Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th April 1824.
Reference Number: 18240407
Reference Number: f18240407-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On WEDNESDAY, 7th of APRIL, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albron Cox , Esq.; John Key , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Algar ,

Charles Edwards ,

Thomas Morren ,

Robert Howard ,

James Gann ,

Barnard Barry Henington ,

Nicholas Stone ,

Richard Platt ,

John Holmes ,

Samuel Langs ,

William Taylor ,

Samuel Hardwick .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Ovid Topham ,

William Bailey ,

Edmund Gardener ,

William Sadler ,

Richard Bailey ,

John Jenkinson ,

William Joslyn ,

Thomas Fullham ,

Jonathan Hinks ,

James Cranmer ,

James Edward Shaw ,

Thomas Smith .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

James Gibson ,

William Robins ,

William Peck ,

Rowland Thomas ,

William Purkis ,

Robert Hennessy ,

Thomas Cook ,

William Wilson ,

Thomas Walker ,

James Redman ,

Thomas Cotterell ,

Richard Colly .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 7, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240407-1

608. THOMAS BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a shawl, value 6 s. the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

CHARLES CRUISE . I am shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , linen-drapers , Long-acre . On the 27th of January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was behind the counter, near the door, and saw a shawl fall, which had hung on a bar. I got over the counter to pick it up, and Wilson gave me information - I sent a person in pursuit.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am thirteen years old. I was in Long-acre with Hemmings, a few doors from this shop, and saw the prisoner with another boy - I knew them before; the other turned down Langley-street - Barrett remained in Long-acre; I saw him snatch a shawl from the prosecutor's door - he twisted it round his arm, and ran down Langley-street with it. I told Cruise, who sent a person after him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM HEMMINGS . I am eleven years old, and was with Wilson, and saw the prisoner, whom I knew before - I saw him snatch the shawl from the door, twist it round his arm, and run down Langley-street. Somebody followed him, but he got off.

SAMUEL TURNER . I am an officer. On the 10th of February, I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home at the time.

WILLIAM WILSON re-examined. I knew him before; I had seen him about Castle-street, tossing halfpence. There was a light in the shop. I am certain of his person, and mentioned his name to Cruise.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-2

Before Mr. Justice Best.

609. JOHN FREDERICK CREES and ELIZABETH HARRIOT , HIS WIFE , alias ELIZABETH HARRIOT CREES , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , at St. Mary-le-bone , a diamond cross, value 150 l.; a pair of diamond ear-rings, value 30 l.; two diamond rings, value 30 l.; a diamond locket, value 30 l.; a shawl, value 5 s.; a muslin dress, value 3 l.; six yards of muslin, value 5 l.; a watch, value 10 l.; a lace dress, value 1 l.; a lace veil, value 1 l.; five yards of lace, value 5 l.; sixty silver spoons, value 30 l.; two silver cannisters, value 10 l.; a silver sugar dish, value 5 l.; a fish knife, value 30 s.; two pairs of silver tongs, value 2 l.; five ladles, value 5 l.; two silver castor frames, and two sets of castors, value 10 l.; a silver saucepan, value 30 s.; eighteen silver forks, value 18 l.; three knives, value 10 s.; twelve tablecloths, value 10 l.; thirty napkins, value 5 l., and twelve sheets, value 5 l., the goods of Sarah Christiana Keighly , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

CAPTAIN THOMAS KEIGHLY . My mother-in-law's name is Sarah Christiana Keighly - she lives at No. 16, Harley-street, Cavendish-square , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, and keeps the house - she has lived there seven years. I have known the female prisoner in her service for the last seventeen years - she was confidentially entrusted. My mother was possessed of a quantity of plate and jewellery. The female prisoner has been married about four or five years. I know some of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did she hear the character of a strictly honest person - A. Yes; we had every confidence in her. I did not reside in the house.

MRS. SARAH CHRISTIANA KEIGHLY . I am a widow. The female prisoner has lived sixteen or seventeen years with me. I missed my property in October last, from a room adjoining my bed-room, and communicating with a room where she and her husband slept - she has been married to the other prisoner six years, and he lived in the house with my permission; I gave him leave to occupy one of the parlours, and he always kept it locked, which I thought a great liberty. I do not think that I saw him above four or five times. When I left town for my health, I put my jewels into a small deal box, which I put in my portfolio, and when I was in town, they were kept in a drawer in the middle room. I saw them last about July twelve months - I had seen the box often after that. When I missed them, which was in October last, I called the female prisoner up, and interrogated her - I asked her how they could be taken, and said I supposed somebody must have false keys; but I had such confidence in her, I did not suspect her. I then thought proper to look after my plate, which was kept in the same room - I opened the closet and the plate drawer, and found the paper it had been in, but all the plate was gone - she said she wished she had her health, for she would go and seek after them. She remained in the house a very few days after this; I had given them warning to leave, but they left suddenly before the notice expired, and without giving me any intimation.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The communication you made for them to leave, was by writing the man a note - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not expect that they were going, in consequence

of some communication made to you - A. No; on the contrary, when I was going to bed I sent to enquire for her. I had not seen my jewels for a year and a quarter - I had seen the plate frequently, whenever I went to the drawer, but never opened it; I might not have gone to the drawer for three or four months. I have no butler. I keep the key of the plate myself, and the female prisoner went for it when I wanted it. I very seldom saw the man, but can speak positively to his person. I spoke to the female prisoner about the parlour door being locked, and remonstrated with her about it from the very first of his coming, and continually afterwards, but not latterly. I cannot say when I last remonstrated about it, I did it so frequently.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The female prisoner has been many years in your service - A. Yes, and deserved the character of a very honest person. I missed nothing previous to her marriage. The property was deposited in a room, next to that they occupied, and they had to pass through it. I believe the male prisoner was scarcely ever out of the house. She was particularly under his influence and controul; there were dreadful disturbances in the house. I have begged him to leave the house frequently - his usage to her was barbarous. I missed my keys on one occasion, and they were found in the parlour, which he kept locked; they were the keys which I had occasionally entrusted the female prisoner with - I used to put them in my couch, and in the morning when I came down, they were missing - she was in that room every morning.

ELEANOR WALL . In October last. I was employed as washerwoman in the prosecutrix's house; my daughter Margaret was servant there at the time. I can read but very little. I was making the prisoner Elizabeth's bed one day (they sometimes slept separate,) in the front attic, not on the same floor as the prosecutrix; it was when she slept alone. As I made the bed, I saw a dirty petticoat between the bed and mattress, and as I was going to wash, I threw it out, and as I threw it down, I heard papers rattle - curiosity induced me to see what it was; I found the petticoat had a pocket in it, and in it I found two duplicates of property pawned at Dobree's - I took them to my daughter, and gave them to her. The male prisoner never made his appearance in the kitchen till between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, when I was there. On the morning after the duplicates were found, I saw him come down into the kitchen in a flannel jacket, a little after six o'clock. I saw him again on the following morning, at the same time; I was washing, and had some linen of his, and missed it on the third day after I found the duplicates. I had washed it on Tuesday, hung it up on Wednesday and Thursday, and missed it on Friday morning - he had gone away on the Thursday, and on that day he wanted a pair of stockings to put on; I said I had none of his; he said,

"It does not matter, I will take these," which were the prosecutrix's; he took them out of my hand - this was about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning. I said they were Mrs. Keighly's; he said it did not matter; he dined at home that day, and I did not see him after. He gave me no reason to suppose that he was going away. He and the female prisoner dined with us that day, which was not usual; the female prisoner seemed very ill; she was quite frightened and was crying, and was almost in steric fits and said, Oh! Thomas, what have you brought me to" - he said,

"Why do you fret, don't mind Mrs. Keighly, she won't fret for you." About half-past five o'clock, she had her tea, and went out, saying she would not be gone ten minutes, and told my daughter that if she was asked for, to say she was gone to lay down - she never returned.

Q. Had you heard anything from them about any foreign country - A. On the Wednesday night she said to my daughter,

"I must go out, for Thomas has gone and left me;" my daughter said,

"Don't go out to night, it is so wet" - she said,

"I must go, for I miss his passport, he is gone and left me;" she went out, and wanted me to go with her.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. They were both at dinner on Thursday, so that he had not left her - A. No. When I found the duplicates, I told my daughter; there was no other servant in the house. My daughter gave them to the female prisoner on Wednesday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The room the duplicates were found in was more apart from the prosecutrix's bed-room than where they slept - A. Yes.

JONAH PEARCE . I am in the service of Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker, Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. I produce two diamond rings, pawned by the prisoner Elizabeth, on the 25th of June, 1823; also a pair of diamond ear-rings, pawned on the 7th of October, 1822, by a female, in the name of Creed, but I do not know who. I have a diamond cross; I do not know who pawned it, but it was renewed by the female prisoner - 31 l. 12 s. 6 d., was lent on it. I produce a diamond ring, necklace, and sprig, pawned for 25 l.; I do not know who by, but the female prisoner renewed them - also a muslin dress and shawl; I cannot say who pawned them; they were not renewed. I have also a diamond locket, ear-rings, and sprig, pawned by a female, but I do not know who.

COURT. Q. Why did you receive these things without enquiring about them - A. They were pawned before I came into Mr. Baxter's service, all except two of them, but were renewed afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You only speak to two articles - A. I speak of others being renewed. I have been in the service nearly three years. The two articles I took in, were pawned in June, 1823; it was two rings for 7 l. - the other was a pledge for 17 l. I am positive of the woman's person; I have not seen her for the last eight or nine months. I swear positively to her pawning the two rings for 7 l. I know her by a scar in her face. I have seen her at the shop several times in June, and before, but not since.

JOHN BAGULEY . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Oxford-street. I have a gold watch, pawned by the female prisoner, on the 18th of June, 1823, for 4 l., which I consider the intrinsic value of it. I am certain of her.

MRS. KEIGHLY. The cross, necklace, tiara, rings, bracelets, and locket are mine; also the muslin and earrings, and here are some loose pearls; I lost this number, but cannot swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was not the plate kept in a chest under the bed occupied by both the

prisoners - A. Part of it. There were two keys to it - one was kept in the book-case, and the other in the middle room.

MARGARET WALL . I went into the prosecutrix's service the beginning of September last. The male prisoner used to lock himself in the back parlour. I was never in the parlour but once, and then I waited at the door while he opened it; he took his meals down stairs, but by himself, except dinner, which he took with us. When I first went there, he used to come down stairs between ten and eleven o'clock, for a fortnight or three weeks, but afterwards sooner, and sometimes later. I remember my mother bringing me some duplicates, and next morning I saw the female prisoner, and gave them to her, and she seemed very much confused - she put them into her pocket, and said they were some which she had by her; she did not ask how I got them, but a few hours after she asked if I had told my mother that I had the duplicates; I said not, and she told me not to tell her. My mother was washing there on the Tuesday morning. I did not see the male prisoner take anything away, but saw him drying some stockings by the kitchen fire. I dined with them on the day they left; the female prisoner could eat nothing; she was in tears the whole of the time - my mother and myself were at the table with them; she went off into hysterics, and when she came to, the man said how foolish she was to cry - she turned to him, and said she could not help it, that she had to thank him for the whole of it; he said,

"Never mind;" she clapped her hands together, and said,

"What have you brought me to;" he said,

"Why do you fret about Mrs. Keighly, if anything ailed you, she would not fret about you." About four o'clock, while I was taking up dinner, she came and asked if I had seen her husband since dinner - I said I had not; he was not in the house; I had seen him but once after dinner; she was then in conversation with him in the back parlour. She went out about half-past six o'clock; it rained hard - she said a gentleman in High-street owed her some money; that she wanted money very bad, and she would not be gone above ten minutes, and would go to the doctor's in Great Mary-le-bone-street, to get something for her eyes, which were very bad - I begged of her not to go; she said she would, and if mistress asked for her, I was to say she was gone to lay down, and I did so when my mistress asked for her. I was present when the rooms they occupied were opened; there was nothing in them, and nothing in their boxes of any value. There was something wrapped in a letter in the box, with

"Sugar of lead" written on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. It was on Wednesday morning you made the communication to her about the duplicate - A. Yes. They did not leave till Thursday evening. I have heard the man say that he was educated at Brussells, but born in England. I know nothing about his endeavouring to get pupils. He was not in my mistress's service.

Q. Did not the woman complain at dinner that she had had some dispute with her mistress about a turban - A. No; she said she was sorry that she was going, and her husband said, never mind. I cannot swear that she did not say her mistress had found fault with her, but I have no recollection of it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was the male prisoner in the habit of keeping in-doors - A. Yes. While I was there I do not think he went out above twice.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he go out the day before he went away - A. I hear that he was out a good deal.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a Bow-street officer. In consequence of this transaction, I was employed to go to Mrs. Keighly's house. I found nothing in the parlour, and only papers and rubbish in the prisoners' boxes. I had a common warrant, and went to the Hague, but finding my warrant of no use, I returned, and went again in a few days with a Judges' warrant; it was about the middle of February. I went to the Hague, and then to Brussells, and found the female prisoner at a lodging, washing; she seemed very poor indeed; the Commissariat of the Police was there with an interpreter - she asked him what was the matter; they gave no answer, but searched, and found nothing except a book, which was in a box in the room - this was on the 28th of February. She was put into gaol at Brussells; she was brought to Ostend - I then took her to an English Hotel there, and at night I found the male prisoner there, in bed; I asked his name - he said it was Stevens; I asked where he came from; he said from Brussells; I asked if he knew any one at Brussells; he said he knew Simmons, a coach-maker there. I said,

"I am inclined to think your name is Crees;" he said, No, it was Stevens. I desired him to dress, and come down, which he did; it was nearly one o'clock in the morning - I remained with him till daylight, about seven o'clock, and then sent Smith for the woman - he brought her; she went up to him, and said,

"Oh! Thomas;" he then said to me,

"My name is Crees, I am the person you are looking for." I found nothing but his own property. He had a five-franc piece.

The prisoners made no Defence.

J. E. CREES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, being a young man .

ELIZABETH CREES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-3

Before Mr. Justice Best.

610. MARY DEW was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Broad , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of March (no person being therein), and stealing a coat, value 50 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a cloth dress, value 20 s., and a shawl, value 10 d. , his property.

SUSAN BROAD . I am the wife of Edward Broad - we live at No. 24, Market-street, in the parish of St. John Evangelist, Westminster . On the 17th of March, after twelve o'clock in the day, I went out, double locked my door, and put the key into my pocket. I only occupy one room - I left nobody in the room. I returned between seven and eight o'clock, and saw a light through the key-hole, found the door open, and the prisoner's brother (James) sitting in a chair, reading a book; he lived next door, and is about fourteen years old. I looked round, and saw the keys in my bottom drawer, which I had left in the looking-glass drawer. I missed this property from the bottom drawer. Her brother went out. I fetched my husband, and we went to Duck-lane that night, and found the prisoner in Donshoe's lodging; she

asked what I wanted - I said I had been robbed, and as she was in the habit of coming to my place, I suspected her - she said she knew nothing of it. She came home with me, and was very abusive. I found my shawl on her back, and gave charge of her.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What was the shawl worth - A. Tenpence. I have lent it to her several times, three or four times a-week. I said if she would tell me where the things were I would not hurt her - she still denied it.

ELIZA PINFOLD . I live in the same house as Broad; the landlord does not live in the house. The outer door is generally open in the day time. On the 17th of March, I went out about two o'clock; Broad's door seemed fastened then - I returned about four, and saw the prisoner's brother go up stairs to Broad's door; he found it open - he came down, and went out. I went to the prisoner next door, and asked if she knew where Mrs. Broad was gone; she said Yes, and that she would not return before nine o'clock. I and my neighbour made her go up to the room; we could not see that anything was gone; she said the keys were in the bottom drawer; we thought that all was safe, and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. You fetched the prisoner to help look over the house - A. I went to see if she knew where Broad was - I did not leave her alone in the room. I know nothing about her borrowing the shawl; I did not see it on the chair.

ROBERT GREENHILL . I took the prisoner into custody, and took the shawl off her back.

MRS. BROAD. It is mine. I found nothing else. I left the shawl in the middle drawer when I went out.

EDWARD BROAD . When I came home I missed this property; it was worth above 6 l.

Prisoner's Defence. She was in the habit of lending me this shawl - I went into her room, found it on the chair, and took the liberty to use it.

PROSECUTRIX. She had it on her shoulders when I saw her in Duck-lane, but it being dark I did not notice it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-4

Before Mr. Justice Best.

611. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , at St. Anne, Westminster , fifty yards of silk, value 14 l., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , in their dwelling-house .

JAMES RIDGWAY . I am servant to George Drake Sewell , and Thomas Cross , who are linen-drapers , and live in Frith-street, Soho , in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster. On the 27th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, (which is part of the dwelling-house,) between the outer door, and the glass door, and remove a piece of green baize, which was put before a broken square of glass, he then put his hand into the window, and I saw him take hold of this piece of silk; he only got part of it out of the window, but moved it quite from the place where it had laid - he had not moved it more than a foot, but had entirely removed it. I went round by the side door, and on getting near him, I disturbed him - he ran away, and I after him, crying Stop thief! he was stopped without getting out of my sight. The silk is my masters', and the lowest value is 12 l. or 14 l. I can swear that it is worth 10 l.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How was it moved - A. It was pulled straight towards him. I am certain he quite moved the whole of it; whether it was all lifted up I cannot say, but he quite moved the whole of it from where it lay; it was above a yard from the window - his arm was half way within the window. I swear that no part of the silk remained on the spot it previously did - the highest end of it was out of the window. The partners reside in the house alternately, a fortnight each.

JOHN BUCKLEY . I am servant to Mr. Barrell. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him about a hundred yards from the shop.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18240407-5

Before Mr. Justice Best.

612. RICHARD EVANS and JOHN TAYLOR were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Knights , about one o'clock in the night of the 1st of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, an apron, value 3 d.; three bottles of blacking, value 1 s.; a crown piece, sixteen shillings, and the sum of 3 l. 5 s. 11 1/4 d., in copper monies , the property of the said Charles Knights .

CHARLES KNIGHTS . I keep an oil shop , at No. 235, High-street , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the last day of February, I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock - I fastened all the doors myself. I left Mary Anderson , the servant, up. I left about 2 l. 10 s. in halfpence and pence in my desk, tied up in an apron; there was at least 15 s. in silver in the till, consisting of sixpences, shillings, and a crown piece - a bag, containing 7 s. or 8 s. worth of farthings was in or on the desk. I got up about ten minutes past six o'clock on the 1st of March, and received information, went down into the parlour behind the shop, and found that door locked, but a door which opens into the shop from the cellar had the staple wrenched off. I went into the cellar, and found the flap outside, under the window in the yard, had been lifted up, they could get down there, and then into the shop; the flap was down the night before, but I cannot say whether it was fastened; there had been some things on the flap overnight, which were removed in the morning, and there appeared footmarks on the wall. About eleven o'clock that morning I went with Attfield and Garton to Providence-place, Novascotia-gardens, Bethnal-green, and found the prisoners sitting together in the same room; it is a mile and a quarter from my house. The officers said they had come about a robbery, and asked if there was any money in the house which they owned - Evans said there was; they asked if there was any copper; he said Yes, there were ten papers of copper. Garton handed my apron to me. The officers asked if there were any farthings; Evans said Yes, there was, and pointed to a hat-box on the mantle piece in the next room. When we had found all the property, Taylor said,

"You need not go any further, Mr. Knights must know what he has lost." Evans's wife was in the room. My shop door was found open in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Evans said the papers of copper were there - A. Yes. I am not

sure that Taylor said anything about the money - he said I must know what I had lost.

Q. Had you before that said that you had found all you missed - A. I do not recollect saying so.

MARY ANDERSON . I am servant to Mr. Knights. On the night of the robbery I went to bed about twelve o'clock; everything was safe then. I did not go into the shop that night. I got up about half-past six o'clock; my master was up first. I went into the yard, and some things which were on the cellar flap the night before were moved off, and put into the yard - the flap was down as it was the night before; it has a fastening, but I cannot say whether it was fastened.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable. I examined the prosecutor's premises, and saw chips on the wall, as if it had been done by the toes of a person getting over. I went with Mr. Knights to No. 5, Providence-place - the prisoners and Evans's wife were sitting by the fire-side, drinking rum; Mr. Knights gave them in charge on suspicion of robbing his house. I searched Taylor, and found a crown piece, 11 s. 6 d. in silver, and 1 s. 5 d. in copper; the prosecutor produced a bottle of blacking from the mantle piece or the table. Garton and the prosecutor looked round, and handed me two more bottles of blacking. I went into the adjoining room, and behind a door-way found ten 5 s. papers of copper on the window-ledge, and under the bed I found 6 s. 9 1/2 d. in copper, in a basket. I found a crow-bar in the room. The prisoners were tied together - Garton asked them if there were any farthings, and I think Evans pointed to a band-box over the mantle piece; I went there, and found 6 s. 9 d. in farthings. Garton asked if there was anything else in the house which they owned; Taylor said,

"Mr. Knights ought to know best what he has lost;" Evans said to him,

"Hold your tongue, for it is all my property." I compared the crowbar with some dents in the door post of the cellar; it tallied with them, and with some dents on the desk.

Cross-examined. Q. You know that Evans lives there, and Taylor quite in a different place - A. Taylor lives near our office.

Q. Do you call that a crow-bar - A. It is called a jemmy, and is used for breaking open small drawers or boxes.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I was present with Attfield, and searched Evans; I found four shillings and a sixpence in his right-hand breeches pocket, and 3 s. 1 d. in copper in his other pocket - I asked him if there was any more money in the house belonging to him; he said, Yes, there were some 5 s. papers of copper, and shewed me where they were; Attfield found ten papers. Evans had the apron on his person. I found two bottles of blacking on the mantle piece, and in the front room I found 4 s. 7 d. in a tea-caddy. I asked Evans if there were any farthings, and he pointed to the hand-box.

Cross-examined. Q. You know Taylor - A. His father lives close to our office, and is a hard working man. I never heard anything against the son.

CHARLES KNIGHTS . The apron is mine. I lost three bottles of blacking of the same sort as this - Day and Martin's. It was light when I got up.

MARY ANDERSON . I know the apron.

EVANS'S Defence. The money found upon me I received at the East India Docks, for a Newfoundland dog, which I sold for 5 l. The apron is my own.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I know nothing of the money. I had 10 s. on the Friday before, and my father gave me 5 s. on Saturday evening.

CHARLOTTE ROBINSON . On the Monday evening before Taylor was taken up, I paid him 10 s., I believe it was two half-crowns and five shillings, for repairing a double chest of drawer - he is a cabinet maker. I have known him seven years; he bears a good character for what I know. I live in Long-alley.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am the prisoner's father. On the Saturday evening before he was taken, I gave him 5 s. I never kept him without money.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Does he live with you - A. Yes, and was with me till eight or nine o'clock on Monday evening.

COURT. Q. Did he sleep at home - A. I went out, and went to bed when I came home, and do not know.

MARY BUCKLEY . I live in Devonshire-buildings, next door to Taylor's father. Taylor had been doing a few jobs for me on Monday; I owed him 3 s. 6 d., which I paid him on Monday afternoon, in silver.

EVANS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-6

Before Mr. Justice Best.

613. THOMAS PEARSON and GEORGE LOCK were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Pitcairn , about seven o'clock in the night of the 27th of February , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein six wine glasses, value 3 s., and a set of castors, value 3 l. , his property.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HADDOCK . I am servant to Mr. Pitcairn, who lives in Tavistock-place . On the evening of the 27th of February I went on an errand, and returned about half-past six o'clock; it was just dusk; I saw two persons at the door; Pearson was one of them; I cannot speak to the other. Pearson asked me if my master was married, or whether he could see him, or if he was at home. I said he was not. He asked me the name of the street; I said Tavistock-place; he said it was Tavistock-street, and said that must be the place, and then he went up to look at the number, and asked if I lived with master; I said yes. He went away; I rang the bell and was let in, and the door shut. I went down into the kitchen. There were wine-glasses, tumblers, and a pair of silver cruet-stands in the parlour, and a spoon in the cruet. About five minutes after I got down stairs I heard the door shut violently. My aunt, who is the servant, went up, and called to me; I went into the parlour; found the table moved, and the middle door open; the cruet-stand and nine glasses were gone; one wine-glass was much smaller than the others; I have seen some of them since at Bow-street; they correspond in size and pattern; and the spoon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you shut the door yourself - A. No, my aunt did.

COURT. Q. You say it was dusk when you came in, were the lamps lighted - A. I do not think that they were.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. On what day was it? - A. Friday. I have said once that it was Tuesday; I forgot the day, but remember now that I went to the office on Saturday. I am certain of Pearson's person.

ANN PRICE . I am in Mr. William Pitcairn 's service; his house is in the parish of St. Pancras. On the 27th of February I let my nephew in, about half-past six o'clock; it was rather dusk; I do not know whether the lamps were lighted. I shut the door after my nephew, and tried it, and went down stairs; and in about ten minutes, as I was going to tea, I thought I heard footsteps, and said I thought master was coming down stairs; I listened, and heard footsteps again, and as I went up stairs I heard the street-door bang, and on getting into the passage I found the parlour-door open, and the table removed; I missed the castors, which I had seen safe about half-past three o'clock; the spoon was in them; mistress had one wineglass smaller than the rest, which she frequently drank out of; I saw that one at Bow-street.

COURT. Q. Had you a candle when you went up - A. Yes, it was dark enough for candles; my mistress had had candles in the drawing-room for about an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When your nephew came in could you see that it was him when you opened the door - A. Yes; I heard the door bang about ten minutes after; the kitchen stairs are dark.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. On the 27th of February, about a quarter to seven o'clock, I was on duty in Russell-square, with Mason and Dickens; I was not five minutes walk from the prosecutor's; I saw the prisoners coming in a direction from Tavistock-square towards Holborn; I saw them coming along very fast, arm in arm; I turned back after them; they crossed the end of Southampton-row, crossed Russell-square, and at No. 60 in the corner I saw Pearson throw something down the area; I heard it rattle as it fell; he immediately raised up his hand to throw something more away, and I took a large skeleton key out of his hand, and secured him, and in his right-hand waistcoat pocket I found a quantity of phosphorous matches, and in his coat pocket I found one wineglass; he had thrown one glass away before, which was broken. Mason searched Lock, and found a small wineglass in his breeches pocket. Mason brought a silver spoon up from the area, and upon Lock I found another glass. Mason tried the skeleton key to the prosecutor's door, and it opened it. I know that the house is in St. Pancras' parish.

COURT. Q. You saw them about a quarter to seven o'clock, was it dark - A. It was; I should think it had been dark more than a quarter of an hour - the lamps were lighted.

JOHN MASON . I am an officer. I was on duty with Duke and Dickens. I searched Lock, and took a small wine-glass from his right-hand breeches pocket. Duke desired me to go into the area, and I found a silver cruet spoon. I tried the skeleton key to the prosecutor's front door - it opened it. It was dark - the lamps were lighted; I could not find the key without a candle.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I dare say it had been dark half an hour - A. Yes, it had.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It took you some time to search them and handcuff them - A. About five minutes; it was light enough to see a man's face without the gaslight at a quarter past six o'clock.

MR. LAW. Q. How long would it take you to walk from the prosecutor's to where you met them - A. About five minutes. I produce the property.

ANN PRICE . I believe the cruet spoon to be my master's, by its size and appearance; and here is a cruet top; the glasses are such as we had in use, and the smaller one is similar to that my mistress uses; I do not swear to them.

WILLIAM HADDOCK . This cruet top is like my master's, and the wine-glasses - the small one is like that my mistress drank out of; I cannot swear to them.

LOCK'S Defence. The glasses are my property; I bought half a dozen of them the same evening; five were rather larger than one - I had the smaller one to make up the half-dozen.

PEARSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

LOCK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor on account of their youth .

Reference Number: t18240407-7

Before Mr. Justice Best.

614. JOHN THOMAS , THOMAS OAKES , and DANIEL CASTLE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Elliott , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 1st of March , at St. Leonard, Shoredith, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, eight live tame fowls, price, 12 s.; fifteen live tame rabbits, price 20 s., and a bird-cage, value 2 s. , his property.

JAMES ELLIOTT . I live at No. 6, Antelope-gardens, Hollewell-mount, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . I rent the house. On the 1st of March I was the last person up, and went to bed about twelve o'clock - I fastened the doors. I got up at seven o'clock in the morning - it was light then; I found my shed in the yard had been opened - it is enclosed in the same fence as the dwelling-house, and was shut up at night; the fence is a seven-foot rail. I came down stairs and found the door of the dwelling-house tied. I could not open it - it was done to prevent my going into the yard. I broke it away and got into the yard, and found part of the fence broken down, the shed door opened, and the hen roost broken open; the shed had been latched the night before, and there was a secret latch to the hen roost, which was also fastened, eight fowls were gone, and fifteen rabbits. I went and found some of the rabbits in possession of Smith, of Brick-lane, and the cock I found on the Tuesday following in Quaker-street. I found the remainder of the rabbits in possession of Thomas and Oakes, who were in a room in the act of picking two fowls, and one laid in a basket between them, ready picked. I sent for an officer and had them taken. The shed is built of wood, and tiled over - we use it as a washhouse.

ABRAHAM SMITH . I deal in birds, &c. On the 2d of March, Thomas came to me, and asked if I would buy any rabbits - he said he had some does and young ones. I went home with him, and looked at them - I bought a buck and four young ones for 8 s.; I brought them home, and found the prosecutor in my room; he claimed them, and I told him where I had got them.

ELIZABETH ANN ELLIOTT . I am the prosecutor's wife.

I was alarmed about four o'clock in the morning; it was very dark then. I heard something like the pails being broken down, and heard a noise, which I suppose was their tying up the door. I tried to awake my husband, but could not. I got out of bed, heard nothing more, and went to sleep.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 2d of March, I went to Castle's room, No. 2, Gobby's-court Phoenix-street, and found the other prisoners in the room, Castle was not at home. Thomas and Oakes were each picking a fowl, and one laid in a basket before them, and some rabbits were running about the room, and some were in a basket near the bed; I asked how they came by them; they said they found them in a sack near North-green - I cannot say which spoke. I asked if they had a black-bird in a cage; one of them said it was up stairs - the prosecutor went up and brought it down. I took them to the office. I apprehended Castle in bed at that house a fortnight afterwards; I had been there several times, but could not find him before. He said he was sure the boys would state sufficient here to clear him, that he had nothing to do in it himself. I produce the black-bird and cage.

JAMES ELLIOTT . This bird and cage are mine, and were in the shed. Here is a buck rabbit which I found at Smith's; a grey doe found in Castle's room, and six young ones, a buck and four young ones found at Smith's. I locked the yard door, and fastened the shed myself; it is seven feet high.

ELIZABETH ANN ELLIOTT . I produce a rope and iron, which they had fastened the door with. We keep wood, washing tubs, and other things in the shed.

THOMAS's Defence, (written.) I was going to Leather-lane to fetch some window blinds; Oakes was with me - we were crossing North-green, a little after six o'clock in the morning, and saw a rabbit running about the ruins, and went after it - we saw it stop behind some timber, and and saw a sack laying on the ground, with a black-bird and cage; we stopped sometime - nobody came, and we took them home to our lodging. On searching the sack, we found two does and young ones, a buck, and three dead fowls. A neighbour named Benjamin Swan came in, and asked whose they were; we said we had found them; he said he knew a person who would buy them; I went with him to Smith - he came to our lodging, and Swan asked him 5 s. for the buck - he offered 4 s., and 8 d. each for the young ones - Oakes received the money. Castle came in and asked whose they were; we said we had found them - he said if we did not take them out, he would throw them out. Castle went out about five o'clock that morning, and did not return till ten, and did not know that they were on the premises. I pay Castle 1 s. a-week to lodge there, and sleep in the next room to him.

OAKES made precisely the same statement.

CASTLE's Defence. I went to work at five o'clock, and did not return till between ten and eleven o'clock, and desired them to take the things away. They both lodge with me, and sleep in the next room.

ABRAHAM SMITH re-examined. Thomas came and asked if I would buy them; he did not say how he came by them. Castle was in the room when I went there, but did not interfere. Thomas, Oakes, and Swan were the persons who bargained for them.

THOMAS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

OAKES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

CASTLE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-8

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

615. THOMAS MUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two files, value 2 s., and 4 lbs. of steel, value 1 s. , the goods of James Walker , his master .

JAMES WALKER . I am a smith , and live in Harp-alley, Fleet-market; the prisoner was my servant . On the 1st of March, I met him coming from the manufactory, and asked where he was going; he said, home - it occured to me from his appearance, that he had something about him. I told him to walk back, and kept him talking in the counting-house, and sent privately for an officer; but before he came. I set him to move a heavy weight, and as he stooped, two files came out of his breast; I said,

"That is what I suspected;" he said he was aware that he had done enough. The officer found some more files and some steel upon him. He was only a week with me.

DANIEL TURNER . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in the watch-house. Walker produced two large files; I found some pieces of steel and files on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240407-9

616. JAMES HAWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of John Parker Burrows , from his person .

MR. JOHN PARKER BURROWS . I am a solicitor . On the 2d of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the Poultry , and felt a jerk at my pocket, and said my handkerchief was gone - I turned round and charged the prisoner with it; he was close behind - he denied it. I saw it in his hand, seized him, and saw him drop it. I took him to the Mansion House, and there he said that a boy had put it into his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I told the Lord Mayor that I was walking along, saw it, and picked it up. The gentleman laid hold of me. I was so frightened I hardly knew what to say.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-10

617. JAMES FUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , three reams of demy paper, value 36 s.; six reams of double crown paper, value 4 l. 10 s.; a ream of double small hand paper, value 10 s.; four reams of single small hand paper, value 20 s., and a ream of bag cap paper, value 13 s. , the goods of James Gye and Frederick Gye , his masters .

MR. JAMES GYE . On the 6th of February, I was in partnership with Frederick Gye ; we were wholesale stationers , and lived in Gracechurch-street - the prisoner was our carman . On the 6th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, in consequence of information, I found him in a public-house in the yard, where our stables are; he was rather intoxicated. I told him I had had several complaints

of his being tipsy, and was come to discharge him. I desired him to give me up the key of the stable; he sent it to me by another man. I went there, and found a ream of brown paper in the manger, and asked how it came there; he said he had brought it from a customer, but it being late at night, he put it there instead of bringing it to the premises. I asked if there was any more paper in the stable; he said No. I got on the ladder leading into the loft, and he ran away; I did not see him till a fortnight afterwards, when he was apprehended. I owed him five days' wages, which were 1 l. I found all the property stated in the indictment concealed under the hay in the loft, and some in a box.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who took care of the horse - A. He did. We had seven or eight persons in our employ, but he kept the key of the stable. He was never ordered to put goods in the stable when he came home late. I had told him that I should discharge to-morrow, which was Saturday. We dissolved partnership on the 25th of February.

EDWARD ROGERS . I am a constable. On the 6th of February, I went to the stable, and took possession of fifteen parcels of paper - some of it was covered with hay in the loft.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I apprehended him on the 2d of April, at Charing-cross.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor told me I was tipsy, and to go about my business. The warehouse was always locked at eight o'clock at night, and I was always told to leave goods in the stable after that time.

WILLIAM BROADEY . I am in the prosecutors' service. I never knew the prisoner ordered to leave paper in the stable. I remember once that he had to take some to a customer, and put it in the manger, and the horse gnawed it.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-11

618. MARY GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of John Leech and Thomas Buttel , her masters ,

JOHN LEECH . I keep the London coffee-house Ludgate-hill, and am in partnership with Thomas Buttel ; the prisoner had been our kitchen maid for about a week. On the 1st of March, Mr. Guest gave me information, and I had her apprehended.

THOMAS LONGSTAFF . I am shopman to Mr. Guest, of Fleet-market. On the 1st of March, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner offered to pawn this spoon for 10 s.; it appeared to have some writing erased from it, and I told her something had been rubbed out; she said she had rubbed out her name; upon looking close I could trace the words

"London coffee-house." I told her to send somebody to give me an account of it, and kept the spoon - she did not return, and I informed Mr. Leech.

JAMES SNOW . I am an officer. I apprehended her at the coffee-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the people in my life.

THOMAS LONGSTAFF . I have known her three years, and am certain of her.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-12

619. ELIZABETH LAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a gold ring, value 5 s., and another gold ring, value 4 s. , the goods of George Augustus Burgess .

GEORGE AUGUSTUS BURGESS . I am a pieman , and live in Lamb-alley, Sun-street . The prisoner nursed my wife, who is now dead. These rings were were taken off her fingers before the prisoner came, and put into a tin box, which I put into my wife's box, with her clothes, on the 1st of March; (she died on the 29th of February,) the box was in the same room with the corps, and on the 5th, I went to take an inventory of the clothes, and missed the tin box and rings.

JAMES HOLEHOME . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. On the 3d of March, a gold ring was pawned with me; I do not know who by. The duplicate I gave the person was found upon the prisoner.

WILLIAM STAPLES. I am a pawnbroker. On the 2d of March, a woman pawned a ring in the name of Lewis; I cannot say by whom, but the duplicate found is what I gave the person.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. On the 8th of March, I apprehended her, and found but one duplicate on her; she wished to change her gown; I watched her, saw her take something from her bosom, and found a paper in her hand, containing fourteen duplicates; I said,

"What have you there" - she said,

"I am looking for the duplicates of Burgess's rings." I found the duplicates of two rings among them; she said she found the rings on the floor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not open any lock; I found them. I believe it is spite, because I would not let the old gentleman do what he pleased with me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-13

620. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a wooden cask, value 3 s. 6 d., and two gallons of orange bitters, value 23 s. , the goods of Daniel Deacon and others, his partners.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a night patrol. On the 1st of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in company with two others, standing opposite the White Horse Inn, Cripplegate. I watched, and saw one go towards Fore-street; one crossed, and went up the inn-yard - the prisoner stood there a few minutes, then went down London-wall, and presently the other came from the yard up to him, and gave him a cask; he went down London-wall with it, and the man who gave it to him went towards the White Horse again. I went after the prisoner, stopped him, and asked where he got the cask; he said a man gave it to him to carry to the City-road - I asked where to; he said he did not know, but expected the man was after him - that he was to have something to drink for carrying it. I secured him, and gave information at the White Horse. When the man came from him he was opening a paper, what it was I cannot say.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. On receiving the cask, he went off with a direction in his hand - A. No; the other had a paper, not him.

THOMAS HORWOOD . I am book-keeper to Daniel Deacon and Co., of the White Horse, Cripplegate; he has other partners. On the 21st of March, I received a number of casks; this was among them. On the 1st of April, the officer came, and I missed it.

Cross-examined. Q. You received several casks - A. Yes; two were directed to Joseph Felton , of Mansfield, from Messrs. Swain. I have seen porters waiting about near the inn.

JOSEPH BOARD . I am in the employ of Messrs. Swain and Co., distillers, Holborn-bridge. I sent this cask to the White Horse on the 31st of March; it is branded, and the direction is on it,

"J. Felton, Mansfield."

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not sent hundreds directed to the same person - A. I only sent two. I believe it contains orange bitters.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Wood-street, and asked a gentleman my nearest way to the City-road; a young gentleman came up, and said,

"I wish you would take this with you to the first wine-vaults;" I stopped at the wine-vaults, and this man came up.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-14

621. JAMES MITTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of Saul Soloman .

SAUL SOLOMAN . This coat belongs to my father, whose name is John.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-15

622. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Andrew Michael Isaacs , from his person .

ANDREW MICHAEL ISAACS . I have been a merchant . On the 24th of February, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in Cheapside with my brother - a person called out, and asked if I missed anything; I felt, and missed my handkerchief from my coat pocket. The person laid hold of the prisoner, quite close to me, with it in his hand, and charged him with picking my pocket; he said nothing.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a milkman; my walk is in Holborn. I was in Cheapside, and saw Mr. Isaacs and two more gentleman walking arm in arm - the prisoner and another boy were walking close behind them. I watched them all down Cheapside, and just by Gutter-lane, I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of Mr. Isaacs's pocket. I laid hold of his hand with the handkerchief in it, and called to Mr. Isaacs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the stones, picked it up, and was going to ask the gentlemen if it was theirs, when this man took me.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . He said nothing of the sort at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-16

623. DANIEL BOX was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a canvass wrapper, value 1 s. 6 d., and ten hearth rugs, value 8 l. , the goods of Richard Wright .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 1st of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street, with Herdsfield, and saw a man walking backwards and forwards - I watched, and in a few minutes, saw the prisoner going along with a truss on his back; I laid hold of him - two persons were very close behind him. I said,

"Where did you get this," and it directly tell on the pavement; whether Herdsfield threw it off his shoulder, I cannot say, but I believe he threw it down himself. He said at the Mansion House, that a man gave it to him to carry; Herdsfield is not here.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You will not swear that Herdsfield did not push it off his shoulder - A. I believe he did not.

JAMES EALES . I am book-keeper at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street; Richard Wright is the proprietor. On the 1st of April, about one o'clock, I received this truss, and put it outside the warehouse - I saw it safe about six. I believe this to be the truss.

THOMAS COLE . I am a carpet manufacturer. My man packed this truss up; it is directed to Mr. Jackson, Hereford, and contains the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man with the truss on his shoulder - he asked me to carry it; I had got but a little way before I was stopped; the man bid me good night, and ran away.

DANIEL FORRESTER . There was another man, who ran away - I could not catch him; he was about fifty yards from the Four Swans.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-17

SECOND DAY.

THURSDAY, APRIL 8.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

624. ELIZABETH LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of Johanna Denny .

JOHANNA DENNY . I am shopwoman to Mr. Hutchins, biscuit-baker, Strand . The prisoner is quite a stranger . My shawl was safe in my bed-room about seven o'clock in the morning, and at eleven, I went up and missed it.

JOHN STUBBING . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Chandos-street. On the 20th of January, a shawl was pawned at my shop, in the name of Ann Lawson . I have a slight recollection of its being by the prisoner, but am not certain - I knew her before.

JOHN BURCHALL . I am an officer. On the 4th of March, I found the prisoner in custody at Mr. Hutchins's, on another charge, and found thirty-five duplicates on her, among which was one for this shawl.

JOHN STUBBING . This is the duplicate I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the Mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-18

625. JOHN LITTLEFORD and DANIEL NEVILL were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , six bushels of oats, value l. , the goods of Atley Hunt , their master.

ATLEY HUNT. I am a farmer , and live at Harmondsworth.

The prisoner were my servants, and both lodged in the house. On the 28th of February, after breakfast, my son went into the barn, and gave me information. I then went to the barn, where I had a large heap of oats, and considered that two bushels or more were taken - this was soon after eight o'clock. I had seen them the day before. I charged Nevill, who was at work close to the barn, with taking them while the barnman was at breakfast. I asked what he had been meddling with the heap of oats for - he said he had not. We searched different sheds, and at last went into the stable, where there is a large chaff bin. I saw footsteps in the bin - my son found a sack there with two bushels of oats in it, and found a sack buried deeper in the same bin, containing four bushels. We deliver oats from the granary cleaned and mixed with other corn; these were not clean, and correspond with the heap in the barn. Littleford returned from where he had been, I asked why he stole the corn - he denied it. I said,

"It is of no use to deny it, for I have found it in a place where you must know of its being put." He then said,

"We did not steal them - they are oats I have saved out of my allowance for my horses." (Nevill was not present.) I said, that could not be, for they were not cleaned, and endeavoured to convince him of the consequence of such conduct, I had him into my room, endeavouring to get an acknowledgment from him, but am sorry to say I could not. The conduct of Nevill was shameful.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Not withstanding all you said, he had nothing to confess - A. He would not confess. I give the horses food in proportion to their work. I gave him five bushels of oats for his team, and as much chaff as he liked - they mix it together; this was not cleaned, but it had no chaff with it. They would have been seen if they had carried it off the premises before the men were gone. Littleford was not near the barn - he could not take it that morning, for he was not there.

EBENEZER HUNT . My father's account is correct. I saw the heap in the barn all safe the day before; next morning some appeared to be gone. I found two bushels in a sack under the chaff, and four bushels burried deeper. We give the oats out cleaned and mixed with beans, but they mix it with the chaff. I did not hear the conversation with the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. What quantity of corn was in the barn - A. Nine or ten quarters. I did see that it was disturbed.

Q. Is it not common for men to save part of their oats to give to their horses in the spring - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did you look at the oats found - A. Yes, and am convinced that they are part of the same bulk.

JOSEPH DARBY . I am the barnman. I left at eight o'clock - the heap was all then done up. When I returned it was disturbed. The prisoners were working at a dung cart when I went to breakfast.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not they breakfast at the same time - A. No, at six o'clock. I never quarreled with Littleford. It is difficult to miss two bushels out of ten quarters.

LITTLEFORD's Defence. They are what I saved out of my allowance, to give my horses when they worked harder.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-19

626. JOHN KEALER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Holmes , about seven o'clock in the night of the 23d of February , at St. Giles in the Fields , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a waistcoat, value 1 l., a pair of trowsers, value 30 s., and a boys' dress, value 30 s. , his property.

JOHN HOLMES . I live in High Holborn , in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields, and keep the house. On the 23d of February, at seven o'clock in the evening, I was up stairs at tea - it was dark. When I came down, the patrol brought some clothes into the shop. I then looked at my window and found a square of glass taken entirely out. I had observed it before on that day, it was sound and whole. - about 20 l. worth of clothes were taken out. I went round to the pawnbrokers, and found part of them at Balfour's, Chandos-street, and some more at Lazarus's shop. The prisoner was taken about a month after, and a waistcoat taken off his back which was mine.

ELIAS LAZARUS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Martin's Court, Drury-lane. On the 21st of March the prisoner left a duplicate with me in exchange for a pair of trowsers - I gave them to Baker. The duplicate was for a boy's dress pawned at Balfour's. I went there, and it was stopped. He was to call on me when I had redeemed them, and did so; I had an officer in readiness, who took him.

EDWARD STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Balfour, pawnbroker, Chandos-street. I produce a boy's dress pawned on the 24th of February, for 8 s., by a man who, to the best of my knowledge, is the prisoner - I am not positive.

Prisoner. Q. What clothes had I on - A. A black coat, and he looked rather dirty.

JAMES BAKER . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was waiting at Lazarus's shop for an hour before the prisoner came. I took a black silk waistcoat of his back. Lazarus gave me a pair of trowsers, and Storr gave me the duplicate of the boy's clothes.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am an officer. About half-past seven o'clock on Monday evening, the 23d of February, I was passing up Holborn, and saw the prosecutor's window broken, and a space clear, as if things had been stolen. I went in, and found two boys there, and sent them up for Holmes.

ELIAS LAZARUS . These are the trowsers he gave me in exchange for another pair on the 21st of March.

JOHN HOLMES . I know this boy's dress by the make and colour of the cloth. I lost three dresses of this colour - the trowsers are mine, and have my mark on them. I have lined them in a particular manner. The waistcoat I had made for myself, and wore it once. I saw the window secure after dark on that night, and the clothes all safe.

Prisoner. Q. Do you employ men or apprentices - A. Yes, fifteen. I do not learn them to sew.

Prisoner's Defence. I was by Temple-bar one day, and a man came up, and said,

"Will you buy two duplicates of a boy's suit of clothes, a waistcoat and trowsers; he asked 5 s. for them - I went and got 5 s. from my master - came to the man, and got them. On the Monday following I borrowed the money, and redeemed the things

from Burgess's in Long-acre. Mrs. Herbert can prove that I was very ill in bed on the day of the robbery.

Mrs. HERBERT being called did not appear.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18240407-20

Before Mr. Justice Best.

627. EDWARD BRIMMELL , WILLIAM CLUTTERBUCK , and JOHN WALES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Catherine Smith , widow , about one o'clock in the night of the 5th of March , at St Dunstan, Stepney , with intent the goods and chattels therein being feloniously and burglariously to steal .

CATHERINE SMITH . I am a widow , and live in Dock-street , in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney. On the 5th of March, I went to bed at twelve o'clock at night - Turner was up last; I saw that all the doors and windows on the ground floor were secure. I heard a noise about twenty minutes or half-past one o'clock, like footsteps on the stairs leading from the kitchen into the parlour; I only heard it for a few minutes, and then heard Turner open the window of the adjoining room, and call the watchman - I did not leave my room. Turner came to me; I gave him a light, and know nothing more. No property was taken. Clutterbuck has been an occasional servant in the house. I keep the Duke of York public-house. I cannot say whether the kitchen was made fast.

JOHN TURNER . I am servant to Mrs. Smith, and saw every thing safe when I went to bed. I did not see whether the kitchen was safe - the front of the house was fastened. A little after one o'clock I heard a noise, as if somebody was breaking, or had broken into the house; I cannot say whether I heard them in the house. I alarmed the watchman, and asked him to look round to see if all was safe, and saw him go round; he went for more watchmen. The noise continued for about five minutes. I got a light from my mistress, went down, and let the watchmen in at the front door - we went into the skettle-ground to see if we could see anybody - we found a small window in the back kitchen broken, and marks of its having been wrenched; it swings open, and there were marks between the sash and frame, as if it had been forced - the kitchen door was open. There were footmarks on the kitchen floor, of more than one person having been there; it appeared as if their shoes had been off, for there were prints of their toes, as if their feet were wet, which made the marks; there was a jar broken in the yard. I saw nothing of the prisoners.

LETITIA FOX. I am servant to Mrs. Smith. I fastened the kitchen window on the night before the robbery; it fastens with a button, and I fastened the kitchen door with two iron bolts.

JOHN BURRELL . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 6th of March I heard Turner call to a watchman to look round. I went to the back door, and was in Nottingham-place, and another watchman went into the house - in three or four minutes I heard the prisoners coming towards me; I immediately sprang my rattle, and Dennis came to my assistance. I opened the door leading into the skettle-ground of the house; it was unfastened. I found Brimmell and Wales there, behind the door in the passage leading into the skettle-ground; they might be fifty yards from the house, but within the same fence as the house is in; it is a private passage belonging to the house. I secured them, and asked how many more there were of them; Wales said there was another one, but he had made his escape over the wall. I took them to the watch-house; they were searched, but nothing found on them.

WILLIAM DENNIS . I am a watchman. I assisted Burrell, and remember his pushing open the door leading to the skettle-ground; we found Brimmell and Wales concealed behind the door inside. We asked if there was any more - they said there was one, who had got over the wall.

JAMES STONE . I was constable of the night. In consequence of information I went in pursuit of Clutterbuck, and took him in the Commercial-road, about seven o'clock that morning (the 6th of March). He had only one shoe on. I neither threatened or promised him. I did not mention to him what I took him for. I asked him why he was guilty of a crime of that description, after living with Mrs. Smith - he said it was Brimmell's fault, that Brimmell had advised him to do it, that he (Brimmell) had got hold of the pot-boy who usually lived there, and wanted him to be one of the party, but he refused, but told him where the keys were kept, and where the copper and silver were kept. He said that Wales brought a chisel, and that he himself (Clutterbuck) broke the window open, and got in himself first, and Brimmell followed him, without their shoes, that Wales stopped in the skettleground the while, and that he went into the skettle-ground in the evening, and secreted himself there. I was before the magistrates - (looking at the examination) - this is Sir Daniel Williams 's hand-writing. Nothing was said to induce him to say what he did. I heard Clutterbuck make this statement.

(Read.)

The prisoner Clutterbuck says:

"I have been intimately acquainted with Brimmell and Wales for about a fortnight. On Tuesday Brimmell asked me to go with him and have some beer; I went with him, and kept with him till last night. Last night Henry Kingsbury told us what part of the room the silver lay in, and where the halfpence were put at Mrs. Smith's. Wales was with me and Brimmell at the time. We went to the house between nine and ten o'clock, and went through the house and down into back-yard. We remained there till one o'clock; we then made an attempt to get into the house. I forced open the kitchen window with a small chisel that Wales brought with him. Brimmell stood by me at the time, and Wales was in the skettle-ground. I then got into the kitchen through the window, and Brimmell got in with me. I went up stairs, and then returned to the kitchen, and Brimmell and I went out by the door. I afterwards got away over the garden wall, leaving Brimmell and Wales in the alley. - The prisoner Wales declines saying anything."

CLUTTERBUCK's Defence (written). My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, suffer me respectfully to state to your honourable Court, that when Stone, the constable took me into custody in the Commercial-road, he accused me of breaking into the house, telling me to inform him all I knew, for he would clear me, and shew me mercy, if I did but tell him the truth. I very naturally felt shocked at so dreadful and foul an accusation - under such particular embarrasment, I was not sensible of what I

did say. But it becomes me now as a man, to speak the truth candidly, and not endeavour to justify myself in any manner by falsehoods or prevarication. I know the two prisoners at the bar, and was in their company the same night, but I left them about nine o'clock, to return home. Respecting what has been deduced in evidence, I most humbly protest my innocence, and beg leave to repeat again, that my being taken into custody on a charge so dreadful, the threat of Stone, and his offering to clear me and shew me mercy, put me in that distressed state of mind, that I neither knew what I said or did. Should you consider me as guilty. I supplicate for mercy; but, fully on the other hand anticipate that you will find me innocent.

JAMES STONE re-examined. Q. On your solemn oath did you hold out to him any expectation of favour - A. I swear that I did not; he asked me if it would be better for him to confess or not - I said he might do as he thought proper.

Five witnesses deposed to the good character of Clutterbuck, and four to that of Wales.

BRIMMELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

CLUTTERBUCK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

WALES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of their youth and character. The Prosecutrix particularly recommended Cutterbuck, understanding him to have borne a very good character .

Reference Number: t18240407-21

Before Mr. Justice Best.

628. JAMES WHITBY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , at St. John, at Hackney , a watch, value 5 l.; a watch chain, value 1 s., and two seals, value 5 s., the goods of Ann Davis , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MRS. ANN DAVIS . I live on Stamford-hill, in the parish of St. John, Hackney , and rent the house. On Thursday the 4th of March I was in my parlour, and saw a person pass before the window very quickly - he was in my garden, where he had no business. I went to the kitchen door at the back of the house, and found a leather bag in the garden outside the house; I had hung it up, with the watch in it, between nine and ten o'clock that morning, by the kitchen door, inside the house. I found the watch was gone - Slatter brought it back to me in about twenty minutes.

WILLIAM SLATTER . I am a shoemaker. On the 4th of March, a little before eleven o'clock in the morning, as I came from Clapton, and was crossing the fields, I met the prisoner running, and presently I heard the lady had lost her watch. I returned and overtook him; he was still running - and just before I got to him I saw him take the watch from his right-hand side and throw it into the shrubbery. Dimond was coming towards him, and I called to him to stop him, while I got the watch. I saw him throw it away - it appeared like a gold watch. Dimond followed and secured him. I had been over the pails and found the watch - (looking at it) - this is it. I am sure he is the man who threw it away. I gave it to Mrs. Davis, and saw the prisoner delivered to the officer.

GEORGE DIMOND. I am a labourer. I met the prisoner running, and Slatter pursuing him. I saw him go to the pailing, and put his hand over as if to throw something over, but I did not see it in his hand. There was a cry of Stop him, when he came up to me, and he said,

"Nonsense, nonsense, they do not mean me." I passed him, but afterwards pursued him and saw him getting over a high gate; I followed him across a field, and over a hedge, and took him at last nearly up to his middle in water, in a ditch; he said,

"Pray do forgive me, pray let me go;" and as we went along, he said voluntarily,

"I went into the kitchen, and took the watch."

MRS. DAVIS. The watch is mine; it is gold, and worth 5 l.

Prisoner. I am a poor man, have a wife and seven children, and beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18240407-22

Before Mr. Justice Best.

629. FREDERICK BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , at St. Pancras , in the dwelling-house of Mary Martin , widow, a watch, value 10 s.; a seal, value 30 s.; a ring, value 5 s.; a purse, value 2 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 1 l.; a violin, value 1 l.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; two brooches, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 4 s.; a shirt, value 4 s.; a pair of shoes, value 3 s.; a sovereign, sixteen shillings, and a sixpence , the property of Samuel George .

SAMUEL GEORGE . I live in Carlton-place , St. Pancras, in the house of Mary Martin . My brother married the prisoner's aunt; he used to come to my lodging; I left him in care of my lodging several times. On Saturday evening, the 28th of February, I left him there alone, while I went to Drury-lane Theatre - I told him to wash the tea things up, and make my bed, double lock the door, and to put the key under a pail which stood in the passage. I came home at half-past twelve o'clock, and found the door open; the key laid in the passage. I got a light and found the place all in confusion, and missed the property stated in the indictment. The purse had 1 l. 16 s. 6 d in it. I found a ring at Turner's, and saw a handkerchief taken from his person at Bow-street. I did not see him again till he was taken, which was a fortnight after - we could not find him before.

THOMAS WEBB . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, Brydges-street. I produce a ring pawned by a female, who was with the prisoner, for 2 s. 6 d.; it is not worth above 3 s. I am sure of him - I saw him about a fortnight after at Bow-street.

JOHN STOW . I am gaoler at Bow-street office. I took a handkerchief off the prisoner's neck on the 10th of March, and produce it.

SAMUEL GEORGE . The value of all the property stolen that night is 4 l. at least - the ring is mine I am certain, and I believe the handkerchief to be mine. I think the handkerchief taken off his neck was not so much torn as this. I am positive of the ring; it has the inscription

"No cut to unkindness" on it.

JOHN STOW . It is the same handkerchief, and has not been touched since.

Prisoner's Defence. He swore to the handkerchief at Bow-street; it is my own property.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy in consequence of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240407-23

Before Mr. Justice Best.

630. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , at St. George, Bloomsbury , in the

dwelling-house of Thomas Faulkner , six 5 l. Bank notes , his property.

MARY FAULKNER . I am the daughter of Thomas Faulkner , who rents a house in Duke-street , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. The prisoner had lodged at our house. On the 17th of February, I went with my father to the Bank of England, where he received a 30 l. note, and got it changed into six of 5 l.; they were given to me, and I put them into a drawer, in my bed-room, in my father's house, in a pocket-book. The prisoner had left our house in October, but visited me after that, and was at the house on the 17th of February. I went to my drawer on the 25th, and the notes were gone; the pocket-book was left, and I think it was open. I saw two of the notes at Bow-street, in the possession of Duke. Before I put them away, I wrote the words

"Le Notery" on each, which I always put on notes which I take.

Q. Was the prisoner in your room on that day - A. I do not recollect seeing him there; he was not in the house alone at any time that I know of. I went out at times.

WILKINSON MOORE. I keep the George and Dragon, public-house, Buckingham-street, Fitzroy-square. On the evening of the 23d of February the prisoner came and had a bottle of wine, and paid me a 5 l. Bank note: I put it into my bag - I had not sufficient change. I kept the note, and requested him to mark it, and he wrote

" George Child " on it - he sent for the change next morning. I gave the note to my daughter Jane.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not somebody with him - A. A woman was, who told me where she lodged; it was not the last witness I am certain, though I could not swear to the woman.

JANE MOORE . I am daughter of the last witness. I was not present when the prisoner came in the evening, but remember a girl coming next morning for the change; I got the note from my father, and gave 4 l. 15 s. to the girl; her name is Levy - deducting 5 s. for the wine; and after that the prisoner came to me, and said I had given 6 d. short in the change; I said, when the bottle was returned I should return 3 d., and the wine was 4 s. 9 d.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. I never saw him before; he was not more than three minutes with me. I saw him at Bow-street nearly a month after. I am not mistaken in him.

JOHN MASON . I am a constable. The note was given to me before the Magistrate. I was with Duke when he apprehended the prisoner, and by different names on the note, I traced it to Moore - it came from the Bank.

Cross-examined. Q. It was brought to the office by some person who is not here - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HIGNAM . I am a clerk in the Bank Note Pay Office. On the 17th of February I changed a 30 l. note in the name of Faulkner; I find by examining my book, that I gave six of 5 l. for it - Nos. 7241 to 7246, dated the 17th of January, 1824.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the book you have got the one in which you made the entry - A. Yes.

WILKINSON MOORE re-examined. This is the note he paid me - I know it by

"G. Child," which I saw him write on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You know it by that, is it your only reason - A. My daughter's hand-writing is on it as well; I have no other reason. I paid it away, and saw it again three or four weeks after. I receive a good many 5 l. notes.

COURT. Q. Do you now recollect seeing him write the name on it - A. I do my Lord; I particularly requested him to do it in case it should be a bad one.

JANE MOORE . Here is

"Levy, No. 2, Cleaveland-street" on it, in my hand-writing. I know it to be the note which passed through my father's hands by that.

Cross-examined. Q. You wrote Levy on it - A. Yes, in the morning, when I went up stairs and got it from my father; I saw

"G. Child" written on the corner of it. I know it to be the note I received from my father.

WILLIAM HIGNAM . It is one of the notes I gave for the 30 l.; it is No. 7241, dated the 17th of January, 1824.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not notes of the same date - A. The same number, but not the same date as well; they might be the same date, except the year. The notes of 1823 would be paid away twelve months before this.

THOMAS FAULKNER . I went with my daughter to the Bank, and changed the 30 l. note for six fives. I gave them to her to take care of, and saw her put them away that night.

Cross-examined. Q. Does she manage your house - A. Yes.

ROBERT DUKE . I went with Mason, and apprehended the prisoner. I have four notes here, which were got from the Bank. I found a purse and 23 s. on the prisoner, and at his lodging found a quantity of smiths' tools. Three of the notes were delivered to me by Mr. Mullett, and the other by Seekins - they have the words

"Le Notery" on them.

JOHN MULLETT . Seekins got these notes from the Bank, and gave three to me.

RICHARD SEEKINS . I got these four notes from the Bank; they have the words

"Le Notery" on them. I saw all six at the Bank.

MARY FAULKNER . (Looking at the note uttered to Moore) - there is no mark of mine on this note.

Q. Look at these four - A. They have

"Le Notery" on them, which I wrote.

Cross-examined. Q. You put that on all the notes you received - A. Yes; it is not on that paid to Moore.

COURT to MR. HIGNAM. Q. Are all these 5 l. notes what you paid for the 30 l. note - A. They are, I am certain; the numbers and dates correspond.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it at all; as to the notes, I never saw them in my life.

COURT to MARY FAULKNER . Q. Did you say that he was at your house on the day you came from the Bank - A. I am not quite certain - he came to visit me very often, and when he was there I was generally with him; he paid his addresses to me. I am sure I never gave them to him.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long have you known him - A. Since May. My father was not angry when the notes were gone. I had a great affection for the prisoner.

Q. He has had money from you - A. Yes; he has had access to my money, which was in the same place as these notes.

Q. You had a purse in common between you - A. Yes. When he came to lodge with us we had a three year's character with him.

THOMAS FAULKNER . I never consented to the notes being given to him, or any other money of mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Your daughter managed your purse - A. No; I gave her them to take care of. I knew of their intimacy, but do not know of her giving him money.

Five witnesses deposed to the prisoner's bearing a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18240407-24

Before Mr. Justice Best.

631. JOHN JACOB KEYSSER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , seventeen pairs of gloves, value 19 s., and two gaiters, value 12 s. , the goods of Henry Nicholls .

JOHN WOODWARD . I am a constable. On the 4th of March I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Nicholls's shop, and found five duplicates in his fob for gloves and gaiters, which he was charged with stealing.

HENRY NICHOLLS . I am a glove-maker , and live in the Strand. The prisoner was in my service as a cutter . I missed fifteen pairs of gloves a week or two before this, and on the day he was taken I missed two pairs of gaiters, and charged him with stealing them; he denied it, and I sent for an officer.

JOSEPH PARKER . I am a pawnbroker. I have fifteen pairs of gloves, a shirt, an apron, a jacket, and two pairs of gaiters, pawned by the prisoner; he pawned the gloves on the 11th of February.

PHILIP LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of gaiters, pawned by the prisoner. I gave him one of the duplicates found upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a long written statement, representing that he had pawned the goods by his master's order, as he never could get his wages, and that his master owed him 5 l.

HENRY NICHOLLS . I never owed him 5 s.; he had 10 s. a-week, and was paid regularly, and I maintained him; I took him in out of charity. I never authourized him to pawn anything. He owes me 2 l. 10 s., money lent.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-25

Before Mr. Justice Best.

632. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a spoon, value 3 s.; a candlestick, value 1 s., and a snuffer tray, value 5 s. the goods of William Walter .

WILLIAM ENGLISH . I am waiter at the Admiral Duncan public-house , kept by William Walter . On the 1st of January, in the evening, the prisoner came in, and had a glass of rum and water. I gave him a silver spoon with it. He drank it - I missed him, and on looking at his glass, found a metal spoon substituted for the silver one, which was gone. I also missed a plated candlestick and snuffers from the room. I have not found them. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you seen him before - A. No. I went into the coffee-room immediately he left. Nobody else was there but two customers - they left before him, and the spoon was safe after that.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-26

633. JOHN BROWN was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a silver spoon, value 4 s. , the property of James Hartley .

JAMES HARTLEY . I keep the sign of the Two Angels . On the 7th of March, about half-past nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came and had a glass of rum and water. I gave the waiter a silver spoon with it - he left a tinned one in its place. I missed it as soon as he had left the room - the waiter ran after him and brought him back with it.

FRANCIS MANNING . I am waiter at the house, and gave the prisoner a silver spoon with his rum and water. When he was leaving the house I saw he had changed the spoon. I followed and overtook him; he tussled with me in Tower-street - and Haynes brought me the spoon.

ELIZABETH HAYNES . I saw Manning and the prisoner struggling. I went to the public-house, and as I returned I found the spoon on the spot where they had been struggling.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 72.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-27

634. SARAH ALLEN was indicted for stealing on the 21st of March six pounds of mutton, value 3 s. , the property of Samuel Summers .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am servant to Samuel Summers , butcher , Somer's-town . The prisoner came to the shop and took up a piece of mutton as if to have it weighed. My mistress asked if she had had it weighed; she said. No - but she was going, and as my mistress turned her back she went out with it. My mistress went and stopped her, and took the mutton from her.

FRANCES SUMMERS . I saw the mutton taken from her.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR . I am an officer. She was brought to the watchhouse. I asked her what the meat weighed; she said six pounds, and it did weigh that exactly.

MRS. SUMMERS. I am certain it was not weighed to her.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-28

635. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March a box value 9 d., a flat-iron value 1 s., a half-crown, a shilling, and a sixpence , the property of John Bryan .

SARAH BRYAN . I am the wife of John Bryan . I lost a flat-iron and a green box, with a half-crown and two shillings and sixpence in it from under my bed. I saw the prisoner in the house, and as soon as she was gone out I missed it, and saw it in her hand in the street. She did not live in the house.

ROBERT THOMAS . I am a weaver. I saw Bryan following the prisoner, who was running with the box in her hand. I stopped her, and saw her drop the box.

ELIZA WOOD . I saw her drop the box. I picked it up and gave it to Mrs. Bryan.

RICHARD NEEDHAM . I am the headborough. She was given into my charge; the box contains the money and iron.

SARAH BRYAN . Here is a notch under the neck of one piece of the money, by which I know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not drop the box. The girl swore to another woman. The man said he would not be

a witness against me; a woman said he would have 3 s. 6 d. a-day, and then he said he would be a witness.

ROBERT THOMAS. I said no such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-29

636. THOMAS NEALE was indicted for embezzlement .

TIMOTHY O'NEIL . The prisoner was in my service for six weeks, and entrusted to receive money on my account.

CATHERINE JONES . I owed O'Neil 10 s. 2 1/2 d. for milk. I paid it to the prisoner on the 25th of March, with a half-crown, a sixpence, and the rest in shillings and halfpence. I produce his receipt for it.

TIMOTHY O'NEIL. He never paid me this money. He was drunk for a fortnight before he left me. I asked him about this money; he said the cook would have paid him if she had had change. This was before the 25th of March - he said nothing about it afterwards. I asked him to come and make up his accounts, but he did not - there was nearly 2 l. due to him if he had settled with me, but he has kept more than this back.

SAMUEL COULSON . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner; he said he knew what it was for, and would go with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money, and got in liquor; my master owes me 1 ls. 11 1/2 d.

TIMOTHY O'NEIL. I owe him nothing but a-week's wages, which would have been settled if he had stopped till the end of the week. I never called upon him to account for this.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-30

637. HANNAH WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a silver fork, value 15 s. , the goods of Ephraim Harris ; and JOHN FURLONG was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

EPHRAIM HARRIS . I am a silversmith and salesman . The prisoner Welch nursed my wife - she went out on the 19th of March, and was to return at night, but did not. Ballard brought me a fork, which is mine, and has my name on it.

Prisoner WELCH. Q. Was it not among the clothes you sent out to wash - A. She was to come back to wash the clothes. I understand that she called and took them home to wash.

JOHN BAGULEY . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Oxford-street. On the evening of the 22d of March Welch brought this fork, and wished to sell it - I questioned her about it; she did not satisfy me. I sent for Ballard, who took her and the fork.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a pawnbroker. I know both the prisoners. On the 22d of March they both came and pawned a table-cloth, which they redeemed in ten minutes. I was present when Welch gave this fork in pledge for 9 s. - each took up part of the money and went away, and both came in in about ten minutes, and took it out of pawn again; Furlong gave her the money, and she redeemed it; I delivered it to her - he wanted to put it into his pocket, and she said she would take it, as she was more sober than him; it was the same sort of fork as that produced.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a constable. I received Welch in charge at Dobree's with the fork; she said it was her own property. I found a cap in her pocket, which she said was her own. I asked if she had children small enough to wear it; she said, Yes, and that they were at her lodging, somewhere in Crown-street, St. Giles's, and her name was Jones. Next day, as I took her to the office I saw the male prisoner speaking to her, and asked if she was his wife; he said not. I took him into the office, sent him out while she was examined, and after that she said she was his wife, and that the fork was her property, and she had told him she had had it with her former husband. He said at first that he had seen the fork, and knew it was in pawn, and afterwards that he had only heard that it was in pawn, and had not seen it. On the day she was first examined, he said he knew she had had it a long time. On the Saturday following, when I apprehended him, he said she was not his wife, and he had never seen the fork till he saw it in the pawnbroker's hands. He refused to tell where he lodged; he at first said he lived in Golden-lane, and then that he had no lodging. I asked where he took the bundles to - he said he had taken no bundles.

ELEANOR RUSHBROOK . I am servant to Mr. Harris. I washed this fork on the 22d of March, and laid it on the secretary in the parlour, and it was there when she came for the clothes.

CHARLES CLARK . It was a similar fork to this.

WELCH's Defence. I have been employed at this house several years, and trusted with a deal of property. I attended his wife till she died, and was then told I had no more business in the room, as he is of a different persuasion to me. I was told to call on Monday for the things to wash, which I did, and his daughter told me to bundle up the clothes - I did so, and this fork was among them; I found it on sorting the clothes, and being short of money I went to pawn it, met Furlong, and asked him to go with me; I pawned it in my own name, and took up the 9 s., and when I came out he asked how I got it; I said it was my own - he left me. I took it out again, and offered it for 5 s., intending to take it back.

FURLONG's Defence. I met her in Mortimore-street - we went and pawned the fork; she promised me that she would take it out. Next morning a watchman informed me she was in confinement, and I went to the watch-house.

WELCH - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

FURLONG - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-31

638. JOSEPH BLINCO was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 14 d. , the goods of Charles Cooper .

ANN COOPER . I am the wife of Charles Cooper . On the 28th of February the prisoner came into the shop, and asked my man to weigh a piece of bacon, and while he was doing it, I saw the prisoner take another piece, and put it under his arm, and then into his pocket. I went and took it out, and gave him in charge.

BENJAMIN SWEATMAN . I am a well-digger. I stood at the shop door, and saw the prisoner take the bacon and put it into his pocket.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-32

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

639. JOSEPH BARARA was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a box, value 2 d., and two bushels of groats, value 24 s. , the goods of William Gootch .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-33

640. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Simonds , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-34

641. EDWARD SCOTT MANN was indicted for embezzlement .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. HENRY LUKE COOPER . I am in partnership with Joseph Cooper - we carry on business in Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was in our service in November, 1822, as clerk and warehouseman - when he received money, his duty was either to hand it over to H. Mark, the cashier, or to one of us; if he received a draft, it was my particular request that they should be paid in without being received. Mr. Parker was indebted to us in the sum of eight guineas; the prisoner has never accounted for that sum.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. His business was to receive and pay money for you - A. If any one called or came for money, I handed him a draft to give them - he kept the petty cash at one time, full three or four years ago. Mark kept it in 1822. The prisoner was in our service six or seven years ago, and continued with us till about five weeks, when he was taken. When he received money he brought a book with the party's names he had received it from, and paid in the total amount.

Q. If he wanted to give change he might receive the cheque - A. It is possible.

MR. JOHN PARKER . I live in Broad-street-buildings. In November, 1822, I owed Messrs. Coopers eight guineas, and paid a cheque for that sum to some person; I cannot swear to the prisoner. I have destroyed the cheque - I have the banker's book, which I examined by the cheques, and find it entered there. I produce the receipt the person gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear that very cheque was returned, or do you speak of it in common with others - A. I cannot recollect the particular cheque, but I have checked off every payment, and this among them.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there not an alteration in the figures of the receipt - A. Yes; it brings to my mind that the bill was made out for nine guineas; I begged him to get it corrected, which was done, and on returning I gave him the money. I believe the prisoner to be the man.

(Bill and receipt read: - signed E. S. Mann.)

MR. COOPER. This bill and receipt are both in the prisoner's writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Does it not frequently happen that one man writes the receipt, and another receives the money - A. Yes; If the porter received money he would have a receipt given him.

MR. JOSEPH COOPER . The prisoner never accounted to me for this draft or the money; it was his duty to bring us all cheques without receiving them.

SAMUEL ELCOCK . I am clerk to Messrs. Coopers. On the 27th of February last, I had some conversation with the prisoner about some deficiences in the cash account - I did not threaten or promise him anything. We went over a book in which a list of outstanding debts are kept, to ascertain the names and amounts of what he had received; he admitted the receipt of this among several other sums; he read them from the book. He requested me to take a letter to the prosecutors, and read me a copy of what he intended to write; he asked what I expected they would do - I said I could not tell, for the amount was very large.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in the prosecutors' employ - A. About a year and a quarter. I was very intimate with the prisoner; I went to him by the direction of the prosecutors - he had been seriously ill, but was considerably better. I saw him in his bed-room, and took the book to him at his request; he read from it himself what he had received, and I wrote it down; the amount was 218 l. 7 s. 0 d. I held him out no inducement. I went to him in consequence of a letter he had written to them; I produced the letter to him; it was in his handwriting. I told him the letter would explain my business.

(Letter read.)

To Mr. H. Cooper,

"Dear Sir, What Mr. Harriet says is correct, and had you been kind enough to have called on me, I could explain it to you, but I could not to Mr. Page. I hope to be with you to-morrow, when I will settle it with you; till then I must beg your kind indulgence not to mention it, by which you will oblige your obedient servant,

E.S. Mann."

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. On the 28th of February I apprehended the prisoner, and told him it was on suspicion of robbing Messrs. Coopers of about 250 l. - he said he thought it was about that sum, and that he had lived on the money.

HENRY MARK . On the 9th of November, 1822, I was clerk to Messrs. Coopers. I did not receive this eight guineas.

Cross-examined. Q. Whose duty was it to receive the money - A. Whoever sold the goods generally received it. When money is paid to me, the person paying it is mentioned to me.

HENRY SEARLE . I was manager of the business at the time in question. The prisoner never paid me this cheque or the money. I and Mark were the only persons who receive money, except the firm; if the prisoner collected he should pay it to Mr. Cooper.

Prisoner's Defence. If there are deficiences it must arise from the inaccuracy of the books, or from the number of persons continually in the receipt of money; in the multiciplity of business, it is very possible that I might have forgotten sums of money, or paid it in trifling disbursements.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-35

642. JOHN SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , two knives, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Jane Davis Burrows , widow .

JANE DAVIS BURROWS . I am a widow, and keep a sale-shop in Barbican . On the 23d of March my window was broken, and two knives taken out; (looking at two,) I believe them to be mine - I cannot swear to them - I had some like them.

JAMES PRATT . I am a cooper, and live in Barbican. On the 23d of March, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner put his hand through the window, and take something out - a person passed, and he went away; then crossed again, and put three of his fingers through the broken glass, and took out another knife - I ran and secured him, took him into the shop, the knives were found in his apron. Another boy was taken, but nothing was found on him.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am an officer. I was passing and met the prisoner - I shook my head at him, returned soon after, and saw Pratt securing him - I found one knife in his apron.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-36

643. HENRY KENNY was indicted for stealing on the 7th of January , six razors, value 12 s. , the goods of Martin Allies , his master .

MARTIN ALLIES . I am an ironmonger , and live in Newgate-street; the prisoner was my porter . I cannot say when these razors were safe in my stock - I think I saw them six months ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They are very common ones - A. I do not consider them so, they cost me 5 s. a pair; they are kept in a drawer under the counter; he was two years with me.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 7th of January these razors were pawned with me. I have some slight recollection of taking them in of a man in the name of Kenny; the duplicate of them is not in my writing.

Cross-examined. Q. The duplicate is filled up by the person taking in the pledge - A. When we are busy an apprentice writes it.

ROBERT WILSON . I am an officer. On the 20th of February Honey and I searched the prisoners lodging, and found some duplicates in his box, one was for these razors; he was in the Compter at this time.

HENRY HONEY . The prosecutor directed us to the prisoners lodgings, Brown's-lane, Spitalfields, where we found several duplicates.

CHARLES PAYNE . Here is the duplicate I gave the person, the name of Kenny, Cow-lane, is on it.

MR. ALLIES. I directed the officers to his lodging; he never told me where he lived, but I have sent there for him frequently.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-37

644. HENRY KENNY was again indicted for stealing twelve knives, value 28 s., and twelve forks, value 14 s. , the goods of Martin Allies , his master .

CHARLES PAYNE . I have twelve knives and twelve forks, which I bought of the prisoner on the 14th of February, for 20 s.; I knew him very well.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was on the 14th. - A. I believe so, they are not worth more than I gave. I consider it a very handsome price. I had seen him three times before. I put them in the window for sale, Mr. Reeves keeps the shop.

COURT. Q. Did you buy any thing else of him - A. I bought another set of him on the 7th of February, for 38 s., and sold them to Mr. Cook for 32 s.; they are in the possession of Honey. I know his face, and swear to him.

HENRY COOK . I bought these knives and forks of Payne. I left them at a cutler's in Newgate-street, to be set, and called on Mr. Allies, whose name is on them, to know what he would make me desert knives to match them for. I shewed him the forks; he went with me to the cutlers, and gave me another set for them, a quarter of an hour after I had left them there.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear that the cutler gave back the same knives that you left - A. I believe so.

MR. ALLIES. Mr. Cook brought me the forks to have desert ones to match. I went with him to the cutler's, and got the knives which I produced; they are marked with my name, and were made at Sheffield.

Cross-examined. Q. Your name is stamped on them to persuade the public that they are town-made - A. No, I wish persons to know that they are bought at my house. I had five dozen of this pattern. I sold two dozen in the country, two dozen are at the cutlers, and one at home.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-38

645. JAMES MERRETT alias HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , four pairs of gloves, value 6 s. 8 d. , the goods of John Rogers .

JOHN ROGERS . I am a hosier . On the 23d of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning, a boy, younger than the prisoner, came into the shop, and in a few minutes the prisoner came in and asked the price of a pair of red cuffs, which the other boy had been looking at; my boy was attending to him. I was in the back room, and could see every transaction; they asked for some at 6 d. a-pair; the boy went to the end of the shop for them, and had to stoop, and at that moment I saw the prisoner snatch a bundle of gloves off the counter and put it under his apron. I came forward and took them from under his apron.

ROBERT TUCKER . I am shopman to Mr. Rogers. While I went to the end of the shop, he came forward and took the gloves from under the prisoner's apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-39

646. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th March , forty-nine yards of flannel, value 2 l. , the goods of Adam Mather .

ADAM MATHER . I am a hosier , and live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street . On the 15th of March this flannel stood on a stool at the door. I saw a hand lift it off, there was a cry of Stop thief, and it was thrown down about three yards from my door, I picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT WAY . I was in Sun-street, I saw the prisoner in company with another man. I saw a lady looking into

Mather's shop, and as soon as she entered the door the prisoner snatched the flannel. I was loaded or I could have stopped him. I called Stop him, he dropped it, and a person followed him towards Bishopsgate-street. I put my load into a shop, followed, and met him in the custody of Riley, and am certain that he is the person.

WILLIAM RILEY . I saw him running. A gentleman apprehended him, and gave him to me. Way came up and said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Sun-street, heard an alarm, and pursued a man, a gentleman came up and said I was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-40

647. JAMES HERBERT was indicted for stealing on the 22 d of March , thirteen printed bound books, value 3 l. 3 s. the goods of John Reeves .

CHARLES PONDER . I am a book-binder, and live in Ireland Yard, Blackfriars. On the 22d of March I was in the first private box of Reeves's, the pawnbroker's shop, on Snow-hill ; several piles of books were on the counter next to the last box. I saw them shake, and the top parcel was taken off. I opened the door of the box I was in, and saw the prisoner go off the steps with them under his arm. I stoped him, and he said a person gave them to him to take to the coach-office.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Reeves. Ponder brought the prisoner in with the books; it was a parcel containing thirteen; they had been pawned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met one Thompson in Shoe-lane, who dealt in ivory; he asked where he could pawn some ivory. I took him to Reeves's; I stood outside; he came to the door and said,

"Go round the corner with this parcel, and wait till I return."

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-41

648. THOMAS OLIVER was indicted for stealing on the 22d of March , a great coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Driver .

CHARLES DRIVER . On the morning of the 22d of March I went to Billingsgate, and left my great coat in my cart, on St. Mary's Hill , about five o'clock, and left a man in care of the cart, and he left it in the care of Winterborn.

JOHN WINTERBORN . On the 22d of March, at a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, I had the care of the cart. I saw the prisoner take the coat out of it, and walk about twenty yards. I then secured him; he said he found it under the horses heels, but I saw him take it.

Prisoner. You said you had lost a good many things, and I should suffer for all. - Witness. I have lost a good many, but did not say that he should suffer for that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-42

649. ELIZABETH FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing on the 21st of February , a watch, value 3 l., a chain, value 6 d., two seals, value 1 s., and a key, value 6 d. two crowns and a half-crown, the property of Neil M'Intire , from his person .

NEAL M'INTIRE. I went home with the prisoner, to her lodging, in West-street, Smithfield . I slept with another girl; the prisoner was in the same room. I awoke in the course of the night, and missed my silver watch from under the pillow; the girl was still there, but the prisoner was gone; she appeared the worse for liquor. I was sober.

JOHN SHEPPARD . I am a constable. Early in the morning of the 22d of February the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on another charge. I searched her, she pulled out this watch, and said a lad had given it to her in Holborn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-43

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 9.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

650. AARON ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing on the 28th of March a watch value 2 l., two seals value 1 l., and a key value 4 s., the goods of James Drew , from his person .

JAMES DREW . On the 27th of March, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I went home. I could not get in, and was going to sleep with a man who was with me, and in Tothill-street we met the prisoner with two or three others. The prisoner took my watch out of my pocket. I felt him take it - nobody else was near enough to do it. The others stopped behind - he instantly crossed the road. I gave an alarm, and the watchman stopped him about sixty yards off, without my losing sight of him. I do not know what became of the others. I suppose he let the watch fall, as I heard something fall ten or twelve yards from him - it sounded like the case.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you sober - A. I was not tipsy, nor the worse for liquor. I left work between five and six o'clock, and might have been four hours at different public-houses, but drank very little. I had taken a walk after leaving work. I am a journeyman baker. I have seen the prisoner about Westminster several times before; the street is lighted with gas, and was very quiet; he did not turn any corner.

BENJAMIN BUTLER . I am a carman, and was with Drew. He could not get admittance, and was going to sleep with me. I saw the prisoner and two or three others, but he was rather before them, meeting us. He came up close to Drew, who immediately said,

"The scoundrel has drawn my watch." We both ran after him, and were not above six yards behind him, and never lost sight of him. Cox stopped him. I thought I heard him throw the watch away. I returned to look for it - but his companions were looking for it, and I could not find it.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people were in the street - A. None except them. Drew looked at his watch four or five minutes before. I knew the prisoner before. We were both sober.

THOMAS COX . I am a watchman. I was in Tothill-street about a quarter to one o'clock. I heard an alarm.

I came out of my box and stopped the first man I saw, which was the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. How many people did you see - A. Three. Drew appeared sober.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-44

651. WILLIAM CHURN and JAMES LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , two live tame pigs, price 4 l. , the property of Henry Cripps .

HENRY CRIPPS . I have a small farm at Hillingdon . My pigs were stolen on the 13th of March. I was awoke about two o'clock in the morning by their noise. I had fastened them up about eight o'clock that night. I got up and found them gone; and between ten and eleven o'clock that morning I got a search warrant, and went to Lawrence's house with two officers; he lives at the tile-kilns at Harefield, about two miles and a half off. We found some fried and raw liver upon a rack in his cottage, and a pail of bloody water upon the floor. Churn lodged there; we found both the prisoners and another man sitting round the fire. Churn's breeches were spotted with blood; he attempted to run away; one of the officers fetched him back. I put him into a cart; he said,

"What is the value of your pigs" - I said between 4 l. and 5 l., he said,

"If you have 5 l. paid you, and the officers have their expenses, do you want to hang anybody." I said,

"No, I do not know that I do, but I am sure you are the men who drove my pigs away this morning." he said,

"No, I was not the man, but I was with the man," and said that it was John Martin . After we had been before the magistrate, he said,

"I can tell you where one of your pigs are; it is in a meadow about a hundred yards from where you found it had been stuck, covered up by the hedge." I went there, and found the pig stuck and covered with rubbish. Lawrence came to me on Monday the 15th; he said he came about poor Will. I said,

"What is it" - he said,

"I will give a 1 l. note with his father sooner than he shall be sent away." I said,

"You are a very civil fellow, but if you had nothing to do with it, what makes you want to give a pound-note." I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I went to Lawrence's house, and found the prisoner and Martin there; there were two pork puddings in the pot.

FRANCIS WEEDON . I am an officer. I went to the house - Lawrence said he knew nothing about it.

CHURN - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

LAWRENCE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-45

Before Mr. Justice Best.

652. FREDERICK SCOTT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth, the wife of Joshua King , on the King's highway, on the 14th of February , at St. Margaret, Westminster , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, five shirts, value 20 s.; three neckcloths value 3 s.; nine handkerchiefs value, 10 s.; five pairs of stockings, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 4 s.; a pair of drawers, value 1 s.; and a night-cap, value 6 d. ; the goods of the said Joshua King .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Dean Paul .

ELIZABETH KING . I am the wife of Joshua King , who is butler to Sir John Paul . On the 14th of February, about half-past six or seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Dean-street , Westminster, taking home John Dean Paul 's linen, and as I was passing Gardener-street a person stood by the gateway; my eye no sooner caught him than he jumped out upon me, seized my bundle, pulled me down, and ran off with it instantly.

COURT. Q. I suppose you struggled to hold your bundle - A. Yes, my Lord; he pulled me down as I resisted to keep it. I held the bundle to keep it, and he pulled me down. There was another person standing on the other side, but he took no notice. I jumped up and followed him all through the lane, calling, Stop thief! There were plenty of people who could have stopped him, but nobody interfered. It was nearly such a person as the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him; he is about the height and figure of the person. I found three of the articles at Queen-square on the Thursday. The man was dressed in a fustian jacket, like a stableman; a jacket was produced at the office which seemed to answer to that the man wore.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. On the 18th of February I apprehended the prisoner, but found nothing on him relative to this business; I asked where he lived; he said over the water. I asked where there, he said he did not know the name of the street, he had only lived there a week. I asked where he lived before that; he said at Westminster, but could not tell me where there. I said I should go and find out. Next morning, as I was taking him from the watchhouse I had a bundle under my arm and told him I had soon found out where he lived; he said I was lucky; I said

"This bundle came from there" - he said there was nothing there but what was his own. I do not know that he could tell what was in the bundle, but he could see the yellow handkerchief it was wrapped in. Pace and I had found it in the back parlour, next door to the One Tun public-house, Perkin's-rents, Westminster, having been informed that he lodged there. I directed his attention to the bundle at the time, he said there was nothing there but what was his own.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The bundle was tied up - A. Yes, he could not see the contents; he saw nothing but the handkerchief it was in - I did not tell him the place I found it at, but said at his lodging.

Q. Was it not in reference to the bundle, and not to his lodging, that he said there was nothing there but what belonged to him - No, I pointed to the bundle.

Q. Did not his answer follow immediately after you said you had found where he lodged - A. Yes; but he looked at the bundle and nodded at it, and gave that answer.

COURT. Q. What did you find at that lodging - A. I found a silk-handkerchief hanging on a line to dry, a waistcoat and shirt in the drawer, rolled up damp; two picklock-keys, a crow-bar, and two padlocks.

ELIZABETH KING . The handkerchief the bundle is in is not mine; a handkerchief, shirt, and waistcoat, in it are mine.

JOSEPH COOPER . I did not find the bundle tied up, Pace tied it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-46

653. FREDERICK SCOTT was again indicted for feloniously assaulting Marianne Hawkes on the King's highway, on the 9th of February , at St. John the Evangelist,

Westminster , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a reticule, value 3 s., a purse, value 1 s., two crowns, four half-crowns, 10 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d., her property; eleven frock bodies, value 2 l., and sixteen yards of trimmings, value 12 s. the goods of Mary Hope , spinster .

MARIANNE HAWKES . I am a single woman ; on the 9th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was walking up Marchmont-street, Westminster - it was dusk; I had a reticule hanging on my left arm - it contained a purse with about 30 s. in half-crowns, crowns, and shillings, a lawn handkerchief, and other things; some person behind snatched my reticule, it broke the steel chain - it was a violent snatch; I was alarmed, and instantly turned round; he pulled at it twice, and the chain broke at the second pull - he ran down a passage. I cannot speak to the prisoner - the man was about his size. I have since seen my handkerchief and purse.

Cross-examined. Q. The man was behind you - A. Yes. I live with my parents, and am not of age. I was both frightened and surprised.

JOSEPH COOPER . On the 18th of February I apprehended the prisoner, and took this purse from him in the watchhouse - there was a sovereign and 10 s. in it. I found the duplicate of a handkerchief in the room which I searched; it was pawned by a woman.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search him before you got to the watchhouse - No; I have had the purse ever since.

MARIANNE HAWKES . This purse is mine; I am certain.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you buy it - A. No, my father gave it to me; it is a common one; I have no mark on it, but there is a hole at one end of it, which I noticed before I lost it; all my money was silver.

COURT. Q. How long had you had the purse - A. About three months; I have no doubt of its being mine.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix .

Reference Number: t18240407-47

654. STEPHEN BEEKS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Foothead , about the hour of eight, in the night, of the 1st of March , at Hanworth , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a watch, value 2 l., a pair of breeches, value 1 l., a pair of shoes, value 10 s., a handkerchief, value 5 s., and a waistcoat value 2 s. , his property.

WILLIAM FOOTHEAD . I rent a house in the parish of Hanworth. On the 1st of March I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon, and left nobody at home - I returned next day between six and seven o'clock in the evening; I had fastened the house up when I left, and when I returned I found the window broken all to pieces, and broken open; the back window was torn quite out, it was safe when I left home. I missed my shoes, a watch, and stockings, some bacon, and sugar - my breeches were not gone, but moved from where I had left them; the watch was worth 2 l., the shoes, 10 s., handkerchief, 5 s., waistcoat, 2 s., and breeches, 1 l. I have not recovered the property; the prisoner worked for me. Kendon gave me information.

CHARLES KENDON . I am a piano-forte maker, and live at Hanworth. On the 2d of March I was at Twickenham, and went into Mrs. Scurr's, the pawnbroker's shop, and saw the prisoner there pawning a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and a handkerchief, and heard him ask her to lend 10 s. on them; she could only lend 5 s.; he said he would take 5 s., that he was going down to the brewhouse, and would call as he returned - he left the articles there - he knew me. He called again, and Mrs. Scurr would not take them in, in consequence of what I told her; this was on Tuesday; he was apprehended next day. As I returned home I called on the constable, who lives next door to the prosecutor, and we found out in the evening that the house was broken open. Foothead was unloading his cart in the field - we called to him, and I told him what I had seen. I went into the house, and saw the clothes, which appeared to be the same I had seen him with at the pawnbroker's. When he was apprehended I saw a pair of shoes taken off his feet.

THOMAS WHITTINGHAM . I am a constable. I produce a waistcoat and breeches, which I found in the house, and a pair of shoes, which I took off the prisoner's feet.

ANN SCURR . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Twickenham. On the 2d of March the prisoner brought a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and a handkerchief to pawn - the waistcoat produced is what he brought, I am positive; I cannot swear to the breeches, but have every reason to belive them to be the same. I was going to lend him 5 s., but in consequence of what Kendon said when he called, I said I would not take them in; he had left them with me, and called in an hour - he took them away. I asked him his name; he said it was Collyer, and that he came from Hampton - I told him his name was not Collyer, but Beeks, and that he came from Hanwell; he said it was not, and took the things away. The prosecutor called, and shewed me the things next morning - I knew the waistcoat.

Prisoner. You asked what name I wanted to pawn them in; I said Collyer - Witness. I asked what his name was, and if they were his own; he said they were.

CHARLES KENDON . They are like the breeches and waistcoat he had.

WILLIAM FOOTHEAD . The shoes, breeches, and waistcoat are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Twickenham. I went into a public-house, and a man there asked if there was a pawnbroker's near, and asked me to pawn the breeches - he pulled his waistcoat off his back, and gave it to me with them, and told me to pawn them in the name of Collyer, for 15 s.; she would only give 5 s. - I said I would call as I returned, and then she would not take them in, and asked what name I was to pawn them in; I said Collyer - she said that was not my name - that I came from Hanwell; I said I did not. I took them to the man, and went away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Reference Number: t18240407-48

Before Mr. Justice Park.

655. GEORGE BOSWELL , BENJAMIN HOLLOWAY , alias HENRY GRIFFITHS , and FRANCIS HENRY JERMAINE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , at Acton , in the dwelling-house of William Hendley , a watch, value 3 l.; a watch chain, value 2 d.; a

seal, value 2 d., and a key, value 2 d. , the goods of Samuel Crouch .

PHOEBE HENDLEY. I live at Acton, Middlesex, and am the wife of William Hendley ; he rents the house - Samuel Crouch lodges with us. I keep a fruit shop. On the 6th of March Crouch's watch was in my care, hanging on a nail in the back kitchen. I went up stairs, and my neighbour called out to me - I came down, and immediately missed the watch; it was there when I went up stairs; it was a silver watch, with a gilt chain, seal, and key. I had seen the inside of it; there was a watch paper, and a worked piece of cloth in it, in the form of a flower-pot. I had sewn it on the paper myself.

MARY CRIPPS . I live next door to Hendley. On Saturday, the 6th of March, about a quarter to two o'clock I saw the prisoners Holloway and Jermaine - Jermaine went down into Hendley's kitchen; Holloway did not go further than the passage leading to the kitchen - Boswell was with them, but he went down the town to a grocer's-shop, ten or twelve yards off, for some cheese. I saw Holloway come out of the passage about a minute before Jermaine. I heard Boswell say when he left them, that he would go and get some cheese, and asked the others were they were going - they said they would go next door and get some onions; this was before they went into the house. Jermaine came to my door; I told him I did not sell onions - that he could get them next door; they did not go into the shop. Jermaine went down into the kitchen I am certain; there is only a thin partition between that and my house, and I heard him go into the kitchen, and seeing him come out without onions I went and called Mrs. Hendley.

ROBERT RICKETTS . I live at Acton. In consequence of what I heard from Hendley, I went in pursuit towards Ealing-common, and just as I got on the common I saw the three prisoners walking along; I was walking - they turned round, and seeing me, they turned short to the right, and ran into a lane. I lost sight of them; I got on a butcher's horse, and rode till I got up to them in Ilangerhill-lane, and said,

"Stop" - Boswell said,

"What do you want;" I said,

"You have stolen a watch." Boswell then got over a ditch, and Holloway did the same. I followed them on foot, and as I got over the ditch Boswell dropped the watch papers into the ditch, out of his breeches pocket. I followed them both across two fields, and then collared Boswell; Holloway turned back, as if to shew fight; they wanted to know what I wanted with them; I said they had stolen a watch - Holloway said he had not; I asked what they ran for; he said,

"I ran, I thought you was after me for stealing turnips." I secured them both, brought them back to the ditch, and picked up the watch papers, which I produce.

Prisoner BOSWELL. Q. Did not one Cooper pick up the papers - A. I did.

SAMUEL CROUCH . I am a bricklayer, and lodge in the house. I left my watch there when I went to dinner, and hearing that it was stolen I went in pursuit of Jermaine, from the description I had of him, and overtook him between 3 and 4 miles from Acton; I asked if he belonged to the canal boat; he said, No - I asked if he had been at Acton; he aid No, he did not know where Acton was. I said I should take him there, and see if the people knew him, and did so. Nothing was found on him.

MARY CRIPPS . I am sure Jermaine is the boy who went into the kitchen.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable. Crouch gave Jermaine into my custody - I found the duplicate of a silk handkerchief upon him, pawned on that very day (the 6th of March,) for 2 s. 6 d., in the name of Liddy; I asked how he got it; he said he bought it of a boy named George Liddy , for 1 s. I afterwards searched Boswell, and found about 18 d. in silver upon him - he said he had been out of work six weeks; that he had worked in a brick-field, and was looking for work; I asked how he became possessed of that money; he said he had pawned a silk handkerchief that morning for 2 s. 6 d. I asked his name; he said George Liddy , and that the handkerchief was pawned in that name; I asked him where the duplicate was; he said he had left it at his lodging in Cato-street, Paddington. I afterwards told him that Jermaine was in custody; they both denied knowing him, or having been with him.

Prisoner BOSWELL. Q. I told you I was called Liddy, but my right name was Boswell - A. He gave the name of Boswell at the office.

SAMUEL CROUCH . The watch papers produced are mine - I had had them twelve months. The watch was worth three guineas; I would not sell it for that.

PHOEBE HENDLEY . I know this watch paper; I sewed it to the paper myself.

BOSWELL'S Defence. I and Holloway were looking for work at the brick-fields. We went to Acton, and this man came and asked if I had stolen a watch; I thought he had come after us about some turnips; we ran away and when I came back he found the papers, and said,

"Which of you dropped these?" and that one of us must, have dropped them. The people in the town asked who he found them on - he said one of us must have dropped them.

HOLLOWAY'S Defence. We were looking for work; this man came up, and took us to the woman, and she said she saw us all three go through the town together.

JERMAINE'S Defence. I was going to meet a boat on the canal; I could not see it coming, and returned. Some bargemen asked me to drive the horse, which I did, and this man took me.

BOSWELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

HOLLOWAY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

JERMAINE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18240407-49

Before Mr. Justice Park.

656. JOHN CORBITT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , at St. Ann, Westminster , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Cooper Barlow , fifty-five yards of linen, value 5 l. , the goods of the said Thomas Cooper Barlow .

THOMAS MARCH . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Cooper Barlow , a linen-draper , who lives in Greek-street, Soho , in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster, and rents the house. On the 22d of March, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner walk out of the shop with this piece of 5-4ths Irish linen - he had taken it out of the window inside; he was walking out very deliberately; I

called to the boy, who had his back to the door, and he followed, and brought the prisoner back in three or four minutes. I picked the cloth up in the street; he had dropped it about eight yards from the door.

Prisoner. You said you thought I was the man, that I had a brown coat on - Witness. I am certain he is the man.

HENRY BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Barlow. March called Stop thief! I turned round and saw the prisoner with this Irish on his arm - I followed him, and called Stop thief! he dropped it before I overtook him. I stopped him, and brought him back; he had turned round the corner shop, then turned back as if he knew nothing about it, and I met him; he was not out of my sight above a minute. I am quite certain of him.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plaisterer. I was in Greek-street. March gave me the linen, which I produce.

THOMAS MARCH . This is the linen; it has my mark on it, and cost my master 7 l.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible that the boy can swear to a person after he has been out of his sight above half a minute.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18240407-50

Before Mr. Justice Park.

657. EDWARD COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , sixty yards of flannel, value 3 l. the goods of Thomas Morten Statham .

THOMAS MORTEN STATHAM . I am a linen draper , and live in Commercial-place, City-road . On the 16th of March, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour behind my shop. I heard footsteps in the shop, turned my head, and saw a tall man going out with two rolls of flannel under his arm. I jumped up, hallooed very loud, and followed him; he threw it down and ran up a gateway close to the house, which is no thoroughfare. I went up there with a crowd of people, and saw him turn up to the wall, as if for a necessary purpose, but his dress was not unbuttoned. I took him back - it was the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You lost sight of him as he turned the corner, I suppose - A. Yes, for the moment. The gateway leads to Mr. Johnson's manufactory, who has a number of work people - every door in the gateway was shut.

COURT. Q. Did he say that he had come from the manufactory - A. No, my Lord.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I saw the prisoner and two more going along Commercial-place, between seven and eight o'clock. I saw him one door from the shop, but did not see him lurking about.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home when I was seized and charged with this offence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-51

Before Mr. Justice Park.

658. JOHN GIBSON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Dennis Doyle , about eight o'clock on the night of the 22d of February , and stealing a looking-glass, value 7 l.; a tea caddy, value 30 s.; a pistol, value 10 s.; two saltcellars and a spoon, value 2 s., his property: a hat, value 26 s.; two gowns, value 30 s.; two night-gowns, value 2 s.; a child's gown, value 6 d.; five napkins, value 6 d.; three petticoats, value 3 s.; a shirt, value 4 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a box, value 1 d.; eight drinking glasses, value 4 s.; six tumblers, value 9 s.; two saltcellars, value 1 s.; two cruets, value 1 s.; a glass plate, 6 d., and a pair of drawers, value 1 s. , the goods of Dixon How .

The evidence given on this trial having been repeated on the prisoner's trial as an accessary, it is presumed useless to state it here. See the 8th day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-52

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

659. ELIZABETH HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a sheet, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of the city of London as governors of St. Bartholomew's hospital, in West Smithfield, of the foundation of King Henry the 8th .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ANN DANN . I am an assistant at St. Bartholomew's hospital. The prisoner was a night nurse with me. Since Lady day I have looked over the linen, and missed twelve sheets, in consequence of suspicion, I spoke to her, and she gave me twelve duplicates of them, which I gave to the steward.

MR. WALKER WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY . I am steward of the hospital. The property there belongs to the Corporation. Dann gave me the duplicates.

WILLIAM TILYARD . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets, pawned on the 2d of February and the 22d of March, for 1 s. 6 d. each, by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-53

660. THOMAS WINSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Tathan , from his person .

WILLIAM TATHAM . I am clerk in a solicitor's office. On the 20th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in Newgate-street; an officer told me I had lost my handkerchief - I felt, and it was gone. I saw a boy running down the street, who dropped it. Another officer took him, but not in my presence. The handkerchief was brought to me.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I was in Newgate-street with Herdsfield, and saw the prisoner and another lad following the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner put his hand in, and take the handkerchief out of his pocket. I followed him - he threw it down, and fell; he was stopped, and delivered to me. I never lost sight of him. A man gave me the handkerchief.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I saw the prisoner and another boy close behind the prosecutor, and saw him take the handkerchief. I secured the other, but he was discharged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-54

661. JOHN SIDNEY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of William Bailey , from his person .

WILLIAM BAILEY . I live in Chiswell-street. On the 6th of April, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was in Long-lane . A woman told me my handkerchief was gone, and pointed the prisoner out. He ran down, Charterhouse-square, and seeing me close at his heels, threw the handkerchief over into the area of a house in Charterhouse-lane. I caught hold of him, and on returning, the servant of the house gave it to me. I had not felt it taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE HAZZLEWOOD WORRAL . I am an officer. I received him in custody with the handkerchief. He said nothing to the charge.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-55

662. ABRAHAM THOMAS BROWN and JOHN WILKINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Henry Willoughby , from his person .

JOHN CHOWN . I saw the prisoners following Mr. Willoughby - his handkerchief hung out of his pocket. The prisoners laid hold of it, attempting to get it, but one end of it still remained in the pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-56

663. JOHN BLANSHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Corrie , from his person .

JOHN CORRIE . I live in Charterhouse-street. On Sunday evening, the 29th of February, I was standing in the aisle of the chapel, in Barbican , and felt a hand in my pocket. I turned round, and saw the prisoner walking out of the chapel - and missing my handkerchief, I followed him, and saw him put it into his hat on the steps. - He crossed the road - I followed and secured him. He denied it, and said he had nothing in his pocket. I told him to take off his hat. He did so, and gave the handkerchief to me, and said he could not tell how it came there, he thought it must have been by accident.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you miss your handkerchief yourself - A. Yes, I felt it taken - nobody stood near me except some children.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the chapel, where I generally attend, and after some time I came out. The prosecutor followed, and asked if I had not a handkerchief of his - I said, No, for I had come out without one. One of the young chaps who stood behind the gentleman must have put it into my hat.

MR. CORRIE. I saw him put it into his hat as he went out.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-57

664. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a fir deal, value 6 s. , the goods of William Atkinson .

SAMUEL DOWNING . I am foreman to William Atkinson , carpenter , Giltspur-street . On the 2d of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a deal out of the yard. I followed, and took him with it on his shoulder. He said he was going to take it some where, but I could not understand him. He appeared intoxicated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-58

665. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Wood , on the King's highway, on the 13th of March , at St. Giles, without, Cripplegate , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two shirts, value 15 s.; two neckkerchiefs, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; a table cloth, value 1 s; and four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. ; her property.

MARY WOOD . I am a laundress , and live in Parr's-place, Goswell-road. On Saturday, the 13th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going up Hart-court , Cripplegate, with a bundle containing the articles stated in the indictment; (looking at the bundle) this is the property. A young man came up - hit me a blow on the side of my head, and took the bundle from me without saying anything; he ran away with it, and I after him, and saw him stopped - it was the prisoner; I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you married - A. I am a widow. I had turned up the Court - there was a strong gas-light there; the person came first in front of me, and then on my side - the Court leads into Bridgwater-square - it happened about six yards from the square, and was done almost instantaneously; I was very frightened and a good deal confused - he went round towards Golden-lane, and turned a corner, but I never lost sight of him - I ran very fast; the Court is but narrow. He was stopped, and I came up immediately.

Q. Did he not instantly say,

"I have just picked the bundle up" - A. Yes; and I said

"Oh dear No, he has taken it from me;" I swear to him - I never lost sight of him.

Q. If you had not seen him for a fortnight, could you have sworn to him - A. Yes; I could - I am sure of him.

WILLIAM SMITH . On the 13th of March I was standing in the shop, in Bridgwater-gardens, where I live, talking to a person, and heard a female cry Stop thief! I run to the door, and heard her say

"he has taken my bundle of linen;" the prisoner was then running down the street - I immediately attempted to lay hold of him - he pushed on the right hand side, but I caught him by the tail of his coat, and kept hold of him with the bundle.

Cross-examined. Q. You heard an alarm and came out - A. Yes; and saw him within a yard of the shop - and took him three yards further; he was running - and when he was taken, he said he had picked the bundle up.

JAMES TREACHER . I was coming out of my father's door which is close to this spot; I heard a woman cry out before I opened the door - I ran, and saw a man turn the corner running, he was stopped in a moment with the bundle, and said he had picked it up. The prosecutrix fainted away the moment she saw that he was taken. I heard a tremendous blow, as if a head was knocked

against the shutter, as I was in the passage, and then I heard her cry out,

"Oh!" and then

"Stop thief!"

Cross-examined. Q. A push against the shutter might make that noise - A. It might; I went out instantly, and lost sight of the person, as I slipped - the prosecutrix was behind me.

Q. If you lost sight of him, she must have done the same - A. I should think so.

Q. Do not you believe that it was some other man who took it, and not the prisoner - A. I thought so when I came to see him with the bundle, as he had an apron on, and I did not think that the man I saw running had an apron on.

COURT. Q. What coloured apron was it - A. A blue butcher's apron. He said he had picked it up, and went quietly to the Compter; the prosecutrix fainted the moment he was taken; she was much agitated, and cried out

"My gentlemen's linen - my gentlemen's linen!"

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I am an officer. I received him in charge; he said he picked it up in the court; I did not ask why he ran away with it.

MARY WOOD . Only one person attacked me; he had a dark coat and a blue woollen apron on when he attacked me; I am positively certain of it; the bundle is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. The man taken had a dark coat and apron on, but will you swear that you could describe the dress of the person who robbed you - A. Yes; and he came up to the office in the same dress; I can safely swear to his dress, and could have described him if he had not been taken; my head did not go against the shutters that I know of; I did not faint till he was taken.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . When I came up I do not think that she knew me from the thief - she was in such a bad state, not fit to be positive.

COURT. Q. What are your reasons for saying so - A. When I went to her, she was in a house, and several people round her. She could hardly give any account - she had fainted.

The prisoner made no defence, but eight witnesses gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to mercy, on account of his character, by the Jury .

Reference Number: t18240407-59

666. THOMAS PARLOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a purse, value 2 d.; a razor, value 1 s.; eight files, value 2 s.; a leather case, value 1 d.; a sovereign, two half-crowns, and six shillings , the property of William Evans .

WILLIAM EVANS . I am a shoemaker , and lodge in Fleur-de-lis-court, Fetter-lane . The prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 15th of March he laid in bed all day till five o'clock in the evening. I opened my purse at twelve, and took out some money in his presence. I locked my box, went out, and returned to tea at four, but did not go up stairs; I went out, returned at six, and he was gone. I found my box open and money gone. I found him about half-past seven at a public-house in Long-alley, Moorfields, and gave him in charge. My purse, 22 s. in silver, and the duplicate of my watch were found on him, and a crooked file. I lost two sovereigns, two half-crowns, and some silver. I found a razor and some files next day, at another lodging which he had taken.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. I found a purse, 22 s., the duplicate of a watch, and a file on him. The file is bent, and fits the marks on the box.

WILLIAM EVANS . The purse is mine and the duplicate. I had pawned the watch at Brighton.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my lodgings, and two or three yards from the door picked up that purse, and the duplicate in it. I met my brother, who gave me 24 s. I took the files up by mistake, as we work together.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-60

667. THOMAS SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a box, value 3 s. 6 d.; twenty-four curtainpins, value 1 l. 2 s. 9 d.; one hundred and eight sash screws, value 21 s. 9 d.; eighteen handles, value 12 s. 4 d.; twelve stubs and plates, value 5 s. 3 d.; twenty-four lifters, value 7 s. 6 d.; twelve bolts, value 5 s. 3 d.; two escutcheons, value 6 s. 4 d.; one hundred and forty-four turns, value 42 s.; seventy-two rings, value 7 s. 4 d.; one hundred and forty-four knobs, value 9 s. 4 d.; one hundred and forty-four screws, value 5 s. 3 d.; two hundred and four hooks, value 55 s.; one hundred and forty-four other escutcheons, value 1 l. 6 s.; one hundred and forty-four top-pieces, value 3 s. 9 d.; seventy-two striking plates, value 18 s.; sixty-six latches, value 89 s.; eighteen bell-pulls, value 9 s. 6 d., and seventy-two padlocks, value 33 s. , the goods of Richard Lattimore .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Crowley and others, his partners.

RICHARD BARNETT . I am clerk to Messrs. John Crowley and Co., carriers , at Albion Wharf. On the 17th of March a box came by the boat, directed to Mr. Johnson, Bishopsgate-street, it was put into Lattimore's cart, to deliver.

RICHARD LATTIMORE . I am a carter . On the 17th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I received this box - my cart stood in Lime-street for five or eight minutes at the end of Richard's-court, while I took a box up there, and on returning, this box was gone.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I met the prisoner a few minutes past seven o'clock, in the middle of the road, in Lime-street, with this box on his shoulder - he passed me, I followed, he turned up a dark place, and I laid hold of him and asked what he had got, he said a box, which a man had asked him to carry and to throw it down there, and he would give him 1 s.; he said he did not know where the man was - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. A man stood at the corner of Lime-street-square with this box, and desired me to take it round the first turning to the right, and he would follow me.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-61

668. THOMAS JONES and JOHN MYERS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , two hundred pounds of lead, value 30 s., and two hundred pounds of copper, value 40 s,; the goods of John Howell , and fixed to a certain building (to wit,) a house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Richard Ashworth , and to be fixed to a building of his.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Quarrill , and to be fixed to a house of his.

THOMAS QUARRILL. I am a lamp-maker , and live in Bell-court, Doctor's Commons. On the 20th of February, in consequence of information, I went to a house on Peter's-hill , which I had purchased by auction last July - but have only paid a deposit. I found all the gutters stripped of the lead, and eighty-four feet of water-pipe gone. I found some of it on the attic stairs, rolled up ready to be carried away. I compared it to the place and it fitted. I bought the house of William Ashworth - John Howell is assignee of a bankrupt , who originally occupied it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You have not completed the purchase - it has never been conveyed to you - A. No, the key was delivered to me - I could have lived in it if I liked; the key was not given to me as possession of the house.

COURT. Q. Why was not the conveyance completed - A. Some deeds were not in their possession, but they are now; the title was not made good till after the robbery. Howell and Ashworth both joined in the conveyance.

HENRY TURNPENNY , I am an officer. On the 20th of February I went with the prosecutor to this house, and found the lead and copper stripped, and some on the garret stairs, and while he was gone to find a place where we could watch I heard a noise in the kitchen. I waited about ten minutes, and saw a light come up stairs, and Jones the prisoner went into the front parlour; he had a dark lantern. I caught hold of him, we scuffled - I got him into the back yard - rose an alarm - and sent another officer down stairs, and he brought Myers out of the coal-hole - the lantern was thrown down in the scuffle, and I found a box of matches on the floor, and a latch key on Jones.

MR. QUARRILL. I was at the house a fortnight before, and every thing was safe, The key was lent to me by the auctioneer. I mended the roof myself, and had some glass put in previous to the robbery.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable. I was with Turn-penny - Jones came up stairs, and went into the parlour with a dark lantern. I found Myers in the coal cellar; they said they came there for a night's lodging. I asked what they wanted the dark lantern for; they made no answer. I found another dark lantern, a can of oil, and a phosphorous bottle there.

Cross-examined. Q. You had not seen them together - A. No, Myers said they both came in together for a night's lodging, and that nobody else was in the house.

ELIZA COOK . I live at No. 19. Peter's-hill. On the 19th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I heard a noise in the next house, as if somebody was beating up lead.

ANN OWEN . I live in the same house, and heard the noise, it lasted from half-past eleven till about twelve; we were afraid to give an alarm.

JONES'S Defence. It was a very wet night - I had no place to go to, and seeing this empty house, and all the windows broken, we went in for shelter.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MYERS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-62

669. HENRY WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , sixty yards of muslin, value 4 l., and forty-eight handkerchiefs, value 19 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Boyd and Thomas French .

ROBERT S. WIGLEY . I am in the employ of Thomas Boyd and Thomas French , who live in Skinner-street. On the 1st of April I made up a parcel, containing sixty yards of muslin, and four dozen handkerchiefs.

JOHN BOLTON . I am the porter. On the 1st of April I took this parcel from the prosecutors to Aldgate High-street ; it was taken out of my cart while I ran up the Three Nunn's-yard; it was safe when I was in Shoreditch; I had wedged it in between two bales.

JOHN FORRESTER . On the 1st of April, about a quarter to three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Aldgate High-street, and saw the prisoner and another lad walking backwards and forwards by the cart. I stepped into a doorway, and saw the prisoner go to the tail of the cart, and presently come away with this parcel. I secured him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-63

670. JAMES M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , two fixtures, (i.e.) two window sashes, value 4 l. , the goods of the Rev. Gilbert Berresford and others.

Mr. Alley for the prosecutors, declined offering any evidence, being unable to sustain this indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-64

671. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM FINDLATER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d March , a watch, value 5 l. , the goods of Charles Joseph M'Phael .

T. M. M'PHALE. My brother Joseph is a jeweller , and lives in Pope's Head-alley, Cornhill . On the 23d of March, I was dining in a room adjoining the shop, and saw the prisoners come in together; they asked the price of a watch-key, and offered 5 s. for it, one said he would pay 1 s. off; the other looked at another key, and said,

"Will you pay 1 s. for me." and just at that moment my brother's boy called out,

"Drop that watch." I directed my attention to where the watches are kept, and saw one laying outside the case; it was not there a short time before.

MATTHEW GOVETT . I was in the prosecutor's service at this time; the prisoners came in. I saw Findlater take a watch out of the glass case and put it into his breeches pocket. I was at the other end of the shop, and called out

"Drop that watch before you go," and he put it on the counter; they were going out of the shop, but Mr. Fergusson detained them; they were five or ten minutes in the shop, and had opened the door of the case to get it.

GEORGE FERGUSSON . I occupy the next shop to this. I went in and saw the prisoners. Govett told them to drop the watch. I immediately detained them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I was buying a key; he said I had taken a watch. I know nothing of this lad; he was behind me.

FINDLATER'S Defence. He knows nothing of me.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FINDLATER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-65

672. ELIZABETH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a gown, value 2 s. 6 d., two pair of stays, value 17 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Cole .

JAMES COLE . I live in Angel-court, Throgmorton-street . About three o'clock in the afternoon, I found the prisoner in my attic, with a gown and two pair of stays; she is a stranger.

MARY STALLARD . I am servant to Mr. Cole. I saw the prisoner with the property in her apron. The house is let out as offices, and the door kept open; the gown hung in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240407-66

673. GEORGE COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , eleven pounds of Sultana raisins, value 6 s.; three pounds and a-half of currants, value 3 s. 8 d.; and six pounds of sugar, value 5 s. , the goods of John Hancock and Thomas Hogg , his masters .

MR. LAW conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am a city officer. On the 2d of March, in consequence of directions, I watched the prosecutors' premises; and about ten minutes to seven o'clock I saw the prisoner coming along Thames-street; I said, Coleman you are suspected of robbing your employers; he said he had not. I said, you have property about you now; he said he had not, and agreed to go with me to the stables. I attempted to search him; he dragged me to a dark part of the stables, gave me a violent kick, and we both fell, and then he got rid of what he had. I could feel something under his apron in the scuffle, and when he had got rid of it he got up, and said,

"What do you want of me;" and down the cellar stairs, at that place, I found these raisins, a bag of currants, and a bag of plumbs; they were Mr. Hancock's stables, opposite to his house; a picklock key was produced to me, which I tried to the warehouse door - it opens it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you attempted to search him he began the struggle - A. Yes, I did not see him throw any thing away, it was so dark; he had something bulky under his apron, in the street.

WILLIAM WILSHIRE . I am an officer. I went to Marchant's assistance, and took the prisoner into custody; he walked about the kitchen in great agitation; the servant said,

"What is the matter George," he said,

"I am accused of robbing master;" she said,

"You had better sit down and make yourself comfortable; he sat down, and presently started up and made his way into a door, which I found was his bed-room; he shut the door and jammed my knuckles between it and the post. Marchant came, and we secured him with some difficulty; we found the keys of his box on him, and in it was six pounds of sugar.

WILLIAM DAVEY . I am porter to the prosecutors. On this day, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I stood at the warehouse door, and saw the prisoner go into Thames-street; my master lives on Bread-street-hill - he returned with Marchant, who took him into the stable; I heard a scuffle, and on going in it was nearly over. There is a cellar under the place; I got a light, went with the officers there, and found a bag of raisins at the foot of the cellar stairs, close to where they were struggling.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the bags on the steps - A. They appeared to have rolled down. I found them there not three minutes after he was secured.

THOMAS PUGH . I am porter to the prosecutors. I was with the witness, heard the scuffle, and found the bags.

SAMUEL COX . I am groom to Mr. Hancock. I was in the next stable, heard a noise, came out, and the officer called me to help him, but I was frightened - they were struggling close at the top of the cellar stairs; I got a light, and found two bags close to the stairs. I had been in the stable a quarter of an hour before. I fetched the keys out of my master's room - nobody else could have put the property there. There were several trusses of hay close to where he was taken, and about nine days after, when I used the hay, I found a picklock-key among it - I saw it tried to the warehouse door; it unlocked it. The door leads from the place the prisoner occupied in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the hay packed pretty tight - A. One or two trusses were apart from the others.

MR. THOMAS HOGG . I am in partnership with Mr. John Hancock . The prisoner was our servant, and occupied a room in our house, which communicates with the warehouse by a door which we kept locked; he had no key to it with our permission, and had no authority to touch any of the property. I know some of this sugar, it being chippings, and a quality we use very little of; it corresponds with the bulk in the cask; we have such currants in our warehouse, and here is a package of Sultana raisins; we miss exactly this quantity. The boxes were broken and left empty.

Cross-examined. Q. If your servant stole raisins he would not leave empty boxes to be seen - A. He could not take them out. The sugar is broken to pieces for samples.

Prisoner's Defence. Every man in the place has access to the stables. My reason for struggling with the officer was because he ran his hand into my breeches.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-67

674, JAMES HEATH was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March , fourteen pounds of lead, value 2 s., a fixture, (i.e.) a ball-cock, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Wild , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain outlet belonging to his dwelling-house.

RICHARD WILD . I am a cutler , and live in New-street, Fetter-lane . On Tuesday morning, the 16th of March, when I got up, I found my yard overflowed with water; the pipe and ball-cock were gone from the water-but; I found them at Guildhall a week afterwards, and matched them with the place, they corresponded. It might have been stolen on the evening of the 15th.

JAMES STANTON . On the 15th of March, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought this pipe and ball-cock to me to sell; I asked where he got it, he said he had been at work putting down new pipe and taking the old; it being wet I detained him, and gave him in charge; and next day Wild sent for me to put new pipe to his place, and I found that this matched it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-68

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 10.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

675. JOHN TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , two pairs of boots, value 15 s. , the goods of Nicholas Ward .

BENJAMIN WARD . My father lives in Holywell-street . On the 27th of March, about a quarter to ten o'clock at night, I was in the parlour, heard a noise in the shop, and saw the prisoner there taking these boots off a line; he saw me, and ran out with them - I followed him to Savoy-street, I lost sight of him for about two minutes, and saw him taken by the Savoy. I am certain he is the man; the boots have not been found.

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable. I was near the New Church; the prisoner passed me, and was stopped; I did not see him with any thing; he said he was not the man, but he was running before any body.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a cry of Stop-thief, a man ran by me with something, and I ran after him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-69

676. ANN CURNOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a quilt, value 2 s.; four yards of flannel, value 2 s.; four yards of stuff, value 4 s.; a yard of carpet, value 18 d.; a shirt, value 1 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; an apron, value 1 s.; and a pair of spectacles, value 6 d. the goods of James Harmsworth .

RACHAEL HARMSWORTH . I am the wife of James Harmsworth ; we live at Twickenham ; I am eighty-two years old, and my husband is ninety; we are relieved by the parish ; the prisoner was appointed by the parish to do a few things for us, we being infirm ; she came to my house on the 6th of August, and absconded on the 8th of January; I was very poorly, and used not to go into her bed-room; but when she left I missed a blanket off her bed, and afterwards missed the rest of these things from my drawers and boxes - two of the boxes were locked.

ANN SCURR . I am a pawnbroker at Twickenham. On the 8th of January the prisoner pawned a sheet with me in her own name.

ELIZABETH STEVENS . The prisoner sold me some stuff, a blanket, flannel, and a carpet. I keep a clothes-shop at Twickenham.

- SIMCOCK. I took her in charge; she had 2 s. 6 d. a week, and liberty to go out to work four days.

Prisoner's Defence. I could get no work to do.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-70

677. ELEANOR LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , twenty yards of lace, value 30 s. the goods of Richard Clement and William Hobbs Clark .

GEORGE STIRLING . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody at the prosecutor's shop with this lace.

RICHARD CLEMENT . I am in partnership with William Hobbs Clark; we are linen-drapers , and live in Holborn . On the 1st of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and asked to see some lace; I shewed her a drawer, and observed her conceal a piece under her shawl; I continued to shew her more, and saw her conceal another piece in the same way; she offered me a price which I could not take, and wished me good night; I followed her out, and charged her with it, which she denied; I brought her back; she put her hand under her shawl, and threw both the cards of lace up; one fell on the counter, and the other on the floor.

WILLIAM HOBBS CLARK. I saw Mr. Clement bring the prisoner back; she threw the lace from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not afford to give his price, and came out; I never saw the lace till he brought me back.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-71

Before Mr. Justice Park.

678. WILLIAM CLIVE GREY was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 24th of January , a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows, viz. -

London, 24th of January, 1824. One month after date, pay myself, or order, 10 l. Value received. W. GREY.

To Mrs. Greig, 19, Upper Berkley-street, Portman-square. with intent to defraud Thomas Chalmets .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, well knowing it to be forged, with the like intent.

THOMAS CHALMERS . I live in Edgeware-road. I let a furnished house to Mrs. Greig, No. 3, Hereford-street, Park-lane, on the 24th of July last. When she left, if a hill of 20 l. had been paid, she would have owed me 18 d. The prisoner was a friend of hers, and had been to my house several times about it. I wrote him a letter, and did not see him after that till the 24th of January, when I went to No. 19, Upper Berkley-street, and saw him. They had left my house - he said,

"Mr. Chalmers, you wrote me a very scurrilous letter;" and that, among other things, I had charged him as a deserter, but I had acted very handsomely by giving up my authority. He said,

"Deserter, indeed - I am no deserter. If you will go to Cox and Greenwood's, you will hear of me. I am William Grey , a lieutenant on half-pay, of the 58th regiment of foot." I said I was very sorry if I had written any thing improper, but I had given my authority. We talked about a settlement of the rent, and my getting possession. Mrs. Greig and he said they could not pay the money then, but were ready to give security. I asked them if the 20 l. bill, due on Thursday, was paid - and both assured me that it was. I said if that was the case I would accommodate them, and take a bill or any thing. He said he would accept a bill. It was agreed that I was to have 8 l. on Tuesday, and take a bill for 10 l. A stamp was sent for, and a bill drawn, which he offered to accept. I thought it better to have a housekeeper's acceptance, and so he drew a bill on Mrs. Greig, endorsed it, and handed it to me.

COURT. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, his name is William Clive Grey .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-72

679. SHEIK BROM was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , at All Saints, Poplar , in the dwelling-house of Francis Robinson , three coats, value 19 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 12 s.; four waistcoats, value 12 s.; a pair of breeches, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; a pair of gaiters, value 1 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; a

pair of shoes, value 1 s.; a towel, value 6 d.; five gloves, value 6 d., two sovereigns and six shillings , the property of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am clerk to Francis Robinson , who is a provision-merchant, and has a depot for the reception of black men; it is a building attached to his dwelling-house, No. 72, High-street, in the parish of All Saints, Poplar. There is a communication between his dwelling-house and this building. I sleep in the depot with the men. I have a room there for myself, and always keep it locked in the day-time, and keep the key in my pocket. On the 5th of March there was nobody but the prisoner and one more man there, and about seven o'clock that morning I missed from my room a blue great coat, two coats, two pairs of trowsers, four waistcoats, a pair of breeches and gaiters, a towel, two black silk handkerchiefs, two pairs of white cotton stockings, five leather gloves, two sovereigns, and six shillings. I had seen them all safe the morning before, about twelve o'clock. I locked my door then, and found it locked in the evening when I went to bed, but the key went very hard. I did not then miss the things, as I did not look for them. About eight o'clock on the morning after I missed them, I saw the prisoner in the depot washing himself.

DOUGLAS TOWNS . My husband is a seaman. I live with my father, Jonathan Dodd , who keeps a tobacconist's shop. The prisoner used to come there to buy snuff, and on Thursday the 4th of March, between two and three o'clock, he came with a great coat and waistcoat to sell. I bought them of him for 7 s. I produce them. He came back again with some things in a towel, and asked if I could get them washed; he had a pair of breeches, a pair of gaiters, five gloves, and a towel. I said I would wash them for nothing, as I had bought the other things. I gave them to the officer on Friday.

JOHN DAWSON . I am apprentice to Mrs. Merrit, pawnbroker, Ratcliff-highway. I have two coats which the prisoner pawned on the 4th of March in the evening for 8 s., in the name of Jack Brown .

DAVID GIDGEON . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, who lives at Shadwell. On the 4th of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner sold me three waistcoats and a pair of trowsers. He said he wanted money, and had no use for them. I gave them to Beechey.

JAMES BEECHEY . I received a pair of breeches from Townes, a pair of gaiters, five gloves, a towel, a blue great coat, and a waistcoat. Gidgeon gave me three waistcoats, a pair of trowsers, a coat, and a waistcoat. When I apprehended the prisoner I found 17 s. 6 d. sewed up in his drawers. I had asked if he had any money - he said he had only 2 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The evidence was communicated to the prisoner through an interpreter, and he stated that one Captain Maxwell had given him the clothes.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy, being a foreigner .

Reference Number: t18240407-73

Before Mr. Justice Park.

680. ELIZABETH HILLARY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , at St. Pancras , in the dwelling house of William Bone , two silver spoons, value 30 s.; one coat, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 11 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 s. , his property.

ANN BONE . I am the wife of William Bone . We live in Ashby-street , in the parish of St. Pancras. The prisoner lodged with us for nearly three weeks. On the 26th of February, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I missed this property from a drawer in my bed-room; it was not kept locked. We got Reid the officer, who searched the prisoner, and then went away, leaving her in the house; she went out about a quarter past nine o'clock, and returned at half-past three, and then we had her taken up.

THOMAS BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town. On the 25th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned two table-spoons, in the name of Ann Brown , for 23 s. - they are worth 30 s. I had seen her before, and have no doubt of her. I gave them to Limbrick.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office. I found 17 s. 6 d. on her, and a quantity of duplicates, six of which were for property pawned in the name of Brown; but the duplicate of the spoons was not found. Blackburn gave them to me - I produce them.

ANN BONE . These spoons are ours. We rent the house. The coat was worth 30 s., and the waistcoat 11 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty. I went myself to the pawnbroker's. Read searched me, and found nothing.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18240407-74

681. JAMES LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , at St. George , two shawls, value 22 s.; one hundred and twenty yards of lace, value 15 l., a scarf, value 15 s.; four pairs of stockings, value 30 s.; and twelve yards of sarsnet, value 35 s., the goods of Charles Walker , to whom he was servant, in his dwelling house .

CHARLES WALKER . I am a linen draper , and live in King's-place, Commercial-road , in the parish of St. George. The prisoner was my shopman , and left me about the end of January or beginning of February. I missed property while he was in my service, and in about three weeks or a month after he had left, he returned wishing me to take him into my service again; I told him I should not because he had robbed me, and said I should send for an officer; he said he hoped I would not, and he would confess all. I had said nothing more to him whatever; I did not say he might as well tell the truth, or any thing to induce him. I went for an officer, leaving him with Richards my shopman.

Q. Had you instructed Richards to endeavour to get any confession from him, or to make him any threat - A. I had not. I returned with the officer, and found him still with Richards, who stated in his presence, all that he had said. I went to different pawnbrokers, by the prisoner's direction, and at each of them found property which was stolen while he was in my service.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Did you miss it while he lived with you - A. Yes, and suspected him. I missed it three or four days before he left. I did not charge him with it. I sent my clerk round to all the pawnbrokers, but he found nothing; and a few days after the prisoner asked leave to go home to his friends; he went. I told my clerk that if he returned, to discharge him, which was done. I have eight shopmen, and did not

know who to charge; he lived a year and a quarter with me. I believed him a faithful servant.

JAMES RICHARDS . I am clerk to Mr. Walker. After the prisoner had left, he came to ask master to take him back. Mr. Walker's account of the conversation is correct; I heard it; he went out for an officer; he had not desired me to question the prisoner, or to make him any threat or promise; he left me in the counting-house with him, and as soon as he was gone the prisoner, was standing by the fire, he came up to the desk and asked me to let him go; I said, I certainly should do nothing of the kind; he burst into tears, and said he would tell the truth; he then leant on the desk. I took up a piece of paper and wrote down what he said; (reads,) he said he had taken a silk shawl. I asked what he had done with it, he said he had pledged it at Parson's, in Hounsditch; and had taken four lengths of lace, and pawned it in the name of Hart, at Flemming's, Whitechapel; and had also pawned a silk scarf or shawl there for 12 s., and four pairs of silk stockings, at Barker's; and six yards of sarsnet for 17 s., in the name of Hart, at Matthew's, in the Minories; he said nothing more; upon Mr. Walker's returning he was taken into custody. I went to the pawnbrokers' next morning, and found property corresponding with the account he gave me.

HORATIO MILES . I am errand boy to Mr. Walker. At the end of January, on the day the prisoner left, I was in the shop, and saw him take a shawl and put it into his hat, and before I could get down to tell of it he was gone; there was nobody in the shop. I went down to tell them, as they were at dinner. I did not see him afterwards, till he was taken.

FREDERICK LINDNER . I am shopman to Mr. Matthew's, pawnbroker. I have a remnant of silk which was pawned on the 22d of January, for 17 s. 6 d., in the name of James Hart . I do not recollect the transaction; and do not know who pawned it.

JOSEPH TEBBS. I am shopman to Mr. Parsons, pawnbroker. I have sixty-six yards of lace, pawned in the name of James Sharp , on the 13th of December, for 4 l., by the prisoner. I am certain of him. I have frequently seen him as a customer, for the last two years. I have also four pairs of stockings, pawned on the same day, in two different lots, and at a different time, for 7 s. each, in the name of James Hart ; but I may have made a mistake in writing the name. I have a shawl and two handkerchiefs, pawned for 15 s. on the 15th of December, by him.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, a pawnbroker. I have three remnants of lace, pawned on the 13th of January, by the prisoner, for 35 s., in the name of James Hart . I knew him before.

MR. WALKER. I believe the silk shawl to be mine, but the mark is taken off. I missed one exactly like this; the sixty-six yards of lace I believe to be mine. I missed this very pattern, and know I had not sold it; it is worth eight or nine pounds; a single piece is worth 3 l. 10 s.; it cost more than 3 l.; the handkerchiefs and stockings are mine, the marks are taken off.

Cross-examined. Q. There are thousands of yards of lace of this pattern - A. No doubt of it, I swear to the best of my belief. I have several handkerchiefs of the same pattern, and miss some; the shawl is rather an uncommon one.

The prisoner made no defence, but one witness gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged.

Earnestly recommended by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character and confession .

Reference Number: t18240407-75

Before Mr. Justice Park.

682. CHARLOTTE LEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a bag, value 2 d., and four sovereigns, the property of Benjamin Dixon , from his person .

BENJAMIN DIXON . I live at Kensington. On the 21st of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from Shepherd's-bush, into the Hammersmith-road; the prisoner met me coming off Brook-green, and asked me to give her something to drink; I said the houses were all shut; she said no, they were not, that there was one open further on; she followed by my side to Hammersmith turnpike ; the Bell and Auchor public-house was shut up. I said,

"You see the house is shut." I immediately crossed to the opposite side, and as I came through the posts, she pushed against me several times; she said there was a house further on, and when I got about two hundred yards from the gate, she turned down William-street , and by her leaving so suddenly, I suspected that she had robbed me. I put my hand into my breeches pocket, and my bag, containing four sovereigns and some silver, was gone. I immediately ran back to the turnpike to look for the watchman; he was not there. I stoped a few minutes; two watchmen came; I described her to a watchman, who took me to a house; we stopped there, and she came up to the door. I gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was it quite dark - A. Yes; she had a bonnet on. I meant to give her something to get rid of her if the house had been opened. There are gas-lights on the opposite side of the road. I am sure of her person; I had an opportunity of seeing her face, and if I had not I could have described her person.

COURT. Q. How could she got your money without your perceiving it - A. I suppose it was done as I went through the posts. I do not remember whether my pocket was buttoned. My money was safe when I was on the green - I met nobody else.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a watchman. Dixon came to me just after. I had called twelve o'clock; he said he had been robbed, and described the person - but before that I had met him with the prisoner; she was rather before him. I went with him to her house; she came up. I went to her, and charged her with robbing Mr. Dixon; she said she had not; I was ten minutes before I could get her from the door, and in the meantime her husband came up - she wanted to get in doors; I would not let her - she said to he husband,

"You take the key," and put something out of her hand into his; I suspected that it was the money, and collared him, and immediately saw him throw something out of his right-hand, it sounded like money in falling. I told the watchman to get a light; and, where I thought, the money was all found in the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. You had not searched him before - A. No. I was hustling to get her to the watch-house; I saw her pass something to her husband, and saw him

clench his hand up. I saw no key; the door was locked.

JOHN DAVEY . I am a watchman. I got a light, and looked where Jenkins pointed out, and found the bag and money - the prosecutor gave it to the constable.

JAMES MILLWELL . I am a constable. Dixon gave me the bag - it contained 3 l. 6 s. 6 d.

BENJAMIN DIXON . It is mine; it is not a common one, it is made out of brown Holland by my children. I was perfectly sober.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-76

Before Mr. Justice Park.

683. JOHN BAILEY alias DONALD M'CRAW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Edmund Choice , about two o'clock in the night of the 22d of March , at St. Martin in the Fields , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 10 lbs. of snuff, value 45 s.; 20 lbs. of tobacco, value 4 l. 10 s.; thirty snuff-boxes, value 3 l.; five tobacco pipes, value 10 s.; five segar tubes, value 15 s.; four silver spoons, value 6 s.; a pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s.; a coat, value 5 s.; five hundred segars, value 10 s., and an umbrella, value 5 s. , his property.

WILLIAM EDMUND CHOICE . I live at No. 4, New-street, Covent-garden , in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields - I rent the house, and pay the taxes, but the shop is divided into two, which have different entrances from the street, but both have one stair-case. Mr. Ryan, a perfumer, has the other shop. I have a back door, leading into Goodwin's-court, St. Martin's-lane, which I open on Sundays, and he goes in at his shop door.

Q. Can you go from your shop to your neighbour's without going into the street - A. Yes, my Lord. There is a partition between the two shops, but there is a door to each shop leading into the passage and stair-case of the house - these doors are both locked at night; the dwelling-house is common to us both; we have one landlord; I pay 100 l. a-year rent, and he pays 80 l. we have separate rooms, and separate kitchens. On the 23d of March, at seven o'clock in the morning, the servant came up; I went down stairs, and found the parlour in a state of great confusion - the parlour is within my shop, and looks into Goodwin's-court. I was the last person up the night before, and saw every thing secure; the window looking into Goodwin's-court was secure. I found the box of the lock on the door leading from the shop to the parlour was taken off; it appeared that they had got in at the stair-case window. The back parlour has been built since the house; they had got on the roof of that, and opened the landing-place window, which was shut at night, and is generally fastened by a padlock; they could then walk down stairs. There is a small kitchen behind the parlour; they had gone through there, taken off the box of the lock, and got into the shop. I was not disturbed in the night. I missed between ten and twenty pounds of snuff, about thirty pounds of tobacco, and about thirty snuff-boxes, which were worth 3 l.; they cost more - also five hundred segars, and five amber segar-tubes. The prisoner is my landlord - I had been his tenant about six or seven weeks; he lodged with his father and mother, in Brook-street, Holborn. I knew him by the name of M'Craw - I was never at his father's before house the robbery. I get Avis and Smith, who went there with a search-warrant.

COURT. Q. Do you pay the taxes - A. I pay the taxes of the whole premises. Ryan is not my lessee, but a lessee of the landlord's, as well as myself.

EMLY CHOICE. I am the wife of the prosecutor. The prisoner is our landlord - I knew him by the name of M'Craw. On Monday, the day before the robbery, he came to the house; I was in the shop; the stair-case window was padlocked; he asked for the key of the padlock, to go out there, pointing to the window; I did not hesitate in giving it to him, being the landlord. I do not know whether he went out, but he went up stairs, came down again, threw the key into the scales, and went away; it was the same key. When I went to bed I looked at the padlock - it appeared to be fast. Next morning, when the robbery was discovered, the padlock appeared to have been opened with a key - it was not wrenched open.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did he not come on that day for Mr. Ryan's rent - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Did he go to a lodger for rent - A. He went up stairs, and staid about three minutes - I do not know where he went; we have a lodger named Gale.

MR. CHOICE re-examined. There was no agreement who was to do the repairs. Ryan came to the house since me. There was rent due to the prisoner by Gale, a lodger; he pays rent to me now, but owed the prisoner a balance for rent due before I came, as I understand.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday, the 24th, I had a search-warrant, and went to No. 36, Brook-street, Holborn - the house of the prisoner's father; the prisoner opened the street door for me; I asked if Mr. M'Craw was within - he said Yes; I walked up stairs after him with Smith and the prosecutor, to the two pair front room, where his father was living; he took us up there. I produced my warrant, and said the gentleman present had been robbed, and in the table-drawer in that room I found two bundles of Spanish segars, and two amber segar-tubes, and in a cupboard in the room I found about a quarter of a pound of tobacco. I asked him where he got them; he said he bought the Spanish segars at Mr. Gordon's, a tobacconist, in Holborn, and bought the tobacco of a smuggler.

WILLIAM SMITH . I went with Avis, but found nothing relative to this case.

JANE INCE . I am servant to Mr. Choice. I was the first person up on this morning, and found the stair-case window open; it was shut when I went to bed. I found the back door leading into Goodwin's-court open, and the padlock laying on the window cill.

MR. CHOICE. I know this tobacco by having prepared it myself a few days before; I did not prepare it from the leaf, but it is a mixture which I made for an experiment; I am as sure of it as if my name was on it. The value of the property lost is 12 l. as I have given it, but that is not a third of the real value. I can speak to one of the amber tubes particularly, it being a milky amber - I remember offering it to a gentleman a few days before. I am not so certain of the others.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You lost a large quantity of tobacco - A. Not of this description, not above half a pound - it is mixed with a particular bark, and different things; it is a secret of trade.

Q. Is not Cascarilla bark bought at a low price - A. Yes; that mixed with tobacco gives it a perfume; it must be smoked to ascertain the perfume.

Q. You speak from the quantity lost - A. No, the quality; it is a preparation of my own. Amber tubes vary much in appearance, make, and shape; a milky appearance is common in them, but two are seldom a-like; I only lost five. They are sold by most tobacconists - I do not swear to the tubes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was desired by my father-in-law to go and receive 5 l. 10 s. from a lodger at this house. I went, and saw the lodger's wife - and it was agreed that I should come in the evening and see the husband - and as I came down stairs, I saw a quantity of dirt on the tiles. I went down to Mrs. Choice, and said,

"Have the goodness to lend me the key - there is a quantity of dirt on the tiles, and I will sweep it away." I went up and swept the tiles, as they complained of the rain coming in. Three people in the court saw me sweeping the tiles. I went down threw the key into the scales, and said I had been sweeping them - but she had a customer, and I did not disturb her. I believe the servant saw me throw the broom down stairs. I was at home in bed at the time of the robbery. As to the tobacco, I have smoked it myself, and have witnesses who have seen me smoke it. I buy a quarter of a pound at Gordon's, and put an ounce of Cascarilla back into it, as a fume arises from it exactly like musk.

WILLIAM MATHEWSON . I keep the Skinner's Arms public-house, Coburg-street, Clerkenwell. I have known the prisoner eight months. I heard of his apprehension a few days after it happened - I think at the latter end of the week. On the night of Monday, the 22d of March, he was at my house, and left before twelve o'clock at night - he had been there about three hours. He always smoked his own tobacco in my parlour. I have had part of a pipe with him several times. I have bought tobacco of the prosecutor both before and since this happened.

Q. What sort of a flavour was it, as to what he lent you - A. It is the same sort and flavour as what the prisoner lent me - it is called returns, and is scented. I have some here which I bought of Choice about three weeks ago. There is a flavour in mine which there is not in that produced;

(examining it.)

JOHN CURE . I live at No. 29, George's-place, St. John-street-road, and have known the prisoner some years. I heard of his apprehension on the Sunday following. On the Monday before, I called at his father's house, to consult him about some repairs, and while I stood at the door he came; that was at half-past two o'clock, and he met me at Matthewson's at seven in the evening. I went home about half-past seven, returned in an hour and a half to him, and remained there till half past eleven, and left him there. I have often had tobacco of his - there is something of a musky flavour in it.

Q. Have you since tried any tobacco bought at Choice's - A. Yes, I have smoked some that Matthewson bought. I think it is the same sort as the prisoner used, but cannot swear it; I thought it as nearly alike as possible; the prisoner's was mixed with Cascarilla bark, which is bought at the chemist's. I know Gordon's shop, King-street, Holborn - he is a large tobacconist; a customer could go there without a person being able to speak to them; there were three or four customers there when I went.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I am acquainted with the prisoner. I did not hear of his apprehension till he was committed, which was on Saturday the 27th. I was in company with him on the preceding Monday at Matthewson's till nearly twelve o'clock. It is a mile and a half from Covent-garden. We came out together, and walked as far as Bowling-green-row, Leather-lane, which leads up to Brook-street, and left him about twenty minutes after twelve. I have smoked his tobacco, and have since smoked some bought at Choice's - they are both of the same flavour in my judgment. I can get the same at any other shop in London; it is prepared with Cascarilla bark.

COURT. Q. What are you - A. A coppersmith and brazier. Matthewson's house is not generally open so late - there was a party of friends there.

MARY ADAMS . I rented a room in Mrs. M'Craw's house, No. 36, Brook-street. The prisoner lived there. I let him in on Monday night, the 22d of March, about half-past twelve o'clock. I did not go to bed for two or three hours after. I work at the fancy trimming business, and am frequently at work all night. I think I must have heard him if he had gone out, as the door goes hard. He sleeps in the same room with his father and mother.

COURT. Q. What trade is the father - A. A clerk in some office. I have frequently seen him in bed in their room. I live in the attic, and they on the first floor.

Q. What does the prisoner do - A. I never knew him do any thing. I believe his father is independent - he has property I know. I believe he goes by his mother's maiden name.

ELIZABETH M'CRAW. I am the prisoner's mother. My present husband is his father - my maiden name was Bailey. On the Monday night in question. I went to bed about half-past ten or eleven o'clock. The prisoner sleeps in the same room - we have no other bed-room. I awoke when he came into the room, about half-past twelve. I heard the watchman go, and laid awake till our clock struck one. We have a clock in the room which strikes. I remained awake till near two. He went to bed directly he came in, and remained in bed all the time. I was awake, and got up about eight o'clock - he was in bed then. I am sure he had not got up in the night, for I do not sleep very sound when I am disturbed. My husband is clerk to Rosser and Sons, and has been so for twenty-five years.

COURT. Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is nothing particular - his father employs him; he has a sufficiency to keep him; he gets little bills, and collects money for his father.

Q. What bills has your husband to collect - A. I never enquire his business.

Q. On your oath, is the prisoner engaged in any occupation whatever - A. No: he comes home sometimes at twelve and one o'clock - he was always out till twelve or one. He is nineteen years old in June.

Q. Why did you not put him up a bed elsewhere - A.

That we may know what time he comes in: we advise him to come home early. We have three floors in the house, and two rooms on each. We have a man, his wife, and two female lodgers, besides the witness; the females sleep together.

Q. Is your son landlord of the house in New-street - A. His father is - he employs him to look after that and two other houses.

DONALD M'CRAW. I am writing clerk to Messrs. Rosser and Co., Bartlett's-buildings, and have been there twenty-five years. The prisoner is my son. He slept at my house on the 22d of March. I left him in bed between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, when I went to the office. I employ him to collect the rents, and look after the repairs of my house in New-street, and two others which I have, one in King-street, Covent-garden, and another in the City-road.

COURT. Q. How many days does that occupy him - A. Not many - he was three weeks or a month letting this one in New-street. I have 32 s. a week. He has been clerk to two attornies, and left them three or four years ago, and since that (two or three years ago) he lived with Mr. White, a chemist, for some months. He has been in no employ for two years. He was often out at night, but always accounted for being in good company. He was out three or four nights every week.

MRS. CHOICE. The prisoner said nothing to me about wanting a broom - he had none in his hand. I gave him the key because he was the landlord.

JANE INCE re-examined. I saw him with the key of the window - he had a broom in his hand - he said nothing about the dirt. I saw him outside in the gutters.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-77

684. JOHN BAILEY alias DONALD M'CRAW was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Ryan , about the hour of two in the night of the 22d of March , at St. Martin in the Fields , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein one watch, value 2 l.; one seal, value 12 s.; fifteen combs, value 9 l.; and ten bottles, containing Macassar oil, value 1 l. , his property.

RICHARD RYAN . I am a hair-dresser , and have the adjoining shop in the same house as the prosecutor in the last case. My shop was broken open at the same time as his. I found it broken open at seven o'clock in the morning, when I came down stairs. I had gone to bed about eleven o'clock. I live on the first floor of the house. I missed twelve tortoise-shell combs, a quantity of pocket combs; nine or ten bottles of Macassar oil, and a watch from a glass case, on the counter; the value of all the property is 16 or 18 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. This robbery was done at the same time as the other - A. Yes.

GEORGE AVIS . I went with a warrant, as I stated before, and in the table draw found two combs, a bottle of Macassar oil was in the drawer in the washband-stand. I asked the prisoner where he got the combs, he said, a young man. an acquaintance of his gave them to him.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I also searched the room, and found a pocket-comb in the prisoners waistcoat pocket; not knowing that any combs had been lost, I put it back into his waistcoat pocket; but in a few minutes hearing some were stolen, I searched him again, and found the same comb again in his fob, under his watch, he made no remark about it. I have kept it locked up ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. These combs had been used - A. Yes.

RICHARD RYAN . I know these combs. I had cleaned my window on the Monday, and saw them. I know them to be mine, one in particular is marked in a particular spot. I had not another marked like it. I will not speak to the oil, as the cover is off it; it was in bottles like these when I lost it.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. All the 3 s. 6 d. bottles are like that - A. Yes, the combs I lost were new. I lost six or eight pocket combs; the one I speak to is made out of the top of the horn, and is a new one; I can tell by the teeth that it has never been used in any head of hair; there is dirt in it, but it is not from the human hair; the dirt from hair would be more at the end of the comb.

Prisoner's Defence. I took these combs of a man who lives in Charles-street, about a month ago, for a debt of 3 s. 6 d. I had them three weeks before they came to my house; the man is a comb maker. I told the officers where I bought the oil.

John Cure, William Matthewson , Thomas Anderson , Donald and Elizabeth M'Craw, and Mary Adams , were re-called, and the Learned Judge read to them that part of their evidence in the last case, relative to the alledged ulibi, which they deposed to be correct.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

This case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges, whether the dwelling-house be properly described in the indictment .

Reference Number: t18240407-78

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

685. MARY MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , in the dwelling-house of John Nicholas Garrod , her master, a diamond pin, value 4 l.; a silver mug, value 3 l.; a ring, value 2 s.; two candlesticks, value 3 s.; a box, value 1 s.; two frocks, value 3 s.; a piece of bed-furniture, value 1 s., and eight silver coins, value 1 s.; his property, and one silver ladle, value 30 s. ; the goods of Catharine Hall .

JOHN NICHOLAS GARROD . I live in Upper Mary-le-bone-street , and am a grocer. The prisoner came into my service on Monday, and left on the following Saturday, the 21st of February; and about eight days after my mother missed a soup-ladle; I then examined and missed all this property; I got Buckeridge, who took the prisoner up; I went with him to St. Giles's, and found duplicates of the property - the cap and furniture are my mother's.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis, Hampstead-road. On the 24th of February I took a diamond pin in pawn from the prisoner for 28 s.; I knew her before - I asked who she brought it from, she said from her mistress, Mrs. Morgan, No. 9, Henry-street; I have also a paste ring pawned at the same time - also a small box of coins; I lent 28 s. on the whole.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure of her person - A. Yes, Sir.

HENRY BARR . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, Oxford-street. I have a silver mug pawned on the 23d of February, for 34 s., by the prisoner, and on the 16th of March she had 8 s. more upon it - on the 17th of March she pawned

a soup-ladle; seeing a crest on it, I asked who it belonged to, she said Mrs. Jerman, No. 9, Howland-street, and produced the duplicate of the mug which she had pawned in the same name.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On the 17th of March I apprehended the prisoner at No. 5, Hampstead-road, where she lodged - we had watched her in there; she was called down to me; she took me up to a back room on the first floor - I asked for her keys, which she gave me, and in her trunk I found a lace cap, the duplicate of the diamond pin and things pawned for 28 s.; I found a piece of bed-furniture and two candlesticks at her lodgings; in one of her trunks I found two duplicates of the mug and ladle. On the 22d, in consequence of information I and Sellers went to Ryan's house, and found two frocks - and at Ryan's mother's in St. Giles's, I found more duplicates.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I have the two frocks.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Larceny only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-79

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

686. MARGARET VARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a tobacco-pouch, value 6 d.; a snuff-mull, value 5 s.; a sovereign; two half-crowns; a shilling and two sixpences, the property of John M'Allister , from his person ; and MARY ANN DAY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN M'ALLISTER. I lodge at Somer's-town. I came from Bromley, Kent; last Saturday night I was in Fleet-market; I had mistaken my way from London-bridge - I met a set of men and girls at the corner of Fleet-market, they said,

"Old codger will give us some gin," I said,

"I want nothing to do with you, I want to go to Somer's-town, let me get to the bottom of Holborn, and I can find the way;" Varlow said,

"Old gentleman, you are out of your way, we are going to Battle-bridge, and will go with you; come up this lane and we will go together;" I said

"I did not care, so that I went the right way;" Varlow said

"Come in here, and we will soon go" - she took me up stairs into a room - I said,

"What do you want me to stop all night," -

"to be sure," said she; I said I would not; I wanted to get out - my pocket was open - she came up close to me, and my money was gone in an instant; she made her escape - I missed my Scotch mull and tobacco-pouch; I made a disturbance at the door, and at that time she escaped - I came down stairs talking to the girls there, and was disgusted with their conversation; Day was in the passage - I said,

"What a house you keep, I am robbed of all;" she said,

"No, not all," and gave me my pouch and mull, which I put into my pocket, and went down stairs; I had not got far when the girls followed me and robbed me of my watch.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a patrol. The prosecutor came to the watch-house, and said he had been robbed in George-alley , and on Monday I apprehended the prisoners.

EDWARD MOORE . I was with Johnson.

EDWARD COUSINS . I was constable of the night. The prosecutor gave the same account at the watch-house as he has now.

JOHN M'ALLISTER. A sovereign, two half-crowns, a shilling, and two sixpences were taken from my pocket by Varlow; nobody else was in the room - I was perfectly sober. I went up stairs with her, as she said she was going to Battle-bridge, and I thought she could shew me the way.

VARLOW'S Defence. I was never with him - I am not the woman.

The prisoner Day was here Acquitted , and called on behalf of Varlow.

MARY ANN DAY . The prosecutor came to my house; the female he had with him was not the prisoner, but who she was I cannot tell; the prisoner was in the house with another man at the time. I took the pouch and mull from the woman as she went out, as he said he was ruined if he lost them. I gave them to him, and asked if his watch was safe. It was a tall stout woman he had with him.

JOHN JOHNSON . He described the woman as tall and stout. The prisoner denied the charge, and swore she had never seen him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-80

687. ELIZA FOSTER and SARAH WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a watch, value 1 l.; seal, value 6 d., and a key, value 2 d., the goods of John M'Allister , from his person .

JOHN M'ALLISTER. The two prisoners and another came into the house when I rose an alarm - I said I was robbed; one of them used very bad language to me. I went down stairs, and when I got thirty or forty yards from the house the prisoners came up, one on each side, and one said,

"Come, old gentleman, let me take hold of your hand." I saw Foster whip my watch out of my fob; I turned to catch hold of her, but fell down, and was kicked about shamefully - I have not been able to walk without a crutch since; I have not recovered my watch. I am positive of them; I saw them in the room - I pointed them out at Guildhall.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You would not have known them if you had only seen them in the street - A. No, but I saw them first in the house. The mull was my grandfather's; he had it at the battle of Culloden. My eye-sight is not bad; I am sixty-five years old. I use glasses to read small print. There is a gas-light in the alley where they attacked me, I think, but am not sure, I was so agitated.

JOHN JOHNSON . I took the prisoners on the Sunday night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-81

689. ELIZABETH M'LOUGHLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a half-crown, and three shillings, the monies of William Addison , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240407-82

690. JOHN SMITH alias IVEY and THOMAS OWDLGATE were indicted for feloniously uttering a counterfeit sixpence, as and for a good one, knowing it to be counterfeit, and at the same time having another counterfeit sixpence in their possession, knowing that also to be counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering a counterfeit shilling, knowing it to be counterfeit.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM H. BRUCE . I am a stationer, and live in Trump-street, King-street. On the the 7th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, Owdlgate came and bought half a quire of foolscap paper, which came to 8d. He gave me a half-crown; I gave him change - and afterwards doubted about its being good. On the 1st of March Smith came and bought a sheet of brown paper, and tendered me a shilling, which I suspected, but was not certain about it. I kept it separated from any other, and gave him 11 1/2 d.; and in about an hour Owdlgate came for a penny-worth of whitey-brown paper, and paid me a shilling, which appeared very much like the other; and at eight o'clock Smith came for another sheet of brown paper, saying that the other was not sufficient; he gave me a sixpence; I took the shears and cut it - it appeared to be made of base metal. I told him he had passed bad money, and so had the old man from whom he came; he said he had not. I asked where he lived - he said at No. 7, King-street. I questioned him, and then he said his father lived in the neighbourhood of Wellclose-square, and was a shew-maker, and that he had been to Evans's in Long-lane for some pictures for his father. As he would not give his father's name I sent for a constable and detained him. He denied that his father was near the house; and, in consequence of what my boy said, I went out and saw Owdlgate about two hundred yards off. I told him he had passed bad money at my house that day - he denied it. I said,

"There is a boy at my shop belonging to you" - he said he never had a boy. We took him to the shop. He said he was a shew-maker, and had been to Evans's in Long-lane for some pictures.

Q. The man said so - A. Yes; the boy had said so before; the officer said,

"Do you know this boy?" he said he did not, but soon after, he said he believed he recollected him, and afterwards, that they lived in the same house, he was searched, and a bad sixpence fell from his clothes on the floor; he had two good sixpences in his fob, and a basket with some pictures, some brown and whitey-brown paper in it. Smith acknowledged at the Compter, that the two good sixpences which I had given to him and Owdlgate in change, were paid to Evaos for the pictures, and that he was in the habit of passing bad money for this man, who gave him 2 d. or 3 d. for himself; that he had been employed by him about a week. I produced the money I received from them.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I produce two shillings and two sixpences; I received one sixpence from the prosecutor, and the other the man dropped from his waistcoat pocket and tried to put his foot on it. I found two good sixpences in his fob, and found the pictures and paper in his basket; the paper which was bought at Bruce's, and two shillings-worth of copper; when I took Smith, I asked him if the man had a basket, he said he had; I said then I had passed him in the street; I sent Bruce to look at him; he gave me a signal and I took him, and asked if any body was waiting for him, he said not, and denied knowing the boy, but afterwards said that they lived in the same house near Wellclose-square; the boy gave the account Mr. Bruce has stated.

WILLIAM H. BRUCE re-examined. I threw the first shilling into a part of the till separate from any other, and put the other into the same place.

MR. SEWELL. I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. The two sixpences are counterfeit, but of different dies - the two shillings are also counterfeit.

MR. BRODRICK addressed the Jury on behalf of the defandants, and called

- IVEY. I am the boy's mother. I gave him good money to buy some pictures at Evans's.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 11. On the 1st Count.

OWDLGATE - GUILTY . Aged 50. On both Counts.

OWDLGATE Confined One Year , and to find sureties for Two Years more . SMITH's parents entered into recognizances for his appearance to receive Judgment when called upon.

Reference Number: t18240407-83

691. WILLIAM DOMMET BIRD was indicted for a misdeameanor .

JOHN WILKINS . I lived with my brother Edward in Carthusian-street. He keeps a confectioner's shop there; he has a customer named Rawley, who lives at Bethnal-green. On the 22d of March the prisoner came to the shop, and said Rawley had taken a shop in South Audley-street, and that he had come from him, and wanted 7 lbs. of stone blue, a can of barley-sugar, and 2 lbs. of refined juice. I gave them to him in consequence of this statement, and on the 24th he came again with this written order (producing it, read): -

"Mr. Wilkins, - I should like you to send by bearer 7 lbs barley-sugar, 7 lbs Spanish juice, 7 lbs. sugar-candy, and charge the lowest price, and when you call I will pay you.

"W. RAWLEY."

In consequence of this letter I let him have the barley-sugar, but had not got the other goods.

WILLIAM RAWLEY . This paper is not written by me. I never authorized the prisoner to get these goods; he lived with me two years ago.

GUILTY . Aged.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-84

692. JOHN WORMACK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JONADAB WILLIAM HUNT . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Wood-street, Cheapside. On Wednesday the 18th of February, I was called into my warehouse, and found the prisoner there. I never saw him before; he said,

"Mr. Hunt, I am looking at your silks, but your young man and I cannot agree about the price; they are for a good man, and if you can do them well, it may be a good account;" he said he had a commission to purchase them. I asked if he wished them to be entered to himself, he said no. to a much better man than him. John Robinson of Duffield; in consequence of this representation I let him have three lengths of lutestring, and two pieces of Persian. I asked how he wished them to be packed, he said he could not inform me then, but he was going to Hull next day, and should probably take them with him; but having a good many parcels to take, he had not made up his mind whether he would take them or have them sent. I asked for a reference; he referred me to Messrs. Fry's, bankers, and Mr. Nalder's, Cheapside. I enquired, and next morning he called and got the goods. I told him they were entered to Robinson, he said he had several parcels to collect, and would call in a coach, in about twenty minutes, as the Hull coach passed his door; he did so, and took them.

JOHN ROBINSON . I live at Duffield, and deal in silks; there is no other person there of my name. I never desired the prisoner to order these articles; I had given him some commissions some time ago; he was recommended to me as a clever man, likely to select goods for me; all my orders to him were in writing; I did not know that there was such a person as Mr. Hunt - I have not employed him for two or three months; the last order I gave him was in November.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He was recommended to you as an agent - A. As a man likely to buy for me, as he bought goods on his own account, and therefore I could buy of him; when I have sent him an order he has enclosed other things on approbation, which I had not ordered in one or two instances, and I have kept some of them; he had no orders at this time; I always bought for cash - I did not direct him where to apply for goods - he has had orders to buy in his own name for me, he once had orders to buy in my name; Messrs. Fry and Co. are persons to whom I should have referred; he has bought in my name since I ordered him not.

THOMAS WARD . I belong to the firm of Holroyd and Co., Bread-street. On the 19th of February the prisoner called at our house; I knew him before - he said he had some goods to sell for a manufacturer - a job for cash - I gave him 29 l. odd for the goods in question, which are here.

Cross-examined. Q. How many years have you known him - A. Ten years; he was much respected, I understand.

MR. HUNT. This is the property he obtained from me, I sold it for 40 l.

MR. LAW addressed the Court in behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-85

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 12.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

693. WILLIAM GORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a picture, value 3 s. , the goods of John Tayleure .

JANE TAYLEURE . I am the wife of John Tayleure , bookseller , Panton-street, Haymarket . On the evening of the 24th of February, I was in the parlour behind the shop with Withnell, and saw the shop door pushed against three or four times, about the distance of half a foot - I got up, but seeing that it was not sufficiently open to admit any one, I sat down, and afterwards saw it pushed open again. A person came in, and took something from the window - I ran to the door, looked down the street towards the Haymarket, and one door off saw the prisoner with this painting under his arm. Withnell ran out, and took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WITHNELL . I was with the prosecutrix - she said something, and went to the door; I saw the prisoner running down the street with a picture under his arm - I followed, and brought him back with it.

Prisoner. I did it from distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-86

694. EDWARD CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a pestal and mortar, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Plant .

WILLIAM PLANT . I keep a china-shop in Worship-street . On the 26th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, my daughter said this pestal and mortar were stolen, and in the course of the day the prisoner was brought to the shop charged with taking it - he said that he and a young man together took it away, and had left it at a place in Long-alley - I went there, and the person denied having it, but brought it to me in about ten minutes. I find the prisoner bears a very good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EBENEZA HEYNER. I live opposite Mr. Plant. I saw the prisoner go into the shop; another boy waited outside, and attracted the attention of Plant's daughter while the prisoner took the pestal and mortar; put them under his coat, and both went towards Finsbury-market. I ran over - they ran off, and I lost sight of them for about four minutes; then the prisoner returned to the shop, and I followed him to the new market, where he was taken.

RICHARD DAVIS . I live in Duke's-court, Long-alley, and am a tin-plate worker. On the 26th of February, the prisoner and another boy came and asked if they might leave something with me; I refused - they said they should not be above five minutes, and I let them leave this pestal and mortar. Three men came to the shop - I was flurried, and denied having it; but hearing that it was stolen, I sent it to Plant, and went myself.

HENRY MARSHALL . I am a headborough. I heard an alarm, and found the prisoner in a crowd - he said he had left the property in Long-alley.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a person in possession of it - the gentleman stopped me; I said I had seen a man take it, and put it in Long-alley.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-87

695. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two screw-drivers, value 2 s.; a square, value 2 s., and a pair of compasses, value 6 d., the goods of William Redwood ; and two saws, value 6 d. , the goods of Edward Johnson .

WILLIAM REDWOOD . I am a carpenter . I left my tools in a building in Park-lane , about twelve o'clock on the 1st of March, returned before one, and they were gone.

JOHN ARNOLD . I am a plane-maker . On the 1st of March, in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my father's shop in New Compton-street, with a screw-driver, a square, and a pair of compasses; he sold me the square, screw-driver, and two saws, for 5 s.; I gave him 3 s. 6 d. - he was to call again for 1 s. 6 d., and when he called, having heard that they were stolen, I detained him.

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I took him in charge, and found a pair of compasses on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-88

696. THOMAS FALLON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a knife, value 18 d. , the goods of William Cadman .

WILLIAM CADMAN . I am a cutler , and live at Shadwell . On the 25th of March, the prisoner came and asked to see some 1 s. 6 d. knives, which I shewed him - he asked to see some more; he was above an hour in the shop, and while I was reaching him some I saw him put one into his hat, and another into his pocket; he offered 10 d. for one, which I refused. He went out; I followed and took him - he pulled the knife out, and said,

"Here d - n you, here is the knife; I did it in a lark." I thought he was tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Weeks .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18240407-89

697. JOHN HILL WAGSTAFF was indicted for that he, on the 20th of March , at St. Mary, Wolnoth , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and did cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and did willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows. -

Change-alley, Cornhill, No. 2. London, March 18, 1824.

Messrs. John Bond , Sons, and Pattisall - pay - 425 - or bearer, Two hundred and fifty pounds.

WILLIAM RIDLEY and Co.

250.

with intent to defraud Benjamin Bond and Stephen Pattisall , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, with a like intention, he well-knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited, against the statute.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud William Ridley .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BOULT . I am porter at the Old Hummums, Covent-garden. On the 20th of March a gentleman in the house asked for a porter; I went to him in a room called the Old Rose, in the Old Hummums; he asked me to fetch a badge porter from the Temple; I told him I was a porter myself, and could do anything that a badge porter could do, and that my master was responsible for anything he wished me to do; he said, No, he wished me to go to the temple and fetch a badge porter - I asked him the name of the porter he wanted; he said Hopkinson - I asked if he was not there, whether any other would do - he said I was to bring any one. He did not say what he wanted the porter for. I took Burt to him.

Q. Look round, and say if the prisoner is the man who employed you - A. I cannot say, for when I saw the man he was naked; I cannot say whether he is the person or not. I went up with Burt, opened the door, and said that was the gentleman who wanted him, but I did not see the gentleman. I shewed him into the same room. I only enquired of Burt for Hopkinson.

JOHN BURT . I am a Temple porter. On Saturday, the 20th of March, the last witness came for me at the Temple, and took me to the Old Hummums. I followed him to the top of the house; he knocked at the door, and said he could not find Hopkinson, but had brought me. I went into the room - the gentleman was not dressed; he asked what o'clock it was; I said half-past ten.

Q. Is the prisoner the man he introduced you to - A. Yes, he is. He gave me 2 s., and told me to get him a 1 s. 6 d. bill-stamp; he said I was to get it at Pounce's in Long-are - I came back with it, and gave him 4 d. change. He wrote me a direction to go to the Bull-inn, Leadenhall-street, to take a place by the Brighton three o'clock coach, to take him up at the Elephant and Castle (looking at a direction;) this is what he gave me, and at the same time gave me this cheque (looking at it;) I can swear to it, because here is his hand-writing on the back; he wished me to get the money. He said he was going to Charing-cross to breakfast, and if I came back before he returned, I was not to go up stairs, but to wait outside the door till he came to me; he told me to take the cheque to Messrs. Pattisall and Bond, No. 2, Change-alley.

COURT. Q. Did he say why you were to wait outside the door - A. No; he only told me to wait for him outside the door. I got him to write down on the back of the cheque what I was to get for it, in case I should forget; (looking at the back) - he said four 50 l. notes, and fifty sovereigns. I went to Messrs. Pattisall and Bond, and presented it to Mr. Pearson - he looked at it for a few minutes, and then went backwards, returned to me, and asked who I brought it from; I told him. I was then handed into a back room, where I saw Mr. Pattisall, who went back with me to the Hummums; I went up stairs and the prisoner was gone. I stopped there till two or three o'clock in the afternoon, went again at four, but saw no more of him till I saw him on the Monday at Bow-street. I left the cheque at the banking-house, in the clerk's hands, with the direction.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was the bedroom light, or was the window curtain down - A. I did not notice; it was light enough for me to see him; he was writing at a table - he had no coat, boots, or hat on; there was daylight enough for me to see him, and to have a full view of him - I was close to him at the table; he was sitting down; I stood at his side. I am sure that I know him again. I know all the Temple porters: there is no one of the name of Hopkinson. I belong to the Inner Temple - there are six of us, and three at the Middle Temple.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Look at the cheque and see if you have written anything on it to know it again - A. Yes; I wrote my initials J. B. on it at the banking-house. I know all the badge porters by sight; I do not know such a name.

COURT. Q. When you went to the hotel, he was in his shirt - without coat, hat, or boots on - A. Yes, I was about ten minutes in his company. I was gone about ten minutes for the stamp, and did not observe, when I returned, whether he was any further dressed. I am quite sure that the prisoner is the person. I never had a doubt of it. I did not see him again till the Monday, and then knew him directly - he had a white great coat on at the office.

The direction was here read, and was as follows.

" Bull Inn, Leadenhall-street, Tomkinson, one place inside, at three o'clock, to Brighton, to take up at the Elephant and Castle."

JOHN PEARSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Benjamin Bond and Stephen Pattisall - they are the only partners. They trade under the name of John Bond , Sons, and Pattisall - but there is no John Bond in the house. I do not know John Bond . Mr. William Ridley keeps cash at our house. He is a carpet-manufacturer , and lives in Castle-street, Holborn. I believe he has no partner now, and I think not in March. He traded as William Ridley and Co., and has kept cash at our house for four or five years. This cheque(looking at it) was presented at our house on Saturday the 20th of March, about twelve o'clock. We generally have more cheques presented on a Saturday than on any other day, and twelve o'clock is a very busy hour with us. Burt is the man who presented it. I immediately saw that it was a forgery, the hand-writing being a little different to Mr. Ridley's, and it not bearing a private mark, which we had agreed upon with Ridley about fifteen or sixteen months ago. I gave the cheque to Mr. Pattisall. I wrote my initials, J. P., on it at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know a man named Pullen - Yes, he has kept cash at our house. I am not aware that there was any suspicion upon him. Mr. Pattisall was up stairs when the cheque was presented. I saw him on the subject. I did not hear him say any thing about Pullen.

Q. When did you look for the private mark on the cheque - A. Not for five or ten minutes after I had declared it a forgery. I detected the forgery by the handwriting, and looked for the mark afterward - that confirmed my opinion, but I should not have paid it from the writing. It is like Ridley's writing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. From the first moment you saw it had you any doubt whether it was his hand-writing or not - A. None.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How do you know that Ridley has no partner - A. We have only his signature as drawer, and I know there was a dissolution some time ago, and he has never given us any intimation of his having a partner.

Q. Do not you know that Pullen's cheques have been paid into your house on account of Ridley - A. Not that I am aware of.

Q. Do you know that one Smith was clerk to Pullen - A. No.

COURT. Q. When Burt presented the cheque, what did you do with it - A. I took it to Mr. Pattisall, and he went to the Hummums with Burt.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 20th of March, about a quarter to ten o'clock at night, I apprehended the prisoner at the Old Hummums, Covent-garden. I had been waiting at the house all day for him. When he came into the parlour I asked what his name was - he said Samuel Tomkinson . I said,

"Where do you live" - he said next door but one to the White Hart at Reigate. I said,

"You have sent a porter into the City this morning with a cheque for 250 l." - he said he had. I replied that that cheque was a forgery - he said he had taken it of Mr. Smith in the Strand. I said,

"I will accompany you to Mr. Smith" - he said,

"Never mind, it is of no consequence." I searched him, and found some oxalic acid in a phial, and a small quantity in a paper not mixed.

Q. Do you know the effect of that - A. I have taken it to a chemist, but did not see him try any experiment. I took him to Bow-street - he gave his name there as John Hill Wagstaff.

Cross-examined. Q. He told you he got it from Smith - A. Yes, and said Smith lived in the Strand.

Q. Did he say he lived in the Strand, or that he got it from him - A. He said he got it from Smith in the Strand. I said I would go to Smith with him; he paused for a moment, and then said it was of no consequence.

The cheque was here put in and read. See indictment.

Prisoner's Defence, My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - A man placed at this bar, conscious of guilt, and forced to hear its detail in evidence, with a knowledge of the awful punishment that awaits his crime, has indeed a painful and afflicting task to support; but a man placed in my position, conscious of innocence, and forced to listen to a detail of evidence, intended to implicate him in a crime of which he is not guilty, has a part to support, infinitely more painful, infinitely more distressing - a part indeed insupportable! That, Gentlemen, is my position! Gentlemen, were I to take leave of you with this my simple assertion, feeling as I do that it will have its proper weight with you; and feeling, too, that the case laid before you has in it so many doubts and so little of positive proof or confirmation; were I thus to take leave of you, I have a sentiment in my breast which not alone gives me hopes, but that confidently assures me of your verdict of acquittal. My mind, agitated and disturbed as it is; my feelings, harassed and goaded as they are; my wretchedness altogether, does not admit of my calmly and dispassionately sifting, and observing on the evidence; but I have a confidence the Learned Judge will do so on my behalf, at once with humanity and discrimination; and I have firm reliance that you, my Jury, will do me justice. In contemplating an address to you, Gentlemen, I have not collected the various topics likely to bias your judgment through the medium of your feelings; yet that you may know on whose fate you are to decide, I cannot refrain from telling you, that, like some of yourselves, I have been a tradesman - but I have been an unfortunate one; that I now occupy the important relations of husband, father, brother, and, to my aged parents, an only son; that from my earliest age I have been taught habits of honest industry, and that if ever I deviated transiently from that path of honour, it has been occasioned more by the force of untoward and unfortunate circumstances, than from any lack of principle. In the case which has been stated to you, and attempted to be proved, I am sure that you will unhesitatingly decide, that either I must have been confident that I was acting no guilty part, or that I must have been acting the part of a lunatic. And although it is not possible that I can be prepared to produce evidence on oath, to rebut testimony which I could not beforehand know would be set up, yet I may give explanation sufficient to destroy all insinuation, and which I know ought also to repel all accusation. It has transpired in evidence, and an air of importance given to the fact, that there was found on my person, when taken into custody, a small bottle,

containing oxalic acid. Now had there happened to have been found on my person a needle and a thread, the very same consequences, by construction, might have attached to these implements. I could not commit forgery with acid, but, on the contrary, it is an article peculiarly calculated to destroy or detect such a scheme on a coloured cheque. But, however awkward or far-fetched the explanation may be, when that explanation is the fact, I venture to make it, fearless of any bad consequences. On reading Bell's Weekly Messenger of the 25th of January last, which fell into my hands, I found the following paragraph, which I shall read to you from the Paper itself. [Here the prisoner read from the paper the paragraph, stating that oxalic acid, in small quantities, was good for punch], and to make the experiments alluded to, I bought the acid. It has been insinuated that I might have had this acid as an immediate and destructive poison, but that idea will vanish when it is known that the bottle was so sealed up that without much trouble it could not be got at. Some stress may be placed on my giving another name than my real one of Wagstaff, but when the Jury are told that I did not appear to an adjourned meeting of my bankruptcy, and that a reward of 100 l. was, in consequence, offered for my apprehension, I am sure that will sufficiently account for my using another name, without looking for the crime of forgery to account for it. You all know, Gentlemen of the Jury, that the expence a ticket porter is not more than that of an ordinary porter at an inn; and that the security is much greater; and, if fraud had been intended, you also know that a ticket porter is more likely to be the cause of its being detected, than any other ordinary porter, inasmuch as the name and address of a ticket porter is more easily traced and obtained. It has been stated in evidence, that part of my instructions to the porter were, that when he returned with the money, he should stop at the door, if I was not in room. It will probably known to the Gentlemen of the Jury, that at the Old Hummums there is no coffee-room; that Gentlemen occasionally sleeping there, as was my case, pay for their bed and leave the house, so that, in fact, the only place I could appoint to meet this porter, was at the door, and I had the less difficulty in doing this, as his name and address were known to me. It is my misfortune, Gentlemen of the Jury, not to be able to place witnesses before you to show you through whom I became possessed of this checque of 250 l.; but there will be no difficulty in satisfying you that it bears no similarity to my hand-writing in any of its parts - and were it necessary, every one who ever saw me write could testify to that. Mr. Smith, from whom I received it, who represented himself as the messenger of Mr. D. Pullen, and who indubitably was so, delivered the checque to me at the door of the New Exchange Coffee-house, in the Strand, on account of Mr. Pullen. With this Mr. Pullen, who was a bill-broker, I had various dealings previous to my leaving London, but availing himself of the circumstances of my being obliged to be out of the way, he took advantage of me, and amongst other bills, which he kept from me, besides money I lent to him, was one for about 240 l., drawn by the very Messrs. Wm. Ridley and Co., who purport to be the drawers of the cheque in question, and for which I never got any value; but lately, I intimated, that, at any personal risk to myself, I would expose him, if he did not pay me something on account, and it was in consequence of this threat of mine, that I received the cheque in question by the hands of Mr. Smith. I never had any address from Mr. Smith, nor do I know him otherwise than as the accredited clerk of Mr. Pullen; I have made every enquiry for him, but in vain. I am sure Gentlemen of the Jury, you will not fail to remark that it is an extraordinary coincidence of circumstances, that this same Mr. Pullen, who sent me the cheque, possessed the bill of 240 l. the signature and hand-writing of Messrs. Ridley and Co. - and Messrs. Ridley and Co. knew that he did so possess that hill - and it is also to be observed by you, that Mr. D. Pullen kept a banking account with Messrs. Bond and Co. These two incidents will account for he or his clerk having the means of obtaining a coloured cheque of Messrs. Bond, Sons, and Co., and the means of imitating the hand-writing of Messrs. Ridley and Co., and added to all this, it is, if possible, more extraordinary that something or other about the cheque should have excited the suspicion both of Messrs. Bond and Co., and Messrs. Ridley and Co., so as to cause them to say as soon as it was presented, that the cheque emanated from Mr. Pullen. Here is Mr. Pullen owing me money; here is a cheque given to me in a hand-writing I was familiar with, and therefore could not doubt its being geniune. Here, then, in the absence of this Mr. Smith, whom I have tried in vain to find, here then is, as I trust you will consider, enough to satisfy you that I had no knowledge of the cheque being a forgery, nor were any of the circumstances under which I received it, or about the cheque itself, calculated to excite in my mind a suspicion that it was a forgery. Gentlemen of the Jury, I would not willingly tire you by needless detail. It must be unnecessary to ask you to divest your minds of anything that has transpired to my prejudice, unconnected with the matter at issue. I confidently repose in your dispasionate decision. My life is in your hands. If you have no doubt of my innocence you will at once relieve me from suspense. Do by me as you think you yourselves would be entitled to be done with in my situation, and I make sure of a favourable determination.

THOMAS WILKINS . I am clerk to Mr. Cope, solicitor for the prisoner. I received directions to go in search of a person named Smith.

Q. When was the first time you received that direction - A. Yesterday; I went to No. 24, Hutchin-lane, and asked there for a person named Smith, who had been clerk to a Mr. Pullen; the answer I had was that the person did not know the name of Smith, and as for Pullen they knew nothing of him, for he had not lived there for three years. I then went to Mr. Faucett, No. 21, Little St. Thomas Apostle, by Mr. Cope's direction. Faucett was not there; a woman answered me; I asked her where Faucett lived - she said she did not know. I then went to No. 10, Water-lane, and enquired for Mr. Hughes, but did not find him; I asked a woman for him. I made no further enquiry for Smith. I did not know him or Pullen myself.

Q. On the 5th or 6th of April did you make any enquiry for Smith or Pullen - A. I enquired of a Mr. Ridley about Pullen. I did not tell him what I wanted of him. I was informed that Faucett very likely could inform me, and in consequence of which I went in search of Faucett. I have

not been able to learn anything of Smith, Pullen, or Paucett.

COURT. Q. How came you to take so long time before you enquired - A. I had enquired before; I was first asked about enquiring for Smith.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you been clerk to Cope - A. Nearly four months. I do not know when he was first employed for Wagstaff.

Q. The 6th was on Tuesday, you made no further enquiry from that time till Sunday - A. No; I was not desired.

HENRY PALMER . I live at No. 9, Hercules-buildings, Westminster-road. I do not know Pullen; I know a man named Smith - I do not know in whose employ he was; he was a man who professed to discount bills.

Q. Did you at any time about the beginning of last March see a bill in Smith's hands - A. I did; a bill and cheque; the amount of the cheque was 250 l. - it was drawn by Messrs. Ridley and Co., on Messrs. Bond, Sons, and Pattisall; it was on a coloured paper, with yellow bars. I saw it; but did not take any very particular notice of it.

Q. How came you to see the cheque - A. Smith was indebted to me in the sum of 30 l. on a cheque, and had been so indebted since the middle of September last. I had repeatedly applied to him for payment, and he had as frequently promised to pay, but always excused himself when I asked him for it.

Q. When did you see the cheque - A. In the middle of March, in the evening, I was sitting at the Bay-tree tavern, St. Swithin's-lane, kept by one Philpot; I had to meet a gentleman there on business. I was reading the newspaper, Smith came in accidentally, and sat himself down in the same box; I asked for my money, but did not get it. He produced a bill of exchange, and a cheque for 250 l.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. In the early part of March you first saw the cheque in his possession - A. About the middle; it was the latter end of the week, certainly, either on Thursday or Friday in the week previous to my seeing in the paper a report of the arrest of Wagstaff - I will swear that it was either Thursday or Friday; my impression is that it was on Thursday evening - I had known Smith for two or three years; I do not know where he lived in March or February, but can give a very good reason why I did not. I never knew where he lived.

Q. Had you any note of his for the 30 l. - A. I had a cheque of another person's, which I had from him, and on which he owed me 30 l.

Q. You deal a good deal in bills and cheques - A. I do. I have lived but three weeks in Hercules-buildings, before that I lived at No. 8, Waterloo-road, and lived there about three months.

Q. How long is it since you lived in a much larger house than either of those - A. I was four months in the House of Correction, Clerkenwell; that ended in October, 1822; it was about some bills of Sir Thomas Champnesses . I went there by sentence of the Court of King's Bench. Smith had given me a cheque which was not paid. Waterloo-road and Hercules-buildings are not in the rules.

COURT. Q. Were you put to hard labour at the House of Correction - A. No. I think the cheque I saw Smith with was payable to a number - I do not remember what the number was; I noticed the banker's name, as I had a cheque on the same banker myself, and have it here (producing it.)

Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I have known him two or three years; I never saw him write. I never knew where Smith lived.

Q. How came you to have dealings with a man to the amount of 30 l., and not know where to call on him or to enquire after him - A. I usually found him at the Commercial Coffee-house, Skinner-street. Mr. Cope did not apply to me to know where he was to be found.

Q. When did he apply to you - A. I met him on Saturday by accident; I knew him before.

Q. Though you had known the prisoner two or three years, and heard he had been taken up for forgery, had you never the kindness to go to him and tell him all this - A. I went to him at the House of Correction, but could not get admittance; I never went to Cope. I have seen the prisoner every day since he has been in Newgate; he told me who his attorney would be, but I did not go, as Cope held a judgment against me, and had a writ against me. I told the prisoner of the dealing I had with Smith, and put this cheque into his hands, to make what use he thought proper with it. I told him a fortnight ago that I had been accustomed to meet Smith at the Colonial Coffee-house.

Q. Here is the cheque you have produced, now look at the one for 250 l. - A. I have no hesitation in saying it is like it; the writing is not the same. The writing I remember appeared in a tremulous hand; the front of the paper I remember was the same. I did not see the back of it.

THOMAS LITTLE . I am a carpet manufacturer, and live in Tottenhan-court-road. I have known the prisoner thirty years, and am acquainted with his hand-writing, (looking at the cheque;) I never saw him write like this. I believe it is not his hand-writing. I always thought him as respectable a man as any body in this town.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How old is he - A. I believe thirty-one. I knew his father before he was married.

COURT. Q. Be so good as to look at the figures on the back of this cheque. Whose hand-writing do you believe them to be - A. I do not know.

Q. You do not believe them to be Wagstaff's do you - A. I do not know.

Q. Now look at this paper - (the direction given to Burt by the prisoner) - A. I know nothing of it, it is not like any of the prisoner's writing which I have seen.

Q. On the back of the cheque there are

"four 50 l. and fifty sovereigns;" do you know that hand-writing - A. I do not.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a most excellent character till within the last fifteen months, since which time they had not seen him.

A JUROR to BURT. Q. Did you see him write the direction to the Bull Inn - A. Yes, and saw him write on the back of the cheque.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27. On the 2d Count.

Reference Number: t18240407-90

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

698. STEPHEN HERMAN was indicted for feloniously

receiving, on the 19th of March , at St. John, Clerkenwell , three promissory notes for payment of, and value 5 l. each. the property of James Taylor and others, his partners, and the sums of money payable and secured by, and upon the said notes, being due and unsatisfied to them, the said notes, having before then (to wit,) on the 12th of December, in the 3d year of His present Majesty's reign, at St. Lawrence, Jewry, been feloniously stolen, by an evil disposed unknown person; the prisoner well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting the words printed in italics.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the same parish, three pieces of paper, each stamped with a stamp, denoting the payment of a duty to our Lord the King, of the sum of one shilling and three-pence, being the duty directed by the statute to be paid on every promissory note for the payment to the bearer, on demand of any sum of money, exceeding 2 l. 2 s. and not exceeding 5 l. 5 s.; all such pieces of paper, so stamped, as aforesaid, being respectively of the value of one shilling and three-pence, and the property of the said James Taylor and others, his partners, stolen, as in first count, the prisoner well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen, against the statute.

FOURTH COUNT, for feloniously receiving on the same day, at the same parish, three pieces of paper, value threepence, the goods of the said James Taylor and others, his partners, the said pieces of paper, being part and parcel of eight hundred and twenty-five pieces of paper, value 1 l., the property of the said James Taylor, and others, his partners, stolen as in the first count, the prisoner well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen against the statute, & c.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BROWN . I am clerk to Messrs. Hanbury and Co., bankers, Lombard-street. James Taylor and Co. of Birmingham , bank with us; he has other partners. In December, 1822, I made up a parcel of 5 l. and 1 l. notes, to be sent them, they amounted to 4001 l. together; a 5 l. note, No. 9036, was among them; they had all been paid at our banking-house, and were sent back to be re-issued; they were payable either at Birmighman, or at our house in town; nothing is done to them before they are re-issued. I delivered the parcel to Sergent the guard of the Balloon coach, which runs to Birmingham. I have since seen two of the 5 l. notes, Nos. 8882 and 9036; they were in the parcel.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The book in your hand is in your writing - A. Yes, I made the entry myself, and took the numbers of all the notes.

Q. It is discretionary with them whether they will reissue them or not - A. Exactly so; there were eight hundred and twenty-five notes in all, they would weigh about one pound.

MR. LAW. Q. What is the stamp on each 5 l. note - A. 1 s. 3 d., and 3 d. on the ones. I should think the expence of printing would be 2 d. or 3 d. each.

WILLIAM SARGENT . I am guard of the Balloon Birmingham coach. On the 12th of December, 1822, about twelve o'clock, I received a parcel from Messrs. Hanbury to take to Messrs. Taylor and Lloyd, at Birmingham. I put it into my pocket handkerchief, and carried it in my hand, to the Magpie and Pewter-platter public-house, where I lodge, and gave it into the care of Graves the landlord, to lock up, while I went to bed, and when I got up he gave it to me in the same state as before. I carried it in my handkerchief to the Swan and Two-necks, Lad-lane, and put it in the bottom of the coach, between the seats, on the floor of the coach. I then assisted in loading the coach, and went into the office for a few things, and on going to the coach in two or three minutes it was gone. I went and gave information at the bankers.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you about the coach all the time - A. Except for the three or four minutes that I was in the office; the horse-keeper was cleaning the pannels of the coach, and several people were about the yard.

JAMES GRAVES . I keep the Magpie and Pewter-platter, Wood-street. On the 12th of December, 1822, Serjent came and gave me a parcel to take care of; I returned it to him in the same state as I received it. I had put it in the cupboard in the bar.

THOMAS STEAD . I am an assistant to Mr. Pemberton, linen-draper, St. John-street. On the 19th of March the prisoner came to our shop and bought a piece of Irish linen, and about 48 s. worth of goods, and paid a 5 l. Birmingham note for them. Mr. Walters served him. I saw him pay the note, and have it here; the young man who took it enquired of Mr. Pemberton whether he was to take it or not; he was asked for his name and address, and gave it

" Stephen Harding , No. 25, Gray's Inn-lane;" he received the change and left. I produced the note; it has that address on it. I saw Walters write it.

Cross-examined. Q. Walter served him, and had the conversation with him - A. Yes, I stood by, and was not engaged at the time. Walters paid the note to his brother, (who is cashier,) at the desk; it was never in my hands. I do not know what was done with it. I know it again, as I saw Walter write on it, and heard him give the address; it was sent to the banker's next morning, and refused.

Q. Where did you get it from now - A. The witness Brown. I saw the prisoner in custody a few days after, and am positive of him.

WILLIAM PARNELL TYERS . I am a linen-draper, and live in the Minories. On the 22d of March, at six o'clock, I saw the prisoner at my shop, he bought Irish linen, and other things, amounting to 3 l. 17 s., and tendered me this 5 l. Birmingham note, (producing it, No. 8882.) I said it was not usual for us to take notes of that description without knowing the party particularly, as it was after banking-hours, but if he would take a seat I would send to the banker's to enquire whether it was a good note, and then give him the change. I left the shop, and went to another shop of mine in the Minories, and sent my clerk to Messrs. Ladbrook's, (my own banker's,) returned in a quarter of an hour, and the prisoner was gone; my shop was lighted with gass. I had a good opportunity of seeing him, and I am sure he is the same person; he did not call again for his note or goods. I asked his name and address, he gave me

" John Williams , No. 23, Nelson-street, Stepney," which I wrote on the face of it in pencil, and afterwards in ink.

Cross-examined. Q. This was before you gave it to the clerk - A. Yes.

THOMAS PARRY . I am shopman to Mr. Tyers, the prisoner came to the shop, looked out the goods, and tendered a 5 l. note, Mr. Tyers went out with it, having previously written the name and address which the prisoner gave, on it; he remained in the shop about ten minutes after master had left; he then said that provided he could go and see the Stepney coachman, he could get him to wait half an hour for him, and he would return for the goods and change; he left, and never returned.

Cross-examined. Q. He was apprehended next day - A. I do not know. I saw him in prison a few days after. I believe our house is in the City.

THOMAS NEAL . I am shopman to Charles Corder , linen draper, Cavendish-street, Mary-le-bone. On Wednesday the 24th of March, at four or five o'clock, the prisoner came and bought a piece of Irish, amounting to 3 l. 16 s., he said,

"I must trouble you with a country note," and gave me a 5 l. Birmingham note, dated 1818. I do not know what number, it was drawn by Lloyd and Taylor's of Birmingham, payable at Hanbury's. I have a clear recollection of that. I could not make the signature out; but it was a name like Jeffrey. I asked his name, he said John Williams , No. 23, Edmund-street, Battle-bridge. I said it was not regular to take country notes of strangers, and if he would leave it, I would send him his parcel and change down, he said there was no occasion for that, he would get it changed in Covent-garden, where he was known; and while he was speaking he took the note off the counter, before I was aware of it; he seemed very much embarrassed, and began asking for patterns of furniture, and said he should be glad to have them sent down in the parcel; he went out of the shop in five or ten minutes, and did not go towards Covent-garden, so I followed him; he saw me when he had gone about twenty yards, and then went in another direction; he was going in quite a contrary direction. I followed him to Portland-place; he saw me there again, and crossed over in a crowd, to avoid me, and altered his direction again. Mr. Corder, jun., was with me; we went up and told him he must come back with us; he seemed very much frightened; he had a piece of paper in his hand, and was squezing it up, he put it into his mouth, and appeared to swallow it, we endeavoured to take him; but he fell back, and ran away about fifty yards; we followed, and took him to the shop, and kept him two hours, till master came home; while he was in the shop he said,

"You have made me loose the note, you knocked it out of my hand." I said,

"You know where the note is gone." he said nothing more, but that he had just found it in the New-road, that he was a poor man, and was willing to leave his coat if I would let him go.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I was fetched to Corder's, and took the prisoner. I asked his name and where he lived; he said, Stephen Harman , No. 1, Penton-grove, White Lion-street, Pentonville. Neal said he had been offering a stolen note, and had swallowed it; he made no answer to this. I went next day to Penton-grove, but found nothing. St. John-street is in Middlesex.

JOHN MASON . On the 22d March, and for fourteen years before I lived at No. 23. Nelson-street, Stepney, and I have no lodgers; no such person as the prisoner ever lived there.

JAMES GANAWAY . I keep a public-house, at No. 25, Gray's Inn-lane; the prisoner did not live there on the 19th March, nor any person named Hardy, I do not know him.

ELIZA ROBINSON . I live at No. 23, Edmund-street, Battle-bridge; the prisoner did not live there, nor any person named Williams.

ROBERT BROWN . The two notes produced are two of the stolen ones.

Cross-examined. Q. No, 9036, has the letter A to it - A, Yes, there are no duplicate numbers; I do not know what the letter is for.

Prisoner's Defence. The first witness stated that he hardly ever saw me, or that he did not know who passed the note, and yet he swears positively to me. I think I can prove that I was not there, if he will state the time; if I had time I could bring witnesses to swear that every person but one must have taken a false oath. At my second examination Tyers came and asked if I knew him; I said I did not; he said

"You must certainly know me; I think I have a knowledge of your face, was not you at the other end of the town on Tuesday week?" I said I believe not; he said,

"I am sure you was at my house;" I said he was quite wrong, for I was dining at a friend's at the time, and after dinner went to the Jolly Butcher's public house, Brook's-market, to see some fellow-workmen, and between five and six I left there with Osborne; at the next examination he swore that it was not the 23d, but the 22d, and I cannot call to mind where I was then.

WM. PARNELL TYERS . I saw him in the lock-up room; he has stated the truth, but I recognized his person the moment the door was open, and never entertained a doubt of it. I said it was on the 23d; supposing so; I had not the book with me in which I entered the date, not being aware that I was going to be examined; the Magistrate said it did not matter, as I could refer to my book when I got home; at the second examination the prisoner heard me say that it was the 22d.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240407-91

Before Mr. Justice Park.

699. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square , a silver waiter, value 2 l.; thirty silver forks, value 25 l.; twenty silver spoons, value 8 l.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 15 s.; eight knives, value 30 s.; three whips, value 1 l.; six forks, value 5 s.; an inkstand, value 10 s., and a toasting-fork, value 6 s., the goods of Samuel Pratt , his master , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL PRATT . I live in Regent-street. This property was taken from a house of mine. No. 47, New Bond-street , St. George, Hanover-square. I have three houses - the prisoner lived nearly five months with me as porter, and occasionally waited at table . I am a trunk-maker . On the 16th of March, about four o'clock, I was writing at my house in Regent-street, and he came to me to ask if I had taken any plate out of Captain Blake 's canteen, as my son had missed it. I asked him whether it was a single plate - he said he believed it was. I noticed that he appeared agitated, and said I should be

there presently, and that it was all right, thinking that he would then go back to my son, which he did. I followed him - I called him into the counting-house, and asked him if he knew any thing about it, as I missed a great number of things. My son told him it was only three weeks ago since he had ordered that canteen to be locked up in the warehouse; he said he had never seen the canteen open. I said I should endeavour to find it out. I went for an officer, who came and apprehended him. He denied every thing. We searched his lodgings, and found a waistcoat. We took him before a magistrate, and he was committed - and on the 20th I received a letter from him, and in consequence of that letter, I went to him in Tothill-fields, with my wife. I asked what he had sent for me for - I did not threaten or promise him at all. He said he had sent for me to ask if I would forgive him, and that if I would, he would tell me all the truth, and keep nothing back. (I had found two of the spoons then.) I began to tell him what I had found, and said, I wondered that he could ask me to forgive him. I asked what he had done with the rest of the plate, saying, that we had found a portion of it, and it was of no use to deny it; he said he had every reason to believe that the rest of the plate was melted - that he had met a man in the street who took him to a jew named Philips, in a court in Poulteney-street, where he had sold it in small parcels - that he at first took six large table-forks, for which the man gave him 2 l. 7 s. I wrote down in pencil what he said, and my son copied it.

SAMUEL LUKE PRATT . I copied this paper from my father's pencil writing.

SAMUEL PRATT continued. He said he sold the six forks on one day for 2 l. 7 s., on another day a waiter, four tea, two salt, and four egg-spoons, for which the Jew gave him 1 l. 19 s.; the next lot he said he had taken was six desert orks, for which they gave him 18 s.; that he afterwards took sugar-tongs and tea-spoons, not mentioning how many, and he did not recollect the price they gave him. I asked what he had done with the five duplicates which we had traced to different pawnbrokers', where the plate had been taken out the week before - he said, that on being introduced to this Jew, he made him a present of the duplicates to give to a friend of his, who was to use them - that his own wife had pawned the things, and said one of the duplicates was lost; he told me where one of the whips was. He sent for me again on the Wednesday following; I then told him we had found a quantity of other things, and did he mean to tell me who took him to the receiver's - he directed me to Vine-street, but we did not find the man.

SAMUEL LUKE PRATT re-examined. I am the prosecutor's son. I missed a quantity of plate from two canteens, and told the prisoner it was very singular that plate should be taken from them without being missed; he said he had never seen the canteens opened, and did not know that there was any silver in them. I missed a plated toasting-fork, a rose-wood inkstand, a small pair of scissars, three whips, and a brush.

ROBERT PIKE . I am servant to Mrs. Rochford, a pawnbroker. On the 6th of February the prisoner pawned six knives and six forks, silver mounted, for 5 s., in the name of John Moore .

JAMES GURNEY . I am shopman to Mr. Morrit, a pawnbroker. I have a whip, pawned for 3 s. on the 13th of December. I cannot swear who by, but have every reason to believe that it was the prisoner. He gave his name Brown, Hamilton-row, Burton-crescent. I remarked to him that there was no such place.

LAWRENCE NOTLEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have two table-spoons pawned for 20 s., in the name of Mary Hudson .

MR. PRATT. He owned to me that his wife had pawned these spoons, and she went with me to the shop as the duplicate was lost. He said she was his wife.

LAWRENCE NOTLEY re-examined. I saw the woman who came with Mr. Pratt, but cannot say whether it was her, as I did not take them in myself.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker. I have an inkstand, pawned on the 9th of December, in the name of John Whitehead , John-street. I have every reason to believe the prisoner to be the person upon seeing him now, but before the magistrate I rather doubted it.

ROBERT SEWERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a whip, pawned on the 13th of December, in the name of Thomas Brown . I cannot say by whom.

HENRY WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am shopman to Mr. Tomlinson, pawnbroker. I have a toasting-fork, pawned on the 22d of January, for 1 s. 6 d., by a woman, in the name of Mary Brown .

SAMUEL LUKE PRATT . The property is all my father's. The knives and forks are damaged. I had put them away to be returned. He came into our service about the beginning of December. The whip pawned at Morrit's cost 12 s.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. The prisoner took me to his lodging on the 16th of March; his wife was not then living with him - he said she was dead. I searched his box, and found a waistcoat, which Mr. Pratt, sen., who was present, claimed. I found a doctor's bill, at the back of which is a memorandum, which led me to Morrit's and other pawnbrokers. I found a new pair of men's shoes in his box - he at first said that they belonged to a woman who came to see him, and perhaps would be his wife, but afterwards that they were his wife's. I found his wife in another man's room, and afterward accompanied her to Notley's. I found some duplicates in her box, also a brush and a pair of scissars.

SAMUEL PRATT . I went with Ballard to this woman's lodging. The prisoner afterwards acknowledged that she was his wife.

JAMES HILL . I am apprentice to Messrs. Neat and Son, pawnbrokers, Duke-street. I have a whip pawned for 1 s. 6 d.; by the prisoner I believe, but am not quite positive.

SAMUEL LUKE PRATT . The brush is my father's, and I believe the scissars to be so; the whip is his. I manage the business in Bond-street. The lowest value of the six large table-knives and forks is 6 l. The value of the lot he said he sold to the Jew for 1 l. 19 s. is 5 l. 4 s.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240407-92

Second Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

700. WILLIAM GOUGH was indicted for stealing, on

the 27th of March , a horse, price 6 l.; a cart, value 3 l.; and a set of harness, value 5 s. , the property of William Gough the elder .

WILLIAM GOUGH . I live in Portland-town, St. Mary-le-bone, and am a green-grocer . On the 27th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I left my horse and cart in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden , with other carts, while I went into the market. I was absent about fifteen minutes, and on returning, it was gone. I found it on the Monday following, in Ewer-street, Gray's-Inn-lane, in the possession of Denyer. The prisoner is my son, I had not seen him for five or six weeks - he was backwards and forwards with me up to February, but did not live with me. He sold garden-stuff about. I lent him the horse and cart sometimes. He always used to ask for it when he wanted it. I do not know where he lived.

HANNAH MILTON . I am sister to William Denyer , who lives in Ewer-street. On Saturday morning, the 27th of March, about eight o'clock, the prisoner brought this horse and cart, and sold it to my brother. I do not exactly know what he said, but heard the agreement - my brother gave him 4 l. 19 s. for them. He paid him 5 s. earnest, and the prisoner gave his address at No. 9, Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's; and in the afternoon my brother ascertained that to be correct, and paid him the rest, and took his receipt. My brother is not here he was in the country, when his summons was left. The horse was put into our stable, and the cart stood in the yard. Mr. Gough came on Monday and claimed them.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner last Sunday - he said he knew what it was for - that it was for stealing a horse and cart which he had from his father.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I do not know Milton, except that I paid her 4 l. 19 s. for the horse and cart, and 2 s. 6 d. for the harness. She delivered the horse and cart to me, and said her husband was out of town. She called him her husband, and signed her name as H. Denyer to the receipt.

HANNAH MILTON . He is my brother. I did not call him my husband. I signed that name to the receipt; it is a great wonder that I did not put my brother's name; it is my maiden name, I did it without a thought.

Prisoner's Defence. In 1813, I bought that horse for 3 l. 10 s., and in 1815, I went to sea, leaving it with my father, and never received any money for it, I considered it mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-93

701. MARY ANN HUDSON was indicted for stealing on the 22d of February , at the Liberty of the Rolls , one bonnet, value 1 l.; two feathers, value 10 s.; five shirts, value 2 l.; two shawls, value 30 s.; two gowns, value 30 s.; three petticoats, value 8 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 l.; five cravats, value 5 s.; one pair of half-boots, value 4 s.; two half-sovereigns, and twenty shillings, the property of John Bamber , in his dwelling-house .

RUTH BAMBER . I am the wife of John Bamber . We live at No. 7, Shire-lane , in the Liberty of the Rolls, and keep a confectioner's shop . The prisoner came to lodge and board with us, on the 12th or 13th of February - she was a stranger before that, She sometimes slept in one room and sometimes in another, she had no particular room. My husband and I sleep in the shop. We keep our property there in a box. On Sunday, the 22d of February, we missed the box, clothes, and all together, just before 10 o'clock in the morning, when we got up. I also missed a band-box, containing my bonnet and feathers.

Q. Did she go to bed on Saturday night - A. Yes, she went to bed before us, and slept on the second floor that night - she was in the habit of doing little things for us, and lighting my fire. The box was on the top of my bureau bedstead, and was safe when we went to bed. I heard her come into our room about seven o'clock in the morning - she set about lighting the fire, but I did not hear her go out. I and my husband were in bed, and when we got up at ten o'clock we missed this property, and she had left the house. I had not heard her go out of the room. She had been nine days with us, and had given no warning. I had no reason to suppose that she was going, I am sure that the box was on the top of our bedstead when we went to bed, There was a lamp burning in the room when she was there, We let the house out in lodgings - some of the lodgers are single women.

Q. Do you take them in without a character - A. Yes. I fell asleep while she was in the room, and did not see what she did. I did not awake till near ten o'clock - the trunk was a paper one, it contained the property stated in the indictment, (enumerating it) It was locked and I kept the key. I had opened it on the Saturday, night to put the money into it. The property was worth 9 l. 5 s. altogether. I have since seen my bonnet and feathers, the skirt of a gown, and another gown cut up into aprons, on the 22d of February, when she was taken.

JOHN BAMBER . I rent this house, and let lodgings to single women. The last witness is my wife. A band-box, with the bonnet and feathers, and another with the clothes, were both on the top of the bedstead, over our heads. The prisoner came into the room about seven o'clock on Sunday morning - she made herself useful about the house - I was half asleep and half awake when she came in - she left the room before I went to sleep. I awoke rather before ten, and found the trunks gone, and went in pursuit of her. She was taken ten or twelve days after. She was brought to our house by a female, and said she came from Brighton, and wanted a lodging; two other females lodged with me at the time, and are there now; they did not go away. I took the prisoner myself, drinking with a gentleman at a public-house in the Old Bailey, with my wife's beaver bonnet, feathers, and gown on. I produce them.

RUTH BAMBER . This is my bonnet, feathers, and gown. I am certain of them.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 17th of March, the prisoner was given into my custody - and after she was committed for re-examination, the prosecutor and prosecutrix identified the bonnet, feathers, and gown on her back. I asked where she lived, and at last ascertained that it was at Mrs. Shields's, No. 3, Queen's Gardens, Brompton. I searched her apartment there, and found a hat-box, and some pieces which the prosecutrix says have been cut off her gown, and here is an apron which Mrs. Shields gave me. She appeared in distress.

RUTH BAMBER. This is my band-box; the apron is

made out of my gown, and here is the body of it. My trunk and all were taken.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of her distress, and the bad example set by the prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240407-94

702. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 22d of March , at St. Mary-le-bone , a sugar bason, value 2 l.; a fish-slice, value 1 l.; a gravy-spoon, value 1 l.; two table-spoons, value 1 l.; a fork, value 10 s.; two salt-spoons, value 7 s., and seven seals, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Elder , in his dwelling-house .

HENRY ELDER . I am a coach-maker , and live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. I was not at home at the time in question.

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a coach-finisher, and live with Mr. Elder. On the 22d of March, between two and three o'clock, I was in the workshop, near the staircase of the dwelling-house. There is a private-door leading to the dwelling-house, and another from the shop, which is generally open, the street door is kept shut. I heard some words on the stairs, looked up, and saw the prisoner behind the cook, who was coming down stairs - she asked him what he did there; he said he was sent there by a gentleman; she then asked what he had in his apron; he said

"What is that to you?" she said she insisted upon knowing, and put her hand on his shoulder to stop him from going out - he gave himself a twist, I directly collared him, and insisted on knowing what he had got; I put my hand to his apron, which was tied up round him, something rattled, he said,

"Well, come, I will shew you, do not hold me in this way." I took him into the counting-house, and found a sugar-bason, two table-spoons, a fish-slice, a gravy-spoon, a fork, and two salt-spoons on him; he afterwards sat down by the side of the desk, and there I found a seal.

ROBERT WILLIANS . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my custody, with the property, which I have had ever since.

MARY LITTLE . I am cook to Mr. Elder. I was going down stairs, and saw the drawing-room door open; I went in, (as I knew it was shut not an hour before) and saw the prisoner coming out of the adjoining room, where part of this plate was kept. I asked him how he came there - he said a gentleman below had sent him up. He asked if some gentleman lived there; I do not recollect the name. I went down stairs before him, keeping him behind. I stopped him at the bottom of the stairs. Summers came - he has stated what passed correctly. Part of the plate was kept in the adjoining room too that in which I saw him, and the other locked up in the room where I saw him. I knew it all to be my masters'. I missed it from where it was taken.

MR. ELDER. It is my property; most of it is engraved with my initials; it would take 30 l. to replace it.

Prisoner. Q. Are you aware that your door was open - A. It must have been, or he could not have got in.

Prisoner. I will leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18240407-95

703. JOHN BASS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Jones , on the King's highway, on the 4th of April , at St. Mary, Islington , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2 l.; a watch-chain, value 2 l., and three seals, value 30 s. , his property.

THOMAS JONES . I am an engineer , and work in Castle-street, Clerkenwell, with Mr. Windmill, a grinder, whose private house is at Islington. On the 4th of April, at twenty minutes or half-past nine o'clock in the evening I was near Ball's-pond turnpike ; coming home towards town, a man and two boys met me, and the man struck me on the breast, when they came up; he struck me with his shoulder, it made me stagger back, and one of the boys ran right against me as I staggered.

Q. Can you say which boy it was - A. It was the prisoner; I had a full view of him by the moon-light as he came up to me, I am certain of him - it was moon-light, there was a lamp within a few yards of us; I do not think that it was a gas one.

Q. When the prisoner ran against you what happened - A. The man ran up to me immediately, and snatched my watch from my pocket; my seals hung out, but the chain was hardly to be seen. He ran away immediately that he got it.

Q. Did your watch come out of your pocket without any force - A. Yes, it came right out. I caught it in my hand, but had no power to hold it, he got it; from the blow I received I had hardly power to protect it - I could hardly keep myself on my legs.

Q. The man ran away, what became of the boys - A. They all ran together a considerable way, and then separated. I pursued them, and called Stop thief! I did not lose sight of one, but lost sight of the two who separated; they threw the watch under my feet when I had pursued about ten yards; I do not know which threw it down; it was the man, who took it out of my pocket when the prisoner had shoved me; I could not see which threw it down, as I was running very swift - I never lost sight of the prisoner at all I am certain, for when I stooped to pick up the watch, I kept him in view, and finding the others had escaped, I kept following him; he ran two or three hundred yards before he was taken by the witness - I am certain of him. I have the watch here.

THOMAS LISTER . I am a jeweller. I had been visiting a friend, and was coming home with my family, and about ten or twenty yards before me, I heard a noise, and a cry of Stop thief! A man and two boys immediately ran by me towards town, and I was going towards town; I caught at the man - Mrs. Lister pulled me back, saying that it was only a parcel of boys. After that I left her arm, and ran after them; the man ran down a dark court, and dropped his hat at the corner; I did not choose to follow him; the prisoner ran towards the turnpike; I followed him, and in two minutes he was brought back; a lad like him had passed me, but I cannot swear to him; Jones immediately said he would swear to his being one; he was coming from Jones; the prisoner said it was not him; I asked why he ran away then - he said he was running out of the way of the people.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me go from the gentleman - A. A boy about your size, but I will not swear to you.

JOHN WOODS . I am a labourer. I was on my way home to Newington-green, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner met and ran right against me; I stopped him - nobody was with him. I kept him till the prosecutor came up.

Q. Would he have stopped if you had not held him - A. No; I was obliged to hold him. Jones came up, and said he was one of the three who had attacked him; the prisoner denied it. I am sure that he was running when I stopped him, and he wished to go on.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been looking for work - I was coming home, and met three patrols in the road, who asked where I was going; I said, home, or I should get locked out, and just as I got to the turnpike this man stopped me, and asked where I was going.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18240407-96

704. ELIZABETH FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , in the dwelling-house of William Voller , ten sheets, value 5 l.; eight table-cloths, value 2 l.; four shirts, value 1 l., and two pillow-cases, value 2 s. , his property.

MARY RIDEAL . I am daughter-in-law of William Voller , who lives in New North-street, Red Lion-square . The prisoner lodged at our house with her husband; they had the second floor furnished. We took the house in July, and found them as lodgers. I missed this property in February.

JAMES GURNEY . I am apprenticed to Mr. Morritt, pawnbroker, High-street, Mary-le-bone. I have a tablecloth and two towels, pawned on the 12th of February, by Sell.

ELIZABETH SELL. I have had the care of a house No. 8, Red Lion-square, for five or six months; the prisoner was charwoman there. She came to me there several times, and brought me several duplicates, saying they were things she had pawned in her first husband's time, and had not been able to redeem them. On the 28th of February, I had a letter from her, which I have destroyed - it stated that if I went to her lodging I should be taken up. I have not seen her since. I redeemed the things, and pawned them afterwards.

EDWARD YOUNG . I am apprentice to Mr. Lee, pawnbroker, High Holborn. I have three sheets pawned on the 12th and 14th of January, and on the 14th of February, for 5 s. each, in the name of Ann Archer , by the prisoner; I have known her for four years.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Ross, Paddington-street. I have two sheets pawned by Sell, in the name of Mary Pearce .

ELIZABETH SELL. I had the duplicate of them from the prisoner, and finding they did not suit me pawned them again.

GEORGE BENTON . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Holborn. I have a table-cloth and sheet, pawned in the name of Mary Francis , I believe by the prisoner.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a constable. I have a pair of sheets which were given up by a pawnbroker in South-street; also a table-cloth, which was given to me by Rideal. I found a key in the prisoner's room, which opens the prosecutor's bed-room.

ELIZABETH SELL. I redeemed this table-cloth with a duplicate she gave me, and gave it to Rideal.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had anything to do with their key; it used to be left in their door - they used to encourage me to drink, and they bought a handkerchief of me, which they knew was stolen.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-97

705. JOHN BOUNCE and THOMAS LILLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , three spoons, value 40 s., the goods of William Bourk , and a spoon, value 12 s., the goods of Thomas Hughes , in the dwelling-house of the said William Bourk .

WILLIAM BOURK . I am a dancing-master , and live in Trafalgar-street, Hackney-road . I missed some spoons.

JOHN PRICE . I am a publican, and live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel. On the 12th of February, both the prisoners were at my house in company with another man - they all three came in together, and called for a pint of beer; I saw Bounce offering to sell some silver spoons to the other man, who came in with them - I took them out of the other man's hands, and said I would buy them; I took them to the bar, and asked what he wanted for them - he said 20 s. I said if he would sit down I would send for change. I immediately sent to Lambeth-street for an officer, and before he came the other man absconded, and I detained the other two.

Q. How came he to get away - A. They were in the tap-room; I told him to wait in the tap-room, and while I was in the bar, he went out at the back door. I then stopped in the tap-room with the prisoners till the officer came - they did not know that I was detaining them; they never offered to go. I am sure that Bounce first produced the spoons; he offered them to the other men for sale. I gave them to the officer, and pointed to the prisoners; he took them.

EBENEZA DALTON. I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prisoners at the house. Four spoons were given to me - they both said that they had found them in a dust-hole in Haggerston-lane.

MARY EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Bourk. Two tea and one desert spoon belong to him, and the other to Mr. Hughes, from whom I had borrowed it; I had put my master's spoons in the wash-house about ten o'clock in the morning, and missed them next day in the afternoon of the 12th. There is only a latch to the wash-house door, but there is a gate to the garden, which is seldom locked. I did not see either of the prisoners about.

MR. BOURK. My three spoons are worth about 25 s.

BOUNCE'S Defence. I found them among some dust in Haggerston-lane.

BOUNCE - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . - Confined 6 Months .

LILLY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-98

707. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Closs .

THOMAS CLOSS , JUN. My father is an auctioneer , and lives in the Borough. On the 1st of March, between two and three o'clock, he and I went to Clement's-inn, in a gig, we left a box coat on the horse's back in the care of German, returned in about two hours, and it was gone; we found the prisoner in custody with it.

WILLIAM GERMAN . My father is a waterman, I had the

care of the gentleman's horse and gig, the prisoner came and took the coat off the horse's back; I did not see him take it, but missed it in about two minutes, and saw him running across the church-yard with it under his arm; I gave an alarm and saw him taken; I cannot swear to him, as I lost sight of him for about five minutes.

JOHN RICHARD PRIMET . I live with my mother. The prisoner ran by me with the coat under his arm, I saw him drop it, and am sure he is the man; there was a cry of Stop thief! I ran after him, and kept him in sight till he was taken. German picked it up.

WILLIAM NISBET . I am a street-keeper. I heard a cry of Stop thief! pursued the prisoner, and took him immediately, about thirty yards from the gig.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the coat till I got to Bow-street.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy by Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-99

707. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , a bed-tick, value 10 s. , the goods of William Gregory .

ROBERT HARRIS , I am in the employ of Mr. William Gregory , upholsterer , High Holborn . On the 5th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I caught the prisoner with one foot on the cill of the door, going out of the shop. She made a noise which attracted my attention. I was in the back part of the shop. I went forward and took her with this tick, under her arm, she said,

"Pray let me go, I will never do so again." She had taken it from the window close to the door. I had seen it there a day or two before.

FRANCIS LOWE . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said she meant to buy it; she said she had it under her arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy it - the noise he heard was my knocking my foot on the floor for him to come and tell the price.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-100

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, APRIL 13.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

708. THOMAS DENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a bell, value 10 l. the goods of William Gladwin .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GLADWIN . I live at Southgate . On the 22d of March, I had an alarm-bell on my premises; it weighed nearly 2 cwt.; it is made of bell-metal. I missed it in the morning; it was safe the day before; the premises were locked up. I traced the marks of a wheel, about six o'clock in the morning from the premises to his own gate, and in his house I found it; it is worth about 12 l.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you any mark on it - A. Yes.

SAMUEL FITCH . I am an officer, stationed at Southgate. On Tuesday night, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner wheeling an empty barrow, about one hundred yards from his own house; he said,

"Good morning Mr. Fitch;" he left the barrow about twenty yards from his house. Next morning I accompanied the prosecutor to where the barrow was, and found a mark in it, which the mouth of the bell, being heavy, had made. I found the bell at his house, covered with sacks. I knew him before.

DAVID PIKESLEY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of March, at Bows-farm, he asked what he had done; I said it was about the bell, stolen from Mr. Gladwin, and which had been found on his premises; he said he left the Cherry-tree public-house, about eleven o'clock, and found the bell in the street, and if he found any thing he thought he had a right to it. The Cherry-tree is about a mile from Southgate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say that I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-101

709. STEPHEN ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , a bag, value 2 d., and forty sovereigns, the property of John Tee , from his person .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN TEE . I am a coal-merchant , and live at Enfield. On the 25th of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I was at the Sun public-house , and had occasion to take out my purse, which contained forty sovereigns. I was going to put it into my pocket, when the prisoner snatched it away, and ran off with it. I did not follow him, not thinking that he was robbing me, having known him for many years - but he has not returned it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you drunk or sober - A. I had been drinking a little, but knew what I was doing; I was not the worse for liquor. A person offered to lend me two sovereigns - I pulled out my purse, and said,

"I will let you see that I do not want it." I have always said that the prisoner took it away. I said I suspected nobody but him.

Q. Did you say so at the time that you saw him take it - Not at that time, but I said so in the course of the evening. Cuffley, one of his party, went for him and brought him back. The constable was called for, and went to fetch another to assist him, and at that time he came back.

JOSEPH SHAW . I was at the house - somebody offered to lend Tee some sovereigns, and he produced his money to convince them he did not want it; he put it back again; they began pitching for gin; he took his purse out, and I saw the prisoner snatch it, and go away with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-102

710. BENJAMIN GASKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a load of hay, value 5 l., and eight trusses of hay, value 1 l. , the goods of John Nicholl .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am hay-binder to Mr. Nicholl, who lives in Hendon parish . On Friday the 27th

of February, about three o'clock, I left the shed, with a load and ten trusses of hay bound ready for the market. On Sunday evening I missed eight trusses out of the load - eight rough bundles of hay were substituted for them. It was common hay, cut out of the rough of the rick. On the Saturday before the robbery the prisoner saw me. I said I wanted a new cutting knife, and must go to London next Saturday and buy one, and on that Saturday this robbery was done.

JOSEPH HANDYMAN . A message was delivered to me, in consequence of which I sent my man Anderson to Kennington-lane, at five o'clock in the morning, with a cart.

BENJAMIN ANDERSON . I am servant to Mr. Handyman. On the 28th of February, at five o'clock in the morning, he sent me down to Kennington-lane, with the cart and horses. I there met the prisoner, who told me to make haste. I said I could not come faster. He asked me to give him the whip, and he drove the horses into a field near the hay-rick. The gate was open - his brother Will was waiting there. They set the cart all ready for loading. The prisoner got into the cart and loaded the hay, and Will pitched it. They told me to move three large trusses into a place from where they took four trusses. The prisoner then got off the load, took the whip, and drove off, and I left Will Gaskin in the rick-yard. I drove the hay to Paddington - Will went with me. The prisoner joined us at Paddington, and then they tried to sell it, but could not, and brought it to town. They sold it in New York-place, near the New-road. The prisoner gave me 10 s. to give my master for the cartage. I did not know that any thing was wrong.

COURT. Q. Do you know from whose premises they took the hay - A. I know it used to be Mr. Nicholl's premises.

SAMUEL NICHOLLS . I am son of the prosecutor. I know the place Anderson has spoken of - the hay there was my father's. It is worth about 4 l. 10 s.

GEORGE COOPER . I live in Little York-place, Mary-le-bone. I bought the hay for 4 l. 10 s. I believe the prisoner to be one of the men.

BENJAMIN ANDERSON . I think Mr. Cooper is the gentleman he sold it to.

Prisoner's Defence. That is not the gentleman I sold it to.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-103

711. JOHN PHILPOT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 8 cwts. of lead, value 5 l, the goods of Thomas Dickanson , and fixed to a certain out-house, belonging to his dwelling-house; and one hundred lbs. of lead, value 10 s., his property, and fixed to a stable of his .

SECOND COUNT stating the lead to be fixed to a building of his.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DICKANSON , ESQ. I occupy some premises on Twickenham common . On the 5th of March I had a leaden pump attached to my house, and in the morning of the 6th, I found it gone - and missed a leaden cistern from the green-house, which had been fixed. I went to Brentford, and a quantity of lead was produced, which I am satisfied is mine.

EDWARD JONES . I am coachman to Mr. Dickanson. On the 5th of March this pump was fixed outside the wall of the stable, and the cistern was fixed in the green-house, and in the morning they were both gone. I found a quantity of lead at Brentford, which was the same as this.

JOHN FARR . I am gardener to Mr. Dickanson. On the morning of the 6th I missed the cistern, and saw it afterward at Brentford.

WILLIAM HEWETT . I am an Excise-officer. On the morning of the 6th of March, about five o'clock, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner sitting in a cart at Brentford, driving it - a person was with him - he was about three miles from Twickenham. I stopped the cart, and asked what he had in his possession; he said, nothing that he need to be ashamed or afraid of - but on my coming up and putting my hand to the horse, he set off, and left the cart. I found it contained a leaden cistern and pump, and other pieces of lead. It was shewn to the witnesses.

GEORGE WARD . I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house, at Lewisham, fifteen miles from Brentford, yesterday week.

STEPHEN STAPLES . I saw the prisoner in Bow-road, one day after the fifth of March. He was with one Wasley, who told the prisoner that he was going to have his horse and cart, and advised him to keep away; he said he would endeavour to keep away if he could, and that he was likely to have been caught with the horse and cart, and that there was lead in it.

Prisoner. I am suffering for other people.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-104

712. JAMES WITHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , two bushels of chaff , the goods of Henry Walker , his master .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY WALKER . I am a farmer , and live at Enfield. The prisoner was my servant . On the 16th of March I sent him to town with a load of potatoes, and told my son to watch him. He was brought to me afterwards, and begged of me to forgive him. I said I would not, as I suspected that he had robbed me many times before. I gave him in charge. He afterwards sent for me, and said he had been in the habit of taking chaff, and selling it at the Weaver's Arms public-house, for 1 s. a sack.

RICHARD PALMER . I am Walker's son-in-law. I watched the prisoner at four o'clock in the morning, and when he had got about thirty yards from the premises, I told him to stop, and found a sack of chaff in his cart put between two sacks, concealed under a great coat - and another sack under the cloth. I took the chaff away. He went to town with his team, returned at night, and next morning absconded.

JOHN WILSON . I am constable of Enfield. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday last, at Wandsworth. He asked if I thought Mr. Walker would hurt him - I said I could not say. I took him to Walker, and he said he

sold the chaff to the hostler at the Weaver's Arms, for 1 s. a sack. He has three or four children.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-105

713. JOHN GRAVES was charged on the Coroners Inquisition only, with killing and slaying James Parteridge .

JANE STOKES . My husband is a clock-maker - we live in Rose-alley. On the 22d of February, I was at the Cooper's Arms-public house ; Parteridge was there. I had half a pint of beer, and warmed it in the tap room, he came up and squared in my face, and said he would fight me, and stamped on my toes - he insisted upon stamping on my toes and used bad language, and struck me on the side of my face; I cannot say whether he was drunk. The prisoner was sitting on the other side of the tap-room alone. Parteridge went up to him, and spilled his beer over him. The prisoner said he hoped he would pay for another pint; he then struck him over the head. I turned my head, and did not see whether the prisoner returned the blow. I saw his arms round the prisoner's neck, and both fell.

GEORGE BROWN . I keep the Cooper's Arms. I was called into the tap-room. One M'Keal was in the act of rising to strike Parteridge, who was in liquor; he turned round and behaved very indecent to Stokes, then jumped about, and knocked the prisoner's beer over. Stokes slapped his face, and he struck her. A man jumped up and struck him, and just as the prisoner was rising, Parteridge turned and struck him on the side of the neck. The prisoner returned the blow, and both fell. I picked Parteridge up, and he was taken home.

JOHN WINDER . I am a surgeon. I believe that the deceased died from a rupture in the bladder, occasioned by violence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-106

714. ELIZABETH WETHERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a silver plate, value 4 l., the goods of Thomas Hope , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

MR. BENJAMIN SMART . I am a gold-refiner, and live in Prince's-street. On the 5th of April, a person who I believe to be the prisoner, came to my house, and offered this silver plate for sale. I asked how she came by it; she said it was found at the bottom of a night-cart; that her husband was a nightman, and had found it in emptying a privy. I said if so it belonged to the person whose privy they had emptied - she said no, she thought it belonged to the gang who had emptied the privy. I detained the plate, but not her.

PETER WEBSTER . I am house-steward to Thomas Hope , Esq. - the prisoner has been employed in the house for five or six years , and bore a very good character; this plate is his, and has his arms on it. She was employed as charwoman on Sunday week.

ISAAC ROBERTS . I am under butler to Mr. Hope. I missed this plate on Monday the 5th, it was safe on Saturday; it was kept in the pantry, which is not always locked. She was generally employed in the kitchen.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner up at her own house, and told her some plate had been stolen, and she said she had heard something had been stolen, but knew nothing of it. I asked what she had to say to the plate she had offered to Mr. Smart, she said that plate she found on the top of Theobald's night-cart; that as she went home she saw a man like a footman, throw something on the night-cart - that her husband was in Theobald's employ, and in the morning she went to the cart, and found the plate on the soil, tied in a handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more how the plate came out of the house than the board which is before me.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-107

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

715. TIMOTHY DONAHU and ALEXANDER BURGESS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two decanter, value 10 s. , the goods of John Harris .

WILLIAM BENNETT . I keep a green-grocer's shop. I know Harris, he is a carpenter , and lives near the Nelson public-house, at Chelsea . On the 26th March, about twelve o'clock, I was wheeling gravel, nearly opposite his house, and observed Donahu and two others at play. I watched them for a few minutes, and then saw one, less than either of the prisoners, go from them, and walk by Harris's house, then return, and go into the shop, he came out in a minute or two, with something bulky under his coat, he joined the other two, who were fifty or sixty yards off, and all turned out of the road. I gave an alarm - Harris's son joined in the pursuit; I fetched Larkin, and took Donahu in ten minutes; I am certain he was one of them; he was in company with the boy. I saw a decanter in his bosom as I followed him, saw him take it out, and put it on the coping of a wall. I took it up, followed, and never lost sight of him afterwards.

HENRY HARRIS . I am the son of John Harris . I was called, and watched the prisoners - Donahu was one of them; I saw a decanter in his bosom; another boy dropped the other; they are my father's, and had been taken from the shop window.

- LARKIN. Bennett came to me, and pointed three persons out - we followed them, and by the waterside one of them threw a decanter down. I made a catch at them, but fell, and they got out of my sight, and am not certain whether the prisoners are the person.

DONAHU - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

BURGESS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-108

716. JOHN SWAP was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a tub, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Thurkettle ; and 7 lbs. of lead, value 2 s., the goods of David Jones , and fixed in a garden belonging to the dwelling-house of the said Henry Thurkettle ; and a fixture (i.e.) a brass cock, value 1 s., the goods of David Jones , and fixed in the said garden .

WILLIAM HOME . I am a gardener. On the 24th of March, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was in the New-road, East India-fields , and saw the prisoner alone with a tub on his head, and a pail in his hand - I went up to him and told him I thought they were stolen, looked into the pail, and took out a green baize, some leaden pipe, and a brass cock. I took the pipe and

carried it to Mr. Eld, and knocked him; the prisoner walked backwards and forwards in the road the while - he could not have escaped without my observing him. Eld came out, and we took him to the watch-house.

EDWARD ELD . Home called me up - I found the prisoner in the road, and took him to the watch-house.

MARY THURKETTLE . I am the wife of Henry Thurkettle - we live at Islington, about a quarter of a mile from the East India-fields. This pipe was safe in our garden on the night of the 23d, fixed under the ground to supply the water, and on the 24th, about seven o'clock, I missed it. The tub is ours, and was taken from a shed behind the house.

DAVID JONES . I am landlord of the house. I fitted the lead to the premises; it tallied exactly.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-109

717. WILLIAM UNCEL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Hannah Poulter , widow .

HANNAH POULTER , I am a widow, and live in Portland-street . I have known the prisoner from a child. On the 4th of March, about three o'clock, he called upon me, and remained with me half an hour; he got up while we were talking, took the watch off the mantle-piece, and said,

"What do you think it is o'clock;" I said,

"Near three" - he said it was a few minutes after. I was busy, and did not notice what he did with it, but he immediately went out very quick. I did not miss it till about eleven o'clock at night. I gave information at Marlborough-street, and found it there in about a week. I never permitted him to take it.

JOHN PEARSON . I am servant to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Tottenham Court-road. On the 4th of March a watch was pawned by the prisoner I believe, in the name of Smith. The duplicate was found upon him.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer. On the 12th of March I apprehended the prisoner, and asked him about this watch - he said he had stolen it, and pawned it at Harrison's, and gave me the duplicate. I made him no promise whatever.

Prisoner's Defence. He promised if I would confess he would try and settle it.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I said nothing of the sort.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240407-110

718. WILLIAM UNCEL was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a coat, value 6 s.; a hat, value 6 d., and a pocket-book, value 6 d. , the goods of John Smart .

JOHN SMART . On the 12th of March I slept at the Harp, public-house, Russell-street, Covent-garden . My pocket-book was in my coat pocket, which I left on the drawers in my bed-room when I went to bed, and in the morning they were gone. I found the coat and hat on the prisoner's back at the office - he was a stranger.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . On the 19th I took the coat and hat from the prisoner, and at the second examination found the pocket-book in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I slept at the house on this night, and when I got up these things were on the floor - I put them on by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-111

719. JOSEPH WAYLING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 37 s. , the goods of John Augustus Brooks .

MARGARET RILEY . I keep a fruit-stall near Mr. Brooks's. On the 25th of February, about a quarter to six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner lurking about the door alone - two young men came and asked the price of my fruit, and every thing which I had, and were screening him from me; I saw him put a piece of print under his arm, and walk away with it. I followed, and told him to bring it back, which he did, and laid it down; he had gone about seven yards from the door with it.

THOMAS KING . I am servant to John Augustus Brooks . I heard a noise at the door, went out, and saw the print laying down before the door; it had hung over the step. The prisoner was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM FRYER . I am an officer. I was crossing opposite to this shop, and heard the woman call out, and saw the prisoner five or six yards from the door with the print under his arm; he turned back, and threw it down at the door. I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was on a chair. I took it up to look at - this woman called out, and I put it down. I was not two yards from the door.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-112

720. JOHN WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a watch case, value 3 s., and a morrocco case, value 6 s., the goods of James Scott , from the person of Henry Williams .

HENRY WILLIAMS . I live with Mr. James Scott . On the 21st of February, my master sent me with a watch case to Mr Luke's, in Aldersgate-street, to get a morrocco case fitted to it - I was returning with them between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner in Old-street ; he asked me for the work I had just fetched from Smithfield - I told him I had not been to Smithfield; he asked where I had been; I said five or six doors from Fann-street. He said they had given it to me wrong, and I was to give it back to him. I took the morrocco case and the watch case out of my bag, and gave them to him. I was going down a street on another errand. He said he would go part of the way with me - a gentleman crossed over, and took us both into a public-house - I told him all about it, and he took him to my master.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where did you come from this morning - A. From Cold Bath-fields; my master put me there - he did not charge me with stealing a watch case.

ROBERT FELL . I am a glazier, and live in Bird Cage-walk, Hackney. On the 21st of March. I was coming from Leather-lane down Old-street-road, and saw the boy Williams with this bag in his hand, and the prisoner following close behind him - he tapped him on the shoulder and stopped him as I passed; he leaned down to him, and

said,

"What did they say to you;" the boy made no answer. I then walked on a few paces, turned up for a necessary purpose, and saw the boy give the prisoner this parcel out of his bag - they crossed the road to go up a turning, and suspecting something I went up to the prisoner, and said,

"You will excuse me, but is this your boy?" - and in the interim, he said,

"No, Sir;" and gave the parcel back to the boy. I asked the boy if his master told him to give it to anybody; he said, No. I took them into a public-house, and said to the landlord,

"I suspect something between this man and boy, and have brought them here to investigate the business." The prisoner said

"It is perfectly correct, I have come from Mr. Luke, for the parcel back again;" I said I should not be satisfied till he went to the boy's master. The boy told me readily where he lived, and on the road there, the prisoner met a man; who asked him to go and drink; the prisoner asked me to stop a few minutes, and he would be back again - I said No; and on the way he said,

"Perhaps I may be mistaken in the boy; I hope you will not attempt to injure me if it is so." I took him to Mr. Scott, who said he knew nothing of him, and gave him in charge; he said a man told him to meet a boy of that kind.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you go by the name of Fuller - A. Never. I was never tried here.

JAMES SCOTT . I sent my boy to Mr. Luke's with a watch case, to get a morrocco case. Fell brought him and the prisoner back, and asked if I knew him, and said I might thank him for saving me from being robbed - the prisoner said he had been sent by a young man after the boy. My boy has since lost a gold case, and given two different accounts of it; I took him to the office. The Magistrate committed him in order to save my recognizance, as I am bound for his appearance here.

Cross-examined. Q. You charged him with stealing a case - A. I thought his story false.

JOHN LUKE . I gave the boy a morrocco case like the one produced.

WILLIAM NUNNY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge. He said a person who stood at a door asked if he had any employment, and told him to stop that boy, and bring back his parcel, as he had given him a wrong one.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-113

721. RICHARD FLETCHER was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Middleton , on the night of the 5th of April , and stealing thirty yards of woollen cloth, value 16 l. , the goods of Frederick Dixon .

JOHN MIDDLETON . I am a feather bed and mattress maker , and live in Tottenham Court-road. Aver sleeps there as my servant. The prisoner was in my service nine days as porter .

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You do not sleep in the house - A. No; I employ Aver to sleep there - he is a carpenter, but acts as my porter; he is paid according to what work he does.

JAMES AVER . I am a carpenter, and live in Tottenham Court-road. Last Saturday week I observed that the pin of the window was out, and on Monday, when the prisoner came I asked if he had taken it out; he said,

"I recollect that I took it out after you put it in, because I thought the shutter was not closed, and I forgot to put it in again." I left work about seven o'clock on Monday; it was dark; he agreed to go meet me at the Plough, public-house, in Carey-street, to drink. He said he was going to his brother's in Cavendish-square; he owed me 5 s. 4 d., and asked if I would have 5 s.; I said No; he put 4 s. into my hand, and said it was to get something to drink - we went about two hundred yards down Tottenham Court-road; he turned to the right as if to go to Cavendish-square, and I returned to the house - I had the key of the shop door. I went in, and sat by the fire, and in about half an hour heard somebody come to the door - I went on the stairs opposite the street door; the door was unlocked; it was locked before; I heard the lock go. The prisoner came in, and went into the shop, then returned, and bolted the street door, and called out Tom three times (master calls me Tom) he then took a chisel off the bed-rack, and broke open the parlour door at the back of the shop, which was full of beds, mattresses, and cloth; he had told me that he had carried a piece of cloth out of the cart into that room one morning; and when he got into the parlour he brought something heavy out, which I thought was cloth; he tied some cord round it, put it under his arm, and went out; I went to the door, but was so confused I could not open it; he had shut it. When I did get out I saw that he had just crossed the street - I called after him, but he had got too far. I went next morning with Dixon in Bishopsgate-street, and saw him, pointed him out, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He knew that you slept in the shop - A. I sleep on the first floor. It happened at eight o'clock; he could not see me for the door hid me. I was put into the house to look after the house, and repair it. I might have stopped after I had finished the repairs, but I did not intend it. The goods belong to Mr. Dixon. I gave an alarm directly I got out; the watchmen were not on duty; the lamps were lighted; I could not see his face out of doors.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If there had been no lamps could you have seen a man's face at eight o'clock - A. I could not. He could not see me on the stairs. I had been fitting up the house, and if any porter's job was to be done, I should do it. I had been porter at the old house in Barbican, and continued the same engagement.

COURT. Q. In what capacity were you engaged at Barbican - A. I carried out goods, and had 15 s. a-week. No new engagement was made when I went to this house, but he paid me 20 s. a week then.

FREDERICK DIXON . I am in the employ of Mr. Middleton. This cloth was mine, and was placed in the back room - I saw it safe on the Friday previous, and gave nobody authority to remove it. I had the key of the room in my pocket. The prisoner had handed the cloth out of the cart - it was tied up - I cannot say whether he knew the contents; it was in different lengths. I was informed of the robbery on Tuesday morning, and went with Aver to Bishopsgate-street, where he pointed the prisoner out to me; I got a constable, who took him, and found two duplicates on him. I found some cloth like part which I had lost at Sowerby's; it was the same colour, quality, and quantity, but I cannot swear to it. I bought it of my brother Charles.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How came

you to have the cloth there - A. I was going to occupy the first floor. I had the cloth from my brother to barter or sell. I only found one length; I lost thirty yards.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. There were several lengths of cloth in the parcel - A. Yes; this length was among them.

JOHN LEECH . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, Chiswell-street. On the 3d of April the prisoner pawned a piece of cloth, in the name of W. Jones; I am positive that he is the man.

JAMES AVER re-examined. This happened on Monday night, April the 5th.

MR. ADOLPHUS. This cannot apply to the burglary. I will proceed with the larceny.

CHARLES DIXON . I am brother to Frederick Dixon . I sold him a similar length of cloth to this; it is Oxford-mixed kerseymere.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You do not swear to it - A. No. It measures two yards and a quarter; there are thousands of yards of that colour; I have no mark upon it. I never sold him but this one length of this colour. I believe this to be it.

FREDERICK DIXON . I had no other cloth of this colour - this is the same quality, colour, and length as I lost.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer. I took him into custody, and produce two duplicates which I found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What account did he give of it - A. He said it was an article which he had sent out of the country by his friends, and that he pawned it.

JOHN LEECH . This is the duplicate I gave him; he said he lived in Sun-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the cloth of a hawker in the street about a month ago, for 24 s., and in consequence of only receiving 5 s. of my wages on Saturday night I pawned it. I got drunk, which was the reason I did not go to work on Tuesday.

GUILTY. Aged.

Of stealing the cloth only, and not of breaking & entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-114

722. WILLIAM JEWELL was indicted for bigamy .

ANN MARIA BAKER . I know Mary Ann Todd , and was present when she was married to the prisoner, in May, 1819, at St. Martin in the Fields; he was a journeyman tailor , and she was in service - she left service to marry him. They lived together as man and wife, and separated about fifteen months ago. I saw her this morning.

MARY LEWIS . I know the prisoner, and was present when my sister Sarah was married to him on the 27th of June, 1823 , at St. James, Clerkenwell . She lived with her father, who is a carpenter, and had no money - he was living comfortably with her, and did not desert her. The first wife has brought this forward.

JOHN MASON . I am a constable. I got a certificate of the prisoner's marraige to Mary Ann Todd ; his wife gave it to me; I have not examined it with the original.

Prisoner's Defence. Three months after I married Todd I found that she had a child, which I did not know before; she left me, and took away my property - returned, and lived with me till October, 1822; I did not see her afterwards till Christmas, when she found I was married.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-115

723. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 23d January , nine reams of paper, value 10 l., the goods of James Gye and Frederick Gye , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. JAMES GYE . I was in partnership with my brother Frederick; we carried on business as stationers , in Gracechurch-street.

EMANUEL MERCURY . I am a book-binder. About the latter end of January, I met the prisoner near East Smithfield. I had known him four or five years, living with Messrs. Jones and Wiggin's, wholesale stationers, of Leadenhall-street; he said

"I have left my place, and am out of employ, will you buy any pieces of pasteboard,"

"I said

"No, I buy it whole and cut it out," he said he should have something else for me another time; I said he could let me see it, and about a week after he brought me a sheet of paper, and said he had two reams of it at 18 s. I asked what was the trade price, he said he believed it was 28 s. 6 d. I took the sample sheet to Mr. Wiggin's, who gave me money to buy it; he called in an hour for an answer - I told him to bring it to the Brown Bear public-house in the afternoon, which he did. I paid him 36 s. and immediately sent it to Mr. Wiggins; he said he should have something more to-morrow or next day, and in a few days be brought a sheet of cartridge; Mr. Wiggins gave me money, and I bought three reams of that for two guineas, and took this receipt for it (producing it.) I said

"Powell, this is not signed in your own name, it is signed Johnson;" he said it makes no odds. I sent this to Mr. Wiggins in an hour or two by his porter. I bought a third lot of him, which I also sent to Mr. Wiggins.

Prisoner. Q. Where is the Brown Bear - A. In Upper East Smithfield; the porter was stopped by an officer in carrying them, but he let him pass.

Q. Do you know Antoni Spisatito - A. Yes; he fetched the first two reams from the Brown Bear .

MR. NICHOLAS WIGGINS . I am a wholesale stationer, and live at Aldgate; two parcels of paper were sent to me by Mercury; they are these which are now produced; the prisoner had been five years in our service, and left three months ago. I believe the first parcel was brought about the 21st of January; the number of the mill not being ours, I thought it best to ascertain who the manufacturer sold it to; the cartridge paper was brought about the 23d or 24th of January. I kept it in my possession till it was taken to the Mansion-house; we traced it to Mr. Gye's.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am porter to Mr. Gye. I got some paper from Mercury, and delivered it to master.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. On the 6th of March, I apprehended the prisoner.

MR. GYE. I can swear to this paper being ours', all except one ream which I will not be positive of. I believe the cartridge paper to be mine; we lost it from our warehouse in Pudding-lane; we lost thirty or forty reams. A man was convicted here of stealing it - I do not know the prisoner, we found the warehouse unlocked about a week before; the door was broken open.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recognise any of this paper. I shewed Mercury samples of paper which I received from a person in bad circumstances, who was in the paper line.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-116

724. BENJAMIN BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a jacket, value 7 s. , the goods of Solomon Davis .

SAMUEL GILES . I am a patrol. On the 9th of March, between of twelve and one o'clock in the day-time, I was in Whitechapel; and saw the prisoner running with something under his jacket. I stopped him, and asked what he had there - he said a jacket which he had bought in Shoreditch. I asked him to shew me where, he said he would not, and I took into custody.

EPHRAIM ASCOLI . I am shopman to Solomon Davis , tailor, Osborne-street, Whitechapel. This jacket hung out of doors for sale; I was told a man had taken it, ran out, but could see nobody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-117

725. HENRY BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a coat, value 10 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of John Bass .

JOHN BASS . I am servant to Mr. Ridley . On the 2d of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, my waggon was in Crown-street, Finsbury ; my coat was on the fore-part of it, and a handkerchief in the pocket. I missed it, and found it a quarter of an hour after at the watchhouse - the prisoner was in custody.

RACHEL BRIGHT . This cart stood by my master's door. I saw the prisoner get into the waggon, take the coat, and run off with it; he was brought back in a quarter of an hour - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM THORP. I was at Mr. Trueman's. The waggoner was delivering malt. Bright said two men had ran away with the coat; I pursued by her direction, and caught the prisoner about eighty yards from the house, with the coat under his arm. I took it from him - he ran off - I left the officer in pursuit.

JAMES BROWN . I am a constable. On the 2d of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Hollywell-street - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and followed the prisoner and secured him, without losing sight of him. Thorp came up and said he was the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The coat lay on the pavement, and I picked it up, and was going about my business when Brown took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-118

726. BENJAMIN BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , twenty yards of woollen cloth, value 20 l. , the goods of John Reyburn .

JOHN REYBURN . I am a woollen-draper . On the 21st of February I had about forty yards of cloth to carry; it was a piece of black and a piece of blue. I was carrying it myself about six o'clock in the evening, and seeing the prisoner at a public-house door in Whitechapel I employed him to carry it; he walked by my side with it, but was continually stopping behind. I turned round to him in Whitechapel, and said

"I will take it the rest of the way," I turned round and saw that one piece was gone - I seized the other. They had been tied together with two strong strings, and it is impossible that the strings could be cut without his knowledge; it must have been done by his associates. I turned round and laid hold of one piece; three or four men surrounded me directly, and said,

"Bill, run," and he did run pretty quick. I kept the piece of cloth, went to Lambeth-street, and gave information; it was worth 22 l. I saw him on the following Saturday, and am certain of him; I have not found the cloth.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am a Bow-street patrol. Reyburn described the prisoner to me. I apprehended him on the following Saturday by that description.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman asked me to earn 6 d., and I carried it as far as Catherine-wheel-alley; he was behind me or by my side all the time, and must have seen if anything was taken; three or four people came round and ran down Essex-street, and I after them; whether they took anything or not I cannot say.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240407-119

727. GEORGE CHIPPERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a coat, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 3 s.; a shirt, value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Cutler ; and a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Snow .

JOHN CUTLER . I am coachman to Mr. Robert Snow , who lives in Saville-row. I employed the prisoner as helper at the stables on Wednesday, the 17th of March, from two till half-past four o'clock, when I left him in the stables - when I returned he was gone; the stable was locked, and the key over the door. On going in I missed this property, which I had left hanging in the stable, and on the Monday following I found the coats in Monmouth-street, and a waistcoat in pledge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES DRY . I am shopman to Mr. Sherino, pawnbroker, Brewer-street. On the 17th of March, between two and three o'clock, this waistcoat was pawned in the name of Smith. I believe the prisoner to be the person.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On the 20th of March the prisoner was brought to me by two constables. I heard him say that he had pawned the waistcoat in Brewer-street, in the name of Smith, and sold two coats on the left-hand side of Monmouth-street.

HENRY HART . I am a salesman, and live in Monmouth-street. I bought these two coats of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240407-120

728. JAMES FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , six loaves of bread, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Tatner .

EDWARD TATNER . I am a baker , and live in Cannon-street-road . On the 19th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the street opposite my shop, and saw the prisoner enter my shop, and before I could get across he came out with six 2 lb. loaves - I stopped him with them three feet from the door.

CHRISTOPHER ARNOLD . I saw the prisoner scuffling with the prosecutor, and took the loaves from him.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I asked why he

took the bread; he said he was very hungry. I found 2 1/2 d. in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-121

729. JAMES FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a hat, value 5 s.; a shawl, value 4 s., and a scarf, value 3 s. , the goods of Daniel Sullivan .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240407-122

730. JOHN HORWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a boot, value 6 s. , the goods of John Huttley .

THOMAS CHILD . I am servant to Mr. John Huttley , who is a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Middle-row, Bloomsbury . On the 23d of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, as I came up the cellar stairs I turned towards the door, and saw the prisoner in the act of taking a boot down - I went towards him; he asked if I had a pair of ancle jacks to fit him; I asked him where the boot was; he said he knew nothing about it. I turned him round, and found it in his hand concealed behind him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Nobody being in the shop I took this boot to knock on the floor to make them come.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-123

731. WILLIAM HAZEL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a sovereign, four half-crowns, and two shillings , the monies of Robert Hanson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to William West Timbrell .

WILLIAM WEST TIMBRELL . The prisoner was my servant - he received this money, and did not pay it to me.

COURT. This is embezzlement, and not larceny.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-124

732. CHARLES JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , an umberella, value 6 d.; a speaking trumpet, value 6 d.; a box, value 2 d.; a pair of scales, value 1 s.; nine brass weights, value 1 s.; a gun case, value 2 d.; twenty-four ounces of butter, value 6 d.; eight ounces of biscuits, value 1 d.; eight ounces of ham, value 1 d.; a spoon, value 1 d., and two gallons of oil, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Sinclair , and others, his partners.

WILLIAM MANSCON. I am keeper of the ship, Phoenix - Robert Sinclair is the owner . On the 7th of April, at ten o'clock in the morning, I left the vessel, and locked the hatches up, and nailed down the fore-hatch. I returned at five o'clock in the morning, and found the fore-hatch open, and missed this property from the cabin.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HESELTINE . I am an officer. On the 7th April, I saw the prisoner at the south Gate of the West India Docks with a bundle, containing this property; the gun-case was tied round his waist, he said he was second-mate of the Eagle, and that the articles were his own; he was covered with oil; I said there was no such ship as the Eagle in the docks; he took me to the Elizabeth; they did not know him; he then took me to the Phoenix; I found the hatch open, and the cabin covered with oil. I know that Sinclair has partners in the vessel.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-125

733. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a coat, value 30 s.; a sword-belt, value 4 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 15 s.; five waistcoats, value 20 s.; five pairs of stockings, value 20 s.; nine shirt-collars, value 5 s.; two pairs of gloves, value 4 s.; two half handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; an eye-glass, value 4 d., and a pair of boots, value 1 l. , the goods of Lewis David .

LEWIS DAVID . I am a midshipman in the blockade service , at Beachy-head - the prisoner was in my service, and left the station. I came home at eleven o'clock at night, and missed the articles stated in the indictment. My property is now in Court.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HAWKINS. I am patrol of St. George's. On the 17th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner at Wapping, with a bag, containing a sword-belt, an uniform coat, three waistcoats, and several things.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. On the 17th of March, I went to a public-house where Hawkins had the prisoner in charge - he said all the things in the bag were his own - he was very drunk - when he came to himself, he said he belonged to the Blossom, and then to the Ann, and that his master gave him the coat.

MR. DAVID. I gave him nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-126

734. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for sealing, on the 12th of March , a saucepan, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Deville .

THOMAS DEVILLE . I keep a public-house in St. Martin's-court . I have known the prisoner about twelve months. On the 12th of March, I was told that a saucepan was gone. I looked, and missed it from the back shelf; the prisoner lodged with us once.

SARAH HORNSEY . I am niece to Mr. Deville. On the 12th of March, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the tap-room, and saw the prisoner coming by the bar-door, with this copper saucepan in his hand. I told my uncle of it; he went down the court.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying the charge.

SARAH HORNSEY , re-examined. I am thirteen years old, and am sure he is the person. I did not call to him; he had been up in the club-room. I did not call after him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-127

735. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , five books, value 30 s. , the goods of Martin Doyle .

MARTIN DOYLE . I am a bookseller , and live in High Holborn . On the 17th of March, I was in my shop serving a customer - Resbrook brought the prisoner in, and charged him with taking these books from the door, which he denied.

HENRY RESBROOK . I am a gun-maker, and work next door to the prosecutor's. On the 17th of March, I was shutting up my master's shop, and saw the prisoner take five books from Mr. Doyle's door. I went and collared him, he dropped them, he had put them under his arm, and had gone twelve or fourteen yards with them. I am sure he is the man - I did not take my eye off him.

JOHN DOYLE . I am porter to the prosecutor. On the 17th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning I was in the street, and saw a man take these books - I followed, but lost sight of him, and do not know who it was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD WHITE . I am a patrol. I took him in charge - he said afterwards that it was his first offence, and he hoped we would not he hard with him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man ran against me with the books, and knocked me down, but I never saw the books till they were brought to the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-128

736. JOSEPH PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Joseph Baker .

JOSEPH BAKER . I am a hay jobber , and live at Croydon. On the 4th of March, I was in Whitechapel-market , with a load of straw, and left my coat on my horse about half-past eleven o'clock, and in half an hour I missed it. I have not found it.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am eleven years old. I was in Whitechapel-market, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the horse's back. I told Baker, who was loading straw. He could not overtake him; he came up George-yard. I am sure he is the person. I saw him next day in Smithfield, and knew him by a scar on his face.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am a Bow-street patrol. Baker informed me of his loss. Taylor described the person, as having knee breeches, a blue coat, and a cap. I knew him by the description, he mentioned his having a scar. This was Thursday, and on Tuesday morning I saw the prisoner turning down George-yard, and took him; he denied it. I sent for the boy, who said he was the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I never wore a cap. I made no resistance when he took me. There are plenty of people dressed alike.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-129

737. FRANCIS RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing on the 29th of March , 12 lbs. of veal, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Peacock .

THOMAS PEACOCK . I am a butcher , and live at Camden-town . On the night of the 29th of March, Jenkins gave me information. I ran out and overtook some boys about a hundred yards round the corner, and the prisoner was among them. I held him till Jenkins came up and said he was the man who took the meat. I missed a leg of veal which hung at the door five minutes before.

STEPHEN JENKINS . I work for a bricklayer. On the 29th of March I saw the prisoner come out of Peacock's shop with a leg of veal; he gave it to another lad who ran out with it - the prisoner then put on his shoes, and walked as if he was lame. I went in, and told Peacock; then followed, and found him at the back of the buildings.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-130

738. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 12 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. , the goods of Francis Chalkley .

FRANCIS CHALKLEY . I am a butcher , and live in Whitecross-street . On Saturday, the 6th of March, about twelve o'clock at night Burkett brought me an aitch-bone of beef, which I knew by a notch I had made in cutting it - I missed it.

JOSEPH BURKETT . I am a watchman. On the 6th of March, about a quarter past twelve o'clock, the prisoner ran by me in Gloster-court, Whitecross-street, with something bulky under his arm; he was about fifteen yards from Chalkley's shop. I called to him to stop; he hastened his pace, and ran into Pump-row - I came up to him, and he dropped it; I caught hold of him; he got from me, and ran away. I overtook him again in Chequer-alley, and took him; I had not lost sight of him. I returned to Pump-row, and found the beef where he had dropped it, and took him to the watch-house with it. I went to the prosecutor, who claimed it.

Prisoner. I was in Blue Anchor-alley - he came up and asked for my bundle; I said I had none. He said at the watch-house that I resisted; the constable would not take the charge, as he said if I had resisted and fallen down I should be dirty.

Witness. The constable of the night said if I locked him up he would let him out, as he complained of my keeping possession of the meat. I thought it right to keep it till it was sworn to; he was locked up at last.

THOMAS HARRISON . I heard a rattle spring. Burkett gave the prisoner into my hands to take to the watch-house while he fetched the beef. He resisted and escaped from me. I threw him down, assistance came, and I secured him.

Prisoner. I wanted to stop to pick up my loaf.

Witness. He had no loaf.

Prisoner's Defence. I never resisted; why should I? as I was innocent. He said it was of no use to take people in charge, for he never made anything of them.

JOSEPH BURKETT . I said nothing of the sort.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-131

729. JOHN SPINKS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , eleven hair-brooms, value 1 l., and eleven brushes, value 6 s. , the goods of James Boaz Wiggett .

ROBERT NORRIS . I am servant to James Boaz Wiggett , who lives in Drury-lane. On the 2d of April, in the evening, I left these brooms outside the Alphabet public-house in Stanhope-street ; a boy came in and gave an alarm - I went to the door, and they were gone. I had not left them above a minute.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES PENDRILL . I keep the public-house. I followed Norris out, ran down Duke-street into Drury-lane, and collared the prisoner with the brooms; he immediately threw them off his shoulder, and used abusive language to me. I secured him.

THOMAS GRAY . I am twelve years old. I saw three men sitting at a door about seven houses from the Alphabet; two told the other one to go and get them; the two ran off to a cook-shop - the other went and got the brooms. I know two of them, but cannot say whether the prisoner was the third or not, he was not the one who took them; the two remained at the cook-shop till

they saw the other had got them, and then all set off. I went in and told the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. A man stood at the corner of a court with them, and asked me to carry them to Newport-market.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-132

740. JOHN SOMERVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a half-crown , the money of James Rogers .

MARY ANN ROGERS . I am the wife of James Rogers , who lives in Elm-street, Gray's Inn-lane , and keeps a chandler's shop . On the 20th of February I was in the parlour behind the shop, and heard the scales move. I got up, and saw the prisoner going to the door - the till was wide open. I ran and took hold of him in the shop, charged him with robbing the till; he denied it; I missed half-a crown from it, there being only one there. I sent for an officer; he then entreated me to forgive him, and said he would do so no more; a person came in, and I got her to fasten the door, but he contrived to open it and get out - I followed him for two hundred yards, crying Stop thief! and he was stopped.

THOMAS READING . I am a cabinet-maker. I heard the alarm about half-past four o'clock, and saw Rogers following the prisoner - I followed, and at the corner of Laystall-street, he was stopped. I brought him back; he said he took the half-crown - that it was his first offence, and if he was let go he would give it up.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer - he pulled a half-crown from his pocket, and said that was it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-133

741. STEPHEN STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a hammer, value 5 s. , the goods of Alexander Goudge .

SAMUEL RUTTY . I am an assistant to Mr. Alexander Goudge , a pavior , who lives in Spital-square; this hammer was missed from the yard, in Elder-street , on the 24th of February.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a watchman. On the 24th of February, about nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Elder-street, with this hammer, concealed as far down his arm as he could get it; he said he found it in the stone-yard.

EDWARD STAINER . I work for Mr. Goudge, and put this hammer in the yard, behind a heap of stones, at seven o'clock in the evening.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-134

742. THOMAS SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , eighty-three pounds of cheese, value 3 l. , the goods of Thomas Bousfield .

ANTHONY BOUSFIELD . My brother Thomas is a cheesemonger , and lives in Carnaby-street . I saw this cheese safe at half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 26th of March, and found it at the watchhouse that night.

JOHN PEDDER . On the 26th of March, in the evening, I and two men ran in pursuit, hearing that a cheese was stolen, and saw the prisoner a quarter of a mile from the shop, with the cheese on his shoulder; two men were with him, one of them was carrying his hat - I passed them, and went to the end of the street to look for a watchman, and as I returned, the young man who went with me had come up with them.

WILLIAM CARNEY . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner with the cheese on his shoulder; he said he was to have 6 d. to carry it to Crown-court, but he had passed Crown-court, and was going into Wardour-street.

THOMAS GOOK . I received him in charge. I have known him for five years; and until within the last month be has borne a good character.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry it to Crown-court; the man who was with me carried my hat.

WILLIAM CARNEY . He did not mention any persons name in Crown-court.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-135

743. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS SAVAGE . On the 2d of March, I was servant to Thomas Wood , who lives at St. John's-wood . Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner going from master's door; I went up and asked him what he wanted, he said, he was very hungry. I looked under his coat, and saw one of master's boots, took it from him and asked if he had any thing else; he said, No, that his brother had the other boot, and if I would let him go he would call him back - I took him to the gate, and saw another person waiting for him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy take up the boots and run away with them; he dropped one, I picked it up, and was taking it to the door when he came up.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-136

744. ALFRED TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , four tea-spoons, value 5 s.; a pair of shoes, value 6 s.; three shirts, value 6 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; one scarf, value 1 s.; three aprons, value 1 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s., and a handkerchief, value 3 s., and a scent-bottle, value 1 s. , the goods of John Tapley .

JOHN TAPLEY . I am a bricklayer , and live in Strutton-ground, Westminster . My wife was from home, and I got Mrs. Diggle to take care of my room. On the 3d of April I came home about half-past six o'clock, and about a quarter to eight o'clock went to the pay-table, returned at nine o'clock, and found the door open, and missed this property; the prisoner had lodged in the house for a week - he came home at night - I charged him with it, which he denied. I have not found the property.

PHOEBE DIGGLE. I lodge in this house. Tapley gave me the key of his room. I went up about eight o'clock, and found the window open - the pots outside had fallen on a chest under the window. I missed the spoons. I had seen the prisoner go out of the house very quick, about half-past seven o'clock, he went sideways - I could not see whether he had any thing.

FANNY TAPLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I came home on Sunday, and missed this property; here is a scent-bottle found, which I swear positively to, it has two

Scripture subjects carved upon it - I have had it eighteen years.

THOMAS SPEED . I am a watchman. I took him in charge, and found this scent-bottle in his breeches pocket. I had searched him once without finding it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out at seven o'clock, and did not return till a quarter past twelve o'clock, and as I went up stairs, I fell against Diggle's partition, he came out and said, he suspected me of this robbery; I said, if so, he had better send for a constable. I have had that scent-bottle three years.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-137

745. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a looking-glass, value 38 s. , the goods of Daniel Fenwick Elms .

LYDIA WILLIAMS . I am servant to Daniel Fenwick Elms , who keeps a broker's shop in Grafton-street, Soho . On the 13th of March, in the afternoon, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, and saw the prisoner walk out with a looking-glass, which had stood four feet inside the shop; I ran after him, took it from him, and held him till assistance came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-138

746. HENRY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Sanderson , from his person .

WILLIAM SANDERSON . I live in Russia-row, Milk-street. On the 21st of March, I was at the Caledonian church , and as I came out, I felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket, in the court between the door and the street - I turned round and saw the prisoner putting it into his pocket, and took it out myself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS THOROWGOOD . I am a constable. I took him in charge; he said somebody else must have put it into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy put it into my pocket, and then said,

"What have you got in your pocket;" the gentleman said I was not the boy who took it.

MR. SANDERSON. I said, I thought there was another in company with him.

GUILTY Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-139

747. ANN PONTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a blanket, value 4 s., and a sheet, value 3 s., the goods of Richard Merriman , in a lodging-room .

CHARLOTTE MERRIMAN . I am the wife of Richard Merriman . On the 15th of February, the prisoner took a furnished room of us, and a fortnight after I gave her notice to quit. Some people came after her, and I asked her for the key of the room, she would not give it to me. I got an officer, who searched the room - and I missed the blanket and sheet off the bed. I live in Bell-street, Tothill-fields.

JAMES WATTS . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Knightsbridge. On the 24th of February, the prisoner pawned a pair of sheets and a blanket.

RICHARD TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I took her in charge; she gave me the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-140

748. WILLIAM STANNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a brass cock, value 3 s., a brass flange, value 6 d.; a crank, value 6 d.; a pulley, value 4 d.; a latch plate, value 3 d., six ounces of wire, value 8 d., and a brass lock-nob, value 4 d., the goods of Robert Burgess , his master .

ROBERT BURGESS . I am a smith , and live in Walker's-court. I have a shop in Meard's-court - the prisoner came into my service on the 26th of February, and had access to this property. I did not miss it till the officer brought it to me; he has worked for me occasionally for two years.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY YATES . I am a Thames police constable. On the 26th of February, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner offering a brass cock for sale, at the shop of a dealer in marine stores, in Crown-street, Soho. I found the articles stated in the indictment on him; he said he got them from his father, who is a smith; that he was distressed, and took them from his father to get his shoes mended. I went to his father, who directed me to Burgess.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a public-house, and asked a man about a ship - he said I should find it difficult to get one, but he could put me in the way of getting one, if I could get some old metal, and take it to the shop in Crown-street - there were men looking out there, and if I gave them an incorrect account of them, I should be sent on board the tender - and this man I have since learnt is a police officer. I saw him at the office, but could not get to speak to him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-141

749. WILLIAM ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a jacket, value 10 s.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a shirt, value 15 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d., two handkerchiefs, value 6 s., and a crown-piece , the property of Samuel Martin .

ESTHER MARTIN . I am the wife of Samuel Martin . On the 11th of March, at half-past twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to me and said, my husband, who is a lighterman , had fallen overboard and was almost drowned, and had sent him for some dry things to put on - he was a stranger. I gave him the clothes stated in the indictment, and a crown-piece, as I knew my husband had no money, and told him to give it to my husband to get something to drink before he came home.

Prisoner. It was not a crown-piece, but two half-crowns - and she gave me a waistcoat, not a jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL MARTIN . I am the husband of the last witness - I had not fallen overboard, and never sent the prisoner for any thing. I have known him a long time.

Prisoner. Q. What do you know of me - A. You

have been transported before for the same sort of offence.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 11th of March these things were pawned with me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-142

750. JEREMIAH BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 4 lbs. of pork, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Borley .

JOHN BORLEY . I am a cheesemonger , and live on Tower-hill . On the 20th of March, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw the prisoner in the shop, and his arm come from a table where this pork lay. He appeared to put something into his apron twice, and then walked out. I jumped up, ran out, and overtook him fifteen yards off, and found the pork in his apron.

JOHN KING . I am a watchman. I took the pork from his apron.

ABRAHAM ELLIS . I am a headborough. I left the prisoner locked up in the watch-house at six o'clock in the morning, and at eight found he had escaped. He was re-taken in the week following.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240407-143

751. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a brush, value 2 s, and a trowel, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Beck .

SAMUEL BECK . I am a plaisterer , and live in Old-street, St. Luke's. On the 6th of April I was working at the East India House . I went to dinner at twelve o'clock, and left my tools on the soaffold - returned at one, and met the prisoner with them in his hand; with more tools belonging to the other men. I secured him - one of them was concealed in his trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the corner of a court. I had been out of work six days.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-144

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

752. HENRY BARNETT and JAMES FARRELL were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a coat, value 9 s. , the goods of Samuel Miller .

The prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-145

753. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , two leather pole-pieces, value 4 s. , the goods of Edward Tunno .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am coachman to Mr. Edward Tunno , who lives in Upper Brook-street. On the 12th of April, about eight o'clock, the coach stood in Bath-street . I saw the prisoner take the pole-straps, and walk away with them - I stopped him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-146

754. WINIFRED MILLMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , five yards of ribbon, value 3 s. , the goods of John Wyld .

JOHN WYLD . I am a haberdasher , and live in Rathbone-place . On the 9th of March the prisoner came to look at some black ribbons. I shewed her a drawer - as I took up one piece she took up a second. I shewed her a remnant which she approved of, and gave me a half-crown. I went to the till for change, and saw her drop her handkerchief over a piece which she had laid on the counter. She then asked for bonnet trimmings. I went into the back room for it, turned my head, and saw her covering the handkerchief over the ribbon - the trimming did not suit her. I followed her out, took her basket from her hand, and took the ribbon out of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Her handkerchief was in the basket as well - A. Yes - she made two attempts to put her handkerchief more over it to conceal it; it was only six or seven yards, but there is a block of wood inside it; she said she did not know that she had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-147

755. JOHN MOORE and JOHN SHORT were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Noble , from his person .

ROBERT NOBLE . I am an upholdsterer . On the 19th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in Park-lane , and saw the prisoners there. They passed me, and a gentleman said my pocket was picked. I felt, and missed my handkerchief. I immediately went up to them, and saw Moore give it to Short from his bosom. I secured them both.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took them in charge.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SHORT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-148

756. MARRIAN BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , four table-cloths, value 16 s.; two sheets, value 3 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; four shifts, value 6 s., and four napkins, value 3 s. , the goods of Peter Latouche .

ELIZA WAGHORN . I am servant to Mr. Peter Latouche , who lives in Baker-street . The prisoner was the laundry-maid I did not miss these things till she wrote me a note, and then came to me, and said she had taken this property and pawned it. She conducted herself very well.

HUGH BEERS . I am butler to Mr. Latouche. The prisoner was engaged by the week to wash, and used to take things out to be mangled.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Paddington-street. On the 16th of February the prisoner pawned a table-cloth and sheet.

THOMAS HILL . She pawned several articles with me.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. I received her in charge. Her daughter gave me the duplicates by her desire.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband was ill, and being in distress I pawned them, but meant to redeem them.

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-149

757. GEORGE CHALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a load of hay, value 5 l. , the goods of Thomas Ricketts , his master .

THOMAS RICKETTS . The prisoner was my servant in husbandry . On the 21st of October I sent him with a load of meadow hay to Thomas Vines , at Whitechapel. He was not to receive the money, but to bring home a ticket of the price - he never returned. I did not see him again till he was apprehended, which was in January - he never accounted for the money.

JOHN REED . I live at Stoke Newington. About ten weeks ago I bought a load of meadow hay of the prisoner - I paid him five guineas for it. I am a cow-keeper.

JAMES WATTS . I am constable of Waltham Abbey. - On the 8th of January I apprehended the prisoner in Essex. He said he received five guineas, and it lasted him about nine days - that he sold the hay to Richards, a cow-keeper, and he and another man spent the money, and he lost a sovereign.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said such a word - I said I had lost it, and was afraid to return.

MR. JOSEPH JESSOP . I took down what the prisoner said before the magistrate, and saw the magistrate sign it.

(Read.)

"The prisoner says he sold the hay, the property of his master, to a person at Newington, for five guineas, and having lost part of the money on the road, was afraid to return, and gave a man 1 s. to take the cart home.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-150

758. GEORGE SAMUEL TELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a coat, value 7 s.; a yard of Holland, value 18 d.; ten yards of cotton, value 4 s., and two pieces of padding, value 1 s. , the goods of William Newton and William Mears Newton , his masters .

WILLIAM MEARS NEWTON. I am in partnership with my brother William - we are tailors , and live in Piccadilly; the prisoner was three years in our service. On the 24th of February, having missed calico I marked some, and some brown Holland with a pencil mark, locked the shop up at night, and in the morning gave the servant the key to give to the prisoner. I went into the shop about half-past seven o'clock, and found him cutting some shalloon - the shutters were not open; he said he was cutting it for a wrapper, and afterwards that it was to cover over some things. I looked and found about a yard and a half was cut off the brown Holland. I searched him, but did not find it - I gave him in charge. The coat was stolen a year ago.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN RAFFARTY . I am servant to Messrs. Newton. I gave the prisoner the key and a light a few minutes before seven o'clock.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am servant to the prosecutors. I found the brown Holland in the corner of the shop, among some rags on the 26th of February.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I received him in charge. He said he had taken some things, but not to any great extent, and on the following morning he said he had taken some padding, and sold it to Lloyd, in Rupert-street, where I found it. I found three duplicates at his lodging.

THOMAS LLOYD . I live in Rupert-street. This padding was sold by somebody at my shop - I do not know when; I may have bought it twelve months ago.

JOHN FOUCHE . I am a pawnbroker. The coat was pawned with me by a woman.

Prisoner's Defence. This arose through a quarrel with my wife and a female lodger. My wife pawned many things, which I knew nothing of.

MR. NEWTON. I believe many things have been taken at the suggestion of his wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-151

759. ANN DARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a coat, value 3 s., and a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of John Boff .

SARAH BOFF . I am the wife of John Boff ; we live in Brunswick-street . On the 18th of March, in the morning, the prisoner took an unfurnished room of us; there was a trunk there which was unlocked. She went out three times, and did not return the last time. I found her next day at Lambeth-street, and missed a gown and jacket from the trunk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN GEORGE . I am shopman to Mr. Campbell, pawnbroker, Shadwell. On the 18th of March the prisoner pawned a jacket.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . A coat was pawned at our shop, but I did not take it in.

JAMES LEE . I took her in charge, and found the duplicates on her on the 19th.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-152

760. JOHN DENNISON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , eighteen penny-pieces, and thirty-six halfpence , the monies of John O'Brien .

ELIZABETH O'BRIEN. I am daughter of John O'Brien. On the 20th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was sitting in our parlour with another man - we keep a public-house in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane ; my brother came for 3 s. worth of copper for silver, which I counted out. The prisoner came to the bar, and took part of it off the counter - my brother followed him with the rest; he said if my brother came into the parlour he would give him the silver; he asked him several times for it - he said he would give it to him directly, he was not going to run away; but he went out without giving us the 3 s. They had three pots of half-and-half.

JOHN O'BRIEN. I am fifteen years old. The prisoner and another man came into the parlour, and told me to bring 3 s. worth of copper for silver; he took half of it into the parlour, put some into his pocket, and some in his apron; he said there was but 2 s. 6 d. - I said he had put 6 d. into his pocket. He said,

"Oh! Yes," and then said

to the other man,

"Is not he a cunning little fellow." He sent me for 1 d. loaf, and told the other man to wait till he returned - he went out, and in five minutes the other man went out; my sister tried to stop him, but he knocked her down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-153

761. DENNIS DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a trowel, value 2 s., the goods of James Cox ; and a trowel, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward Cannon .

JAMES COX . I am a plaisterer . On the 24th of March I was working in Sussex-place, Regent's-park , and left my tools on the scaffold at twelve o'clock - the trowel was locked up in a box. I returned at one, and missed it.

EDWARD CANNON. I was working at the same place, and left my trowel in another box at the top of the house; it was stolen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ROSE . On the 24th of March I was at work at this place; Cox's trowel was put into a box which I locked, and when I returned from dinner the box was gone; I had seen the prisoner about the place, and found him that afternoon, and said I wanted my box of tools - he said he had not got it, and told me to go with him to his lodging. I went and he gave me these two trowels; he worked on the premises once.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I took him in charge with the property.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-154

762. REBECCA EUSTACE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a shirt, value 5 s. , the goods of Susannah Fenwick .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Robert Brutton .

SUSANNAH FENWICK . I am a laundress , and live in the Hackney-road . On the 27th of January the prisoner came to wash for me; she washed for me all the week till Saturday, when she did not come; I missed this shirt.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send me to pawn it - A. Never.

JOHN ELLIOT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Kingsland-road. On the 27th of January the prisoner pawned a shirt for 5 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She has known me twelve months, and I have always been in the habit of pawning for her to pay me, or buy soap or coals. I always kept the duplicates, as she wished her mother not to know it.

MRS. FENWICK. I have sent her to pawn my own property, but not to pawn this article. I never sent her to pawn my customer's things but once. She did not come to work on Saturday, as she was ill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-155

763. CATHERINE ELDON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , a tea-kettle, value 2 s. , the goods of William Atkinson .

ELIZA ATKINSON . I am the wife of William Atkinson , a tin-plate worker - we live in Seven Dials. On the 23d of March I had information, went out, and found the prisoner with this kettle under her clothes; she had denied having it, and then said she had bought it at our shop. I said,

"Shew me the shop;" she said,

"Well if it is yours, take it." I took her back.

SARAH WEEMS . I saw the prisoner take the kettle from inside the shop, and told Mrs. Atkinson.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a violent fit; a woman picked me up, and gave me the kettle to hold while she fetched some snuff.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-156

764. JANE FINDLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 8 ozs. of tea, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Tabernacle .

WILLIAM TABERNACLE . I am a grocer , and live in East Smithfield . On the 11th of March, at half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing at my counter; I was in the back parlour - my daughter was serving her. When she left the shop I went to the counter, and missed half a pound of tea, which was there an hour before. I went up a court adjoining the house, and saw her looking at some butter, which she had bought, and in her apron I found the tea. I had tied it up myself with a particular string.

THOMAS POLLOCK . I am an officer. I took her in charge - she desired me not to take her on account of her family; but did not say how she came to take it.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had put her apron on the counter, and took this up with it by mistake - but on discovering it, she was returning with it when the prosecutor met her, and was deaf to all explanations.

WILLIAM TABERNACLE . She did not attempt to give any explanation - she was agitated. I find she bears anundeniable character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-157

765. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on on 1st of April , two shirts, value 12 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. , the goods of George Read .

GEORGE READ . I am a gentleman's servant , and live in Green-street, Theobald's-road . On the 1st of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon I heard my wife call Stop thief! she was holding the prisoner by the collar on the stairs. Two shirts and two cravats laid on the floor.

ELIZA READ . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I hung this linen on the landing-place - I heard it being dragged off the line, opened the door, and saw the prisoner going down stairs with them under his arms. I collared and held him till my husband came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-158

766. WILLIAM GOLDING was indicted for stealing; on the 7th of February , nine rabbit skins, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Platford .

WILLIAM PLATFORD . I am a hatter , and live in Kingsland-road - the prisoner worked for me, and left on the 7th of February. I missed nine rabbit skins I lost twenty-four dozen in all. On the 17th I called at Mr. Routh's, and found the prisoner offering skins for sale, nine of which I can swear to; he said he had bought them

of a man, but did not mention his name; he afterward said they were mine, and offered me a handkerchief to take them back in, and afterward said again, that he had bought them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not he summons you for his wages - A. Never, nor did he threaten to summons me. I thought that I owed him something for overwork, and told him to call on Monday for it; he said that he never got his money, which is false; he said if I did not pay him on Monday he should take means to get it.

NATHANIEL ROUTH . I live in Church-lane, Whitechaple. The prisoner called, and said he had twenty-four skins dying, and would bring them in a few days, which he did; Platford was at my house at the time, accidentally, and claimed them; he seemed alarmed, and said,

"Here Mr. Platford, I will leave them, and call by-and-by," and wanted to go, but was detained.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mr. Griffiths - A. Yes, he deals in skins.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I took the prisoner into custody with the skins; he said he bought them of Griffith's. Platford claimed nine of them.

WILLIAM PLATFORD . I know them by the colour, they belong to two lots. I marked one lot with three holes, and the other with six - seven are marked. I have sold some with these marks.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them before I worked for him.

- GRIFFITHS. I am a skin dealer, and live in Rosemary-lane. I sold the prisoner fourteen or sixteen skins on the Monday after he left Platford; they have been dressed since.

- STEVENS I am a skin dresser. On the 11th of February I dressed eighteen skins for the prisoner, and returned them to him on the 13th.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-159

767. RICHARD HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , fifty pounds of lead, value 9 s., the goods of Thomas Harrison , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

MR. THOMAS HARRISON . I have a cottage in Wilsden parish . On Wednesday, the 10th of March, I missed this lead off the roof; it was safe on Sunday. I saw it at Bow-street; some slips were taken off the roof, and compared with it, it fitted exactly.

WILLIAM BURY . I am servant to Mr. Rocker, plumber, Russell-street. I took off the lead which remained on the roof and matched it with some at Bow-street, it tallied exactly in size and fitted; it had been cut all round.

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am a patrol. On Saturday night the 13th of March, I saw the prisoner and another man, about a mile and a-half from Mr. Harrison's; the prisoner had some lead in a bag, and the other had some in a basket. I asked what he had got - Hill said he did not know what it was, the other threw down his basket and ran. Hill said he had employed him to carry it - he attempted to escape, but I kept him. I had seen him in company with the same person on Wednesday and Thursday night, with the same basket and bag. I saw the lead compared with the slips. I found a knife in his posession.

JOHN RICHER . I am patrol, and was with Boucher. I had seen the prisoner and the other man together twice before, loaded in the same way. I followed the other but he got off.

WILLIAM BURY . This knife is made for the purpose of cutting lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Harrow, and met this man, who asked me to carry the bag.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-160

768. HENRY HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of William Brathwaithe .

WILLIAM BRATHWAITE . On the evening of the 20th of March, I was going up Cross-lane, Longacre - a boy came and said my pocket was picked - I turned round and saw a boy running away; He said

"That boy has got your handkerchief, but that one, pointing to the prisoner, took it, and gave it to him." I took the prisoner, the other being too far off; he said,

"Search me;" I said,

"No, you have nothing;" he got from me in going to the office, and gave the boy a severe blow; it was with great difficulty that we got him to the office.

JOHN REEDY . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief and give it to the other boy, who ran off with it.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy struck me, and I struck him again.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240407-161

769. JOSEPH KIPLING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a jib-sail, value 7 s., and two bags, value 2 d. , the goods of Edmund Fisher .

EDMUND FISHER . I am a fisherman and have a decked boat off the London-docks . On the 1st of April, at three o'clock in the afternoon, my jib-sail and bags were safe - I missed them next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WEST . I have some boats off the London-docks. On the 2d of April I was on the pier-head, and saw the prisoner bringing a bag ashore. He said a person named Dixon sent him for the things - I said I would go to Dixon with him; he then said they did not belong to Dixon, but to a person whom he would fetch. I went with him - he ran off twice - I secured him a third time, and he escaped. I met him in Mordan's-rents afterwards, and asked him to go to the person who sent him for the sail - he took me to a house, and said the person was not at home. He ran away again - I at last secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. The vessel was not locked up.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-162

770. GEORGE KING and WILLIAM HOWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 14 lbs of lead, value 4 s., the goods of James Hellyer , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building of his.

JAMES HELLYER . I have the lease of a house in Little Collingwood-street, Bethnal-green . I gave the key to Mr. Wilmin to let it. On the 16th of March the prisoner King came and said he had looked at it, and asked if I

would take 3 s. a-week. I said, No - he said he would have it. I told him to get the key of Wilmin.

JOSEPH WILMIN . I let the house to King at 3 s. 6 d. a-week. On Tuesday the 16th both the prisoners came to me for the key - I live next door to the house. I gave the key to King - he never brought anything in. I did not see him again till the Friday following, about three o'clock, when I looked through the key-hole and saw them both on their knees, pulling up the floor and earth which covered the pipe. I went and told Hellyer, and in an hour looked through again, and saw them pulling up the pipe. We got an officer, went into the house, and found one up-stairs and the other below, and the water-pipe was up-stairs, tied in one of their aprons.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer. I was fetched to the house, got over the paling, broke the back door open, went in, and King ran to the front door - Dalton secured him. I found Howard up-stairs - he said he knew nothing about it. I found the pipe in a cupboard tied up.

WILLIAM DALTON . I took King. He said there was nothing in the house to injure him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KING - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-163

771. JAMES SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , at St. Luke , a watch, value 3 l.; a pair of boots, value 1 l.; a gown, value 6 s., and a shawl, value 7 s., the goods of William James Corbin , in his dwelling-house ; and MARY ANN WOODCOCK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH CORBIN . I am wife of William James Corbin ; we live in Macclesfield-street, City-road . On the 30th of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, we lost this property from the front room, where we sleep; the watch was on the chimney-piece, the boots were in the window, the gown and shawl were in the room, but I do not exactly know in what part. I saw them all safe a few minutes after eight o'clock; whoever took them must have come in at the window. I was at breakfast in the back parlour. I went into the room at half-past eight o'clock, and found the window open; my husband went out at five o'clock.

(Shawl produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WILLIAM ROBINS . I am shopman to Mr. Fryett, pawnbroker, of Whitecross-street. On the 30th of March, between eight and eleven o'clock in the morning, Woodcock pawned a shawl and whittle for 6 s., in the name of Ann Sutton .

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know her before - A. I believe I have seen her. I am sure she is the woman; the prosecutrix only claims the shawl.

ANN GIBSON . I lodge at Corbin's, on the first floor. On Tuesday, the 30th of March, at a quarter past eight o'clock I was putting my head out of the window to look for my husband, and saw the prisoner Sutton and another person in a dark coat, close to Corbin's parlour window, standing close with their backs to the window, talking. I did not know him before; they saw me, and walked off to the corner house, which is three doors off. I saw him in custody four or five days after, and am certain of him.

Prisoner SUTTON. Q. What do you know me by - A. By his dress, and looking at him.

Q. Is there any difference in my face since that - A. No.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. On the 2d of April I went with Brown to Playhouse-yard, and found Woodcock on the first-floor, and found the duplicate of the shawl and whittle in her pocket. I asked her what shawls they related to, she said they were her own; observing the name of Sutton on that and other duplicates, I asked if that was her name, she said it was. I sent Brown to the prosecutrix, and after he was gone she said,

"I am very sorry that the ticket is found on me." I said

"How did you come by it," she said she bought it of a young woman. I said

"How does the name of Sutton come on it; do not you live with Tom Sutton ," she said she did. On the 8th of April, about eight o'clock, I went with Brown to Golden-lane, and saw Sutton and another man come out of the Benbow public-house - Brown took him, and I took the other. Brown said to him,

"Your name is Tom Sutton ;" he said No, it was Jem or James, that he lived at Hampstead; we asked if he had not lived in Playhouse-yard, he said not. I mentioned this robbery to him at the watchhouse, he denied it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know that Woodcock cohabits with him - A. I believe so.

JAMES BROWN . I went with Hauley to Playhouse-yard, we found a duplicate on Woodcock. I took Sutton coming out of a public-house in Golden-lane. I looked him in the face, and said,

"Your name is Tom Sutton ," he said No, it was James Sutton , that he lived at Hampstead, and never in Playhouse-yard, and that he did not know Mary Ann Woodcock .

JOHN POWELL . I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 13, Playhouse-yard, and let lodgings; the female prisoner lodged in my first floor front room. I have seen Sutton there when the room was first taken; they passed as man and wife, and had occupied it a fortnight and four or five days; when they were taken; they lived together as man and wife.

Cross-examined. Q. He ordered her about, and she did every thing as if she was his wife - A. Yes. I thought they were married.

SUTTON - GUILTY Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

WOODCOCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-164

772. JAMES SUTTON was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , at St. Luke , a carpet, value 30 s; a rug, value 7 s.; two gowns, value 10 s.; two shirts, value 8 s.; a shawl, value 6 s.; twelve yards of sheeting, value 8 s.; a tea-chest, value 2 s.; a stocking, value 1 d., and a pinafore value 1 d., the goods of William John Wheedon ; and the crown of a bonnet, value 9 s.; forty yards of straw-plait, value 5 s.; a pair of scissars, value 1 d.; a rule, value 2 d., and an apron, value 1 s., the goods of William Whitbread , in the dwelling-house of the said William John Wheedon ; and the said MARY ANN WOODCOCK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SUSANNAH WHEEDON . I am the wife of William John Wheedon - we live in Norman-street, St. Luke's .

On the 30th of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I missed the articles stated in the indictment, a carpet, a rug, two gowns, two shirts, a shawl, twelve yards of sheeting, a tea chest, a stocking, and a pinafore, which are worth above 3 l. 10 s. They were all safe the evening before. My sister had left a bundle at our house; and when I when to look for it I missed my property.

ELIZABETH WHITBREAD . On the night of the 29th of March, I left a bundle of split-straw, and some other things, at my sister's. I went for them next morning, and they were gone.

WILLIAM JOHN WHEEDON . On the morning of the 30th of March, I went into the parlour - fastened the shutters back, but did not fasten the window sash as usual. This property was then safe.

CHARLES WHEEDON. I was in the parlour about seven o'clock in the morning, and found the window wide open, and missed things off the table, and the bundle which I had seen there the night before.

MARY ANN FORRESTER . I am daughter of John Forrester . On the 30th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was looking out of our window in Church-row, two doors from Wheedon's house, and saw Sutton and two more men come round the corner; one of them had his arms full of something, and droped a little blue pinafore. I have no doubt of Sutton - the others had things in their hats - they took them out and looked at them, and put them in again, and went round the street. I went out in about a quarter of an hour, and saw the pinafore, but did not pick it up.

MARY HARRIS . I live next door to Wheedon. On the 30th of March, I went out to shake a carpet, and picked up a little blue pinafore by the door.

JAMES HANLEY . I found the duplicate of the whittle produced with the shawl, in the last case, on the female prisoner. I took Sutton on the Thursday. He denied this robbery, and said he was not there, that he did not live in Play-house-yard, but at Hampstead. I found a stocking in a drawer in the room in Playhouse-yard.

JAMES BROWN . I took Sutton. He said he lived at Hampstead, and never in Playhouse-Yard.

JOHN POWELL . The prisoners cohabited together, at my house in Playhouse-yard, for a fortnight before.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner Sutton a good character.

SUTTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

WOODCOCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-165

773. THOMAS TILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a silver castor, value 20 s., and a strainer, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Hawkins .

GEORGE BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Hawkins , who lives in Gloster-place . On the 28th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming from the kitchen and saw the prisoner run out of the pantry into the passage with a basket in his hand, he dropped the top of the wine-strainer; I followed him up the area-steps - he dropped his basket on the steps and ran out at the gate; I caught him, and found this castor and wine-strainer in his basket.

Cross-examined by LAW. Q. You lost sight of him - A. No; I am certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREDERICK MOTT . I was in Gloster-place; saw Baker following the prisoner; he dropped the basket in the area; it had oranges in it; I secured him.

GUILTY , Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-166

774. DAVID SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , an iron kettle, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Lawrie .

THOMAS LAWRIE, I am a tinman , and live at Wapping . On the 28th of February I missed some tea-kettles.

ALEXANDER WALKER . I am errand-boy to Mr. Lawrie. On the evening of the 27th of February I was in the parlour, and saw two persons, one took a kettle from the door and run out - I followed and came up with the prisoner about six yards off, with it it in his hand; the officer came and detained him - I had let go, but not lost sight of him.

JOHN RYE . I am an officer. I took the kettle from the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240407-167

775. MARTIN SHEE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Peate .

JAMES ELLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Peate . On the 30th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and looked at several pairs of shoes; none would do - he said he would call again to-morrow, and as I turned to put them in the window he walked out, and I missed a pair off a nail; I ran out and stopped him with them - he said he had bought them of a woman; but they are a pair he was looking at.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN RYE . I am an officer. I took him in charge; he said he had bought the shoes at a shop in Ratcliff-highway, but he could not shew me the shop; he appeared sober, but afterwards pretended to be drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-168

776. CHARLES TWINING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a chair, value 20 s. , the goods of. Nathaniel Smith, Machin and Robert Debenham .

JAMES LOVELL . I am servant to Messrs. Nathaniel Smith Machin and Robert Debenham , who are auctioneers , and live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 7th of April I was going through the passage, and saw the prisoner close to the inner door. I went to look after a cart in the street, and saw him come out with a chair - he lifted it on his head. I went after him, and asked where he was going with it - he said, to Mr. Watkin's Bedford-court, and that a man had given him a pint of beer to carry it - he was rather drunk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have a wife and seven small children.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-169

777. JOHN WARD and JAMES PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Long .

ANN LOTT . I am a widow, and live in Wellington-street, Pentonville, with my nephew, Robert Long . On Saturday evening, the 27th of March, I was in the Pentonville-road with two of his children, and at the corner of Ann-street the children were rather behind me; Price tapped me on the shoulder, and put his hand before my eyes - but I pushed him away, and saw Ward take the handkerchief off the child's ( Robert Long 's) neck. I pursued, crying Stop thief! - and before we got to the end of Ann-street, I saw him throw it at the witness.

JOSEPH KENT . I was in my master's shop in Ann-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! ran out, and saw Ward draw a silk handkerchief from his bosom, and throw it in my face - he was secured.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a patrol, and live in Ann-street - I heard an alarm, and ran out. The witness's master gave me the handkerchief - Ward was given into my charge - and about nine o'clock, as I came out of the office, Price came up to him, and said,

"Hallo, Jack, where are you going?" I said,

"I shall take you, for you was with him" - as he answered the witness's description.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WARD'S Defence. I saw it on the ground, and picked it up.

PRICE'S Defence. I was going home - the officer said I was his pall.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-170

778. HENRY WISKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , a tool called a stock and dies, value 10 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Shipman , widow .

ELIZABETH SHIPMAN . I live in Saffron-street, Saffron-hill - the prisoner was apprenticed to my husband, and afterwards employed by me. I sent him to do some work with this stock and dies, and do not know whether he brought it back. He might take it from the shop or the basket - he behaved very well. I would take him into my service again.

JOHN GOUGH . I am servant to Elizabeth Shipman - On the 25th of March, at five o'clock in the morning, I missed this tool.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I took him into custody, and found the duplicate of the tool upon him.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 23d of February the prisoner pawned this with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it with any bad intent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-171

779. EDWARD WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 24 lbs. of ham, value 4 s. , the goods of William Hawley .

WILLIAM HARBOUR . I am porter to William Hawley , who is a cheesemonger . On the 1st of April I went to the wharf with four hams. The prisoner came up to me in Church-lane, and said I had got a heavy load, and offered to assist me. Another man walked by his side - he went a good way with me, and I saw him put his hand over the truck. I stopped - he said,

"Go on," - but I said I could do it myself, and did not want any more of his help - he said if I gave him a pint of beer, he would assist me all the way. I refused. I walked round the truck, and a ham was almost off - I replaced it, went on, and when I got to Tower-hill, in the alley, they were right, but on getting twelve yards further one was gone. I found it at the office - it was about two o'clock in the day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD CARTER . On the 1st of April I saw the prisoner in East-Smithfield, about one hundred and fifty yards from this truck, with a ham on his shoulder - he went at a very quick rate, and about the middle of White's yard threw it away, and escaped, and next morning was taken.

THOMAS GRAY . I am an officer. On the 2d of April I apprehended the prisoner in Chandler-street, and said it was on suspicion of a robbery. He said,

"What for a ham?" I said,

"Yes." he said he picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up on Tower-hill.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-172

780. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a tea-kettle, value 16 s. , the goods of Thomas William King .

THOMAS WILLIAM KING . I am a hardwareman , and live in Jerusalem-passage, Clerkenwell . On the 9th of March, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my parlour, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop with this kettle. I followed him, and tripped him up - he dropped it, and was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM MAAPERLEY . I was with King, run out, and saw the prisoner drop the kettle - and took him without losing sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-173

781. JAMES CREED was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Bruno Silver , from his person .

BRUNO SILVER . On the 9th of March I was in the City-road , and felt my pocket get lighter - turned round, and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner with it in his hand - two or three boys were with him - he dropped it, and I gave him in charge - he did not say how he came by it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along - two boys behind the gentleman dropped the handkerchief - I took it up. The gentleman turned round, and I threw it away - he asked what I had done with it - I said two boys gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-174

782. WILLIAM SPRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a shirt, value 1 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. 6 d., and three sovereigns, the property of George Stration , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240407-175

783. MARY ANN MORDENT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , four shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of William Potter , her master .

WILLIAM POTTER . I am a shoemaker . The prisoner was four or five years in my service as charwoman . On the 25th of February Myers brought a shoe to me - the prisoner came about eight o'clock; I asked if she could give me any information about it, and she said not; I desired to search her apartment - she said I might, but could not do it then, as her husband was at Blackwall, and had the key; I searched there about twelve o'clock, and found three shoes of mine in the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARGARET MYERS . I wash for Potter's lodgers; I found a shoe in the copper-hole when I went to light the fire.

ELIZABETH JAMES . The prisoner lodges with me; on the 23d of February, about a quarter past ten o'clock, she came and asked me for the key of her room, which she had left with me - I gave it to her and she brought me down three shoes, and asked to leave them with me till she came home - she put them on my table; Potter came with a warrant, and I gave them to him; she lodged five years with me - I never knew her do wrong.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I took her into custody, and asked why she put the shoe into the copper-hole - she said she took both away, and brought that to replace in the shop, but had no opportunity, and intended to put the other back.

Prisoner's Defence. I always buy my boots and shoes of Potter, and in October I bought a light pair for my husband, and he gave me these two pair to bind - and when I got home I found one pair was bound, and thought I would keep them, being in distress, but afterwards thought I would put them back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-176

784. JAMES RUDD was indicted for stealing on the 8th of April , 8 lbs. of leather, value 12 s. , the goods of William Loat , to whom he was apprentice , and ROBERT COLLETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM LOAT . I am a currier . The prisoner Rudd was my apprentice; I live in East Smithfield . On the 8th of April, in consequence of information, I detained him, and asked what business he had up in the room where I keep my goods - he hesitated, and said he had not been there. I called the servant, who told him he had been up - he still denied it. I gave him in charge - Sampson said he had been up in the front-room, and he had seen some leather in his hat. Sampson brought it from the room, and I was convinced that it had been in his hat, for it was squeezed, and we keep it quite smooth. He was taken to the watchhouse - the officer brought him back to me - he said voluntarily then that he had taken the leather from the front-room, and put it into his hat. I found some of my goods at his lodgings next morning, and took them to him - he said he took them from behind my counter; and in consequence of what he told me I went to Collett's house - he is a shoemaker. I told him I had come on unpleasant business, that he had some leather of mine - he turned to a box and said,

"That is Rudd's leather - he brought it to me to take care of."

COURT. Q. Did not you first mention Rudd's name, for you told the Magistrate that you asked him for Rudd's leather - A. I do not recollect saying so.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Rudd has lived a long time with you - A. Yes; two years; he was honest.

THOMAS SAMPSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. He wished to see his master, and I took him back, but did not hear what he said.

Cross-examined. Q. Loat took him into a private room - A. It was in the back part of the shop. He made a rush from me at the watchhouse door, and got three hundred yards. I raised a cry, and he joined in the cry.

WILLIAM SAMSOM . I am in the service of Mr. Loat. On Thursday last I heard the prisoner go up stairs to the ware-room; nobody else could have gone up, as he was the only person in the workshop. I found part of this leather in his hat - when Mr. Loat came I told him of it, and after that heard the prisoner go up stairs again, and on my going up I found he had returned it.

SARAH PLATT . I live with Mr. Loat. I was in the kitchen, and saw Rudd come up the back stairs, he went into the ware-room, and came down with leather under his arm - I said,

"What, are you going to work so late at night;" he said, Yes, and in a quarter of an hour after he returned up again with a light, and some leather under arm.

RUDD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

COLLETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-177

785. JOHN PLUMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , three deal boards, value 10 s. , the goods of John Smith .

BENJAMIN WALKER . I work at the Diorama, Regent's-park. The prisoner was a carpenter there. These boards were taken from the cellar.

JOSEPH ROY . I am employed at the same place. On the 5th of April I saw the prisoner bringing boards out of the vaults on his shoulder.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he was taking them for placards - A No. Mr. Smith is in France; I do not know his Christian name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-178

716. REBECCA BRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a quilt, value 10 s.; a pair of sheets, value 4 s.; a gown, value 5 s.; a table-cloth, value 3 s.; two shawls, value 2 s., and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Mary Ann Price .

MARY ANN PRICE . The prisoner was my servant . On the 6th of April I missed some things from my drawers, which were not locked - she saw me examining the drawers, and immediately went away, and was taken next day.

ALEXANDER TATE . On the 8th of February the prisoner pawned a quilt, a gown, a pair of sheets, a table-cloth, and a pair of stockings with me - I am sure she pawned the quilt, but cannot swear to the other things.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-179

Second Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

787. WILLIAM COLE and THOMAS BRANSON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 27 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of William Robbins , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM ROBBINS. I live at Bethnal-green . On the 3d of March, about half-past four or five o'clock in the afternoon I was at home, and heard a noise in the adjoining house, which belongs to me, and is unoccupied. I went round to the back of the house, and in the kitchen found two rolls of lead. A friend who was with me watched outside while I examined the house; I found the prisoners on the roof, and asked what they were doing there; they made no answer. I gave an alarm. Branson said he came up to see what the other was about. I brought him down, and gave him in charge. I compared the lead next day with the roof - it tallied exactly, and measured eight feet; it had been ripped and cut.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You found the lead in the kitchen - A. Yes; they had thrown it from the roof into the kitchen, as the floors were not boarded.

WILLIAM PATTISON . I am a scale-maker. I was with Robbins, and found the lead as he has stated. I found Cole concealed in the chimney.

JAMES ESSEX . I have the lead, and matched it next morning - it tallied exactly.

COLE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

BRANSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-180

788. JOHN COX was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , an ass, price 5 s. , the goods of William Roberts .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240407-181

789. JOHN HALFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a looking-glass, value 34 s. , the goods of Thomas Black and John Black .

THOMAS LIDDON . I am journeyman to Thomas and John Black , who live in Greek-street, Soho . On the 26th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon I saw the prisoner taking a looking-glass out of the shop; I followed and overtook him thirty or forty yards from the shop with it - he said he did not take it, but some person gave it to him to carry - I said I knew better for I saw him take it; he denied it. I told him to give it to me, which he did. I took him back.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do not you remember saying at the office that you did not see him take it out of the shop - A. I said no such thing. I was at work in the back shop, and did not see him come in. The door was shut but not locked.

WILLIAM PRATT . I was near the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner in company with another; they opened the door and went in, and each brought out a glass - they were not in the shop four minutes. The prisoner turned to the right; I did not see which way the other went. I ran into a shop, and got a man to help me follow the prisoner. I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see his face - A. Yes. The other came out of the shop first.

THOMAS PIZZEY . I am the watch-house keeper. I took the prisoner with the glass - he said that it was all over with him, and he did take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-182

790. THOMAS HOGG and THOMAS LOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Lawrence Crane .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Teresa Crane .

WILLIAM THISSLETON . My father is an officer. On the 9th of March, about eleven o'clock in the morning I was in Gray's Inn-lane , and saw the prisoners in company near Crane's window, and watched them - they went to the corner of a street, turned back, and Lock took something from the window, and gave it to Hogg; they ran off - I pursued, and took them in John-street, and found a pair of shoes on Hogg. Mrs. Crane claimed them. They said they had eaten nothing for two days.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I saw Lock put his hand through the pane of glass, and take a pair of shoes, and give them to Hogg - both went off.

JOHN MORGAN . I assisted in taking them to the office.

TERESA CRANE . I have not seen my husband for seven years, and do not know whether he is living. These shoes are mine.

HOGG - GUILTY. Aged 19.

LOCK - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-183

791. MARY JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a shift, value 1 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., and an apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

JANE UNDERWOOD . I am the wife of William Underwood ; we lodge in Gray's Inn-lane , and Thomas Jones lodges there. On the 3d of April, at two o'clock I was sitting in my room, and heard a strange foot overhead, in an empty room where these clothes hung to dry. I went up, and saw some things taken off the line, and thrown into a corner; they were on the line ten minutes before. I found the prisoner, (who is a stranger,) standing in the corner of the next room. A shift, two handkerchiefs, and an apron laid there, which belong to Jones.

ANN JONES . I am the wife of Thomas Jones . The prisoner had no business in the room. I saw the things safe a quarter of an hour before - I met Underwood on the stairs with the prisoner - she said she would never do it again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken ill, and went up there to find a water-closet, and hearing a man's foot I turned down stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-184

792. HENRY JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of George Cheesman .

THOMAS WALKER . I am a constable. On the 13th of March I was in Finsbury-place , about seven o'clock in

the evening, and saw a gig standing at a door - the prisoner passed with another man, and looked at it; they stopped at the corner of Cross-street. The prisoner turned back, went behind the gig, and took the coat; he went round into Cross-street; I pursued, and he dropped it. I still followed, and took him without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM GREEN . I was in Finsbury-place, and saw the prisoner take the coat out of the gig. I followed and picked it up when he dropped it.

WILLIAM CULYER . I stopped the prisoner who was running.

GEORGE CHEESMAN . This coat is mine, and was stolen from my gig.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-185

793. THOMAS KENDAL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a sheet, value 5 s. , the goods of Esther Silva .

This article was let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging - the indictment not being under the statute, she was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240407-186

794. MARY PRESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of George Morley and Thomas Morley .

HENRY MORLEY . I live with my brothers George and Thomas, who are salesmen , and live in Whitechapel . On the 23d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of information I went out, and overtook the prisoner about two doors off, and asked if she had not got a pair of shoes under her cloak - she said, No, and refused to come back; but did at last, and about two yards from the door dropped the shoes - they had hung inside the door-post.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 54.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240407-187

795. MARY BRADSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , eight yards of cotton, value 9 s., the goods of Richard Attenborough , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HAYES . I am servant to Richard Attenborough , pawnbroker , Crown-street, Finsbury . On the 25th of March, about half-past five o'clock the prisoner came to the shop with three other women - the prisoner produced the duplicate of a shawl, pawned for 12 s. I suspected, and watched them; one of the others handed me a cloak, which she pretended she had picked off the floor. The prisoner proposed giving me 9 s., and leaving another shawl in pawn for 3 s. I went round the corner, and missed a piece of cotton, and said,

"One of you have got a piece of cotton." I saw the prisoner move - she shifted her clothes, and the cotton fell at her feet; it could not fall from the others. All three were in company. I was attending to a customer part of the time. I am sure that she dropped it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not enough money to redeem the shawl; somebody came to the door and asked the price of something; he saw the cotton on the floor, and said, somebody had dropped it. I was rather saucy, and so he said it was me.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-188

796. AMELIA JOANNA HENRIETTA ROUBERY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a carpet, value 8 s. , the goods of Robert Smith .

SUSAN SMITH . I am the wife of Robert Smith - we live in Anchor-alley . This carpet was in our back kitchen. I was looking out of the up stairs window, and saw the prisoner going down the steps with something in her apron. I pursued, and overtook her a short distance off with the carpet in her apron; she gave it to me; she was a stranger. The door had been left open.

JANE NICHOLLS . I live at this house. I was coming through the yard, and saw the prisoner in the kitchen - she saw me, and went up stairs with the carpet under her arm.

THOMAS HARDING . I took her in charge. She said she did not know where she slept the night before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had only come from Germany in the summer. I met a woman, who said she would pay me to carry this to Gravel-lane.

GUILTY. Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-189

797. MARGARET POYNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 5 lbs of pork, value 3 s. , the goods of William Fincham .

WILLIAM FINCHAM . I am a butcher , and live in Long-alley, Shoreditch . On the 21st of February, in the evening, the officer brought the prisoner in with this pork.

GILES BOLLEN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner take this pork from Fincham's shop, while he turned his head - I went after her, and told her to take the meat back, and she let it fall. A woman picked it up, and gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-190

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 15.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

798. SARAH EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a purse, value 2 d.; eight half-crowns, and four shillings, the property of John Gentry , from his person .

JOHN GENTRY . I am a farming-man , and live at Malden. On the 8th of April, about two o'clock in the day, I was in town, talking to a man in Whitechapel, close to Angel-alley . The prisoner came up and spoke to me - I talked with her, being fresh; she kept feeling about my pockets - I did not see her take any thing - she left me - I do not know whether she walked or ran, I was so drunk - I had felt my purse safe in my right-hand breeches pocket ten minutes before. I missed it after she was gone

- it contained eight half-crowns and four shillings. I have not found it.

CHARLES MILLER . I am eleven years old. I saw Gentry talking to a countryman, and then saw him talking to the prisoner. I saw her unbutton his coat, and put her hand into his breeches pocket. I was only one door off - I saw her take a small purse out - I saw it in her hand - another girl was with her - she ran up Angel-alley, and was taken in a quarter of an hour. I know her to be the girl - she has only one eye. I heard money jingle in the purse.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. There was more than one woman there - A. Only two - I never saw her before - I saw her run away.

CHARLES BRASHIER . I am sixteen years old. I saw Gentry talking to a countryman, and then saw a short woman with one eye talking to him. I saw her draw his two great coats aside, unbutton then, and draw something out of his breeches pocket - she nearly dropped it as she ran away. The prisoner is the young woman, I am certain - she has only one eye.

Cross-examined. Q. How many women did you see - A. Two - no woman spoke to me.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. The prosecutor brought these boys to the office; they said he had been robbed by a girl with one eye, in consequence of which I took the prisoner in a quarter of an hour, and they identified her directly. The prosecutor did not appear drunk.

Cross-examined Q. Are there not several girls about there with bad eyes - A. There is one who has a patch over her eye.

JOHN GENTRY re-examined. I know that the prisoner is the girl. I cannot say whether she had but one eye.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man, or the boys.

- WEBB. I live in Angel-alley. I was standing at my door on this day. Two girls ran up the alley - one said to the other,

"Run on;" they ran very hard, and never stopped till they got to the end of the alley. I thought they had done a robbery, and presently Gentry came to my door with these boys - his pocket was turned inside out, and he said he had been robbed. One of the boys said that one was a one-eyed girl. I said,

"No, do not say that the one-eyed girl did it - she is a bad girl," but she is neither of the two girls. One of them has a cast in her eye, and the other a black patch over her eye - she is not either of them.

COURT. Q. You know the prisoner - A. Yes, any one may know her she is so remarkable. I did not see Gentry talking to either of the girls, but as they were running, I suspected they had committed the robbery. I heard, that the prisoner was taken up for it, and said,

"Well, she is a bad girl, but she is free from that."

CHARLES BRASHIER . This woman did not speak to me, but she spoke to a third boy; there were three of us, and we all said the prisoner was the woman, because we had watched her.

JAMES LEE . There is a woman answering the witnese's description, but she is taller than the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240407-191

799. WILLIAM SMYTH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two looking-glasses, value 8 s.; eight chairs, value 6 l.; two tables, value 6 l.; a fender, value 1 l.; a set of fire-irons, value 10 s.; a coach, value 1 l.; a bed, value 5 l.; a bolster, value 10 s.; a pillow, value 3 s.; three blankets, value 1 l.; a pair of sheets, value 10 s.; a pillow-case, value 2 s.; a mattrass, value 1 l., and a rug, value 10 s., the goods of James Millner , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. Andrews, on behalf of the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-192

800. JOHN GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , six casks, value 18 s. , the goods of Benjamin Blabey .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I am a Thames Police officer , and live in Edward-street, Limehouse . On the 22d of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I went to the prisoner's house, No. 38, Edward-street, relative to a burglary. I believe it to be the prisoner's house - it is within thirty yards of my own. I had missed six beer casks from my yard on the 2d of December, which were safe the night before. On going to the prisoner's house, the headborough, Gillen, went into the yard, put his staff into the water-butt, and found one of my casks - it was sunk being full of water. I went up stairs, and found another one in the back room, which is a bed-room - it was a nine gallon cask, and the one in the water-butt held twelve gallons. I also found thirty staves of casks, which I know to be mine by the marks on them; they would make more than two casks - they were different sizes, and might belong to four - there were more than hoops for two casks. The prisoner kept threatening me with an action; I replied that he need not talk, for I had found some of my casks.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You missed them on the 2d of December - A. Yes - a man named Walker was in bed in the room where I found one. The prisoner threatened me with an action for breaking into his house, and said he would blow our brains out, if he had a pistol.

THOMAS BOND. I am constable of St. Ann's. I went with Blabey. I was in the back room when the cask was found up stairs. We took Walker into custody - he did not claim it - he was liberated before the Justice. I found a bunch of keys, a stock, and centre bit, in a cupboard in the front room, where the prisoner's wife was in bed - a crow-bar was found.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You found the staves in a room where a man was in bed - A. Yes, I saw no cask found there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you search the room alone - A. Blabey searched as well. He might have found it, but I did not see him; I was in the front room most of the time. I only saw one cask.

BENJAMIN BLABEY re-examined. Here is the cask found in the water-butt - the other found in the bed-room is not here - I found it myself.

GEORGE GILLEN . I saw the cask found in the bedroom, and the other in the water-butt.

DENNIS DOYLE . I know that the prisoner lived at No. 38, Edward-street, for his wife and child were in bed there - he did not say whose the house was.

THOMAS BOND re-examined. He told me he would enter an action against me for entering his house.

Cross-examined. Q. You had entered a room in which he was sitting - A. Yes, we burst open the street-door, but the door of the room he was in was open - he said,

"I will bring an action against you for entering my house." I am sure he said my house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-193

801. JOHN GIBSON was again indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 22d of February , at St. Ann , a looking-glass, value 7 l.; a tea-caddy, value 30 s.; a pistol, value 10 s.; two salt-cellars, value 2 s., and a spoon, value 2 s., the goods of Dennis Doyle ; a hat, value 26 s.; two gowns, value 30 s.; two night-gowns, value 2 s.; a child's gown, value 6 d.; five napkins, value 6 d.; three petticoats, value 3 s.; a sheet, value 4 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a box, value 1 d.; eight small drinking glasses, value 4 s.; six tumblers, value 9 s.; two salt-cellars, value 1 s.; two cruets, value 1 s.; one glass plate, value 6 d., and a pair of drawers, value 1 s., the goods of Dixon How , then being before stolen by an evil disposed person, he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen against the statute .

DENNIS DOYLE . I am an Excise officer , and live in Regent-terrace, Salmons-lane, Limehouse, the prisoner lives at No. 38, Edward-street, about two-hundred yards from my house. On the night of the 22d of February, I was out with my family, and on returning found my street door open, and missed this property; a crow-bar was found in the prisoner's house, which tallied with the marks on the door. I was fetched to his house that night, and saw a pair of salts; and a silver spoon, the salts were found in the prisoner's room.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Which do you call his room - A. It was found in the front bed-room, on the first floor. The goods could be taken away in a coach by one person; the prisoner was tried here for the burglary, and acquitted.

The record of the prisoner's trial and acquital, was here produced. See page 242.

DIXON HOW . I lodge at Doyle's ; the property stated in the indictment as mine, was stolen at the same time; the gown was a good bombazeen one; my wife had had it two years, but it was good enough to wear again. I lost a hat among other things.

THOMAS BOND. I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's house about a quarter past ten o'clock - we broke the door open, and saw him in the back-room, in the act of burning a bombazeen gown on the fire - we saved a part of it; we had been about three minutes breaking in, he said if he had a pistol he would blow our brains out for breaking in, and would enter an action against us for breaking into his house. I have the remains of the gown here; Lines, who was with us, is now dead.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find a crow-bar - A. Yes, it fitted the marks in Doyle's door. I do not know in what part of the house it was found.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I went to the prisoner's house with Bond and saw him sitting by the fire, with part of the gown on the fire - I took part of it off, and some more of it was on the floor, and some pieces up stairs; some glasses were pointed out to me next morning in the front parlour by How. I found a pair of salts on the side-board, and a crow-bar in the wash-house, which is open to all the lodgers. I found some of the trimmings of the gown up stairs, and took a hat off the prisoner's head.

DENNIS DOYLE . I can swear to these salts positively.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after you discovered your loss, did you find them there - A. I went to the house at half-past ten o'clock on the night of the robbery, and he was taken that night.

THOMAS BOND. When I broke into the house, I found the prisoner, his wife and child, and Walker there, an alarm was given that a man had escaped out of window.

DIXON HOW . These are parts of my wife's gown, they are like it - I cannot swear to it positively, but believe it to be hers; here are six tumblers like six which I lost - here are two marked at the bottom with my initials; I cannot swear to them, but believe them to be what I lost - here is a cruet, a mustard pot, and salts of the same pattern as I lost.

JAMES BARBER . I am a pot-boy in the neighbourhood. On the night of the 22d I saw two men on one side of Edward-street, with a large bundle under their arms. I was standing at No. 38 - some person came up and knocked at the door, he had nothing; a woman opened the door - I asked if they wanted any beer, and the man at the door answered

"No, not till next time." I walked on, looked behind, and saw the two men with the bundles go into the house, and the third man went in also; they were not in his company.

Cross-examined. Q. How many yards were they apart - A. Several - the two went in about a minute after the first man.

WILLIAM SEYMOUR . I am a hackney-coachman. On the night of the 22d of February, two persons took my coach from Aldgate to Edward-street; they had nothing with them, it was nearly nine o'clock when they hired me. I do not know what number I drove them to; they took something like a glass away from the house in Edward-street, and told me to drive back to the City-road, and one went with me there; he had a small bundle, and I thought a looking-glass. I drove him to Winkworth-buildings, Back-road, City-road; they discharged me about half-past ten o'clock.

COURT. Q. How long did you wait in Edward-street - A. Not above three minutes. I got there at ten o'clock, one of the men got out before I got to the house, and knocked at the door - I do not know who opened it. My coach is No. 70 - it is two miles and a half from there to the City-road - the young man said

"I suppose your fare is about 7 s.," I said

"Yes," and he paid me 7 s.

THOMAS BETTS . I am a watchman. I saw the coach No. 70, at the door of No. 38, Edward-street, as I was calling ten o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240407-194

802. JOHN TURPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a chaise, value 20 l. , the goods of John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON . I am a coach-maker , and live in Thorney-street, Bloomsbury ; about the middle of November a chaise was stolen from the Mews . I found the body of it in Holloway's-yard, at Westminster, on the 20th of March. I do not know the prisoner.

LEVY HOLLOWAY . I am a coach-maker, and live in Horseferry-road. Turpin's cart stood on my premises. Whether he brought this chaise-body there, I do not know.

JAMES SKINNER . I am servant to Holloway. I do not know who brought the chaise-body to the yard, it had a shield and coronet on it when I first saw it there. I saw the prisoner rubbing the pannels of it, and asked if he was preparing it for painting; he made no answer.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am an officer. On the 20th of March I went to the prisoner's house, and asked if he knew any thing of the chaise-body in Holloway's-yard; he said he did not, it did not belong to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-195

803. JOHN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on 29th of March , eighteen ounces of tea, value 7 s. , the goods of David Bardsley .

THOMAS FINDEN . I am a surveyor. On the 29th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my parlour, in John-street, Fitzroy-square, and saw the prisoner in a cart, nailing up a chest of tea. I followed the cart to Bardsley's; he was driving. I told Mr. Bardsley of my suspicions - a constable was fetched - the prisoner denied taking any tea; I said if the constable looked into the nosebag he would find the tea - he did so.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many chests were in the cart - A. Three; he said he had taken no tea from it.

WILLIAM PRINCE . I am servant to Mr. Lloyd, a carman, and the prisoner was a carman. I sent him to the East India Warehouse in Haydon-square, to fetch two chests of tea, and gave him another - he was to deliver one of green tea to Mr. Bardsly the other two were black.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know which was Bardsley's chest - A. By the number on the permit.

DAVID BARDSLEY . A chest of green tea was brought to my house by the prisoner, it was nailed up very neatly. Mr. Finden gave me information, and a bag containing eighteen ounces was found in the nose-bag - I compared it with that in the chest, it is the same description of tea in every respect - the chest weighed about a pound short. The prisoner said,

"I hope you will forgive me, I will never do so any more, it was a case of necessity."

Cross-examined. Q. Do not chests often break in coming over the stones - A. I have had them come loose - the tea was very clean, and did not appear to have fallen out, he did not say that the chest had broken. I live in Tottenham-court-road.

ELIZABETH WINDMILL . I am servant to Mr. Finden. I saw the prisoner's hand in the corner of a chest, and saw him pull tea out, and put it into a white bag, and put that into the nose-bag. I was looking out of the garret window.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him take it from the chest or sweeping it up from the cart - A. I saw him take it out.

Prisoner's Defence. As to my taking it out it is false, it had fallen out into the cart.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-196

804. CATHERINE CARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value 1 l.; a key, value 5 s.; four sovereigns, and four half-crowns, the property of Nels Leden , from his person , and CATHERINE TALBOT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

NELS LEDEN . I am a carpenter , and lodge in East Smithfield, and am a Swede . On the 19th of March, at half-past one o'clock at night, I met Carty, and went home with her to Dock-street . I put my trowsers on a chair, close to the bed. I had a purse containing four sovereigns and fifteen shillings in my trowsers' pocket - she did not come to bed, but asked me for 1 s. to get some gin - she went out for it, and did not return - I went to sleep, and when I awoke my breeches were there, but the money was gone, and my watch was taken from under the pillow. I was quite sober - I had not been drinking. I saw nobody but her in the house. I shewed her the money, and told her that if I lost it I should blame her for it. I found my watch in pawn. I saw Carty again in two hours, and knew her.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a headborough. On Friday morning Leden described this girl to me. Carty was in the house at the time; I took her, and found sixpence halfpenny on her, a person said in her presence, that he had found the watch in pawn. I asked what she had done with the money, she made no answer. I took her to the pawnbroker's, he said she was not the person who pawned it. she said if the prosecutor would forgive her she would get him his watch back, and return part of his money, but that she had only taken two sovereigns and four half-crowns.

JOHN HAWKES . I am shopman to Mr. Christie. This watch was pawned with me on the 19th of March, by Talhot - she came about one o'clock to redeem it, and paid the money - I detained her; she said an officer had been to her house and said that she was to fetch it out and bring it to the Brown Bear public-house, where the parties were all waiting to have the matter settled.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and asked her in Carty's presence, if she gave her the watch to pawn; she said she did not, but that the other did.

CARTY'S Defence. He gave me the watch as he had no money.

CARTY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

TALBOT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-197

805. HENRY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Gray .

WILLIAM HECKETT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 6th of April, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was going up York-place, and stopped the prisoner with two pots under his jacket. I asked what he had got - he said; it was no matter to me.

JOHN GRAY . I am a publican , and live in Steven-street - these pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-198

806. CHARLES LEE and JOHN HOLDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , five live tame rabbits, value 5 s., the goods of Edward Jones ; and three live tame rabbits, value 3 s. , the goods of John Harris .

EDWARD JONES . I live at the Red Lion public-house, Type-street, Chiswell-street . On the 28th of February I lost three rabbits out of the hutches in the outhouse. The lock was picked - three belonging to Harris were stolen from the same place. I saw the skins of all five at Worship-street, and knew them. Lee used to work in the neighbourhood.

JOHN BELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners in one room together. Lee was in the act of taking the entrails out of the rabbits. Harris stood by; it was Lee's room - he lives about seventy yards from the Red Lion. Holden said he had only come to look at them.

ELIZABETH HARRIS . I lost three rabbits from the outhouse, and here are their skins.

(Skins produced and sworn to.)

LEE'S Defence. The man offered to take money to make it up.

LEE - GUILTY Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HOLDEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-199

807. THOMAS MARSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , nine yards of printed cotton, value 6 s. , the goods of Samuel William Cousins .

WILLIAM WEATHERLEY . I live with Samuel William Cousins , who is a linen-draper . On the 3d of March I was in the area, and could see into the street. I saw the prisoner looking at the window - I went up and watched him - he walked backwards and forwards. I at last saw him take this print, and pull it from the door - it was full a yard inside the door. He rolled it up in his apron, and ran away. I pursued, and overtook him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work.

GUILTY Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-200

808. GEORGE NASH and THOMAS WITHERS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a tea-chest, value 35 s. , the goods of Robert Chapman .

MARY ROBINSON . I live in Ashby-street, St. Pancras , opposite Mr. Chapman's. On the 3d of March, at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner Nash go into the house and come out - he went in again, and came out with something in his apron - he had nothing when he went in. The street-door was open - he walked across the street, and I saw no more of him till I saw him in custody. I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You never saw him before - A. Never. I saw him in custody about twelve o'clock, and am certain of him.

ROBERT BRADBURY . I am an engine-turner. I was about a hundred yards from Chapman's, and saw the prisoners together - Withers had a bag over his shoulder, with this tea-chest in it - they were walking together.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. About eleven o'clock I think. I went up with the constable to stop them, and Nash ran away. We followed them nearly three quarters of a mile, and secured Withers in Penton-street. I ran after Nash, who ran away.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 3d of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw the prisoners - Withers had a bag over his shoulder. I followed them to White Conduit-house, and stopped Withers, and asked what he had got; he said he did not know, but a gentleman had given it to him to carry to the Elephant and Castle. Nash ran away.

HANNAH CHAPMAN . I am the wife of Robert Chapman . This caddy is our property, and stood on the dining-table in the parlour, and was safe at ten o'clock in the morning.

NASH'S Defence. I was looking for work, and never saw this boy before.

WITHERS'S Defence. A gentleman asked me to earn 1 s., by carrying it to the Elephant and Castle.

NASH - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WITHERS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-201

809. MARY PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , twenty-three yards of printed cotton, value 10 s ., the goods of Samuel William Cousins .

WILLIAM WEATHERLEY . I am servant to Samuel William Cousins , linen-draper , Norton-falgate . On the 27th of March I saw two men lurking about all the morning; one of them came and untied this piece of print - the prisoner then came up, looked at it, and went away; then came again in about half an hour, rolled it up, and put it under her cloak; she looked at some handkerchiefs, and then went away. I took her thirty yards off.

THOMAS GARTON I am an officer. I took her in charge, and found the print under her cloak; she had two cloaks on, and it was between them. She said she was distressed, and begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240407-202

810. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , four ivory balls, value 5 s.; a sheet, value 4 s.; a yard of calico, value 6 d.; a table-cloth, value 6 d.; a shirt, value 6 d.; a waistcoat, value 6 d.; five shirt collars, value 1 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and six gloves, value 1 s. , the goods of John Fraser .

JOHN FRASER . I live in Cranbourn-street . On the 23d of March, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, at night I went home - I have the charge of some billiard rooms . A gentleman went out, and I told the man to fasten the door. I went into the kitchen, and heard the door open, went up stairs, and found the prisoner sitting at the bottom of the stairs - I asked what he did there; he made no answer. I found this property under him; he had taken them off my bed in the attic.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES GRAHAM . I am a watchman. I received him in charge with the property.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the property. I found a black silk handkerchief and six gloves in his hat; four balls and a piece of candle in his pockets.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240407-203

711. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 4 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. 4 d. , the goods of John Rodrigues .

WILLIAM ANTHONY . I am an officer. On the 2d of March, about half-past eight o'clock I saw the prisoner follow Rodrigues shopman into the shop, and take a piece of beef off the stool, and put it into his apron. I gave information, and he was secured.

MARTIN TAYLOR . I am shopman to John Rodrigues , who is a butcher . The prisoner bought a piece of steak, which came to 3 d., but nothing else; he was brought back with 4 lbs. of beef, which he had taken off the stool, and said he hoped I should let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a family, and did it for want.

GUILTY. Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18240407-204

812. HENRY MORRIS COWELL was indicted for embezzlement .

SOPHIA WATKINS . I am ten years old, and live with my parents in Little George-street. One Monday I paid the prisoner a half-crown for Mr. Yeldham.

THOMAS YELDHAM . I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham Court-road. The prisoner was my apprentice for three years, and entrusted to receive money on my account - he never accounted to me for this money; he absconded, and was taken on the 19th of February. This money was for goods payable by weekly instalments; he always gave the money to my wife when he came home, but on the 9th he did not return from his rounds.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-205

813. JOHN STARKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a pair of shoes, value 8 s., the goods of Alexander Mills , privately in his shop .

ALEXANDER MILLS . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Pulteney-court . On Saturday evening, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked if I had a pair of shoes to fit him; I said I thought not. He reached two pairs, and tried one, and then a third pair - another man came in, and said,

"Don't they fit?" he made no answer; they did not fit, and he asked me to measure him - I did so, and asked what he wanted; he said,

"I want them like yours Jack," speaking to the other man. I asked what name I was to put on the measure; he said Dickenson, then said,

"Put down Starkey." He came close up to me; I looked, and saw the other was gone, and the shoes also. I ran out - a woman said he had run up the court, as hard as he could. The prisoner was going, but I detained him. He said he would call on Monday, and pay 5 s. off them.

THOMAS GOOK . I received him in charge, and did not find a farthing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the shop twenty minutes before the other person came in. I said nothing about Jack, or having them like his.

ALEXANDER MILLS . They were both in company; he said

"I want them like yours Jack."

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240407-206

814. MARY ANN BOWDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a watch, value 1 l.; a chain, value 2 l.; a seal, value 12 s.; a key, value 4 s., and seven shillings, the property of Michael Collins , from his person .

MICHAEL COLLINS . I belong to the ship Mellish . On the 17th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner at Ratcliff, with another girl, who I had seen before; they asked for drink, which I gave them, and went home with them to Blue-coat-fields . I put my watch under the holster - I thought she was putting her clothes under the pillow, instead of which she was taking mine out - she blowed the candles out, and ran out, and the door was shut - I could not open it - I called out - the patrol forced it open, and came to me. I was fastened in the room for a quarter of an hour. I saw her again between eleven and twelve o'clock that night, and knew her - she denied knowing me, and said she lived in Whitechapel, but afterwards said she lived in that room.

JOSEPH KINDELL . I am a watchman. The prosecutor described the girl to me - we went to look for her, and saw her over the way with two girls - he pointed her out. She denied having seen him, and said she lived in Whitechapel, but acknowledged having been in the court; he seemed sober, but I thought he did not know who had robbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240407-207

815. CATHERINE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a basket, value 6 d., and a counterpane, value 7 s., the goods of John Dobson , from the person of Thomas Dobson .

THOMAS DOBSON . I am eleven years old , and live with my father, in New-court, Fashion-street. My mother sent me to take this counterpane in a basket to Whitechapel - the prisoner met me in Brick-lane , and said she would give me a halfpenny to go on an errand for her - I said,

"No, I thank you, I will do it for you and welcome." She told me to go up a little court in Church-lane, to ask for two or three shirts for Williams, and said she did not like to go herself, as she had a shirt to mark, and had not done it, and that she must hold my basket the while. I went, and when I had got to the steps I thought I had done wrong, and went back to see for her, and she was gone. I went into the Commercial-road, and saw her walking away with the bundle. I pointed her out, and a gentleman followed her, calling Stop thief! She threw the basket down, and ran up a carpenter's yard, where she was taken.

JAMES PIPER . I was in the Commercial-road, and saw this boy crying; he said the prisoner had taken his basket. She was walking away with it - I called Stop thief! she dropped it and ran away; I followed, and she was secured.

ELIZABETH DOBSON . I sent my son with the counterpane in a basket. My husband's name is John.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240407-208

816. GEORGE MILNE was indicted for embezzlement .

ANTHONY BRUCE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Clarges-street, Piccadilly. The prisoner was my porter - I never entrusted him to receive money for me.

NOT GUILTY .


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