Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd June 1824.
Reference Number: 18240603
Reference Number: f18240603-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On THURSDAY, 3d of JUNE, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Anthony Brown , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq., Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

1st London Jury.

John Hornby ,

Samuel Skinner ,

William Hopkins ,

Thomas Ben. Percival ,

John David Price ,

Edward Clare ,

John Muckle ,

Edward Witham ,

Wm. S. Hutchinson ,

Joseph Smith ,

Henry Bollond ,

John Dracey .

2nd London Jury.

Benjamin Wood ,

Stephen Underwood ,

Joseph Peas ,

Joseph Wornock ,

George Waterworth ,

James Messenger ,

Samuel Johnson ,

Henry Smith ,

William Ford ,

Thomas Kinder ,

Stephen Powell ,

William Bushby .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Scrivener ,

Jonathan Thompson ,

John Wilton ,

Henry Brooks ,

William Dobson ,

George Robinson ,

George Birt ,

John Cadogan ,

Joseph Gifford ,

William Large ,

Edward Carpue ,

John Francis Duncan .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

William Wilshire ,

P. Salter ,

Richard Bulmer ,

John Waterhouse ,

J. Castor ,

William White ,

T. Thwaites ,

J. Millburn ,

S. Prowett ,

William Fenton ,

J. M. Long ,

J. Kersley ,

3rd Middlesex Jury.

John Bolton ,

Francis Painter ,

Edward Gobart ,

Wm. Mason ,

Wm. Dunn ,

Wm. Chappel ,

Robert Mayne ,

Samuel Brown ,

Wm. Drew ,

Richard Williams ,

John Biddleston ,

Edward Sherbourn .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 3, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240603-1

817. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Anderson , about the hour of nine in the night of the 20th of April , at St. Luke, Chelsea , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein three candlesticks, value 5 s. , his property.

STEPHEN ANDERSON . I live at No. 3, Hooper's-court , in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. On the 20th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went out with my wife and family, leaving nobody in the house - I locked the street door, and tried it afterwards; it was then broad day-light. I returned about half-past ten o'clock, in consequence of information, and found the street door open - the box of the lock was broken off, and the screws broken from the door-post; it was put too, but not fastened. I got a light, went up stairs, and found the things as I had left them; but two candlesticks which stood on the shelf when I went out, were moved on to a board near the door leading to the back premises - I had left them on the shelf. and had left a white metal candlestick on the table, I found that on the floor, broken in two. I picked up the box of the lock and the screws. It is my dwelling-house. It was dark when I came home.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not you state before, that you left at six o'clock and returned at nine - A. No. I stated at Bow-street that I left at seven and returned at half-past ten. I noticed the candlesticks on the shelf when I went out.

JOHN BROWN. I live in White Lion-street, Chelsea. On the night in question (Easter Tuesday,) about nine o'clock, I was going to bed, but my sister called on me; I went out with her. The prosecutor is my brother-in-law. We were going to the next house to his; it was dark. I went to the prosecutor's door, and when in the street I saw a light in his up-stair room - we both went into the passage - I found the door ajar on putting my hand to it, and instantly called out, Watch! thieves! I instantly perceived the light put out, and heard a person come down stairs; I stood by the door; the prisoner came out and just passed me, but I pursued him, and was not a yard from him all the way until I caught him, and never lost sight of him. I caught hold of him, and said,

"You villian, I will follow you go where you will;" he turned round, and struck me over the head several times, and cut me in two or three places; I do not know whether he struck me with his fist or what; I clung to him and succeeded in getting him on the ground, and never let go of him; he struck me several times, and cut a hole right through my coat, and cut my shoulder. An iron crow-bar was afterwards picked up by his side, with which I suppose he must have struck me. I am certain that he is the man. I struggled with him for ten minutes before assistance came; there was no watchman near. My sister got assistance. While I was down on the ground some persons came up and kicked me dreadfully on the side, but finding assistance was coming they ran off.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure that you did not lose sight of him - A. Quite sure. I was not a yard behind him.

ANN DAYMAN . I live at the prosecutor's - he is my brother-in-law. I went out with him and his family between six and seven o'clock, and saw him lock the door. After that I went to Brown's house, and he came out with me about nine o'clock; I was going to a situation, and when we got by Anderson's door I saw a light in the room. Brown's account is correct. I know nothing more.

CHARLES FINNEY . I live in Lower Simmons-street. On the 20th of April I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock; I was undressing, when I heard a call of

"Watch" - I went out, and saw the witness Brown laying on his back, holding the prisoner, whom I collared, and assisted in securing him; as soon as he got up a light was brought, and some person picked up an instrument, which was a small crow-bar. I saw it in Brown's hand.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am watch-house keeper of Chelsea. On the 20th of April, about half-past nine o'clock at night, the prisoner was brought to me; the prosecutor was covered with blood, and very weak; the blood appeared to have issued from his head, which was very much cut. I sent him to the doctor, then locked the prisoner up, and went with a candle and lantern to Anderson's house, and on entering the house found a phosphorus box about the middle of the lower room. I then went to the place where the scuffle ensued, and on the ground was a great quantity of blood. The prisoner had lost his hat and handkerchief in the scuffle; the hat and handkerchief were picked up in my presence, and he acknowledged them to be his own. I received a crowbar from Brown, and compared it with marks which were on the door-post, and it exactly fitted. The prisoner was also very bloody. In my judgement the marks on the prosecutor's door had been made with that instrument.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by Hooper's-court;

some man came out and struck me - I was covered with blood; the man turned the corner. Brown caught hold of me, and thinking he might be the man who struck me I defended myself.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240603-2

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

818. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a coat, value 30 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 1 l.; two waistcoats, value 8 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Walker , in the dwelling-house of Isaac Bentley .

JAMES WALKER . I live in Cow-cross-street, St. Sepulchre-without , and am a cabinet-maker ; I lodge in the back attic - I took the room of one Hooper, but Isaac Bentley is the landlord, and lives in the house. On Saturday, the 6th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I went out and did not lock my door. I had a chest of drawers in my room, which were not locked. I returned between eight and nine o'clock at night; and between eleven and twelve, when I went to bed, on opening the lower drawer I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I had seen safe on the Wednesday or Thursday previous. I saw part of them again on the Monday following at a pawnbroker's. The whole are worth above 3 l.

JAMES LEACH . I am apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, Chiswell-street, Finsbury. I have a coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, which were pawned by Lucy Allen, on Saturday, the 6th of March, about two o'clock, for 25 s. - she came again on Monday, and had 5 s. more on them.

LUCY ALLEN . I live in Reynold's-court, and am the wife of James Allen . I have seen the prisoner three or four times; on Saturday afternoon, the 6th of March, she came into my room for something I had to wash for her, and enquired for Mrs. Sims, and asked me to pawn these things for her, as she knew a young man who was in trouble, and wanted to make up some money for him - I took them from her, believing them to belong to the young man she lived with. I pawned the same articles she gave me without opening the bundle, for 25 s.; she stopped in my room while I went, and when I returned I gave her the money. Before I took the things I saw her put a pair of trowsers on a chair in my room, and she left them there, and on the Tuesday they were claimed, and I gave them to the officer. On Monday morning, in consequence of a message from the prisoner I got 5 s. more upon the clothes; I sent to her to say I wished to speak to her, but did not see her.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 10th of March I received the prisoner in charge. Allen gave me the trowsers. I told the prisoner what she was charged with, and do not think that she made any answer.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Fleet-market - a young man followed me, and asked me to go to a house with him; being an unfortunate girl I went, and he gave me the bundle as my compliment to hold till he returned; he did not come back, and I asked the witness to pawn them, but did not send her for the 5 s. afterwards.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-3

819. WILLIAM NIBBS and HENRY YEAMS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Christian and Henry Curwen Christian , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 23d of April , at St. Martin in the Fields (the said Henry Curwen Christian and others therein being,) and stealing therein six handkerchiefs, value 50 s. , the goods of the said Joseph Christian and Henry Curwen Christian.

MR. HENRY CURWEN CHRISTIAN. I live at No. 10, Strand , and am in partnership with my father , Joseph Christian . I live in the house - my father does not; it is our joint property. My father has not slept in the house for two years; the lease of the house is his. On the 23d of April an opposite neighbour gave me information; I went out, and saw the two prisoners at the shop window; we have two windows to the shop. One of them stood with his back to the window, and the other with his face to it. I noticed them particularly - they walked away on my going into the street, and very shortly after one of my servants gave me information; I went out again, and the prisoners were then moving from the window; I caught hold of them both within a yard of the window, and a piece of silk handkerchiefs containing six handkerchiefs dropped from the person of one of them; it is worth 50 s. cost price - it is one entire piece of handkerchiefs; there is a line between each handkerchief.

Q. When you buy them are they charged by the number of handkerchiefs or by the piece - A. By the number of handkerchiefs; the invoice specifies it to be six handkerchiefs - it is not applicable to any other purpose; we call it in our shop a piece of silk handkerchiefs; the value of each handkerchief is 8 s. 4 d. prime cost. The piece has not been cut since I bought it. I cannot say which of them dropped it: they were both going away together - I seized them both, and it fell between them; I set my foot on it. I am sure they are the persons whom I saw at the window when I first went out; they were in company. I saw the handkerchiefs in the window when I first went out. Part of the pane of glass had been cut out in order to get it - it was whole about an hour before, when I saw it. The handkerchiefs are the property of myself and my father.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Your father has not resided in the house for two years - A. No. The house is occupied by my family alone; my father lives in the country, and comes occasionally to dine with me, but does not sleep in the house. I call the property six handkerchiefs; it is in one piece, not separated, but there is a border to each handkerchief; the mark between each handkerchief is cotton instead of silk; it is merely a mark to guide the scissars in cutting it.

Q. It is impossible to use one without using the whole till they are separated - A. Certainly; the size of each handkerchief is marked. I had been outside about an hour before to see how the window was dressed, and saw

it all safe. I found afterwards that it had been cut by some instrument.

SPRIG HARMERWOOD. I live in the Strand, opposite to Mr. Christian. On the 23d of April, at half-past ten o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoners together; one was looking in at the window, and the other had his back to the window, looking towards my shop; they went away together towards Hungerford-market, and returned again in five or ten minutes together, and looked in at the window, and in about a minute went towards Northumberland House, and went backwards and forwards three or four times, stopping at the window every time. I suspected that they were after no good, and took a description of them down on paper to give to the officers - I got a friend in my shop to watch them while I served a customer - he called out

"They have got them," and I ran over to Mr. Christian's assistance, who had hold of them - they are the men I had seen lurking about.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I live in Fox-court, Brook-street, Holborn. On the morning in question, about a quarter to ten o'clock, I was at the top of St. Martin's-lane, and saw the prisoners together, and knowing them before, I watched them for five minutes; they were talking together. I went on, and as I returned from Piccadilly, in the Haymarket I saw Mr. Christian following them; he collared them, and called for assistance, and I saw Nibbs fling the handkerchiefs from under his coat - Mr. Christian put his foot on them. I assisted him.

THOMAS FORD . I am gaoler of Bow-street Office. The prisoners were brought to the office - I searched them, and found a piece of wire and a knife in Nibb's pocket.

NIBB'S Defence. I know nothing about the wire.

YEAMS'S Defence. I know nothing of Nibb's. I was going down the Strand on my father's business, and was caught hold of by Mr. Christian.

NIBBS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

YEAMS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

This case is reserved for the decision of the Twelve Judges, whether the property be correctly described in the indictment .

Reference Number: t18240603-4

820. JOHN READING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , at Enfield , twelve sovereigns, and four half sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Reynolds , in his dwelling-house ?

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MARY REYNOLDS . I am the wife of Thomas Reynolds ; we keep the Goat, public-house , at Forty-hill , in the parish of Enfield. On Wednesday, the 3d of March, between twelve and two o'clock, I was at home, standing by the fire, and saw the prisoner in the tap-room; several other people were there - Burton served him with something. I lost sight of him a very short time afterwards, and saw him again between six and seven o'clock in the evening coming down stairs - he was at the foot of the stairs leading to the best sitting room; we have two stair-cases leading to that room, but only one is kept open - the stair-case he was at the foot of has a door at the top of it, which is kept locked - it is the door of the room at the top of the stair-case; I saw that door locked at eleven o'clock that day. When I saw him at the foot of the stairs my husband seized him, and I ran out for assistance. I saw him in custody afterwards, and swear that he is the same person.

Q. Had you any property in the room the door of which was locked - A. No; we lost some money from our bed-room, which he could get to from that stair-case, but he must go through three rooms first. I had left twelve sovereigns and four half sovereigns in the bureau drawer in that bed-room, and know that the drawer was locked at five o'clock that afternoon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time did you see the door locked - A. At eleven o'clock, and at five I went to the drawer and it was locked then. I did not know the prisoner before. There were seven or eight men in the house when he was there.

Q. How do you come from the bed-room if one door is locked - A. Down the back stair-case, which was not locked up. I saw him at the front stair-case.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I keep the Goat, public-house. On Wednesday, the 3d of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I went up the back stair-case to my bed-room, and on getting to the top of the stairs, the prisoner rushed out of the bed-room, and ran along the passage leading to the front stair-case - I immediately ran down the back stairs to the street door, and found him at the foot of the front stair-case, which is behind the street door - I seized him, shut the door, and gave an alarm, and almost at the same moment he called to another man for assistance; they both endeavoured to get the street door open, which they did, and got outside, but I still held the prisoner fast, and his companion finding that he could not liberate him, commenced beating me with a bludgeon until I fell from the loss of blood, but recovered before the prisoner got many paces from me. I pursued him calling for assistance - Saville joined me; I ran after the prisoner; he ran down Carter Hatch-lane - I got within three yards of him, and was attempting to seize him - he turned round and looked at me, put his hand into his left-hand pocket, and said if I approached him he would be the death of me - I ran close to him till assistance came, and he was secured. I walked home behind him, went up to my bedroom, and found a drawer taken out of the bureau chest, and put on a chair, and a picklock key laying by it - the gold, which was safe five or six hours before was gone; there had been about 20 l. there, most of it in sovereigns, and the rest in half sovereigns. The key of the drawer was in my wife's possession at the time. While I was following the prisoner he untwisted an apron which was round his waist, and threw it down, and on the following day I saw one Baalam; he accompanied me down the lane, and in my presence picked up a crow-bar, which has been tried in my presence to the door at the top of the front stair-case, and it made exactly similar marks to those we found on the door; there was a dent on the door as if the edge of this instrument had been pushed against it - I had found it open when I returned from following the prisoner. One of the Saville's brought me three sovereigns about half an hour after the prisoner was taken. Cuffley has the crow-bar and apron.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose property were they - A.

Mine; they were in a little drawer laid within a large drawer. I had not seen the prisoner before that day, but am sure of him - it is impossible that I can be mistaken; I had him in my grasp for five or six minutes. My house is in Enfield parish; I rent it.

ELIZABEEH BURTON. I reside in the prosecutor's house. On the 3d of March, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the house, and afterwards, about six I saw the prosecutor seize him at the foot of the stairs - they were together for some minutes; I went to his assistance. His companion came up (I had seen him there also about one o'clock;) he came to the prisoner's assistance, and got the door open, got into the porch, and began beating Mr. Reynolds, and hit me a violent blow over the arm, which made me leave go, and he ran towards the lane.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him before - A. No.

WILLIAM SAVILLE . I am a labourer, and live at Bush-hill, Edmonton. On the 3d of March I was coming towards the prosecutor's house, and about a hundred yards from it saw Reynolds, the prisoner, and another man scuffling outside the porch - Reynolds fell on the ground; the prisoner and the other man ran towards me; Reynolds got up and cried Stop thief! The prisoner said if I attempted to stop him he would kill me; Reynolds came up. I never lost sight of him till he was taken. My brother James came to our assistance with Smith and Huzzey - my brother secured him. When he passed me I saw him throw his hand out, and heard something jink, but did not see what it was. After he was secured, I went to the doctor's, and as I returned I picked up three sovereigns on the spot where I heard the jinking; it was in the open road, close to a shop. It was about half-past six o'clock when I saw him, and twenty minutes past eight when I found the sovereigns.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a man was the other - A. He was about the prisoner's height. I searched all round, but only found three sovereigns.

JAMES SAVILLE . I am a labourer, and live at Forty-hill. On the 3d of March, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I returned from work, and heard an alarm - I went into the shop, and was four or five poles from Reynold's. I went into the high road, and saw a man running towards Carter Hatch-lane - I ran after him, and saw Reynolds, the prisoner, and my brother running - they looked back, and called me. I went with them, and got up to the prisoner, and secured him, as Reynolds pointed him out to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see another man running away - A. No.

WILLIAM CUFLEY . I am constable of Enfield. On the 3d of March, about seven o'clock, Reynolds sent for me - I found the prisoner at his house, searched him, and found five sovereigns, a shilling, two-pence, a knife, and a gimblet on him. Reynolds gave me a crow-bar, which I tried to the door at the top of his front stair-case, and made a mark myself with it; it made the same impression by opening the door with it as was on it before. Reynolds was all over blood, and the doctor was dressing him.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not fit the crow-bar to the impression - A. No. The house is in Enfield parish.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Waltham Abbey, and went into this house to have some beer - a person ran down the stairs; he passed me, and ran out. Reynolds came and accused me of being the man who had come down the stairs.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18240603-5

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

821. ROBERT FEBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , at St. Luke , three sovereigns, the monies of Robert Hardy , in the dwelling-house of John Potter .

ROBERT HARDY . I lodge at the Crown and Sceptre, public-house, Arthur-street, Goswell-street ; John Potter keeps the house, which is in the parish of St. Luke. The prisoner lodged in the same house for about a fortnight. On Tuesday, the 13th of April, about one o'clock, I came home; I had left three sovereigns in a pocketbook in my box half an hour before; I had seen them on Sunday. The key was in my box; I do not know whether it was locked. I found the pocket-book open, and the sovereigns gone. I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and took him about seven o'clock, on Holborn-hill, standing in the street. I got an officer, and gave him in charge. I told him I took him for stealing three sovereigns - he was very sancy, and threatened to strike me; but after he was in custody he said he would tell me all about it if I would go into another room. I said nothing to induce him to say anything; I went into another room with him; he said he took one sovereign on Monday, and on Tuesday, about one o'clock, took the other two, and bought a pair of new boots and a hat with part of it, and he had them on. He was searched at the Compter, and 8 1/4 d. found upon him.

Prisoner. Your wife said if I would confess, it would be better for me - Witness. She was with me at the Compter, but was not alone with him, and could not have said anything without my hearing it - I heard her say nothing of the sort.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable of St. Sepulchre's. I received the prisoner in charge on Holborn-hill from the prosecutor's wife - I took him to the Compter; they went with me. He was very sancy to the prosecutor, but after I searched him he wished to speak to the prosecutor, and said he would tell all about it. Nobody threatened or promised him anything; the prosecutor went into the passage with him - I followed them soon after, and heard him say that he took one sovereign on Monday, and two on Tuesday - that he bought a pair of boots for 27 s., and a hat for 12 s., and had spent the rest.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18240603-6

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

822. JOHN M'GRAW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a coat, value 3 l., the goods of Thomas Bailey Rose , in the dwelling-house of John Rose .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BAILEY ROSE. I live at St. Pancras , with my father, whose name is John. On the 19th of April, in the afternoon, I saw a man coming up the steps of the house, and in five minutes after I saw him leaving the steps; he went along the front garden - I called after him once or twice; he ran, and I after him; I took him without losing sight of him. I asked if he had taken anything from the hall; he said not; but I found he had my great coat on

his back; it was the prisoner. I took him to the watch-house. I had hung it up in the hall about seven minutes before; it is worth 3 l.; it was new last winter, and cost about five guineas.

HENRY SHORT . I am a constable. Mr. Rose gave the prisoner into my charge with the coat - I have had it ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-7

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

823. HARRIET MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , six spoons, value 3 l.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 6 s.; a silver mug, value 20 s.; and a soup ladle, value 30 s., the goods of John Mayhew , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MAYHEW . I live in Hunter-street, Brunswick-square . I do not know the particulars of this case.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. On the 5th of April the prisoner pawned four table spoons and a pair of sugar tongs for 45 s. - she came in a week or ten days after to redeem the sugar tongs, and I detained her, having received information. I never saw her before, but know her to be the person.

THOMAS WHYMANT . I am servant to Mr. Mayhew. I never saw the prisoner till she was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know a man named Stone - A. Yes; he came to the house to see me on Saturday, the 3d of April, and was in the pantry. where the plate is kept - I left him there at times when I was called away - I have not seen him since. The property was safe in the pantry cupboard when he came; I might have been absent ten minutes. The cupboard was not locked. I missed them about nine o'clock next morning. I cannot tell where Stone is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-8

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

824. THOMAS DAVIS , JOHN THOMPSON , and JOHN JOHNSON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Marratt , about two o'clock in the night of the 27th of May , at St. Mary, Islington , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a watch, value 1 l., the goods of Mary Marratt , spinster .

JOHN NORRIS . I am a conductor of the dismounted patrol of Bow-street; my beat is from the Angel Inn at Islington to Hornsey-gate. On Thursday, the 27th of May, about ten minutes before two o'clock in the night, just as I entered Cambden-passage, Islington-green, I saw one of the prisoners about two hundred or two hundred and fifty yards off; I cannot say which of them it was - he was standing under a gas-lamp. Newman was with me. As soon as he saw us he ran down a middle court; we made haste up to this court, as it is not a thoroughfare - we went down the court, but saw nobody. I saw all the three prisoners coming out of Mrs. Marratt's garden door, which opens into the court; it was quite dark; the front of the house is in Pierpont-row, and the court runs down by the side of it - the garden is behind the house; there are two bolts and a latch on the garden door, inside. They came through the door, and shut it (it was dark.) I said,

"Halloo, who is here" - Thompson answered,

"I have only been down here to ease myself;" he had his waistcoat unbuttoned, and was buttoning it up. I knew his voice, and said to my brother officer,

"Lay hold of him;" we instantly apprehended all three of them, and took them to Islington watch-house - I searched Johnson and Davis, but found nothing particular. I left Newman with them while I went out, and just on the curb stone of the pavement, about twelve yards from the watch-house door I picked up a chisel and a watch, in the exact direction we had brought them. I went on till I came to the court, got a watchman's lantern, and looked down by the garden gate, and found a small crow-bar. I returned to the watch-house, locked the prisoners up, and noticed that Johnson's shoes were loosely tied, as if they had been recently put on. I went to Mrs. Marratt's house, and found the back parlour window open as high as the sash would go; it looks into the garden; and at day-light, about three o'clock, I alarmed the people of the house. I went into the garden, and found a dark lantern, part of a phosphorus box, and a bundle of matches under the window, all scattered about. We were let into the house by the boy, and found a pane of glass broken in the parlour window, and the catch undone; a time-piece stand stood on a chair in the window. I found the door at the bottom of the stairs leading into the garden nearly open, except the bottom bolt, which was not quite undone, and just by the garden gate were several footmarks on the fresh mould. I went to the watch-house, and took a shoe off each of the prisoner's feet; I tried them to the various footmarks, and each shoe fitted one mark or other. I have no doubt but the marks were made by those shoes. The parlour window had been opened by breaking the glass over the catch, and then an arm could he put through to undo it. I found a bell under the window in the garden, and a handkerchief, which has not been claimed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What distance were you at first from the premises - A. About one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards. The prisoners were taken almost instantly; the shoemarks were of different sizes. Johnson's was rather larger than the other two. I tried the shoes to the marks about an hour and a half after - it was dark when I went back after they were taken. I have seen them all before, and knew Thompson.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am a dismounted patrol, and was with Norris, and accompanied him into the court about ten minutes to two o'clock on Friday morning, and saw one of the prisoners; he said he went there to ease himself; the other two prisoners came out of the back gate of the garden, and were secured; they all three came out of the gate - we took all three. I remained with them in the watch-house while Norris returned. I afterwards went with him (when the family were alarmed,) and saw the footsteps compared with the prisoners' shoes; different footmarks corresponded with each shoe. I took their shoes off myself. I firmly believe that they were produced by those shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You found nothing on them - A. Except money; one of them had

12 s. 6 d. Their shoes were nearly new, so that they left a better impression.

MARY MARRATT . I live in Pierpont-row, with my mother, who keeps a chandler-shop. The house is in the parish of St. Mary, Islington; my father's name is William; he does not live at home, but is alive. On the morning of the 28th of May, about half-past three o'clock we were alarmed by the boy. I was the last person up the night before, and fastened the back parlour window myself about half-past eleven o'clock; I fastened the catch, and put the bell on it. The garden gate was bolted top and bottom - I saw it safe at ten o'clock, and the back door was locked and bolted at the bottom. In the morning I found the hack parlour window open, and glass broken by the catch, which was whole the night before. I missed my watch which I had left on the parlour mantlepiece the night before, when I went to bed, fixed in the time-piece stand, which was found on a chair under the window in the morning. The bell produced is what I fastened to the window the night before; the watch is mine (examining it;) I have had it six or seven years; it is a metal one.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you go to bed at night - A. At twelve o'clock; my mother occupies she whole house, and is married to my father. I saw the footmarks in the garden, they were not confused. No strangers were in the garden except the officers.

DAVIS'S Defence. I had been to see a friend, and stopped with him till between twelve and one o'clock, and as I returned I went down this court for a necessary purpose, was coming back and saw two officers with these two men in custody - the officer said,

"Catch hold of that young man," and he caught hold of me.

THOMPSON'S Defence. I went to the playhouse, and then accompanied a friend home - I left him in the Lower-road about half-past one o'clock, and on returning, at the end of this court met the officers, and told them I had been down to case myself.

JOHNSON'S Defence. I had been to my cousin's on Stamford-hill, was making my way to Westminster rather intoxicated, and went down this court, and finding it was not a thoroughfare I came back.

DAVIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

THOMPSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240603-9

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

825. ISAAC MILLER was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Hubbard , on the King's highway, on the 25th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a seal, value 1 s.; a chain, value 1 s., and a watch key, value 3 d. , his property.

WILLIAM HUBBARD . I live in Red Lion-passage, Hoxton. On the 25th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I had just come from my house, and turning round at the back of Hoxton chapel, I heard some persons running after me, and on getting into Ask-street I saw about five persons; two of them crossed over to me, holding their heads down - one caught me round the waist, and made a stumble as if he was falling; he caught hold of the chain of my watch, but my fob being buttoned he could not get out the watch; the ring broke, and he got the chain, seal, and key - they both instantly made off. I called Stop thief! and went in pursuit, and was stopped by the other three, who wanted to push me into a muddy place, and as I turned round to look at them I was struck in the mouth by the prisoner, who sent me staggering backwards - there was a gas-light where I was stopped. I never saw the prisoner before, but am certain he is the man who struck me, for I followed him so close, and kept him in sight till he got to Pimlico, where he ran down; I was a very short way behind him, and in a moment I caught sight of him again; a woman had directed me which way they had ran; I saw Stevens, who got a light, and I found the prisoner standing up behind a dung hill, in a bye place, which is not a thoroughfare - he had his hand to his breeches, and seemed as if he had unbuttoned them; I collared him, took him to a public-house, and gave him in charge. I am sure he is the man who struck me, and is one of the three who were with the two who robbed me. He was dressed in a white coat and black handkerchief, and all the rest were dressed different.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you alarmed - A. I was frightened a little. I can swear to none of them by their features. I can swear to the dress of four of them; the prisoner's hand was across his face; I could not see his features. He pretended to be buttoning his clothes up when he saw me.

EDWARD STEVENS . I live in Drinkwater-buildings, Pimlico, Hoxton. I was going to bed, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went down Pimlico, got a light and went behind a dung hill with the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner standing up; Hubbard went up, and collared him, and said he was the man who struck him. There was another man on the tiles of a shed close by - he jumped off on the other side, and got away.

WILLIAM KEASLY . I am a watchman. Hubbard gave the prisoner into my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to take a walk, was taken ill, and went down this place for a necessary occasion, and as I was buttoning up my clothes Hubbard came, and said he could swear to me by my white coat and black handkerchief, and while I was there a man came up in a smock frock, and got on the tiles.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-10

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

826. SARAH ARNOLD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Willis , on the 24th of April (he and others being therein,) and stealing two gowns, value 2 l.; a cloak, value 1 l.; a sheet, value 5 s., and a shawl, value 7 s. , the goods of Mary Critchfield .

MARY CRITCHFIELD . On the 24th of April I lodged in Tottenham Court-road , at Joseph Willis 's - the prisoner is my sister . I went out at a quarter to nine o'clock, left the door locked, and took the key with me, and on returning about ten o'clock I found the box of the lock broken off, and the door open. I missed the articles stated in the indictment from my drawers, which were not locked; I do not know where the prisoner lived, not having seen her for some time. I went in search of her, and could not find her, but on the 28th, about half-past one o'clock at night the watchman came to me; she had given herself up to him; she had a black dress on, but it is torn all to

pieces - I know it to be mine by my own work on it. When I got to the watch-house I asked how she could do it; she said because she choose. Howard asked her to give up the things; she said she would sooner have an halter round her neck than give them up. We have not been on bad terms particularly. The street door is kept on the latch - there are three other lodgers.

WILLIAM RYDER . I am a watchman. About half-past one o'clock in the morning the prisoner came to me at No. 9, Charlotte-street, and desired me to take charge of her, saying that she had been guilty of felony, and if I would go with her she would shew me where her sister lived; she said,

"Though she is my sister, I am sorry to call her so, for she is now in bed with my husband," and that she had committed a felony in her husband's apartment. I went with her - she threw some dirt against the window, and desired me to call out

"Arnold," which I did, and the prosecutrix came out. I asked if she was robbed, and told her to come with me, and she claimed a black gown, which the prisoner wore. I did not go into the room, and saw nobody but the prosecutrix. She said she put the gown on in purpose for it to be owned, that she might be hung or transported, for she could not live in this country with the idea of her sister living with her husband. I understand that the prisoner has lived in that house with her husband, who is a blind man.

Prisoner. I think I told him that my husband had kept my clothes from me, and my sister had worn them out. I was in the greatest distress, and anything was better than the life I was leading. I did not go there intending to thieve, but to stop there, whether I might or not.

MARY CRITCHFIELD re-examined. Q. Are you married - A. No. The prisoner's maiden name is Parker; we are both by one mother, but my father married twice.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-11

London Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

827. JOHN JOSEPH KAYLL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a bill of exchange, for payment of and value 100 l. , the property of George Fuller and others, his partners.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-12

828. JOHN JOSEPH KAYLL was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a bill of exchange, for payment of and value 500 l., the property of George Fuller others, his partners, in their dwelling-house .

Mr. BOLLAND, (for the prosecution,) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-13

829. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Dobson Willoughby , from his person .

MR. DOBSON WILLOUGHBY. I am a solicitor . On the 27th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-street, near Temple-bar , I was walking before my son, and just as I came to the bar my son said the prisoner had picked my pocket; I turned round, and saw my handkerchief on the ground. My son collared him, and I gave him in charge. He said he knew nothing about it, and offered me his card.

BENJAMIN EDWARD WILLOUGHBY . I was with my father, but a pace or two behind him. I looked aside, and saw the prisoner drawing the handkerchief from his pocket - he drew it entirely out, and I collared him - he dropped it on the ground, and denied it, he offered me his address, but I saw him take it, and seized him with it in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Drury-lane Theatre. I saw some gentlemen walking behind this gentleman, and as soon as I got up he seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-14

830. MARY STRAW was indicted for stealing on the 25th of May , a half-crown, and two shillings , the monies of Henry Oakey .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to George Hibbert and others, his partners.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

HENRY OAKEY . I am clerk to Messrs. George Hibbert and Co., of Billeter-court . I was in the habit of receiving small sums of money to make disbursements for them; I keep it locked in a drawer in my desk, which is not locked. On the night of 25th of May, in consequence of suspicion, the witnesses marked several half-crowns and shillings; I put them in the drawer; I looked at it next morning, and the money was gone. The prisoner occasionally assisted in the house - I had her apprehended, and saw a purse of money found on her, among which was a half-crown and two shillings, which were part of what I had marked. A key was found on her, which I saw applied to the drawer; it opened it. I have known her for a year.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 26th of May I was sent for, and found five sovereigns, a half-crown, two shillings, and a key on the prisoner - the key opened the drawer.

CHARLES JOHN HAMMOND . I marked some money for Mr. Oakey. Here are two shillings which I marked, and saw him put into the drawer; I am sure of them.

JONAS HOLBRET . I marked a half-crown for the prosecutor; that produced is it - I gave it to Mr. Oakey, and saw him deposit it in his drawer.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

The prisoner received an excellent character; and was recommended to mercy .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-15

831. WILLIAM BANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Morris , from his person .

JOHN MORRIS . I am a painter . On the 9th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in Newgate-street, near the Old Bailey , with a friend, and felt something taken from my pocket; I turned round to the prisoner, who was passing between me and Newgate, and seeing me turn round so quick he put my handkerchief down on the ground, and ran off - I saw him do it; I took it up, and ran after him - I overtook him without losing sight of him.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I received him in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with the rest of the people down a court in the Old Bailey - I happened to fall, and the gentleman took me.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-16

832. RICHARD JONES and EDWARD ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , three hundred sheets of paper, value 21 s. , the goods of George Byrom Whittaker and William Budd Whittaker , to whom the said Richard Jones was servant .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I received directions to watch the prosecutors' premises in Ave Maria-lane, and on Saturday evening, the 1st of May, about nine o'clock, I and Hesketh went, and about a quarter past nine I saw Jones come out of the private door with a bag, and take it under an archway to Roberts, and in a moment I saw Roberts with it on his back; we followed him to Whitecross-street, Cripplegate, to Mr. Lloyd's - he threw it down in the shop. I ran in, and said,

"Where did you get this bag?" he said

" Richard Jones gave it to me." I took him to the Compter - then went and took Jones. I brought the parcel away - it was claimed by the prosecutors' servant.

ROBERT HESKETH. I am an officer. On the 1st of May I was with Forrester, and saw Roberts loitering about - he went under the archway in Stationers'-court. I saw Jones bring him a bag, deliver it to him, and wish him good night; we followed him to Lloyd's with it, and took him. I have the paper.

JEREMIAH HOWE . I know Jones - he was porter to Messrs. George Byrom Whittaker and William Budd Whittaker ; he lived there four or five years as a regular servant - I am in their employ. We had such paper as this on the premises; it is worth about 1 l. Jones had no orders to send it out.

JURY. Q. Are not the warehouseman allowed that waste paper as perquisites - A. No; most of it is new; the servants are allowed no paper as perquisites. Jones should use this for packing up.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERTS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-17

833. RALPH FALE FREEMAN AITKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Charles Peak , from his person .

CHARLES PEAK . I am a chemist . On the 19th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon. I was in Upper Thames-street , and had my handkerchief in my right hand pocket - I felt something at it - put my hand round, and missed my handkerchief. I looked round, and saw the prisoner not two yards off, with it in his hand; he put it behind him. I charged him with robbing me, he seemed alarmed, and threw it at me and ran away. I picked it up, pursued him a long way, raising a cry: nobody at first attempted to stop him; the first who tried to stop him he wrestled with, and got away, but was soon afterwards stopped, without my losing sight of him at all.

GEORGE CHEYNE . I saw a scuffle between Mr. Peak and the prisoner, who made off; the first man who tried to stop him he got from; but I followed and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was proceeding to my father's in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square, walking at a slow pace, when the property was thrown in my face - it fell at my side, and I picked it up; when the prosecutor accused me of the theft, I was surprised, and said if it was his property he was at liberty to take it, and set off, fearing I might get into trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-18

834. JOHN DAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April . 39 lbs. of whalebone, value 4 l. , the goods of George M'Kenzie , his master .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE M'KENZIE. I am a whalebone cutter , and live at Aldgate; my warehouse is in Houndsditch; the prisoner was my servant , and slept on the premises; he was my bookkeeper , and had the charge of my property. I particularly spoke to him one morning about some whalebone having been seen to go from the premises a week or a fortnight before, and said I believed that there was a deficiency. He said I should find it all right when I took stock. I appointed an officer to watch, and on the 27th of April I was sent for to the Mansion-house, and found him in custody; I said he was the last person whom I should have suspected; he said it was the first time, and he was sorry for it; I held him out no inducement to say anything; I found some whalebone at the Mansion-house, which I believe to be mine; it weighed 37 lbs., and is worth about 40 s.; I have examined my stock, and find a deficiency of 12 cwt.; I had left my warehouse about ten minutes before I was fetched to the Mansion-house.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 27th of April, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Lombard-street, with a bundle on his shoulder. Herdsfield looked at him - he said,

"What are you looking at?" - I said, What have you got here? - he gave no answer, but said

"I am going to Mr. Mills, Hollywell-street, Strand." I asked if he had got a bill of parcels - he said Yes. I said,

"Walk into the Mansion-house, and I will see it." I took him there, and said.

"Now where is the bill?" he said he had not got one - I said,

"You told me just now that you had" - he said,

"Stop a bit and I will feel" - he did not produce any - I said,

"Where did you bring it from?" - he said,

"From Mr. Mills, 137, Whitechapel-road - it is the firm of Mills, but is carried on under the name of Matthews" - I said it was a pity he was not civil when he was stopped with a load - he said his master told him not to give an answer if he was asked what he had - I asked him why he came that way to go to Hollywell-street - he said he liked it - I was going to Whitechapel, but called on Mr. M'Kenzie, and brought him to the Mansion-house.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I was with Forrester - his account is correct.

Mr. M'KENZIE. I believe this property to be mine - I miss whalebone of this description.

Prisoner's Defence. The property is not his - I have

a friend for whom I go backwards and forwards - he deals in these goods.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-19

835. CHARLES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a wooden cask, value 1 s., and 18 lbs. of mustard, value 9 s. , the goods of John Edwards .

DANIEL STUBBS . I live in Fleet-market , next door to Mr. Edwards. On the 21st of April I was standing at my door, the prisoner went by, turned round very sharp, and looked at Mr. Edwards's window - then went to the door and took a cask - I ran in and told them - he was pursued, and brought back in three minutes with it.

JOSEPH B. EDWARDS . I live with my brother John, who is a grocer, and live in Fleet-market. About three o'clock Stubbs alarmed me - I went to the door, and saw people bringing the prisoner back - the cask contained 18 lbs. of mustard - it stood just within the door.

GEORGE CORBY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, who was running with the cask - I saw him stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court, having been out of work for a long time.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-20

836. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , six pairs of stockings, value 35 s. , the goods of John Davenport and James Martin Tapson .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 24th of April I was in Aldgate - about two o'clock I saw the prisoner, and another person very close to him, at the corner of the Minories - I suspected that they were in company - they did not talk together that I saw - they both went towards Leadenhall-street, and both returned in about a minute - I turned up Church-row, they went by, I came out of the row, and saw the prisoner with this parcel in his hand, which he had not got before - I ran and overtook him by the Bull Inn - he scuffled - I took him to the Mansion-house, and he there said that he had picked it up.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I am a porter to Messrs. Davenport and Tapson. On the 24th of April I put up these things ready to be put into a parcel, and put the parcel into a truck which was to go to the Saracen's Head, Aldgate, and the Three Nuns - the parcel produced is what I put into the truck - it contains six pairs of stockings.

MICHAEL HEYMER . I am employed occasionally at the prosecutors' warehouse, which is in King's Arms Yard, Coleman-street - I was delivering parcels in a truck at different places - I stopped at the Saracen's Head, Aldgate - this parcel and two more were in the truck, and when I got to the Three Nuns it was gone - the truck is in closed with rails at the sides - it could not fall out - I had not left it after I went to the Saracen's Head, but I was in front of the truck.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Cannot you tell when it was taken - A. It was safe when I was at the Saracen's Head - I had nine parcels when I set out.

MR. JAMES MARTIN TAPSON . I am in partnership with John Davenport - our porter had this parcel to take out - it contained six pairs of stockings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN WILKINSON re-examined. I packed them up myself - I did not see the stockings myself, as each pair were in separate papers - here is the invoice which was inside the parcel.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-21

837. PETER MADDEN and TITUS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of George Collard , from his person .

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 19th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was by Queen-street, and saw the prisoners following the prosecutor into the Poultry , in company together, and just by Mr. Kipling's shop , I saw Brown close behind the prosecutor, and saw his hand close to his pocket. I did not see what he took, but he gave something to Madden, who put it into his pocket, and turned round to leave the prosecutor. I laid hold of them both; the prosecutor looked round, and called out,

"That is my handkerchief." I looked and saw it drop from Madden. Collard picked it up.

GEORGE COLLARD . I am a clerk in the East India House ; I was in the Poultry; I felt nothing; there were three or four people near me; a cart made a stoppage; I felt behind me, and missed my handkerchief; turned round, and saw it on the ground, about five yards from me; the officer was holding the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MADDEN'S Defence. There was a crowd, and the officer took me, and at that moment a lad rushed by me, dressed as I am, and threw the handkerchief on the ground.

BROWN'S Defence. I was going home, stopped to see what was the matter, and the gentleman collared me.

MADDEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-22

838. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , two reams of paper, value 35 s. , the goods of John Bryan Courthorpe and another, his partner.

JOHN GOSS . I am servant to Mr. Phillips, a bookseller, who lives in George-yard, Lombard-street. On the 17th of May, at half-past eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Courthorpe's house with two reams of paper under his right arm - he passed me, and went down the yard. Having my suspicious, from seeing another person peeping up the alley with him before, and seeing that person very near again, I ran over to Courthorpe's; a boy came, and from what he said I pursued the prisoner, caught sight of him in Lombard-street with the paper under his arm, saw the officer take him, and saw him drop it.

JOHN BRYAN COURTHORPE . I know this paper to be mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD MEDWIN . I am errand-boy to Mr. Courthorpe. I was in the shop on this morning; this paper laid on the left-hand-side of the shop on the floor; Goss came in and I missed it, and saw the prisoner secured; he dropped it in White-hart-court.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and was going through the yard; a person gave it to me, and asked me to follow him with it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-23

839. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 16 lbs. of pepper, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of George Croker Fox and others, his partners.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am porter to Mr. George Croker Fox , who lives in Clement's-lane, Eastcheap. On the 17th of May, at a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, I was coming from the cellar, and saw the prisoner come into the warehouse and take this parcel, which contains 16 lbs. of pepper. It stood four or five yards inside the door; he went out with it; I pursued and immediately took him, and made him carry it back.

JAMES TERRY . I live with Mr. Fox, who is a wholesale grocer , and has other partners. I know this property to be theirs.

JESSE BAKER . I saw the prisoner enter the warehouse, and go out with this parcel.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who sat it down on a step, and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-24

840. GEORGE SPUILES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a muff, value 4 l. 10 s., and a tippet, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Susanah Schneider , widow , his mistress .

LEWIS LLOYD . I am a furrier, and live in Skinner-street. On the 10th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was called into my shop, and found the prisoner offering a muff and tippet for sale. I asked him who it belonged to; he said, to Mrs. Fergusson, of Dover-street, Piccadilly; that it had been bought at my house, but she was taken ill, and had no further occasion for it, and he was desired to bring it to me for sale. I asked his name; he said it was George Spuiles , and that he was servant to the lady; and on examining them, I found the muff was very valuable, and the tippet inferior. I said I was certain that he had come improperly by them; he appeared confused, and said what he had told me was false; that they belonged to his mother, and he had stolen them from her. I asked where she lived, he said she was barmaid at the King's Head public-house, Finchley, and that she was sister to the landlady. I said I should detain him; he still insisted that it was his mother's; that she had bought it about twelve months ago, when in better circumstances. I said it was a fresh made article. I sent for an officer, and while he was being searched, he said if I would let him go he would tell the whole truth; that on going through some street at the west end of the town, he saw a gentleman's door open, went in, and ran away with them. Mrs. Schneider at last claimed them.

GEORGE G. SCHNEIDER . I am son of Susanah Schneider, a furrier , who lives in Regent-street, and is a widow; the prisoner was our errand boy ; this muff and tippet are my mother's; we had not missed them; my brother's handwriting is on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-25

NEW COURT. (1st DAY,)

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

841. RICHARD TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January, 1820 , three sheets, value 10 s.; three pillows, value 10 s.; two blankets, value 10 s.; and a bolster, value 5 s. the goods of Richard Clements , in a lodging room .

RICHARD CLEMENTS . I am a tailor , and live in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials . On the 18th of January, 1820. I let the prisoner part of my house furnished - another man, named Harper, was with him - they occupied one bed, at 2 s. a-week each - they both left together, about a fortnight afterwards - Richard Tubbs came home on the day they went, (about five o'clock,) and said

"Let me have the key for my fellow-lodger is coming, and I want to get a fire" - my wife gave him the key, and he came down for a knife and fork - I know no more of the business.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was it before you saw either of the men again - A. Not for four years; I described the prisoner to the officer on the night he was taken - I did fix upon a young man in Court as the person as well as the prisoner, and directed him to be taken into custody, thinking he was Harper - when he said his name was not Tubbs nor Harper, I let him go - I said he was the man till then, and that he was one of the two - I had never seen him before - I had seen Tubbs four or five times while he lodged with me; it might be ten times; he was always at home - I should not have known him in the street so well as in a house; he had not the same general appearance as when at home; the prisoner might have slept in my house or not; I don't know who enters my house or who goes out; they can go in and out without a key - I saw Harper go out on the night of the robbery; he gave my wife the key, and said

"We shall be back presently."

COURT. Q. Does this man answer the description you gave to the officer - A. Yes; I described as him about my height, and from twenty-five to twenty-seven years of age; he had carried on the business of a working smith; he had a sailor's jacket on the last time I saw him; I described him to the officer in going along the street from Bow-street; I had not seen him before I described him to the officer; but I described him according to the recollection I had of him.

Q. Did you give the officer any other date - A. Yes; I did say 1821, from memory only - I had the account of it on slate; it was legible to myself; I had kept it against the wall, but I did not look at it till I took it to the Magistrates.

CATHARINE CLEMENTS . I am the wife of the prosecutor - I know the prisoner; he lodged at our house; he came with Harper, on a Saturday evening; they lodged there for a fortnight; I saw him three or four times a day - on the day they left he came in, and asked for the key, and said he must get a fire for his bed-fellow; he had something in his apron, and said he should want a knife and fork and plate - I took them up in a little time; he had then got a fire; the beds were then made; as I left Harper came in, and came down soon after for a towel;

he said

"I shall come down and settle with you;" he came down again with the towel; I did not see Tubbs at all then. I went up-stairs in about an hour after they were gone; the door was then locked - my husband came home about nine o'clock; we opened the door, and the bed was then stripped of every thing - I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I let with the room - I went to the office, and there saw this young man, but I did not charge him with being the person; he is very much like Harper - I never said this robbery was committed in 1821; I told my husband he was wrong; he then went home and took the slate to the Magistrates.

THOMAS DRUMMOND . I am an officer. The prosecutor described the prisoner to me early in March, and said he was a short young man, with a smooth face, and that he had been robbed in 1821 - I went with them to a public-house on this side of Berners-street - I directed him to go into the Ship, public-house, and inquire if he worked near them; the prosecutor came out of the public-house, and said they did not know such a person - we all went into the house; Mr. Mallin's son was there; both the prosecutor and prosecutrix pointed him out as the person - the prosecutor said, as we went along, that his wife would know him better than he did, as she had seen him oftener, and she pointed Mallin out as the prisoner - when Tubbs came in they both turned round, and said

"That is the man."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-26

842. JOHN CRAMER and MARY CRAMER , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a clock, value 1 l.; six deal boards, value 1 l.; a bonnet, value 5 s.; a basket, value 3 s.; a chair, value 3 s.; a towel, value 6 d., and a gown, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Mahon .

JOHANNA MAHON . I am the wife of Thomas Mahon , who is in America - I lived in London-street, Fitzroy-square , and was removing to Princes-street, Drury-lane - the male prisoner was employed to remove these things - I not seen his wife at all at that time - I have seen the property since - it is worth about 2 l. 18 s.

JOHN GERRARD CUTHBERT. I employed the prisoner to remove these things from London-street to Princes-street - I did not see the articles at Princes-street, nor have I seen them since.

ANN DENNY . I live at No. 3, Princes-street, Drury-lane; Mrs. Mahon lived there - John Quilk came on the 25th of March and brought the clock, and the prisoners were with him; they took it to Mahon's apartments; the prisoner and his wife came about three o'clock, and took away the clock from a nail, and a basket and chair - I asked what they were going to do with the clock; they said to take it to Mrs. Mahon's; I have not seen any of them since; I saw Mrs. Mahon on the same day, and told her what I had seen; I am certain of the prisoners.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's lodging in Tann's-court, Middle-row, with Mrs. Mahon, and she pointed out a chair and towel; I took the female prisoner into custody on the same night, but the constable refused to take charge of her; they came voluntarily to me at Hatton-garden; I told them the charge; they said they had been to Bow-street several times, and had been discharged; Mrs. Mahon was not there at that time.

JOHANNA MAHON re-examined. Q. Had you made a charge against them at Bow-street - A. Yes; and the Magistrate reprimanded them and said, if I intend to go on with the charge I must indict them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The male prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had worked for Cuthbert, and had the care of his house, but he had failed, and he did not see him till last March, when he said to him,

"You are the very man I want to remove some goods, but I must not be seen in it, as I have just come from Whitecross-street prison;" that he removed his goods to Princes-street, and the next day to Titchfield-street, and he said

"I will give you the old rubbish that is left in Princes-street, if you wont tell my old landlord where I have removed, as I have saved seven guineas for rent;" that he and his wife had then fetched the basket and the chair. Some days after Cuthbert called on him and said,

"Your wife has informed of me, and I will have my things back again; he offered to return the chair, but said the basket was lost, and the shelves were burned. The next day Cuthbert brought an officer, and took him and his wife to Bow-street. The Magistrate had directed him to try to find the goods, and attend again. He had attended, when the Magistrate said he could see no felony in the case.

JOHN GERRARD CUTHBERT re-examined. Q. Did you give them leave to take the goods - A. No; I did not, nor did I know it till two days afterwards; I never told him that they were mine; I never said so at Bow-street, or any where else - I declare so on my oath.

JOHN CRAMER - GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Three Months .

ANN CRAMER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-27

Before Mr. Recorder.

843. JOHN SHEEHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January, a ton weight of potatoes, value 2 l. 12 s. , the goods of Michael Deady .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-28

844. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for embezzlement .

NATHANIEL COLSON . I am a baker, and live at Clapton; the prisoner was in my employ on the 13th of April . East is a customer of mine; on the 13th of April she owed me 3 s.. 1 d.; it was the prisoner's duty to receive that money, and pay it to me; I have not received it since; I charged him on that day with this offence, and several others; he said he was sorry for it, but would stop and work it out; I used to pay him a guinea a-week, with three loaves, and a quartern of flour.

HARRIET EAST. I live at Clapton, and am a customer of Colson's; I owed Colson 3 s. 1 d., which I paid to the prisoner on the 13th of April; I gave him 3 s. 6 d., and he gave me 5 d. in charge.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-29

845. WILLIAM BUCKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 30 lbs. of iron, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Harding .

RICHARD HARDING . I am a whitesmith , and live in Thomas-street, Grosvenor-square . On Sunday, the 16th of May, a lodger who keeps a shop below, gave us information

that the prisoner had gone out with some iron; I sent a person to watch him; he came back himself without the iron; (he lodged in my house,) and as he was going up stairs, I said I suspected he had stolen some iron, as I had missed some several times; it was kept in the kitchen, where I live.

JOHN PARKINS. I live in Mr. Harding's house, and am his servant; as soon as I heard of the robbery, I went out, and saw the prisoner turn into an old iron shop in Gilbert-street (it was on a Sunday); he had something with him, and as he turned to go into the shop, I saw the end of the bars; I followed him into the shop, but did not speak to him; I heard him say to the person in the shop

"Give me 1 s.;" I asked the person if the young man that did her business was at home; she said No; I said it was of no consequence, and I came away and told my master, who sent for a constable; I went with the constable and got this iron; I am quite sure that it is my master's.

ELIZABETH WELFORD . I live at 44, Gilbert-street; I keep the shop and parlour; my little girl had occasion to go out, and left the door open; the prisoner came in very much in liquor, with something in his hand, and asked me for a shilling; in about half-a-minute the last witness came in; the prisoner then laid down the iron, and seemed so insensible, that I had not patience with him, and went into my room; Parkins must have seen the iron, but he did not claim it as his master's; I had known the prisoner for some time.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; he did not appear to me to be in liquor; the iron was claimed by the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD HARDING re-examined. Q. What do you suppose to be the worth of the iron - A. About 4 s.; the prisoner has been some time in my service; I had missed some iron, but never suspected him.

JOSEPH COLLINS re-examined. He might have had a glass or two of liquor, but he was not intoxicated.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-30

846. CATHERINE BRYAN and JANE PHILMORE were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , two half-crowns, and three shillings , the monies of George Ching .

GEORGE CHING . I keep a green-grocer's shop, and sell milk . The prisoners were strangers to me. On the 23d of April, I had put about 26 s. or 27 s. into the till; were some half-crowns and some shillings among it - I saw the till about one o'clock, and emptied my pockets into it and left it unlocked; there was nobody in the shop but my wife and the children. I returned about four o'clock, and was informed of this loss. There was 15 s. 6 d. left in the till.

LYDIA CHING . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I saw the prisoners in the shop about two hours after my husband went out; they were standing by the side of the counter - I heard them whisper, and they ran out in the street as soon as they saw me - I went out, and called out,

"Those girls have robbed me." I examined the till before they were brought back, and missed some silver, but I cannot tell how much. I had not given change to any one. They were searched in the shop, but no money was found upon them. I asked how they dared to rob the till - they accused each other of the theft. I sent for my husband.

JAMES MARRINER. I live near Mr. Ching's. I saw these girls running away from the shop towards me; I laid hold of Bryan - she bit me, and dropped some silver; the other ran off, but was taken in five or ten minutes. I picked up the money, and gave it to Stowell.

JAMES BURGESS . I am a fishmonger, and live near Ching's. I saw Marriner with one of the girls - I seized the other. A person brought me a half-crown, and said she had picked it up.

HENRY STOWELL . I took them into custody, and produce the money.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 10.

PHILMORE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240603-31

847. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Graham .

JOHN GRAHAM . I am a musician , and live in Albermarle-street, Clerkenwell . I lost these boots from my room on the ground floor - the prisoner was apprenticed to a shoemaker who lived in the house; they had been made by his master. I enquired of him, and he said he knew nothing about them. I saw them three four or days afterwards at Moss's, the pawnbroker. The prisoner has lived in the house about four years.

ROBERT MOSS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots that were pawned by the prisoner, on the 19th of April. I had seen him before, and am certain of his person.

JOHN HAYFORD . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner; he denied all knowledge of the property.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-32

848. ANN DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a frock, value 3 s. , the goods of William Blackburn .

JOSEPH BROCK . I live at Mr. William Blackburn 's, pawnbroker , Great Saffron-hill . I know the prisoner. On the 14th of April this frock was at the door when she came in, and was missed soon after she left. I found it at Mr. Fleming's, Fleet-market.

HENRY THREDDER . I am shopman to Mr. Fleming. I took this frock in pawn from the prisoner on the 15th of April, with other articles, for 5 s.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. On the 21st of April I apprehended the prisoner, on a charge of stealing a waistcoat, at No. 11, Plumb Tree-court, Shoe-lane; the place seemed very destitute.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to pawn a little article at the shop - as I came out this frock laid on the step of the door; I took it up and pawned it, having a sick husband and three children in the greatest distress.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-33

849. WILLIAM HOBBS was indicted for stealing, on

the 22d of April , two pairs of stockings, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Nelms .

RICHARD NELMS . I keep a hosier shop in Tottenham-court-road. On the 22d of April I lost two pairs of stockings - I was not in the shop; I had seen them half an hour before. They were brought back by the person who picked them up. The prisoner is a stranger.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live in New North-street, Red Lion-square. I was in Chapel-street, Tottenham-court-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running before me, and saw him pull the stockings from under his jacket, and run away - I caught him at the end of Pitt-street. I believe a man of the name of Johnson picked up the stockings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my aunt's, and saw the stockings at a door - I picked them up, and ran away.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-34

850. WILLIAM DALTON was indicted for stealing, a hat, value 15 s. , the goods of James Lake .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240603-35

851. JOHN SCARBOROUGH JENKINS & GEORGE CHEESE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a shovel, value 2 s., the goods of Edward Roberts ; and a shovel, value 2 s. , the goods of James Street .

JAMES STREET . I live in Draper-buildings. I left my shovel at Mr. Roberts's, for a boy to put into the sand-house - I left mine and Mr. Roberts's too. I returned to work about five o'clock the next morning, and missed them. The prisoners were strangers to me.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I work at Mr. Roberts's brick-fields. About seven o'clock at night, I put my master's shovel in the sand-house; I know nothing about Street's. I came next morning about half-past five, and it was gone. One of the prisoners worked in Mr. Colson's field, near my master's.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am an officer. On the 13th of May the prisoners were apprehended - the shovels were found in the chace after them; I picked up one, and my brother officer the other. We saw Cheese while we were pursuing Jenkins.

WILLIAM WOOLEY . I am an officer. I have heard the statement of Lawrence, and I can state it to be correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JENKINS'S Defence. As I was returning home, in Maiden-lane I saw these two officers - one of them said,

"Here comes one;" I was frightened, and ran away; he laid hold of me, and took me back to where the shovels were.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-36

852. GEORGE PRETTYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. 7 d. , the goods of John Birt .

JOHN BIRT . I am a linen-draper . These stockings were laying on my counter - no person could have taken them without coming into the shop. I was at dinner in the sitting room, and saw the prisoner come in and ask my young man for something - he took something from the counter, and ran away; I ran into the shop and told my man, who pursued him, and brought him back.

CHARLES PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Birt. The prisoner came into the shop, and asked me for a handkerchief, and while I turned round he took the stockings, and ran away; I pursued him, and took him in Crown-court

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-37

853. SARAH NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 15 s. , the goods of John Pemberton .

GEORGE ELLIS . I am in the employ of Mr. John Pemberton , St. John-street . The prisoner came into our shop on the evening of the 15th of April, about seven o'clock, and asked to see some prints; she staid about half an hour, and bought seven yards of one - she was to leave 1 s. deposit, and call again; she left the shop, I suspected she had secreted something under her cloak; I followed and overtook her in Aylesbury-street, about a hundred yards off - I looked under her cloak, and found two lengths of print, they were not the same she had bargained for - but some which I had shewn her. She has bought articles of us before.

JOHN HAYFORD . I am a constable, and took her into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-38

854. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a coat, value 2 s.; five bottles, value 1 s., and a gallon of wine, value 5 s. , the goods of John Woodward .

MR. JOHN WOODWARD . I live at Moscow-cottage, Bayswater. I lost a coat, and eleven or twelve bottles of wine, from a house I was building in the Bayswater-road ; I had seen them about four o'clock on Sunday afternoon, the 23d of May, and about ten on the following morning they were missed. I had never seen the prisoner. I saw the coat on the prisoner's back when he was examined at Bow-street - I did not know then that it was mine, but at the second examination at Bow-street I looked at it, and was certain as to the identity of it.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 24th of May, between one and two o'clock in the morning, in Craven-lane, Bayswater-road; there was another man with him when I first saw him, but I lost sight of the other - I took him, supposing all was not right, and found two bottles of wine, four skeleton keys, and a phosphorus box with matches ready for use upon him. I learned that Mr. Woodward had lost some property. When the prisoner was at Bow-street Mr. Woodward intimated to me that he had lost a coat similar to the one the prisoner had on, and next morning he saw and identified it. The prisoner gave no account whatever of it; this is the coat.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had not that coat on when Mr. Woodward came to the prison.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . He had it on when I took him; he had three coats on, and this was the middle one.

JOHN IRWIN . I am a patrol. When the prisoner was taken he had that coat on, with wine in the pockets, and this dark lantern, which appeared as if it had lately

been put out. There were some matches in the phosphorus box.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no work, and a man whom I had known for some months past, asked me on Sunday before the robbery to carry some smuggled spirits for him; I agreed, and met him on Sunday night, near the turnpike in Bayswater-road - he gave me the property; I did not know that it was stolen. I could have destroyed the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-39

855. DAVID WILLIAM STEPHENSON and ANN STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , six yards of muslin, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 20 s., and a yard of silk, value 2 s. , the goods of James Pincott .

JAMES PINCOTT . I live in Oxford-street , and am a linen-draper . The male prisoner was my shopman - the female prisoner used to come backwards and forwards for his washing; he lived with me till Tuesday, the 20th of April, when my young man gave me some information, and I went down to the back kitchen, where I discovered six yards of printed muslin, concealed under some boards. My premises were then under repair. I desired my young man to watch who would come for them. I went outside, where I saw the prisoner Ann Stevens ; she asked me if Stephenson was at home; I said he was, and came in and told him his washerwoman wanted him - he went out, and my young man came up and gave me some further information - Stephenson was then gone up stairs; I went to the stair-case, and sent for an officer; and when he came down I took him by the arm, and said,

"You are my prisoner;" he had two bundles of foul linen with him - I desired my young man to open them, and enclosed in one of them I found the same six yards of printed muslin, and two shawl handkerchiefs. I went to the place where the muslin had been concealed, and it was gone. I had never sold him anything of the sort, and am sure that they then formed part of my stock. The female prisoner was searched by the officer, who found several duplicates, one was for some silk, which had been stolen prior to this time.

Cross-examined. Q. When you went down to the kitchen did you examine the muslin - A. Yes; I put my private mark on all the articles in my shop. I found it on the piece in the kitchen - when I saw it in the bundle I saw the same mark. I had no more of that pattern. He lived in my house; he occupied a room with another young man.

THOMAS BONNER . I live at Mr. Pincott's. On the 20th of April the carpenters were there at work; they had occasion to go down to the kitchen for some wood, and in consequence of something they said I went down, and saw the print under some boards in the back kitchen. I gave information to Mr. Pincott immediately; he came down and saw it there - he desired us all to be silent, and placed me to see who came for it. In about an hour the prisoner came to the place, and staid about a minute - he then went up stairs; I went immediately to the place, and the muslin was gone. I had seen the handkerchiefs in the shop which I found in the bundle of dirty linen. The prisoner was near me, and saw the bundle opened; he said nothing at the time. The private mark is on them.

Cross-examined. Q. When had your master taken stock - A. In August or September last. When goods are sold the private mark is generally cut off. Any of the workmen might have gone into the room. I saw the prisoner come down and go to the place, but I did not see him take anything. I could not get out of the kitchen in time to stop him, but I followed him up stairs.

GEORGE WELLS . I am a constable, and took the prisoners into custody. The goods were found before I arrived. I have kept the goods ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to).

MR. PINCOTT re-examined. Q. This is your private mark; but as articles are sold with the private mark on, will you swear that these articles had not been sold - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

STEPHENSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

STEVENS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-40

256. GEORGE TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , three garden hand-glasses, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edward Inkersley .

EDWARD INKERSLEY. I lost three garden hand-glasses about the 13th or 14th of March, from my garden, which is about a quarter of a mile from my house. This man had been employed in a garden at the end of mine, which was divided from it by a fence. I afterwards found them at Clapton, and knew them by a mark upon them - they were in the possession of George Garret . The prisoner was taken in Spa-fields.

GEORGE GARRET . I am a victualler, and live at the Robinhood, public-house, High-hill-ferry, Clapton. I believe the prisoner brought me the glasses - I had seen him once before; I cannot be positive as to his person. There were four glasses brought to me.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I took the prisoner into custody on the 24th of April - I did not then know of this charge. As I was taking him to Clerkenwell he said he had a letter written to him, and he took the glasses with the letter.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came to me in Ray-street, Clerkenwell, and asked me to go with him and sell the glasses.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-41

857. GEORGE TURNER was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a spade, value 1 s., and a rake, value 1 s. , the goods of William Mansel .

WILLIAM MANSEL . I live at 33, Sutton-street, and have a garden at some distance from my house, near Mr. Inkersley's. I was in the garden on the 7th of March, and left the articles in the summer-house; the garden has a small fence round it; there is also a wall and a gate, which is kept on the latch. I went there again on the 16th of March, and saw them in the possession of Appleford.

HENRY APPLEFORD . I have a garden next Mr. Mansel's. The prisoner brought a spade and a rake to my house on the 8th of March, or about that time; I knew him, as I had seen him working in the gardens; he told my wife that I had sent them; I knew them to belong to Mr. Mansel; I went to his garden in about nine days, and he claimed them.

ELIZABETH APPLEFORD . George Turner came to me in the beginning of March, with a spade and a rake, and said

that he had seen my husband, and I was to give him 2 s. for them - I got change, and gave him the 2 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of the same man whom I bought the glasses of.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-42

858. CAROLINE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a watch, value 7 l.; a seal, value 10 s.; a key, value 5 s.; and a ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of John Schroeder , from his person .

JOHN SCHROEDER . I live in King-street. Between the 8th and 9th of May, about one o'clock in the morning (I had been in the City), I met the prisoner in Fitzroy-street, and asked her the nearest road to Oxford-street; she took me to Market-street, Fitzroy-market ; she laid hold of my watch and snatched it, and ran away into a house, but I watched the house, and the watchman said he would assist me. I described her to him, but he could not find her; we watched some time, but she did not come out; I saw the watch again at the office; we did not go to any place together.

Prisoner. I met him in Oxford-street, not in Fitzroy-street - Witness. I have seen her in Oxford-street, but not on that night.

RICHARD HOSEY . I am a constable. Between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 9th of May, Schroeder said he had lost his watch, seal, and key; that he had been in company with a female under the piazzas of the market, and she had snatched it and ran into one of the houses - he was not certain whether it was No. 7 or 8. I got under the piazzas and saw a light, and heard people talking in one of the rooms, and while we were talking, the light was put out. Two people came out of the house, and I desired another watchman to go round and meet them. Schroeder had described the person of the woman. I met the prisoner in Grafton-street, and she appeared to answer the description. I told her she was accused of robbing a gentleman, which she denied. I saw the watch at Mary-le-bone watch-house, in the possession of Howard.

HENRY HOWARD . I am constable of the night - when the prisoner was brought in, she denied knowing any thing about the watch; but it was found on a person of the name of Seabright, who was brought in afterwards. I don't know that the prisoner had been in company with Seabright.

RICHARD HOSEY re-examined. Seabright was with her, arm in arm, when I apprehended her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in Oxford-street, and that gentleman accosted me, and asked me to accompany him to a house - he said he had no money, but gave me his watch to hold - Seabright came and took it from me - I sent for him and he came, and brought it to the watch-house.

JOHN SCHROEDER . Upon my oath I did not give it to her.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-43

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

859. JAMES GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a watch, value 20 s.; a seal, value 20 s.; and two sovereigns, the property of James Clark , from his person .

The prosecutor stated his name to be Charles instead of James.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-44

860. HENRY BATEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Slark , from his person .

WILLIAM SLARK . On the 22d of April I got on one of the Clapton stages , at the Flower-pot public-house, Bishopsgate-street. After going some distance, I saw the prisoner hanging behind, and I told him to get down, but he spoke very civil, and I did not press the subject; and when we came near Holywell-lane , I felt a plunge at my pocket, and I felt and found my handker- safe; I then insisted upon his getting down. I felt another plunge at my pocket, and he got down. I immediately jumped off the coach and pursued him; I never lost sight of him; I did not find the handkerchief on him, but he had ran through a number of girls of the town, who were standing there.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see the handkerchief taken from your pocket - A. No; but to the best of my belief I saw him grasp one when he was down; his civility threw me off my guard.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an officer. I was sent for about twenty minutes after nine o'clock - I searched the prisoner, but did not find the handkerchief - he told me his name was William Sanders , but I found the name of Bateman on his tobacco-box, I went to the office and asked if he had not given a false name, and he confessed that his name was Bateman.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-45

861. JOHN FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , eight plates of tinfoil, value 47 s. , the goods of Townshend Compton and Henry Compton , his masters .

THOMAS HANLY . I am in the service of Messrs. Townshend Compton and Henry Compton . On the 29th of April, between one and two o'clock, I was in the yard, and saw the prisoner with two bags on his shoulder - he had been in masters' service - the beadle came, and took him to the watch-house - I saw him searched, and the two bags emptied; four of these plates were before and four behind him - I know them to be my masters' by their fitting the mould, and by their colour - they are taken over to the mills to be flattened - the prisoner had no access to the flatting-mills, but the door was open while we were gone to dinner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HART . I am the beadle; I was sent for on the 29th of April; I searched the prisoner, and found these plates in his bags.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-46

862. WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a silver spoon, value 4 s. , the goods of Edmund Collingridge .

GEORGE HOWEL . I am clerk to Mr. Edmund Collingridge , who is a jeweller . The prisoner came to the shop

in the early part of May, and asked if we wanted an errand-boy - I said no, but he might call again - he came again on the next day; and I saw him again on the 10th, in the gilding-shop - he said he was not hired, but was waiting to see Mr. Collingridge - I left him in that shop - there were six spoons in one parcel, and one by itself, within his reach - I did not return to the shop while he was there, but went in a few hours, and the single spoon was gone.

EDMUND COLLINGRIDGE . This boy had been about my premises for several days, and had induced my errand-boy to rob me.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pledged the spoon at my shop on the 10th of May, in the name of John Willis , for 2 s. I asked him several questions, all of which he answered very satisfactorily. I asked him his father's name and trade.

JOHN MUSGRAVE . I am servant to Mr. Collingridge - two spoons were missed on the 10th of May, one from a parcel, and one that had lain by itself; this was about a quarter past ten o'clock.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-47

863. AMBROSE ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a sovereign , the money of George Elmes .

GEORGE ELMES . I live in Lockwood-place, St. Pancras - the prisoner slept with me on the 20th of May - I went to bed about twelve o'clock - I had a purse in my waistcoat pocket, which I put upon a box at the foot of the bed - I got up at six o'clock - he was then gone - the waistcoat was removed, and the purse and sovereign were gone.

WILLIAM KELLARD . I keep the house, and I went with Elmes to Thames-street, and saw the prisoner, and asked him if he had been playing tricks with George, for he had lost a sovereign, and it would be better to settle it - he said he had no sovereign - we went out together, and he said,

"George, do you think I have taken your sovereign" - he said,

"I don't think about it, I am sure you did;" he was taken to the watch-house, and a sovereign found on him; he said before the Magistrate, that it was his last week's wages.

LEWIS FACHE . I am an officer - I found a sovereign on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went home from work - this man and the rest were drinking, and I drank with them till about half-past nine - I then went home, but don't know when they left - the watchman called me next morning at half-past four - I got up soon after, and told the prosecutor to pack up my tools - in the afternoon Mr. Kellard came, and an officer was sent for - I was searched - I said all my money was in my breeches pocket - the sovereign was found, and the prosecutor said he would give me half a sovereign to say that it was his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-48

864. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a pair of boots, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; and a bag, value 1 s. , the goods of Isaac Bird .

ISAAC BIRD . I live at Harrow-on-the-Hill - my boots hung in an out-house - I saw them safe on a Thursday evening, about the 10th of May, at six o'clock - I did not miss them till the watchman brought them, with a pair of shoes and a bag, which was two or three days afterwards - the bag was hanging by the boots and shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HARRIS . I saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Bird's premises, and I asked him what he had got - he said a pair of boots and shoes, and a bag, which he said had been dropped by a cart which had just passed, and which I knew to be a butcher's cart - he was coming from Bird's house, near the out-house door, some distance from the road.

Prisoner's Defence. When the last witness came up, I said

"I have found a bag with something in it, which I suppose dropped from the carriage - I am going after it; but they don't belong to me, if they belong to you take them." I was returning from Portsmouth, and saw them on the road - I took them up, and thought they belonged to the chaise-cart.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-49

865. JOHN FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Edmund Morton Hill .

EDMUND MORTON HILL . I am a coach-master . I was at No. 15, Finsbury-square , on the 20th of May, waiting for a family to take to Holloway - I had a blue box-coat on the coach-box - two persons asked me the way to Wood-street, and to Finsbury-street - I missed the coat the moment I gave the answer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN M'LANE. I was in Finsbury-square, and saw the prisoner with a blue coat under his arm, talking to a man - when he saw me he ran away, and dropped it - I am positive as to his person - the manner in which he held the coat made me think he had not got it honestly - I followed him and picked it up, and then lost sight of him - I saw him again that evening, at the watch-house - he was dressed the same as when I saw him - he was not charged with taking the coat.

WILLIAM CROSS . I am a patrol - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running away - I followed and took him - I don't know who gave the alarm - I saw M'Lane that night at the watch-house - he said that is the person I saw throw the coat away - the prisoner replied, that he had not seen the coat.

CHARLES RICKETS . I am a constable - M'Lane gave me the coat on the 20th of May.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through Finsbury-square and saw a crowd, and I passed through to see what was the matter - soon after an officer seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-50

866. ROBERT ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a plane, value 3 s.; a square, value 1 s.; and a jacket, value 6 s. , the goods of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . On the 11th of May I was working in Eagle-street , and went to dine at the nearest public-house at twelve o'clock - somebody came to me, and I went to the shop - the constable was there, and had a

long plane of mine - I went to Hatton-garden Office, and saw the prisoner with a coat of mine, which had been left in the house in Eagle-street - I missed a square, and told the constable - we went to the lock up-house, and found it.

WILLIAM HANKEY . I am a carpenter - I live at No. 7, Eagle-street - the prosecutor was in my service. On the 11th of May I saw the prisoner with these articles - I followed him, and at the end of Leigh-street I quickened my pace, and he went at full speed - I called out Stop him! and he dropped the plane, which I took up, and returned to the shop - I left the constable pursuing him, and turned round afterwards, and saw the constable collar him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. I think I have, but am not certain - I saw his side face - he was pursued by a great number people - I am sure he is the man.

EDWARD COOK . I am a constable - I was on duty, and saw Hankey pursuing the prisoner, who dropt the plane - I followed him, and at the corner of Princes-street he was stopped - I took him to the watch-house - I searched the watch-house about two hours afterwards, and found a small square - I had lost sight of him at some of the turnings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-51

867. HENRY BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , eight brass weights, value 30 s. , the goods of Edward Dixon .

THOMAS HODGSON . I live with Mr. Edward Dixon , surgeon . On the 30th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to the shop, and asked the price of tamarinds - I looked behind me, and saw him put his hand up, and put it again to his pocket. I missed the weights, and asked him where they were; he pointed to the end of the counter to some basins - I collared him, and said he had them; he pulled them out of his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you seize this man by the collar yourself - A. Yes; he made no resistance - he begged of me to let him go. His manner appeared strange; he seemed to want sense.

JOHN GOOK . I am a constable. I was passing Mr. Dixon's shop, saw the prisoner, and took him into custody. I took this weight from him.

The following witnesses were called on behalf of the prisoner.

MOSES COSTER . I know the prisoner; he appeared to me not to be in his right mind lately - his mother has often called me in. I have seen him break the windows, knock his head against the wall, come down stairs without his clothes, and roll his head in the kennel. He had one or two fits some years ago; this strange conduct has happened within this three or four weeks.

- AARON. I am his mother. I believe he is not right in his head; he is subject to fits, and I have sent for the neighbours in on account of it - he has been taking medicine, and he sometimes took three or four pills when he should have taken but one. My belief is that he is out of his mind.

NOT GUILTY - being insane .

Reference Number: t18240603-52

868. WILLIAM GAVALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a watch, value 5 l., and two watch keys, value 1 d. , the goods of James Ellis .

JAMES ELLIS . I am a seaman, belonging to the brig Ann . On the 15th of April she was at the brig-tier - the prisoner had left that morning, and about an hour after he was gone I went down below, and missed my watch from my chest; he had slept by the side of the hammock. I found it at the pawnbroker's the same day. I did not see the prisoner till the 17th of last month; he used to wear a blue jacket and white trowsers.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am in the employ of Mr. Corningly. The watch was pawned with me on the 15th of April, in the name of William Gavell . I do not know the person of the prisoner, but he was in a blue jacket and white trowsers.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-53

869. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 40 lbs. of grapes, value 40 l. , the goods of the Right Honourable George Canning .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-54

870. DAVID JOHN and JAMES ARNOLD were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , four billiard balls, value 1 s.; a table cover, value 4 s.; a brush, value 2 s., and a book, value 9 d. , the goods of Nathan Meyer Rothschild , Esq.

THOMAS LANDELLS . I am an under gardener to Nathan Meyer Rothschild , Esq. I know these things to be his property.

CHARLES LOW. I am an under gardener to Mr. Rothschild. I know that the cloth was on the table on the 2d of May.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 3d of May the prisoner John came to the shop, and pledged the billiard cover and the brush in the name of William Griffin , of Highgate.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner Arnold into custody, and asked how he got the property; he said from a man at Highgate - he then said he was not the man who stole the property, but the Welchman stagged upon him, meaning, as I understood, that he told where he was to be found. He afterwards said,

"Well, I will tell you; me and the Welchman went to Mr. Rothschild's, and robbed the summer-house; it is my first offence, and I hope I shall find mercy."

ARNOLD'S Defence. I did not know that they were stolen goods - John pawned them, and gave me the duplicate; I afterwards put it in my pocket, and did not know but that it was his property.

ARNOLD - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

JOHN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-55

871. LEWIS JOSEPH and WILLIAM PALMER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a pair of snuffers, value 2 s. , the goods of Ann Oldham , widow .

ANN OLDHAM . I am a widow, and live at St. Pancras . On Saturday, the 24th of April, I went out about one o'clock, leaving a pair of snuffers in the shop - I returned

about four or five o'clock, and saw the prisoners at the door. I missed the snuffers; I went to my brother, and said,

"I believe these lads have robbed me." They ran across the fields.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am Mrs. Oldham's brother. I went out and pursued the lads; they had been walking, but ran away. I got within a few yards of them, and saw Palmer take the snuffers from his pocket, and throw them away; the other was some distance behind him.

JOHN JONES . I picked up the snuffers, but I did not see them throw them away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

PALMER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-56

872. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , three shillings , the monies of John Dean .

JOHN DEAN . I am a porter at Westminster Hospital . Three shillings were left with me on Sunday morning, the 25th of April; I laid them on the table, and had occasion to go to the door. The prisoner came in - I thought he was a surgeon. As he went out again I saw something strange in his appearance - I looked on the table, and the silver was gone. I went after him, and brought him back - he said he had not stolen it; did I mean to say he was a thief? I said he had taken 3 s., and I could swear to them - he said,

"Sooner than have words I will give you 3 s.," which he did, and I saw that one of them was one of the shillings I had lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say it would be better for him to give you 3 s., and go about his business - A. I did not. I had looked at the shillings, and had noticed a mark on one of them; I had been in the habit of looking at the money that was left to see if it was good, and I saw a mark on the neck of the first shilling. They had been left in the hall where the porters generally sit. I had only gone to the bottom of the steps, and had but just left the room. The money was left for a patient of the name of Whitworth.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to dine with a friend, and saw the door open; I went in, and read a board over the fire-place. I had got a little way from the infirmary, and he came and asked me to come back with him, and told me to give him 3 s. which I had taken off the table; I said,

"I know nothing about them;" they said they would fetch an officer, and I told them I would rather give them 3 s. than have any piece of work about it. I put my hand in my pocket, and gave him 3 s., and then he said,

"I can swear to this shilling."

JURY to JOHN DEAN . Q. Was there any person with him at the time - A. No. I am positive as to this shilling. There were persons who saw him give me the 3 s., and I immediately identified this one. I could see any one who entered the room - I am certain no person could have come from the interior of the Hospital without my seeing them; I was not down the steps more than a minute.

Prisoner. Q. Are there no other doors which lead to the hall - A. Yes; one leads to the surgery.

COURT. Q. The hall, I suppose, is the place that admits you from the street to all the other parts of the building - A. Certainly, my Lord. I was at the bottom of the steps when he passed me; I did not suspect him. He was going down the steps as I came up.

Prisoner. I had stood at the door while I read a printed board before I went in, and there was not another person in the hall - when I went in I read a large board of the rules of the place.

JOHN DEAN re-examined. Q. How long were you absent from the hall - A. I did not notice the time exactly, but I think not more than a minute.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-57

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, JUNE 4. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

873. JOHN BOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a coat, value 15 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d., and an iron, value 1 s. , the goods of John Brice .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-58

874. MARGARET DUNLEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 4 lbs. of ham, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Gammage .

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in King-street, Seven-dials. On the 22d of May, about half-past twelve o'clock, the prisoner came in, and went to a table where bacon and ham lay; she took a piece of ham, put it into her apron, and went out with it - I called to her - she ran away. I secured her about ten yards off with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-59

875. ABRAHAM BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on 19th of April , two saws, value 7 s., the goods of James Waitman ; and a saw, value 3 s. , the goods of John Burcher .

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. I was with my brother officer in Oxford-street, on the 19th of April, about a quarter past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner carrying three saws in a dust sack; Jennings stopped him. I crossed over, and he said he was going to take the saws to his father in the City; he was near Regent-street. He said his father was working in the City, and had sent a man to tell him to bring the saws. I offered to take him to the City - he then said he found them in a load of rubbish.

GEORGE JENNINGS . I have heard Carter's statement; it is correct.

JAMES WAITMAN . I am a carpenter , and was working at a new building, in Carlisle-street, Edgware-road. I saw my tools safe in the house at one o'clock on Sunday, and then saw the prisoner about one hundred yards off, playing with some boys. Two of these saws are mine.

JOHN BURGLES. One of them is mine. I left it safe in this house on Saturday night.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240603-60

876. ELIZABTH BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , twelve yards of ribbon, value 15 s., the goods of Giles Redmayne and Thomas Redmayne , privately in their shop .

SAMUEL BENNETT . I am shopman to Giles Redmayne and Thomas Redmayne. On the 24th of April, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop with a basket, and asked to see some figured ribbons, which I showed her - she seemed to admire one very much, but said it was too high a price, and asked to see some plain ones. I went for some, leaving the drawer with her, and on returning missed the ribbon she had so much admired, and saw the end of it hanging out of her bundle. I let her take it up and go; and I then went out, brought her back, and took her bundle from her basket, and the ribbon was in it. She said she believed she had not got it - she had bought and paid for one yard of ribbon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I looked at it, but did not know that it was in my bundle; I laid it down by the side of my bundle, and when I took the bundle up to put into the basket it was in it, but I did not know it.

SAMUEL BENNETT re-examined. Whether it was in her bundle or in the basket I do not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-61

877. JAMES CURTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 4 lbs. of pork, value 2 s. , the goods of Andrew Parsons .

ANDREW PARSONS . I am a provision dealer , and live in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's . On the 20th of April, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came, and reached his hand into my shop, and took out a hand of pork. I was in the back parlour - my son called out; he started off, and I after him, and took him in four or five minutes, down a passage. I had lost sight of him; he denied it. I did not see his face, only his breast and hand. The pork was dropped a few yards from the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240603-62

878. JOHN MORRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , at St. James, Westminster , one tea poy, value 5 l., the goods of Archibald Forman , in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE FORMAN . I am the wife of Archibald Forman , who is a cabinet-maker - we live at No. 48, Berkeley-street, Golden-square, in the parish of St. James, Westminster ; the shop is open to the street. On the 17th of April, between one and two o'clock, I was sitting in a little room in the shop; and on looking up, I saw the prisoner going out with a tea poy on his shoulder; there was nobody in the shop; I got up, ran out, and overtook him two doors off, and asked where he was going with it, as it was mine; I took it from him, he gave it to me willingly, and was detained; it is worth 5 l. The shop is part of the dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was your husband at home - A. No; I never saw the prisoner before; the room door was shut, but I am positive of him; the property was inside the shop, not at the door.

THOMAS ROLES . I am a bricklayer. I was at work in Marshall-street; somebody called Stop thief! I went out, and saw the prosecutrix taking this tea poy off the prisoner's shoulder; he immediately ran away, and I after him, through the market, and took him in Cross-street, without losing sight of him; I am certain of his person.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a constable, and live in Marshall-street. I heard an alarm, ran round another way, and Roles gave the prisoner to me in Marshall-street, and the prosecutrix gave me the tea poy.

ARCHIBALD FORMAN . This tea poy is my manufacture, and worth full 5 l. - I should sell it for more. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the shop for money for his master.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240603-63

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

879. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , at St. Mary's, Islington , a watch, value 5 l.; a watch-chain, value 18 d.; a seal, value 18 d., and a watch key, value 6 d., the goods of William Nicholls , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I live at Ball's Pond, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . On the 5th of May, at ten minutes before five o'clock in the morning, when I got up, I saw my watch hanging on the mantle-piece, at the foot of my bed; being late, I went out without it, and did not return home till eight at night; my wife had missed it before that; I saw it next day at Worship-street; the prisoner is my nephew, and lived in the Curtain-road with his mother; he had lived with me last summer.

JANE NICHOLLS . My husband went out in the morning - I went after him, and returned at seven o'clock in the morning, lighted the fire, and put the watch into a box wrapped in a counterpane; I did not lock the box - I locked the door; the window of that room was a little open; a person could get in at it. We have three rooms, all on the ground floor; I went home again at eleven o'clock, and again at ten minutes after five; opened the bedroom door, and went to the box - the counterpane was safe, but the watch was gone. I had seen the prisoner between twelve and one o'clock, sitting in the fields where we work; it is not far from our house; upon missing the watch, I went to my sister, who is his mother, and told her, in his hearing, that I had lost the watch, and suspected him; he began to cry, and denied it; I said if he did not let me know where it was my husband was coming - he took me to a fishmonger's - Connelly came out, and said he would take me to where the watch was; he took me to a stable, and the watch was down a cellar in the stable; the prisoner went with us, and Connelly handed the watch to me.

WILLIAM CONNELLY . I am a butcher, and live in Virginia-row, Shoreditch; I was painting a cart close against Ashton's father's stables on Thursday evening, when Ashton came and showed me a watch - he said,

"Look here, I have got a watch, a boy told me to hold it;" I said,

"Go and

put it into the stable till your father comes home," and when the prosecutrix came, I gave it to her. I knew Ashton before.

Q. What made you tell him to put it in the stable - A. I did not know better, my Lord.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I had known the prisoner for about a fortnight, by his coming backward and forward to my father's stable; he brought this watch to me on a Thursday about five o'clock, and said,

"Will you keep this until my father comes home;" he gave it me - I showed it to Connelly, who told me to put it down in the cellar in the coach-house.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . It is mine; I bought it a year ago for 5 l.; I know it by the chain and gold seal.

Prisoner's Defence (written). My Lord, permit me to state, that I had no intention of robbing the prosecutor - I constantly lived with him, and was provided for by him; my aunt quarrelled with her husband, and left him for three days; she at that time gave me many articles of clothing to carry to my mother - she told me her watch was in her box, and told me to bring it to her - I went and found it in the box, and brought it to my aunt.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240603-64

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

880. RICHARD CORDWELL and SARAH WILKINS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth, the wife of William Arms , on the King's highway, on the 13th of April , at St. Luke, Chelsea , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a shawl, value 6 d. , the goods of the said William Arms .

ELIZABETH ARMS . I am the wife of William Arms . On Monday, the 13th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was at Chelsea, by the College ; I had walked seventeen miles, and had come from Colebrook to see my husband, who is a Chelsea pensioner - it was dusk - I was going down the road, and the prisoners met me; another woman was with them, whom I had seen before, but never spoke to her; she (the one not present) gave me a blow with her fist, and gave me a black eye, cut my eyebrow, and knocked me down; Cordwell then came and took my shawl off my shoulders, and kicked me in the breast while I was down; I am certain that he is the man, he took my shawl and gave it to Wilkins - they left me laying on the ground - I got up as well as I could, and was walking towards London, when Wright took me to the watchman, that I might go to the office next day - I was coming to London to see my father and mother, who live in town; I did not know where my husband was at the time, but was searching after him - the prisoners were in custody next day - I am quite sure of them both - I have not seen the other woman since. I was half an hour on the ground, laying to recover myself, as my eye bled; they left me the moment they got the shawl.

Prisoner CORDWELL. Q. Were you not fighting on that night - A. No; I was perfectly sober.

RICHARD WRIGHT . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea. On Tuesday night, the 13th of April, about half-past ten or eleven o'clock, I was standing at my door - they were turning the people out of the Duke of York public-house, and the two prisoners came out with them; I knew them before - there were a good many of them in company; I saw the prosecutrix coming down by the wall; a woman, who is not in custody, ran up to her, and rammed her against the wall with violence, she struck her in the eye; the male prisoner ran over directly and caught her by the shoulder, dragged her on the ground, kicked her, and gave the shawl to the female prisoner; the prosecutrix had fallen into the road; he kicked her while she was down, and when he had got the shawl, he wrapped it up and brought it to the female prisoner, who put it under her apron. I said to him,

"That it was too bad to rob and ill use a woman so." The female prisoner said,

"There is old Wright, an old b - , what is it to him?" I said

"I will not stand here to see a woman robbed;" an officer came up, I pointed them out, and they were taken directly; I had known them both before a good while; the man had run away, I described him, and he was taken. I am certain of them both. I cannot say whether the prosecutrix was sober, not having had any conversation with her.

JOHN DANCE . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty at the Hospital on the 13th of April, as the pensions were being paid; and about eleven o'clock at night I came out of the Duke of York public-house, and heard Wright say,

"It is a great shame that a poor woman should be knocked down and robbed." I went to him; he pointed out the female prisoner. I took her, and took the shawl from her hand; she had it behind her - Cordwell ran away, I left the female in custody - pursued, and found him in a house in Castle-yard, Jew's-row. I had seen him before; Wright told me that it was Cordwell; I knew his name before - I had seen him a few minutes before, and he had a coat but when I took him he had a jacket on.

ELIZABETH ARMS . This is my shawl. I have a mark in the corner where I burnt it. I have had it a year.

WILKINS'S Defence. I was coming out of the public-house, and saw this woman on the other side of the way - several women and girls were round her, beating her. I saw the shawl on the ground, picked it up, and crossed over, and Wright said he saw this young man cross and give it to me. I had it in my hand intending to give it to her, when I got her from the crowd.

CORDWELL'S Defence. The woman was beastly drunk, and I never had the shawl.

CORDWELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

WILKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-65

881. HESTER CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Fairhead , two saucepans, value 4 s.; a pepper-box, value 15 s.; a salt-holder, value 15 s., and five spoons, value 12 s. , the goods of the said Benjamin Fairhead , her master .

BENJAMIN FAIRHEAD . I live in Chapman-street, St. George's East . The prisoner was six weeks in my service, and left me about the 10th or 11th of April, and when she was gone I missed this property.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am shopman to Mr. Price, pawnbroker, of Wentworth-street. On Friday, the 9th of April, about ten o'clock, a woman came to pawn a silver salt-holder. I detained it till she brought the woman whom she said she had it from; she fetched the prisoner, who said it was her own. I asked if she could tell the initials on it - she said she could, and then that she could not - that she had had it many years, and that she lived in Rosemary-lane.

I gave her in charge of an officer. She was very much intoxicated, and the other woman rather so - she knew what she was about, and answered me very pertinently.

ROBERT COOMBS . I am an officer. On the 9th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was fetched to Mr. Price's, and took the prisoner in charge there - she was rather tipsy, and asked the pawnbroker for her property or the money. I took her to the office, and found a silver pepper-box on her, and four duplicates pinned in her bosom; she said she had lost the duplicate of the sugar-tongs, and directed me to the prosecutor's, and said she had sent the other articles to be pawned, and the woman who pawned them had sold her, and the things were her mistresses.

GEORGE KETERER . I am shopman to Mr. Christie, pawnbroker, High-street, Whitechapel. I received three tea spoons in pawn from another woman; one of the duplicates found on the prisoner is what I gave the woman.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cable-street; another person pawned two copper pans, and a tea and table spoon with me; three of the duplicates produced are what I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 59.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Confined 1 Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-66

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

882. JOHN JORDAN and MARGARET SMYLLIE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , five spoons, value 5 s.; a pair of tea tongs, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a pocket-book, value 6 d.; a sheet, value 3 s., and nine sovereigns, the property of James Fromett , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH FROMETT . I am the wife of James Fromett ; we live in Margaret's-rents, East Smithfield . On Saturday night, the 19th of April, the prisoner, Jordan, took a furnished room in our house. Smyllie passed as his wife. They slept there on Saturday and on Sunday, and on Monday I went to Greenwich, about twelve o'clock, leaving them at home; Smyllie promised to take care of the house until I returned. About half an hour before I went, the landlord called for my rent. I took out a pocket-book in her presence, and gave him three sovereigns, leaving nine. She saw me do it, and the money jinked as I put the pocketbook into a box under the bed. I locked it, put the key into my pocket, and told her I was going to Greenwich with my children, and gave her the key of the door. I returned about eight o'clock, found the door locked, and the key on the table in their room; they were both gone. I found my box broken open, and the pocket-book and money gone, with the other property stated in the indictment, I have found none of them. We apprehended them on Wednesday at the Horse-Guards; Smyllie was then dressed with a new bonnet and feathers like a lady, and when she came to live with us she had but one gown.

DANIEL HOSSACK . I lodge with Fromett. Jordan worked with the same master as me, and is a shoemaker, and earned 16 s. or 1 l. a week; he came to lodge at Fromett's with the other prisoner; and on Monday, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I came home to tea, and drank tea with Smyllie in her room, and returned to work in about twenty minutes; I went home at nine, and both the prisoners were gone, and next morning, as I knew some of Jordan's old comrades were quartered at the King's-mews, I gave information to a soldier there.

Prisoner SMYLLIE Q. What tea things did you use. - A. She went into the prosecutor's room with me to fetch the tea caddy, and locked the door herself.

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I belong to the 3d regiment of Guards. On the 29th of April Hossack described Jordan to me. I saw the prisoners about half-past 10 o'clock next morning, at the King's-mews Barracks, and had them apprehended. I knew neither of them before. Smyllie was dressed in a plaid gown, a new bonnet, and shawl. Nothing was found on them.

JORDAN'S Defence. I asked this woman to go with me to the fair; she said she had promised to get the lodger his tea; but after tea we went. I met a comrade, and staid with him until Wednesday morning, and on going to the Mews was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-67

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

883. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , three gowns, value 28 s.; a clock, value 6 s; a whittle, value 1 s.; three shawls, value 6 s.; an umbrella, value 1 s.; and a scarf, value 4 s., the goods of Elizabeth Smith , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I live in Chapel-court, St. Clement's-lane , and am a widow . On the 28th April, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, locked my sitting-room up, and latched the outer door after me. I have no lodgers. The street door could be opened from the outside. I returned in three quarters of an hour, and found it wide open; hearing somebody on the stairs, I called out,

"Is any one on the stairs?" no answer was made. I went up three stairs, and found some one was coming down - the stairs being narrow and dark, I stepped out into the street, and the prisoner came down with a large bundle and an umbrella in his hand. I let him pass me for several yards, and when he had got to the light, I saw my gown and cloak sticking out of his bundle. I stepped up, and caught hold of him, saying,

"My friend, this is mine." He said, it was no such a thing. I said,

"I insist upon having it." He threw the bundle at me, saying,

"Take it." I took it up, and called Stop thief! He was brought back in four or five minutes. I am sure of his person - the bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment, which were all in my room on that day - they are worth about 44 s. He had wrapped them in his own apron.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a lad pursuing the prisoner. I stopped him in Stanhope-street, running as fast as he could, and Masters following him. I found a shawl in his hat, and the prosecutrix gave me the other things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT MASTERS . About a quarter to four o'clock in the afternoon, I was looking out of the window, and saw the prisoner with Mrs. Smith; he threw the bundle out of his hand, I ran after him, and saw him taken as he ran up a court, which has no thoroughfare.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18240603-68

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

884. JOSEPH DARVIL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sherwood , on the night of the 1st of May , with intent to steal, and stealing therein five live pigs, price 40 s., and three live rabbits, price 3 s. his property.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD . I live at Holloway, in the parish of Islington . On Sunday morning, the 2d of May, about eight o'clock, I was informed that my premises were broken open and robbed; and at 12 o'clock the officers came, and said they had taken some men. I had a sow and nine pigs in a stable adjoining my house; it is all in one range of building under one roof; you go from the house to the granary, then into the barn, and from there into the stable, without going into the air.

JAMES DANIELS . I am gardener to Mr. Sherwood. On the 1st of May, my master had a sow and nine pigs. I locked them up safe in the stable at half-past seven o'clock in the evening; there was also some fowls and rabbits in the stable, and in the morning, about half-past seven, I missed three rabbits and five pigs, and found the stable door forced open by a chisel or some instrument, and a great coat of mine was stolen; I saw two of the pigs that evening. I thoroughly examined them at the watchhouse, and am sure they are two of the five pigs.

WILLIAM ADKINS . I am keeper of Pentonville watch-house. On Sunday morning, the 2d of May, at little after four o'clock, I was standing at the top of Chapel-street, Penton-street, talking to the watchman - it was daylight, and had been so for half an hour - two persons passed me. I suspected them, and went down the road; and nearly opposite the Belvidere I caught hold of one of them, whose name is Jerdan - he got from me, and threw down a pig, and then a rabbit, and sprang from me, but was eventually taken, and put into the watchhouse. I returned, and picked up the rabbit and pig - they were dead. I was returning to the watchhouse, and nearly on the spot where Jerdan ran from; I saw the prisoner; he was not one of the two; but suspecting him from his appearance I collared him, and said he was my prisoner - he raised his arm. I said if he raised his arm I would break it. I called two watchmen, took him to the watchhouse, and found a pig under his smock frock. Jerdon afterwards got away - they were both taken from the watchhouse, and fully committed. I shewed the two pigs to Daniels; they were not quite cold. The prosecutor shewed me his live pigs - they appeared of the same litter.

ROBERT ALLEN . I saw Adkins take the prisoner. - Jerdan had got away. I had followed him till he was taken by another watchman.

JAMES DANIELS re-examined. I examined the two pigs very closely, and knew them to be two of the nine which were safe on the preceding night - they were five weeks old, and were white - they had no mark on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from seeing a fight in the fields, and saw three people drop something. I went and took up this pig.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-69

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

885. ISABELLA BEECHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a soup ladle, value 30 s.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 6 s.; two waistcoats, value 4 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a ring, value 4 s.; a seal, value 4 s., and a key, value 2 s. the goods of Isaac Barkley , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH BARKLEY . I am the wife of Isaac Barkley ; we live in Rupert-street, Whitechapel . On the 17th of April, about seven o'clock in the morning, when I got up, and went into the back parlour, I found the drawers taken out, they were locked the night before, and every thing was safe. I missed the articles stated in the indictment; the bolt of the back door was broken; the persons must have got over the wall of the yard to get to that door; the prisoner had lodged with us, and left about three weeks before the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. COOKE. Q. What is your husband - A. He is foreman to Mr. Parsons, a butcher. I went to bed about half-past twelve o'clock; nobody but my own family were in the house.

Q. Do not many persons come to your house at night whom you do not see - A. They may, but nobody came on that night; my servant is not here; persons sleep at the house sometimes whom I do not see; but I swear that none but my own family were there on that night; the back door was forced.

Q. The prisoner has lost the use of one arm - A. It is crooked, but I have seen her wash and work with it.

EDWARD MALES . I am servant to Mr. Parker, pawnbroker, Aldgate. On the 17th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned a soup-ladle and sugar-tongs for 34 s. I am certain of her.

MOSES FORTUNE , I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th, dancing at the Golden Lion public-house, Leman-street, Whitechapel, about nine o'clock at night; there were about 200 persons in the room; she was sitting down, and was pointed out to me. I went to Dock-street, and searched a room, which was pointed out to me as her's. I stated before her next morning, that I had searched her room; described where it was, and said I had found a napkin, a piece of ribbon, and three duplicates there. She sent for her landlady, who was the person who shewed me the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you notice the prisoner's door - A. I did; it had been wrenched with the violence, but clum-sily; not as thieves generally do. The yard wall is about four feet and a half high; it was a very wet night, and in the soft dirt in the yard, there were prints of a man's feet and a woman's pattens near the wall

COURT. Q. Does the door open into a garden - A. Into a paved yard, my Lord. It appeared that persons making the foot and patten marks had got over the wall which leads to a court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-70

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

886. MARY ANN SIMPSON was indicted for that she, on the 10th of May , in and upon William Simpson , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault; and with a certain sharp instrument did strike, cut, and stab him in and upon his shoulder, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be, to disable or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ELIZABETH CRAWLEY . I live in Sun-court, King David Place, Shadwell. On the 10th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was at the Whitehart public-house, Shadwell, with the prisoner and her husband, who is a seaman; two more men were there, one of whom did not belong to our party; we were drinking grog; the prisoner and her husband seemed in very good humour; she gave him the key of the door to go home; he went out and returned, and called for some grog, and I saw her aim at him to hit him; I had not heard them quarrelling, and do not know whether she had any thing in her hand; she aimed at his shoulder; whether it was in a passion or in fun, I do not know, or whether she hit him, but I saw a knife sticking in the shoulder of his jacket; she called out,

"Oh, my G - d! I have done it;" he said,

"My dear, what have you done?" and then said," She has stabbed me." She fell as if she was fainting; he caught her in his arms, they sat down together comfortably, and I left; one of the men pulled the knife out of his shoulder, gave it to me, and I put it on the table; it appeared a new one; I saw a little blood on his shirt.

Q. You don't know her reason for doing this - A. It was something about a woman named Bonham, who had been there that evening - I have heard them fall out about her, but not on that night - she had come in and sat down opposite to him; he told her to go away, for he would have nothing to say to her; she went out, and after this was done she came into the room several times. I went to their lodgings on the Tuesday following, and saw the prisoner applying leeches to her husband's shoulder; they were friendly together then, and she said she was very sorry for it - he said,

"Never mind, it cannot be helped now." I have not seen him for the last three weeks - he said he was going to sea.

WILLIAM CADMAN . I am a cutler. On the 8th of May the prisoner came to my shop and bought a penknife, and a few days afterwards she bought another, and on the same evening another.

MARY DOOREY . I live at the Whitehart public-house. On Tuesday morning, the 11th of May, I found a penknife on the floor.

RICHARD PULLEN . I am a surgeon. I examined Simpson's shoulder, which was considerably inflamed. I found a puncture of a sharp instrument, but could not then ascertain the depth of the wound. I was fetched again in the evening; his wife had applied leeches by my order; I then probed it, and found it about an inch and a half deep; it was a dangerous wound; he was under my care for a fortnight; it had struck on the spine.

The prosecutor was not in attendance.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-71

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

987. ALEXANDER BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a coat, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 15 s.; a hat, value 10 s.; a pair of boots, value 10 s.; and eight shillings, the property of Charles Boyd , from his person .

CHARLES BOYD . I am a shoemaker . On the 20th of May I was at a public-house in Orchard-street, Westminster. I came out at half-past nine or ten o'clock, and was going home to Berwick-street, and at the corner of the first street I found myself sick - I was rather intoxicated. Three young men came up, and said it was a pity that I should stand there; I said if they would procure me a coach I would give them a shilling; they said they would, and told me to follow them, which I did, but don't know along what streets, for I was never there but once before. I asked if that was the nearest way to the coach-stand; they said it was. We came to a house in Duck-lane; they said I had better step in, and one of them would fetch a coach directly; I went in - the room was quite dark - I felt for a chair - could fine none, and sat on the bed; they said I had better stop there for half-an-hour, as it might be that time before the coach came; I said I could not. One of them helped me to take off my coat, which I consented to - I held it in my hand - one of them dragged it from me, and then seized my waistcoat, another my boots, and pulled them both off at once, and all three set off and locked me in; there was the duplicate of a watch in my coat pocket, and a purse containing 8 s.; I called out of a window, as square of glass was broken, but nobody came. In about an hour and a half some persons came into the room, and said if I did not come out they would take me to the watch-house; I said I would not leave till I had got my clothes; the room was still dark, they came two or three times in the dark; I cannot say who they were; they at last brought a light; the first who came with it in his hand was the prisoner - I am sure he is one of the three who robbed me, but he was not one of those who took my clothes off. I remained in the room till daylight, then went for a female whom I knew, and she got an officer.

Q. How long did the prisoner stay when he brought a light - A. Not a moment. I heard a number of voices after that, and knew his voice, but saw nobody; I described them to the officer, and about two o'clock in the afternoon, saw the prisoner at a public house in Orchard-street, and gave him in charge. I cannot speak positively to his being one of the persons who took me to the house. When he brought the light, two or three others were with him; he told me to leave that house; he had a white hat on, and I believe one of the three had a white hat.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. On the 21st of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was fetched to Duck-lane, and found the prosecutor in his shirt and trowsers; he described three persons to me, and in the afternoon, I apprehended the prisoner, who denied the charge; he lodged at the house once, but I cannot say whether he did then.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Vauxhall on the evening of the robbery, and left at eleven o'clock, and slept at my father's - three men who had hired the room, and had been missing ever since, were taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-72

988. ANDREW CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a boy's dress, value 7 s. 6 d. the goods of James Henry Williamson .

JAMES HENRY WILLIAMSON . I live in Brick-lane, Whitechapel , and am a pawnbroker . On the 12th of May, about one o'clock, I stood behind the counter; the prisoner came within the door, and by the reflection of a looking glass, I saw him unpin a boy's dress, which hung up;

he dropped it down, and ran away with it as quick as he could; I pursued and took him, without losing sight of him; he dropped it, and my boy picked it up.

WILLIAM JOHN MARTIN . I am errand-boy to Mr. Williamson, and was behind the counter; I saw the prisoner come in and take this dress; I followed, he threw it down, and I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I saw it lying down two or three yards from the door, I picked it up, and hearing a cry, I dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-73

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

889. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a pair of trowsers, value 7 s. the goods of David Jones .

PHILIP RILEY . I am a patrol. On the 3d of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner running up George-street, St. Giles's, with these trowsers under his arm; I ran and overtook him in Church-lane with them - they had the shop ticket on - he attempted to drop them - he said his shoes were very bad, he thought he could get a pair for these trowsers; and so he took them.

DAVID JONES . I am a clothes salesman , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's; I know these trowsers to be mine, but cannot positively say that I had not sold them, and omitted to take the ticket off.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-74

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

890. JOHN EDMUNDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and half-a-crown , the monies of Alfred Berry , his master .

ALFRED BERRY . I am a blind-maker , and live in Long-acre; the prisoner was in my service for a year and a half, except for four or five months, while he was ill. On Sunday, the 2d of May, I gave him two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and two half-crowns, to pay a quarter's ground-rent to Dalton; he never returned.

THOMAS DALTON . I live at Norwood; Berry owed me 2 l. 15 s. for ground-rent - I have known the prisoner for five or six years; he was at my house on Sunday evening, the 2d of May - I sent for him to take a message to his master - he sat in my house about two hours, but has never paid me this money.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-75

London Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

891. JOSEPH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , at St. Mary Magdalen, Milk-street , five yards of canvass, called a wrapper, value 6 s., and sixty-seven pieces of printed cotton, value 85 l. 14 s., the goods of William Pattison and William Dudley ; in the dwelling-house of the said William Pattison , there situate .

MR. WILLIAM DUDLEY . I am in partnership with Mr. William Pattison ; we are Manchester warehousemen : our warehouse is at No. 115, Cheapside , and Mr. Pattison resides there. I have an invoice of the goods stated in the indictment; it was in our possession before the goods arrived. I will not swear that I have seen it on the invoice file; the goods were delivered at our warehouse, and stolen before the bale was opened. I compared them at Guildhall with the invoice, and they corresponded; the bale contained forty-four pieces of printed cotton, and twenty-three of another description.

RICHARD HEDGES . I am apprenticed to the prosecutors. On the 17th of May, I saw the Manchester carrier bring some bales of goods, and put them in the passage; and next morning about nine o'clock, I missed one bale marked P. D. L. 410 - it was safe twenty minutes before.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 18th of May, in consequence of information, I went to French Horn-court, Beech-street, Barbican, to a private house; and in a room there I found sixty-seven pieces of print - I cannot say in which room they were, but I found the prisoner close to the bedside, with the prints spread out on the bed - I secured him - he had a plaister on his lip, which the witness Bignall had described to me. I said I wanted him - he said nothing. I have ten pieces of the cotton here - the Magistrate said I might give up the rest.

SAMUEL BIGNALL . I am servant to Mr. Bailey, who is a carrier. On Tuesday morning, the 18th of May, my cart stood in Bread-street. The prisoner came and asked if I belonged to it - I said Yes - he said bring it to Pattison and Dudley's. I followed him to Milk-street, and saw him with a bale of goods - he said,

"Here, my man, I have got the bale ready for you;" he was at the corner of Milk-street; he told me to turn about; we got a person to help us with the bale into the cart; he rode in the cart, and wanted me to go in great haste to Barbican; and when I got to the end of Barbican I said,

"Where is the place;" he said,

"Go farther, and I will shew you." I drove to French Horn-alley; he told me to drive up the gateway, which I did; he said,

"Set the bale down here, and I will not detain you any longer;" he went into the house, and fetched me 3 s. 4 d. for the cartage, and I went away, leaving the bale in the court. A man came out of house, and I saw them rolling the bale over, but did not see it taken into the house. When I got to the cart-stand, an officer was making inquiry - I told him where I took it to, and I went to Guildhall on the same day, and again next day. The prisoner had a cut lip, and a black plaister on it, at the time.

Prisoner. Q. You said before that I stood with the bale close to a hairdresser's shop - how could that be, if I fetched the cart - A. You ran up the street before me, and when I came up you stood against the bale at the end of Milk-street.

Q. Did not the officer offer you 9 l. to come and swear against me. A. No, he offered me nothing - he said he would lock me up with you. I did not notice what mark was on the bale.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I first saw Hedges on Tuesday morning, the 18th of May - he went with me immediately to the house - we got there between nine and ten o'clock.

Mr. WILLIAM DUDLEY . I examined the goods at Guildhall - every piece has our private mark, which is put on by my partner, when he purchases them at Manchester - the

goods agree with the invoice. I can swear to the private mark, and it corresponds with the price charged for the goods.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Cheapside, and accidentally met a stranger, who told me to get him a cart. I was near Milk-street. He said if I went half-way down Bread-street I should get one. I went, and employed this man; and the person said, if I would take it to his lodging he would be there and direct me what to do with it. On arriving he was waiting for me - he took off the wrapper, and went away with it - he told me to wait till he returned, and in the mean time the officer came up and took me. How it came from the prosecutor's house I don't know.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18240603-76

892. RICHARD HART was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Thomas Tyas , about 11 o'clock in the night of the 10th of April , at St. Giles without Cripplegate , with intent to steal; and stealing therein a watch, value 1 l. 16 s.; two seals, value 4 l. 12 s.; a watch-key, value 20 s.; two watch-chains, value 16 l. 16 s., and two reticule-mounts, value 6 s. , his property.

WILLIAM THOMAS TYAS . I am a watchmaker and silversmith . I live in the parish of St. Giles without Cripplegate. On Saturday evening, the 10th of April, about eleven o'clock, I was going from my shop into the parlour, and as I entered the parlour I heard the shop window broken with violence - the shutters were not shut. I ran out, missed property, and went in pursuit. I ran up a passage three doors from my house, leading to the tap of a wine vaults, and saw a man running. Two or three women who were in the passage said he had thrown the property down - I looked and found nothing. I returned to the shop, and missed two gold chains, two gold seals, a gold key, a lady's watch, and two steel reticule clasps - the whole are worth 25 l. Mr. Watson, who was in my parlour, found the watch - it is an engine-turned one (looking at one) - this is it - it was in the window.

WILLIAM GEORGE WATSON . I was in Mr. Tyas's parlour, heard the window break, and followed him out, and found the watch exactly under the broken window. The prisoner was brought back by an officer, with his hand cut and bleeding. I asked how it got cut - he said it was not, and drew it aside. I looked at it, and said it was cut.

SARAH HOWARD . I live at No. 6, Denmark-court, which is at the back of the prosecutor's house. On the 10th of April, about ten minutes to eleven o'clock, I was in my room - heard a noise in the passage, and opened the door - the prisoner ran up stairs, and the constable after him. I picked up two clasps by the street door. His left hand was bloody.

JAMES GEORGE COX . I live in Barbican. On the 10th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, I was crossing from Redcross-street, and saw one man at one corner of Mr. Tyas's window, and the other at the other corner, nearer to the door. The one at the corner near a cheesemonger's shop broke the window, and in a minute or two he ran away. I saw something glitter in his hand, and tried to stop him; he gave me a blow, and ran down the passage, and I after him, and called to a person at the end of the passage to stop him - he turned round, gave me another blow, and shut the door at the end of the passage - I forced it open, and when I got near to him I saw him throw a clasp down - he went into one of the houses; I could not tell which - Howard's door was open. The officer went in, and found him there; it was the prisoner; I saw his hand bleeding; he is the man I saw at the shop. I saw his face when he struck me.

THOMAS WILLIAM PATEMAN . I am a cheesemonger, and live next door to the prosecutor. On the 10th of April, about a quarter to eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner opposite my window, and noticed him, suspecting he was after no good. I saw him in custody on Monday, and knew him.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable. On Saturday night, the 10th of April, I heard Mr. Tyas's window break, and saw the prisoner running - he ran up a passage by the Redcross-tap, and I after him; I took him in three or four minutes, in the passage of Howard's house. I am sure he is the man whom I saw running. I had ran round Denmark-court to stop him. Howard gave me two clasps.

Prisoner's Defence. My brother took my shoes to be mended; I had not got the shoemaker's right address. I was returning from work, and was directed to Johnson, a shoemaker, and was told it was on the first floor - as I came down I saw the officer knocking at the opposite door; he came over, and took me; he was called back, and these things given into his hand.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240603-77

893. FREDERICK TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Baylis , from his person .

JOSEPH BAYLIS . On the 15th of April, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Lower Thames-street , and felt a twitch at my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner and another passing me, and said,

"You have stolen my handkerchief," (as I missed it;) they both ran away - the prisoner crossed the street; he seemed to be fumbling about his coat. I followed him; he was stopped - I said,

"You villian, you have stolen my handkerchief;" he pulled it from under his coat; gave it to me, and begged my pardon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up. I have been out of work a long time.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-78

894. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , two petticoats, value 1 s.; two gowns, value 15 s., and a milk pot, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Sherman .

MARY SHERMAN . My husband's name is Thomas - he is a plumber ; we live in Water-lane . On the 29th of April, about half-past three o'clock, I was cleaning the passage, and was called into the shop to serve; I left the private door open; my lodger went up-stairs soon after, and gave an alarm. I saw her struggling with the prisoner on the stairs, and went to her assistance - we held him till

Leadbeater came and took him. I saw a bundle of my clothes under his arm on the stairs; when he was searched, my milk pot was found in his hat. The property was taken from a chest in our bed-room.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was he not in liquor - A. No, Sir. I told him he had got my property - he said he had not. I did not desire him to leave the house.

SARAH HARTLEY . I lodge at Sherman's. I saw the prisoner on the third flight of stairs, coming down with a bundle. I took hold of him, and asked who he wanted; he said he had been up to John Smith ; I said, there was no Smith there. He struggled, and said,

"Let me go;" but I held him till the officer came, and saw the bundle taken from him - he did not appear to be in liquor.

JANE STEWARD . I assisted in holding him on the stairs, hearing an alarm when I was in the shop. I went up, and the man was secured. I do not know who he was. I found the bundle on the stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear to the prisoner - A. No; several people came round the shop.

JOSEPH POTTER . Steward fetched me to the house - I found the shop full of people; Leadbeater was there. I found the milk pot in the prisoner's hat; he was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor - I had been at the public-house next door, and was told that a friend of mine lived at the top of this house, and on going up stairs I saw this bundle. This lady was the first person whom I saw; she shoved me down, and said, I had gone there to rob. I could have got away. She told me to go, but I said I would not till I had seen my friend. There is an officer in Court who knows that I was in liquor. I know nothing of the charge.

- . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner - he appeared to me to be in liquor.

JANE STEWARD re-examined. I told him to go away; he said he would not. I was too much terrified to say whether he was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-79

895. MARY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , at St. Bridget alias St. Bride , a gown, value 12 s.; a scarf, value 11 s.; a jacket, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 7 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of Joyce Kingston , in her dwelling-house .

JOYCE KINGSTON . I am a widow , and live at No. 30, Water-lane , in the parish of St. Bridget's alias St. Bride. On the 15th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went up stairs, and heard a person say,

"Is any one coming up?" the voice came from my room door. I found the prisoner outside the door; I went into the room, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were all safe in the drawers at seven o'clock that morning. I lost a gown, a shawl, and a suit of clothes; they were worth 3 l. 10 s. I immediately came out of the room - the prisoner was then gone out. I ran out, looked up and down the lane, and saw her come out of the next house; she had nothing then - I said she had got my things, and laid hold of her - Gould, who lives in the next house, assisted me; she denied having my things, and said I did not see her take them.

JOHN GREENWOOD . I am a sawyer. I stood in a cellar opposite to the prosecutrix's house, and saw the prisoner come out with a bundle of things in her apron, and go into the next house. I afterwards saw Mrs. Kingston stop her - she had nothing when she came out of the next house, but she had when she went in.

WILLIAM GOULD . I am thirteen years old, and live at No. 29, Water-lane. I saw the prisoner coming out of our house; I stood in the shop, by the window, and asked what she wanted; she would not answer, and was going to run when Kingston caught hold of her, and in a minute or two I found these clothes on our cellar stair - any person in the passage could put them there; they were not tied up. I gave them to Mrs. Kingston.

CHARLES MASTERS . I am a constable. I received her in charge. I found none of the property on her. Mrs. Kingston gave me a waistcoat and trowsers.

JOYCE KINGSTON . They were picked up on the stairs, and are mine. All the property is here.

Prisoner. I did it from extreme distress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of her distress .

Reference Number: t18240603-80

896. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Samuel Sheffield , on the night of the 13th of May , with intent to steal .

SAMUEL SHEFFIELD . I live in Aldgate High-street . The prisoner was in my service four or five months ago. On the night he was taken, at a quarter to twelve o'clock, I examined my till, and found the screws of it drawn ready to take it down; three of them were quite out; by pulling the others the till would drop down; the shop is part of my dwelling-house. There is a large slaughter-house at the back of the premises, in Chequer-square; it has an open place in it to admit air; a person can get up it as easy as on a ladder, and then drop into the yard upon the bullock-house, and get into the slaughter-house. I am a butcher.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. What day are you speaking of - A. The 19th. I cannot say whether the slaughter-house door was fastened. I do not know the state of the premises on the 13th. I went to bed last on the 13th, and saw that all the doors were shut - there is a space over the door, which is always open to admit air. A person could get in without breaking anything.

COURT. There is no proof of any breaking.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-81

897. WILLIAM ADAMS was again indicted for a burglary in the said dwelling-house, on the 19th of May , with intent to steal .

SAMUEL SHEFFIELD . On the evening of the 19th, I found the screws of my till loosened - the officer called me a little after 12 o'clock - I found the prisoner in custody - the officer produced a chisel - I found my back door open; also the back and front kitchen doors, which were closed when I went to bed - they were on the latch.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons have you in your house - A. Three men, a maid-servant, and my daughter. I went to bed about half-past 11 o'clock; none of the doors were broken, as he could get in by lifting up a latch - I tried the back door before I went to bed, and am sure that it was latched - I leave it so for the man who sleeps in

the back premises, to come in in the morning - my men went to bed before me - I saw their lights out.

Q. Do you not know that he came to sleep in the house A. I do not; I should not have suffered it; he might have got in over the door, the same as on the 13th.

JONAS TAYLOR . I am a servant to Mr. Sheffield, and sleep in the back premises. On the 19th of May I went to bed before eleven - my master was up then.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am an officer. On the 19th of May, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was watching the prosecutor's premises, and saw a light come into the shop. I got on the bench in the street, looked through the fanlight, and saw the prisoner come into the front shop, and draw some screws from the wood work of the till with a screw-driver, which I afterwards found in his breeches pocket; he was at the till for eight or ten minutes; he then went to the desk at the corner of the shop, and, in about twenty minutes he took the light to the back of the house. I had a key of the street door. I went in, and secured him at the foot of the stairs; the back door leading to the slaughter-house was open. I asked how he came there - he made no answer.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to a friend's, and got in there to sleep, as I was locked out, and his man had often asked me to sleep there. I had no intention to rob.

JURY to MR. SHEFFIELD. Q. If he got through this open place, could he get into the house without opening a door - A. He must open one door to get to the till - it is the back shop door. The open place is over the door of what we call the pound - it is not part of the dwelling-house. He must open a door in the outer wall of the house to get in, but one door leading to the yard was open.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-82

898. HENRY LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a great coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES . I manufacture ginger-bread , and live in Bouverie-street, City-road. On the 19th of April my cart stood in Bishopsgate-street , with my great coat on it. I went into the King's Arms public-house - I missed it when I came out, and found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM RILEY . I am a constable. On the 19th of April, between four and five o'clock, I saw the prisoner take this coat off the cart, and cross over with it. I seized him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked me if I wanted a job, and told me to carry the coat for him, and he would give me a shilling. He ran away when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-83

899. HENRY KING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Richard Donkin , from his person .

RICHARD DONKIN . On the 29th of May, in the afternoon, I was in Water-lane, Fleet-street . I felt something at my coat pocket. I turned round, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe just before. I saw the prisoner behind me, and secured him; he fell on his knees, begged for mercy, and pulled it from under his jacket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he beg for mercy, or to be let go? A. For both; he confessed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief laid on the ground on the opposite side to where I was. I crossed and picked it up, and walked on, seeing nobody near me. The gentleman asked me for it - I said,

"Is this it; I did not know that it was your's."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-84

900. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 100 lbs. of lead, value 16 s., the goods of John Wilson , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to an out-house.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

MR. JOHN WILSON . I have a house at No. 3, Crescent, in the Minories ; when the prisoner was apprehended I found the lead stripped off it.

BENJAMIN SANKEY . I am servant to Mr. Wilson, and live in the house; this lead was taken on the night of the 17th, or early in the morning of the 18th of April; I afterwards saw some fitted to the building.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Where was it taken from - A. The back yard; if it had been taken the day before I must have missed it. I missed it on Sunday morning; the place measured nine feet and a half by three feet.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer; on Sunday morning, the 18th of April, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Houndsditch with this lead in a bag. I asked what he had got, he said lead, that he had brought it from Deptford, and was going to take it to Clark, a plumber, in Sun-street. I tried, but could find no such person; and in the evening I found Mr. Wilson's house had been stripped of lead. I applied it to his premises on Monday morning, and it fitted exactly; about 1/2 a cwt. was still missing; it had been cut with a knife.

Cross-examined. Q. It had been daylight for some time - A. Yes. He was about three minutes walk from the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going from Crutchetfriars to the corner of George-street, and turned up behind a hoard for a necessary purpose, I saw this bag of lead behind some planks, and was going to sell it in Long-alley.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-85

901. HENRY SCARRD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , two seals, value 30 s.; and two watch-keys, value 30 s. the goods of Daniel Edward Colston , from his person .

DANIEL EDWARD COLSTON . I live in Aldermanbury; on the evening of the 15th of April, I was passing the end of Hare-court, Aldersgate-street , the prisoner and two others stood there; the other two were sparring, which made me pass nearer to the prisoner, who instantly snatched at my watch; the chain broke, and he got away with the seals; one of the others laid hold of me, saying,

"What is the matter," and tried to hinder my pursuing; but I sprang forward, calling, Stop thief! and saw him stopped a few yards off by Pearson. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say,

"Has any body ran by?" - A. No; Pearson said nobody had passed him. I

know him from his dress and appearance; there is a gas lamp opposite the entrance; I did not lose sight of him for a moment; I heard something fall, and the seals were picked up at his feet.

JAMES PEARSON . I was in Paul's-alley, near Hare-court, and met three people running towards me, calling, Stop thief! I stopped the first, which was the prisoner; and picked the seals and keys up at his feet.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the prosecutor ask you if a young man had not run by - A. Yes; I said no.

JAMES CLARK . I saw Pearson holding the prisoner, and saw two gold seals drop from his hand; they were picked up and given to Pearson.

JOHN BARNES . I received the prisoner in charge, with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men ran by me. How can they swear which of us dropped the seals - they were not found within six yards of me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-86

902. GEORGE NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a watch, value 20 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; two seals, value 15 s.; and a key, value 3 s. 6 d., the goods of John Morgan , from his person .

JOHN MORGAN . I live at York. On the 11th of May, at eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Gutter-lane , and saw the prisoner with another person. I endeavoured to pass between him and the wall, but he jostled me against the wall - his companion came behind him, snatched at my chain, and drew my watch from my pocket, saying,

"Young man, I'll ease you of this." He ran down the lane. I pursued, calling out Stop thief! - a person came in contact with me, and we both fell - the prisoner ran by, and joined the other man. I saw the prisoner taken in two or three minutes in St. Martin's le-Grand - he was taken into a shop and immediately gave the watch to Mr. Engelhart, and then told the officer that he might search him. Englehart produced it, and said in his presence that he had put it into his hand - he did not deny it.

JOHN ENGLELHART . I am a pork-butcher, and live in St. Martin's-le-Grand. I heard an alarm, went to the door, and saw the prisoner in custody. I put out my hands to keep the mob off; he put the watch into my hand, and said,

"Keep it, keep it!" Morgan claimed it.

WILLIAM GRIFFITH . I saw the prisoner put the watch into Engelhart's hand, and told him to take care of it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. Engelhart gave me the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-87

903. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 4 lbs. of flower, value 1 s., and a paper bag, value 1/2 d. , the goods of Robert Abelton , his master .

ROBERT ABELTON . I am a baker . The prisoner was my journeyman for nine months. On the 3d of May, in consequence of suspicion, I examined my cellar, and found three paper bags of flour concealed in a rat-trap - the prisoner had just gone out with bread, and I had seen him come from the cellar - he came in, and went into the cellar, came up, and went out. I went down, and found one of the bags gone. I followed him into the street, took his hat off, and found it there. He fell on his knees, and begged forgiveness.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. When did you miss any flour - A. I did not miss it; the three bags weighed 11 lbs.; it was all in one trap. I did not give him in charge until next day, as I could not spare him; it had no business in his hat - if it was for a customer, it should be in his basket - he confessed that he had put the bags into the trap. I thought well of him before.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-88

NEW COURT. (2d DAY,)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

904. CATHARINE KEENAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , four napkins, value 2 s.; two towels, value 1 s.; two books, value 1 s.; two plates, value 4 d.; three spoons, value 3 d.; two pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; two frock bodies, value 2 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; two bed-gowns, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a pillowcase, value 1 s.; two pair of ruffles, value 3 s.; and a pocket, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Dunhill .

THOMAS DUNHILL . I keep the Chelsea Coffee-house - the prisoner was my servant - she came on Saturday, the 10th of April, and applied on Friday, the 16th, to leave - she wished to go on Saturday, but she did not go until we had discovered this robbery.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH BARNES . I am Mr. Dunhill's mother-in-law, and was at his house from the 10th to the 17th of April, on a visit. I accused the prisoner of taking some lace of mine, which is in Court - she denied having it several times. I put her into the dining-room, and said,

"Stop here until it is found" - she at last said,

"I will go, and find it;" - she went, and brought it. I then said, there was a lace cap of the baby's missing; perhaps she could be clever enough to find that - she went into her room and brought it. I said

"There are several other things missing - there is one of the little girl's frocks." I followed her up stairs, looked through a crack in the wainscot, and saw her look into her box - when she heard me she pushed the box round, and said

"Pray Ma'am, don't look into the box." I found this cap and several other things there, and took them down to my daughter.

JOHN COLES . I am an officer. I was sent for to take her into custody - the articles found in her box were produced. I asked if she had pawned or given away any others; she said she had given a frock and spoon to an acquaintance, who had given her victuals and other things when she was out of place.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-89

410. THOMAS MILBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a jacket, value 20 s.; a pair of pantaloons value 10 s.; and a pair of braces, value 4 d.; the goods of John

Patison ; a jacket, value 4 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s., and a waistcoat, value 9 d. , the goods of Samuel Fenwick .

JOHN PATTISON . I am a seaman, and belong to the brig Horn . I lodged at Mr. Thompson's, Stone-stairs-court . I took a jacket and a pair of pantaloons up into the garret on the 19th of May, and put them into the chest - there were three beds in the room - the prisoner occupied one of the beds, and had slept there for three or four nights - he came to sleep there on Tuesday night, but did not return on Wednesday. I met him on that day, and said,

"Are you going to your lodgings" - he said,

"I shall be in directly." I asked what ship he belonged to - he said, the John. I went home, and missed my property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL FENWICK . I lodged in the same room. I left my goods tied up in a bundle, and missed them on Tuesday morning; here are the jacket, waistcoat, and trowsers.

JAMES CRAGIE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on Tuesday the 20th of May - he said he belonged to the ship Friendship. Mr. Evans asked him for the key of his chest - he gave it up; but these clothes were in the half-deck, which the Captain told me belonged to Thomas Smith . I brought them to the prisoner, and he said he had taken them out of his lodgings by mistake - he left no clothes of his own behind except a pair of shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-90

906. JAMES LONGMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , two half-crowns, and two sixpences the monies of Elizabeth Hunt .

ELIZABETH HUNT . I am a widow , and live in Charles-street, Lisson-green. On the 13th of April, I met the prisoner in Shepherd-street, Oxford-street, and we went together - he desired me to pay for the room, as he had no silver. I had two half-crowns and two sixpences, after paying 1 s. for the room, and I then had the money in my hand - he was then in the room and could see it - he proposed to stop all night. I consented, and he said I had better go and ask how much the room would be for the night. I was partly undressed; but I went down. I had taken my gown, pocket, and shawl off, and put the pocket into my bonnet. I came up again, and told him 3 s. He said,

"Poh, poh, nonsense, I will go down, and speak to the mistress." He went down, and met the servant on the stairs, and said

"Is that the lowest?" - I heard her say,

"Here is my mistress." I then heard him run out. I went up stairs to put on my clothes, and found the money gone. I saw him on the Saturday week at the office. I had not seen him before.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has your husband been dead - A. Twelve months and a fortnight. I was married at St. John's, Westminster; I did not accost him, but he accosted me; he said he had no silver till he got change, and he would then return it.

SAMUEL GILBERT . I am an officer; I saw the prisoner on Saturday the 24th of April. The witness had told me of her being robbed, and described the man. I charged him with it, and he said he was innocent; I asked why he ran away; he said he had no money, and wished to bilk them; I did not detain him. I afterwards went to his house and pushed the door open, and said I had a charge of felony against him; he said

"About that girl?" he then said he did not rob her, but was as innocent as a child unborn.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to his house more than once - A. Yes; several times; I called at last, and said I had a charge of felony against him; he confessed that he had been at the house, and that he ran away, but did not wish to rob the girl.

MARIA ROBERTS . I am an unfortunate girl; I was at the house on this night talking to the landlady, when the question was asked about the price of the lodging; I knew the prisoner perfectly well; I saw Mrs. Hunt with the shawl thrown over her shoulders; she went up stairs again, and I heard her speak to him, and he said,

"Poh, poh, nonsense." He came down, and the servant said,

"Here is my mistress" - he then ran away, and Mrs. Hunt came down and said she had been robbed of 11 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Wapping and met the girl; she said,

"Will you take a walk with me." I said,

"I have very little money, I have but half-a-crown, if you will take that and pay for the room, I will." We went into the house, and she paid for the room; the servant came, and she asked the price of the room for the night - she said 3 s.; I said it was too much, and she said,

"Go down and ask my mistress;" and I went, and as I did not wish to be seen with the females who were there, I went out. I heard somebody say

"That is the man, stop him." When the officer came to me he said,

"Do you recollect being with a person in that street." I said

"About that girl;" he said

"Yes, the girl you robbed." I said

"I know nothing about robbing her."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-91

907. GEORGE NICHOL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a looking-glass, value 3 l., and a carpet, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Watts , the elder .

JOSEPH WATTS . I keep the Peerless Pool Baths, City-road - I lost these articles on the 24th of April from the Bath.

JOSEPH WATTS , JUN. I am apprentice to the last witness. On the 25th of April, about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I opened a door of the bath, and the prisoner was coming out at the other door with the glass and carpet - I did not speak to him, but followed him a step or two - he laid the glass against the front of the house and ran away. I saw him taken in about a minute - I had lost sight of him, when he turned the corner, but am sure he is the same man - he was taken about a hundred or a hundred and fifty yards from our premises. I went to see if the glass and carpet were gone, and they were.

Cross-examined. Q. You lost sight of him - A. Yes; at the corner, only for an instant - there were three or four other persons pursuing him - my opportunity of seeing his countenance was but short; but I know him by his dress and countenance - he was dressed in a long pepper and salt coloured coat.

THOMAS POTTER . I took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work, and was rather late - this young man cried Stop thief! A man stopped me near the City-road. I said I was not the person.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-92

Before Mr. Recorder.

908. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 21 yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. , the goods of William Neville .

JOHN HILL . On Thursday evening, the 27th of May, about nine o'clock, I was coming down the Mile-end-road, about a hundred yards from Mr. Neville's, and saw two men running towards town - I observed them particularly; one appeared to be pursuing the other - the prisoner, who was first, threw something away - I pursued him immediately, and did not lose sight of him till I caught him. I am quite positive as to his person - I did not go back with him, because Mr. Young brought the article which had been stolen soon afterwards, and I delivered him to the watchman.

ISAAC HORATIO ELLISTON YOUNG. I am in the employment of Mr. Neville, linen-draper, Mile-end-road, these goods were in the shop on the evening in question, hanging upon a line, about three feet from the door - I had seen them within an hour of their being taken. The witness, Harrie, came in and told me something had been stolen, and pointed in the direction in which the man had gone. I pursued, but could not at first perceive whether he had any thing, but I saw him throw away the cotton, and picked it up. Hill pursued with me, but in consequence of my stooping to pick up the goods, he caught him first. I gave the cotton to the constable.

FREDERICK HARRIE . I live near Mr. Neville's - my mother and I keep a boarding-school - on the night of the robbery I saw a man go into Neville's shop and take something - I gave information directly, and saw Mr. Young run in the direction which I pointed out to him. I could not distinguish the features of the prisoner - I did not join in the pursuit, but went home.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a night constable; this piece of goods was brought to me, and the prisoner given in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-93

909. CHARLES RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 40 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., the goods of John Campbell , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of John Matthews .

JOHN CAMPBELL . I live in the New-road, Tottenham. The house from whence this lead was taken is No. 33, New Belton-street . I saw the lead upon the roof about Christmas, when it was repaired - I did not hear of any being stolen till the 24th of April, when Mr. Matthews called, and said that the wet came through. I went with him, and got up at the front of the house, and missed lead from the middle of the gutter - it appeared to be fresh cut. I saw some lead found on the same morning, in another house of mine, No. 29 or 30, occupied by Mr. Chapman. I compared that lead with the vacancy, and it exactly fitted it; I have no doubt of its being taken from there.

WILLIAM WALBANCKE . I occupy the first floor of this house; it is rented by Matthews; Campbell asked me to go with him to Bow-street; when we came back we went to No. 30, got up to the top of the house, and went along the roof to Mr. Matthews's house, and found the lead had been taken from there, it was in the loft at No. 30 - I saw it applied to the place, and it fitted exactly. I have no doubt but it was taken from there. The prisoner lives at No. 30; his mother keeps the front garret, and he keeps pigeons in the loft where the lead was found.

COURT. Q. Was the lead in one or more pieces - A. The lead was in two pieces; they were both in one pigeon loft, the one kept by the prisoner.

Prisoner. There are other pigeons kept in the next house - Witness. I believe there are.

JURY. Q. Could another person have gone along the roof, and have put the lead into that pigeon-house or loft - A. Yes; a person could get from No. 30 to 33.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I found this lead in the pigeon-loft or cock-loft, of No. 30. I met the prisoner coming in at the street door when I went down - I followed him up, and took him; his mother was there, and told him about the lead, but he made no answer. I saw it fitted to the place, and found three small pieces of lead in his pockets, which fitted the small spaces exactly.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the lead between the lofts, and put it into my pigeon-house. Persons could go along the roof, and he said at the office he could trace footsteps to the door where the next neighbours kept their pigeons. There was not room to get through the place he spoke of from my pigeon loft.

WILLIAM SMITH . I could get through myself. I could see the lead had been dragged along the roof.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-94

910. JAMES RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of William Tillier .

WILLIAM TILLER . I live at Hatton, in the parish of Belfont, and am a carpenter . I put my coat on the pales on the 10th of May, about eleven o'clock, and it was gone about half-past twelve. I went in pursuit, and found the prisoner about twenty minutes before one o'clock asleep, with a smock frock on, and the coat over it - I had never seen him before.

ALEXANDER WILLIAMS . I lodge at Stanwell, and am a grinder. I met the prisoner on the road, about two o'clock; he offered me the coat for sale - I saw Tillier afterwards, and told him.

Prisoner. I never offered it for sale - Witness. I declare that he did. I met the prosecutor soon after; he said he had lost a coat, and I told him the circumstance. The prisoner had another man with him, and they went away together.

Prisoner. Q. Did the other man or myself offer you the coat - A. Yourself; the other man said,

"Feel the coat, it is a very good one, and will keep out a deal of rain."

JAMES HOWSON . I am a constable. The coat was delivered to me with the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it on the road for 3 s. 6 d. - stopped in a public-house, and had been drinking;

when he came to me, I said I had bought it honestly, and was not ashamed to put it on.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-95

911. JOSEPH SCRIVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , three boxes, value 3 s.; 15 caps, value 20 s.; three frills, value 1 s., and a bonnet, value 9 s. , the goods of Richard Blake .

RICHARD BLAKE . I keep a green-grocer's shop in Duke-street, near Battersea-bridge. I had been to Mornington-place with my cart, to fetch three boxes for my daughter, who was leaving her place. I was going on gently, and my wife and daughter were sitting in the cart, which has a high tail-board to it. I missed the goods when we got just below the turnpike beyond St. George's Hospital. I knew nothing of their being taken till Mr. Maggs told me of it - it was about eight o'clock at night. I got out of the cart, and ran into Hyde-park, but did not see them, and I got into the cart and waited there - Mr. Maggs returned, and said he had got the man in Park-lane - I turned round and came to the place, and went into the public-house, and there were the three boxes - the prisoner was in custody at a shop, about two doors from the public-house - he was quite a stranger to me - he must have taken them over the tail-board - it had not been taken down.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose property were they - A. They all belonged to my daughter; she was in the cart with me.

The Court ruled that the owner being present, the property should be described as her's, and the prisoner was acquitted.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240603-96

912. JOHN WILSON , GEORGE LACKEY , WILLIAM COOK , and JOHN HURLING , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 320 lbs. of lead, value 50 s., the goods of John Story , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JOHN STORY . I have a house in Whitechapel . On Monday morning last I was informed that it had been broken into, and robbed of the leaden gutters. I had passed there on the Friday previous, but the lead was not visible; but on looking up it appeared that one of the windows had been pressed in, and I sent my son down to see to it. I went down on the Monday, and found the roof much disconcerted, the gutters taken away, and the flashing of the windows - upwards of three cwt. of lead was gone - I saw it afterwards at the watch-house, and the size of it corresponded with the spaces on the house - it had been cut, and torn off - the edges appeared bright, as if fresh cut, but in a haggling manner - the prisoners were in custody.

JOHN THOMAS STORY . I am the son of the last witness. I went to the house on Friday - the lead was apparently all right then. On Monday I went with my father, and it was stripped off.

MICHAEL HUGHES . I am a watchman of the parish of Christ Church - this house is on my beat. About twenty minutes before three o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in the house; and knowing that it was uninhabited, I fetched my partner Lewing, and another watchman. I knocked at the door of the next house; we went in, and got over the pales. I heard some persons whispering in the house. I came round again, and the prisoner Lackey jumped out of the window; I laid hold of him in the yard - my partner sprung his rattle - the Whitechapel watchman laid hold of one of the other prisoners, and Powell and Brown secured the other two. They were taken to the watch-house, and I returned to the house. The roof was much damaged, and a quantity of lead laid in the garret; it had been cut, except one piece, which had been drawn from a gutter, and was hanging down; here is the piece that was hanging down; it is gutter lead; I then found a smock frock, which the prisoner Wilson said was his, but Cook put it on. After I left duty I went again to the house, and found a knife, which Hurling claimed; the lead was afterwards claimed by Mr. Story; it weighed 320 lbs.

JOHN LEWING . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 31st of May, in consequence of information from Hughes, I went to the house; we heard some whispering inside, and saw Lackey drop from a window nearly as high as a first story; he was secured. I sprung my rattle. We were then in the back premises. We took him to the watch-house, and found the other three there. I went back to the house, and found a piece of lead in the wash-house, but I did not look further. It appeared to have been taken from the house, partly cut and partly torn away - the edges were bright, as if cut by a knife.

WILLIAM WARNE . I am a watchman. I was stationed by Hughes at the front door; I saw the door open, and the prisoners put their hands out; I pushed it open, and seized Hurling there; there were others inside, but they made their way up stairs. I sprung my rattle, Brown and Powel came, and went up stairs; they came down shortly; each brought a prisoner - they were all taken to the watch-house - a knife was found on one of them, with the edges turned, as if with cutting something hard. We went back to the house, and found a quantity of lead doubled up in one of the garrets, and the smock frock was laying by it.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I heard the rattle sprung - went to the house, and saw a watchman standing at the door with a prisoner in his hand; I went up stairs, and found Cook secreted in a corner of the garret; I took him, and called to Powell to look up the chimney, and he pulled Wilson down. I took Cook, and two small pieces of lead to the watch-house - I went on the roof, and found a chissel in the gutter - the lead weighed 320 lbs. - it was claimed by Mr. Story.

JURY. Q. When you took Cook, was the lead upon him - A. No; lying by his side.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. I went up stairs into the garret and saw Brown with Cook; he told me to look up the chimney; I found Wilson there, and took him into custody; they were all taken to the watch-house - we found several pieces of lead in the house - I went back to the house and found the gutters stripped of the lead.

THOMAS HART . I was the night constable. The four prisoners were brought to the watch-house - here is a knife which was found on Cook, it appeared bright, as if it had

been recently used. I saw the frock produced, but neither of them claimed it in my hearing; the lead was afterwards claimed by Mr. Story.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COOK'S Defence. I was out of employ, and hope Mr. Story will forgive me.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

LOCKYER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HARLING - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-97

913. CHARLES TAPPIN was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES DAVIS . I am a coal-dealer , and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields; the prisoner lived with me for several weeks, and carried out coals to customers . I intrusted him to receive money of them - he was to account for it directly he came home - I had a customer of the name of Comber; Fray is his servant. On the 7th of April, I sent them a sack of coals by the prisoner; he was to bring back 4 s.; he returned, and said they would pay next time - I supposed that it was all right. He left me on Saturday, the 10th of April without warning; I had paid him 7 s. a week, and gave him tea, and what we could conveniently spare; he said he should come on the Monday, but I did not see him again till the Tuesday fortnight, when I took him into custody; I called on Mr. Comber, who paid me for the coals, but I returned the money, suspecting that my servant had robbed me.

SARAH FRAY . I lived with Mr. William Comber on the 7th of April; the prisoner brought two sacks and a half of coals from Mr. Davis; I paid him myself with four shilling pieces. I left Mr. Comber on Saturday the 10th of April, and was sent for on Monday by my mistress to know if the coals were settled for.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-98

914. JOHN GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a purse, value 1 s.; one sovereign; one half-crown, and five shillings, the property of Walter Henry Head , from the person of Ann , his wife .

ANN HEAD . I am the wife of Walter Henry Head , who is a tailor ; we live in Craven Buildings, Drury-lane. On the 26th of April, I was in a sale-room, in King-street, Covent-garden , I had a purse containing this money - I saw the prisoner in the room - I felt something touch my side; I turned round and saw him close by me; I instantly put my hand to my pocket, and found my purse was gone; I turned round to see if the man who had been behind me was there, but he was gone - I am positive as to the person of the prisoner; he was dressed much as he is now. I believe I mentioned in the room that I had been robbed - I went out, and saw him near the door - I called before I got to the door to a person coming in, and said Stop thief! he was not stopped till he had run across King-street; I went out after him - he was out of my sight for a moment in the passage, but not in the street; I am sure he is the same person - he had got about half way up the street towards the market; he was searched, and my purse found on him - I did not see it taken from him, as a crowd collected, and I cannot swear to the quantity of money that was in it when I lost it, but it must have been within a shilling or two of what there was when I went into the sale-room - there was one sovereign - I can't swear to the silver.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You were in this room, which was very much crowded - A. No; it was not crowded on the side where I was - nobody was near me but the prisoner; he had a blue frock coat and a black waistcoat on; when I felt in my pocket, he went towards the door - I called out

"I have been robbed!" nobody went out after him before I did - the room is on the ground-floor - I could not run so fast as he did - Norris and another man brought him back.

Q. Have you not told Norris that you were not certain as to the man - A. No; I have had no talk with Norris about it.

Q. Did not Norris tell you at Hick's Hall to mind what you were about, and if he got off he would be sure to murder you - A. No.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I live in Queen-street, Blackfriars'-road. I was going in at the door of the sale-room: the prisoner was coming out, and brushed against me; the prosecutrix said

"that is the man who has stolen my purse" - I am quite sure he is the man who passed me; I turned round and called Stop thief! and ran after him - I did not lose sight of him till he was stopped in the middle of the street, about one hundred yards from the saleroom; the officer put his hand into his pocket, and I saw the purse fall from his trowsers on his right side; it was claimed by Mrs. Head - it had a sovereign, half-a-crown, and five shillings in it - he said he picked it up off the floor at Mrs. Head's feet.

THOMAS COTTAM . I live in St. Martin's-street. I was at the sale room, and saw the prisoner there - I was looking at some linen, and he pushed against me, and pressed me against the counter - he came and stood against the right shoulder of Mrs. Head. In about five minutes my attention was drawn that way, and I saw him take his hand from under Mrs. Head's shawl, with a purse in it; I did not speak, because I did not know but it might be his own property - I did not suppose he had taken it from her. In about a minute she turned her head, and said,

"My purse is gone;" in consequence of which I turned, and looked for the gentleman with the purse, but he was gone. I left the sale room soon after, and did not see him again till I saw him at Bow-street. I am certain he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were there in the room - A. There might be a hundred; the prisoner was in the lower part of the room; there might be a dozen persons near Mrs. Head.

JOHN NORRIS . I pursued the prisoner, and he was taken by some other person. I was then about ten yards from him - Mrs. Head came up and said she had lost her purse. I put my hand into his pocket, and found the pocket separated from the trowsers, and this purse dropped from him.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Head said I had a blue coat on - it was a brown one.

JOHN NORRIS . It was a frock coat, very fashionably made.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-99

915. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , seven sovereigns, the monies of James Gill , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240603-100

916. THOMAS MORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Ball , from his person .

JAMES BALL . I live in New-street-square. On the 30th of May I was in Chiswell-street , and had a silk handkerchief in my pocket - I was walking with my child, and felt something press on my shoulder, and a hand in my pocket at the same time. I turned round, and laid hold of the prisoner - he had the handkerchief, and threw it down; there was another person near him, whom I also suspected - he ran down Grub-street. Mr. Gurling said he saw it done, and we took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM GURLING . I live in Mitchell-street, St. Luke's. I was in Chiswell-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Ball's right hand coat pocket. Mr. Ball turned round, and seized him, and asked me to assist in taking him to the watch-house. There was another person near him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BEE . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner about eleven o'clock in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-101

917. EDWARD NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , a watch, value 4 l.; a chain, value 2 l., and a seal, value 1 l., the goods of George Varney , from his person .

GEORGE VARNEY . I live in Spitalfields-market, and deal in potatoes . On the 4th of May, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Crown-street towards Sun-street , and saw a great crowd; a man was walking backwards. Soon after I entered the crowd, I was surrounded and pressed by a throng of person. My watch was safe just before - it cost 7 l. with the chain and seals; I felt it drawn from me, and saw the prisoner near me, on my left - his arm went across, and immediately the throng left me, and rushed down Long-alley; I pursued and took him; he declared his innocence, and said he had not a watch about him, and would go with me any where. I sent for an officer, who searched him, but did not find it. He said next morning at the office, that if I would drop the prosecution he would send and see for the watch; he sent a person, who did not return.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was he when he said this - A. In the parlour at the office; he came to me and said so. He was standing in a crowd of persons at the time of the robbery; there were not less than fifty people; he was near me - in front; there was no person between me and him. I saw no watch in his hand; I saw his hand near me, and pass with great rapidity towards my right. I did not see the property pass from him to anybody.

WILLIAM ROBERTSON . I live in Long-alley, near the spot in question, and am a stone mason. I was sent for to Crown-street, being an officer, and took the prisoner in charge. I did not hear what was said at the office, but in taking him to the watch-house, at the corner of Crown-street, he struck me a violent blow on the head, and attempted to get away. I had used no violence to provoke him. He did not deny the charge, but said he would go with me.

HENRY MARSHALL . I am a fruit-seller in Finsbury New-market. I saw this man at the end of Crown-street strike Robretson, and I told him if he did so again I would knock him down. I assisted in taking him to a place of safety. I heard him say to the prosecutor that if he would forgive him, and not take him before Magistrate, he would return the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. This man said,

"If you will give the prosecutor his watch or the value of it, he will let you go." I was returning from Smithfield, and passed through this crowd; when I got out of the crowd, I had walked about a hundred yards, and the gentleman came up, and said,

"You have robbed me;" I said,

"Me, Sir" - he said

"I expect you are the person;" I said,

"You may take me where you please."

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-102

918. HENRY STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a parcel, containing two rings, value 50 s.; a book, value 20 s.; a shift, value 10 s.; a bed-gown, value 4 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s., and a frill, value 3 s., the goods of Hannah Margaret Elbon , from the person of Henry Schooling .

HENRY SCHOOLING . I am fourteen years of age , and live with my uncle Bryant. On the 12th of May my master gave me a parcel to take to Miss Elbon, No. 5, Park-street, Grosvenor-square. I was inquiring my way at the corner of Duke-street , and the prisoner came to me and said,

"You are going to Miss Elbon's, are you?" I said Yes. I had the parcel in my hand. I don't know what was in it. It had a direction on it, which he could have seen, as it was outside. He said,

"You young dog you have been stopping by the way; you ought to have been here an hour ago; Miss Elbon says you must give it to me." I said

"I can't; I am to go with this and bring another back." He said, Miss Elbon said he should bring that to my master. I gave him the parcel and watched him, and he did not go to the place, but went down North Audley-street, and up the Mews. I followed him, and he began to run. I ran after him, and cried Stop thief! I had lost sight of him when he turned the corners, but not for more than two minutes. When he was stopped he had not got the parcel. I don't know what became of it; I have not seen it since. He was taken to Mount-street watch-house. I charged him with taking the parcel; I know that it was directed to Miss Elbon.

Prisoner. Q. Am I the person who came up to you - A. Yes; you are the person who came up to me as soon I had inquired the way.

HANNAH MARGARET ELBON . I live at No. 5, Park-street, Grosvenor-square. I am single. I expected to receive a parcel, containing the articles stated in the indictment, from my mother. It was to come from Mr. Bryant's, by the hands of this lad - I never received it. The prisoner is a perfect stranger to me.

SARAH ELBON . I live in Foster-lane, Cheapside. On Wednesday, the 12th of May, I gave this parcel to Mr. Bryant, who sent it by his lad to my daughter - he was to

bring another back. It was directed to Miss Elbon, and contained the articles enumerated in the indictment. I have not seen them since. I know nothing of the prisoner.

HENRY PLUCK . I am a cooper, and work for Mr. Minton, Shepherd's-court, Upper Brook-street. On the 12th of May I saw the prisoner running, and heard a cry of Stop thief! He appeared to be the person running from that cry - he was not far from me, and I stopped him, and Schooling came up. He had no parcel with him, and said he had not got it.

ROBERT TURNER . I am an officer. I received him in charge at the watch-house. Schooling accused him of taking a parcel from him - he denied it, but the boy spoke positively. I searched him, and found a crow-bar up his sleeve - he was in the act of concealing it - one end was in his hand, the other up his sleeve.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the parcel.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-103

919. MARY ANN CRANMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , a bed, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 5 s.; a bolster, value 5 s.; a towel, value 6 d.; two pillow-cases, value 1 s.; a quilt, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 7 s.; a spoon, value 2 s.; eight plates, value 1 s.; two mugs, value 1 s., and a looking-glass, value 1 s., the goods of William Loader , in a lodging-room .

MARIA LOADER . I am the wife of William Loader . I live in Medway-street, Westminster - the prisoner came to lodge in my house on the 15th of April, and took the back room, one pair, at 4 s. a week. The articles stated in the indictment were let to her with the room - she staid four weeks, and left on the 15th of May without any notice. I went into the room, and missed the articles in question - she paid her rent regularly - she told me her uncle supported her - there was one bed left in the lodging, and two chairs and a table, but no furniture to the bed.

GEORGE COOPER PAGE . I live at Messrs. Courteney's and Page, No. 16, Lower Eaton-street, Pimlico, pawnbrokers; a napkin was pawned on the 17th of April, for 1 s.; a pillow, on the 19th of April, for 2 s. 6 d.; a sheet, on the 20th of April, for 1 s. 6 d.; a quilt, on the 24th of April, for 3 s., and a bolster and pillow on the 24th of April - they were all pawned in the name of Ann Archer , by the prisoner. I am certain of her person.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Crump, of Queen's-row, Pimlico, a pawnbroker; on the 20th of April, the prisoner pawned a blanket for 2 s. 6 d. I had seen her before, and know her well.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a shopman to Joseph Harris , pawnbroker, Tothill-street, Westminster. I have two sheets; one was pawned on the 17th of April for 3 s.; the other, on the 4th of May, for 1 s., by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES DEW . I am a messenger at Queen-square Police Office. I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not quitted my lodgings; nor did I intend to quit them until I had replaced these articles.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240603-104

920. MATTHEW WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a bolster, value 20 s.; a pillow, value 5 s.; a pillow-case, value 1 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 5 s.; a quilt, value 2 s.; a poker, value 2 d.; a pair of tongs, value 1 s.; two shovels, value 1 s.; a candlestick, value 6 d.; a saucepan, value 6 d.; three teacups, value 2 d.; two saucers, value 2 d.; two knives, value 2 d.; and a teapot, value 2 d., the goods of George Sperry , in a lodging-room .

GEORGE SPERRY . I live in Hemlock-court, Carey-street . My wife let the prisoner a lodging on the 26th of March - he staid one week, and on the Friday following left without giving notice - he left the door locked and took the key. I had information that he was at his mother's, in Currier's-row, Doctors' Commons, and apprehended him there about a fortnight afterwards. I know nothing of him but by letting him and his wife in on the first night.

ELEANOR SPERRY . I let the lodging on the 26th of March. I only saw his wife, not himself. I agreed to find her in every thing for 5 s. a week - they were to lodge in the back room first floor - they generally came in together at night - they were to have the use of the things stated in the indictment - they gave no notice of their going, but left the door locked, and I have not seen the key since - they had not paid any rent - she said her husband had lost his father, and he would pay on the week following. I opened the lodging on the Wednesday after they left and these articles were all gone - they had left some furniture behind - the prisoner was taken up about a fortnight afterwards - when I saw him at Bow-street, the woman he had cohabited with was there. I asked if he knew anything of my property - he said he did not.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house on a charge of robbing Mr. Sperry's lodgings - he denied knowing anything of it, and said he had left the woman there.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the lodging. I met with this woman, and she asked me to go with her, which I did, and gave her my linen to wash and mend. I went backwards and forwards for it - that is all I know about the business.

Prisoner to ELEANOR SHERRY - Q . How many times did you see me there - A. About twice - once was on the last Friday in the first week.

GEORGE SPERRY . I had seen him there more than once. I have heard there were two persons in the room. I heard two persons in the room most nights when I came home - he never came to my house after the woman was gone. I never observed any other man but the prisoner come to her. I cannot find the woman. I found the prisoner at his mother's house - they took the room in the name of Davis - a man came on the following Monday after they were gone, and asked for a man of the name of Wright, a painter. I said no such person lived in my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-105

921. THOMAS SANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a handkerchief, value 10 d., the goods of Joseph Nash , from his person .

JOSEPH NASH . I live at the Spread Eagle public-house, near the Middlesex Hospital. On the day of the drawing-room I was in Pall-mall ; a considerable crowd was collected; I am sure my handkerchief was safe when I went

there; I did not miss it till the officer came and told me it was gone; I had been there about two hours - the officer shewed it to me; I had not observed the prisoner near me.

JAMES LEE . I am a constable - I was near the place on duty about half-past four o'clock, and saw the prisoner, with another boy, go behind Mr. Nash - they were there not more than two minutes; I then saw the prisoner's arm move, and suspected he had taken something; he went away, and had got about three yards from Mr. Nash when I caught him, and asked what he had got in his hand; he said nothing - I took his hand from under his apron and found this handkerchief; he was going to put it into his breeches; he said he had it from the other boy who was gone. I went to Mr. Nash, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the carriages passing by, and a boy said he had picked up the handkerchief.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined One Shilling , and delivered to his father.

Reference Number: t18240603-106

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

922. GEORGE BOUNDY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , one gown, value 4 s. , the goods of Charlotte Cash .

THOMAS MACREE . I was at the Seven Stars public-house, Brick-lane , on the 28th of May; and as I came from the privy I saw the prisoner in the yard; he took the gown from the line, put it into his hat, and put his hat on his head. Charlotte Cash is the publican's daughter ; she was at the door - I said Stop him! and her father pursued and took him - he took the hat off his head, and the gown was in it.

WILLIAM CASH . My daughter's gown hung in the yard on the 28th of May; Macree gave the alarm; I pursued the prisoner and sent for an officer, and gave him into custody - he said if I should let him go he would be guilty of the like again.

CHARLOTTE CASH . I am daughter of the last witness - I had a gown hanging in the yard - I had seen the prisoner go through the passage once before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-107

923. JOSEPH BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Pell .

RICHARD PELL . I keep a clothes-shop in Butt-lane, Deptford - I frequently come to London to buy clothes - on the 7th of May I was sitting at the Blue Boar public-house, Rosemary-lane, and saw the prisoner with some trowsers, which I thought I knew, and sent a man after him to say there was a person who wanted to buy some blue trowsers - he came back and threw them in at the window; they are mine. I took him by the collar and said

"You thief, where did you steal them" - he was confused and could not speak - I sent for an officer, but he got off and ran away, and was taken the next day - I had left the goods in my shop with my wife.

ABRAHAM ELLIS . I am a constable; on Friday the 7th of May, the prosecutor informed me that he had lost a pair of trowsers; I apprehended the prisoner in White's-yard next day; he said he had sold one pair to a man in Rosemary-lane for 8 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence soliciting mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-108

923. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , five lbs. of pork, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Young .

HARRIOT TIBBLE. I live with Mr. Young, pork butcher , of Brick-lane; the prisoner was a servant in the family. On the 10th of April I was in the cellar, and saw him concealing meat in a bag, but could not swear that it was pork - I told Mrs. Young of it.

MARY YOUNG . I am the wife of the prosecutor - the prisoner was our servant - I recollect Tibble telling me something about some meat - I found it in the prisoner's bag on Sunday morning - I charged him with stealing some pork; he denied it, but afterwards said it was the first time.

WILLIAM YOUNG . On the 11th of April I missed the meat, and I found it in the prisoner's bundle; he said it was the first time he had done so.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-109

925. JAMES FROST was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a brooch, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 3 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; a collar, value 6 d. and a sovereign , the property of Thomas Wheeler .

ANN TIMBERLAKE . The prisoner came to lodge at my house on the 23d March, at No. 4, Smart's-buildings, High Holborn - Thomas Wheeler is my son by my former husband; he is very ill in the hospital; the prisoner slept in the house three nights - I had taken the articles out of my son's box on the 23d of March, and put them in a chest in the room where the prisoner slept - there was a brooch, two waistcoats, three collars, a sovereign, and a handkerchief - these were afterwards missed - I have seen the handkerchiefs and two collars since.

RICHARD STENNING . I live in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane; the prisoner employed me to pledge a handkerchief for him at Mr. Wells's, in Broad-street, on Thursday or Friday evening; I gave him the money as soon as I came back.

JOHN MASON . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of April; he said he knew nothing of it; I searched him and found a bunch of keys, one of which opened the box; I found a collar upon him, which Mrs. Timberlake said was her son's; he said he had found the keys near St. Giles's Church.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery; I asked the young man to pledge it, not knowing but it was my own.

RICHARD STENNING re-examined. Q. How came you acquainted with the prisoner - A. By going into a public-house in Drury-lane; I had pledged a black handkerchief for him before; I pledged the things in the name of James Frost .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-110

926. RICHARD FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , two saws, value 8 s. , the goods of John Dilloway .

THOMAS PEARSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch; the prisoner came on the 6th of May and offered to pledge two saws; I detained him; he wanted half-a-crown for them, and said they were his own; he gave his name as John Brown.

JOHN DILLOWAY . I am a carpenter ; I was at work in Gloucester-street, Hoxton, building a new house; I left the saws there at twelve o'clock on the 6th of May, and had seen the prisoner near the house; I put a piece of wood against the door when I went away; I returned at one o'clock, and they were gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a labouring man.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-111

927. ALFRED HARRIS and JOSEPH WESTLE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , four deal boards, value 7 s. , the goods of Henry Fox .

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 15th of April I was going down White Horse-street, and met the prisoner Harris carrying four deal boards on his shoulder. I asked him where he was going - he said to Westle's house, (the other prisoner.) They were both strangers to me. I then asked where he brought them from - he said from Fox's, in the Commercial-road - that Westle had bought them of Mr. Fox, and was to pay him so much a week. I took him back to Mr. Fox's, and some persons were working there. I then asked Westle who was there where he got these timbers from; he said it was his own; he had been doing a job at Limehouse. I sent the foreman over to Mr. Fox - he said it was his property, and he had given him no liberty to take it; they then both begged his pardon.

The property was produced, but the prosecutor declined to swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-112

928. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , one pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of William Thomas Wilkins .

THOMAS GEORGE GROVER . Mr. Wilkins's shop is opposite mine, in Cranbourn-passage - he is a shoemaker . On the 4th of May, I saw the prisoner take the shoes from a nail in the window - he was running away - I stopped him, and he went back with me to the shop.

WILLIAM THOMAS WILKINS . I keep a shoemaker's shop . I was out at the time, but was sent for, and saw this pair of shoes - they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness says the shoes were inside the shop, and they were outside.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-113

929. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a jacket, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Richard Edward Hopkins .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a painter and glazier. I was in Goodge-street on the 24th of April, about half-past 8 o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner with two other persons, not in custody. I saw him and another, dressed in a sailor's garb, go into Mr. Hopkins's shop - I am certain the prisoner was one of them - they had nothing with them; but when they came out, the prisoner had something under his jacket. I ran across to meet them - they ran away, and dropped something down in a stand of coaches - the prisoner had the jacket - Reardon picked it up - the prisoner was taken five minutes afterwards. I had seen him before he entered the shop, and am sure he is the man.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plasterer. I saw Roberts at the end of Goodge-street, and he pointed out the boys. I saw them go in and come out. The prisoner had the jacket. I could not see that it was a jacket, until he dropped it in the coach-stand.

SUSANNAH HOPKINS . I am the wife of Richard Edward Hopkins , who keeps a sale shop. About half-past 8 o'clock (I was in the shop a minute or two before) I had gone into the room, and the door was partly shut. The jacket hung behind the door, and no one could get it without opening the door. I went to serve a customer, and this gentleman brought me the jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-114

930. WILLIAM LENDON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , a scarf, value 9 s. , the goods of Richard Riley .

MARY RILEY . I am the wife of Richard Riley ; we live in York-row, Hackney-road , and keep a clothes-shop. On the 26th of May I had a scarf hanging in the shop - I heard, about a quarter past two o'clock, that it was lost - I have not seen it since - it was a light green kersey mere scarf - I had seen it about two - it was on a Wednesday - I had not been absent from the shop two minutes.

JOHN GLEED . I was near the house on the 26th of May. I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and bring out a light green scarf - he had none when he went in - he stopped in the shop about five minutes. I went in and told Mrs. Riley, and then ran after him - he got away from us, but I saw him taken by a man. I don't know what became of the scarf.

Cross-examined. Q. What colour did you say it was when you were at Worship-street - A. I said it was a lightish green. I am sure it was not a handkerchief. I was outside when he took it; he passed me, and I looked at the colour of it.

WILLIAM LOVETT . I know Mr. Riley's house. I saw the prisoner go in, and come out with a light green scarf. He wrapped it under his arm, and ran away. I followed, and saw him give it to his partners - there were two others with him. He went alone into the shop - the other two staid at the window the while.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you about - A. I was minding my father's shop. I did not say that one of the boy's had a blue scarf. I did not see one of them with a blue pocket handkerchief. I have always said the scarf was light green. I had seen him talking to other boys before he went into the shop.

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I had been as far as Cambridge-heath,

and saw the prisoner with a light green scarf in his hand. I am certain it was the prisoner. I did not see any boy with a blue handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the shop at all.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy .

Whipped , and delivered to his father.

Reference Number: t18240603-115

931. JOHN DIRKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , four half-crowns , the monies of William Trembath .

WILLIAM TREMBATH . I am a bookbinder , and live with Mr. Wallis, of Berwick-street, Soho. On the 11th of April I was going along Leicester-fields with a friend of mine, and some young men came up and pushed us off the pavement - my friend pulled off his coat and hat, and I took them up in my hand - he ran away, and the watchman came and took me to the watch-house - I was detained till the next morning, when my friend came and redeemed them.

Q. How came you to stay there till the next morning - A. I don't know how it was, but they did not believe me; I was not the worse for liquor - it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. The prisoner was in the watch-house when I went, and in the same cell as me. I had four half-crown pieces in a purse, with some loose silver in my left hand pocket; I know I had it safe about a quarter of an hour before I got there - I fell asleep there, and awoke about twelve o'clock at night; I then missed the money out of my purse - there was only 6 d. left in it, and 3 d. in copper put into the purse; I lost four half-crowns - I cannot speak as to the other - I did not mention it till the night-constable came in the morning - I had no other time to tell him - he did not come in the course of the night; there were two other persons in the cell; the prisoner borrowed a knife of one of them, and a needle and thread. When he was taken to Marlborough-street, he denied having any money about him, but on being searched, one half-crown was found in the facing of his coat, sowed up, and the other in his waistcoat pocket; he was not searched till he got to Marlborough-street.

JOHN PROCTER . I was the night-constable. The prosecutor was brought to the watch-house on suspicion of stealing a hat; he was locked up with the prisoner, who had been brought in the morning - they were locked in the same cell - there were two others in the cell; I searched the others, but found nothing on them, but two half-crowns on the prisoner, one in his coat, sewed in the facing, the other in his waistcoat pocket - he had said before that he had no money at all.

THOMAS PIZZEY . I am the watch-house keeper of St. Ann's, Westminster . I took the prisoner for stealing a quantity of lead - I searched him before he went into the watch-house, particularly for instruments to cut lead; I am sure he had no money about him, for after that he said that he had none, and what was he to do for victuals, and asked for a needle and thread.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-116

932. JAMES GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a necklace, value 3 s., the goods of James Crew , from the person of Juliana Elizabeth Crew .

JAMES CREW . I am a grocer , and live in Dog-row, Bethnal-green . My daughter Juliana Elizabeth is two years old ; she was at the door, and had a coral necklace on; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I was in the back of my shop, and saw the prisoner and another lad running away - a witness had the beads in his hand - I ran after him and took him myself.

JOHN SUTHERLAND . I was in my room opposite Mr. Crew's, and saw the prisoner sitting on the steps near the child - I saw him draw the child near him, and take the necklace off her neck; I ran down stairs, and he ran away, and threw the beads down, and said

"Here they are." I pursued him, and saw Crew take him.

WILLIAM JONES . I live in Brown's-lane. I was passing and saw the prisoner running, and as he came near he threw down the beads - I took them up, and gave them to Mr. Crew - he was taken in a few minutes - I am certain that he is the same boy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I met with two boys. who stopped me, and offered me money to take the necklace - I refused to do so, and one of them took it off. I am entirely innocent - the boys, who are known bad characters, are now in this prison for trial - I refused to have any thing to do in the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-117

833. HUMPHREY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and five penny pieces, the monies of William Parker , from his person .

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a labourer , and live at Romford. I was in London on Saturday the 17th of April - I fell in with the prisoner at the bar, at a public house in Chelsea ; I did not know him before - I was in the act of paying for what I had called for, and had got my money in my hand, when a hat struck my hand and knocked out two sovereigns and a half; I saw the prisoner stoop, pick up something, and go out of the room - there were twelve or fourteen persons in the room - we had been all drinking together; I can't say who it was that knocked my money down - it could not be the prisoner, for he was standing right before me - I was perfectly sober - I said I had been robbed. I then went and sat down, and in a short time the prisoner returned and sat down beside me, and endeavoured to put his hand into the left pocket of my pantaloons - he did not succeed, but put his right hand round my waist and into my right hand pocket, and took out five or six halfpence; I then thought it was time to send for a constable. I gave notice to the persons present; when the constable came, he was searched. I can't say whether any money was found on him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. - Q. How much had you drank - A. I cannot tell. I cannot say I was drunk. I had been drinking porter, nothing else. I do not know that I got any ale; but I am not obliged to swear to that. I had no gin and water.

Q. Upon your oath did you charge this man with robbing you of more than 5 d. - A. I told the constable I had been robbed of two sovereigns and a half, and some halfpence. I was perfectly sober. I knew what I was doing. I do not know how much I had drank - half-a-crown and

some shillings were found on him. I believe I did not see any halfpence.

JOHN DANCE . I am a constable. I found the prisoner and seven or eight persons in the back parlour - the prosecutor said he had lost two sovereigns and a half. I searched them all one by one, and found only half-a-crown and three shillings on the prisoner, but no halfpence - one person there had some sovereigns, but he was a respectable man. Parker said the prisoner had picked his pocket of five or six pennyworth of halfpence.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Was he sober - A. He had been drinking, but was not drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-118

934. THOMAS LILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , a necklace, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Osborne , from the person of Jane Osborne .

JANE OSBORNE . (The witness being questioned appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.) I am ten years old . On the 4th of May, I was with Miss Whale a little way from my father's house looking at some music. The prisoner came and snatched my necklace off my neck. I took hold off the beads and pulled, but got half of them and ran away. I cried Stop thief! and another boy came and put his hand before my mouth - the prisoner was brought back to me directly. I am sure he is the boy.

JOHN FELL . I am a plumber. About half-past six or seven o'clock, I was crossing the Curtain-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - the prisoner passed me, and made a kind of laugh at me. I saw this child running after him. I followed him down New-inn-yard, and saw him throw the necklace into the Jacob's-well passage. I got them, and then took him - he tried to get his jacket off, and then got his foot between my legs, and threw me down into the mud.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I received this necklace from Fell.

JANE OSBORNE . I am the wife of Thomas Osborne . I can swear to this necklace.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw people running; I picked up these beads in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240603-119

935. FLORENCE MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the goods of Albert Jones , from his person .

Rev. ALBERT JONES . I am a clergyman . I was going along Compton-street on the 29th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, in company with some friends, and felt something touch my pocket behind me. I put my hand into my pocket and missed my handkerchief - the prisoner was passing. I seized him, and charged him with having it - he denied it - but I looked and saw it hanging out of his coat pocket. I took him to St. Ann's watch-house, took the handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to the officer.

THOMAS PIZZEY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner and handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw three gentlemen walking arm in arm - some boys were going by, and one of them took the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket and threw it down. I took it up and they seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-120

936. HENRY PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , seven shifts, value 10 s.; a table-cloth, value 2 s.; four pinafores, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 3 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; a counterpane, value 3 s., and a sheet, value 3 s., the goods of Edward Phillip , from the person of Hyam Phillips .

HYAM PHILLIPS. My father 's name is Edward - we live in Rupert-fields. On the 8th of April my mother sent me to the mangler's with a bundle. I saw the prisoner in Grove-street , and when I was looking down the area of the house where I was to go, he took the bundle - he snatched it from under my arm, and gave it to a young man - they ran across the opening. I did not pursue them, nor call Stop thief! - I do not know that any body followed them - my mother has not got the bundle again - the prisoner was taken on the 14th of April. I know he is the boy, and I said so at the office. I knew him before that night - he was not a friend of mine, but I had seen him about the streets. I am quite sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where he lived - A. No; but I know his name. I told the watchman of it, but nobody else.

Q. Did you say at the office that you knew the boy because he had a black coat - A. Yes; and a brown one he wore sometimes - it was not very dark - there was a gaslight in the alley.

Q. Did you call out Henry Phillips - A. No. I did not - the business did not take more than half a minute.

SARAH PHILLIPS . I sent my son with a bundle to Grove-street to the mangler's - it contained the articles stated in the indictment. I have not seen them since - he was not gone five minutes - he told me had been robbed by a boy, and said his name was Henry Payne .

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street - the boy gave a very good description of the prisoner, and mentioned his name. I was some days looking for him - he came to me again on the 14th, and said he had seen Payne go to a public-house. I went with him, and he pointed him out in the tap-room.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of it till the officer came and took me.

JOHN GRANT . I am a tobacco-pipe maker. I lived in the house with the prisoner, at No. 42, Cannon-street-road. I can take upon myself to say, upon my God, that on that evening, and for three evenings before, and three evenings after, he was at home from seven o'clock till he went to bed. I can positively affirm to the Jury, and to all present, that that is the fact. He is not in any business. He has a mother and a father.

COURT. Q. Where do you work - A. At the west end of the town. I leave work at five or six o'clock in the evening. I have spent my evening at home for the last twelve months. I am a widower, and have no children. I sometimes go out by chance.

Q. Does this lad lodge with you - A. He occupies the front room of the first floor, and I occupy the back.

Q. What time do you go to bed - A. Sometimes at eight o'clock, sometimes at nine.

Q. Do you watch their door - A. No; they might go out, and I not know it.

Q. What impresses so strongly upon your mind about

the three days before, and the three days after the time spoken of - A. I do not know.

Q. How do you know the lad was in the house; can you swear positively to the six evenings you have spoken of - A. I do not know that I can.

Q. Will you tell us what you can say - A. I can answer nothing to the purpose I am called upon unknown to this business.

HYAM PHILLIPS re-examined. Q. How did you know the name of the prisoner - A. Because I had had sold him fruit, and I have heard his name from other boys. The other boys were all bigger than him; I should not know any of them. It was very moon-light, and there was a gas-light. I cannot be mistaken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-121

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 5. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

937. MARY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Job Townsend , Matthew Shaw , and William Hardwick .

WILLIAM DURANT . I am shopman to Messrs. Job Townsend, Matthew Shaw , and William Hardwick , who are haberdashers , and reside in Holborn. On the 12th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some ribbons; I shewed her some; she asked to see some narrower, which I found for her, she had some cut off. I saw her take a piece out of the drawer, and conceal it, and then put it into her right hand pocket. A young man who had also seen it told Mr. Townsend. Mr. Hardwick searched her, and found it in her pocket. She said it was the first offence she had committed.

WILLIAM HARDWICK . I am a partner in the firm. I saw the prisoner in the shop, and in consequence of information I searched her, and found the ribbon in her pocket - it has our private mark on it; she said it was the first time she had ever done such a thing.

THOMAS M'GRATH. I am an officer. I saw the ribbon found in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was rather intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-122

938. ROBERT MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , a pair of hammock clues, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

GEORGE DRINKALD . I am servant to Thomas Jones , a sail-maker , who lives in High-street, Shadwell . On the 12th of April, the prisoner came into the shop with four others; they asked to look at some toys, which my master sells - they were about ten minutes in the shop, and directly they were gone I missed a pair of hammock clues, which hung inside the door-post. I told my master - we went after them, and found them all at the Shakespear's Head, public-house, and took them all five to the watch-house. I there saw the prisoner take one of the clues from under his coat, and throw it from him; I picked it up.

THOMAS JONES . I keep this shop. I went and found the men at the public-house, and took them to the watch-house. I did not see the prisoner do anything. I found the other clue in the passage of the public-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. One of my shipmates took them, and gave me one, and when I got to the watch-house, he told me to throw it aside.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-123

939. ISAAC LUTMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , twenty eight yards of cotton, value 12 s. , the goods of Matthew Kinsey .

JOHN SCOTT . I am warehouseman to Matthew Kinsey , upholsterer , Oxford-street. On the 7th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was at work in the warehouse . I was called by the porter, and saw a piece of calico concealed between some boards and the wall, and when the men went to dinner, the porter fetched the prisoner back. I had seen him come from where the calico was concealed; he was brought back, and I found it under his apron - he said he took it to make himself shirts. He has been two years in our service, and has had 8 s. a-week for the last six months. I think he was badly off.

JOHN WALES. I am an officer. I received him in charge - he said he took it to make shirts with.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-124

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

940. WILLIAM WHALLEY was indicted for that he, at the time of committing the several felonies and offences in the eight counts of this indictment, hereinafter mentioned, was a person employed by, and under the Post-office of Great Britain (to wit), at the parish of St. Mary-le-bone , in certain business relating to the said office, that is to say, in delivering letters and packets brought to the General Post-office in London, and that heretofore, to wit, on the 2d of April , at the parish aforesaid, a certain letter then lately before sent by the post, to wit, by the post from Sandhurst, in the county of Berks, to the said General Post-office, for, and to be delivered to a certain person at Portman-street, Portman-square, that is to say to one John Cox , and then and there, to wit, at the said parish, containing therein a Bank note, for payment of and value 5 l., came to the hands and possession of the said William Whalley , whilst he was so employed as aforesaid; and that he, the said William Whalley afterwards, to wit, on the same day, at the same parish, being such person so employed, as aforesaid, feloniously did secret the said letter, containing the said Bank note, the said Bank note being in force, and the property of one Francis Charles Cassaigne , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only for stealing

from and out of a letter, a like Bank note, for payment of and value 5 l.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two first, only for secreting a packet, and stealing from and out of a packet instead of a letter.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same as the four former, only stating the Bank note to be the property of the said John Cox .

MESSRS. GURNEY and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS CHARLES CASSAIGNE . I am clerk to the Governor of the Military College at Sandhurst . On the 1st of April I addressed a letter to Mr. Cox, Portman-street, Portman-square, and enclosed a 5 l. note in it; I have a memorandum of the number which I made before I sent it off; (reads) it was No. 15,774, dated Jan. 8, 1824; I sealed the letter with wax, and put it into the letter-bag in which letters are conveyed from the Governor to the receiving-house - I locked the bag.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How many persons have a key of that bag - A. The Governor, myself, and the letter-sergeant have each one; the Governor was not at Sandhurst at the time, and took his key away with him, I suppose, as he generally does; he was in Scotland; I know nothing of the prisoner.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Look at this note (handing one) - A. This is the note, it has the same number and date.

JURY. Q. Are you accustomed to enter notes - A. I always enter the number, date, and amount - here is the entry.

(Producing it.)

MR. LAW. Q. These entries appear all in the same ink, and to be taken at the same time - A. It is an entry of the notes made when I receive them, and I write against each note the person to whom I pay it. I have written the name of Cox against this one. I have not placed his name to the wrong number; I received the notes in Feb., and at this time had only one other left, which was 15,775; I remember that number in my hands afterwards. Here is a copy of the number, made at the time I inclosed it; at the time I sent it, I was not in the room in which the original memorandum was, and so I took the number on this paper, and entered it off on the original one when I went into the room; these notes were my private property, and did not belong to Government.

ROGER MORRIS . I am letter-sergeant of the Millitary College, Sandhurst. On the 1st of April I opened the Governor's letter-bag before I sent the letters off to the post, in order to take the letters out and put them into the College-bag. I remember one letter being in it directed to Mr. Cox; I put it into the College-bag with the other letters, and delivered it to Hammond, who carries it from the College to Bagshot; the postmaster at Bagshot has a key of the College-bag; I have one, and Hammond has another, but nobody else has one.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The Governor has a key - A. I believe so; he was not at the College, and is not here; I do not know what had become of his key - I generally look at all the letters - there were only four in the Governor's bag, and I read the directions of them all - I am not positive whether two were not addressed to the Horse Guards - I took a copy of the address of one.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Which did you take a copy of - A. One that was going to the Governor, as I intended to write to one of his servants, and wanted to know where to address it; I heard of the loss of this letter some days after. The Governor has a key of his own bag, but not of the College-bag. I delivered the bag to Hammond directly after I had locked it. I keep my own key hanging on a nail in the Post-office of the College; nobody but myself has access to the Post-office. I always lock the door when I leave.

JOHN HAMMOND . I a am letter-carrier from the Military College to Bagshot, and other villages. On the 1st of April I received the College-bag from Morris; it was locked; I carried it in that state to the Post-office at Bagshot, and delivered it there in the same state as when I received it.

WILLIAM SMITHERS . I am postmaster of Bagshot. On the 1st of April I received the College-bag; it was locked; my daughter opened it in my presence, and the letters were put into the Post-office to go to London, and would arrive next morning. I send the bag sealed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Sometimes letters get mislaid, and do not get into the bag - A. That might be the case sometimes. I have no particular recollection of this transaction more than of any other.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Have you any knowledge of any letter having been left behind on that night - A. Not the least.

JAMES STEPHEN COFFIN . I am a clerk in the Post-office, Lombard-street. On the morning of the 2d of April I received the Bagshot bag; the seal was unbroken.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you open it - A. Yes; and delivered the unpaid letters to the clerk. There are a vast number of letters, and a good many sorters.

Q. Accidents do happen at times, and letters remain in the office - A. Yes.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Do such things happen often - A. I cannot say - I have heard of such things happening.

WILLIAM WOODS . In April last I was inspector of letter-carriers at the Post-office, and am so now; the prisoner was a carrier; Portman-street; Portman-square, was in his delivery; the letters for that delivery would come into his hands.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How do you know that he was a carrier in April - A. My book will prove that he was on duty on that day; he is paid by Government, and has 14 s. a-week, and a penny on every letter he fetched in his bag; he always bore an extremely good character, or he would not have been employed.

JOHN COX . I live in Portman-street, Portman-square. On the 2d of April I received no letter from Cassaigne containing a Bank note, nor have I since received it. I had a letter from him afterwards, stating that he had sent one, but I never received it, or the letter which had inclosed it. I know the prisoner as postman of our district.

CHARLES FORDES . I keep the Cambridge Coffee-house in Newman-street, Oxford-street, and know the prisoner as a postman. He applied to me on a Saturday to change a five pound note from him, which I did, and wrote on the front of it at the time (looking at a note) - this is it. I have written

"Postman 3 - 4 - 24 on it." Part of the word postman is torn off by cancelling the note, but I know my writing which is left.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. How long have

you known the prisoner - A. I cannot say; I have known him many weeks as a postman. I can swear, from what remains of my writing, that it is mine.

Q. There is the letters Po and an, 3 - 4 - 24; now might that not be the name of Portman - A. I know nobody of that name. I never change a note for persons whom I do not know, and always write the person's name on it when I know it. I did not know his name.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Do you distinctly recollect receiving this, and writing that upon it with the date - A. Yes.

JURY. Q. Is your house in his district - A. No; I wrote postman on it, because I knew him as a postman - if the postman of my district had paid it to me. I should have written the same; but I have no doubt of the prisoner being the man I took it from - he had his red coat on at the time. I did not change a note for any other postman.

MARIA FORDES . I am wife of the last witness. I know the prisoner - he used our house. I remember his coming on a Saturday to get change for a note. I saw my husband give him the change, and was present when he wrote on the note, but did not see what he wrote. It was a 5 l. note, for I had it in my hand; the prisoner gave it into my hand, saying,

"Can you oblige me with change for a 5 l. note." I gave it to my husband. I have no doubt of his being the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I assure you. The gentleman must be mistaken in my person. I have borne an excellent character through life.

Four persons gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

Reference Number: t18240603-125

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

941. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , at St. John, at Hackney , a gelding, price 5 l. , the property of John Sutton .

TIMOTHY READING . I am patrol of St. John, Hackney. On the 29th of May, about one o'clock in the morning, I was on duty at the White Lion public-house, Hackneywick, with Brewer, and saw the prisoner in the road, leading a horse by an halter. I asked where he was going with it? he said he was going to turn it into a grass field just by. I asked if it was his own? he said No, that it belonged to his master. I asked who his master was; he said George Marsh , a farmer, who lived close by the Three Colts public-house, at Old Ford. I asked how he came to be out at so unseasonable an hour; he said he had been to town after a load of dung, and was late home. I asked how long he had been in Marsh's service - he said for six months, and that he lodged in his master's house. I took him into custody, and Brewer brought the horse to the watch-house. I inquired, but could find no Mr. Marsh.

Prisoner. Q. Could I be taking the horse anywhere but to grass in that road - A. I do not know - Sutton saw the same horse that morning, and owned it.

JOHN SUTTON. This horse is mine - my son had turned it out in a field at Old Ford the night before. I was not at home. I found it at Hackney watch-house, about ten o'clock next morning. Reading was present. I have had it four months - it is a grey gelding, and worth 5 l. My son was with me. I am sure it is mine.

Prisoner. Q. Was it in an inclosed field - A. No, an open place; it is possible that it might have strayed.

JOHN SUTTON , junior. I put this horse in the field, at the Three Colts public-house, Old Ford, at seven o'clock on Friday evening. I went there again at five in the morning, and missed it. There were other horses there, one of which was my father's; the one missing was a grey one. There is no gate to the field. I went to the watch-house and found it there, and knew it.

JURY. Q. Did you leave a halter on it in the field - A. No, sir.

JOHN GARVA. I was constable of the night. The prisoner and gelding were brought to me about one o'clock in the morning. Sutton and his son saw it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Old Ford-lane, and saw the horse straying with the halter on its neck. I was going to take it into the field to grass. I could take it nowhere but to the field, for there is no road to lead any where else.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 59.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240603-126

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

942. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , at St. George's, Hanover-square , 17 yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l., the goods of James Osborne and Charles Osborne , in their dwelling-house .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18240603-127

London Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

943. WILLIAM CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a Bank post-bill, for payment of and value 10 l. , the property of William Wilkinson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Gibson .

MESSRS. GURNEY and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE THOMPSON . I am a farmer, and live at Welburn, in Lincolnshire. On the 23d of March, Wilkinson, of Grantham, got me to write a letter for him to Gibson, in town, as he cannot write well - a 10 l. Bank post-bill was inclosed in the letter. I took an account of it before I inclosed it - Wilkinson has the memorandum - (looking at it) - this is it - it was No. 914. dated the 19th of September, 1823, and I made a private mark on the bill - (looking at it) - this is the bill. I put the letter W. on it by desire of Wilkinson, and that is on the back of it now. I directed the letter to Thomas Gibson , and inclosed it in a cover, directed to Lord Viscount Sidmouth, Secretary of State, Whitehall. I dated the letter on the 24th.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I got Thompson to inclose this Bank post-bill for Gibson. I gave the letter to Allam, the carrier, on the 23d, about eight o'clock at night.

WILLIAM ALLAM . I received a letter from Wilkinson, and took it in the same night to the Post-office at Ledenham. I gave it to Mr. Colton.

WILLIAM COLTON . I keep the Post-office at Ledenham. On the evening of the 23d of March, I received a

letter from Allam, directed to Lord Viscount Sidmouth, Secretary of State, London. I put it into the bag about a quarter past nine o'clock with other letters; it went to Grantham next morning.

- TODD. I am postmaster at Grantham - a letter coming to me on the morning of the 24th, would be sent to London that evening, and arrive on the 25th. I forwarded all the letters to town on the 24th.

JOHN STUDDERT . I am a clerk at the General Post-office - the Grantham bag comes to me. I open it - it arrived in due course on the morning of the 25th.

JOHN STRAUGHAN . I am a letter-carrier at the General Post-office - Dover-street, Piccadilly, is in my district - Lord Sidmouth lived there on the 25th. I deliver all the letters which come into my possession - if I had had one for him in on the 25th, I should have delivered it.

JOHN SCUTT . I am a porter at Whitehall - a letter coming there in March, directed to Lord Viscount Sidmouth, would be given to me for his Lordship after the cover was taken off. I should receive it from the office-keeper - there are more porters besides me.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD VISCOUNT SIDMOUTH . In March last, Gibson was in my service - no letter came to me directed for him on the 25th, or since. I allow my servants the privilege of having their letters addressed under cover to me.

THOMAS GIBSON . I am servant to Lord Sidmouth. I received no letter from Wilkinson with a 10 l. note in it.

THOMAS JONES . I am a servant, and know the prisoner. I met him in Oxford-street between eleven and twelve o'clock one day - he said he had a note which he wished to change, and asked me to go with him to the Bank. I went with him, and they would not change it there I suppose, as he came out of the Bank and said to me.

"Do you know any one who will change it for me;" - I said,

"I knew one Barnet, in Houndsditch, and introduced him to him.

Prisoner. I told you it was a Bank post-bill which I had found. - Witness. He did so; and shewed me the fragments of the letter which he had found it in. I read the writing on it; but do not remember what it was - the letter was squeezed up together.

MORDICA BARNET. I am a clothes salesman. Jones introduced a man to me in Cutler-street fair. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner - he said he had a 10 l. Bank post-bill to get changed. I took him to Benjamin, who gave him a watch and 6 l. in money for it - it was on a Tuesday, but I cannot recollect the date.

LEWIS BENJAMIN . I keep a coffee-house in Duke's-place, Aldgate - Barnet introduced two gentlemen to me on Friday afternoon, the 26th of March, at four o'clock - Jones was one of them, and I think the prisoner was the other - he produced a 10 l. Bank post-bill. I took it to the Bank, and returned with it. I understood that he wanted a silver watch. I gave him 6 l. and a watch, which came to 4 l - he did not tell me how he came by the bill. I asked his name, which he wrote on it, and the person he received it from. Here is

" William Connolly , of William Wilkinson " on it - he wrote that in my presence - my daughter was also present.

Prisoner. Q. Were you present when I wrote it - A. I was.

MARTHA BENJAMIN . I am daughter of the last witness, and remember the prisoner coming for change of a Bank post-bill. I saw him write on the back of it.

Prisoner to BARNET. Q. Was Benjamin present when I wrote on the bill - A. No; he went out to fetch the watch while his daughter brought the pen and ink - neither he nor his daughter were present, nor was I, for I went out at the same time as Benjamin.

Q. Then none of you were present - A. No; I will take a solemn oath that nobody was present - the daughter was not present - she brought the pen and ink, and then went into the back kitchen.

Q. You were not present - how do you know whether she did not go into the room again - A. That I cannot tell.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the Bank post-bill in Albemarle-street on Sunday evening, and took it to the Bank next morning to be accepted - they told me to bring it on that day week, and it would be paid.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-128

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

944. WILLIAM PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a coat, value 4 l., the goods of Benjamin Smith , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH HAWKINS . I work for Mr. Benjamin Smith , an undertaker , who lives in Oxford-street; the prisoner was employed in painting the house in May - I did not see him at work on the 7th - the workshop is in Castle-street , On the 7th, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the workshop and saw him come out at the private door with a bundle under his arm - I informed my master, and then went after him, but lost him; I suppose that he had a coat, as I saw the serge lining of it; it was rolled up - I thought it was the lining of a coat.

JOHN WHALES . I am an officer. On the 7th of May, in consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner in Vine-street, Chandos-street, about five or six o'clock. Hawkins pointed him out - I took him to a public house - he denied the charge. I found a purse on him containing silver - I put it on the table - he took it up, and threw it on the floor. As I was taking him to the watch-house, I told him I knew he had stolen the coat, for he had been seen carrying it from the house; and that Mahoney, who he was at work with, was in custody, until I found him. He then said

"I have sold it, and the money in the purse is what I got for it" - that he had sold it in Vine-street. I went there and found such a shop as he had described - I got a coat there, which I produced.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I was with Wales; the prisoner threw down two five shilling pieces and six shillings - he said he received that for the coat.

ISAAC ISAACS . I live at No. 5, Vine-street, and sell old china, watches, and things. On the 7th of May, between four and five o'clock, the prisoner came and purchased a watch for 30 s., and told me to regulate it, and he would call in the evening for it, when he should receive some money; he had a coat under his arm; he went out - returned - and asked me to advance him a sovereign on the coat. I lent him 16 s., and gave the coat to Whales.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-129

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

944. GEORGE PHILLIPS and WILLIAM REYNOLDS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Phillips , on the 18th of April , (she and others being therein) and stealing four copper boilers, value 9 s.; one coal scuttle, value 3 s., and a can, value 2 s. , her property.

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution:

CHARLES MURRELL . I know the Fox and Bull public-house at Knightsbridge - Elizabeth Phillips , a widow woman , keeps it. About a fortnight before the robbery, I was employed to sit up to watch - I did not sit up on this night, but at two o'clock in the morning, I went round to see if all was safe; I then went to bed - got up at six, and found the wash-house window up, and the cellar door broken off the hinges.

MARY ANN PHILLIPS . I am the daughter of Elizabeth Phillips , who keeps the Fox and Bull . The prisoner Phillips is my brother. On Sunday morning, the 18th of April, I came down about seven o'clock; Murrell, who had set up every night since Christmas, gave me information. I found the cellar door wrenched off its hinges - somebody had got in that way, opened the wash-house window-shutters, and both the windows, and this property was gone. One of the boilers were brought in by a man, and the other three were found at a broker's. The Park is behind our house - any one can get over the wall into the yard - the cellar opens into the yard.

THOMAS WESTBROOK . I lodge at the Fox and Bull public-house. On the 18th of April, I lived in Whitechart-court, close to the Fox and Bull. I was getting up at five o'clock in the morning, and on looking out of the window, I saw Reynolds getting over the Park wall into Mrs. Phillips's yard; he had a dark coat and a red handkerchief on, and a kind of a shoemaker's apron. I thought at first that it was Phillips, but looked again and saw that it was Reynolds; he was getting on the flat, which is level with the wall.

HENRY MAYBERRY. I am a hair dresser, and live in Strutton-ground, about a mile and a half from the Fox and Bull public-house - Phillips lodged opposite to me. On Sunday morning, the 18th of April, at a quarter or ten minutes before six o'clock, I stood at my shop door, and saw him go into No. 35, nearly opposite, with a copper coal-scuttle and a can.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a butcher. On Easter Monday, the 19th of April, I was in the Park with my master's dog. I came to a pond in the Park - the dog dived, and brought out a copper pot; I sent him in again, and he got out another, and I got one out myself. The pond is about fifty yards from the Fox and Bull public-house - I left them with Hunt.

JOHN HUNT . I am a broker, and live at Knightsbridge Hill brought me three pots - Miss Phillips saw and claimed them.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I apprehended Reynolds in Pump-court, Perkin's-rents. I found six men and three women in the room - a girl calling herself Ryley said she rented the room. I found an old copper boiler under the bed, wrapped in two old blue aprons, which I produce. I went to the premises; they appeared to have been broken open by some large instrument. I found the shaft of a chaise in the yard - it corresponded with the marks on the cellar door - it had been used to force the hinges off. I apprehended the other prisoner before.

REYNOLDS'S Defence. I know nothing of the robbery; that man has taken a false oath.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-130

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

945. MARK JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Chalk .

JOHN CHALK . I am a butcher , and live at Barking, On the 9th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Whitechapel-road with my cart, and left it in the care of a strange boy while I went into a public house - my coat was across the cart, and the beadle brought it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It was very old - A. Yes; it is worth above 1 s.

JOHN SHIPPEY . I mind horses. I saw Chalk's cart in Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the seat, he walked off with it up Osborne-street, Brick-lane, I saw Boutle bring him back with it - I am sure the same man was brought back.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say that you recollected him - A. Yes; he had a short coat, and a high-crowned hat on - I did not see his face.

HENRY MARSHALL . I live in Osborne-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! - went to my shop door - I saw the prisoner running towards me with a coat under his arm; I collared him - he dropped the coat and broke from me; I picked it up - he was brought back in about five minutes; I am sure he is the man - I saw his face when I collared him.

Cross-examined. Q. Many Jews are alike - A. Some are. I am certain of him.

JOHN BOUTLE . I am headborough. Marshall delivered me the coat - I found the prisoner in custody in Osborne-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-131

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

946. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , two coats, value 15 s. , the goods of John Dickinson .

JOHN DICKINSON . I lodged with Mrs. Thompson in April last, and left my clothes in her care.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON . I live in Lambeth-street . Dickenson lodged with me, and in April left his clothes in my room. On the 24th of April, about one o'clock, my neighbour gave me information - I ran out and saw the prisoner about twelve doors off, and saw him drop two of Dickinson's coats and run away; I picked them up - I had put them into a box on the first-floor room on that day; I had heard nobody up stairs - Parteridge pursued and took her.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am a beadle. I heard an alarm - saw the prisoner running, and took her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who said if I went up to the first-floor, and brought two coats from his box; he would give me 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-132

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

947. JANE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a lamp, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Wilson .

CATHERINE MARSH . I live in Jermyn-street, St. James's. On the 22d of April I was servant to Thomas Wilson , who keeps a wine-vaults in High Holborn . About twenty minutes to seven o'clock on that morning, I saw the prisoner in a box in the tap-room - she remained there till nearly ten, and then went into the yard, and then into the parlour; I had served her with a glass of rum; she went out in about twenty minutes, and I missed a lamp from the parlour ceiling. I had seen it safe several times that morning. The officer brought her back with it about five o'clock that afternoon.

HENRY PEPPERHALL . I am an officer of St. Giles's. On the 2d of April, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I found the prisoner in Short's-gardens, with this lamp in her hand; she said it belonged to William Jones . I took her to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-133

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

948. PETER KENYON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a watch, value 20 s.; a chain, value 1 d., and a key, value 2 s. , the goods of George Cox .

GEORGE COX . I am servant to Mr. Rutland, a baker , and live in Old Burlington-street. On the 17th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, I left my watch in the bake-house, returned in half an hour, and it was gone. The prisoner is a pot-boy , and used to call every morning about nine o'clock.

MARY ANN COOPER . At a quarter to nine o'clock on this morning I saw the prisoner go down into the bake-house for the pots - there was no one there - he came up in about ten minutes. I am servant at the house.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. On the 17th of May, about two o'clock, I went to the prisoner's mother's house; she lives in Peter-street, Wardour-street. I saw the prisoner there, and said,

"Where is the watch which you had?" he began to cry, and said,

"Oh! my mother has got it" - she immediately brought it from the mantle-piece, wrapped in a towel, and gave it to him; he gave it to me. He said he had found it in Chapel-passage, but at the watch-house he said he was sorry he had taken it - that it was his first offence, and begged forgiveness.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, soliciting Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-134

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

949. MARY LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , a silver spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of John Miles .

JOHN SAVAGE . I live with Mr. Rouberry, pawnbroker, Auchor-row, Wapping. On the 2d of June, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to pawn a spoon - I saw

"Feathers, Hand-court, Holborn," written on it, and asked her name; she said, Mary Lambert , but refused to say where she lived. My master fetched an officer, who took her - she begged of me to return it, saying that she would take it back to where she had taken it from.

JAMES JEFFERIES . I am an officer. I was fetched to Rouberry's shop, and took the prisoner into custody with the spoon. I asked where she got it from; she made no answer. I said I suspected that she had stolen it - she said she had, and begged I would let her take it back herself.

JOHN MILES . I keep the Feathers Tavern , Hand-court . The prisoner had been two months in my service. On Wednesday, the officer brought me the spoon; I believe it to be mine; I had only two marked as this is - they were my father's, who kept the tavern four years ago. I took his stock, but cannot recollect whether I have seen it for the last two years. I have twelve servants. The prisoner behaved very well, and I would take her into my service again.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and delivered to her Master.

Reference Number: t18240603-135

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

950. FRANCIS PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , seventeen yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. , the goods of William Sharman .

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. On the 28th of April, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner sitting on a step, two or three doors from the prosecutor's, with another boy; he was sharpening a knife on the step, and in a moment I saw him go towards Mr. Sharman's. Some cotton hung under the window, tied with two strings. I saw him cut the strings - he and the other boy then went and took hold of a piece of cotton, and carried it between them till they had passed the shop; the prisoner then carried it alone; I crossed over, and took him with it - he was trying to put it under his coat. I found a knife upon him; he cried, and begged to be let go. The other ran off.

ROBERT STOUT . I am shopman to William Sharman . This cotton is his, and was safe ten minutes before Fogg brought the prisoner in with it - it was fastened with two strings; one was cut, and the other broken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-136

London Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

851. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a printed bound book, value 18 d. , the goods of Edward Simmons .

EDWARD SIMMONS . I am a bookseller , and live in Bell-alley, Coleman-street , On the 21st of May I was in a back room, and saw the prisoner at the shop window - I turned round, and on turning again I saw that he had moved further on. I missed a book, and saw him putting it under his waistcoat; I followed him ten or fifteen yards - he saw me, and then threw it into a passage, and set off running - he was taken in my sight. I picked the book up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded great distress.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-137

952. JAMES NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , a reticule, value 1 s.; two printed bound books, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d., and an apron, value 7 d., the goods of Elizabeth Betts , from her person .

ELIZABETH BETTS . I am a single woman , and live in New Union-street, Moorfields. On the 16th of May, at ten o'clock at night, I was returning home, and was just going to knock at my door when the prisoner came up, and snatched my bag from my hand; I called Stop thief! he immediately dropped it, and ran away - he was taken directly. I am certain of his person.

WILLIAM COLBECK . I was at the corner of Union-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, and another man following him. He fell down by the workhouse, and dropped the bag; he then ran up a place, and got into a dust-hole, where I secured him. He had got about fifty yards from the prosecutrix's house. I am certain he is the man.

MATTHEW POLLOCK . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. The prosecutrix spoke positively to him.

CHRISTOPHER HALL . I picked up the bag or reticule in New Union-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken ill, and went to the dust-hole.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-138

953. JACOB WEAVER and ROBERT WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of George Roles , from his person .

GEORGE ROLES . I am servant to Miss West , who lives in Fitzroy-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 10th of May, about a quarter to nine o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Barbican , and felt something at my pocket; I put my hand behind me, and caught hold of the prisoner Williams's hand; I turned round and saw him and Weaver about half a yard behind me; I kept hold of Williams's hand; some other persons were standing close by; I saw my handkerchief among them, but cannot say which of them had it - I have not recovered it - I secured both the prisoners, and gave them in charge.

WILLIAM SEDGWICK . I am a cork-cutter - I was in Smithfield, and saw the two prisoners in company with another man - I followed, and watched them to Barbican, and saw Williams put his hand into Mr. Roles's pocket - I did not see him take any thing out - Roles turned round and caught hold of him - I assisted in securing them both.

WILLIAM PARLETT . I am an officer; on the 6th of May I was fetched to the corner of Barbican; Roles gave the prisoners into my charge.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I received Weaver in charge from Parlett.

WEAVER'S Defence. I saw a mob at the corner of Barbican - went over, and in three minutes the gentleman laid hold of me.

WILLIAM'S Defence. I was coming from my sister's; the gentleman turned and caught hold of me - I know nothing of Weaver.

WEAVER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-139

953. ELEANOR STEPHENSON , and ELIZABETH WOODFIELD were indicted for feloniously assaulting Frances Nye on the King's highway, on the 1st of May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person against her will, a pocket-book, value 6 d., and 4 s. , her property.

FRANCES NYE . On the 1st of May I lived in Turnagain-lane, Fleet-market - I was going down by the side of Fleet-market , on my way home, about three o'clock in the morning -

Q. What kept you out so late - A. I am generally out at night; I had been walking in the street; I am an unfortunate girl ; the prisoners followed me down by the side of the market, on the right hand coming from Ludgate-hill ; I never saw either of them in my life before; I heard them behind me, but did not see them till I got to my own door; I was just going to put my hand to the knocker, when one of them knocked me down; they pulled me by my clothes, and I fell.

Q. That was not knocking you down - A. No; one pulled me by my cloak, and Stephenson knocked me down with her fist; I only received one blow, and that was on my breast. Stephenson put a handkerchief into my mouth, and Woodfield put her hand to my pocket, and took out my pocket-book, while I was on the ground. Stephenson said to Woodfield -

"We are all right," and both ran up the street with it. I got up as soon as I could, and went to the bottom of the street and called the watchman; they ran up that street, and came down the same street again, and met me and the watchman; the pocket-book contained 4 s., and thirteen duplicates. When they got me down I asked what they were going to do; they said if I made any resistance they would cut my throat; this passed while they were taking the handkerchief out to put into my mouth.

Q. Could you not call the watchman when you fell - A. No; I had no power; I was stunned. I laid there for ten minutes before I had power to get up, after they had run away.

Q. How could you tell which way they went - A. I heard them run, and told the watchman which way they went.

JURY. Q. Were you sober - A. I was perfectly sober. I had gone out about nine o'clock, and only had one glass of liquor. I had not been with any gentleman that night, I never saw the prisoners before, and never spoke to them.

JOSEPH EVESON. I am a watchman, and was stationed in Skinner-street, close to Turn-again-lane. At three in the morning I saw the prisoners come out of the lane into Skinner-street, running as fast as they could; but not hearing any alarm, I did not take them - if there had been a cry. I am certain I must have heard it. In about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes afterwards, I found a red pocket-book against the door at which the prosecutrix says she was knocked down. I did not see her till I got to the watch-house, which was in about twenty-five minutes - she appeared perfectly sober.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. About ten minutes past three o'clock in the morning, I was sitting by the Rose Inn, Fleet-market. The prosecutrix passed me, and the prisoners behind her, singing a song. The prosecutrix bid me good night, and in about ten minutes I heard

a cry of Watch! at the bottom of Castle-street. I ran there, and the prosecutrix said she had been knocked down and robbed. I ran up Castle-street and Turn-again-lane, but could not find them. I was returning to my beat, but a man said two women were coming down the lane - it was the prisoners. I knew them to be the women who had followed prosecutrix - she also said they were the women, and I took them; and as they went along, Stephenson said, three or four times over, that she would have the prosecutrix's *** life; and Woodfield said,

"If I cannot do it myself, I will get somebody else to do it."

MATHEW BANKS. I was constable of the night; the prisoners were brought to the watch-house. The prosecutrix said they had knocked her down, and robbed her of a pocket-book and 4 s. 6 d.; they were very ontrageous, and said the would serve her out. I found 1 s. 6 d. on one of them, and a few halfpence on the other. The prosecutrix gave the same account of it them as she has now - she had been drinking, but was not drunk.

STEPHENSON. Q. Did she not say that she had been drinking with us from a quarter to twelve o'clock - A. She said she had been giving them a glass each, and that she had been with a gentleman, who gave her the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-140

955. JOHN STARKEY , JOHN KEEFE , and THOMAS JONES , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 10 pairs of stockings, value 16 s. , the goods of Richard Kipling

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 3d of May I was in St. Martin's-le-grand, and saw the prisoners. I followed them to the shop of Mr. Dew, a hosier, in Cheapside; a gentleman looked at them, and they crossed over. I followed them into the Poultry , and saw Starkey and Keefe go into a lobby next door to Mr. Kipling's. Jones went and took these stockings from Mr. Kipling's shop, and threw them into the lobby to the others. They did not take them up, but came and looked to see if they were seen. I am certain that all three were acting together in company - they came towards the door - Jones came back, and was going towards the shop again - Latham took him, and I took the others, and the property.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am warehouseman to Mr. Smith, who lives in the Poultry. Herdsfield came into our warehouse to watch the prisoners. I saw Jones take a bundle of stockings from Mr. Kipling's door, and throw them into the lobby - I ran across and took him.

MR. RICHARD KIPLING . I am a hosier ; these stockings are mine. I was not at home at the time.

JONES'S Defence. I was coming from Cheapside when he laid hold of me and said,

"I think you are the man who took the stockings."

STARKEY'S Defence. I was coming along with Keefe, it rained, and we stood under a doorway.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

STARKEY - NOT GUILTY .

KEEFE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-141

956. JOHN BRETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Mallison , on the King's highway, on the 15th of April , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two waistcoats, value 2 l.; a fan, value 2 s.; two ounces of tea, value 1 s.; eight ounces of sugar, value 6 d., and two handkerchiefs, value 18 d. , her property.

ELIZABETH MALLISON . On the 15th of April, at about a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming up Bishopsgate-street , and saw the prisoner interrupting a little girl, who was a stranger to me - she appeared to be ten or twelve years old - he attempted to catch her in his arms - this made me take particular notice of him. I walked on, and as I approached two or three steps (at the corner of Angel-alley ), he turned his attention from the girl to me, looking at me in a frolicsome manner. I quickened my pace, and he came before me, then came round behind me, and struck me on the left arm - the blow did not hurt, but numbed my arm, - he snatched my bundle directly, and ran up Angel-alley - it was on my left arm, and contained the articles stated in the indictment. I pursued him, calling Stop thief! but nobody was kind enough to stop him. He took a turning on right of the alley, and at the top of that turning I lost sight of him. He was taken by Liman in a quarter of an hour - I pointed him out myself in the tap-room of the George public-house, which is a few steps from the spot on which I lost sight of him. I am confident he is the person - I charged him with the theft - he denied it - I have not found my property.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you seen the girl since - A. No; people were passing in the street. I noticed them for about a minute or two. He appeared to lear at me as I passed, which attracted my notice. I thought he meant to insult me, and passed on quickly. I looked at him sufficiently to know him - it was a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening - I am sure of the time - it was not later - I looked at Bishopsgate Church clock - it was then better than ten minutes past seven - I was taking the waistcoats home to a gentleman. The transaction did not occupy above a minute or two. I only looked at him once, when he leared at me - if I notice a person, I can speak to them again - I am confident that he is the man. I may have taken one person for another in the course of my life, but I am confident of him. I described him to Sapswell, the patrol, before I went into the George public-house.

JOHN LIMAN . I am a constable and patrol of Bishopsgate, On the 15th of April, I was going upon duty, and was told this young woman had been robbed. I found her at Sapswell's door; she described the prisoner to me as a full faced young man, dressed in blue trowsers and coat. I took her to the George public-house - the prisoner was sitting there, leaning over a chair, and the moment she entered she said to him,

"What have you done with my bundle?" he said

"Me!" she said

"Yes, you are the man who took it, and nobody else;" he said," I have not been out of the house for an hour and a half." I said to the people present,

"How long has he been here?" nobody present would answer. I went to the bar, and asked a person there in his presence - he said he did not know - I took him to the Mansion House - he told the same story there, and was remanded till Monday, to bring persons to prove it; in which case, the Lord Mayor said, he would not commit him; but nobody came forward.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my father about six o'clock, and went immediately to the George public-house, and

met two gentlemen who knew my father - I was drinking in their company till I was taken.

RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I live in Lucas-buildings - on the night this man was taken I was at the George, with my brother - we got there about six o'clock, and about half-past six the prisoner came in - I asked after his father, and asked him to drink, and he never quitted the place till about eight, when a man came in and took him out.

COURT. Q. What are you by trade - A. A weaver; I live about twenty yards from the George public-house; he joined me and my brother; nobody else was in our company.

Q. What makes you so accurate as to time - A. Just after tea I told my wife I was going to the George, and should be home to supper, and when I got there I said

"Bill, we have not got above two hours to stop;" there is a dial in the room - I looked at the dial when he came in, and said,

"If you had been here a little sooner you would have been here before me, for I have only been here half an hour" - I did not go before the Lord Mayor - I did not hear of this charge till his father desired me to come here; nothing was said to me before he was committed.

WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE . I was at the George on this night - the prisoner came in about twenty minutes or half-past six o'clock, and remained with my brother and me till this woman came in.

COURT. Q. You were not desired to go before the Lord Mayor - A. No, my Lord - my brother told me he was subpoened here, and as I was with him I said I would come - I lodge with my brother.

Q. What makes you particular as to its being after six o'clock that he came - A. I went in with my brother just after six - we did not expect him to come - I saw the officer take him - I did not hear him ask how long he had been there - it is a small room - I was on the left hand side of the fire, and he on the other, very near me - I never heard the officer ask how long he had been there.

RICHARD BUCKERIDGE re-examined. I did not hear the officer ask any questions - he told me to-day that he asked Watts at the bar how long he had been there.

JOHN LIMAN re-examined. When she said she was positive of him, I said

"Now, how long has this man been here?" I addressed myself to all the company - I know that one of the witnesses were there, and must have heard the question. I then went to Watts, who acted as landlord, and asked him - he said he did not know.

MARY BUTLER . I keep the George public-house, in Angel-alley - the prisoner was in my house on this night: he came in, as near as I can tell, about half-past six o'clock; but I have been out of my mind - I waited on him the whole of the time till the officers came - he was never out of the house.

COURT. Q. Do you remember the officer coming - A. Yes; he asked a young man how long he had been there; he said he did not know - he did not ask me, as I was in the bar - both the witnesses were there - I heard nothing more about it till I was subpoened here - I was absent for a short time.

MR. LAW. Q. Should you have had any difficulty in stating this to the Lord Mayor if you had been desired - A. No - I did not hear the officer ask the witnesses at what time he came in.

COURT. Q. You were absent for a short time - A. I went out of the tap-room to snuff the candles - I heard a little scuffle, and heard him say

"I have not been out of the house" - and Buckeridge said

"No, he cannot have done any thing, for he has not been out of our company;" and I said

"Don't take him away, I am sure he is the wrong man."

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force and violence .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-142

957. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Henry Roberts , from his person .

HENRY ROBERTS. On the 19th of April, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. I was in Chiswell-street , somebody touched me on the shoulder, and said my pocket was picked. I turned round and missed my handkerchief - the man pointed to the prisoner, who was about twelve yards off, and said he was theman who had taken it - he ran away. I pursued, and lost sight of him as he turned into a court. The officer took him - he is the man who was pointed out to me.

HENRY BLACKROSE . I was in Chiswell-street, and saw the prisoner picking a gentleman's pocket. I saw him take something from a gentleman's pocket and put it into his own. I pointed him out - he ran down Whitecross-street, and down an alley into a privy - a butcher kept him in the privy until the officer came - we found the handkerchief thrown down the privy. I had seen him about the streets before.

THOMAS BAKER . I am a butcher. I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner run into the privy. I kept him there till the officer came.

The prosecutor could not identify the handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-143

958. FREDERICK HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th April , a bag, value 3 d., and a coat, value 10 s., the goods of James Walls , from the person of George Walls .

GEORGE WALLS . I am the son of James Walls , and am eleven years old . On Saturday, the 10th of April, my uncle Britton, who lives in Cross-street, Hatton-garden, sent me to take a bag to my father in Catherine-street, Commercial-road - the prisoner came up to me in Leaden-hall-street , and said,

"Will you go on an errand for me;" - I said,

"I would." he said,

"Go to that bookseller's shop, in St. Mary-axe, and ask for my brown great coat, and I will give you 2 d., and let me hold your bag until you come back." I gave him the bag and went - there were two booksellers' shops; I returned to ask which it was, and he was gone with my bag. I began crying - a coachman went and brought him back almost immediately with the bag. I know him to be the man.

WILLIAM BROOKS . On the 10th of April I saw this boy in Leadenhall-street, and in consequence of what he said, I ran and overtook the prisoner in Great St. Helen's walking with the bag - he said a man in a drab great coat had given it to him - the boy said he was the man.

- WALLS. I am this boy's mother - this bag and coat belong to my husband - he had been sent to his uncle's for it.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman came up and asked me to carry it - he absconded when I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-144

959. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a watch, value 2 l.; a chain, value 1 s. 6 d.; a seal, value 4 s., and a key, value 4 s. 6 d., the goods of William Potter , from his person .

WILLIAM POTTER . I am servant to Mr. Tippen, a surgeon , of Spital-square. On the 24th of May, about 4 o'clock in the morning, I was in Smithfield , going to my situation. I had to drive my master to Hackney in the chaise very early that morning; but being too early, I sat down to see the men fasten up the oxen - the prisoner came by and made a snatch at my coat, and unbottoned it - he returned again, unbottoned my waistcoat, and snatched at my seals. I had hold of them; his hat fell off, and so did mine. I I went to pick it up - he gave me a blow in the eye, and ran off. I called Stop thief! - his companions stopped me. I got my hat, and pursued him down Three-fox-court; he held up a stick, and swore he would murder me if I followed - he got over a wall into the pig-market; the watchmen got over and took him.

Q. Did your master expect you so early as four o'clock; A. I was to be at his house at six. I had come from Crown-street, Soho. I got up at half-past three.

Q. When he unbuttoned your coat, then returned, and unbottoned your waistcoat, did you not suspect he was going to do something - A. Yes, my Lord; I struggled with him, and got my watch back, and put it into my fob. I did not lose sight of him.

JOHN DOBBS . I am a patrol. I heard a call of Watch! and saw the prisoner getting over the wall; he got down among the sheep, and tried to hide himself. I secured him. Potter appeared sober; he was very ill used, and had a scratched eye.

MATTHEW BARRETT . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; nothing was found on him except a badge; he is a drover .

Prisoner's Defence. I was minding my master's sheep; the prosecutor came and struck me, and said I had attempted to rob him - if he felt me open his coat, why not seize me without waiting for me to open his waistcoat?

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-145

NEW COURT.

(3d DAY.)

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

960. JOHN COURT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert Hogard .

ROBERT HOGARD . I am a haberdasher , and live in Waterloo-place; I left my gig in Goswell-street on Saturday morning, the 1st of May, in the care of a boy in the employment of Mr. Budd. I was gone into the house, and had left my coat in it; I came out in about a quarter of an hour, and it was gone.

HENRY GREEN . I had the care of Mr. Hogard's chaise. I was at the horses head; there was a brown great-coat and a blue cloak in the chaise. I was looking towards Goswell-street, and the chaise was towards Old-street, when the coat was stolen.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. On the 1st of May, about ten or eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner just turning round Old-street, rolling up this coat, and running fast; I followed him, and Bradford caught him. It was about fifty yards from Mr. Budd's.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I followed the prisoner, who was running. I stopped him, and took the coat from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-146

961. THOMAS CORBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , a candlestick, value 2 s. , the goods of Martin Krantz .

ELIZABETH KRANTZ . I am the wife of Martin Krantz , who is a publican . On the 18th of May, the prisoner came in and called for a pint of beer; he took it into the parlour and drank it, and then returned and took the candlestick off the shelf, and put it into his pocket; my little boy saw it done, and gave the alarm. I ran and stopped him, and said,

"You have got my candlestick?" he said,

"I have not;" but he had it in his pocket. I sent for a constable and had him taken.

THOMAS PIZZEY . I am a constable. I took him into custody, and took the candlestick from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was real distress.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-147

962. THOMAS TUFFLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , three sovereigns, two crowns, four half-crowns, four shillings, and a six-pence, the monies of William King , from his person .

WILLIAM KING . I was at a public-house at Edmonton on the 3d of April. I had seen the prisoner before that day, but was not acquainted with him. He was in the tap-room about eight o'clock in the morning. I had three sovereigns, two crowns, four half-crowns, and some shillings and sixpences in my pocket-handkerchief. I gave it to the landlord till I left; we went away together; he asked me to let him ride in my cart to Waltham-cross; he shook some hay about in the cart, and said,

"Lay down and go to sleep, and I will drive." I did so. We kept on till we came to the Two Brewers public-house, at Ponders-end, and I was rather sleepy, but I saw that the horses were going wrong; the prisoner was then gone. I called to the horses to stop, and a man in the road stopped them; I then felt in my pocket and found it was cut, and the money was gone. I did not see him again till the Sunday week following, when he was in the cage at Cheshunt. I charged him with having my money, he said he had not had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-148

963. GODFREY BOOTH was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM BAYLEY . I am a victualler , and live at Highgate - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 20th of May he went round and carried out beer, and received money. He received 2 s. 6 d. from Mrs. Hannah Watkins for four days' beer - she generally pays on a Thursday; when he returned I asked him to settle for the beer he had taken out; he made no answer; I asked him again about nine or ten o'clock; he then said he would settle bye and bye; he was getting rather forward in liquor, and I told him to go bed, and the next morning he said if he had any thing to pay he would make it all right.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-149

964. MARY GUTTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , a purse, value 3 d.; two sovereigns, and thirteen shillings, the property of George Taylor , from his person .

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a bricklayer , and live at the Bell public-house, Kilburn. I was in the New-road on the 23d of May, and saw the prisoner there; she asked me for a drop of gin; we retired behind the road; I was with her about ten minutes, and gave her 1 s. 6 d. I had two sovereigns and some silver in a purse in my fob; on the top of my watch; I gave her 1 s. 6 d. out of my fob; when we parted I missed my purse; I called the watchman and charged her with taking it; nothing was found on her except 5 s.

Q. Was any other person near you - A. There was another girl near me at the time - she was within two or three yards of us; she was gone when I gave the alarm; she might have touched me without my perceiving it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-150

965. RICHARD GRANTHAM and ELIZABETH JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a pair of sheets, value 4 s.; two blankets, value 4 s.; a looking-glass, value 1 s., and a flat-iron, value 6 d., the goods of William Ward , in a lodging-room, let by him to the prisoners, to be used with the lodging .

WILLIAM WARD . I let the prisoners a lodging in my house, New Peter-street, Westminster , at 4 s. 6 d. a week. They lived there three weeks and four days; they lived together. The woman came into my room on the 15th of April, and I asked to go into her room, as I had not been in before; she touched the bedstead, and said,

"The sheets and blankets are gone;" I said,

"I dare say you know where they are gone?" but she denied any knowledge of them. I do not know that they took the lodging for both of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-151

966. FREDERICK HURNONG was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. , the goods of Joseph Harris .

SAMUEL SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Harris , pawnbroker , Tothill-street. On the 27th of April the prisoner brought some handkerchiefs to pledge - he said he believed there were four of them, but I found there were six in one piece, and one separate; a soldier, who was in the shop, gave the alarm. I pursued the prisoner, and found a handkerchief in his hat, which was Mr. Harris's. He was searched at the watch-house, and two other handkerchiefs of Mr. Harris's were found upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL BATES . I am a soldier in the Third Regiment of Foot Guards. I was in this shop - the prisoner was there before me; I saw him conceal a black silk handkerchief under his clothes, but did not see him take it. I told Smith.

JOSEPH HILL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody, and found these handkerchiefs in his pocket.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating, that he had bought the handkerchiefs of a man on the road, and went to the prosecutor's shop to pledge them, but they would not receive them; he went away and the witness followed him, and took him back; the handkerchief was found in his hat, but he knew not how it had got there.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-152

Before Mr. Recorder.

967. JAMES SNELLING and SAMUEL alias DOLBY HAINES , were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , two live swans, price 40 s., the goods of the Wardens and Commonalty of the mystery of Dyers of the city of London ; the said swans being severally pinioned and marked with a certain mark used by the said company; and one other live swan, price 20 s., the goods of our Lord the King , the same being pinioned and marked with a certain mark, which swans of and belonging to our said Lord the King are marked with .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing two live swans, price 40 s., marked and pinioned, the goods of the Wardens and Commonalty of the mystery of Dyers of the city of London, and one other live swan, marked and pinioned, price 20 s., the goods of our said Lord the King.

Mr. ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS PAGE . I am swan-marker to the Vintners Company and live at Vintners Hall; I am well acquainted with the marks of the King's swans, the Dyers and the Vintners. The swan-markers of these Companies go every year, on the first Monday in August, to mark the swans. We have none on the River but tame swans; the colour of the beak of the wild swans is yellowish, and they have not black legs. These swans (examining soms) and this cygnet, have the Dyers mark. I went in March, with Harrison, the City officer, to Carstangs's, and saw five swans there; these two swans were there, and I found another swan, a (pen,) which has died since it was in my custody. The pen was the King's; here is the beak of it, which I have preserved; they were all delivered into my custody, and I have kept them ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Where is the mark made - A. The mark is always across the beak; these scratches are a part of the King's mark.

Q. There are a great many swans in England - A. Yes, I suppose there are.

Q. What marks persons in the country may put upon their swans you don't know - A. No.

Q. You would not be surprised at other people marking them on the beak? - A. No.

Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. These swans were pinioned, and could not fly - A. No; there are six marks across the beak; I could see these marks very plain when the bird was alive, or I should not have seized it. This cob has the mark of the Dyers' Company; it is cut out with a penknife, and there are marks across the beak beside. It is smooth when first cut, but gets rougher; we cut them again next year. I can say upon my oath that these are the Dyers Company's swans.

Mr. W. BENTLEY proved the charter of the Dyers' Company.

HERCULES UPJOHN. I am one of the swan-nesters to his Majesty, on the Thames, and to the Dyers' and Vintners' Companies. About Christmas last there were upon the Thames in the neighbourhood of Chertsey, belonging to the King, the Dyers, and Vintners Companies, forty or fifty swans. About a month after I missed some; I can't say how many. There is a place called Docket Point, about three quarters of a mile from Chertsey-bridge; there might be ten or twelve swans there, and in about a month or five weeks after Christmas they were nearly all gone. I remember

one swan with one eye, and a female belonging to him, and two young ones; they were all the Dyers Company. I saw them sometimes two or three times a day; I have rested the one-eyed swan for three years, and know it perfectly well; I should know it among a thousand: this is the swan (looking at it). There was another brood of swans at Docket Point, and another at Chertsey-bridge. This swan nested between Docket Point and Chertsey, in a place called Dumsey-meadow; it is in the County of Middlesex.

Q. There being another brood of swans at Chertsey-bridge, and another at Docket Point, what effect would that have upon these swans? - A. They will not let the other swans go past: they come to their bounds and there fight, and never pass that point at the brooding time.

Q. When did you lose sight of the one-eyed swan - A. About Christmas; it might be before or after, I cannot say. I did not see if sometimes for a week together; I do not recollect that I had seen him the week before Christmas; it might be a fortnight or three weeks, I cannot exactly say. I have been at Vintners' Hall since then; I have seen swans there, and the one-eyed swan was there; this is it - I saw it at Vintners Hall; it is the one I nested in Dumsey-meadow. I never heard of any one-eyed swan on the river but this.

Cross-examined. Q. You say that the broods fight very much; should you be surprised if one were to beat out another's eye in a fight - A. It might happen for anything I know. They moult every year, and get lighter by moulting. Some swans may wander a little way in a flood time; they might go a mile. There are a great many swans on the Thames, but no private gentleman has got them near our parts. I have gone to the nest of this pair very often in flood time, and put stuff to raise the nest, and they seemed pleased that the eggs were raised out of the water. They moult in the spring, but do not lose their mark by moulting.

PHILIP ROWSELL . I am a swan-nester to the King, the Vintners and Dyers Companies, and know their marks. I have been in the habit of nesting them for sixty years; I am seventy-one years of age. I should know by the mark to whom they belong (looking at one); this is the King's bird; I can see no other mark upon it. I am a nester, and not a marker. I live at Chertsey Bridge; I know Dumsey-meadow, but do not nest the swans there.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been acquainted with swans - A. Sixty years. I have seen them marked, fed them, and nested them. I have had great experience, and I think this swan is the King's; this beak of the dead swan I think is the same as the other.

GEORGE HICKS . I am one of the swan-markers of the Dyers' Company; I live in Moss-alley, Bankside. This swan with one eye I marked myself; it is the mark of the Dyers' Company. This cygnet was marked by me in August last. Mr. Page has sometimes assisted me in marking them, but I marked this myself. I believe I know but of one instance of Mr. Page marking a bird. The beak of the female swan has the King's mark.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not Mr. Rowsell great knowledge of all the swans about the neighbourhood - A. Yes; but he is only a nester not a marker; there are many old nesters who do not know the marks.

JOHN ROAKE. I lived at Christmas last, at Back-lane, Chertsey, near the sign of the Bell, public house. I know the prisoner Snelling; he came to me on a Sunday morning, about six or eight days after Christmas, and asked me if I would take a walk with him to look at a few swans, which we could get very easily; we did so, and he said there were three swans we could get very easily; they were in some bye water in the neighbourhood of the Thames. I know Dumsey-meadow; I was there about a month after Christmas; James Snelling was with me then, on a Sunday morning; we went to take a walk over Chertsey-bridge to Dumsey-meadow; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon; there was no one with me but James Snelling . We saw three live swans; he said we could easily get them at night. I told him that Sunday night was a bad night for any thing of that kind; he said,

"What does it matter to us as to the night;" there were two white swans and one brown one; I do not know the difference between a cygnet and an old one except by the colour. We then went over Chertsey-bridge and round Chertsey-meadow, and then home. About six o'clock Snelling came to my house again; it was then dark; he asked me to go out and get some swans - I went with him. There was nobody with him at my house, but Haynes joined us soon after; he had two sack. We went together to Dumsey-meadow, pelted the swans ashore, and caught them; we drove them on the meadow shore, and put two in one sack, and one in the other - I believe that they were the same as I had seen in the morning; we carried them and laid them under the hedge in Dumsey-meadow. Snelling said his father's cart was going to Leadenhall-market that night, and he would get him to let him go up with it, and take them; he said

"We will keep these swans alive, for they will fetch double the money of dead ones;" we then went to Chertsey-bridge. When they were sold we three were to share the money. I saw Haynes two days after that, and again some time after. I never learned from him what became of the swans, but that he took them to Leadenhall-market to the salesman. He gave me 3 s., which he said was all he could give. I was taken up on the 3d of April, I believe. I and Snelling had been acquainted from the time we were in Dumsey-meadow till we were taken. I was taken before him, and was accused of taking the swans; I then laid the blame upon Snelling.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you expect to save yourself by accusing him - A. No, I did not, upon my oath, expect to save myself, nor do I now expect it.

Q. What then is your motive; is it pure love of justice - A. Yes; I have come from the House of Correction now. I objected to Sunday night, because I thought it was a very bad night to do it on, because it is the Lord's day.

Q. You would not mind it on a week day then - A. I was very cautious about doing it.

Q. Were you ever accused of robbing any person before, or of any crime before this - A. I do not recollect being accused of robbing any one, or trying to rob any one before. I was taken once before a Magistrate for asking a man for my wages; that is the only time.

Q. How do you get your living - A. By gardening; I was not then in regular employment; I work at different

places, where I can get a job; I had been as much as three months out of employment, and have had relief from the parish; that was my chief support. I made up my living by working now and then for my brother.

Q. Do you know this place well, where the swans were taken from, Dumsey-meadow - A. I have known it sixteen or eighteen years. I never told this to any one till I came to Bow-street.

Q. And yet it is for the mere love of justice that you tell it now - A. I had not an opportunity of telling it before; I was nearly the whole of the time ill in bed; it was my illness that caused me to apply to the parish; I had applied before I was ill; they refused to relieve me at first, but did afterwards.

JOHN LINSEY . I am a labouring porter at Leadenhall-market. Mr. Stevens is a salesman there. I remember about a month after Christmas bringing three swans from a cart about five o'clock in the morning; I was then in Lime-street. Snelling was in the cart; he said to me, go and get an empty basket or flat to put these live things in. I did not see what things they were. I went to a shop, and they said they had not an empty basket or flat, and I came and told him so, and he then sent me to Upjohn's, and I saw something with a bottom out; he went himself, and got that, and lodged it on Mr. Stevens's stall, and we brought the swans out one at a time; there were three live ones; we took them to Mr. Stevens's stall, and left them there.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Snelling drunk or sober - A. I never took notice; I run from one cart to another to get a job; I had not drank any thing myself.

WILLIAM HEARN . I am servant to Mr. William Stevens , a salesman in Leadenhall-market. In January last I remember a person coming, but I do not recollect the porter; he asked me if we had a hamper we could lend him, or a coop. I said we had not. I saw three live swans in a coop some time after; Mr. Stevens had no other swans but them. I did not go up to them, as I was busy; I saw Bantock there.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure that they were swans - A. Yes.

THOMAS BANTOCK . In January last I purchased three swans of Mr. Stevens for Mr. Carstang. I sent them from the stall to Mr. Carstang by Throsby. I had bought none in that season before. Two were moulted off clean, and the other was a cygnet. I did not examine their heads.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a salesman of Leadenhall-market. I remember in January last having three swans; I do not speak as to one being a cygnet. A memorandum was made at the time in my book by my son; it was on the 26th of January. I cannot say who brought them; I believe they were sold for 3 l., but they are not paid for. It appears I got 8 s. commission for selling them; I am certain I had no other swans on the 26th of January.

THOMAS THROSBY . I am a porter, and am generally employed by Mr. Bantock. I went to Mr. Stevens's for swans in January; Mr. Bantock employed me. I took them to Mr. Carstang, and left them with Mrs. Carstang. I took them in the shop first, and then put them down in the yard. I did not examine them, and cannot tell whether one was a one-eyed swan or not.

MR. BANTOCK re-examined. I gave 3 l. for them. I bought them for Mr. Carstang: I think that was the full value of them.

SARAH CARSTANG. I am the wife of Phillip Carstang ; I live in Hampstead Road. I remember Throwsby bringing three swans in January; Mr. Page and Mr Harrison came soon after, and the swans they saw were the same that had been brought by Throwsby. I did not examine them. I do not know whether one had but one eye or not.

PHILLIP CARSTANGS . I am a bird fancier. I saw these swans on the morning after they came; I did not examine them particularly. I saw the cob had but one eye. There was a cob, a pen, and a cygnet. They were taken away by Mr. Page and Mr. Harrison.

MR. PAGE re-examined. After I had seen Roake and Haynes, it was a considerable time before I could see Snelling. I went first to Chertsey, and then to other places, but did not find him. I went to Andover; he was apprehended near there, but I did not see him taken. When I saw Haynes, I made him no promise or threat. He said he would tell all about it, for some one had been splitting; I said he might use his own pleasure; he then said that he had gone out with James Snelling and Roake to steal swans several times.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went in search of Snelling, and found him at Abbot's End, two miles beyond Andover, in April, after the others were in custody. I told him the charge, and showed him my warrant; he said his mind was at rest now he was taken, and said,

"You have got 30 l. for me."

ALEXANDER ROBERTS . I am the King's swan-marker. This is the mark of one of the King's swans. I saw the swan before it died, and the mark was then more plain. This is one of the Dyers' marks. The mark could not have been done by accident; the King's mark is twenty strokes across the beak.

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SNELLING - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-153

968. FRANCIS JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a coat, value 5 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; a shirt, value 1 s., and a pair shoes, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Smith .

JAMES BROOKER . I am a sawyer. I bought two duplicates of the prisoner for a coat and a pair of shoes, late in March, or early in April; they were claimed afterwards by Charles Smith .

SAMUEL STEVENS. I belong to Bow-street. On the 22d of April, Charles Smith came to me. I found the prisoner in St. Martin's workhouse. I did not make him any promise or threat. He said he had parted with the articles, and disposed of the tickets. That a person in Whitechapel of the name of Wilson had some, and part of them were gone to a person of the name of Brooker.

ELIZABBTH WILSON. I live in Rose-lane, Whitechapel. The prisoner lodged with me at one time. I received the duplicate of a shirt from him at the same time - as he sold the duplicates to Brooker. I gave him 9 d. for the ticket, and it was in pawn for 1 s. 6 d. Here is the shirt.

CHARLES SMITH . I live in Charles-court, Strand, and am a porter. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me for about three weeks in January. He went away without my knowing it. My clothes were in my box, but it was not locked; there was no other person in the room. I got up about eight o'clock that morning, and staid in the room till twelve o'clock. I left the prisoner in the room when I went out. I returned about two o'clock, and missed my things. I did not see him again till Easter Monday, when I heard that he was in the workhouse. I asked him how he came to take my property? he said he had sold them to a Jew in Whitechapel for 15 s.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . My father is a pawnbroker and lives in Whitecross-street. A coat was pledged by a man, whom I do not know, in the name of J. Brooker, in February last, for 12 s. I saw the duplicate in the hands of Mr. Brooker. A shirt was also pledged, but it was redeemed by Wilson.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-154

969. WILLIAM LEASON was indicted for stealing on the 23d of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Barrow , from the person of Jane Barrow .

THOMAS BARROW . I am a glazier . On the 23d of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, my daughter Jane was taking a walk in the fields with her brother; she had a silk handkerchief on when she went from my house in Middleton-street, Spa-fields, to White Conduit-fields, she returned about twelve o'clock; the handkerchief was then gone. The prisoner is a perfect stranger to me.

JOHN BARROW . I am eleven years of age. I went with my sister Jane on Sunday into White Conduit-fields , about ten o'clock; she had a silk handkerchief on her neck. In about half an hour a boy came and took the handkerchief from her neck. I halloed out Stop thief! he got away, but somebody stopped him about ten minutes afterwards. I should know him again; that is the boy; (pointing to the prisoner) he said,

"Look at your handkerchief," and then snatched it off and ran away. The person who stopped him took it out of his jacket pocket.

WILLIAM KNIGHTON . I am a boot-maker. I was turning my horse into the field and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the baby's neck; he got over some bricks, and I took hold of him, and took the handkerchief from his pocket.

WILLIAM MERRY . I am an officer. The prisoner and handkerchief was delivered to me by Knighton. Barrow described it before he saw it.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-155

970. HENRY JUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a shirt, value 8 s. , the property of Thomas Spradbury .

The prosecutors name being Thomas Theodore Spradbury , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240603-156

971. LOUISA LOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a cap, value 5 s. , the goods of Jane Davis .

MARIA FLETCHER . On the 18th of February I lost a cap from a bundle brought to me two days before from Miss Jane Davis , to wash. The prisoner lodged in the same room. She heard me enquire about it, and denied knowing any thing about it. Schofield brought it to me about a fortnight or three weeks ago. She staid about a week after the cap was lost, and then left me. I went to her lodgings on the 26th of February; she still said she knew nothing about it. I am quite sure that it is the cap that I had lost.

HENRIETTA GREGORY . I live in Cross-lane. I did lodge with Mrs. Fletcher on the same floor, but not in the same room. I have seen the cap a great many times in Fletcher's possession, and I have seen it on the prisoner's head. On the 26th of February I went with Mrs. Fletcher to her apartments, and her landlady told us in her presence, that the cap had been on her head the night before - she denied it, and produced a cap, saying,

"That is the cap I wore," which the landlady contradicted. I saw her afterwards with the cap on, and told Mrs. Fletcher of it.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Upper Rupert-street; she had a a cap on her head, which was claimed by Fletcher at the office.

MARIA FLETCHER . I do not think there is a possibility of my being mistaken in the cap. I have had it to wash for three years. She lodged with me about a week, and then went to Villiers-street, in the Strand, and then returned to me again.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not show you the cap at the time when you were making enquiries about it - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-157

972. MARIA MURRAY and ANN MURRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , twenty-nine yards of silk, value 5 l., the goods of Griffith Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GRIFFITH FOULKES . I am a mercer , and live in Russel-street, Covent-garden . I saw the prisoners in my shop on Saturday, the 29th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; they seemed in company together. My attention was attracted by the elder one stooping down. I went up and laid hold of her, saying,

"What have you got here;" she said nothing. I drew her aside, and the piece of silk rolled from under her clothes; there is twenty-nine yards and a half of it, it is worth 4 s. 6 d. a yard. They were looking at some prints; I did not see them look at any silks. I gave them in charge. They were strangers to me.

MARIA MURRAY 'S Defence. I went to buy a piece of cotton, and by the side of the counter was this silk, and in reaching over I knocked it down, and Ann said,

"See what you have done." I stopped to pick it up, and the prosecutor came and took me by the shoulders.

ANN MURRAY 'S Defence. He is a false-swearing man.

MARIA MURRAY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

ANN MURRAY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240603-158

973. FREDERICK MERCY was indicted for stealing,

on the 1st of April , a knife, value 6 d.; a chisel, value 6 d., and two files, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Chapman .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am the son of John Chapman, who is a smith and farrier , and lives in Church-street, Twickenham . The prisoner had been in our service for three or four years. In consequence of suspicion, I went to his house with Simmons, we did not find him at home, but he came in soon after. We searched the premises, and found some plates of tin, horse-nails, two files, a knife, and other articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he left your father's employment - A. Yes. He was not an excellent workman, he was used to the place, and knew the customers. He lives at Twickenham.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CHAPMAN . The prisoner had lived with me for three or four years. He had left me about a week before I took out a search warrant. I took it out because I had missed some things. I did not go to his house with my son and the constable the first time, but I did afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of a workman was he? A. He was not a very good workman, but suited my purpose very well. He went away, I did not discharge him; I offered him 3 s. a week more to stay, and work an hour longer each day; he gave me a week's notice, and then went away; I expected he would have come on the following week, but he did not.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am a headborough. I accompanied William Chapman , and saw the prisoner. We diligently searched the place, and found these articles in his possession. He came out and said to Chapman,

"Do you want any thing more of me." There were a few other tools besides those taken by Chapman. Mr. Chapman only took the knife at first, but then said, "We will go back and take the files, for I think they are mine;" and two days following there was a second search.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-159

974. JOHN RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , a watch, value 10 s.; and a chair, value 4 s. ; the goods of John Price .

JOHN PRICE . I live on Walworth Common, and work in the brick fields . I lost my watch last Sunday week, about half-past eleven o'clock. I laid down outside the house, and went to sleep, and my watch was taken from my fob. I saw it the next day at a pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined. Q. Where had you been that day - A. I had been out with my moulder. I was not very drunk - very drunk is when a person can neither walk nor go; I was only just drunk, I left the moulders about half-past eleven. I do not know how the watch went.

ELIZABETH WILMOT . I am a packthread spinner. Ridley came to me as I was going to the pawnbroker's, and desired me to pledge this watch for him; I did not know him, but I took it and pawned it; I swear that I never saw him before - my husband is a sawyer - it was about half-past eight on Monday morning - he told me to ask 12 s. for it - I only got 7 s. I gave him the ticket and the 7 s. on the step of the door; he gave me nothing for my trouble. I did not see him again till this day week at a public-house. Mr. Price had come to me about it - he had traced it from the pawnbroker's to me - I had pawned it in my own name; I did not ask him his name.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you charged with stealing the watch - A. I do not know about that; I did not hear any body say that I had stolen it - it was after they found me out that I went to the watch-house. I went from there to the pawnbroker's, and then sent for him.

THOMAS EMBERSON . I am servant to Mr. Anniss, a pawnbroker. I took the watch in pawn from Wilmot. I knew her before - she pawned it in her own name; I saw nobody waiting at the door.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-160

975. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , an iron chain, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Payne and James Goulden .

HENRY PAYNE . I am a builder , and am in partnership with James Goulden . On the 29th of April, we lost two iron chains from a part of our premises near a saw-pit in White Conduit-fields ; they were used the day before with a timber carriage, which was in the fields. I did not know that they were gone till the prisoner was taken up.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a dairy-man, and live in White Conduit-fields. My house joins Mr. Payne's grounds. I saw the prisoner in the fields on the 29th of April, about eight or nine o'clock, with this chain in his apron; he was fifty or one hundred yards from the premises; I asked what he was going to do with it - he said to take it home to be sure - I said

"You have stolen it" - he tried to throw it on my feet. I took him, and picked it up.

JOHN CHARLESWORTH , I am an officer, and took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and did not know that it belonged to any person.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-161

976. ROBERT SHANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a basket, value 6 d.; a calve's head, value 2 s.; a loin of veal, value 8 s.; two pigs cheeks, value 18 d., and a cheese, value 8 s. , the goods of George Kent .

GEORGE KENT . I am a carrier . My caravan goes from Fleet-market to Puzey, in Wiltshire. I had a basket in my cart on the 24th of April, with a calve's head and loin of veal in it - it was near the middle of the cart, which only opens in front - the tilt cannot be lifted up. I stopped at the Old White-horse-cellar to deliver some goods; I was in the cart, and gave them out - another man took them of me - the basket was safe then; when I got to Fleet-market , I stopped and stepped into the yard, and when I returned it was gone. I had seen it in the Strand, near Temple-bar, and did not miss it till I got to Fleet-market. I saw it again at Hatton-garden, the head and the veal were in it - I knew it to be the one I had to deliver - it was directed to Mr. Foulkes, Russel-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. Had you taken any particular notice of it - A. No; I did not know it by any particular mark, but I put it into my cart.

JOSEPH HUTCHINSON . I am a watchman. On the 24th

of April I was in Lower Charles-street, Clerken well, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was going to shut the box to go off duty and saw the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder, and two other men following him - one had a long blue coat on, and the other a smock frock; I thought it was not all right, and followed them to Vine-yard-street. I then asked the prisoner what he had got - he said he had got beef - I asked where he was going to take it - he said to Newington-green, and had brought it from Newgate-market; he did not know the person's name, but a person whom he knew had given it to him. I detained him - I looked at the basket, and saw a bit of card tied to it, which had been a direction torn off; it had a calve's head, a loin of veal, and two pigs' cheeks in it, and at the bottom was a letter, directed

"Mr. Foulkes, No. 2. Little Russel-street, Covent-garden." We went to him - he told us we should find Kent at the Rose Inn, Fleet-market.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did he say he was going - A. To take it to Mr. Johnson, a butcher, at Newington-green.

GRIFFITH FOULKES . I expected this parcel - we often have parcels by Kent - we did not know what it would contain.

THOMAS GARNER . I am a watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - here is the basket.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up to go to work - I was too soon; and as I was going along Newgate-street, I met a man who told me to take this parcel to Newington; he gave me 6 d., and said he would go with me and give me 1 s. more - I thought he was behind me - the watchman called me, and I stopped and told him where I was going to.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-162

977. ANN SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, a pail, value 18 d. , the goods of Charles Robert Beckett .

MARY BECKETT . I am the wife of Charles Robert Becket, and live at St. George's-terrace, Commercial-road . On the 8th of May, this pail was taken from the yard, which has a fence six feet high; the patrol came to me a little after five o'clock, it was then gone, and the yard gate open; it had been fastened by an iron bolt - it had not been forced - the prisoner is a perfect stranger to me.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am the patrol. I saw the prisoner about eight yards from Beckett's house, about twenty minutes after five o'clock, with a pail and other articles; I asked what she did with them - she said if I would let her go, she would tell me where she got them. I took her to the watch-house, and found Beckett's yard open; the bolt had been shoved back by some means.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-163

978. RICHARD SHELDRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 300 lbs. of white lead, value 5 l. , the goods of Robert Atmore .

ROBERT ATMORE . I am an oilman , and live in the Minories. The prisoner was my servant . On the 26th of March he brought an order from a gentleman of the name of Hoden, for a firkin of white lead; I gave it to my boy, Brown - it weighed 3 cwt. The prisoner did not go with him to deliver the goods. I never saw it afterwards. The prisoner remained in my service a few days - I then discharged him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he live with you - A. Yes; and he used to go and get orders for me, he was at liberty to send goods to customers. Hoden was a customer of mine, and had bought lead of me. I did not treat it as a civil debt. I never received 1 l. on account of that lead; it was on account of other monies, that he had received from other persons. I did not apprehend him about this before I had received the 1 l. He went round with the officer to the customers, to see what he was deficient. I never agreed that he should pay me by instalments. He collected some money on that day, and brought me 1 l. of a certain man's account. I had had him in custody, and let him go - I then took 1 l. from him. He never executed orders - I always did that myself. I took the 1 l. because I thought it was some money he had received from a man of the name of Capilliar; he then said,

"I believe Capilliar did not pay me," and I said I must erase it; but I went to Capilliar, and saw the receipts in his handwriting, for 30 s. I saw Mr. Hoden some time afterwards; it might be three weeks or a month after I saw him, that I apprehended the prisoner.

WILLIAM HODEN . I am a painter, and live in Mild-end-road. On the 26th of March I had not given any order for white lead - I might have done so prior to that. I received some on the 17th of March, and on the 6th of April I received 3 cwt. 1 qr. 14 lb. I believe it was delivered by the prisoner, but I was not at home. I did not receive any on the 26th of March - I saw Mr. Atmore on the subject after the 6th of April. Firkins have different weights. I cannot say that the lead delivered on the 6th of April had not been ordered on the 26th of March. I expected that I was dealing with the prisoner himself; I never saw the prosecutor, and did not know him.

THOMAS BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Atmore. I had taken goods to Mr. Hoden before - I did not deliver this lead to him, because the prisoner met me, and said he wanted that firkin of white lead - he had got an order for it; I said I was going to take it to Mr. Hoden - he took it, and went down Whitechapel with it; I asked if I should go with him, and he said No, as I had other goods in the truck. I went up Brick-lane. He rolled the firkin along after he took it off the truck. Mr. Hoden's is about three quarters of a mile from Whitechapel-church. I never saw a firkin rolled so great a distance.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner live in the same shop with you at the time - A. Yes. He was in the habit of taking orders for Mr. Atmore. On seeing the lead in the truck, he said he had an order for it, and he rolled it as a person would do who was going to some place near. I never heard from him where he took it to.

HENRY RICE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of May, at the Three Compasses, public-house, Mile-end-road - I sat down by him, and said,

"I am sorry to say that you are my prisoner, I must take you to Mr. Atmore," that I had a charge of felony against him, which Mr. Atmore would, explain.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-164

979. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , two books, value 6 s., the goods of Peter Wright ; and a book, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Mason .

PETER WRIGHT . I live in Broad-street, St. Giles's , and am a bookseller . I lost a volume of Shakspeare's works, and a volume of the Biographical Dictionary - I did not miss them till the prisoner had been taken into custody; he is a stranger. They may be worth about 6 s. I have nothing to do with Mr. Mason.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MASON . I have no connexion with Mr. Wright.

WILLIAM BRADFORD . I live with Mr. Higham, a pawnbroker. On the 10th of April, I took a volume of Shakspeare's works in pawn - another young man wrote the ticket; that and another book were together. We advanced 3 s. 6 d. on them I believe the prisoner is the man who pawned them, but will not be positive.

CORNELIUS BOWER . I am beadle of St. Giles's. On the 24th of April I was sent, and apprehended the prisoner in Mr. Wright's shop, and found thirty-two duplicates on him; one of them was for Mr. Wright's books. I found 9 s. 8 d. on him.

PETER WRIGHT re-examined. Q. What did the prisoner say when he came to your house - A. He called, and enquired for Cowper's Poems; I went to look for them, but had not got them - he returned again in the afternoon, and I sent for an officer, and took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-165

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

880. THOMAS TRAXLER and SARAH TRAXLER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a bolster, value 3 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; a sheet, value 4 s., and a blanket, value 3 s., the goods of Benjamin Hammond , in a lodging-room, let to them .

ELEANOR HAMMOND. The prisoner Thomas Traxler took my upper room furnished for his aged mother - not for himself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-166

981. THOMAS TRAXLER and SARAH TRAXLER were again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a bolster, value 2 s.; a pillow, value 2 s., and a sheet, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Pugh , in a lodging-room, let to them .

MRS. PUGH. This lodging was taken by Thomas Traxler , for his mother.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-167

982. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-168

883. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , four books, value 5 s. , the goods of William Galloway .

WILLIAM GALLOWAY . I am a potatoe salesman , at Spitalfields-market . I missed some books from my front parlour in April and May - I missed a great many on the 12th of May, and got under the stairs for the purpose of watching, and saw the prisoner, whom I knew, go to the book-case, and take a book out of it - she put it under her shawl, and went back to the street-door. I told her she had stolen a book; she made no answer.

SARAH GALLOWAY . I am the wife of the last witness. I never gave the prisoner permission to take any books. I have sent her to sell some old novels that were lying about the house. I never sent her to sell a magazine, nor ever gave her leave to take one.

GRIFFITH JONES . I am a dealer in marine stores. I recollect the prisoner coming to my shop, and offering several books for sale. She said her master had given her them to dispose of as occasion required. I told her I could only give waste paper price, (3 d. per lb.) for them. She came one day with two books - one was sermons, the other a geographical book. I said they were too good to sell to me, but she would not take them away, and I bought them of her. I kept them till Mr. Galloway came and searched my house, I gave them to him.

HANNAH JONES . I am wife of the last witness. The prisoner brought me an old ledger that was torn, and said it had been the property of a person who was dead.

THOMAS VANN . I got a search warrant, searched this house, and found these books.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. These books are what Mrs. Galloway gave me to sell; she used to give me books from time to time to sell for her.

WILLIAM GALLOWAY re-examined. Q. Were any leaves cut out of this ledger when it was in your possession - A. No; it was quite perfect.

SARAH GALLOWAY , junior. I engaged the prisoner to come to work at her needle. I took her without any character, and thought her honest. I never gave her books to sell, but I know my mother gave her some to be sold, and she was to give the money to my mother.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18240603-169

984. ELIZA WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 26 yards of linen, value 50 s., and a yard of calico, value 4 d. , the goods of Samuel William Cousins .

SAMUEL WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Norton Falgate . On the 18th of May, about a quarter past 7 o'clock in the evening, I was very busy, and saw the prisoner in the shop - she asked for some shawls. I had shown her some. I saw her cross from the counter, and take a piece of Irish linen from a pile on the other side; she brought it to the counter, and rolled it up in a piece of calico, which was also mine. My boy was then at the drawer, reaching some more shawls. I showed her some more shawls myself - she did not buy any, but said she would look in again in the morning, and went out of the shop. - I followed, and stopped her at the next door, and gave her in charge.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . I am an officer. I took her into custody on the night of the 18th of May, and found this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-170

985. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of George Hurcoum .

GEORGE HURCOUM . I am a footman - the prisoner was errand-boy at the green-grocer's - he came to our house on the 22d of April, about four or five o'clock - I let him in - he went into the kitchen, and as he returned he came through the hall - I then went into the hall, and missed my handkerchief off my coat - I had placed it there a short time before - he returned soon after with some goods - I asked him if he had seen a handkerchief - he said No - I told his master; he was searched, and it was found on him, round his hips.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-171

986. JAMES ENRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , a bolster, value 5 s.; a carpet, value 5 s.; two curtains, value 2 s., and a bed, value 30 s., the goods of William Hartridge , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM HARTRIDGE . The prisoner took a furnished lodging at my house, at 4 s. a-week - he went away on the 31st of March - he left the door and window open - I went into the room, and missed these articles.

MARY HARTRIDGE . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I was putting my two children to bed, and heard a noise, which I thought was Hartridge. I went to the passage, and the prisoner said

"I have touched your parlour door instead of the street door." I then took the candle to light him out, and he pushed the bed out of the door, and shut the door after him. I told my husband; he looked into the street; but could not see him - we then went into the room and missed the goods.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you not stop me. A. I was so frightened I could not. I ran to my husband, and said

"I am afraid that young man has robbed the house."

GEORGE GILLETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, two curtains, and a bolster, pawned on the 18th and 25th of March by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. He said at the Magistrate's, that he could not swear to me.

THOMAS VANN . I apprehended the prisoner. I have two duplicates of curtains pawned at Mr. Gillet's in the name of Williams.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-172

987. LOUISA ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a pair of sheets, value 8 s.; a blanket, value 8 s.; a pillow, value 4 s.; a pillow-case, value 1 s., and two curtains, value 5 s., the goods of Arthur Willis , in a lodging-room .

ARTHUR WILLIS . I live in Russel-court, Drury-lane - the prisoner lodged in my attic for eight or nine weeks - she went away about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning, and as she did not return, I went into her room and missed these articles.

WILLIAM BELFOUR. I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of March the prisoner pawned a pair of sheets in the name of Mary Adams .

SAMUEL CHALLONER . I am a pawnbroker. I took a blanket in pawn on the 12th of April, and a pillow on the 3d. I suppose the prisoner to be the person, but I do not know her.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court. I was well brought up, and encouraged to look forward to every luxury in life; but having been left a widow at the early age of 19, after being married but two years, and reduced to the greatest distress, I was so unhappy as to commit the crime with which I am charged.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-173

988. THALIA CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , two yards of flannel, value 1 s.; a scarf, value 5 s.; a yard of silk, value 3 s., a yard of cloth, value 2 s., and two yards of ribbon, value 1 s. , the goods of William Saunders , her master .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . The prisoner was about a month in my service. On the 16th of April I went into the kitchen while she was gone home, and found a length of flannel, a piece of silk, a silk scarf, and several other little things, which were all mine, under the dresser. We put them back again, and next morning I met Jackson, the officer he agreed to come at twelve o'clock; they were then all gone. I sent her out at three o'clock, and the officer met her - she was then asked where they were; she told the officer to come up stairs, and pointed to her bed - we found the goods between the bed and the sacking.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was this after you had seen the goods - A. Two or three days.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I was in the room when she was searched, and found the goods. The account given by Saunders is correct.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-174

989. ANN EDGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a child's dress, value 18 s., and a coat, value 12 s. , the goods of William Sharpe .

THOMAS SHARP . My brother, (the prosecutor,) is not here. He suspected the prisoner, who was in his service. I went to his house, and we desired her to let us search her box, in which we found several articles taken from the shop. I saw her take them out of her box.

THOMAS GORDON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took her into custody. She said she took the goods off the counter to brush them.

Prisoner's Defence. On passing through the shop I had the misfortune to tread upon a child's dress, and took it up stairs to brush - being called away I laid it in the box to keep it from the dust; the box was not locked, and the prosecutor had constant access to the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-175

990. REBECCA JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , a pair of stays, value 3 s.; six caps, value 13 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; two

frocks, value 4 s.; three yards of ribbon, value 1 s., and three yards of lace, value 4 s. , the goods of Frederick King , her master .

FREDERICK KING . I live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell . The prisoner was in my service, and quitted about the 28th of December - she was in the shop sometimes. We missed the articles stated in the indictment; I did not suspect her, as I had another person robbing me. On Saturday, the 15th of May, I found this lace cap in pawn.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . I took a cap in pledge from Mrs. Apothecary - it was taken from me by the officer.

SARAH APOTHECARY . I know this cap - Rebecca Jennings gave it to me as a present; I afterwards pawned it for myself. She gave me a frock body, which I put on my child's frock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GROVER . I apprehended the prisoner at Goswell House boarding-school - I went with Mr. King, and found all the articles in her box, except the cap and frock body.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240603-176

991. THOMAS BURBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , a horse-cloth, value 8 s. , the goods of William Anderson .

HARRY HARRAGE . I am servant to Mr. William Anderson . I know this cloth to be his - we did not miss it, having so many of them.

JOHN LINCOLN . On the night of the 26th of May I was in Berkley-square with Smith, and stopped the prisoner - we asked what he had got; he said a horse-cloth, and he was going to Mr. Dixon's, in Oxford-street; I said,

"Will you go along with me to Mr. Anderson's;" he said, Yes; but as we were going along he said,

"Oh! God! I have stolen it;" I sent him to the watch-house.

JAMES SMITH . I have heard the evidence of Lincoln; it is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely took the cloth to make a bed for my child as I had done before, and returned it again, having scarcely anything for use. I humbly beg the mercy of the Court, for the sake of my wife and three children.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18240603-177

992. JOHN CONE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a carpenters' plough, value 10 s.; four planes, value 10 s.; two saws, value 5 s.; two squares, value 3 s.; a spoke shave, value 1 s.; a chisel, value 6 d., and a gauge, value 6 d. , the goods of George Knapman .

GEORGE KNAPMAN . I am a carpenter , and was working at a building in Vauxhall-road , on the 8th of May - I went to breakfast, and left my tools on the bench, in the room on the ground floor.

GEORGE SANSOM . I am a stone-mason. I was at work at the George public-house, about a hundred yards from this house, and saw the prisoner about half-past seven o'clock; he staid about there till near eight; he came towards me, but I would not speak to him.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am shopman to Mr. Newby, a pawnbroker, Drury-lane. On the morning of the 8th of May, some tools were pawned in the name of Smith; I have reason to believe by the prisoner. I said at the office that I thought he was the man. I knew him by a patch on his left cheek, which he has not on to-day.

(Tools produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-178

993. JOHN ELLIOT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , five handkerchiefs, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Nichols .

JOSEPH NICHOLS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Bell-street, Edgware-road. I had been out on Saturday evening, the 10th of April, and returned about ten o'clock - my shopman gave me some information, and I went in search of the prisoner, whom I had not seen before; I found him at the end of Cato-street; he said his name was Johnson, and said afterwards that he lived in Cato-street; he afterwards said his name was Jones, and he lived in Little James-street; I went with him to a house in James-street, and asked the woman if he lived there; she said, No. I then gave charge of him.

CHARLES COBB . I was in the service of Mr. Nichols. About half-past eight o'clock on the evening of the 10th of April, the prisoner was in the shop with another young man; they asked to look at some socks - they did not buy anything then, but went away, and in about ten minutes they came back together, and while the other bought the socks, the prisoner stood behind him, and pulled the handkerchiefs out of the window; I saw him take them, he went out of the shop with them. I went to the door, but could not see him. Mr. Nichols came home about an hour and a half afterwards, and went with me to find the prisoner as he has stated. I am certain he is the person.

HENRY KIRKFIELD . Mr. Nichols gave the prisoner in charge; he said,

"Let me go, and I will make it all right with Mr. Nichols."

Prisoner. I said no such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-179

994. ELIZABETH FOWLER , ANN FOWLER , and ANN TURNER , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a boy's dress, value 15 s., and a pelisse, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Sharpe .

THOMAS SHARPE . I live in High-street, Whitechapel . Elizabeth Fowler lived in my service for three years. I go to church mostly on Sunday mornings, but on Sunday, the 11th of April, I did not go out myself - the rest of the family were out, and during service time Ann Fowler and Ann Turner came, and were let in by Elizabeth Fowler - I saw them about five minutes afterwards in the kitchen. In consequence of this I remained at home on Sunday, the 18th, and concealed myself in the shop, and at twelve o'clock the bell rang; she admitted her sister and mother, and soon after her sister and herself went into the back warehouse, where there were suits of all descriptions; they came out of the warehouse, and returned into the kitchen, and soon after they went out - I followed them, and found the bundle under the arm of Turner; she dropped it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is this the same account as you gave at the Police-office - A. Yes. I found the child's suit under Turner's arm - she dropped it in the passage. There is I believe 1 s. 4 d. wages due to

Elizabeth; she sent a bill yesterday - I did not send it to her. I never refused her her wages.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am a beadle. I took the prisoners into custody on Easter Sunday.

ELIZABETH FOWLER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

ANN FOWLER - GUILTY . Aged 68.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months in Newgate .

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months in the House of Correction .

Reference Number: t18240603-180

495. ANN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , nineteen yards of lace, value 25 s., the goods of Nathan Blake , privately in his shop .

NATHAN BLAKE. I am a haberdasher , and live in Oxford-street . On the 30th of April the prisoner came to match a piece of silk; I could not match it - she staid there some time. I went behind the counter, and saw her looking at some lace, with one piece in her hand; I turned as if to look on the shelf again, and saw her put a piece of lace under her shawl; she said,

"Will you give me a pattern of this silk," and asked if we had gauzes to match it; I said, Yes, on the other side - she would not turn round for some time, but at length she turned, and said,

"I will call again." I followed her, and in Berner-street I found this piece of lace under her shawl.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you accuse her of it in the shop - A. No; there were other persons in the shop. She said she was going to bring it back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240603-181

FOURTH DAY, MONDAY, JUNE 7. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

996. CHARLOTTE SOUL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a shirt, value 18 d. , the goods of Caleb Cleworth .

FRANCES CLEWORTH . I am the daughter of Caleb Cleworth, who lives in John-street, New-Road. On the 30th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, this shirt hung on the landing place of the garret with other linen - I was in the front garret, and hearing a noise I went out - heard somebody going down stairs, and missed a flannel shirt - I saw the prisoner going out of the door, followed and took her two doors off, with the corner of it hanging from under her arm - she said she had not got it, but I took it from her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-182

997. CHARLES ELMSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , a coat, value 10 s., and a waistcoat, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Bragger .

ROBERT BRAGGER . On the 15th of May the prisoner lodged with me, in Rupert-street . I found two duplicates about half-past nine o'clock, and on looking into my box missed a coat and waistcoat - the prisoner was out - he came home in half an hour - I charged him with it - he said he had found them, and asked if I had not found the duplicates.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer - I took the prisoner into custody - he told me where he had pawned the clothes.

THOMAS DEBENHAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Princes-street - I have a waistcoat, but do not know who pawned it, but I gave the person one of these duplicates.

JAMES BENDALL . I am a pawnbroker - the prisoner pawned a coat with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. He would not give me time, or I would have taken them out.

GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-183

998. CHARLES PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , three silver tea-spoons, value 9 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Keeble , widow.

HEPZIBAH KEEBLE. I am niece to Elizabeth Keeble , a widow, who lives at Fulham . On Saturday, the 29th of May, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the house begging - he was going out of the yard when I saw him - I did not miss the spoons till Monday, when the officer brought him with them - he must have gone to the closet to get them before I saw him.

JOHN CUFF. I am a constable. On Saturday, the 29th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner on Putney-bridge - I watched and saw him rubbing these spoon on the bridge-wall, to erase the marks - he then came to the foot of the bridge and offered them for sale - I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only borrowed them - I have been in Bedlam.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18240603-184

999. ANN GATES was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Brown on the King's highway, on the 28th of May , at St. Andrew's, Holborn , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a sovereign, 30 s., and a promisory note for payment of and value 1 l. , his property, against the statute.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at Kempton, in Herdfordshire, and sell fish about. On the 28th of May I was at the Rose public-house, West Smithfield, having a pint of beer; a young woman invited me to her house to tea - I did not know her before - it was not the prisoner - the woman took me to a house in a court in West-street - (I am a married man) - I had upwards of 5 l. in my purse - it was my own money - I went into a room with her - she said she was going to the privy, and when she returned she brought another woman, and asked me for money for some gin; I pulled out my purse to give them sixpence each, and directly afterwards the prisoner came in; the

room door was locked, and after they had drank the gin they pushed me down on the bed; one held my hands, another held my feet, while the third wrenched my purse out of my hand. The prisoner is the one who held my legs; the other two said they would have a shilling a piece; but the prisoner said,

"Have every farthing the b - r has got." As soon as the one had got my money she ran out, the others locked the door and kept me in; they let me out in four or five minutes - I ran to the watch-house at the bottom of Holborn-hill and got an officer, and went to Hatton garden - two officers went and searched the house, but did not find any one; I saw the prisoner in custody on this charge, at Hatton-garden, about ten o'clock the next morning (Saturday) - I knew her directly I saw her - I am sure she is the person - my purse contained a country 1 l. note, a sovereign, and about 60 s. in silver - I had within sixpence of 5 l. - it was between three or four o'clock in the afternoon when I went to the house - I did not stay half an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The person you took for the prisoner was not very long in the room - A. No; we had two-pints of beer at the Rose public-house between two of us, and I took part of the quartern of gin which the four of us had at the house - I was frightened when they got me down to take my money - I never saw the prisoner before; she held me by the legs.

Q. She was more down on the ground than the others. A. They pushed me on the bed - I could see her when I got up, and saw her before I was frightened; I should know them all if I was to see them.

COURT. Q. Where is the house - A. I do not know in what court it is. I took Limbrick there; I saw no number on the door.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. The prosecutor took me to a house in Brewer's-yard, West-street; there is on number to it; the City boundary is near there, but this house is in Middlesex. I know that the prisoner lived in that house. I apprehended her in West-street on Saturday - I had been to her room on the Friday about five o'clock, in consequence of information from Brown - when I took her she denied the charge; I told her I had been to her room on Friday with Thisselton; she said she was in bed in the afternoon. I said we had searched every part of the house, and she could not have been in bed; and after she was committed, on her going to prison she swore a very violent oath, that the countryman should not go into the country alive.

Cross-examined. Q. After declaring her innocence, she got angry at your detaining her - A. I do not know; I am certain the house is in Middlesex.

WILLIAM THISSELTON . I am officer; and was with Limbrick when this man gave information at the office. I know nothing more than Limbrick has stated. I was not present when she was going to prison; I am certain that the house is in Middlesex; it is in the Lower Liberty of Saffron-hill.

Prisoner's Defence. He is mistaken in my person altogether.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18240603-185

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1000. JOHN COLCLOUGH & JAMES CLARK were indicted for, that the said John Colclough , on the 26th of March, at Chelsea, feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, did personate and falsely assume the name and character of one James Worthington , a gunner of the Royal Artillery, entitled to certain prize-money, for service done by the said James Worthington in his Majesty's army, to wit, at the capture of the Isle of France, in order to receive such prize-money due to the said James Worthington , for such service done by him as aforesaid, with intent to defraud the Treasurer of the Royal Hospital, at Chelsea, against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT - For feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, personating the said James Worthington , a gunner, entitled to prize-money, for and in respect of service done by him in his Majesty's army, in order to receive such last-mentioned prize-money, due for and in respect of the last-mentioned service, done by the said James Worthington as last aforesaid, with intent to defraud the Deputy Treasurer of the said Royal Hospital, at Chelsea, against the statute, &c.

THIRD COUNT - For feloniously &c., and falsely assuming the name and character of James Worthington , a person entitled to prize-money, for and in respect of service done by him in his Majesty's army, in order to receive such last-mentioned prize-money, due for and in respect of the last-mentioned service done by him as last aforesaid, with intent to defraud the Commissioners of the said Royal Hospital at Chelsea, against the statute.

FOURTH, FIFTH, AND SIXTH COUNTS - The same as the three former, only omitting the words in italics, and substituting the words following,

"A person supposed to be entitled."

SEVENTH COUNT - For feloniously, willingly, and knowingly personating, and falsely assuming, the name and character of one James Worthington , a person entitled to prize-money, for service done by him in his Majesty's army, in order to receive such last-mentioned prize-money, due for the said last-mentioned service so done by him as last aforesaid, with intent to defraud the Treasurer of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, against the statute, &c.

EIGHTH COUNT - The same as the last, only stating the said James Worthington to be a person supposed to be entitled to prize-money, for services supposed to have been done by him.

NINTH, TENTH, AND ELEVENTH COUNTS - The same as the three first, only omitting the intention to defraud.

ELEVENTH COUNT, against JAMES CLARK , for that he, before the said felonies were committed, to wit, on the same day, feloniously did procure the said John Colclough to do and commit the said felonies in manner aforesaid, against the statute.

TWENTY-THIRD COUNT - Charging both the prisoners with feloniously, willingly, and knowingly personating, and falsely assuming, the name and character of James Worthington , a gunner of the Royal Artillery , entitled to certain prize-money for service done by him in his Majesty's army (to wit,) at the capture of the Isle of France, in order to receive such prize-money, due to the said James Worthington , for such service done by him, with intent to defraud the Treasurer of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea , against the statute.

COLCLOUGH pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

CLARK pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18240603-186

1001. THE SAID JAMES CLARK was again indicted for that he, on the 16th of March , at St. Luke, Chelsea , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain certificate, in order to receive certain prize-money due to James Worthington , a soldier , who had really served in his Majesty's army, for and on account of the services of the said James Worthington : - which said false, forged, and counterfeited certificate is as follows, that is to say -

I hereby certify, that Gunner James Worthington was present at the capture of the Isle of France, in the month of December, 1810, and is therefore entitled to any unpaid shares of prize money, arising from the said capture; and also that he has not been enabled to apply personally for the said prize-money at an earlier period than the present - he having been stationed abroad from the date of the above capture, till his landing in England on the 23d of November, 1823.

R. S. DOUGLAS, Captain R . A.

To the Treasurer, or Deputy Treasurer of Chelsea Hospital.

with intent to defraud the Treasurer of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea, against the statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged certificate, he knowing it to be forged with the like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud the Commissioners of the Royal Hospital at Chelsea .

MR. LAW, on the part of the Crown, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-187

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

1002. SAMUEL TAYLOR was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John King , on the night of the 25th of December , and stealing a coat, value 12 s.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; a shawl, value 16 s.; a gown, value 1 l.; four sovereigns, value 28 s., and a 10 l. Bank-note , his property.

DEBORAH KING . I am the wife of John King - we live in White-street, Bethnal-green . On the 25th of December, about 5 o'clock in the afternoon, we went out, and left nobody in the house - it was dark. I double locked the door myself, and took the key with me - we were fetched home about eleven - my brother came with us. I found the window-shutters torn away at the bottom and forced open; they had tried to force the lock of the door, but did not succeed, I found the door open - on going up, I found a box, which I had left on a shelf over the staircase, was put on the bed, wrenched open, and the property stated in the indictment taken out, and quite gone - the bed and bedding were taken off the bedstead, rolled up, and put on the head of the stairs. I found a crow-bar on the bed, and a dark lantern was picked up - they took away a plum-pudding, a piece of roast beef, a quartern loaf, and some candles.

Cross-examined by Mr. LAW. Q. You have found none of the property; - A. No. I know the prisoner by sight; he lived in the neighbourhood.

JOHN KING . I am a brewer's servant. On the 25th of December we went out about 5 o'clock, locked the door, and left every thing safe - it was dark then - we returned about a quarter to eleven o'clock, and found the shutters open and the sash pushed up - there was a mark on a table which stood under the window - it appeared like the mark of a heel, as if a man had got in backwards - we found several people in the house - a dark lantern was found, and next morning we picked up a crow-bar. The prisoner lived about two hundred yards off, and passed the house almost every day; I saw him pass next morning. About two months afterwards I saw him in company with a man named Eden, who had a coat on which looked like the one I had lost. I followed them to a house, and asked Eden if that was his coat - he said,

"My worthy friend, do you think it is your's; what are you following me for;" - this was in Goddard's-rents. I said, it looked very much like mine, but the lining was altered - a mob gathered; and the prisoner said,

"Come along, Jack; it is of no use bothering with him;" and away they went.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a very populous neighbourhood. - A. It is; I saw him on the day of the robbery about as usual; when I got home the house was in an uproar.

JOHN CLAYTON . I am a silk weaver, and live in John-street, Brick-lane. I know the prisoner - he came to my house on the last Friday in January. In the evening I went with him to the Duke of York public-house, Turk-street, Bethnal-green - we met Phillips at the door. I knew him before. I did not go into the Duke of York. Phillips said to Taylor and me, that Taylor had only one shilling more of the property than the rest.

Q. Was that the first thing he said - A. Yes; he was rather in liquor. Taylor had told me that Phillips said I was suspected of the robbery.

Q. Well; but had you spoken to him about this before Phillips came up - A. Yes; I told him I was out of work and very much embarrassed, and that I had been suspected of the robbery. Taylor said, that on the night after robbery he came to my mother's to bring me one pound, but was told I was not there - the pound was to send me away - they had a reason for it - he said he would have given me a pound if he could have seen me - he knew that I was suspected.

Q. Then what made you tell him of it - A. I thought it hard that I should be suspected, when, according to every appearance, he was concerned in it. I had seen him at my brother's, at No. 21, Wilmott-street, on the Sunday week after the robbery, and told him I was out of the way, as the officers were after me, and I knew nothing of the robbery. He told my brother to come to the corner of Air-street, about nine o'clock that night, and he would give me some money, and would speak to the other parties to send me some, as I was out of the way for it. I did not see him again, to my recollection, till the last Friday in January, when we went towards the Duke of York public-house. I met Phillips, who said Taylor had had one shilling more than the rest, and if there was a Bank note lost, Thomas Blacket must have had it - they were talking about the robbery. Phillips went inside the taproom, and John Haydon came up. I went with him, and the prisoner, to the Loggerheads public-house - we had two pots of porter, and a quartern of gin. Haydon said he was very poor, and had not had his share of the property, for he had seen no note. Taylor said if there was a note, Blacket must have had it. We came out, shook

hands with Haydon, and bade him good bye. The prisoner and I went down Turk-street, and he stated to me the particulars of the robbery. He said, that on Christmasday he went to the Gibraltar public-house, and went with Blacket, Phillips, and Jones, and got to the prosecutor's house between seven and eight o'clock, and tried the street door several times, but could find no key to touch the lock, and they broke the shutters open, and forced the window up; but, in the mean time, somebody was looking through the window of the first floor opposite, and they said, one to the other, that the place was spoiled; they put the shutters to, and went to the Gibraltar public-house, and met James Walker and John Haydon , who came back with them. Blacket, who had been left to watch, came to the public-house about nine o'clock, and told them it was all right. There were then six of them, and they went down - Taylor got in at the window, and let in two of them, saying,

"Come in, Bob - come in, Tom;" three of them went in, and Haydon, Walker, and Phillips, were outside; Taylor and Jones went upstairs, and Blacket was sky-larking below; Taylor and Jones took the box from over the stairs - then Blacket came up, Taylor caught hold of the money, and said,

"Here it is, Bob," and gave him the money; and after they came out of the house, they threw the plum-pudding about the place, and brought the bread and beef out, and found a string of candles, which they brought away, and came along the road - that is all he said. We then went to the Ship public-house, at the corner of John-street, Brick-lane, and there saw Blacket - Taylor spoke to him about wronging him of the note - he said he had not had one - Taylor said, if any thing should happen to him, he should blame Blacket - we had a quartern of gin and parted. I saw him again last Monday three weeks at a fight - his arm was dislocated - he said, that when that was well, he would break the other over me. I had told my father of it before this, and he told Powis. I did not give information myself till after I met Taylor at the fight.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were out of the way for this robbery - A. Yes; I was accused wrongfully; I was not there. I was tried here for a highway robbery, which I was innocent of.

Q. You said nothing about this till the prisoner threatened to break your head - A. No; he told me every thing about the robbery. I have been at work for the last three or four months. I was out of work for a month before Christmas, and for two or three weeks after. I might be out of the way for two or three months after the robbery. I recollect all that Taylor told me very well.

Q. How did you get your living while you were out of the way - A. I had plenty of goods, and sold them all off. I lived about a hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor, and the prisoner lived nearer. I was concealed in Wilmot-street, which is not three hundred yards off. I went out frequently in the day-time, and went home two or three times.

Q. Where were you at nine o'clock on the 25th of De- December - A. At a public-house about thirty yards from the prosecutor's. I was not out of there after six o'clock on that evening - several people saw me there.

Q. Have you been to the prosecutor's house lately - A. Last Thursday, as we came from Hick's Hall, I went in as Taylor's mother was standing by. Powis did not wish to hurt her feelings, so we went into the house till she was gone. I was there last Monday, and staid about half an hour; I went to ask when they would go to Hick's Hall. I did not talk one word about this business - we did not mention the prisoner's name.

JOSEPH POWIS . I am an officer. On the 12th of April, Goodwin gave the prisoner into my charge. Clayton had given me information about three weeks before that, and I received information from his father about a week or nine days before. The prisoner denied all knowledge of it.

Cross-examined. Q. The officers had been on the lookout for Clayton - A. I believe so. I went into the prosecutor's house last Friday, as we came from Hick's Hall. I had no reason for going in, except that I was tired - no other reason was assigned.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 12th of April I met the prisoner, and asked if his name was not Taylor; he said No, that he lived in Tyson-street, Bethnal-green, near or next door to the sign of the Duke of York; I said he did not live there - he said he did, and offered to take me there, but I did not go, not believing him. I took him towards King's, and in the road met an officer, and said to him,

"What is this man's name?" he said,

"Sam Taylor, is it not Sam?" he gave no answer. On the morning of the robbery Mrs. King gave me a crowbar, a dark-lantern, and the iron tip of a shoe. I took his shoes off at the first examination; one had an iron tip, and the other not, and the tip corresponded with the heel of that shoe; he wore the shoes in prison, and I afterwards found he had torn the other tip off; I could not compare the tip with the shoe, as it had been heeled, and has nails in it. I asked what he had taken the other tip off for; he said he had kicked it off in prison, but we could not find it there. When I examined the two tips they appeared to be fellows, but I cannot say that the loose tip had been on that shoe, as it had been mended; he appears to tread on the back of his heel, and both tips were worn alike.

Cross-examined. Q. He offered to go to Tyson-street with you - A. Yes. We had received information about Clayton on the day after the robbery. I was desired to to look after the prisoner a few days before the 12th of April.

DEBORAH KING . I found that tip near the window.

Cross-examined. Q. There is nothing uncommon in the shoe produced - A. I do not know. My husband does not wear iron heels.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-188

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1003. GEORGE BRUNSWICK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Catherine Bath , spinster , about nine o'clock at night of the 5th of May , with intent to steal, and stealing two counterpanes, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 2 s., and a blanket, value 1 s. , the goods of Daniel Davis .

CATHERINE BATH . I am single. In May last I rented a room in Daniel Davis 's house, No. 8, New-street, St. Catherine's - he does not live in the house, but keeps a shop opposite. I rented the room furnished; it is on the ground floor. On the 5th of May I went out about half-past

eight o'clock in the evening; I locked the door; it opens into the passage, which leads to the street door. I came home about nine, and missed two counterpanes, two sheets, and a blanket; they belonged to Mr. Davis - I had the use of them; I did not know the prisoner; but as I went out I saw a black man standing in the street, next door to a cook shop - I cannot swear that it was the prisoner. I saw the property again that night, at Parsons's, in Blue Anchor-yard, which is about a quarter of a mile off, and am sure they are the same. I had lodged in the room six months. I locked the door when I went out, and am certain that I left the window fastened; but on returning I found the door open; the window was shut; whoever had come must have entered at the door; the holt of the lock was not shot - it must have been opened by a false key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DALTON . I am an officer. On the 5th of May Parsons gave me this property, in the presence of Bath.

HUGH PARSONS . I live in Blue Anchor-yard. The prisoner took a room of me four or five days before this happened, and on the 5th of May, about ten o'clock at night, he came in in a bustle, and wanted a candle - my wife asked him for the rent, which be refused; she said she would see if the things in his room were safe - I went into his room, and saw these counterpanes, sheets, and blankets; he said they were his own - I said I should detain them till I knew further about it. I locked them inside, kept him out, and told the watchman. Bath saw them about eleven o'clock, when he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. She told the gentlemen that she knew nothing about me. The last time I came from Jamacia I fell in with her, went to her room, and was robbed of 2 l. 4 s.; she promised to return it next day, but I could not get it, and on this night I saw a young man named William, whom she had robbed of 8 s.; he took these clothes, and left them at my place. He wanted me to take them, but I would not. I said they were mine, but they belonged to this man.

CATHERINE BATH re-examined. It is quite false - I never saw him before; it was not quite dark when I went out.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240603-189

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1004. GEORGE BRUNSWICK was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a pillow, value 2 s., and a counterpane, value 2 s., the goods of Harman Henry Ring , in a lodging-room .

SARAH RING . I am the wife of Harman Henry Ring - we live in Dock-street, Rosemary-lane . The prisoner took a furnished room of us, at 3 s. 6 d. a-week, on the 1st of April - he and his wife slept there, and on the 1st of May he went out; I went up stairs, and missed the pillow and quilt. I found him in custody; the woman he brought with him only slept there four nights; he turned her out, saying that she was not his wife.

JOHN BOOTLE . I took him in charge. The property has not been found - he said the woman took them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-190

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1005. SOPHIA YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , a jacket, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 16 s.; a pair of shoes, value 6 s., and a sovereign, the property of William White , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240603-191

1006. THOMAS LANGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , eight trusses of hay, value 1 l. , the goods of Sarah Medley , widow ; and THOMAS COOK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MRS. SARAH MEDLEY . I live at Acton, and carry on the farming business . In the year 1822, I bought the hay of Kensington-gardens; it was made up and stacked in the gardens. I began to dispose of it on the 22d of March last, and ended in May. Barnett was employed to cut it to go to market - he has worked eight or nine years for me. I superintended the making of the hay myself; I believe it was the best that has been made for forty years. The prisoner Cook had a rick of hay last year within six or seven yards from mine. The prisoners were apprehended in consequence of information from Barnett.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The grass in the gardens is let by tender, I believe - A. Yes; I had he offer of it last year, but Cook made a better offer; I have made no offer this year; I assisted in stacking it myself - I have no partner.

WILLIAM BARNETT . I have been seven or eight years in the prosecutrix's service. In March, April and May, I was employed to cut this hay from the rick in Kensington-gardens; the prisoner Cook came to me one morning between ten and eleven o'clock, and asked if his haybinder had been there? (that was Langton) I said No; he asked if I had done any thing this morning? I said No; he said

"Well, get what you can; I shall give you 1 s. a truss for it;" he said no more, but went away. Langton came to me next day, and I had a quarter of a load of mistress's hay - Langton said,

"Can we get another quarter of a load," and we got it - I cut it - he fetched some of it away and bound it, and I bound some; he took it into his shed. I generally twist my hay-hands shorter and lighter than other people; it was quite a light brown hay, and that in Cook's rick was a very dark brown; it was loaded on Cook's cart, and taken away - a quarter of a load is nine trusses. Langton paid me 4 s. 6 d. for it as soon as I had done it - that was 6 d. for me, and 6 d. for himself. I have drank at the King's Head public-house with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose you went and told Mrs. Medley of this proposal directly - A. No; I agreed to steal it for 6 d. a truss - it was not my wish, but they came and bothered me so. I was found out about a week after - I have seen Langton's brother since I made this charge, and said I was very sorry that it should happen.

Q. Did you not say you would not have said one word about it, if Mrs. Medley had not told you - A. No; I said no such thing; I stated at first to mistress that I knew

nothing about it. I went away, and they sent me word that I should not be hurt, if I would come back and tell the truth.

COURT. Q. Did Mrs. Medley ever tell you what to say - A. No; when I was accused of it, she wrote down what Puttick, the carter, had said; that I had been doing. I denied it at first, but when she read to me what he had said, I ran off, but came back, as they said if I told what had been done, she would not hurt me. She said nothing to me about Cook.

Q. Cook said he would give you 1 s. a truss - A. Yes; 6 d. for me, and 6 d. for Langton - we had that before when we took some.

MICHAEL STRICKLAND. On the 21st of May, I bought thirty-six trusses of hay from Cook, in the Hay-market - it was divided between me and Mr. Knight. I had eighteen trusses - it was brown hay - I did not notice whether, it was all of one colour. When the officer came I had seven trusses left, which they examined.

SAMUEL KNIGHT . I had half this hay; the officers afterwards saw part of it on my premises.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Strickland's on the 31st of May, and to Knight's on the 2d of June. I saw four trusses at Strickland's - Barnett picked out three of them, and picked up a hayband, which he said he had made; he fixed on one truss at Knight's, and a band.

JOHN WILLIAMSON. I was with Buckeridge - Barnett pointed out three trusses at Strickland's - it was rather lighter and brighter than the other hay, and smelt sweeter; there was very little difference in the colour, but one appeared mouldy.

WILLIAM BARNETT re-examined. I went with the officers, and pointed out the hay - I cannot swear whose it was; here is a hayband which I made.

JOHN PUTTICK. I was carter to Mr. Cook. I remember some hay being in his shed; he took it to the Hay-market for sale, on the 21st of April - eight trusses were taken from the shed to the loft, and then to the market by me, and sold to Strickland.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You do not know who brought it to the shed - A. No; I drove it to market with a load, the rest was made up from the loft.

THOMAS WITHERS . I am an attorney, and have frequently seen Mrs. Medley's hay in Kensington-gardens, and have seen Cook's hay. About three weeks, or a month ago, I was passing through the gardens, and saw two of Cook's carts loaded with hay, near the spot where his own and one of Mrs. Medley's ricks stood. I was brought up a farmer, and have often noticed Mrs. Medley's stacks and Cook's - her's was very good, and his very bad; some of the hay in his cart looked much better than his own. I took no further notice, thinking she had borrowed his cart. Cook is a respectable man, and the last person I should have suspected - the upper trusses were covered with cloth - I have not the least doubt but what I saw was her hay.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to swear that it was her's - A. By no means.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-192

1007. JOHN TAYLOR , GEORGE FREDERICK COLTMAN , and STEPHEN SOMERSET , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 400 lbs. of lead, value 2 l., belonging to Thomas Dickason , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

2 d. COUNT stating it to be fixed to an out-house belonging to him.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be fixed in a certain yard belonging to him.

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD JONES . I am coachman to Mr. Thomas Dickason , who lives on Twickenham Common . On the 5th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I went round the premises - they were then all safe - the pump at the kitchen door, and the pump in the stable-yard, were safe - next morning, about six, I found the pump gone from the stable-yard - the pipe of the pump by the kitchen was screwed off, and the leaden cistern in the green-house gone, and a quantity of lead was taken off the roof of the out-building; a field, called Seven-acre-field, communicates with the premises. I observed the tract of a narrow-wheeled cart going in and out of the gate. I traced it about one hundred yards into the road - there is a paddock there, in which I found a quantity of lead, such as I had lost. On the following Monday I went to Brentford, and saw the pump, cistern, and some lead in a cart in the Magistrate's yard - the leaden pump was found in the gravel-pits.

THOMAS DICKASON , Esq. I live at Twickenham. On the 5th of March I saw all the lead of my out-house safe, and next morning I found a considerable quantity taken off the roof - the cistern and pump were gone.

GEORGE GRIMSHAW . On the 5th of March I lived with my father and mother on Twickenham Common - the prosecutor's house is on the Common close to where I live. On the 5th of March, I saw the prisoners at the Red Lion public-house, and was in their company at the Swan about a week before - we had some beer, and smoked tobacco.

Q. Did you talk - A. Yes.

Q. What about - A. Nothing particular.

Q. You are desired to tell the truth - what did you talk about at the Swan - A. Nothing particular.

Q. Did you agree to do any thing - A. No; I know nothing about this robbery.

This witness having stated himself before the Magistrate to have been an accessary in the robbery, and admitted as a witness for the Crown, he was committed.

JOHN PHILPOT . I was convicted last Sessions of this robbery. On the morning of the 6th of March I was apprehended at Brentford, with a quantity of lead. I got it from Mr. Dickason - the three prisoners were with me. I took my cart into Mr. Dickason's meadow, and they all put the lead into the cart. Grimshaw was with them - a cistern, a pump, and some more lead were put into the cart - there was more than I wished to take - the prisoners said,

"Why did you bring such a horse and cart as not to be able to take so much;" - I said, I had a great mind to shoot it all out, and have nothing more to do with it. I had met them at the Swan public-house, at Isleworth, on the 5th. I had the cart from Wasley, at Isleworth, and went straight to the prisoners. I was stopped at Old Brentford with the lead - neither of them would go with me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How often have

you been tried before this last business - A. Once; and was imprisoned eight or nine months. I have told the truth for my own sake.

Q. Were you not told that if you swore against them you would get off very light - A. Yes; Mr. Thackey said, if I would tell who robbed the premises, I should be free.

Q. It was from no motive of repentance or the love of justice, but to free yourself - A. I had repentance; I gave information a few days after I was convicted myself.

MR. LAW. Q. You have received your punishment, and have no hope of any further favour; A. No; four men could hardly lift the cistern. I mentioned their names to Mr. Thackey - he said they were all desperate characters, and wished me to speak the truth.

WILLIAM GROVER . I keep the Swan public-house, at Isleworth. On the 3d of March Philpot came in with the prisoners about three o'clock in the afternoon, and remained until about seven.

Cross-examined. Q. Your house is the resort of the lower orders of people - A. Yes; they were drinking and amusing themselves. I never remember seeing them together before - one Wasley, who has absconded, was in their company.

THOMAS FORD . I keep the Red Lion public-house at Twickenham, On the 8th of March, from eight till half-past ten o'clock at night, the prisoners were all at my house, which is three quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's; Somerset went away out about ten, Grimshaw and Beauchamp were there.

RICHARD BEAUCHAMP . On the evening of the 5th of March I was at the Red Lion; the prosecutor and Grimshaw came there; they had two pots of beer, and there was a good deal of whispering; they might stay there an hour and a half, and went away towards Mr. Dickason's estate; the Duke's Head public house is in that direction. I went from there to Lady Baroness Howe's premises, and laid down under the lean-too of a cow-house to sleep; this is half a mile from Mr. Dickason's; and about three o'clock in the morning; Somerset came and awoke me, and wanted to know why I lay there; he said there was a warmer place further on; and in the morning I found him, Grimshaw, and Coultman, all laying in a place where they cut chaff. When they left the Red Lion Somerset was not with them; they said they were to meet him by the Duke's Head public-house, and if I saw him I was to tell him they were waiting there. For a quarter of an hour before I went away they were cleaning each others clothes, which were very dirty with cobwebs, as if they had been lifting something. When they went from the barn Grimshaw said,

"Be d - d if it will do to go all one way." He and Somerset went over the fields at the back of Twickenham to come in at the end of Cross-street and meet the other two. Coltman went over the footpath towards his mother's to breakfast; it was then about nine o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Somerset awake you - A. Yes; and told me to go to a place where I found the others in the morning. I noticed their jackets; they appeared as as if they had been lifting something; Taylor was not there.

MR. LAW. Q. How far were they from their homes - A. About a quarter of a mile; I had been at work, and had no lodgings; I came to apply to the parish for relief, but could get none that night.

HENRY TODD . I am a carpenter. On Saturday the 6th of March, at nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners coming out of the barn where Beacham says they slept. Taylor was with them, and Grimshaw also.

Cross-examined. Q. If any one has said that Taylor was not there it is false - A. He was there - I saw them come out of the cow-yard, not out of the barn. I had no conversation with them.

JOHN PICKERWELL . I am carter to Mr. Stanborough, of Isleworth. On the 6th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock, (I think) I went to Mr. Martin's at Twickenham, with my cart - I saw Somerset and another man, who wore a blue plush waistcoat, coming out of Twickenham; they were a mile and a half from the prosecutors. Somerset said

"Hallo! what have you Isleworth chaps been at." I said the wooden legged cobbler's horse and cart was stopped at Brentford with lead in it, and the man who was in it jumped out and ran away.

JOHN BOLTON . I am clerk at Coles' brewery at Twickenham. On the 6th of March I saw Somerset and Grimshaw standing on a bridge together; I did not hear what they said.

WILLIAM HUETT . I am an Excise-officer; about five o'clock in the morning of the 6th of March, I stopped a cart in Brentford, with a very heavy cistern, and several pieces of lead - the man who drove it set off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SOMERSET - GUILTY . Aged 24.

COLTMAN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-193

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1008. THOMAS FORDHAM was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-194

1009. WILLIAM GREENWOOD and JOHN NEAL were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of a certain man, whose name is unknown, from his person .

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 20th of April, about one o'clock I was coming through Smithfield and saw the prisoners - they followed a gentleman up Cloth-fair into Long-lane - I saw Neal take a handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket and give it to Greenwood, who put it into his breast - I seized them, and took it from Greenwood's breast - Newton ran after the gentleman but he would have nothing to do with it.

JAMES NEWTON . I have heard Waddington's evidence; it is correct - I did not see the handkerchief taken, but saw him take it from Greenwood's breast.

GREENWOOD'S Defence. I bought it.

GREENWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

NEALE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240603-195

1010. HYMEY MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a box, value 25 s.; forty-five gold

seals, value 10 l.; nineteen gold keys, value 30 s.; twenty-three gold brooches, value 5 l.; twenty-two pair of gold drop ear-rings, value 2 l.; twelve pairs of gold hoop earrings, value 1 l.; eighteen silver pencil-cases, value 2 l.; fifty-eight gold pens, value 2 l.; four steel clasps, value 4 s.; two silver salt-spoons, value 4 s.; twelve rings, value 30 s.; six watch chains, value 12 s.; three bracelets, value 3 s.; eighteen spoons, value 5 s.; nine pairs of spectacles, value 9 s.; twenty-four thimbles, value 1 l., the goods of Mordecai Isaacs , in the dwelling-house of Mary Jones .

The articles in question being the joint property of Mordaci Isaacs and another person, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED

Reference Number: t18240603-196

1011. THOMAS RICHARD POPPY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. GEORGE BALLARD . I am in partnership with Messrs. Samuel Dawes and Charles Yorke - the prisoner was in our employ. I sent a Bill of Exchange for 2 l. 5 s., from Scotland, to our house in King-street, Cheapside, in a parcel directed to the firm.

Mr. CHARLES YORK . This bill was remitted to us from Scotland; but I cannot be certain that I ever saw it. I remember it on account of it being for so trifling an amount.

JAMES GILBERT . I am a clerk in the Bank. I find by our books that this bill was presented on the 5th of April, and paid by a cash order upon Messrs. Fuller's - it has the receipt of T. R. Poppy, No. 1, King-street, on it.

COURT. There is no proof of his receiving this on account of his employers.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-197

1012. JAMES THOMAS BOYCE was indicted for that he, on the 11th of April , at St. Bridget alias St. Bride , in and upon John Fishburn , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault and with a certain sharp instrument; feloniously did strike, out, and stab the said John Fishburn , in and upon his head and right arm, with intent feloniously, &c. to kill and murder him against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intention to be to disable the said John Fishburn .

THIRD COUNT, stating his intention to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FISHBURN . I am a watchman of St. Bride's . On the morning of the 11th of April I was on duty; and as I went my rounds, my attention was directed to the shop of Mr. Richardson, a fishmonger, nearly at the top of Fleet-market, I found the door open, and, upon going in, I found two young men there. I went in, and asked what they did there - one ran away, and the other who was the prisoner, remained: as soon as I got inside, he shut the door, and struck me with his fist - I returned the blow, and was knocked down - I got up, and he took up a crow-bar which laid on the ground, and struck me with it; but before that, he said he would serve me out, and would do for me; he took this crow-bar (producing it,) and struck me with it on the head and arm - he struck me with it as I was against the wall; I happened to have a thick hat on, which stopped a good many of the blows, but I received one on the head about two inches long - my hat was off at that time. I received a blow on my arm by putting it up to defend my head; he used but one hand, and struck in this way (beating with it.) I received a wound on my arm, not quite an inch long - I was obliged to go to the hospital, and remained there a month and three days; my head was entirely all over blood.

Q. On recovering yourself, what did you do - A. I asked him for mercy - he told me to sit on the block, and if I moved, it would be worse for me. He ran away - I followed his out, and sprung my rattle, and kept him in sight till he turned the corner of Stonecutter-street. Four or five more watchmen came to my assistance, and in four or five minutes he was brought to me - I knew him again - I caught sight of him as soon as I turned the corner of Stonecutter-street - nobody but him was running before me - he was stopped just by Robin-hood-court, Shoe-lane, by a watchman of St. Andrew's. I examined the fishmonger's shop, and found the crow-bar there. I felt the effects of my wound in about an hour, and went to the hospital about six o'clock that morning. I was ordered to bed, and my head dressed - I felt great inconvenience from it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did it happen - A. At a quarter or twenty minutes before five o'clock - he shut the door upon me - they were both in the shop when the door was shut - I was alarmed very much, but did not lose my recollection - there was no light there - it was daylight; the back door was open, and I had plenty of light; I saw him take the crow-bar off the floor.

Q. Do you mean to state that you were possessed of your senses sufficiently to know the manner in which he struck you - A. Yes; he struck me with one hand, and the sharp end of the crow-bar turned towards my head - the dresser of the hospital saw me about five minutes after I got there; I attended before the Alderman the second day after it happened.

COURT. Q. We understood you to say that you saw two men, one ran away and the other stopped in - A. Yes, my Lord - he went away directly after the door was shut; I and the prisoner were then left alone; I saw no marks of violence on the door; the lock had been sprung; the crow-bar did not appear to me to have been used to get in with.

CHARLES SILVESTER . I am watchman of St. Bride's; I was on duty on Sunday morning, the 11th of April; about five o'clock I heard Fishburn's rattle spring; my box faces the centre of the market near Harp-alley - I can see this shop by moving a yard or two - I saw Fishburn pursuing the prisoner, who ran straightup the market towards me; I pursued him into Shoe-lane, where he was stopped by a watchman - I lost sight of him as he turned the corner of Stonecutter-street, and on turning the corner myself, I saw the watchman trying to stop him; he was still running, but the watchman struck at him, and he got away; but he struck him again and was taken - nobody but him and the prosecutor were running in a direction from the shop; I have no doubt of his person; there is a linendrapers shop next door to the fishmongers.

JOHN CLARK . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's. I was upon duty in Shoe-lane at five o'clock, and heard a rattle spring - I saw the prisoner running, and two or three watchmen after him, calling Stop him! - he came directly towards me, out of Stonecutter-street, nearly out

of breath. I called out

"Stop, or else down you go;" he used some bad language, and tried to brush by me - I struck him on the shoulder with my staff - he got about twenty yards further, when I gave him another blow and secured him, at the corner of Robin-hood-court - I did not lose sight of him from the time I first saw him - Fishburn's face was covered with blood - he said

"That is the man who tried to take my life."

SAMUEL BEAVAN . I was constable of the night at St. Bride's. On the 11th of April the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found 13 s. 2 1/2 d., and a piece of wax taper, in his pocket - a lantern was found on the premises, and given to me by a watchman.

WILLIAM BURCH . I am dresser to Dr. Abernethy, and attended the prosecutor at the hospital - he had a cut on the forehead, extending an inch and a half perhaps - it laid the bone bare - he had a cut on the right arm, and the back part of the fore arm, about an inch and a-half long - it was not a deep wound, merely through the skin - I have no doubt of the wounds being made by an instrument, such as the one produced - it is an incised wound, not a bruise - the sharp end of the crow-bar could have produced it, but not the other end.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he give any account of the matter to you - A. I asked how it happened - that was not in consequence of any doubt I entertained of the manner in which it had been done.

THOMAS GIFFORD - I am shopman to Mr. Richardson, fishmonger, Fleet-market. On Saturday the 10th of April, I locked up the shop, and left 13 s. and some odd halfpence in the drawer, and on Monday I found a large hole in the wall - the plaster was knocked off - the wall communicated with the linendraper's shop next door - I found a dark lantern, and a small crow-bar, in the shop, and gave them to my master - these are them (looking at them) - I looked into the drawer, and the money was gone - the shop-door had been locked, but not the drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. Does any body sleep in the shop - A. No; I left about ten o'clock at night, and did not hear of this till Monday.

COURT. Q. Was the hole made through the wall - A. Not quite, my Lord; there were one or two bricks out.

THOMAS WISBY. I was in Richardson's shop on Saturday night, the 10th of April, and locked it up between ten and eleven o'clock, and left the premises all safe.

The prisoner made no defence, but one witness deposed to his good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18240603-198

1013. JOHN PADBURY stood charged upon two indictments, with frauds - to both of which the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months for each offence .

Reference Number: t18240603-199

1014. FREDERICK HADLEY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN BENJAMIN HEATH , Esq. On the 31st of May , between four and five o'clock, I was walking up Holborn with a friend, and opposite Furnival's Inn I felt a motion at my pocket, and heard a voice saying,

"Your pocket has been picked, and here is the man." I turned round, and found the prisoner in custody - my friend held him while I fetched an officer.

MR. ROBERT WALTER CORDEN . I was in Holborn, and observed the prisoner and two other boys pass me, and go up to Mr. Heath; the prisoner put his hand into Mr Heath's pocket, and was in the act of drawing a handkerchief out, when I collared him, and said,

"Sir, this fellow is endeavouring to pick your pocket."

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-200

1015. EDWARD COOPER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a cutler , and live in Lombard-street - I know Mr. Smith, a cutler, of Cheapside. On the 25th of March, the prisoner came to the shop and requested half-a-dozen of scissar-knives for Mr. Smith of Cheapside, and said that he lived with him. I did not know him, and, as he brought no note, I packed them up, and delivered them to him, but sent my porter to see if he delivered them safe. I have not seen the prisoner since - my porter is now seriously ill.

MR. JOHN SMITH . I am a cutler, and reside in Cheapside. I never sent the prisoner to the prosecutor for anything. I do not know him.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-201

1016. THOMAS RICHARD POPPY was again indicted for a misdemeanor . -

(See No. 359.)

MR. GEORGE BALLARD . I am in partnership with Messrs. Samuel Dawes and Charles Yorke . The prisoner was in our service from the Spring of 1823, until June in the same year. On the 14th of May Ball brought an order to our house, purporting to come from Mr. Sewell of Kingsland, who is a customer of ours.

WILLIAM BALL . This order (looking at it) was given to me by the prisoner - he met me in Hoxton-square, and asked if I was inclined to earn sixpence; he said his name was Sewell - that he lived at Kingsland - and if I would take this order, and bring the goods to his house, he would give me 3 d. more. I went to Messrs. Dawes and Co., in King-street, and gave the order to Mr. Ballard - he asked my name, and if I was going to take the goods to Kingsland. I said Yes; and as I went along I met the prisoner in Pitfield-street - he took the goods from me, and gave me 6 d. - Order read.

Messrs. DAWES and Co., No 1, King-street.

Gentlemen - I will thank you to send by Bearer as under, on the lowest terms.

Your humble servant,

B. SEWELL.

Kingsland, Friday noon.

Two Waterloo filled silk shawls; two scarlet ditto; 2 6-4th stiff books, 9 d. and 10 d., and one ditto soft, 13 d.

BENNETT SEWELL . I live in Kingsland - this order is not my writing - I gave the prisoner no order - I deal with the prosecutors, and did so while the prisoner was in their service.

MR. YORK. The defendant was our clerk - the instant I saw this order I said it was Poppy's writing - it is very little disguised.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. What makes you speak to it - A. Its general appearance.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-202

NEW COURT. (4th DAY,)

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1017. GEORGE GAMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 100 lbs. of lead, value 18 s., the goods of Alexander Copeland , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On the 26th of April I had occasion to go to see a quantity of lead on the premises of Messrs. Walker and Maltby, in the Commercial-road, Westminster - there was about 800 lbs. weight. On the 27th I obtained a search-warrant, and took it away. I went to the prisoner - he lives in Strutton-ground, Westminster, at the bottom of Orchard-street. I asked him if he had sold any lead to Messrs. Walker and Co. - he said he had - he could not be particular as to the weight, but it was about 8 cwt. I asked where he got it; he said from his houses in Shoe-lane, which were repairing. I ordered him to attend the Magistrate, which he did on the 27th, and again on the 4th of May. I afterwards met him at Shoe-lane on the 30th of April - I had examined the house in Shoe-lane on the 27th of April; it was a tiled roof, and part of this lead came from a slated roof; I did not compare it with that roof, being satisfied that it could not come from there. I told him so, and he then said he had more houses in Strutton-ground, Westminster, and wished one of us to attend there with him, which my brother officer did. I went to Mr. Copeland's house, in Regent-street, on the 29th, and examined that roof with Green, and one Mason, who had the key of it. I took about 1 cwt. of the lead with me - I took part of it up, and compared it with the parts of lead, which remained on the roof, and it fitted as near as old lead could fit; it had been knocked about a good deal, and would not fit entirely without beating out, but it fitted the nail holes and the marks on the tiles as near as could be; it fitted in three places particularly - the thickness exactly corresponded; it had been torn off from the roof; most of the roof had been stripped, and the hips also. Some portion of it had been left on the roof; my belief is that it had come from there; I should suppose about 2 cwt. had been stolen from that house. I found some lead in the watch-house at Westminster, and got the watchman to bring it to Mr. Copeland's house, but that was different. The prisoner attended at the office on the 4th of May, voluntarily, and a person of the name of Coney with him, who he said was his plumber.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have looked at a book, have you put down there what Mr. Gamble said - A. No; I have put down dates, but not the conversation - I have put down that Gamble said he had sold the lead, and that it came from his house in Shoe-lane - I wrote this as near the time as possible. I did not warn him to be cautious what he said. I could trust to my memory, because there was so little passed except his appointing to go to Strutton-ground. I have a complete recollection of what passed; he said he had had it at Strutton-ground for some time.

CHARLES GREEN . I accompanied Mitchell to the prisoner's house at Strutton-ground. Mitchell asked him if he had sold any lead over the water to Walker and Co? he said he had - Mitchell then said he had seized it - that he was an officer, and suspected it was stolen - he asked, where he had got it from; - he replied, from his houses in Shoe-lane; that he had been repairing them, and this was the old lead from them - he told him he was ordered to attend the Magistrate's on the day following, which he did - he said he had had it in his cellar for some time - his house is about a quarter of a mile from the house which had been robbed - he attended the Magistrate's the next day, and we went to Shoe-lane and examined the roof; but the lead had not the least appearance of being taken from there - there was no appearance of any new lead; it appeared to have been there for two years - we examined the house in Regent-street - the lead had every appearance of having been taken from there - there might be about one hundred weight of the lead which we had with us taken from that house - it fixed itself on the roof in two or three places-particularly - it fitted as to the nail holes in the sides - we compared it very attentively, and the result is upon a fair examination - that I believe it was the identical lead stolen from that house - Gamble was not with us. I told him I considered that I knew where the lead came from, and that it was impossible it could come from his premises in Shoe-lane - he attended again on the 4th of May, and was then committed.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He attended after you told him you considered you knew where the lead had come from - was Mitchel with you when you went on this business - A. Yes; most times - he was there when this conversation passed - we did not take any lead to the house in Shoe-lane - the lead there seemed to have been on two years more or less - I don't swear positively; but I think so - it had an old appearance - it is only a mere vague guess. Gamble said it had come from his houses in Shoe-lane - he did not say that he took it from there; but it had come from there - he said afterwards that he had other houses in Strutton-ground - I saw Coney at Shoe-lane - he lives next door to Gamble.

COURT. Q. How much of the lead you had with you fitted the roof of the house in Regent-street - A. About 1 cwt.; the whole quantity gone seemed to be 2 cwt.; it appeared to have come from a slated roof - and from the colour it appeared to have been there about the same time.

JOHN MASON . I am a carpenter, and live in the yard of Messrs. Bennet and Co. Horse-ferry-road, Westminster - the key of the prosecutor's house was in our office - it was then unoccupied, and had been so for some time - the witnesses came to our office for the key. I accompanied them to search the house - we found the ridge, the hips, and the dormer door had been stripped of their lead - the officers produced some and compared it with the ridge of three pieces; one on the ridge of one on each hip fitted the nail holes - where it went down on the slates it corresponded

with the pieces left as near as old lead possibly could do; it fitted exactly; it was of the same thickness - flatted lead is sold at so many pounds to the square.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you mean that it fitted exactly - A. I mean it fitted as near as old lead could, because it had been rolled up; we flatted it out a little at the end.

Q. Was there a single piece that you will swear came from that dwelling - A. Yes; it fitted the nail holes exactly, and the places too. I compared one small piece on the bottom of the hip which was left on, and it fitted to this piece exactly - it was about eighteen inches long.

JOHN BOLLAND . I am clerk to Messrs. Walker and Co., they are lead-merchants, and live in Southwark. We received some lead from the prisoner, which was taken afterwards by the officers; there was 8 cwt., 13 lb., it came in butter baskets, on the 26th of April, in a cart.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the value of old lead - A. Twenty shilling per cwt.; it was paid for in the counting-house, in Thames-street; I gave a receipt for the quantity, but do not know what money was paid for it; it was brought about eleven o'clock in the morning; in open day. I do not know who drove the cart, but Mr. Gamble accompanied it - there was nothing suspicious about it; I should have had no objection to take it - we do not often buy lead of butter merchants, but I understood he was in the building way, and did not ask where it came from.

WILLIAM STEPHENSON . I am agent to Mr. Alexander Copeland . The lead was stripped from his house; I had seen it about a fortnight before it was taken - the house is in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner's counsel called the following witnesses.

THOMAS SEARS . I am servant to Mr. Gamble; I have lived with him sixteen months. Mr. Coney lives next door to my master - he is a plumber and glazier; he came once on a Sunday evening, about a horse and cart, which Mr. Gamble keeps for his trade, as a cheesemonger - Mr. Gamble was not at home; he lent it to him on Monday morning: I did not hear what passed between him and my master. I did not see the cart go or return. I generally drive it, but did not on that day.

SARAH LOT . I live with Mr. Gamble, and have done so eleven months; he keeps a cheesemonger's shop, and lives next door to Mr. Coney, who is a plumber. Mr. Coney came to ask the young man one Sunday evening to take some lead for him on the next morning; my master was not at home; he came again next morning, and asked my master to take it; my master refused, and said he did not like taking it, but at last he did, and the cart came about nine or ten o'clock. My master came back soon after the cart went away; I did not see him give Coney any money or paper. There were some butter baskets in the cart; Coney has some, because his son deals in eggs. I believe the same sort of baskets are used for both. I never saw any lead in my master's cellar in my life. There is no communication from Mr. Coney's cellar to ours that I know of.

The prisoner received a most excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

(See 5th Day.

Reference Number: t18240603-203

1018. WILLIAM PERRATT was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ruth M'Koul .

GERARD PERNO . I live at Egham-hill. On the 21st of April, Ruth M'Koul was with me in my gig, and we were going along near the Powder-mills at Hounslow heath , from London, home. I saw a waggon driven by the prisoner; it was about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, and quite day-light. We had dined; I was perfectly sober; I had not had more than two glasses of wine. It was a broad wheeled waggon and seven horses; both that and my gig were going from London. I attempted to pass the waggon on the near side, in order to avoid the dust; there was sufficient room for it. I had passed the waggon and the shaft horses without any inconvenience; there was abundant room for me to pass. I think the prisoner is the man who drove the horses. He touched the leaders with the whip, and drew them across the road; he was on the near side, where he ought to be; this prevented my passing him on the near side. The gig was then so near him, that he must have seen it; and he turned round and looked at us before he drew the horses towards him. I immediately pulled up and let the waggon pass, and then went round on the off side. I had again passed the waggon, and he then laid his whip on the horses lengthways, and they then crossed the road, in consequence of which I could not pass on that side, and the gig got entangled with the waggon, and was dragged half the length of this Court before it was overturned. The driver did not make any attempt to stop the horses, but persevered in going on. I believe some of the leaders were in a trot in consequence of being flogged. Somebody behind hallooed to him to stop. I should conceive that he must have heard the call to stop as well as me, but he never attempted to stop the horses. I believe he did turn round, but cannot be positive. I am positive that he did not stop, or attempt to stop. The gig, which was very strong and heavy, went over; I was thrown under the waggon, the wheel went over my hat. I can not tell how I escaped. I could not see in what direction Ruth M'Koul fell. The moment I saw her she was lying quite flat, and the two wheels I suppose had gone over her head; she must have died momentarily, as the waggon was loaded. The driver did not stop, nor take the least notice any more than if he had gone over a rat. There was a person with him, who, I believe, at the time of the accident, was in the waggon. I understand the prisoner is the guard, not the waggoner. I staid by the deceased, and did not see the waggon any more on that evening. I saw him on the Friday following, (the accident was on the Wednesday.) I had not the means of discovering whether he was at all the worse for liquor. The person in the waggon did not get down or stop, but went on with the waggon.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. What distance were you from your house - A. About seven miles; I had dined with Mrs. M'Koul in London, but not at a party. I was perfectly sober.

Q. Did you use any coarse language to the driver. - A. No.

Q. Did you not say,

" Johnny Raw , get out of the way or I will ride over you" - A. No; I used no coarse or jeering language. I think the road is wide enough for three

waggons; it was my duty to go on the right side of the waggon, but I went on the left to avoid the dust. The wind was blowing from south to north upon the lady. I was on the driving side. The distance of the foot-path from my gig, when I had passed the waggon was, I believe, about a foot; the driver was then at his leading horses. He touched them gently, and I stopped and went round on the other side. There was a sandman examined by the Coroner; I do not know whether he was the man who called out to stop. There was a man before, who did not interfere at all. Nobody said,

"Mr. Perno it was entirely your own fault."

JURY. Q. Are you sure that the person who drove the waggon knew that the gig was entangled with the waggon. - A Yes.

WILLIAM BARNARD . I am the guard to Mr. Jones's waggon. I was on the road at the time of this business. I was walking along with our waggon. I saw the waggon which occasioned the accident. The prisoner is the man who was driving the horses; I was behind it. There was a sand cart between their waggon and ours. I saw the gig with the lady and gentleman in it behind the waggon. It attempted to pass on the near side, and had run up as far as the horses, and there pulled up; I did not see what prevented its passing; it then drove round on the right side, and went as far as the horses. I could not see any further than there. I saw the gig turned over; it went a little way, I believe, before it turned over; it was entangled with the chains. I believe the waggon was very handy on the near side of the road; they were likely to get into the ditch. The horses were very much on the near side. I could not see what stopped the horses; they then came on the off side, and the gig turned over. I did not see the driver whip either of them; I was not near enough for that. I did not call, but ran as fast as I could. I was pretty near two hundred yards behind the waggon when I began to run. I could not see the gig entangled, but as soon as it had turned over I ran. I had not called to any person. When I got up the waggon-wheel had gone over the lady's head, and she was dead. The waggoner was in the waggon, or up at the head of it; the guard was driving; they did not stop, but were a good way on. The gentleman was coming back; I stopped and lifted up the lady. The waggon was gone on a goodish step, but the horses were only walking at a smart pace. After I had lifted the lady up, I remained there to carry her to a public-house. I saw the waggoner get off the shafts just after the lady had been killed; he was not then more than the length of this Court from me; he went up to the horses; I could not see whether either of them looked behind, but they did not stop. There was room enough for three waggons to pass between the waggon and the off side of the road. The dust was flying from the left. I did not see the waggoner afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. When this poor woman met her death, she was on the off side of the waggon - A. Yes; I don't know whether the driver knew what he had done.

Q. Was the prisoner on the proper side of his horses, and driving at a proper rate - A. Yes; it did not strike me he was trotting or driving his horses fast.

Q. If the man driving the gig had done his duty, could he have got entangled with the chains - A. No; there was room enough for him to have got out of the way; I think room for three waggons to pass. I think there was great fault in the man's driving. I did not see whether he directed his couse towards the waggon, or whether he used his whip. If any body had called to the waggoner I must have heard it. I could not judge whether Mr. Perno was sober or not. Our waggon stopped at the public-house. When he passed me he was on the off side, and the dust blew in the lady's face.

WILLIAM PULMAN. I live at Kew, and am a carpenter. I was on the road coming to meet them; the first thing I observed was, when the gig was on the off side of the waggon; I then saw the waggon drawn up very near the ditch, on the proper side, the gentleman appeared to be passing, and the man driving the waggon called the horses very near the ditch; when the gig had passed the waggon and the shaft horses, on the other side the horses turned square round, brought the gig round square, and the wheels getting entangled, occasioned it to be turned over; the lady was thrown under the waggon; it might have been dragged a little distance, but I did not notice that - I saw it turned over; the waggon had been drawn near the ditch, but it was then keeping off the ditch, and I suppose it was to keep it from the ditch that the driver had put the horses off; they went off in a slanting direction; I made as much haste as possible to the spot to assist; the driver and his companion went directly on; the horses quickened their pace; I did not call after them, but went as fast as possible to the deceased - she was quite dead; Mr. Perno had got up by that time. I saw the man who drove the waggon - it was the guard; the waggoner was sitting on the shafts with his face towards the ditch; I believe he could not see the accident; the forwardest of the waggon-horses were about a yard from the centre of the road when it happened, I think about a yard beyond the centre of the road, and a considerable distance from the ditch; the gig was pretty near the waggon, and Mr. Perno must have turned out of the road to have got away from it; I considered that it happened by his pulling the right-hand rein very tight, to get past the waggon on the road. I did not see the prisoner or the waggon afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Might not the waggon-driver have done all this mischief, and yet not have been conscious of it - A. Yes.

Q. Then there would have been no blame attached to his going on; there was a ditch about three feet deep on the near side, and the horses crossing the road was to get away from the ditch - A. Yes.

Q. There was ample room on the off side for the gig to pass - A. Yes; when I saw it, the gig was crossing the road, and the off wheel of the waggon overturned it. I saw no effort on the part of the driver to whip or hurry his horses.

COURT. Q. Do you think the driver must have seen that the horses were entangled - A. Yes; he did not stop. I did not notice whether he whipped his horses or not.

WILLIAM DEAN . I sell sand and live at Egham. I was behind the waggon; my horse was close to it. I saw the gig with the gentleman and lady come on the near side of me; there was room enough then for the gig to pass on that side without touching the wheels of the

waggon. I saw the horses of the waggon drawn towards the driver. I cannot say how that was, for I did not see the driver do anything to make them draw that way; I was near enough, but did not see him touch the horses; that prevented the gig going along, though it had passed the body of the waggon. Mr. Penro stopped his horse, and the waggon passed the gig; I stopped my horse; there was space enough for Mr. Perno to pass, he did pass; and went on the right side; I did not see what happened then, as I was behind the waggon; I saw the gig on the near side of the waggon, but not when it got on the off side, till it was turned over; when I got up the lady was dead. I did not call to them to stop, nor did I hear any one call to them; they were then gone on about five yards from the spot where the body was laid; they went on to Belfont, I overtook them before they got there, and told the waggoner (not the prisoner) that the waggon had passed over the lady; they did not stop; the waggoner said he would not go back, he could not bear to see such a thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the horses entangled together before you got up - A. No; I did not hear the gentleman use any improper words to the driver.

JAMES COOPER . I keep the Duke's-head public-house, about a mile and a half beyond the place where the lady met her death; I saw the waggon driven by the prisoner on that night about a quarter before seven o'clock, it was after the lady had been killed; the waggoner, ( Robert Laws ), said, in the hearing of the prisoner,

"We have had a sad accident on the Heath, I understand we have run over a lady and killed her." I said,

"Did you stop?" He said,

"No." I said,

"Then I think you did wrong not to stop and assist." That was all that passed; the prisoner had got the whip in his hand, and was by the side of the horses.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman ran against me, and drove me into the ditch almost, and the lady was killed nine feet and four inches from the ditch. I know nothing of it.

ROBERT LAWS . I have travelled with this waggon and the prisoner a good while; he drives steadily and carefully, and would not wilfully take away a fellow-creature's life, quite the contrary; I was at the head of the waggon at the time; I saw the horses entangled, and called to him to stop the horses, and he tried to stop them, but this gentleman kept driving his horse upon our horses, so that they would not stop; I was getting down, and almost run over, I was so frightened; I hallooed six or seven times as loud as I could; the gig kept running against them, which made them go the faster, that is as true as I stand here; the horses were out of the road, on some stone heaps near the ditch, and this gentleman kept driving upon them; there were only two wheels of the waggon in the road, the others were on the stone heaps; he came quite across the road to run against us; I said

"What are you doing?" as loud as I could; I am certainly sure of it, every body must have heard me; there was all the road for him, but he came there on purpose to do us an injury, and almost overturned the waggon; he might have gone by it if he pleased; there was nothing to hinder him - he had got past four horses, upon my oath; I told Cooper that the man was in fault, and attempted to injure my horses.

JAMES COOPER re-examined. Q. What did the last witness say to you on the business - A. He said he supposed the gentleman drove in upon him; I do not recollect that he said he thought he meant to do the horses an injury.

ROBERT LAWS re-examined. Did you attend the Coroner's jury - A. Yes; but I was not called in; I never heard a word pass between the gentleman in the gig and the prisoner; I could see every thing.

GERARD PERNO re-examined. Q. Did you hear Laws call to the prisoner to stop the horses - A. I heard some one call stop the horses, but I cannot say who it was; I never heard him say it was my fault, or that I meant to hurt the horses.

WILLIAM BARNARD re-examined. Q. Did you hear the waggoner say to Mr. Perno

"It was your fault" - A. No; I was not near enough.

WILLIAM DEAN re-examined. I heard nothing of the kind said.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-204

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1019. GEORGE BIRKETT was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES BATTERSBY . I am a shipping butcher , and live at Shadwell. In January last the prisoner was in my employ, and had been so for three or four years - he left me on the 7th or 8th of January. He handed me over his cash-book some days afterwards. He had the management of the butcher's-shop , and in general received money. I saw an order entered in the book from Mr. Charlton, on the 3d of January, and I think it was for three quarters of a hundred weight of beef; he probably ordered it of me, and of Birket also. On Monday, the 5th, or Tuesday, the 6th of January I asked the prisoner if the Leander's bill was paid; he said No - here is an entry of it in his writing in the day-book, but there is no credit given for it in the cash-book. In consequence of what he said I wrote down to the North.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he leave you, and open a shop in the neighbourhood - A. Yes; he was a clever man in business. He remained with me till the Wednesday after, as Law, who succeeded him, requested he might be there; he had a bed-room in my house, but had not slept there for some time - my son slept with him; he did not enter it for several days afterwards - I did not know for a fortnight or three weeks after, that Mr. Charlton had paid him. He did not tell me at the door of the Green Dragon, that 7 l. 10 s. of it was his own, and he would give me the remainder, when I let him have a cistern and some other things belonging to him. There are some other things belonging to him, but I do not know what they are. He said

"Will it suit you to have a settlement with me to-day, for I am a small trifle in your debt, having received Captain Charlton's money."

COURT. Q. How long was it after he was gone, before he said that - A. A few days afterwards.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you several account-books - A. Yes; a cash-book, and several others. The whole of the items are in Birket's own writing - the book is made up to the 3d of January, at which time I appear to be a debtor to him 7 l. 6 s. 9 d., and at that time he gave me up his books, except his private cash-book; this account was always in my possession. I cannot tell exactly when it was made up. I have never said that he was great annoyance to me, and if I could remove him I would, nor anything to that effect; or that he has taken several of my customers away. He had managed my business for some years, but I did not then know of his conduct. I never said that I would have him hanged for signing a receipt - I cannot tell how long it was before I knew this money had been received; it must have been about three weeks. I wrote to Captain Charlton, and he wrote to say he should be in town in a few days. I think it must have been in February.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When Captain Charlton arrived, did you charge the prisoner with this - A. Yes; he could have had his things at any time if he had sent for them. The amount of Captain Charlton's bill was 8 l. 6 s. 9 d. Birket has made a balance due to him of 7 l. 6 s. 9 d., admitting this cash-book to be correct, but it is incorrect; there is a balance due to me; it has been examined by an accountant. I do not know when the prisoner made it up. He took this book away with him, but he let me have it again after some time.

COURT. Q. When did the prisoner cease to be your servant - A. His week ended on Saturday; he was hired by the week, and paid by the week.

GEORGE CHARLTON . I dealt with Mr. Battershy, and knew the prisoner. I was in the River in January last, and went to get three quarters of a hundred weight of beef - I ordered it on Saturday, but did not take it till Sunday, the 4th of January. I do not think I saw Birket at all on Saturday, but I saw him on Sunday, when the other man called him down to cut the beef for me; he cut it out, made the bill, and gave it to me. I went down to the ship with it, and in the afternoon I came to the house next door to Mr. Battersby's, and gave Birket a 5 l. Bank note, and four sovereigns - he gave me change. When Birket was called to cut the beef he came from the next door, the public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-205

1020. CATHERINE PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a coat, value 3 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a shirt, value 4 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a gown, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s., and a basket, value 6 d. , the goods of Michael Cronin .

MICHAEL CRONIN. I am a mop-maker , and live in New-street. The prisoner is my wife's niece , and lived with us. I missed this property from a chest about four o'clock in the morning of the 10th of May; the prisoner had gone to bed the evening before, but she was then gone out of the house. I went out, and at length found her at No. 19, Long-alley, about two o'clock, with a gown and handkerchief. I asked her to let me have my wife's gown, my boy's handkerchief, and the duplicates of the other things, and go about her business. I wanted to take her, but she got away, and was taken by her brother-in-law. I found my other property in pawn; I had not given her permission to take any of them but I understand my wife has; I did not know that till last Saturday.

MARY CRONIN . I am the wife of the last witness. When my husband got up on this morning he missed the property - I had given her leave to take it. I told the lodger to let her have these things to pawn to get herself a little market-money to go out with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-206

1021. CALEB GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , four handkerchiefs, value 10 s. , the goods of John Webb .

SARAH STILES . I live with my mother, who takes in washing, and lives in Lamb's Conduit-street . On the 21st of April the prisoner called to speak to me at the street door, and I asked him in; he used to come, and play with my brother seven years ago. While he was in the kitchen Ann Barnes brought a bundle - I opened it in his presence; it contained the nine handkerchiefs. I then went into the parlour and left him alone, and in five or ten minutes Barnes came back again; I gave her the bundle; the prisoner was then gone. She soon after returned, and said the bundle was not right.

ANN BARNES . I took the bundle to the house; it contained nine silk handkerchiefs. They were some things we had from Mr. Thomas Mellish to wash. My father's name is John Webb . These handkerchiefs were in the bundle when I took it to the house; I hadcounted them about ten minutes before. When I took it away the handkerchiefs were gone.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner into custody at his lodgings; we then went to Mr. Armstrong's, and found a handkerchief. I then returned to his lodging, and found some duplicates in a box - he denied the charge at first, but afterwards said the duplicates were in his room.

JAMES PALMER . I live with Mr. Armstrong, a pawnbroker, of Baldwin's-gardens. A handkerchif was pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Gill, on the 21st of April - I am positive to his person.

MR. GRIFFIN. I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Thomas Jones , Gray's Inn-lane.

WILLIAM CREED . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. I have two handkerchiefs pawned by the prisoner on the 21st of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I followed Barnes: she went over the way to look at a man who was intoxicated - her brother called her away, and she dropped the handkerchiefs, which I picked up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-207

1022. THOMAS HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a truss of hay, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Baker .

SAMUEL SANDERS . I live with Mr. Charles Baker , No. 131, Tottenham-court-road - he is a butcher - he keeps a horse - the hay is kept in his back premises. On the 21st of May, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner coming out of the passage leading to the stables - the door

was only latched. I knew him as a tenant of my master's; his premises are at the back of my master's; but he had no business there - he had a right to pass the passage, but not to go into my master's back premises - when he came out he had a truss of hay on his shoulder. I followed him down the New Road, leading to Battle-bridge - he then turned down a place, and pitched the hay. I asked him what he was going to do it - he said he was going to take it to Russell-square, which is quite in a contrary direction. I asked him where he had got it - he said, it was sent him from over the water. I wanted him to bring it back to my master, which he refused to do - he wanted me to go with him and have something to drink, and hush the matter up, and say nothing about it. I told him that I believed it to be my master's hay. I went and examined the place, and there was a vacancy as if a truss of hay had been taken - it appeared to be the same hay, though we did not take it to compare it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner a lodger of your master's - A. Yes.

Q. Had he to go through a part of your premises - A. Yes; but he had no occasion to go through my master's stable or slaughter-house to go to his apartments - he had access to these premises, but had no business there. I went before the Magistrates and told the same tale there to the best of my recollection. I was not asked to swear to the hay - there is a great similarity in it; when the prisoner came out, I followed him two or there hundred yards - he was walking. I wanted to see where he went to - he pitched the hay, but did not sit down upon it - when I accosted him, he said he was going to take it to Russell-square, but he was going towards Battle-bridge; he said he had it from one Jeffries over the water.

COURT. Q. Had he any business whatever in the passage - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Could I get into the kitchen without going through the passage - A. Yes; there was a way through your own room.

CHARLES BAKER . I am a butcher, and live in Tottenham-court-road - the prisoner rented a shop and parlour of a house of mine in Warren-street - there is a shop-door and a private passage - he has nothing to do with the passage whatever; in consequence of information I went to Warren-street, and found my man and the prisoner with the hay - he appeared much agitated or very drunk; I cannot say which. I said

"Hickman, I am afraid you have been at this a long while, and other things as well." He said

"No; I have not." I said,

"It appears pretty clear, and I shall give you in charge." He said he had had it from a friend. I went to the stable and missed a truss of hay.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he behind in his rent - A. I believe he was a week or two behind. I sent him word that if he did not pay better I must seize, and then he paid better.

Q. Pray have you not seized his goods since he has been in custody, and turned his wife and seven children out - A. He owed me a bill of 4 l. besides for meat.

Prisoner's Defence. A man of the name of Jeffries came to my house, and I said I wanted a truss of hay for my children to sleep upon, and he sent one. I had it two or three months; my mistress had been confined, and had not an opportunity of making a mattress to put it in for the children to sleep upon - she then said she thought it would not do, and I was going to Russell-mews to sell it, when I was stopped by Sanders.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined for Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-208

1023. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , a coat, value 1 l., and a pair of boots, value 10 s., the goods of John Ivermee , and a sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Sweeting .

JOHN IVERMEE . The prisoner came to lodge in my master's house; on the 22d of May, he was to pay 9 d. for his lodging. I slept in the next room to his; my boots were by the side of my bed, and the coat on a chair. I got up about half-past six o'clock; he got up about half-past seven; directly he went away I went up and missed them, and a sheet was gone from the bed I slept in - he never came to the house again, but was taken in about a fortnight. I have not seen the property since.

SAMUEL GILES . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 2d of June the prisoner came to the office, and inquired for an officer of the name of Godfrey, and asked what time we left Shoreditch, and said he wanted to speak privately to us. He then said that a lodger had stolen a coat, a pair of boots, and a sheet - and then said,

"I am the person. I have sold the coat for 8 s., the boots for 4 s., and the sheet for 3 s." I asked him why he did it - he said through distress - and he gave himself up, because he expected to be taken, for he had been at Worship-street a short time before.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer, and confirm Giles' statement.

Prisoner. I hope you will be as merciful as you can.

GUILTY - Aged 47.

Confined for Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-209

1024. WILLIAM PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s., and a jacket, 3 s. ; the goods of John Thomas .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240603-210

1025. EZEKIEL RYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of Joseph Pearce .

JOSEPH PEARCE . I am a whitesmith , and live in Westminster - the prisoner and I lodged together for about a month, and I lent him my clothes now and then. I had lent him a coat and some other things, and this handkerchief was with some things on the bureau bedstead - he said one evening that he was going to receive 2000 l. the next morning, and he should lie in bed in until seven o'clock. I got up about five; he then said

"Wait at the door, and I will go with you." I waited to see if he was coming, and he ran away. I had lent him all these things except the handkerchief. The constable took the handkerchief off his neck at Bow-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-211

1026. JEREMIAH SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a hat, value 2 s.; two shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Joseph Peat .

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. On the 30th of April

I was in Ratcliff-highway and saw the prisoner at the next window to Mr. Peat's shop - two more boys were with him; he was showing a boy less than himself how he could get the shoes - the little boy pulled down the shoes and gave them to him - the prisoner rolled them in his apron - I went over and took him into Mr. Peat's shop - he said he did not take them.

THOMAS PEAT . I live with my father, whose name is Joseph - he is a shoemaker - these shoes are his.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and the boy took the shoes off the nail and walked along with them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240603-212

1027. JOSEPH SCRIVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , three boxes, value 3 s.; fifteen caps, value 20 s.; three frills, value 1 s., and a bonnet, value 9 s. , the goods of Ann Blake .

WILLIAM MAGGS . I am a newsman - I was returning from town on the 12th of April, a little before eight o'clock, in a cart, to my residence at Knightsbridge - I saw the prisoner - he crossed the road and followed the cart three or four yards, and then took out the three boxes - the moon was quite bright - I saw him plainly - I told Mr. and Mrs. Blake, who were in the cart, of their loss - he put the box under his arm, and walked away with them - I pursued him as far as the Duke of Gloucester, public-house, which is about 200 yards - when I came up with him I said,

"These boxes don't belong to you" - he said they did. I said,

"Will you step into the public-house" - he said Yes; but he dropped them at the door and ran away; I did not pursue him, but he was brought back to me about five minutes afterwards; and I swear that he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you loose sight of him at all - A. Yes; I lost sight of him while he ran about two hundred yards - there were three persons in the cart, but none of them observed him - I took him to the public-house - he remained in the back parlour alone while the officer was gone for - I had seen him when he crossed me to go to the cart - it was dusk, but the moon was full - he was out of my sight for a short time; but I am certain he is the man.

ANN BLAKE . I am a servant - I was leaving my place and was in the cart with my father and mother - I had four boxes, containing fifteen caps, three frills, and a bonnet - when we were near Hyde-park, Maggs said the boxes were gone - I did not get out nor see the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. How many boxes did you lose - A. I only lost three, four were in the cart - I did not see the prisoner - the darkness prevented my seeing him at that distance - I had been sitting with my face to the horse, and did not turn round.

RICHARD BLAKE . I was going along with my own cart with my daughter's trunks in it - I received information that they were gone, and went in pursuit as far as Hyde-park - I saw the prisoner, whom Maggs said he had taken with the boxes - I did not see him till the boxes were in the public-house.

WILLIAM WARD . I am an officer, and have the trunks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When Mr. Blake came to me he said if I could give him a sovereign he would let me go; he put his hand in into my pocket and said, as I had no he would take me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-213

1028. WILLIAM WILSON and WILLIAM LOW were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 80 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. , the goods of Hugh M'Intosh and James M'Intosh .

JOHN WALES . I am an officer, and was in Piccadilly on the 23d of April; about three o'clock in the afternoon I saw the two prisoners on the opposite side of the way in conversation with each other. Low had something on his shoulder; from their manner I suspected something wrong; they went into the Green-park, and when they came to one of the benches they laid it down to rest; I went up and turned up the corner of the canvass and said,

"What have you got here?" It was about 80 lbs. of lead; they made no reply; I took them into custody, and put them in the watch-house, and then went down Piccadilly and saw Condon, who went with me to the watch-house and saw the lead.

WILLIAM CONDON . I work for Messrs. Hugh and James M'Intosh, who are contractors and builders ; they have some work carrying on in Engine-street, Piccadilly ; they had a pig of lead there; it was safe about two or three o'clock; I missed it about half an hour or three-quarters of an hour before it was found; I believe this is the lead.

LOW'S Defence. I was returning from the barracks; I met the other prisoner; we saw a man put this lead down; he asked us to carry it from him; and in the meantime the officer came and took us.

WILSON'S Defence. I have only to say the same.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

LOW - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-214

1029. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , six drinking glasses, value 5 s. , the goods of William Nunn .

SAMUEL MACEY . I am a waiter at Mr. Nunn's eating-house, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 23d of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner dined there and staid about an hour; I did not furnish him with any glasses, but there were some on a shelf in the room - three or four minutes after he was gone we missed six drinking glasses - I pursued him and took him, and found four of them in his hat, and two in his pocket; he said he would bring them back and deliver them up, if I would forgive him; he had paid for his dinner.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I took the prisoner into custody; these glasses were in his hat and pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been unfortunate, and have been endeavouring to get a situation; having some glasses I wanted to sell them; I had them in my hat and my pocket; I put my hat on the table, and paid for what I had had; after I left the house I was pursued and taken; I told them I had some glasses in my pocket, but none of their's.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240603-215

1030. RICHARD PEMBERTON was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 12th of May , of a certain evil disposed person, eight brass cocks, value 8 s.; an inkstand, value 4 d.; a corkscrew, value 4 d., and an iron tray, value 3 d., the goods of John Tozer and Henry Tozer , he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

GEORGE LEADBEATTER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's house on the 24th of May last; he is a dealer in marine stores , and lives at No. 5, Church-lane, Strand; I found these eight brass cocks, a corkscrew, a small inkstand, and on the same shelf a small tea-tray. I told him I had a search-warrant; he asked for what; I told him some brass cocks; his wife said she would produce them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Why do you call this a marine store shop - A. Because they sell those things. I believe he is chiefly at work, and his wife minds the shop; I do not know that there are persons who go about the streets with these brass articles to sell for sixpence a-piece.

HENRY TOZER . I am a tin-plate worker, and live in Drury-lane; I saw these articles at Bow-street, and know them; I know one, by ordering it for my own use; they were made by Whitford, of Birmingham; I know this by the mark a figure of 8; here are five other cocks; I ordered half-a-dozen of them for oil cisterns, with square tops; they are of a particular nature, but have no private mark of mine; I had a pair of these tea-trays; one was left, and this is the other; this corkscrew has a broken ring; I broke it myself. They were discovered on the 20th of May; I had seen them all eight or ten days before, except one lock, which I had four days before; I had been missing things from the window continually; I locked it up, and put the key in a private part of the shop, and told James Connell , my boy, to look after them; no one knew where the key was kept but him; it shuts with a glass door. I am in partnership with my father, whose name is John; we have a shop in Drury-lane, and another in Titchfield-street.

JAMES CONNELL . I live with Messrs. Tozer, and am their errand-boy - I know the prisoner; I took an old cock to his shop about a month or five weeks ago, and a day or two afterwards I took seven new ones; I took them from the glass window of the shop in Drury-lane - I opened it with the key, which hung on a nail - I sometimes found the prisoner in the shop, and sometimes a woman; he was sometimes filing in the shop - when I first took this old cock he stood in the shop - he did say any thing, but looked at it - the woman bought it - I found him at home when I took some of the new ones - I took them one or two at a time from the glass-case; when I found the prisoner at home he did not say any thing; but when I asked 1 s. for them he said 6 d. was plenty - his wife gave me 6 d. a-piece; they never asked who I came from; I saw the man about four times; I sold the tea-tray for three halfpence.

Cross-examined. Q. When you took the old cock, you say you saw the man, what was he doing - A. He was filing or doing something in the shop - I do not know that I have seen such things as these sold about the streets - I never asked the price of them.

WILLIAM CONNELL . I am the father of the boy; I saw the cock taken from the window, and went with the boy to see the place, and waited while he went in and got what he was to receive.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240603-216

FIFTH DAY, TUESDAY, JUNE 8. OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1031. GEORGE GAMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 400 lbs. of lead, value 2 l., the goods of Paul Storr , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER MITCHEL . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I went to Messrs. Walker and Maltby, Commercial-road, Lambeth, and took some lead from there; there were 813 lbs. - I got it from the foreman, Bolland, on the 26th of April; I went to the prisoner on the same day, and saw him at his house in Strutton-ground - I asked if he had sold a quantity of lead to Messrs. Walker and Co - he said he had, about eight cwt., but could not exactly tell the weight of it. I asked where he got it - he said from his houses in Shoe-lane. I ordered him to attend the Magistrate the next day, and he did so; he said his houses in Shoe-lane had been under repair, and the lead had come from there. On the 29th of April, I took some of the lead to the house of Mr. Storr, at the corner of New-street, Westminster - the house was unoccupied - the door leading to the house from the wash-house had been bored with a centre-bit in two places, and part of the door frame forced away - the door was forced off the hinges, and wide open. I went to the top of the house, and found the tops of the three dormers or garrets stripped of their lead; they have windows that project out, and they are covered with lead; I took some of the lead in my possession to the top of the house, and found part of it to fit one of the tops of the garret windows; it consisted of three pieces, and they made a complete covering for that dormer; a nail left in the lead exactly fitted a nail-hole in the top of the dormer; and a nail on the dormer exactly fitted a nail-hole in the lead; there was no nail-hole but what fitted; I found the wood of a sink in the wash-house, and a piece of lead I had fitted it; the lead of that sink was missing; the pipe from the water-butt was gone; I had two pieces of lead with me which corresponded with the size of the pipe; the wash-house had been recently white-washed, and the pipe I had was white-washed; this lead had been torn away; part on the dormer had been cut into three pieces to get it off the top, and there were the nails where it was torn off. On the 30th I saw Gamble and Coney at Shoe-lane; Coney is a plumber, who lives next door to Gamble - they took me to the top of a house to point out where the lead had come from; I did not see any place where such lead had come from; Gamble said, then it must have come from his house in Strutton-ground; he had not on the former occasion said any thing about houses in Srutton-ground; I made an appointment to meet him next day to

look at his house there; my brother officer examined the house in Strutton-ground.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Did you find Mr. Gamble to be a man who keeps a respectable shop, and likely to have many houses - A. Yes; I have heard since that he had been a warrant officer in the navy; my first question was, whether he had taken any lead to Messrs. Walker and Co.; he said he had, but did not say for whom, but from his houses in Shoe-lane; and when he and Coney went there, he also mentioned about houses in Strutton-ground; his plumber went with him to point out where the lead had come from; but he did not state that the lead had come from him; Coney was supposed to be his plumber, and that he could show best where it had come from; he is his brother-in-law.

COURT. Q. What weight of lead might there have been taken from Storr's house - A. From two to three cwt.; the whole of the lead was torn from the dormer tops - when we went to Shoe-lane he said he had been repairing that house, and pointed out the gutters - I said it was not gutter lead that I had got; but there was no part of the house from which it was possible that it could have been taken.

CHARLES GREEN . I am an officer. I went over the water to the prisoner, and asked him if he had sold some lead to Walker and Maltby, as they had got some which I suspected to be stolen; he said he had sold about 8 cwt. Mitchel asked where he got it from, he said from his house in Shoe-lane, and he had had it in his cellar in Strutton-ground for sometime; he was ordered to attend the Magistrates next day, which he did; we afterwards met him at Shoe-lane to point out the place where it had come from. I was on the roof, and told him I could see no part that appeared to have been lately new leaded; he said I might say so if I pleased. There are no dormers, nor did I see any place from which it could have come. I afterwards discovered that the prosecutors house had been stripped; all the lead taken from the three dormers; the lead taken there exactly fitted with the dormers, cistern, or sink, and the pipe. I examined the dormers particularly, and can speak with certainty of them. In the middle dormer there was a narrow piece gone about six inches wide, that we could not find; the others were completely covered with the lead we brought; and as far as we could conscientiously and honestly judge, it had come from there; we went into the kitchen, and the lead exactly fitted the cistern and pipe.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Mitchel with you during all the conversations with Gamble - A. I believe he was, and Gamble's wife was there, and I believe there might be somebody else, but I cannot say who, or whether they heard the conversation - he attended the office according to his promise.

JURY. Q. Did you fit the lead on the dormers particularly - A. Yes; and there were several nail holes that exactly fitted; there was one nail in the lead which fitted a hole on the dormer exactly; there was another which had remained on the top of the dormer.

JOHN BOLLAND . I am in the employ of Messrs. Walker and Co. I received this 8 cwt of lead from the prisoner on the 26th of April; it came in a cart in baskets, such as butter dealers use. I believe twenty-one shillings per cwt. was paid for it, but I did not pay it. I have seen Mr. Gamble before, but had no acquaintance with him. It was brought about eleven o'clock in the morning, and taken away by the officers afterwards.

RICHARD BISHOP . I am brother-in-law to the prosecutor. He is a silversmith, and lives in Bond-street; the house which had been robbed is his. I had seen it about a fortnight before all safe; the door was not broken open; it was unoccupied.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, Mr. Coney is my wife's brother; he came to me and said,

"I owe Messrs. Walker and Maltby for a cask of white lead, and if I take this lead myself, they will stop the money for what I owe, I wish you would take it for me." My wife persuaded me, and I did; he sent one of his servants with me to receive the note for the payment. I delivered the lead myself, but did not notice what it came to; the clerk gave me the order to receive the money; I came out and gave it to Coney's servant to receive the money.

ROBERT CONEY . I am a plumber. I live at No. 273, Strand, and No. 50, Strutton-ground. I am the prisoner's wife's brother. I had been doing some plumbing work for him in Shoe-lane; he lives in Strutton-ground. In April last I made application to him about some lead. I had sent down a lot of lead from the house in Shoe-lane, with some wood to burn; and I had also bought a lot of lead of a man named Turpin, who keeps a broker's shop in Peter-street, Westminster. Not having conveyance myself to carry it to Walker and Maltby's, and as I was then indebted a trifle to them, I asked Gamble to take it in his cart, and I would lend him mine in the mean time; he objected to it; I dont know why he objected, but his wife however prevailed upon him - this was on the Monday morning. It was then taken in some baskets to Mr. Gamble's stable; he went with it himself, and my boy William Povey with him. My wife received the money for it. My reason for asking him to take it was this - I was about changing some lead for my own use some time before, and sent some lead to Walker's and Co. to make up a quantity, and it was stopped by some officers, who asked what I had got in the cart, and I was ordered to attend at the Thames Police Office for it; and if I had taken it, the officers might have stopped me, as I had been up to the office once before; and as I owed Messrs. Walker and Co. 6 l., and could not spare the money just then. I begged of him to take it; he had nothing to do with it but to carry it there.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you here yesterday - A. No; I was not here yesterday when my brother was tried. I had to go to Pentonville, and I went; and it was understood from the solicitor that my attendance was not necessary. I came to see if I should be wanted - he was tried for stealing a part of the same lead. I had told the attorney that I would give any evidence, but I left the place and went to Islington before the trial was over. I attended at the Thames Police Office; I did not give the same account there. I was not sworn.

Q. Were you not sworn by the Magistrates to tell the truth - A. No; they asked me to swear to the lead, and I said I could not - it was the same lead that was then inquired

about; but they only asked me if I could swear to the lead. I was not called upon to account for my brother's possession of the lead.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, did you not tell the Magistrate that the lead in question was taken from a house in Shoe-lane - A. I did not, Sir; I was not asked the question. I went to Shoe-lane with the officers to point out where part of the lead came from.

Q. Then if you had not told the Magistrate that it came from there, how came you to go to Shoe-lane. A. I had not told them; but Mr. Gamble had told them that.

Q. Did you say you bought part of the lead of a man in Westminster - A. No; I said I sent some old lead and some wood to Westminster; and that lead, with some I took from No. 7, Shoe-lane, was what Mr. Gamble took for me. I pointed out to the officers where a quantity of lead came from on that house - it was sent to Mr. Gamble's on the 26th - it was put in the baskets on the same day, and sent to Messrs. Walker and Co. - it could not have been in his stables for some days before, nor any part of it. I think the money received for the lead was seven or eight pounds; but I cannot, nor will not, swear it. I had a returned bill of about fifteen pounds the day before.

Q. Was there no bill of parcels of the lead - A. There might have been one, but I never saw it - the boy is here, and can tell you more than I can; it was signed in Messrs. Walker and Co.'s books.

Q. Will you again solemnly affirm that you did not tell the Magistrates that she lead came from the house in Shoe-lane - A. No; I did not; they asked if I could swear to any part of the lead, and I said I could not.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL examined. Q. Did you take any part of the lead with you to Shoe-lane - A. No; I did not.

ROBERT CONEY re-examined. Q. What part of the house in Shoe-lane did you point out to the officers - A. I pointed out a quantity of new lead that had been laid in a gutter, and a quantity from a dormer window that had been replaced with slates - it had been taken away by my man, and sent to Westminster. I superintended the work, and know that it was done. I could not swear to the lead when I saw it; it is impossible, when lead is taken, by other persons, to swear where it came from, unless it was re-laid. I know of no lead from a cistern or a pipe; but I have no doubt the whole of it was in my possession, as I bought a quantity. I had no idea of its being stolen. I got the cistern lead, and pipe, from Turpin; he brought it in a barrow. I did not tell the Magistrates I knew of that lead, because I could not safely swear to it. I knew Gamble was charged with having lead in his possession; but I did not notice the sink; there was a quantity of lead.

JOHN BOLLAND (looking at a bill.) This is Walker and Maltby's; the amount is 6 l.; it was paid at the counting-house in Thames-street.

WILLIAM POVEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Coney. I took some lead from his house to Mr. Gamble's about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, and then I went with the same lead to Messrs. Walker and Maltby's, and signed my name on the book. I went with Mr. Gamble in his cart. I received seven or eight pounds. I think this paper is my writing - it is for 8 l. 4 s. 5 d.; this was for the lead. I brought the money home, and gave it to Mr. Coney.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Look again at that paper, and tell me if it is your writing - A. No; I see now that it is not my writing. I signed my name to what was down in the book. I do not know what it was; but they told me to put my name.

JOHN BOLLAND re-examined. I was not present when the boy came with this lead; but it is the regular custom of our house that those who come should sign a receipt in the book.

SARAH LOT . I have lived with Mr. Gamble eleven months. I see the cellar several times every day - there never was any lead there; if there had I must have seen it. Mr. Coney's house is next door; but there is no private way of getting there, without you get over the wall. I heard my master say to his wife,

"Coney wants me to take some lead; I don't like it; but being one of your family I suppose I must do it, or the whole fat will be in the fire." I did not see the lead come in the morning, but I saw the cart waiting for it. I have now left Mr. Gamble's; Mr. Coney engaged me yesterday after I had been here. I was Gamble's servant yesterday, but I am not now. I believe Mr. Coney keeps a horse and cart such as plumber's use. Coney first asked for the cart on Sunday evening, the 26th of April.

THOMAS SEARS . I am servant to Mr. Gamble. Coney came to me on the 26th of April, and said

"Tom, I want you to take a load of lead for me." I did not tell my master of it that night, because I did not see him. I went out early in the morning, and did not say any thing about it. I never saw any lead on my master's premises.

WILLIAM NEW. I am in Mr. Gamble's employ. Coney came on the 26th of April, and told my fellow-servant he wanted him to take a load of lead for him in the morning, and he said,

"I am sure I can't; for I must go to Wandsworth - you must speak to my master."

- JONES. I have been a workman for Mr. Coney. I saw some lead put into a cart in Shoe-lane; it might be 5 or 6 cwt.; it was in February, as near as I can guess - there was a sink and a gutter, and some strippings from a ridge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-217

1032. ROBERT WHITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , six quarts of brandy, value 20 s.; and two quarts of Geneva, value 10 s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Lord George Seymour and other persons, Commissioners of Excise .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to various persons.

JOHN HARDING . I am an excise-officer, and one of the River Inspectors. I live on the Hartshorn Wharf , which belongs to the Commissioners of Excise; there are several warehouses which belong to them likewise - the premises are all inclosed by one outer boundary, and there is a lodge in that outer boundary; my house stands East and West upon the wharf, and the North end of it comes against a warehouse; the South looks on the river from that window; the prisoner was employed by the Commissioners of Excise. On the morning of the 2d of June, having been rather restless in the night, I went into a room which overlooks the river, and saw a vessel

come into the wharf. I then looked on the wharf, and saw the prisoner with a pint pewter pot in his right hand, and a tube in his left. I saw him put this tube into a puncheon, and draw liquor out of it, and put it into the pint pot - he went to a dust-bin immediately opposite, and put the contests of the pot into something I did not know what - he then came back, did so a second time, and then put the bung in with his hand. I saw the liquor run into the pint; he then went on to the puncheons in the next tier near the dust-bin; I saw him draw some liquor from there, and put it into the dust-bin; the first puncheon was foreign Geneva. I believe it belonged to the Crown - the second was Geneva too - they both belonged to the Board of Excise. I left the window; and after going to my bed-room and dressing, I went down, and then found the prisoner in his watch-box on the premises, about ten yards from those puncheons. I called him; he came to me; and I inquired where the officer was who had charge of these spirits - he said his feet were swelled, and he had sent him to the lodge to rest himself. I sent him to the lodge, while I went to the dust-bin, and discovered two bladders, four glass, and one stone bottle, and a pint pewter pot. I asked the other officer if he had charge of these spirits - he said,

"I have." I said,

"I am very sorry you have broken your trust;" - he said the prisoner had told him, in consequence of his feet swelling, he might go down for half an hour, and he would take care of his charge. I then asked the prisoner how he could do so - he said,

"For God's sake forgive me this time, and I will never do so any more." I put the pot and the other things into my premises, and communicated this to the officer who came in the morning to take possession of the place. I then went back with him into the wharf; this was about ten o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were these seized spirits - A. Yes; they had been seized by the Crown; but I cannot say whether they had been tried and undergone a legal condemnation.

BOYD SYLVESTER . The prisoner told me had taken this liquor - he said his mother and cousin were in the country, and his cousin had been lately put to bed - he said there was some brandy and some gin, but very little; one small bladder, and one rather bigger, which he meant to send them.

GUILTY. Aged 47.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240603-218

1033. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , one load of hay, value 5 l. , the goods of Joshua Wright .

JOSHUA WRIGHT . I live at Enfield. On the 13th of May I sent William Date to London, with this load of hay. I found him again at the Basing-house, Kingsland-road, with the prisoner - he said that was the man who bought it of him. I asked the prisoner for the money - he said he had not got it, but he would pay me all he had, which was 2 l., and he now owes me 3 l. 16 s. I took the 2 l., and sent for an officer, who took him. I found 1 l. in his left shoe, and 6 d. in his right shoe.

WILLIAM DATE . I sold the hay to the prisoner. He asked what I wanted for it - I said 5 l. 18 s., and he said it was too much - he came again to say he would give me 5 l. 16 s., which I agreed to, and went with him to unload the hay - we unloaded it, and carried it into the house. I asked him for the money - he said he had not got it all, and asked me to go with him to get the rest of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-219

1034. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 11 s. the goods of William Kerby .

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am an apprentice to Mr. Kerby, who lives in High-street, Poplar . I remember the prisoner coming to the shop on the 30th of April. I went out, and he was running away with another man - he had a blue apron on, and was holding it up, as if something was in it. I saw him throw the prints out of his apron. I was close to him, and saw him drop them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The man who took me asked me if I had got any handkerchiefs - I said No - he knocked me down, and cut me in the eye - he then told me I might go about my business.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-220

1035. JAMES GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a watch, value 20 s.; a key, value 6 d., and two sovereigns, the property of Charles Clark , from his person .

CHARLES CLARK . On the 10th of May, about six o'clock in the morning. I was drinking at the Two Sawyers public-house . I saw the prisoner there, and asked him to drink - I was a little the worse for liquor - the landlord advised me to go and lay down - I did so - I had a watch, some sovereigns, and some silver - when I awoke I began to feel my pockets - my watch was gone, and also two sovereigns.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the watch and seal to take care of - A. He denied that to me. I said I had lost my watch and money, and he was sent for, but he denied it and said, I had given him 1 s. I asked if he had got it - he denied it.

ROBERT PEARSON . I was at the Two Sawyers public-house - Clark was fresh in liquor, and the prisoner was with him. I went there again in the evening, and Clark said he had been robbed. I said nothing then; but when the prisoner came to my stable, I asked him what he had done with the watch - he said he brought it down stairs, and given it to Mr. Bingley, the landlord.

WILLIAM CURTIS WALKER . I was at the Two Sawyers on the 10th of May, and saw the prosecutor with three sovereigns, some silver and halfpence. - he put into in his waistcoat pocket - the prisoner was a friend of his - I saw them go out of the box, but not go up-stairs.

Prisoner. When I was coming out of the house with the watch in my hand he asked me for it - Witness. I did; I thought it was the watch of the prosecutor, and he refused, and went away from me directly - the watch was in his pocket - I was standing at the corner of the street, about one hundred yards from the Two Sawyers - I first mentioned to him about giving it to me, and he would not.

MARY PATTERSON . I keep the General Townshend public-house. On this day the prisoner came in, and called for a pint of beer. He brought the watch to me at the

bar, and told me to take care of it till the evening - he had not been gone ten minutes before the constable came, and asked if I had a watch. I know the prisoner by sight very well - he is a helper in the stables.

HENRY STORY . I am the constable - I went in pursuit of the prisoner - I asked him what he had done with the watch - he said he knew nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I went up stairs with the prosecutor, he said,

"Here Bill, take care of my watch," and I put it into my pocket; and at night two young chaps asked me to have some beer, and I gave the watch to the landlady for fear I should lose it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-221

1036. JOHN SHELMERDINE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , three quarts of Geneva, value 10 s. , the goods of our Sovereign Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Lord George Seymour and others, Commissioners of Excise .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to other persons.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RODMELL . I am an Excise watchman. I was employed on the 1st of June as watchman at the Excise distillery, in St. Catherine's ; I was relieved at twelve o'clock at night by the prisoner - we watch six hours at a time. It was my duty to return again at seven o'clock in the morning - I did so, and found him at his post; I went up the yard, and he came out of the gate - I had not taken particular notice of him; he had nothing in his hand that I saw, but when he had got out I saw a bundle under his arm; it looked bulky; it was a bundle, but I cannot say whether it was in a handkerchief, as I have but a bad sight.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does this distillery belong to the Excise - A. Yes; nobody else keeps anything in it to my knowledge. I could see that he had something under his arm when he was in East Smithfield; there are very few persons in the streets at that time in the morning. There is a boundary fence and a lodge; there is nobody there but the watchmen. I was up the yard when he went out.

DANIEL BLIGH . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 2d of June I was in Lower East Smithfield, with Howard and Stevenson, going towards the Excise distillery; the prisoner was coming towards me, in a direction from the distillery - he had a handkerchief, and something tied up in it; he passed me; I immediately turned round and said,

"I am an officer, what have you got there?" he said,

"I am an officer also; you have no business to stop me." I touched him, and felt something in the left breast pocket of his coat. I said,

"You must stop." I gave the parcel to Stevenson, who was with me. He said,

"Take the things, and for God's sake let me go, it will be the ruin of me." I took him to the office - he said several times,

"Let me go," and that he would give me all the money he had in his pocket. I searched him, and found bottles in his breast, a bottle in each side pocket of his coat, and three bottles in the handkerchief, containing altogether about three quarts of liquor. The bottles were wrapped up in a towel, and a night-cap and the handkerchief tied over all. I asked how he got them - he said,

"Don't ask me anything about them, but take them and let me go; you don't want to know my name, that is of no use to you." I drew the cork, and said I thought it was whiskey - he said,

"It is only British spirits." I found afterwards that it was Hollands.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the necks of the bottles out of the handkerchief - A. No. He was about one hundred yards the Excise distillery. I was twice examined at the Police office; I did not then say so much as I have now - there was about two hours between the two examinations - the first was very short; the Magistrates asked me if I knew much about him - I said the other officer knew most. I had not ascertained then that these spirits were 2 per cent. lower than the bulk. When he said it was British spirits he might have told the truth for what I know.

MR. LAW. Q. Is it easy to reduce the strength of spirits - A. Yes; the officer said various causes would make a difference in the quality; changing it out of the bulk, or the beat of the sun, would make a difference.

WILLIAM HURST . I am senior inspector of the Excise watchman. The prisoner was an established Excise watchman; his duty was to watch these premises. On the 2d of June I went to the office, and saw him sitting in a small room there - I asked what brought him there; he said the officer, for taking some gin from the distillery; I said,

"Have you been plundering the casks" - he said, No - it was stowed away in different parts of the yard, and he took it away. I told him I had but one duty to perform - I thought he was going to say something, but I did not hear him. I represented this to the board.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not say he was going to take it to the Excise-office, and was stopped - A. No. He bore a very good character.

Q. Does it ever happen that persons bring samples in these bottles, and they are left behind - A. Not that I ever saw or heard of. I am not acquainted with the nature and strength of spirits.

JOHN WATERS . I have tasted the contents of one of these bottles, and of one of the casks at the distillery, and compared them - they are of a similar quality; it is what we call foreign Geneva, condemned under the Revenue laws. I had tried the strength of the vats, and this sample also - the greatest variation was 2 1/2 per cent.; the lowest was 7-10ths of 1 per cent. lower than the lowest of the puncheons. The prisoner had access to seventy-nine puncheons, which were in the yard on the night of the 1st of June. The increase of the temperature would make a difference in the spirits; the better the spirits the weaker it appears. I consider that it had come from the puncheons, but was a little reduced in strength.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you tasted this in a public-house, should you have said it was the same quality - A. I do not know that I should. The spirits might have been got out by knocking out a bung; each vat is locked up by a spirit lock; he could get into the warehouse. We try the spirits by an hydrometer - I tried these spirits at the office at the same time, by pouring it into a tube. The temperature would not be the same in them as in the puncheons, because it would take two or three hours for them to get the same temperature.

MR. LAW. Q. Where were these casks - A. In the yard. The cocks of the vats were locked.

COURT. Q. Could there have been 2 1/2 per cent. difference in the quality of the spirits and those in the casks, unless something had been put to them - A. Certainly not; I consider that water had been put to them.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am an Excise inspector. I went on duty at this distillery on the 2d of June in the morning, and saw the prisoner that morning about half-past six o'clock - he came from the lodge, and opened the door to me - he appeared to be on duty; he was alone - I went into the yard, and saw a great number of casks - they appeared to be full - they had bungs in them - I should think it not easy to move them without making a noise - if the bung cloths had been left in, it might have been done.

JOHN WATERS re-examined. Part of the bungs were shived off, ready for exportation, and part of them had the cloths on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the spirits in the distillery - I did not steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-222

1036. JOHN MUNT and WILLIAM SALTER were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , a shawl, value 2 s., the goods of James Gorman , from the person of Catherine Gorman .

JAMES METTAM . I live in Margaret-street, Spafields . On the night of the 4th of May I was putting up my shopshutters, about half-past ten o'clock. I heard the screams of a girl, and saw two persons running away - I do not know who they were - I never saw them before - I went to her assistance - they ran down a mews, and could not get out for a wall - one of them was stooping down, and the other had jumped over the wall, and was taken in a garden, with the shawl about a yard from him - the other one had been taken first - it was the prisoners.

CATHARINE GORMAN . I am not quite nine years old . On the 4th of May I saw the two prisoners together - they asked me for a pin - I said I had not one, but I found one in my frock, and gave it to them. I had a basket, and some bread, tea, and sugar; my shawl blew up, and one of them said

"Put the shawl on her;" the other did so, I thanked him, and then they ran after me and took it off, and ran down a gentleman's garden. I was crying for my shawl.

Prisoner MUNT. Q. Did you see me take the shawl off your back - A. Both of them took it off - they were behind me.

JOHN CALLENDER . I live in Margaret-street; hearing the cries of this little girl, I ran out and saw two neighbours running round a corner - I went to see what was the matter - I found Munt in the corner of the mews, and Salter in the corner of my garden - he was quite doubled up in the corner - the shawl was picked up beside him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SALTER'S Defence. I did not see the shawl, but when I put it on her shoulder.

MUNT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

SALTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-223

1037. JOHN HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , two sides of bacon, value 4 l.; 121 lbs. of other bacon, value 4 l.; two firkins of butter, value 5 l.; 120 lbs. of other butter, value 4 l.; a cheese, value 40 s., and 53 lbs. of other cheese , the goods of William Tipping .

JAMES WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Tipping; he lives in the Borough. On the 9th of April the prisoner called at our shop, he was then dressed in a brown coat, a red handkerchief over his eyes, and a white apron; he looked out two tubs of butter, two sides of bacon, and a Cheshire cheese; the amount of the bill was 9 l. 12 s. 2 d. He said his name was William Hall, 10, North-street, City-road; there was to be 1 s. taken off for ready money, and I was to be there by half-past six o'clock, he wished to have them earlier; I was to have the money when I went; he was a stranger to me; Mr. Tipping was at home and saw him; the goods were delivered to Harrow, the carman - I gave him the direction, and told him to bring back all the goods or all the money; this was the prisoner's own proposal; I had taken the direction in writing, and made him spell it; I entered the goods in the name of Hall.

JAMES HARROW . I am carman to Mr. Tipping; I carried these articles to No. 10, North-street, City-road; when I got there I went by the house, and stopped to look at the direction; and the prisoner called out to me,

"Young man, this is the house." I pulled the cart round, and gave him the goods; I think it was a green-grocer's shop; he took the two tubs of butter and put them in the passage; I gave him the cheese and the bacon, and they were taken into the cellar - he asked if I had got any thin cheese - I said No - he said he was sorry, as he looked three out - I said that was impossible, as he took the bill before he left the shop - he then asked if I had any objection to copper; I said No - he said some people had great objection to it - I said I had none, as I had the horse and cart - he said he dealt with many publicans who paid him in copper - he gave me eighteen papers, five sovereigns, and some silver; I put the copper in my cart and came away - I did not discover what I had got till I got home; then I found it was lead - my master and I went back immediately, and he was gone - it was at the house of one Mr. Morell.

The papers were produced and shown to the Jury, which contained pieces of lead of the shape and size of pence and halfpence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-224

1038. SARAH AYRE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of January , a yard of silk, value 7 s.; three-quarters of a yard of Tulle, value 4 s.; half a yard of crape, value 2 s.; three-quarters of a yard of woollen cloth, value 15 s.; three yards of lace, value 9 s., and a yard of muslin, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Lees , by an evil disposed person, then lately before stolen, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-225

1039. ROBERT ARCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , a pair of shoes, value 4 s., and a comforter, value 1 s., the goods of John French ; a book, value 1 s., the goods of Morris Livesly ; a book, value 3 s., the goods of John Rasch ; a book, value 1 s., the goods of Alexander Riley ; and a book, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Harrison .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to the Rev. George Nicholas , the Rev. George Frederick Nicholas , and Francis Nicholas .

MR. FRANCIS NICHOLAS . I keep a seminary , in partnership with the Rev. George Frederick and George Nicholas - the prisoner was in our regular employ - he was to clean shoes and other things - in consequence of some suspicion, I obtained a search-warrant, and searched his lodgings - he was not then present - I found a book and a pair of shoes, which I could identify - he was afterwards taken at my door - he wished to know what he was apprehended for, and I told him he might hear that before the Magistrate.

BENJAMIN SPITTLE . I am a constable - I found all this property at the prisoner's lodging.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The pumps were brought me by Harrison - he said he had got Smale's pumps, because he was going out dancing - they were throwing about for two months - I took them over to the shoe-maker's and had them mended, and took them to my lodgings; the comforter was given me by Mead, and two waistcoats - the red covered book was thrown into my place - I had no intention of keeping it, but having so many leisure hours, I thought I would read them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-226

1040. CORNELIUS CHRISTIAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , twenty-six yards of linen, value 50 s. , the goods of Charles Lintot .

CHARLES LINTOT . I am a linendraper ; I lived at Hammersmith, and was removing to Clare-street, Clare-market; I saw the prisoner cleaning his horse in the next place, and asked him to assist us - there were a great many drapery goods about; and in consequence of information I took two officers to find his lodgings, but we could find nothing that I could identify; I went the next morning to the stable and found a piece of paper that the Irish had been enclosed in - three trusses I had had all been opened - I cannot tell what was missing, but some Irish cloth was missing - I found it at Bow-street - it has my private mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you had sold the cloth that morning, you would not have rubbed that mark off, should you - A. Certainly not. These goods were in a loft which was open I suppose to many other persons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH OTTERWAY . I am a watchman, and was going my rounds last Thursday, and met the prisoner in Oxford-street with this piece of cloth concealed under his jacket. I asked what he had got - he said,

"What is that to you;" I said,

"I am an officer, and insist upon knowing;" - he then showed me the cloth. I asked him where he got it; he said from his own house; that he had bought it in Clare-market. I asked what he gave for it - he said 1 s. 8 d. I told him to come back, and when we got to the end of Clare-market he started, but was afterwards taken.

GUILTY - Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-227

1041. WILLIAM GREENFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , four bushels of oats, value 12 s. , the goods of John Benkinsop and John Spurgeon .

JOHN SPURGEON . I keep a livery-stable near Hanover-square, and am in partnership with John Benkinsop ; on Thursday, the 6th of May, the prisoner brought a cart load of oats to the stables - he should have brought twenty sacks - he had a man from a coal-waggon with him. I was backwards and forwards; but after I had seen two sacks shot I went away for some little time. He asked me to count the empty sacks, but I had not time. I saw some oats, which appeared to be of the same quality, at Mrs. Catharine's, in the Mews, and brought a sample back with me.

JANE SPURGEON . I am the wife of the last witness; the prisoner brought some oats - my husband called me, and I went to see them shot. I saw sixteen sacks shot - my husband came back just as Greenfield had done shooting them, and he asked him to stop and see the sacks counted, which he could not do. I had remarked when he came to the fourth or fifth sack, that he put down two sacks instead of one. I was in a loft where he could not see me. I staid there all the time; there could not be more than nineteen sacks delivered at any rate; when he went away, there was a sack of oats lying in the cart, and the others over it - while the men were gone into the public-house, I went to the cart, and saw the oats - they drove the cart, to Mrs. Catharine's, in London-mews. I saw it stop there and turn round. I do not think they saw me at all.

WILLIAM BULL . The prisoner was in my employ. On the 6th of May, I carted ten quarters, or twenty sacks of oats, from St. Andrew's wharf.

JOHN STAPLES. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of May at Mr. Bulls. I said I took him for some oats; he said,

"What oats" - I said,

"Those delivered at Mrs. Catharine's" - he said, he knew no such person. I said,

"Mrs. Catharine, of Howland-mews;" - he said,

"Mrs. Catharine, of London-mews." I then said,

"What oats were they you delivered to her on Thursday;" - he said,

"I brought some oats for her from a waggon in Drury-lane;" that she had commissioned him to do so; I went to Mrs. Catharine's, and Mr. Spurgeon claimed them.

MARY CATHARINE . I live in London-mews, and am a stable-keeper. I know the prisoner. I bought some oats of him on the 6th of May; between eight and nine o'clock he shot them into a sack of mine; I gave him 12 s., for them - Mr. Spurgeon came afterwards, and got some of them away.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-228

1042. THOMAS PAVIOR was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 40 lbs. of lead, value 7 s., the goods of the Dean and Chapter of the Collegiate Church of St. Peter, in Westminster , and fixed to the said church .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

CHARLES GREEN . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I met the prisoner on the 20th of May, coming down King-street, Westminster, carrying something weighty in a white cloth under his arm. I asked him where he got it - he said, it was a cistern; I took him to a public-house, and he there said,

"I will tell you the truth; I am employed as a mason's labourer at Poet's-corner, Westminster-abbey, and this was thrown down to me to go and sell it." I left the lead in the house, and took him into custody.

ALEXANDER MITCHEL. I unrolled the lead; it was measured; and we went to the top of the abbey - it corresponded exactly - there was a piece of solder which was cut from the abbey by Scott, and compared with the other which was taken from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. They were pulling the whole wall down; this was hanging down; I found it, and took it away.

GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240603-229

1043. THOMAS THOMPSON and WILLIAM WELLINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , a copper boiler, value 12 s.; two pieces of iron railing, value 14 s.; an iron bar, value 1 s.; a dresser, value 8 s.; a plate-rack, value 2 s.; a stove, value 14 s.; a cupboard, value 5 s.; three drawers, value 6 s.; a furnace-door, value 1 s., and a brass cock, value 1 s. , the goods of John Ianson Fyler , Thomas Ratcliff Fyler , Thomas Champness Fyler , George Townsend , and George Ramsey Rodd .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to a person unknown.

JOHN CHATWOOD . I am a chemist, and live in Gravel-lane; there are some premises next to me belonging to Messrs. Fyler - I had the key for letting the house. On the 24th of March the articles stated in the indictment were all safe; Thompson took possession of the house adjoining; this house is No. 145, and Thompson's is 145 1/2; I was occasionally there, but did not miss any thing till the 24th of April, when I missed the articles stated in the indictment. On Tuesday the 27th I went to Wellington's shop, and saw the copper boiler which had been in the parlour. I saw Wellington there. I found an aperture, four feet high, cut from Thompson's kitchen to the unoccupied house. I went with the warrant to Wellington's shop, and took the copper - it was the same which had been in the parlour; in the room passing through the shop we saw the cupboard, and we found all the articles except the stove - there was no appearance of the doors or windows having been forced. Thompson lives a quarter of a mile from Wellington, who is Thompson's father-in-law.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a constable. I went to Thompson's house on the 27th of May, and said,

"I have a warrant to search your house; the next house has been robbed, and the things are suspected to have been carried through your house; he said

"They may be, but I know nothing about it." I went in, and found the aperture very badly nailed up. I was going up stairs, but he said,

"You need not go up, there is no bed; I sleep with my father in Ratcliff-highway." As we were going to Wellington's I said,

"Shall we find the square copper boiler there;" he said,

"I don't think you will." I then said,

"Is it not exposed for sale on your father's counter;" he said,

"My father has a square copper boiler for sale." I went to the house; the copper boiler was on the counter; I asked the price of it; he said 15 s.; I said,

"Of whom did you buy it;" he said he did not know the man. I asked what he gave for it; he said he had bought it some time, and could not say when; Wellington then said, he was not master of his house, but that it had been brought in by somebody

ANN CHATWOOD . I am the wife of Mr. Chatwood. I saw Thompson going out of the house one night with something like a door or a shutter - he lived at his shop, but went away of an evening.

THOMPSON'S Defence. My father-in-law took this shop for me, where I go in the day-time, but sleep at home. The houses at the back of the premises are in a very dilapidated state, so that any person might get to the back of the house, and commit the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240603-230

1044. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 70 lbs. of lead, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Pars Edwards , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to fixed to a building of his.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I live in Manchester-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 24th of April I heard of some lead having been stolen from a house belonging to my father, Thomas Pars Edwards , at No. 96, Great Portland-street , which had been empty a short time; we went there, and found some lead was stolen from over the back parlour; we compared the lead produced with what was left; it exactly corresponded as far as it went, but there was much more gone.

JOSEPH WAREMAN . I am a watchman. On the 23d of April, at two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with this piece of lead - I called to him - he quickened his pace, and threw it down at the corner of a street - I sprung my rattle, and pursued him.

JAMES PERRY . I heard the rattle sprung, and assisted in taking the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Paddington. On my return, passing near Portland-chapel, I found this lead laying on the ground; I took it up, and being seen by the watchman, I threw it down and ran away; another piece of lead was found the same night by the watchman - I hope the Court will believe it was so with mine.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240603-231

1045. EDITH PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , four sovereigns, the monies of William Casey , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240603-232

1046. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , a watch, value 20 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; a seal, value 2 s., and a key, value 1 s., the goods of William Hutchinson , from his person .

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . I am a carpenter , and live at Battle-bridge. I was going home on the 2d of June, and met the prisoner; she asked me for some beer; we walked on together, and between there and the new bridge I missed my watch; I accused her with it; she denied it; I told her it was no use denying it, for she should not go till an officer came; Brown came up and took her; I found it in her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. He was to have given me 2 s.; he gave me one, and then gave me the watch till he got the other; he was not sober.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240603-233

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1047. JOHN HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a waistcoat, value 6 d.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; a pair of boots, value 1 s., and 108 penny-pieces, the property of William M'Gee , from his person .

WILLIAM M'GEE (a blind man ,) I get my living by selling laces about the streets . On the 11th of April I lodged with Carrigan, in George-yard, Whitechapel - I was only a nightly lodger. I went to bed between 12 and 1 o'clock - there was no person in the room but me, and the man who has just spoken (the prisoner.) I had a pair of trowsers, a waistcoat, a pair of boots, and some penny-pieces in the inside pocket of this waistcoat. I pulled off my clothes, and put the waistcoat between the bed and sacking - the other clothes I left quite careless about the room. I awoke about seven o'clock I believe, to the best of my knowledge - I felt about before I made any alarm, as I could not see, and did not wish to accuse any one wrongfully - I first missed my boots, and then my other things - I have got my property since - the prisoner slept in the same bed with me - I know him by his voice.

MARY CARRIGAN . I am the wife of Michael Carrigan ; we live in George-yard, and take in persons to lodge for the night. I remember the poor blind man coming to lodge there on the night of the 10th of April; the prisoner came before the blind man - they both had the same bed. I recollect the prisoner left a porter's knot, because he had no money, as he stated - he was to pay 4 d. for his lodging - the blind man got up about seven o'clock next morning, and said he had been robbed of his clothes and money. The prisoner was gone - I do not know how he went; he had no money the night before, and left the knot as security, but he has never called for it from that time to this.

Prisoner. I never saw this person in my life - Witness. I am sure he is the man.

MARY M'GEE. I am the wife of the blind man - I did not sleep with him on this night, but I know that he slept there; he used the house. He had a pair of trowsers, a waistcoat, and some money. I saw the prisoner with them on the 15th of April, when he was in custody; he had my husband's trowsers on, but nothing else; they were my husband's trowsers - I looked at them, and knew them to be my husband's.

Prisoner. Q. Were there any pieces in the pockets - A. Yes; I put them in myself.

SARAH FRANCIS . I live at No. 9, Anchor-street, Rosemary-lane. The prisoner came to lodge at my house on the 10th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock; I refused to take him in. He offered a porter's knot. He went away - he said he had been working all the week, and his master would not pay him till Saturday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HALL . The prisoner was given into my charge. The prosecutor's wife came and identified the trowsers; they were taken off, in my presence, in Newgate.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the trowsers in Petticoat-lane; I am in the habit of buying these things, and translating them for shops. These I bought a month after Christmas, with some other things, which I have at home now.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-234

1048. CATHERINE ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a bed, value 10 s.; a bolster, value 3 s.; a table, value 3 s.; two chairs, value 1 s.; a saucepan, value 1 s.; a tea-kettle, value 1 s.; a spoon, value 1 d.; a plate, value 1 d.; a tea-board, value 6 d., and a fender, value 1 d., the goods of Bernard Gready , in a lodging-room .

ANN GREADY . My husband's name is Bernard - we live in Vine-street, Westminster . The prisoner came to lodge with me about the first week in May; she hired the kitchen only, at 3 s. 6 d. a-week. I let her the articles stated in the indictment with the lodging. She left (without giving warning) before the week expired, and took the key away - we got into the room in about two days, and missed these articles, and others; I found them at her lodgings, in Upper Marsh, Marsh-gate. I found her there, and all the property. She walked over the bridge with me, and I sent for Mr. Patmore to take her up.

ELIZABETH WHITE. I am the wife of Michael White , and live at Marsh-gate. The prisoner came to lodge with me about three weeks and three days ago; she took an unfurnished garret, by the name of Godfrey, and brought this furniture there.

WILLIAM PATMORE . I am an officer. Mrs. Gready sent for me to take the prisoner into custody. I have had the property ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240603-235

1049. JOSEPH LEE and CORNELIUS LYNCH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a hat, value 9 s., and a cap, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Savage .

CHARLES SAVAGE . I live with Thomas Savage - he is a hosier , at No. 98, Grafton-street . On the evening of the 1st of May, about nine o'clock, a woman said two boys had run away with a hat - I saw the two prisoners carrying a hat, and running away together, about fifty yards from the house. I pursued them; they turned round Windmill-street, and dropped the hat - I took them both myself. They denied any knowledge of the hat. I gave them both in charge. We had missed a cap on the same day.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer, and took the prisoners, and found this cap on Lynch's head - he had no hat.

LYNCH'S Defence. I met this boy, and asked which was my way, and while we were talking the man came, and seized us. I had not seen the hat. I bought the cap ten days before.

LEE'S Defence. I was walking by the gateway, and the officer seized me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

LYNCH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240603-236

1050. RICHARD LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , three live tame fowls, price 6 s. , the property of Joseph Cable .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a watchman of Clerkenwell. On the 19th of May, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with something in a bag under his arm, in Arlington-street - I spoke to him - he threw it down and ran off. I turned my rattle, and my brother watchman brought him back in about five minutes. A dead fowl was in the bag; he had another fowl in his hat, and had dropped one.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a watchman of Clerkenwell. I was with Davis, and pursued the prisoner, and overtook him about one hundred yards from Davis - he dropped a dead fowl from under his coat in coming back. I have shown the fowls to the prosecutor, who claims them as his.

JOSEPH CABLE . I live at No. 5, William-street, Spafields , about two or three hundred yards from where the prisoner was taken. I kept five fowls in my area - they were all safe at half-past eleven o'clock when I went to bed, but three of them were gone in the morning. The watchman shewed them to me at Hatton-garden, and to the best of my belief they were mine - I swore to them They were all cut on the left wing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the fields, and found a bag with the fowls near it - I took them up, and was going along when that gentleman stopped me.