Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th February 1824.
Reference Number: 18240218
Reference Number: f18240218-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On WEDNESDAY, 18th of FEBRUARY, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Alexander , Knt., Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; and George Bridges , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; John Garrett , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Henry Kent Causton ,

Robert Ashby ,

Rees Price ,

William Kenning ,

John H. Abrahams ,

Hugh Sandeman ,

James Bailey ,

William Croucher ,

George Miller ,

Frederick Wisler ,

Richard Walton ,

James Orr .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Peter Vesey ,

William Jarmaine ,

Benjamin Lewis ,

Isaac Ennos ,

Edward Ede ,

John Froggatt ,

William Evans ,

Thomas Webster ,

Richard Twyford ,

Richard March ,

Samuel Harvey ,

John Holton Vere .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

John Thompson ,

Henry Jay ,

Christopher White ,

Robert Brown ,

James Maul ,

Richard Woods ,

George Wallis ,

Joseph Jenkinson ,

James Perrian ,

John Wilshire ,

John Sadler ,

Thomas Plaw .

3rd Middlesex Jury.

James Knapp ,

George Edwards ,

John Burbidge ,

John Baxter ,

Robert Roberts ,

Jeremiah Howe ,

William Johnson ,

William Pick ,

William Habgood ,

Joseph Tasker ,

William Timms ,

William Woods .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 18, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240218-1

434. RICHARD STAGG was indicted for that he, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, (by adjournment), on Monday, the 21st of October, in the 3d year of his present Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted on an indictment for uttering a counterfeit shilling, he well knowing the same to be counterfeit; and having at the same time in his possession a counterfeit half-crown, he well knowing that also to be counterfeit, and was ordered to be imprisoned in the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, and kept to hard labour for the space of one year, and find sureties for his good behavour for two years more; and having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, to wit, on the 20th of January last, at St. Luke , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a piece of good money, called a shilling, unlawfully, unjustly, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to William Henry Bayfield ; he the said Richard Stagg , at the time when he so uttered the said last mentioned piece of false and counterfeit money, well knew the same to be false and counterfeit, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only omitting the words in italics.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 57.

Reference Number: t18240218-2

Before Mr. Justice Best.

435. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for that he, on the 11th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a forged and counterfeit Bank note, (setting it forth No. 10880, 5 l., dated the 20th of August, 1821, signed H. Whiting;) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Abigail Levy , a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged and counterfeit.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Lyon Levy .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ABIGAIL LEVY . I am the wife of Lyon Levy, a clothes salesman ; we live at No. 29, Hollywell-street. On Thursday, the 11th of December, the prisoner came to the shop, accompanied by a young woman, who asked for some cloth to make a pelisse; she had had a pattern in the morning - the cloth was taken down. I asked how much she wanted; she said,

"Enough for a pelisse, how much will it take;" I said two yards and a half; she said she wished to have a cape - I said a quarter more would do. She did not seem satisfied with the quantity, and the prisoner said,

"I will have a waistcoat off it, and you may as well cut three yards and a half," which was done. It came to 2 l. 9 s. The prisoner threw a 5 l. note down on the counter, which I took up; he said,

"Here give me change of this" - I suspected it to be forged, and asked his name and address - he said, Stevens or Stevenson, No. 218, Tottenham Court-road, which I wrote on the note, with L. L., my husband's initials. (Looks at a note.) this is it; it has

"Mr. Stevens, 218, Tottenham Court-road, L. L.," on it. I called my son, and told him in the prisoner's presence, to get change, and said something to him to Hebrew - I gave him the note; he went out with it, and was gone above a quarter of an hour. Mr. Levy said the boy stopped a long time; I spoke to him in Hebrew - he then opened the door and went out, and in a few minutes the prisoner also went out, and returned to the door in about a minute, and said to the woman,

"I cannot stop for the change, you stop and take it, and I will meet you by and by;" he went away. The note was brought back by my brother-in-law; I told the woman it was forged - she still remained in the shop, and was afterwards discharged.

Prisoner. Q. Are you certain that I said Stevens or Stevenson, or did I say Simpson - A. No, he said Stevens.

Q. When you asked what name you should put on it, I said,

"Put Simpson on it, it is a note I took of a person of that name, who lives in Tottenham Court-road - A. I am certain that he said nothing of the sort. I am certain that he is the man.

LYON LEVY. I am a clothes salesman. The prisoner came to our shop on Thursday evening, the 11th of December, between 6 and 7 o'clock, with a girl - I was in the parlour, and remained there till Mrs. Levy called me to cut three yards and a half of cloth - I cut it off and tied it up. He threw the note down, and said,

"Give me change of this." Mrs. Levy asked his name and address; he gave it, Stevens or Stevenson, Tottenham Court-road; I do not recollect the number, but my wife wrote it on the note immediately; she spoke to me in Hebrew, and gave the note to my son, who went out with it, and was gone a quarter of an hour, but before that I went out, and the prisoner followed me, and saw me at the corner of the street, and said,

"I cannot

stop, but will go and tell Mrs. Levy to give the change to the girl;" he went back, and came out; and suspecting him, I followed him down towards St. Clement's church, then turned back again towards my house, but did not go into Hollywell-street; he went into a public-house in the Strand, and came out in an instant with another man - they went towards New church, and crossed over to Somerset House. I ran back to see if my son had returned with the note; I saw him, ran back, and found the prisoner standing at Somerset House gateway, talking to a man. I said he must come back for there was something not right in the change of the note - I insisted on his coming back: he said,

"I shall be back in a quarter of an hour;" I said,

"You must come back now," he said

"If I must I must," and went quietly with me. I found the woman in the shop - nothing was said to him. An officer came instantly, and took them both. The woman was afterwards discharged.

Prisoner. Q. Had I not plenty of time to go away - A. He did not attempt to go; I think he could not have got away if he had attempted. He was never out of my sight after I accosted him.

THOMAS CORBETT . I am a bookseller, and have lived at No. 218. Tottenham Court-road, for two years and a half, and did so on the 11th of December. I never saw the prisoner. No person of the name of Stevens or Stevenson lived there.

JOHN SCRIVENER . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Oxford-street. I have known the prisoner many years; his name is William Hill. On Tuesday evening, the 9th of December, he came and asked me to give him change for a 5 l. note. I asked what he was doing; he said he was selling cloth on commission, and had business in the neighbourhood, and could not get change. He lived with his father, who kept a wine-vaults, when I knew him, which was twelve years ago, and after that he was a police officer. He said he had been asking at several shops for change, and could not get it, and believed they thought the note was a bad one. I gave him change, and asked his address - he said,

"No. 27, Tottenham Court-road," which I wrote on the note; (looking at one,) this is it; it has

"W. Hill, 27, Tottenham Court-road," written on it.

Prisoner. Q. Will you swear that I said No. 27, Tottenham Court-road, or only Tottenham Court-road - A. I am sure he said No. 27.

CHARLES BOWER . I live at No. 27, Tottenham Court-road, and am a grocer. I do not know the prisoner. I have lived there nine years.

JOEL COX . I am a law stationer, and live in Liquor-pond-street. On the 21st of November, I believe the prisoner to be the man who came to my shop, but he has not that red appearance in the face as at that time; he came for two 20 s. warrant of attorney stamps, two subpoena, and two 2 s. notes, and two skins of parchment - he offered me a 5 l. note; I asked his name or who they were for; he gave me the name of Mr. John Price , No. 37, St. John-square, which I wrote on it; (looking at one,) this is it; it has that written upon it. I gave him two sovereigns, and I think 18 s. 2 d.; he went away.

Prisoner. Q. I believe there is no lamp in your passage - A. No.

Q. I came from the passage into the front parlour did I not - A. Yes. Only myself and him were in the front parlour at the time.

Q. When you saw me in the yard at Bow-street, did you not say that I was not the person - A. Certainly not. I knew him when he was examined; my conviction was much stronger at Bow-street than now, as his face had then a much redder appearance.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. While he was in your shop did any one else come in - A. No. I do not keep an open shop. He knocked at the outer door; Walker, my apprentice opened the door, and he came into the front room, and my boy was there at the time.

HENRY WEBSTER WALKER. I am apprentice to Mr. Cox. I let the prisoner in on this night; he came through the passage into the back parlour, and then into the shop - I was in the back parlour, which is only separated by a glass window, and could see him all the time, which was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes. I have no doubt of his person.

JOHN LIPSCOMBE PRICE . I am a solicitor, and lived in St. James's-walk, Clerkenwell on the 21st of November. I lived in St. John-square nine years ago. I never sent the prisoner for any stamps - I have known him many years, in various capacities.

LIPSCOMBE PRICE. I live at No. 5, St. John-square. I sent the prisoner to buy no stamps - I have known him some years. There is no other attorney of my name in St. John-square. I do not know who lives at No. 37.

JOHN WARD . I live at the Duke of York, public-house, at Chelsea. In November last, I kept the Horse Shoe, public-house, Clerkenwell-close, and know the prisoner very well - he came to my house nearly five months ago, on a Thursday night, and called for a pint of beer and a pipe, which he paid for, and afterwards had 3 s. worth of brandy and water, and tendered me a 5 l. note; I said I had not got change - he said,

"Never mind, let me have a sovereign, and the difference of another sovereign, and give me the rest on Sunday, when I intend having the honour of dining with you." I gave him 1 l. 17 s.; he said he would come on Sunday, and that he was happy to inform me he had got a situation of 20 s. a week in the West India Docks, and expected to have his wages raised in about six weeks. I gave the note to my wife, and somebody came to me next day, and on Saturday he came himself, and got his full change from my wife - I did not expect him on Saturday; he did not come on Sunday. My wife gave me the note again, and on the Monday following, I paid it away at the West of England fire-office. I had no other 5 l. note, and know it to be the same.

Prisoner. Q. When I gave you the note you took it into the tap-room - A. Yes, for two tradesmen to look at; I had not marked it. A man had it in his hand for about a minute, but it was not out of my sight till I gave it to my wife.

MARY WARD . I am the wife of the last witness - he gave me the note; I took it up stairs, and put it in a place by itself; I had no other 5 l. note in my possession. I wrote my name upon it; (looking at one,) this is it; here is

" Mary Ward ," in my writing upon it. It remained there from Thursday till Monday not mixed with any other 5 l. note, and on Monday I gave it to my husband, to pay at the Insurance-office. I saw the prisoner at the

house on the evening on which he paid the note. I knew him before. He came again on Saturday night, and I gave him the rest of the change.

THOMAS WILLIAM NEWCOMB . I am a clerk at the West of England Insurance office. (Looking at the note) - I received this note on the 15th of November, in payment of a renewal of a policy; and I think from Ward.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of notes of the Bank of England, and have been so above twenty-five years. (Looking at the note uttered to the prosecutor;) this is forged in every respect, paper, plate, and is not the signature of Whiting, which it purports to bear - there is a clerk of that name, but he never signs 5 l. notes. The three others are also all forged in every respect, and are all four from the same plate.

HENRY WHITING . I am a clerk in the Bank; it was my duty to sign 1 l. and 2 l. notes, but I never signed a 5 l. note - the note with my name to it is not any signature.

(The note was here put in and read.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

JOHN CHEW . I live in Carnaby-street, Golden-square, and have known the prisoner for the last fifteen years, and never knew a stain in his character.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. What has been his business during the last year - A. I do not know his employment; he called on me a fortnight before his apprehension, and appeared distressed, and asked for relief - I gave him 1 s.; he said he should be happy to take a potboy's place - that he had not broken his fast for twenty-four hours.

Q. Do you know what his occupation has been for the last two years - A. I was only acquainted with him by meeting him about. His father lived near me fifteen years ago.

MR. SCRIVENER. I knew him fifteen years ago. I never heard a flaw in his character before this.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury on account of his character and distressed situation .

Reference Number: t18240218-3

436. CHARLES CROWDER was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 15th of December , fifty promissory notes, for payment of and value 5 l. each, the property of James Taylor and others, his partners; the same notes having lately before, to wit, on the same day, been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be fifty pieces of paper, each piece being stamped with a stamp of the value of 1 s. 3 d.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to be the property of William Sargant .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Hanbury and Co., Lombard-street. Messrs. Taylor and Lloyd of Birmingham had an account with our house, and make their notes payable there. On the 12th of December, 1821, we made up 4001 l. worth of their notes, which were principally for 5 l. each - they were in two parcels, which I made into one parcel, and delivered them to Sergeant, the guard of the Balloon coach, which runs to Birmingham.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had the notes been paid - A. Yes, and were sent back to be re-issued.

WILLIAM SERGEANT . In December, 1822, I was guard to the Balloon coach , and on the 12th of December Mr. Brown delivered me pa parcel at the banking-house, to take to Messrs. Taylor and Co., of Birmingham, to whom it was directed. I received the parcel about twelve o'clock at noon - the coach starts at a quarter to five. I put the parcel into a handkerchief, and went to the Magpie and Pewter Platter, public-house, Wood-street, where I lodged; I slept there that afternoon, and gave the parcel to Greeves, the landlord to take care of while I went to bed. I got up a little after three o'clock, asked him for the parcel, and he gave it to me in the same state as when I received it. I then took it in my hand to the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane, and put it inside at the bottom of the coach, which stood in the inn yard, by the tap-room window; this was about half-past three o'clock, and in less than five minutes I missed the parcel. I made enquiry for it, but to no purpose. I went and informed the bankers.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You knew what was in the parcel - A. I knew that it was valuable. I gave it to the landlord to take care of while I slept - it appeared in the same state when he returned it. I moved it from the bottom of the coach, and laid it on the seat with my coat over it, and considered it safe, as several people were about. I left it on the seat while I went into the office. I intended to put it into the boot, as it was too large for my pocket, and missed it immediately on coming out of the office. I was not absent above three minutes.

JAMES GREEVES . In December, 1822, I kept the Magpie, public-house, Wood-street, Cheapside. On the 12th of December, Sergeant delivered me a parcel, and when he got up I returned it to him in the same state as when I received it.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. At what time did you receive it - A. About twelve o'clock, and returned it about twenty minutes to four; I had locked it up in the bar cupboard immediately on receiving it, and unlocked it to deliver it to him. I kept the key in my pocket, and did not leave the bar.

DANIEL GRAY . I now live at Norwich, but formerly lived at Birmingham. In September last I was at Malden fair, Essex, and saw the prisoner and one Thomas Turnley there, in company - Turnley asked in the prisoner's hearing if I knew Messrs. Taylor and Lloyd's bank at Birmingham; I said I did - he said he had got a parcel of their notes; that he had touted (which means watched) the guard of the Balloon rattler, (coach) and that he had got very nearly 11,000 l., and had fenced (sold) them for 2000 l., and said,

"We tried to fence them back to the owners, but they would not allow us a mag" (halfpenny)

"for them;" that they were all 5 l. notes - he shewed me one 5 l. note, and said,

"Will you cop" (buy)

"any, for they are rare good things, and you can put them away;" I said I had no money to buy them; he asked if I knew anybody who would - I said I would recommend him a person who I thought might buy some, and introduced him to George Ward ; Crowder was present, and heard all this conversation - I had seen him before,

but did not know much of him. I wrote to Mr. Payne, the keeper of Birmingham goal, and communicated to him what had passed, and in consequence of his direction, I saw the prisoner in December last. I had seen Mr. Bird, the solicitor, and both those gentlemen gave me instructions. Mr. Payne gave me money to make a purchase. I left Birmingham on the 14th of December, and came to the Three Crowns, public-house, City-road, on the 15th - I saw the prisoner near the Three Crowns about one o'clock, and agreed to take nine 5 l. notes of Messrs. Taylor and Lloyd's bank, for 10 l.; he was to bring them to me at the Three Crowns, about six o'clock that afternoon. I bought a crab for my dinner, and took it to the Three Crowns - some horse dealers were there, eating beef steaks. I remained there till half-past five o'clock, when the prisoner and Turnley came in; he said the notes were not ready, but would be ready by six, and at six they both came to the house - Crowder called me out - I found Turnley, Crowder, and George Ward outside; Crowder said to Ward,

"Give Bill" (meaning me)" your money, and then he can have all the things, and give you yours out."

Q. What was Ward to give you money for - A. He was going to buy some notes as well as me. Ward was to have six notes, and I nine. Ward said he did not like to trust any one with his money. Ward, Turnley, and Crowder went round the corner together - I saw them again in about two minutes, altogether. Turnley pulled a lot of notes from his pocket, and counted them into Ward's hand, and said,

"I think I have given you seven" - Ward said,

"If you think so, count them over again," but he did not. Ward went away. Crowder said he thought Turnley had given him seven - Turnley then pulled some more notes from his pocket, and counted them into Crowder's hand, and said there was only eight; they were 5 l. notes. Crowder gave them to me, and said Ward had got one to many. Turnley was going away; I said,

"Here is the money;" he said,

"No, stop till I come back." When he was gone, Crowder took the notes out of my hand again, counted them, and said there was only eight. I said,

"Will you have the money" - he said Yes, and I gave him the ten sovereigns, and said,

"When shall I have the other note, I hope I shall get the other;" he said,

"Yes, you shall when he comes back." Turnley returned, and said to Crowder,

"I will be d - d if there is not one wrong somewhere;" Crowder said,

"Then Ward has got it;" and be would be d - d if he would not sooner be lagged (transported) than done out of one. I saw Ward afterwards; Crowder called him out of the Three Crowns, and said,

"George, you have got one too many, you had better turn it up, or I will be d - d if there will not be a bl - y row" - Ward said he did not know what he meant; some words passed, and Ward called a man named William Cutts out; they had some words, and I went in and got half a pint of gin, and gave them a glass all round - they went into the parlour, and had a row there, but I went away. I had a glass of wine and water there, and asked for a biscuit; they had not got one, but brought me a slice of bread and butter. I asked for a bit of lemon, as Crowder told me to put a bit of lemon into the wine and water. I delivered the eight notes to Mr. Payne, having first marked them D. G., and informed Mr. Bird what had happened.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You have not told us what you are - A. A brass-founder by trade; I work for myself. I sell handkerchiefs and all kinds of goods at Norwich, I have not worked at my trade for three years, or longer. I was a journeyman brass-founder at Birmingham.

Q. Have you within the last four years worked as a brass-founder - A. Yes; it is four years as near as can be. When I left that trade I went to the coal work, for three or four months, and then got a hawker's licence, and continued at that till the licence was out. I took that licence out about fifteen months ago.

Q. Then there were two years between that which you cannot account for - A. I was at Birmingham, and have done business for Mr. Payne, the keeper of the prison - I was employed for the Bank of England to detect forgeries. They thought me a kind of a sly chap, whom they could depend upon.

Q. You understand the slang language very well - A. They all understand that at Birmingham; they are all fly there, and all know flash. I was employed by Mr. Payne for three or four months, and then lived on my money like a gentleman - I saved above 100 l. Mr. Redfearn has had 60 l. of mine, and Mr. Payne 20 l.; that was three years ago. Redfearn is an officer of Birmingham.

Q. Did any one ever make a charge against you about a note - A. There was once a 1 l. forged note, which I was tried for passing, but I was acquitted.

Q. Was not that the occasion of the Bank taking you up as a convenient person - A. No; it was before that; this happened at Norwich. I was never taken up at any other time. I had not lived at Norwich above a fortnight when that happened; I have lived there ever since - it will be three years ago next Summer Assizes. I have been a soldier, and left the regiment after the battle of Waterloo. I knew Turnley before, by a little conversation I had with him on the 3d or 4th of September, at Barnet, when I went to sell my master's horse. It was Turnley who asked me to buy the notes - he said they had got nearly 11,000 l., and fenced them for 2000 l.

Q. Then they were all gone if they had fenced them - A. Yes; that was a different thing entirely; he said they had bought a good many back on speculation, and sold them. He said that in Crowder's presence.

Q. How came Turnley to suppose you could put them away - A. I was in the habit of going about selling things. I never had any of them before.

Q. How long after you were at Malden did you write to Mr. Payne - A. As soon as I got to Huntingdonshire, where I met my wife, which was in October; it was not many weeks after the conversation. When I came from Mr. Payne, I asked Crowder for the notes. I have gone by the name of Bill; I did not wish them to know my real name. Crowder was a stranger to me till I saw him at Malden - they called me Bill.

Q. Was anybody within sight when you were all four together by the Three Crowns - A. The people came round to see what the matter was when there was a row kicked up; there was a dispute between Ward and Crowder about the note - it was darkish; only the gas was lighted. It was six o'clock; it was dark where we

stood. I counted the notes when he gave them to me; I could tell by the feel that they were notes, and I looked at them after I got into the house. I counted them in the dark when he gave them to me. I counted them in the passage where the gas-light shone; I went beyond both the doors to a private part of the passage.

MR. LAW. Q. When you were applied to to buy the notes, were you a hawker - A. No. (Looking at a letter;) this is the letter I wrote to Mr. Payne; it is dated Huntingdon, 19th of November.

Q. Having counted your notes, you went into the passage to ascertain what they were - A. Yes. I saw the landlord of the house, and the girl who waits there. Ward was in the house, and Turnley, but he did not stop there. I delivered Mr. Payne the same notes as I received from Crowder, and paid Crowder for them; he counted the notes over to me in the dark.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am chief constable of Birmingham, and was formerly keeper of the prison. Gray had been employed by the police, under my direction, and in consequence of a letter from him in October, or November, I communicated with Mr. Bird, and from what passed with the bankers, I employed Gray to buy some of the notes, and in December I gave him fifteen sovereigns to buy them; he left, and about three days after returned to Birmingham, and gave me eight 5 l. notes - this was on the 17th. I saw him put his initials on them before he gave them to me, and I put the day of the month on each of them, and gave them to Mr. Bird. These are them (looking at them.)

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Some persons have already been convicted at Birmingham, of receiving these notes - A. Not that I know of. Gray was paid his expences liberally for every transaction he had with the police. I have promised him nothing for this.

MR. RICHARD BIRD . I am solicitor for this prosecution, and live at Birmingham. Mr. Payne gave me these eight 5 l. notes. Mr Taylor's name is James; there are five other partners.

Cross-examined. Q. Have not persons been convicted of receiving part of these notes - A. Two have been convicted at Manchester.

MARY ANN DAWSON . I am servant at the Three Crowns, public-house, City-road. I remember the witness Gray, being there before Christmas; I do not remember on what day it was. I have some knowledge of the prisoner being there with him. I do not know Turnley by name. Gray had a crab for dinner that day; several horse-dealers were there, who had steaks - Bill Cutts was there on that day. There was a disturbance about notes; one man who was to have had seven had eight, and another who was to have had eight had but seven; the party did not come into the house after the quarrel. Ward was the man who had eight notes instead of seven. I do not remember Turnley having any refreshment. I cannot speak to the prisoner's having been there.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You came out in front of the house I suppose during the quarrel - A. They were quarrelling outside the door at first, and then in the parlour; my attention was directed to them in the parlour, which is on the right hand side of the passage; the passage goes beyond the door. I do not think that Gray was in the parlour at the time of the row. I was in the bar, and hearing the noise went into the parlour. I did not notice whether any one was in the passage; there was a good light there - I did not see Crowder there. Gray was there that evening. No gin was carried into the parlour. I was in the bar some time before the row, and do not recollect Gray coming for any gin; he came for some wine and water just before the quarrel, and had it in the taproom - I saw no papers in his hand.

MR. LAW. Q. What makes you remember the wine and water - A. He said he did not like quarrelling, and would have it in the other room, as it was quiet. It was quite dark, but the lamps were lighted.

ANN MOORE . I keep this public-house, and remember some horse-dealers being there on a Monday in December. Gray and Bill Cutts were there. I heard a quarrelling about some notes - one man had more than he should. I have no recollection of the prisoner.

MR. JOHN TEAGUE . I am keeper of Giltspur-street Compter. On the 12th of December, 1822, the prisoner was in my custody, under sentence of six months imprisonment, for keeping a brothel.

ROBERT BROWN . I entered the numbers of the notes; those produced are part of what were in the parcel.

Prisoner's Defence. I was apprehended coming out of my own door in Goswell-street, and taken to Bow-street, and everybody prevented from seeing me. I was charged with robbing the coach, and told them where I was when this was committed. I was sent to the House of Correction, and my solicitor not suffered to see me. I was sent to gaol on a certificate of being indicted, without any examination. I never saw Gray in my life, and if I had known what the evidence was, I have no doubt I should be able to establish an alibi, or something of that sort.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-4

London Cases,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

437. HENRY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a ream of paper, called demy, value 20 s., the goods of Israel Thomas and John Jones , to whom he was servant ; and SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

ISRAEL THOMAS. I am a stationer , in partnership with John Jones ; our warehouse is in Baldwin-court, Cloak-lane. The prisoner Adams was in our service between three and four years. I do not know the particulars of this case.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. On the 28th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped Robert Adams in Playhouse-yard, Golden-lane, with some paper. The prisoner Smith, who was in his company, ran away.

JOHN THOMAS HIGLEY . I work for my father. On Sunday, Henry Adams asked me if I would come to his masters' on the Monday - it was about three Sundays ago. He said his masters were going to turn the girls away, and have boys instead. I was to go and ask for a place. I went between one and two o'clock; I met Henry Adams on the Pavement, Moorfields, alone - he asked me to go

back to his masters' and wait till he had done work. I went and waited till four o'clock; he came out then, and we went home together, and on Tuesday, I, his brother Robert, and Smith, went down into Cloak-lane about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and all came home together. On the Wednesday we went again, and Henry Adams brought this paper into Globe-lane; Smith was with me - he asked us to come and meet him at eight o'clock, which we did, and he brought the paper to us in Cloak-lane, which is about two hundred yards from the prosecutors'; he gave the paper to me; I carried it into Coleman-street, and then gave it to Smith. Robert Adams was not with us on that evening.

Q. How came you to go - A. He asked us to come and meet him as he came from work; he did not say what we were to come for. I put no questions to him about the paper. When I gave it to Smith, I told him to carry it; he carried it to Willow-gardens, and called Robert Adams out, and gave the paper to him. I waited at the corner of Playhouse-yard, when they went down with it; they did not come back, and so I went away, and heard that Robert Adams was in custody. I was taken up on the Saturday morning. They did not say where they were taking the paper to.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am clerk to the prosecutors. On the evening of the 31st of January, an officer came to the warehouse, and took Henry Adams on suspicion of stealing this paper; he denied it. I went to Worship-street, where the paper produced was shewn to me. I afterwards saw Henry Adams at the office; he was asked if he had taken the paper; he said voluntarily that he did - I asked where he took it from; he said, from a stack near the door of the women's room. I examined that stack on Monday morning, and missed a ream, and believe this to be it; it is similar paper, and has the same maker's name and date on it.

THOMAS VANN . I was present when he said he took the paper from near the women's room, and that he asked Smith to come and fetch it away.

SAMUEL KENT PARSONS . On the 26th of January I know that forty reams of demy were delivered to the prosecutor - it was paper of this description.

ADAMS'S Defence. That is not the paper I gave him; it was only a few spoiled sheets.

SMITH'S Defence. That is not the paper he gave me.

ADAMS - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-5

438. THOMAS BROTHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , two boots value 20 s. , the goods of Pendrill Hardcastle .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-6

439. JANE MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , at St. Andrew, Undershaft , three silver waiters, value 15 l.; a silver bread basket, value 7 l.; thirty-six table spoons, value 36 l.; thirty-six forks, value 18 l.; a silver lamp, value 5 l.; a tea kettle, value 6 l.; two pairs of snuffers, value 3 l.; two snuffer stands, value 2 l.; a fish slice, value 1 l., and two gravy spoons, value 3 l., the goods of Matthew Kirwan , to whom she was servant , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH KING . In January last I was in the service of Matthew Kirwen , of Richard's-court, Lime-street ; the prisoner was the house-maid , and had been there a month. On the 29th of January, master and his family went to the play, and about seven, or a quarter past, I went up stairs - some of the clerks were in the counting-house at the time. There are leads to the house, which lead from our bed-room into Mr. Proctor's garden, in Billiter-square. On getting up stairs I found the lead doors both open - I went to shut them; I was obliged to go out on the leads to shut them; I staid outside for a few minutes, as the bells were ringing, it being the King's accession. I turned my eye round, and saw a candle standing on maser's bed-room table, below where I stood, and saw the prisoner very busy, passing too and fro in the room, but could not see what she was doing, The plate was kept in a closet in that room. She came up stairs to our bedroom to me, and said,

"Is that you?" I said, Yes - she took something off her own bed, and immediately went down into master's bed-room again; I then went down to see what she was doing - she came out, and pulled the door too to prevent my going in, and I did not go in, but came down into the kitchen, and felt very uneasy; I did not know what to do. I went up stairs, put on my bonnet and shawl, and went out to watch if anything was taken out; I shut the street door as I went out, and the middle door also, and on getting into the street, I saw a man standing with his back against the India House, looking up the court. I did not know what to do, so I went down the street - the man followed me quickly down the street. I returned to the house, and found both the doors wide open; the prisoner came out of the parlour into the passage. I asked what she did with both the doors open, saying I thought Mr. Kriwen would be angry if he knew it - she said,

"I expect a friend;" I said,

"Let him ring the bell;" she shut the parlour door; I passed her, and went into the parlour, and found a bundle standing on a chair there; she stood before the chair sometime, and seemed confused. I said I thought all was not right, and that she had been there a very short time; she said,

"Then you are a very suspicious woman;" I then caught sight of the bundle, and called in Mr. Barr. the clerk - he came - I said something induced me to think all was not right, and at that instant she left the parlour. I then saw what the bundle was; there was a silver bread basket in it, and the silver which is now in it - Barr immediately locked it up. I did not examine it till master returned. I did not see the prisoner afterwards till she was taken. I am the cook. The plate was usually kept in a closet adjoining the bed-room.

HENRY BARR . I am clerk to Mr. Kirwen; his house is in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft, Aldgate Ward. King called me about five minutes before eight o'clock; I went into the parlour, and the prisoner went up stairs. King was extremely agitated, and pointed to a bundle, which I examined; it contained plate - I immediately locked it up in the counting-house. A bread basket and other plate was in it; but I cannot say what; I kept it till about twelve o'clock, when Mr. and Mrs. Kirwen came home; I took it up to Mr. Kirwen myself. I went up stairs to endeavour to find the prisoner, and found her

walking backwards and forwards on the leads, in a very distracted manner; I was afraid she would make away with herself, and persuaded her to come in and stay in the room till Mr. Kirwan came home. She said nothing to me. The bundle contained various articles of plate, a bread basket, silver tray, and other things.

OWEN EDMUNDS . I live next door to Mr. Kirwan. The clerk came to me; I went to the house, and found the prisoner on the leads in great agitation; and after she came in, she desired me to go on the leads with her, to assist her to bring in a basket off the leads, but having the gout, I was not able - she fetched it in herself, and said it was plate. I immediately locked it up, without opening it, and it was not taken out until Mr. Kirwan came home - Lloyd carried it in to Mr. Kirwan. I asked her what was in the basket; she said it was plate, and that she put it there in her confusion, to hide it, and that there was a person at the door, who had induced her to do it, through his poverty - that he was her husband. The basket was on the outside of the leads, fastened round to the railing; it was dark; I could not see it, but I felt it hanging to the railing.

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE . I am officer of the Ward. Mr. Kirwan sent for me next morning, and I took an inventory of the plate; it consisted of the articles stated in the indictment.

EDWARD LLOYD . I am servant to Mr. Kirwan. All this plate was in the chest to the best of my knowledge - I had put it there a fortnight before. I have the care of the plate. I saw the bundle when master returned; there was plate in it, but I did not see it opened. The waiters, bread basket, and all the plate are his property. I brought the basket out of the room myself, but did not see it opened. I took it into the parlour for master to look at, and next day saw all the plate in the house; it is master's - I am his butler. Master kept the key of the plate.

HENRY BARR re-examined. I saw the waiters in the bundle after Mr. Kirwan came home, on the same night, and other plate; but cannot say what. I only saw that there was plate in the bundle, and immediately locked it up. Mrs. Kirwan pulled it aside, and I saw that it was plate in it, but cannot say what articles. I know it to be Mr. Kirwan's; it has his mark on it.

OWEN EDMONDS . The basket was not opened in my presence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18240218-7

440. JAMES CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a basket, called a flat, value 2 s. 6 d.; a butter cloth, value 6 d., and 31 lbs. of butter, value 30 s. , the goods of James Parker .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Richard Babb .

RICHARD BABB . I am porter to James Parker , who lives in Old Change. On the 29th of January, I was in Newgate-market , with his waggon, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, with flats of butter in it; I saw the prisoner nearly opposite the market, walking away with a flat of butter which was in the waggon just before - he dropped it on the curb; I took it up, and he was detained - he afterwards asked me to make it up.

GEORGE JACKSON . I am a cheesemonger, and was in Newgate-street, and saw the witness holding the prisoner - he said he would not run away; the man let go of his collar; he then said,

"Come along, we can make up this." I said I should not allow it.

(Flat produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY. Aged 59.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-8

441. JOHN SANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 18 lbs. of beef, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert Blackford .

ROBERT BLACKFORD . I am a butcher . On the 27th of January, I saw this beef safe in Carter's waggon half an hour before it was stolen. I had delivered it to Carter to take to my shop over the water.

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Carter. I saw the prisoner take a quarter of beef out of the cart. I sang out, nobody answered me; he went away with it. My master missed a quarter of beef - we followed the prisoner, and took him with it on his back. I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner for half a moment - he did not go a hundred yards with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. There were a great many more people carrying beef in the market - A. Yes. I know he is the man; he had the beef when I took him. I had seen him in the market before.

THOMAS CARTER . I received the beef, and put it into my cart. Smith sang out, and told me something - I went to the cart, and found the tail-board down, and the beef gone; we followed and took the prisoner a hundred yards off - he did not deny taking it.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him take it - A. No. We went to the Compter; they turned us out as we had no officer. He did not attempt to escape.

JOHN SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I took him into custody at eight o'clock in the morning, at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. They did not see me take it from the cart. I was employed by a person to do it, and did not know that I had done wrong.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of having a good Character .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-9

442. THOMAS BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , a feather bed, value 35 s. , the goods of John Middleton .

JOHN MIDDLETON . I deal in feather beds , and live in Barbican . On the night of the 30th of January, I was told a bed was stolen. I went out, and met the prisoner with it in his arms.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN COLLENDER . I saw the prisoner take this bed out of the frame, and walk away with it on his shoulder.

WILLIAM PARLETT . I am an officer. I took him into custody.

Prisoner. I was in extreme distress.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-10

443. JOHN HATT and WILLIAM PALMER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 20 lbs. of

whalebone hair, value 30 s. , the goods of Henry Smith , to whom the said William Palmer , was servant .

HENRY SMITH . I am a whalebone cutter , and live in Fell-street, Wood-street; Palmer was in my employ. On the 16th of January, about six o'clock in the evening. I went up to the top warehouse, and found a candle placed in a very dangerous situation, and placed so that it would not he seen at the window - I could find nobody there. I looked about, and just as I took the candle up, I saw Palmer peeping in at the window; he came in; I asked what he did out there - he was agitated, and made no answer. I ran down stairs, and went to the end of my premises; Simmons followed me. I went to the end of the yard, suspecting somebody was there, and that Palmer had been throwing something down to him. Hatt was trying to get over the pails at the end of the warehouse - he had been in the warehouse, and was getting back over a hoard, from the bottom of the warehouse. A house had been pulled down there. He was under the window at which Palmer came in; he was getting over into the street. We stopped him, and found two bundles of whalebone hair, weighing 20 lbs., over the board. I am sure it is mine, by the string round it; it had come from Hull, and is a particular sort of string.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was Hatt on your premises - A. He was off the premises. I did not see him on the premises, but he was under the window.

Q. Would a line falling from the window come upon him - A. No; he was about three yards from it, round the corner at the end of the warehouse; he could not see the window where he stood. It was not usual for me to go up stairs at that time. There was a small piece of glass broken in the window, but not sufficient for the hair to fall out.

RICHARD SIMMONS . I am in Mr. Smith's service. On the night in question, master came down stairs; I went into the street, and found Hatt getting over the board; the officer came up immediately. I got over the hoard, and found the hair. I had heard something fall as he got over. We had some of this description on the premises.

JAMES TOMKINS . I was coming by when Hatt came over the fence. I searched him, and found two latch keys on him. The hair laid inside the fence, where he came over. Simmons got over and picked it up.

HENRY SMITH re-examined. As Hatt got on the top of the board, we heard the hair fall down the hoard. I have twenty-two workmen; they were all in the bottom warehouse except Palmer, and all the hair is kept in the top warehouse. I could not miss it, having a quantity.

HATT - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

PALMER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-11

444. JOHN JEFFKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a fender, value 30 s. , the goods of David Evans .

DAVID EVANS . I am a stove-great-maker , and live in Crutched-friars. I know this fender to be mine, by the ticket on it.

JOHN HEMMINGS . I am servant to Mr. Evans. I saw the prisoner take this fender from my master's warehouse in Mansion House-street . I followed him to Grocer's Hall-court, and asked where he was going with it; he said nothing. I took him back with it on his shoulder.

WILLIAM ODELL . I met the prisoner with the fender on his shoulder, and saw my fellow-servant stop him with it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-12

445. GEORGE HATT and THOMAS SEATON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , an oil-can, value 18 d., and two gallons of oil, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Marriott , their master .

HENRY MARRIOTT . I am an ironmonger , and live in Fleet-street. Seaton has been my porter for eight years. On the night of the 26th of January, about ten o'clock, Mr. Creed called on me, and stated something, in consequence of which, next morning at eight o'clock, when Seaton came to work I called him in, and asked where he went last night after he left work; he said to the Welch Harp, public-house, to get a pint of beer - I said,

"Did you go anywhere else;" he said, No, and persisted in it. I put him aside, and called Hatt, who was also my porter - he said he went to the Red Lion, public-house; I said he went somewhere afterwards; he said, Yes, he helped Thomas lock up the stable, but took nothing with him. Seaton then came up, and said, if I would forgive him, he would tell me all about it; I said I certainly should punish him-he said he had stolen a can of oil, and that it was old sediments, which had been at the wharf at the water side, and was going to sell it for cart grease; I said if it was that sort, it was fit for my cart, but I went to his house, and found the can hid in his cellar, full of sperm oil. I believe it to be Hatt's only offence. Seaton had 21 s. a week.

JOSEPH CREED . I keep the Sussex Hotel, Bouverie-street. On the evening in question, about half-past nine o'clock, I was coming through the Temple, and saw the prisoners come from Mr. Marriott's stable with a can. I went and told Mr. Marriott.

DANIEL TURNER . I am an officer, and found the can at Seaton's house over the water.

(Can produced and sworn to.)

HATT'S Defence. Seaton asked me to go to the Welch Harp , and by his persuasion, I went with him - we had a pint of beer; he said he was going to the stable, and told me to come. He took the can and locked the door. I carried it partly over the bridge, and he took it to his own house.

SEATON - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

HATT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-13

446. JOHN COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Pearce , from his person .

WILLIAM PEARCE . On the 15th of January, I was walking with Mr. Jones, and in St. Ann's-lane , I felt my pocket very light, turned round, and saw the prisoner crossing towards Bull and Mouth-street - I went over towards him; he immediately took the handkerchief from his bosom, threw it down, and dodged me, but was immediately stopped.

SAMUEL JONES . I was with Mr. Pearce - the prisoner and a boy were behind him; I had overtook Mr. Pearce - the prisoner drew the boy back from behind him, and soon after Mr. Pearce missed his handkerchief. The prisoner took it, threw it down, and said,

"I did not take it."

EDWARD TAYLOR . I saw the boy give the handkerchief to the prisoner. They were together.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-14

447. JOHN WALLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , two curtains, value 15 s., the goods of Joseph Sandall and William Green , his masters , Also for stealing, on the 8th of August , three curtains, value 15 s., the goods of the same persons. And also for stealing, on the 13th of November , two curtains, value 8 s. , the goods of the same persons.

To all three indictments the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-15

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

448. ROBERT BISS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , sixteen handkerchiefs, value 12 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell , and Thomas Cross .

The prosecutors did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240218-16

449. LUDWICK GREENCORN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a shirt, value 1 s., and a waistcoat, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Beverill .

ROBERT BEVERILL . I live at the Duke of York, public-house, Chelsea . On the 26th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I went out, returned between twelve and one, and missed a waistcoat, which was safe that morning; also a shirt of my boy's. The prisoner slept in the same room with me and five more; I had left him in bed; he returned in the evening, and I asked if he had my boy's shirt, or my waistcoat; he said No; I said if he did not say what he had done, I should use foul means - he then said he had sold them at No. 32, Monmouth-street. I had him apprehended, and found them at No. 82.

CAROLINE GREY . I live No. 82, Monmouth-street. I bought a shirt and waistcoat of the prisoner on the 26th of January. I told him I thought the shirt was not his own; he said he had worn it; I said it looked like a boy's shirt, about twelve years old - he said it was his boy's. I gave him twelve shillings for them.

JAMES SPEED . On the 27th I took him in charge; he said he had sold the things in Monmouth-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-17

450. SAMUEL GRANGE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January . 11 lbs. of soap, value 7 s. , the goods of William James .

WILLIAM JAMES . I live at Chelsea . On the 27th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was in my kitchen, and heard an alarm, ran up, and missed this soap from my shop door. I went out, and my neighbour, Husband, overtook the prisoner with the soap; it was brought back to me in about twenty minutes, with the box it was in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALTER HUNTER . I heard the alarm, ran, and found the prisoner about two hundred yards off, walking away; I asked what he had got there; he said, this soap - he said a person, who he pointed to in the Five Fields, gave it him, and I had better take him; I said if so I should loose both.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I received the prisoner in charge; he appeared in great distress, and said the man who gave it to him lived in Tothill-street; he did not say where he was taking it to.

Prisoner's Defence. I had just come from the country, and will never do it again.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240218-18

451. WILLIAM GREEN and JOHN GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , an umbrella, value 1 s., and a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Walter Hunter .

The prosecutor was not present .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240218-19

452. JOHN HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , a cloak, value 1 l. , the goods of John Howard March .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240218-20

453. JAMES FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a mare, price 10 l. , the goods of William Bainbridge .

HENRY HILL . I am a carter, and live in Fullwood's-rents. I am servant to Mr. Bainbridge , and so is the prisoner. On the 7th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, and said master gave him orders to have the mare to go to buy some plants - I did not give it to him then; he went away. I saw him at dinner time at the Plough, public-house, where I live; he still insisted that master said he was to have it; it was then three o'clock - I refused, but he said he should return in an hour and a half with her, and I let him have her; he had been working for master ten or eleven weeks; he rode off on the mare.

Prisoner. I was in liquor, and asked him for the mare, but do not know whether I said master had given me leave - Witness, He said so; he was in liquor.

WILLIAM CARTER . I keep the Swan, public-house. on Finchley-common. The prisoner came to my house, between three and four o'clock on Saturday, riding this mare - he put her into the stable, came into the house, and came out in a few minutes. I met him at the door; he offered to sell me the mare for three sovereigns, and to clear a score of 5 s.; I said if he would satisfy me that it

was his own, I would give him three sovereigns, and asked where he bought it; he said he bought it at Mr. Grange's sale, and then that he bought her of Mr. Bainbridge. I suspected that it was not his; he staid there three hours, begging of me to give him the money, and I sent for a constable; he was in liquor; he was fresh when he came, and had part of a pot of beer at my house. He rode the mare up to my door; there was nothing remarkable in his appearance. There is a nursery-ground at Finchley.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the Swan, with the mare; he said he bought her at Mr. Grange's sale at Kingsland; he was sober then.

JOHN CHINA . I was at Carter's - the prisoner offered the mare for sale, for three sovereigns; he told me he bought her of Messrs. Bainbridge and Eaton, and asked when would there be a coach to town; I said in about an hour. He asked me to go and get two sovereigns from Carter for the mare; I went, returned, and told him Carter would come and settle with him; he said if I could get two sovereigns and a half from him, he would give me the half sovereign.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am horse patrol of Barnet. I went to the Swan with Wilkinson, and took the prisoner; the horse had two shoes off, and was of more value than he offered it for, which made me think it stolen.

WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE . I did not send the prisoner to Hill; he told me that he knew a person at Finchley, who had some beautiful carnations. I gave him a sovereign to buy three dozen, but did not tell him to take the horse. I went to the ground on Saturday, and the carnations were planted there, and suppose he had bought them. I heard nothing of him till Sunday, when I found him in custody with my mare. I sent him for carnations and pinks.

JAMES EATON . I am in partnership with Mr. Bainbridge, but the mare is his sole property. I met the prisoner in the Hornsey-road, on Saturday morning, with some carnations in a wheel-barrow, but no horse.

ROBERT DAINTRY re-examined. I went to the nursery, and found he had been there, and bought a dozen of carnations.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, or should not have gone off at that time of day. I met a friend at Highgate, and had two pints of beer with him; then rode on the mare, but did not think of selling him the mare. When he offered me the money, I would not take it, as it was only a lark.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

Reference Number: t18240218-21

454. JAMES MARN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Ralph Gallon , on the night of the 30th of January , and stealing therein a loaf of bread, value 9 d. , his property.

RALPH GALLON . On the 30th of January, between eight and nine o'clock at night, an alarm was given that a man's arm was through my window. I keep a chandlers-shop , in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, Westminster . I saw the prisoner's hand through the window, and a loaf in it, and as I opened the door, he ran away. I followed, and took him twenty yards off with a 4 lb. loaf in his possession. I found the glass cut out of my window - it was perfectly whole an hour before; he denied cutting the window, but acknowledged taking the loaf - it was quite dark. I never lost sight of him. I rent the shop and parlour, and sleep there; the landlord does not live in the house.

MARGARET FROST . I was standing by Gallon's door; the prisoner stood at the window. I went into the shop, and saw his hand through the window on the loaf. I gave an alarm, and Gallon ran out.

WILLIAM PATTMORE . I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner. I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the house - the window was broken; a loaf of bread was better than half out of the window, and just as I went by it fell out. I picked it up, and was walking along with it.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of Petty Larceny .

Reference Number: t18240218-22

455. WILLIAM SYKES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Earl of Darnley , about seven o'clock in the night of the 31st of January , at St. George, Hanover-square , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, four coats, value 20 s.; four waistcoats, value 20 s.; four pairs of breeches, value 20 s.; a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s.; two jackets, value 10 s.; two window-curtains, value 2 s.; a knife, value 1 s., and a string of beads, value 1 s. , the goods of James Child .

MARY CHILD . I am the wife of James Child , who is coachman to Lord Darnley . I live with my husband over his Lordship's stables, which are in a mews opposite the house - there is a communication from the back of the house to the stables, but the mews is between the house and the stables. I am not servant to the family, but my husband is entirely emplowed by his Lordship, and lives in the stable by his Lordship's permission - my husband does not rent the stables. On the 31st of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out to work at Sir Hudson Lowe 's - I left every thing safe. I locked the bed-room and stable doors, and put the key of the bedroom on the bannisters of the stairs ready for my husband, and took the key of the stable with me, as there was another key at the house which my husband could get. I returned before five o'clock, went up stairs, and did not notice any thing wrong then. I went out again about five o'clock - it was not quite dark, but the lamps were lighted. I put the key on the bannisters as before, locked the stable-door, and took the key with me. I returned a little after eight o'clock, and found the key on the bannisters as before, and found the stable-door locked as I had left it. I unlocked it, and observed nothing at first; but having occasion to go out to market, I went to a little box which stood on the table and missed it. I thought my husband had returned. I went into the adjoining room, and found his box taken off the table and put on the bed, opened, and all his clothes and mine gone - it had not been locked. I did not miss the knife till it was produced to me.

CHARLES REEVES . I am beadle of St. George, Hanover-square. On the 4th of February, about a quarter past three o'clock in the afternoon, I apprehended the prisoner in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square, and took him to Mount-street watch-house, searched him, and found a knife on

him, which the prosecutrix claimed, and on the Saturday following, I asked him where he lived; he said he had no place of residence. I asked where he slept the night before I apprehended him; he said no where, for he had no money to pay for his lodging. I found 3 s. 7 d. in his pocket when I took him. I asked where he slept on Monday night; he said, in St. Giles's, but could not tell in what street. On the Thursday following, I heard he had sent a letter by Charles Serjeant, for the prosecutor and prosecutrix to come to him at Tothill-fields. I reported this on Monday at Marlborough-street, and Ballard was sent with the prosecutrix to him; and on the same day I accompanied Ballard to his lodging; we went into the room he had slept in, and found two bundles which contained a coat, three pair of breeches, and a quantity of property claimed by Child.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I was desired by the Magistrate, on the 9th of February, to accompany Mrs. Child to Tothill Fields, to see the prisoner. I said to him

"You have seat for Mr. Child, what have you to say to her." After a little hesitation, he said, he wanted to know what Mrs. Child had to say - what promises she had to make to him. I told him she was not come to make any promise, for she could not be allowed to do any thing of the sort, that she was come in consequence of his having sent for her, and he might say what he liked, and if not, we must go back again, for she could make no promise; he then said he should like to see Mr. Child; we both said he could not come, and if he came, the Magistrate would not allow him to see him, unless I was present; he hesitated a good deal, and repeated again that he should like to see him. I said he could not, and said,

"Do you mean to say anything, if not, we shall go;" after a little hesitation, he asked for pen, ink and paper. I said I had a small memorandum book and pencil, which I gave him, and at the same time told him no promise could be made whatever, his statement must be voluntary; he then wrote in this book (reads)

"That part of the things were at his lodgings, at Mrs. Patterson's, a public-house in Oxford-street, and one coat at a pawnbroker's, named Stonestreet, in Oxford-street" In answer to a question put to him, he told me in what part of the room the things were, and which was his room. I went and enquired where he directed me, and they did not know him by name; but I described his person, and the room he said he lodged in. I was shewn into a bed-room, and found all this property, which I produce, except one coat, which I found by his direction at a clothes shop, at the corner of Chandler-street, and David-street - not a pawnbroker's. I have had the property ever since - it was claimed by Child.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Mrs. Child say she would not prosecute me if I made a confession - A. She said nothing of the kind in my presence, and I was not absent.

MRS. CHILD. Before he was taken to prison, I said if he would confess where the things were, I would not appear against him if I could possibly help it - this was on the 4th of February. I think I said so more than once.

Prisoner. The constable brought me word, that if I would confess where the things were they would not prosecute.

CHARLES REEVRS . I never said any thing of the sort.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, pawnbroker, who was in partnership with Mr. Stonestreet, thirteen months ago. On the 31st of January, in the evening a servant's great coat was pawned. I have no recollection of the prisoner. I cannot speak to the hour, but it is nearly the last thing entered in my book on that day.

NEIL MARTIN . I live at the corner of Chandler-street, Berkley-square. I bought a coat of the prisoner on the night of the robbery, or the night before, I cannot tell which. I heard of the robbery afterwards. I gave it to the constable.

MRS. CHILD. (Looking at the property produced.) This knife was in my bed-room in the morning, for I cleaned it, and all these clothes belong to my husband. Here are four coats, three waistcoats, three pair of breeches, and several other things. I would not sell them for 5 l., that is a very low value.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Child made me a promise, and I wrote to her on that account.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Of stealing in a dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

Strongly recommended to mercy.

Reference Number: t18240218-23

Before Mr. Justice Best.

456. SAMUEL BRIGGS was indicted for burglariouly breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Hampton , about seven o'clock in the night of the 26th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three Bibles, value 15 s.; a watch-stand, value 1 s.; a pinafore, value 3 d.; a work-box, value 2 s.; a piece of lace, value 5 s.; two pin-cushions, value 2 d.; a knife-case, value 2 s.; two umbrellas, value 4 s., and an umbrella case, value 1 d. , his property.

ELIZABETH HAMPTON . I am the wife of James Hampton ; we live in Hare-walk, Hoxton Old Town , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 26th of January, at a little after six o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour - it was quite dark, the window was shut, and the outer shutter put to, but not fastened. I am sure that the sash was down. As the bell was going eight o'clock, my daughter went into the parlour, and called me; I found the window sash open, and thrown up to the top. I went through into the bed-room, which is on the same floor, to see if any one was concealed. My daughter called me, and I missed three Bibles, a knife-case, and a watch-case stand, off the mantle-piece; a work-box, three yards of lace; two pin-cushions, two umbrellas, which hung on the parlour door, and a pinafore, marked A. H. I found nobody in the house. Frost, the officer, brought me the three Bibles and pinafore.

Cross-examined by MR. BARNARD. Q. You did not notice whether the property was safe that night - A. I saw the watch-case stand on the shelf - I did not see the other things, not taking notice.

ANN HAMPTON . I am the daughter of the prosecutrix. I was in the parlour between twelve and one o'clock; the windows were then shut; I did not notice the Bibles. I saw all the property safe between ten and eleven in the morning. I went into the parlour in the evening, and missed the knife-case, work-box, and time-piece stand. The sash was up, and the shutters partly open.

THOMAS HAMPTON . I am twelve years old. If I swear false I shall go to hell. Between six and seven o'clock on this evening, I went into the parlour, and the Bibles

were there, and everything was right - the window was shut. I went into the room after eight, and it was open.

JOHN FROST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 26th of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner passed me in the Curtain-road, with a bundle under his arm, about half a mile from the prosecutor's. I asked what he was carrying, he said some books, which he had brought from his father - it was three Bibles. I asked where his father lived, he said in Edward-street, Commercial-road. I took him into custody, and then he said he had brought them from nowhere - the watch-stand fell from his person. He afterwards said two men met him at the top of the Curtain-road, and gave him the bundle to carry, and that each of them were carrying an umbrella. I said I should take him to the public-house and search him, which I did, and found some duplicates on him, and a pinafore in his hat.

Cross-examined. Q. He said each of the men were carrying umbrellas - A. Yes; and that they were on the other side of the way.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer. I was on one side of the road, and Frost on the other - I crossed over, and saw the prisoner push this watch-stand through the rails into an area - it fell down and broke. Frost found the pinafore in his hat. The prosecutrix's house is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

ELIZABETH HAMPTON . This property is all ours - my name is written in the Bibles.

The prisoner made no defence, but received a good character from four witnesses.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18240218-24

Before Mr. Justice Best.

457. JOSEPH THOMSON , WILLIAM THOMSON , and JAMES THOMSON . were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , at St. George, Hanover-square , a dirk, value 3 l.; a necklace, value 60 l.; a snuff-box, value 2 l.; a card-case, value 30 s.; two china images, value 5 s.; a how, with glass feathers, value 2 s.; twelve shifts, value 1 l.; a piece of lace, value 5 l.; a coat, value 10 s.; a pair of breeches, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 6 s.; and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Potter Macqueen , Esq. in his lodging-room .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS POTTER MACQUEEN , Esq. M. P. My town-house is at No. 18, Park-lane , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. I left town on the 4th of November last; before that I locked up several valuable articles in different wardrobes on the second floor of my house. I came to town in December, and saw all the property safe on the 13th of December, where I had placed it. Some repairs were to be done in the breakfast-room, in which part of the articles were; the others were in a room adjoining, and all were under lock and key. My jewell-case was in a third room, in which no repairs whatever were going on; the jewel-case contained a pearl necklace. The prisoners were at work at the house - they had the key of the two rooms, but not of the third. I left two female servants in care of the house; the dirk was in one of the wardrobes in the breakfast room, and my clothes were in another wardrobe in the same room - the wardrobes have a drawer in the centre for papers; these two centre drawers have better locks than the doors; my snuff-box was in the upper division of the same wardrobe as the dirk - the lace and ladies clothes were, I believe, in the bed-room. I employed Mr. Hudson, a builder of respectability to do the repairs. I left town on the 18th of December - returned on the 15th of January, and on Saturday, the 17th, I had occasion to unlock my writing-desk, and found the key go stiff. I unlocked the desk, but could not relock it, but had no suspicion. I took no more notice of it on that day, but on Sunday the 18th, in consequence of information, I tried the lower part of the wardrobe, where the dirk was, but could not open the lock, I then tried the upper part, in which the snuff-box was, opened it, and missed the snuff-box; and hearing that goods to a considerable amount were missing, I sent for an officer, and on further search, found the jewel-case had been forced; the lock was a patent one, and the depredators being unable to force it, had wrenched the lid off; various articles of jewellery were missing, among which was a necklace of seventy-eight large pearls, with a diamond clasp in the centre - the centre diamond was a large, and a remarkable one, yellow, and set in gold; there were fourteen other diamonds in it. I also lost an amethyst and topaz head ornament, a pair of ear-rings, of amethyst and pearl - that is all I missed from the jewel-case. On examining the drawers in the sleeping-room, we found they had been opened, and many of the locks injured; (there were twenty-six locks in all opened.) I then went to the wardrobe, and opened the place were the dirk was, and missed that. I opened the place by force - the lock was immediately taken off, and the bolt had been sprung, by the application of a false key, and could not be opened again, and to that I ascribe the safety of a number of valuable articles which still remained there. I went to the other wardrobe in the same room, and missed a blue dress-coat and from the appearance of the drawer, I am certain other things were taken. I found a remnant of lace severed from the rest of a large piece in the bed-room. I missed a coronation gold medal, two other snuff-boxes, one tortoiseshell and gold, and the other a remarkable tortoiseshell, with a Scotch pebble on the top of it; and next day, in looking over another part of the room, I found the medal and snuffboxes in the drawing-room in a china dish. The value of all that I lost was 7 or 800 l. I have recovered the pearls since. I have received the dirk from Inderwing.

ELIZABETH PARKER . I am in the service of Mr. Macqueen. I was left in the house when he went from town - the three prisoners were employed to paint the breakfast-room, on the ground floor; it looks into Park-lane, and there was a little job in the bedroom - they had nothing to do higher up in the house than that bed-room. One day while they were there, (it was three or four days after they came, or more than that) I went up the back stair-case, to go into the back drawing-room, and found some resistance behind the door - they had no business in that room. I opened the door a little, and somebody pushed it back. I was frightened, and ran away. I went up and mentioned it to Joseph Thompson, and asked him to come down into the drawing-room, and as we came down we met his brother James - he had come up a fight of stairs higher than the

drawing-room - he said he had been into the room by mistake, to look for a crack. I said the crack was in the dining-room, and not there; a young man came to the house once or twice afterwards, and one day, I saw an old man in the house; he asked me which way he should go out. I told him to go out at the front door, and soon afterwards I went up to let my aunt out, and found the door open. I went up to one of the prisoners. I think (Joseph), and asked him who it was that went out - they said their master or governor, or something. I took no notice of any thing else, till master came to town.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. - Q. Who else was at work there - A. Mr. Stubbings and his two sons, and two carpenters, while master was away.

JAMES BASSETT . I am nephew to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Wardour-street. (Looking at the dirk.) On the 18th of December, I took a dirk in pawn exactly resembling this of the prisoner William, for 1 l. 1 s. The duplicate of it was lost; and on the 9th of January he applied for the form of an affidavit of the loss of a duplicate, which I furnished him with. The affidavit was afterwards brought to me by one of the other two prisoners, but I do not know which. I saw William sign the affidavit. The one who brought the affidavit paid me the money, and redeemed the dirk.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You attended to him yourself - A. Partly; I have known him several years, and am certain of him - he brought it in the day time - he came into the boxes. I am not certain of the value of it, but should fancy that I got a good price if I sold it for two guineas, as a fancy article in trade; it might cost ten guineas to make it - I never saw such a thing before. He came for an affidavit on the 9th of January, alone. It is usual to make an affidavit when a duplicate is lost - I produce it: it is sworn before Mr. Conant; one of the other prisoners redeemed it. I have a counter-part of the duplicate. William Thomson is the name I knew him by, and he pawned it in that name. It is common for people to pledge for others.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever in your life see such a stone as the one on the top of this dirk - A. Perhaps not one of that size. I do not know the value.

Q. Could it be made for twenty guineas - A. I am not certain what the stone is.

The affidavit was here read, in which the prisoner William, describing himself as residing in Avery-row, deposed, that he pawned the dirk at Harrison's, and that it was his own property.

DAVID DAVIS . I live at No. 23, Jermyn-street. I bought this dirk about a month ago - the prisoners James and Joseph were together when I bought it. It was on a Monday, about three weeks before I went to Bow-street, about twelve o'clock - I gave them 30 s. for it; one of them had been to my shop and bought a travelling cap, and before he left, asked if I bought anything in the fancy way; he said he had a Scotch dirk, that he bought at the time he was in Scotland, and was of no use to him now, and three or four days afterwards he brought it; I gave 30 s. for it, and sold it to a person who came from Norwich, for 2 l, on the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you taken into custody - A. No. I did not know the value of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have the goodness to tell me the day of the month - A. It was about three weeks before I went to Bow-street, which was last Saturday week.

MR. MACQUEEN. This is my dirk; the chasing and binding have been taken off - it is an old family one; in 1816, I sent it to Edinburgh to have it ornamented - I paid for the ornaments and a pair of buttons, 39 l. odd. I can conscientiously swear that it is worth five guineas. I believe if I went to buy one, I should he asked five guineas for a common one, without the carmagoran ornaments.

WM. HAWKINS. I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 72, Wardour-street, with my father, and know the prisoners. One day since Christmas, Joseph Thomson sent me to Mr. Rochford's in Brewer-street, to pawn a new coat; it was rather of an old fashioned make; I should know it again - it was about Christmas. I pawned it for a guinea, in the name of Roys; nobody told me to pawn it in that name. I gave Joseph Thomson the money in Little Windmill-street - James Thomson was present. (Looking at a coat,) this is the coat - it was given to me at a house in Little Windmill-street. I believe James was present when it was given to me, but when I returned he was in the shop; I called Joseph out; they both came out - I gave Joseph the money, and he divided it with his brother James, and gave me 1 s. The money was a sovereign and some halfpence; Joseph gave James his share out of his pocket. I had some pawnbrokers' duplicates from Joseph Thomson since that; he gave me one which I destroyed. I saw Joseph with a carved tortoiseshell snuff-box in his possession; (looking at one,) I know this to be it by the coat-of-arms inside it; I went with him when he had it as far as Vinegar-yard, and he went into a Jew's shop - I saw him next day, and he told me he had sold the snuffbox for 30 s. I heard James mention once in a public-house, that he had sold a chain or necklace in King-street, and passed himself for a jeweller, but he did not say which King-street, or the person's name.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you in employment - A. I work with my father. I have had situations at different times; I live by trade, but have been with my father for many months. I had the coat in my possession about five minutes. I looked at it, and noticed its curions make. I saw it again at Bow-street, about three weeks after; there was a warrant issued for me; I was in custody from Saturday till Monday morning, and then gave this account to the Magistrate.

Q. Do you mean to say that you have worked at your trade, and got your living honestly for the last six months - A. Yes. I have known the prisoners three months; not more than four. The conversation about the necklace was at the Fleece, public-house, Windmill-street - nobody but myself was present with them. I mentioned it to nobody till I was taken.

COURT. Q. You was in custody a whole day before you made a disclosure, why not make it immediately you were taken - A. I thought it best not to make it till I was before the Magistrate. I told all I knew at the first examination. I never was at Mr. Macqueen's house, nor did I know that they were at work there.

MOSES SOLOMON . I live at No. 6, Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane. The prisoner Joseph brought a card-case and snuffbox to my shop to sell; it was the snuff-box produced,

and this is the card-case, (looking at one;) he brought them on the 4th of January, and left them to be sold on commission. I sold the snuff-box to Mr. Hawley, for 2 l. 10 s., and the card-case to Mr. Fox, of Regent-street, for 2 l. Joseph told me he had brought them from India. I gave him the money, and received 1 l. commission.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you know him before - A. No.

MR. MACQUEEN. The coat is mine; the snuff-box has my arms in it, and was made in China for me, and the card-case is mine; they were both presents.

WILLIAM GROSER . I am shopman to Mr. Carnegie, No. 57, King-street, Soho, a refiner and dealer in stones. I saw the prisoner James at our shop with a pearl necklace, with a diamond snap; I did not have it in my hand. The pearls were about the size of a cherry-stone; (looking at some,) they were about this size; the snap had a good many diamonds in it. I saw Mr. Carnegie take them out; there were several; I do not know what he did with them - they were weighed; he sold them to Mr. Carnegie: I left the place before the money was paid - he was to give him 3 l. per carat. I do not know what they weighed.

Q. What was done with the gold they were set in - A. I do not know. I saw the pearls afterwards in Mr. Carnegie's possession - I do not know what became of them. Mr. Carnegie has a crucible.

Q. Which is generally warm - A. No. We put the gold together, and melt it in a week or a month; this gold was melted in a lot, I dare say.

Q. Do not you know that it was - A. Not that identical gold.

Q. Was not this melted within two hours - A. No.

Q. Within twelve - A. I cannot say. I do not know what the pearls are worth.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was anybody present but you and your honest master - A. No. My master was apprehended and taken to Bow-street. The pearls were brought to us in the form of a necklace, in the evening, after dark. I think the prisoner separated them. I had seen him once or twice before.

COURT. Q. How long before that had he been at your shop - A. Perhaps a month before; it was only James; he brought some hits of gold, and old jewellery. I do not know what sort.

CHARLES CARNEGIE . I live at No. 57, King-street, Soho, and am a dealer in gold and silver. I buy diamonds and pearls, and anything in the jewellery way - I melt gold and part a little, but do not refine. I have been in the house about twenty-two years. The prisoner James has been to my house three times as well as I can recollect; he always said he bought the things which he came to sell - he has brought in little his of gold and silver, and a pair of broken ear-rings - I bought a pearl necklace with a diamond snap of him; the snap contained better than three carats of diamonds; the center one was larger than the rest, and a very discoloured, a very dark one. I took them all at 3 l. a carat. I paid him for the gold they were set in, and melted it.

Q. How soon after did you melt it - A. It might be eight days; I bought them on the 26th of December. I may have melted them within four days after, on perhaps a fortnight; he asked 2 s. each, for the pearls, which I gave him.

Q. What is the lowest value of them - A. I cannot say, for I never had to do with such large ones - we have them at 1 d. and 2 s. each. I have bought some at 4 s. 6 d. and 5 s.

Q. Have you any doubt that they were worth 15 s. each - A. When they were new they might; I should think the fair trading price now would be 15 s. each. There were seventy-eight of them.

Q. You gave 2 s. each for them - A. Yes; but I did not set the price; he shewed me an amethyst center of a brooch or necklace, but I did not buy it, and I think he shewed me something of a painting. I cleaned the diamonds, and put them into my diamond boxes.

Q. What became of them - A. The officer has the largest ones mixed with my own; the small ones are sold.

Q. For how much per carat - A. Five pounds.

Q. They are not so valuable as the large ones - A. Yes; for the large ones were discoloured.

Q. When this matter was talked about what was done with the pearls - A. My wife took them to her mother's at Westminster, and afterwards sent the servant to fetch them - they were brought back to my house, and given up.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you ever tried here - A. Never. The moment the solicitor for the prosecution came to me I acknowledged that I had bought them.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I have had the property produced in my possession ever since it was brought in Bow-street. I got the snuff-box from Holles, and the card-case from one Nathan, whom Fox had sold it so. Carnegie gave me up the pearls, and two diamonds; the center one and a small one.

MR. MACQUEEN. I cannot swear to the diamonds - the large one appears precisely the same as the center one; the pearls are about the size and quality of those composing the necklace.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am a copper-plate printer, and live in Rupert-street. I know all the prisoners. James Thomson gave me a bunch of keys, a bow, and three glass feathers, and told me to give them to Mr. Beer, who keeps a book-shop in Little Windmill-street; (looking at the keys.) these are what he gave me. I saw him give Beer a few china images a few days after; it was about six weeks ago.

JOHN BEER. I am a bookseller. Osborne gave me the keys and feathers - James Thomson gave me the images and a piece of lace, to keep for him for a day as two - it was six weeks or two months ago.

MR. MACQUEEN. These glass feathers belong to High-land cap of mine; the cap was in a cap-case, in my bedroom, with three feathers of this kind. I found the plumage all cut away, and merely the cap left. I produce the cap, the bow, and the feathers fixed to; it now five the cap.

MARY THOMSON . I am the prisoners' sister. My brother Joseph employed me to pawn some ladies up parel, and to bring the money to him.

The prisoners made no Defence. Ten witness's deposed to

the good Character of the prisoner Joseph; eighteen to that of William, and eleven for James.

JAMES THOMSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

WILLIAM THOMSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

JOSEPH THOMSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury on account of their youth, and good characters .

Reference Number: t18240218-25

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

458. JAMES JONES was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Tipple , on the night of the 17th of January , with intent to steal, and stealing 68 lbs. of butter, value 30 s., and a tin dish, value 1 s. her property.

MARY TIPPLE . I live at Hoxton-town , in the house of my mother-in-law, whose name is Elizabeth Tipple - we farm the poor . The prisoner was a pauper in the house, and had leave of absence on the 17th of January, till half-past nine o'clock at night. I do not know whether he came back at that time, but he was at home at half-past eight next morning, and about nine that morning. I observed the bars of the cellar window broken open - they were safe the morning before, as I had ordered the prisoner to cover them with straw to prevent the pipes from freezing - the back of the cellar door was also forced open. I missed a firkin of butter on the 19th, and a tin dish on the 20th; the butter was worth 39 s.

FRANCES PERRY . I keep the Crooked Billet public-house, at Hoxton. On the 17th of January, at half-past nine o'clock at night the prisoner came in and staid till ten minutes to twelve.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I live at Hoxton workhouse, at Mrs. Tipple's. On the 20th I pulled a tub out from under a spare bed, and found a saucepan full of butter under the bed. I had seen the prisoner scraping gum on that bed.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 24th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner passed me in Goswell-street, with a bundle, I asked what he was carrying - he said, butter. I took him into a public-house, and asked him how he came by it - he said his brother-in-law, who lived near Cambridge-heath, gave it to him - he did not know the name of the street, or number of the house, but his name was Chiswick; that his brother-in-law had left Mr. Tucker, his master, about a fortnight ago, and he gave him a tub of butter, a cask of ale, and a sack of coke. I locked him up, and at eleven o'clock went to him - he said,

"Now I will tell you the truth," and said voluntarily, that if I would go to Tipple's, I should hear all about it, that he got it from there. I found some pieces of gum among the butter, which was in a tin dish.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I was with Lines - his account is correct. I did not hear the confession.

MARY TIPPLE . I missed the butter on the 19th; the dish it is in is of the same size that we lost. I gave him three pounds of gum to pick.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . - Confined Three months .

Reference Number: t18240218-26

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

459. ALEXANDER LESAGE was indicted, for feloniously assaulting Jane Robinson , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, two shirts, value 6 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s., and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the goods of Richard Robinson .

JANE ROBINSON . I am thirteen years old. (the witness upon being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.) My father lives at Bow. On the 11th of February I was coming from Cambridge-heath , with my brother's linen. The prisoner met me as I came down the lane, and he caught me round the waist, and held me tight, and lifted me up. I saw nobody else near at that time. I was frightened - he said, be d - d if he would not kill me. I cried out - he pulled my bundle out of my hand, and as he saw some people runing across the field - he dropped it. I picked it up, ran home and told my mother - he had not got far off when he dropped it - he met me.

MARTHA ROBINSON . On the 11th of February, I sent my daughter to fetch my son's linen, about eight o'clock in the morning - she returned about ten, very much frightened, and told me what had happened.

JOSEPH AYLWARD . On the 11th of February I was at work near Mile-end, and heard this girl scream out - she was in a field. I looked round for a few moments, and saw the prisoner walking along the lane; the girl was then out of sight; the field comes into the lane - she had got from the lane into the field when I saw her. I went up to the prisoner - he did not resist - the girl's father was with me - he asked what we took him for - we told him for stopping a little girl; he said he was innocent, for he never saw her.

Q. You said before the Magistrate, that you saw him on the bank at first - A. It was by the side of the lane, and then he went into the lane, and stood still till we came up to him.

Q. You said before the Magistrate, that he ran, and you ran after him - A. I did not see him run; he ran a little when we first hallooed to him - he stopped before we took him.

RICHARD ROBINSON . On the 11th, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, my sister came to me at Cambridge-heath. I gave her my dirty things; the lane she was stopped in, is in her way home.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a constable. I was fetched, and took the prisoner, and received the bundle; the girl saw him, and said he was the person.

JANE ROBINSON . I am quite sure he is the man. I saw him when he was brought to my mother's house; he stopped me in the lane, just before I got into the field.

Prisoner's Defence. The child is entirely wrong, you may depend upon it, for I never recollect seeing her. I never ran, I declare. I heard him halloo, and asked what was the matter.

JOSEPH AYLWARD re-examined. When I heard the scream I saw the girl, and soon after saw the prisoner, and could see no other man in the field or in the lane; he was about one hundred and fifty yards from the girl; there are high banks to the lane, a tall man could hide himself behind them, if he stood upright, for they are six feet high.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-27

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

460. HENRY BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 240 halfpence , the monies of John Maberly .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-28

461. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing on the 12th of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Joshua Stranger , from his person .

JOSHUA STRANGER . I am a warehouseman , and live in Cheapside. On the 12th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Newgate-street , walking with a gentleman, and felt my handkerchief taken from my coat-pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner standing about two yards from me. I seized him, and found it concealed in his coat - he said nothing.

JOHN JACKSON . I am an officer, and took him in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have neither father, mother, nor friends.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-29

462. JOHN BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 3 d.; a shirt, value 1 s. 3 d.; an apron, value 1 s. 8 d.; and a pair of stockings, value 9 d., the goods of John Mersh , from the person of Elizabeth Mersh .

ELIZABETH MERSH . I am the wife of John Mersh . On the 24th of January, just after nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Jewin-street , and had a bundle containing these things. I observed the prisoner looking at me - he was standing still - I passed him, and when I came to the end of Well-street , he came upon me, forcibly snatched the bundle, and ran away with it down Well-street. I screamed out, and he was taken - the bundle was brought back. I swear that he is the man. I was frightened, and fainted away in the street, and was taken home.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was there anything strange in his looking at you - A. I thought he was looking at my bundle - it was very dark, and I thought he seemed to follow me - the street was lighted with gas. I never saw him before, but I knew him again by the light when he took my bundle, and I saw him running nearly to the end of Well-street with it. My fright was so great I cannot say whether I saw his face for a minute or less.

CHARLES HARVEY . I am a porter. I was in Bartholomew-close, about two hundred yards from Jewin-street, about nine o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - turned round, saw the prisoner running very fast, and stopped him. The people came up; I asked if he had done any thing, but could not hear that he had. I brought him down to Jewin-street, and let him go; and in a quarter of an hour after, as I was passing Cripplegate watch-house, I heard a man was in custody, went in, and found it was him.

Cross-examined. Q. How long did you see him before you let him go - A. About five minutes - I caught him under a lamp.

JOSEPH PAGE . I am a patrol. On the night in question I heard a cry of Stop thief! about a quarter past nine o'clock, in Fore-street, and found the prisoner stopped in Whitecross-street, and took him to the watch-house. I found the prosecutrix at a house at the corner of Well-street, and directly she came to the watch-house she said,

"That is the man who robbed me of my bundle."

JOHN BARNES . I was officer of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. Page brought the prosecutrix and bundle in; she said the prisoner was the man who had robbed her - she was perfectly sober.

ELIZABETH MERSH . This is my bundle, and contains my property. Somebody in the mob brought it to the watch-house about half an hour after I lost it, it was a man who lives at the Red Lion.

JURY to HARVEY. Q. You took him in Bartholomew-close - A. Yes; he ran from Well-street towards the Close - I was coming through Queen-square - he was running behind me from the opening in the Close - he must have come from Well-street to Westmoreland-buildings, and round to Queen-square. I stopped him a little after nine o'clock.

JOSEPH PAGE . It was not quite half-past nine o'clock when I took him near the Prison; he was then running from Fore-street, and a mob after him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-30

463. WILLIAM HAMMOND and JAMES STEWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Simons , from his person .

JAMES STAINTON . I am an officer. On the 26th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Smithfield-market on duty, with Hawkins, and saw the prisoners, in company with another, following the prosecutor. I watched them, and came close behind them; the one who has escaped, and Steward, were both endeavouring to pick Mr. Simons's pocket; the one who got off drew the handkerchief from Mr. Simons's pocket, put it behind him to Hammond, and said,

"Take it - take it!" He took it, and I took him with it in his hand. The gentleman turned round and claimed it.

Prisoner STEWARD. Q. I was not within four yards of the gentleman - A. He was close to the gentleman at the time it was taken.

MR. ROBERT SIMONS . I am a wine-merchant. I was in Smithfield, and had a handkerchief in my pocket. I did not feel it taken, but heard a noise, turned round, and found the prisoner in custody close to me with it.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am an officer. I stood on two or three steps, and saw these three boys following the prosecutor; they passed me; I desired Stainton to watch them. I followed them, and took Steward. They were all three in company.

HAMMOND'S Defence. The market was crowded - a lad picked the gentleman's pocket, and threw the handkerchief on me; I put my hand to take it off again, and the officer took it from me.

STEWARD'S Defence. I was going through the market; the officer laid hold of me, and said I had picked the gentleman's pocket.

HAMMOND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

STEWARD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-31

464. SARAH FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a handkerchief, value 15 d., the goods of Robert Woodcock , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240218-32

465. ISAAC BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 9 1/2 lbs. of fat, value 2 s. , the goods of William Sack , the elder , and William Sack , the younger , to whom he was servant .

WILLIAM SACK , SEN. I am a carcase butcher , at Newgate-market, in partnership with my son William; the prisoner was our servant, employed to kill sheep at so much a head . On the 5th of February, I was coming out of a public-house, and saw him with an apron under his arm, about thirty yards from the slaughter-house. I followed him into the market, and asked what he had there - he said, nothing belonging to me. I brought him back, opened his apron, and found 5 lbs. of fat in it. I said,

"Isaac, after what I told you last week, I shall send for an officer." He said it was the first he had stolen. The officer came, and then he pulled out 4 1/2 lbs. more from his pocket. I went to the slaughter-house, and missed two cauls of fat, which was the quantity found upon him.

HENRY HONEY . I am an officer - I was sent for. The prisoner pulled a quantity of fat out of each of his pockets, and said it was done through distress, and it was the first time.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240218-33

466. DAVID PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s., and a shirt, value 1 s. , the goods of James Smales .

JAMES SMALES . I belong to the brig Matilda , of Yarmouth. On the 10th of February, I was in town - the prisoner belonged to the ship . I went ashore about six o'clock, leaving these things in my trunk, which was nailed up. I returned at ten o'clock, and found it broken and the property gone. I found them next morning at the Unicorn, public-house, Tooley-street - the prisoner had gone ashore before me.

Prisoner. Q. You used to lend me things - A. Yes; but I nailed these up in my chest, just before I went ashore, as I knew he was going to leave the vessel.

JAMES WHITE . On the 11th, I was called on board the Matilda, and took the prisoner; he said he had left the things at the Unicorn.

MARY ANNE SENIER . I keep the Unicorn, public-house. On the 10th of February, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner brought the bundle in and asked for a bed. I said he could not have one - he asked me to lend him 5 s., for him and another sailor (who was with him) to get a bed. I lent him 5 s. on this bundle as a deposit.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-34

467. JAMES LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , twenty-nine shawl handkerchiefs, value 20 s. , the goods of John Medhurst .

JOHN RICKETTS . I am a City toll collector. On the 11th of February, about half-past five o'clock, I was in Red Cross-street , and saw the prisoner walking backward and forward before Mr. Medhurst's shop; he went to the pump for some water, then came to the shop, and took these handkerchiefs, which hung outside the door; he went away about half a yard, when I took him with them, and pushed him into the shop; he said

"Oh dear."

Prisoner. Q. Did I move at all - A. Yes. I did not see him take them down, but when I saw him, he was picking them up.

THOMAS CHARLTON . I am shopman to John Medhurst ; a boy came and gave me information, and in about five minutes the prisoner was pushed into the shop, and the handkerchiefs taken from him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I was going to buy them - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-35

468. MARY ANN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , six sovereigns, and sixteen shillings, the monies of William Jameson , from his person .

WILLIAM JAMESON . I am a mariner , and belong to the Seringapatam . I was discharged at Bristol, and arrived at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street, on the 14th of February, and at seven o'clock I came out, and met the prisoner with another woman in Gracechurch-street, after nine o'clock - I was sober. I accosted her; she took me to a house in Still-alley . I retired with the other girl; the prisoner went into another room with an old man. I had hardly got to bed before she came and crept under the bed. I had a light in the room, heard somebody under the bed, jumped out, and caught her by the neck; my trowsers were drawn off the bed, and my pocket torn out of them. I took hold of a knife, and said

"Deliver it up, or I will cut your block off," and she gave me my pocket, there was a sovereign and 16 s. in it. I said I had lost more, but if she would give me half I would give her the rest. When I left the Cross Keys, I had six sovereigns and 16 s. loose in my breeches pocket. I had spoken to nobody else - a sovereign was found on her at the watch-house. I detained the other woman, but she slipped away.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Had not the keeper of the house been in the room - A. I do not know. I was sober.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am inspector of the watch. About half-past ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; the prosecutor gave the account he has now, and appeared sober. I found a sovereign in her hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Another woman had been in his company - A. Yes. I went to the house and found it shut up, the people have left it.

JOHN SAUNDRY . I am a watchman. The prosecutor came to me, and said he was robbed. I went to the house, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and a sovereign found in her hand.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman gave me the sovereign.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-36

469. JOHN HAMBIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , seven sovereigns; six shillings; a warrant for payment of and value 10 l. 19 s.; a 10 l. and a 5 l. Bank notes , the property of George Anderson , to whom he was servant .

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am a stationer , and live in Bull-alley,

Lombard-street; the prisoner was my errand boy . On Tuesday, the 13th of January, I gave him a 10 l. and a 5 l. Bank note, seven sovereigns, 6 s. and a cheque upon Messrs. Barclay for 10 l. 19 s. to take up a bill which laid there due on that day. When he was gone, I found I had given him 9 d. short, and waited his return, and not coming in a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes. I went to the banker's saw Mr. Smith, and found the bill unpaid. I went to his brother-in-law's, where he lodged, but could not find him; but on the Monday following, I found him at Portsmouth, and asked why he had absconded with the money, if I had used him ill; he said voluntarily that I was a very good master; he could say nothing for himself, and was very sorry for what he had done - the 10 l. note was stopped at the Bank. I found a boy in town whom I understood he was acquainted with - he behaved well. I believe it to be his first offence.

JAMES SMITH . I went to Messrs. Barclay's. I do not know whether the prisoner came to the banking-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad who persuaded me to go with him; we had agreed a week before, that whoever had money first from our master, we would go off with it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-37

470. HENRY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , eighteen sovereigns , the property of John Perring Field , his master .

JOHN PERRING FIELD . I am a grocer , and live in Charlotte-terrace, New-cut, Lambeth; the prisoner was my shop-man . On the 1st of January, I gave him eighteen sovereigns to pay to Mr. Walker, of Cannon-street, on my account; he absconded, but came to me in about a fortnight, saying, he had disposed of all the money; that he unfortunately met a female, with whom he spent nine sovereigns of it, and was very sorry for it; he said he thought the female had robbed him of part of the rest, as he was in liquor. I had a very good character with him, and believe he has been misled; he bears a most excellent character, and I believe it to be his first offence.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What wages had he - A. Twenty pounds a year. He said he would work it out, and do all he could to recompence me. I will take him into my employ again.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a wholesale grocer. I never received this money from the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-38

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

471. CHARLES MUSGRAVE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , a fender, value 8 s. , the goods of Richard Priestley .

RICHARD PRIESTLEY . I am a broker , and live in Adam and Eve-court, Oxford-street . On the 30th of January, about nine o'clock, I put a fender outside the door, and missed it about ten. I met the prisoner in three quarters of an hour, with it, in Charlotte-street; nearly a quarter of a mile from the house; he said I was quite mistaken, that it was his property - he walked a little way with me, then threw it down, and scuffled with me. The constable came, and took him, and I picked it up.

JOHN WEEKS . I am a constable. I stopped him in George-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry to say that it is true - but I was distressed, and out of employ for eighteen months; it laid outside the door. I was reduced to great distress, having lost all my money in the public line.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-39

472. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , two cushions, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas George Kipps .

JOHN WILKINS . I am servant to Thomas George Kipps , coach-maker , Great Mary-le-bone-street . On the 17th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was shutting up the shop, and saw the prisoner pass down the mews, which is no thoroughfare; a chaise of my master's stood there. I went down to it, found the cushions unbuckled, and put into the body of the chaise; I watched and saw him come into the mews again, and come out in a minute with the cushions under his arm, and took them from him twelve yards from the chaise.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a watchman. I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and took them to lay on, meaning to sleep in the mews.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-40

473. JOHN HAMER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , twenty-two yards of calico, value 7 s. , the goods of John Green .

JOHN GREEN . I am a linen-draper , and live in Coppice-row, Clerkenwell . On the 5th of February, about a quarter to six o'clock, I had just come home, and was stooping to pick my handkerchief up; a neighbour came in, and alarmed me. I missed a piece of calico, which hung inside the door a minute before; I ran out, and met the witness, who directed me towards Clerkenwell-green, where I saw the prisoner standing with his brother, who kept a stall there; I asked if they had seen any one with the calico - the brother said No. Somebody said,

"That is him;" the prisoner then said,

"I shall go home." I followed and asked if he had seen any one with the calico; he said No. Gray said,

"That man stole it," and I secured him - a child came up, and said he had put it under his brother's stall. We found it there in a bag.

WILLIAM GRAY . I was in Coppice-row, and saw the prisoner leave Mr. Green's door with the calico under his arm. I followed, and told Green which way he went, and afterwards saw him at his brother's stall, and said he was the man; it was found under the stall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-41

473. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a dress, value 3 s., and a cloak, value 10 s. , the goods of John Oram .

JOHN ORAM . I am a chaser , and live in Manchester-buildings, Westminster . On the 14th of February, I lost a cloak and dress from my first floor room, and found them on the step of the door. The window was not fastened.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREDERICK ORAM . I am the prosecutor's nephew. I was going out about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the cloak on the step of the door. I fetched a light, heard a noise above, and saw the prisoner sitting on the leads over the door; I told him to come down, and secured him. He could get out of the window on to the leads; I did not notice whether it was open - there is a lamp post near the window.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-42

474. WILLIAM HOWE and HENRY BULL were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , two pairs of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Poole .

THOMAS POOLE . I am a haberdasher , and live in Clement's Inn-passage. These stockings are mine.

CHARLES BUNNING . I am shopman to Mr. Poole. I hung these stockings over the door, about eight o'clock, and about half-past nine o'clock. I was sitting in the back-room, and saw them move; came out, and saw the two prisoners in company, about twenty yards off; they separated. I missed the stockings, went after them, and found one pair on Howe - Bull came into the shop, and was secured, and on being charged with it, said he had thrown the other pair away.

JOHN SCOTT . I am an officer. Bull said he had thrown one pair away.

HOWE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

BULL - NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Best.

Reference Number: t18240218-43

475. JOHN ADAMS HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , at St. Martin in the fields , a watch, value 2 l.; a gold chain, value 1 l.; two gold seals, value 1 l., and a watch key, value 3 s., the goods of William Tuck , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM TUCK . I am a salesman , and rent a house in Castle-street, Leicester-square, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On Saturday evening, the 7th of February, between seven and eight o'clock. the prisoner came and asked to look at a hunting watch, which hung in the window; I shewed him two - he did not approve of either, and asked to see one which hung in the window with a gold chain and two seals attached to it; I shewed it to him - he said he had a friend who would come and look at it, and if he approved of it, he would pay 1 l, of the amount. He went away, returned in an hour and a half, and asked if his friend had been, and desired me to shew him the watch again - he held it in his hand some time, and suddenly threw a quantity of snuff into my face, and ran out of the house with the watch and seals; he ran down Castle-street, and I after him; he stumbled and fell. I saw some person pick him up. I went back to look for the watch, as I saw his arm move, and thought I saw him throw it down; some person in the crowd picked it up; it was taken to the watch-house, and returned to me at Bow-street - I am sure it is the watch I shewed him; but the two gold seals, a key, and part of the chain are gone. I am sure he is the man - he was half an hour with me the first time. The value of the watch, chain, and seals is full 4 l.; I would not take that for them.

THOMAS HODNETT . I am a tailor. I was passing the prosecutor's shop, saw the prisoner come out, and the prosecutor follow him, calling Stop thief! He fell, and I secured him, and am certain of his person.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a watchman. The prisoner was stopped, and I took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I solemnly declare, with a clear conscience, I am as innocent of this charge as one who never saw London, and I am as positive as the persons who prosecute me, however positive that they may feel that I am the person. I was in company with some persons from half-past seven o'clock, until a quarter to ten; and scarcely had left one of the party, when I proceeded down Castle-street, towards the Haymarket, and on hearing the cry behind me, of Stop thief! I was in the act of turning round, and was knocked down by a man that was in full speed; he passed on, and I imagined he entered a public-house, and about one minute afterwards, I was picked up by some people, and conveyed to the watch-house, where I was charged with this. It was not until the next morning that I was sensible of the nature of the charge, because at the time I was knocked down, I was nearly intoxicated, which together with the effects of the fall, rendered me quite insensible for a time; but should I be convicted of this shameful charge, I hope your Lordship will in pity sake, send me out of the country, where I can reap unmolested, the benefits arising from industry - for believe me, my Lord, was I found guilty of this false charge, and the gates of this prison thrown open to me, it would be constant misery to me, for all my prospects in this country are blasted.

WILLIAM TUCK . I understand he bears a good character. I am sure he is the man - I noticed a black mark on his thumb, made with aquafortis in making buttons; he is a button maker. He came at first about eight o'clock, and the second time nearly at ten.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury .

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

Reference Number: t18240218-44

476. JOHN WILLIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Nicholas , about eight o'clock in the forenoon of the 23d of January , at St. Margaret, Westminster , (he and others being therein), and stealing therein sixteen yards of calico, value 10 s. , his property.

GEORGE NICHOLAS . I live in Parliament-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster, and sleep at the house. On the 23d of January, I was informed that I had been robbed, and found the prisoner at the office, with this calico, which is mine.

JOHN NARES . I am apprentice to Mr. Nicholas. On the 23d of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in the kitchen, and saw the prisoner put his hand through the cutting room window, which I am

certain was shut at seven o'clock; I did not see him lift it up. I saw him put his hand through the iron bars, and take hold of two pieces of chintz, and some blue calico. I called Stop thief! and he dropped the chintz, and took the calico. I ran out of the front shop door, and met him coming up the court, which the window looks into, with the calico under his arm; he dropped it directly - I called Stop thief; and some people coming along stopped him, without my losing sight of him. I picked it up.

SAMUEL POOL . On 23d of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Parliament-street, and saw the prisoner running towards Charing-cross, with something under his arm, and Nares following him, calling Stop thief! and seeing no one offer to stop him, I ran across the road, and saw him throw the calico down. I met him by the Duke of Richmond's portico, and took him to the office. Another person had hold of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18240218-45

Before Mr. Justice Best.

477. JOHN GLEDE and SAMUEL MOORE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Gavin Turner , about eight o'clock in the night of the 15th of February , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a clothes brush, value 3 s., and a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , his property.

GAVIN TURNER . I live in John-street, Curtain-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and rent the house. On the 15th of February, I and my wife went out together, leaving nobody in the house. I shut the doors and windows, and on returning, about eight o'clock, I opened the door with the key, and found two men in the house; I am positive that Moore is one of them, but cannot speak to the other; both ran away, and I followed them. Moore was stopped without my losing sight of him; the other ran down Charlotte-street, and next morning Glede was taken. I examined the house, and missed a clothes brush and a pair of shoes, which were safe about eleven o'clock in the morning, when we went out. They must have entered the house in front; there were marks of a crow-bar where they had tried to open the door; but it must have been opened by a false key. I saw Moore throw a crow-bar away as he ran. I did not see it picked up.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you sure that you locked the door when you went out - A. I do not know whether my wife, or myself locked it but I tried it, and it was fast. I was not at home after eleven o'clock.

ELIZABETH TURNER . I am the prosecutor's wife - we went out at eleven o'clock; the door was fastened - we always try it, and are very particular with it; we returned about eight o'clock, my husband unlocked the door. I passed him, and the prisoner Glede caught hold of me by the shoulder. I saw them both in the parlour before they touched me - they had no light, but there is a gaslight from a public-house opposite. Glede took me by his two hands, as I was entering the parlour, and shoved me right out of doors. I am certain of him - Moore was behind him; Glede ran out first, and Moore followed. When a light was brought, I found every cupboard-door in the parlour thrown open, and a clothes brush, and pair of shoes taken off the table; there was nothing else down stairs that they could have taken; there was property up stairs. I saw Glede at the watch-house next morning, and knew him. I looked at him quite amazed in the room; the light was strong enough for me to notice his features. I thought at first that it was my brother playing us a trick; we have not found the brush or shoes; there were marks of a crow-bar on the door; it had been opened by a key.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You at first thought it was your brother - A. I did not know what to think; my brother could not get into the house - my back was to the light, and his face towards it. I looked at him, before they moved to go out; they were hid up in a corner ready to run out when the door was open; we have no lodgers.

WILLIAM BEADLE READ. I live in Hoxton-market-place, and am in the prosecutor's service. I was standing near the house, and saw master and mistress come down the street, and open the door. I heard mistress scream, and master call Stop thief! I saw a person run out, and pursued him. I did not see him come out of the door; he was about five yards from it, and got off. I did not see his face, and do not know who he was. I saw him throw something away. I got a lantern, and found a crow-bar in the street, about thirty yards from the house - that was not thrown down by the man who I saw. Next morning I found three skeleton keys at the bottom of Willow-walk, three hundred yards from the house; the man I followed ran by that spot, and threw something from him there; he ran through Willow-walk.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I work for Mr. Turner. I found a phosporus box in Willow-walk, about three hundred yards from the house.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a constable. Turner gave Moore into my charge at ten minutes past eight o'clock. I found nothing nothing upon him. I locked him up, returned to the house, got a light, and went into Willow-walk, and found a dark lantern and phosphorus box, picklock key, and crow-bar, and the other keys were given to me next morning. I tried the crow-bar to the door, it exactly fits the marks, and here is some of the blue paint of the door on it. Next morning I apprehended Glede, in consequence of information, locked him up, and fetched Mrs. Turner, who said in his hearing,

"That's the man" - he said,

"Ma'am don't say it was me; don't swear my life away."

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was he pointed out to her - A. No, only the two prisoners were there; he said he was not the man.

GAVIN TURNER re-examined. A young man took Moore within five minutes; he did not run above two hundred and fifty yards, and was not out of my sight.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner Moore a good character.

MOORE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, as he used no violence .

GLEDE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-46

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

478. JOHN GIBSON , and EDWARD SALT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house

of William Parker , about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 17th of January , at St. Giles in the Fields (he and others therein being) and stealing therein a pistol, value 10 s. , his property.

WILLIAM PARKER . I live in Holborn , in the parish of St. Giles. On the 17th of January I had occasion to look at a pane of glass in my front window, which had been previously cut or started in two directions. I observed one of the pieces of glass almost loosened, but not out, and, just after four o'clock, I observed the two prisoners at the window, and told my servants Freeman and Carpenter. I sent Freeman into Holborn, to stand near the hackney coaches, and told Carpenter to have his eye on the pane of glass; the prisoners separated several times, and came backwards and forwards to the window for nearly half an hour - they then came back together to the broken pane. Carpenter opened the door, and pursued - Salt ran off down Holborn. I went out immediately, and secured Gibson, who ran among the hackney coaches. I brought him into the shop. Carpenter and Freeman immediately brought Salt in with a pistol, which I missed from the window; they were taken to the watch-house, and, on searching, the constable found a knife on Salt; the blade of it fitted the marks made in the window frame - a piece of cork was found in the shop, which fell from one of them; there was a quantity of grease at one end of it; the piece of glass was out of the window, and we could not find it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you lighted candles - A. No. It was between four and five o'clock, and quite light. I was in the shop, and saw them for half an hour - there is a glass case to my window. I have to look through two glasses - my attention was directed to them. I have seen them both before at my window repeatedly, and knew them well. I cannot be mistaken in them; the glass was loose when I looked at it, but not a piece of it was out. I have inquired, and find Salt's mother is a decent woman, and that he bore an honest character.

WILLIAM FOREMAN . I am Mr. Parker's servant. On the 17th of January, I first saw the prisoners standing against the window, lurking about, and having seen them several times before, I suspected them, and stood in the shop nearly twenty minutes looking at them. Master sent me out the back way - I went out to the coach-stand, and in about five minutes saw the arm of the prisoner, Salt, go towards the glass, and directly afterwards Carpenter opened the door and ran out. Salt ran away, and we both pursued; and when he had got near the end of the coach-stand, he threw the pistol away - I saw him swing his arm, but did not see the pistol come from him. I stopped at that spot till Carpenter brought him back to me, and he asked him what he had done with the pistol - he said,

"What pistol? - I have not had any pistol." Carpenter said,

"Don't tell me that, for I saw you take it out." We both looked for it, and found it under a coach, opposite to where he threw his hand out - I took it back to the shop, and gave it to Mr. Parker.

JOHN CARPENTER . I am in Mr. Parker's service. On the 17th of January, about four o'clock, he desired me to watch the window. I saw the prisoners lurking about, to and from the window, for half an hour - they then both came to the window, and I saw Salt push the piece of glass out; he then put his two fingers inside, and lifted a pistol off a peg which it stood on, and took it through the hole in the glass. I then moved from where I stood. Salt ran off, and on opening the door Gibson ran also. I pursued Salt, who was first, running down Holborn; I first came up with Gibson, but did not meddle with him, and after I had passed him he cried out,

"Master, I have got the pistol." I answered,

"I will let you know who has got it;" and when I came within three yards of Salt, he turned his hend and saw me; he put his left hand towards his pocket, and I very distinctly saw him throw the pistol under one of the coaches. I still pursued, and took him about five yards farther, and brought him back. Foreman met me - we found it under the coach, and took it back to the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe the state of the glass before they came up to it - A. Yes; no part of it was out before, but it had been cracked - it was quite daylight.

JAMES ASHTON . I am a constable. I received them in charge, and found a knife on Salt, which I tried on the window where the putty was broken - it matched.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners made no defence, but two persons gave Salt a good character.

GIBSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

SALT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Reference Number: t18240218-47

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

479. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for the wilful murder of James Richardson .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL BRECHETT . I live at Enfield. In June, 1821, I was working for Mr. Paris, of Beech-hill, mowing , with six more men - James Richardson was one of them, and the prisoner another. We dined altogether in the field, about one o'clock, and were all in good humour at dinner - we had a pot of strong beer each. We got up from dinner between one and two, and went across the swath of clover towards our work. Words occurred between Johnson and Richardson - Johnson swore that he had a foot wider swath than Richardson - he said he would lay him 1 s. that he had. They continued walking further across the field - we were nearly all together. Richardson said to Johnson, with an oath, that he would strike him - we all had our scythes; Johnson threw down his, and, with an oath, told him to hit him, if he liked. Richardson still repeated that he would strike Johnson, but I never saw that he did, nor did I see him make any attempt to strike him.

Q. Was there anything to hinder your seeing him if he had - A. No; I was within two poles of him - he possibly might have hit him, but I never saw him - my back was sometimes towards him - I was walking before them sometimes.

Q. After Johnson threw down his scythe, what was next done - A. Richardson still threatened to hit him. Johnson picked up his scythe, and, with an oath, swore he would chop his legs off. He had hold of the handles of his scythe as if he was going to mow, holding it in both hands. He stepped up to him with his scythe as soon as he possibly could pick it up, and said he would chop his legs off.

They stood hesitating together some little time, and then the prisoner struck him with the scythe. Richardson had not got his scythe, he had laid it down.

Q. After Johnson had taken up his scythe, had Richardson used words of any kind to him, and before he struck at Richardson - A. They stood wrangling together - the prisoner struck him with the scythe, and Richardson directly fell backward, and said,

"Oh Lord! Oh dear! - You have killed me!" I ran to Johnson and said,

"Oh Lord! Oh dear! What have you done! - are you not ashamed of yourself?" He said he would serve any man so that meddled with him; he was in a passion at that time. I was so much frightened at seeing the deceased lay bleeding there, that I ran immediately for a horse and cart to carry him away. I was not gone half an hour, and when I returned Johnson was gone - Richardson laid as I had left him; we put him into the cart and took him home. He said he was dying, and died in a few hours. I saw him after he was dead. The prisoner lived near Hadley. I never saw him afterwards till this month, when he was in custody at the Town Hall, Borough.

COURT. Q. Was the deceased a stout young man - A. He was tall and thin, but stouter than the prisoner - the whole cause of the quarrel was about their work - we were all very sober.

Q. Did you observe at any time that Richardson had clenched his fist, as if to strike him - A. No, he threatened him; he said,

"D - n your eyes, I am a good mind to hit you." I did not look at him till I saw Johnson pick up his scythe. I was walking before them; he struck him in the left thigh; the scythe went through one thigh and struck the other.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you know that the man was a quarrelsome fellow, he was a quarreling with you before - A. He quarrelled with me the year before that, but not on this day; they were both very hot tempered resolute men. I have known him quarrel, but there was no quarrel on that day before this circumstance - he was of a hasty temper.

THOMAS AUSTIN . In June, 1821, I was working in Mr. Paris's field, on a Friday, and dined with the men - we were all in a very good humour at dinner, and after that, words occurred between the prisoner and Richardson, about which had got the biggestswath from the ground - I do not know which began it; they kept wrangling, and I left them; but before that, the prisoner asked me to measure the swath, I said I would not, and begged of them to come to work - they still kept wrangling, and I heard Richardson say to Johnson, that if he called him so again, he would knock him down. I did not hear Johnson make any answer. I went on a little farther, and then heard Richardson scream out. I instantly turned round, and saw him lay bleeding on the ground. I went back to him immediately - he was laying flat on his back with his heels up in the air - I do not recollect his speaking. I saw the prisoner at that time, but did not observe what he was doing; the scythe laid on the ground a very little way from Richardson. I asked the prisoner if he was not ashamed of what he had done; he said No, he was not ashamed for he would serve any person so who hit him. I helped afterwards to put Richardson into a cart, and tied five handkerchiefs round the wound on his thigh, before I could staunch the blood; we took him home - he died that afternoon. I did not see Johnson again till he was apprehended; he lived in Enfield parish, and had a wife and children. I have to state that Richardson was certainly a very aggravating, domineering man.

COURT. Q. How far off were you when you heard the scream - A. About twenty yards, or more. I could not see Richardson strike him if he ever did.

WILLIAM MOLES . I was working for Mr. Paris at this time; we finished dinner between one and two o'clock, and were very good friends; but, on the way to our work, words passed between the prisoner and Richardson; they laid a bet, which had the biggest swath. I left them at high words, and was going down the field. I turned my head, and saw Johnson coming down the field with his scythe on his shoulder - he had laid it down to measure their work, when I turned to go away. I turned and saw him with his scythe, and saw the deceased coming after him - he also had his scythe on his shoulder - they were still at high words. I turned round and saw the deceased have his left hand up, with his fist clenched, holding it towards Johnson (he was a left handed man) he was within reach of him - they were almost close together - he was near enough to hit him. I kept my eye on him, and did not see him hit him.

Q. At the time he held up his fist, had Johnson his scythe in his hand - A. Not at that moment, but when Richardson held up his fist, Johnson picked up his scythe, and cut him down. I saw the blood flow from the wound; he fell instantly, and the blood came from his thigh. I heard him say,

"Lord have mercy upon me." I went to fetch the surgeon, and when I came back, he was taken home. I saw him when he was dead.

Prisoner. Q. I think you must have seen him hit me, when he held his fist up - A. I never saw him strike him, only hold up his hand as if to strike him.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it possible for him to hit him, and you not have seen it - A. Not at that instant. I had turned back, hearing them at high words. He might have hit him before I turned back, and I not have seen it.

COURT. Q. When you saw the prisoner cut him down did you speak to him - A. No, my Lord; I ran off for a surgeon.

GEORGE FENNELL . I was working in the field when this happened. We all dined together in good temper, and as we crossed towards the work, words arose between the deceased and prisoner, about which had done the most work. I went on about my business, and began to work at some distance. Johnson came to me soon after, and asked if I had got any money in my pocket - I said I believed I had 4 s.; he asked me to let him have it - I gave it to him, and he went away. I did not know what had happened then - I was twenty or thirty poles from where the quarrel began. The men called to me - I went to them, and found Richardson laying there, bleeding; I helped to put him in the cart, and did not see the prisoner again till he was apprehended this month.

COURT. Q. Did you hear Richardson say anything - A. I cannot exactly say now what he did say, to be sure of it.

Prisoner. I told you what had happened, and you said, if he began with me he must take what followed. - Witness. He did not mention a word to me about it.

Prisoner. I said I had cut Jem Richardson, and did not think he would get over it; and you said, if he began, he must take what followed. - Witness. I do not recollect a word about it.

JAMES WILLIAMS . On a Saturday in this month I met the prisoner in the Borough, near St. Thomas's Hospital, and gave him in charge.

JOHN KINSEY . I am a constable. Williams delivered the prisoner into my charge - I took him to the Borough Compter.

MR. WALTER MORRISON . I am a surgeon. On the 9th of June 1821, I was sent for to see the deceased. I found him wounded in the thigh, about six inches above the knee: the principal wound was a very extensive one in the left thigh - the principal artery was divided; he died between three and four o'clock. His death was occasioned by the division of that artery. The wound was on the side of his thigh, and passed through - it might have been done with a scythe.

Prisoner's Defence. Beckett was the first man who came up to me, and said,

"D - n your eyes, you have killed this man, and I will hang you." He fell on me and knocked me about, and all of them knocked me about. The deceased had been quarrelling all day about mowing, with Austin; and when he challenged to fight me, the row began. He said he would lay me a pot of beer that his work was two feet more than mine - Austin and Beckett measured it, and mine was two feet more. I said,

"Now, Jem, I have won." He said,

"No, you have not; and you shall pay, or I will thrash you." I threw down my scythe, took it up again, and he ran after me and kicked my backside, and then I cut him with the scythe.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18240218-48

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

480. GEORGE BAKER and BENJAMIN COLE were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Yeates , on the night of the 13th of February , and stealing two gallons of Madeira wine, value 3 l.; a pint of Cape white wine, value 1 s.; fourteen glass bottles, value 3 s.; a half-crown, three shillings, a sixpence, 322 penny-pieces, and 362 halfpence , the property of William Yeates and Jacob Yeates .

JACOB YEATES . I am in partnership with my father, William Yeates . We have a warehouse in Cross-lane - neither of us sleep there, nor any of our servants - we are wine-merchants . On the 13th of February, we left the counting-house between seven and nine o'clock. I recollect trying the door when we came out, and found it fast. Between seven and nine next morning I heard of this robbery, and found a cupboard in the counting-house broken open with a crow-bar. I had taken stock on the 6th, and kept the key of the cupboard ever since; there were then nine papers of copper coin, thirteen bottles of Madeira, and five bottles of Cape. I missed thirteen bottles of Madeira and one of Cape, and the copper was all gone.

GEORGE LODGE . I lodge at Miss Cottles, who rents the upper part of these premises. On the night of the 13th I saw the reflection of a light cross my bed-room from Yeates's skylight - I went down stairs, told the watchman, and the prisoners were secured.

JOHN ALLINGHAM . I am a patrol of the Tower Ward. About half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Idol-lane; I was called, and went into Cross-lane, and found a watchman and Mr. Lodge at Yeates's door. I stationed two watchmen at the street-door, while I went to the back of the house; I returned and found the prisoners in custody. Baker was endeavouring to get away, and I secured him. I went into the counting-house, and found that the iron chest had been opened by a key, which was afterwards found at the watch-house. Several bottles of wine were taken down and put into a basket, which had a bladder in it; a 5 s. paper of halfpence, and two skeleton keys, were picked up in a drain in the passage; a dark lantern and crow-bar were found - the largest skeleton key opened the street door; a half-crown and three shillings and sixpence were found in the drain, and a door communicating with the upper part of the house was forced open.

JOHN FITZGERALD . I am a watchman. I secured Baker in the passage, coming from Yeates's counting-house; he said nothing, but wanted to trip me up three or four times; the prisoners had opened the door inside, and we rushed in upon them.

PETER QUIN . I am a watchman. I took Cole in the passage of the house; when the prisoners opened the door we rushed in.

DANIEL JEWSON . I am constable of the night. I produce the wine and money. I found a knife on Baker, and a watch on Cole.

WILLIAM YEATES . The skin has wine on it, and the cork of it is marked M, in my writing.

BAKER - GUILTY. Aged 45.

COLE - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-49

481. GEORGE GOULSBERRY was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with feloniously killing and slaying Sarah Lawrence .

EDWARD RYAN . I am a pensioner, and live on Saffron-hill . The prisoner lived in the same house with me - he and Sarah Lawrence lived in the next room to me, as man and wife. On the 31st of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I heard a noise in their room - I thought it was a table thrown down; I heard bad words pass between them, and then heard something like earthenware breaking - I could not tell whether it was thrown or whether anything fell on it. The prisoner came into my room with nothing on but his shirt, which seemed very wet. He said,

"See how I am used by this drunken woman." She rushed in after him, and said,

"Come out of this room, for here you shall not be," using very coarse language. She was in a great passion, and very much in liquor. Riley and his sick wife were in bed in my room; he said,

"Go out of the room, both of you, and don't disturb my sick wife." She said,

"D - n you and your wife." and took a plate off the table and threw it at him. She would not go out; Riley got up and pushed her out. I observed a little blood on her arms. She went out, brought in two watchmen, and gave charge of the prisoner and Riley. The prisoner was lame, and said he could not walk to the watch-house; he was at last taken there, but the woman being drunk, they would not take the charge. She charged the prisoner and Riley with heating and cutting her.

MARY RYAN . I am wife of the last witness. I heard many bad expressions come from the woman and the prisoner. I said,

"For God's sake leave my room, for I cannot leave my bed;" he had a bad leg. I heard earthenware break, and think that the woman fell on it, but cannot say; the prisoner came into our room; my husband has stated the truth. I said to the woman,

"How have you come by this?" she said,

"It is no matter how it happened, I have got it;" her face was all over blood, her cap off, and her hair hanging down; she kept rubbing her forehead, and said, she had got her death-blow from the chamber-pot; the prisoner said,

"You cannot say, Sarah, that I gave it you - Can you say it was me?" she said,

"No, my dear;" he said,

"Sarah, if you had not drank so much gin, you would not have come home drunk, and fallen over the pot and hurt yourself." She used a very bad expression, and said,

"Never mind, you did not pay for my gin;" she was very much in liquor.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a watchman. On the 31st of January I was sent for: the deceased fetched me between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - she charged the prisoner with ill-using her; there was a cut on her forehead, and the blood running down. I said,

"Which is the man that did it?" she said,

"That is the man," pointing to the prisoner; he said,

"No watchman, I did not throw it at her, she fell on the pot."

JOHN HAINES . I am a watchman. I was present. Watson's account is correct. The woman said that the prisoner had given her her death-blow, and thrown the chamber-pot at her; he said, she fell on it; she said,

"You good for nothing fellow, you know you gave me my death-blow;" he denied it; she went to strike him, but I would not let her - she was not sober.

JOHN ALLPORT . I am surgeon of St. Bartholomew's Hospital; the woman was brought there on Sunday morning, the 31st of January; she had a cut on her forehead, which laid the bone bare. I did not apprehend danger. I told her to come next morning, to have it dressed, but she did not come till Thursday; it was then very much inflamed, erysipelas had spread over her face; she died on the Tuesday week following; the erysipelas caused her death; it often follows wounds, where people have a bad constitution; it commenced first in the wound; if she had lived temperately. I think it would not have come on; my opinion is, that the wound did not cause her death.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the deceased was intoxicated, and had thrown a pot of beer, and the contents of the chamber utensil at him, and, by endeavouring to prevent his leaving the room, she had fallen over it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-50

482. TIMOTHY OLIVER was indicted for embezzlement .

BETTY WEBSTER . I live in Wheatsheaf-yard, Fleet-market. On the 3d of January I paid the prisoner 4 s., on account of Mr. Chillman, his master. I believe it was half-a-crown, a sixpence, and a shilling. I am sure there was a shilling.

RICHARD CHILLMAN . I live in Upper Thames-street; the prisoner was employed by me to carry out coals for four months, and, for sixteen months before; I entrusted him to receive money for me, which he should give me immediately on his return; he never accounted to me for this. I discovered it on the 10th of February, told him that I had suspected him some time, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did he take the order for these coals - A. I do not know whether he took it, or whether she sent to the wharf; it is usual to put down all that is owing, which he and I examine. I never asked him for this specific sum - when I charged him with it, he said he would account for what he received.

ELIZA CHILLMAN . I am the prosecutor's wife; the prisoner never accounted to me for this money; my son at times receives money from him - he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-51

483. ROBERT BUCHANAN was indicted for embezzlement .

MARTIN EDWARD HOPKINS . I am in partnership with my brother Edward Grey Hopkins ; we are brokers , and live in St. Peter's-alley, Cornhill; the prisoner was our clerk , and occasionally employed to receive money on our account . On the 15th of January, he came to me, and stated, that a quantity of galls ought to be forwarded immediately to Scotland; we had been particularly engaged; he said, he had better pay for them, and forward them. I asked him the amount, he produced the weigh-notes of the East India Company, and in pencil put down the amount, and said it was 86 l. 11 s. 11 d., but that the Company owed us 9 l. 10 s. overpaid on a former occasion, and a draft for 77 l. 1 s. 11 d. would be required for these galls. I wrote a draft for that amount, desired him to pay for them, and forward them immediately. I asked him in the afternoon if he had done so, he said yes, and had forwarded them. I asked him repeatedly since, in consequence of a correspondence between us and our friends in Scotland; he invariably said, that they were forwarded; he absconded last Monday week, and we discovered this.

EDWARD GREY HOPKINS . I am in partnership with my brother. When the prisoner had been absent two days, I got information - the warrants for these galls were delivered into my hands, uncleared, by the prisoner's brother.

JAMES ROBINSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Whitmore and Co., bankers. I paid a draft drawn by the prosecutors, for 77 l. 1 s. 11 d. on the 15th of January.

ROBERT ALEXANDER . I am clerk in the East India-house; the galls in question were not paid for.

Cross-examined. Q. What department are you in - A. The Account-General's. The payment would be made to the Treasury, but the weigh notes would be sent us from the Treasury - there is nobody here from the Treasury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-52

484. CATHARINE HANDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , a pelisse, value 5 s.; a petticoat, value 5 s.; a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d., and a hat, value 6 s. , the goods of Benjamin Wake .

ELIZABETH WAKE . I am the wife of Benjamin Wake , and keep a chandler's shop ; the prisoner lodged on our second floor, in the same house as us, for six weeks - these things were in a drawer in the bed room - the hat was on the table. I missed the hat on Tuesday, and the

other things last night, and preferred this bill to-day. Our bed-room door was not locked.

JAMES SMER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brook-street, Whitecross-street. On the 13th of February, the prisoner pawned the pelisse, for 2 s.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . About eight o'clock last night I was fetched, and took the prisoner in charge.

(Pelisse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took her things.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-53

485. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a basket, value 5 s.: twelve bottles, value 2 s., and eighteen pints of wine, value 2 l. 1 s. the goods of Charles Wright .

WILLIAM RILEY . I am an officer of Bishopsgate Ward. On the 19th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw the prisoner in company with another; the prisoner had a basket on his shoulder; they crossed over, and went through Clark's-court - I went round Camomile-street, and stopped the prisoner at the end of the court with it. I asked what it was; he said some wine, which he had brought from the Ship Tavern, and that the landlord's name was Thompson. I said that was not right, and I should detain him - he threw it down and ran away - I pursued and took him in Bishopsgate-street - returned and found the wine.

BROOKS BULLOCK. I am clerk to Charles Wright , a wine-merchant , who lives in the Haymarket. On the 19th of February I saw this basket of wine put into our cart, between four and five o'clock. I know this to be the basket - our name is on it - it is Port wine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man stopped me in Leadenhall-street, and asked me to carry it for him to Houndsditch.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-54

486. JOHN CORSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 17 ozs. of tea, value 3 s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies , to whom he was servant .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

HENRY FARMER . I am an assistant elder to the East India Company; the prisoner was a labourer in the service, and had 16 s. 6 d. a week, for attending from eight o'clock till two, and threepence an hour for additional time. On the 14th of February he came as usual, and was employed in the warehouse No. 18 ; there was a quantity of Twankay tea in a chest; we opened it ready to be shewn for sale, on the Monday following; I observed that when anybody was in the room he went out; but when he was alone he went into what we call the alleys, between the chests of tea. At five minutes after two o'clock he had left work - I took him to the office to be searched, and told him he must be searched there, for I suspected him - he made no answer. I fetched the Excise officer and commodore - he unbuttoned his breeches and produced a bag containing 17 ozs. of Twankay, from between his legs - it corresponded with that in the chest.

JOHN UPTON . I am a commodore. I produce the tea and the bag. The prisoner walked very wide, which induced me to suspect him; and when he took his coat to go away, he took his apron, and turned his back towards me, and stood so to put his great coat on, and buttoned it over. When he came into the service he gave his address at No. 15, Duke-street, Westminster. I went there, and we could not find him.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-55

487. MARY PURCELL and HENRY HARMER were indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 14th of January, about a quarter past five o'clock, I was in Goswell-street, and saw Harmer standing on the curb stone, and saw Purcell come out of a baker's shop, go some distance, and then they joined company. I followed them to Old-street, and met Waddington, who assisted me in watching of them. Purcell went into a baker's-shop; Harmer waited lower down - I went into the shop; the person refused the money, and she came out; they then went to Slack's shop, in Barbican; Purcell went in; Harmer remained about twenty yards off. When she came out I went to the shop, came out, and followed them to a pastry-cook's shop - Purcell went in, and bought something; Harmer waited outside - she came out, and joined him. I went in, and Ware produced me a sixpence from the counter; she marked it before she gave it to me. They went to a cheesemonger's shop; Harmer was brought out to me by Waddington. Purcell was also taken while I was enquiring at the cheesemonger's shop.

EDWARD SLACK . I am son of Benjamin Slack , who lives in Barbican, and sells pastry. Purcell came to the shop about half-past six o'clock in the evening, for a halfpenny bun, and gave me a sixpence - I gave her change; it had a particular sound. I rubbed it on a piece of marble, and it being candle-light, I could not see it properly - I put it into the till with two more sixpences - Colton came in soon after; I selected it from the others, by the mark where I had rubbed it, and am sure it is the one she gave me. I produce it.

REBECCA WARE . I am servant to Michael Clinton , pastry-cook, Barbican. On the evening of the 14th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, Purcell came to the shop for a penny bun, and paid sixpence for it, which I put on the counter, separate from any money. Colton came in; I marked it, and gave it to him - (looks at one), this is it.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a patrol. I was with Colton, and followed the prisoner, and saw them go to Slack's and Clinton's - the woman went into the shops; Harmer waited outside for her; she always came to him, and I saw their hands close together, but saw her give him nothing. They went to Slack's and Clinton's, and then to a cheesemonger's in Beech-street - I there took them into custody. I took Harmer, and observed his left hand in his breeches pocket - a man came up; I said,

"Lay hold of his left hand;" he pulled his hand out, and I saw something drop - the man picked it up, and gave it to me; I found it contained nine shillings, separately wrapped up, and seven sixpences, all counterfeit. Purcell said she hoped I would he favourable to the man, for he was innocent - that she picked the money up in

Somer's-town, and met the man at the Angel, thinking him distressed, and was going to treat him. I asked how he came by them; he said she gave them to him to hold, and it was a d - d had job for him. I found 18 d. or 2 s. worth of copper on him, and a counterfeit shilling in his waistcoat pocket.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I took the woman into custody, and found nine duplicates, a purse, two buns, some bacon, and seven farthings on her.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint. The sixpences are both counterfeit, and both from the same die. The shillings are counterfeit, and all of one die, and here are seven counterfeit sixpences all from the same die, as those uttered to the witnesses.

PURCELL - GUILTY .

HARMER - GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years then to come .

Reference Number: t18240218-56

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

488. HENRY HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a tablecloth, value 10 s., and 2 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. , the goods of John Dalrymple .

JOHN DALRYMPLE . I am master of the ship William and Alfred , which laid in the West India Docks - the prisoner was steward , and had charge of the table linen, but had no business to take it. I never suspected him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ROPER . I am an officer. On the 18th, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the docks, and saw the prisoner coming out of the Export dock, with the tablecloth concealed under his clothes, wrapped round his body, 2 lbs. of beef in his hat, and two small pieces in his pocket; he said he was going to take the meat home for his supper, and to get the tablecloth washed.

JOHN DALRYMPLE . I believe he had taken linen out to be washed before, but he should have a pass.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to be washed.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-57

489. GEORGE CHRISTOPHER PRIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a watch, value 30 s.; a key, value 1 d., and a seal, value 1 d. , the goods of Sarah Payne , spinster .

SARAH PAYNE . I am a single woman, and servant to the prisoner's father , who has the charge of a sugar house in Christian-street. On the 19th of January, between two and three o'clock, I went into the kitchen, and saw the prisoner; he caught me round the neck, and struck me in the face - I struggled with him, made an alarm, and got from him. Some people came, but he had then got away. We found him concealed in a large box in the counting-house, with some wearing apparel and my watch; I saw his father take it from him. It was safe in my bed-room at three o'clock that afternoon.

HENRY PRIGGINS . I found the watch on my son about four o'clock - I was in search of him for an hour and a half. He said he would give up all he had got.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am a constable. I took him in charge for stealing his father's property, and this watch. I asked what his intentions were; he said to secure the woman, and get away with the property he had taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-58

490. WALTER PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a coat, value 7 s. , the goods of James Raine .

JAMES RAINE . I live in Charles-square, Hoxton . I missed my great coat at six o'clock, when I came home.

DOROTHY LAWSON . On the 26th of January, about two o'clock, I hung Mr. Raine's coat in the yard; it was safe at three o'clock - I missed it about four o'clock. Other peoples' back doors open into the yard.

WILLIAM JONES . I live in Pitfield-street. On the 26th of January, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Charles-square, with a blue coat on his arm. I knew him before.

WILLIAM HENRY JONES . About four o'clock on Monday afternoon, I was standing by a lamp post, and saw the prisoner take a blue coat out of this yard, and run round the square with it.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. On the 27th, I apprehended the prisoner, from the description given by the witnesses.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home, very ill in bed all that day.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240218-59

491. SAMUEL LINSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 8 lbs. of brass, value 4 s. , the goods of Sir Charles Price , Bart. , Richard Price , and Charles Price .

The article in question being composed of a mixed metal, and not of brass, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240218-60

Before Mr. Justice Best.

492. JOHN EASTERBY , PETER RYAN , and HENRY KING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jarvis , about eight o'clock in the night of the 25th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, eight silver spoons, value 40 s.; eight gowns, value 9 l.; six tablecloths, value 3 l.; eighteen towels, value 18 s.; four shawls, value 20 s.; three petticoats, value 6 s.; eight shifts, value 20 s.; twelve pairs of stockings, value 12 s.; a bonnet, value 5 s.; an umbrella, value 18 d.; three salt-holders, value 5 s.; four caps, value 20 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; three sheets, value 12 s.; a pepper castor, value 18 d.; two frills, value 3 s.; two aprons, value 2 s.; a window curtain, value 6 d.; a comb, value 6 d.; a piece of lace, value 4 s., and thirty sovereigns , the property of the said John Jarvis ; and MARIA BENNETT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, an umbrella, a salt-holder, a pepper-castor, a tablecloth, three handkerchiefs, a comb, a piece of lace, a frill,

and a bonnet, part and parcel of the aforesaid goods, she well knowing them to have been feloniously and burglariously stolen .

JOHN JARVIS . I am an appraiser , and rent a house No. 24, Goswell-road, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . On the 25th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went out alone, leaving my wife at home, and met her at a friend's at one o'clock.

ANN JARVIS . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the house at twelve o'clock on Christmas-day - I shut the doors and windows, and double locked the front door. I returned at eleven o'clock at night, with my husband; he put the key to the door, and found it on the spring lock; I am positive that I had double locked it - he unlooked it. I saw a small bundle laying in the passage. I then called a watchman, who went over the house with Mr. Jarvis. The whole of our wearing apparel was gone, and the house in the greatest confusion; all the drawers and boxes empty - they had not been locked in the morning, as we keep no servant. We found nobody in the house. When I went out at twelve o'clock, while I was fastening the door, I saw the prisoners Easterby and Ryan; they had passed the door, and got two or three yards; when they observed me double locking the door; the key makes a great noise; Easterby nudged Ryan on the arm; they spoke to each other, and turned their heads over their shoulders, and saw me take the key out of the lock. I had seen them before, and am certain of their persons. I went down Rawstone-street, and across Spafields - Easterby followed me as far as Spafields, and Ryan followed me only to the end of Rawstone-street. I was at my door on the Sunday following, (the 28th) and saw Easterby opposite the house, standing looking over towards our door - I looked at him, and he walked on. When I first saw him he stood with his hands in his pockets, and appeared smiling. I found part of my property in possession of the officers.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were absent from your house about eleven hours - A. Yes. I knew Ryan and Easterby before, sufficiently to be able to speak to them, and cannot be mistaken. Easterby is of a very striking appearance. Some of the articles stolen were worth more than 40 s., but none of those are found.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are you sure that you saw Ryan - A. Yes; they were both together. Easterby followed me across Spafields; I saw them talking together as far as Rawstone-street; they walked together as far as there, and then only Easterby followed me. I am positive of both on my oath; I have seen both before. Ryan was not with him on Sunday. I saw Ryan pass the shop about a week after.

Q. Were your suspicions sufficiently excited as to induce you to cause them to be apprehended - A. I described their persons to the patrol, and at Bow-street. I did not take them when I saw them, as I did not know that I had the power.

COURT. Q. Had you anybody to assist you to apprehend him when you saw him on Sunday - A. I called my husband, and told him that was the man who followed me; he looked at him, and came in again. I am certain they are the men who were by my house. I had seen both before.

JOHN JARVIS re-examined. I came home with my wife and unlocked the door, I found it on the single lock, I am certain; I found a small bundle just beyond the door, and being afraid that some one was in the house, I called a watchman - we went over the house - I found the drawers all empty, and the boxes in the garret empty, and some boxes in the parlour empty; every thing was gone - we have only the parlour and three garrets; the other apartments are to let. Every room had been entered - a cupboard on the first floor was broken open, but there was nothing in it. My desk in the shop which I had left unlocked was opened, and thirty sovereigns gone, which I had saved to pay my rent; it has placed me in great distress - I found every thing gone that was worth a farthing. except a little stock of furniture which I had in my house. A parcel of rags were strewed over the parlour - the salt thrown about the room out of the salt cellars. I found four phosphorus matches in the passage; at the bottom of the stairs, two of them were burnt. The lowest value of the property stolen, is 100 l., including the sovereigns. I had a great quantity of sheets and blankets and things. My wife pointed Ryan and Easterby out from seven or eight others, when they were in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You found matches at the bottom of the stairs - A. Yes, they lead to the garret, and down to the kitchen. There are windows to the kitchen, but the shutters were shut. The front kitchen is secured by iron bars, and has no shutters, and there is a light comes down from the staircase. There was nothing in the kitchen but what they brought up to the passage, which was the bundle, containing two dirty sheets and a petticoat. There is plenty of light below.

Q. When the back kitchen shutters are shut, can persons see about conveniently - A. They might not see a pin, but could see any thing as large as a hat; the back kitchen is a wash-house; there is light enough to find every thing which was there, or which they could expect to find in a wash-house; it would be dark if they shut the door. We lost spoons, a pepper-box, salt cellars, and other things; no one has any business in the house but my wife and I.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How many sovereigns did you lose - A. Thirty; seven were found on Ryan. I saw them in the desk that morning. You can see at twilight in the wash-house if the shutters are shut.

COURT. Q. In all the rooms except the wash-house was there sufficient light to see to do anything - A. Yes my Lord, it is as light as this Court, and a strong light comes from the staircase and shines into the wash-house.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mrs. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. I have an umbrella pawned on the 10th of January, by Sophia Mills , in her own name, for 1 s. 6 d. I knew her before. I have a towel pawned by the prisoner, Bennett, with her own name, on the 12th of January; she pawned a gown wrapped in it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was Mills bound over to attend here - A. Yes; the towel is a common one, not worth 1 d.

MRS. JARVIS. This towel is ours, and was in the house at the time of the robbery. The gown is not mine - the umbrella is my husband's.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a constable of Worship-street. On the 10th of January, I went to the lodgings of the prisoner Easterby, in Turk's Head-court, Golden-lane, with Vann, Garton, and Lines; we went up stairs, knocked at his door, and waited twenty minutes before any one would open it; we got in after some time - when we told our names he opened the door himself, and when I got in I found him and Bennett there. I went to the fire-place, where there appeared to be a quantity of things burnt; we found tinder there, which I took up - it appeared recently burnt - cinders were put on it to smother it. I took it up, it was quite warm; a person wanted to speak to Bennett - I went down stairs, and while I was down Bennett escaped. We took Easterby into custody. I went down on the ground floor of the house, which I do not think was occupied by Easterby, but by the landlord of the house - the door was open - the landlord's name is Sheckell - he is not here. I myself found nothing in Easterby's room - the tinder appeared to me to be like muslin handkerchiefs - it was very fine linen - I took it to the window and examined it.

Q. Is there any difference between the tinder of linen and paper - A. I cannot say. Bennett was taken a few days after.

Q. What did you find in the lower room - A. A basket containing a salt-holder, a pepper-box, a veil, several muslin caps and pieces of muslin, and the lining of a bonnet. When I produced the basket before the Magistrate, Easterby said they were his wife's wearing apparel.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. I presume you are not in the habit of burning fine linen - A. No; I do not know what sort of ashes it produces. The things were all in the basket when Easterby said they were his wife's apparel - the basket was not claimed. I took the things out and produced them before he said so. The salt-holder had salt in it when I found it in the basket. The landlord is a very infirm old man, and can hardly speak.

COURT. Q. Was it before the basket was opened, or after the things were produced, that he said they were his wife's - A. After I produced them.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I searched this house on the 15th, after the officers had been. I went to Easterby's lodgings, in Turk's Head-court, and found nothing relating to this robbery. On that morning I apprehended Bennett in Mills's room, Little Arthur-street, St. Luke's. I took her up to an upper room, in which was a bed, with three boxes, some hat-boxes, a bonnet-box, and bundle. Bennett took a bonnet off the bed in that room and put it on, and finished dressing herself. (I had taken her in Mills's room.) I asked her who the boxes belonged to - she said they were a person's who was coming there to lodge. I took her down stairs, and asked Mrs. Mills, in her presence, who the property belonged to - Mills said it was Bennett's property, that she had brought it there. Bennett then said it was hers, and gave me the keys of the boxes, which opened them, and in them I found a table-cloth, a towel, and comb; and in the bonnet-box, two frilled handkerchiefs; and on my way with her to her former lodging, where Vann was, I asked her who the basket belonged to; she said it had been her mother's, and was given to her by her sister. I then asked if the ribbons and lace were hers; she said that they were, and that she left them with her landlord on the Friday.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not Mrs. Mills call her Mrs. Easterby, instead of Mrs. Bennett - A. No. The basket was not produced when I was talking to her about it - the table-cloth is not of much value - she might have such a one of her own - none of the articles would be too good for her use.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable of Worship-street. In consequence of information, on Friday, the 9th of January, I went to the lodging of the prisoner King, in Bell-place, Bell-alley, Goswell-street - King was in the room. I asked how long he had lived there - he said

"Rather better than three months." I said,

"Is the room furnished" - he said No, the things were his own. I said,

"Then all the property in this room belongs to you" - he said Yes. We then proceeded to search the room, and under the bedstead, on the floor, were two bundles, containing a salt-cellar and a piece of lace, among other things. Next morning, I went to Easterby's with the officers, and saw the tinder in the fire-place. We found nothing in the room relating to this robbery, but the three boxes which were afterwards found at Mills's were the same boxes which we searched in Easterby's room - I am certain of it. On the 14th, I apprehended Ryan; and between his bed and the sacking I found seventeen sovereigns, tied up in a piece of old rag. Before I opened it I said,

"Halloo! what is here?" He said,

"There is seventeen sovereigns, but they are not mine - they are my wife's, which she has saved up." At the office, Easterby said the salt-cellars were given to his wife by her mother.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where did you find the sovereigns - A. In Ryan's room. I know that he did live there - I think I have seen him there before - I know that it is his room, and know the woman he lives with - he was in the room with his wife, and had just got up, but was not dressed.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I went with Gleed and Vann to Easterby's room. We were kept outside full twenty minutes. I kept down stairs, and the others went up; and when they got in, I went up stairs. A woman said,

"They are at home." I passed her, and on going up the second flight of stairs, through a crevice in the wainscot, I saw a hand; and said to Gleed, who stood at the door,

"There is somebody within - I saw a woman's hand;" and then the door was opened. A saucepan was on the fire; I took the lid off - there was nothing in it - I took it off, examined the chimney, and found nothing; but I saw all the ashes had been taken off the back of the fire and from under the grate, and patted down. I took the poker and stirred the fire, and tinder fell out. I said,

"Something has been burnt." Bennett said,

"I have been burning a bit of rag." Easterby said, he would not open the door without a warrant; I said I should break it open - he then opened it.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer, and was with Garton; his account is correct.

MRS. JARVIS. (Examining the property.) Here is a salt-cellar, which I know, but my husband can speak best to it; the lace I am sure is mine, and was on a cap when I lost it. I had washed and ironed all my caps the day before. The property in the basket is ours; here is the lining and ribbons of my bonnet; the lace and handkerchiefs are mine, and a muslin curtain, which I have the

fellow to - and here is the fellow-piece of the ribbon - one curtain was left, they match; here is a handkerchief which was taken, and here is the fellow one left behind; the one stolen had not been washed, but the other has; here is an apron, but partly made. I have a piece of the same, which was left behind; here is a salt-cellar which I had chipped at the corner in washing; all the things are ours. (Examining the property found in Bennett's room at Mills's house.) Here is a small breakfast-cloth and two towels; the towel pawned with the gown is mine, and the pepper-box. I believe everything produced to be ours; it was in the house on the day of the robbery. This is but a very small part of the property stolen.

Sophia Mills being called, did not appear.

JOHN JARVIS . I know the salt-cellar found at King's. I have the fellow one here; there is a piece broken at the side, which was done before I lost it. I know the pepper-box. I had rubbed it to make it stand steady - here is another salt-cellar, which I know. The umbrella I had rivetted a new ferrule on myself with a nail, and marked the handle in doing it - it was open in the parlour when I went out.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were your sovereigns wrapped in rag - A. No; they were in a black purse.

THOMAS VANN re-examined. I was ordered to deliver all the sovereigns up to the prosecutor. I have given the Sheriff fourteen, and the prosecutor the rest. I have forgot to state, that I found seven sovereigns on Easterby.

KING'S Defence. The property found at the place I know nothing of. I did not know that it was there; the woman could give a good account how it came there. I was absent when these things were brought up.

EASTERBY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

RYAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

* KING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

* See the next case.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-61

Before Mr. Justice Best.

493. JOHN EASTERBY , HENRY KING , and PETER RYAN , were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Bond Graham , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 29th of December , with intent to steal, and stealing therein a clock, value 8 l.; a desk, value 40 s.; a tea-caddy, value 4 s., and a spoon, value 6 s. , his property.

JOHN BOND GRAHAM . I live in Bartholomew-terrace, St. Luke's , and am a housekeeper . On the 29th of December. I went to bed about eleven o'clock at night, and was the last person up. I got up at half-past six in the morning - it was then dark. I went into the front parlour, and missed a table-cloth. I found the parlour blinds open, the glass of the sash cut, and the sash open; the shutters were forced open, but put too again. I missed a desk and tea-caddy. I found the caddy, through an advertisement. Four or five phosphorus matches were left behind; three or four of them were burnt, and a piece of candle had been burnt almost to the socket.

SARAH GRAHAM . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the 29th of December I fastened the house up at night - we came down about half-past six or seven - it was dark. I went into the room with my father, and missed the clock off the table, and the desk, and afterwards missed the tea-caddy - a piece was cut out of the window, large enough to admit a man's hand to undo the hasp - the shutters were forced open; a spoon, and some tea were in the caddy.

WILLIAM DENNIS . I am a watchman. I was on duty near the prosecutor's house - between eleven and twelve o'clock on this night, and saw two men near the house. Easterby and Ryan are them. I had a good opportunity of seeing them. I pointed them out from among others, and am certain of them.

Q. You told the Magistrate you believed they were the men - A. I never had a doubt of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that you believed they were the men - A. I do not recollect it. I swore positively to them. Easterby had a fustian jacket, but not the one he has on now. Ryan had a blue coat buttoned up.

Q. Can you tell the colour of a coat at that time of night - A. Yes, by the light of the lamps.

THOMAS VANN . I have a tea caddy and a shoe. On Friday, the 9th of January, I went to King's room, and found this tea caddy concealed under the bed among other things; King was there, and said all the property in the place was his. I asked how he came by these things; he said a woman had brought them up there. I took Ryan's shoe off his foot; a chair was brought to the office which stood in the prosecutor's parlour, under the window; it appeared that the person on entering the window had stepped on the chair - the mark of a foot is on it now, and the shoe fits it; here is the chair; it is the print of a right shoe; his shoes are rights and lefts; the heel and waist of the shoe fit the mark.

Prisoner KING. When you came into the room and asked if all the things belonged to me, I said Yes; not knowing that these were there; but when you found them, I said I could produce the woman who brought them up. I sent for the woman, and she came up and owned them. - Witness, The woman he lived with came up and said they belonged to her; and we took her to the office; the Magistrate discharged her; her name is Sharp.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner himself say when they were first produced that they belonged to Sharp - A. No, my Lord, it was Eliza Blackwell , who he lived with; she said that they belonged to Sharp; I do not recollect King saying so.

Q. Did he say that the caddy was his - A. No he spoke generally of the things in the room; the caddy was not then found.

Prisoner KING. When I said I could produce the owner, Sharp came up - you shewed them to her all separately, and she owned them all. - Witness, He never told me he could produce the owner. Blackwell said Sharp had brought them up there; Sharp came up and said she brought them there.

JURY Q. Did you suppose these things to be stolen - A. We found so. I took the woman to the office with Blackwell - they were discharged. Sharp was sent to Clerkenwell Prison, and afterwards discharged.

COURT. Q. Did Sharp also own the things belonging to the last case - A. She did.

Q. Why not mention that on the last trial - A. It was

done away with before the Magistrate - I thought it not necessary.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer, and accompanied Vann to Easterby's and to King's, where we found the tea-caddy, with other property. Blackwell said a girl named Sharp brought them there - Sharp came up in a few minutes, and owned them. Sharp was in custody some days. King said nothing about who brought the property there - it was Blackwell - and when Sharp came up I saw Blackwell pull her by the gown, but what it it meant I cannot say. King said he rented the room, and that all the property there was his, speaking generally.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give this account when you were examined half an hour ago - A. Yes. I did not mention about the woman coming up and claiming the property - as the woman was discharged I did not think it necessary. I have been an officer nine years.

Q. Did you not know it to be most important, for the purpose of a conviction, to prove that man in possession of and claiming the property - A. I cannot say that I did. I would not say a wrong thing if I knew it.

Q. Did you not think it materially in his favour that the property was claimed - A. If I have done wrong, I am sorry for it.

JURY. Our verdict would have been quite different in the last case as to King, if we had known this before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-62

494. HENRY KING was again indicted for feloniously assaulting John Francis Powell , on the King's highway, on the 9th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bag, value 1 s.; forty-two silver spoons, value 18 l.; and twenty pairs of sugar tongs, value 8 l. the goods of Richard Britton ; and ELIZA BLACKWELL was indicted for feloniously and maliciously inciting, procuring, councilling, and commanding the said Henry King , to do and commit the said felony .

JOHN FRANCIS POWELL . I am fourteen years old . On the 9th of January, I was coming from Goldsmith's Pall, and taking this plate to my master, in Little Sutton-street, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I saw Hepburn, and went with him to a house in Bell-place, Bell-alley, Goswell-street - we found Blackwell there. I came out of the house about half-past five, and under an archway two men pushed me; I got by them, and ran down Bell-alley; Hepburn ran after me, and said something. The two men came after me; one took hold of my shoulder, and pulled me round, and said I was a thief - they pulled out a staff; the prisoner was not one of them. One of them took this property from me; I ran after him, and then the prisoner King stopped me, and asked what I was hallooing about; I was then about five yards from the spot where I was robbed. I told him two men had robbed me; he told me to stand still, and he would go after them - he then ran away. I ran after the men, but could not see them, so I ran back towards King, and then another man stopped me, and asked what was the matter - King had run away a hard as he could. I went to him about an hour after with the officer, and knew him to be the man who had stopped me; they took him into custody - he had taken nothing from me. The property has not been found.

Q. How long after the property was taken did King come to you - A. In about half a minute. I am sure of him.

WILLIAM MAYHEW DICKERSON . On the 9th of January, I was at work, and heard a boy cry out; I ran out, and met a man, who I believe to be King - I said,

"What have they been doing to the boy?" he said two men had been beating him, and had run that way, directing me a contrary way to what he was going. I met the boy, who said he was robbed.

HENRY HEPBURN . I am fifteen years old. On the 9th of January, I met Powell in Aldersgate-street - he went with me to Bell-place, up to Blackwell's room; I had been there in the morning. I have known her about two months - I asked her for Bill Thomas , who owed me 1 s.; she said he would be there directly, and that he had told her to tell me to wait till he came. A young man was in the room, but not King. I had sold Thomas some guinea pigs - the man went out to fetch Bill, and said he would come directly, and then Bill came up, said he would pay me, and went down; Powell and I followed him, but could not see which way he went. I came away and did not see the robbery. I did not tell Blackwell where Powell was.

WILLIAM DINES . I am a weigher at the assay office. On the 9th of January, I delivered Powell three dozen and a half of tea spoons, and twenty pair of tongs, weighing sixty seven ounces.

JOHN FRANCIS POWELL re-examined. Q. When you went to Bell-alley, did you see Blackwell - A. She was up in the room; Hepburn asked for Bill; she said she would fetch him - I did not mention what I had about me - it was buttoned in a bag inside my coat; they could see that I had a bag; the string was twisted round my arm; it belonged to Mr. Britton, a silversmith. Hepburn had taken me there once before - we were kept waiting for Bill about eight minutes, and then he came up. When I came out some men tried to hold me under the archway, by the side of the house. When we first went into the room, Blackwell asked me to come to the fire, and said she had been ill; she did not press us to stop. I went back after the robbery, and found King with her.

THOMAS VANN . I apprehended King.

THOMAS GARTON . I went with Vann, and apprehended the prisoners - they said they knew nothing of the robbery.

KING'S Defence. I was out at the time.

BLACKWELL'S Defence. He was not at home after dinner, till after the robbery. We know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-63

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

495. JAMES LOVETT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , at St. James, Westminster , a box, value 5 s.; three coats, value 30 s.; three pair of trowsers, value 30 s.; three waistcoats, value 10 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s.; a pair of braces, value 1 s.; two shirts, value 6 s.; three brushes, value 1 s.; two watches, value 3 l.; three seals, value 30 s.; a watch key, value 10 s.; a sovereign, and eighteen shillings, the property of William Pearce , in the dwelling-house of Edward Thomas .

WILLIAM PEARCE. I am servant to Mr. Candel, a master milkman . On the 30th of January, I lodged at No. 58, Rupert-street, St. James's , and slept in the same bed with the prisoner there for about seven weeks. On the 30th of January, I got up about four o'clock in the morning, leaving him in bed; I took my handkerchief, waistcoat, and hat off of this box, and went to work, leaving the box locked, and the key in my pocket. A person came, about half-past eight o'clock, and gave me information; I went home about ten, and missed my box, and could not find the prisoner. I returned home at one, and at half-past two he came in. I asked him where my box was - he said at first that he had not seen it, but after asking him some time, his brother said,

"If you get your box you won't hurt him" - I said,

"I want my clothes and my box, and nothing more" - meaning that I would not punish him if I got them. The officer went to Moorfields, where the prisoner said he had taken it to, and found it there. I gave the officer the key, unlocked it, and found everything there as I had left it in the morning; it was taken to the office. Edward Thomas is landlord of the house we lodged in - it is in the parish of St. James's, Westminster.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. There had been some money transactions between you and the prisoner - A. No; I owed him nothing. I was going to remove nearer to my work. I paid my rent every Saturday, and owed none. I did not tell him to move my box.

MARY JONES . The prisoner called at my house two months before this happened with a letter; and on the 29th of January, he came and asked when I had seen the person he had brought the letter from - I said,

"Not for some time." He asked if my husband would make him a pair of shoes - I sent him into the shop. He asked if I would give him leave to bring a box to my house for ten days, as he and his brother were going a little way out of town, and when he returned he would call for it, and next day, at eleven o'clock, he brought it.

THOMAS MILLBURN . On Friday, the 30th of January, I understood that the prosecutor had lost his box. I met the prisoner coming in doors about two o'clock, and followed him up stairs; and on entering the second floor room, occupied by one Tyler, I accused the prisoner of having stolen this box. He said, how could I think of accusing him of it - he had seen no such thing. I asked him how he could look me in the face and say he had not taken it, when I had seen him, between eight and nine o'clock, take it out myself (this was not true), and I must send for an officer. He said,

"For God's sake don't do that - I will take you to where it is, if you will go with me." I sent the landlord for a constable, and in the mean time he cried a great deal, wished us to go with him, and kept asking for forgiveness. When the constable came he insisted on his telling where the box was, that he might fetch it; he said he had taken it to No. 25, Little Moorfields, to Mrs. Jones, and that it was exactly as he had taken it away, for he merely went straight there and back. We asked him about a watch which had hung in the room - he said he had sold that for 5 s. to a person in the street, and he believed, on Ludgate-hill, but not being acquainted with town he did not know the street; 3 s. was found on him, which, he said, was part of what he had sold the watch for.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You told him an untruth - how are we to believe you now - A. I said so because I had been told he had taken it out.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. On the 30th of January, I was fetched, and took the prisoner; he voluntarily told me that he had taken the box to Mrs. Jones, No. 25, Little Moorfields. I found 3 s. on him, which, he said, was part of what he received for the watch, which he had sold to a Jew for 5 s., in the street. I went to Mrs. Jones, and found the box - it contained all the property stated in the indictment, but the watch.

WILLIAM PEARCE . The things are all mine. Thomas lives in this house. Here are three coats, worth 30 s., and 28 s. in money.

THOMAS MILLBURN . I am son-in-law to Edward Thomas . The house is his - I receive all the lodgers' rents for him - he pays the taxes.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not stated to the Magistrate as your dwelling-house - A. I do not know. There are two houses connected, No. 57 and 58; one is a public, and the other a private house; a door is broken through from the bar into the parlour of the other house; it has been so for the last twelve years. Thomas sleeps in the public-house - the private house is entirely let out.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his confessing the robbery .

Reference Number: t18240218-64

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

496. THOMAS OAKLEY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Seabrook , on the night of the 19th of August , and stealing nineteen live tame ducks, value 27 s. , his property.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SKABROOK . I keep the Aberdeen Arms, public-house, at Great Stanmore. In August last, I had nineteen ducks in a small place under my dwelling-house, which had been used as a harness-room; the door opens into the stable-yard; there is a bed-room over it. It was secured by a latch, staple, hasp, and pin; it could be opened outside by taking out the pin. They were stolen one night, about the middle of August. I have not found them.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say on what day - A. No; there is a wall round the yard, and gates at each end, which were shut.

WILLIAM CHENIES . I had the care of the ducks, and fastened them up about five o'clock; and about eight o'clock next morning I found the door open, and the ducks gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not go to look for them till the next morning - A. No; the gates are shut about ten o'clock at night.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I have known the prisoner seven or eight years - he lived at Stanmore, and is a rat-catcher. I went with him one night, just before harvest, about eleven o'clock, to Mr. Seabrook's - we lodged just opposite there. We took nineteen ducks from the house adjoining the dwelling-house - it was fastened with a latch and staple. We killed and put them into two bags, and carried them away - the bags belonged to the prisoner. We took them to Worrall's, at Edgware; he would not buy them with the feathers on; we carried them away and concealed them in a hedge, and left seventeen of them

there till the next night, and took the other two home unpicked. Mrs. Clark dressed them for us - she picked them. We went at night, got the seventeen, and Worrall gave us 6 s. for them.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first tell this story - A. Three or four months afterwards, to Mr. Wadlington, the Magistrate. I was taken up for stealing a hare, and kept four days; was then taken to Clerkenwell prison for six weeks. I mentioned about the ducks four days after I was taken. I saw the prisoner at St. Alban's gaol; I was to have been a witness against him there, but the Grand Jury threw out the bill.

Q. Do you remember telling the prisoner, that as the evidence was not enough for him there, you would do for him in London - A. I never said such a word. Worrall lives about two miles from Seabrook's. We got to Stanmore-marsh about three o'clock.

SUSAN CLARK . I live at Stanmore. In August last Oakley and Thompson lodged with me. I do not remember their bringing anything home. I picked and dressed two ducks; I do not know who brought them. I heard of this robbery two or three days after.

RICHARD POTTER . I am a constable. Worrall has been tried here, and is under sentence of transportation. I went to his house when he was in custody, and found twelve ducks hid in a dung heap quite putrid; it was about the first week in October.

Cross-examined. Q. Could you count them - A. I counted twelve, and there were parts of others. He told me he had buried them there, and that the prisoner brought them there; they were covered with straw, not with dung.

GEORGE WADLINGTON , ESQ. I am Magistrate of Hertford. Oskley was brought before me on the 25th of October. Before I committed him he said that he had a communication to make to me, respecting other offences. I cautioned him against criminating himself; and took down what he said, (reads) -

"I and Thompson took Seabrooks' ducks; we took them to Worrall, and got 5 s. for them; there was about seventeen I think; it was in August. I and Thompson also stole some copper from Seabrook's about six weeks before, and sold it to Worrall. The door of the place where the ducks were was not locked."

Prisoner's Defence. That confession I never made. I was put into the cage, and in the morning a man came and gave me half-a-pint of rum and some beer, and told me Worrall had been saying that I had done different things; and if I ever confessed to it I was in liquor.

MR. WADLINGTON. He made this statement before twelve o'clock in the morning: and seemed to have his senses completely about him. I read it over to him, and he said

"Have you taken down Sir, that the door was not fastened, because it was no burglary."

GUILTY. Aged 49.

Of Larceny only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-65

London Cases, before Mr. Arabin, Esq.

497. JOHN EASTERBY , HENRY KING , and MARIA BENNETT were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Thomas , about the hour of two in the night of the 3rd of January , at St. Giles's, Cripplegate , and stealing twenty knives, value 15 s.; twenty forks, value 10 s.; ten tea spoons, value 2 l.; two table spoons, value 30 s.; four salt spoons, value 20 s.; a pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s.; a caddy spoon, value 5 s.; a silver bowl of a punch ladle, value 5 s.; two silver cheese knives, value 20 s.; a silver pocket knife, value 3 s.; a silver mug, value 30 s.; five silver thimbles, value 1 s.; two metal mustard spoons, value 2 s.; four table cloths, value 8 s.; a pair of snuffers, value 1 s.; 24 ozs. of tea, value 8 s.; 3 lbs. of candles, value 1 s.; a velvet pelisse, value 30 s.; an ivory memorandum book in a tortoiseshell case, value 20 s.; a silk scarf, value 40 s.; a plume of feathers, value 5 s.; two lace caps, value 2 s.; six small pieces of lace, value 10 s.; three small pieces of muslin, value 1 s.; four other small pieces of muslin, value 3 s.; a small piece of satin, value 6 d.; two yards and a quarter of brown Holland, value 1 s.; four pair of scissars, value 4 s.; nine yards of broad ribbon, value 4 s. 6 d.; ten yards of other ribbon, value 5 s.; three and a quarter yards of other ribbon, value 1 s.; thirty-four yards of other ribbon, value 5 s.; thirty yards of silk ferret, value 2 s.; and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. ; his property.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN THOMAS . I live at No. 9, Castle-street, Falcon-square , in the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate. On the 3rd of January, at night, I was the last person up. My family consists of my wife, a servant-maid, and children; the eldest child is fifteen years old. I saw that the house was all fastened, and went to bed at half-past eleven o'clock; and was not alarmed in the night - the servant got up about eight. I got up myself and found every thing in the lower part of the house scattered about the floor, and in confusion; the drawers had been emptied, and the cupboards forced open. The thieves had entered by the back kitchen area; the iron grating in the yard, over which, was forcibly wrenched up; it had been bedded in the brick work over the back kitchen window. I missed the articles enumerated in this indictment, with many others, amounting in value to 30 l. or 35 l. at least. I saw a few trifling articles in the possession of Garton; ten or twelve days after, the adjoining house was empty, and in that some of the property was found; they must have come through there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you instruct counsel in this case - A. I have no solicitor. I have not employed counsel at the suggestions of Garton or Vanu. A gentleman suggested to me the propriety of employing counsel, as the Judge on the former case had much trouble to trace out the case, having no depositions. I was present when the Judge directed an acquittal, in consequence of Vann concealing a fact.*

* See page 177.

MRS. CONSTANTINE THOMAS . My husband and I went to bed together on this night. I saw the house made secure - we lost property, amounting to I suppose 70 l. I found every thing in confusion, and the drawers empty. I think more than one person must have been in the house, or it would have taken a good many hours.

Cross-examined. Q. Any one person undisturbed might have done it in the course of time - A. Yes.

SARAH CASS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas. I went to bed before my master, and came down about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and found two of the children's

hats on the stairs, and one in the passage, I went into the back-parlour, and found things in confusion. I could not tell how many persons had entered the house.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 9th of January I went to King's apartment, Bell-court, Bell-alley, Goswell-street; there was a woman in the room (not the female prisoner.) I asked how long he had lived there - he said, three months. I asked whether the place was furnished or unfurnished; he said it was furnished, and that all the property in that room belonged to him.

Q. Did he say that, without your putting the question to him - A. No. When I got into the room I asked how long he had lived there - he said three months, and that it was furnished. I said,

"Then are all the things in this room yours?" - Yes, said he; we then proceeded to search the room. Garton and Lines were with me.

Q. Did King make any objection to your searching - A. None. We found two bundles under the bed. I asked him who they belonged to; the woman (Blackwell) said, that a woman of the name of Sharp had brought them there, and, in a few minutes Sharp came up into the room. Blackwell got her to the door whispering, Garton pulled them away, and made them come apart. I asked Sharp whether that property was hers - she said Yes, and acknowledged that she had brought them there. I asked her, in King's presence, how long she had had them - she said, a young man had given them to her. I asked her who the young man was - she then altered her story, and said, a young man had given her money to purchase them, and that she had bought them in Petticoat-lane. I brought the bundles, and took all three to Worship-street; and the evidence I have now given as to what Sharp said, I gave in my deposition to the Magistrate, but it was afterwards ordered to be erased out, and a fresh copy taken.

Q. What part of your evidence was to be erased - A. That part where I asked Sharp if she brought the property there. Mr. Thomas claimed part of the property in the bundles. I apprehended Easterby next morning at his lodgings, Turk's Head-court; Bennett was with him, and on a table in the room, I found this fork; we were a good while before they would let us in. Garton came up and said, he saw a hand, and called out, that if they did not open the door he would break in. Easterby then opened it; he had said he would not let us in without a warrant.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were examined this morning on your oath - A. I was.

Q. It became material to enquire whose property certain goods found in King's room were - A. It did.

Q. On your solemn oath, did you tell the Judge one word about the woman, saying the property belonged to another person, or about another person claiming it - A. No. I explained it. I did not shrink from it, when King put the question to me; I did not state it, because it was put out of the deposition.

Q. On your solemn oath, did you mention it, till the verdict was recorded - A. It was on the next trial. Mr. Bevil ordered it to be erased. I did not think it necessary to state it. I did not conceal it wilfully.

Q. Were you sworn to tell the whole truth - A. Yes. I would have brought the woman, if I had thought it necessary. I did not think it necessary, it being erased, or I would have stated it.

Q. Did you hear the Jury state, that if they had heard it, they would have acquitted the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean it to be taken down, that you stated that a woman in King's company said the property was not his, and that a person came and claimed it, and that the Magistrate ordered those facts to be erased from your deposition - A. Yes, I do.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been an officer - A. Eight or nine years, and have been upon the established five or six.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street, and accompanied Vann to King's lodging. Gleed was with us, but not in the room - we found King in the room, and a woman named Blackwell. Vann asked King if he lived there - he said Yes; he asked how long - he said about three months; he asked if the property in the room belonged to him - he said it was his. Vann asked if it was a furnished lodging - he said the things were his own. Some knives and forks, and several other articles were found between the sacking and the bed; some dishes and plates were found under the bedstead near the head of it; we brought away several articles; the knives and forks and some table-cloths were tied in an apron.

Q. Did anybody come in while you were there - A. Yes, a girl of the name of Sharp. I omitted to say that Blackwell said Sharp brought the things there, and when Sharp came in, Vann asked her if she had brought them there - in the mean time I saw Blackwell give Sharp a nudge; she pulled her gown - I said,

"Fall back, I will have no conversation between you," and had something to do to make her go back. Sharp said they were her property; Vann asked how long she had had them, and where she got them; she at first said (I think) nine months, and then six months, and that a friend gave them to her; she said afterwards that she bought them in Petticoat-lane, and a friend gave her the money to buy them - we took all three to the office. I went next day to Easterby's lodging, with the officers. I placed myself at the street door to let nobody go out; we at last got into the room, and found Easterby and Bennett. I took a saucepan off the fire to examine the chimney, and found nothing, but tinder came out of the bars when I poked the fire. Vann found a fork. Bennett said she had put a bit of rag in the grate. I was not present at the examination.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you state to the Magistrate all that you have now - A. Every word, all but about Sharp; I was not questioned about that, for I was not at the examination. Mr. Bevill said I must be bound over on account of the tinder being found in the fire. I was bound over after the prisoners were committed. I was not at the office when Sharp was there.

Q. To day when King was on trial for his life or death, did you state a word respecting Sharp claiming the property - A. I did not. I was examined to day against King.

Q. Did you suffer the Jury to return a verdict against him without stating it - A. I did; if I did wrong, I am sorry for it. I did not know that I had any occasion to do it, when I gave no evidence to that effect at the office. I

would sooner speak on a prisoner's behalf, than half a word against him.

Q. Do you think you are not to state a word more than you say at the office - A. If I had been asked the question I would have stated it. The woman had one or two hearings, and was then discharged, and I thought it would have died away then.

Q. You thought you would not state what was material for the prisoner - A. The Magistrate did not believe Sharp, or he would not have discharged her.

Q. Now, as you did not mention it here to-day, and your brother officers also omitted to tell the Jury, l ask whether you agreed that it would not be convenient to mention it - A. No; it was pure accident; it was through the woman being discharged.

Q. Then it was purposely omitted - A. I did not give it a thought.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer of Worship-street, and have some property claimed by Mrs. Thomas. On the morning of the 15th of January, I went to a house occupied by a person named Mills, in Little Arthur-street, St. Luke's, and in the first floor room of that house, I found Bennett - I afterwards took her up stairs, where there were a bed, three boxes, and a bonnet box; she took a bonnet off the bed, and put it on, and finished dressing herself there - I asked her who the boxes and property there belonged to; she said to a person who was coming there to lodge. I asked Mills in Bennett's presence, who the boxes belonged to; she said to Mrs. Bennett - I afterwards received the keys from Bennett; they unlocked each of the boxes, and the key of her former lodgings, where Easterby and her had lived, and in those boxes, I found among other articles, a pair of cotton stockings, two pounds and a half of candles, and a small quantity of tea; and on the way to her former lodging, where I had left Vann, I asked how she came possessed of a basket which was left there, and if the ribbons and lace among other things in it were hers; she said they were her own; that the basket was her own, and she had left it with her landlord on the Friday (this was on the 15th.) I went to her former lodging with the key she had given me, unlocked the door, and in that room, I found a pair of scissors, and some clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any conversation with Vann before you went to Mr. Bevill - A. Not before he had been to Mr. Bevill. I have had conversation with him before he came here - he told me about Sharp; I heard him examined to day, and heard the Judge's observations; Vann stated to the Magistrate that Sharp came up, and claimed the property.

Q. Was you not surprised when you heard him say nothing about it in Court - A. I thought he had forgotten it.

Q. Was not your surprise increased when you heard Garton omit it, did you think he had forgotten it - A. I did certainly believe both had forgotten it.

Q. Did it not occur to you that if they had not forgotten it, the prisoners must be acquitted - A. Perhaps I did not know sufficient of law. I did not state it to them.

Q. You suffered the Jury to go to their verdict without stating it to them - A. I think I should have done extremely wrong; to dictate to any witness when he was being examined.

Q. When they retired from the box, did you say to Vann or Garton,

"You have forgotten something which would save that man's life" - A. I did say something when I heard that the prisoner was convicted. I said to Vann

"Something has been omitted, which should be communicated to the Judge;" and I think my words were these

"Before the man should suffer, I will tell the Judge," but I did not think this the place to speak to the Judge.

COURT. Q. Were you or Vann examined on the second trial - A. I was not a witness on the second trial. I determined to communicate it, but did not think this the place to do it. I did not know the facts of the other case; it was only hear-say.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Saturday, the 10th of January, I went with Vann, Garton, and Lines, to Easterby's lodging; they left me there while they went to another house; I stayed in the passage all the time; they returned in twenty minutes. One of us then knocked at the door, and mentioned his name; somebody said they would not open the door; at last we gave our names, and Easterby opened the door; he and Bennett were in the room. Garton poked the fire, and something appeared to have been burning - I took some of it in my hand; it appeared to have been recently burnt. I went into the lower room, and found a basket. Bennett escaped while I was down stairs. Some of the property in the house has been claimed by Mrs. Thomas.

Cross-examined. Q. The basket was not found in Easterby's room - A. No; it was produced to me in the absence of both the prisoners.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 9th of January I was on duty in Goswell-street; heard a boy had been robbed of some silver, and went into Bell-yard. Vann and Garton came down, and I followed them to King's house in Bell-court; there was a woman in the room - Vann had been talking to her before I got up - I only know what passed in the room.

Cross-examined. Q. You forgot to mention that in the morning that Sharp said the things were hers - A. I was only examined about Easterby - I was not asked at all about King; I did not mention what Sharp said.

Q. All four of you forgot to mention it - A. I only came about Easterby. I was not examined at the office, I heard what Sharp said, and did not mention it in the morning.

MRS. THOMAS. My name is on some of the things found at King's, and the knives and forks are ours. The lace is mine, and here is a green ribbon of mine, some brown ribbon and muslin - they were in the house on the night before the robbery. The scissars found in Easterby's room are mine - (Looks at the property found in Bennett's boxes). I lost a piece of brown Holland like this, a pair of stockings, and some candles, but cannot swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is there any mark on the muslin - No; but I have a piece of the same - I speak to the pattern. The stockings are marked, and are my own mending. I have a piece of ribbon to match what was found. I had the whole piece made me a present of; I believe it is unsaleable. The fork found at Easterby's corresponds with mine - I have brought one to match it. The servant put the knives and forks into

water, which made the rozin start; we lost two dozen. These knives were made for us by Mr. Morgan.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-66

498. LOUIS ENGLAND was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-67

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

499. MARY WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at St. Dunstan, Stepney , in the dwelling-house of Henry Beeton , nine sovereigns , the monies of the said Henry Beeton , to whom she was servant .

HENRY BEETON . I am a baker , and live at No. 1, Aslop's-place, Mile-end-road , in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney - I rent the house. The prisoner came into my service in the beginning of January; she gave me a reference, but I did not go after it. On the 27th of January, I missed a sovereign, and accused her of it - she paused a moment or two. I asked if she had found any money - she said she had. I asked how much - she asked how much I had lost. I said it did not matter, how much had she found - she said she had found four sovereigns on my drawers in the bed-room. I asked if that was all she had found - she said it was. I said I would take her to the watch-house - she seemed irritated, and said, if I would not, she would go down into the kitchen and get them me. I sent for an officer, who went into the kitchen - came up, and asked her where the sovereigns were - she said she would go and get them; he went into the yard with her, and brought them.

THOMAS WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a headborough, and live next door to Beeton. On the night of the 27th of January, he sent for me, and told me in the prisoner's presence that she had said she had found the sovereigns on his bed-room drawer. I said, she must have some key to get them. I was going to search her, but she said she had no pockets. I searched her box, but found nothing there. I asked her where the money was - she said down in the kitchen. I went down and found 17 s. 1 1/2 d. in her work-box. I came up and asked where the gold was - she said, if I would go with her she would shew me where it was concealed. I took a light; she went into the yard with me, and between the prosecutor's fence and my own, in the garden, over his dust-hole, I found four sovereigns wrapped up in a piece of rag - I took her to the watch-house.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house. Beeton charged her with robbing him of five sovereigns, and said he had no doubt but she had taken more. I made her no promises, but told her she was not bound to say anything. I questioned her; she said, the first she had taken was a sovereign from her master's drawer; that on the second time she took two, and the third time five. I asked her if her master did not keep his drawer locked - she said he did. I asked how she got possession of the money - she said she took the housekeeper's keys, which hung in the parlour. She mentioned a number of articles which she said she had bought with the money she had taken; and finding she mentioned having spent more than the amount she said she had taken, I said she must have taken more; she then admitted that she had taken a sovereign from a bag in the parlour, and had left 1 l. 12 s. at the butcher's for safety, when she went to the play. I find that her friends are very respectable.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her youth .

Reference Number: t18240218-68

Before Mr. Justice Best.

500. WILLIAM MERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , fifty-three yards of bombazeen, value 48 s. 6 d., the goods of George Lowe , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN COWLING . I am shopman to Mr. George Lowe , who lives in the City-road . On the 4th of February, I was in the shop - an alarm was given - I went out and overtook the prisoner in Plumber-street. I saw him throw this piece of bombazeen down. before I took him - I picked it up, and produce it - it is my master's, and cost 2 l. 8 s. 6 d. It stood between the glass and the street door.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it for him.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240218-69

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

501. JAMES BAKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Rowland , spinster , about the hour of three, in the night of the 28th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein eight silver spoons, value 30 s. , her property.

FRANCES CHAPMAN . I am servant to Miss Mary Rowland , who lives at No. 14, Hanover-street , Hanover-square. On the 28th of January, I went to bed at half-past ten o'clock. I had shut the front kitchen shutters, which are inner ones, myself, and the window was shut. I was alarmed at half-past two o'clock by the watchman knocking at the door; I came down, opened the door, and let him in, and in about ten minutes they brought the prisoner up the kitchen stairs.

HENRY SYKIRK . I am a watchman. On the night of the 28th of January, I was stationed in Hanover-street; and on going my rounds, at half-past two o'clock, I found Miss Rowland's front kitchen shutters and window open; I rang the bell two or three times; I saw a light in the kitchen, and called out,

"Who is down there?" Nobody answered - I rapped at the door and sprung my rattle; and after knocking two or three times a gentleman came down, who lives in the house, looked out of the window, which was open, and asked what was the matter - I told him to let me in - the servant opened the door (not Chapman). I went in and searched the kitchen all over - then went into the yard at the back of the premises, found the privy door half open, and the prisoner standing up there; I collared him, brought him into the passage, and gave him in charge of another watchman - went to the door for further assistance - came in again - took him into the parlour,

and gave him in charge of the patrol of St. James's, who searched him in my absence.

Q. When you found him in the privy, did you say any thing to him - A. I said,

"Come along, I want you" - that is all.

Q. You say in your deposition that you asked what he did there, and he said nothing. - A. I did not say so.

FREDERICK WAGNER . I am a patrol of St. James's. I heard the rattle sprung, went into the house, and saw Sykirk holding the prisoner. I laid hold of his hand; we took him into the parlour; the watchman left me; and while I was searching his waistcoat, he put his hand into his trowsers pocket; he took out six silver tea, and two silver salt spoons, and threw them down, saying,

"I know what you want - take these, that is all I have got." I found a latch key on him.

OWEN ANWYL . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, with the property. I found nothing on him. I have had them ever since, and produce them.

FRANCES CHAPMAN . They belong to my mistress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18240218-70

Before Mr. Justice Best.

502. CATHERINE DRISCOL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , at George, a pair of stays. value 10 s.; a shift, value 5 s.; a petticoat, value 5 s.; a bonnet, value 5 s.; two shirts, value 15 s.; a spencer, value 10 s.; a necklace, value 40 s.; a brooch, value 20 s.; three caps, value 40 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; a gown, value 10 s.; a thimble, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 6 s.; a scarf, value 40 s.; and a pocket, value 6 d., the goods of Matthew Aainsley , to whom she was servant , in his dwelling-house .

MATTHEW AAINSLEY . I live in Lucas-street, St. George's in the East . The prisoner was in my service. On the 1st of February I and my wife went to spend the evening with my mother-in-law, who lives in the neighbourhood. The prisoner came to the house with the child. and after she had left the child, we told her to return to the house, and gave her the key. I got home between nine and ten o'clock, in consequence of information, and found the door open, and the prisoner gone. I did not see her again till the 10th, when she was in custody.

MARY ANN AAINSLEY . I am wife of the last witness. I went home after my husband, and missed two dresses and all this property.

ROBERT ATKINSON . I am headborough of Shadwell. On the 10th of February I met the prisoner in the Commercial-road, and said I wanted her. She said

"Don't take me into custody now, Mr. Atkinson." She said she would tell me where she lived, but going down the road, she declined telling me. We walked to the watch-house together, and I took from her person a bonnet and gown which she had on, also a black silk skirt, flannel petticoat, a pocket, and a handkerchief. She said the shift she had on was her mistresses, and gave me a book, which she said was her own, and seven duplicates. I asked her about a brooch and black satin spencer; she said voluntarily that she had pawned them at a shop at the other end of the town, and left the duplicate on the counter; she did not know where the shop was.

HENRY FLOWER TURNER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief and coral necklace, pawned on the 2d of February, by the prisoner, I believe; for 5 s. The duplicate given to her is among those produced.

THOMAS SAMUEL RAVENSCROFT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a scarf, pawned by the prisoner on the 5th of February, for 6 s., I gave her one of the duplicates produced.

HENRY WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 3d of February, the prisoner pawned a lace cap; I gave her one of the duplicates produced.

MRS. AAINSLEY. All the property produced is our the lowest value of what we lost is 5 l. I had seen them all in the course of the evening, and missed none before she left - I should have missed them if they were taken before.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, on account of her youth .

Reference Number: t18240218-71

Before Mr. Justice Best.

503. JOHN ROACH was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Patrick Carroll , in the night of the 27th of January , and stealing nine awls, value 18 d.; a pair of pinchers, value 9 d.; a cup, value 6 d.; a yard of muslin, value 18 d.; half-a-yard of cambric, value 6 d.; six yards of lace, value 6 d.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , his property.

ELIZABETH CARROLL . I am wife of Patrick Carroll , we lodge in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster . The landlord does not live in the house; it is all let in lodgings - we have the first floor back room. On the night of the 27th of January, at half-past ten o'clock, I was in the front room with one of the lodgers, and thought I heard somebody in the room - I opened the door and the prisoner came out - I ran to fetch my light; he ran up to the second floor, and I followed him with a light, and saw him put down eight awls on the garret stairs; he knocked at the second floor front door, and I asked who he wanted - he said Mrs. Jones - I said

"There is no such person in the house; you villain, you have been into my room" - he said he had not; I said

"You have, for here is my husband's tools." I ran down with the awls, and called the watchman, who took him on the stairs; he dropped the muslin, cap, handkerchiefs, pinchers, and one of the awls, after I left him; I had put the cap, muslin, and handkerchiefs, into a bonnet box, just before; the street door was kept open.

JACOB BUCK . I received the property from the hands of Carroll.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a public house; a bricklayer came in, who said his master would want a man shortly, and he could get me a job. I agreed to meet him at his own house, at half-past nine o'clock; he said he lived in Crown-street, and I was to ask for Mrs. Jones - a woman in the street directed me to No. 14. I was in liquor. I met a boy on the first floor stairs; he said Jones lived on the second floor; I went up, and this woman came and asked who I wanted - she had an awl in her hand, and made a stab at me with it, I took it from her - and am innocent.

PROSECUTRIX. I did not stab at him.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-72

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

504. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 13 lbs. of silk, value 13 l.; the goods of William Gilbert , his master , in his dwelling-house ; and MARY PERRY , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM GILBERT . The prisoner Warren was my apprentice . I am a silk manufacturer . On Sunday evening, the 11th of January, I went to chapel, leaving him and four of my youngest children in care of the house. I returned about eight o'clock, and found he had left contrary to my orders. I missed nothing that evening, but on the 22d, I found by an advertisement that some silk laid at the public office; I then looked at my winder's book and found the silk sent out had been returned, but on looking at my dyer's book, and again referring to my silk book, I found I was two bundles of 14 lbs. each deficient. I found it at the office, and can swear to it, because we skein ours very large, and very different to most manufacturers; I know it by the size of the skein, and the silk is more common them most that I manufacture. On the 18th, when I returned from chapel, Warren had absconded. I examined my silk drawer then, but it is so large I could not miss the silk without referring to the books - I have not got my books here; but I am positive that on the 9th, before I gave out work to the winders, there were two bundles of 14 lbs. in the trunk, knotted in the same manner; and on the 22d I missed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLHHUS. Q. When did you see the advertisement - A. I was informed of it about a week before I ascertained my loss - the prisoner was with me then. I could not tell that I had lost any thing till I referred to the books. My servant, who keeps the book, is not here. I always stand by while he makes the entries, and call the work over to him. I know it by my manner of knotting the skein.

Q. I might make a knot by accident exactly the same - A. Perhaps you might - there is a thread tied round eight skeins, which, my dyer says, is quite different from any that he does for other people.

ROBERT JAMES HENDRIE . I am a dyer (looks at the silk). I know this to be the prosecutor's, by it being tied different to what is done by other manufacturers. His skeins are much larger, and have never any what we call left off threads, in dividing them.

Cross-examined. Q. You dye for nobody who make up their skeins so - A. No.

MARY ANN SWIFT . On Sunday, the 11th of January, I was with the prisoner, Warren; I was to meet him at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, by appointment; but he came at seven, and told me to come down in half an hour - nothing passed then; but next week he seemed agitated, and as if he wished to open his mind to somebody - I asked him what was the matter, he said Charley Britian 's sister (which I believe is Perry) was taken with a bundle. I heard so more till Friday or Saturday, when we were by the fire - (I work for the prosecutor) - I asked him what was in the bundle; I think he said silk of his master's; but I am not certain, for there were a good many girls round - and I could not hear him well; I had asked him several times before, and he said he did not like to tell me.

Q. Did you ever meet him at Charles Britian 's - A. Yes, on the Sunday night that he went away. Mr. Perry came in crying, and said he did not know what he should do with his children, and Warren said he did not think he should go back to his master - I did not ask why. I did not state to the Magistrate that I had any more conversation with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Charles Britian is Perry's brother - A. Yes. I have not seen him since.

MERCY GILBERT . I am nine years old. On Sunday, the 11th of January, my father went to church, and left me, my brother, two sisters, and Warren at home, and in about three quarters of an hour there was a ring at the bell - Warren told me not to go, for he knew what it was; I said I would, but he went before me. I followed him, and when I got to the door he was gone out without his hat. I looked down Stewart-street, and saw some one talking - I do not know whether it was him or not; a person came and talked to me, and in the mean time Warren came running from Stewart-street; I asked him who it was - he made no answer. I said I knew that it was Swift - he said nothing.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. On the 22d, I went with the prosecutor, and apprehended Warren at his father's; we then went to Perry's lodging, and apprehended her. She said that what she had stated at the office about finding the silk was true.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Perry is a married woman - A. Yes, and has three children; they were in a wretched state. She had been taken before, and discharged.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. On the 11th of January, between six and seven o'clock. I stopped Perry with this bundle of silk under her arm. I asked what she had there; she said it was a child, and I must not awake it, or it would cry - Almond who was with me, came in front, and said it was too big for a child - we took it from her, and found that it was this silk.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer, and was with Barrs. Perry said the bundle was a child; I felt it, and said it was silk or cotton; she said if she must tell the truth, it was dirty linen, which she had brought from home, but when we found what it was, she said she had found it in the street, opposite the church. It was wrapped in a handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At what time did you see her - A. About half-past six o'clock in the evening. We told her that we were officers. She was dismissed before the Magistrate.

SUSAN NOE . I have known Warren three years, and have seen him with a handkerchief like that the silk is wrapped in, but cannot swear that it is his.

WILLIAM GILBERT re-examined. I have seen Warren with this handkerchief on his neck, and am positive of it - I have picked it up in my house, and given it to him. I live in Fort-street, Spitalfields.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You will positively swear that you have seen that very handkerchief on his neck - A. I have; I cannot say when. I know it by no mark, only by its rough twill, and these holes in it; it has a red border, and is very thin in the texture. I

have a bundle of the same silk, which the Jury can compare. I have eight or twelve work people.

WARREN'S Defence. I have often found the door open of a night, and not long ago three men came in when it was open - I have found it open scores of times. People can prove they have had silk out of his warehouse unweighted. The books cannot prove his loss.

PERRY'S Defence. I was going to set up with my mother at the hospital, and met my brother, who asked me to carry that bundle for him, and had no sooner got it than I was taken. I did not think them officers, or I should not of said what I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-73

Before Mr. Justice Best.

505. JANE BLAKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Baker , on the night of the 23d of December , and stealing two pillow cases, value 1 s.; two shirts, value 8 s.; two shifts, value 5 s.; two night gowns, value 3 s.; four gowns, value 3 s.; six shirts, value 6 s.; two frocks, value 3 s.; four petticoats, value 4 s.; eight caps, value 3 s.; two aprons, value 1 s.; four pairs of stocking, value 4 s.; two tablecloths, value 3 s.; two towels, value 18 d.; a blanket, value 18 d.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; a coat, value 18 d., and two sheets, value 3 s. , his property.

ELIZA BAKER . I am the wife of Thomas Baker - we live in Euston-street, Spafields . On the 23d of December, in the morning, when I got up, upon unlocking the kitchen door, I found the window open, and all the linen, wet and dry, stolen; the window was shut the night before. The prisoner lodged in our back parlour, and had no business in the kitchen. I knocked at her door, and receiving no answer, put my hand to the lock, and found it open; she was gone - I did not see her again till the 14th or 15th of January, when she was in custody, at Mr. Creed's, Gray's lnn-lane - a great deal of my property was produced at Hatton-garden. The value of all that we lost is about 16 l.

Q. If she broke at all, she must have broken out of the house, and not into it - A. The kitchen door was locked, and I had the key, and I found it locked - there were foot marks in the yard near the window, and the trace of a person going to and coming from the window. I was not the first person up.

Cross-examined by MR. SHORT. Q. When you came down it was pretty light - A. It was just before eight o'clock - I saw her about eight o'clock the night before; she came into our parlour - she has not a key of the street door, but one of the lodgers has. I found the door shut when I came down, but not locked, as one of the lodgers go out at six o'clock. I know that the prisoner was at home at half-past ten.

COURT. Q. At what time did you go to bed - A. About eleven o'clock. The window appeared to be pushed up from the outside - it opens inward. No violence was used, either to the street door, or the kitchen door.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have some childrens' linen, pawned for 2 s. 3 d., on the 13th of January, by a woman, in the name of Jones; I believe it to be the prisoner, but cannot positively swear it.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of December, a shirt and stockings were pawned with me, for 3 s. 6 d. I cannot positively swear to the prisoner.

SAMUEL JAMES WOOD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of December, some childrens' linen was pawned, for 3 s. 6 d. I am not certain that it was by the prisoner.

WILLIAM MARSH . I am a constable. Mr. Creed, a pawnbroker, sent for me, and gave the prisoner into my charge - I found duplicates of this property on her, which I produce.

GEORGE HARVEY . Here is the duplicate which I gave the person.

SAMUEL JAMES WOOD . My duplicate is among those produced.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . Here is the duplicate I gave the person.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I have a child's coat, two pillow cases, and a pin cloth, which I found in the prisoner's lodging, at Parkins's house, Hat and Tun yard; she was in custody at the time.

HANNAH PARKINS . On Christmas-eve, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came to lodge with me, and slept in the same room with me on that night. I gave the officer those things when he came; I had bought them of her.

MRS. BAKER. The property produced is all mine. I lost the articles stated in the indictment; these are worth 2 l.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only; and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-74

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

506. JAMES SHEEN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Charlotte Elizabeth Bean , about seven o'clock in the night of the 22d of January , and stealing two glass lustres, value 4 l. her property.

HANNAH DIMKS . I am servant to Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Bean , who lives at No. 3, Fitzroy-street . On the 22d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I found the parlour window open. I shut it down, and shut the shutters - in a quarter of an hour I went into the room again and missed two lustres from the mantle-piece. I was in the room at ten o'clock in the morning; the window was shut then.

DANIEL CLEWLEY . On the 22d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw two men standing in the carriage-way in Fitzroy-square, wrapping something in a white cloth. I went up, and one ran away - it was quite dark; the other dared me with a shout - I tried to take hold of him, but he ran away, and threw the things over a wooden paling. I did not see what it was, but it rattled like plate, as I thought. I followed him, calling Stop thief! to the end of Carburton-street; he then came back. I waited till he came up to me - we made a blow at each other; I then followed him across the street, knocked him down, and nearly fell myself, and on recovering, saw him in the hands of the watchman. I left, and cannot say whether it was the prisoner.

THOMAS SIMPSON . I was in the Nelson public-house, at the corner of Carburton-street, on the 22d of January, about half-past six o'clock, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I

ran out, and saw the prisoner knocked down - I laid hold of him, and gave him to the watchman. I am sure of him.

TIMOTHY MAHONEY . I am watchman of Carburton-street. On this night, as I was calling half-past six o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running on the other side of the way. I put my lantern down to stop him - he turned round sharp, and ran towards Clewley - they met, and he fell down. Simpson took hold of him; I came up and took him.

JOHN WHALES. I am a constable. I heard an alarm at the end of the street - the watchman was holding the prisoner. I took him into a shop, and searched him, and in his pocket found the brass nozzle of a lustre, and four cut glass drops - a watchman of the square gave me four more drops; and after taking the prisoner from the office to the watch-house, between nine and ten o'clock at night, in a passage which goes through the square, I found this lustre - the brass nozzle corresponds with it, and belongs to the fellow one.

HENRY HOWARD . I am watch-house keeper. On the 22d of January, about seven o'clock, another lustre and drops were brought in by a watchman, wrapped in a white apron; and from the spot where he said he had picked it up in Fitzroy-square, I traced drops all the way, to within a few yards of the prosecutrix's house - this was between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the square, saw two men kick the nozzle, and found the drops and picked them up.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only; and not of burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-75

London Cases,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

507. ISAAC ABRAHAMS and HYMEY ABRAHAMS were indicted for a conspiracy .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GRIFFIN . I am a goldsmith, and bulliondealer , in partnership with Thomas Wilkes Barker - we live in Leadenhall-street . On or about the 4th of August, in the last year, a person, whom I believe to be Hymey Abrahams, called at my shop, about eight o'clock in the evening - I was very much engaged at my books - he produced a chain and bracelets for sale. I looked at them, and told my young man to weigh them. I said it was unusual to buy gold at that time of night - he said I might depend on its being the best gold, that a friend of his had just brought it from the East Indies - it weighed about 8 ozs., and I gave him 28 l. 15 s. for it. I offered him a cheque, which he said he could not take, for he had got to pay the money away that evening, and could take nothing but cash - he was dressed in a surtout coat, and I think a black cravat - he said he was in the trade, and was in the habit of having gold and silver, and, from his appearance I considered him a dealer. In consequence of his refusing a cheque, I drew one for 30 l., and got Tomlinson to get it changed in the neighbourhood, and find by my book that I gave him 28 l. 15 s. I have not put the weight down, for I found shortly afterwards that I was done, and have written the word

"done" in the book. I found, in an hour or less, upon examining it closely, that it was silver gilt. I did not see him again till within the last two or three months. I called on Levi, of St. Mary-axe, in consequence of information. I went there with Mr. Kidder, of Hatton-garden, and took the chain and bracelets to him. I afterwards went to the prisoner's father, Henry Abrahams - the prisoner Isaac was present, but not Hymey. I stated to the father, that a chain and bracelets, which I had bought some time ago for gold, which turned out to be silver gilt, I had traced to the possession of his son Isaac. Isaac, the father, and others, who were present, declared they had neither seen nor heard anything about it. I said I was convinced, from the information I had, that it had been in his possession. Isaac then said, it had been in his possession, but he had not sold it - that he had offered it to Mr. Levi, and he knew that I had got my information from Levi, and that he offered it only as silver-gilt - they were very abusive, and said, I might go to Hell. Isaac said he had not sold it to me or to Levi, but had sold it in the Jews' Coffee-house, with upwards of 100 l. worth of other goods - he did not know to whom. Isaac constantly dealt with me, and was in and out of my shop, and must have seen the chain there before I went to him about it - I shewed it to him once.

Q. When you were at the father's, was any doubt expressed about the chain being the same - A. No; but another brother said he was a d - d fool for owning it. I produce it - it is solid silver gilt; the weight of it deceived me - I believed it to be an Indian gold chain - it was as heavy as a hollow gold chain.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. If it had been solid gold would it not have weighed considerably more - A. Yes; gold chains are frequently made hollow. I sent next morning to several shops, to know if it had been offered. I instituted this prosecution last Sessions. I saw Isaac at my shop several times after the chain was brought. I pay the expences of the prosecution, and employed Mr. Isaacs, the attorney - I never employed him before. I did not proceed till I saw Mr. Levi. It has always been my determination to do so if I could meet with the party.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How long have you known Isaac - A. More than twelve years. I have only known Hymey two or three months. I have been to the father's house perhaps a dozen times before I bought the chain, but never saw Hymey till this transaction.

Q. When did you first see him, on your oath - A. I do not exactly know; he has come into my shop within the last two or three months. I am not concerned in a commission of bankruptcy against Hymey. Mr. Isaacs called on me (before I employed him). with one Cashmore, or Cashman; I asked his advice on the subject. They did not solicit me to prosecute; I thought, from what Cashmore said, that Mr. Isaac would know more about the party, and was induced to give him the instructions. I think I shewed the chain to the prisoner Isaac within a month after I bought it. He was a good deal among the shopkeepers, and I thought he might have seen it elsewhere. I do not swear to Hymey Abrahams, because I was much engaged at the time; he had a surtout coat on, with a black collar lined with red. Hymey brought an epergne to my shop very lately - I think it was before I saw Mr. Levi.

COURT. Q. Did you know him again - A. No, my Lord; the epergne did not suit me, and I did not buy it. He and his brother brought me a bag of silver prior to that.

Q. How came you not to stop him - A. I did not know him - it did not occur to me - I did not recollect him, as he was with his brother, who I did more business with than him. It was daylight, and the epergne was brought by daylight. He has several brothers.

MR. LAW. Q. When Hymey came after this transaction, he came in company - A. Generally with his brothers; and my business being with the brothers, I did not notice him. My attention was called to him afterwards in consequence of what Levi said. Mr. Isaacs recommended me to send the chain round the trade, to see if any one had had it offered. I called on the father by his recommendation, and proposed that I should give him a fair opporunity to return the money, if he had sold it in ignorance - he said he had never seen it.

COURT. Q. What is there in the appearance of Hymey to induce you to believe him to be the person - A. From his size, appearance, and countenance.

Q. Why do you know him better now than when he brought the silver - A. Because he has been two or three times since with his brothers. I broke one link of the chain - it is silver gilt. I have never assayed it.

JOHN TOMLINSON . I am in the service of the prosecutors, and remember the person coming to sell the chain; the defendant Hymey is the person, I have not the least doubt of it. He brought the chain, threw it down on the counter, and said a friend had brought it from the East Indies, and it was made of ducat gold. Mr. Griffin was busy marking off a lot of plate which he had bought. His brother weighed the chain by his direction - it weighed between eight and nine ounces. Mr. Griffin had not enough money, and asked him to take a cheque; he said his friend was going into the country next morning, and wanted the cash. Mr. Griffin drew a cheque for 30 l., which I got changed, and Mr. Griffin paid him; and between ten and eleven o'clock that night, we found that it was not gold. I took it round the trade next day, to ascertain whether any shopkeepers had had it offered, in order to find out the parties who sold it. I did not see Hymey again till I saw him in Duke's-place, two or three months ago, I charged him with having sold it - he denied it, but would not give his name or address at first, but did afterwards. I never recollect seeing him in the shop, except when he offered the chain; the chain is silver gilt.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How have you tried it - A. Mr. Griffin filed it. I swear that there is no gold in it. I was not at home when the epergne or silver were brought.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Was it after you had seen Alexander Levi , that you charged Hymey with being the person - A. Yes. I knew where old Abrahams lived; but did not know that Hymey was his son; my master deals with his brothers. I was assisting Mr. Griffin in putting away the plate when he came; I think he had a dark olive coat, and a black stock on - my master never told me what coat he had on. I mentioned to my master today, that he had an olive coat on; I never mentioned it to him before that I recollect.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Mr. Levi say anything to you before you saw this man in Duke's-place - A. I had called on him about the chain - he had said nothing to me about Hymey.

COURT. Q. How came your master and you to have conversation about the dress to-day - A. He was mentioning something, and I said he had a dark olive coat on; I believe it was in answer to a question he put. I said nothing about the black stock.

ALEXANDER LEVI . I live in Bury-street, St. Mary-axe. In the early part of last year, the prisoner Isaac came to my shop, and produced a chain; it was the one produced (looking at it.) He proposed to sell it as gold, and asked 4 l. an ounce - I looked at it, and having some doubt about it, gave it to my brother to have it tried with a file - he called out,

"Don't file it;

"I said

"The file will not hurt it, if it be gold;" he said,

"No, don't file it, for if it is not gold, I can return it to the person from whom I had it." I said it was fit it should be filed, as if it should not be gold, it should not be further offered - he said he insisted on having it back in the state he brought it. I handed it over to him, saying I doubted its being gold; he went away with it. I saw him again two or three days after, and told him I understood the chain and bracelets were sold in the neighbourhood for gold, and 27 l. or 28 l. obtained for them - I had heard that from Mr. Griffin's man, who had called to enquire if such an article had been offered me, by a person pretending himself to be the mate of an Indiaman; the answer Isaac made was

"I did not get half that money for it." I had promised the man I would make enquiry about it. Tomlinson called the following day, and I told him what had passed; I did not tell him it was Isaac Abrahams , but that I understood he had not given anything like that money, and need not complain about his bargain.

Q. Why not tell him the person's name - A. I wished to ascertain the fact, as he said he had not had half that money. I thought one had taken advantage of the other. I only know Hymey by sight - I knew the family, but did not know whether he lived at home; he was constantly about the neighbourhood. The chain is made up as they are made here.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you call it foreign or English manufacture - A. I should suppose it English; it is like a foreign make in some degree.

JUDAS HART . I am clerk to Mr. Levi and remember Isaac bringing the chain produced; I think it was in the after part of the day - he came in and said,

"Will you give 4 l. an ounce for this chain?" Mr. Levi told me to try it by the file; he called out,

"No, it shan't be filed;" Mr. Levi said, if it was not gold it should be discovered - he said,

"No, I shan't have it tried, I can return it to the person I had it from," and insisted on having it back. I saw him again a day or two after; Mr. Levy told him it had been sold for 27 l. or 28 l.; he said he did not get half that money for it.

JOHN KIDDER . I live at Hatton-garden. I accompanied the prosecutor to Levi, and received information from him respecting the chain. I went to the prisoners' father's house, Bevis-marks, with Mr. Griffin; Isaac was present. Mr. Griffin stated to him that he had bought a chain of some person, who he did not know, but had traced the possession of it to him; that if it had been sold

to him without knowing that it was not gold, he gave him an opportunity of returning the money, which he should expect him to do - Isaac said he had had the chain in his possession some length of time, and I think he said he had bought it at Bath (the chain was produced - he did not question it being the same); he said he had offered it to several persons in the trade, among whom was Mr. Levi, for 6 s. an ounce; but that he eventually sold it among a quantity of goods, to the amount of upwards of 100 l., to a Foreigner (at the coffee-house), whom he did not know, but should know him if he saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Mr. Griffin was with you, and heard all this - A. Yes. The name of the coffee-house was not mentioned, I am certain. I know dealings are carried on at the Jews' coffee-house.

ALEXANDER LEVI re-examined. I have examined one link of the chain; it appears to be composed of silver of an inferior quality; it certainly is not gold.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN , JUN. I am the prosecutor's brother. I was at home when the chain and bracelets were bought; to the best of my belief the defendant Hymey is the man, but we were very busy, and I will not swear to him.

MR. PLATT to LEVI. Q. Have you anything to do with the commission of bankruptcy against Abrahams - A. I am a creditor. I have not employed Mr. Isaacs to oppose him. I have been present when he has opposed him.

Q. Has not that opposition been carried on with a great deal of zeal - A. I call it a deserving zeal, as I have reason to believe the accounts very incorrect. My debt is between 200 l. and 300 l. Isaacs is not solicitor under the commission.

MESSRS. ANDREWS and PLATT addressed the Jury.

ISAAC ABRAHAMS - GUILTY .

HYMEY ABRAHAMS - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-76

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant,

508. BARTHOLOMEW VANDEEM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a bed, value 30 s.; a blanket, value 2 s.; a sheet, value 2 s.; and a pillow, value 2 s.; the goods of Peter Cook Barrand , in a lodging room .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - Aged 34.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240218-77

509. ANN COOPER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of January , a pair of boots, value 5 s.; the goods of Thomas Deeble Dutton , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

THOMAS DEEBLE DUTTON . On the 9th of January, I sent a quantity of goods in a basket from my house, in the Borough, by the van, to my shop at Brighton; they were worth 38 l., among the rest were eighteen pair of women's boots - on the following week I received information that one of my shopmen was in custody; and on the 17th, I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings, Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square; the officer asked if she had any boots or shoes in her possession - she said not; we found a pair of boots in her drawer. She then said she had bought them in Cranbourn-alley. When we got to the office, I asked to see the boots she had on, and they were also mine - she then acknowledged receiving them from my shopman; these were not taken from the basket - but those found at her lodgings were.

THOMAS CROFT . I am in Mr. Dutton's service at Brighton. I received the basked from town, and selected a pair of boots, and put them at the back of the shop - and in the evening they were missing. Thomas Cubit the shopman is now in custody, charged with robbing his master.

JOHN WHALES . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's room, and asked if she knew Cubit; she said she did - I said he was in custody, and asked if she had heard or received anything from him - she said No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-78

510. JAMES HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , seven knives, value 20 s.; and six forks, value 10 s. , the goods of William Lovegrove .

WILLIAM LOVEGROVE . I keep the Percy Coffee-house . The prisoner was my waiter , and left about nine months ago, after which I repeatedly missed property. I missed this on the 24th of January, and went to the prisoner's shop, in Bluecoat-buildings, where he sold roasted corn; the landlady of the house produced these knives and forks. I can swear to the knives by the maker's name, and a crest which is on them.

Prisoner. Q. Did you miss anything while I was in your service - A. Repeatedly, and since.

PHOEBE M'GRASP. The prisoner occupied part of my shop, in Bluecoat-buildings, Butcherhall-lane. He came in January, and on the Monday week after he first came he gave me these knives and forks to take care of.

Prisoner to MR. LOVEGROVE. Q. How did you buy these knives - A. My nephew was servant to the Honourable Mr. Upton, at College, and when he left College he gave them to my nephew. They have Mr. Upton's crest on them. I missed them on the 24th, and had them in use on the 18th; I had not seen him about the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. - I bought them in my own shop.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-79

510. RICHARD GARDENER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a coat, value 4 l. , the goods of Peter Tree , Esq.

JOHN DEACON . I am servant to Mr. Peter Tree , who lives in Portland-place. My livery coat is kept in the carriage, which stood in Beaufort Mews . On a Friday about the 21st of November, I went into the Mews, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and missed it. The prisoner was occasionally employed about the Mews; it was safe at one o'clock.

ISAAC LAZARUS . I was calling

"Old Clothes" in Arlington-street, on Monday, the 23d or 24th of November, and saw the prisoner standing outside the Blue Posts, public house; he called me into the house, and offered me a box coat; I bought it of him for 2 l., and spent 2 s. I sold it to Simmons, of Newington.

THOMAS YOUNG . I keep a coffee-shop in Woodstock-street; I saw the prisoner following Lazarus with the coat - he borrowed 11 s. of me to pay him for it.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I found the coat at Simmons's. Lazarus pointed it out to me, about a month after the robbery.

ISAAC LAZARUS . I know this to be the coat by a Hebrew mark which I saw Simmons put on it. It had no buttons on it.

JOHN DEACON . This is the coat - when stolen it had crest buttons on, but now it has plain ones.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-80

512. ABEL GARNHAM and ANN GARNHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , two seals, value 1 l.; a watch-key, value 5 s.; two brooches, value 10 s.; three pairs of ear-rings, value 14 s.; a necklace, value 10 s.; two pencil-cases, value 5 s.; and a ring, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Joseph M'Phael .

CHARLES JOSEPH M'PHAEL. I am a jeweller , and live on Fish-street-hill. On Saturday, the 14th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, a pawnbroker called on me, and produced a pair of coral ear-rings, two pencil-cases, a ring, and other articles, which were mine, and had been taken from my window. I did not miss them till he produced them. I had taken stock five weeks previous, and they were safe then - the male prisoner was in my service.

JOHN FLOWER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of February the female prisoner pawned two pencil-cases with me.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury. On the 3d February the female prisoner pawned two gold seals and a pair of ear-rings. On the 13th she pawned a necklace, ear-rings, and brooch, for 1 l.; and on Saturday last she pawned more things.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I live with Mr. Salmon, of Bishops-gate-street. On the 7th of February the female prisoner pawned two pins for 4 s., and on the 13th a pair of earrings.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I apprehended the male prisoner at his master's - went with him to his lodgings, and in a tin box found the duplicates of the property produced. Before he knew what I came about, he told his master how sorry he was that he had taken the property from the window, but that it was through distress, and said he had employed his wife to pawn them. I found a quantity of duplicates for childrens' clothes which had been pledged before these things.

MR. M'PHAEL. He had 24 s. a-week. I have since learnt that he has four children, and was in a most deplorable state.

ABEL GARNHAM - GUILTY. Aged 33.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

ANN GARNHAM - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-81

Before Mr. Justice Best.

513. SARAH AMELIA MILFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , at St. George, four sheets, value 30 s.; three tablecloths, value 20 s.; a bedgown, value 3 s.; and a pair of shoes, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Farley , to whom she was servant , in his dwelling-house and MARY YOUNG was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen against the statute .

THOMAS FARLEY . I live in the Commercial-road, in the parish of St. George . The prisoner Milford was in my service for three years; she gave me notice to quit on the 4th of November, to spend Christmas with her friends, and was to return to me again. I paid her her wages on the 4th of December; she took her boxes and left on that evening, and was to return into my service; she called next evening and had tea, and went off in the evening. A trunk, containing this property, was always kept in her room, locked. On the 16th of January it was unlocked in my presence, and four sheets, two pairs of pillowcases, three tablecloths, a white cotton night-gown, and a silk handkerchief, were missing. I apprehended her in the street, and found a silk handkerchief on her person which was taken from the trunk; nobody could get to it but her. A pair of shoes were found in her box, and one silk handkerchief was taken from another part of the house. I told her I wanted her on some business which I dare say she guessed; she said she knew nothing about it. The officer came up, and asked where she lodged? She said in Dock-street, and took us there. I found the shoes in her box; I asked if she knew anything of the property - she said she did not, but that Mary Young , who lived in that house, knew where the things were; we took Young into custody in the house - she said she knew nothing about it. I neither threatened nor promised them; they began accusing each other - Milford said

"I never should have thought of doing this, if it had not been for you, and to you alone I attribute all this misfortune." They found fault with each other. Young said the property was pawned, but she had lost her pocket the day before with the duplicates in it, but she would go and make an affidavit, and get the property back. They were taken to Lambeth-street Office. Young took me round to seven or eight different pawnbrokers, where she said she had pawned the property, and I found my goods pawned there.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a constable of Lambeth-street. I went with Farley - his account is correct. I took a silk handkerchief off Milford's neck, and found a pair of shoes in her box; I got a pair of pillowcases from Reynolds, a pawnbroker, at Ratcliff-highway - Young took me there, and round to all the pawnbrokers; I get a tablecloth from Harris, Commercial-road; a sheet from Kennedy - she took me to all these places. I found two duplicates in Milford's box for goods pawned at Reynolds's, and one in Young's drawer, for property pawned at Hull's.

- HULL. I am a pawnbroker. On the 31st of December Young pawned a handkerchief for 1 s., and on the 24th of December a sheet for 5 s.

THOMAS FARLEY . This handkerchief is mine, and was in the trunk, and the other in the house. All the property produced is mine. The value of all that I lost is 3 l. and more. I am certain they were all in my house on the 24th of December, and on that night I left her alone in care of the premises, while I and my wife went out. Young came to my house twice, to inquire for Milford. I asked what she wanted; she made no reply.

Q. Young said to Milford, you got me into all this trouble - A. Milford said so to Young, and said,

"If it was not for you this would not have happened, for it was an set I

never did before." I believed her to have been a good character; I trusted her with everything, and she conducted herself properly.

Prisoner MILFORD. Young is innocent of knowing that they were stolen.

MILFORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

YOUNG - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-82

514. JAMES NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a coat, value 2 l.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; a hat, value 12 s.; a pair of boots, value 2 s.; a pair of gloves, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; a comb, value 1 d.: a key, value 1 d.; a half sovereign, and half a crown, the property of David Reid , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Thompson .

DAVID REID . I lodge in the dwelling-house of Alexander Thompson , who lives in Cecil-court, St. Martin's-lane ; the prisoner came to lodge there on the 15th of January, and slept in the next room to me; the articles stated in the indictment, with half a sovereign and half a crown, were in my bed-room - the whole was worth more than 5 l. - it was all safe on the night of the 19th. I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock, and on awaking in the morning it was all gone, and the prisoner also. I have only found my boots, comb, and key.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I live in Cecil-court, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields , and rent the house; Reid lodged there; and the prisoner came on the 16th of January, in a destitute state, stating that he had been laying about the streets three or four nights, and I put him in sleep in the room adjoining Reid's; he slept there till the 19th, and on that morning he was missing. I saw him in custody on the Thursday following.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Charing-cross, on the 22d of January. I found a comb and two keys on him, and a pair of boots on his feet; he said he was glad that he was taken, for he wanted to go out of the country.

DAVID REID . The comb, boots, and keys are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been for sixteen years in his Majesty's 21st Regiment, or Royal Fusileers , and after coming home set up in business at Edinburgh, was unfortunate, and got a recommendation for the Caledonian Society, but could not get two subscribers to sign it. I was destitute of every thing.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 39.

Reference Number: t18240218-83

515. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , at St. Giles in the Fields , three silver cups, value 9 l.; a silver soup ladle, value 3 l.; two silver butter ladles, value 3 l.; a silver gravy spoon, value 2 l.; thirty-six silver spoons, value 22 l.; and six forks, value 6 l., the goods of John Gordon , to whom he was servant , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. MARY VICTORIA GORDON . I am the wife of John Gordon , a merchant , who lives in the parish of St. Giles. The prisoner was our footman for three months - I have known him twelve months. On the 1st of February, he went off without notice, and I missed three cups, a soup ladle, two butter ladles, a gravy spoon, nine or eleven tea, eleven table, and six dessert spoons, and six silver forks - they were all silver, and worth about 40 l. - we have recovered none of it - he had the charge of the plate - it was kept in a sideboard drawer, in the front parlour, except the silver cups, which were in a closet.

ANN PYE . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 1st of February, at seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the kitchen, and said he was going out for milk; he never returned. About eight o'clock, when tea went up, the spoons were missing - we looked for the plate, and it was all gone. I had seen some of the table spoons and a dessert spoon on the kitchen table that day, the prisoner was in the kitchen at the time - I did not see him do anything to them - I saw him bring the soup-ladle into the kitchen in the evening; he was the only man servant; the key of the door, which he kept to let himself in, was found on the sideboard, in the front parlour.

GEORGE MARSH . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On Saturday the 7th of February, I heard a cry of Stop thief! looked out of my door, and saw the prisoner pass. I followed him. A coachman on horseback was pursuing him. I followed him to Nassau-street, and lost him there. I am sure it was him. I went again in three-quarters of an hour, and saw him coming out of Union-mews - he ran away - I pursued, and lost sight of him again, but caught sight of him in Little Argyle-street; followed and took him in Cleveland-street, and asked why he ran away from the coachman; he said he did not know. I searched him, but found nothing.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office by Marsh, charged with this robbery, which he denied.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out and met a young man, who told me that I belonged to the Militia. I said I did. He said he was coming to take me up as a deserter, for it had been called out. I said, if so, I would not be taken as a deserter, for I would go and join them.

MRS. GORDON re-examined. I have a house-maid, a lady's-maid, and cook; only the cook (Pye) was at home on that evening - the prisoner took all his clothes away with him.

ANN PYE . There was no other servant in the house but myself and the prisoner.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18240218-84

516. JOHN HAINES , THOMAS SUTTON , and JOSEPH DAVIES , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , at St. Mary-le-bone , a coat, value 4 l., the goods of Henry Hayne , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Albion Slack .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am servant to Joseph Albion Slack , who lives in Devonshire-street, Portland-place , St. Mary-le-bone, and keeps the house. On Saturday, the 24th of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was at home, and answered a ring at the bell. I found the prisoner Sutton there; he asked if that was Mr. Slack's; I said Yes, and he gave me this note (producing it). I took it up to my master, it was sealed up, and the instant I gave it to my master I heard the street-door open. I had shut the door, and left Sutton in the passage, as he requested an answer. I ran out instantly, found the door open, and missed a coat which hung in the hall, near the door, and he was gone. I ran out, and saw him running, with the coat on his arm; no one was with him. I pursued,

calling Stop thief! some one ran from the corner, and called out Stop him! but he got away. The coat belonged to Mr. Henry Hayne , who was dining with my master - I have not seen it since. I am sure Sutton is the man. It was a new coat, and cost six guineas, and was worth 4 l. I am certain. I know nothing of the other prisoners.

Prisoner SUTTON. Q. You said at the office, you did not know which of us it was - A. No, I did not; when I was at the lock-up house the place was rather dark - I had not a good view of them, and I did point to Davies, and say I thought that was him, but I should know better when they came out. I am now confident of it being Sutton - I pointed him out immediately as he came to the office.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I apprehended Sutton and Davies, in consequence of information about another transaction, on the 13th of February.

SUTTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

HAINES - NOT GUILTY .

DAVIES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-85

517. JOHN HAINES , JOSEPH DAVIES , and THOMAS SUTTON , were again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , a cloak, value 20 s. , the goods of John Howard March .

HAINES pleaded autrefoits aquit, * which plea was admitted.

MR. JOHN HOWARD MARCH. I am a native of America . On the 9th of February, I lost a cloak from No. 12, York-buildings . I heard a cry of Stop thief! went down, found the street door open, and the cloak laying on the step. Haines was brought back, and charged with stealing it; he begged I would forgive him, and said he was induced to do it on account of his poverty.

JAMES SWAINE . On the 9th of February, Sutton brought a letter to our house, about seven o'clock, and said,

"Is this Mr. Smith's?" I said No, it was Mr. March's; he went away, and in three-quarters of an hour Haines brought a letter, and said,

"Is this Mr. March's?" I said Yes. He said,

"Give him this letter." I suspected something and took it up, but instead of going into the drawing-room, I looked over the bannisters, and saw him take this cloak. I ran down and followed him; he struck me, and flung it in my face. I know nothing of the other prisoners.

JOHN STAPLES . When I apprehended the prisoners, I found a seal on Davies, which corresponds with the seal on the letter sent to Mr. March.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-86

518. WILLIAM GREEN and JAMES WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a pair of coach springs, value 10 l., the goods of William Hopkins and Daniel Hopkins , in their dwelling-house .

DANIEL HOPKINS . I live in David-street, Berkley-square , and am in partnership with my brother William. On Friday, the 30th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I received a pair of springs from Bailey, whose master had made them - he put them down in the shop, and I shut the door after him, and saw them safe at half-past ten o'clock. I went out early next morning, and know nothing more of them till I found them at the office, on Wednesday - they are worth full 10 l. I live in the house, but my brother does not, and has nothing to do with the dwelling-house.

ROBERT CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Phillips, a coach spring maker. I made these springs, and know them to be those which I sent to the prosecutor, by Bailey.

GEORGE BAILEY . I am Mr. Phillips's porter, and carried these springs to the prosecutors', and know them by a private mark on them.

SAMUEL WHITE . I am porter to Messrs. Hopkins. On the 31st of January, at half-past seven o'clock, when I went to work, the springs laid in the shop.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. On the morning of the 31st of January, in consequence of information, I went to search the house of one Martin, in Strutton-ground, and found these coach springs - he is a jobbing smith.

JOHN COOPER . I went with Handley; his account is correct.

MARGARET MARTIN . My husband is a lock-smith. I was very ill in bed with my husband; my little sister, Mary Ann got up, and opened the shop - we live in the kitchen. The prisoners brought these springs in, and left them; we thought it very odd. They said they would leave them, and call again, as we were abed. I knew Green before. All they said was,

"We will leave these, and call again;" they went away, and when we got up, my husband looked at them, and desired if they came again, to make them take them away; they did not come, but the officers came, and said they were informed we had them; I said,

"Yes, there they are." I am sure the prisoner brought them.

Prisoner WELLS. I understand her husband has feed the officers not to be taken himself, as they were found under the bed - Witness, They left them at the bedside; my little sister put them under to sweep the room.

JOSEPH COOPER . They were under the bed. She gave them up immediately I asked for them.

MARY ANN MARTIN . I am fifteen years old, and lodge with my sister-in-law. I am sure the prisoners are the men who brought the springs; they asked if my brother was at home - I said he was not up; they brought them into the back room, and said they would leave them till he got up, and laid them down at the bedside. I have seen them both before in the street.

GREEN'S Defence. We went to her place a second time, and I saw the man twice after that.

GREEN - GUILTY. Aged 19.

WELLS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing but not in a dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-87

519. JOHN DUNN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mark Skerrett , on the afternoon of the 10th of February (Eleanor, his wife being therein), and stealing a shawl, value 10 s.; a shirt, value 3 s.; a seal, value 12 s.; a pair of bracelets. value 8 s., and a thimble, value 3 d. , his property.

ELEANOR SKERRETT . I am the wife of Mark Skerrett - we keep the Bricklayer's-arms, public-house , South Molton-street - the prisoner frequented our house - he came between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 10th of

February, stopped an hour, and went out - he came again about two, and stopped till half-past three, during that time I missed him from the bar, and went up stairs. I kept the key of the bed-room, banging in the bar, and missed it. I tried the door of my bed-room on the first floor, and found it unlocked. I went away, thinking he might be in an upper room, and then saw him come out of the bed-room, and asked how he came there - he asked what I made a piece of work about: I asked if he had taken anything from the room; he told me to look, and said he had not. I have three chests of drawers there - I looked, and missed nothing. I called the pot-boy, and the prisoner declared to him that he had nothing, and was going down stairs; I called out to two gentlemen who were in the bar; they stopped him. The officer was fetched, and found a pair of bracelets and a silver thimble on him, which I had seen in my room three weeks before.

Prisoner. Q. Was I out of the room when you saw me - A. Yes; I saw him coming out on the landing-place, close to the door; he was liberated, but finding more property in the parlour, he was brought back.

WILLIAM SMART. I am servant to the prosecutor. I was called up, and took hold of the prisoner - he attempted to go down; I took hold of him, called for help, and two gentlemen came from the bar, and stopped him. The officer found the bracelets, three keys, and a thimble on him.

MATTHEW HARKER . I travel for a house in the City. On the 10th of February, I was in the bar, heard Smart call, and in five or six minutes heard a bustle on the stairs - I stopped the prisoner coming down, took him into the bar, and saw him give up a shawl and shirt; he went to the end of the room, and sat down, pulled something from his pocket, and tore it up. I heard something fall, and after that Mrs. Skerrett said he might go; I went to where he had sat, and found a gold seal and three picklock keys. I called out not to let him go, and he was brought back.

MARY MANNING . I am servant at this house. I locked the bed-room door, and hung the key in the bar.

CHARLES OSBORNE . I am a tailor. I was at the house, and saw the prisoner go out of the bar into the tap-room. I saw the bracelets found on him.

ANDREW ROBERTS. I am a constable. I searched him, and found a pair of bracelets, a thimble, and three small skeleton keys on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of Larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-88

520. ROBERT SWEET was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 29th of January , seven plants, value 7 l., and seven garden pots, value 6 d., the goods of our Lord the King , which on the same day, at Kew, in the County of Surrey, had been feloniously stolen, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of William Townsend Aiton .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SMITH . I am assistant to Mr. William Townsend Aiton , who is gardener at his Majesty's gardens, at Kew . On Thursday, the 29th of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, my attention was called to the propagation house; the front window was about two inches open - a plant called Banksia Grandis, which had been placed within three inches of the window was gone. I looked round the house, and missed one Jacquinia Mexicana, one Serah Koah, one Eugenia Mallaccensis , one Gustavia Augusta, and two Calamus Nigers, from different places in the pits; the persons must have gone all round the pits to take them. I went to the front of the house, and saw footmarks; they could not have been taken out through the window. I informed Mr. Alton, who took me to Bow-street, and I accompanied Ruthven to Mr. Colvill's nursery, at Chelsea. I went first to the prisoner's house, and saw him; Ruthven stepped forward, and said,

"I am Ruthven, of Bow-street, I want the box you received this morning from Kew-bridge" - he stood about two minutes, appeared struck, and said nothing. Ruthven then told him that he knew all the circumstances of the case, and it was of no use to hesitate, and there was only two ways for him, either to go to the watch-house, or deliver up the box; he said he would go and shew us the box - he took us to Mr. Colvill's house, adjoining the nursery ground. He (Sweet) asked for Colvill, and told him that we were come about the box that came that morning; before Colvill answered, Ruthven stepped forward, and told him his name; Colvill said to the prisoner,

"You know nothing about the box, and I know nothing about the box" - Ruthven said it was of no use, for that Sweet had brought him there to receive the box, and he would search all the gardens over, but he would find it, and it was of no use to hesitate. I was sent to fetch a coach to take him to the watch-house, and brought one within twenty yards of Colvill's door - I found the garden door open when I returned, and no person there. I knocked at the house door; Colvill came running down the street opposite, and spoke to me.

Q. Did you afterwards go to a house in Colvill's garden - A. Yes; Ruthven and Mr. Sweet were there - the door was locked. Colvill found a key after some difficulty, and let us in. Ruthven then said to Sweet,

"Now, where is the box?" He looked round the shed, and could not find it. Ruthven then asked where the plants were - the door of the plant-house was opened - we all entered, and went along the passage. Sweet took a plant down, and asked me if that was one - I said No - he then took another, and asked if that was one - I said No; I did not want that at present, but we had lost that plant some time ago. I suspected that it belonged to the gardens. Ruthven said,

"Come and look here," where Sweet was looking - I did so, and immediately recognized two plants, the Gustavia Augusta, and a Calamus Niger. I said to Sweet,

"I want a small plant of Banksia Grandis;" he went to an adjoining house, took it off a back shelf, and gave it to me. I knew them all well - all these three were under my care, on Wednesday, the 28th. I then said to Sweet,

"I want an Eugenia, of the species Mallaccensis;" he said that was in another house - we went to that other house - it was with some difficulty the key was found by Mr. Colvill. Sweet picked the plant out from among other plants. I then said, there was a Jacquinia. Colvill said," We have different species of them." I described it as having

pointed leaves, and Sweet produced it. I then described another plant, with large leaves and glands on the foot-stalk, which I have no name for but Seerah Koah, the native name - it comes from the East Indies. Sweet took us to a house, and found it among other plants, after some difficulty. I said, there was another plant. Sweet said,

"No: did you not get the two Calamus Nigers?" - I said, No; we had only got one - we went back to the first house, and found it in the same place as the other - I knew them all on seeing them - they were in larger pots than when they were at Kew - they are of great value, and are not to be found in this country, except at Kew. The Calamus Niger, Seerah Koah, and Banksia Grandis, have been previously taken from Kew, and there are now some of them. One Michael Hogan was a gardener employed at Kew on the 28th; he absconded on Friday, the 30th, six days' wages were due, which he has not called for.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been employed at Kew - A. Two years. There are a great many work-people there at times.

Q. Has not Mr. Aiton the privilege of buying - and does he not part with some of the plants at times, without consulting anybody - A. I do not know; he may allow cuttings to be given to growers - he has given plants away, but by what authority I do not know - he has ordered them to be packed up and sent away. We often receive plants at Kew without any letter intimating from whom they come.

Q. Is not that the constant habit of botanists - A. Yes: we receive boxes which remain for a week before we open them to see what is in them, because we do not know where they come from. The prisoner was in Mr. Colvill's service - he has a most extensive nursery, part in King's-road, and another is called the Grosvenor nursery - we found the plants at the Grosvenor nursery. The prisoner lives five minutes walk from there. I told the prisoner that the box came from Brentford, or Kew-bridge, they were both mentioned. Ruthven said,

"I have come for the box you received from Kew-bridge, or Brentford," I am not certain which. Colvill strongly denied knowing anything of the box, and then Sweet denied it. Handcuffs were then put on him, and I was sent for a coach.

Q. You mentioned to the prisoner the plants you came in quest of, and he produced some to you of, the same description - A. He produced the plants I wanted - I saw none of the same species with them.

Q. Did you not claim two plants as stolen from Kew, and afterwards admit that you were in error - A. I said, there was one I suspected had been stolen from Kew, but in that I might be wrong. Sweet took it down and asked if it was one - I said,

"No; we lost that a fortnight ago." I have said, that I may be mistaken in that one. The plants were not in the same pots, or the same mould, as when at Kew.

Q. Does not every botanist prepare mould in his own way - A. Yes; when we receive plants we put them into our own mould, but we never open the boxes till we are ordered. The prisoner has published a great deal upon botany.

GEORGE THOMAS JOSEPH RUTHVEN . I am principal officer of Bow-street. In consequence of information, I accompanied Mr. Smith to the prisoner's house, Old King's-road, Chelsea. On Thursday evening, the 29th of January, about ten o'clock, he came to the door - I told him who I was - and that I had come to him for a box brought to him that morning, from Brentford - he hesitated for some time. I told him not to deceive himself, for I knew all the circumstances, and that the man brought it to him, about ten, or between ten and eleven o'clock that morning - he hesitated and then said he had received a box. I asked if he would shew it to me - he hesitated, and I told him I must take him to Bow-street; he said he had the box, and would shew it me. I at that time had only asked for the box received from Brentford - he fetched his hat - and walked with me to Mr. Colvill's, which is about one-third of a mile off. As we went along, I told him the box contained plants - that there were five or seven in it - and asked if he had opened it - he said Yes; but he did not know how many it contained. When we came to Mr. Colvill's house, he rang the bell, and asked for Mr. Colvill, who came; he said I had come about the box; and before Colvill answered, I told him my name, and who I was - Colvill said to Sweet

"You know nothing about the box. - I know nothing about the box" - I said that would not do, and turning round to Sweet, said

"Are you inclined to say where the box is" - he said

"No, I do not know" - I said that equivocation would not do for me - for he had brought me there to get it - I took him into the house - handcuffed him, and sent Smith for a coach to convey him away, as he would not tell me - and after some hesitation he said he would shew me - Mr. Colvill said to him again,

"You know nothing about them, or where they came from - I know nothing about them; we have many things sent us, and we do not know where they come from" - I, Sweet, and Colvill, then left the parlour to go into the grounds - it was then nearly eleven o'clock - when we got outside the door, Colvill separated from us and went out of the grounds, fearing there was something wrong; I took Sweet without a light across the ground to the place where he was going to shew me - he took me to a place called the Sand-house - I asked him for the key; he could not find it - I endeavoured to lift the gate up; he said he could open it; which he did - and about that time Colvill came in a direction from his own house - calling

"Sweet, Sweet, where are you;" he said

"Here" - and immediately he came up, he took him by the arm, and said

"I know nothing about the box - do you know what you are at?" I told Colvill that would not do, that he had brought me there to find the box, and if he did not produce the key, I should find something and break it open. Colvill fetched the key and a light afterwards; we opened the door, went into the sand-house, and there was two boxes; Smith said he did not think it was either of them; we then went into the plant-house - he walked down the paths - I asked him to shew the plants, as it would save a great deal of trouble - he pointed to one and asked if that was one. Smith who had joined us, when Colvill came up, said

"No," he pointed to another - Smith said

"That is not what we are looking for, that we lost about a fortnight ago." Sweet went to another end of the path, I asked him again to shew us the plants, as it would save a great deal of trouble; I asked him two or three times over; he made no answer; but seeing his eye directed to a place over the shelves, I

called to Smith, and said,

"Take the light, and look there;" he looked, and picked out two pots. Smith asked for another pot; he took us to another house, and and in a corner, nearly at the top, Sweet reached the Banksia Grandis - he asked for another. Sweet took us across the ground to another house, in which was found two more; he asked for a sixth; we went to another house, and found that - Smith then said there was another plant. Sweet said

"Did you get three;" and I said

"No; only two." We went back to where we got the first two; and on the same spot found the third; we then went into the seed shop; and saw one Durdon; and Sweet asked him for the box that came to him that morning. Durdon pointed to a box; but we did not think that was it; he said there had been a second box which was sent away. Colvill, Sweet, and Durdon, agreed that this was the box (producing it). I said it was two small to contain them; but they said they came in smaller pots - I asked Sweet where the direction was, which was on the box, or if he knew where it was; he said No. I then began to search him - he then said

"Perhaps I have got it in my pocket - and produced this from his pocket - (handing it in). Read,

"Mr. R. Sweet, at Mr. Colvill's nursery, King's-road, Chelsea, to be delivered immediately." He had got one of his hands out of the handcuffs, as he has a small hand - I compared the nail holes in the direction with the box - but there were no nail holes in the box; the direction could not have been on that box. On Saturday morning, between King's-road and the office, I asked him if he knew Hogan, who worked at the King's gardens, at Kew - he said No; he did not recollect - I told him to be careful of his answers, for if he told me what was not true, and I proved to the contrary, it would act against him; and told him I believed there was but one Irishman worked in the Botanical garden - and I meant him, (Philip;) he said Yes; he believed he had seen him, but did not know him - I said if I proved that he had written to him and was acquainted with him, it would be against him; he said then that he did know him very well; and had talked to him at Mr. Colvill's garden, about plants; and that he knew other workmen at Kew gardens.

Q. This happened on Saturday; had he been at large - A. On Friday night I went to the gardens again, and could not get to the office to appear against him, and he was discharged, and on Saturday I took him again.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You found him still at his own house - A. Yes; there was a nursery where he resides. I do not know whether that is Colvills. There was nothing on the direction of the box to inform him that it came from Brentford; he said he had taken out the plants, but did not know whether there were five or seven.

Q. Why not take the master in whose grounds you found them - A. I received information that he was concerned; and the box was directed to him - the master could not get away, and I could not take both - there was three of us, and the plants to go in the coach - Colvill was examined at Bow-street, and held to bail; bail was offered for the prisoner. After the two first plants were found, he pointed out the rest; the box produced had a cover to it, but I have not brought it. I left it at Mr. Aiton's, and do not know what has become of the cover. I am not aware that this is a prosecution from Bow-street. I have given no evidence on any bill against Colvill. I felt it my duty to ask the prisoner the questions I did - it was to ascertain who was the thief.

Q. Did you say to him

"you won't do me to-day, though you got the better of me yesterday" - A. I said so to the master, who made a false representation to get him at liberty.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has the cover of that box any mark or writing on it - A. None; I think it impossible that the plants could have been put into it.

MARY ANN NORTH . My husband keeps the Waggon and Horses public-house, Brentford; Limpus's Isleworth coach stops there every morning at eight o'clock. On Wednesday the 28th of January, at half-past eight o'clock at night, Charles Noyes brought a box - it was directed to Sweet - the direction produced was on it (looking at it.) I believe it to be the same - I read it, and put the box down in the bar, and next morning our hostler took it out of my hand, and gave it to Orkshot, who was with the coach. I booked it, and have my book here (reads)

"Sweet, King's-road, Chelsea, 28th."

THOMAS ORKSHOT . I am a tallow-chandler. On the morning of the 29th, I received a box from Mrs. North - the direction produced was on it. I put it into the back boot of the coach, and went with it to the White Horse cellar, Picadilly, and rode with it to the Admiral Keppel public-house, Fulham; I then took it to Mr. Colvill's - knocked at the door, the gardener came - I said

"I have a box for Mr. Sweet" - the prisoner then came; he turned the box round - I asked him, if the direction was right - he said, Yes, and asked where I brought it from - I said, from Kew-bridge, and it came to 1 s. 6 d., which he paid me; it was a wider box than that produced, not quite so long, but about the same height.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it like that - A. It was rough, and not made so well - he turned it round, and looked at the direction.

CHARLES NOYES . I work at Kew-gardens. Hogan gave me this box to take to the Waggon and Horses - he gave it to me opposite the Ferry - he works in the Botanic, and I in the kitchen garden.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that he had lived with Mr. Colvill many years, but never had any interest in his stock; that his duty was, when they arrived, to make the necessary arrangement for their nurture and improvement, but he knew nothing of who they came from, and that Mr. Colvill ran the risk of their purchase. That thousands of plants had come directed to him (the prisoner) unaccompanied by any letter or message, and he has not known for months after who they came from, that they were sent in compliment to him, being a publisher, and that these came like many others, and were transplanted into Mr. Colvill's mould, that he would have produced the direction to the officer, but he said there was guilt in the transaction, and he did not wish to implicate his master.

A JUROR to MR. SMITH. Q. Mr. Sweet is an author, and is not Mr. Aiton one also - A. Yes.

Q. Has not Mr. Sweet criticised Mr. Aiton's work, and said he was a dunce, and had palmed a publication of others on the world - A. I have read a publication calling

Mr. Aiton a dunce, but do not know who is the author - it was in the Botanical Register - Sweet is not the editor.

Q. Did you know that the box was to have been sent from Kew before it went - A. No.

Q. You did not know that it was a trap or plan for Mr. Sweet - A. No; on my solemn oath, I have not the least idea of any thing of the sort; I had suspicions.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What do you mean by the expression, had suspicions - were your suspicions, that there was a trap - A. No, suspicions where the plants went to.

THOMAS DURDON . I have been clerk to Mr. Colvill for twenty years - the prisoner lived five years with him as cultivator - he is author of the Botanic Register. Plants have been frequently sent to Mr. Colvill, and we not know who they came from.

Q. Is it not the courtesy of the profession, when there is anything rare, to send it without any communication to another cultivator for improvement - A. Yes; when plants come, we move them into our composition mould - the prisoner lives at the other nursery - these plants were put in a public place - a number of people constantly come there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean, that you often receive plants or cuttings - A. Plants, cuttings, and seeds; we transplant them the same day, if they are perishable; the prisoner was employed at the nursery daily.

COURT. Q. Can you name any one instance in which valuable plants have been sent without an intimation from whom it came - A. I know that plants have been sent without any message or letter. We have received valuable plants, boxes, and seeds, without any message or letter; I do not know the value of these - they are reckoned valuable. We have received valuable plants from Sir Richard Hoare and Sir Richard Seymour , and have had no advice of them. They are frequently addressed to Mr. Colvill, and frequently to the prisoner. We received a small Indian plant on Saturday, without advice, and do not know from whence it came.

WACEY WHISKIN. I am a gardener in the employ of Mr. Colvill, and have been so about thirteen months. Sweet is managing man - I am under his direction. I have known boxes and packages to come directed to him without any letter - we constantly receive plants without knowing whom they come from. Sweet is the author of botanical works, and plants come to him for experiments - they are placed in the house according to their proper temperature; these were put into different hot-houses, near those of the same species. We have the Gustavia Augusta and Banksia - I think we have plants the same as all of them, but cannot say - I am only there for improvement - Mr. Colvill receives the money the plants are sold for.

MR. LAW. Q. When was your attention called to them - A. I saw them in the course of the afternoon - they were not shewn to me.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you have plenty of the description of all those produced - A. Yes.

Q. Point out the Jaquina - A. I do not know them in this state - I know these are plants of the same species, but do not know their names. I have heard them say, when unpacking them, that they did not know who they from.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You are only on improvement - A. Yes. I saw the place these plants were moved from, and saw plants of the same species about them.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am curator at the Apothecaries' Company's garden at Chelsea, and understand botany. I have seen plants of the description of all these in this country except one, which, I think, is the Calamus Niger. I have some of all the others. Plants frequently come to me without advice from various views. My friends at times send me plants to puzzle me - the puzzle is to know who they come from. Mr. Sweet is considered the first practical botanist in Europe; and as his talent appeared, I courted his society, which is for the last seven years. I never knew an imputation on his character. I know that Colvill has plants of the description of both these.

Q. Might a young man know from the look of these plants the species, without knowing their names - A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You often receive plants sent to puzzle you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you then put them in a place for sale - A. We have no sale place; they are put into a hot-house for nursing - (Looking at the plants). - Here is a Zamia Spinalis - we are not tied to Kew names. The Banksia is not common, but it is in this country, and has been sold. I have looked over Colvill's collection, and will venture to swear he has Engenia and the Jacquinia; here is one without leaves, which I cannot speak to. Here are only two of them which I would take to Chelsea, which is the Calamas, and one which I do not know the name of. There is no price but as fancy leads - some of them I should think worth 10 s. 6 d., others 5 s. - the value depends on whether they can be propagated.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If plants were sent you. you would put them where they would thrive - A. Certainly.

JOHN RIDGWAY . I am a bookseller, and live in Piccadilly. I have published several botanical works for the prisoner - he has two periodical works going on now. I do not know that he has spoken of Mr. Aiton in them. The Botanical Register is not his publication. I suppose, within the last five years, I have received fifty or sixty parcels for him - they have come containing what is considered rare plants, and sent to him to be figured for the Botanical Register - sent to him without his knowing who they came from - they come in such a state, that the engraver cannot draw them. Mr. Sweet brings them into a state for their beauty to appear.

MR. LAW. Q. In what way do you send them to him - A. By my own servant.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-89

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

521. HENRY MITCHELL was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-90

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury. Before W. Arabin, Esq.

522. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of January , a 20 l., and a 10 l. Bank note, the property of John Chisolme , from his person .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CHISOLME . I am brother to Mr. Chisolme, solicitor, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On Tuesday, the 13th of January, I had been at Westminster Hall, attending a cause, and dined with the witnesses - we had four bottles of wine among six of us. I was sober enough to go to the office and make some entries. I left about seven o'clock, and had a 20 l., and a 10 l. Bank note, and a cheque for 5 l. in my pocket-book - I had received the 20 l. note from Mr. Tomlinson, on the Friday previous. I had occasion to go through St. Giles's , and at the top of Plumb-tree-street , I was running, and a person ran out of George-street, against me; I received a severe blow on my head, and was knocked down, and after that got such a violent head-ache, that I completely lost my senses - this was about ten o'clock. I got home about one. The only recollection I have after being knocked down, was telling the watchman that I was robbed, for I felt my pocketbook gone some time after; it had been in my inside coat pocket - it could not have fallen out when I fell. On the Thursday it was brought to me by Hawkins, with the cheque and memorandums in it, but the notes were gone.

MARY HARROLD . I live servant with Hawkins, at No. 24, George-street, St. Giles's. On the 13th of January, I remember a man and woman coming to the house, and about half-past twelve o'clock that night, I found a red pocket-book on the bed, and gave it to my mistress without opening it. The prisoner was in the house on that night with a gentleman, but I do not think that it was the prosecutor.

ANN HAWKINS. I keep this house. I did not see the persons who came. Harrold brought me a pocket-book; I opened it, and found a cheque for 5 l., and some memorandums in it, but no Bank notes. I kept it next day, thinking the gentleman would could; there was a direction in it, and I took it to Mr. Chisolme.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I keep this house. The prosecutor and prisoner came about half-past eleven o'clock, and staid about half an hour. I am certain of both.

BRIDGET LEONARD . I live in Bainbridge-street. On the 14th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and asked me to change her a 10 l. note; she had it sewed up in her petticoat - she produced it, and it was a 20 l. note; I put down the number, which was 10, 572. I said I could not get change, and returned it to her, as I did not like to have it.

WILLIAM SULLIVAN . I am Leonard's brother. On the 14th of January, the prisoner came and asked me to go with her to the Minories to get change for a 20 l. note, and said if I would go with her she would buy me some things, and if they asked any questions, I was to say I was her son, and that I had received the note as my own money. One Phillips was to go with us to pass as her sister, and my aunt. I had known the prisoner for years, and thought she had received the money from her husband, who is a seaman. I went with them to a sale shop in the Minories - she asked for some clothes, which were fitted to me. She took the note from her bosom, and told me to get change for it; I handed it to the shopman. She bought a pelisse for herself - the shopman went out, and returned in half an hour with the change, and handed the prisoner 15 l. 8 s. 6 d.; she put it into her bosom. I heard her say the day after that she took the money from a gentleman's shop in George-street.

JAMES HEWSON . I am shopman to Mr. Findley, who keeps a clothes shop in the Minories. Sullivan, Phillips, and the prisoner came to the shop on the 14th of January, and bought things as he has stated. I went out, and changed the note at the Bank, after my master had endorsed it. I gave Sinclair three 5 l. notes, which he handed to the prisoner.

MARY PHILLIPS . Sullivan's account is correct, except about her saying that she had robbed a man of the note. I understood that she got it from her husband, who is cook of a seventy-four gun ship, and used to send her large sums.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I have a 20 l. note, No. 10, 572, paid into the Bank; it has James Findley , 10, Minories, on it, and R. T.

JAMES HEWSON . This is the note she paid me.

ROBERT TOMLINSON . I paid this note to Mr. Chisolme, on the 9th of January; it had my initials on it.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman sent her brother to go with me to change the note. I cannot read or write.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing, but not from the person . - Confined 1 Year .

Reference Number: t18240218-91

523. JAMES SHEADY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a coat, value 10 s.; two waistcoats, value 6 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of Francis Taxcero Sampoyo ; and a snuff-box, value 1 s.; two ink-stands, value 2 s.; a buckle, value 2 s., and two pairs of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Peter Yzeran .

PETER YZERAN . I am a coal-merchant , and live in Albemarle-street. The prisoner was in my service, and left on the 6th of February - I paid him his wages; he was going away; I desired to see his boxes - he had taken them away, but came back to stay a few hours till my new servant came. I told him to fetch his boxes back; he went alone, and brought them very readily.

THOMAS LADLEY . I am valet to Mr. Sampoyo. The prisoner fetched his boxes readily, unlocked them himself, and this property was found in it - he said it was his own, and that he had bought it.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am an officer. I found the articles stated in the indictment in his box - he claimed most of them, but some he said belonged to persons lodging in the house.

- . I am valet to Francis Taxcero Sampoyo , who lodged in the house - his clothes were taken from the wardrobe. My master says he never gave them to the prisoner, but I do not know that.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-92

514. ISAAC SCEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a ham, value 10 s. , the goods of John Sloane , William Leedham , Charles Sankey , William Barrenger , and John Wells .

WILLIAM LEEDHAM . I am a cheesemonger , and live in St. Martin's-lane, in partnership with John Sloane , Charles Sankey , William Barrenger , and John Wells . The prisoner was our waggoner . On the 10th of January, I saw Prigmore, our hostler, loitering about the warehouse and

in the yard; and on going into the stable I found the prisoner there. I waited till he got into the loft over the stable - then went up to the horse and found a ham hid under the manger, and when they returned into the stable, I asked Prigmore if there was not something under the stable which there should not be; the prisoner went to where the horse was, turned the straw and ham over altogether, and said there was nothing there. Bailey pulled the straw up, and found the ham. I asked him about it; he said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many men have you in the stable - A. Two besides the prisoner - one of them was in the stable when I made the search - the prisoner must have seen the ham when he turned the straw over; he afterwards said that Prigmore gave him the ham - I believe it to be mine. I missed none.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a waggoner. My master told me to search under the manger - I found the ham there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they not charge you with stealing it - A. No; they took up Prigmore, and not me; all the men have access to the stable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-93

525. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , a chaise, value 10 s., and a set of harness, value 2 l. , the goods of John Smith Young .

JOHN SMITH YOUNG. I am a coachmaker , and live in Whitechapel. On the 13th of December the prisoner called on horseback, and hired a chaise for two days, to fetch his wife from Brentford; he was to send a horse for it next morning, between nine and ten o'clock; he went away, and next morning a man came with a horse, at the time appointed, and took the gig and harness. I have not seen it since - he was apprehended two months after.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who was present when the bargain was made - A. My man. I think I should know the person who came for it. When he was taken he denied being the man who hired it. I am certain he is the man.

LUKE SPURGIN . I am servant to Mr. Young. The prisoner is the man who came and hired the chaise for two days, to take his wife to Brentford, and said he would send for it next morning; and next morning a man brought a small sorrel horse for the gig - I believe it to be the same the prisoner rode when he called. The harness and gig were delivered to the person who came - he gave the name of Turner, not Young.

Cross-examined. Q. How was the Gentleman dressed - A. In a drab great coat; he said his name was Turner, and he would send his man for it.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am an officer. On the 12th of February I apprehended the prisoner; he denied knowing anything about it.

MR. YOUNG. When the prisoner was taken, he said he knew nothing of me; but when I persisted in the charge, he called me aside, and said he had a horse which he would sell, and make it all right with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell him it was of no use to deny it, for you should charge him before the Justice - A. Yes; I said nothing to induce him to say what he did.

Defence Defence. I never saw the prosecutor till he was at the office, and never was in his shop.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-94

526. JOHN WARDEN was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HENRY TURNER , ESQ. On the 4th of February, I went to Drury-lane Theatre, with three friends, for a private box, and was directed to the Princes' side of the house, where I saw the prisoner; he said he had some disengaged up stairs, which I declined, as I wanted one below - he then said he could put me into the Duke of Gloster's box - I asked the expence; he said I might give him what I pleased. He wished me not to bring my party through the body of the house, but to go to the door in Vinegar-yard, which I did, and he was waiting to receive us, shewed us into the box, and I gave him two sovereigns and two shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not you understand he was letting you into the Duke's box, as a favour, and you were to give him what you pleased - A. It did not strike me at the time. I said in order to get a lower box, that I would go to Covent Garden; he then said he would let me into the Duke's box - he did not say that if the Duke came we must turn out.

SAMUEL SPRING . I am box-keeper to Mr. R. W. Elliston, the proprietor of the Theatre. The prisoner was private box-keeper on the Princes' side - the Duke of York's box is under his care; his Highness has it on alternate weeks, not by the year; this was a week in which it belonged to his Highness, and was entirely at his disposal. Mr. Elliston had no liberty to let it. If the prisoner had brought me the money I could not have received it.

COURT. This is no embezzlement.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-95

527. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , thirteen yards of cotton, value 10 s., the goods of John Manning , privately in his shop .

FREDERICK LEGGAT . I am shopman to John Manning, linen-draper , Holborn . On the 5th February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop; I shewed her some prints. Several shopmen were there - I asked her 10 1/2 d. a yard for one; she offered 8 d., which I refused, and on turning round, saw her going out, and suspecting her, I followed, and took her five yards off, with this print concealed under her shawl. She begged for mercy, and said it was her first offence.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did she not take her shawl off to lay it on the counter - A. Not that I saw.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Recommended to Mercy. Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-96

528. CHARLES REYNOLDS was indicted of stealing, on the 29th of November , a bed, value 5 l.; a bolster, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 10 s.; two blankets, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 10 s., and two pillow-cases, value 4 s., the goods of Betty Mitchener , in a lodging-room .

BETTY MITCHENER . I live in Tottenham-place, Tottenham-court-road - the prisoner took my first floor, furnished, in October, at 3 s. 9 d. a week, but never paid me anything. He left on the 29th of November, without notice, and I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He left on the 29th of November - A. Yes, early in the morning. I saw the things all safe in his room the night before - he and his son set off early next morning, while I was getting up.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of January, at Chelsea; he said what things he had taken away were his own, and that he left his son in the lodging on Friday, when he went to Buckinghamshire. I then took the son, and the prisoner wished me to propose to the prosecutrix not to prosecute, if his son would say what had become of the property. He said he was in Buckinghamshire on the Friday.

PROSECUTRIX. He left my house on Saturday, the 29th of November - the things were all safe the night before. I saw him go out with his son on Friday morning. I did not see him after, but heard him come home at night.

WILLIAM WYATT . I am a farmer, and live at Wing, in Buckinghamshire, forty-four miles from town. On the 28th of November, at four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was at my house, and staid till the Wednesday following.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-97

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

529. WILLIAM WALKER and WILLIAM HEATH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , six fenders, value 12 l.; twenty tea-trays, value 10 l.; eighteen tea-pots, value 7 l.; two hundred knives, value 6 l.; one hundred and eighty forks, value 3 l.; three shovels, value 1 l.; three pairs of tongs, value 30 s.; three pokers, value 1 l.; fourteen tea-kettles, value 9 l.; two coal scoops, value 2 l.; forty candlesticks, value 8 l.; thirty-six spoons, value 15 s.; thirty cork-screws, value 35 s.; four pairs of nut-crackers, value 5 s.; four milk-pots, value 14 s.; two sugar-basons, value 11 s., and six fender footmen, value 18 s. , the goods of Uriah Bryant .

MR. SHORT conducted the prosecution.

URIAH BRYANT . I live in Beech-street, Barbican, and have a shop in Commercial-place, City-road ; my daughter-in-law had the care of the shop - I allow her 10 per cent. upon what is sold, but she is not a partner. I know some of the property by marks on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you or the officers employ counsel in this case - A. I ordered the officers to employ counsel. I proposed it myself; they said nothing about it.

ELIZABETH ELLIOTT ARKINS . I had the care of this shop for my father-in-law. I was present on Saturday night, the 18th of June, when the boy shut it up. I went there on Sunday morning, about twelve o'clock; and all was safe - and on Monday, at half-past eight, I found the private door, which is up a gateway, on the single lock - I had left it double locked. I found all this property gone - the shop was nearly stripped - I can swear to the tea tray; I saw it at the door on Saturday, and know it by a particular scratch across the throat of the figure on it. I know the candlesticks by a private mark on them; and here is a pair of snuffers which I can swear were in the shop on the Saturday night, and likewise a sugar bason which I saw at eleven o'clock at night. I believe all the things to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The tea tray was bought to sell again - A. Yes; I suppose it has been scratched by a child with a pin.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I went with a search warrant on the 12th of February; to Walker's house, Vincent-street, Old-street; and in the bottom room found a tea tray, sugar bason, tea pot, milk pot, snuffers, corkscrew, tea cannister, candle box, and other articles. Walker was asleep upstairs, with his wife, some were in a cupboard, and some at the top of the cupboard. Walker said all the property was his own, and said something about buying them some time ago; but I do not perfectly recollect what. I went to Heath's house, City-gardens, City-road, and found a carving knife and fork in a drawer, a snuffer tray in a cupboard, a pair of curling irons, cork-screw, and nut crackers, in his table drawer; they were not concealed. Heath said they were his own, and that he had bought them. I found three picklock keys in his table drawer. I took one Goodman, who was in the house; but he was discharged, as none of the property was found in his room.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you told all the truth - A. I have; except that Vann came down stairs with a picklock key at Walker's - we went there to take the two prisoners. Heath, I believe, is a shoemaker - we brought away three hides of leather from his premises, presuming they would be owned - there had been a robbery of leather; he said

"The things are mine, I bought them;" not speaking particularly to any one article; he spoke of all the things in the room. I do not recollect that he spoke to these particular articles.

This witness was cross-examined at considerable length respecting his evidence upon the trial of Easterby and others, pages 174 - 177 - 180, and gave the same account of the case, as upon those trials; it is presumed unnecessary to restate it.

THOMAS VANN . On the 12th of February, I reached Walker's house, in company with Mance; and on the top of the cupboard found a hat and a quantity of skeleton keys, a small crow bar, and a piece of wax candle, and three saucepans. Walker was in bed with his wife; I think he said

"Mind, you have not found them on my person." I went to Heath's house, and found a footman, two saucepans, and fire irons; he said he bought them - we took one Goodman there, but he was discharged.

This witness was also cross-examined by Mr. Brodrick, as to his omitting evidence in a prisoners' favour in Easterby's case, and gave the same reason for so doing as before, except that his original deposition with the erasure, had been shewn to Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN VANN . I assisted in searching Walker's house, and found a dark lantern concealed in the corner of a cupboard, with a wax candle in it; also three spoons, a fender, and tea-tray. Walker said the property in that house belonged to him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was Walker in the

room the tray was found in - A. He was up stairs in bed; he was brought down, and the tray and things shewn to him, and asked if they were his - he said they were. I did not hear him say.

"Mind, you have not found them on my person." There was great confusion in the room. I was not in the bed-room with my father.

THOMAS VANN re-examined. He was in the bed-room when he said that.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Bryant. I saw the tea-board on Saturday afternoon about four o'clock - I know it by a scratch.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Things get scratched hanging up - A. I think it was done by a child with a pin or nail, while hanging outside.

WALKER'S Defence. I have had the tea-board in my possession three or four months. As to the rest, I bought them at the prosecutor's shop. I bought the tea-canister in Old-street, and the candle-box at the prosecutor's - I laid out 2 l. 10 s. with the gentleman. There are nearly five hundred tea-boards of the same pattern as that.

HEATH'S Defence. My wife bought the things in my absence; as to the keys, I do not believe they were ever in my house. I know Vann has said he should be able to buff it home to us.

MARY NICHOLLS . I know the prisoner Walker. I have seen this tea-tray at his house three or four months ago - I have seen a great many of the same pattern, it is a common pattern. I helped him to move on the 23d of January, and saw it then - it was one of the same size and pattern. I cannot swear that it is the one. When he moved his goods, dishes were put in it, which might scratch it. I have drank tea off it twenty or thirty times.

MR. SHORT. Q. Does that tray look as if tea had been drank off it twenty or thirty times - A. Yes, with care - when cleaned up they look well. He had a common one besides. I live in Charles-street, Hackney-road.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

HEATH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-98

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

530. WILLIAM DURST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Shipton Browning , from his person .

WILLIAM SHIPTON BROWING . On the 12th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Chiswell-street . Mr. Silver gave me information - I turned round and took my handkerchief from the prisoner's jacket - I did not feel it taken.

CHARLES SILVER . I am a haberdasher, and live in Spencer-place, Goswell-road. I was in Chiswell-street, and met the prosecutor coming down the street. I saw the prisoner and another close behind him; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and put it under his jacket. I secured him, and called the prosecutor, who took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys were before me. I picked the handkerchief up.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was strongly recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-99

531. ELIZABETH CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a petticoat, value 6 s.; a military sash, value 3 s.; an epaulet, value 10 s.; a work-bag, value 1 s.; a miniature painting, value 1 s.; a curtain, value 4 d.; seven pieces of muslin, value 2 s.; a key, value 1 d.; and a piece of foreign coin, value 1 s., the goods of William Smith , her master ; and a petticoat, value 3 s. , the goods of Mary Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am wife of William Smith . We keep a public-house , at Lower Shadwell ; the prisoner was six months in our service. On the 17th of January, I sent her on an errand; she stopped longer than I thought proper; I told her of it - she was saucy, and said I might turn her out. I suspected her, went up stairs, looked in her box, and found my petticoat. I laid it down again, and sent for Atkinson, the officer, who came and took her up stairs to her box, in which were found a miniature, and a variety of articles of mine. She said she hoped I would forgive her. The officer produced a key to me, which opens my sideboard and drawers.

Cross-examined by MR. COOKE. Q. Do you let lodgings - A. No; sailor boys sleep there sometimes. The prisoner slept in a front attic, and a little girl with her, who I took as a servant - her box was not locked.

ROBERT ATKINSON . I am a headborough. I was fetched, and found the prisoner in the kitchen, and told her I wanted to go up to search her box. She wanted to go up stairs behind me, but I made her go before. I examined and found the property stated in the indictment. When the miniature painting was found, she said,

"Oh, pardon me, mistress, pardon me!" She wished to put her hands into her pocket, which I would not allow. I found a key there, which Mrs. Smith said had been taken off her bunch of keys; she said at the watch-house, that she had put some of the things into her box, but not all; that she found the key the day before, and forgot to give it to her mistress.

Cross-examined. Q. At what hour were you called in - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock. I live two or three hundred yards off. Mrs. Smith was agitated when the miniature was found. The box was open, and one or two things seemed to have been lifted up at the top, every thing else was laid with exactness. As soon as I went up, she said some person had been to her box, and had put the petticoat in, but said nothing about the other things being put there. She said the sash was her father's. The epaulet was pinned up in an old stocking, nearly at the bottom of the box. No conversation passed in the room - what she said at the watch-house was voluntary.

MARY SMITH . This key belongs to my sideboard - I had missed it for a fortnight - I never left my keys about.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not been drinking that night - A. No; I am not in the habit of drinking. The miniature was kept in my bed-room drawer, the epaulet in a box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-100

532. GEORGE PEEL and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , two cartwheels, value 5 l. , the goods of Robert Gunter .

WILLIAM RUBERGALL . I am bailiff to Robert Gunter ,

who has a farm at Kensington . On the 31st of January, the cart was in the barn, in a shed, and on the 2d of February I missed these wheels. Peel worked for me on the farm five years ago, and lived on the premises at this time, and knew where to find the cart - they were three-inch wheels.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. On the 2d of February, I went to Pimlico wharf, and saw the prisoners and another man standing at the corner of a recess, at the top of the wharf; they moved round, saw me, and all three walked off. I ran as fast as I could, and saw two cart wheels there - they had stood close by them - it would take at least two men to put them there. They crossed a ditch into the Vauxhall-road - I jumped over the ditch; Brown turned, and seeing me, immediately ran away - I followed and took him; and in bringing him back met Peel, secured him, and took both to the wharf. Peel said the wheels were his own, and Brown said he assisted him in bringing them there. I took them to the office. Peel said he had bought cart and all at Smithfield for 19 l. Rubergall saw and claimed them.

PEEL's Defence. I was alone at Kensington, and saw two wheels - enquired round the neighbourhood if any one had lost them, and met Brown; asked him where I could sell them, and he took me to this man.

BROWN's Defence. I met Peel by accident - he asked if I knew who would buy the wheels. I took him to a man, whom I had sold a cart to two years.

PEEL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-101

533. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 5 lbs. of rags, value 3 s. , the goods of Frederick Augustus Bell and others, his partners.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am in the first regiment of Guards. On the 2d of February, I was at Bell's wharf, at Irongate, Tower; the prisoner came on the wharf, and went to the bottom of the wharf with another man. I saw him go towards the bags of rags, and fill his hat and breeches with them - I seized him, and found them upon him. He asked me to let him go.

WILLIAM KINCHEN . I am an officer. I found the rags in the prisoner's pocket, and some in his hat.

MR. FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BELL . This wharf belongs to me, and others, my partners.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18240218-102

534. JOHN RAPER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Barney Wood , from his person .

BARNEY WOOD . On the 14th of February, about one o'clock, I was in Hart-street, Bloomsbury , and felt a pull at my pocket - I turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; he was five paces from me, and concealing it under his apron. I seized him, and said,

"How came you to be so impudent, as to pick my pocket" - he said,

"It was not me, another man dropped it, and I picked it up" - there was nobody else near.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. (Written) I was returning from an errand, and in Hart-street I saw three boys running - one of them dropped the handkerchief - I picked it up, and called after them - they took no notice. I went on, and in a minute or two this gentleman came, and said, he had lost one - I said, if it is yours, take it. I have picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240218-103

535. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing on the 30th of January , a coat, value 2 l. the goods of John Arscott , from his person .

JOHN ARSCOTT . I am out of employ , and have come from Bristol. I was looking for a groom's place, and lodge at my aunt's, next door to the Plasterers' Arms, public-house. On the 30th of January Sersale came for me - I went into the Plasterers' Arms, and found the prisoner there - he said to Sersale,

"It is too soon to go to the gentleman yet, stop till six or seven o'clock, and I will go with you;" and about six o'clock the prisoner came to my aunt's, and said, he would go with me to the gentleman in Lincoln's-inn-fields, about the place; as we went along, he said, he understood I had had a good deal of trouble, and had lost my father and mother - I said I had; he said,

"You are quite sure of this place, and will have very little to do, and when you get there, don't get me into any disgrace" - he said he knew the gentleman well - he took me up to some chambers on the second floor in Lincoln's-inn-fields, and then said,

"Young man, stop down here, and I will go and speak to the gentleman, and when I come down I will call you up" - he went up higher, and called me up, and said, the gentleman was at home, and I could see him, and said,

"Young lad, I will go down stairs, and get you a groom's coat, I know where to put my hands on one in a moment, and it will look better to see the gentleman in a groom's coat - pull off your own, and I will go and get you a groom's;" he helped me off with it, and said he would get me a groom's coat - he went down with it. I never saw him afterwards, and have not recovered it. I waited there half an hour, and then spoke to a woman, who said, I was taken in.

JOHN SERSALE . I met the prisoner at the Plasterers' Arms - he asked if I knew anybody who wanted a place; I said I wanted one myself; I had seen him there several times before - he said it was a groom's place, but not exactly that, for the gentleman kept his horse at livery, and it was to ride about with him all day, at 14 l. a-year, and two suits of livery, but I was too heavy for him; a young man said, there was a young man next door, who had come from the country. I thought he would suit, and went to tell the prosecutor's aunt, whom I knew. I saw nothing more of the prisoner till I met him, and secured him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-104

536. WILLIAM BARTLETT and HANNAH BARTLETT were indicted for stealing, on the 21st January , six half-crowns, the monies of John English , from his person .

JOHN ENGLISH . I am a carpenter , and live in Cooper-street, Westminster. I have seen the prisoners at different times, at different public-houses. On the 21st of January I met the man in Tothill-street, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and treated him with a pint of beer, and some gin, and then went to the Feathers, public-house, Broad-way; his wife came in, and we had a pot of beer - he borrowed one shilling

and sixpence of me; I pulled my purse out of my left hand inside pocket. I had eight half-crowns there - I laid all the money on the table - put it into my pocket again, and treated them with two pots of beer; we came out, and went into the George and Ball public-house, St. Ann's-lane. I treated them there with three pints of beer; the woman said,

"Mr. English, you are wet and cold, come to our lodgings, and warm yourself, it is only three doors off;" they took me to Pye-street . I had some soup there, and sent for some beer - the man wanted her to stop with me while he fetched it, but I said she was the most fit to go, and she did, and after that I wanted her to go for more, but heard him whisper to her,

"Don't go for any more, I will knock him down, and take his purse" - I then got up, and said

"Good night, I will have no more here, but will give you anything down stairs;" he got between me and the door, and she came and laid hold of me, while he took my purse out. I said,

"Bartlett, you have robbed me" - he said if I said a word he would knock my eye out - she ran towards the fire-place, and he ran down stairs. I followed him into the One Tun, public-house, and said he had robbed me - he said he would split my skull - a parcel of girls came round, and began laughing. I went to the office, could find no officer, but next morning got one, who took the woman, and on the following night I saw the man, drunk, and fetched Pace, who took him - a man came and gave me 10 s. not to prosecute. I shewed it to the Justice, but he committed them - I had drank no liquor but two glasses of beer - I did not halloo out in their room, as it was of no use. The landlord was in the bar of the One Tun, but it was of no use to say any thing there. I told two or three watchmen that night, but they said they would have nothing to do with it.

Prisoner WILLIAM BARTLETT . Q. Did you not go out with me, after we had supper; to the George and Ball, public-house, and sit there drinking - A. That was before we went to his lodging. I went to a public-house by Queen-square, for an officer, but could get no one.

THOMAS PACE. I am an officer. On the morning of the 22d, the prosecutor informed me he had been robbed in Old Pye-street, and took me to the first floor of No. 20; I found the female prisoner there - she denied the charge. I took her to the watch-house, and about six o'clock in the evening the prosecutor came, and said the man was at the Feathers, public-house - I ran there, and found him quite intoxicated. I asked if his name was Bartlett - he said not; the prosecutor said he was the man, and I took him.

JOHN WINCH . I was at Queen-square, standing by English; he said if he could get 10 s. he would not go before the Magistrate - he did not know that I knew the prisoners. I said, if I thought 10 s. would do them good, if they were not guilty, I would sooner pay it, as it would be more out of their way, as they would lose their work - he offered at first to take 7 s., but said it was 10 s.

WILLIAM BARTLETT 's Defence. I met him in Tothill-street, with a bottle in his hand - he insisted on my going into a liquor shop; we had several pots of beer and spirits, and remained there till eleven o'clock; he then went and treated a woman with spirits, and went to several houses - my wife came in for me - he took two women out, and called for a quarter of gin.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-105

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

537. ALEXANDER MUNROE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , a hat, value 3 s., the goods of Henry Morris , from the person of William Morris .

HENRY MORRIS . I live at Ratcliffe. On the 22d of January, about six o'clock in the evening, my son William went out. I was not present, and cannot say whether he had a hat on; he returned about half-past six. I heard him screaming by the door, went out, and he was getting off his knees. I was directed after three boys, and saw the prisoner crossing the road, with the hat in his hand - he threw it down, and was stopped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two boys, who asked if I would have a hat - I said Yes, and they put it on my head.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-106

538. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , a watch, value 2 l., the goods of Oliver Lloyd , from his person .

OLIVER LLOYD . On the 12th of February, I was at the entrance of the pit of Covent-garden Theatre ; the prisoner rushed by me, and snatched at my watch chain, but did not get it from my fob.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-107

539. GEORGE BUTLER and EDWARD BRUCE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a petticoat, value 4 s.; two shifts, value 8 s.; a gown, value 10 s.; two aprons, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 d.; a pocket book, value 5 d.; and a cap, value 6 d. , the goods of Sarah Reed .

SARAH REED . I am a widow , and live in Bath-street, Hackney . On the 21st of January, about five o'clock, the prisoners came and asked me to buy coals; Bruce came to the cart with half a bushel - I said I wanted none; and at the same time there was a knock at the door - I went and found Butler there, he said I should have the half bushel for 7 1/2 d. I said I was a poor widow, and had no money - I stood at the door to hinder him from coming in, and said I would not have them - he sold them and went for another half bushel. Bruce said he insisted on it that I should have them; he pushed me in doors - they said Mrs. Temple had had two sacks. I then said I would have half a bushel - they both came into the room with them; and while I was getting the money from the cupboard, I suppose they snatched a bundle, containing this linen, off my bureau bedstead; I had put it there just before - one staid for the money, and the other went out - and their cart drove off in great haste. I took up a candle and found they had not left me a quarter of a peck of coals, and missed the bundle - I ran after the cart, but they got out of sight, and I have not found my property. I am sure they are the persons.

Prisoner BUTLER. Q. Did I come inside - A. He was inside, standing against the bedstead. The bundle was safe two minutes before they came in.

MARY TEMPLE . I live in Bath-street. On the 21st of January, I saw the prisoners in the street at my door - I am certain of Butler, but not of Bruce.

JOHN TOMLINS . My mother lives near Reed's. The prisoners are the men whom I paid for half a bushel of coals.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 25th of January, I and Gleed apprehended the prisoners in Gorgan-place, and told them it was for stealing linen from a woman in Bath-street, where they had sold coals; they said they had sold none in Bath-street, at all, and did not know where it was.

BUTLER's Defence. I did not know the street by name - I did not enter her door.

BRUCE's Defence. I offered her a bushel at half price, as I wanted to get home; she lighted me to the cupboard, and came to the door with me. I was not out of her sight.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-108

540. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , twenty oak spokes, value 15 s.; fourteen fellies, value 14 s., and three elm posts, value 3 s. , the goods of Richard Collins .

RICHARD COLLINS . I am a wheelwright , and live at Hampton-wick . These things were safe on my premises, on the 17th of January, and on the 6th of February, on looking through a crevice, I saw them on the prisoner's premises, which are next to mine; he calls himself a corn and coal dealer . I got a search-warrant on the 7th, and found them there - I know them by my mark, and one is an apple tree felly, which is very uncommon, and another has a number on it. We found the prisoner concealed up stairs, behind the bed curtains - he said he had bought them at Hounslow. My yard has a fence eight feet high, but there was a ladder on his premises.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. They were found in his yard - A. Yes; in his pig-sty; his house is about twenty yards from his yard. I had seen him on the premises after I missed them, which was on the 26th; there were about forty on a pile, which was all pulled down. I had not sold them, as I kept them for my own use. I never had an apple one before.

WILLIAM SMITH . I work for Mr. Collins, and know the fellies; I always sort them out, and put them on the piles, and on the 18th of January, I found the piles taken down - here is one made of crab apple tree; it is a very singular one.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the prisoner's yard - A. Yes; they were found concealed in the pig-sty, and two boards put before the sty; he had not let the yard. I have seen him there since the 17th of January.

RICHARD COLLINS re-examined. At the time he said he had bought them, he was in my cart with them going to the office.

CHARLES WALDUCK . I am a constable. Collins brought me a search-warrant. I found the prisoner concealed behind the bed, and found fourteen fellies and twenty spokes in the sty. He said he had bought them at Pidder's, at Hounslow.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been to Hounslow - A. No. I know nothing of Pidder. I went into the bedroom once, without finding the prisoner - he was concealed.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not been on the premises for two months, and did not know that they were there.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240218-109

541. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a coat, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Pratt .

EDWARD PRATT . I live at Edmonton. On the 27th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, my coat laid on my cart, which was in Spitalfields-market, loaded with turnips. I drove into Shoreditch , and a man came after me - I then missed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY SKELSER . On the 27th of January, I was in Simmonds's shop, at the corner of Lamb-street, and saw the prisoner; he followed this cart to White Lion-street; we stood at the corner, and saw him attempt to take the coat, and in Glasshouse-street he took it, and ran away with it under his arm; he dropped it in Blossom-street. I went and told Pratt.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear that I took it - A. Yes; I noticed him before he took it, and know his features. I saw him in custody on the Thursday following - this was on Tuesday.

MOSES SIMMONDS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street; Skelser was in my shop - I saw the prisoner standing opposite my door for twenty minutes, watching another cart - we followed, and saw him make several attempts to get this coat, and at the corner of Blossom-street - he took it, and ran off with it, and I after him, calling Stop thief! he dropped it; I picked it up, and secured him in Lamb-street; I had lost sight of him for a moment, but am sure he is the man. He was not running when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. Is it a likely thing that I should be standing still if I had done the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-110

542. THOMAS DRUMMOND and WILLIAM LEWIS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , a hat, value 15 s. , the goods of George Birch .

GEORGE BIRCH . On the 11th of February, I was dining with a friend, at No. 39, Charing-cross , and left my hat on the counter, about five o'clock, and missed it about nine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plasterer. On the evening of the 11th of February, I was in Crown-street, Soho, and saw the prisoners together - Lewis had this hat wrapped in a handkerchief; he went into a shop on the right hand side, then came out, and gave it to Drummond, who went into another shop with it, and then into a third - I followed him in, and it was on the counter; I asked where he got it: he said he had bought it of a gentleman for 4 s. that afternoon.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was with Reardon, and saw the prisoners together a little after six o'clock; they went into three different shops - we followed them into the last, which was in Monmouth-street; Drummond said he bought the hat at Marsh-gate, Lambeth, of a gentleman's servant, that afternoon. Lewis said he had got it from him.

DRUMMOND's Defence. I met a gentleman's servant by the Marsh-gate, with the hat; he said he wanted to sell it for 7 s.; I offered 4 s., and he at last took it, and in St. Ann-street, I met this man, and he went with me.

LEWIS's Defence. I had not left work a quarter of an hour before I was taken - I met this young man, and asked

him to go and drink; he asked me to go with him to sell the hat.

DRUMMOND - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-111

543. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of James Alexander Blake .

JAMES ALEXANDER BLAKE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Barrett's-court, Mary-le-bone . On the 17th of January, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner going off the step of the door, putting a pair of shoes into his pocket - I ran out; two others were about three houses off. I ran after the prisoner, and found one shoe on each side of him, under his coat; he had taken them off the board, outside; they were safe ten minutes before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through this court; a boy ran by, and dropped the shoes - I picked them up, and before I could look round, the prosecutor took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-112

544. GEORGE ELSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , a saw, value 3 s., and a snuff-box, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Baker .

RICHARD BAKER . I am a carpenter . On the 4th of February, I was working at No. 95, Quadrant, Regent-street , and left my saw and snuff-box on the bench, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SMITH . I am a bricklayer. On the 4th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner coming out of the door of this house, with this saw concealed under his coat, and asked who he wanted - he said a person named Smith; I said my name was Smith; he then said he wanted Smith, a carpenter. I unbuttoned his coat, and found this saw.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I received him in charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-113

545. TIMOTHY GAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of John Duncan .

JOHN DUNCAN . I live in Monmouth-street . On the evening of the 12th of February, about six o'clock, I was in my shop - a man gave me information; I went to the door and missed a great coat, which was safe inside the door, three minutes before. I went in pursuit of two boys, and overtook them about one hundred and twenty yards off, and found the coat on the prisoner.

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I received the coat from Duncan.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my aunt's, two lads who had the coat threw it on my shoulder, and the gentleman directly took me.

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . There was another boy who escaped; he told me some boy had thrown it on his shoulder - he had it loose in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-114

546. WILLIAM HOLBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a watch, value 2 s.; a chain, value 3 d.; and two seals, value 8 d. , the goods of Thomas Limeston .

THOMAS LIMESTON . I live in Castle-lane, Westminster . On the 7th of February, my watch hung over the fireplace; the prisoner came in between one and two o'clock, and asked my wife to buy some herrings - she said she had no money, and he trusted her till night, and came between seven and eight o'clock for the money; she went out to borrow a shilling - the watch was then safe - she returned, saying she had not got it, but would go elsewhere, and asked him to sit down; he went to the fire in about a minute, saying he would light his pipe. I was at work with my back to the fire - he immediately went out. My wife returned - he came in after her, received the shilling, and immediately left, and in a very few minutes we missed the watch. I found it in pawn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JANE LIMESTON . The prisoner called for his shilling in the evening, and when he was gone we missed the watch, which was safe just before.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 7th of February, the prisoner pawned the watch in the name of Deacon.

ROBERT GREENHILL . I am a watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said he had torn up the duplicate of the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. It was an extorted confession; the prosecutor promised not to prosecute if I told where it was. If I could have paid the money, he would have let me off.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-115

547. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , fifty-four pieces of cloth, value 5 s. , the the goods of Thomas Vincent .

MARY VINCENT . I am the wife of Thomas Vincent , piece-broker , White Horse-yard. On the 20th of January, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I had this bundle of cloth in my hands, and put it in the window - I did not miss it till between five and six o'clock, when the officer brought it to me.

Cross-examined. by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You did not see the prisoner in your place - A. No; he lives close by. I can swear to them - one piece is cut in a particular manner. I am certain of it.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner between five and six o'clock, in Bedford-street, Strand, with this cloth in his apron. He said they were cuttings, which he had saved up, and afterwards, that he had bought them of somebody, but he could not tell who. I went to different shops, and the prosecutrix claimed them, and described one particular piece.

Cross-examined. Q. In what state were they - A. Tied up with list round them - he had them in a leather apron. He said he gave 5 s. for them. I know that he worked a little as a tailor.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-116

548. SAMUEL KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green . On the 10th of September, I went out, returned about half-past eight o'clock, and missed a pair of shoes off the shelf.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 10th of September, the prisoner came, and said he wanted a pair of shoes for a customer - I knew him before. He looked at several pairs, and at last said,

"These will do; what is the price?" I said, seven shillings. He asked for a pair of laces, and while I turned my back to get them, he snatched the shoes off the counter, ran out, and closed the door after him. I did not know where to find him. I had not seen him for three years before - he did not pay for them.

JOHN WILLIAMS, JUN. I was in the shop when the prisoner asked for the shoes, and while my mother was getting a pair of laces, I saw him take them off the counter and run away; I called for the apprentice, who ran after him, but he got off.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-117

549. WILLIAM LEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Nixey .

JAMES NIXEY . I am brother to Thomas Nixey , who lives in Oxford-street . On the 7th of February, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter, and saw the prisoner come and take a pair of stockings which hung just inside the door - he ran off; I followed, and took him three hundred yards off - and the watchman picked them up. I never lost sight of him, but did not see them thrown away.

PETER MARTIN . I am a watchman. On the 7th of February, I stood at a door, and saw the prisoner run down Hanway-street, and Nixey followed him - a gentleman said he had stolen a pair of stockings; I saw him drop something; I stopped and a woman picked these stockings up on that spot, and gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-118

550. JAMES QUANTOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , four silver spoons, value 20 s. , the goods of John Church .

JOHN CHURCH . I keep the Red Lion, public house , Eagle-street, Holborn . On Saturday night, the 14th of February, my servant alarmed me. I went up to my bed-room, which is the first floor front room - found one of the drawers a little open, and linen taken out and strewed under the bed - I went to the window and found the prisoner on the leads over the tap-room; both windows were open. I collared him, pulled him in and brought him down stairs - and four spoons were found on him, which were taken from the drawer; also a skeleton and latch key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a constable. I found the spoons on him, with a skeleton and latch key.

SARAH HALIMAN . I am servant to Mr. Church. On Saturday evening, about seven o'clock, I locked the bedroom door; and about eight o'clock, took the children up to bed, I found the door open - somebody pushed against it. I gave an alarm - heard somebody cross the room - found the door open, and linen about.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-119

551. WILLIAM STURDY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a till, value 3 d.; five shillings; a sixpence; and three shillings and twopence halfpenny, in copper monies , the property of Robert Andrews .

ROBERT ANDREWS . I am a green grocer , and live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 17th of February, in the evening, I was in the parlour; heard a noise - went to the door; and saw the prisoner going out with the till, which he had taken from behind the counter - I followed; he dropped it five or six yards off - I called Stop thief! and he was stopped, thirty yards off; without my losing sight of him; my wife picked it up.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am constable. He was brought to the watch-house. I asked how he did it; he said he reached over the counter and took it.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-120

552. THOMAS WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , two men's boots, value 10 s. , the goods of George Ashfield .

GEORGE ASHFIELD . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Dowill's-row, Hammersmith . On the 7th of February, in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and asked the price of a ham, which my wife had to sell; he bought none - went out, and we missed two odd boots from the window. I went after him, and about one hundred yards off, met two officers, and while mentioning it to them, I saw him opposite - I went over, and said

"My friend, you are the man who asked the price of the ham?" he immediately let the boots fall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NICHOLAS DALTON . I am an officer. I met Ashfield, he pointed over to the prisoner - and I arrested him; and saw him drop the boots from under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in a large way of business, in Bow-lane and Holborn - and stopped payment for 74,000 l.; was reduced in circumstances - and went about selling bonnets. I met one Jones, who sold shoe-strings; he went into the shop - I waited till he came out - and seeing the ham, I went in and asked the price; when I came out he said he would overtake me, and gave me two pair of boots.

GUILTY. Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-121

553. WILLIAM DRAYCOTT was indicted for feloniously receiving, 7 lbs. of beef, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Hutley , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH HUTLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Hutley , who lives in Brick-lane . On the 22d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, 7 lbs. of beef were stolen off the block in the shop; and next day I found 1 lb. 6 ozs. at Worship-street; but cannot swear to it, it was a blade bone of beef.

JOHN ISAACSON . On the 22d I apprehended a boy named Wrag, on this charge - he took me to the prisoner's house, about twelve o'clock that night, and asked him for

the beef he had sold him - the prisoner produced some beef, and a blade-bone, and said, he gave him 3 d. for it - it weighed 1 lb. 6 ozs. The Grand Jury ordered me to file a bill against the prisoner.

JOHN ABSON . I am a watchman. I went to the prisoner's house - he said the boy asked him 4 d. for the beef, and he gave him 3 d. he keeps an iron-shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-122

554. STEPHEN ABBOT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st January , a coat, value 10 s. the goods of Charles Young .

CHARLES YOUNG . On the 21st January I was unloading flour in Providence-row , and missed my coat off the waggon when I came out. I turned round and saw Cripps bringing the prisoner back with it.

ISAAC CRIPPS . I was in Providence-row, and saw the prisoner take this coat off the waggon. I followed - he dropped it, and I took him.

Prisoner's Defence, I saw people running, and I ran also.

ISAAC CRIPPS . Nobody ran but him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-123

555. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st February two gowns, value 10 s.; a counterpane, value 10 s.; a blanket, value 9 s., and a sheet value 9 s. the goods of Thomas Daniels .

The prosecutrix stating herself not to be married to Thomas

Daniels, but cohabiting with him, and that these goods were her private property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18240218-124

556. MARTHA GRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st January , a whittle, value 3 s.; a gown, value 8 s.; two skirts, value 3 s.; three towels, value 2 s.; a pair of drawers, value 1 s.; two caps, value 6 d.; two pairs of stockings, value 1 s.; an apron, value 6 d.; a pair of stays, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s., and a shift, value 1 s. , the goods of Maria Mandaville .

MARIA MANDAVILLE . I am a widow , and live in Silver-street, Golden-square . On the 31st December, the prisoner came to my house in great distress - I supported her for three weeks - she slept with me. On the 20th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went out leaving her in the house - returned about twelve o'clock, and she was gone - I missed the property stated in the indictment, and much more.

JOHN VERGO BUCKLAND . I am an officer. On the 21st of January, I apprehended the prisoner, and found a gown, whittle, frill and handkerchief on her person - I afterwards went to Dodd's, and got more things.

MARY DODD . I live in Portland-street. On the 21st January the prisoner applied to me for a lodging, and left a bundle at my house, which I gave to Buckland.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She was in the habit of lending me things, and I took the liberty to use them.

PROSECUTRIX. I lent her none of them.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-125

EIGHT DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury. Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

557. JOHN SMITH and WILLIAM WATSON were indicted for stealing on the 15th of January , a candlestick, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Freeman , and a book, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Starling .

THOMAS FREEMAN . I live in Providence-row, Finsbury . On the 15th of January, Bridges came and asked if I had lost any thing, I looked round my shop, and missed a candlestick from about five yards from the door - it was safe five minutes before; he desired me to follow him, and we overtook Watson in Long-alley, looking into a chandler's-shop. I saw Bridges take the candlestick and book from him, and in the chandler's-shop we found Smith.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS STARLING . Here is a book which was taken from my shop, on the 15th of January. I did not see either of the prisoners there.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am a headborough. On the evening of the 15th of January, I followed the prisoners down Windmill-street to Providence-row, and saw the prisoner Smith go into Mr. Freeman's shop, and come out directly - Watson was waiting about five yards off, pretending to be about a certain purpose - I looked them both in the face, then ran into Freeman's shop - we crossed Finsbury-market. I saw Watson looking in at the chandler's-shop with the candlestick in his hand, and the book under his arm. I pushed him into the shop, and took Smith - he said he knew nothing of Smith.

WATSON pleaded distress.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

WATSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-126

558. JAMES PURCELL , WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH and GEORGE SACKEY were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , four bundles of horse-raddish, value 6 s. , the goods of Gabriel Patcher .

GABRIEL PATCHER . I am a salesman at Covent-garden Market . On Friday evening, the 29th of January, about six o'clock, I packed up about twenty bundles of horseraddish, and next morning about six, missed three or four.

FRANCIS JOHN YATES . On the night of the 30th of January, I saw the prisoners and two more standing together in Drury-lane, near Queen-street. Sackey had two bundles of horse-raddish, and Holdsworth had one - I took Sackey with two bundles; Purcell ran away, and my partner took Holdsworth. Sackey said he brought it from home - that he lived at Hampstead, and was going to sell it.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I was with Gates. I had before that seen three boys with horse-raddish, but Purcell was not with them. I informed Gates, looked again, and there was then five in company. I took Holdsworth with a bundle of horse-raddish.

DANIEL HALFPENNY . I secured Parcel, who ran from the others - he had nothing; and said, he knew nothing of the others, but that they met him in the street, and asked him to sell it for them.

GABRIEL PATCHER . I bound two of these bundles myself, and know them well. I believe the other to be mine.

HOLDSWORTH'S Defence. I picked up a bundle; stopped to ask whose it was, and they took me.

SACKEY'S Defence. I packed the bundle up myself, so the man swears false, for they came undone.

HOLDSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year .

SACKEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

PURCEL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-127

559. JOSHUA SEABURN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of William John Huetson .

JOHN LOWGER . I am a shopman to William John Huetson , who lives in Kingsland-road . On the 4th of February, I was standing in the shop, and by the reflection of the looking-glass, saw the prisoner cut a pair of shoes down from the door, and ran away - I followed, and found the boots under his coat - he said his father had turned him out of doors, and he had no victuals.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-128

560. ELIZA BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , a curtain, value 3 s., the goods of Ann Bean , widow ; a coat, value 1 s., and a Testament, value 1 s., the goods of James Bean , and a pelisse, value 10 s. , the goods of Hannah Ward .

JAMES BEAN . I lodge with my grandmother , Ann Bean , a widow - we live in Gibraltar-walk, Bethnal-green-road . On Sunday the 25th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I went out with her - this curtain was then at the bed-side - we returned about half-past seven, and found the door open - my coat and Testament were gone from a deal-box, which was not locked, and the curtain from the bed. I had locked the door, and taken the key. I found a knife on the landing-place, and a piece of wood chipped off the door-post - it was wrenched open - the prisoner lived in the next room.

HANNAH WARD . I lodge on the second floor in the same house. On Sunday afternoon, about ten minutes to five o'clock, I went down stairs, returned at five o'clock, and missed a pelisse off my bed. I met the prisoner on the stairs going down, but did not see any thing with her, as it was rather dark.

MAJOR SOMES. I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby. On the 26th of January, about noon, the prisoner pawned a curtain for 4 d., in the name of Mary Chard , George-street, and in about an hour, she pawned a pelisse in the name of Ann Chard, Brick-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ISAASON . I am an officer. I took her into custody, on the afternoon of the 26th, at her mother's, and found 5 s. 7 d. on her, and behind a washing-tub in the room, I found two duplicates of this property - she said she had put them there. I found a knife in the house which fitted the place.

CATHERINE SULLIVAN . I live in Blue Anchor-yard. On the 26th, the prisoner came to me, and said she had met her aunt by Whitechapel Church, that she had made her a present of this pelisse, to be altered to fit her, and she was to take the coat and curtain to her in the morning. The landlord made her take them out of the house.

THOMAS COOPER . I am an officer. I found a Testament in Sullivan's house.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-129

561. THOMAS GEORGE MALIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , six chests, value 5 s., and 8300 eggs, value 21 l. , the goods of Charles Agneray .

The prosecutor had sold the goods in question to the prisoner, but he had not paid for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-130

562. JANE CONWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two shirts, value 12 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 s.; and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of John Walsh .

JOHN WALSH . On the 1st of February. I had this property in a bundle. I lodge at a public-house, and left it on the first table in the tap-room, went to the fire, and then went out, leaving it there. The prisoner sat at the table, very much in liquor. I returned in ten minutes, and missed it, and found her in her own room with it, in half an hour.

GEORGE BASEY . I am an officer. I found the prisoner sitting on her bed, with this bundle - she had untied it - she was very much intoxicated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she went to the house with a man who had a bundle, and she took this up, thinking it to be his.

JOHN WALSH . She had a man with her, who told us where she lived.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-131

563. JOSEPH CROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a pair of boots, value 20 s. , the goods of James Taylor .

SAMUEL BUCKINGHAM . I am servant to James Taylor , a shoemaker , who lives in Brewer-street, Golden-square . On the 31st of January, the prisoner came into my master's shop, and asked to see a pair of shoes - I desired him to sit down; he looked at two pair, at 9 s. 6 d., and objected to the price. I shewed him another, at 8 s. 6 d. - he would not give that. He stood up, with his hands behind him, against the wall, where several shoes hung. He said he must go to his old shop, in Piccadilly, and get a pair for 6 s. I saw him take a pair of boots, and conceal them under his coat, and as he went out, I asked what he had under his coat - he said nothing. I collared him, and took one boot from under his coat. He ran away; I followed, calling Stop thief! he was stopped, and a man produced the other boot.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in liquor - A. He pretended to be so.

THOMAS GOOK . I received him in charge, and found 3 l. on him. He appeared a little in liquor, but pretended to be more so.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

Several witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, and stated him to be a very respectable man.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 10 l. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-132

564. MARY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 18 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

HENRY MORRIS . I am shopman to George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross . On the 29th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and looked at some ribbons. She described a ribbon to me - I fetched another drawer and shewed her; she said she wanted one with a flower. Mr. Cross came and asked me a question, and as I turned my head, I saw her put something under her child's clothes - her child was on the counter. I said I had not got what she wanted - she immediately left the shop. I missed a piece of ribbon from the drawer, followed her into the street, and told her she had taken a piece of ribbon - she said not. I said it was useless to deny it. She was then taking a piece from under her apron - I took it out of her hand, and have it here. It was in the drawer when I shewed it to her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she not appear a little intoxicated - A. No; I did not see what she put under the child.

DANIEL HERRING . I am an officer. I received her in charge; I believe she had drank a little, but she made herself worse than she was.

Prisoner's Defence. It was the child's birth-day - I had drank rather too much, and went to buy a yard and a half of ribbon, like some I had bought there before. The child took the ribbon up, and being rather in liquor, I went out without perceiving it. The child dropped it on the step of the door, and before I could turn to take it back, the gentleman came.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-133

565. BRUCE FRAZER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , a handkerchief, value 4 s. , the goods of William Macbeth .

WILLIAM MACBETH (a blind man ). I lodge at the Inverness Arms, East Smithfield . On the 19th of January, I bought a silk handkerchief of William Douglas , and on the 22d or 23d, I took a string off the handkerchief, put it into my trunk, locked it, and kept the key - I only had one there. Next week I heard something was stolen. I unlocked my trunk, turned out all my things, and missed the handkerchief. I felt all my things, and the handkerchief was gone.

HECTOR MACBETH . I am the prosecutor's son, and lodged with him. Something was said about a robbery - I saw my father examining his box, and the handkerchief was gone. We found the lock had been broken off the box and clapped on again.

THOMAS EMBERSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Sparrow-corner, Minories. On the 23d of January, the prisoner pawned this handkerchief, in the name of Scott.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS . I live in Crown-street, Soho. On the 19th of January, I sold this handkerchief to Macbeth. I have the fellow one, which I cut from it at the time, and the paper it is now in is what I wrapped it in, it is part of a catalogue.

The prisoner put in a written defence, asserting that he had not pawned it, and stating that the pawnbroker had sworn to another man.

THOMAS EMERSON . I am positive of him. I said the other was not the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-134

566. HENRY VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 150 lbs. of soap, value 2 l. , the goods of Thomas Young .

THOMAS YOUNG . I am a carrier . On the 21st of January, I received this soap from Mr. Clark, of Shoreditch, to take to Enfield, and in Kingsland-road I sent Cooper, my servant, to buy something. I was at the horses' head, the cart was very full, and the soap was on the tail-board. As he returned, he called out.

"Master, collar that man." I turned to the back of the cart, and saw the chest of soap on the ground. I ran round the off side of the cart, and saw the prisoner running away. I ran after him - he dodged me round the waggons - I overtook and brought him back to the chest. He said he saw it fall off the cart. My man said,

"I will swear you are the man who took it off;" he ran three hundred yards, but I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS COOPER . My master sent me to buy some bread, and as I came back, I saw the prisoner approach the cart - I saw him take the chest of soap off the cart, and attempt to put it on his shoulder - but it fell on the stones - I immediately got up; he put out his hand, and said

"Oh, mate, go and tell that man, he has dropped a box of soap; and I will pick it up for him." I said I said

"I will shew you the man;" he went on one side of the cart, and then to the other, pretending to look after master. I sang out,

"Master, collar him, he has taken the soap," and he immediately ran away, the tail ladder was on the slant to keep it in, it could not fall off.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it fall off, and went to tell the man, but never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-135

567. GEORGE DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Lewis Lyons .

RUBEN LYONS . I am father of Lewis Lyons , who keeps a shop on Brook-hill, Clerkenwell . On the 17th of February, in the evening, I was coming home, and saw three young men standing near my son's shop; the prisoner was nearest to the door; and when I entered the shop. I called out

"Is there nobody to mind the shop;" and at this moment, while my back was to the door, this coat was stolen - and in a few minutes an officer brought the prisoner in, and my son Isaac came in with the coat.

ISAAC LYON . I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner come into the shop and take this coat down - throw it over his arm, and run away with it - I ran out and saw him nearly five yards off - overtook him; but he had then thrown it down - I picked it up about twenty yards from where I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. You lost sight of him, did not you - A. No; I saw nobody else running; he was walking,

with his hands in his pocket when I took him. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner, by the Sessions-house Court.

Q. When you took him, could you see the coat - A. No; my Lord, it was dark and he had turned the corner. I speak to him by his dress, and not his features - he ran across the road and then walked - he was three or four yards off when he turned the corner, and when I turned he was about the same distance.

JOHN BALLARD . I am a constable. I heard a cry of Stop thief! came out and took the prisoner; the witness had just got hold of him - he said he was innocent; he did not appear at all out of breath.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-136

568. MARY GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , two shawls. value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Lodge and Henry Lowman .

AMBROSE BOODLE . I am shopman to Richard Lodge and Henry Lowman , linen-drapers , Regent-street . On the 19th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening, a boy ran into the shop, and said I was robbed. I went out - he pointed to the prisoner; I stopped her, and found two shawls on her, which were safe near the door an hour before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them laying by the door and picked them up. My husband died this day week.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-137

569. WILLIAM WALL , and JAMES FRENCH , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of John Atkins .

JOHN NORTH . I am servant to John Atkins , who lives in Broad-street, Ratcliff. On the 27th of January, Marshall told me something - I went out, and saw the prisoners about 100 yards off - together with three more. I took hold of Wall; he asked what I wanted - I said nothing but the meat he had taken; he then dropped something, and ran away, and I after him. I overtook him - he knocked me down and ran off again; I still followed, and caught him in Stepney-causeway. Marshall came up, and he was secured - and said he had not seen any bacon; I did not name what meat it was.

GEORGE MARSHALL. I am a shoemaker, and live at Ratcliff. I saw five boys lurking about Atkins's window - the sash was partly up; they walked by three times, and the third time I saw Wall take the bacon, and put it under his left arm; French was behind him; I went into the shop, and North went with me. They went down Vine-tavern. French was taken.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am a patrol. I received them in charge.

WALL - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRENCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-138

570. ROBERT STEVENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , thirteen cakes of soap, value 2 s. , the goods of John Rawbone .

JOHN RAWBONE . I am a druggist , and live in St. John-street-road. On the 13th of February, in the evening, I came into the shop from the parlour, and saw the prisoner busy behind the counter; I asked what he wanted; he asked if I sold indicus - I looked round, and missed this soap off the counter, which was safe just before; I shut the door, and asked if he knew anything of it - he said, No; I said I would see if he did not - he immediately began emptying his pockets, and gave me thirteen squares of soap from them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240218-139

571. HENRY SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a watch, value 2 s., and two watch keys, value 2 d. , the goods of Henry Hobbs .

SARAH HOBBS . I am the wife of Henry Hobbs , a farrier , York-street, Newington-gate . On the 11th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw this watch on the mantle-shelf; I missed it before twelve.

MARY ANN WRIGHT . I live in this house. About eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked for Mr. Sharp - I asked him in; he went up to our room, and said he was to meet Sharp between eleven and twelve o'clock. Hobbs's room was on the ground floor - I went into the next room, and in five minutes he was gone; I missed two shillings from my drawer. I ran down, but could not see him.

SAMUEL CHALLONOR . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. On the 11th of February, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch.

HENRY HOWARD . I am an officer. On the 11th, I apprehended the prisoner on suspicion of felony; a man said he had robbed a person of a watch; and next morning, after Wright had seen him, he said that he had pawned the watch in Long-acre.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-140

572. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two quart pots, value 2 s., and a pot, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Harding .

THOMAS HARDING . I keep the Carpenters' Arms, public-house , Burton-street . On the 1st of February, I missed three pots.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BRYANT . On the 1st of February, I was at the Carpenter's Arms, at six o'clock, and saw the prisoner come into the yard, and take these pots, and put them under her apron. I called the landlord as she went out at the gate; she then stopped, and acknowledged taking them.

Prisoner. They were not in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-141

573. MARIAN WEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a waistcoat, value 14 s.; a shirt, value 3 s.; a shawl, value 4 s., and a tablecloth, value 4 s. , the goods of Joshua Weaver .

JOSHUA WEAVER . The prisoner is my daughter . On the 19th of January, I went in search of her, and found her with this property, in a bundle, about three hundred yards from my house; they were my wife's - she is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-142

574. ISABELLA BENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two gowns, value 15 s.; a scarf, value 3 s.; a cap, value 4 s.; a sheet, value 4 s., and a frill, value 6 d. , the goods of William Banks .

ELIZA BANKS . I am the wife of William Banks - we live in Spencer-place, St. George's East . The prisoner lodged at the house for eight weeks. On the 16th of November, I went out at two o'clock, leaving Mrs. Cook and her at home together, returned at ten o'clock at night, and the prisoner was gone. I looked over my drawers, and missed this property - I did not see her again till last Tuesday week, when I met her in Back-lane, and gave her in charge. I have found none of the property.

ANN COOK . The prosecutrix left me and the prisoner in the house; the prisoner brought me a note, which induced me to go out - I found what was stated in the note to be quite false. I returned in three quarters of an hour, and she was gone, and when Banks came she missed her property.

STEPHEN CARTER . I am a headborough. Mrs. Banks brought the prisoner to me, and charged her with stealing her wearing apparel and asked if she knew anything of it; she made no answer.

Note read: -

"Ann, your aunt says for God's sake come here, your father is dying, and it is as much as four of us can do to hold him - he keeps calling for you, and says he cannot die till he sees you - his leg is bursting. We could not get anybody to come, so I was forced to write."

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-143

575. JAMES BASS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a handkerchief, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Sowerby .

JOHN JACKSON . I am shopman to John Sowerby , a pawnbroker , of Brick-lane, Bethnal-green. On the 17th of February, Stephens alarmed me; I ran down St. John-street, and caught hold of the prisoner, who had been running, but stopped, being out of breath. Cooper searched him, and he delivered this handkerchief from his bosom - it is my master's, and was pinned to a petticoat.

EDWARD STEPHENS . On the 17th of February, I saw the prisoner looking in at the prosecutor's window; another boy took the handkerchief down, and ran off with it; Bass ran with him. I did not see what was done with it, but it was found on the prisoner.

THOMAS COOPER . I received him in charge, and took the handkerchief from his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. It was on the ground when I came by.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-144

576. HENRY COBB was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , thirty bushels of sand, value 15 s. , the goods of John Hall .

JOHN HALL . I live at Kentish-town. On the 17th of November, I employed the prisoner and Harris to take out this sand to sell, and bring the money to me - neither of them came back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-145

577. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , a sovereign , the monies of John Bustard .

JOHN BUSTARD . I live in Bull's Head-court . On Sunday morning, the 8th of February, the prisoner came to my house, about nine o'clock in the morning, and asked if we would give her a breakfast, which we did - we knew her before; she pleaded poverty, and was going to stop dinner. I went out for a rabbit, leaving her and my wife together - I returned in a quarter of an hour, and she was gone. I looked into the tea-caddy on the mantle-piece, and missed a sovereign, which was there when I went out, as I had given my wife a shilling from the caddy. I saw her on the Tuesday following, and asked how she could do it; she said she had spent part of it, and lost part.

MARY GREGORY . I changed a sovereign for the prisoner on this Sunday.

JOHN FORD . I apprehended her on Tuesday evening; she said she had spent the sovereign, and lost part of it. She was concealed behind a door.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-146

578. JOHN FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , a coat, value 50 s., the goods of James Thurling ; and a coat, value 8 l. , the goods of Charles Tyrishit Jones .

JAMES THURLING . Here is a coat in Court which belongs to me. It was safe at twenty minutes past five o'clock on the 23d of January, in Pitt's Head Mews, May Fair. I was acting as coachman to Mr. Jones.

WILLIAM HITCHMAN . I am coachman to Mr. Charles Tyrishit Jones. On the 23d of January, at half-past five o'clock in the afternoon; I left the prisoner in the stables, he was helper there - he asked me to lend him some money - I lent him 11 d. being all I had, Master's box coat and four others, were then in the stable, I returned after tea, and met the prisoner; he said he had not got enough money; I told him to go and wait at the public house for me. I went to the public house, and found the other helpers there, but not him. I was ordered to have the carriage ready at half-past seven; and in going to the stable I found the door locked, the key outside, and missed these two coats.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. On the 24th of the February, I found the prisoner in the watch-house - I found a blue coat at his lodgings in Queen-street, and a drab one at Nathan's.

EDWARD NEARY . I live at Mary-le-bone; and was employed as a helper in the stables. On the 23d of January, I left the stable at half-past five o'clock; and left the prisoner there, and the key inside the door - I returned with the coachman in about twenty-five minutes, and missed two box coats - they were all five safe when I left - I went and found him in Mary-le-bone-lane - charged him with it; he said nothing, and I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOEL NATHAN . I live in Chapel-street, Edgware-road. On Friday evening I was sitting by my fire-side - the prisoner knocked at the door - and said

"I have been sent here with a coat by a young man where I work - you are to tell me what is the most you will give for it." I said 30 s.; but I would not buy it of him, he said he would go back and ask the person if he would take it; and return

either to night or to-morrow morning - but never came. I gave it to the constable.

Prisoner. Q. Did not another young man come in with me - A. Yes; he said he was sent to see that the prisoner did not cheat the coachman.

Prisoner. He gave you a wink, as much as to say that it was stolen; and you winked again, to say that it was.

CAROLINE JONES . My husband is a butcher; and lives in Queen-street, Hanover-square; the prisoner lodged with us for a week - he brought these coats into our house on Friday evening, between five and six o'clock; and was apprehended on the same day - he could hardly carry them; he left the blue one in my parlour, and went away with the other - he did not return; I took it into his room, and afterwards gave it to the officer.

Prisoner. It is the first time I was ever guilty of a crime.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-147

579. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing on the 3d of February , two boys' dresses, value 1 l. , the goods of Edward John Brashier .

EDWARD JOHN BRASHIER . I am a salesman , and live at Bethnal-green . On the 31st of January, some boys' dresses hung at my door; and in five minutes I was told they were gone. I ran into Brick-lane, Whitechapel; a boy pointed the prisoner out. I went up to him, and said

"Give me what you have got in your hands;" he said

"I shan't," and tried to throw something out of his apron over a wall; but I seized him - and this dress fell out of his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-148

580. THOMAS HEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , eight handkerchiefs, value 37 s. , the goods of Maria Ross .

SOPHIA SMITH . I am in the employ of Maria Ross , who lives in Whitechapel-road . On the 29th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was at breakfast in the parlour behind the shop; and saw the prisoner in the shop - he opened a slide in the window, and took this piece of handkerchiefs off the top shelf - and went out; I followed and gave an alarm - he was brought back to me, and I took them from him.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN . I am an officer. I received him in charge - he said he was distressed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking by the shop - a young man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me to carry the parcel for him - and told me to put it in my apron; there was a cry of Stop thief! he ran, and I ran too - but lost him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-149

581. JOSEPH HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 6 lbs. of beef, value 2 s. , the goods of William Gilling .

WILLIAM GILLING . I am a butcher , and live in Cow-cross . On the 20th of January, about eight o'clock at night, I went out, returned about ten minutes past nine, and missed a piece of beef, which I had left hanging inside the shop.

ROBERT QUANTOCK . I live servant next door to Gilling. I saw the prisoner looking at master's window, about nine o'clock. I then saw him go into Gilling's shop - and saw him come out with a piece of beef and a hook, I called my master to look at him - he threw it at my master's feet - and about one hundred yards off, my master took him.

ABRAHAM HAMER . I am an officer. I received him in charge - he said he did not take the beef, but ran after the boy who did take it.

ROBERT QUANTOCK . I am certain of him. I followed - and saw him stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm; ran to see what was the matter, and the gentlemen caught hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-150

582. JOHN JONES and PETER EFRAM were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , three pairs of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Jolly .

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am a shoemaker, and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 16th of February, I saw Jones cut these shoes down from the door post, and give them to Efram - they ran away and I after them - secured both, and took them from Efram.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer - I received the prisoners in charge; Efram said Jones took the shoes and gave them to him.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

EFRAM - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-151

583. THOMAS MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two axletrees, value 10 s.; and the arm of an axletree, value 2 s. , the goods of Andrew Watts .

ANDREW WATTS . I am a cork cutter , and live in Crown-street, Westminster. On the 3d of January, I secured a shed, (which I took for a warehouse,) with two padlocks, and kept the key; I heard of no robbery till about the 15th; then went and found it broken open, and three axletrees gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH WATTS . I am wife of the prosecutor. We hired a stable in Holloway's yard, Horseferry-road , and on the 3d of January, placed these goods in it. I went there on the 13th, and found the door broken, and a quantity of goods, besides these, gone.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am an officer. On the 13th, at night, I stopped the prisoner in Tothill-street, with this property - he gave no account how he got it. I saw him go into an old iron shop with it; but they would not buy it.

Prisoner's Defence. I work for Mr. Holloway. A man came out of my master's yard carrying these things. I asked where he was going - he said to Mr. Turpin's, in Dartmouth-street; and when I got to the corner of Dartmouth-street, I met him again; he dropped them, and I picked them up; and asked Turpin if he knew anything of them.

GUILTY - Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-152

584. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a ladder, value 10 s. , the goods of Francis Tollinton and Charles Tollinton .

CHARLES TOLLINTON . I am in partnership with Francis Tollinton . On the 21st of January, I was informed that this ladder was stolen, and found it in Port pool-lane, a very short distance from our house. The prisoner had been in our employ.

JAMES FRAKES. I am a shoemaker, and live in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 21st of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in my room, which looks into Tollinton's yard, and heard glass breaking; I looked out, and saw the prisoner dragging the ladder under a door, into part of the yard, which is divided off for the lodgers. I went out, and he asked me to help him carry it to Leather-lane, which I did; we put it down by the side of the White Horse, public-house, and went to the prosecutors to enquire if it was all right.

WILLIAM READ . I received him in charge, and asked how he came to take the ladder - he said he was distressed - he seemed quite stupid, and said he did not know what he was going to do with it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening previous, I was at a public-house in Portpool-lane - a young man said he had a water-spout to repair, and would give me 2 s. to help him; I was to bring a ladder, and the man wanting me early, I took the liberty to borrow this without asking leave.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-153

585. HANNAH SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a gold ring, value 7 s. , the goods of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster . On the 18th of February, the prisoner came into the shop, and pawned a gold ring for 7 s., at half-past two o'clock; she came again at half-past five, to redeem it - I gave it to her - she shuffled about, and said she had not money enough, laid down a 7 s. piece, and said if I would lay it aside she would call again; she had not three halfpence to pay the interest - she took the money up. The ring she pawned was wrapped in an old piece of printed paper; she returned me one wrapped in similar paper, but immediately she was gone, I found she had given me a metal ring instead of the gold one. I went out, and found it upon her, with the 7 s. piece, and a brass 7 s. piece.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner walking very fast at the corner of Tothill-street - Williams came up, and took hold of her. I saw her endeavouring to loosen something from her right hand, from which Williams took a 7 s. piece, and a gold ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I have often pawned the ring there; I bought the brass one to wear while the other was in pawn - I took it out of my pocket with my money, having the other in my hand. When I went out, it rained hard, which made me run.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-154

586. JAMES ROWLEY and MARY ROWLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a watch, value 50 s.; a crown-piece, value five shillings, two half-crowns, and seventeen shillings, the property of Michael May , from the person of Mary May .

MARY MAY . I live in Closeall-court, Barbican. In August last, I got my husband's watch out of pawn, and met the prisoners in White-cross-street - they had lodged with us - they asked me to go and drink, I said I was in a hurry, for I had been redeeming my husband's watch; they pressed me, and I went to a public-house, and had two glasses of rum and water, and called for a third. I paid 1 s. for it, and said, when the last glass was drank I should go - Mrs. Rowley said, it was a long time since we had met, and I need not hurry - another glass, and a fifth was called for. I was getting very sleepy, as I had been up all night - another glass was brought. I said,

"This is too much, we don't want it." I had not got much money, and gave my husband's watch to the landlord to take, instead of money, and said, I would call in the morning for it, but Rowley would not let me - he paid for it - I laid my head down, and fell asleep - Mrs. Rowley awoke me, saying, the house was going to be shut up - they both came home with me, and sat for an hour, and, when I undressed, I missed the watch, and found my purse in my pocket, but empty. I had 29 s. 6 d. in it - my husband's name is on the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not been to some other public-houses before you went to this - A. No; I was quite sober when I went in - I was not over and above drunk; I was very heavy and sleepy I did not offer the landlord the watch to pawn.

Q. Why offer it, when you had so much money - A. I did not want to own to my money.

Q. Did not the landlord send his servant to see you part of the way home - A. No; I drank my share of four glasses, but none of the fifth.

Q. When you met the prisoners, did they not take you out of a mob, and bring you into this house, to save your life - A. No; I was in no row. I did not give Mrs. Rowley the watch to pawn.

THOMAS EMBERSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 1st of September, Mrs. Rowley pawned this watch, in the name of May.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HANLEY . I am a constable. On the 5th of February, I apprehended the prisoners at Lines's house - they both denied any knowledge of the watch, and said nothing about pawning it by her desire

JAMES ROWLEY 'S Defence. I met this woman in Golden-lane, quarrelling with another - I got her out of the mob, took her into the public-house, and she gave me the watch to keep for her, and in a few minutes asked me for it again, and after that, she went out with my wife - I do not know what we drank, for I fell asleep.

MARY ROWLEY 'S Defence. She offered the watch to Lines - he said he would rather have the money - I gave her 1 s. - she fell asleep; Lines sent his servant and me home with her, as she was in liquor, and in Golden-lane she gave me the watch, and next morning I pawned it, and we both spent the money.

- LINES. I keep the public-house, and remember Mrs. May coming with the prisoners - she was three parts drunk when she came in - Mrs. Rowley seemed the most sober of the three. They drank four or five glasses of rum and water in my house. May offered me the watch to let them have as much liquor as they liked - I refused.

When she left the house, I was obliged to lift her off the table, and sent my servant to help Rowley out of the house with her, and in the morning she came and asked me for the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-155

587. THOMAS BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , three pairs of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of George Wilson and William Parker .

THOMAS BINGHAM . I am servant to George Wilson and William Parker , hosiers , Whitechapel. On the 24th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner take three pairs of stockings down from inside the door, he ran off with them. I was behind the counter, and followed him with two more, and secured him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in a court.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-156

588. ROBERT ADAMS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 28th of January , a ream of paper, value 20 s. , the goods of Israel Thomas and John Jones .

ISRAEL THOMAS. I am in partnership with John Jones ; we are stationers ; our premises are in Baldwin's-court, Cloak-lane . The prisoner's brother was in our service.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am in the prosecutor's service. On the 31st of January. I missed a ream of paper off a pile. Henry Adams was charged with taking it, which he at last confessed.

JOHN THOMAS HIGLEY . On the 28th of January, Henry Adams brought a ream of paper to me in Cloak-lane. I gave it to Smith. We went to Willow-gardens, called the prisoner out, and he gave him the paper, and asked him to go with me and Smith into Whitecross-street with it. He went with us down Playhouse-yard, and I left him. I do not know why we called for him - he did not know that we were coming.

JOHN VANN . I stopped the prisoner on this night with Smith - the prisoner had the paper tied in a blue apron, he said a man gave it to him at the corner of a court in Golden-lane, to take to Mr. Carrier - that he did not know the man, or what he was to have for carrying it. I took him to Mr. Carrier, who did not expect it.

Prisoner's Defence (Written). Higley and Smith came to my father's house, and asked me to go a little way with them, and when I came out they produced the paper. Higley said, some one gave it him to sell, and asked me to carry it, and he would shew me where to sell it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-157

589. SARAH COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a gown, value 4 s., a bed-gown, value 6 d.; and an apron, value 6 d. , the goods of John Neate and John Thomas Neate .

GEORGE PICKETT . I am shopman to John Neate and John Thomas Neate , Duke-street, Manchester-square . On the 18th of January, I missed a gown, which hung inside the shop; the prisoner was there half an hour before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS TOWNSEND . I am shopman to Mr. Morritt, Mary-le-bone-lane. The prisoner pawned the gown in the name of Stevens, on the 20th of January - I am sure of her.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-158

590. JOHN DUNSHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a pistol, value 10 s. , the goods of John M'Donald .

JOHN M'DONALD. I live in Chequer-alley, Whitecross-street . On the 24th January, I put my pistol on a shelf by the side of my bed, and missed it on the 28th. The prisoner lodged in the house. I charged him with taking it; he said he had sold it in Aylesbury-street, for 1 s. I told him I would go there with him, and while I went for my hat he ran off.

ANN BERRESFORD . The prisoner lodged at my house, in the same room as the prosecutor - he went by the name of Bull. He acknowledged selling the pistol in my presence.

JAMES TAYLOR . I took him on another charge, and at the office he said he had lost the pistol.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-159

591. GEORGE FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , a cheese, value 6 s. , the goods of Joshua Needham .

THOMAS SMITH . I am porter to Joshua Needham , cheesemonger , No. 191, Shoreditch. On the 17th of February, I and Ayland went to fetch some cheeses from the warehouse up a court. Ayland gave me fourteen; I put them on my truck and dragged them in. I went backward and forward several times with cheeses, and saw the prisoner standing at the door in the passage of No. 189; I passed him three or four times - the door opened and closed - I missed him, and on looking down missed a cheese; there was nobody else about.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM AYLAND . I saw the fourteen cheeses put into the truck - we missed one. I saw the prisoner come out of the passage door, and accused him of it - he denied it. I unbuttoned his coat, and saw the colour of the cheese on his waistcoat. He still denied it, and I detained him.

EDWARD LEMON . I am shopman to Mr. Needham. I sent Smith for one hundred and seventy-six cheeses, marked No. 4. Ayland brought the prisoner to me, and said he had stolen one, and that the marks were on his waistcoat; the prisoner began rubbing the marks off. I went to No. 189, where he lodged, and on the landing-place found a cheese, near the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-160

592. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , three cages, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Alexander .

THOMAS ALEXANDER . I live at St. John's Wood . I had three linnets hanging in cages at the end of the Barracks . On the 2d of February, at one o'clock, my granddaughter came and said something - I went in pursuit towards Portland-town, and saw the prisoner by a cow-yard,

about a quarter of a mile off, with two of the birds and cages. I found a little boy, who got away with the other. They were safe at half-past twelve o'clock. I let him go, as he said he would not go with me without an officer, and fetched one, who took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN STAPLES . I took him in charge on the Monday following - I could not find him before. He said the man had got his birds back, and that he had bought them in the fields.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in the brick-field.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-161

593. CHRISTIAN LOWERBACK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , four loaves of bread, value 18 d. , the goods of Thomas Horsburgh .

THOMAS COX . I am in service in Grosvenor-square. On the 17th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Upper Berkley-street , and saw the prisoner take four loaves out of a baker's basket - they were all stuck together; another man was with him - both ran away. I followed, and took the prisoner with them.

SAMUEL HART . I am servant to Thomas Horsburgh , a baker . I left my bread in the basket - the prisoner was brought back with it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240218-162

594. JOSEPH M'GUTHERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , four shillings , the monies of Joseph Brook .

JOSEPH BROOK . I am a corn-dealer , and live in Foley-street . On the morning of the 27th of January, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked if I had any large halfpence - that he wanted some to put round a board; I shewed him some - he then asked for some thick rimmed shillings; I shewed him the till, took some out, and was looking at them; he said,

"You cannot tell that way" - I gave 8 s. into his hands, to select some; he returned them to me, and while I was giving the witness Rose 6 d., he took four shillings out of the till, and put them into his breeches. I asked him for them - he said he had taken none; but he unbuttoned the knee of his breeches, and out fell three shillings, and one was found in the corn bin.

Cross-examined by MR. SHORT. Q. Was not something said about giving you more than 1 s. for them - A. He said nothing about it. He put his hand over the counter, and took them out of the till, after he had returned them to me; and while I was speaking to Rose. He said he wanted them to make a punch ladle with.

Q. Have you never said that you would do all you could convict him - A. I said the first man who tricked me I would prosecute.

ANN ROSE . I was in this shop. The prosecutor shewed the prisoner some silver - he returned it, and after that I saw him put his hand into the till, and take silver out, and put it into his breeches - it fell out at his knee.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness swore to three shillings, now he swears to four.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-163

595. JOHN NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , two pairs of trowsers, value 3 s., a coat, value 2 s.; an apron, value 3 d., and a towel, value 1 d. , the goods of William Bostick .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240218-164

596. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of William Henry Lloyd .

WILLIAM HENRY LLOYD . I am a cooper, employed at the London Docks . On the 2d of February, I was working at the warehouse No. 4, and hung my coat on a nail, under the shed - there were some iron hoops at the back of the shed. I left work at four o'clock, and it was gone.

WILLIAM HENRY MURRAY . I am celler clerk at the Docks. I saw the prisoner lurking about the docks - he had no business there. I saw him go to where the men's coats hung; he took Lloyd's coat - I ran out, and laid hold of him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240218-165

597. DANIEL LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a coat, value 2 s. , the goods of Maria Shephard , widow .

MARIA SHEPHARD . I live in Bowyer's-buildings, Commercial-road. On the 14th of February, my son was at work at a coal-shed - I find him in clothes.

JOSEPH SHEPHARD . I live with my mother, and work for Mr. Gordon. On the 14th of February, I hung my coat up into the shed, and missed it. I met the prisoner on the Wednesday following, in the Commercial-road, with it on his back, wearing it; I claimed it; he said it was not mine, and he would knock me down - that he had bought it in Rosemary-lane, for 2 s. 6 d.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I took the coat off the prisoner's back - he told me he had bought it for 1 s. 8 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-166

598. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Chandler .

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Ratcliffe-highway - these shoes were in my shop, on the 19th of February.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DAVID PETRIE . I am errand-boy to Mr. Chandler. On the 19th of February the prisoner came into the shop with another boy, and asked for low priced shoes. I shewed them some, which would not suit - they then asked for laced boots; he said he would go for the money, and come in half an hour; the prisoner asked if I had any to fit him - I shewed him some; they both left together, saying, they would go for the money. I saw the prisoner take a pair of women's shoes off the rail, and put them under his coat - I went out, took hold of him, and took them from him - the other ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-167

599. RICHARD THOROGOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , two saddles, value 20 s. , the goods of Stanger Fisher .

THOMAS THOMAS . I am servant to Stanger Fisher, a saddler , who lives in Little Ryder-street, St. James's . On Thursday, about half-past one o'clock, my master went out. I left two saddles on the step of the door, on a stool, and went down to dinner, and in half an hour Haydon knocked at the door. I missed the saddles - went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner coming out of Jermyn-street with one of them in a basket, and the other on his arm - he told me that a woman was to give him 1 s. to take them to a house.

WILLIAM HAYDON . I was coming down the street, and saw the prisoner turn the corner, with two saddles - he put the stool down, and went off with the saddles. I gave an alarm, and took the stool to Fisher's. I am sure of his person, he was a very little way from Fisher's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I overtook a groom in Ryder-street with them - he asked me to take them to Sackville-street, and he would give 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-168

600. ELIZABETH WALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 8 s. , the goods of John Platford , her master .

JOHN PLATFORD . I am a linen-draper , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury - the prisoner was in my service. On the 14th of February, at night, I went into the kitchen where she sleeps and opened the doors of her bedstead, and found a length of print under the children's clothes - she washed and undressed the children; it was taken from my shop - I sent for an officer, who pulled her bed down, and another piece fell out; and between the bed and sacking, we found another length of print.

JOSEPH WALTER . I am an officer. I was fetched and found the property in the prisoner's bed; she said she got them from the shop; she said it was not decent for me to search the bed, and I declined it; but afterwards I searched, and found another piece.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-169

601. THOMAS READING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 11 dwts. of gold, value 28 s. , the goods of Thomas Dugard ; and RICHARD HOLYER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

Mr. Alley on behalf of the prosecutors, having no evidence against the prisoners, but a confession which had been extorted, declined calling the witness

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-170

602. HENRY HURST was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , two half crowns, two shillings, three sixpences, and fourteen penny piece, the monies of Mary Pottinger , widow , from her person .

MARY POTTINGER . On the 15th of February, I was in Long-acre . I had two half-crowns, and some other money loose in my pocket; and a bundle of linen in my apron - the prisoner came and asked me the way into Holborn; I directed him straight on; and all at once, missed him from my left side; and found him on my right. I thought he was after my bundle, as it was eleven o'clock at night. I caught up my apron in both hands to hold it; my pocket hole was rather open and I caught his hand coming out of my pocket; I said

"Master, you have robbed me;" he ran down a court - I missed my money, and called Stop thief! I ran as hard as I could - saw a man coming along and said,

"Stop that man;" two gentlemen stopped him - I ran up and said, he was the man.

Prisoner. Q. I asked you to go and have a glass of gin - A. He did not; I lost a duplicate, which was found upon him.

THOMAS TAPLIN . I was in Hart-street, at my door, about half-past eleven o'clock - I heard a cry of Stop him! the prisoner came up - I stopped him, and took him to the watch-house. He was searched, and 16 s. 8 d. found on him; he said he received 15 s. from Mr. Oakley, his master - then said to the prosecutrix,

"I will give you back two half-crowns, not to send me to the watch-house" - she would not take them.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found 10 s. in silver in his hand, and 1 s. in copper - he said that was all the money which he had, and that it was left out of his wages - that he had received 15 s. - he resisted being searched. I found two shillings and three sixpences in his breeches pocket, with a duplicate belonging to the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. I received my wages, and had 2 s. 8 d. besides.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240218-171

Third Jury, Before Mr. Arabin, Esq.

603. WILLIAM WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , twenty-eight yards of stuff, value 30 s., the goods of William Davis , privately, in his shop .

WILLIAM WILLIANS . I am servant to William Davis , linen-draper , Chiswell-street . On the 12th of February, the prisoner came to the shop, other shopmen were present. I was carrying some stuffs to the counter, heard one fall off the pile, turned round, and saw him crossing the street with a piece under his arm - it had stood under the door. I pursued, he threw it down, and the watchman took him without my losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-172

604. JOSEPH CARROLL and HENRY PAPE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a tea-pot, value 5 s. , the goods of George Betson Thompson .

JOHN MASON . I am a constable. On the 19th of February, at a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoners in company together, at the corner of Great Russell-street and Bedford-square. Carroll had something under his apron. I asked what it was - he said nothing. I took this tea-pot from under his apron. He said he had bought it of a boy for 2 s. Pape ran away - Duke followed and secured him.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I secured Pape.

JAMES SALTER . I am shopman to George Betson Thompson, Oxford-street. This tea-pot is his, and was stolen from the shop between six and nine o'clock on that evening.

CARROL'S Defence. I met a boy in Tottenham Court-road, and bought it of him for 2 s. 6 d., and afterwards met this boy - we were talking together when the officers came.

PAPE'S Defence. I met this boy with the pot - he said he gave 2 s. for it.

CARROL - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

PAPE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-173

605. JOHN CRONAN and JOHN DURKING were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 30 lbs. of leaden pipe, value 20 s., the goods of Samuel Baxter , and fixed to a building of his .

JAMES HAINES . I am a mason, and was working at Mr. Baxter's house, in Regent-street . On the 16th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I heard a sawing in the adjoining house - I went there, got into the kitchen, and found this pipe pulled from the hold fasts, but still attached to the rest.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240218-174

606. JOHN SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a cap, value 2 s. , the goods of William Golder .

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 16th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the Commercial-road , in company with another - he unpinned a cap, which hung outside Golder's door. I was on the opposite of the way, and did not see what he took at first, but saw him put something under his coat; he turned round, and ran off - I followed and took him a quarter of a mile off, and found the cap under his coat.

WILLIAM GOLDER . I am a salesman . This cap is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240218-175

607. EDWARD GAINSFORD was indicted for embezzling the sum of 7 s. 8 d., which he had received on account of Robert Coles , his master and employer .

ROBERT COLES . I am a butterman , and live in Wigmore-stret - the prisoner was my servant, and entrusted to receive monies on my account; he had one guinea a-week - he keeps what we call a round-book, and settled with me every night for what he received; it was his duty to enter on that book all he received. On the 24th of January, nor on the 25th did he account to me for 7 s. 8 d. received from Laker, or at any time. I discharged him on the 7th of February, and found this out afterwards.

MARTHA LAKER . I am cook to Mrs. Ord, No. 6, Montague-place - we deal with Mr. Coles. On the 24th, I paid the prisoner 7 s. 8 d. on his master's account. I do not recollect the date, but I paid him every week, and have a memorandum of having paid him 7 s. 8 d. on the week following, the 17th - I produced the bill, with a receipt, which he wrote in my presence. I gave him a sovereign, and he gave me change - the bill was for goods up to the 17th of January.

ROBERT COLES . He should account to me every evening for what he receives - he never accounted to me for this sum; he pays his money every night, and has his book signed - there is no entry whatever of this sum; he has paid me monies since, according to the entries in his book. I did not inquire about this sum, Mrs. Ord being a regular customer.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to make the money up, but being discharged sooner than I expected, I could not do so; my wife was confined on the week I was discharged.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .


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