening, about eleven o'clock, I was going from Newgate-market to St. Martin's-lane, where I live - the prisoner met me near Exeter-change , and snatched at my watch; he got the seal, and part of the ribbon, and ran away towards the New-church - the seal and ribbon were brought to me next morning: this is my seal.

Prisoner. Q. When I came past you were talking with three or four women: as I was going across the road some person called out, and I stopped directly - Witness. There were no women near me.

WILLIAM HANDS . I am a watchman of the Savoy. I was about a hundred yards from Exeter-change, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, and got near to Wellington-buildings; the prisoner was stopped by my partner; I did not see him stopped. He was searched, and no property found upon him, but next morning we found the ribbon and seal in the place where he was taken, in the road.

Prisoner Q. You said you found it on the foot-path - A. No.

THOMAS BAIN . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! it came from Savoy-street, near Exeter-change - I saw the prisoner come running along; when I got up to him he stood still; I took him to the watch-house, and found nothing upon him; but next morning we found the seal on the spot where he had been. There was a gentleman at the watch-house, who said he lived at the Salisbury Arms, public-house, Durham-place, who said he had seen Mr. Moon talking to some females, but I cannot think that, for I had been there just before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I stopped, and was taken to the watch-house. The gentleman said he was rather intoxicated, and had been drinking with some friends.

THOMAS BAIN . Mr. Moon appeared quite sober.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-96

1165. WILLIAM TWIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , two hats, value 40 s. , the goods of Thomas Savage .

THOMAS SAVAGE . I live with my brother, who is a hatter and hosier; the prisoner came to our shop and said he wanted a hat for himself, and he looked at another which he said would fit his friend. I took them up next morning to his house, and he put the hat on which he took for himself, and said his friend was out and he did not know if the other would he large enough for him, but wished me to bring up two others to look at. I did so, and he desired me to leave them till Monday morning. On Monday morning he called, and said he neither had got the hats nor the money, but he was going into the City, and about four o'clock he should be at home, and if I called on him he would return the two hats and pay for the two be kept. I went up at four o'clock, and he said it was not convenient to give me the hats then, but he would call on my brother next morning to look out some goods, and he would return two hats, and the money for the two that were kept. He came in the morning and looked out some goods to the amount of 25 l.; these were sent in the afternoon, about five o'clock, with a bill, and the two hats he was to keep were put down in the bill, but the other two that were to be returned were not included. I heard from my brother that day that there was a warrant out against the prisoner. I went with my brother and got 20 l. worth of the goods back, but I have not seen the hats since.

Cross-examined by Mr. COOK. Q. Did he not promise to pay for these second two hats on the 8th July - A. No, I did not leave the second two upon an understanding that he was to pay for them; he was to take two out of the four; the price of the first two was one guinea each, and the others were to be the same price. I left them from the Saturday till the Tuesday when I got back the goods; he never promised to pay on the 8th July: there were some persons present when he spoke about the hats, and promised to return two; the bill of parcels of the goods was made out on Tuesday, and the goods sent to his house.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker; the hats were pledged at our shop on the 3d July by the prisoner.

THOMAS SAVAGE . The hat he first bought is not here; this one has a particular mark on it which we never put on a hat before - it might be the one which his friend might have chosen. I do not know whether the choice had been made.

Prisoner's Defence. The two hats I first ordered, one of them I chose for myself, the other I thought not quite large enough. Mr. Savage was to bring two more; he did so, and said they were one guinea each - the Thursday following was appointed for payment. His brother then proposed to let me have a small assortment of hosiery, but he took out 25 l. worth. On the day I received the goods he called and said there was a warrant out against me, I said

"If you think so, here are your goods, take them back if you please."

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-97

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, JULY 17. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1166. SARAH WARD was indicted for stealing on the 7th July , a jacket, value 2 s.; a knife, value 2 d. , and a shilling the property of John Carman .

JOHN CARMAN . I live at the Buffalo's Head public-house, New Road . On the 7th of July, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the morning the prisoner came into the garden I served her with half a pint of beer. I went away leaving my jacket in the box she sat in. I returned in ten minutes and it was gone, and she also. I found her sitting on some steps in Baker-street with it, tied in her bundle. She was very much intoxicated - there was a shilling in my pocket.

JOHN STAPLES. I took her in charge, she said she had no money - I found two sixpences on her, but no shilling.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and must have taken it by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-98

1167. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th July 14 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., belonging to Abraham Burstall and Edmund William Burgess , and fixed to a certain building of theirs .

DAVID DOOLEY . I am a carpenter. On the 12th July I was working at a building in Wardour-street. I found the prisoner there at four o'clock in the morning, and asked his business at that nseasonable hour; he said he had come to sleep there - I searched him and found this lead on his person - he asked me to let him go - I gave in charge - the lead had been cut from the gutters - I compared it, it fitted exactly - I found a knife on him which appeared to have cut lead.

ABRAHAM BURSTALL . This house belongs to Edmund

William Burgess and myself. I fitted the lead to the gutter.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lay down there.

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-99

1196. THOMAS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , two saddles, 30 s.; and two coats, 50 s. ; the goods of Thomas Collins , Esq.

ASHER HOPKINS. I am coachman to Thomas Collins , Esq., who lives at Finchley . On the 3d of July, in the morning, I missed two saddles and two coats from the coachhouse - they were safe the night before; I enquired, and one Hawkins, who has absconded gave us information, and the saddles were found in a ditch about three quarters of a mile from the house on the 5th, the prisoner was with me - I am not certain whether it was him or Hawkins that pointed them out, but he said he knew where they were; he was then in custody - the coach-house was fastened inside, they forced the bar up.

LORKIN ELY. I live at Finchley, and have been a constable. I was fetched to the public-house - Hawkins there gave me charge of the prisoner - they were together - he told me that Mr. Collins's coachhouse was broken open, and the prisoner was the man who had done it - he did not deny it. Hawkins wished me to take him to Mr. Collins - I did so; the prisoner pointed out where the saddles were - he never denied being with the men who had stolen them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-100

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1169. WILLIAM RAMSDEN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , two ladies albums, value 4 l. 12 s. the goods of Thomas Denham , in his dwelling house .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MISS LUCY DENHAM . I live with my father in Regent-street, which is about five minutes walk from Great Marlborough-street. On the 26th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, my father and mother were out - I and my sister Ann were in the shop; a person came to purchase some albums.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say if you think he is the person - Q. He is the person - I have no doubt, or I would not swear it - I saw him walk by the shop about nine o'clock; he walked by more than once, and afterwards came into the shop and desired to be shewn a Ladies album which was in the window, for he wished to make a present of one to a lady. I shewed him one with a plain lock - he asked the price - I told him 1 l. 15 s. and 10 s. for the lock; it had a lock and key attached to it - I said I had one with an embossed lock, which came to 35 s., and the lock to 12 s. - he said very well. He put his hand into his right hand pocket and said

"That will be 2 l. 7 s. won't it" - I said it would. I heard money rattle, and thought he was going to pay me; he had put the plain one on the counter, and the one with an embossed lock upon it; and said he wanted a purse, which was in the window - I did not exactly recollect what purses were in the window, and having some in a glass case on the counter I opened it and shewed him one. I was standing outside the counter by the side of him - he asked for a purse from the window - I had to go round the counter to get it, and my back was turned towards him, and on my turning round he was gone, and the books also. I ran round and called Watch! the watchman was not in the way, nobody heard me execept the servant of the house.

Q. When you went to the window did you go quite up to it - A. Yes, and just as I got to it I missed him and the books; before I opened the window - I only turned my back to him as I turned round to go behind the counter. He pointed out the place from which he wanted the purse, I could not get at it without turning my back to him.

Q. At what time was your sister present - A. She was in the shop, and I was just inside the door. The prisoner had been waiting some time, passing up and down - I dare say he passed the shop eight times - I noticed that to my sister before he came in. I thought he was waiting for somebody; my attention was directed to him before he came into the shop by his passing in that way.

Q. Had you an opportunity of noticing his features - A. Yes, there were three gas lights, two in the shop, and one opposite.

Q. When did you next see him - A. On the 8th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening. I was going down Cleveland-street, just by Union-street, (with my two little sisters to the mantau makers) and saw him - I left go of the children, and directly went up to him and said,

"It was you who robbed me, on such a day in my father's shop," he said

"You are bringing a mob round me and insulting me - quite a disgrace" and then pushed me away.

Q. Had you at that time seized hold of his person - A. I had - he endeavoured to get away - he went over to a butcher's shop, and said to the people assembled

"Give me a coach" - he spoke of Marlborough-street, and Carburton-street; he went out of the shop - I told I would not let him go; he went out twice to go away - I ran after him and caught hold of him - a little girl came up and I asked her to fetch an officer, and directly afterwards Schofield and another person came up and took him, and when I got to the watch-house he said he would ruin my father - I said he had robbed me in my father's shop.

Q. Did you observe his hands - A. He had a ring on the little finger of his right hand - the officer said he did not understand his name, he offered to write it himself, and when he put his hand out I saw the ring - he said his name was William Ramsden Robinson - he did not write. He took out a watch or time piece, saying, I shall remember it was such a time that you put me in, and I will make you remember it, - he had the watch in his hand when he made the observation.

Q. Had he the watch when he was taken to be examined - A. No; nor had he a ring - he was examined on the following day which was just a fortnight from the day of the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. On what day of the week was the 26th of May - A. Wednesday. It happened by candle-light - I should think he was four or five minutes in the shop - my sister was not in the shop all the time - we have only one counter - he was dressed much as he is now, except his trowsers: he had a blue

coat, and his trowsers were either unbleached Russia duck or light cloth, a kind of drab colour; he wore a black hat, which was on all the time; his neckcloth was something of the same kind as he has now. I have always described his dress as I have now - I never said he wore a brown coat.

Q. Did he make any effort to get away - A. Yes, he did, three times - he pushed me away; I never said that he pushed me down, he pushed me nearly down - nobody went for a coach - he desired to be taken into some shop; I said certainly, it would be most proper - he said

"For God's sake, let me go into some shop" - he went in of his own accord; I followed him - he asked somebody to go for Mr. Abraham's, of Marlborough-street, and likewise to Carburton-street, where I now know that he lodged, and that he was clerk to Mr. Abrahams.

MISS ANN DENHAM . I was at home, with my sister, on Wednesday evening, the 2d of May - I know the prisoner, I saw him pass my father's door several times, about half-past nine o'clock, or twenty minutes to ten - I speak from the appearance of the evening, not from any clock - we have two gas lights in our shop, and one opposite; my sister made an observation to me about him; I then saw him come into the shop; I looked at him, but did not remain in the shop an instant after he came in; I stood just inside the door, he came in, and I went into the parlour, which joins the shop - I had seen him pass seven or eight times close to the window; I saw him each way he went, he looked in at the window; there were albums and purses in the window - after I got into the parlour I heard my sister call Watch! - he was then gone - I saw him at Marlborough-street office afterwards.

Q. What was your opinion as to his being the person who came into your shop - A. I was quite certain that he is the person; I never entertained a doubt of it.

Q. Was your observation sufficient to fix on your mind a recollection of his person - A. Yes, I speak positively, on my oath, to his person.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was it on the morning after your sister met him that you saw him at Marlborough-street - A. No, on the Saturday at the second examination, she had told me she had met the man.

Mr. LAW. Q. Did you consider him to be the person from what you had been told, or from your recollection - A. From my recollection, I am quite positive to him.

HENRY FLOWER FENNER . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Tottenham-court-road - on Thursday or Friday 27th or 28th of May the prisoner came to our shop - I had seen him pass our door before.

Q. What is your belief as to his being the person - A. I believe it was the prisoner - I have seen him pass the shop more than once on different days.

Q. When the person came to you, are you sure that it was the same person you had previously seen passing - A. Yes, he came with a square book bound in morocco with a plain brass lock and key to it, and wanted to sell it; I opened it and asked what it was for, he said it was for setting down extracts; he asked thirty or thirty-five shillings for it, which I thought too much. and did not buy it; I believe he had dark clothes on; his coat was buttoned; I think he had a black coat and blue trowsers on; I believe it to be the prisoner; our shop is at the corner of Hanway-yard, nearly opposite Russell-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did the prisoner come - A. Between three and four o'clock; our windows are filled with goods, which darkens it; I will not be positive of the colour of his coat or trowsers, I know it was a dark coat, and very fashionably made.

Mr. LAW. Q. The individual you saw was a person you had seen before - A. Yes, my attention was directed more to his features than his dress; I verily believe it to be the prisoner; I have no doubt about him.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street; I was passing in Cleveland-street when Miss Denhan had hold of the prisoner. Carburton-street is about a mile from Mr. Denham's, or may be rather more. On seeing the crowd I went up; there seemed great confusion; the prisoner was endeavouring to get from Miss Denham, who had hold of him, and the mob were encouraging him; he endeavoured to escape; I took him into custody; I knew him before by having seen him in Marlborough-street; he said he lived with Mr. Abraham, and lodged in Carburton-street, he reminded me of his having been in my company, and mentioned a person named Hill, as relating to that case; I did not observe whether he had a watch; but at the watch-house he was noticing the time, observing that he was at the watch-house at such a time, and would punish the people who brought him there; I saw a ring on a finger of his right hand.

Q. Had he either watch or ring next morning at the office - A. I have no recollection that he had.

MR. THOMAS DENHAM . On the 26th of May I missed two albums from my shop; they were worth 2 l. each, including the locks.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in a situation which calls for the compassion of your Lordship; through an unfortunate resemblance to some person, I am brought here charged with crimes of which I am entirely innocent: I should be sorry to accuse the witnesses of perjury, but they are mistaken, and have clearly sworn false, which we shall clearly prove to your Lordship: under these circumstances I shall trouble your Lordship no further.

WILLIAM BILES . I am journeyman to Messrs. Chaffers and Mills, pawnbroker's, Greek-street, Soho. On the day after these albums were stolen, a hand-bill was brought to our shop; it was on the 27th or 28th of May: A person had been to our shop a quarter of an hour before the bill was brought, and offered an album, bound in blue morocco, with a plain lock and key; he asked two guineas for it. I had seen him once before at our shop.

Q. Was the prisoner that young man - A. No; he was very much like him, and had the same coloured hair, but was not quite so fair, and was rather stouter.

Q. Was he in his general character like the prisoner - A. Yes; he was about ten minutes in the shop. I refused to take the album in: he called again in about a fortnight, and offered me two razors; I did not buy them; he was then about five minutes with me; knowing him to be the same person who had offered the album I intended to stop him - I asked him what the razors cost, meaning to get round the counter to stop him, but upon my putting my hand on the flap of the counter to lift it up, he immediately slipped out of the shop, leaving the razors behind; I produce them - I have not seen him since. I appeared at Marlborough-street when the prisoner was apprehended,

and stated this. Mrs. Clifton claimed the razors. I am certain the prisoner is not the man.

MR. LAW. Q. The person was so dissimilar that you have no hesitation in saying he is not the man - A. It was not him; I have not the least hesitation in saying so; there is a resemblance between them. Cook, a constable desired me to attend at Marlborough-street; I had given him information about the razors. Nobody but me was in the shop - both the apprentices were absent. Directly the man went out I alarmed Mr. Mills; he is not here. Cook (who had left the hand-bill) called, and said he had taken a man for stealing the albums; I said I had two razors. I went and saw the prisoner in the lock-up-room.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When the man brought the razors you intended to stop him - A. Yes. I thought if I made an alarm before I got round the counter he would make off. Immediately on seeing the prisoner I said he was not the man.

COURT. Q. When did you stop the razors - A. About the beginning of June - the album was brought in May.

GERALD FITZGERALD . I have been an officer in the French army. I was in Cleveland-street, at the corner of Union-street, when Miss Denham stopped this young gentleman - he conducted himself with great propriety as I thought: he did not attempt to escape - they both crossed over to me. The lady begged of me to stop him, saying he had robbed her; I asked of what; she said, of albums, which I did not understand, and asked what they were - she said two books: the prisoner denied it, and said she mistook him. I observed to her that she should be very cautious in making so serious a charge, without being perfectly satisfied. They went into a butcher's-shop; he offered to go to Marlborough-street, and desired a coach might be got, and said he would pay the butcher if he got it. I told her Marlborough-street was a respectable street, and as he appeared a respectable young man she would find who he was, and had better go; she said he would run away; he made no attempt to go away.

MR. LAW. Q. She however applied to you to stop him - A. She did; I advised her to go to Marlborough-street with him, and feeling for his situation I said I would go and inform his friends.

THOMAS SHORTLAND . I am a butcher. I remember this young gentleman coming into my shop; there were not three persons in the street at first, but there were several afterwards; Miss Denham came in after him; I saw her meet him as I sat in the shop. I did not observe him make the slightest attempt to go away - he came in and said,

"This young lady accuses me of stealing some albums." He might have run away twenty times if he had liked.

MR. LAW. Q. She did not catch hold of him - A. She did in my shop. I advised him to go away, as I thought it was a love affair.

THOMAS LARDENER . On the night the prisoner was taken, I was at Shortland's house, in front of the window, putting in a square of glass, and saw Miss Denham and this young gentleman together in the street; he came into the shop, and stood as quiet as possible, and did not make the least attempt to go away. Very few persons were in the street.

MR. LAW. Q. Was there a great crowd in a few minutes - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not collar him when he got into the shop - A. That was as he was going out, to prevent him.

MARY HUDSON. I am the wife of Edmund Hudson - we live in Carburton-street. The prisoner has lodged with me since Christmas till the 8th of June, when he was taken up.

Q. When he was taken did you turn your attention to consider where he was on the day of the charge - A. Yes; on the evening of the 26th of May I was at home; Susan Hudson , my servant was also at home. I think it was on a Wednesday; I have a distinct recollection of the day, from various circumstances; the servant let him in at seven o'clock in the evening - he enquired for me; I went into the back parlour to him - he wanted to speak to me on some business which I had spoken to him about in the morning - I was about ten minutes in the room with him; I then went down stairs, and sent the servant up to him with coffee. I did not go into the room again that evening; the servant took him up candles afterwards - I had heard him ring the bell, and asked what it was for, having two bells, which ring alike; I thought it was a gentleman on the second floor, and enquired why it was not answered; the reply was that Mr. Robinson had rung for a candle. I did not see him again that night, but am sure he was not out of the house; he supped about half-past nine o'clock, and had a little ham, which Susan carried him; she had to go out for it, and came up to me for the money. All the family retired to bed a little after ten. - if I do not see the door fastened the person on the first floor does. I did not see it fastened on that night. I swear he did not go out from seven o'clock that night, till after breakfast next morning. I am certain it was on the 26th.

MR. LAW. Q. When did they first apply to you to say where he was on the 26th - A. I attended his second examination. Mr. Fitzgerald had called to enquire about his character on the night he was taken.

Q. Can you tell at what time he came in on the 25th - A. Why he was rather late on the previous night; it was the night Harris's balloon went off - he did not sup at home. He came home to tea on the 27th about half-past six o'clock; then took a short walk, and returned - I think he had no supper that night.

Q. This was in Term time - A. Yes. I have particularly considered the transactions of this day.

Q. What is there to fix in your mind about his having coffee and ham, and ringing the bell so often on this particular night - A. Why I can give you a reason; I was up stairs with the lady on the first floor, and spent the evening with her - I am not in the habit of going up there much; I was out the day previous, and she was to have gone with me to see my mother, but it was thought best for her to stay at home - it was on the day the balloon went off, and the first time I had taken such a walk after my confinement. I was in the habit of seeing what clothes he wore; he had no blue trowsers - I have seen him in white ones; I never saw him in a black coat; I have seen him in two blue and one green coat. I, my husband, my servant, and Ann Grissell (in whose apartment I was), were all at home on that night.

Q. On the oath you have taken did you not send a black

coat to him at the watch-house - A. I did not; I sent his best blue coat, no black coat was sent from my house. The lodgers can go out, but cannot come in without having the door opened to them; he had a blue coat on when he came in - I think he wore such a handkerchief as he has now.

Q. Did he generally board with the family - A. Yes; I had my tea before he came home that evening. He has a top room for a bed-room, and sits in the back or front parlour, which ever I happen to be in. Mr. Abrahams came to my house with my husband on the morning after he was apprehended; nothing of his was taken away but a clean shirt and handkerchief, a pair of clean white trowsers, and his blue coat, from that time to the present. Mr. Abrahams has called at my house once since - but has not been in his room. I sent him a pair of black trowsers. I opened his box with the officers. I was at Marlborough-street, but was not examined.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. If anybody goes out and shuts the door after them, they cannot get in without knocking - A. No. Susan generally attends to the door. Schofield came to my house on the morning after he was taken, and searched; nothing was found belonging to anybody. I think I have seen him in blue striped trowsers some time ago - his habits were very regular.

SUSAN HUDSON . In May last I was servant to Mrs. Hudson. I remember the day Harris went up in his balloon and was killed - the prisoner lodged at our house then.

Q. Do you remember one night his having coffee and ham - A. Yes, it was on the 26th of May; I let him in on that night between six and seven o'clock; he went into the front parlour - my mistress saw him there. I took him coffee almost directly, and about half-past eight took him candles into the front parlour: he had some ham for supper about half-past nine - we went to bed a little after ten that night. He was not out of the house after he came in at half-past six; if he had been I should have let him in when he knocked - when he rang the bell I answered it.

MR. LAW. Q. Are you the last witness's daughter - A. No, her niece. I know it was on the 26th, because my aunt went to see my mother, after her confinement; she had not been out the day before: it was the first time she went to Westminster after her confinement.

Q. She did not go out on the day the balloon went up - A. Yes, that was the day he went out - this occurred the day before the balloon went up; my mistress had spent the evening up with Miss Grissell; she is generally down in the kitchen, and has her meals there - she used to have tea with the prisoner, when he came home to tea, but did not on that evening - I do not recollect what trowsers he had on; I have seen him in blue-striped and in black trowsers; I never saw him in a black coat - I took some things to him at the watch-house the day after he was taken - I have lived nearly twelve months with my aunt; we have one lodger besides Miss Grissell, it was Major Stanton , he was out; he came home about nine o'clock, but did not see the prisoner; he has a room to himself.

JURY. Q. Which parlour did the prisoner take his coffee in - A. The front.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. In which parlour did he have the ham - A. In the front.

Q. On what day did your mistress go to see her sister, (your mother), after her confinement - A. On the day the balloon went up - Mr. Robinson had the coffee and ham the night after; he never went out after he came in, between six and seven o'clock - the parlours do not communicate; mistress saw him in the front parlour; I was down stairs at the time, and did not see them together; I had not seen him in the back parlour - mistress gave me the money for the ham, she had it from master.

MR. LAW. Q. At what time was the money given to you - A. I went for it a little after nine o'clock; my aunt and uncle were up in Miss Grissell's room; my uncle gave it to his wife, and she handed it to me, it was sixpence; I got the ham from the corner shop, which is about two minutes walk.

ANN GRISSELL . I occupy Mrs. Hudson's first floor; she was in my room on the 26th of May, (Wednesday;) she drank tea with me, about five o'clock; it was the day after the balloon went off - I did not see Mr. Robinson, but I heard him in the house; I heard him speak about seven or half-past; I did not hear him again that evening; he was usually in the back parlour; Mr. Hudson was in my room part of the evening - I remember Susan coming up for money for ham; Mr. Hudson gave it to his wife, who gave it to Susan; it was a half sovereign; for I remarked to him, that he should not keep a half sovereign in his pocket with silver - Mrs. Hudson went down to speak to somebody after tea - we went to bed about eleven o'clock - the prisoner was regular in his hours, and conducted himself very well.

MR. LAW. Q. Where did you hear his voice at half-past seven o'clock - A. From the back parlour.

EDMUND HUDSON . I live in Carburton-street. On the night after Harris's balloon went off I spent my evening in Miss Grissell's apartment; Susan came for money to fetch Mr. Robinson's supper; I gave my wife a half sovereign, which she gave her in my presence; it was remarked, that it was simple in me to keep a half sovereign and silver together - I had not seen Mr. Robinson myself that night.

Q. Are his things now in your house as he left them, except necessaries sent for him to change his dress - A. Yes; he was of very regular habits; our hour is half-past ten o'clock; and, unless he left word where he was going, he was at home in time. I believe Susan brought my wife some change.

MR. LAW. Q. As you had silver, why give a half sovereign - A. Mrs. Hudson said she wanted change - I only know of the prisoner being in the house from what I heard from the servant; I was up stairs about an hour, and then went into the front kitchen; the prisoner had his meals in the back parlour; I do not think that I went into the back parlour that evening - I drank tea myself at Westminster; I had been there the day before; I cannot recollect whether my wife had been there either of those days; she did not go or return with me; I had been at my father-in-law's - I did not see the prisoner next morning, as I go out about half-past five o'clock - I am a carpenter.

JURY. Q. At what time were you at your father-in-law's - A. I am there from six o'clock in the morning till six in the evening daily.

JURY to MARY HUDSON . Q. Did not you state that you were at your father-in-law's on the 26th of May - A. No, on the 25th, on the day the balloon went off.

COURT. Q. Have you had any conversation with anybody about what has passed in Court - No; I received half a sovereign from my husband, and gave it to the servant; she went out twice for ham; it was a quarter of a pound, and would be about 7 d.

SUSAN HUDSON re-examined. After I went out of Court I recollected that it was a half sovereign I had from mistress; I paid sixpence for the ham - I have spoken to nobody about it since I was examined - I gave my aunt the change - I went out for more ham for my aunt afterwards - I took the half sovereign the first time.

Mr. GEORGE FREDERICK ABRAHAMS . I am a solicitor. I first knew the prisoner at Lady-day, 1821 - his mother wished me to take him into my office, but being fall he remained at school another year, and was articled to me in 1822; and has remained in my office ever since - his conduct was exemplary and good. He has an entailed estate - he is above want or necessity - he could have had money from me at any time - I made him a ward in Chancery. When this charge was made, I advertised to bring persons together, who might have charges against him. I have taken every pains to discover his innocence or guilt. I have seen several young men in our neighbourhood who might be mistaken for him - I never saw him in drab pantaloons - I have taken pains to find these albums; if he is discharged. I shall take him into my service again. He is allowed 90 l. a year by the Court of Chancery.

Mr. LAW. Q. Were you not aware when you advertised that Mr. Denham had advertised - A. I had seen such advertisements - he has not worn a black coat for the last year; he had one at the death of his mother some time ago; I think he has blue trowsers - I have papers in my hand dated the 26th of May, with which he was sent to the office of the Clerk of the Rules, about six o'clock on the 26th - the rule was to be served in Staples-Inn; he did not return to the office that evening. I had given him leave to go home, after serving the rule - he had not asked leave - he generally left about six o'clock - he sometimes wanted to go to Turnham Green to his aunt. He could not obtain the rule before six o'clock or after nine; I know that he did obtain it; the latest time that I saw him was between four and five o'clock I think, I have only two clerks he did not particularly take the out-door business.

Several most respectable witnesses gave the prisoner an unquestionable character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-101

1170. WILLIAM RAMSDEN ROBINSON , was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , twenty printed books, value 10 s. the goods of Samuel Dolby .

SAMUEL DOLBY . I live in Wardour-street - I keep a tobacco shop which communicates with my stationer's shop, by two glass doors - I can see in one shop what is going on in the other. On the 1st of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in my stationery shop - he held in his hand a list of numbers and titles of some periodical publications; which were then publishing He said he wished as many looked out for him as that list contained; but I was not to trouble myself to get those which I had not by me. I put the list into my desk, and did not look them out then - he said he would call again for them, but did not say when; he went away and in the evening between seven and eight o'clock, (I think nearer eight), I saw him again in the stationer's shop, his conversation was addressed to my wife - I was not within hearing. I was in the snuff shop, and went into the shop before he left, for Mrs. Dolby came to me and asked if they were looked out - the list was at that time in my desk - she took it out; I said they were not ready, for the gentleman did not say when he should call. I do not think that he heard this conversation. Mrs. Dolby took the list from me and went into the shop to him, as if to explain it - I afterwards walked into the shop - she was then looking out the things, and placing them on the counter before him; I went back to the other shop as a customer came in - but returned to the stationary shop before he left, and had an opportunity of seeing him both then and in the morning; he was not above three minutes in the shop in the morning - when I saw him in the evening I had no doubt of his being the person who left the list. He was under my observation in the evening for ten or fifteen minutes, the things took some time to look out. When I was very much engaged in the tobacco shop, Mrs. Dolby gave an alarm, and the things were gone, and the list was gone. I have not the least doubt whatever of his being the man. My house is about five hundred yards from Great Marlborough-street,

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. You never found any of the property - A. No, Mrs. Dolby looked out the books in the evening, she was in the shop for about a minute in the morning - the books are worth 10 s.

CHARLOTTE DOLBY . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 1st of May, I was at home, and saw the prisoner in the shop about eleven o'clock in the morning - he brought a list of periodical publications; I heard him say he wished for those numbers to be got ready for him; but what numbers we had not got, he did not wish Mr. Dolby to get - I looked at him the whole of the time he was in the shop.

Q. Did you see the same person in the evening - A. Yes, as near as I can guess it was between seven and eight o'clock - it might be near eight; he came into the shop and asked me if those things were ready which he had ordered in the morning; I said, I believed they were not, but would enquire - I went into the tobacco shop, and asked Mr. Dolby. Mr. Dolby had given me the list in the morning - I returned to the shop and said they were not ready - he said

"Pray what is the reason they are not ready;" he spoke in rather a raised tone; he then said

"Well, look them out and I will wait for them" - I looked out all we had, and laid them on the counter before him, and said I believed the principal part of the numbers he had ordered in the morning were there, he then drew another list from his pockets of nineteen numbers of

"Dolby's acting plays" which I also looked out and placed them before him - he then said

"I want No. 1 and 2 of the same work" - I turned my back to reach them from a closet behind me, and while I was so doing, he took up all the books I had looked out and ran away with them - they were worth 10 s.; there was as also one number of the

"Oracle of Health" value 1 s.

Q. You saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street - now

divesting your mind of all prejudice, have you such a recollection of his person as to be certain of him - A. I have; I gave a description of him to the officer, before I went there; I have no doubt whatever of his being the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. When did you see him at Marlborough-street - A. On Saturday, the 12th of June.

BENJAMIN SCOFIELD . I took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. His lodgings were pointed out to you - A. Yes, I searched his trunks but found no property claimed by any one; every facility was given me to search - he told me himself when he was taken where he lodged.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen, in this case as in the former, I shall be enable to clearly prove that the witnesses labour under a mistake; by proving a clear and undeniable alibi.

MR. FENTON ROBINSON. I am the prisoner's brother, and have been in the army. I reside in Eberry-terrace, Pimlico. I heard of this charge on the day after he was taken; he frequently denied and drank tea with me. On Saturday, the 1st of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I met him in the Park; we parted, and I went home to dinner; he came to me about six, (before I had finished dinner,) and remained with me till nearly eleven: he was not out of my house, or out of my sight all that time; I think I walked part of the way home with him. Cheese-man, my servant was there.

MR. LAW. Q. Are you in the army now - A. No, I am on half-pay.

Q. As he was frequently in the habit of coming to your house, what brings to your mind the transaction of the 1st of May - A. It was the first time he ever drank tea without dining with me; I do not recollect whether I met him accidentally or by appointment; we were together till near five o'clock; he parted with me at the bottom of Grosvenor-place; Eberry-terrace is a quarter of a mile further.

Q. Was any reason assigned for his parting with you so near your house - A. No; I asked him to come to tea; I have no reason for saying it was on the 1st of May, except from it being the first time he drank tea without dining; I knew he was engaged in business; he wore a blue coat, but what trowsers, neckcloth or waistcoat, I do not know.

Q. How long after his apprehension was this charge made - A. At his second examination; I was not at the first examination; he frequently drank tea with me afterwards without dining, but not so often as when he dined; my female servant, Sadler, was also at home; he might have drank tea with me half a dozen times in May.

Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Was it at Marlborough-street you first considered of his having been with you on any particular occasion - A. I believe it was; I have not the slightest doubt of what I have stated; I cannot be mistaken.

THOMAS CHEESEMAN . I am servant to Mr. Robinson; the prisoner came there on the 1st of May, about six o'clock, and only drank tea; he did not dine there that day; he staid till about eleven; I was at home all the time.

Mr. LAW. Q. How often in May did he drink tea with your master - A. I dare say half a dozen times; I know it was on the 1st of May, because it was the first time he drank tea there without dining; that is my only reason.

Q. Did your master observe that to you - A. No; he never drank tea there in April without dining; he did after the 1st May; the first time he ever came into the house was on Easter Sunday.

Q. Have you never mentioned to your master your reason for recollecting why it was the 1st of May - A. Yes, I have, when I first heard of the business, and he said that was his reason; he assigned the reason first.

Q. And then you said that was your reason - Yes.

Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Sadler, the maid, kept down stairs, I suppose - A. Yes; I always open the door, and answer the bell.

EPHRAIM MALLOUGH . I am servant to Mr. Bannister, a hosier and glover, who lives in the Strand. On a Saturday evening, early in June, a man came to our shop, and wanted to buy a handkerchief which was in the window; I shewed it to him; he looked at it for some time; it was not the pattern he wanted, and was too dear; he wanted to see more; I went to fetch more, and in the mean time he bolted off with them; the prisoner is not that man, but very much resembles him; I attended at Marlborough-street, and saw the prisoner and am satisfied that he is not the man.

Mr. LAW. Q. The prisoner was not charged with stealing your handkerchiefs - A. No, the man was dressed in a blue coat, gilt buttons, black waistcoat, and dark mixed trowsers.

JOHN BUTLER . I am clerk to Mr. Harmer, the prisoner's attorney; Mallough has made this statement within the last half hour; I did not know on the last trial what evidence he could give; or he would have been called.

Mr. LAW to MALLOUGH. Q. What brought you here today - A. Mr. Abraham's desired me to attend in case I should be wanted; I had seen an account in the newspapers of the prisoner's apprehension, and a person of his description having been at our shop, I wrote to Mr. Abraham.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited , vide 3d day.

Reference Number: t18240715-102

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1167. WILLIAM HODGES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th July , three yards kerseymere, value 30 s.; three yards of Holland, value 2 s.; and three yards woollen cloth, value 3 l., the goods of Thomas Cartwright and Francis Cartwright , in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Cartwright .

THOMAS BAGUELEY . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Oxford-street. On the 7th July the prisoner came to our shop and offered to pawn 3 yards 1-8th of superfine green cloth for 10 s.; I thought that it cost about a guinea a yard, and asked his name; he said William Dukes ; that he had bought it for 16 s. a yard of a man in St. James's-street; I took him into the parlour, and said I would inquire if he had bought it at any house in St. James's-street; he then said he had bought it of a man in the street; I fetched an officer and gave him in charge.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer; I was fetched to Mr. Dobrees, and took the prisoner and cloth; he said he bought it of a man in the street for 16 s. a yard; I made inquiry, and in the course of the day, and saw Mr. Cartwright, jun. and went with him to the office; as soon as the prisoner saw him, he said the cloth was given to him by Richard, Mr. Cartwright's servant; I fetched Richard to the office, and spoke to the prisoner about some other property; he voluntarily directed me to a shop on the right

hand side of Kensington, and said there was some blue cloth pawned there for 16 s., and that he had pawned some more at Mr. Rochford's, in Jermyn-street, but had taken it out again and sold it; and that he had also taken some brown Holland to make him some aprons; and that some kerseymere had been sold at a shop in Marylebone-lane; I went to all these places and found his statement correct; he said the property was all given to him by Richard; he had given him the money; he persisted in this account to Richard's face, and before the Magistrate; Richard denied it all; he said all he had for his trouble was the brown Holland.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. He persisted in this story from beginning to end - A. Yes.

JOHN S. TURNER . - I am warehouseman to Thomas and Francis Cartwright , tailors, Lower Grosvenor-street; the prisoner had lived with them, and left about five months ago. Wales brought this cloth to me; I know it to be theirs; I have ascertained that there is that quantity deficient; it is worth about 3 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you say it had not been sold - A. We do not sell cloth, but only make it up; I have no mark on it. Richard lived in the house at the time it was missed, and has since been discharged. The warehouse is never locked; any person in the house could get there. The cloth was bought since the prisoner left.

COURT. Q. Has the prisoner been in the habit of coming to your house since he left - A. Richard allowed him to sleep with him unknown to master; I have seen him there repeatedly since he left; he told me himself that he had been sleeping in the house - I objected to it, knowing Mr. Cartwright would not like it.

ROBERT PIKE. I am servant to Mr. Rochford, a pawnbroker. On the 5th of July some brown Holland was pawned for 2 s., and I believe by the prisoner.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am shopman to Mr. Wells, pawnbroker, Kensington. On the 28th of June some kerseymere was pawned for 15 s.; I believe the prisoner to be the person.

RICHARD YOUNG . I was in the prosecutor's service. I did not give the prisoner any of the property.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you left your place - A. Since the 9th of July: I was dismissed. I have not asked for a character, wishing to clear this up first; I shall ask master for a character if the prisoner is convicted or not. Master never said he should be angry if any one slept with me. I did not know that he was dishonest. I live in Paradise-street, Finsbury. I could not engage myself in a place till this business was settled, being bound over to attend here. I was in custody, in the watch-house one night, and part of a day.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of sleeping with him till he gave me this cloth, some to pawn, and some to sell - I gave him the money.

RICHARD YOUNG. I never had a farthing from him.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-103

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1172. JOHN BRAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , six pairs of shoes, value 18 s, and six pairs of upper leathers, value 6 s. , the goods of the overseers of the poor of the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Thomas Gibbs .

THOMAS HAYES . I am superintendant of the poor of the parish of St. Mary, Lambeth . The shoes were in a room called the shoemakers'-shop; I saw them all safe at eight o'clock on the night of the 18th of June - I locked the door, and put the key in the porter's lodge for Gibbs, and about half-past six o'clock in the morning I found the door wide open, and missed six pairs of shoes, and six pairs of upper leathers, and found them at the office - the prisoner was a stranger.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you at times leave the key about - A. I always take it to the lodge.

THOMAS GIBBS. I am master of the workhouse. This property was under my care - the prisoner was a stranger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. On the 19th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of a house in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's, with a bundle; I stopped him, and asked what he had got; he said, shoes - that he was a shoemaker, and had had them by him sometime. I found he had six pairs of shoes, and six pairs of upper leathers: the marks upon them led me to the workhouse at Norwood.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them for 14 s. that morning.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-104

1173. GEORGE COLVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , four forks, value 1 s., and three knives, value 1 s. , the goods of John Smith .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but a confession, which had been extorted from him, he was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240715-105

1174. JOHN ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 50 lbs. of lead, value 9 s. , the goods of Jonas Faithfull ; and JAMES WEBBER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JAMES SIMMS . I keep a tripe shop in Little Chapel-street, Westminster. On Saturday night, the 10th of July, at half-past twelve o'clock, I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner Robins come through Castle-court, with one or two other young men, one of whom I knew; they stood in the center of the street, consulting which way the should go - Robins had a sack on his back, which appeared very weighty: one of them said,

"It won't do to go round the corner, the watchman will see us;" this induced me to watch. I walked after Robins - the others went to the right: Robins went into Orchard-street, and stopped at a house opposite Duck-lane - he took the sack into a house there, which goes up one or two steps: I noticed the house, but not the number of it. I then went to the watchman at the corner, by my own house - I informed him and Squires, and shewed them the house. I then went home.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. It was a

very short time from your seeing him go into the house till you called the patrol - A. They were there in less than two minutes.

WILLIAM SQUIRES . I am a patrol. Simmons gave me information - I and Davis went into the house which he pointed out; the street door was open, and two women standing there, they saw as coming, and one of them went into the shop: the name

"Webber, dealer in marine stores." is over the door - I saw the shop door open, and went in, and saw some pipe lead rolled up, and laying on the counter; I put my hand on it, and asked Webber, who stood behind the counter, if it belonged to him; he said No - I asked who it belonged to; he nodded his head, and pointed to the prisoner Robins and one Death, who stood there, and said it belonged to them; there was nobody else in the shop. I asked Webber if they had offered it for sale - he said he did not buy such sort of lead as that. I asked him twice if they had not brought in some more lead in a sack - he did not answer - he had got a sack with the rest of the lead inside the counter, on his right side; as he made no answer, I said

"Where is it;" and Davis went round the counter, laid hold of the sack, and gave it to me, with the lead in it - he had made no answer about the sack; he must have seen it there, it was not a yard from him - I instantly gave the prisoner and Death in charge; and said,

"Webber, will you be so good as to go to the watch-house;" he seemed unwilling - I said, there can be no harm in his going as a witness against them - he, however, went quietly with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say that Webber could see the lead while he was speaking to you - A. Yes, he put his head down where it was, when I asked him about it - I did not hear him tell them he would not buy it.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a watchman. Simmons gave us information - we went to the house directly, it was about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock - the door was open, we went in and found Robins and Death there - Webber stood inside the counter - Squires laid hold of the pipe, and asked whose it was: Webber pointed to the men, and said it was their's, and that he did not buy such lead - Squires asked him if there was not a sack of lead brought in - he hesitated - the question was put again; I looked over the counter and saw it; he then said,

"This is the sack," he must have touched it with his feet, it was so close to him. I was looking for it when the question was asked the second time - a saw was found in Robins's bosom; the pipe appeared to have been cut with it, but not the sheet lead - it is not usual for such shops to to be open so late.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house - Robins said Death had asked him to carry the lead - he afterwards said he would tell me where they got it from, that it was from the lower end of Vauxhall-road - I went there, and found the prosecutor out - I asked Webber to come forward as a witness next morning; he said he would not, for he should lose his work - I then thought proper to detain him.

JONAS FAITHFULL. I am a carpenter , and live in Susannah-place; I have a yard in the Vauxhall-road, nearly half a mile from Chapel-street. On Sunday morning, the 11th of July, I found three parts of the leaden cistern lining cut away, and the pipe cut close to the ground; it was safe at eight o'clock the night before - I saw the plumber fit part of this lead to the cistern; the nail-holes corresponded.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a plumber. I compared the lead produced with the cistern, and have every reason to believe that it was cut from there; I have not the least of it.

Cross-examined. Q. You beat it out before you tried it - A. I flatted it out, as it was doubled up; that does not make it wider than it originally was; the nail-holes tallied - there was 52 lbs. in all.

ROBINS'S Defence. Death took it into the house, and this man refused to buy it five times.

WEBBER'S Defence. It being a fine night, I was standing next door, and two persons went into my shop; I went and asked what they wanted - they asked if I bought lead - I said No; and the patroles immediately came in, and asked if it belonged to me; I said

"No, to these men" - he said

"Is there any more?" - I looked down and said, with surprise,

"Yes, here is a sack" - he said

"Well, as you have not bought it, if you will only go to the watch-house it will be sufficient." - I was asked to go to Queen-square, I said if I did I should lose a good situation.

WEBBER received an excellent character.

ROBINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

WEBBER - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-106

1175. DENNIS COLLINS , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , a pouch, value 6 d. and nine rupees, value 14 s.; the property of Timothy Donovan , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240715-107

1176. HENRY SCOTT , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , a boy's dress, value 20 s. , the goods of Edward Ginger .

EDWARD GINGER . This dress belongs to my master, Mr. Sharp.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-108

1177. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , four yards of floor cloth, value, 19 s. ; the goods of William Pitt .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am shopman to William Pitt, floor-cloth manufacturer , Commercial-road . On the 9th of July, about half-past one o'clock, I had just gone into the parlour, the neighbours alarmed me; I went out and at last saw the prisoner with this floor cloth under his arm walking between two others; I overtook him - he threw it down - I picked it up, and never lost sight of him till he was secured - the cloth had been chained outside the door.

THOMAS BARTON . I am a bedstead-maker - I saw the prisoner and two others standing by the floor-cloth at Mr. Pitt's door; I watched and saw the prisoner put his hand on it; the other two went on each side of the door; they made a motion to me to go away; I said it would not do, and one of them put his hand across his throat as much as to say I should have my throat cut if I did not; I went home to dinner, and on returning found the prisoner in custody - I am sure he is one of

them - I understand that he bears a very good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man who I knew, he asked which way I was going, and said he had carried the floor-cloth a great way, and would I carry it for him - I had not got many yards before he turned round and said

"Throw it down, here are the people after us" - I did so.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-109

1178. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , a saw, value 5 s.; a pair of hinges, value 4 d.; two thumb latches, value 4 d.; two turn buckles, value 3 d.; six brass knobs, value 6 d.; six cast-iron buttons, value 4 d. and a bolt value 2 d. , the goods of Timothy Coleman Johnson .

TIMOTHY COLEMAN JOHNSON. I am a builder - I was building two houses in Hare-street-fields, Bethnal-green ; and left the articles stated in the indictment in one house on the 25th of June - I fastened it with a padlock - I went there again about eleven o'clock in the morning, and and found the padlock wrenched off, and the property gone. On the 1st of July, I was passing an iron stall in Spitalfields, and saw them exposed for sale - the woman described a man to me. I fetched an officer, and while we were there the prisoner came up; the woman said he was the man, and the officer took him.

CATHERINE CONDE. I live in French-alley, Spitalfields. On the 26th of June, the prisoner sold me two thumb latches, two turn buckles, five or six buttons, and some brass nails. He came to the door while I was talking to the officer and was taken.

CHARLES STILL . I am shopman to Mr. Goodber, pawnbroker, Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. On the 26th of June, the prisoner pawned two saws.

JOSEPH WALTON . I am a constable. I was talking to Conde, the prisoner came to the door with a saw, and I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met one Norman in Brown's-lane, who sent me to sell the things, she said I might bring what I liked - whether stolen or not she would buy it.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-110

NEW COURT. (3d DAY,)

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1179. HENRY EWER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d June , a ham value 5 s. , the goods of John Carruthers .

JOHN CARRUTHERS . I keep a warehouse for the sale of hams in Leadenhall-street - on the 23d of June a neighbour gave me some information, a ham was brought back to me soon after, which I knew to be mine, I had not missed it.

PHILIP GEORGE DODD . I am in the employ of Mr. Taylor, whose shop commands a view of the prosecutor's cellars - on the 23d June, at two o'clock, my attention was led across the road; the prisoner and another young man were standing near the cellar, and the next instant I saw the ham come up through a sort of railing which protects the cellar; I told my fellow apprentice to follow them; he went over and picked up the ham; I pulled the bell for Mr. Taylor to come down, and when he came I went over and saw the prisoner who had been taken; he had been out of my sight down Billiter-street; I did not see his face till he was brought back, but I had seen his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the street and had nothing to do with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-111

1179. WILLIAM HOOPER was indicted for stealing on the 25th June , two quires of paper, called outside foolscap, value 1 s.; and 125 sheets of paper, value 3 s. the goods of Henry Garrett Key , and John Key , his masters , and PHILIP BUCHANAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. In consequence of some directions, I was watching for the prisoner Hooper, and saw him on the 25th of June coming by the City-road burying-ground - I followed him to the corner of Chiswell-street, where he joined Buchanan - they then turned down Chiswell-street, and Hooper delivered a parcel to Buchanan - they walked on about thirty yards, then crossed and went half way down Finsbury-street - Hooper then went away, and Buchanan put the parcel into a bag - I followed him to White-street, and then said,

"What have you got there," he said

"Paper to make a book" - I said,

"Where did you get it" - he said

"I received it from a man, a friend of mine." I said " Should you know that man again" - he said " I do not think I should" - I then took him to the Mansion-house, and Mr. Cook asked him some questions - he said he had been at a public-house (I think the Crown) on the day before and saw the man - that he was going to take the paper to some person to get it ruled - I proceeded to Alderman Keys, and Hooper was called, I took him to the Mansion-house - the prisoners there denied all knowledge of each other - I have seen Hooper before, I suppose twenty times - I went to Buchanan's house, and there saw a working bench for bookbinders.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. You saw Hooper in the City-road - A. Yes, and walked ten or fifteen yards behind him all theway - I saw his face when he passed me before I followed him, in Finsbury-street, he went a few yards beyond Buchanan, and then turned round and came back to him again - I did not stop them when they were together, because I might have lost one of them - there were not many persons in that street.

JOHN KEY , ESQ. I am one of the firm of John Key and Henry Key Garrett. Hooper had been in our employ some years; we had some information, and directed the officer to observe him - I have seen the paper, and know it to be ours, we had made it for particular customers, and no other house has such paper - on the 25th of June last Hooper had no business with any such paper - I had not seen him that morning - his work is a good deal in the part where this paper is kept - he generally leaves about eight o'clock in the morning to go to breakfast, this paper is worth about 4 s.

Cross-examined Q. Had you been at the warehouse that morning. A. No, I was not come to town. I know the paper by a particular mark - we have manufactured it for many

years. - it is sold perhaps to three or four persons, but not many quires are sold, except in one particular direction - those persons are stationers and sell it to anybody who may go to buy it.

HOOPER - GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

BUCHANAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-112

Before Mr. Recorder.

1181. FREDERICK WINGRAVE was indicted for staling, on the 4th July , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the property of Gabriel Brandon , from his person .

GABRIEL BRANDON . I live in Alie-street, Goodman's-fields - on the 4th of July, between four and five o'clock, I was in Leadenhall-street, opposite the India House , and felt a jerk at my pocket - I placed my hand on my pocket, and found that my handkerchief was gone - I had it a very short time before - I turned round and saw the prisoner walking five or ten yards before me, and saw part of it between his coat and waistcoat - I collared him and charged him with the robbery; he denied it - I took the handkerchief from him, and am quite certain it is mine - I know it by the pattern, and my initials are on it - he said he had found it on the ground, it was impossible that it could have slipped out of my pocket, I felt the jerk.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. There are many persons out on Sunday - A. There might be some passing at that time, but I saw the prisoner in front of me when I turned round; if any other person had taken it there would not have been time to have given it to him.

EMMANUEL BRANDON . I am the prosecutor's brother, and was with him, he said he felt a pull at his pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner with the handkerchief hanging partly out of his coat, there were one or two young boys on the same line with him, but they ran off; the prisoner did not run, he said he had picked it up; I do not think there was time for him to have picked it up.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer: I received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchiefs; I found 1 s. and a few mock coral beads upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two young men walking behind a gentleman; he dropped a handkerchief; I picked it up, and was going it to him when the prosecutor stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-113

1182. WILLIAM PARKER and CHARLES WILKINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Godwin , from his person .

THOMAS GODWIN . I live in Gutter-lane, Cheapside, and am a warehouseman . On the 16th of July, between twelve and one o'clock at noon, my pocket was picked in Newgate-street , as I was returning from Newgate-market; I had used my handkerchief after I left home: as I was passing near Ivy-lane, in consequence of some information I put my hand to my pocket, and missed it: I did not observe any person near me - it was a silk handkerchief, and has my initials on it. I did not see the prisoners till after they were taken in an alley, near Dolly's chop-house.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 16th of July I saw the two prisoners in Newgate-street, near Warwick-lane: they were following several persons backwards and forwards - this conduct induced me to watch them for about twenty minutes; I then saw Mr. Godwin and another gentleman close together; I could hardly tell which of them the prisoners were following: they were close to them - I stopped down, and looked under a cart, and saw them turn down Queen's Head-passage, leading to Paternoster-row: I saw Mr. Godwin clap his hand upon his pocket - I called to him, and took him down the passage; there were no other persons near enough to pick his pocket but the prisoner, and the other gentleman: it was done momentarily, and I took them within about a minute, five or six yards down the passage - I found the handkerchief in Wilkinson's small clothes; Mr. Godwin immediately claimed it. Hesketh seized Parker.

Prisoner PARKER. Q. Was I in company with Wilkinson at the time of the felony - A. Yes; I am quite sure of it. I saw you open one or two gentlemen's pockets.

Prisoner WILKINSON. Q. Did you see me take the handkerchief - A. No: there was a cart which prevented me.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a constable. I followed the prisoners from near St. Martin's-le-grand till they came to Newgate-street; I did not see Mr. Godwin till about a minute before he lost his handkerchief - I saw the hand of one of them go to his pocket, but I cannot say which: there were no other persons near them. I had been watching them in company with each other about ten minutes. Mr. Godwin put his hand to his pocket - we then pursued them down the court; I took Parker, and saw Herdsfield take the handkerchief from Wilkinson's trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILKINSON'S Defence. I saw the handkerchief lying on the ground; I did not know whose it was, or I should have given it to them. I turned down the court, as I had heard there was some painter's work to be got there.

PARKER'S Defence. I was walking down Newgate-street, and got into conversation with this young man: we turned down the court, and the officers came and took us.

PARKER - GUILTY Aged 18.

WILKINSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-114

1183. JANE HORROBINE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , a pen-knife, value 2 s. , the goods of John Walklin Ryley , her master .

JOHN WALKLIN RVLEY . I live in Duke-street, West Smithfield, and am a surgical instrument maker . The prisoner had lived with me about two years - I had her from St. Clement's workhouse . Within the last three or four months I have lost property to the amount of above 20 l.; I told her I knew things were going, but did not suspect her - she denied knowing anything of them. I received information, and found this pen-knife on Harriet Gatehouse , who lives nearly opposite me; the prisoner and her were intimate. I knew it to be mine - it had never been

in use: it has my name on the blade; it is made in the country, but I put my name upon it before it is sold - it had been in the shop, in a glass-case, which is not locked.

HARRIET GATEHOUSE . I live with my father, who is a tailor. I have been acquainted with the prisoner some time - she gave me the knife, which she said a person of the name of William gave her, and it would do for my work: this was about three weeks before I heard it had been stolen - my father told Mr. Ryley, suspecting it was stolen; he had taken it from me. I saw it in possession of the officer; I am positive it is the same knife - I had not used it at all.

HENRY DAVIS. I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoner and the knife. Gatehouse saw the knife, and said it was the same the prisoner gave her.

JOHN WALKLIN RYLEY re-examined. Q. Have you a person in your service of the name of William - A. Yes, I have.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-115

1184. JANE HORROBINE was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a knife, value 2 s., and a pair of scissars, value 1 s. , the goods of John Walklin Ryley , her master .

JOHN WALKLIN RYLEY . On the 10th of June I found this knife and scissars in the possession of Isabella Brown - they were taken from my glass-case, and had been there about a month before.

ISABELLA BROWN. I live in Well-yard. The prisoner gave me this knife and scissars about a month or five weeks before she was taken up: I have know her three or four months - I have seen her going on errands; I knew she lived with Mr. Ryley, and knew he was a cutler, but did not know that he made or sold these articles; she told me her master's brother gave her them. I heard she was taken up, and I told Mr. Ryley of it two or three days afterwards.

MR. RYLEY. I knew this child was an intimate acquaintance of the prisoner's, and went to her house to ask her about it.

JURY. Q. Can you say that these articles had not been sold - A. No; but the prisoner has acknowledged before that she took them.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240715-116

1185. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , two 5 l. Bank notes, and three other notes for payment of 5 l. 5 s. each , the property of John Milner .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240715-117

1186. ANN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , an apron, value 3 d.; a pair of gloves, value 3 d.; four half-crowns, fourteen shillings, and ten sixpences, the property of Catherine Harding , from her person .

CATHERINE HARDING . I live in Jackson's-court, Blackfriars. I know the prisoner by sight. I lost this property by the side of Fleet-market , between eleven and twelve o'clock on Sunday evening, the 19th of June; the apron and gloves were in my right hand pocket, and the money in my left, in a small bag; they were taken from me in the street, by the prisoner and another person: I felt their hands in my pockets; they had not been near me long: they were in a wine-vaults, where I went for shelter from the rain, but it was in the street that they put their hands into my pockets; I was pushed down in the mud, and bruised very much, and left there till the watchman came up; the prisoner was then gone - she was taken next morning. I am quite sure she was one of them; I knew her before. I have seen none of the property since. I was sober.

Prisoner. What she says is very false; she was very tipsy, and so was I - Witness. She appeared quite sober.

MARY JONES . I live in Fleet-market; my master keeps the wine-vaults. I saw Harding at our shop, between ten and eleven o'clock - the prisoner and several other persons were there: I did not hear of the robbery till the next morning, when the prosecutrix came, and complained of having been robbed - I am sure that the prisoner and another young woman, and a young man had been there together: the prisoner had been there before but very seldom. The officer brought her in next morning.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am a constable. The prosecutrix came on the Monday morning to my house in Fleet-lane, and said she had lost 29 s., an apron, and some things in Fleet-market: I went down to Mr. Wood's wine-vaults, and found who the parties were, who had gone home with her. I found the prisoner in George-alley, Fleet-market, and told her the charge - she denied it. Harding complained of some hurt in her legs, and had a bandage on it. I searched the prisoner, and found 1 s. 6 d. in her mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the loss: there was a young man and woman with me - the old lady was in company with a man, like a pensioner. I came down the market, and went home.

CATHERINE HARDING re-examined. When I got to the wine-vaults there was a first cousin of mine there, but he went away almost immediately.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-118

1187. JOSEPH HOWLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Goyder , from his person .

THOMAS GOYDER . I live in the Strand, and am a printer . On the 14th of June, about ten o'clock at night, my pocket was picked of a handkerchief, just by St. Dunstan's church , I was walking with a friend, who he turned round and collared the prisoner behind us, and said,

"You have been stealing this gentleman's handkerchief" - I turned, and saw him pass the handkerchief to another person who ran off with it; I found my handkerchief gone - I had used it within half an hour before.

NEHEMIAH BACON. I was with Mr. Goyder, passing along Fleet-street , about a quarter past ten o'clock; I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the handkerchief from Mr. Goyder's pocket - I turned round and collared him, but the handkerchief was passed to another person, who made his escape - I said to the prisoner,

"You have taken this gentleman's handkerchief" - he said,

"You are quite mistaken." Upon my oath I am not mistaken.

Prisoner's Defence. When that gentleman took hold of me, and said

"You have taken this gentleman's handkerchief," I said

"I have not" - he said,

"Will you go to

the watch-house" - I said

"Yes." I was searched, but nothing was found on me - I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-119

1188. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 27 s. , the goods of Thomas Bickham .

JOSIAH LEWIS. I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Bickham , Manchester warehouseman , Cheapside . On the 4th of May, about a half-past eleven o'clock, a piece of cotton was stolen, which I had seen about five minutes before, near the door-way: I did not miss it until I saw it in the possession of the prisoner, in the lobby; he then got into the street, and got half way down Queen-street, which is three doors from the warehouse; I did not cry Stop thief! - the prisoner did not run, he had it in his hand, and stopped to wrap it up at a door; I do not think he knew I was following him; I took it from him.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered in charge to me at Mr. Bickham's warehouse, with the print.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along and saw the piece of print thrown on the ground; I stood and looked at it about a quarter of an hour, and then took it up to see if I could find an owner - this gentleman then came and asked me to go with him.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-120

1189. GEORGE REED was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a pair of boots, value 15 s. , the goods of James Williams , his master .

JAMES WILLIAMS. The prisoner was in my employ for about six weeks; I employed him till he could get anything better - he was detected, on the 8th of July, leaving my house with a pair of boots, one of them in his trowsers, and one in his hat - they were mine - he was employed to clean boots and shoes.

WILLIAM TOZER. I am a servant to Mr. Williams. On the 8th of July I went into the cellar, and saw a pair of boots there, concealed beneath a blind, which was not the place for them; I gave information of it in the house; this was about eight o'clock - the prisoner was in the shop at the time; he went down afterwards, and when he came up again he was stopped, and the boots found concealed, one in his hat, and the other in his trowsers; the boots were men's boots, they were new.

PETER GOLDING . I was in the employ of Mr. Williams. I laid hold of the prisoner when he came from the cellar: I asked him if all was right; and he made no answer - I found the boots as described by the witnesses.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am a constable, and took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, confessing his guilt, and entreating forgiveness.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-121

1190. JOHN FEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a snuff-box, value 5 l., the goods of Philip Davis , from his person .

MR. PHILIP DAVIS . I live in Corbet-court, Gracechurch-street. I had a snuff-box taken from me on Friday, the 9th of July, between twelve and one o'clock, as I was going down by the side of the Bank, towards Guildhall . I felt a snatch at my pocket, I turned short round, and saw the prisoner, who turned round also, and threw away the box, which I picked up, and cried Stop thief! - I did not lose sight of him, he passed between some coachmen, who drive the stages, and I think there was a boy in a sustian jacket near him, but I kept my eye upon him; the other boy I believe crossed the way - he did not at all attempt to stop him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The other boy was as near the box as the prisoner - A. Yes; when I looked round there where two boys, but I saw the prisoner throw it away - there might have been half a dozen coachmen - I did not lose sight of him. His friends have been with me, they appear very respectable; his mother, I believe, is a widow.

CHARLES BOND. I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was stopped by a young man, he fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-122

Before Mr. Recorder.

1191. RICHARD TOLKINGTON was indicted for that he, on the 26th of June , at St. Mary Woolnoth , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain warrant for payment of money , which is as follows: -

London, June 24, 1824.

Messrs. Willis, Percival, and Co.

Please to pay the bearer Twenty-Seven Pounds.

SAMUEL BROWN .

27.

with intent to defraud Samuel Brown , against the statute &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only with intent to defraud William Willis , the younger , Richard Percival , Samuel Tomkins , Richard Percival , the younger , and Richard M'Pherson .

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only calling the forged instrument a certain order for payment of money, instead of a certain warrant for payment of money.

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS, for feloniously offering a certain false, forged, and counterfeit warrant, for payment of money; well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intention.

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH COUNTS, the same as the fifth and sixth, only calling the forged instrument a false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, instead of a certain warrant for payment of money.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, like the four last, only for feloniously disposing of and putting away, instead of offering, with a like intention.

ELDRED ADDISON . I am clerk to Messrs. William Willis , the younger, Richard Percival , Samuel Tomkins , Richard Percival , the younger, and Richard M'Pherson, of Lombard-street, in the City of London - they are bankers to Captain Samuel Brown . I saw this prisoner at their banking-house on the 26th of June; he presented a draft of 27 l. for payment; we had cash enough in hand of Captain Brown's to have paid it, but I suspected it was not Captain Brown's hand-writing, and went into one of

the offices to compare it; my suspicions were then confirmed - we detained the prisoner, and sent for Captain Brown; we stated to the prisoner our suspicions - he at first said he brought it direct from Captain Brown - he afterwards said he found it, and I believe he said in the street. Captain Brown did not come that day, but Mr. Walker, his partner did. Before the draft went out of my sight I put my initials on it; it is all in writing - it is not a banker's cheque filled up. This is the draft.

MR. JAMES THOMAS WALKER . I was in partnership with Captain Brown on Saturday, the 26th of June, I was sent for to Messrs. Willis and Co's.; I found the prisoner there - I had seen him before, as a waiter at a Coffee-room. My opinion was asked about the hand-writing of this draft; my opinion was, and still is that it is not Captain Brown's writing. The prisoner dropped on his knees, and said,

"I own I did it, but it is my first offence; I was in distress, and I have a wife and child." He appeared much distressed; his eyes were wild and haggard.

CAPTAIN SAMUEL BROWN . I know the prisoner; he was in my service about two years, but was not at the time of this transaction - he conducted himself with great propriety while with me, and I parted with him solely on account of the breaking up of my establishment.

WILLIAM BECK . I am constable of Langbourn Ward. I went to Messrs. Willis and Co's., and took the prisoner into custody. I took him into a private room, and as I had not had a distinct charge against him I sent for Mr. Willis. As I was standing at the door of the room where the prisoner was talking to Mr. Willis, he attempted to make his escape out of the window. He appeared almost out of his mind.

(The cheque was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress of body and mind, and did not know what I did. If it had been possible to make away with myself I should have done it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his distress, and former good character .

Reference Number: t18240715-123

1192. GEORGE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Henry Wilkinson , from his person .

JOHN HENRY WILKINSON. I live in Canterbury-place, Lambeth. On the 11th of June, I was returning from the City, down Holborn , and had occasion to use my handkerchief just before I got to Shoe-lane . I had not got many yards further before I felt a jerk at my pocket, and found the handkerchief was gone - I turned round, and saw the prisoner, in company with another young man, who was discharged at Guildhall. They were the only persons near me - I suspected one of them - I walked after them, and charged them with it; the other man denied it, but the prisoner said nothing. I secured them myself as it was near the watch-house, and the handkerchief was found on the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. How could you swear it was your handkerchief - I had one like it round my neck - A. I am certain it is mine, your's is a lighter colour.

JOSEPH LUMLEY . I am a day patrol. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I took the handkerchief out of his right hand coat pocket; the prosecutor claimed it; the prisoner said he had picked it up, he did not say it was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE CORBY . I am a constable - the handkerchief was delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief lie at the corner of Shoe-lane, and took it up and put it in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-124

1193. WILLIAM TAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , a coat, value 2 l. 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; two silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; one other handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a hat, value 16 s.; and a thimble 1/2 d., the goods of Thomas Handley , in the dwelling house of William Wilks .

THOMAS HANLY . I live in Skinner-street, Bishopgate , in the back garret; the prisoner lodged with me in the same room. I lost the articles stated in the indictment all at one time, they had been by my bed-side loose, not locked up; I went to bed on the 14th of June, just before twelve o'clock; the prisoner went to bed at the same time, and slept in the same bed, we are both shoemakers and generally rise about six o'clock in the morning; the landlord came to me about six o'clock and said the prisoner was gone. I then missed the things - he was not taken till the 5th of July - the thimble was then on him finger; he took the coat and waistcoat I now have on, but he dropped them on the stairs. I have not got any of the other things. I had had the thimble two years; the coat he took was worth 2 l. 10 s.; the waistcoat was worth 10 s.; and the handkerchief, 5 s.; no person slept in the room but myself and him.

WILLIAM WICKS . I am landlord of the house - I did not see the prisoner on the morning of the robbery; but I found prosecutor working coat and waistcoat on the stairs, and returned them to him; this was on a Monday morning - the other clothes which the prisoner took were his Sunday clothes. The prisoner was articled to me for two years; and had no right to leave me till the time was expired. He gave me no notice - he had been with me about five months.

JOHN BROWN. I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of July, at the corner of Widegate-alley - I asked him what he had done with the things; he said he had sold them, but he could not say where. I found the thimble in his breeches pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave a half-penny for the thimble, and know nothing about the property.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-125

1194. SARAH FORRESTER was indicted for stealing on the 5th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Frederick Ehn from his person .

HENRR FREDERICK EHN. I live in Gough-square, Fleet-Street, and am a furrier . On the 5th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was a little way up the Old Bailey, from Ludgate-hill , and felt my handkerchief go from my pocket, and turned run I and saw this woman close behind me - there was no one with her; I charged her with taking it - she denied it, but I lifted up her shawl and found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-126

1195. ROBERT INGLEBERT was indicted for stealing,

on the 13th of May , sixty skins of parchment, value 4 l., the goods of George Roberts and George Hitchen Furlong , from the person of Joseph Lawrence .

GEORGE HITCHEN FURLONG . I am a law-stationer , and live in Throgmorton-street, and am in partnership with Geo. Roberts , I sent Joseph Lawrence , our errand boy , (who has lived with us about two years,) on the 13th of May, with sixty skins of parchment to the printers in Fetter-lane, they were worth about 4 l.; he returned, and said they were stolen from him - I have never seen them since.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE . I am thirteen years of age. On the 13th of May, I was sent by my master with some skins to Messrs. Hawkins, Printers, Fetter-lane, Holborn; I was overtaken by the prisoner - I am quite certain he is the person; he was alone - he asked if I would go into a shop for 6 d., and ask for a portmanteau for Mr. Jones - I went into the shop and left the parchment and my umbrella for him to take care of - I stopped in the shop but a minute, it was in Skinner-street - there was no portmanteau there, and they knew no Mr. Jones; it was a grocer's shop - when I came out he was gone. I did not see him again till I met him in Cheapside; I ran past him and saw it was him - I turned round to look at him, and he looked round too. I followed him down Queen-street and he came into Cheapside again - there was a person with him, who asked me what I wanted; I said if I knew where there was a constable, I would tell him what I wanted; the prisoner was near enough to have heard that; he then went into Newgate-street, and I met a man and asked him if he could tell me where I could get a constable; he then ran down Bagnio-court; I got a constable in Butcher-hall-lane, and he was taken in Bagnio-court; he was then taken before the Lord Mayor; the person who had been with him was gone before the constable came. I am certain the prisoner is the person, though I had not seen him from the time he took the goods till I met him in the street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the boy a hat on his head - A. Yes, Sir - I never saw him before: he was with me five minutes; I looked at him a great deal.

Q. How many streets did you walk together, five or six - A. Yes Sir.

Q. And are you sure he was the man - A. Else what should make him run away, Sir.

JOHN TRIGGEY . I am a constable - the prosecutor came to my house, and when I got to the place there were forty or fifty persons round me. I saw the prisoner and asked who gave charge of him - this lad said

"This is the man that stole some skins from me." I said

"Are you sure that is the man." he said

"Yes." I took him before the Lord Mayor, he was remanded, and on the second hearing was committed.

Prisoner's Defence. I know myself to be innocent, and leave it entirely to you.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-127

London Cases, Second Jury Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1196. JOHN HARRIS alias HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , two bottles, value 4 d.; and three pints of wine, value 5 s. , the goods of William Harper and William Bell , his masters .

JOSEPH JAMES MILTON . I am a cellarman to Messrs. Harper and Bell, wine-merchants ; the prisoner was in their employ. On the 12th of July; I went down into the wine-cellar (where there was a pipe of port on draught) to watch. The prisoner came there and staid about ten minutes, when he returned; I looked before the cask, and saw some wine spilled: I mentioned this to John Boulogne and about five minutes before eight o'clock that evening, while I was outside the door, Boulogne made a motion to me, that the prisoner had got something, he was then coming from what is called the kitchen cellar. I said

"It is not eight o'clock, and probably the foreman will be angry with you to-morrow for going so soon;" he went back and we communicated the circumstance to master: he was then searched, he had long pockets inside his trowsers large enough to contain a bottle, and a breast-pocket that would contain a bottle.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not uncommon to have some wine spilled - A. No, but we had not been at work in that cellar; he had a pocket inside the thigh of his trowsers - the men are not allowed to take it away; they may drink what they like.

JOHN BOULOGNE . I am in the employ of the prosecutors. Between seven and eight o'clock on Monday the 12th July, I was in the wine-cellar: in consequence of some information from Milton I went into the left hand kitchen cellar, and concealed myself; I saw the prisoner come and put one bottle into his right, and one into his left hand pocket, he took them from some lumber on the side of the kitchen cellar - I gave Mr. Bell information of it - I saw the prisoner afterwards in the counting-house with Mr. Bell, who told him to take what wine he had from his pockets - he then took one bottle from his breast pocket, and said he had no more, but afterwards produced a bottle of wine from his right hand breeches pocket, after I had challenged him with having it there - I have not compared the wine with that in the cask, nor tasted it, but I saw it poured out, and judged from the deepness of the colour, and thickness of the body, that it was the same.

Cross-examined. Q. In this cellar where the lumber is, is any wine kept - A. No; the men help themselves to wine while they are at work - if I had seen the wine in these bottles ten miles off I could swear it come from that cask - the prisoner said it had been given him.

Mr. WILLIAM BELL. I am in partnership with Mr. William Harper : I questioned the prisoner as to what he had in his pocket - he said nothing: I said

"Are you quite certain you have nothing? he said

"I am not": I said,

"Produce what you have," and he pulled a bottle of wine from his side-pocket: I called Boulogne, who said

"He has got another bottle in his breeches pocket" - it was then pulled out: he then said it was given to him by a man named Rider: I said I believed it was our property. Our corks are marked on the inside part that goes into the bottle, but in drawing the corks of these bottles at the Mansion-house, one of them had a piece cut off. and the other was broken off, both of them might have had our name on it - it was fresh-drawn wine, and the corks were not sealed: they seemed very slightly put in, and not in the regular way: I have seen the wine drawn from the cask and tasted

it, and that in the bottles, and have not the least doubt that it is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. It was at the Mansion-house you tasted the wine - A. Yes, I had not broken the corks in drawing them - we have many casks of one flavour: I cannot tell the vintage of this wine, but wine of the same vintage will vary in quality in one hundred different particulars - if I went into a tavern one hundred miles off, and a bottle of wine was brought, I could swear to the taste of my own wine.

Prisoner's Defence. I told my master where I got the wine - I had it of a man named Rider - I went out to carry a dozen of wine, and he said to me

"Here is two bottles of wine" - I said

"I do not know where to put them" - he said said

"Put them in your lumber place" - I did so, and my master asked me about them, I said

"Sir, it is not your's."

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, having a good character - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-128

1197. THOMAS ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , a live calf, price 3 l. 15 s. , the property of Robert Gilmore .

ROBERT GILMORE . I am a butcher , and live in Gray's Inn-road. I bought a yellow calf on the 2d of this month - it had a clip on the left thigh: I put a letter G. and three clips on its hip - it was worth 3 l. 15 s.; I put it into the pen about eleven o'clock, returned in about a quarter of an hour, and it was gone.

GEORGE CLARKE . I am a porter at Smithfield-market. On the 2d of this month, between half-past ten and eleven o'clock, I stopped the prisoner with a yellow calf, marked G. on the off-side; I asked where he was going - he said to Fleet-market: he is sometimes a drover, and has a badge; anybody employs a drover to take cuttle; he is to do so without enquiring where they came from. He was apprehended on the Tuesday following. I know nothing more about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-129

1199. JOHN CRESSER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Atkinson , from his person .

JOHN ATKINSON . I am a stone-mason , and live in Goswell-street. On Sunday, the 21st of June, about six o'clock, I was passing between Moor-lane and Grub-street , and felt both my pockets moved: I turned round, and saw my handkerchief falling between the prisoner and another lad; the prisoner said, "It was not me, Sir:" I then appeared to take no notice, but picked it up, and followed them - they walked a little way in company, and then the other one turned to the right, and the prisoner went on till he came to Bowling-alley; I called for assistance, and collared him; he made some resistance, but I took him into a house. There was not a person near me that could have taken it but them.

WILLIAM PAIN . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner - I handcuffed him as he was very violent at first; but he afterwards kneeled down, and said he would not do so again.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-130

1299. JOSEPH WINN and JOSEPH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of George William Charles Lydiard , from his person .

GEORGE WILLIAM CHARLES LYDIARD . I am a lieutenant in the Navy . I was in Holborn on Tuesday last, about half-past nine o'clock, and felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket, nearly opposite St. Andrew's church - it was brought to me again in the watch-house by Mr. Hudson.

WILLIAM GUMMETT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Windmill-place. I was in Holborn, and saw the two prisoners: Smith put his hand into this gentleman's coat pocket; took out a handkerchief, and gave it to Winn - I told the gentleman; we pursued, and took them: they dropped the handkerchief in going to the watch-house. I lost sight of Smith before he was taken, but am quite sure of him; we came to the bottom of Holborn, and then met them coming back - it might be about three or four minutes after it was taken.

RALPH HUDSON . I was in Holborn, and saw Smith drop a handkerchief while he was being dragged to the watch-house. I took it up, and gave it to Mr. Lydiard.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WINN'S Defence. I never had it at all: I had been speaking to a gentleman.

WINN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-131

1200. SOLOMON DIAS and BENNET LYON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two shirts, value 16 s.; a shift, value 6 s.; a tablecloth, value 4 s. 6 d.; a waistcoat, value 7 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; a neckerchief, value 2 s.; four towels, value 2 s.; four aprons, value 4 s.; a frill, value 6 d.; two caps, value 4 s. 8 d.; a night gown, value 3 s. 6 d.; another gown, value 14 s.; an apron, value 1 s., and a basket, value 18 d. , the goods of James Sapsord .

JANE SAPSORD . My husband was in Hounsditch with a basket of linen of Friday, the 18th of June - I had done up the bundle to go home.

JANE SAPSORD , JUN. I am turned twelve years of age. I was with my father in Houndsditch on Friday, the 18th of June, about nine o'clock - he had three baskets of linen in a barrow: my mother is a laundress. My father went into a house to take a basket of linen, and I was left in care of the others. A man came and asked me the way to St. Mary-axe; I told him - he then asked me the way to Aldgate; I told him: he then crossed over, and went down Cutler-street. When he was gone, there was only one basket left; there had been two.

THOMAS DAVIS . I was in Houndsditch on the 18th of June, about nine o'clock, and saw this little girl with the barrow and two baskets - I saw one of the prisoners talking to her, and the other took the things. I knew the persons of the prisoners before.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you a chimney sweeper - A. Yes. They were by the side of the girl; she was sitting upon the barrow; one of them spoke to her, and another took the basket off the barrow while she got up to show him the way. I did not see them

again till they were in custody; I do not know how long that was. It was dark - I was sitting at my own door, opposite to the barrow. I thought they belonged to the bundle.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners together on this night in the Minories - when they saw me they separated; it was a little before nine o'clock on the 18th of June.

Prisoner DIAS. He came to me to raise 1 l., and because I could not do that he brought me here.

JOHN FORRESTER . I have heard about 1 l., 5 l., and 10 l., but I said I would have nothing at all to do with it - they could have raised 20 l. if they had wanted it, but that I have nothing to do with. I did not take the prisoners, but gave the hue and cry at Lambeth-street. I do not know their names - it might be about a fortnight afterwards that they were taken.

GEORGE MORGAN . I took Dias into custody from the information of Davis, the sweep.

DIAS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

LYON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-132

1201. HENRY WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a sack, value 1 s., and three pecks of oats and chaff mixed, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Waterhouse .

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am a constable of St. Luke's. On the 16th of July, a man came into a public-house, and fetched me to Old-street-road, where I saw the prisoner Willis with a cart and horse, delivering tares, he was coming from a court, and I asked him if he had been to Mr. Waterhouse's that morning - he said he had - I asked what he had done with the corn and chaff he got from there - he said he had none - I said,

"You are charged with stealing some" - he said,

"You may throw all the trusses out of the cart and look if you like:" we did not search, but Tweedy took the cart, and I took him. When we got to the green-yard, I saw Tweedy turn over the trusses and take out this sack.

JOHN TWEEDY . I was with Bradford, and took the cart, and found the sack - I threw it down.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How many times have you been before the Grand Jury - A. Twice.

JOHN BERWICK . I know the sack to be the property of a lighterman employed by Mr. Waterhouse; it is brought by Mr. Ashley to the Hambro' wharf. I do not know that any of the sacks were missed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-133

1202. WILLIAM BUCKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a sheet, value 2 s., the goods of William Smith , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM SMITH . The prisoner took a furnished room in my house, in Plough-court, Fetter-lane , on the 3d of July, and continued there till the 10th. On the Saturday we missed two sheets, a pair of pillow-cases, and a quilt: one sheet has been returned by a pawnbroker, named Stokes, and the pillow-cases by another person; they were a part of the furniture of the room.

JOHN MARTIN HAIGH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Fetter-lane. I took a sheet in pawn on the 9th of July of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am an officer, and was sent for to take the prisoner, who was charged with stealing the bed-clothes - I searched him, and found some duplicates in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came home on Saturday, the prosecutor asked me what I had done with the sheets and things - I said I had made use of them for victuals, and I meant to get them out again.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-134

1203. HENRY STEPHEN MARTIN , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Alfred Diston , from his person .

ALFRED DISTON . I was in Gracechurch-street yesterday, and my handkerchief was stolen out of my right-hand coat pocket - I did not know it till the officer told me I was robbed - I saw the handkerchief this morning at the Mansion-House.

CAARLES HERDSFIELD. I saw the prisoner in Gracechurch-street, near Leadenhall-street: the prosecutor stopped to look at a picture-shop; some ladies stopped at the same time. I could not see the prisoner take the handkerchief, but immediately afterwards I saw him coming away, with something in his small-clothes; I took him, and found this handkerchief there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-135

1204. ISAAC STOW was indicted for a fraud .

ELEANOR SHORTLAND . I am the wife of James Shortland , we live in Princes-street. Rosemary-lane. William Jeffries lodged at our house. On the 2d of June the prisoner came and said he had just left Mr. Jeffries in Tower-street, and he had directed him to bring that bill to me to pay; (producing one) - he receipted the bill, and said I might depend upon it it was quite correct, Mr. Jeffries owed him the money for moving some goods; it was 3 s., which I paid him. Here is the receipt, which he wrote it presence - I am certain he is the man.

WILLIAM JEFFRIES . I lodged at Mr. Shortland's, and know the prisoner, but did not owe him any bill, and never said there was a bill I wished Shortland to pay.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. I was applied to to take the prisoner, and Mrs. Shortland said she was sure he was the man that gave her the bill.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I never was in the house till after that time.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-136

1205. JOSEPH OLIVER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN CARD . I am warehouseman to George Grout , John Baylis , and John Brown . On the 7th of June William Grigg , a little lad, brought us an order purporting to come from a customer of ours, a Mr. Archer, of Banner-square; Goffe looked out the goods in my presence.

HENRY GOFFE . I am a warehouseman the prosecutors. Upon receiving this order, I looked out a packet of old dyed and a packet of new dyed black crape; I gave them to William Grigg .

WILLIAM GRIGG . I received the order from Oliver - I did not know him before he brought the paper to me; I took it down Gutter-lane, and gave it to Henry Gough , who gave me the two packets of goods; I took them over the way in Cheapside, and Oliver was taking the goods from me, when Mr. Card came up - I had hold of one of them, and Oliver the other.

JOHN CARD re-examined. I had a caution from my fellow-warehouseman, lest the boy should lose them, and I followed him to Cheapside, and saw the transaction.

WILLIAM ARCHER . The prisoner is a stranger to me, I never saw him before - I never wrote this paper, nor was it written by my authority.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from the King's Bench, I met a gentleman who desired me to go of an errand; as I was going down Gutter-lane he pulled out this letter, and said

"I am not accustomed to send a person of your size, you had better send that boy;" and when the boy came back with the parcels, I was taking them to go to the gentleman, when Mr. Card came up to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240715-137

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, JULY 19.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1206. NICHOLAS BOWEN was indicted for stealing on the 10th of June , a wooden bowl, 3 d.; two sixpences, and 160 farthings , the property of Joseph Burch .

JOSIAH BURCH. I keep the Beaumont-arms, public-house , Stepney . There was a bowl in my bar, containing four or five shillings worth of farthings; two sixpences, and a penny-piece; I missed it on Saturday night between eleven and twelve o'clock; the prisoner was in the house at the time. Ellis produced the bowl to me.

CHARLES ELLIS . I am Mr. Burch's servant - I saw the prisoner standing by the street door; and watched him, suspecting him, and as I went into the tap-room, I saw him put his hand round the bar window and take the bowl and put it into his hat; he bolted out as quick as he could, we pursued, but happened to go the wrong way; master went with me and took him coming out of his mother's house; he lived there with her; and the officer found the bowl there.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I went to his mother's and found the bowl inside the fire place - it was a wet night - I went into the yard and found the dust heap had been disturbed, and found a quantity of farthings, and two sixpences in a bag there.

(Bowl produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-138

1207. RICHARD WALDRON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of John Arnold , from the person of James Brown .

MARY ANN ARNOLD . I am daughter to John Arnold , and live in Clark-street. I was by the Vinegar-yard, City-road , with James Brown in my arms, about nine o'clock in the evening; he had a handkerchief round his neck tied with two knots - a person spoke to me, I turned round and missed the handkerchief from the child's neck, and saw the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM TAPP . I am a clerk to a coal-merchant. I was passing, and saw Arnold with the child in her arms; and saw the prisoner untie the child's handkerchief and gradually take it off its neck; the girl was gaping at a shew. I took him with it in his hand.

JOHN GIRTON . I am a labourer. I was by the Vinegar-yard, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief off the child's neck - I had watched him for three-quarters of an hour - and saw him attempt several peoples pockets - then saw him unite the handkerchief and take it off; he put it into his right hand; I caught hold of his hand and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped to see the shew, a handkerchief laid on the ground, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-139

1206. WILLIAM VICKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a neck-lace, value 6 s.; the goods of Hendon Treverton , from the person of Mary Treverton .

MARY TREVERTON . I am thirteen years old . On the 9th of July, about eleven o'clock, I was in Henry-street looking at Punch, and felt something touch my neck; I turned round but saw nobody; I still stood there, and on turning round my necklace was gone off my neck; I saw it in the prisoner's right hand, and told him they were my beads - he said nothing, but took them from his right hand, put them into his left, and then into his left hand pocket; he then took them out and handed them to another boy who ran away with them; I called a person out of a shop - he said he had not got them, and that I might feel in his pocket - Webb took him directly.

HENDON TREVERTON. I am the prosecutrix's father , and am a carpenter - she had a coral necklace on on the 9th of July; she came home to me - I found the prisoner in Webb's custody, and after he was committed the necklace was brought to me.

JAMES WEBB . I am a grocer. I saw this girl crying, she pointed the prisoner out to me and said

"This boy has taken my beads." I told him to give them to her; he said he had not got them, that another boy had taken them and gone away with them. I secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-140

1208. WILLIAM STOREY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , a handkerchief, value 10 d., the goods of George King , from his person .

GEORGE KING . I am a brush-maker , and live in Burton-cresent. On the 20th of June, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing by the Horse-guards with my handkerchief in my right hand pocket - Lawrence gave me information - I felt and missed it, he produced it. The prisoner was standing close by; there was a crowd, as they were relieving guard.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am an officer. I was at the Horse-guards - I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. King

take the handkerchief from his pocket, and put it into his breeches pocket; he turned round to come away and I took hold of him; he then took it from his pocket and threw it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been standing with my back against the wall for ten minutes, when the officer called me, and among the thick part of the mob he picked up this handkerchief, a yard-and-half from where I stood. The prosecutor said if I would find my accomplice, he would not prosecute me; and on Thursday when a person went to him he wanted 20 l. in money; the officer has been several times times to see my wife about it.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . His wife sent for me - I went to her, she begged of me not to appear; I said I certainly should, but as I found he had not been in custody before, I should state it to the Court. The prosecutor is in a very large way of business, and he said as the prisoner was not an old offender, if he could find a person to put the amount he was bound in, into a person's hand, he would not appear. I told him it was compounding felony.

MR. KING. I was not aware that it was compounding felony till the officer told me. I then would not proceed further.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-141

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1209. WILLIAM RAMSDEN ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , two razors, value 18 s. , the goods of Henry Clifton .

ELIZABETH CLIFTON . I am the wife of Henry Clifton , a cutler , who lives in Wardour-street . On the 3d of May the prisoner came to our shop, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and wished to be shown some razors; I showed him several - he did not appear perfectly satisfied with them, and asked to see some others - I fetched a tray out of the window, and placed it before him on the counter; he selected a pair with ivory handles, inlaid with silver, and asked the price of them; I told him 18 s.: he appeared perfectly satisfied with them, and immediately went out of the shop with them - not offering to pay for them at all; I felt myself confused for a moment: I ran round the counter, and called Stop thief! but he was gone - I could not pursue him, being alone.

Q. When you showed him the two razors where did you put them - A. I placed them before him on the counter - he took them up himself, and staid a short time, but did not offer to pay for them; I never saw him before: he was about ten minutes in the shop - he was dressed in a black coat, a pink striped fashionable waistcoat, and light coloured trowsers, I think, but will not be positive.

Q. What opportunity had you of looking at him to say whether he was the man - A. I looked at him particularly, thinking he had very much the appearance of a gentleman - I cannot be mistaken: I am certain he is the man who entered my shop - we have three candles in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. On what day of the week was it - A. Monday; it was as near half-past eight o'clock as I can tell: we have a branch with two candles in the window, and one on each side of the counter; he wore a black hat.

Q. From the 3d of May till six weeks after, when he was in custody, you never saw him - A. I never did. The constable came to me the morning after he was taken, and asked what kind of a young man it was who came to my shop: I described him, and he then said there was a person in custody.

Q. Did you ever mistake a person in your life - A. I do not know that I have. I feel myself perfectly satisfied that he is the man. I may perhaps have mistaken a person in the course of my life. I went to Marlborough-street at the second or third day after he was taken - I saw him pass through the passage to go to the office: I afterwards saw him in the office, in an elevated place, distinguished from other persons.

Q. You knew that he was the man of whom the officer had been speaking - A. I knew he was the man who took my razors, that is all I have got to say; the officer said he was the man who had been taken on suspicion of other cases - Biles produced my razors.

COURT. Q. When you saw him at the office, did he answer the description you had given - A. Exactly so my Lord; he was dressed nearly the same as at my shop, except his trowsers, which were white, and at my shop he had light cloth ones.

WILLIAM BILES . I am in the service of Messrs. Chaffers and Mills, pawnbrokers, Greek-street, Soho - I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Marlborough-street; I have some razors here which I produced there; I stopped them from a young man who presented himself to pawn them in the early part of June; I think it was the first week in June; the young man very much resembles the prisoner; I knew him from having seen him twice before, and should know him again if I was to see him - I intended to stop him as he had brought an album the week before which had been stolen: I put a few questions to him to keep him in parley, but on putting my hand to the counter flap, he ran out directly: he had brought something about a fortnight before, but what it was I cannot say: he was remarkably fashionably dressed: when he brought the album I thought I should not take it in, in consequence of his having asked a high price for something before: when he brought the album he had a blue coat on, but when he brought the razors he had a dark coloured coat, with covered buttons, and I think a light coloured striped waistcoat, and dark mixed trowsers, and a red silk watch guard over his waistcoat (I think) it was visible: I said the razors were very good ones; what did they cost; he said 24 s. - I asked where he bought them - he said in Great Russell-street - I am perfectly convinced that it was not the prisoner - I agreed to lend him 3 s. on the razors: he gave his address in Great Russell-street.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did any person come to your shop soon after he brought the album - A. Cook, the officer, came in shortly after, and left a paper, stating that two albums had been stolen the day before; this directed my attention particularly to him - I am quite sure that the same man brought the razors.

Q. Is there such a resemblance between him and the prisoner that a casual observer might mistake one for the other - A. Certainly they might - I have seen two or three persons very much like him.

COURT. Q. Seeing the man bring the razors whom you

suspected before, how came you not to detain him - A. On putting my hand to the counter he made off, and there was no one in the shop but me - I think it was on Thursday or Friday in the first week in June; I put the money on the counter, but did not intend to lend it; he left razors and money behind.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury - the whole case rests on a mere question of identity; I solemnly declare my entire innocence, which I shall be able to demonstrate, by proving a clear alibi, and leave my case with confidence in your hands.

EPHRAIM MALLOUGH was examined, and gave the same evidence as in page 428, except that the person who robbed his master wore a gold and scarlet watch-guard.

MRS. MARTHA TURNER . I am the prisoner's aunt, and live at Acton Green, which is about five miles from London. In May last, Miss Coates was staying with me; the prisoner came to see me two or three times a week, at Acton Green - he was in our company, at Acton Green, on Monday the 3d of May; he usually came on a Monday, and I know that on that day I went to Mr. Hoole's, on Turnham Green, after dinner, respecting some business of the prisoner's.

Q. At what time did you first see the prisoner - A. A little after six o'clock; he staid with me till twenty minutes past eight - I went with him, as I generally do, to see him to the stage, which passes the top of the terrace, and we were too late for the coach.

Q. Does that circumstance bring to your recollection that it was Monday - It does; he walked, and I took leave of him at half-past eight o'clock - he was then five miles from Hyde Park corner.

Q. Of course you have been taking pains to consider about this incident, to be quite sure of the day - A. I have, and have not the slightest doubt of it. I am certain no person deserves a better character than he does.

COURT. Q. You usually see him into the coach - A. Always; I never omitted it, as I am very much attached to him, and wish to remain with him as long as I could.

Q. When was your attention first called to the 3d of May - A. I keep a journal, and it appears by that that he was there on the 3d of May; and he wrote to me at Manchester, requesting me to look at it - I left it at Manchester with my papers. I set off for Manchester a month ago last Friday; and returned yesterday week. The journal contains an account of every time he came. I reside at Mr. Byng's, at Acton Green; Miss Coates also resides there.

EPHRAIM MALLOUGH . He was in custody before we were robbed; as I saw the account in the newspaper, on the Monday or Tuesday after the Saturday.

MISS JULIA COATES . I reside at Mr. Byng's; Mrs. Turner also lives there. I saw the prisoner on Monday the 3d of May, a little after six o'clock, at our house, in the parlour; he was there for half an hour, while I was there; I lost sight of him finally at half-past eight; he was going to ride home, but missed the coach.

COURT. Q. What induced you to say it was the 3d of May - A. I had occasion to write a note to a friend, while he was in the house, and I dated it the 3d of May. I have since seen that note - he was there two or three times a week - when he did not come on Sunday, he came on Monday; and I particularly remember that she was not there on Sunday. He went away with his aunt about half-past eight o'clock; she walked to Hammersmith with him.

MR. ABRAHAMS deposed as in the former case, page 427; and MR. FRAZIER a clerk Mr. Abraham's office, deposed that he never saw the prisoner with a scarlet and gold watch-guard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-142

1210. WILLIAM RAMSDEN ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a seal, value 35 s., and a brooch, value 12 s., the goods of Michael Marchant , in the dwelling-house of John Winter .

ANN MARCHANT . I am the wife of Michael Marchant - we live in Titchfield-street: I have a shop in Oxford-street - a woman belonging to us sleeps there. On the 8th June I was standing in the shop behind the counter, the prisoner was coming along, he passed and stopped short, looked in at the window, then came in, and asked me to let him look at a key, I asked if he wanted a fine gold, or a common key; he said a fine gold one; I shewed him a tray with seals and keys - he said he wanted one with a stone in it. I took out two or three sets of keys with stones - he said,

"There is a key with a square stone in the window:" I said I would shew it to him if he would point it out to me. I went to the step of the door, and looked; he did not follow me - he had his right hand glove off, and had it in his left hand, on the counter - he did not follow me to the window, but came to me immediately after I had left, and said,

"I see you have not got such a thing - it is a mistake:" I said,

"No, Sir, I don't think I have." He bid me good day, and went away. I came into the shop immediately, and missed a fine gold stirrup-shaped seal, with a blood stone; it was chased. I immediately went to the door; I did not see him, and ran a little way down Oxford-street, but having left nobody in the shop, I ran back immediately, and then missed a brooch - some brooches laid on the counter when he came in; I heard nothing more of him till my husband brought me up the Times newspaper - in consequence of which I attended the second examination of the prisoner; I think it was on the Wednesday week following - I knew him immediately. I have not found either the brooch or seal.

Q. What time of day did it happen - A. Between two and four o'clock; I think about three: he was dressed in white trowsers, and a kind of frock coat, which I should call a bronze or brown colour. I should think he was in my sight six or seven minutes: my back was towards him part of that time - I was about four minutes before him. The tray of seals and keys were cleaned the day before: I had placed them in the tray myself - it was filled, and none had been sold. I am sure the seal was in the tray when he came in; there were three fixed on a card, different from the others - it was marked 35 s.; the brooch was in a tray, full, which had been cleaned that morning, and laid on the counter ready to be placed on a card. Nobody but him had been in the shop after they were cleaned. I do not recollect that I ever saw him before: I particularly noticed him before he came in, by his stopping so suddenly, and am positive he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the number of your shop - A. No. 350: there is an cating-house next door but one.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Cleveland-street, on Tuesday evening the 8th of June, about half-past eight o'clock - he was dressed in a blue coat, white trowsers, and striped waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, the only observation I have to make is to ask whether it is possible for a man to account for every day of his life? it will be proved that I never wore a brown frock coat - that is all I have to say.

ANN JONES . My husband keeps an eating-house three doors from Marchant's shop. The prisoner dined at our house nearly every day - if he missed a day we wondered at it; he generally came about three o'clock. I never saw him in a bronze or brown frock coat.

COURT. Q. Do you happen to recollect whether he dined at your house early in June - A. The last time he dined at our house was on the 8th of June; that was at three o'clock in the afternoon; he staid there till past four, and next day we missed him - he wore a blue coat, and white trowsers on that day.

GEORGE FRAZIER . I am the prisoner's fellow clerk, and have seen him every day from January, 1823; he wore a frock coat when he first came to the office; (it was a black one,) in consequence of his mother's death. I never saw him wear a bronze coat. He left off mourning at Christmas, and has not worn black since.

SUMMERS CLARK. I have been in the habit of seeing Mr. Robinson since Christmas: I never saw him in a bronze frock coat, or any frock coat whatever.

MRS. HUDSON. The prisoner has lodged with me since Christmas. I never saw him wear a bronze coloured frock coat; he was not in the habit of changing his dress after he went out in the morning. I was with the officers when his boxes were examined - there was no frock coat there.

MR. ABRAHAMS. I never saw him in a bronze frock coat; he never came in the evening in a different dress to what he wore in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-143

1211. WILLIAM RAMSDEN ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , four printed books, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Veck .

THOMAS VECK . My Lord, may I request the prisoner to put on his hat. - I am a bookseller and stationer , and live at No. 3, Tavistock-row, Covent-garden ; I know the prisoner, I first saw him on Thursday, the 29th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, he came to my shop, and asked if I had procured for him the books which he had asked my lad for, which books were all the numbers of

"Proteus or the Life of an Actor," as I understood from my lad; I told him I had not, but would procure them by the evening; he said, he would call in the evening; I said he should be sure to have them. About nine o'clock that evening, I was shaving myself in the parlour, a knock came at the door, I immediately put on my coat and went to the door and opened it; when the prisoner entered, and asked if I had now got him the books; I said, I was extremely sorry, that I was particularly busy, and had not; but if he would wait in the shop a few minutes I would send my lad for them into the next street to Mr. Arnold, who published them - I sent the boyand gave him I think 8 s.; he was gone about ten minutes, during which time I entered, into conversation with the prisoner, as to the state of the weather, or some trivial thing; my lad came back and said he wanted more money, as there were four numbers out instead of three; I then gave him 2 s. more, he went for them, and was gone full ten minutes more; the books were then brought and handed to the prisoner; when he took them in his hand, he said,

"I thought there was but three numbers out, what are they a number," I said, I believed 3 s. 6 d. but the price was marked on them; he said, he thought they were but 2 s. 6 d. - I replied, I could make no mistake as the price was on them; he said,

"No matter, what will they amount to;" (putting his hand into his pocket as I thought with intention of paying) I said 14 s.; he then asked if I had the tragedy of Cato; I said I had not - he then asked, if I had the tragedy of Hamlet; I said No, for I had sold it a short time before - he then said, there was something else that he wanted, and waited about half-a-minute; he then said, it was some book that he had seen in my window; he reflected a moment, and said it was the

"Farce of Blue Devils," it was just behind me in a glass case in the window. I pulled the glass case to reach it, and took it in my hand; this did not occupy the space of half-a-minute; I turned round to give it to him. when I saw him deliberately walk out of the shop - I did not feel surprised, thinking he was gone for some temporary purpose, as his appearance quite set aside suspicion. but in an instant I missed the books; I directly buttoned my coat up, ran round the counter and ran out into the market, but could see nothing of him; I returned and told the watchman; I did not see him or the books afterwards.

Q. How was he dressed - A. In a dark olive or pace coloured frock coat; a light waistcoat; a small key to his watch ribbon, and light coloured trowsers, which I think were cloth.

Q. You expressed a wish for him to put his hat on - A. Yes, that I might be positive, though I am positive without that - I wish him to do it as he had his hat on in my shop. I saw him the first time for about five minutes; the last time was full twenty minutes. I am positive he is the man. [The prisoner here put on his hat.] I am still positive of him, though his hair appears darker than when he came to my shop, it appears to have been oiled.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you told us all that you have said about him, on any former occasion - A. I have.

Q. Did you not state at Marlborough-street, that he appeared to wear an artificial colouring on his cheeks - A. I did so, I had forgotten to state that to-day; I did not say it was on Thursday, the 25th of April - I said it might be on the 25th; but I could not positively state, but owing to a memorandum I made in the common day book, when I got home - I could positively state the day - I stated so at Marlborough-street, it was taken down as not a positive thing; I went to Mr. Abrahams, and told him I was mistaken and that it was on the 29th; I did not see the prisoner again till the 16th of June - I had never seen him except on this occasion; I desired him to put on his hat at Marlborough-street.

Q. Was it for satisfaction or what, that you desired it again to-day - A. For satisfaction, I should not like to swear to him without his hat.

Q. Is it with his hat on, or from seeing him in both states that you venture to swear to him - A. By seeing him in both.

Q. Are you the man who said if fifty juries acquitted

him you should die believing him to be the man - A. I am not; I have said, I should die convinced of him, but never mentioned about fifty people - I think he had a light striped handkerchief on; I noticed that when he spoke he had a peculiar twitch with his mouth; I did not mention that at Marlborough-street; I saw him talking with his friends there.

JURY. Q. You are quite positive as to the dress he had on - A. Yes.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you not said to Mr. Clark, that if 50,000 persons were to swear he was not the man who robbed you, you should not believe one of them - A. I have not; I might have said something inadvertently - I cannot be positive what I said - my lad is not here; he is only eleven years old.

Q. You had a perfect opportunity of distinguishing the colour of his coat at that time in the evening - A. If I had I should have said whether it was puce or olive. When he called the first time it was so short I did not take notice - there was no light in the shop except one, which I brought from the parlour.

Prisoner's Defence. In this case it is not in my power to prove an alibi. I have, however, solemnly to declare my innocence, and call your attention to the circumstance of the dress. I can give such an account of the proceedings of that day, as to make it impossible that I could have committed the robbery.

MR. ABRAHAMS. I never in my life saw the prisoner wear an olive or puce coloured frock coat: he generally wore blue. I never saw him in a frock coat, except when he was in mourning, when I believe he had a black one. I have seen a person very similar to him near my house once, and once at Westminster - he might be mistaken for the prisoner, by persons not intimate with him.

MR. FRAZIER. I never saw the prisoner wear a puce or olive frock coat.

SUMMERS CLARK. Since the prisoner's committal I have had conversation with Mr. Veck; he said his opinion would be quite conclusive as to the prisoner's guilt, if 50,000 persons came to swear to the contrary. I never saw an artificial colour on his cheeks, or any alteration in his appearance, as if to conceal his identity. Since the prisoner's committal, I have seen a person so much like him that I could hardly know the difference, though I have seen him daily for months.

COURT. Q. Where did you see that man - A. In Princes-street, about three weeks ago - I was in conversation with a lady, (who knew the prisoner) at the time, and she remarked the same to me: he was standing in conversation with very respectable persons.

MR. BING. I am the prisoner's guardian. I have seen him two or three times every week; I never saw him in a brown or puce frock coat: he generally advises with me before he has new clothes - I never heard of his having such a dress.

AMELIA KINNO . I am a professor of music. Last Christmas, when the prisoner was out of town, I was going along Oxford-street, and met a young gentleman - I went up to him, and said,

"How do you do, Mr. Robinson?" he turned to me, and said,

"Ma'am, you are mistaken, my name is not Robinson," and to convince myself I called upon Mr. Abrahams that afternoon, to ask if he was come to town or not: I found he was not expected for some time. Any person might mistake him for that young man.

JURY. Q. What sort of a coat had the young man - A. I do not recollect, only it was very similar to the prisoner's stile - I looked more at his face than his dress. I have dined at Mr. Abrahams's frequently with the prisoner.

EPHRAIM MALLOUGH and JOHN BILES deposed to the same effect as upon the former trials; and several witnesses to the prisoner's character swore that they had never seen him wear an olive or puce coloured frock coat.

NOT GUILTY . *

* The prisoner has received His Majesty's most gracious pardon for the offence of which he was convicted.

Reference Number: t18240715-144

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1212. MARY KIRKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , in the dwelling-house of Robert Barlow , a sheet, value 4 s.; a curtain, value 1 s.; a whittle, value 1 s.; a bonnet, value 1 s.; a pocket-book, value 2 d.; a bed-gown, value 2 s.; a table-cloth, value 2 s., and eight sovereigns , his property.

ROBERT BARLOW . I live in St. John-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner was in my service from November till Sunday, the 2d of May, on which day, when I came home, about half-past eight o'clock at night, she was absent. I went to my drawers, in the bed-room, and missed a sheet. a pillow-case, a table-cloth, and several other things. I then looked between the mattrass and sacking, and missed a pocket-book, containing eight sovereigns, and my apprentices' indentures. I had left my wife and the prisoner in the house at three o'clock that afternoon - I have two apprentices, one had been to see his friends, but had returned, and the other was at chapel. I saw nothing more of the prisoner till the 3d of July, when my sister-in-law brought her in; the bonnet was found upon her head, but nothing else. I had seen my money on the morning of the 2d of May, but do not know when the other things were taken.

JOHN JACKSON . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, Brick-lane. On the 15th of April the prisoner pawned a bed-gown and pin-cloth for 1 s.; on the 20th, a table-cloth; on the 29th, a pillow-case and napkin; and on the 1st of May, a sheet and curtain.

LEVY TOBIAS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wheeler-street. I have a whittle, pawned on the 21st of January - I do not know who by.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicate of the whittle on her, and a bonnet on her head. I went to Wentworth-street, in consequence of information, and a person there gave me the pocket-book, containing the indentures and duplicates of the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BUDD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Barlow. On the 2d of May I had leave to go out - I returned about eight o'clock; the prisoner then took up a bonnet and whittle, and went out.

GUILTY. Aged 47.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-145

Before Mr. Justice Guselee.

1213. THOMAS CHAMBERS and WILLIAM CLANCY

were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Gower , about five o'clock in the forenoon of the 14th of July , at St. George, Bloomsbury , (the said Edmund Gower and other persons being therein) and stealing therein 20 lbs. weight of mutton, value 10 s., and 6 lbs. of lamb, value 4 s. , his property.

EDWARD BURTON . On Wednesday, the 14th of July, I lived with Edmund Gower , a butcher , at No. 12, Bloomsbury Market , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. I was called up a little after six o'clock on that morning, and asked if we had lost any meat. I then went into the slaughter-house, where the meat was the night before, and missed a quantity. I then went to the watch-house, and saw the meat tied up in a bag in Furzman's possession - there was a fore-quarter, a shoulder, and a neck of mutton, and a fore-quarter of lamb. I knew it to be my master's by its appearance - I had cut up the lamb myself, and my master cut up the mutton - it was worth about 15 s.; it was taken to the watch-house, and then returned to my master.

JESSY WILLIAMS. On Wednesday morning last, about five o'clock, I was taking a walk, and saw the two prisoners loitering about the corner of Lion-street, which joins the market. I determined to watch - I went on this side of Bloomsbury-square, and down Southampton-street, then turned to the right, and saw them again - they advanced towards the prosecutor's premises - I passed them, and got into Holborn - ran to Broad-street to look for Green, the beadle, but not finding him I returned the back way, and saw Clancy in Castle-street with a bag on his shoulder. I went up to him and asked where he was going - he said he did not know; I said he must go back with me, for he had robbed some house in the market. I took him to the watch-house - Chambers was not with him then - Clancy was about three hundred yards from Gower's when I stopped him - a girl came to the watch-house to him; we followed her to Bainbridge-street, where we found Chambers at his lodgings. I had not seen them go into Gower's house, but saw them close to the grating. Burton saw the meat at the watch-house.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am watch-house keeper. About half-past five o'clock on this morning I was called up, and Clansey was brought in by Williams, with a quantity of meat - I locked him up, went up stairs and dressed myself; and Williams and I followed a girl (who had been to the watch-house) to a house in Bainbridge-street, and she called out

"Chambers," as soon as she got into the passage on the stairs - I got close to her, and heard a man's voice say

"Where is Bill?" she directly answered,

"He is taken." The man said

"What, meat and all?" I answered

"Yes, meat and all," and at that moment the man ran up stairs, hearing my voice - I followed, and took him on the top landing-place, it was Chambers. I brought him down - Williams pointed him out, and said he was the man he had seen with Clancy. I took him to the watch-house - Clancy said, as we went to the office, that he was very sorry, and that it was his first offence. I went to Bloomsbury market, and saw Burton at Mr. Gower's. I found the area rails had been wrenched up - the meat is kept in the cellar, which they call the slaughter-house.

EDWARD BURTON re-examined. The slaughter-house is under the shop, even with the kitchen - I saw the meat there the night before - they got in by forcing the grating, and could then get down the steps into the area - the grating was fastened the night before. I went to bed soon after ten o'clock - my fellow servant and the maid servant slept in the house - I believe my master was gone to market at the time.

JESSY WILLIAMS. I first saw them near Gower's house - I do not know at what time the grating was forced.

CLANCY'S Defence. I was passing there, the railing was up - I happened to see the meat hang up - I stooped down and got it - but Chambers is innocent.

CHAMBERS - GUILTY - DEATH . - Aged 16.

CLANCY - GUILTY - DEATH . - Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18240715-146

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1214. JOHN JAMES WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , eight silver spoons, value 3 l.; a pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s., and a chain and locket, value 3 s., the goods of John Perry , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH PERRY . I am wife of John Perry . We had lodgings to let for single gentlemen. The prisoner came on the 23d January and took a room, at 6 s. per week - I asked for a reference - he said he was assistant to an auctioneer, under the Piazza, Covent-garden, and lodged at Mr. Brown's, 33, Wood-street, Cheapside, to whom he referred me; and wished to come in directly. I did not go to the reference for two days, it being wet. I then told him I should go - he wished to know at what time - I said between twelve and one o'clock - he called on me at that time, and asked if his portmanteau had come - I said No. and that I had not been for his character. He staid at home till between three and four that afternoon, and then went out (he had slept there for two nights.) I went into the parlour, and missed a chain and locket from my writing-desk, and in about two hours, on going to my drawers, I missed eight spoons and the sugar-tongs. I found six of the spoons in pawn - he had the use of the front parlour, but had nothing to do with the spoons - he had breakfasted alone, in that room, both mornings. I went to Wood-street, but could find no such person, nor was he known at the auctioneer's.

JAMES WILMOT ANDERSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brewer-street, Somers'-town. On the 25th of June, the prisoner pawned four tea-spoons, for 10 s. in the name of Dixon.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Ossulton-street, Somers'-town. On the 25th of June, the prisoner pawned two table spoons for 26 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - the charge is not sufficiently borne out by the evidence; no person can positively swear that I committed the theft, nothing was was found in my possession - I humbly conceive you will give me the benefit of those doubts.

MRS. PERRY. I missed the locket and chain five minutes after he left the house, the spoons was locked in a table drawer.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

See page 420.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only . Transported 7 Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-147

1215. THOMAS SHANNON , JOHN WHITE and

NICHOLAS RYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , five window sashes, value 10 l. , the goods of Charles Theophilus Hall .

GEORGE CURTIS . I live in Cromer-place, Somers'-town. On the 1st of July, about twenty minutes past five o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of Albany-street, New-road, and saw the prisoners White and Ryan drawing a truck, Shannon was behind - and as they approached Mr. Hall's building he followed them on the footpath ten or fifteen yards off. I took particular notice of them all - the two came through the posts, and drew the truck up near the building; whether Shannon went into the building, I cannot say but he was walking up and down, I only looked towards them occasionally, and am not positive - I saw White and Ryan go in, and come out in five or eight minutes with five window sashes, and put them on the truck, and draw it in a direction towards Norton-street; Shannon was then following them. Ebbs came up - I told him and he alarmed Mr. Hall, and went in pursuit, and at ten or eleven o'clock I saw them in custody. I am confident that all three are the men.

JOHN EBBS . I am a carpenter. The witness pointed the prisoners out to me - I saw two men drawing a truck, and one walking behind; I went and rung Mr. Hall's bell, then followed them and kept getting nearer - I overtook them by Wells-street, about half-a-mile from the building - they had just broken a square of glass in the sash, and were all three putting them to rights. I went up and said Mr. Hall was coming, and I would thank them to stop, one of them gave a sort of alarm, and they all started off in different directions - I followed White and secured him by the Middlesex Hospital, without his being out of my sight; and on turning round the other two were brought up. I had seen all three assisting to drag the truck.

THOMAS BUGG . I am a watchman. On the 1st of July, at half-past five o'clock in the morning - I was in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. I heard a cry of Stop thief! Shannon was stopped and given to me, the other two were brought up.

JOHN THOMPSON. I am a watchman. I heard an alarm in Wells-street, and saw White secured: I had seen them all three run from the truck, which contained five window sashes.

THOMAS THOMAS . I was building some houses for Charles Theophilus Hall, in Albany-street - these sashes are his property: I delivered them on the premises. They were only put into the frames, not fixed.

SHANNON's Defence. I saw a man in Norton-street, with the truck: these two young men were putting the sashes right - I went up, and said they had better put them a different way.

WHITE's Defence. I was out of employ, and went to the Horse Shoe, public-house with my fellow prisoner: a man there said he should want two men early in the morning, and would give them 3 s. each, and not detain them above an hour - we were to meet him at five o'clock in the morning: we went, and saw him with the truck; he told me to draw it over to this building - he brought the sashes out, told us to cross over, and he would overtake us - some of the glass broke, and we stopped to adjust them: the witness came up; I considered then that we were led into an error, and said,

"Jem, what is to be done?" I took to my heels.

RYAN. I have nothing further to say.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am positive that Ryan and White brought the sashes out. I saw no fourth man.

SHANNON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-148

1216. WILLIAM SHARP and HENRY HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Joel Weight , from his person .

JOEL WEIGHT . I am a cloth factor . On the 14th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was in Regent-street : my handkerchief was in my right hand coat pocket. Somebody gave me notice - I turned round, and saw Sharp near me, on my left hand, and Harris running away; he was brought back immediately, and I secured Sharp - my handkerchief laid on the ground, within a yard of me.

THOMAS MINTON . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Beak-street, at the corner of Regent-street. I was at my door, and saw the prisoners following Mr. White: they crossed over Beak-street, and at the corner of Regent-street, Sharp took hold of Mr. White's coat, took the handkerchief out. and gave it to Harris: I ran out, and seized them both; but before I could properly secure them they started, and Harris threw the handkerchief down: they were both secured. My window looks into Regent-street. They were both acting together.

JOHN BAILEY . I am an officer. I took Harris, who was running as hard as he could.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHARP's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! but know nothing of this lad.

HARRIS'S Defence. I was running, being in a hurry.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SHARP - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-149

1217. GEORGE GRIMSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 400 lbs. of lead, value 2 l., the goods of Thomas Dickanson , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain outhouse of his.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be fixed in a certain yard belonging to his dwelling-house.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DICKANSON , ESQ. I live at Twickenham . On the morning of the 6th of March I discovered that a quantity of lead was stolen from my premises; it consisted of a pump, a cistern, and a variety of other lead: I have since seen it in Watson's possession. It cost me some hundreds of pounds to replace it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had no mark upon it - A. Yes; on part of it there was the letter W., and I believe I had had the cistern fifteen or sixteen years. The pipes tallied with what was left.

MR. GEORGE THACKRAH . I live next door to Mr.

Dickanson. After this robbery I heard that the prisoner was in custody, and saw him - I held him out no threat or inducement to say anything: I felt desirous to render him a service, as his father was in my employ. I said I wished him to tell the truth about the business, but at the same time said I could make him no promise, as I had not seen the prosecutor. He told me voluntarily that he had been in company with Taylor, Coltman, and Somerset - that they were at the Red Lion public-house at Twickenham, on the night of the robbery, and left there about eleven o'clock, proceeded to Mr. Dickanson's premises and stole two leaden pumps, a cistern, and a large quantity of lead off the stables and out building, and that soon after twelve o'clock Philpot came with a cart to take it away - that he brought the cart into Mr. Dickanson's meadow; and loaded it with the lead, but had got more than it would carry: they threw part of it down, and left it in the meadow, and again finding that they had more than the horse could draw, they took more out, and threw it into the gravel-pits. Philpot left them with the cart - he and Coltman then retired to a barn, the property of Sir W. Walham, where they slept.

Cross-examined. Q. What induced you to get this out of him - A. A wish to serve his father. I thought if he told the truth he might possibly be saved, but did not tell him so. He was committed to prison last Session, by this Court, and to my surprise two or three days after I heard he was at Twickenham, and finding he had escaped by accident I had him apprehended. I was informed he understood that I had obtained his discharge, and sent to him to say it was not so - he called upon me, and was detained. When he was examined here he declared that he knew nothing about it.

JOHN PHILPOT . I am a labourer. I was tried and convicted of stealing this lead, and was fined 1 s. I was examined here last Session. On the morning of the robbery I saw the prisoner at Mr. Dickanson's premises: he told me the lead was all ready and waiting for me - I had brought a horse and cart for it. He, Coltman, Somerset, and Taylor were there: they all four assisted in putting it into the cart: there was more than I could carry, and I threw it off the cart. I was stopped at Brentford with it, and escaped, but was afterwards taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you ever here before except as a witness - A. I was tried for another felony besides this and was confined three years. I gave an account of this robbery to Mr. Thackrah in the gaol, before I was liberated.

RICHARD BEAUCHAMP . On the evening of the 5th of March I was at the Red Lion at Twickenham, and saw the prisoner there in company with Coltman, Somerset, and Taylor, for two hours or more. Between ten and eleven o'clock one went out, and then another - there was a good deal of whispering between them: they went towards the Duke's Head, public-house, which is half a mile from Mr. Dickanson's. I had applied to the overseers for a lodging that night, and was refused, and went into a shed belong-to Sir W. Walham, and about three o'clock Coltman, Somerset, and the prisoner came into the shed, and remained there till about nine - they then got up, and were brushing each others clothes, which appeared to have cobwebs about them. The prisoner said,

"Be d - d if it will do all to go one way" - he and Somerset went over the common fields, and they agreed to meet at the Broadway. Coltman went home to breakfast.

Cross-examined. Q. Who gave you the coat you have on now - A. No one.

Q. Where did you get it - take care - A. A gentleman gave it to me - it was Mr. Thackrah. I was taken up once for being in company with one Facey - nothing was done to me. I was never charged with felony, or in confinement. I was working for a biscuit-baker, and took a biscuit for my tea - he took me before a Magistrate.

MR. WILLIAM WOODS , clerk to the Magistrates of Bow-street, read a voluntarily confession made by the prisoner, (before Thomas Halls , Esq.) which agreed with his account given to Mr. Thackrah, and the evidence of Phil-pot.

JOHN FAN. I am gardener to Mr. Dickanson. On the morning of the 6th of March I missed a quantity of lead, the pump, and cistern - some of it was found in the meadow. I traced the cart out of the field. I found more lead and the pump at Brentford, and know it to be my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any private mark on the cistern - A. It was marked with four Ws, one at each corner: one side was painted a stone colour, and the other lead colour. I saw every thing safe on the 5th.

EDWARD JONES . I am coachman to Mr. Dickanson. I saw all the property safe on the night of the 5th of March, and missed it next morning about six o'clock - the pump, pipes, cistern, and a quantity of other lead, which had been attached to different buildings. I traced a cart from the field, both going in and coming back into the road, and in the paddock I found a quantity of lead. I saw the cistern at Brentford, and knew it to be my master's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HEWETT . I am an Excise officer. About five o'clock in the morning of the 6th of March, I stopped a cart at Brentford with a leaden cistern, a pump, pieces of pipes, and other lead - Philpot drove it. I delivered it to Watson. The name of Wasley was on the cart.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a headborough. Hewett delivered the lead to me - the witnesses afterwards saw it, and claimed it.

JAMES FORD . I keep the Red Lion. On the night of the 5th of March the prisoner was at my house with Philpot, Somerset, Taylor, and Coltman - they left about half-past ten or eleven o'clock, and were then within a mile of Mr. Dickanson's premises.

JOHN WILLIAMS . On the afternoon of the 6th of March I was at the gravel-pits at Twickenham, and found three pieces of pipe and some sheet lead, about five hundred yards from Mr. Dickanson's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

The prisoner was admitted as an evidence for the Crown last Session, but refused to give evidence.

Reference Number: t18240715-150

1218. ANDREW DOVE was indicted for manslaughter .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240715-151

NEW COURT.

(4th DAY,)

London Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1219. THOMAS RILEY PERRY was indicted for publishing a certain wicked and blasphemous libel of and concerning the Holy Scriptures, and the Christian Religion .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am one of the Bow-street patroles. I know the shop, No. 84, Fleet-street - the name

"Carlile" is over the door: I do not know if there is any other name. I went there on Monday, the 31st of last May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner in the shop - I went there again between twelve and one: the prisoner was there then; he was alone, behind the counter each time; I asked if he had got

"Palmer's principles of Nature;" he said he had, and the price was a sovereign - I said that was more than I was authorized to give: I understood it was 4 s.: he said the regular price was 2 s., but they would not sell it to any person but Mr. Carlile's friends, or some person belonging to the concern for less than a sovereign, for they had so many Bow-street officers, and what they call patroles coming in different characters, that they scarcely knew who was who: I said I hoped he did not think I was coming to lay an information - he said,

"No, I don't suppose you are." I told him it was a commission I had from the country; he asked what part of the country I came from; I said, Lincolnshire - he said he had only come from Spalding a few days before - I said I knew little about Spalding:

"I never was there" he said,

"what part might you come from?" I told him a village near Market Raisin - he said he knew very little of Market Raisin; I said it was a village named Claxon - he said he knew Claxon very well, and had been there several times: he then said,

"I suppose I must let you have it, and risk it" - he reached down the book from a shelf behind him, and gave it to me; I put it into my pocket, and put him down 2 s.: this is the book (producing it) - I marked it before it went out of my possession. He said,

"If there is an information, we will immediately raise them to 5 l." I am positive the prisoner is the man who sold it to me. I wrote on it

"Bought at Carlile's shop, 31st May, 1824, William Wilson ."

Prisoner. Q. Do you know the nature and obligation of an oath - A. I do. I am certain of his person.

Q. Do you know my brother, who is so similar in his features that you might well have mistaken me for him - A. No; but I am certain you are the person from whom I received the book.

Q. Of what religion are you - A. Of the Church of England. I was sent by Mr. Stafford, and if I had not gone I might have been suspended.

Q Did those passages do you any harm, or produce any bad principles in your mind - A. That I cannot tell; I took very little notice of it.

MR. RAVEN. I am chief clerk to the Solicitor of the Treasury.

Prisoner. Then he is my prosecutor.

Q. What do you consider a binding obligation - A. Swearing on the Gospels.

Q. What is blasphemy - A. Any attempt to vilify the Christian Religion , promulgated by our Saviour and his Apostles.

Q. Are you of the Church of England - A. Yes.

The prisoner then read a long Defence, contending that these prosecutions were inconsistent with Christianity.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Years in Newgate , and to enter into his own recognizance of 100 l. for good behaviour for Life .

Reference Number: t18240715-152

1220. PETER DELCOUR was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MR. ZACHARY LANGTON . I am one of the firm of Messrs. Pickford and Co. ; we are carriers . My place of business is in Wood-street, and we have wharfs at the canal. The prisoner was our collecting clerk ; he had been so rather more than three years. Messrs. John and Thomas Dobson , of Bucklersbury, were indebted to us in the sum of 24 l. 15 s. 9 d., which was paid to the prisoner on the 13th of September, and for which he never accounted: it was his duty to collect cash and bills, and to deliver them at night at the house in Wood-street, to Mr. Todd, our cashier. We had occasion on the 1st of December last, to question the prisoner - he had then been absent a week on leave. When he came to Wood-street I took him up stairs to my office, and told him I was sorry to say there were some discoveries made during his absence, reflecting upon his integrity, and I hoped he would be able to exonerate himself - he said he should be able to satisfy me that there could not be any deficiency, or a very immeterial one, which he would make good directly if I would take him up to our other office in the City-road - I got a coach and took him there: it was then about eleven o'clock. I took him into a private office, and then mentioned to him the names of partis who had shown receipts which he had given to them, and had not accounted for to us. I sent for a cash-book and some others to show him it was so: he said if he might go over to his own office, he would fetch his book and tell how it was; I was simple enough to believe him - he went away, and I saw him no more till he was apprehended, about a month ago; it was his duty to enter every night in the cash-book what money he had received. A gentleman of the name of Veal was our cashier at the wharf, and he was burnt when our premises were destroyed by fire. The books were partly burnt, but there is a part of one of them here - we have directed two of our clerks to make extracts from it.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. The prisoner had had leave of absence for a week previous to the 1st of December - A. Yes. Veal was the cashier, and the prisoner was to account to him; when I took him to the wharf I did not tell him I should send to Manchester for his bond; there was no bond then in existence: there had been one on his father, who was then dead - I do not think his own name was on the bond. Mr. Veal's books were burned; the books the prisoner kept were what were copied every month, by the ledger keeper, from the ledger - he was to receive different sums of money, and then to put them down at Wood-street, in what was called the payment book, and the cashier signed it, and that released him from any further responsibility: it should be in his own writing, and signed by the cashier. The place he first occupied

was not a place of trust. He might give a small cheque for a large one, but he had no right to give a cheque in change - he might have gone to a banker's to get change. Holland preceeded him as collector; he kept his book as Holland had done. The entries in the payment book were the day of the month, and then so much gold, silver, and copper. We have damages claimed sometimes, which it was his duty to pay after they had been ascertained. If he received a cheque he was not allowed to pay money instead of it.

JOHN DOBSON . I am a factor, and live in Bucklersbury. On the 13th of September last I paid the prisoner a draft for 24 l. 15 s. 9 d., upon Messrs. Masterman and Co.; he wrote this receipt for it in my presence (producing it.)

JOHN GROVE . I am clerk to Messrs. Masterman and Co. I paid this draft, but cannot say to whom.

ROBERT LAMBERT. I am clerk to Messrs. Pickford and Co. The prisoner was one of the collecting clerk - it was his duty when he received money or cheques to enter them in the payment book, and give account of it to Mr. Todd, in Wood-street, who gave him his signature, which was his discharge.

Cross-examined. Q. When this young man was absent his desk was broken open, and a number of papers found - A. Yes; they were given to me and put into my desk, which was burnt at the fire: there were a great many memorandums and different papers of the prisoner's, and a great many accounts, which should have been delivered by him, as collected; if there had been any papers among them for him to have shown anything on this charge they were burnt. The fire did not happen till the 26th of February.

CHARLES TODD . I am cashier to Messrs. Pickford and Co. The prisoner never accounted to me for 24 l. 15 s. 9 d. received from Messrs. Dobson, on the 13th of September, which he should have done when he came home. Veal was not then in the employ, but he was afterwards, and then he should have accounted to Veal. I never directed him not to change a draft to make a payment - if he brought the collection of the day it was of no consequence is what manner. He kept the books the same as Holland had done. He has never accounted in any shape or way for this money. Mr. Veal did not come into the situation till October. In this book here is an account in the prisoner's writing on the 13th of September, but no mention of the money received from Dobson. Here is one

"10 l. note and four soverigns," received that day, that is all.

Prisoner's Defence. The book produced was never meant as a book of particulars, but only a memorandum of the money collected in the course of the day. If I had gone to any house where they had offered a 50 l. or 100 l. note, I should have given them a cheque in change if I had it, and I never had any instructions not to do so - then of course the cheque would be sunk in the payment of that bill, and could not be produced in that specific form - the book I kept was called the cash-book; I had an item there of the cash I received, but that was burnt. The book now produced contains a great number of sums in the month of September, in cheques, gold, and silver, which are not put down from whom they were received. If the collect had got the right amount, or the form in which it was paid would not be objected to - if I had paid anything in the way of damages it would not be put down in that book: it was not considered a principle book; anybody might have entered things in it.

EDWARD JONES HOLLAND . I preceeded the prisoner as collecter at this house - the payment book is intended as a check between the collector and the cashier: there are entries in it of gold and silver; it is not specified from whom they are received. I have known the prisoner about five years, and never heard anything against him before: the first thing the collector does when he has received money is to enter it with the cashier - the cash-book is made up afterwards, from the collector's portable book; the ledger is posted from the cash-book: the portable book is the book from which the cash-book is made out, and it then remains in possession of the house. I left the service twelve months before the prisoner was apprehended.

MR. LAMBERT re-examined. The prisoner should make up his cash-book from the portable book - I have seen the portable book, and looked over it very minutely indeed, and it contained no entry of 24 l. 15 s. 9 d. received from Mr. Dobson - I examined it for the purpose of ascertaining this fact from the 13th of September to the 1st of October, and after that the prisoner had no right to enter anything in it. I will swear that after the 1st of October there was no entry of it: these books are continually before me - there was no entry at all of this cheque in any shape, up to the 26th of February, the day our premises were burnt.

Prisoner. Q. Can you tell in what folio of the cash-book it should have been entered - A. No.

Q. Do you remember any of the entries in September - A. No: my attention was particularly directed to those entries where Dobson's and some others occur. I do not recollect the total amount of cash received in September, nor the items which composed it. I did not compare the cash-book with the portable book; what I speak of are the cash-book and the ledger. I looked at the portable book after this was found out - the sum total of the cash-book and portable book agreed together.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-153

1221. PETER DELCOUR was again indicted for a like offence .

MR. ZACHARY LANGTON . In November, 1823 the prisoner was in our employ - Veal was then the acting clerk, but the prisoner was assisting him - our business was carried on in Wood-street, and at the City-road. When the prisoner received a cheque or money, he was to enter it in the payment book, and deliver the money to the cashier every evening, who gave him a receipt for it - he was to make the entry in the cash-book: he had no further duties to perform with respect to entries there. On the 1st of December the prisoner returned after a week's absence - I then told him there had been discoveries made, which impeached his integrity; we had heard from some parties that they had got his receipts for money, for which he had not accounted - he went up to the wharf, and there he escaped.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Todd was the person to whom he was to render the account of money

collected in November - A. Todd was not the collector - Veal had been appointed: he was to account for the money to Veal, and Veal to give it to Todd. If he gave his account to Veal or Todd it would have been sufficient. My orders to him were to go round to the customers with Veal, and account to him. It would not have been a branch of his duty if he got a draft to have got it cashed. His father had given a bond when he entered our service, but I believe his name was not to it - his father was then dead.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He might pay a cheque in change - A. Yes; if he got a cheque for 10 l, and had to take a larger cheque, he might have paid that away, and I should not have expected an account of that, but should, no doubt, of the larger one. If there had been a trifling damage to pay of a few shillings, I should not have permitted him to settle that without its being submitted to our inspection.

MR. DOBSON. This is my draft (looking at it,) and this is the receipt the prisoner gave me - the draft was upon Messrs. Masterman and Co., for 14 l. 7 s. 9 d.: the receipt was written by the prisoner in my presence, about twelve o'clock on the 19th of November - I wrote the cheque in his presence.

THOMAS BRAND . I am clerk to Messrs. Masterman and Co. I paid this draft on the 19th of November, 1823; I paid a 10 l. note, No. 15781; this is the note (looking at it) - the rest was in cash: it might have been silver if requested. I have not entered the year; the note was dated. I believe there are 10 l. notes issued every year - we only enter the dates when we receive them, not when we pay them away.

ANN MOORE . I live with my father, who keeps the Cumberland's Head, public-house, City-road. I received this note and gave change for it in the month of November, but I cannot say on what day - I changed it for the prisoner or his servant: I knew him perfectly well before - here is the name of Moore on it, but that is not my writing - this 11-23 is my writing; it signifies the 11th month, 23d year.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know who brought the note, a man or a woman - A. No; but if I had not known the parties I should not have changed it. I knew where the prisoner lived - he was a housekeeper: I delivered the money to him or his servant; I cannot say which - his servant was a female; I had known her before; her name was Jane - I have seen her in his house.

ROBERT LAMBERT . I was clerk to the prosecutors'. I examined the portable book, the cash-book, and ledger, for the express purpose of seeing if this account was entered - I did this about a week before they were destroyed, in February last: I examined them diligently and no trace of this account was to be found - the portable book was partly in the prisoner's hand-writing: the payment book includes the accounts of many years. The entries of the 19th of November are in the hand-writing of Veal - the prisoner had access to that book, and could have corrected any inaccuracies.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there any one book which has been saved from the flames relative to accounts but this - A. No: the cash-book and ledger were destroyed - the ledger was made from the cash-book - and the bills, or invoices. There are entries here not made by Mr. Veal - it was not the prisoner's business to make entries here: it was Veal's duty to do it. If Veal had made a mistake he would have found it out by the cash in his pocket. If the prisoner had received in any one day 100 l., made up partly of cheques, and partly money, and brought the whole of the amount it would have been all that was required - he had no right to change a cheque for payment. The amount on the 19th of November was in eight payments, 83 l. 19 s. 3 d., all in bills or cheques except 6 l. 6 s. 8 d. Veal was there at the time of the investigation, and assisted in it. If the prisoner had received a cheque for 14 l. 7 s. 9 d., and gave it in change he should have accounted for both in the book.

Prisoner. Q. Was the practice previous to Mr. Veal's coming, to enter both the names in the book - A. It ought to have been: the credit given to the customers did not depend upon this book, but the cash-book; the ledger could not have been creditted from this book - it must have gone to the cash-book, which had the entries from the collectors portable book, which the prisoner carried about with him - it might be half a sheet of paper: it afterwards remained as a document of the house. I found several of these portable books in the prisoner's desk, which had dates to them; he should have made them out every day. I do not know that I had every one he wrote.

JOHN GARDNER . I was ledger keeper to Messrs. Langton and Co. I remember the prisoner leaving on the 1st of December. I examined with the last witness the various books to see what entries were made - there was not in the cash-book any entry of this money, paid by Dobson - I cannot speak to the other books. Mr. Veal continued there till the 26th of February, and all that time there were enquiries going on - it was Veal's duty to have made the entry in November last if he had received the money - if he did not he could not have made it: if he had received the money and not made the entry, it would have been the prisoner's duty to have asked him for it.

MR. TODD. The prisoner never accounted to me nor Mr. Veal for this 14 l. 7 s. 9 d. - he had an opportunity of seeing this book every day: every sum he paid me he had my signature for.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. From what did Mr. Veal make his entry in the cash-book, from these memorandums - A. Yes. When he had a day's money to account for he was to give an account to Mr. Veal, but I cannot tell whether it was by word of mouth, or memorandums - but if he brought money Mr. Veal should have entered it, or if he brought it to me I should have entered it. I have been many years a book-keeper, and sometimes make mistakes. Mr. Veal was very correct, if he made a mistake of 1 d. he would have set it to rights. I think it quite impossible he should have made a mistake of 14 l. 6 s. 9 d. - he continued in his place till the fire.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. On the 1st of December, I searched for the prisoner under a warrant, but I did not apprehend him till the 10th of June last - when I took him I either read or suffered him to read the warrant - he said he had written a letter to his masters, to try to settle the business: I asked if the letter was gone; he said, No, it was in the hands of a friend, and he should stop it: I made no reply to that.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not he tell you his master had got his bond, and that he kept away to avoid being arrested - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I have very little to add, but with regard to changing the note, I think I can explain that. Though I was not to collect, I used to settle the damages up to that time, and if there was any trifling damages I was authorized to pay them, and if I had paid them out of any money of my own, I might change a note to reinburse myself - there was never any memorandums passed between Mr. Veal and me when he received money. I have paid many hundreds of pounds without receiving any memorandums, and it depended upon their entering it in the cash-book to exonerate me.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-154

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1222. GEORGE REDWOOD was indicted for stealing on the 26th of June , a yard of woollen cloth, value 10 s., and a yard of satin, value 2 s. , the goods of Isaac Archer , his master .

ISAAC ARCHER . I am a tailor , and live in Greek-street. The prisoner was my shop-boy for three months. On the 12th of July I got an officer to search him, and a duplicate was found on him, referring to Collins's in Long-acre, where I found a piece of cloth, and a piece of blue striped satin - I knew them to be of the same description as what I had in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you compared the piece - A. No, I had not, but I know they were mine by the appearance and the quality of the cloth. He said at first it was a piece of Irish linen - he then said it was a piece of kerseymere. When we went to the pawnbroker's I said

"These are not the goods you spoke of:" he then said he found the piece on the counter.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I produce a piece of blue cloth and satin, pawned in the name of George Redwood .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicate in his fob pocket.

Prisoner. It is the first thing I ever did in my life. I hope you will have mercy upon me.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240715-155

1223. LYDIA MOFFAT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a carpet, value 7 s.; a blanket, 2 s., and two flat irons, 1 s., the goods of James Cousins , in a lodging room .

MARY COUSINS . My husband's name is James. The prisoner came on Friday, the 14th of May, and took a furnished room in our house; there was a blanket, a carpet, and some flat irons let to her as part of the furniture; on the Monday after, I went into the room and missed the carpet, blanket and two flat irons; she came back about nine o'clock in the morning - and said she was going out ironing - I found the articles at Mr. Griffiths, the pawnbrokers.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a carpet, blanket and irons which were pawned with me at different times - the carpet on the 15th of May for 3 s. 6 d., the blanket and irons were pawned on the 17th of May.

WILLIAM CLEWLOW . I took charge of the prisoner - she was brought to me by Mr. Cousins; and told me where the things were pledged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and took the things intending to replace them.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240715-156

1224. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 15th of July , a violin, value 4 l., the goods of Thomas Chitty , he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

THOMAS CHITTY. I am a musician . Last Thursday evening I played my violin at a house in Orchard-street, and left about one o'clock, I met a young woman and went home with her to No. 4, Perkin's-rents ; I put the violin under the pillow - I was going to sleep there; I had got my coat and waistcoat off, and one of my boots, and another girl came in and put her hand down, and I thought she took something, and then they both ran away - I could not go after them because my boots was off. My violin was shewn to me next morning, at eight o'clock, by Mr. Lloyd.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me you had lost a violin, and if I saw such a thing to take care of it - A. I saw several persons, but cannot tell that I saw you.

WILLIAM HENRY LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker. Last Friday morning I saw Chitty come to our shop to ask about a violin; the prisoner came afterwards, and brought a violin which corresponded with the description he had given me; the prisoner said he had bought it from his brother, who had two or three violins; I stopped him, and sent for Chitty, and an officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN TIMBREL . I am an officer - and was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; I asked where he got the violin; he first at said he did not know any thing about it and then said he had found it,

Prisoner's Defence. I live in Perkin's-rents, and got up about half-past seven to go out to work. I saw this violin apparently thrown in the dust hole, and from what the man said, I thought by placing it in the hands of Mr. Lloyd - I might give the man the money when I saw him; I do not see him very often, and it is not always convenient for me to carry a violin with me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-157

1225. THOMAS WEDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July ; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; eight shillings, and a sixpence , the property of Richard Jury .

RICHARD JURY. I live at Old Brentford. The prisoner lived in the same room with me, for eight or nine nights. I kept all my working clothes in a box, and a purse with 8 s. 6 d. in it. On the morning of Sunday the 11th of July, they were all right; when I went to bed on that night I found the box broken open.

JAMES BLORING . I was at the Fox and Hounds, public-house Old Brentford, on the 11th of July, about half-past 11

o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner offering a yellow waistcoat for sale. I gave him 1 s. 6 d. for it; this is it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ADDERLY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Monday morning, about half-past one o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I had drank some liquor, and do not know what I was doing - this is my first offence, and I humbly throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-158

1226. JOHN STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 4 lbs. mutton, value 2 s. , the goods of John Price .

JOHN PRICE . I am a butcher , and live in the Commercial-road - some mutton was shown to me last Tuesday about eleven o'clock at night, by Davis the officer - it had been lying on the stall board.

ROBERT DAVIS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in the Commercial-road, with some others - I saw one of them do something, and while I was pursuing him, I saw the prisoner turn and take the meat from Price's shop - I pursued and took him about twenty yards off - I saw him throw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-159

1227. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st June , a coat value 20 s. the goods of James Cole Humbert ; and a bat, value 5 s. ; the goods of Francis Joseph Humbert .

MR. FRANCIS JOSEPH HUMBERT . I keep the Hyde-Park Hotel . On the 21st of June, about eight o'clock at night, I heard something had happened; I went into the yard, and saw my servant, Brown, with a great coat on his arm, and the prisoner by his side; I took the prisoner into my house, and sent for a constable: I was looking for my hat to go the watch-house, and found it was gone; and an old one left in its place: I went into the room, and took my hat off his head, this was my son's coat.

JAMES BROWN . I saw the prisoner going towards the street door with a great coat on his arm - I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said to give it to a man in the street - I took it from him, and then pursued him to Fort's Livery stables, we met my master on returning.

GUILTY. Aged 68.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18240715-160

1228. CHRISTIAN NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th July , forty-three yards of ribbon, value 23 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 s. ; the goods of James Sholbred and John Ferguson .

WILLIAM SMEETON . I am in the employ of Mr. James Sholbred and John Ferguson , haberdashers , Tottenham-court-road . On the 8th July about half-past four o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and made some purchases to the amount of 7 l. 18 s. 8 d., which she paid for; she was served by another shopman - I saw her take from the counter five lengths of ribbon out of different drawers; and put them into her left side pocket - when she came to the door I met her, and asked her to step up stairs, I wanted to speak to her; another young man, named Smith, went with me - I asked her for the ribbon; she gave me one piece, and the others dropped on the floor: she gave no account of them whatever - she had given directions for the goods she had brought to be sent to a house; she did not take them with her; she offered me any thing I pleased for the ribbons.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Did she appear distressed - A. She appeared rather confused - I knew her perfectly well; I have seen her come to the house for some years - I observed nothing peculiar in her manner on that day - she did not appear stupified in any way: she did not say she was not aware that she had the ribbons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out the whole day and was rather fatigued, and had taken rather more than I was accustomed to do, and was rather confused.

GUILTY. Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-161

1229. EDITH PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a pocket-book, value 6 d., four half crowns, sixteen shillings, and four sixpences, the property of George Summers , from his person .

GEORGE SUMMERS . - I am a seafaring man . I saw the prisoner on the day of the robbery in Osborn-street, Whitechapel, about nine o'clock in the morning; when I went to get a pint of porter: she said she knew two lodgers that were in the house where I lived; I gave her some refreshment. and she asked me to go with her to her lodging; when I got up stairs she snatched my book and ran down again: I gave information, and she was taken - I am sure she is the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the public-house, and this man was there very much intoxicated, and several women were with him: he asked if I would have any beer: I said I had some of my own; he then got some gin, and gave some to everybody there, and went out with some women, then came back and said I had robbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-162

1230. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing on the 13th July , a sheet value 3 s. the goods of Francis Matson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be property of Sarah Thomas .

ELIZA MATSON . I am the wife of Francis Matson , we live in New-court, Goswell-street . About half-past five o'clock on Tuesday last, there was a sheet hanging on a chair back in my room, which had been lent me by Mr. Thomas; I went out and shut my door, but did not lock it; I saw this boy in the one pair room; I had seen him there on Monday morning, and Tuesday, laying on the boards; I staid down stairs in the parlour some time, and I saw him go out with something under his coat; I then went out and staid about half an hour; when I returned the sheet was gone: I went down stairs and saw him in the one pair room, and asked him if he had been robbing me: he said he had for hunger, and endeavoured to get out of the window, but I caught him, he then undid his boot, and gave me half a crown.

SARAH THOMAS . I lent a sheet to Matson.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Peachey, this sheet was pawned at our shop by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a father-in-law, and I had lost my place; he turned me out of the house; I did it from hunger.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240715-163

1231. JOSEPH ORMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 1st June , two cabinet tops, value 10 s.; a mahogany seat, value 4 s.; five pieces of paper, value 3 s.; nine prints, value 2 s.; a carpet, value 5 s.; a chair, value 3 s.; tape value 2 s., and a night bolt, value 1 s. , the goods of John Fielder .

JOHN FIELDER . I live at Bath Lodge, Queen Elms - the prisoner was my servant - I gave him orders the latter part of last year to remove my furniture from Piccadilly to Chelsea. I saw this furniture at Chelsea about the latter end of last year - I did not see any part of it again till June last, when I found two cabinet tops at a brokers's shop.

PHILIP POWEL . I live Pound-place, in Fulham-road - I never saw the prisoner in my shop, but it was his wife that came to me - she said she was a housekeeper, at No. 19, Harford-street, and I went there to see an old bedstead - she asked a price for it that I could not give her - I saw two cabinet tops and a mahogany seat belonging to a hall - I said I would give her half a guinea for them - the prisoner was there at the time the bargain was made - I took the property home and put it in my shop to sell - I parted with the seat; that was all - the two cabinet tops I kept till they were seen by the gentleman - I had sold the flap, but I got it back again.

JOSEPH KENCH . I live at Kensington, Gravel Pits, I never went to any house in Harford-street - I bought a carpet of the prisoner and his wife for 5 s. - to the best of my recollection it was at Mr. Fielder's house - I have had it in my possession till to-day.

JOSEPH - . I went into Harford-street on the 8th of June, and apprehended the prisoner. I saw these prints, which he said were given to him by Mr. Fielder, and a quantity of stained paper he said Mr. Fielder, gave him; but Mr. Fielder denied it. I then found this iron fender, this measuring chain, brass night bolt, two cabinet tops, a mahogany flap, and other things, all of which he said Mrs. Fielder had given him. I sent for her, and she denied it; he then said he was sorry for what he had done.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say to Mrs. Fielder's face that she had given them to him - A. No; when she came, he said,

"Ma'am, I am very sorry; I thought they were all old things."

MR. FIELDER. Mrs. Fielder is not here. She said she had not given him the things; he said, I am very sorry; I hope master will not prosecute me.

Prisoner's Defence. I left Mr. Fielder through some words; the property was given to my wife; I was not there at the time; his own servants helped me off with them; I did not steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-164

1232. MICHAEL BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a watch, value 3 l.; a coat, value 30 s., and a waistcoat, value 2 s., the goods of Daniel Huckey , in the dwelling-house of William Cuckland .

DANIEL HUCKEY . I am a groom . The prisoner was groom to Colonel Stanmore , who lives about two miles from our stables. On the 4th of July he came and told me his master was gone out of town, that he had had a child sworn to him, and asked leave to remain in my stables for a few nights; and on the 10th, when I came home, he said the Colonel was returned, and he was going back to him. I went next morning to the loft where he slept, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. I went to the Colonel's, and found he had left the service. I was going over Blackfriars-bridge next day, and saw him running before me - I pursued, and the officer took him, and found my watch in his pocket. It hung over the fire-place on the 9th, when I went to bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE PURDY . I am an officer. On the 12th July the prisoner ran by me. I saw Huckey pursuing him; he ran down Pedlar's-acre, into a coal-wharf, and finding it no thoroughfare, returned, and I took him. He pulled a watch out of his fob, and said,

"Here is your watch."

Prisoner's Defence. We were drinking together all the week; I pawned my jacket and waistcoat to get drink; he said his master was in prison, and he could get no money, and asked me to pawn his watch. They would not give what I asked for it. I spent the money, and was afraid to return.

DANIEL HUCKBY. I never gave him any thing to pawn.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-165

1233. MARY MALONE was indicted for stealing on the 30th of June , a waistcoat, value 3 s. the goods of Ann Smith .

THOMAS MULLIN . I am son-in-law of Ann Smith , pawnbroker , Golden-lane . On the 30th of June, the prisoner was in our shop, several other people were there. I saw her unpin a waistcoat, which hung inside the shop, put it into her apron, and then walk out; I jumped over the counter ran out, and brought her back with it; she said she knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was she not measuring it with a piece of tape - A. No she had got to the next door which joins ours.

JOHN FORDHAM . I am an officer. I received her in charge; she said she took it down to look at, and dropped it out of her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I brought a piece of tape from home, to measure the waistcoat with, and was measuring it when he seized me. I never left the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-166

1234. HENRY HIGGINS , was indicted for stealing on the 22d of June , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Samuel Grafty from his person .

SAMUEL GRAFTY . I am an umbrella maker , and live in Cannon-street. On the 22d of June, I was passing the Lying-in-hospital, in the City-road , and felt something at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe two minutes before; I seized a boy who was behind me; he said it was not him; I saw the prisoner running through the turnpike, followed him, and saw him drop the handkerchief - about two hundred yards from the place; he dropped it when I seized him. I picked it up and gave him in charge,

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on the pavement put it in my bosom, and was walking along when the gentleman came up.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Confined One Week and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240715-167

FIFTH DAY,

TUESDAY, JULY 20.

OLD COURT.

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1235. WILLIAM HELDER was indicted for gross, wilful and corrupt perjury, and GEORGE PALMER was indicted for subornation of perjury .

MR. ANDREWS for the prosecution stated the case - the perjury was alledged to have been committed by swearing that the copy of a writ served upon the prosecutor was a true copy. The copy was dated 1804, instead of 1824.

MR. ROBERT ROSE , deputy Filazer, of the Court of King's-bench, produced the writ, and stated that the copy was correct, the writ itself being dated 1804.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-168

1236. FRANCES RATTY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th April , four bedsteads, value 6 l.; three sets of bed furniture, value 5 l.; four mattresses, value 1 l. 12 s.; four beds, value 13 l.; four bolsters, value 2 l.; nine pillows, value 2 l. 4 s.; eight blankets, value 2 l.; five counterpanes, value 1 l. 15 s.; twenty-four chairs, value 9 l.; five curtains, value 29 s.; five carpets, value 30 s.; five hearth rugs, value 15 s.; nine pillow cases, value 9 s.; one cotton sofa cover, value 1 l.; six tables, value 5 l.; three blinds, value 15 s.; five looking glasses, value 5 l. 10 s.; four fenders, value 30 s.; two sets of fire irons, value 1 l.; one sideboard, value 2 l.; one chest of drawers, value 1 l. 5 s.; two wash hand stands, value 10 s.; five basins, value 7 s.; one caddy, value 2 s.; one decanter, value 3 s.; six wineglasses, value 4 s.; two glass tumblers, value 2 s.; two kettles, value 3 s.; a warming pan, value 7 s.; five candlesticks, value 5 s.; two pair of snuffers, value 2 s.; one snuffers and stand, value 1 s.; one gridiron, value 1 s. one frying-pan, value 1 s.; one coal scuttle, value 3 s.; one bras footman, value 3 s.; one pair of bellows, value 1 s.; four saucepans, value 7 s.; two tea-pots, value 5 s.; two knives, value 6 d.; two forks, value 6 d.; two dishes, value 1 s.; one jar, value 6 d.; four spoons, value 1 s.; one callendar, value 1 s.; three brushes, value 5 s.; one piece of floor cloth, value 5 s.; two mats, value 5 s.; one pail, value 2 s.; one tub, value 3 s.; one mop, value 1 s.; six sheets, value 1 l. 5 s.; six napkins value 1 s.; two table cloths, value 3 s. 6 d.; one mustard pot, value 1 s., and one cruet, value 6 d. the goods of Sarah Gale .

Mr. ANDREWS, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-169

NEW COURT, (5th DAY.)

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1237. WILLIAM RITCHIE was indicted for a fraud .

MR. JOHN WOOLFITT . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in St Paul's-church-yard. I know Mr. Wm. Teanby , of Old-street; he has been a customer of mine some years; I have a note here purporting to come from him - I received it on the 3d of June, in the presence of the prisoner; I do not know whether I received it from him; but he said Mr. Teinby wanted a plain tea-chest for a niece of his who was going to be married; I gave him a tea-chest worth about 2 l. 15 s. - I had known him some time and his friends also.

(Order read.)

MR. WOOLFILT, - Please to send by bearer one mahogany tea-chest for

WILLIAM TEANBY , bricklayer, 132, Old-street.

GEORGE RUCK . I am an apprentice to Mr. Woolfitt. The prisoner brought the paper just produced, and gave it to me, he said he came from Mr. Teanby.

WILLIAM TEANBY . I am a bricklayer, and live in Old-street. I am a customer of Mr. Woolfitt's, this paper is not my writing, nor did I ever see it till Mr. Woolfitt shewed it to me; I had no niece about to be married - the prisoner's father has worked for me seventeen years, and the prisoner has worked for me; I have a son of own my name.

WILLIAM TEANBY , JUN. I did not write this paper.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody - he gave me up the duplicate of a writing desk, and told me where to find the tea-chest, it was pledged at Snow hill.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240715-170

1238. JAMES YATES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-171

1239. HENRY DRUID and FELIX M'DONOUGH alias M'DONALD were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a pocket-book, value 1 s.; a 5 l. Bank note, four 5 l., and four 10 l. promissory notes, the property of Thomas Weaver , from his person .

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WEAVER . I am a linen-draper , and live at Abingdon. On the 29th of June I was at

"The Royal Saloon," Piccadilly, and made some observation upon

"The Hermit in London:" the prisoners were there; Druid said that his friend on the left was the author of that work - upon that we entered into conversation on the nature of the work, and I asked him to drink some wine, which he did - this was about twelve o'clock at night: the Saloon is a tavern. Captain Duncan, (as the prisoner M'Donough was called) gave me an invitation to go and see him; his address was

"Captain Duncan, Petersburg-hotel, Dover-street" - Druid gave his address

"Mr. Jones, No. 15, Newland-street, Kensington." I have enquired at Kensington, and could not find that such a person lived there. I left the Saloon in company with both the prisoners - I was not drunk: I was elevated with wine, but not so much but that I knew what I was about; we had a coach; Druid and I went on the coach box, to the Bell inn Holborn - the captain went inside. I was going to sleep at the Bell, as I was going to Abingdon next morning:

they said they were going to Oxford, and went there to sleep also. I rang the Inn bell, and then found I had lost my watch: I had then discharged the coach, and paid 3 s. - upon missing my watch I called back the coach, which was going down Fetter-lane, and asked the coachman what he would take me back to Piccadilly for; he said 9 s.; I said it was an exorbitant demand, the fare being but 3 s.; I gave him a sovereign, and he gave me 17 s. - I intended to go back to see if I had left my watch at the Saloon, but I did not state my loss till I had got upon the box of the coach, and the captain inside - I then requested the prisoners to accompany me, as I had lost my watch: Druid immediately called me from the coach, and said,

"You need not trouble yourself, I have taken care of it," and gave it to me - I had not given it to him. A watchman came up, and requested we would not disturb the people at the Bell inn - I told him I was going to sleep there. I then told the coachman to give me back my sovereign, and I gave him 1 s. or 1 s. 6 d. for his trouble. Druid then pulled down a sign-board by the side of the inn: the watchman said he would take us to the watch-house, and a scuffle ensued - the watchman sprung his rattle, and a second watchman came up. After waiting some time with them, Druid and myself were taken to the watch-house, but not M'Donough. Next morning, when I arrived at the Compter I discovered that I had lost my pocket-book, containing property to the amount of about 100 l.; it had been in my left hand coat pocket - there were four 5 l., and two 10 l. Abingdon notes; one Oxford 10 l. note; one Wallingford 10 l. note; and one 5 l. Bank of England note, with some others that I cannot swear to. There were some letters in it, addressed to myself. I mentioned my loss to Druid about seven o'clock in the morning, who replied,

"We know the number of the coach, and I have no doubt we shall find it." I do not remember saying anything more about my loss till we were going to Guildhall, when I again named it to the constable, and asked if he had seen a pocket-book - Druid said,

"Why do you make yourself so uneasy, we know the number of the coach, and doubt not when this affair is settled at Guildhall that we shall find it." We were taken before Mr. Alderman Thompson, and M'Donough appeared, and said he came to speak for the young man at the bar, and stated his name to be Captain M'Donough - the Alderman asked if he knew Druid; I believe the clerk took down what he said, but it was not read for the prisoner to sign; it was read to his solicitor at the second examination - he said he had known him for twelve months. The Alderman directed Druid to be searched, but I was not present - Fogg, the marshalman brought me the book in about five minutes afterwards; it was then empty.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What is your name - A. Thomas Weaver . I have never gone by the name of Charles. I have never been further in France than Calais. I have lived at Abingdon twelve years - I am not married. I have been in business on my own account nearly four years. When I came to London on the 27th of June I had about 190 l. I have never said my loss was 300 l., upon my solemn oath, neither in the Compter or elsewhere. I had come to town on business, and intended to return the next day, if I had not had this loss. I had taken my place, and intended to take this money home with me. I had a letter of license from my creditors three months ago - I do not know Mr. Gibson of Newgate-street - nor that there was a bill of 20 l. of mine out in London, and unpaid: there was a bill of 20 l. returned from Leeds after my return to Abingdon, which I paid - it was not returned because it was alledged to be a forgery - but there was a bill of 97 l. returned three months ago (which I had endorsed,) because the acceptance was forged: I paid it afterwards - I did not get Mr. Baker to pay it. I did not dine at the Saloon on the 30th of June, but at the Swan, public-house in Arundel-street, between three and four o'clock. I went to the Saloon between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I had been attending to my business in the interval. I had made some purchases; one was at Messrs. Gillman and Lucas, in Newgate-street, which was the last I made - that was about half-past nine o'clock. I must have been walking about. I was in company with some ladies at the Saloon; one female was addressed by the name of Mary Ann ; I do not know her other name - it might be Clark. There were many ladies and gentlemen there. A person of the name of Westbrook was at the Saloon before the prisoners came - we were taking some champaign with some Ladies; I paid for it out of my own money, which was in my pocket: we had three bottles of champaign; there was some Bucellas drank, but I did not drink any. I retired for a short time from the Saloon with Mary Ann about one o'clock, but I will swear I had the pocket-book when I returned. I did not say I went there between eleven and twelve o'clock: I was absent with her probably half an hour, and she returned at the same time with me, but did not sit down with me. She did not leave the Saloon.

Q. Did she not accuse you of behaving ill to her, and give you a blow on the nose - A. No; I said if the landlord did not send for an officer to take her away, I would report the house - she made my nose bleed - the place is very well lighted, there was a gas chandelier nearly opposite the box - there are boxes on each side, and seats on each side of the boxes, the back of the boxes are from three to four feet high, and there are curtains to them - I do not know what is become of Mr. Westbrook, he is now out of business - I believe I saw him at Abingdon, a few days prior to my coming to London, it was yesterday week; I did not know that the prisoners wished him to be brought here - I know an affidavit was made to postpone the trial on account of the absence of four witnesses, but I do not recollect Westbrook's name being mentioned, or that my attorney undertook to bring him here - Westbrook resides at Abingdon, he did not attend any of the examinations - I told him on Monday week that I was going to town on this trial - I did not see him last Thursday - I did say I had left my watch in possession of Westbrook, when I retired from the Saloon till my return - it was returned to me, and Westbrook retired from the Saloon before I did; he had not dined with me; he came into the Saloon while the ladies were there; I do not know that he belonged to either of them; they appeared to be the companions of the prisoners - they were not in our company before the prisoners came - when we were going from the Saloon I paid the bill - it was between two and three pounds.

Q. When you was going away with the woman did you not put your pocket-book on the table, upon one of the prisoners saying you had better - A. No. I said I was going to Oxford the next day, though I had taken my place for Abingdon - I swear I did not say I had a coach in readiness to take me down, and had relays of horses on the road; or that I was a Fellow of Brazen Nose College, that I recollect - I might have said some such thing in levity at the Compter, but do not recollect it.

Q. When the woman gave you the thump on the nose did you not say you was a nephew of the Lord Mayor, and would play the deuce with the Saloon and the keeper of it - A. No, I said I would report it to the Lord Mayor - I did not in the Saloon or any where else say that I was a Fellow of Brazen Nose College, a nephew to the Lord Mayor, or a man of large property; of 5000 l. a year - I never said so to my knowledge, but I will not take an oath of it - I was perfectly sober when I went to the Magistrate - I cannot recollect whether I said so or not - I was elated with wine, but I knew perfectly well what I was doing - I drove the coach - I was nearly three quarters of an hour going to the Bell - I did not when I was going away with the lady, put down my watch and request Druid to take care of it - I told them I should be happy to see them at Oxford or any where else - I do not know their motive for going to the Bell; they said they would sleep there, but I do not recollect that they said it was in consequence of my invitation - when we got to Holborn there was some disturbance between the watchmen and Druid, and I missed my watch; in consequence of that, I went to the end of Fetter-lane, and took the coach again - they had accompanied me to the coach, but it was afterwards that I told them of my loss - I had a small paper parcel in my hand - it were a part of my luggage - I dropped it, and it was picked up and put somewhere, and brought to me again at Guildhall; but I do not know who took it; we might be three quarters of an hour at the Bell; I paid the person who attended us at the Saloon - I do not know whether it was the landlord or a waiter; I paid with money which was taken from my trowsers pocket; I had some one pound Country notes there, but the five and ten pound notes were in the pocket-book; I have never said my loss was made up partly of sovereigns, and partly of notes, nor that sovereigns were in the pocket-book - I believe I said at the Compter that I lost my pocket-book containing one hundred pounds in cash, notes, and sovereigns; but there were no sovereigns in the pocket-book; if I stated so it was incorrect; I had sovereigns in my pocket when I went to the Saloon; I did not say my pocket-book had sovereigns in it; I did not pull down the board at the Inn myself; it was Druid; the watchman did not take me into custody till he had taken him - I do not think he had an opportunity of getting rid of the pocketbook, as the watchman was close at hand; the prisoner Druid sat by me; his father, who is the other prisoner, sat inside; the book was in my left inside pocket; the coachman sat behind; I sat by the fire at the Compter, and went to sleep; I was taken to Guildhall between eleven and twelve; I did not request the officers not to make the charge against me which had been made by the night officer, but only to say I was tipsy, and I would pay them for it; I asked him what was the charge, and he said

"Disorderly;" I did not see the board in the coach; when we got to Guildhall, we were permitted to walk up and down the street for some time; Druid's father did not join us before we went to the Alderman; there was an examination on Wednesday and Thursday; the father attended voluntarily on the first day, and I believe the Alderman remanded him for re-examination; I believe they were ordered to be kept separate. I have never stated that my loss amounted to 300 l. or nearly that; that I repeat deliberately, and swear that I had my pocket-book when I returned with Mary Ann .

ROBERT EVANS . I am a watchman of St. Andrews. On the night in question I was near the Bell, and saw those persons - the prosecutor appeared a little the worse for liquor, but seemed to know what he was about. He called back the coach. I took Druid to the watch-house. I heard the prosecutor speak about the loss of his watch - they were persuading him not to return to the Saloon.

"No, no," says Mr. Druid,

"we will go into the Bell, and then return to get it." It was full three quarters of an hour before the watch was produced; I took them to the watch-house: and I know no more.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. I was at the Compter; I heard the prosecutor complain in the presence of Druid of the loss of his pocket-book: Druid said,

"I don't know any thing about it; don't be uneasy, after this is settled; we have got the number of the coach, and it will be all right." Weaver spoke of it several times in the coach, and afterwards; Druid said,

"I wish Captain Duncan was here." Weaver appeared to me perfectly sober - he was what I call lively from his having had some drink: Druid appeared the best of them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The prosecutor said in the coach that he had lost 100 l. and upwards - A. Yes; and all Druid said was, that when that affair was settled, they would attend to the other.

MR. BERESFORD. I am clerk to the magistrates; I have got the book with the notes of the charge against the prisoner; M'Donough came forward voluntarily, and I have the entry that was made by me at the time; they were charged with making a disturbance at the Bell Inn; M'Donough was remanded to the next day; Druid made a statement which I have a note of - he denies all knowledge of the pocket-book: he was then searched, and it was found.

SAMUEL FOGG . I searched the prisoner, and found two pocket-books (which I now produce), but not a farthing of money.

THOMAS WEAVER . This is the pocket-book which contained my notes.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's. I was at the Bell about half-past three in the morning, and saw the parties, but did not take them to the watch-house - I heard Weaver say he must go back to the Saloon, to get his watch - he and Druid got on the coach box together - M'Donough was inside - Weaver was not so drunk but he knew what he was doing.

WILLIAM KERBY . I am a hackney chariot driver, and lodge in Titchfield-court - my number is 722 - I took up these three gentlemen at the Saloon on the morning in question, about half-past three o'clock - I rode behind,

and Mr. Weaver drove to the Old Bell, Holborn: it must have been past four o'clock when we got there: Mr. Weaver paid me, and I was discharged, and called back in about ten minutes after, by him; he wanted to take me back to the Saloon - he said he was going back for a watch and something else: Druid produced a watch in about five minutes after; Weaver took it, and gave me 1 s., and discharged me, saying,

"You are a good fellow." I saw Mr. Druid at the Saloon, with a pocket-book, trying to put it into his pocket; it was a leather one, with a steel clasp - it was unclasped: M'Donough was close by him - I never saw the book afterwards to my knowledge: I saw Fogg with one afterward; but when I first saw it, I was at my horses' heads, and could not be positive that the one I saw afterwards was the same - it was similar to it: Mr. Weaver called the coach - the doors of the Saloon were shut, and I did not see the landlord; Weaver was not so drunk but he knew what he was doing: he took the right change for the sovereign.

THOMAS GAMMAGE re-examined. I saw Druid in Holborn; when Mr. Weaver got down from the coach, there was some altercation about the fare; and Captain Duncan went a few doors off with Druid, and stood there four or five minutes: Druid had a paper parcel under his arm.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am landlord of the Crown and Horse Shoe public-house. I saw the prisoner pass my house to go to the watch-house; this parcel was brought to my house to take care of - it contains a shirt, a handkerchief and brush.

EDWARD MURNOCK . I live in Honey-lane Market. I merely saw the parties come across the road; the parcel was picked up and handed to the other person.

HENRY DRUID then read a very long defence, stating that he had not wished his name to be known, from being in pecuniary embarrassments; that if the prosecutor had ever had the notes in his pocket-book, it was very doubtful after he had been for hours in suspicious company, if they had ever reached him; and if he had taken them, it was not likely he should have kept the book; that when the prosecutor left the Saloon with the woman, he left his watch and pocket-book on the table; and it was entirely through his having forgotten the book, that he had not returned it to him with the watch.

M'DONOUGH's Defence. I took the earliest opportunity of stating that this was my son, soon after we got to the watch-house; when I entered the Saloon it was from curiosity, being a depicter of the scenes of life; we were invited by Mr. Weaver to take some wine, and were introduced to the women as his old acquaintances; he stated that he was a fellow of Brazen Nose College, and being myself brought up at Oriel, it was a sort of tie to me, and I sat down with him. A crime of this nature was not likely to be perpetrated in the broad light of day, and while exposed to the gaze of suspicious watchmen.

BARNARD ROYLE . I am one of the watchmen of Giltspur-street Compter. I remember the prisoner and the prosecutor being brought there - the prosecutor stated that he was going down to Oxford the next day, to take out his degrees at some College, but I don't remember which; he said he was worth 5000 l. a-year: I don't know that he said he was a nephew of the Lord Mayor - I remember his sending me to the Queen's-head Tavern with a letter: I gave it to the waiter, who took it to the landlord, who was in bed - he sent word down that it should be attended to; he then sent me back there again to borrow ten sovereigns - the answer was, that the landlord would get up and wait upon him; I heard him say he had lost 300 l. in notes and sovereigns and bills; he appeared a little intoxicated; I said the notes and sovereigns he might not get back, but the bills he might, if he knew the names on them; I heard the subject of the pocket-book mentioned several times in the coach; they were not much intoxicated then; the night before they were able to talk and walk.

WILLIAM STRANGE . I live at Abingdon, and am a wine merchant. I know the prosecutor - his name is proverbial for lying; a man in the habit of fabricating falsehood. I should myself feel great hesitation in paying attention to him upon his oath; he is a linen-draper - has a good-looking shop in a principal street, Boar-street, Abingdon.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240715-172

1240. GEORGE KING was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH HOPKINSON . I live with Mr. Serjeant, at the White-hart, public-house, Fleet-market. The prisoner came about six o'clock, on the evening of the 18th of June, and asked for change for a sovereign; I sounded it and said it was bad - he took it up and gave me another; I said this is bad likewise, he said he was sure they were not. I took them to Mr. Jones at the next door, who called Mr. Lynes, and gave them to him - he accompanied me to the house - they went into no persons' hands but Jones and Lynes.

- JONES. I keep the Crown and Anchor, public-house. On Friday, the 18th of June, Hopkinson came to me and said

"Look at these sovereigns, a young man wants change - I do not think they are good;" I called Mr. Lynes the beadle, and gave them to him - he went in with her.

Prisoner. Q. Did not she say, that I sent her to ask if they were bad - A. Yes, she said you told her she had better come to our house to see if they were good; I think he could have gone away if he had thought proper.

Prisoner to ELIZABETH HOPKINSON . Q. Could I not have gone away, while you were gone to Mr. Jones - A. I should think so - I said I would go to Jones, and you said I had better.

JAMES LYNES . I am the Ward beadle. The sovereigns were shown to me by Jones - I searched the prisoner and found a good sovereign, a farthing and this purse - I asked him to tell me who he took them of, which he positively refused to do - these are the sovereigns (looking at them) here is a mark on them which I put at the time.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the mint - the sovereigns are both counterfeit.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240715-173

WILLIAM BUTTRESS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LANGFORD . I am servant to a gentleman who lives at Lambeth; my brother wanted a pony; we were to meet in Smithfield. on Friday, the 2d of July, to buy one - after we met he left me; I had only 15 s. in my pocket;

I saw the prisoner who had two ponies - I asked him the the price of one, he said 3 l. 10 s.; he then said 3 l. and then came down to my price, which was 50 s.; I said I would give him something to drink, and gave him half-a-cown, and went to look for my brother - I stopped half-an-hour, but could not find him - I then went and pawned my watch, with Mr. Stafford in St. John-street, for two sovereigns - I came back to the prisoner, and met him at the same place (Stafford's man threw them on the counter, and they both sounded alike:) I said I had got the money, he said I thought you was not coming I took him to a public house and gave him a glass of rum, and then paid the two sovereigns and 7 s. 6 d. out of my purse, and he delivered me the pony, and as I was going away he said to me

"As a friend I would advise you to sell it, for it is broken winded, and has got the staggers" - I then looked and it had been blooded in the neck, and offered it for sale, and two or three came round me and offered me 20 s. or 25 s. for it - the prisoner then said he would buy it back again; I said I would lose 5 s. by it: he said I must lose 10 s. At last I agreed to lose 7 s.; he gave me two sovereigns and three shillings. I went to Mr. Stafford's to get my watch again, and there discovered that one of the sovereigns was bad - I then went back, and found him on the other side of the market; I told him I wanted to speak to him, and got him up St. John-street, and then told him what I wanted, and had him secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What are you - A. I am a gentleman's servant. I swear that I got those sovereigns from the prisoner; he said to me,

"You saw that I put the sovereign in my left hand breeches pocket, and you see I take them out of the same."

JOHN FITCH . I am servant to Mr. Stafford. I remember this lad coming and pawning his watch for two sovereigns, which I gave to him; I sounded them on the counter, and am positive they were good; he came back, and brought the ticket, and two sovereigns, one of which was bad; I gave it back to him: I weighed the bad one, but not the other.

WILLIAM HARPER . I was on duty as a constable at Smithfield-bars; I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner disputing about a poney; the prosecutor said,

"This man has given me a bad sovereign, and I wish him to be searched;" I took him by the arm with the assistance of Small; we had not gone many yards, before I observed his left hand going into his pocket; I said to Small,

"Watch that hand;" and immediately after, Small put this paper into my hand, with a sovereign in it; the prosecutor had given me the other sovereign; when I secured him, I found a sovereigns and silver to the amount of 15 s., on him, which was given back to him.

THOMAS SMALL . I am a goldsmith; and assisted in taking the prisoner; I saw him drop a piece of paper from his pocket; I took it up and gave it to the officer - it contained this sovereign.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . The two sovereigns are counterfeit, and from the same die.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and find Sureties .


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