Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th January 1824.
Reference Number: 18240114
Reference Number: f18240114-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; On WEDNESDAY, 14th of JANUARY, 1824, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1824.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julian Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Joshua Arnold ,

Barnard Evans ,

Anthony Pattison ,

Henry Oak ,

Robert Sugden ,

William Hopkins ,

George Brashier ,

Edward William Younger ,

William Smith ,

Rohana Lawrence ,

John Bray ,

Charles Goodwin .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Robert Kennedy Dickman ,

Joseph Tavernor ,

James Harris ,

Thomas King ,

George Foulkes ,

Richard Forty ,

John Metcalfe ,

William Walker ,

Peter Morrison ,

S. Barker ,

James Purvis ,

Robert Duffs .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Harvey ,

Isaac Wilson ,

William Morrison ,

Thomas Sherratt ,

Thomas Ramsden ,

William Golding ,

Thomas Dexter ,

James Kent ,

William Monk ,

Thomas Weston ,

William Cheesman ,

Thomas Greenham,

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 14, 1824.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-1

209. WILLIAM HENRY REYNOLDS was indicted for that he, on the 1st of January , at St. Mary-le-bone , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did shoot at Napier Christie Burton , a subject of the King; with intent in so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating his intent to be to disable the said Napier Christie Burton.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do some greivous bodily harm to the said Napier Christie Burton.

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GENERAL NAPIER CHRISTIE BURTON. I was once Commander and Colonel in a battalion in which Serjeant Medley was ensign; I procured him that rank. He had a female child, who afterwards married the prisoner - after his death, I procured his widow a pension, and the child a pension of 8 l. a year. I had not seen the child from two years old till she was eighteen or nineteen years old; I think it was about December, 1822 - I have seen her perhaps seven or eight times between that time and the present, and have seen the prisoner three or four times - he desired me to get him some information respecting his wife. On the 1st of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, she was sitting in my parlour with me, and about five the servant came, and said Mr. Reynolds was at the door; he immediately followed the servant in - the servant left, and shut the door, leaving us three together. I said,

"Pray take a chair;" he sat down about two feet from the table, with his back against the wall - I sat on the opposite side of the table, which was between us; his wife sat at the opposite corner, by the fire. I said,

"Shall I give you a glass of wine?" he said

"Yes." I immediately took up the decanter (which was on the table,) in my right hand, and the glass in my left - I poured the wine out, and handed it over to him, keeping my eye on the glass to avoid spilling it; he had approached nearer the table and nearer to me. I was leaning over the table, handing the glass towards him; his hand was under the table. I heard a sort of tick, which I now suppose to be his cocking the pistol, and just as I sat the glass down he fired a shot at me, putting his hand across the table - I did not see the pistol, and felt no bodily hurt from that; the ball had gone through my coat on the left side; I have the coat on now; it was buttoned; the hole is near the waistband of my breeches. I immediately got up, went round to him, and put my hands on his, not to hold them - I merely said,

"Mr. Reynolds, for God's sake moderate your passion, or you will do something serious; consider what you are about, you will do something serious presently if you don't moderate your passion." My temper was not rough in the least. I thought at that time that he had fired at his wife, and not at me.

Q. Was she in the line of the pistol - A. We were at a triangle; he might have fired at either. I got up to pacify him, thinking he had fired at her, and while I was close to him, he fired a second pistol on my right side - I immediately felt that I had been shot; his wife at that time had pushed her chair about two feet further from the fire.

Q. In the manner he directed the pistol, could it be intended for her - A. I do not think it possible. That ball perforated my coat, and went through my waistcoat. I went and sat down, and asked him if his pistols were loaded with ball; he immediately answered Yes, he was sure they were loaded with ball, for he had loaded them himself. I then asked where he got them - he said he bought them in Norton-falgate, on the Tuesday, (this was Thursday;) I asked of whom; he said he did not know - that he was sure the balls were in me, and he hoped they were in my g - ts or bowels and said,

"I am very happy, I am now quite easy" - he repeated that three or four times. I said,

"Mr. Reynolds, I think it was the second shot that hit me;" he said,

"No, it was the first;" and then he added,

"I took a very good aim at you;" I replied,

"You certainly had a very good opportunity." The report of the pistols alarmed my servants, who came running up - his wife was alarmed, jumped up, and ran to find the bell, but could not. She opened the door and the servants came in - my man servant called a watchman, who came in. The candles were out when the servants came up, but I had not observed it before, and cannot tell how they came out. I sent oyer to Mr. Lock, the surgeon, who came immediately, and said,

"Let me examine the wound;" I said,

"Stop a moment" - I then said to the prisoner, (as he had only said that the pistol was loaded with ball before his wife)

"Sir, were your pistols loaded with ball?" he said

"Yes, I loaded them myself; they are in you, and I am very glad of it, I am sure they are in you." Mr. Brodie came in eight or ten minutes - the prisoner still sat in the same chair; he either threw the keys of the pistols down, or put them on the table, I do not know which; I was as collected as I am now. Mr. Brodie looked at my wound. We found the ball had gone through the wooden part of the fire skreen, hit the wall, and fallen down on the

ground, where it was found. I got up, and felt something run down my side, and took the ball out of my breeches - it had gone through my coat and waistcoat, and lodged in my breeches. The prisoner took out a letter, and threw it on the table; his wife got up, seized it, and crammed it into her pocket. I afterwards said,

"By the bye, where is that letter?" The prisoner immediately said, looking at her in rather a spiteful manner,

"Oh! I suppose you have burnt it" - she said, No, and threw it on the table. I took hold of it, and said,

"I presume I may read this letter;" she said, Yes. I took it up; it was rather dirty and torn; I could scarcely make it out; he looked across the table, and said,

"Oh! No, to be sure you cannot read it, you never saw it before." I never had seen it before, so help me God. I gave it to Mr. Locke. He repeated several times that he thought the bullets were in me, and seemed mortified when they were found, and said he knew very well he should suffer for it. He said to me,

"You are a serpent, you have stung me in the most vital part." I said,

"Sir, you do me an injustice, I never did you an injury." I never had the slightest intercourse with his wife.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. However innocent you may have been, you are quite sensible that he was under the influence of jealousy, however improperly excited - A. From his observations I presume he was. I have seen his wife seven or eight times within the last twelve or eighteen months. I am now unmarried, and was so at that time.

Q. Had you seen her between Christmas-eve and the 1st of January - A. She called on me on the 26th, about eleven o'clock in the morning. I had told him before that if I saw or heard of her, I would acquaint him, and did so, and he came about five o'clock on the 26th - I said,

"Good God, have you received my letter already?" he said, Yes, and asked me if she was inclined to come back to him; I said,

"I really cannot say, she seems frightened." I did not see her from the 26th to the 1st of January. I live in New-street, Dorset-square, and he near Finsbury-square. He said he had got on the stage and come up. I was never at his house but once in my life; he was present then. His wife had left him twice I believe. I know of nothing to make him have any ill-will towards me. When I procured his wife the pension, she was between seven and eight years old.

MR. JAMES LOCKE . I am a surgeon. I was fetched, and got to the General's house between five and six o'clock; several people were then in the parlour. The General said,

"Mr. Locke, I am shot; that man has shot me," (pointing to the prisoner.) I desired him to sit down, for me to examine the wound; he said he wished first to put some questions to the prisoner, and asked him to be candid and acknowledge if the pistols were loaded with ball - he replied that they were; I then examined the wound, and found the ball had passed through the coat, waistcoat, and shirt, and considerably grazed the side, directly over the left ribs, for about an inch and a half - if it had struck a little above it would have entered the lungs and produced death. I was convinced that the ball had not entered the side, but the General said he thought it had, and the prisoner said he hoped it had. I proposed examining him to see if he had more pistols - he took out seven or eight balls, and declared that he had no more pistols; he had given up two to the watchman. Both balls were found while I was there; one had passed through the wooden part of the fire skreen. I have the letter.

(Read.)

To Mr. Reynolds, No. 2, Little Peter-street, Sun-street, Bishopsgate, December 21.

"Sir, There is scarcely a newspaper comes out of press, but somebody's wife has left them, and it always happens that it is without any provocation - now it does not stand to reason so many women would leave their homes without a reason: - the truth is, there are so many men, nasty beasts, drunken, discontented, gambling wretches, who neither care for wife nor family, so that they get their g - ts filled, and I do not doubt but you are one of that sort.

Not Signed.

ANDREW HAWKINS . I am a watchman of St. Mary-le-bone, and took the prisoner into custody in the parlour of the General's house - he said he was happy - he was easy - he knew he should die, and his wife said she hoped so too. The General said,

"Mr. Reynolds, answer me candidly, did you load those pistols yourself, and were they loaded?" he said

"They were - I did" - he said,

"Did you load them with ball?" He said,

"I put a ball in each." I took the pistols, and gave them to the officer.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. I have two pistols, a key, and seven bullets. I received the pistols from Mr. Locke, and six of the bullets at Mr. Locke's house, and the other at the General's house. I perceived that it had passed through the fire skreen, and gone into the wall by the side of the fire-place.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner at the office, and found a powder-flask on him, with powder in it.

WINIFRED HOARE . I am cook to General Burton. The report of two pistols brought me into the parlour - on entering the room I found the General leaning on the table - he said,

"Cook, I am shot." The prisoner was sitting in a chair close to the General; the candles were out; I lighted one. I heard the prisoner say that he bought the pistols in Norton-falgate - that they were loaded, and he had made the balls himself; that he was happy, and that was the serpent who had stung him, (pointing to the General.)

WILLIAM BURGE . I am footman to General Burton. The report of pistols brought me into the room. The General sent me for Mr. Locke. The candles were out; they had been lighted. When I returned the General asked him if the pistols were loaded with ball; he said, Yes - that he bought them at Norton-falgate, and laying them on the table, said he had no further use for them - that he was happy, and pointed to his wife.

The prisoner made no Defence, but nine witnesses gave him a good Character, as a good tempered inoffensive man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-2

210. ELIZA NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a watch, value 6 l.; a piece of ribbon, value 1 d.; a watch key, value 3 s., and a seal, value 3 s., the goods of Jacob Warman , in the dwelling-house of Ann Rhodes , widow.

JACOB WARMAN . I am a glover , and live at Chelsea.

On the 20th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Tothill-street, Westminster, and went with her to a house, No. 21, Almonry ; she carried a light up stairs - I was about half an hour with her. I was not sober. She tried to pull my clothes off; I would not let her, and sat down on the bedside, took out my watch, and put it on the mantle-piece. Finding she could not get me to bed she left the room, saying she would fetch a pot of beer, and did not return. I remained there till four o'clock in the morning, thinking she might come back - I missed my watch and about 8 s. from my breeches pocket, about five minutes after she left, when the landlady came up and asked if I had sent her for beer.

ANN RHODES . I live in the Almonry. On the 20th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock the prisoner came with a gentleman to my house - she came in and took a candle. I heard the man go up stairs, but did not see him - she came down in about half an hour. I followed her out, and asked where she was going; she said for a pot of beer; I said it was too late to get any - she ran off without answering me. I went up to the room in about five minutes, and found the prosecutor there, very tipsy. Smith went up before me.

PHOEBE SMITH. I live at this house, and saw the prisoner come in with the prosecutor. I cannot say whether he was in liquor or not - she afterwards went out; I went up to the room, and found Warman there with his coat off; he desired me to go out of the room for a few minutes, which I did; he then called me in; he was still on the bed without his coat; he told me to look on the mantle-piece for his watch, which I did; it was not there - I told him so; he said then he was robbed. He did not appear very sober nor very tipsy.

MARIA RAFFETY . I live in Duck-lane, Westminster. The prisoner lodged with me for a fortnight and three days. She went out on Saturday night, the 20th of December, about half-past ten o'clock, and returned about one next morning, with two young women - she went out in about half an hour, with one Alexander Burgess , and returned about ten o'clock in the morning with him. A man named Rhodes went up stairs. Burgess went away directly, and as he went out I heard him call to Eliza, and asked if he should take 1 l. for it - she said she did not care. I cannot say what

"it" meant.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. On the 21st, Warman applied to me. I took the prisoner in Duck-lane, about one o'clock - she said she knew nothing about the prosecutor or his watch; he said he was certain of her, and as I took her down Peter-street, to the watch-house, she said,

"You know you was in liquor when you was with me." I said,

"You now know him; do you know anything of his watch" - she said, No. I found nothing upon her.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-3

211. MARY STRIKES , SARAH COLLIS , and ELIZA M'MANIS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , in the dwelling-house of Henry Sansom (to whom the said Mary Strikes was servant ,) seven dishes, value 7 s., twenty-four plates, value 6 l.; a chest, value 3 l.; six wine glasses, value 6 s.; a silver wine label, value 3 s.; a mug, value 1 s., and a neckcloth, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of the said Henry Sansom ; and a coat, value 4 l.; a common prayer-book, value 5 s; two neckcloths, value 5 s.; a purse, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Philip Sansom ; and a wafer seal, value 16 s.; three shells, value 1 s., and an almanack, value 1 s., the goods of Charles Sansom ; and seven books, value 1 l. 1 s., the goods of Elizabeth Frances Sansom ; and two salt-cellars, value 4 s.; two cups, value 2 s., and two saucers, value 2 s. , the goods of James Robarts .

SECOND COUNT, charging Mary Strikes only with stealing, and the other prisoners with receiving the said goods knowing them to have been stolen.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY SANSOM , ESQ. In September last, I resided in Wimpole-street , and left town in that month with my family, leaving the prisoner Strikes in care of the house - she was hired for that express purpose. I returned about the middle of December, and missed property.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. On the 13th of December, I went to Mr. Sansom's, and searched Strikes; I found a key upon her, which opened a box in a room over the stable, in which I found a prayer-book - I told her what I had found; she said nothing.

WILLIAM WATKINS . I am a constable. On the 15th of December, I went to Hawkes's house at Mortlake - she pointed a box out to me, which was locked. I found some muslin handkerchiefs and a gold seal in it.

SAMUEL EMANUEL . I live in Wigmore-street. I bought a wine label of the prisoner Strikes - I believe her to be the woman.

MR. PHILIP SANSOM . I live at the prosecutor's. I left this prayer-book in the house about the 25th of August, when I left town. The handkerchiefs produced are also mine.

ANN HAWKES . I live at Mortlake. Strikes left her boxes with me when she went to live at Mr. Sansom's. I was not present when she brought these things, but they were found in her box.

MR. SANSOM. The wine label is mine.

STRIKES - GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

COLLIS - NOT GUILTY .

M'MANIS - NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-4

212. EDWARD COONEY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Wales , on the night of the 30th of December , and stealing therein nine pairs of stockings, value 7 s., and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. , his property.

DINA WALES . I am the wife of John Wales ; we live in New Tothill-street . I sell hosiery and wearing apparel, and rent the shop and parlour - the landlord does not live in the house. I sleep there, but my husband does not live with me; we have been separated four years; he is alive. On the 31st of December, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner came in and asked for a pair of stockings - I shewed him a pair, which came to 8 d.; he told me not to double them up, for he would go and tell his mother, and return in a few minutes - he came back

and asked if I had a pair of men's stockings; I said, No: he went out, returned in about five minutes, and asked if I had a pair of shoes; I said, No. He went out, and kept walking backwards and forwards. I saw his face through the glass, and said,

"What are you doing there?" he said,

"Nothing, you will know me the next time you see me, shan't you, for you look at me very hard." I went into the parlour to supper, and in a few minutes heard jugs rattling - there were two in the window. I went and found a square of glass taken out, which was safe before, and nine pairs of stockings gone, and a pair of gloves. I went out, and met him in a quarter of an hour, in Old Tothill-street, coming from the baker's with a pie in his hand - I said,

"Oh! you are the lad I am looking for."

"Me," said he,

"I have not got your stockings." I had not mentioned anything about stockings to him. He ran into a house in the Almonry with the pie. I followed, and fetched his mother, who searched him, but found nothing.

HENRY BARTLETT . I am thirteen years old, and live with my father, who keeps a coal shed opposite to Wales's. On the 30th of December, I was at the shed, about a quarter to seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner standing about Wales's window - there was a light in the window, and a gas-light in the street. I saw him do something to the window, and go away three or four times, and then saw him put something into his pocket; he went away, and stood by a dead wall for two or three minutes, then went to the window again, and as he came back, I saw him putting something more into his pocket; he put something into his jacket and trowsers' pockets, and could hardly get it in - he returned a third time, and put his arm half into the window - Wales came out, and he ran away. I told Wales what I had seen. I was about six yards off, and am certain of him.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. Mrs. Wales came to me on the 31st - I went and took the prisoner; he denied the charge. The pane of glass was taken quite out, by turning the leaden casement back.

Prisoner's Defence. I went and asked the price of her stockings, came out, and stopped for a young man who lived in the street - he asked me to fetch his pie. This woman came out and said,

"You are the boy I want;" I asked what for? she said,

"For the stockings I have lost," and I said,

"I know nothing about the stockings."

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-5

213. EDMUND BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn , in the dwelling-house of Gilbert Ainslie Young , Esq. , one 20 l. Bank note , his property, against the statute.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. GILBERT AINSLIE YOUNG. I am a barrister , and reside in chambers in Gray's Inn . The prisoner came to assist as my clerk , in the room of his brother, who was ill. On the 3d of January, I had four 20 l. Bank notes in my library table drawer, and on the 6th I found one had been taken away; I had not come home in the afternoon, as usual. It was his duty to wait there for me - I got to chambers about half-past seven o'clock; he was there then, but did not come next day, as his brother was recovered. I have not found the note. I believe him to have been a good boy previously.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. On Tuesday morning, the 6th of January, I apprehended the prisoner, and found a purse containing fifteen sovereigns in his hat, and 10 s. in his waistcoat pocket. I asked him what had become of the rest of the money - he said he gave Cooper a sovereign, some he had spent, and some he believed he had lost.

MARY ANN COOPER . On Monday night, the 5th of January, about half-past seven o'clock, my son Thomas came home quite drunk. I put him to bed without undressing him, and next morning found a sovereign in his bed.

THOMAS COOPER . I was in the prisoner's company, on Monday, the 5th of January - he gave me a sovereign; he said nothing about it. I went over the water with him. I did not see him with any more money.

MARTHA TAYLOR . I am a laundress, and attend Mr. Young's chambers. On the 6th of January, I was at the chambers, and after the constable had searched the prisoner, I went into the back room with him and his brother, and said to him,

"So you took the note on Sunday night, how did you get to the drawer?" he said,

"I took the key of the cupboard in the same room, and that opened it." I have since tried that key, and it opens the drawer.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and previous good character .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-6

214. JAMES KERR was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Austin , on the night of the 20th of December , and stealing a watch, value 30 s.; a chain, value 6 d.; three seals, value 15 s.; a key, value 2 s., and a ring, value 3 s. , his property; and THOMAS KERR was indicted for feloniously receiving the said seal, knowing it to be stolen .

AMELIA AUSTIN . I am the wife of Robert Austin , who is a soldier - we live in Orchard-street, Westminster . I have known the prisoners about three years; they were never at my house before the prisoner James came, which was last Saturday three weeks, about seven o'clock at night; I was at home, alone - I had seen him three months before. He knocked at the door, and asked if I would go and have something to drink; I never drank with him before; I refused to go three or four times, and said my husband had just gone out, and would be in in a few minutes, and I could not think of leaving - he said I might as well. I said I was going for some potatoes, and went with him. I told him when I was in Orchard-street, that I could not stop many minutes, for I had double locked the door and left the key in, and that my husband's watch hung over the fire-place, and if it should be taken it would be a terrible thing. I went to the Castle, public-house, Strutton-ground with him, into a back room, as he said his brother and two other friends were there - we sat down and had a glass of rum and water; he put it on the table, and told his brother he was going out after a man; he whispered in his brother's ear, and went out. I said I would go with him, as I could not stop; he said,

"Oh! no, stop and drink, I shall not be many minutes," and so I stopped. He returned in about eight minutes. I went

home immediately; and found the room door shut, but not locked - I had double locked it. I missed the watch from over the fire-place; it had three seals, a ring, and a steel chain to it. I immediately went back to the house, and found James only there - I told him somebody had taken my watch, and it could be nobody but him, for nobody else knew that the key was left in the door; he said,

"No, I have not got it, perhaps your husband has been and taken it, to frighten you;" I asked for his brother - he said he was gone out. I said it was a planned thing between them to make away with it; he said,

"No, indeed, so help me God; I could not go up into your room without making marks with my shoes;" it was dirty, and there were no marks - I said he could pull his shoes off, and there was a mat at the door. I went home, and found my husband there; he had not got it. I returned to the public-house, and found them both there; I told James he must have it - his brother jumped up, and threatened to kick me out of the room, and I came away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been married - A. Eleven months. I never lived at Chelsea. I thought it no harm to go and drink with him; he persuaded me to go. I never drank with him before. I was not out a quarter of an hour. It struck me before I opened the door that somebody had been in. I never gave the prisoners anything to pawn. The street door was always ajar; there are lodgers. I was married at St. Martin's Church; my maiden name was Amelia Yates . I never went by the name of Pusey.

H. F. FENNER. I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Tottenham Court-road. On the 24th of December the prisoner James pawned a watch, two seals, a key, and a chain, for 24 s., in the name of James Parkins , Union-row, Vauxhall-road; he was not long with me.

Cross-examined. Q. A good many people come to your shop - A. Yes. He was with me perhaps a quarter of an hour; I took particular notice of his face.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 2d of January, I apprehended the prisoner James on another charge, and on the 3d, Thomas came and asked what charge I had against him; I asked if he had any duplicates about him; he said, No, but he had the duplicate of a watch; I asked to see it - he pulled out the duplicate of a seal, and said he bought them of a stranger for 5 s.; he was taken before a Magistrate, and suffered to go at large. I took him again the same night.

ROBERT AUSTIN . I am husband of the prosecutrix - we were married at St. Margaret, Westminster, ten months ago. The watch and seals are mine. When I went out, the watch hung over the mantle-piece - I returned in half an hour or three quarters; my wife was then out, the door locked, and the key not in it. I never saw the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you did not know of their being in your room - A. No. When my wife returned, she asked if I had been and took the watch; she said that she had been out for a quarter of an hour for some potatoes, and a person came to the door, and asked her to have something to drink.

Q. Did she say she had just been questioning that person about the watch - A. No. She said she had been with a friend, who she had seen before, and suspected him of stealing it. She was in service in Dean-street, Soho before I married her. I did not ask what public-house she had been to.

H. F. FENNER. The duplicate produced is what I gave him. I am sure of his person.

(The following witnesses appeared for the prisoners.)

ROGER JONES . I am a watchman. I knew the prosecutrix when she lived in Queen-street, Chelsea, with a watchman, named Pusey - she went by his name, and told me several times that she was married to him.

COURT. Q. How long did you know her live there - A. For a month, or better. I have frequently seen her in the room, through the window, and she frequently spoke to me through the window. I lived at Westminster, and was never there in the day time. I am a watchman on the shoals. It is twelve months last May or June that she lived there with him.

AMELIA AUSTIN . I was living in Dean-street at that time. I do not know that man, and never saw him till to night; it is all false. I never knew Pusey, and never lived at Chelsea.

JOHN WALKER . I live in Frederick-street, Westminster, and am foreman to Mr. Bennett, at the sewers. This woman has sworn she never drank with the prisoners before; I have seen her in company with James Kerr , last December - the prisoners were working at Knightsbridge, at the sewer; she came by and asked James to drink with her, and they went into the Fox, public-house; she came by again in the evening, and took them both away.

WILLIAM CHERRY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Queen-street, Chelsea, and knew the prosecutrix at the time she lived there with Pusey. I lived at No. 31, and she lived with Pusey at Nos. 9, and 22; she passed as his wife - I am certain she is the woman. I know her as well as I do my mother - everybody called her Mrs. Pusey.

SARAH MORGAN . I live in Dean-street, Carnaby-market, and lived in Queen-street, Chelsea, opposite the prosecutrix, when she lived there with Pusey; she went by the name of Mrs. Pusey.

JOHN MORING . I was at the public-house at the time the prosecutrix came in with the prisoner; he wanted something to drink. She put a watch, or something into his hand, and told him to get a pound on it, for she wanted a few shillings herself. I supposed it to be a watch from its appearance.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18240114-7

215. ISAAC ALLEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Isaac Hassan , in the King's highway, on the 1st of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will a box, value 2 s.; three pieces of silk, value 4 l. 16 s.; three crape shawls, value 2 l. 2 s.; three other shawls, value 1 l. 16 s. 6 d.; a scarf, value 18 s.; nine crape handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 7 s.; seventeen other handkerchiefs, value 3 l.; twenty-four thimbles, value 20 s.; ten ounces weight of coral beads, value 2 l. 10 s.; five ounces weight of silver, value 22 s. 6 d.; twelve ounces weight of rhubarb, value 3 s.; eight ounces weight of nutmegs, value 3 s.; ten ounces weight of cloves, value 3 s. 6 d.; six ounces weight of mace, value 3 s. 6 d.; nine ounces

weight of cassia, value 2 s. 6 d.; seven ounces weight of cassia buds, value 2 s. 6 d.; one ounce weight of isinglass, value 6 d.; eight ounces weight of sealing-wax, value 1 s.; twenty-four black lead pencils, value 9 d.; six bottles, value 3 s.; half an ounce of otto of roses, value 11 s.; four other bottles, value 6 d.; three ounces and a half weight of cayenne, value 1 s.; four brooches, value 10 s.; four penknives, value 1 s. 6 d., and eight ounces of ginger, value 8 d. , the property of Jacob Hadida .

ISAAC HASSAN . I live in Gulston-street, Whitechapel. On the 1st of December, Jacob Hadida employed me to carry a box for him to Little Ayliff-street; he gave it to me in Cutler-street, Hounsditch, and told me to stand by Aldgate Church with it, while he went into a shop. I had it on my shoulder, and a saucer of pickles in my hand. The prisoner came up - I knew him before about the neighbourhood, and cannot be mistaken in his person - he came up and snatched the pickles out of my hand; I had seen him and Benjamin talking together before he came up. I knew them both before. I turned my face to see what he was doing with the pickles; Benjamin immediately knocked me down - I kept hold of the box, and Benjamin snatched it from me while I was on the ground; this was not half a minute after Allen snatched the pickles. I got up as quick as I could, saw Allen, and asked him where Benjamin was gone with the box; he said down the Minories. I called my uncle, and ran down the Minories with my uncle, but could see nothing of him, or the box. I saw the box afterwards at a house in Gulston-street - I did not know where Allen lived; he was taken up the same evening, and taken before the Lord Mayor, and discharged on a second hearing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was he examined twice - A. Yes. I knew his name before. He took all the pickles, saucer and all and when I asked him what had become of Benjamin he returned me the pickles - he did not ask if they were for sale, but ran off directly towards Petticoat-lane - towards Tuson-street, not towards the Minories.

ZIPPORAH HASSAN . I live at No. 1, Gulston-street. On the 1st of December, my son came home and said he had been robbed of his uncle's box. I went out to look for it - I went to my own door, and in about ten minutes I saw Benjamin come along with the box, wrapped in a green baize and a blanket - he came from Petticoat-lane way, not from the Minories. I stopped him, and told him he had got my property; he d - d me, and said he would have my life unless I let the box go. I followed him about twenty yards, and said I would have the box; I did not care for his threats. The prosecutor is my brother-in-law - he came up; I said,

"Here is your property;" he went to take the box off Benjamin's shoulder, but Benjamin threw it down, and knocked him down twice, and got off before we could get an officer. We had Allen taken in Petticoat-lane - he said he knew nothing of it, and before the Lord Mayor, he said he only took a bit of pickle. Benjamin and him are constant companions; I frequently see them go out together.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you open the box - A. Yes; it was empty. I had seen it a day or two before; it was well stocked then. I have spoken to none of Benjamin's family. The Minories are about a hundred yards from Gulston-street - a person coming from the Minories might come the way he did.

JACOB HADIDA . I live in Little Ayliff-street, and am a hawker. I was with Hassan, and gave him my box to take home - I had packed it up myself; it contained the articles stated in the indictment; it was locked; he carried it for me, and had the pickles in a saucer. I went with him to the corner of Houndsditch, and told him to stop by the church while I went into Wright's shop, and in about ten minutes he came in, and said he had lost it. I went with my nephew into the Minories, and in Gulston-street, found Hassan's mother had stopped Benjamin. I laid hold of the box - he knocked me down twice, and ran away, leaving the box behind, with a blanket and a green cloth, which did not belong to me. I examined it directly - found it broken open, and the drawer of it empty. The silks, coral beads, silver, and my license gone; they left some spices in the box. I went to the Mansion House, and got an officer, who took Allen.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-8

216. CHARLES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , five pigs of lead, containing 112 lbs. each, value 4 l. 10 s. , the goods of William Thompson and others, his partners.

WILLIAM SIMMS . I live in Brewer's-lane, Upper Thames-street, and am in the employ of Mr. William Thompson and others, his partners. On the 29th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, we landed three hundred pigs of lend on the wharf - I went there at seven o'clock next morning, but did not miss any till the officer came to enquire, which was in the course of the morning; I then missed five pigs. I have known the prisoner sometime, and saw him standing at the head of the wharf while we were landing them.

WILLIAM JUDGE. I am a Thames Police officer. On the 30th of December, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at the end of Tooley-street, with something wrapped in a piece of old bag; I asked what it was; he said a piece of lead. I found it was part of a pig of lead, and appeared fresh sawn off. I asked where he got it - he said he was watching Mr. Illman's craft at Dowgate-wharf, and a man gave it him - he could not tell who the man was; and said he was going to sell it. I made enquiry, and found out the prosecutor's wharf. It matched with a piece which was afterwards produced with four pigs.

JOHN GASKELL . I was with Judge. I went in search of a lighter, and found four pigs and a piece of lead in a barge, called the Jemima, and in the cabin I found a saw, which had lead in the teeth, and lead dust on the floor. I took the lead to the prosecutor's wharf, with a piece of bag which was in the barge, and it corresponded with the piece of bag the prisoner's lead was wrapped in. The lead also corresponded.

JOHN BELL . On the 26th of December, I sent the barge Jemima with three hundred pigs of lead, and saw them all landed on the 29th, and saw them marked on the 30th. I was told the barge was missing; the prisoner had no business with it - I found it afloat half a mile down the river, with four pigs and a half of the same lead in it.

JOHN MACK . I am foreman to the prosecutors. I counted the lead as it was landed - there were three hundred pigs. I left the wharf at seven o'clock, and next morning missed five. The officer produced them - they corresponded with the marks on the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-9

217. ROBERT WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 56 ozs. of tea, value 30 s.; 2 lbs. of sugar, value 1 s., and 8 ozs. of chocolate, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Deacon and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

JOHN BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Deacon. On Sunday, the 7th of December, my master employed me to watch the prisoner, who was also in his service, and about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I concealed myself in the shop, and at half-past nine, the street door bell rang; the female servant let the prisoner in - he had no orders to come on Sunday. He went up into the kitchen; then immediately came down into the shop, and took up a tin scoop, went round the counter to a canister of green tea, and took the scoop out full; he walked into the warehouse with it - he returned and took a second, and then a third scoop full, which would be about 4 lbs. together. He came through the shop in a few minutes, and went out - I followed him into the street, collared him, and brought him back. The officer found the tea, sugar, and chocolate on him - the sugar and chocolate were not in sight where I was concealed.

THOMAS DEACON . I am a grocer , and live in Skinner-street, Snow-hill, and have other partners. I was concealed in the counting-house, but was not in a situation to see what the prisoner did. He lived nearly three years with me.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge. I found above a pound of tea loose in each of his breeches pockets, and in his side pocket more tea, and above a pound in his hat, with paper over it - a can of chocolate in his pocket, and a pound of sugar on each side of his breast, next his skin.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-10

218. THOMAS ANTHONY and JOHN BURGESS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Arthur Coleman .

ARTHUR COLEMAN . I live in Pitman's-buildings, St. Luke's. On the 8th of December, I was working at Mr. Davis's, Bishopsgate-street , and about two o'clock put my coat on a frail of bottles, on the ground floor, and about half-past four it was gone. I found it at the Mansion House. I do not know the prisoners.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 8th of December, about half-past five o'clock, I and Hesketh were in Bishopsgate-street, and saw the prisoners and another together at Mr. Davis's shop - a cart came up, and interrupted our view of them, and all of a sudden they ran off, and I after them. I seized Anthony with this coat - he said it was his own, and was putting it on. I said it was a funny fit.

ROBERT HESKETH . I secured Burgess. Anthony had the coat, and claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANTHONY'S Defence. I saw something on the ground, and being in distress, I picked it up, held it in my hand, and Forrester caught hold of me. I did not claim it.

BURGESS'S Defence. I had just left work when the officer laid hold of me.

ANTHONY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-11

219. JOSEPH SORRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a pair of shoes, value 5 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d.; a necklace, value 3 s. 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 s. 6 d. , the goods of William James Burrows .

JANE DAVIS . I live with William James Burrows , in Barbican , and serve in the shop . On the 24th of December, about five o'clock, the prisoner came in, and again about six - he had been several times before. He asked for a pair of shoes; there was a pair on the counter, with two pairs of stockings, a necklace, and a handkerchief, and while I went to get him a pair, he snatched these things up, and ran out with them - I went after him; he crossed the road, and got into some of the courts by Jacob's-wells, and got off. I described him to Harrison, who took him on Sunday. I have not found the things. I saw him going out with them.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a constable. On the 4th of January, I apprehended the prisoner in New-street, Cloth-fair, in company with two other lads. I charged him with this robbery; he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been to the shop to buy shoes, but on the day before Christmas-day, I bought a pair in the Strand, and am not guilty of this.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-12

220. EVAN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Jandrell , from his person .

THOMAS JANDRELL . I live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street, and am a carpenter . On the 19th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Fleet-market ; my handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket. I did not feel it taken - somebody said it was gone; I turned round and missed it. The prisoner was within a yard of me, in company with another boy. I laid hold of him, and saw him put his hand under his coat, and draw it from under his clothes; it fell on the ground, and I picked it up. The other boy went off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going on an errand - a waggon stopped at the Angel; I stood for it to pass, then went on. A gentleman took hold of me, and the handkerchief laid at my feet.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-13

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

221. CHARLES ELSWORTH , CHARLES NUTTALL , ROBERT WELDON , JAMES RANDALL , and JABEZ GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , six saws, value 20 s.; eleven planes, value 20 s.; a stock, value 7 s.; a bit, value 6 d.; a pair of dividers, value 6 d.; a chisel, value 6 d.; a gauge, value 6 d., and a bevil, value 1 s., the goods of George Watmough ; and two trowels, value 2 s., the goods of Charles Lindsay ; and a trowel, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Clark ; and MARY ANN KING was indicted for feloniously receiving, harbouring, and maintaining the said prisoners, well knowing them to have committed the said felony .

GEORGE WATMOUGH . I am a carpenter . I was working at a house in Asher-street West , and left the house on the 24th of December, about half-past four o'clock. Lindsay and Clark worked in the adjoining house. I left all my tools, which were worth 3 l. or 4 l., locked up in a chest, and the house locked up. I saw five persons lurking about the house on Christmas-eve, after dinner; Weldon was one of them - I cannot be certain of the others. On the 26th, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I found a hole cut through the brick work; my chest broken open, and most of my tools gone. I found them at Queen-square office next day, with a glue kettle, which was also taken.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. On the 26th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, I apprehended all the prisoners in one room - Elsworth was just coming out; I pushed him into the room, and found a quantity of tools under a half-tester bed, and Nuttall was filing a key. I called Handley in; there was only one bed in the room; they all denied knowing anything of the tools. King acknowledged that the room was her's, and said she had been out all night. I know that she lived there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where did you find them - A. At No. 1, Pump-court, Perkins's-rents, Old Pye-street. Some of the tools were in a cupboard.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I was with Pace; his account is correct. Weldon was nearest to the trowels - I asked who they belonged to; he said to a plaisterer up stairs. I went up; there was no plaisterer there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELSWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

NUTTALL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

RANDALL - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WELDON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

KING - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-14

222. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Keatley and others, his partners, with intent the goods in the said dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously to steal .

Upon examining a plan of the premises, the Court ruled that it could not be considered the dwelling-house of the prosecutors.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-15

223. JAMES WALKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Till , about the hour of ten in the night of the 6th of January , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, eight silver spoons, value 45 s., and a pair of sugar tongs, value 1 s. , his property.

RICHARD TILL . I am a green-grocer , and live in Globe street , in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. On the 6th of January, I left home between seven and eight o'clock, and left nobody at home; my wife went out before me - it was quite dark. I fastened all the doors and windows. Between nine and ten o'clock, in consequence of an alarm, I returned home, and found people outside the door. Turner, went to the back of the house, and I to the front door, which I found fastened as usual - I opened it with the key. I had seen a light up on the first floor before I got to the house; I had left a light on the ground floor myself. On opening the door, I held it in my hand - two men came rustling down stairs; I said,

"You are not coming out this way," holding the door fast; they then ran to the back part of the house - one escaped, and Turner took the other, who was the prisoner; we brought him into the house, searched him, and found a picklock key, matches, a piece of wax candle, a phosphorus bottle, and 13 s., but nothing of mine. I went up stairs, found the drawers all pulled out, and all the best of my wife's wearing apparel sorted out, tied up, and taken into the shop below. My clothes were taken out of the back room, and carried into the shop. Seven spoons were taken out of the cupboard down stairs, and one from up stairs, and taken away entirely - they have not been found. Those clothes which were not so good as the rest were thrown on the floor and trampled upon.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The persons who got into the house must have entered at the back - A. No, they must have got in in front, with a picklock key. I did not find my back door open - they opened it when they ran to the back of the house. Several persons followed after me into the house.

COURT. Q. Could any of those persons remove the property down stairs - A. No, my Lord. Twelve or thirteen picklock keys were found on the premises. I tried one to the street door; it unlocked it. They opened the back door as they went out.

JAMES TURNER . I joined the prosecutor opposite his own door. I went round to the back premises, and when I got to the door, I heard a great bustle, and before I got up to the door two men came out; the first had a dark lantern, nearly shut, but sufficiently open to shew a small light. I attempted to seize him, but did not succeed. I took the second, which was the prisoner. The lantern was found in the back ground afterwards. I pushed the prisoner into the back parlour, searched him, and found a picklock key on him, also some matches, a phosphorus bottle, and 13 s. I assisted in taking him to the watch-house, and when I returned I got a light, searched further, and close to the back parlour door, I found six more

picklock keys, laying in the wash-house, inside the house - the back door comes from the wash-house. I found a crow-bar and hat in the garden. Till and I applied the picklock keys to the front door; one of them opened it. I went up stairs, and found the drawers broken open, and things in disorder - there were marks on the drawers and boxes, which matched with the crow-bar.

ELIAS EVERETT BACON . I am headborough of Bethnal-green. I was at the door, and entered immediately after Till. Turner called out that he had caught one, and brought the prisoner forward; we searched him, and found these things upon him. He gave his name as Jones at the watch-house; somebody came in and said,

"That is young Walker;" he then owned that to be his name.

WILLIAM HATHORN . I am a watchman of Bethnal-green. I was going my rounds between nine and ten o'clock, and saw a glimmering light in Till's first floor room; it was moving about. Knowing that Till was out, I fetched him, accompanied him to the house, and Turner brought the prisoner forward.

ELIZABETH JANE TILL . I went out before my husband, and came home a few minutes after him, and found the prisoner in charge. A bundle was in the shop, containing two shawls, two tablecloths, and other things, which I had left locked up in the drawers; the boxes in the back room were broken open and robbed. I had locked up a desert spoon in the drawer up stairs; the tea spoons and sugar tongs were down in the parlour cupboard, which was not locked. I had used them all at tea.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in my way home from Mile-end, and passing the back of this house, which is a public thoroughfare, I heard a cry of thieves - the gate at the back of his premises was open. I immediately ran towards the back of the house, when a man ran against me, and almost pushed me down. I went towards the other two men; they laid hold of me, and said,

"You are one." Seven or eight men ran through the house, into the garden, took me into the shop, and took 13 s. out of my pocket; but the key, phosphorus bottle, and matches I never had about me, as God is my Judge.

JAMES TURNER . The back door was closed when I went up to it, and he came out.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-16

224. WILLIAM HUNTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Ingleson , about the hour of seven in the night of the 1st of January , at St. George the Martyr , with intent the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house then being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

THOMAS BELSHAM . I live at No. 19, New North-street, Red Lion-square. On the 1st of January, at seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at my door, and observed two men walking up the street by Mr. Ingleson's house, which is in East-street - they went by the house, crossed over, and came up on the other side, then crossed again at the end of the street, and came down by the house again - they observed me at the door, and walked on, which raised my suspicion. I drew back into a dark part of my passage; they walked a little way down the street beyond the prosecutor's house, then returned, and the prisoner, who was one of them, got on the iron railing, and put his hand to the window, the other man walked on - the prisoner got down again and met him; they walked down the street again, crossed, and returned on the other side; then the prisoner got on the rails again, pushed the window up, and got in. I immediately ran over to Tylcoat, at the corner house, called him out, and while he was coming, I ran to Ingleson's door. Tylcoat joined me - I went to the window (the other man had gone down the street and returned - he ran away); we waited while the prisoner came out at the private door. I heard the parlour door unlocked, and then he opened the street door and came out. I collared him, and asked if he lived there? he said Yes. I think he had seen us at the window. We took him into Tylcoat's house, and fetched a constable. He was searched, and nothing but one shilling found upon him. I am sure the window was shut down, for I saw him push it up. Mr. Ingleson was not at home. I saw nobody belonging to the house.

WILLIAM TYLCOAT . I live at No. 40, East-street, next door to Ingleson. Belsham came to me; I went with him, and saw the prisoner come out at Ingleson's door, collared him, and took him into my house. I did not hear him say anything.

THOMAS INGLESON . I am a tailor, and live at No. 39, East-street, Red Lion-square, in the parish of St, George the Martyr. I was out at this time; I rent the house; my wife and children were at home - I had left the window and blinds shut, but the shutters not put to. I returned about eight o'clock - I do not know the prisoner - I never saw him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. I was passing the house, saw the window open, and went up to the door, intending to knock and inform Mr. Ingleson of it. I had not got on the step before I was taken.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-17

225. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , three waistcoats, value 20 s.; a pair of breeches, value 10 s.; a handkerchief, value 5 s., and a sovereign, the property of David Mead , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Downe .

DAVID MEAD . I am a labourer , and lodge with Mrs. Downe, at Enfield . I do not know her Christian name. The prisoner slept in the same room with me for five weeks; he left on the 3d of October, and when I came home at night I missed these clothes and a sovereign. I did not see him again till the 9th or 10th of December, by the Cock below Edmonton. I found two of my waistcoats and my silk handkerchief on him, and asked where he got them; he said he got them from me - I gave him in charge - I had left him in bed when I went out to work; part of the things were on the bed and part in my box, which was not locked; he said he had pawned some, and sold the other things - the waistcoats were not taken from him, as he had nothing else to wear.

JOHN FOOT . I am a constable. I received him in charge; found a silk handkerchief and two waistcoats on him, and

the duplicate of another waistcoat, which I redeemed, and produce it. He said voluntarily that he took three waistcoats, a pair of breeches, a silk handkerchief, and a sovereign.

DAVID MEAD . This is my waistcoat. I had left it on the bed.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of Larceny only . - Confined Nine Months .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-18

226. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , a barometer, value 3 l., the goods of Stanley Stokes , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES SMITH . On the 12th of January, at eight o'clock in the morning, the dustmen were taking the dust from Mr. Stokes's, whose door was open. I watched the prisoner and saw him go in, and come out in about a minute, with this barometer under his arm. I followed him into the road, and asked him to give it to me - he threw it at me, and ran away. I followed and secured him in about a minute, without losing sight of him; a man minded the barometer till I brought him back and took both to the house.

STANLEY STOKES . The last witness brought the prisoner to me, with the barometer which had been taken from my hall - I gave 3 l. 7 s. for it, a year and a half ago; it was worth above 40 s. when it was taken, but is now broken to pieces.

Prisoner. I leave it all to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . Confined Nine Months .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-19

227. JAMES JONES and JAMES SLADE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a print and frame, value 50 s., the goods of William Bacon , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SHORTER . I am servant to Mr. William Bacon , a transparent blind-maker , of Great Russell-street ; he does not live in the house, but only rents the shop. On the 22d of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was at the further end of the shop, and saw both the prisoners. Jones came into the shop, and took a print off a commode in the shop - the selling price of it is 50 s.; he went out with it, and I after him, and saw him give it to Slade at the corner of the street. I took Slade with it, gave him in charge to Davis, who was passing, then followed Jones and secured him. I had not seen Slade till Jones gave him the picture.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. You saw Jones give it to Slade - A. Yes. Slade did not resist when I took him, but went back willingly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long were you with Slade before you followed Jones - A. About two minutes; he was walking away, but not out of my sight, and could have run away if he had liked; he turned out of Russell-street, into Museum-street. I am certain of them both. Jones had blue trowsers and a fustian jacket on.

JOHN DAVIS . I was in Russell-street, and saw Jones come off the step of Mr. Bacon's door, with the picture before him; he was dressed in a light jacket. The shopman came out after him directly; I saw him give it to Slade, and go up the street; the shopman caught hold of Slade - I took hold of the picture, and minded Slade while he pursued Jones. Slade stood by my side, and did not offer to move. Shorter ran up Museum-street, and brought Jones back directly. I am certain he is the man who brought the picture out of the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. How far were you from the shop when Jones came out - A. Close to the shop; he walked gently. Slade stood at the corner of Duke-street, about twenty yards from the shop. I do not think a word passed between them; they never looked at each other. Slade could not get away, as I was by him, but did not hold him; there were people about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Jones could have ran off if he liked - A. I think so; he got about two hundred yards before he was taken.

SLADE'S Defence. I was passing by Russell-street; a man in a jacket and green apron asked me to hold the picture for a moment - I took it in my hand, and might have moved a few yards, when the boy came and said,

"I want that picture." I gave it to him, and said a man gave it to me to hold.

JONES - GUILTY. Aged 18.

SLADE - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Jones Confined Six Months .

Slade Confined Two Months .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-20

228. JAMES GRIEG was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Lawrence , on the 13th of December , and stealing two loaves of bread, value 1 s., and 36 lbs. of beef, value 13 s. , his property.

CAROLINE IVELL . I am servant to John Lawrence , who lives at Pinner . On the 13th of December, I made six loaves of bread, and put them into the pantry; they were safe at ten o'clock at night. About eight in the morning, I found the window broken open, a buttock and loin of beef, two loaves, and part of another gone. I saw one loaf in the possession of Baldwin next day, and am sure it is one of those I had made and baked. I had pricked it at the bottom and top, with a three pronged fork.

HENRY BALDWIN . I live at Ryeslip. On the 13th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I searched the prisoner's room, and found a home baked loaf - he was working at his master's at the time. Ivell claimed the loaf. I took the prisoner a few minutes after, and told him I had found the loaf in his room - he said he knew nothing of it.

JOHN LAWRENCE . I saw the loaf, and know it to be mine, by a mark the girl had put on it, and the oven mark.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-21

229. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Locke , in the night of the 31st of December , and stealing seven live tame rabbits, price 20 s., and two live tame fowls, price 5 s. , his property.

WILLIAM LOCKE . I am a costermonger , and live in Sycamore-street, St. Luke's . On the 31st of December, at eleven o'clock at night, I fastened up my house secure; there is an entrance to my cellar from the street, by a door

and flap, which were bolted inside. I got up about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and found the bolts broken off the flap, which had been lifted up and put down again. I missed seven rabbits and two fowls, and found four of them at Lovell's, in Earl's-place.

CHARLES HOWARD . I am a saveloy maker. I have known the prisoner a fortnight or three weeks, by seeing him about. On the 1st of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, he and another lad came up to me with seven rabbits and two fowls in their laps - the prisoner asked if I wanted to buy any rabbits; I gave him 1 s. 6 d. for one with three young ones. I sold them to Lovell for 4 s., between twelve and one o'clock. They came back afterwards; I bought two fowls of them for 1 s. 6 d. - I paid the prisoner the money, and sold them for 2 s. to Littlewood. They were killed afterwards.

RICHARD LOVELL . I deal in phials and bottles. I bought a dog and three young rabbits of Howard. Locke claimed them.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am a headborough. I got the rabbits from Lovell's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about them.

WILLIAM TEMPLAR . Howard came to my place with two fowls, and asked me to buy them for 3 s.; he said they were on the cross - I said then I would have nothing to do with them, and he took them away. He called a day or two after, and said he had broken a place open, and took some rabbits and fowls - that he owed me 9 1/2 d., and would give me a fowl for it, that he had sold a doe and three young ones for 3 s., and a young doe for 9 d. He said he was the last who was in the cellar, and stopped to see if he could find anything else.

COURT. Q. What are you - A. A shoemaker. He said he opened the cellar flap, and went down with two more.

Q. Did he tell you the name of the other two - A. He said one was Smiler; I believe they call the prisoner Smiler.

EDWARD BISHOP . I went to Templar's to have my shoe mended, and heard Howard say,

"Last night me and two more broke a cellar open - I was the last in the cellar - we got some rabbits and fowls," and he was a long time in the cellar after the others left - that there was a dog in the cellar, and he gave it some pudding, I said,

"What pudding." He said,

"A nut and some liver." I have known his parents eight years.

Q. What brought you here to-day - A. I heard Howard was coming against him.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am headborough, as I was taking the prisoner to Worship-street, he told me that he and one French broke the cellar open, and took the poultry, and two men persuaded him to do it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-22

230. JOSEPH DYNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , two medicine chests, value 3 l.; the goods of William Henry Fisher , John Toller , and William Orton Aikin , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN WAGSTAFF . I am clerk to William Henry Fisher , John Toller , and William Orton Aikin , who are druggists , and live in Conduit-street . On Sunday, the 21st of December, we lost two portable medicine chests from the shop, and found them on the Friday after, in the possession of Hesketh.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am an officer. On the 23d of December, in the evening, in consequence of information, I followed a coach from the neighbourhood of the Mansion House, with Jones and Wilden; it stopped at Mr. Angus's, chemist, Whitechapel. The prisoner got out, with a basket in his hand, containing these chests. I asked what he had there - he said, two medicine chests and a roll of oil-cloth, and was taking them to Mr. Angus. We all went into the shop. Mr. Angus said he expected such things. The prisoner was asked where he had got them - he at first said that was not a fair question, but afterwards that he had them from one Hardwick, of No. 36, Compton-street, St. Giles's, a general dealer, and had no doubt but he would shew us black and white for them. We took him there. Hardwick was not at home. Dynan said, he thought we could find him at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Belton-street; and, in the way there, he suggested that one of us should go in, and ask if Dynan had had the boxes that were left there by Hardwick. Jones went in, came out, and said the landlord told him that he had. I immediately went into the house. Hardwick and the landlord were at the end of the passage. I afterwards asked him, in Dynan's presence, if he had had the two chests from him. He denied it. Dynan said,

"How could you say so?" He still denied it, and I took him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What became of Hardwick. - A. He escaped from Wilden. I saw him and the landlord in private conversation. Dynan said he had commissioned him to sell a brace of pistols, and I found a brace in Hardwick's house. He was admitted to bail, and went with me to find Hardwick, but we could not.

RICHARD JONES . I was with Hesketh. His account is correct. I went into the public-house, by the prisoner's desire, to ask if Hardwick had left any cases there for Dynan. The landlord said he had, and Dynan had fetched them that evening. In about a minute Hesketh went in and brought Hardwick out - he said he knew nothing about them. The landlord then came to the door, and said he had never told me a word of the sort.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner was bailed. - A. Yes; and attended on the three following days at Bow-street, and accompanied us to different places to find Hardwick. Prichard's is a flash house.

THOMAS PRITCHARD . I keep the Coach and Horses, public-house, Belton-street. Hardwick is frequently at my house. I never saw him with any medicine chests in my life - he never left any at my house, or said anything to me about medicine chests or cases.

Q. How came you to tell the constable so. - A. It is his mistake. He asked if Dynan had fetched any away - I said yes; Dynan had left them at my house, tied in a handkerchief. I have frequently seen Dynan and Hardwick together. I said Dynan had left two boxes - he left one on the 22d, and one on the 23d - a little girl left the other. I was to take care of them for Dynan. When he left the first, he said he would call in a few hours for it, but he did not till the 23d, about three o'clock in the afternoon. Hardwick was never near them. I never spoke to him about

them. The constable did not mention Hardwick's name to me, to my knowledge - I was busy serving in the bar. We did not talk together in the passage, only in the bar, so that anybody could hear. He said nothing about the boxes.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Then you mean to swear that the constable is mistaken, in saying that you said Hardwick had left them. - A. I swear positively that I did not say so. I might have spoken to Hardwick in the passage, but I had no private conversation with him. I have had dealings with him - I have lent him money - I owe him 4 l. now. I never appeared here to prove an alibi. I was here twenty years ago, to give a man a character.

RICHARD JONES . I asked this man two distinct questions. The first was, whether Hardwick had brought any medicine chests or boxes there for Mr. Dynan - he answered

"Yes, I am confident;" the next question was, whether Dynan had fetched them - he said Yes, that afternoon.

THOMAS PRICHARD re-examined. I never heard him mention Hardwick's name. If he put that question, I did not hear him.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not attend as a witness for Bullock, who robbed the Hanoverian Consul. - A. Not here - I attended at Bow-street for him.

THOMAS WILDEN . I had Hardwick in custody. He was rescued from me in Short's-gardens.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18240114-23

231. MATTHEW WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , seventy-one printed books, in sheets, value 4 l. 19 s. 8 d., and seven hundred sheets of printed paper, value 4 l. 19 s. 8 d. , the goods of Anthony Nichol .

THOMAS COLLINS . I am ward beadle of Walbrook. On Friday evening, the 9th of January, about seven o'clock, I received information, and went to No. 2, Turnmill-lane, and in the area of the house, which is inhabited by Messrs. Lovegrove and Co., I found a bundle, containing a quantity of books in sheets, unbound - it was claimed as the prosecutor's.

Mr. BEVIS GREEN . I am in partnership with Messrs. Longman and Co. I saw this bundle at the Mansion-house - it consisted of twenty-one printed books in sheets. They had been sent, on Friday night, the 9th of January, by our porter to Dowgate Wharf, directed to

"J. Jolly, Carlisle." It was our property till we had a receipt from Dowgate Wharf, of which Anthony Nichol is proprietor.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the parcel made up yourself. - A. I saw it after it was packed in brown paper.

BENJAMIN SINCLAIR . I live in George-alley, and am street-keeper of Walbrook. Mr. Collins shewed me where this parcel was. I secreted myself in the doorway. About a quarter to seven o'clock I saw the prisoner coming down in a great hurry - he took the parcel up from the area as quickly as possible, and went off very quick, and unless I had been on the alert he would have got off. I sprung out and stopped him. He said a fish-woman told him it was laying there, and he thought he had as much right to it as anybody else. Mr. Green identified it at the Mansion House.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen the fish-woman since. - A. Never. The area has four steps, but he stooped over the rails and took it up. Anybody passing by could see it, if it had been daylight. It might be two feet from the pavement. There is a gas light about two doors off. The area is within one hundred yards of the wharf.

THOMAS SUTTON . I am porter to Messrs. Longman. On the 9th of January, I took this parcel to the wharf, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and left it with the wharfinger. I saw it at the Mansion House next day - I know it to be the same.

ROBERT PATTERSON . A am clerk to Anthony Nichol , proprietor of Dowgate Wharf. I received this parcel, and put it close to the counting-house door, outside, about half-past four o'clock - I gave a receipt for it. I did not miss it till I heard it was found, which was the same day, and know it to be the parcel. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear to it. - A. No; it was directed and made up the same as this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home, and passed the place where the parcel laid. I met a woman, who said,

"Young man, there is something in a paper over those rails - will you see what it is." I lifted it up, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18240114-24

232. EMANUEL PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , a wooden chest, value 1 s.; and 35 lbs. of tea, value 9 l. , the goods of Joseph Shillcock .

JOSEPH SHILLCOCK . I am a tea-dealer , and live in Philpot-lane . On the 30th of December, about five o'clock, I was called down, and missed part of a chest of tea from my warehouse, which I had seen safe two minutes before. I pursued towards Fenchurch-street, and overtook two persons lifting it on the prisoner's head, in Lime-street, and as I pursued, he threw it back at me, but it did not hit me - I fell over it - continued to pursue, and kept him in sight till he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. COOK. Q. How do you know it was your's. - A. It had the Company's mark on it, and was numbered 1617. They have but one of each number in a sale - they have four sales every year; but there is a mark of the sale as well. I overtook him about forty yards from the house. A little boy directed me after him.

EDWARD WEBB . I am a tailor. I was at the top of Philpot-lane, talking to a person, and saw three young men cross the road with a chest of tea, about fourteen yards from Mr. Shillcock's, who came out after them immediately. They were running, and had a cord under it, one holding each end of it, to support the chest. I was behind the prisoner all the way, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped. I was close to the chest when it fell. He ran away, and I after him.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw three persons. - A. Yes; one in front, and one on each side - the two put it on the prisoner's shoulder, and ran away - there was nobody to follow them.

THOMAS WHITTLE . I keep a public-house at St. Mary Axe. I was going down Lime-street towards Fenchurch-street, and saw the prisoner running with the tea chest, he threw it down. I told Mr. Shillcock to follow him, while I took care of the chest. A person came up, and said he was an Excise officer - that it was smuggled, and he should

seize it. I said he could not, and as soon as the prisoner was brought back, he went off.

JOHN AVERY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Lime-street, and heard the cry of, Stop thief, hollowed out, and met the prisoner; he turned short back, and ran in among the crowd, and I laid hold of him. The chest was half full, and weighed 52 lbs. Webb delivered it to me. The prisoner said it was given him to carry.

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I am an officer, and was with Avery, His account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out selling oranges, and was met by two men, who asked me to earn a shilling by carrying this chest; they put it on my head. I did not proceed far before I heard the alarm, one of them then told me to throw it down.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-25

233. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a fender, value 30 s. , the goods of Martin Allies .

JOSEPH BEDELL . I am servant to Mr. Allies, who lives in Newgate-street , an ironmonger ; this fender was in the entrance passage to the shop. I missed it in consequence of information; ran out and stopped the prisoner in Pater-noster-row, with the fender on his shoulder, and told him it was not his; he said,

"If it is your's, take it." I took it from him; he gave me a push into the road, and ran off, but was stopped without my losing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two men employed me to take it to Little Britain. I asked them to tie my hands, and let me go to Little Britain.

JOSEPH BEDELL . He said so at our shop, but not when he was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-26

234. SOLOMON NATHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , a piece of handkerchiefs, containing nine, value 35 s., the goods of William Joseph Allen , privately in his shop .

HENRIETTA HAGAN . I am sister to William Joseph Allen , who keeps a hosiers shop at Holborn bars . On the 26th of December, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; my sister and I were there; he asked for a cravat; I shewed him one, which did not suit him, and he left immediately; no other customer was there. I had just come in, and saw a piece of handkerchiefs on the counter, and missed them before he left, and saw them in his hat as he went out. I followed him, calling, Stop thief, but did not lose sight of him, till he was stopped in a court in Castle-street.

ROBERT EVANS . I am a watchman. I was collecting Christmas boxes; heard a cry of Stop thief, and saw the prisoner go into a house in Castle-yard; and saw him throw a piece of handkerchiefs behind the stairs. I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240114-27

235. JOHN NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a basket, value 4 s.; twenty-four bottles, value 6 s.; and five gallons of porter, value 10 s. , the goods of Jesse Hobson .

JESSE HOBSON . I am a wine-merchant . On the 31st of December, at six o'clock in the evening, my cart stood at the door, with nine baskets, each containing five gallons of bottled beer.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am cellarman to Mr. Hobson. I was loading the cart, and went into the cellar for another basket, and on coming up saw the prisoner, and another man, (who looked like a coachman,) take a basket out of the cart; the prisoner put it on the other man's shoulder, but the man seeing us, let it fall, and ran off; we detained the prisoner; he did not try to go away; master came out and sent for a constable; he gave no reason for doing it.

Mr. HOBSON. He gave no reason why he took it.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man with the basket upon his shoulder; this man turned round, and said, that I was the man who lifted it on his shoulder; I said I was not; I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-28

236. WILLIAM SIDEBOTTOM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , a hat, value 4 s. , the goods of John Staples .

JOHN STAPLES . I am a hatter , and live in Long-lane . Last Monday, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, I was behind the counter, this hat was on a stand inside the door; I did not see it taken, but was alarmed, and ran out, and saw the prisoner twenty yards off with it; he turned into Charterhouse-street; I saw him drop the hat there; he was secured there. I knew him before by sight.

CHARLES BINGLEY . I live near Staples. I heard a cry of Stop thief; saw two boys running, and the prisoner with the hat - I followed - he threw it down, and I picked it up. I am sure of him.

JOHN HARKER . I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in Barbican, who asked me to walk with him; he took the hat, put it into my hand, and turned into the square somebody called Stop thief, and I put it down.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-29

237. AUGUSTUS MILLS MARGESSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , an umbrella, value 5 s. , the goods of William James Siggins .

WILLIAM JAMES SIGGINS . I am an umbrella-maker , and live in the Poultry . On the 13th of December, an alarm was given, and I missed this umbrella, which was safe five minutes before, hanging on a hook, within two yards of the door - my man went out and brought the prisoner back with it; he said he was sorry he had taken it, but had done it from distress; he appeared so; no money was found upon him.

WILLIAM SINGLETON . I am shopman to Mr. Siggins. I ran out and took the prisoner, by Bow church, with the umbrella.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress, and acknowledging his having been previously convicted, and receiving twelve months' imprisonment.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-30

238. THOMAS CARLEY and CHARLES ROSETTA were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January, a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Bygrave , from his person .

MR. THOMAS BYGRAVE . I am a land-agent , and live in Clement's Inn. On Monday the 5th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was in Smithfield , near the Rose Inn, and had a silk handkerchief in my coat pocket; my snuff-box was in the same pocket; I felt the lappet of my coat come against my thigh, turned round, and collared the prisoner Rosetta, who was immediately behind me. Carley was also behind me, on the left side. Mr. Katz was with me - I said to him,

"This man has taken my pocket handkerchief, and given it to the other (Carley), who is gone down a court; follow him and take him." I took Rosetta down the court, and met my friend coming up, with Carley. Griffiths came up and took both in charge; my friend picked up the handkerchief - nobody but the prisoners were near enough to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were they both near enough to touch your pocket - A. Yes. Nothing was found on Rosetta. My only reason for accusing him is his being near me - which of them touched me I cannot tell.

WILLIAM BERNARD KATZ . I was with Mr. Bygrave, arm-in-arm; he turned round and told me to seize Carley, who ran down a court - I ran after him; he stopped (the court being no thoroughfare) and dropped the handkerchief behind him - I picked it up, and gave it to the officer. I was going to strike him; he said he never did such a thing before, and hoped I would not.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. I was standing at my own door, and saw Carley running down the the court, and Mr. Katz after him, and people calling Stop thief. I said he was quite safe, for it was no thoroughfare. I did not see the the handkerchief dropped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARLEY'S Defence. I picked it up, but did not steal it.

ROSETTA'S Defence. I was looking for my brother-in-law, who owed me 2 s. 6 d.

CARLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

ROSETTA - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-31

239. RICHARD CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 10 s. the goods of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a tailor , and live in Cheapside . Marran ran into the shop and alarmed me; I missed these trowsers, which hung at the door two minutes before. I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Ironmonger-lane - he threw them from under his arm as I secured him.

JOHN MARRAN . I am servant to Mr. Wilson, of Cornhill. About seven o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner, with his companion, looking in at the prosecutor's window. I watched, and saw his companion go in at the door, pull the trowsers off the nail, let them fall on the ground and run off; the prisoner ran and picked them up. I went in and told Roberts, then followed and saw him taken with them in the Old Jewry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to buy a pair of shoes - came by this shop, and close to the wall saw something laying down - picked them up, held them in my hands - nobody owned them. Roberts came and almost strangled me, and said.

"Where are my trowsers, you rascal?" I said,

"If they are yours, there they are."

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-32

240. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a hat, value 5 s. the goods of Charles Bleaden and others his partners.

ABRAHAM ALEXANDER . I live at the London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street , and am in partnership with Charles Bleaden and others. On the 2d of January I saw the prisoner walking out of the tavern with this hat in his hand. I called to him three or four times - he quickened his pace, and ran as hard as he could; I ran and collared him about one hundred yards off, with it in his hand; he had his own on - it belonged to a guest, but we are responsible for it. He said he would answer questions at the proper place.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I have the care of the hats. My master brought the prisoner back with this one - it had a ticket on it, and belonged to another.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-33

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 16.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

241. MARGARET DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , two table-spoons, value 30 s. the goods of George Palmer .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Lumley and William Parker .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN PALMER . I live in St. James's-street ; my husband's name is George. I left town at Christmas, and left Booth in care of the house. On returning I missed two spoons.

SARAH BOOTH . I was left in care of the house, and employed the prisoner to clean. She had an opportunity of taking the spoons. I missed them off the sideboard on the evening of the day she worked there.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner - she said voluntarily that she took the spoons, and intended to redeem them, and had redeemed one, but not having an opportunity to return it, she pawned it again.

JOHN JURY. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the spoons with me.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress compelled me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-34

242. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , twelve brass fender feet, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Armour .

JOSEPH ARMOUR. I am an ironmonger , and live in Strutton-ground . On the 9th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for some hinges, which I shewed him; he said they were too large, and asked for nails - I went to fetch them, and on returning I found this paper of fender feet moved. He said the nails were too small; I went for more, and on returning the hinges were entirely gone. I went round the counter, collared him, and asked for the paper parcel; he said he knew nothing of it. I felt his left hand pocket, and told him they were there - he said they were not; I said I was positive of it; he then took them out, and said,

"Do you say these belong to you;" I said they did, and took him to the watch-house. He made a great struggle to escape.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a parcel of nails in my hand - he came and charged me with stealing them, and knocked me down in the mud. I had no pockets at all.

JOSEPH ARMOUR . I am positive that he had a pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-35

243. WILLIAM SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , eighteen shillings, the monies of William Wright , from his person .

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a smith . On the 8th of December, between five and six o'clock, I was near Carnaby-street, going through a passage by Berkeley-square , with Kennedy and another person; upon going down the steps a woman stood with a lantern - I was going to give her a halfpenny. The prisoner came up, and said,

"Mr. Wright. I'll give her the halfpenny," and thrust his hand into my breeches pocket; I gave him a knock on the head, and thrust him away, and after that he put his hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took out a halfpenny - he was a stranger to me. He followed me down to the end of the passage, and I caught his hand in my breeches pocket again; he took my silver out - I called for the watchman, and gave him in charge. I saw him give the watchman something, and he then set him at liberty - he ran off, and was taken next day. I lost 18 s. from my breeches pocket. I live at Chelsea-common, on a small income, and had been to receive some money in Cross-street.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not intoxicated - A. I was not sober. I could walk very well.

JOHN KENNEDY . The prosecutor called at my master's for me to assist him home; he seemed very drunk - he could walk a little. We met the prisoner on the steps of Lansdown-passage with two more; one of whom I knew, and spoke to. Wright was going to give the woman a halfpenny - the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and said,

"Let me give it her." Mr. Wright pushed him down, and he pushed my master's son down, and said he could see him home better than us. I did not see his hand in Wright's pocket, but Wright called out,

"Stop thief, I have caught your hand in my pocket." I shewed him to the watchman, and he said he should not follow him. He ran off, and was taken two days afterwards. Wright said next day that he had lost 18 s. He had heard me call Wright by his name.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-36

244. WILLIAM HALL BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , a coat, value 5 s.; a watch, value 2 l., and a spoon, value 2 s., the goods of John Cantelow , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL PARKINSON . On the 30th of December, about one o'clock, I was in Jockey-fields, and heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner running very fast, with a bundle in his hand - a carter who was between him and me, stopped him; he said he had just taken an apple from a girl's basket in a lark, and told him to let him go; but I collared him, and took him to the prosecutor's house. A coat was produced, which his daughter claimed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Could you see all along the field - A. It is a mews behind Bedford-row. When I took him back, he fell upon my arm, and said he was faint - I pulled him up; he put his hand behind the parlour door, and I heard something like glass break, and some spoons fall down.

SAMUEL LOWE . I was in Jockey-fields with a cart, and stopped the prisoner, and gave him to Parkinson.

ELIZA CANTELOW . I am the daughter of John Cantelow . On the 30th of December, Parkinson brought the prisoner to my father's house; he was pulling him from the front parlour door, and I picked up a watch by the door, with the glass broken, and a silver salt spoon - they are my father's. The door had been left ajar. I heard footsteps in the passage a few minutes before, and heard the parlour door open, but supposed it to be my mother coming in. A great coat was taken off a peg between the two parlours.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been in the parlour - A. About half an hour before; the watch and spoon were then on the back parlour mantle-piece, and the coat was safe.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I live in Red Lion-street. I was working at Mr. Phillips's, in Holborn, at the back of the house, and could see into the prosecutor's yard, and saw the prisoner go up his steps - he pushed the door open, went in, pulled the door too, and came out - he looked about him, went in again, and brought the coat out in his apron. I went down stairs directly, and caught him in Brownlow-street, and asked what he did with the coat; he threw it down and ran away; I called Stop thief! Lowe stopped him. I gave the coat to Lee.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off were you - A. About fifty yards from the spot. I lost sight of him in coming down stairs. I swear to him positively.

WILLIAM LEE . I have the coat.

JOHN CANTELOW . This is my coat; it hung in the passage. The watch and spoon are also mine.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s., only . - Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-37

245. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Margaret Croft , widow , about the hour of six in the night of the 17th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent the

goods and chattels, in the same dwelling-house then being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a watchman of St. Mary-le-bone. On the 17th of December, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, I was opposite Lady Croft's house, in Welbeck-street - it was dark. I had observed that the windows were shut down at half-past six o'clock, and at a quarter to seven, I observed two men near the house - I turned round, looked at them, and they looked at me, and crossed over to Bulstrode-street - I got right opposite her Ladyship's house, and saw the parlour window sash open. I rang the bell, and informed the servants; I then went after the two men, but not overtaking them, I returned to the house, and was informed that there was a man in the parlour; they unlocked the door, and I found the prisoner standing at the door, inside the room. I asked what brought him there; he said he had hardly any shoes to his feet or victuals to eat. I took him into custody. The window was shut down when I passed, half an hour before.

RYNEAR TYLER. I am footman to Lady Margaret Croft , widow of Sir Richard Croft ; she lives at No. 27, Welbeck-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the 17th of December, I had not shut the shutters, this window was not fastened down, as the hasp is out of repair, but it is never opened. Hall came to the door, and from what he said I went into the room, shut the window down, and shut the shutters. The maid-servant came in with a candle. I then saw the tail of a great coat laying under the bed. It is her Ladyship's son's bed-room. I locked the door. Hall returned: I unlocked it - we both entered, and found the prisoner in the room. I will not swear that the window was not open, as I had not been into the room before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-38

246. JOHN HUTCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , a coat, value 2 l.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; a sovereign, a seven-shilling piece, and eleven shillings, the property of Thomas Toms ; and a half handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Elizabeth Moody , in the dwelling-house of Dougal Christie .

ELIZABETH MOODY . I am servant to Dougal Christie, Esq. who lives in Baker-street, St. Mary-le-bone . On the 26th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the kitchen, heard a noise, went into the passage, and saw the prisoner going out of the passage door and up the area steps, with something under his arm. I followed him. Toms, my fellow-servant , was coming in; I told him, and he followed, but did not bring him back.

THOMAS TOMS . I am servant to Mr. Christie. I followed the prisoner, and overtook him in two minutes. Padbury gave him into my charge. I saw him drop the coat and waistcoat; a boy picked it up and gave it to me; I took him to the watch-house, with them.

GEORGE PADBURY . I was in the street, and by the manner of the prisoner's running I stopped him, about two hundred yards from Mr. Christle's. Toms came up. I saw him drop the coat and waistcoat; a boy picked it up and gave it to Toms in my presence - I believe it to be the same the prisoner dropped.

ROBERT WILLANS . I received the prisoner in charge' with the coat and waistcoat; and in a pocket he had in front of him, I found another waistcoat and a silk handkerchief.

THOMAS TOMS . The coat and both the waistcoats are mine, and are worth 30 s. A sovereign and a 7 s. piece were in the pocket.

ELIZABETH MOODY . The silk handkerchief is mine, and is worth 1 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street, and found these things on the step of the door - nobody owned them, and I carried them on my arm.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-39

247. GEORGE WARBUT was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Cokeham , in the night of the 9th of December , with intent to steal .

ANN COKEHAM . I am the wife of William Cokeham . We rent a house at Highgate . On the 9th of December, I was in the kitchen with my family; my son George had fastened the back door, and the door between the wash-house and kitchen was latched. My son opened the kitchen door to go into the wash-house; he immediately started back, and said a man was there. I took a candle, and found the prisoner standing in the wash-house. He said he wanted a lodging. I asked why he came there for a lodging, and how he got in; he made no answer. I found the wash-house door latched - he could not have come in except through there. I asked which way he came into the yard; he said through the house, meaning the cart-house. He was secured.

GEORGE COKEHAM . I was in the kitchen, and went into the wash-house about half-past seven o'clock, and found the prisoner there. I came in from the yard half an hour before, and was the last person there, and shut and latched the door, I am certain. He was leaning on the copper, near the door - nothing was moved. I had shut the cart-house door, and chained and padlocked it inside, and came in through the shed at the back door, and shut that. I found the padlock gone - it was in his pocket: he tried to lay it down without my seeing him, but it rattled in his hand, and he put it into his coat pocket.

THOMAS BRETT . I am a constable, and was fetched. I found the prisoner in the cart-house, and in his coat pocket I found the padlock. I asked what he wanted there - he gave no answer. Next morning I found that the cart-house door was broken, so that he could put his hand in and take off the padlock. The cart-house is attached to the dwelling-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-40

248. WILLIAM HOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , nine tea-spoons, value 1 l.; a coat, value 3 l.; two pairs of stockings, value 4 s.; two neck-handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two gowns, value 1 l.; four sheets, value 14 s.; and four waistcoats, value 30 s., the goods of Nathaniel Holding , in his dwelling-house .

NATHANIEL HOLDING . I live at Ealing ; the prisoner is my son , and lived at Dublin with his wife and family; he came to my house between six and seven o'clock one morning, in a very deplorable state, and said he was distressed and hungry; I gave him victuals, and kept him till sunday evening; he was very lame with travelling;

my wife dressed his feet, and nearly cured them; and on Sunday evening, about half-past five o'clock, we both went to chapel, leaving him alone; returned about half-past seven o'clock, and he was gone; we missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were all safe when we went out. I have found none of them; this was five weeks ago next Sunday - he came to the door again a fortnight ago; my wife would not let him in. I charged him with taking these things; he said, he understood I had bills out against him. I said I had, and that the officers would certainly lay hold of him. He said,

"Father, I have come on purpose to resign myself up." I said, he must expect to suffer for it. He said, he must. I said, he deserved it, and got a man to take him. He said he had sold the silver spoons, and pawned the coat. The value of the whole is 8 l. or 9 l.

JEREMIAH LAWS . I was present when the prisoner said he had pawned the coat, for 5 s., at Abingdon, and sold the silver spoons for 10 s. in Oxfordshire, and that it was through distress. His father is a poor man.

Prisoner's Defence. I never admitted that I had sold or pawned anything.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only . - Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-41

249. MARY LEOPARD , was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Pardoe , on the King's highway, on the 22d of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 25 s.; four half-crowns, and two shillings , his property.

JAMES PARDOE . I am a silversmith , and live in Regent's-place, Hoxton. On the 22d of December I was coming from Newington , about eight o'clock at night, and just before I got to the Fox public-house, Kingsland-road - it was a very dark night, but the lamps were lighted - a tall man seized hold of my left arm and collar - he came from behind. A woman seized my right arm, and a third, who I believe to be the prisoner, came in front and took my watch out; they all came from behind; the others pinioned me, so that I could not move; the woman took four half-crowns and some silver from my breeches pocket. I then received a violent blow at the back of my neck by the right fist of the man, it knocked me down, and they all ran away; they then ran down Fox-lane. The blow stunned me; I went about half a mile, and then returned to the Fox, and had a woman and a man taken, who I thought to be the party; but it was done in a moment. and the night being dark I could not recognize them. I cannot be certain of the prisoner, for dress makes a great difference. I can swear to the party if she had the same dress on now. I was not at all inebriated.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-42

350. JOHN SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Bradley , on the 26th of December , (he and others being therein) and stealing a watch, value 2 l.; a coat, value 30 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 15 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; and four sovereigns , his property.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I live in Old-street . On the 26th of December, I was at home. Between twelve and four o'clock in the day my bed-room lock was picked, the chest of drawers broken open, and this property stolen, with the duplicate of five silver tea-spoons, pawned at Chappel's, and other trinkets; they were all together in a bag; the value of the whole is near 20 l.; I had seen nobody in the house, and do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you occupy all the house - A. It is a large house divided into two, and has only one common stair case to both. I rent one half, and a baker the other. The landlord does not occupy any part of it.

JAMES TYRRELL . I am shopman to Mr. Chappel, pawnbroker, St. John-street. On the 26th of December, a person came and produced a duplicate of six silver spoons, pawned in the name of John Johnson . A mistake was made in the duplicate; five were pawned - I delivered them to him; he returned in five minutes to know if there was not six instead of five. I believe the prisoner to be the person, but will not swear to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not said you believed it to be another man - A. No; I saw three persons at the watch-house, but did not say it was either of them. He had a different coat on to what he has now.

THOMAS BAYFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Chappel, and saw the person who brought the duplicate; to the best of my belief it was the prisoner - I saw him both times; I do not speak positively to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the last witness present when three men were taken - A. Yes. I pointed out one of them, but did not speak positive to him. I have a very strong belief of the prisoner.

THOMAS VANN . On the 6th of January, in consequence of information, I and Mance went to the Salmon and Ball, public-house, Bunhill-row, and took the prisoner and two others. The pawnbroker's servants fixed on the prisoner.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . The duplicate is mine. I pawned them in the name of Johnson. An instrument was found in the drawer, with which the lock had been picked.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-43

251. JANE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , in the dwelling-house of Eleanor Downey , a 5 l. Bank note , the property of Elizabeth Graham ; and MARY RATCLIFF was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

ELIZABETH GRAHAM . I lodge with Mrs. Downey, at Wapping . The prisoner Thompson was in my service - she came every morning to do needle work. She came on the 1st of November, about nine o'clock, and worked in the bed-room with me. I was called down stairs about eleven o'clock, and left her alone for about ten minutes; nobody else had been there in my absence. Between seven and eight o'clock, I missed a 5 l. Bank note, which I had seen in my drawer two days before; it was No. 4799. I had twenty of them, and the numbers ran regularly, and were all dated the 1st of September. Ratcliff, who is her mother, called for her about eight o'clock that night, but did not come up stairs - they went away together. When I missed it, I said, I should certainly endeavour to find it out; she said she knew nothing about it. She went to dinner at one o'clock, and returned at two. Mrs. Downey

and her servant had access to my room. The notes were folded in one parcel.

JOSEPH HALL . I am servant to Messrs. Murray and Co., East Smithfield. On the 1st of November, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner Ratcliff bought two gold rings, and said they were for a young lady; they came to 13 s. - she gave me a 5 l. note. I gave her change - she was ten minutes in the shop; several people were there. I am positive of her being the person. I gave the note to Mr. Murray to get change; he gave me four sovereigns, and I gave her the silver from the till. I made no mark on it. I took no other 5 l. note on that day. Bellenger called that afternoon, and Mr. Murray gave him change for a 25 l. cheque; he gave him some notes and some sovereigns.

WILLIAM BELLENGER . I went to Mr. Murray's, and got change for a cheque, and endorsed all the notes that I received, which were two or three. I put

"Murray" and the date on the back of each.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce the note paid into the Bank on the 15th of November.

WILLIAM BELLENGER . Here is my writing on the back of this. I wrote it on the 1st of November, at my mother's shop, as soon as I returned from Murray's, and am sure it is the note I received.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. On the 3d of December I went to the prisoner's house, in Albion-street, Commercial-road, and found them at home. I asked Thompson where her hoop and ring were - she said on the mantle-piece. I searched the house over, but did not find them. She then said, the hoop her mother gave her was pawned in the Commercial-road. I asked if it was the hoop and ring which had been bought with the 5 l. note, at Murray's - she said, No; it was one her mother had given her. I said I was come about the 5 l. note which was stolen - that it had been stopped at the Bank, and traced to Murray, and from the description he had given, her mother had paid it. Ratcliff said she did not know where Murray's was, nor East Smithfield - that she was never there, and would go with me; but when I asked her to go she refused, but at last went with me, and begged she might have a fair chance. I said no improper advantage should be taken; we went; I asked Hall if he knew Thompson - he said not. I then asked if he knew Ratcliff, and rather think he at first said he did not. I then began to speak to Mr. Murray, and said,

"Have you received a 5 l. Bank note, which has been stolen?" Hall immediately said

"Yes; and that is the woman who paid it - I can swear to her." He had said, not a moment before, that he did not know her. Ratcliff said she was never in the shop - he persevered in saying it, was her; and when I came out, Ratcliff said I had not given her a fair chance. The hoop was brought to the office, and is her own.

THOMAS JUDD . I was with Wilson - his account is correct, Hall said he did not know either of them. Wilson said, " Do you know anything of a 5 l. note?" He looked at Ratcliff, and said

"Yes, and that is the person who paid it."

JOHN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 1st of November I gave Bellenger change for a cheque with ten sovereigns, and three 5 l., or a 5 l. and a 10 l. note. Hall had given me a 5 l. note, which he received from a person who was buying rings; I gave that note to Bellenger. The prisoners were brought to the shop about three weeks after. Wilson addressed himself to me first, and asked if I knew the prisoners. I said No. Hall immediately looked at Ratcliff, and said,

"Yes; that is the woman who paid the 5 l. note for the rings." I did not hear him speak before that; they might have spoken without my hearing them.

ELEANOR DOWNEY . Miss Graham lodged in my house. On the 1st of November, a 5 l. note was missing; my servant and Thompson were searched about seven or eight o'clock, but nothing found. She had been out to dine.

MISS GRAHAM. I know this to be the stolen note from the number and date, which I got from the banker's where my father received them.

(The Prisoners called the following witnesses)

SARAH DOUGLAS . I live at Stepney Causeway. On Saturday, the 1st of November, Ratcliff came to my house, between two and three o'clock, to ask me to let my daughter be with her daughter Jane, who was rather ill. She stopped there till my husband returned, which was a quarter to six o'clock.

Q. How do you know it was Saturday. - A. Because I said, if she would stay till my husband came home from the docks he would have his money, and we would make her a comfortable cup of tea, and my daughter was cleaning the place up; I know it must have been twelve months ago, our boys had made a Pope, and Guy Fauxs day was on the 5th.

ELIZABETH DOUGLAS. I am daughter of last witness. Ratcliff came to our house on Saturday, when I was cleaning up my mother's place. I know it was on the 1st for on the 5th I had to go and clean a person's place, and it was three days before that; she came between two and three o'clock, and staid till half-past five, or a quarter to six; she asked me to come and stop with Jane, as she was in the family way, and very poorly.

JOHN DOUGLAS . I have found the prisoner at my house several times, when I came home. My wife told me she had been there on that day, but I did not see her.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-44

252. JAMES CURTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Harrison .

HENRY FENNER . I am shopman to Joseph Harrison . On the 29th of December, about three o'clock, this coat was stolen from the door; a girl came in and gave me information, and I missed it.

MARY JOYCE . I saw the prisoner take the coat from the door; ran in and told the witness - I knew him before; he ran off with it under his coat - I had only seen him once before.

GEORGE JENNINGS . I apprehended the prisoner, about eight o'clock that evening, and found 3 s. 6 d. on him, but not the coat.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-45

253. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , four sheets, value 30 s., the goods of Edward Green , in a lodging-room .

EDWARD GREEN . I keep the Magpie, public-house , in Fetter-lane . On the 31st of December, the prisoner took a bed at my house, for one night; he passed the bar about ten o'clock in the morning, with a band-box, tied in a blue handkerchief; it seemed heavy - I sent Garrett up stairs; then followed and overtook him at the top of Fleet-market - he said,

"For God's sake forgive me - I have got three sheets - distress has driven me to it." I sent for the constable, who found them at the bottom of his box.

ESTHER GARRETT . I am servant at this house. I went up, and missed the sheets.

GEORGE CORBY . I am a constable. I found three sheets in his box, and one in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-46

254. THOMAS WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a hamper, value 1 s., and twelve bottles, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Beckley and James Beckley .

HENRY THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 29th of December, about six o'clock, I saw a cart standing on Snow-hill, and saw the prisoner, in company with two others, standing in a court very near it. I passed on, and returned, they immediately came out, and all three drove it off. I am certain they were in company; they stopped the cart at the end of Cock-lane ; the other two got up and lifted a deal box out, then lifted a hamper out, and put it on the prisoner's shoulder. I followed him to the end of Cock-lane; the other two were behind and gave a whistle - he immediately threw it down, in Smithfield, and ran away. I followed and took him, without losing sight of him.

DAVID ATCHESON COGAN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Joseph and James Beckley . The direction on this hamper is my writing, and is their property.

JOHN WEBBER . I am carman to Mr. Poacher. This hamper was in my cart, which I left at the corner of George-yard for three or four minutes - then missed it. I found the cart afterwards, but a hamper and box were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-47

255. CATHERINE BIRCH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , a coat, value 2 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 18 s.; and a pair of braces, value 2 s. , the goods of John Thomas Dallimore .

SAMUEL PLUMBER . I am waiter at the Globe Tavern, Fleet-street . Mr. Dallimore is the proprietor . On the 13th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, these trowsers were in the entrance-hall. I saw the prisoner take them, and go out. I followed and overtook her with them in her apron; she said a person gave them to her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (Written). I was in Fleet-street; a woman came up and asked me to hold her bundle, for she had had a desperate fall. I took it, thinking it no harm, and carried it into Gough-square. The young man came up and asked me what I had got there? I said I did not know, for it belonged to the other woman.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-48

256. GEORGE LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Peter Stainsby , from his person .

PETER STAINSBY . I am clerk at a banking-house . On the 1st of January I was going down Dowgate-hill , about one o'clock, and felt something at my pocket - I directly turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, which was in my coat pocket just before. I could not have dropped it. I charged him with taking it. He said he did not. I seized him, and he threw it behind him - I picked it up, took him towards the Mansion House, and met a friend, who advised me to prosecute him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-49

257. JAMES WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , a goose, value 3 s. , the goods of William Jennings .

JOHN CURBY . I am patrol of Aldersgate. On the 13th of December, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, I was on duty near Jennings's shop, in Aldersgate-street , on the opposite side of the way, and saw a man take a goose from the stall outside the shop; he ran off directly. I called Stop thief! and followed him to Barbican, and in twenty minutes saw the prisoner in custody. I believe him to be the man from his dress. I saw his jacket and trowsers.

THOMAS CORAM . I am a watchman. I heard the cry, ran across the road, and put my stick out to trip the prisoner up, but he ran into the road, and down Cloth-fair, where I overtook him with the goose in his hand, without losing sight of him. He said he picked it up.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I keep the shop, and was told this goose was stolen, and found the prisoner at the watch-house, with one resembling that I had lost.

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman came up with the goose, but it was never in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 37

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-50

258. WILLIAM CRAGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 7 ozs. silver polishings, value 4 s. ; the goods of Henry Charner , Rebecca Emes , and Edward Barnard , his masters and mistress .

EDWARD BARNARD . I am in partnership with Henry Charner and Rebecca Emes , we are silversmiths , and live in Ave-Maria-lane ; the prisoner was in our service as polisher ; having suspicions, I cut some labels of paper, on which I wrote my name, and put them in amongst the silver polishings. I afterwards had him apprehended, and a quantity of silver polishings was found on him, with these labels amongst it, by which I knew it to be ours; he said, that they were not ours, that they had been given to him; he had left the premises where they had been taken from, and come to our warehouse in Paternoster-row.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. This is stuff which falls on the floor - A. No, on the board; it is not

called the sweep, it is melted down on the premises by a refiner, and is called polishings by the trade, there is dust mixed with it, but it is much more valuable than the sweep; we have sold what remains for 16 s. a lb.

HENRY MAIN . I am an officer. On the 2d of January, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I was fetched. Mr. Barnard sent for the prisoner to come to the counting-house, and asked him if he had any idea of any person having taken silver polishings; he said, No. Mr. Barnard then gave him in charge. I searched him, and found the polishings in his breeches pocket; he said it was his own, that a man gave it to him. I asked, what man; he said,

"You have taken me unawares, I cannot tell you." Mr. Barnard examined it, and found these tickets, with his initials, among it.

MR. BARNARD. Here are the tickets I put among it. He lived fourteen years with me, and had a good character. I believe he was in distress.

Prisoner's Defence. I considered I had a right to take it, as I did some jobs on my own account, and do not think that I took more than the polish which came off my work.

MR. BARNARD. I never allow them to work for themselves.

GUILTY. Aged 47.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-51

259. RICHARD OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , thirty-six handkerchiefs, value 10 l. 12 s., the goods of William Heavens , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HEAVENS . I am porter to Mr. Gardener , of Newgate-street, and have been so nine or ten years. I have known the prisoner twelve months. He came to me some time before the 30th of October, and asked if I had any silk handkerchiefs. I shewed him what I had; he chose a piece, and gave me two half-crowns on it, but did not take it away. He called again in four or five days, and desired me to get him seven or eight pieces more, of a good pattern. He called again in about three days, to know if I had them ready - I was not in the way, but on going home was informed he had been, and went to the public-house and met him. He asked why I did not let him know that I had got them - I said I had called on him several times - he appointed to see me at eight o'clock that night.

Q. When did he come at last to fetch the goods. - A. On the 30th of October; another man, called Neary, was with him. The prisoner said,

"Well, Heavens, I have brought my friend." I said,

"I suppose it is your friend to buy the handkerchiefs?" He said Yes. I got them and shewed them - they were tied in a handkerchief. He said to his friend,

"Bill, there they are - you may look at them." His friend examined the ends of them. I said,

"Don't pull them about too much." His friend said, "Do you know that these goods are seizable?" I said, I could not say whether they were the right thing, but if they were, I supposed they were seizable. The prisoner said to me,

"You be d - d; you know they are seizable." His friend said,

"I am a Custom House officer, and must search your place."

Q. At that time did you think him an officer - A. I did. He said,

"Have you any more?" The prisoner said,

"D - n your eyes, get them out - you have." I had two single handkerchiefs by me, which I had shewn him the day before - I got them out by the prisoner's desire; he took them. I begged of the officer very hard not to take them, because the prisoner had paid 6 s. on them. I said to the prisoner,

"Dick, don't be so hard - you know the young man very well, who lives in London-wall, has paid me 6 s. on these, which I must pay if you take them." The officer said,

"I must take them - my place stands at a stake - I must take the whole; that is your informer (pointing to the prisoner), he has lodged the information at the Custom House, and unless you can settle it with him, you will hear further of it." I said,

"Settle it! - how do you mean?" He said,

"You had better give him a few pounds." I said,

"A few pounds! - what do you mean! - I have nothing to give him." The prisoner said,

"Mr. Officer, I will not allow that - I will lock you up and the man immediately." The officer smiled, and said,

"You had better ask him what he will take." I turned round to the prisoner, and asked what he wanted - he said he would not take a farthing less than 3 l. I said I could not give him that, but would give him a sovereign, sooner than go to the watch-house, and I must go and borrow that. He said he would not take a sovereign, and that I should immediately go to the watch-house. The man who acted as officer begged of him to consider my family; and my wife interfered, and begged of him not to be so harsh. The prisoner then said he would consider my family, and take 2 l. I said I could not give him 2 l., and could not afford to borrow it. He then jumped up, and said,

"D - n your eyes, you shall go to the watch-house immediately, and your woman too, if you don't hold your tongue." I told him he might take me to the watch-house, I could not give him the money. I asked the officer for his authority to seize these goods; he said he would shew his authority next day, when he summoned me before the Commissioners, at eleven o'clock. I said,

"I always understood officers had an authority to shew." He refused to shew any. The prisoner said I should go to the watch-house, and came towards me as if to collar me. I said then, rather than go to the watch-house, I would apply to my publican to borrow the money. They both went with me to Walter, the publican. I spoke to him, and he told me to call them forward. The prisoner came forward, and the other man ran out with the goods. I have not seen them since.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner saw the other man take the goods from your house - A. Yes. I then told the publican I wanted to borrow 2 l. He said to the prisoner,

"Do you mean to say you will take 2 l. from this man?" The prisoner said,

"Heavens, are you dissatisfied?" I said

"No; if my friend will advance the money I will let you have it, sooner than go to the watch-house." Walter said he would not let me have it; and told the prisoner if I had done wrong to take me up. He said,

"I can take him tomorrow morning." Walter said he could not take me tomorrow any more than to-day; and if he had done wrong, to summon me before the Commissioners, and he would attend and trounce him for extorting money under false pretences. He then left the house. I expected to hear from the Custom House about my having the goods. He was taken up about a month afterwards. I should have taken

him before, but I expected to hear from the Custom House. I enquired at the Custom House for Neary, but have not been able to find him - he was not known there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You asked for Neary at the Custom House - A. No; I asked for Mr. Steel. I went to enquire if the prisoner or Neary were officers. I knew his name was Neary, because Wells, who was at the public-house, told me his name. I have dealt in handkerchiefs about four times. I never sold four pieces to one person. A friend of mine sent a person to me with them. I cannot say whether they are Foreign or British - I never asked what they were.

Q. Did you not believe them to be contraband - A. I cannot say what they were; I called them India. I live in Lovell's-court, Paternoster-row.

Q. How long was it before you began to look after the prisoner or Neary - A. It might be more than two months. Neary carried the goods with him to the public-house. I could not prevent his going away with them if he was an officer. The prisoner was taken at the Crown, public-house; but he broke from the officer, and was taken again - I knew him when he lived with Mr. Gale, a butcher, in the market.

THOMAS WALTER . I keep the Crown, public-house, St. Paul's Church-yard. The prisoner and Heavens came to my house; another person was with them. When the prisoner was present, Heavens called me aside, and in consequence of what he said, I asked the prisoner what he wanted Heavens to give him 2 l. for - he said it was a matter of no consequence to me, and asked Heavens whether he meant to give him the money or not; he said he had not got it, and I would not lend it him. The prisoner said,

"It is no matter, you will hear of me to-morrow;" turned on his heels, and walked off - I do not know what became of the other man; he had followed Heavens in in the first instance. I told him, in the prisoner's presence, that it was a scandalous shame to try to extort money from a man with such a family - he made no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. At what part of the transaction did Neary go away - A. They did not stop above five minutes - nobody came in while they were there. Neary went away first, and then in two minutes the prisoner went, saying he should hear of him to-morrow at eleven o'clock.

JAMES WELLS . I was at Walter's on this occasion, The prisoner and another person came in with Heavens. I did not hear the conversation, but am certain the prisoner is the person.

HENRY HONEY . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner a fortnight ago. I first took him in a public-house in St. Paul's Church-yard.

MR. LAW to HEAVENS. Q. Do you know the prisoner's brother - A. Yes; I went to him and told him his brother had robbed me, and if they were not paid for nor returned, and it was proved they were not officers, the prisoner must take the consequence of it; but if they were paid for, or returned, I should not see any further into it.

GEORGE O'CONNELL. I am an officer of the Customs. I know of no officer of the name of Neary.

MR. LAW. Q. Are there not many officers of different names - A. Yes. If a man is an officer, it is easily proved - even if the man is absent.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating himself to have been made the dupe of an artful man; he was induced by him to lay information against persons dealing in contraband goods - that he went to the Excise office, and saw a man in the passage, of whom he enquired for an officer, and he said he was one, and could make a seizure for him, and agreed to accompany him to the prosecutors - the officer agreed to take 2 l. to settle the business; they went to the public-house, and soon after he missed the man.

C. H. LORD. I am a Revenue officer. The prisoner applied to me three or four times on the subject of contraband goods - it might be four months ago that he said he knew where some silk handkerchiefs could be seized, and he believed the man who had them was poor, but he thought he fetched them from another house. I was in St. Paul's Church-yard with him, and he said it was not five minutes walk from there, and he had better see if the goods were there, as I had told him. I must take my oath that they were on the premises. I never made a seizure through his information.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You told him an officer must have a warrant before he made a seizure - A. Yes. I think he said he had been intimate with the man.

Q. Have you seen him since the 30th of October - A. I think I saw him in October, but not after - there are offices at which inquiries can be made for Custom House officers, but I have known people wander about the building for two days, before they could know where to lay an information - there is a room to apply for an officer to make a seizure.

- NORMAN. I am a messenger to the Board of Excise. The prisoner has applied to me about seizures; he told me three or four months ago, that he knew of some goods; that is all. I referred him to Lord.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he ever ask you to make a seizure - A. No. He did not say in what street the goods were. We have a messengers' office; any one coming in there can get what information they want.

- OWEN. I am the prisoner's brother. The prosecutor applied to me to make up the money for these goods, and said, on my not complying, he should certainly proceed, he thought it would hang him, and so forth.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He told you he must either have his money or goods, or he would prosecute - A. Yes.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-52

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, JANUARY 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

260. ANN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , six spoons, value 10 s.; three tablecloths, value 6 s.; two napkins, value 6 d., and sixteen drinking glasses, value 16 s. , the goods of Cornelius Offley , her master .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CORNELIUS OFFLEY , I keep a public-house in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner was

sixteen or eighteen months in my service as charwoman ; three days after she left me, I was induced to go to her lodging with two officers, and found a tea spoon, and a variety of duplicates. She fell on her knees, and asked forgiveness, and wanted the officers to put away some duplicates.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer. I went to her lodgings; she said I might search, and when we found the duplicates, she fell on her knees and begged forgiveness, and when I locked her up, she said there was a duplicate of two towels which I had found, and begged of me to destroy that, and she did not care for anything else.

JAMES BARTLETT . I went with Ford, and found nine duplicates in a drawer; she shoved them into my hand, and desired me to make away with them - I asked why; she said the glasses and tablecloths were Mr. Offley's property, and the rest her own.

WILLIAM HYATT . I am a pawnbroker. and have two spoons, two tablecloths, six rummers, and four ale glasses, pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-53

261. LEWIS MORRIS ASHFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a time-piece, value 25 s. , the goods of Loveden Wheeler .

LOVEDEN WHEELER. I am an upholsterer , and live in Cleveland-court . I had the care of a house there for Mr. Robins, and on the 16th of December, I was preparing for a sale; I had the care of the property. The goods were on view - the prisoner came and asked for a catalogue; I said we should have some in ten minutes. He went up into the drawing-room; I had put the timepiece on the mantle shelf five minutes before. I looked out of the second floor window, and saw him going down the court with something under his coat. I followed, and overtook him, and said,

"I beg your pardon, I think you have a time-piece which don't belong to you;" he said he had not - I looked, and saw it under his coat, and said he must go back. He begged for mercy, said he did it from want, and had had no victuals for two days.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was it not the property of a gentleman - A. Yes. I was answerable for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded Distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-54

262. MARIA WILLIAMS was indicted for that she, on the 1st of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 10,770, 5 l., dated the 20th of August, 1821, signed T. Holland;) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited ; against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Mary Ann Pite , a like forged and counterfeited Bank note, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating her intent to be to defraud William Pite .

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN SAMSON . I am shopman to Charles Smith , of Cranbourne-street. On the 29th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for a pelisse; she selected one, which came to 36 s. She was some time looking it out, and after choosing one, tendered me a 5 l. note. I asked her how she came by it, as I thought it strange, from her appearance, that I should take a 5 l. note of her. She said a gentleman had given it to her. I asked her whether she was certain of it, and if she could swear that a gentleman gave it her - she said a gentleman in Holborn gave it to her. I then took it, and went down from the shew-room into the shop, and gave the note to Mr. Smith. He went over to Mr. Perkins, a linen-draper, with it - returned and told me something, and gave her 3 l. 4 s. in change. I asked her where she lived, and what was her name - she said,

" Maria Williams , Hartshorn-court, Golden-lane," which I wrote on it - this was when Smith brought it back from Perkins. This is the note (looking at it) - I know it by my writing on it. I did not mark it before I gave it to Smith. I told an officer about it; and, on the 5th of December, Herring and I went to No. 6, Hartshorn-court, Golden-lane, and she was coming out at the door. Herring said,

"Is that Maria?" She said,

"Yes; but you have the advantage of me." He took her back, and, I believe, asked if she knew me - she said No, at first, but afterwards said she perfectly well recollected giving me a 5 l. note - nothing had been said about a 5 l. note before. She said she had asked me to come and see her, and that I did, according to my promise. I had not been to see her, nor had I been to her lodging before.

ANN CLARK . I am the wife of Thomas Clark ; we keep a coal and potatoe warehouse, in East-street, Manchester-square. On a Saturday night, in November, I think, on the 19th, but it is on the back of the note, the prisoner came, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, for a bushel of coals, a quarter of a hundred weight of potatoes, four bundles of wood, and a bunch of greens, which came to 4 s. She gave me a 5 l. note. I said I did not think I could change it. She said, could I get change - I said I would try, and went to Kelly, my next door neighbour, and got it; but before that I asked her name - she said her name was Brown. When she ordered the coals, she said they were to go to No. 2, Spring-street. My husband asked if it was Upper or Lower - she said, Lower. I went to Kelly's and got change. Mrs. Kelly wrote the name and address on the note in my presence. She ordered the things to be sent in a quarter of an hour - my husband took them, and brought them back again.

LOUISA KELLY . I live next door to Mr. Clark. On a Saturday evening, in November, Mrs. Clark brought a 5 l. note - I do not know the date, but I wrote it on the note, and gave her change, and wrote the name and address which she gave me - (looks at one) - this is it, I have written on the back,

"Mrs. Brown, 2, Spring-street;"

and on the face,

"Mrs. Clark, 20th November." I am sure it was on a Saturday evening.

MARY SALES. I am shopwoman to William Pite , mercer, No. 1, City-road. On the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked to look at a pelisse; she chose one at 30 s. I had taken her into the shew-room, and tried it on - she was about ten minutes with me, and paid me a 5 l. note, which I gave to Mrs. Pite, who took it into the shop and gave it to Mr. Pite, in my presence. He took it out to an inspector, returned in ten minutes, and she was gone. She sat down a little while when he went out, and then enquired the price of a cloak which hung in the shew-room - I said I did not know the price, She said,

"There is one hanging at the door, I'll look at that." She went to the door - I was going to take it down to shew her, but she said,

"I will call again for the change," and walked away, leaving the pelisse, and never called for that or the change.

COURT. Q. Did Mr. Pite say in her hearing what he was going to do with the note - A. No, he went out without saying anything about the inspector.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me in your life before you saw me at the office - A. Yes; not before she came to the shop.

MARY ANN PITE . I am wife of William Pite . On Monday, the 1st of December, the prisoner came and purchased a pelisse - Sales tried it on. I told the prisoner the price of it; she took out a small dirty pocket-book, and gave me a 5 l. note. I directly took it to Mr. Pite, who was in the shop; he went out immediately with it. The prisoner sat down in a chair for a moment; she then rose from her chair, went to the shop door, and asked the price of a cloak at the door. I told Sales not to take it down, and she walked away - she could not hear me tell Sales not to take it down.

WILLIAM PITE. I live in the City-road. On the 1st of December, in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, went into the shew-room, and after a short time my wife brought a 5 l. note into the shop to me; I suspected it was bad, and took it to Mr. Fleetwood, an inspector, who lives in Providence-row - returned in about ten minutes, and she was gone. - (Looks at a note.) - This is it; I have endorsed it

"W. Pite, 1 - 12 - 23."

DAVID HERRING . I am conductor of the patrol of Bow-street. On the 9th of December, I apprehended the prisoner in Hartshorn-court - Davis and Sampson were with me - we went into the house. I heard her say before the Magistrate, that she passed the note to Sampson, and had robbed a gentleman.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I attended at Bow-street, and heard the prisoner examined, what she said was not taken down; I stood close to the clerk, and am sure he did not write it down. In the way to the office, she had hold of my arm, and asked me several times what she was taken up for. I did not answer her, and just as I came through Smithfield, she asked me again. I asked if she had had any 5 l. notes lately - she replied,

"Oh yes, I passed a 5 l. note for a pelisse, in Cranbourne-alley, to that man," pointing to Sampson, and said she gave 36 s. for it, and had invited Sampson to come and see her. I asked how she came by the note; she said, if she must tell the truth, she had picked up a gentleman in Holborn, who was very much in liquor, and had robbed him of it, and she had no doubt, if that was bad, all the notes were bad, that the gentleman had a large roll of notes, and she took one out of the middle of it. When she got to the office she stated the same to the Magistrates. She was charged, at the second examination, with uttering a note to Pite; what she said was not taken down; she denied all knowledge of it, and said she never had a 5 l. note in her possession in her life, but the one she passed in Cranbourne-street, and denied having been at Pites, or that they had ever seen her there in their lives. Mr. Pite and Sales were present.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so for upwards of twenty-five years (examining the notes): that uttered to Pite is forged in every respect, and is signed

"T. Holland," there is a clerk of his name, who signed 1 l. and 2 l. notes, but no others; it is not his writing; that uttered to Clark is also forged in every respect, and is from the same plate, and is signed

"W. R. West," he is a signer of 5 l. notes, but it is not his signature. They have no water mark.

THOMAS HOLLAND . I am a clerk in the Bank, and used to sign small notes, but not fives - this is not my signature.

W. R. WEST. I sign 5 l. notes occasionally, the one produced is not signed by me. I was not at the Bank on the 20th of August, 1821, when it is dated.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I own giving Sampson a note, not knowing it to be bad; but as to these two young women, they have sworn false. I never was in their shop, and never saw them till they came to the office.

JURY to SALES. - Q. You was more than ten minutes with her, are you sure she is the same person. - A. I am positive of it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-55

263. JAMES HODGE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Elliott , about six o'clock in the night of the 30th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 26 yds. of linen-cloth, value 2 l.; 22 yds. of calico, value 1 l.; 6 yds. of muslin, value 11 s.; seven handkerchiefs, value 20 s.; a whittle, value 5 s.; and a cloak, value 10 s. , his property.

JOHN ELLIOTT . I live at No. 40, Foley-place . On the evening of the 30th of December I was in my back parlour, at a quarter or twenty minutes before six o'clock, and heard the front parlour window sash moved up; I had not been into the front parlour that evening. I thought it was the servant shutting it, it had been dark for half an hour; I had candles lighted; I thought it was the servant, but I opened the back parlour door, and immediately a double knock came to the door, and the watchman sprang his rattle, and called out that there were thieves in the house. I unlocked the door leading from the passage to the front parlour; and went in with a lamp, and saw the prisoner close to the door; the bottom window sash was open, it had not been fastened. I know that it was shut before I heard it put up. I asked how he came there, he said,

"I am here," and seemed quite frightened.

I collared him, and took him into the passage, my daughter opened the street door, let the watchman in, and he took him; the watchman brought a cloak, shawl, and several articles, which were tied up in a bundle, and had been bought at the linen drapers by my daughter on Saturday night - this was Tuesday. I had seen the parcel in the front parlour, it had not been opened at all, but my name and address was on it; it was opened before the Magistrate; it was going to my daughter at Chatham; she was at my house at that time; the watchman also brought a shawl belonging to my other daughter, and a cloak - they laid on the piano that morning, when I was in the parlour. I know the shawl to be my daughter's.

JOHN GUDGE . I am serjeant of the watch of St. Mary-le-bone. On the evening of the 30th of December, I was on duty in Foley-place; my beat is on the opposite side to Elliott's house - I was opposite his house about twenty minutes to six o'clock, and observed a man standing on the iron rails before the house, and at the same time saw a large parcel handed out of the window; I could not see who by; the sash was up. I made towards the house immediately, and when I got within three yards of the man, he threw the bundle down, and ran off. I knocked at the door, sprung my rattle, and immediately picked up a cloak, a shawl, and a large paper parcel, directed to No. 40, Foley-place; it was dark. I had not passed the door before. I went to the window, saw Elliott go in with a light, and the prisoner was there. I went in, and took him to the watch-house with the things.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I received the property from Gudge.

JOHN ELLIOTT . I know the cloak and shawl; they are my daughter's. I know the parcel by the direction, which I read on it before it was stolen.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-56

264. ISAAC CANNON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Cathrow , about the hour of seven in the night of the 7th of January , at St. Mary-le-bone , with intent the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house then being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

ROBERT GILL . My wife had the care of Mr. George Cathrow 's house, which is in Weymouth-street , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - he had been from town a fortnight; it is his dwelling-house. On the 7th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was alarmed by a ring at the bell, which I answered, and saw a boy at the door; he asked for some street. Clewley stepped forward at the same moment, and asked if I had anybody in the parlour - I went into the parlour, and found the prisoner at one corner, behind the blind; I asked what he wanted; he gave no answer; I asked him again; he said he did it from distress, and hoped I would let him go. The window sash was down before, and the blinds down; but the sash not fastened. I found it wide open; I had come in about five o'clock; it was shut then, and had not been opened afterwards. I rang the bell for my wife - Clewley was called in, and we secured the prisoner. I never saw him before. Nothing had been removed.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear that the window was shut - A. Yes.

DANIEL CLEWLEY . I live in service in this neigbourhood. I saw a man in Weymouth-street, about seven o'clock in the evening; he was asking a boy which was Harley-street; the boy told him; but he did not go in that direction. I watched, and saw him go to Mr. Cathrow's house - the boy went up to the door and rang. I stepped on, and hid myself behind a weather board, to watch; the boy lingered about the steps. The door was opened and closed again. I came forward, and saw the prisoner standing inside, in front of the window, which was wide open - I had not seen him get in; I could not from behind the board. I desired the boy to ring. I was called in, and found him in the parlour - he was secured. Nobody could have gone in at the door.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am a watchman. About seven o'clock, I was called in, and took the prisoner. I asked what brought him there; he made no answer.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-57

265. JOHN WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , three sovereigns, the monies of John Archer , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ARCHER . I live in Chapel-street, Paddington . The prisoner lodged nearly two years with me. On Friday night, the 19th of December, I put eleven sovereigns in my drawers in my front parlour, where I slept; he slept in the back parlour. On Sunday morning, the 21st, I missed three sovereigns; I found the drawer locked as usual, and had the key in my pocket; I missed another on Tuesday morning. On Christmas-eve the prisoner came into the room - we were having a pint of beer; I asked him to drink. (We always locked the room-door when we went out, and took the key). He paid me for three weeks' lodging which he owed, and for a week forward, which was 10 s., and when he came in at night we quarrelled - my friends threatened to turn him out. He said he should go when he liked, as he had paid his week's lodging. My wife threw down 2 s., and said

"Take your money." I said we had lost a good deal; he swore he knew nothing about it. I said,

"Why you took a razor out of my top drawer" - he said that was in his box, but he knew nothing of the sovereigns. On the morning of the 21st, I found a pair of men's gloves behind my drawers, I immediately called him, and said,

"Webb, these belong to you, I believe" - he said, no, they did not. I have since given them to the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Was I alone in your room on Tuesday morning - A. I cannot say; he always breakfasted with us.

ALICE ARCHER . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Saturday evening I left my little girl alone in bed in the room for twenty minutes, about nine o'clock (she is five years old), and when I returned the prisoner pushed by me in the passage. (I had the key in my pocket, and the door was locked;) he came either from my room or his own. I found the door still locked; I said,

"Is that Mr. Webb?" he made no answer, and did not come home till late that night. I saw my husband find the gloves next morning.

Q. Had the prisoner been into your room that morning before they were found - A. Yes, my Lord; he just came in before breakfast, and before the gloves were found, but did not stop a minute.

CHARLES CRADDOCK . I lodge with Archer, in the same room with the prisoner, and left on the Sunday before Christmas. I saw the prisoner put these gloves on once, and know them to be his.

CHARLES STAPLES. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Christmas-day; he gave me his key; I found a razor in his box; he said he had frequently shaved the prosecutor with it, and thought it no harm to have it in his box. Archer said he had shaved him with it. I found nothing else. I charged him with stealing sovereigns, which he denied, and said he had received some sovereigns, and two of them were in the hands of Mr. Branch, a baker; that he had just received a legacy of 8 l. 18 s. from somebody in Broad-street, who he named, and put two sovereigns into Branch's hands. He produced two letters from the country, with the post-mark upon them, which stated that he was to receive a legacy; he said he never had any gloves, and never wore any - I produce a pair.

CHARLES CRADDOCK . They are the gloves, I am sure - I have seen them in his possession.

JOHN ARCHER . I found them between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I cannot say whether he had been in the room before on that morning.

JOHN BRANCH . On the 24th of December, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner put two sovereigns into my hands; he stated, that he had received a legacy of 10 l. from a solicitor in Broad-street; that 22 s. was deducted for duty, and he had received the money at a banker's in Mansion House-street; he had told me previously that he expected to receive the legacy; he said that he had spent some of the money in clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. My master can prove my having the letters; and receiving the money from Mr. Norris, Old Broad-street. I had a cheque upon Messrs. Lubbocks.

RICHARD MIDDLEBURGH . The prisoner worked for me. I have been to Mr. Norris, who gave me a receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-58

266. GEORGE OWEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jonathan Purchis Paine , about six o'clock in the night of the 6th of December , at St. Giles-in-the-Fields , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a watch, value 30 s. , his property.

JONATHAN PURCHIS PAINE . I live in High-street , St. Giles's, and am a watchmaker . On the 6th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, or rather earlier, I was at tea in my parlour, with my door open, and heard glass break. I went into the shop, and found a pane of glass broken in the window, and two men standing outside, at the broken pane. I pursued into the street, and seized them both at the window. I struggled with them, and one escaped; the other, who was the prisoner, I secured. During the struggle with the prisoner a watch fell from him, which I produce - I picked it up, called

"Watch," and after a short time the constable came and took him. I examined my window, and found a piece broken out of the glass, and a watch gone, which had laid within an inch of the glass - a man could not get it without putting his hand through the broken pane. He said,

"You are mistaken, I am not the man." I am sure the watch fell from him - it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was it not light enough to discern a man's features - A. Certainly not - it was more than half-past five o'clock - my street door was open, but the inner door was shut - the watch was within an inch of the glass - a person's elbow could not knock it out; it fell from the prisoner after the other man escaped - it fell from the prisoner I am certain. The other man could not have dropped it, and the prisoner picked it up, for when I came out, I saw a hand come from the window, with the watch in it - I am confident that it was the prisoner's hand - the hole was hardly large enough for the hand to come out.

COURT. Q. You saw two people at your window, and on going out found two there - A. Yes, my Lord.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I was returning home, about half-past five o'clock, or later, with a long plane under my arm; I heard a cry of Watch; I was within a yard and a half of Payne's shop, and saw him scuffling with two others; I seized them both by the collar, one in each hand - one gave me a kick, and got from me, I kept fast hold of the other, which was the prisoner; a constable came up in a few minutes, and at that moment I saw a watch laying at my feet. I said,

"There is a watch, Mr. Payne, pick it up." The prisoner said, as he went along, that he would go with us, for he was innocent.

Cross-examined. Q. The other man kicked you - Yes; and the prisoner struggled to get away.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge. I found a knife on him, which appeared to be broken at the end, and had putty on it; I examined the window, and the putty had been cut out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home by the prosecutor's door, a young man ran violently against me, and at the same instant the prosecutor ran out and laid hold of me and the other man; he let the other man go. He said at the office that he could not swear whose hand was in the window.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18240114-59

267. SAMUEL STANTON , HANNAH STANTON , MARY SHEEN , and MARTHA STEVENS , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two sheets, value 1 l.; a set of bed-furniture, value 1 l.; a scarf, value 1 l.; a pelisse, value 30 s.; two gowns, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; and a shirt, value 2 s., the goods of John Rudd , in his dwelling-house .

MARY RUDD . I am the wife of John Rudd ; we live in Lemon-street . On the 18th of December, at half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed all this property from a bed-room on the third floor. A coachman lodged in the room, he had taken it furnished for a week. Some property was in boxes, and some in drawers. I lost nothing of my own except the sheets and bed-furniture, which was in the box the day before. I found the property at the office that evening.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. On the 18th of December, about two o'clock, in consequence of information, I

went to No. 21, Duke-street, St. George's in the East, with Dalton and Fortune (it was Stanton's house), with a search-warrant. I waited in the parlour while Fortune went up - he called for me to keep the door - I locked it, and Hannah Stanton came down and put some linen away, and said she could not be accountable for what her lodgers did. There was a bed in every room in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Stanton keeps the house - A. Yes; he appeared to let lodgings.

MOSES FORTUNE . I went with Lee, and found the prisoners Sheen and Stevens in the first floor front room - the door was open - a large bundle laid on the table, the curtains and two sheets hung outside it. I secured the prisoners, and asked who belonged to the room; one of them said,

"We do." They said a young man brought the bundle there, and they did not know who he was. I said that was very extraordinary. They said they did not know who the man was - that he brought it up, and asked to leave it there. Mrs. Stanton came into the room while I was questioning them, and immediately went out again. Stanton occupied the parlour only.

PHOEBE WILSON. I am nine years old. I lived servant to Stanton for three days, and used to see all the prisoners going in and out of the house. Stevens was Sheen's servant.

THOMAS DREW. I am conductor of the patrol. On the 31st of December I apprehended Stanton in Blackfriars-road.

SHEEN'S Defence. I lodged at Stanton's, and was acquainted with a man named Johnson, who came once or twice a week to see me, being an unfortunate woman; and on Thursday, at twelve o'clock, a man came and asked, if one Johnson did not come to see me, and said he was requested to leave this bundle for him, and he would call in an hour for it; he had not been gone long before two officers came.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18240114-60

268. JOHN WEBB was indicted for the wilful murder of Charles Gibson .

GEORGE GIBSON . I live at Bethnel-green, and was at the Bird-cage public-house , one Thursday about ten weeks ago, when Thomas George , and Charles Gibson had a quarrel about jumping in sacks; Gibson had a sack of his master's (Fawcett,) and George's master was owner of the sacks they were jumping in. George claimed the sack Gibson had; words arose, Fawcett said,

"If it is not his sack, you have no occasion to be bouncing about it, my man shall fight you for a leg of mutton and trimmings." one shilling was staked by each of them, they were to fight on the following Monday, but Gibson did not come forward. They met at the Bird-Cage on Wednesday, there was no malice or anger; about seven hundred people were present; the prisoner was there and took part in it. I cannot exactly say what the prisoner did, but he picked Gibson up at different times. Pell was the principal man, he was Gibson's second; it was a very equal match, and appeared a fair fight to me; only at the first round Gibson hit Charles a foul blow - they all called out

"foul" - they fought an hour and five minutes; George had the best of it for the first half hour; nobody endeavoured to part them but Lloyd; he went to Gibson, and said, he had better leave off; but he said, he thought too much of his sovereign, and persisted in fighting; about the end of the battle, George struck a blow on the head and temple, and Gibson fell several times; he received several blows on the head, they were given fair; he fell at the last blow, and could not get up; Gibson was beat very much, and had one eye blinded; he died in about twenty minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The deceased was your brother. - A. Yes; he applied to the prisoner to be his second on the day of the fight; but he said he would rather not, and my brother got Pell for a second.

Q. Did not the prisoner from the beginning of the fight, tell your brother he had better leave off - A. I cannot tell, because I was not near enough; I did not tell my brother, that if I was him I would fight till I died. I advised him to leave off.

Q. Did the prisoner do any thing more, than humanely assist your brother when he saw him down - A. No, he picked him up several times, and washed his face with a spunge.

COURT. Q. Did he interfere with George at all. - A. No, my Lord.

THOMAS ISAACS . I was at this fight, but was called away about half an hour after it began; I saw nothing foul; the prisoner picked the deceased up several times, and washed his face; the deceased said, he thought he should give in; the prisoner said,

"Have another round -

"I am certain of that, and before the round was over I left.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you. - A. A labourer at the gravel pits. I was examined last Session, but was not asked about this. I never heard him advise him to leave off.

CORNELIUS WILLIAMS . I live at Old Ford, and was present at the latter part of the fight. I saw nothing unfair. I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there.

JOHN LLOYD . I was present - they had fought above half an hour, and knowing the deceased, I persuaded him to leave off; he said,

"No, I look too much to my sovereign," and the prisoner said he had better leave off. I was turned out of the ring.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear to conduct himself humanely and kindly to the deceased - A. Very much so.

JAMES FAIRHEAD . I am a surgeon. On the 27th, I examined the deceased, and opened his head - I found a quantity of extravagated blood between the membranes of the brain, which caused his death; his head was much bruised.

Prisoner's Defence. What I did was to serve the young man.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-61

269. WILLIAM ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , a chest, value 2 s., and 86 lbs. of tea, value 20 l. , the goods of Miles Stringer and Thomas Richardson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Fisher and John Fisher .

JOSEPH SIMPSON . I am warehouseman to Miles Stringer and Thomas Richardson . On the 5th of January, I received a chest of tea from the East India House; I marked it, and delivered it into the cart for Sexton, the carter, to deliver at the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, to go to Dorsetshire.

HUMPHREY SEXTON . I am carter to the prosecutors. On the 5th of January, I lost this chest out of my cart at at the bottom of Bread-street-hill - I left the cart for a short time, and when I returned the flap was let down, and the chest gone. I found it at the Mansion House next day.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How did you know it - A. By the direction.

RICHARD DADY . I am an officer. On the 5th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I received information that four men were gone on with a chest of tea; I went along Thames-street, and saw a coach drive off very quick. I stopped it, got in, and found the prisoner inside, with this chest of tea, and ordered the man to drive to the Compter; he said he did not know what he had got there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had met with an accident, and a person put him into the coach - A. He said so next day.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I went to Dady's assistance, and helped to secure the prisoner.

JOHN KING . I am a pot-boy. I was going round for my pots, and saw four men on Dowgate-hill with a chest; one of them said, "It's all right." I went and told my master, who informed Dady. I cannot say whether the prisoner is one of them.

CHARLES BAYFORD . I am a coachman. Some man fetched my coach from Cheapside, about six o'clock, to take up on Dowgate-hill - he took me to the bottom of the hill. A chest of tea was put into the coach by the same man as the officer found in the coach; but I cannot swear that it was the prisoner, as I never saw his face - but the man the officer found in the coach is the man who put the chest in.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you state that the prisoner was not the man who called the coach - A. He did not fetch it. The man who put the chest in got in, and nobody else; I said so before the Magistrate. The man who called the coach got on the box.

HUMPHREY SEXTON re-examined. I missed the chest between five and six o'clock, on Bread-street-hill, which is at the bottom of Dowgate-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Blackfriars-road, and in Thames-street, I was taken with a giddiness in my head, having taken a little laudanum. I fell on the curb; two men took me up, and said, "Old gentleman, here is a coach, we are going to put a box into; where are you going?" I said to Essex-street, Whitechapel; they said they were going to Mile-end, and directly they put me in, I was seized.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-62

270. CHARLES EGGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 3 1/8 lbs. of sugar, value 1 s. 10 s., and 19 ozs. of coffee, value 3 s. 3 d. , the goods of Joseph Collyer , his master .

GEORGE CORBY . I am an officer. Mr. Collyer desired me to watch his house, and on the 28th of December, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out with a bundle. I stopped him five doors off, and asked what he had got; he said his dirty linen to be washed; I said if so it was all right - he said he had nothing but what was his own. I took him to the watch-house, and found 3 1/8 lbs. of sugar, and 19 ozs. of coffee in his bundle, which also contained dirty linen. I sent for his master, who said, "What, I have caught you at last, you have been robbing me." He said it was the first time he had taken anything.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where did you see him - A. On Holborn-hill , coming out of the house, which is opposite the watch-house; he was quite agitated.

JOSEPH COLLYER . I am a grocer , and live on Holborn-hill. In consequence of suspicion, I set the officer to watch. I found the prisoner at the watch-house; he said he had taken the goods out of my shop - that a person he owed money to threatened to summons him, and he took them to pay him with. He was my porter, and boarded in the house, and had 16 l. a year.

Cross-examined. Q. You miss no property - A. No. He said it was his first offence, and wished me to forgive him. I did not observe him agitated. He lived four months with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of place a long time before I went to Mr. Collyer. I owed a man 17 s. 6 d.; he threatened to summons me - I paid him 10 s. out of my wages, and distributed the rest to people I owed it to. He would not wait for the rest.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, having an excellent character .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-63

271. CLARA FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , two half-crowns, the monies of William Ranger , from his person .

WILLIAM RANGER . I am groom to Mr. Yalloway . On Saturday, the 27th of December, about a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-market , going to buy some meat, and about half way down the market, two women came up to me, and said, "My dear, how do you do?" I said it was nothing to them. I stood there looking in at a clothes shop; I felt something at my pocket - they then walked off. I felt, and missed two half-crowns. I told the watchman I was robbed by two women. They crossed the market. I said one was the woman, but found she was not. I then saw the prisoner, but am not positive to her.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. The prosecutor came to me, and pointed out a woman - he looked her in the face, and said he did not think she was the woman. He came to me again in a quarter of an hour, and said the young woman was over the way - I went over, and found the prisoner. I said, "Are you certain of her?" he said, "I am almost sure; take her, and that is sufficient for you."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-64

272. JOHN ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , 1 1/8 oz. of gold, value 6 l., and two shoulders of gold-beaters' skin, value 30 s. , the goods of William Tyrer .

WILLIAM TYRER . I am a gold-beater . and live in Bridge-water-square ; the prisoner is a stranger. On the morning of the 5th of August I found my house broken into, and missed this property from the workshop. I gave information,

and on the 11th of August, two shoulders of gold beaters' skin were produced. I went to the prisoner's house, Providence-place, St. Luke's, and found him there at last, in January. When we went on the 11th of August we found two crucibles with a portion of gold in one - it appeared to have melted about the quantity of gold I had lost.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, and accompanied Mr. Tyrer to the prisoner's lodgings on the 11th of August - I found a key on the stairs, which opened the door, and found two crucibles there. I have been looking for him ever since, but did not go to his house.

JOHN TILLOTT . I am a gold and silver flatter. On Sunday morning, the 10th of August, the prisoner gave me these skins to sell for him. I offered them next day to Mr. Dunford, who asked me if I had not heard of Tyrer's robbery. I recollected myself, and said Yes; and I would have nothing more to do with them.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. I work at a flatting-mill. Mr. Tyrer has had goods flattened at our mill, and had told me of the robbery a few days after it happened. I heard that he lived in Bridgewater-gardens, but did not exactly know the number of the house - I did not know what he had lost. I told Dunford I knew who I had them from - I did not mention his name. He said they were worth nothing. The prisoner said, as I knew the gold-beaters, I could sell them - that they were left at his house, and he did not know what to do with them.

COURT. Q. How long have you known him - A. About ten years; he jobs about as a wheelwright.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. After you were apprehended did not you go to his house and tell his wife, that what you did was to serve yourself - A. No; she came to me, and begged me not appear against him.

MR. DUNFORD. I told this witness they were worth nothing; and said I knew where to find him. He said he knew who he got them from.

MR. TYRER. I received the shoulders from Tillott, and can swear to them - my private mark is on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Tillott was taken up himself - A. Yes, five or six days after the robbery; he was committed for a week, and his master gave his word for his appearance.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it. I have been at home ever since, and about the neighbourhood. On the Friday before Tillott was apprehended, he brought a piece of gold and silver to my house, and sent me to sell it; I received 1 l. 6 s. 9 d. for it. He gave me 2 s. for going.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-65

273. MICHAEL COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 10 ozs. of tea, value 2 s. the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies , to whom he was servant .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to a person or persons unknown.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MORRIS . I am servant to the East India Company, and pay the men's wages. The prisoner was in their service, and had 16 s. 6 d. a week, working from eight o'clock till two.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you known him in their service - A. Since April, 1822. I never heard a complaint against him.

WILLIAM FLEY . I am a commodore in the Company's service, and superintend the labourers. On the 26th of December, the prisoner came to work at eight o'clock, and was repairing a chest of black tea; at half-past eight he was sent on an errand - returned in half an hour; was sent out again at a quarter to ten, and should have come back in half an hour - he returned about a quarter to one o'clock, and appeared to have drank rather too much, but was sufficiently sober to work, or I should have reported it to the elder; he went to work, and in a quarter of an hour I saw him putting his right hand into a chest and take it out full of tea, and put it into his breeches pocket. I thought I must be deceived, but I watched and saw him do it again. I got within three yards of him; he came to me and said, "Master, will you come to-night and take something to drink, and smoke a pipe?" I said

"Yes, I will, Collins." He then returned to the chest, repeated it again, and I reported it to the elder; he was searched, and about 10 ozs. of Congo tea found upon him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you the least suspicion of him before - A. Not the least; he was a hard-working, quiet man. Three other men had been out with him - all four were drunk; he did not know that I saw him. I do not think he would have done it if he had been sober.

ALEXANDER FRAZER . I am an elder in the Company's service. Fley gave me information the prisoner was sufficiently sober to know right from wrong, and able to work. I saw 10 ozs. of tea found in his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you spoken to him after he returned from drinking? - A. I said he had done wrong. I never heard of his being charged with theft before.

JOHN LINES . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the tea in his breeches pocket. He had been drinking, but walked as well as I could, and appeared to know what he was about.

WILLIAM RESTALL . I am an Excise officer, and took charge of the tea. The prisoner was able to work.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stupidly drunk, or I should not be guilty of such a thing.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors and Jury .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-66

274. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , eighteen bagatelle balls, value 16 s.; twelve carpet broom sockets, value 2 ls. 6 d.; twelve mopheads, value 18 s.; forty-two tooth-brushes, value 17 s.; eighteen nail-brushes, value 12 s. 8 d.; four clothes-brushes, value 14 s.; and a basket, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Trimbey and others, his partners.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 17th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I and Herdsfield were in Queen-street, and saw a cart going along, and several persons following it. I watched it through different streets, and in Little Eastcheap I saw the prisoner coming from the cart with a basket; somebody called out, Stop him; he carried it about two yards farther, then threw it down and ran up a passage. I picked it up; Herdsfield ran up the passage - the prisoner lifted his hand up to strike him; I ran and seized him. He was never out of my sight.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I lost sight of

the cart for a short time; then heard a cry of Stop him! I saw the basket in the prisoner's hand, he threw it down; I laid hold of him; he struck me over the ear, and we fell together.

JOHN SPICER . I am a carman. I had brought the goods from Mr. Trimbey's. I was riding on the top of the cart, with the tilt wrapped round me, as it rained hard; I felt the tilt move, looked round, and saw a man running away with the basket.

GEORGE ROBERT SMITH . I am servant to James Trimbey , who has other partners. I employed the carter to take some goods from the warehouse to the wharf; this basket, containing the articles stated in the indictment, was among them.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man coming from the cart with the basket; I crossed, laid hold of him and the basket; he got from me, and I carried it to the curb.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-67

275. THOMAS LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a basket, value 6 d.; and two turkies, value 12 s. , the goods of John Wyberd .

GEORGE MORGAN . I am an officer. On the 24th of December, at six o'clock in the evening, I was by the Flower Pot, Bishopsgate-street , and saw the prisoner there, I lost sight of him in the mob, and was crossing the road; and met him crossing with the basket in his arms, stopped him, and asked what he had got there; he said he was a porter, and had brought it from the Bell, in Holborn. I said he had been very quick, for I saw him just before without anything; he said his father sent it from Gloucestershire.

JOHN WYBERD . I am book-keeper at the Flower Pot. On the 24th of December two baskets stood on the counter for the Clapton coach. I missed them in two minutes, and soon after the officer brought me this direction of it; I knew it to be one of the same, it contained two turkies.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man at the corner of Thread-needle-street asked me to carry this basket to the Old Bell. I said I would, but thinking it odd, I crossed towards the London Tavern, to read the direction, and the officer stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-68

276. STEPHEN FRY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of George Helbert Israel from his person .

MR. GEORGE HELBERT ISRAEL . I am a merchant . On the 25th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the day, I was coming from Finsbury-square to Moorfields , and saw three boys go from me off the curb, and presently the prisoner ran from me, stuffing something into his bosom; I ran after him into Moorfields, and when I was within three or four yards of him, he threw my handkerchief over into a board; I secured him; he begged forgiveness. A man got over and got it for me. I have enquired, and find that he bears a good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Brentford for a letter to go into the hospital, but could not get in; and as I went towards my sister's house in Moorfields, I saw an acquaintance, and ran over to overtake him, and at that moment a young man ran by me; the gentleman came up and took me.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-69

277. ANN CHESNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , a shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of George Henry Watson .

GEORGE HENRY WATSON . On the 13th of December, I lodged in Edmond's-place, Aldgate . I put some new shirts into my drawer, and on the 16th missed one.

HANNAH SCUDDING . I am landlady of the house, and employed the prisoner as charwoman . On the 13th of December she was not sent into Watson's room, but was cleaning on the same floor.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 10th of December I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found seventy duplicates in her possession.

JAMES WATSON . I am shopman to Mr. Fothergill, of Aldersgate-street. The prisoner pawned a shirt in her own name. I have known her for eight years.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to make it good. I intended to redeem it.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-70

278. ROBERT CLARK , was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , a hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Fielder .

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN . I am a porter. I was passing Mr. Fielder's shop on the 26th of December, and saw the prisoner go and take a hat which hung at the door; he cut the string with a knife. I saw him take the ticket off and throw it away. I followed and took him with it.

CHARLES FIELDER . I am a hatter , and live in Bishopsgate-street . Sullivan brought the prisoner into my shop, with this hat, which is mine; a knife was found upon him.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-71

279. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a chaise, value 16 l. , the goods of Michael Lynch .

MICHAEL LYNCH . I am a carman , and live in Water-lane, Fleet-street. The prisoner had access to my yard, (which is in Bouverie-street ) being employed to repair some houses in Shoe-lane. My chaise was in the yard - I saw it safe on Sunday, the 4th of January, and missed it on the Tuesday morning about nine o'clock, and on the Thursday following found part of it in possession of Norman, at Chelsea, and know it to be mine. I had given the prisoner leave to make his mortar up in my yard, but not at this time.

JAMES NORMAN . I am a wheelwright, and live at Chelsea. On Thursday, the 8th of June, the prisoner came to my shop with the dashing-iron of a chaise. I first saw him on that day in a yard in Duck-lane; a man called me in, and I found the prisoner in the yard. I bought

a pair of wheels of the man - he said there were more wheels to be sold; that they belonged to the prisoner (who did not deny it). I asked the price; the prisoner said, 2 l. 10 s. for the axletree and wheels. I offered 2 l. - he said I should have them, and offered to sell me some springs and other things for 30 s. I paid him 5 s. in part. We each agreed to give a man 2 s. 6 d. to take them home, and soon after five o'clock they were brought. He came to the Cross Keys, public-house, and I paid him the rest. The splinter-bar was missing; he said it must have dropped out of the cart. The prosecutor saw and claimed all I bought of him - he said it was his own.

JOHN CORMACK . I carried the things to Norman's, and saw him buy them of the prisoner.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and took the springs, the shafts, axletree, wheels, and dashing-irons, from Norman's.

(Shafts produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that a man employed him to dispose of the property.

JAMES NORMAN . I bought them of the prisoner - he said they belonged to him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-72

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 19.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

280. HENRY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a purse, value 1 d., and eleven sovereigns, the property of Thomas Hester , from his person .

THOMAS HESTER . I am a chair-maker . I came from Oxfordshire; I arrived at the Green Man, at Ealing , on the 30th of December; I fell in company with the prisoner on the road; I went to bed, and next night I laid down in the stable and fell asleep, being rather in liquor. I awoke at three o'clock in the morning, and missed my purse, containing eleven sovereigns, from my right hand breeches pocket - they were safe at seven o'clock, when I laid down. I had not seen the prisoner that day, but when I awoke I went into the house, and found him there. I had not locked the stable door, but believe it was locked part of the time.

JAMES TOMKINS . My father keeps the Green Man, public-house. Hester came to my house on Monday, and returned on Tuesday night. I saw the prisoner in the tap-room on Tuesday evening, and next day, in consequence of what I heard, I went to the Coach and Horses, public-house, at Notting Hill, and found there, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and found three sovereigns, 45 s. and 5 d. on him. The stable had been open part of the time that the prosecutor was there, and at that time the prisoner was about the house, stating that he was distressed, and had no money, and begging for assistance - I found he had a new hat, shirt, and stockings on.

Prisoner's Defence. I found this money in the footpath, near the stable.

PROSECUTOR. It could not have fallen out of my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18240114-73

281. SAMUEL RAINES , WILLIAM ELLIOTT , and JOHN AUSTIN WREN , were indicted for that they, on the 4th of January , at St. Margaret, Westminster , with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did shoot at John Collins , a subject of the King, with intent, is so doing, feloniously, wilfully, and of their malice aforethought, to kill and murder him , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating their intent in so doing, violently and feloniously to rob the said John Collins, and his goods and monies from his person and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal, against the statute.

THIRD COUNT, stating their intent to do the said John Collins some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN COLLINS . I am servant to Mr. Beaufoy , of South Lambeth. On the 4th of January, I had been to Pall Mall, to see my aunt home; I lived with Mr. Beaufoy then, but lodged in New-road, South Lambeth. I was returning about eight minutes before eight o'clock in the evening. I was about six yards from the toll-bar, in the Vauxhall-road ; on foot. A man came up to me, and presenting a pistol into my face, said," Stand;" he pointed it into my face - it was three or four inches from my face; he said,

"Stand, I demand your money, or else I'll blow your brains out." I told him I had got none; he said,

"- You have." He still held the pistol to my face. Two more men came up instantly, and I stepped a foot or two back with my face to him; he followed me up, put the pistol to my temple, and said,

"Positively I will blow your brains out, if you don't deliver your money;" they had all three laid hold of me, the man had his hand on my breast, when he said he would positively blow my brains out, but the others had not touched me at that time; they then laid hold of me, the man who presented the pistol having hold of my breast; one held me round the waist, and the other held me by the left arm. I said,

"I will see you d - d before I give you money," and instantly made a rush to get away, and got loose from them. I cried out Murder, and the man who had the pistol immediately fired. I only called murder once; I did not see him fire; but saw the direction of the pistol, it was directed to me; the ball came so near as to brush against my hat, and knock it off. I caught it with my left hand on the top of my head; it knocked my hat up, the ball came under the hat brim; they all three ran off directly; the one who took hold of me behind, ran across the road - the other two ran through into Rochester-row, which leads out of the road. I followed them, and cried Stop thief! and saw one of them cross the row - they ran down the row; one crossed over the road - I believe that was the man who fired the pistol. I kept the other in my sight, and saw a soldier, who ran faster than me, catch him - it was the prisoner Raines; he is the man - I never lost sight of him. The soldier brought him back to the guard-house. Pace, the officer, came and searched him immediately, and found three or four pistol-balls and a powder-flask on him - he was searched within five minutes of his being taken. I saw Elliott in custody on the Friday following (this was on Sunday). I rather thought that he might be the person who fired, but when I came to see, the prisoner Wren (which was on the Tuesday following), I was satisfied that

he was the man who fired; he was taken on the Monday night or Tuesday morning, early.

Q. When you saw Elliott, you at first thought he was the man who fired - A. Yes; but on seeing them both together on the Tuesday following, I believed Wren to be the man, by seeing him with his hat on, and believe now that Wren is the man who fired. He had some black stuff over his eyes when he fired - it came half way over his nose - I think it came over his eyes; he was the tallest of the three at the time; they all had their hats on. Wren, I believe, had blue or dark trowsers on; and, I think, a dark coat, and lightish waistcoat.

Q. Had you the means of observing the dress of the other man, who you now call Elliott - A. Yes; by his height, and his dress, and figure, I think it was him - his dress was nearly like Wren's, I do not think there was any difference. I believe, on my oath, that those two men were both present at the time; the other man was not out of my sight till he was taken. I had drank nothing, and was quite sober.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were a good deal alarmed - A. Yes; it was a darkish night, but this happened just under a lamp. I never saw either of them before, to my knowledge.

Q. Your attention was more taken up with your escape than observing the parties - A. Yes; one of them was behind me. I have the hat which I wore - there is no mark on it. I believe it was the swiftness of the bullet coming under it that knocked it up.

Q. The pistol was so near to you that the wind of it could raise your hat without a bullet - A. Yes; I found no bullet - I thought there was a bullet.

Q. One man being behind you, you had not much opportunity of seeing him - A. I saw him coming up - they both came up together. When I saw Wren, they put a hat on him, which was found that night, and I thought he was the man. It was not put on Elliott.

Q. The hat made you form that conclusion - A. The hat and his appearance - it appeared to fit him the same as it did on the night in question. I could not see his forehead so well as, if it had been uncovered; they put nothing black on his face when they tried it on. He was about a yard from me when he fired - the muzzle of the pistol was within a few yards of me - it might raise my hat without a ball. Before they fired, I had said I would see them d - d first.

THOMAS LADDS . I belong to the first regiment of the second battalion of the Grenadier Guards. On the 4th of January, a few minutes before eight o'clock, I was talking to my comrade, Harper, at the corner of the guard-room, in Rochester-row, and heard the report of a pistol or gun about two hundred yards off, and heard a man cry out Murder! I immediately afterwards heard somebody sing out Stop thief! Both the cries came from the spot where I heard the report. The corporal said something to me - I looked that way, and saw a man coming up Rochester-row, on the opposite side to me, running from where I heard the report. I ran after him - I saw no other man in pursuit. I did not see the prosecutor till I secured the man and brought him back to the guard-room. I pursued him about two hundred yards - he was running very fast; and as I ran after him he said,

"What are you running after me for - I have done nothing?" I said,

"There is a cry of Stop thief - run as hard as you will, I'll overtake you presently" - and took him at the corner of Vincent-square, brought him to the guard-room, and just as I got to the door, the prosecutor said,

"That is one of the men that stopped me in the Vauxhall-road." I gave him in charge of the corporal, and immediately sent for Pace - it was the prisoner Raines. Pace searched him, and found four small pistol balls on him, and a glass bottle with powder in it; he also found a small piece of cane in his pocket, which, I think, had been used as a ramrod.

Cross-examined. Q. A ramrod is wanted whether you use powder only, or ball - A. Yes.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square, and live in Rochester-terrace, Vauxhall-road. I heard a call of Stop thief, about eight o'clock at night, as I sat by my fire; I immediately ran out; a man was coming up the steps, who said,

"For God's sake go down - there is a man stopped for a highway robbery!" and just as I got into the guard-room I saw Raines, and sent for my handcuffs - handcuffed and searched him, and found four bullets upon him - I do not think that they were moulded, but merely squeezed from the lead - a bottle with gunpowder in it, and a piece of cane, one end being rather forced up, apparently by pressure. Just after I had searched him, Stiff brought in a hat, and a piece of black stuff in it. I inspected it very minutely, and found the name of

"J. Wren" in it; and knowing Wren well, and knowing that he wore such a hat, I apprehended him on Monday, the 12th, between twelve and one o'clock at night - I had been looking for him nearly every night - I have known him three or four years - I knew his lodgings, but could not find him there, nor at the places he frequented. I went to his lodgings once. I took him on the 12th, at twenty minutes to one o'clock in the morning, at a house of ill fame, No. 3, Almonry, on the second floor. I got in at the front of the house, broke two room doors open, and found him in bed with a girl of the town. When I got into the room, I asked who was there - he put his head out, and said

"It is me, what do want with me?" He knew me very well - I had a light in my hand. I asked his name, and understood him to say Wilson, but will not be certain that he did not say Austin. I took him into custody. He asked if I wanted him for felony - I said I did. He dressed himself, and said he hoped I would not handcuff him, but I did immediately. I said,

"Where is your hat?"

"Here it is," said he, and put a paper cap on his head, saying,

"That is all the hat I have got." And while I was taking him out of the room he said,

"I know what you want me for now - I am sure of being topped," which means hanging. I took him to the watch-house. I went to Raines' room on the morning of the 5th of January, and knocked at the door; his wife answered, and in the room I found a large vice, which screws up. I had the balls in my pocket; I put one into the vice, and it exactly corresponded with the inside of the vice. On the same day (5th) I went in search of Elliott, and found him near Salisbury-square, Fleet-street, and told him I wanted him, on suspicion of a highway robbery; searched him, and in his left hand pocket I found three flints, a small key, 2 s. 6 d., and a quantity of halfpence.

Cross-examined. - Q. Raines never admitted to you that they were his lodgings which you went to - A. No.

THOMAS STIFF . I belong to the 2d regiment of Foot

Guards. I was on duty as sentinel in Rochester-row, a little before eight o'clock; I heard the report of a pistol, and saw the flash; I then heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw two men running on the opposite side of the road to me. One came up to me, and I knocked him down; he got from me directly - I was nearly down myself; he left his hat and some black stuff behind him, which I gave to Pace. I should not know him again: he had a dark coat and trowsers on. A pistol was found next morning, seven or eight yards from the spot.

THOMAS PACE re-examined. I got up next morning, and found the pistol within a few yards of where the soldier knocked the man down - it was laying down, stuck ankle deep in the mud - the rammer and cock were down, and the damp of the powder was visible; the pan had a dark wet mark, as if it had been recently fired.

JOHN COLLINS . It was a pistol of this description - this appears to be the same.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not notice it much - A. I speak from the brightness and size of it. It looked brighter than it does now.

ELLIOTT'S Defence. My Lord, I know nothing of it.

WREN'S Defence. I was at the Rose and Crown, public-house, over the water, at the time.

RAINES' Defence. On Sunday morning, before I was out of bed, Elliott called on me, and asked if had got any lead - I said I had not. He said he was going to the Middlesex Hospital, and would call on me in his way back.

One witness gave Wren a good character, and three deposed the same on behalf of Raines.

RAINES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

ELLIOTT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

WREN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

The Jury recommended Elliott to mercy, considering it his first offence .

Reference Number: t18240114-74

282. JOHN RIESBECK was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Charles Elder , about seven o'clock in the night of the 2d of January , and stealing a spencer, value 30 s.; a buckle, value 2 s., and a piece of trimming, value 1 s. , the goods of John Freeman and Frederick Stevenson .

JOHN FREEMAN . I am in partnership with Frederick Stevenson - we are tailors , and rent a shop in Charles Elder 's house, Castle-street East, Oxford-street, St. Mary-le-bone . On the 2d of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, or rather later - it was dark - I was going out, and observed that the shop window was lifted up; I had seen it down a quarter of an hour before - I had not remained in the shop during that quarter of an hour. I missed a spencer from the window; any one could have put a hand in and taken it. I immediately returned and told my partner, and we agreed to watch. I went into the street, and saw some trimming hanging from the window. I saw the prisoner in company with a young man; both walked up to the window - the prisoner went and took a piece of trimming. I immediately went up and secured him; the other walked off. The spencer has not been found.

FREDBRICK STEVENSON. I was in the back parlour, and in consequence of what passed, we watched. I stood inside, and saw the prisoner come to the window at different times, and saw a man with him once, but did not see the trimming taken.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-75

283. CHARLES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , twenty-four pairs of boots, value 5 l., three pairs of shoes, value 10 s., the goods of John White , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WHITE . I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner was my shop-boy for upwards of two years. In consequence of suspicion, I had him apprehended on the 8th of December.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody at Mr. White's, and found twenty-five duplicates on him.

WILLIAM SKINNER . I am shopman to Mr. Baker, pawnbroker, Upper George-street, Bryanstone-square. I have nine pairs of boots, and two pairs of shoes, pawned at different times, by the prisoner, in his own name - he said they belonged to his father, who was a shoemaker.

JAMES THOMPSON . I have a pair of shoes pawned by the prisoner.

SAMUEL WISE . I have two pairs of boots pawned by the prisoner.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I have two pairs of boots, pawned by the prisoner, at different times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only . Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-76

284. JOHN WITTENBURGH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , six sovereigns, and two half-crowns, the monies of William Adams , in the dwelling-house of William Gilbertson .

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am journeyman to William Gilbertson , baker , Upper George-street, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner drove the cart . I slept in the back garret with him and two others. On the 3d of January, I missed three sovereigns from my box, which was in my bed-room. I had locked the box, and found it still locked; it must have been done with a false key, or my key taken from my pocket while I was asleep. The prisoner keeps his box down in the wood-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BERNARD. Q. The prisoner slept in the room, and two others - A. Yes; he had no business there in the day-time.

MARY GREEN . I am servant to Mr. Gilbertson. The prisoner had nowhere to clean himself but his bed-room. On the 1st of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I met him coming up the kitchen stairs, but do not know what room he went to. On the Sunday after Christmas-day, the prosecutor was gone into the area to brush his clothes - the prisoner said the prosecutor had saved six sovereigns in master's service; and on Saturday, when the prosecutor was enquiring about two sovereigns and a half which he had lost, the prisoner put down a shilling, and said it was all he had.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you what he received as Christmas boxes - A. No.

JOHN YOUD . I lived with Mr. Gilbertson, but not when this money was lost. I met the prisoner on the 30th of December, and rode round Chelsea with him. I said I

was out of place, and had pawned my clothes for 3 l., and expected to go about the situation I had before, and did not wish to part with my clothes - if he would lend me 10 s. I would give him security; he called in Long-acre, and redeemed a watch, and tendered a sovereign for it, and on my leaving him, he lent me 10 s., and said if I met him on Thursday night, he would lend me 5 s. more; I gave him two duplicates as security, and told him not to redeem the things. On Thursday, I was waiting by the house, and met him with my coat, of which I had given him the duplicate - he said he had taken it out, for it was only running up to interest, and if I would hold it, he would go and redeem the rest of the things, which were pawned opposite the house, for 2 l. I called him back, and told him he was not to take them out, for I would pay him to-morrow. We went and had two or three pots of beer, and I saw him with three sovereigns.

WILLIAM WALKER GILBERTSON . On the 3d of January the prisoner was going out with the cart, and asked me for 5 s. to give change for bread, he was apprehended that day, and 18 s. found on him; he had been out of presence for two minutes.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked what he had done with Adams's sovereigns; he said, he had not got them; I found eighteen shillings and one farthing in copper on him, which he said belonged to his master; his master said,

"Why then did you want to borrow 5 s.;" he said, he had not sufficient change. I asked where he got the money to redeem his watch; he said that was nothing to me. I found a new coat in his box; he said, he bought some duplicates of a young man on Tuesday for 15 s., and redeemed the coat for 1 l. I found a purse at the bottom of his bedstead, containing two sovereigns and sixteen shillings; he had said frequently, that I should find nothing there, and told me not to tumble his shirts; he said, he had saved 2 l. 16 s. a long time ago; his master said.

"You have always been poor since you have been here, how could you save this?" he said, if he had paid his debts he could not have saved it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said to me one morning,

"Jack, I have saved 5 l. in this place, and have only been here six weeks." I only went up stairs for my waistcoat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-77

285. JOHN SPRING was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , two coats, value 30 s.; two pairs of breeches, value 1 l.; a purse, value 1 s.; two waistcoats, value 10 s.; a pair of braces, value 4 d.; and two half-crowns, the property of Henry Fisk , in the dwelling-house, of John Fisk .

HENRY FISK . I am a sawyer , and live in King-street, Limehouse , with my father; the prisoner lodged there, and slept with me. On the 20th of December, I got up at half-past six o'clock in the morning, and left him in bed, and these clothes were in the room, which were worth 2 l. 16 s.; my purse and two half-crowns were in my breeches pocket. I missed them when I came home.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you authorise me to pawn them - A. Never. I was sent for about half-past eight o'clock by my mother, and went in pursuit of the prisoner in consequence of what she said.

JOHN FISK . I rent the house. I went out at seven o'clock with my son. I called the prisoner, he was just getting up.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, at a public-house in Ratcliffe-highway. I said I believed he was the man I wanted for robbing his lodging; he said he had not. I asked where he lodged; and he mentioned some name, not the prosecutor's; he had two waistcoats on. I asked where he got them, and how long he had had them: he said he brought them from home, out of the country. I found a purse, a sovereign, and seventeen and sixpence on him, which he said was his wages; the waistcoats answered the description I had received. I said,

"You are the man, I shall send for the prosecutor;" he then said, those clothes did belong to his landlord's son, and he had brought them away that morning from Henry-street, and the money was what he had received for part of the things, at a shop at the bottom of the Minories; he took me next morning to Searl's, at the corner of Rosemary-lane; they denied buying any of the things.

(Waistcoats produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-78

286. WILLIAM HOLDAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , four gowns, value 20 s.; a watch, value 30 s.; three sheets, value 10 s.; a blanket, value 5 s.; two towels, value 1 s.; an apron, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Ann Mills , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ANN MILLS . I am a widow, and live in York-street, Westminster . The prisoner, and a woman, who he called his wife, came to lodge with me on the 3d of September 1822; they hired my first floor front room; and remained till the 28th of November in the same year, when they absconded, taking the key with them; they owed me 1 l. for rent; as they did not return at night, I opened their door, and missed things not mentioned in this indictment. I missed them all from my bed-room two days after - it is on the same floor as their room; being in mourning, I had not seen the things for some time, but the black handkerchief I had worn on Sunday; my bed-room was frequently unlocked. On the 22d of December last the prisoner was apprehended. I had nobody in the house but my brother and a man who has lodged with me two years. I found some lace in their drawers which was taken off the sleeves of my brown poplin gown, and which had been taken from my drawers.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was it his lodging or hers - A. Both lodged there - the street-door is open all day - the bed-room is always locked, except when the children leave it open; my street-door is kept open.

HANNAH EMERY . I am the prosecutrix's daughter, On the 28th of November, at eight o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner and his wife go out; he had a basket, and she a bundle. I found the lace in their drawers,

which I had put on my mother's gown myself. I spoke to them as they went out - they did not answer me.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of December, near the King's Bench prison, and told him I had been looking for him along time, for robbing Mrs. Mills; he said he was very sorry for it, and hoped she would not imprison him. I enumerated the articles she had lost - he said if she would not imprison him, he would pay her for them at so much a week, and acknowledged taking them all but the watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long - A. Yes; I knew him as a tradesman. He is the last man I should suspect.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and met a person who informed me that Mrs. Mills would not let us in again.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s., only . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-79

287. RICHARD HENRY JERMAIN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Crossman , in the night of the 15th of January , and stealing a jar, value 6 d., and 8 ozs. of tobacco, value 2 s. , his property.

WILLIAM CROSSMAN . I live in Queen-street, Edgware-road . On 15th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was in my parlour, and heard the top of the tobacco jar rattle in the shop. I ran out, saw two boys running away, and took the prisoner one hundred yards off - I found nothing on him. I picked the jar up as I came back. I had not seen him in the shop. I had closed the door half an hour before.

MARY ANN CROSSMAN . I am the prosecutor's wife, and keep a chandler's shop. I had served tobacco a quarter of an hour before. I found the tobacco a little distance from where the jar was found.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240114-80

288. JOHN MASON was indicted for embezzling two crown pieces, four half-crowns, eleven shillings, twenty-two sixpences, three penny pieces, six half-pence, one 100 l., and one 1 l. Bank note, which he had received on account of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies , to whom he was servant .

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET with MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . In 1813, I was clearing clerk to Messrs. Trueman and Co., and am so now; it is my duty to clear all goods at the East India warehouse, and pay the rent upon them. On the 21st of October, 1813, I cleared some cottons at the East India warehouse - I cleared one hundred bales which came by the Lord Castlereagh, fifty by the David Scott , and one hundred by the Union. I had known the prisoner for years before that. After a certain time there is a rent to be paid for goods before they are delivered. I receive a delivery warrant when the Company are paid, and when we want the goods, we write receipts on the warrants, and change them for others in the Company's possession - they are delivered to the warehouse-keeper. I went to the prisoner, who was clerk at the office in Austin-friars. I have a cheque in my hand for 523 l. 17 s, 1 d.; here is our cheque-book - it tallies with the margin. I had to pay a large sum at the East India House that day for these goods - this cheque was given to me. I took it to Messrs. Lubbock's, and fined by, looking at the warrants, that it was on the 21st of October, 1813. I cannot recollect going to Lubbock's, but I have no doubt of it; for it was my province alone. No other person was entrusted to clear East India cottons. My usual practice was to have a cheque which I received at Lubbock's, and from there went to the warehouse to pay the rent on the goods. I had had other transactions with the prisoner; the course was for him to write on the warrants

"D - d," which means delivered, with his initials - these warrants are so marked, and have his initials. I have seen him write a thousand times. I paid him upon these warrants, 479 l. 13 s. 9 d., with the same money as I had from Lubbocks, for I had no other means of paying it. I had other money to pay in Jewry-street, which I paid also.

Q. What is the practice as to your taking change - A. If the change exceeds 10 s. we generally take it with us; if not, they give us change. I must have paid him 479 l. 13 s. 9 d. for during the whole fifteen years I have been in this situation I never received a bale of cotton without the rent being paid previously.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At this distance of time you do not rely on your memory, but reason from circumstances - A. Yes; but as soon as the prisoner absented himself I was called upon to inform the Company what I had paid, and this sum was among it. I have sent my son to receive cottons, but did not on this occasion, for the receipts are in my writing. I have done business to the amount of thousands with the prisoner; my constant practice was to go to the banker's for the money. I never recollect paying money there which I had not received for a cheque, but it may have happened. I never paid any monies but to the East India Company, except petty cash, and I never change a 100 l. note for petty cash. The prisoner always received the money at the office.

SAMUEL ACKROYD . I am clerk to Messrs. Lubbocks. On the 21st of October, 1813, I find I paid a cheque for 523 l. 17 s. 1 d., drawn by Messrs. Trueman and Co. - (Looks at a cheque) - this is it. I gave a 300 l. note, No. 430, dated the 23d of September; a 100 l. note, No. 15,567, dated the 2d of October; a 50 l. note, No. 16,974, dated the 9th of October; a 30 l. note, No. 772, dated the 5th of October; a 20 l. note, No. 8034, dated the 30th of June; a 20 l. note, No. 7771, dated the 10th of September; a 10 l. note, No. 27,975, and a 1 l. note, No. 5671, all dated 1813, and 17 s. 1 d. in money. The entry is in my own writing.

Cross-examined. Q. To whom you paid it you do not know - A. It was to one of Messrs. Truemans' establishment, or I should have asked the name and entered it. I paid no other cheque of that amount on that day. It is drawn for East India rent.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I paid a 300 l. note, No. 430, dated September 23, 1813; a 100 l. note, No. 15,567, dated the 2d of October; a 50 l. note, No. 16,974, dated the 9th of October; a 30 l. note, No. 772, dated the 5th of October; a 20 l. note, No. 8034, dated the 30th of June; and another 20 l. note, No. 7771,

dated the 10th of September. I find by an entry in the book, that the 300 l. note was paid into the Bank on the 23d of October, 1813.

Cross-examined. Q. Who made the entry - A. I do not know. The 1 l. and 2 l. notes are destroyed every seven years. and the larger ones are kept twenty years.

THOMAS KENT . I am a clerk in the Bank, and was so in 1813. The 300 l. note produced was paid in on the 22d of October, 1813 - I received it myself from a banking-house - I was out-door clerk at that time. I have no recollection of it myself; there is an entry of it in the cash-book of the Bank, which is not here.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there anything written on it by which you know that it was paid in - A. There is a letter on it, which I believe to be written by me, to distinguish the banker I took it from - it does not state the date.

MR. LAW. Q. It has your mark on it - A. Yes; the letter M. I received it from Messrs. Martin, Stone, and Co.

WILLIAM SAYER READ. I was in the service of the East India Company, as chief clerk in the warehouse department. Mr. Stockwell was head warehouse-keeper, and Mr. Saunders, who is dead, was his assistant. Goodhall was also a chief clerk, but had a distinct branch of the business. The prisoner was employed in the office under me: it was his duty to receive money brought for warehouse rent. The warrants are brought by the merchants' clerks; the prisoner's duty was to receive them, search for the counterparts, see if they agreed, and then to receive the rent; it is necessary to calculate, to see if the merchant made it right, and then write a line on each counterpart, and place his initials at the end, as a guarantee to the Commodore to deliver the goods (looking at the warrants) - these all have the prisoner's writing on them, and his initials; it was his business to receive the money, and if he was at leisure, the very next moment, to enter certain items of it into a small book - this is the book he kept (looks at it) - it begins on the 25th of June, 1813, and ends on the 15th of October, 1814 - the entries on the 21st of October, 1813, are in his writing, and contain an account of warehouse rent received on Truemans' cottons; they may have been delivered on a subsequent day; there is a column for the rent due, the number of weeks, the amount, and the initials of the chief clerk; there is 378 l. 2 s. 6 d. entered as Truemans', in three different sums. I have examined the warrants with the entries; here are seven warrants included in the three entries, and three are entirely omitted, amounting to 101 l. 11 s. 3 d.; my initials, as chief clerk, are opposite the sums entered, by which I know that I received these sums from him, and no more, at that or any other time. I never received the 101 l. 11 s. 3 d. - I have looked through his book; there is no entry whatever of these three warrants, or of the rent being paid on them. I pay the money I receive over to Mr. Saunders's bankers, Martin and Co.; and did so on that day, with other sums, for other lots, amounting to 402 l. in all.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner's duty given to him by the Company, or by the chief clerk - A. I cannot say - he accounted to me, and I accounted to Mr. Saunders, the deputy warehouse-keeper for it - he absconded on the 8th of December, 1814. I believe no discovery was made till that time; the warrants had been in a drawer all that time, and in his custody - he paid me only two other sums on that day - they were 7 l. 10 s. and 8 s. 6 d. - he brought me the warrants to compare with the entries.

Q. If he had destroyed the warrants, would there be any trace left to find this out - A. By referring to the delivery book it would be discovered; those entries would be made by other clerks. I retired from the service in 1815, in consequence of ill health.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did you retire voluntarily - A. I was pensioned, on account of ill health (looking at four notes) - here is

"Trueman and Co. 21-10" on every one of these, in the prisoner's hand-writing, and his initials. I believe he lived on Tower-hill.

JOHN STOCKWELL . In 1813, I was chief clerk in the warehouse department; the prisoner's duty was to account to the chief clerk for what he received - he never accounted to me for any money.

WILLIAM SPIRES . I am a Bow-street officer, and a commodore to the East India Company, and was so in 1813, and knew the prisoner very well in the service. I did not see him, from 1814, till the 16th of November last, when, in consequence of information, I went with a warrant to No. 25, Wapping-street, Commercial-road, about halfpast nine o'clock in the morning. I rapped at the door; Mrs. Mason came; I had some conversation with her, and went into the front parlour, then into the back; the prisoner was not there. I went down stairs, and found him washing himself, and said

"Mason, you are my prisoner;" he said,

"On what account?" I said

"The Company's." He said

"Are Mr. Stockwell and Mr. Goodhall in town?" I said they were; he said,

"If that is the case, I shall have all the law they can give me." I had done my endeavours to find him since 1814, but never could hear of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did he live when in the Company's service - A. I cannot tell. I went to where I heard he had been, but could not find him - I went after him a dozen times, but had not looked for him for the last eight years. I got the warrant on the 15th of November. I found a letter in his house - I asked for it before it was given me, having been informed, eight days before, that he had received letters to escape to America. I never said I had seen him about the City-road.

JOHN HAWKINS . I was in the Company's service in 1813. On the 7th of December, 1814, or about that date, the prisoner had been at the office at the usual hours, and left at two o'clock, and about eight o'clock in the evening I went to his house (in consequence of a message), in Postern-row, Tower-hill; he asked me if any inquiry had been made for him at the office - I said I had heard none. He then said he had misapplied some part of the Company's money, or had kept it back and not paid it in - I cannot recollect his exact words, but the substance was that he had made use of, or misapplied some part of the Company's money. I asked if he had the means of making up the deficiency - he said he could borrow it of a friend. I advised him to bring it, and pay it in on the following morning, or put it in his desk, that it might be there when asked for. I left him, understanding that he would attend, and he did, on the following morning; some money transactions took place between him and the chief clerk, and I thought from that that it was settled, as he said no more to me - but on the following day he left the office quite.

WILLIAM SAYER READ (looking at the letter produced). This is the prisoner's writing.

This letter was here read; it was dated Ostend, January 17, 1815, and was addressed by the prisoner to his wife, giving her an account of his going from different parts of the Continent, to avoid persons who he suspected to be in pursuit of him, and stating his intention to go to America.

Prisoner's Defence. For the last eight years the Company have known where to find me; and the officer who took me, told me that he saw me daily, as he lived within two doors of me in the City-road. I was never from home two nights for the last eight years and a half. I had received information that I should be apprehended, and could have avoided it if I chose. My friends had waited on the warehouse-keeper, who seemed satisfied there must be a misunderstanding somewhere.

Several witnesses, who appeared to the prisoner's character, stated that he had lived in Fountain-place, City-road, for the last eight years, and went about publicly and undisguised.

GUILTY. Aged 59.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-81

289. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a pair of reins, value 2 s. , the goods of James Bannister .

JAMES BANNISTER . I am a carman , and live in Castle-court, Oxford-market. On the 8th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was taking a pianoforte into a public-house in Long-lane , my caravan was outside. I came down in ten minutes, and two officers brought the prisoner into the tap-room, with these reins, which are mine.

JOHN CARLILE . I am an officer. I watched the prisoner from Cloth-fair into Long-lane, saw him take these reins off the horse, and secured him.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I was with Carlile; he appeared distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-82

290. HENRY BADMAN and MICHAEL LYONS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a cask value 4 s.; and three gallons of brine, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Dalton .

ROBERT DALTON . I am a shopkeeper , and live at Blackheath. On the 4th of December, I left my cart opposite Mr. Kimber's, in Bishopsgate-street , with a cask of brine in it; I went into the Catharine Wheel , came out in five minutes, and found Badman in custody.

GEORGE MORGAN . On the evening of the 4th of December, I saw the prisoners and another man opposite the Catharine Wheel ; a cart stood there. I saw one of them get up into the cart, take the cask out, and give it to Badman, who ran away. I followed and overtook Badman up Catharine Wheel-alley with it; Lyons was one of the others. I had seen him in their company for two or three minutes before.

Prisoner LYONS. Q. Did I not meet with you on Thursday in Houndsditch, and speak to you - A. Yes, I spoke to him, and told him I had seen him with them, he denied it. I should have taken him, but I was not certain of him.

CHARLES THOROUGHGOOD . I apprehended Lyons.

BADMAN'S Defence. I saw several people go up the alley, and went to see what was the matter; one of them dropped the cask, and the officer took me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BADMAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

LYONS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-83

291. GEORGE WHITAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , two sheets, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Stratford .

JOSEPH STRATFORD . I live at St. Mary's, Cray, and drive an errand cart. On the 19th of December my cart was in Budge-row . I went up a court on business, and on returning missed two sheets, from the cart. I had left a strange boy in care of it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was in Budge-row, and saw the prisoner pass this cart two or three times, a boy stood behind it; the prisoner came on the near side, and was out of my sight for a moment, I then saw him with two sheets before him; Herdsfield stopped him and I took them from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HERDSFIELD . I was with Forrester, and saw the prisoner come from the cart with the bundle, and took him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-84

292, WILLIAM VISITTI was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of Jean Francois Poison Varreville .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240114-85

293. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a box, value 5 s.; twenty-five printed bound books, value 10 s.; eight writing books, value 1 s.; a flute, value 5 s.; and a shoe-horn, value 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Good .

JOSEPH GOOD . I am a carrier , of Stratford. On the 13th of January I received a box of books from Mr. Tyler, and put them into my cart, and missed it when I got to Stratford, three hours after; it could not have fallen out.

JOSEPH TYLER . I delivered a box, containing this property, to Good, directed to Mr. Hazlewood, Rugby-house, on the 13th of January.

DANIEL FORRESTER . On Tuesday, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner, and two more, by the new buildings in London-wall; the prisoner had this box. I said,

"What have you got there?" he said he picked it up. I secured him. The direction was torn off.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it tied up A. Yes; he said he had picked it up in Wormwood-street; he did not mention the Church-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. What I said was the real fact, that I picked it up in the Church-yard, and had I not been stopped should have taken it to the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-86

294. JOHN TITFORD was indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT RIGGLESFORD . The prisoner was in my service,

and entrusted to receive money for me. On the 8th of December, I sent him with a sack of coals to Mr. Dawson, of Threadneedle-street; and on the 31st, I sent him with another sack - he said the first time that Mr. Dawson had four or five sacks every month, and paid for them altogether. He never paid me for them.

JAMES VERE . I am servant to Mr. Dawson. On the 10th of December, the prisoner brought a sack of coals - I gave him 10 s.; he brought another on the 31st, and I paid 5 s. for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost this money, and was afraid to tell him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-87

295. JOHN DONLEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , four packets of pins, value 13 s. 8 d.; six pounds of pins, value 12 s.; twenty-four steel hooks and eyes, value 9 s.; twenty steel watch chains, value 2 l. 10 s. 8 d.; seventy-two cottoning needles, value 10 s.; seventy-two netting mashes, value 4 s.; seven pairs of steel clasps, value 19 s. 3 d.; twenty-one steel snaps, value 11 s. 1 d., and three reticule springs, value 6 s. , the goods of Thomas Emmett , his master .

THOMAS EMMETT . I live on Holborn-hill. The prisoner was in my service, as traveller, to sell goods about . On the 10th of November, this property was delivered to him to sell - he was to return on the following day, but I saw no more of him till the 12th of December, when he was apprehended.

RICHARD BROOK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found part of the goods on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-88

296. THOMAS MONDAY and JOHN LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a piece of linen, containing forty-four yards, value 6 l. 4 s. 8 d. , the goods of John Mabson .

JOHN MABSON . I keep a warehouse in Aldermanbury , and am a woollen merchant . On Tuesday evening last, on looking over a quantity of linen, I missed some at different times; I knew nobody ever entered the warehouse except Monday, who was a porter in the neighbourhood, and had brought things to our warehouse for somebody who kept their furniture there. I missed eight pieces of linen, and concealed myself behind a bale of blankets, and about half-past five o'clock, he came and knocked at the door; the servant let him in, and went up stairs - he unlocked the warehouse door, went to the pile of linen, took a piece, unlocked the street door, and called to Lawrence, gave it to him, and told him to be quick and turn to the left. My friend secured Lawrence, and I knocked Monday down.

ROBERT LINCOLN . I went to watch by desire of Mabson, and saw Monday come into the warehouse. The servant brought the key to him, and left him there; he took a piece of linen, and put it on the table, opened the door, called Lawrence, and said,

"Here, be quick," and put it on his shoulder. I rushed out, and took Lawrence with it, and shut Monday in the warehouse.

ROBERT COOPER . I assisted in securing Lawrence with the property.

MONDAY'S Defence. I was ordered by my mistress to fetch a mattress from the place. I met this young man, and asked him to carry a load, and told him to wait at the door. I unfortunately gave him this instead of the mattress.

LAWRENCE'S Defence. He asked me to carry a load, and told me to wait at the door, and brought this out to me.

MONDAY - GUILTY. Aged 17.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-89

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

297. JAMES WEYMOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Sylvester Blackmore , from his person .

SYLVESTER BLACKMORE . On the 10th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Sutton-street, Soho , and felt a pull at my pocket, put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief. I saw the prisoner running away - called Stop thief! he was pushed down a court, and I secured him. Somebody brought me my handkerchief.

AUGUSTINE SAYER. I was crossing Sutton-street, and saw the prisoner following the prosecutor, and just as he turned the corner, the prisoner thrust his hand towards his pocket, took a handkerchief out, and ran down Crown-street. I rose a cry of Stop thief! pursued him down the court, and saw the handkerchief on the ground.

WALTER HILDER . I am a clerk. I was crossing the square, and saw the prisoner catch at the prosecutor's pocket, and take the handkerchief out. I joined in the pursuit, and saw him secured.

JOHN HARDMAN . I received the prisoner in charge. I have known him some time - he is a watch spring maker, and behaved well.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry, ran with the rest, and the gentleman said I took it. I am innocent.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-90

298. CAROLINE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , two sheets, value 8 s.; a rug, value 18 d.; two blankets, value 3 s.; a bolster, value 1 s.; a bed, value 5 s.; a fender, value 2 s., and a set of fire-irons, value 2 s., the goods of John Cox , in a lodging-room .

SUSAN COX . I am the wife of John Cox - we live in Chapel-street, Westminster. On the 6th of September, the prisoner took a furnished room of us, and was to pay twice a week. I went for my rent on the 9th, and found the door padlocked - I had it opened, and found the room stripped of everything but the bedstead; the articles stated in the indictment were gone. I found her in the Infirmary fourteen days after, and part of one of my sheets on her back.

ELIZA WAUGH . In September last I bought a bed and bolster of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240114-91

299. WILLIAM COX and JOHN CARR were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , thirty yards of flannel , the goods of John Martin .

CARR pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

EDWARD BOUSFIELD . I am shopman to George Martin , carpet-maker, Oxford-street. On the 13th of December, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was at the bottom of the shop. Bidgood brought Carr in with a roll of flannel, which was safe a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I live in Castle-street, Oxford-market. I was in Oxford-road , and saw the prisoners at Mr. Martin's door - Carr was taking up the flannel; I went farther on, and Carr came towards me with it. Cox had nudged him as I passed, when he tried to take it up. I took Carr with it - Cox ran away. I saw him standing at the door with Carr.

JOHN MILLER . I was in Oxford-street. Bidgood laid hold of Carr - I saw Cox running across the street; I pursued - two men stopped him, and I took him from them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

COX'S Defence. I was merely walking along.

COX - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-92

300. ELIZABETH DEVEROUX was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a plane, value 10 s. , the goods of John Mason .

JOHN MASON . I am a carpenter , in the employ of Mr. Cook. The prisoner used to come to our shop for shavings. I did not see her there on the 8th of December, but missed a plane from under the bench.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES GURNEY . I am servant to Mr. Morritt, pawnbroker. On the 8th of December the prisoner pawned this plane. She bears a good character.

Prisoner. I was very much distressed, or I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240114-93

301. JOHN RAPLEY and JAMES SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , a set of bed furniture, value 2 l. , the goods of James Gasson .

JAMES GASSON . I am a broker , and live at Tottenham . On the 25th of December, I was alarmed, and found my warehouse broken open and this bed furniture gone - it was safe the day before.

WILLIAM KINGHAM . I am servant to Mr. Hall, of Tottenham. On the evening of Christmas-day I saw Rapley go into Mr. Gasson's premises and fetch out a bundle - I saw fringe hanging out; Sullivan was with him - I saw them three minutes before walking backwards and forwards by the premises, and he staid there while Rapley went in, and followed him down Lordship-lane, when he came out. I sent two men after them.

WILLIAM GOODALE . Kingham gave me information - I followed and took the prisoners about three hundred yards from Gasson's - Sullivan had the bundle in his arms. I said,

"Where did you get that?" He said,

"That man (pointing to Rapley) gave it me to carry, and is to give me 6 d."

HENRY HACKWELL . I was with Goodale, and took the prisoners. Rapley said he knew nothing of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RAPLEY'S Defence. The bundle laid against the door, when I took it up.

RAPLEY - GUILTY . Aged 35.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-94

302. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , thirteen shirts, value 3 l.; twelve neck-handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; three nightcaps, value 1 s.; five pairs of drawers, value 5 s.; three pairs of stockings, value 3 s.; and five pairs of socks, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Sedgfield .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Benjamin Groberty .

DAVID JOHNSON . I am a horse patrol of Bow-street. On the 17th of December, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner by Hounslow-heath, with a large bundle, and asked what he had got? he said it was his own. I said,

"What is it?" He said, three or four old shirts, a pair of shoes, and breeches. I looked at it and said there were no shoes; he said he had sold them for 2 s. 6 d. I said,

"Here is no breeches, but a pair of drawers stuffed full of something." I let him go on a few yards - he then ran away - I followed and secured him, and found the articles stated in the indictment, in the bundle. He said he bought them of a man in Petticoat-lane. I asked if the shirts were marked; he said No. I found that they were. He then said his brother gave him five of them, and the rest were his brother's, whose name was William Williams . The initials were S. S. He then said they belonged to S. Sommers, his brother-in-law.

SAMUEL SEDGFIELD . This property is mine. I packed it up in a box, and sent it to the Swan inn, Holborn-bridge, on the 16th, to go to Devizes.

EDWARD PECKHAM . I am clerk at the Swan inn. I sent this box by the waggon on the 16th, in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-95

303. WILLIAM HEMSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Davis .

WALTER COLLETT . I am a warehouseman, and live in Shoreditch. On the 8th of December, about a quarter to four o'clock in the evening, I saw Mr. Davis's gig at a neighbour's door. The prisoner was lurking about - I saw him get in and take the coat out of the gig, throw it over his shoulder, and go off with it. I stopped him.

ROBERT DAVIS . My chaise stood in Shoreditch , and this great coat; the prisoner was taken with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM COVENTRY . I am an officer. I received the

prisoner in charge, and on fetching him from the watch-house, he slipped out of his handcuffs, and ran off. I followed and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to mind till the gentleman came out.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-96

304. EDWARD FENTUM , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , five shillings and four sixpences , the monies of William Meaton .

MARY MEATON . I am wife of William Meaton . We live in Round-court, Strand . On the 9th of January I was in the parlour, heard somebody in the shop, and saw the prisoner taking this money out of the till - he shut the till. I went in and took five shillings and two sixpences from his hands in the shop - he begged for mercy, and said he would never do it again.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you look into the till - A. No; I cannot say what was in his hand before I saw him taking it.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am an officer. I received him in charge. The prosecutrix said he had taken 7 s. out of the till. He begged for mercy, and said a boy told him to do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-97

305. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , a coat, value 6 l.; and a pair of trowsers, value 2 l. , the goods of Henry Chitty , his master .

THOMAS ELMS . I am a tailor, and live in Duke-street, St. James's. On Saturday, the 13th of December, the prisoner came to my house for some clothes belonging to Mr. Chitty about five o'clock in the evening; I saw my servant deliver him a coat and pair of trowsers.

MR. HENRY CHITTY . I am a conveyancer . The prisoner and his brother are my clerk s. I live at chambers in Garden-court, Temple. I sent him for these clothes - he did not return; I have not seen them. On Tuesday his mother came to me; she had locked him up in her own house. I gave him in charge. I have a letter which he wrote to me in prison.

GEORGE JEFFRIES . I am clerk to the prosecutor. The prisoner was six weeks in the office. On the 13th he was sent for the clothes, and did not return to chambers; I was there all the evening. I believe this letter to be his writing.

The letter was here read; it merely stated that he had lost the clothes, and begged the prosecutor to be lenient.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the Haymarket; two men came up and threw me down - one hit me with a stick, and took this property from me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-98

306. WILLIAM MITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , an axe, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Lawrence .

JOHN LAWRENCE . I am a farmer , and live at Pinnock . On the 15th of December I lost an axe from my premises. I got a search-warrant, and found it on the prisoner's premises - it was safe the night before.

HENRY BALDWIN . I am a constable. I went with the warrant, and found the axe concealed in a hole under the stairs. He said that one morning as he opened his door it fell into his passage - he has a lodger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lodger worked for the prosecutor - I cannot say whether he had brought it home.

PROSECUTOR. His lodger worked in my orchard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-99

307. EDWARD DIXEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of John Millward .

The prosecutor was not present .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240114-100

308. ELEANOR FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , nine pairs of stockings, value 13 s. , the goods of Thomas Nixey .

JAMES NIXEY . I am brother to Thomas Nixey , hosier , Oxford-street . On the 26th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop with another girl, and asked to see some black stockings. They went out together without buying anything, and I saw the prisoner putting these stockings under her apron. I followed and took her forty yards off with them; she said she had not gone far with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES GASKEN . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge; she said it was her first offence, and seemed quite drunk.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-101

309. MARY HARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , seven handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; eleven shirts, value 2 l. 10 s.; three sheets, value 16 s.; five shifts, value 10 s.; nine bedgowns, value 18 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 4 s.; three pillowcases, value 6 s.; three frocks, value 1 s.; three tablecloths, value 4 l.; three habit-shirts, value 6 s.; a cap, value 1 s.; and seven skirts, value 14 s. , the goods of Edward Hardy Adams ; and THOMAS BUDD , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ANN PLATT . I am servant to Mr. Edward Hardy Adams , who lives in Cloudsley-terrace, Islington . Mrs. Knowles, of Somer's-town washes for the family. On the 15th of December, about half-past two o'clock, the prisoner Harnett called, and said she came for the linen, if it was ready. I asked where she came from, as she was a stranger to me; she said from Mrs. Knowles. I said,

"I had just come from Mrs. Knowles's," she said Mr. Knowles had fallen down and broken his leg. I said,

"I saw him half an hour ago at home" - she said he was gone to Middlesex Hospital; my sister came up and said she knew her, and I gave her the articles stated in the indictment.

HANNAH KNOWLES . I wash for Mr. Adams. The prisoner was eleven weeks in my employ, and had left me thirteen months before December last. I did not send her for this linen - she never brought it to me.

GEORGE ODDY . I am an officer. On the 15th of December, I went with Mr. Knowles, and apprehended Harnett about nine o'clock that night - she denied the charge, but next morning told me she had pawned the things, and burnt the duplicates.

LEWIS HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and have two shirts, and a bedgown, pawned on the 15th of December, by a woman.

THOMAS PACEY BIRTS . I am a pawnbroker, and have eight shirts, pawned by Harnett, on the 15th of December.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a constable. I apprehended Budd, and found a shirt on his back - he said his mother bought it, and gave 15 d. a yard for the cloth.

JOHN MAPLESON . I assisted in apprehending Budd, in Hungerford-market. He said as he was going to Bow-street, that the female prisoner had collared the linen found in the possession of Bulley, and given it to him. Collar is the slang word for stealing. He attempted to escape, but Rogers came to my assistance.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I am a watchman of Hungerford-market. On the 15th of December, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was told a bundle had been left under Bulley's rails - I fetched it; it contained a quantity of linen; some claimed by Mr. Adams, and some by Mrs. Hanson.

SARAH BULLEY . I live in Hungerford-market. I do not know the prisoners. I think I know the man - to the best of my knowledge, Budd is the man who laid this bundle under my railings, at half-past nine o'clock, and at half-past ten I called the watchman. I think I have seen Budd several times about the market - he came next day to demand it, and was secured.

Prisoner BUDD. Q. Did you not swear to another lad at the office - A. Yes, but I was mistaken. I really believe the prisoner to be the man - but am sure he is the man who came for it.

RICHARD CARPENTER . I have two table-cloths, pawned by Harnett. I stopped them till she brought a note from her mistress, to say she sent her.

WILLIAM COOMBS . I am a pawnbroker, and have five sheets pawned by Arnett.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BUDD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-102

310. MARY HARNETT was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , a shirt, value 6 s.; a neck handkerchief, value 1 s.; two sheets, value 8 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s.; a habit shirt, value 2 s.; a tucker, value 6 d.; two shifts, value 10 s.; an apron, value 1 s.; and two caps, value 1 s., the goods of William Hanson ; and three shirts, value 18 s. , the goods of James Horn Hanson and THOMAS BUDD was again indicted for feloniously; receiving a shirt, part of the said goods, knowing it to be stolen .

MISS FRANCES HANSON . I am sister to James Horne Hanson , who lives in Bentinck-street, Manchester-square . On the 15th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Harnett called, saying she came from Knowles for the linen. I gave her the articles stated in the indictment, and found them at Bow-street on the Thursday after.

WILLIAM WOTTEN . I am an officer. I went to Budd's lodgings, in Church-lane, and found a quantity of this linen.

JOHN MAPLESON . I apprehended Budd on the 16th, and found a shirt on his back.

MISS HANSON. This is my brother's shirt - the rest of the property is his.

BUDD'S Defence. I gave that woman 5 s. to buy me a shirt - she brought me this.

HARNETT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

BUDD - GUILTY . Aged.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-103

311. PETER NUGENT and EVAN THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , two books, value 5 s.; a hearth rug, value 6 d.; a cork screw, value 1 s.; three knives, value 3 d.; and five forks, value 3 d. , the goods of William Riddle .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Fletcher , Samuel Burton , John Jossee , William Reid , and Thomas Reid .

THOMAS ALMOND . I am inspector of the watch. On the 27th of December, at a quarter to three o'clock in the morning, I went to the Chapel, in White's-row, Spitalfields , unlocked the iron gate in front of the chapel, and found the inner gate open - we went to the chapel door, and found that open. Barrs, who was with me, said there was a light in the chapel. I called out,

"Who is there?" The prisoner Thomas rushed by him and came-by me. I pursued and caught him in the chapel yard, took him to the watch-house, and on returning, in a minute or two, met Nugent, and took him, as he appeared to be coming in a hurry. I found his hands very muddy. I took him to the chapel, where Barrs was, and in his hat found two matches. Barrs said he was the man who had got over the chapel wall; there was a great deal of mud under the wall.

JOHN BARRS . I was with Almond - we have the keys of the chapel. I saw a light in the Vestry, went in, and found a piece of candle in a person's hand - it was puffed out in a moment. Thomas rushed out and was secured. I ran and saw Nugent getting over the wall, and cut at him with my cutlass; called Stop thief! and Almond brought him back. The Vestry-room shutter was broken to pieces, and by it I found a crow-bar, tinder-box, flint, steel, and matches, and an iron wedge under the door. - Some knives and forks had been moved, and laid by the door; a piece of carpet was taken up and thrown into the yard, several books were moved, and a strange bag was left there. Nugent was cut in four or five places by the broken glass on the wall.

ELIZA RIDDLE . I have the care of the Vestry, and left the pew-opener there between three and four o'clock on the 26th; the books produced were on the top shelf of the cupboard, they were found on the bottom shelf, and were under my care; my husband's name is William; the knives and forks are his, and had been moved.

ANN RHYMES . I was the last person at the chapel, and left all safe. I locked the door.

NUGENT'S Defence. I was going home, and ran, as it was late. This man took me.

THOMAS'S Defence. I was nearly out of the gate when this man took me, standing there hearing a row.

NUGENT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-104

311. GEORGE HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a shawl, value 12 s. , the goods of John Jay .

ROBERT COLLINS . On the 23rd of December, about a quarter to six o'clock in the evening, I was in Mr. Jay's shop, talking to the shopman; the prisoner was buying a handkerchief - I saw him put a shawl into his basket, and told the shopman, who immediately collared him - he begged forgiveness.

WILLIAM PASSMORE . I am shopman to John Jay . I was talking to Collins. The shawl was found in the prisoner's basket. He fell on his knees, imploring pardon, and was extremely sorry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-105

312. THOMAS WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a fowl, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Moss .

WILLIAM BASTING. I am a patrol of Lamb's Conduit-street. On the 24th of December, about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two more; one a grown up man, and watched them; they stood in conversation at the corner of Great Ormond-street, and in six or eight minutes, the prisoner went down to Moss's shop - the others followed; he snatched a fowl off the shelf, put it under his arm, and ran over the way - he threw it down, and ran off. I secured him, and picked it up. He bears a very good character.

ROBERT SIMPSON . I am servant to Henry Moss . The prisoner was brought in with the fowl.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-106

313. JAMES BELLAMY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Tomlins , from his person .

JOHN TOMLINS . On the 20th of December, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Oxford-street , and felt something at my pocket, and presently felt it again, put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief, I looked round - the prisoner saw me, and ran away. I followed, and took him, and found it in his breeches - he fell on his knees, and said he hoped I would forgive him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the pavement, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-107

314. MARY RIXWORTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Andrews , from his person .

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a journeyman baker . On the 8th of December, at one o'clock in the morning, I was in Whitechapel, going home, having been with some friends - I was quite sober, and did not see the prisoner till she ran up and snatched my handkerchief off my neck - it was loosely tied round; she ran away. I called the watchman; who stopped her in my sight.

JOHN COARDY . I am a watchman. I heard a call of Watch three times, ran, and stopped the prisoner turning the corner, with this handkerchief in her hand. I had one end of it in my hand at the watch-house; she snatched it from me, and dropped it. The prosecutor was sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-108

315. JOHN BOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , three silver spoons, value 10 s., and a tablecloth, value 3 s. , the goods of John Southee .

JOHN SOUTHEE . I keep the Commercial coffee-house , at Poplar ; the prisoner frequented my house in July and August, during which time I missed several spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You gave an opening dinner, did not you - A. Yes, on the 12th of August. I lost spoons before and after that. One Parkins acted as occasional waiter on the 12th - he was not there afterwards.

THOMAS SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Latter, pawnbroker, Commercial-road. I have two tea-spoons, pawned by a female, in the name of Mary Ann Smith , on the 16th of December.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am servant to Mr. Hollis, of Poplar. I have a tea-spoon, pawned on the 23d of August, in the name of Reynolds.

LOWTHER JACKSON . I am shopman to Mr. Dickens, of Limehouse. I have a table-cloth, pawned on the 18th of August, in the name of Mary Ann Parker , by the witness Parkins.

MARY ANN PARKINS . I live with my father, in Juniper-row; the prisoner lodged with us, and sent me to pawn these things; he told me to pawn them in the name of Smith. I pawned one spoon for him in the name of Reynolds. The pawnbroker entered the table-cloth in my name, as he knew me by pawning for my mother. I gave the prisoner the money and duplicates. He gave them to me at different times.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to take the name of Reynolds - A. He told me to pawn in that name. I never applied to him for money for my father; my father has borrowed money of him. I never knew them quarrel. My father goes out as a waiter occasionally; he did not know of my pawning these things. I am sixteen years old.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DOWNE . I took the prisoner into custody, and told him it was for felony; he said he hoped it was for nothing worse.

Prisoner's Defence. When I first went to lodge with Parkins, he borrowed money of me. A friend told me he was injuring me, and I withdrew myself - and this is a conspiracy against me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-109

316. CHARLES HOLLEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , a coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Francis Yarron .

SUSANNAH YARRON . I am wife of Francis Yarron , a salesman ; we live at Chelsea-market . On the 5th of January, about twenty minutes to five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner standing at the door, folding this coat up, which had been laying there all day; he put it under his arm, and ran down to the bottom of the market; I followed him to the corner of Sloane-street, calling Stop thief! I saw him take it from under his arm there, but

do not know what he did with it; he then stopped, and Treadaway caught him. He was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had he not turned any corners - A. Yes; but I was not a yard behind him. The coat was found inside a garden gate, which he ran by. I could see his head all the way, but not the whole of his person. I said at first that I saw him give it to somebody, but was not quite sure of that. I never lost sight of him.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. I have the coat, which was found in the garden of a house in Sloane-street. I took the prisoner into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the witness say he gave it to another lad - A. I hardly know, for there was a great bustle. She said she never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence, (written.) I was running down Great George-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and kept running; a man passed me, and I was stopped till the girl came up, and said she saw me give it to another person; and after it was found, she said she saw me throw it into the garden.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-110

317. ANN RYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , eleven yards of cotton, value 13 s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , privately in their shop .

JOHN WHARTON SOPPET . I am shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , who live in Old Compton-street . On the 27th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop alone. I saw a piece of print on the counter, and when she went out I missed it; pursued her, and found it under her shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy, having three fatherless children.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not privately . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-111

318. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a coat, value 40 s. , the goods of William Lloyd .

ROBERT BURTON LLOYD . I am the son of William Lloyd , and live at Southgate. On the 29th of December, I drove his gig to John-street, Pentonville , and left a coat on it, in care of a hostler - returned and it was gone - it is my father's.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plaisterer. On the 29th of December, I saw the prisoner and another loitering about the livery stable in John-street; I saw the prisoner cross the road, go through a yard, and in a moment he came out with this coat under his arm. Bradbury followed them. I ran round and met the prisoner with it. The other man had another coat.

ROBERT BRADBURY . I was with Reardon, and saw the prisoner at the end of John-street, and scured him with this coat under his arm. He called out to the other to assist him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it at the stable door, picked it up, and walked away with it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-112

319. SAMUEL DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , three pewter pots, value 2 s. , the goods of John M'Pherson .

MARY FOWLER . M'Pherson keeps the Prince Regent, public-house , Globe-lane . On the 8th of December, I saw the prisoner take one of his pots from my mother's door, put it under his jacket, and walk away. I told Caywood, who took him.

JOSEPH CAYWOOD . I went out and followed the prisoner; he threw the pots down, and was taken in my presence.

JOSEPH MASKALL . I picked up three pots, which I saw him throw down.

JOHN M'PHERSON. They are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-113

320. MICHAEL DENSON and THOMAS KIRKHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 50 lbs. of rope, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Kennedy .

JAMES BUCKEY . I am a Surveyor of the Thames Police. On the 24th of December, I was on duty, with another officer, near the West India Dock-bridge, and about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners coming over the bridge in company; I stopped Denson, and found 28 lbs. of rope round his body, under his smock-frock. He said he picked it up on the bank of the City Canal, by the Isle of Dogs, in company with Kirkham. In a private pocket, down the seam in the leg of his trowsers. I found a knife, which had been cutting tarred rope. I asked why he concealed the rope - he said he thought it the best way of carrying it. I went and found the brig Pilgrim adrift, in the City Canal, with her head-rope cut at the water's edge; I cut a piece off the end - it corresponded with what he had.

TROMAS CLARK. I was with Buckey, whose account is correct. I examined Kirkham, and found 22 lbs. of rope round his body, under his smock frock - it tallies with what the other prisoner had, and in his jacket pocket, I found a knife.

ROBERT KENNEDY . I am master of the Pilgrim. I fastened her all right, and found her adrift in the morning. This rope is mine, I have no doubt.

DENSON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

KIRKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-114

321. DAVID HOPE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a stock, value 11 s., and six stock bits, value 4 s. , the goods of James Whiting .

JAMES WHITING . I am a carpenter . On the 10th of December, I left a stock and six bits at a building, in Wardour-street - they were stolen from there on the 21st. I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH TILL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Compton-street, Soho. I have a stock and six bits, pawned on the 11th of December, in the name of Davis - I do not know who by.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. On the 20th of December, I apprehended the prisoner and three others. on another charge, and found some duplicates on him. I went to his lodging, by his direction, and found more duplicates, among which, was one for these tools - he said they were his uncle's, and then that he bought the duplicate

of a man in the street, and afterwards that he bought it at the Blue Posts, public-house, Berwick-street.

JOSEPH TILL . It is the duplicate I gave the person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man at the public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-115

322. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 42 lbs. of rosin, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Bridge .

JOHN AVERY . I am an officer. On the 23d of December, I met the prisoner in Church-lane, Whitechapel, about half-past five o'clock, with this rosin, and asked what it was; he said, bees-wax, and that he was taking it into the City. I said he was going the wrong way, and secured him; he said he brought it from just by.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I was employed to carry it - A. He said so afterwards.

SAMUEL BRIDGE . I am a chemist, and live in Back-church-lane, St. George's East. About five o'clock in the evening, this rosin was on a shelf in my shop, near the door - it is mine.

ANTHONY THOMPSON. I was with Avery. He told me he brought it from Church-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carrying it to earn a shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-116

323. DENNIS MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a handkerchief, value 1 s., and a shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of John Holding .

JOHN HOLDING . I am a labourer , and live at Bromley. I was at the East India-dock tap , and put this shirt and handkerchief on the settle while I fetched a pot of beer, and left the prisoner there. On returning it was gone - he was still there; he went away in two minutes. I have not found them. I went out and stopped him a hundred yards off - he had not got them.

JAMES BARNETT . I am a labourer, and was at this house. While the prosecutor was gone, the prisoner and three more came in - the prisoner sat down by the bundle, and when he went out, I saw him take it, and told the prosecutor, who stopped him. I am certain that he took it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-117

324. MARY M'KENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , half a yard of cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of John Smith .

ELIZA SMITH . I am the wife of John Smith - we live in Eggleston-lane . On the 17th of December, the prisoner slept in my room - I had rather more than three yards of cloth, tied in a handkerchief. I have not measured it since, but I took it to Wells to pawn, and they measured it, and I saw that half a yard was cut off.

SOLOMON HART . I keep a clothes shop. I bought a bit of cloth of the prisoner.

PROSECUTRIX. I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-118

325. THOMAS PRATCHET was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 2 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Francis Cooke and George Wilson .

ELIZABETH COOKE . I am the wife of Francis Cooke , who is a slopseller , in partnership with George Wilson . On the 7th of December, I went up stairs for a few minutes, came down, and found the prisoner behind the counter - he was a stranger, I took hold of him, and asked what he was doing there - he said nothing. I opened his smock frock, and took a pair of trowsers out. He threw a silk handkerchief down, and begged for mercy. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-119

326. THOMAS PROSSER and BENJAMIN EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 26 s. , the goods of William Gilbert .

JOHN HUNTER . On the 27th of September, I was shopman to William Gilbert , a tailor , who lives in Shoreditch . About dusk the prisoner Prosser came to the door, and felt these trowsers, which hung at the door - Edwards was behind him, and in his company. I went towards them, and saw him let go of them, and walk away. I then watched, and saw them go two doors off, they looked round to see if any one was watching. I then saw them plainly, so as to know them again. I returned to the end of the shop - a gentleman came in, and asked if I had lost anything. I then missed the trowsers, and went out, but could not find them; but on returning, found Austin in the shop. They were both taken that night. I am certain of their persons.

Prisoner PROSSER. Q. Did you not say at Worship-street that I asked the price of them - A. No; he went off before I could speak to him.

THOMAS AUSTIN . On the 27th of December, I was passing through Shoreditch, and saw two persons looking through Gilbert's window. I watched them, passed on, and in a few minutes the prisoners ran by me, Prosser having the trowsers in his hand. I followed them to Webb-square, where a party of eight or ten joined them. I then turned back, and met Mance and Armstrong, and went with them round a different way; we met Prosser with the trowsers, and secured him. I knew Edwards before, and gave information - he was taken that evening.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer, and was with Armstrong. Austin gave us information - we went round another way, and in Wheeler-street, saw Prosser coming down, and laid hold of him, and took the trowsers from his arm, tied in a black silk handkerchief, which he said he had taken off his neck, and that he found them in a passage.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I apprehended Edwards on the same evening, at the White Hart, public-house, Wheeler-street - he said he had not been in Shoreditch since morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PROSSER'S Defence. I saw three young chaps running; they threw something into the passage - I found it was these trowsers. I never saw Edwards.

PROSSER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-120

327. JAMES ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of William Bradley .

THOMAS HODGES . I am servant to William Bradley , linen-draper , Holborn-hill . On the 22d of December, I hung a shawl inside the shop door, and about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come and snatch it down. I followed him, gave an alarm, and the watchman stopped him, without my losing sight of him. He dropped it on the curb.

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner cross in a direction from the prosecutor's shop, and stopped him. I did not see him drop the shawl.

JOSEPH BATTEN . I heard the alarm, pursued the prisoner, and picked the shawl up opposite the door. I did not see him drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-121

328. HENRY SCARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 4 lbs. of mutton, value 2 s. , the goods of John Robinson .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a butcher , and live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's . On the 6th of January, about twelve o'clock, I put two loins of mutton on the stall board; somebody ran in, and said three boys had taken some - I ran out, and kept my eye on three boys, of whom the prisoner was the foremost; he looked back, and saw me, and on my getting near him, I saw him drop the mutton. I called Stop thief! Taylor ran out, and stopped him.

JAMES TAYLOR . I heard a cry, ran out, and saw Robinson's man stop the prisoner. I collared him; Robinson came up with the mutton, and said he could swear to him.

Prisoner's Defence. When the man took me, he said,

"Oh! this is not the lad," and let me go, but took hold of me again.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-122

329. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 4 lbs. of beef, value 18 d. , the goods of John Laws , the elder .

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. On the 10th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening. I stopped the prisoner in New-road, St. George's in the East, with this beef concealed under his coat. He said he picked it up in the road. I said, if so, it must have been dirty, for it was a very dirty night. He said he had wiped it with his handkerchief - there was no appearance of dirt whatever. I said he had taken it from some butcher. He laid down - I could not get him on for some time, but at last he took me to Laws, and said he took it from under that window.

JOHN LAWS , JUN. I am a butcher, and live in High-street, Shadwell . Fogg brought the prisoner in with 4 lbs. of beef. I had not missed it till then, and produced a piece I cut it from.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240114-123

330. JOHN WEBB and THOMAS GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , twenty-six yards of cotton, value 20 s. , the goods of Samuel William Cousins .

HEZEKIAH D. KIRBY. I am servant to Samuel William Cousins , linen-draper , Norton-falgate . On the 30th of December a lady came into the shop, and informed me that some cotton had been loosened. I went to Green's shop opposite, to watch, and saw the prisoners pass the shop in company about ten times, loitering about, and at last I saw Webb take a cotton print off the iron at the door. Green stood just by him - both ran off. I ran and took them both fifty yards off, without losing sight of them, and saw Webb drop it.

JOHN BEARDMORE . I live at Mr. Green's, opposite Mr. Cousins. I was watching with Kirby, and saw the prisoners pass several times. Webb took the print from the door - I followed, and picked it up where he dropped it, and seized Green.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GREEN'S Defence. The gentleman said at the office that it was inside the shop - it was outside. I think he put it there on purpose for people to take.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 22.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240114-124

331. FREDERICK TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the goods of George Orme , from his person .

GEORGE ORME . I live at the Unicorn distillery. On 8th of December I was in Cow-lane , between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, and felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket. I turned round and saw the prisoner with it in his hand - he ran off; I followed and took him. He had then dropped it, and another person gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman turned round and said I had his handkerchief. I ran, fearing to be taken, as I had been a long time out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-125

332. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , twenty-eight plates, value 2 l. 4 s.; and nine basins, value 3 s. , the goods of David Lassam .

MARY ANN LASSAM . I am the wife of David Lassam; we deal in earthenware . On Saturday the 21st of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, these plates and basins were safe, at our stall in Fleet-market ; and in about 20 minutes, as my husband was serving a customer, a little girl said somebody had taken them, we missed twenty-eight plates, and nine basins; and at a quarter to one o'clock that morning, I went with the watchman to the prisoners apartment, and said I wanted the property which had been gone from my stall not three quarters of an hour ago; he said, he had nothing of mine. I said,

"It won't do Tyler, this is not the first time you have robbed me." I went to the cupboard, and found two basins; I then said, I wanted twenty-eight large plates; he said,

"I do not live here; I live over the way." I looked round and saw the plates under the bed - fourteen, and one broken.

I gave him in charge; he locked the room up when he came out. I said,

"You said it was not your apartment;" he said he must lock it up.

DAVID LASSAM . The prisoner was frequently walking up and down by my stall on this evening; I suspected him, and while I was serving a customer, I was told I was robbed, and missed these plates, which stood in a pile, and four basins.

WILLIAM THOMAS HUGHES. I am a watchman. I have fourteen plates and two basins, which I found in the prisoner's room, in Frying-pan-alley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a public-house, rather fresh, and came out with some coal heavers about half-past eleven o'clock, they had nine plates, and two basins, and bought six more; they got tipsy, and gave them to me to take home.

WILLIAM THOMAS HUGHES . He said he had bought some of them months ago.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-126

333. WILLIAM SPOWER was indicted for a fraud .

RICHARD HENRY GRAY . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Basing-lane. I know Mr. Mollard, of Greenwich. On the 10th or 11th of December the prisoner came to me and said,

"Mr. Mollard wants twelve dozen of old crusted port, have you any?" I said not, he represented himself as Mollard's confidential servant, and said he was going to Wilson and Cutler's, Mincing-lane; to buy two dozen of claret. He returned, and said he had bought it. I had known him some years, and asked what he had paid for it; he said, 5 l. 10 s. a dozen. I asked him to taste my port, sherry, and Madeira; he said it was good wine, and asked the price. I think I said, 44 s. for sherry, 50 s. for Madeirs, and 36 s. for port; he said the price would astonish Mr. Mollard if he could taste it, and he should like him to taste it. I gave him a bottle of each, and told him to mind that Mr. Mollard must pay for it; he came again in a day or two, and said Mr. Mollard had tasted the port, and was quite astonished at the price, and would come on the following Tuesday and look out a pipe, and wished to have a dozen of Sherry and Madeira as a sample ready by ten o'clock next morning, as the cart was coming to town and must not be detained; and to leave the hamper out for him, if I was not in the way. I was out about that time, and locked it up. When I returned I understood he had been there, and about half-past four o'clock I saw him at my cellar door; he said he had called in the morning. I said I was very sorry, for I had sent it to Mr. Mollard by the carrier; he said he was sorry for it. I invited him into the cellar; he had a glass of wine, and I gave him the samples for Mr. Mollard to taste, as he said the carrier would not be down till ten o'clock at night, and he wished Mr. Mollard to taste it at dinner; he packed it up, and took it away.

Prisoner. Q. I told you I was out of employment - A. No, he said he was Mr. Mollard's confidential servant, and when he went away with the wine, he said I should see him next morning, with Mr. Mollard's draft for the amount.

Q. You said you would allow me a commission for any wine I could sell - A. I might have said so; he said Mr. Tritton, the banker would come and taste a pipe of port; and a Mr. Lewis, whom he said frequented Mollard's.

JOHN MOLLARD . I keep the Crown and Sceptre, public-house at Greenwich. The prisoner left my service two months before the 11th of September. I did not send him to Mr. Gray for any wine, and never told him I wished to taste any; two dozen came to my house. I did not expect it.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Middlesex Cases, first Jury,

Reference Number: t18240114-127

334. MARY VILLERS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , two blankets, value 4 s., the goods of Mary May , in a lodging-room .

MARY MAY . I live in Dog-row, Bethnal-green . On the 17th of December, the prisoner hired a furnished apartment of me, on the second floor, at 4 s. a-week. A man who she called her husband was with her. She said she came from the country; they stopped in the room about three hours, then both came down and went out; my niece ran up to the room. I ran out and overtook the prisoner - she had a large cloak on which covered her. I followed her some distance, and saw her drop the blankets. I picked them up and gave her in charge; I went into the room and missed the blankets, which had been given her to make the bed herself. There is no mark on them, but I have no doubt of their being mine.

M. A. SPENCER. I am Mrs. May's niece. I went into the room, and missed the blankets, and ran out, the prisoner appeared bulky when she went out.

GEORGE SAVERY . I am an officer. I took her in charge with the blankets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-128

335. CHARLES BURSTOW was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a watch, value 2 l. , the goods of James Irvine ; and WILLIAM SHIELDS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES IRVINE. I belong to the 12th regiment of Foot Guards . On the 17th of December, I went into the Duke of York, public-house, at Chelsea ; the prisoner, Burstow, was in the tap-room, and brought me a pot of beer; he appeared to be the pot-boy , and in paying him for it I pulled my watch out and gave it him to hold while I got my money out - he returned it to me, and in a few minutes he came and demanded a penny more; I pulled my watch out, he took it out of my hand, and ran away with it. Handley went after him; I found him in custody next day. I was not sober. He took my purse as well.

Prisoner BURSTOW. Q. Did not you pull me down, and ask me to sing a song - A. No; he proposed to sing one, but the people would not let him.

JAMES HANDLEY . I was in the Duke of York; Burstow came in; I thought he was waiter at the house - I was billetted there; he wanted to sing a song for some beer - I took him by the arm and handed him out; I went out, and the prosecutor called for a pot of beer; the prosecutor came out into the street after him; I followed him three-quarters of a mile, and laid hold of him - he pulled me down and got off, and next day his master brought him back, and gave him in charge. I saw a young woman hand him a glove - I took hold of it, and found the duplicate of the watch in it.

JOHN M'FARLEY. I was billetted at this house. Irvine came in about ten o'clock, and ordered some beer, and gave Burstow the watch to hold while he pulled some halfpence out; he returned it, and came back to him, saying,

"Master, there is a penny short of the price of a pot." Irvine pulled his watch out, and put it into his own left hand; the prisoner took it out, with his purse, and ran out. He is not the pot-boy.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I received the prisoner in charge. Handley put his hand into mine, in which hand I found a glove, containing the duplicate of the watch.

LEONARD NEEDES . The prisoner Shields pawned this watch with me, in the name of Smith, on the 17th of December, about noon, and said it was his own.

BURSTOW'S Defence. This gentleman laid hold of me, asked me to sing a song, and sent me for a pot of beer; he had not enough by three-halfpence, which I paid, and asked him for it; he said he had no more, and gave me the watch.

SHIELDS' Defence. Burstow sent me to pawn the watch; I gave him the duplicate and money.

BURSTOW - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

SHIELDS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-129

336. JAMES ROHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a deal plank, value 3 s., and 3 lbs. of rope, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Dartnell ; and ROBERT MACRAE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS DARTNELL . I am a bricklayer , and live in Dock-street, Rosemary-lane. On the 27th of December, at a quarter past eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed this deal, which I had seen safe a quarter of an hour before, tied to a ladder at a house, to prevent people going up. The two ends were bound with iron, and it had two holes in it. Rohan has worked for me. I found it with one end cut off, and the other three parts off.

ELIZA DARTNELL . I was looking out of window, and saw Rohan up the ladder before the house. He had worked for my husband, and I thought he might have been sent for it. He untied the rope, and brought the board down, and as he did not come towards our house, I went out and followed him to Blue Anchor-yard, and saw him push it down Macrae's cellar, which is about one hundred yards off; he staid down there about two minutes, then came out and went into Macrae's shop. I looked down the cellar, and saw Macrae sewing the end off; I said,

"Don't saw that board, it is my husband's." He said he did not care for me or my husband. I sent an officer down, and he threw the board up, with one end sawn off, and the other nearly off. Rohan was so much in liquor, that, although I was close to him, he did not know me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know one Buckley - A. That is my maiden name. I have a brother.

Q. Somebody of your name has been prosecuted, and Macrae's relation appeared against him - A. My brother has been unfortunate, and Macrae's wife has insulted me about it. I have heard of one Watson being hung - he was not concerned with my brother; I do not wish to hurt her husband - I did not wish to bring Rohan to justice, but Macrae insisted on going before the Magistrate.

Prisoner ROHAN. Q. What character have I borne - A. He was an honest upright man - my husband offered to take 2 s. 6 d. for the board, but the officer said it would be compounding felony; and when we got near the Office, Macrae was willing to pay the money.

JOHN MURDOCK . I am an officer. I was fetched to Macrae's, and found him standing in the yard - the board laid outside his house, with the piece which was sawn off. Dartnell said,

"Now, Macrae, if you will give me 2 s. 6 d. for the board, I don't want to have a piece of work about it - if you would satisfy the officers;" he said he would give 2 s. 6 d., but would not satisfy the officers. I would not let them settle it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was willing to go - A. Yes; he said he bought the board of Rohan. I asked what he gave for it; he said that was no matter, they could not value it at more than 11 d. Macrae told the Magistrate that gave 6 d. for it.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoners sign this paper (handing it) - A. Yes, (read.)

"The prisoner Macrae says he bought the board of Rohan, for 6 d., and he told him it was his own property. Rohan says he borrowed the board of E. Dartnell."

ELIZA DARTNELL . He never borrowed it of me.

ROHAN'S Defence. I am a poor man, with a large family. I only got 6 d. for it.

MACRAE'S Defence. I gave 1 s. for it.

ROHAN - GUILTY. Aged 58.

Of stealing to the value of 11 d. only .

Confined Fourteen Days .

MACRAE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-130

337. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , two pails, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Atcheson .

ELIJAH PIGGOT . I am apprenticed to Mr. Atcheson, cooper , York-street, Mile-end . I was told a woman had taken two pails. I went out, and found the prisoner about twenty yards off with them - she said she was in want. I took them her, and gave them to my master's son. She was in liquor.

JOSEPH ATCHESON . I am son of Thomas Atcheson. Piggott took the pails from the prisoner, and gave them to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went out with a woman - she told me to take them. I was in distress, as my husband had left me.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-131

338. MARTHA BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , an iron pot, value 3 s. , the goods of William Taylor .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240114-132

339. ROSINA COXHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two gowns, value 10 s.; and five yards of stuff, value 5 s. , the goods of Eleanor Lee .

ELEANOR LEE . I live in Norfolk-court, Saffron-hill . The prisoner lodged in the same room as me. On the 18th of December I went out, leaving her in the room with my three children. I returned in an hour and a half, and

missed two gowns and five yards of stuff from my box, which were safe when I went out. She had told me she was going out for some broken victuals - she did not return, but on the Sunday following I met her in Fleet-market, and gave her in charge. One gown was made up, and the other not.

(Property produced and sworn to).

THOMAS M'CLELLAN. I am an officer. I received her in charge, and found two duplicates on her for this property inside her stocking, next to her feet.

ABRAHAM SHUTE . I am shopman to Mr. Morrit, pawnbroker. On the 18th of December the prisoner, I believe, pawned a gown.

JOSEPH SARSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of December a gown was pawned with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tickets.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-133

340. CHALES COLECUT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , eighty yards of cotton, value 40 s. , the goods of William Kerby .

WILLIAM HOLLAND . I am apprenticed to William Kerby , linen-draper , Poplar . On the 18th of December, in consequence of an alarm being given, I jumped over the counter, ran out, and missed this cotton off a pile at the door; it had been confined with a string. I went in pursuit into the East India-road, and saw the prisoner running with them under his arm. I called Stop thief! and he dropped them, ran thirty yards further, and was stopped by a sailor - I came up, and took him; two of the pieces have our mark on them, and were safe ten minutes before.

THOMAS MINGAY . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge about one o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. Business being bad, my master gave me a holiday. I saw this print on the ground, and picked it up - heard a cry of Stop thief! and thought I had better throw them down.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-134

341. JAMES DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , two coats, value 20 s.; two waistcoats, value 10 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Stone .

JOSEPH STONE . I am gardener to a gentleman at Knightsbridge . On the 8th of November, in the evening, I missed these clothes from my cottage, which is on my master's premises. I found them at Queen-square - the prisoner worked with me two years, but not at this time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE ELLIOTT . I am a gardener in the same employ. On the 6th of December, I took the prisoner into custody in consequence of information.

EDWARD GRANT . I am a constable, and received him in charge, and found the duplicates of the two coats on him.

JAMES WATSON. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Knightsbridge. On the 8th of November, two coats and a waistcoat were pawned, in the name of Read, and another coat in the name of Witchley.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-135

342. JOSEPH GRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 6 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Smith and John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am in partnership with Richard Smith we are porkman , and live in Bethnal Green-road. On the 8th of January, about half-past three o'clock, I was in the parlour, heard footsteps in the shop, and saw a person pass the window. I missed two hands of pork from the window, ran out, and saw the prisoner run down South Conduit-street. Postern ran round another way. I lost sight of him.

JOSEPH POSTERN . I lodge with Smith, and was in his parlour, I ran out first, and saw the prisoner pass the window, and go down South Conduit-street. I called Stop thief! and at the first turning on the right, saw him drop the pork - a girl picked it up, and I at last overtook him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month and and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-136

343. MARY GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , a tea tray, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Herring .

THOMAS HERRING , JUN. My father lives in Broad-street, St. Giles . On the 7th of January, I saw the prisoner walking up and down by the door, for near an hour - I went to her, and asked if she wanted anything; she said No; and about eight o'clock, the patrol brought her into the shop, with this tea tray, which was safe not five minutes before.

GEORGE GATEHOUSE . On the 7th of January, in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this tea board from the prosecutor's shop door, and walk away with it. I ran and told Herring.

WILLIAM SUTTIE . I am a patrol. Gatehouse informed me that a woman had taken this tray. I ran down Holborn, and took the prisoner with it. Gatehouse saw her, and said she was the woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it very near to where they say I took it from.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-137

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

344. TIMOTHY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , three half-crowns , the monies of Martin Tagg .

MARTIN TAGG . I am a chessemonger , and kept a shop in Bunhill-row . On the 19th of December, about twelve o'clock in the day, I was in the parlour; heard somebody behind the counter, looked, and saw the prisoner behind the counter. I went into the shop, and he asked for a pennyworth of cheese. I found the till open, and silver gone out of it - I had locked it, and left the key in - I missed three half-crowns. He denied taking them, and said his brother was waiting for him outside the door. I

took him out, but could not find his brother. I told him to give up the money; he said he had got three half-crowns which his father gave him; the officer found them on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How much money was in the till - A. I cannot say, but know there was but three half-crowns, and they were gone. I heard him open the till.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I took him in charge, with the money.

Prisoner's Defence. My father gave them to me.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-138

345. JOHN BINGHAM and RICHARD MURPHY were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a child's coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Mary Wells .

JOHN WILKIE . I sell muffins, and know the prisoners by sight. On the 4th of December, I met them: Bingham said to Murphy,

"Was not that a fine coat we got last night?" Murphy said,

"How much did you get for it?" He said,

"I took it to a pawnbroker's, who wanted to see my mother; I took him into Cato-street, and then ran away, and left it with him." I said,

"Where did you steal it from, shew me." Bingham pointed out Mr. Wells' house to me; I went next morning and told them.

SAMUEL WISE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Manchester-square. On the 4th of December, Bingham pawned a coat for 4 s.

MARY WELLS . I live in Quebec-street, New-road . This coat was stolen off a peg in my passage, on the 4th of December.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I apprehended the prisoners.

BINGHAM - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

MURPHY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-139

346. THOMAS KINGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , a stove, value 12 s. , the goods of James Anderson .

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On the 18th of December, a little after six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner loitering about Mr. Anderson's door, in Wardour-street ; I then saw him go into the shop, and take this stove out, and stopped him about six yards off with it. He at first said that two men desired him to carry it, but afterwards that distress was the cause; which I think was the case, as I found only one halfpenny on him.

WILLIAM EWER . I was with Gook, and stopped the prisoner with the stove.

JAMES ANDERSON . I am an ironmonger. This stove is mine, and was taken from inside my shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never here before, and will never come again

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Strongly recommended to mercy, in consequence of distress .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-140

347. WILLIAM LACK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , seven yards of kerseymere, value 25 s. , the goods of George Metcalfe .

GEORGE METCALFE . I am a woollen-draper , and live in Oxford-street . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my shop to enquire for a situation, and after loitering about the shop some time, he asked if I wanted anything in the City - I said No; and as he went out he appeared bulky. I called him back, and found six yards of kerseymere under his coat - he begged forgiveness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-141

348. TIMOTHY LOWING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 lbs. of soap, value 18 d. , the goods of James Soames and William Soames .

CHARLES CONNELL . I am servant to James and William Soames , soap-manufacturers . On the 19th of October, I took two hundred weight of mottled soap to Langham-place; I was carrying it out of the cart, twelve bars at a time; I was absent two or three minutes, and on returning missed a bar out of the chest. I looked round, and saw the prisoner running from the cart, followed, and overtook him with it under his coat. He said,

"Let me go - I will pay you for it."

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge, with the soap; he was in liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employment, and had been drinking with some friends; this soap lay by the curb stone, I picked it up, was called after, and said,

"Here it is, if it is your's." He said,

"Go along with you, you are in liquor;" but the officer said he would take me, and make him appear against me.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-142

349. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 10 lbs. of sugar, value 8 s. , the goods of William Barnes .

MARIA BARNES . I am the wife of William Barnes , grocer ; we live in Little Earl-street . On the 26th of December, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I was in the room behind the shop, and saw the prisoner come in and take a loaf of sugar out of the window, and run out; I followed, but he got off. I saw him plainly, and am certain he is the man. He was taken next day, in the Duke's Head, public-house, about eight o'clock in the evening; I went there and pointed him out from several other people, and I am quite certain of him.

JOSEPH HULL . I am waiter at the Duke's Head. Barnes came into our tap-room, and pointed the prisoner out from among twenty more.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lost the use of one arm, and did not take it.

PROSECUTOR. He took it up with both arms.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-143

350. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , eight sovereigns and four shillings , the monies of Augustus Johnson .

AUGUSTUS JOHNSON . I am a brandy-merchant , and live in Regent-street. On the 20th of December, the prisoner called at my house, and ordered two gallons of rum and gin to be sent to Mr. Robertson, No. 20, Argyle-street, and change for a 10 l. note to be sent with it; I made out a bill

and receipt, sent it by the porter, and told him not to leave the goods without the money, as I did not know Mr. Robertson. I gave him eight sovereigns and four shillings for change; and finding him a very long time gone, I sent my boy after him. I have got the goods back, but not the money.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You never saw him before - A. Only once; he was a very short time with me; I am certain of him.

EDWARD SUTTON . I am porter to Mr. Johnson, and was sent between four and five o'clock with these spirits, eight sovereigns, and four shillings for change; my master told me not to leave the goods without the money; I went to No. 20, Argyle-street, the servant-maid opened the door; the prisoner then came to the door, and told me to go down into the kitchen. He fetched a light up, and took me into the kitchen, told me to put the liquors on the dresser; and said there were some empty bottles in return - he asked if I had not a bill and change for a 10 l. note. I said I had - he said, if I would give him the bill and change, he would take it up to his master, and bring me down the note - he left me in the kitchen, and went up stairs, (as I thought,) to his master for the note. I waited about an hour and a half, and thought it strange that he did not return; found a servant in the next kitchen, and asked her for Mr. Robertson. I did not see the prisoner again till he was taken, and have not got the note or the 8 l. 4 s. back.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go up stairs - A. No. I had seen the prisoner at my master's once before. I am certain he is the man.

COURT. Q. Would you have given him the change unless he had promised to bring you the note - A. No.

GEORGE ROGERS . I was in Mr. Johnson's service at this time; the prisoner came to give me this order at first on the 20th of December; he came one morning before to enquire the price of spirits. I saw him then, and am certain he is the man. On the 5th of January I was with my brother in Paradise-street, and he passed me; he saw that I noticed him, and said,

"Ah! ah! how do you do?" I made no answer, he stood for about ten seconds looking to see if I would answer. My brother said,

"Why don't you notice the gentleman." I said,

"He is the person who swindled Mr. Johnson," but not loud enough for him to hear; he then went away up a passage. I saw two persons standing at a potatoe warehouse, and asked them for an officer to take him; they laughed at me. I followed him into Paddington-street, he crossed over to Nottingham-place. I sent my brother to the office; I followed him into the New-road, and asked a butcher to lay hold of him, he put his hand on his collar, and I said,

"You are the person who has swindled Mr. Johnson, and if you will walk with me to the office, we will have an explanation;" he said, certainly, I went on with him, and met my brother with the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not notice him - A. Yes, I did; and when he could not avoid me, he said, Ah! he walked pretty quick, and I kept behind him. When he gave the order, my master said he did not like his appearance, and I followed him to see if he went to No. 20, Argyle-street.

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I am servant to Mr. Robertson, of No. 20, Argyle-street. The prisoner came about the 1st of December, and took the first and second floor of the house for his master's son, as he said; he looked at the apartments three or four times; he did not live there, but called six or seven times, and said his master would come next day; but afterwards said his master was ill, and could not come to town. On the day before the spirits came he called, in a great hurry, and said his master would be there next day; he desired me to light the fires; and said his master would pay a week's money for the trouble we had in lighting them - he never came, and nothing has been paid. He called next morning, and asked if we could lend him a dozen bottles, as a dozen of wine was coming in, and his master was a near man, and did not like to pay for bottles - he had a dozen, and about four o'clock in the afternoon he came again, and said he wished the wine would come, for he wanted to go; the porter brought the spirits; I ran to the door, but he ran up before me and received the spirits himself - the porter remained in the kitchen a long time, and then asked for my master. I did not see the prisoner afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you positive that he is the man A. I am - he seemed agitated.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-144

351. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a coat, value 10 s., and a jacket, value 6 s. , the goods of William Blackhall .

WILLIAM BLACKHALL . I am servant to Mr. Westbrook , of Heston . On the 10th of December, about twelve o'clock, I was at work, and saw the prisoner look over the yard wall; and in about a minute I came out of the stable, and he asked me the way to Smallborough-green; I told him, and followed him part of the way - he stopped at a public-house - I went on further, and as I returned saw him come out of the yard gate with a bundle. I hallooed after him - he said he had got nothing - I saw him drop it, picked it up, and called out to Cook, who took him without my losing sight of him. I found it was my coat and jacket which I had left hanging in the stable.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable. I secured him, and asked how he could think of committing such an act; he said he had been very much distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, tied up, against the wall.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-145

352. SARAH WICKENS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , two pillows, value 6 s.; a pillowcase, value 6 d.; two sheets, value 6 s., and a flat iron, value 4 d., the goods of Robert Wire Smith , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA SMITH . I am wife of Robert Wire Smith - we live in Church-street, Bethnal-green - the prisoner hired a back-room furnished, at 4 s. 6 d. a week, about a fortnight before this. The articles stated in the indictment were let with it; she went out; I suspected her; my key unlocked her door - I went in and missed them all on the 19th.

JAMES WISKARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. The prisoner pawned a pillow with me.

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT . I have a sheet, pawned by the prisoner on the 13th of December.

THOMAS PETO. The prisoner pawned a sheet with me.

SEPTIMUS SADLER . She pawned a pillow with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-146

353. WILLIAM MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th January , three blankets, value 10 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 7 s.; two pillow-cases, value 3 s.; a candlestick, value 1 s.; and a flat iron, value 1 s., the goods of Edward Taylor , in a lodging-room .

MARY ROGERS . I lived in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane , and let the prisoner a back room, furnished, at 4 s. per week, eleven or twelve months ago, and in November we parted with the house to my brother (Taylor), and sold him the furniture - the prisoner remained there.

EDWARD TAYLOR . On the 25th of November I took possession of the house, and found the prisoner a lodger there - this property was then in the room - I gave her in charge on the 5th of January, as I missed it all.

WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. I have two pillows, a blanket, and a candlestick, pawned by the prisoner.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned two blankets and a sheet with me.

WILLIAM CREE . I have a sheet and an iron pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-147

354. WILLIAM LOVELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a shawl, value 2 s. 6 ds., the goods of Eleazer Heck , from the person of Mary Ann Harding , spinster .

MARY ANN HARDING . I am the daughter of Samuel Harding , and live in Britannia-gardens, Hoxton. On the 22d of December, about half-past six o'clock, I was crossing the road with my mother 's shawl on, and when I was half way across, somebody took it off my back. I turned round, and saw a man run down the street - I called Stop thief! and he was taken, but I had lost sight of him. I saw the shawl picked up in the street he ran down. I cannot speak to the man.

CHARLES CONSTABLE . I saw the prisoner take the shawl off this girl's back. I was two or three yards behind him, and perceived him put it under his coat - he ran about one hundred yards, and I took him. An officer came up. I got a lantern and found it. I had not seen him drop it.

ELEAZER HECK. I am this girl's father-in-law. The shawl is mine.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, ran out, and caught the prisoner. The shawl was found in the direction he must have come.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-148

355. SARAH GAINHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a pocket, value 6 d.; three guineas, twenty-one sovereigns, and a 10 l. Bank-note, the property of Andrew Donly , from the person of Margaret Donly .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MARGARET DONLY . I am wife of Andrew Donly , a master chimney-sweeper - we live in Crawford-mews, Montague-square . On the 20th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our house, and asked me for a piece of linen for her hand, which was sore. I gave her some - she stopped till three o'clock. I sent out for a quartern of gin, and gave her some. She sat down - I offered her some refreshment, which she refused. She asked me to lend her 6 d.; I gave her one; my husband came home, and put down twenty-one sovereigns, three guineas, and a 10 l. note, on the table at which she was sitting, and said,

"Old woman, here is part of the money you have been so long craving after." This was between five and six o'clock. I took it up, and put it into my pocket, and in a quarter of an hour my husband fell asleep. The prisoner said she wished me to go home with her to make an excuse to her husband, or she did not know what would be the consequence, as she had been out all day. I said I could not, as I had my children to put to bed. The prisoner said,

"Pray do, he won't say a word if you come;" and I at last went with her. I had my baby in my arms; we went down Crawford-street. She tucked my cloak up above my arms, to keep the baby warm. She asked me to give her some gin in Crawford-street, but I would not; I however stopped at a public-house; she brought me out two pennyworth of shrub, which she paid for. We went down Baker-street, till we came to Blanford-street; I said,

"You are going further than you need, for that is your way home;" she said.

"Never mind, we will turn up the next street." and at the corner of George-street, by a public-house, she came behind me, round to my right side, and forced her hand into my pocket hole, forced my pocket from my side, and tore it off - she turned me quite round with the force, and ran off through a mob, which was collected hearing some music. I turned round, and said,

"Mrs. Gainham, you have got my pocket, you have robbed me." She rushed through the mob, and I lost her. I went straight to her house in Blandford-mews, and found her husband and a woman there, but not her - she came in in about five minutes. I said,

"Mrs. Gainham, you have robbed me of my pocket; I will give you 5 l., and anything to drink, if you will give me the remainder." She said,

"I dare say you would if I had it." I threw my child down, and went back to where my pocket was taken, as she said I must have dropped it. The watchman assisted me to look for it, but I could not find it. I went and told my husband, and in a few minutes, she came in - I said,

"Master, this is the woman who has robbed me of the money;" she said he might search her if he liked. He turned me out of doors, and told me not to come home. I stopped next door all night, leaving her in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You had something to drink in your room - A. Yes; the prisoner did not go out for it. There was no tossing up for drink. I lost my pocket close to a public-house; I was not talking about going in there. I rushed through the crowd after her. I do not know whether any one heard me call after her. She afterwards followed me to my house - my husband told her to go about her business, for she was deeper than him. She was taken next day. My husband has not threatened me about this.

Q. Do you remember being in the yard of Mary-le-bone Office, and your husband saying to you,

"If you don't bring it home to Salt Gainham, I will have your life" - A. No; he said no such thing at any time. I did not stop in the yard, for I was afraid.

Q. Did you not tell the prisoner that you had lost your pocket, and she said,

"Well, we will go out together and look for it" - A. No. I left my child there, and went out tearing my hair - she did not go with me. She tucked my cloak up several times.

ANDREW DONLY . I brought my wife home, twenty-one sovereigns, three guineas, and a 10 l. note, and put it on the table, and said,

"Old woman, I have got what you have been long looking for;" she put it into her pocket, the prisoner was present. I fell asleep, and when I awoke they were both gone, and in about an hour and a half she returned, and said she had lost the money. I turned her out of doors; the prisoner came and said,

"Donly, your wife accuses me of robbing her, you may search me if you like." I said,

"It is no use searching you, you know too much for me." She went away soon after. I locked up and went to bed, and next morning applied to Williams the officer, went with him to Blandford-mews, and gave charge of the prisoner; she was examined on the Monday. I was in the office yard in the evening, on which she was to be examined a second time, and heard the prisoner's voice call out from the lock-up place to William Lovitt ,

"Bill, halloo, is the old woman coming down," he replied,

"Yes. I expect her here at seven o'clock, it is all right, the blunt is our's."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell your wife, that if she did not give a good account how she lost the money, you would have nothing to do with her - A. No. I threatened her, and beat her too, for going out with the prisoner. I did not threaten to kill her.

Q. Don't you remember saying,

"If you don't bring the matter home to that hussey, I will have your life" - A. No, I never said any thing of the sort. Lovitt and the prisoner have been acquainted for sixteen years.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone office, the prosecutor applied to me on Sunday, and I apprehended the prisoner, but found nothing on the premises. I went to Lovitt's house, in Barrett's-court, Oxford-street, and searched his place, having heard that they kept company, and in a drawer I found several parcels of money wrapped in paper, amounting to 33 l. odd in all, divided into parcels of 2 l. and 3 l. each; there were shillings, crown-pieces, and two sovereigns amongst it. Lovitt is a lamp-lighter, and has 24 s. a-week. I found a pair of silver buckles in the room, and some duplicates of property pawned in December, of small articles for 3 s. and 4 s. each. The money found was all silver but three sovereigns.

JOHN IRELAND . I am a watchman. On the 20th of December, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and prosecutrix coming down George-street, and presently saw her pull her along by her apron; and about ten o'clock, or between ten and eleven, I saw Bill Lovitt and the prisoner in company together, close to my box, talking together.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew both the prisoner and prosecutrix - A. Yes; the prisoner was pressing her to go into a public-house, but she would not. I heard the prosecutrix say,

"You have broken the string of my petticoat." She was then trying to pull her into the public-house. I saw them part, but cannot say whether she ran or not - she did not appear intoxicated. Donly came to me about a quarter to nine o'clock, and said she had lost her money.

WILLIAM JONES . I live in South-street, Manchester-square, and am a pawnbroker. The prisoner redeemed a pair of buckles at my shop on this Saturday night, for 9 s. 6 d. I think she gave me a sovereign - it was rather after nine o'clock. I believe the buckles produced to be the same; they were pawned in the name of Gainham, in February last.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to her house, and staid there; a man named Neal came in, and tossed her for liquor; Donly came in and gave her some money, which she put into her pocket; we came a long together; I went into the Bee Hive, public-house, and bought her some shrub: we came along; I said,

"Here is a gin-shop, we will have some more." I took her by the cloak and pulled her towards the house. She said,

"Mother Gainham, you have broken my petticoat strings." She came home with me to my husband, and said,

"Old man, you shall have something to drink;" she put her hand down, and then, for the first time, missed her pocket. I set off with her to look for it; she went to her husband, and said she had lost it. He said,

"You had better find it, or, d - n you, I'll shoot you;" and told her to go about her business. I told him to take me; he said he should find me in the morning. I met Lovitt afterwards, and he asked me to redeem these buckles, which I had pawned for him.

MARGARET DONLEY . I did not put my hand to my pocket, and say he should have something to drink. I said,

"Old Gainham, where is your wife? - she has robbed me."

JOHN RICHARDS . I live in China-mews, Bedford-square, and am a master chimney-sweeper. On the 21st of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, Donly came to me, and said he was robbed of 40 l., and told me to go to Mrs. Gainham, and he would fetch two officers. I went, and waited till he came with them; I went with him to his house, and saw his wife crying. She said,

"Oh! Richards, what shall I do? - I have lost my pocket; I can almost swear that she took it." Donly said,

"D - n your eyes, you b - h, give it to her home - don't mince her; put on your shawl and bonnet, and come with me, and I'll have her taken directly.

Q. Are you sure she said she could almost swear it - A. Yes.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not you understand him to mean that she was not to favour her, but tell the truth - A. It was as much as to frighten her to swear it, whether or no - I thought he meant to make her swear false.

ANDREW DONLY . I said nothing of the sort. I said,

"If she deserves it, and is guilty, don't mince her." This witness is the prisoner's brother-in-law - I put him into business myself.

HANNAH TILLEROY . I now live at Donly's; I was at the prisoner's place when this happened. She went out about ten o'clock in the morning, and did not return till eight. Mrs. Donly came in first, and said to Mr. Gainham,

"How are you, old man?" He said,

"Where is Sal?" She said,

"Don't be angry, she has been with me

all day, old man - we will have a drop of something to drink." She put her hand down to feel for her pocket, and almost threw the child out of her arms - I caught it; she said,

"I have lost my pocket and money!" Mrs. Gainham said,

"I hope not."

Q. Mrs. Gainham had come in then - A. Yes; and said,

"I hope not, for you had 30 l." They both ran out together to find it.

Q. Did she accuse the prisoner with taking it - A. Not at all; she seemed quite confused.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The prosecutrix was in the room some time before the prisoner came in - A. Yes; they did not come home together. The last situation I had was potgirl, that is twelve months ago; I have lived with Donly since this happened. I went backwards and forwards to the prisoner before, to nurse, but lived in George-street, St. Giles's. I have a person who pays my rent, and I get my living as I can - not in the streets. I am sure they both went out together to look for the money.

- On the 20th of last month, I was coming down Blandford-mews, where I live, about half-past seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner and prosecutrix coming from the end of the mews together. I live at the prisoner's house. They stopped a long time at the door, talking; Donly went in, and Gainham staid outside.

SARAH SQUIRES . I live in Little Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone. I have known Gainham many years. I was at the office on the 22d of December, at seven o'clock at night, and heard Donly say to his wife,

"D - n my eyes, if you don't buff it home to her, I'll have your bl - y life."

MR. ALLEY. Q. Can you tell the rest of the conversation - A. Not exactly. I went there to see if Gainham was acquitted.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-149

356. THOMAS STRUDWICK was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES DELAPORTE . I live in Stacey-street, Compton-street. On the 10th of January I went to Mr. Beazley's, and bought some meat of the prisoner, which came to 4 d.; and when I came out of the shop I was accosted by a person.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What did you pay him - A. Two penny pieces and four halfpence.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I am a constable. On the 10th of January, I was watching Mr. Beazley's premises, and saw Delaporte come out with some meat. I went to the till, and found only one penny there; and upon searching the prisoner I found a sovereign, a half-crown, and three shillings, but no halfpence on him.

GEORGE BEAZLEY . I set the constable to watch my premises. The prisoner was in my service, and entrusted to receive money for me. Seven-pence was found on the shelf above the desk - it was his duty to put it all into the desk. I had been watching, and saw him give change for a sovereign.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-150

357. SARAH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , nine sovereigns and fifteen shillings, the monies of George Greves , from his person .

GEORGE GREVES . I am master of a vessel . On the 17th of December I came from Greenwich, and fell in with the prisoner between six and seven o'clock at night, near Cock-hill. She took me to a house in St. James's-place - I went to bed by myself; I counted my money, and had nine sovereigns and fifteen shillings. She went for a pot beer. I fell asleep before she returned. I had put my money under the pillow, rolled up in my trowsers-pocket. I awoke about twelve o'clock, and missed the trowsers and money. I found the trowsers by the bed-side, but the money gone. I came out, gave an alarm, told the watchman, and she was taken in a few minutes. I am positive that she is the girl. I had drank very little.

WILLIAM KICHIE . I am a headborough. I went to the house, waited there, and the prisoner came out very drunk - I asked if she lived there; she said Yes, and that nobody had slept with her that night; we detained her. The prosecutor immediately fixed upon her as the woman. As we went before the Magistrate; she told me that she had robbed him, and she did not mind going to the mill, for she had been there before. A publican gave me two sovereigns, and fifteen shillings and sixpence.

HENRY ANDREWS . I am a watchman. About ten minutes past twelve o'clock, I met the prosecutor, who shewed me the house he had been robbed at, and described the prisoner. We left him at the watch-house while we went to the house, and took the prisoner - he immediately said she was the woman; she asked me to get her some liquor; I said I could not without money - she said,

"Go to Mr. Marks, he has got the money."

RICHARD MARKS . I am a publican. The prisoner came to me about nine o'clock, for a pint and a half of ale, saying she had a captain to sup with her, and in ten minutes she gave me two sovereigns and two half crowns, to take care of, saying that he had given them to her.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met him, he was struggling with a woman, who would not take him home; he then turned to me, and asked if I would, and followed me up to my place, and while I was getting a light he was talking to two other women. He was very drunk; I went to get him a quartern of gin, and when I returned he was asleep, and undressed. I awoke him, and said he could not be there till he had satisfied me; he pulled his trowsers out, and gave me this money - I took it to Marks to take care of, and when I returned, the officers, were waiting for me. I do not know what I might have said, as I was drunk.

PROSECUTOR. I gave her four sixpences when I first went into the room, but no sovereigns. I knew what I was about.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-151

358. WILLIAM GORMAND was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of George Vipond , from his person .

GEORGE VIPOND . On the 13th of January, I was in Whitechapel , about three o'clock in the afternoon - the prisoner met me, snatched my handkerchief out of my hand, and ran up a gateway. I pursued him, calling for assistance - several people were about, but none attempted to assist. He threw it down. I continued to follow, and overtook him, knocked him down, and collared him. A person came and rescued him from me - I collared him

again, and about half way down Whitechapel, the person rescued him again. I followed him a long way, knocked him down, and got him to the office, as I could not get an officer. I never lost sight of him. The handkerchief was picked up, and given to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and did not know what I was doing.

GEORGE VIPOND . He pretended to be drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-152

364. LEVY HYAMS was indicted for putting off to Jabez Trotman , ten pieces of counterfeit milled money, made to the likeness of good shillings, at a lower rate then the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JABEZ TROTMAN . I am a journeyman pork-butcher , and live at Philip-street, Holywell Mount. On the 23d of December, in consequence of an application to me from Mance, I saw the prisoner; and again on the 24th. I received two shillings and sixpence from the officers; I had no more money about me. The officers marked it before they gave it to me. Goodluck and I then went to the prisoner's lodgings. I had seen him there the day before, but he said he had nothing ready. The coin was to be ready in the afternoon, and if we did not call in the afternoon, he was to have it ready for us by morning; we had asked him for a score of shillings. When we went on the 24th, the prisoner said he had got half a score for Goodluck's order, and offered me sixteen sixpences and a half-crown, as he had no more shillings left; I bought them of him for 2 s. 6 d. good silver. I gave him the money I received from the officers. Goodluck bought the ten shillings for half-a-crown - we left the room, and when we came down, the officers being near at hand, I gave a signal, and they went up and took him. We gave Mance the coin which we had bought. Goodluck is the constable's son.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. - Q. Did you know him before - A. Not before the 17th; when Goodluck introduced him to me, at his father's house at Hoxton. The prisoner's father and mother were present when the agreement was made with us about the coin. I was out of sight of the house before the officers went in. They went with me to near the spot and searched me, before I went in.

MR. LAW. Q. What dealings you had were by the direction of the officers - A. Yes.

JOSEPH GOODLUCK . I am a shoemaker, and live in White-Hart Court, Hoxton. I have known the prisoner two years and a half. In consequence of the directions of the officers, I accompanied Trotman on the 23d to the prisoner's lodgings, Marlborough-court, Petticoat-lane, and asked him for some shillings; he said he had none ready, and we were to call in the afternoon, or next morning; and on the 24th we went; his father and mother were there. The officer had searched us, and given us each 2 s. 6 d. which Armstrong had marked. I said I had come for the shillings - he produced ten. Trotman bought sixteen sixpences and a half-crown of him, as he had no more shillings ready. I gave him the marked 2 s. 6 d. for them, and directly we left him, we made a signal to my father, who stood opposite the end of the court. He and Mance immediately went up to the prisoner's lodgings.

Cross-examined. Q. You have known him two years - A. Yes; I saw him two years ago, but not since, till December. He did not know that my father was an officer.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How did you introduce yourself to him - On the 9th, by mentioning a young man's name; he asked me what I wanted - I said some shillings. He and his father talked in a language I could not understand, and he let me have them.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer, the witnesses went to the prisoner's lodgings by my direction. On the 24th, I gave Trotman 2 s. 6 d., which Armstrong, had marked. Van searched them in my presence. They had no money; after the prisoners were apprehended, Trotman gave me sixteen sixpences and half-a-crown; I searched the prisoner and found 9 s. 6 d. in his right hand breeches pocket, among which were the 2 s. 6 d. I had given Trotman, and the 2 s. 6 d. which I had given Goodluck, who brought me ten counterfeit shillings. I produce the counterfeit money; it was wrapped up in paper separately.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of Trotman before he entered the house - I did. I saw nobody near who dealt in braces.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On the 24th of December, I was at the Baker and Basket, public-house; and saw the witnesses searched; they had no money. Vann gave them each 2 s. and a 6 d. which I had marked. We watched them to Petticoat-lane, I saw them within one hundred yards of Marlborough-court. Mance gave me a signal, and I got into the house in two minutes, and apprehended the prisoner. I asked him how long he had had the money which was found on him, he said ever since yesterday morning. I said

"Have you had change any where," he said he had changed a crown-piece in Petticoat-lane. I introduced Trotman and Goodluck to him; they pointed him out from among others, and he said he never saw them before in his life. The four shillings and two sixpences found on him are what I marked. The other officers were nearer to the court than me.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I searched the two witnesses and saw them come out of the prisoner's house. I ran into the room, and saw Mance find the money upon him, and in a drawer I found several counterfeit shillings and a half-crown, which appeared to have been burnt but not coloured.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am a constable. My son acted under my direction. I was nearest to the house, and gave a signal; we all entered the room.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The sixpences are counterfeit from different dies, and have never been in circulation; the half crown is also counterfeit, and the one found in the drawer.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-153

360. CHARLES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , two bridles, value 3 l.; three halters, value 12 s., and a pair of tuggs, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Hill , his master .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

HENRY THOMPSON . I live in Warwick-street, and employed the prisoner to make a pair of tuggs at his over hours, about three months ago. He said he had nothing

to do after seven o'clock. He made them, brought them home, and I paid him for them - they were not large enough, and I returned them. I told the prosecutor of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who found the buckles for them - A. I did. I never had them back.

RICHARD HILL . The prisoner was my apprentice - I am a harness maker . When I heard of this, I questioned him about it; he said they were in the fire place, under the copper in my kitchen; I found them there - they are mine. I never authorised him to dispose of them.

Cross-examined. Q. The whole things together are tugs - A. Yes; it was mine in its made up state - he never made them himself; he was taught to make them with loops, and these have pipes. He has lodged out of doors lately. He was seven months in the hospital; I did not neglect him there, but repeatedly took him things.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240114-154

361. ANN KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a gown, value 3 s., and a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of John Anderson .

MARGARET ANDERSON . I am the wife of John Anderson - we live in Monmouth-street . On the 8th of January, when I got up in the morning. I missed this gown, handkerchief, and several more things, from the shop, which were safe in the window at nine o'clock the night before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH CUBIT . I live in Monmouth-street. On the 8th of January, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner sold me this gown and handkerchief, for 2 s.; she said she was in distress. I never saw her before. I found her in custody next morning, and am certain of her.

THOMAS KENNEDY . I am a street-keeper. On the 9th the prosecutrix sent for me, and gave the prisoner in charge for stealing these things. She took us to Cubit's, where we found them; she said another girl stole them, and she sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-155

362. SARAH JENKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , fourteen yards of muslin, value 14 s. , the goods of Sarah Hill .

SARAH HILL . The prisoner worked eight days for me, and on the 24th of December, I missed a piece of muslin off the sofa. I live in Henrietta-street - I found it in David-street that day, at a public-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT TURNER . The prosecutrix gave the prisoner into my charge, with the muslin - she said she took it through distress, and begged for mercy.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-156

363. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 8 lbs. of beef, value 4 s. , the goods of James Cowell .

JANE COWELL . I am the wife of James Cowell , a butcher - we live in Leather-lane . On the evening of the 31st of December, the prisoner came into the shop, took up a piece of beef, put it under her shawl, and ran out, I followed and overtook her with it.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I received her in charge with the beef.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the ground in Leather-lane, and had it in my hand when she came up.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-157

364. PATRICK M'DERMOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , a pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Francis .

WILLIAM HOWELL . I am pot-boy at the John of Jerusalem, Crown-street . On the 9th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in to drink with one Burke, and remained there till about four o'clock. I went into the skittle-ground, and saw him take a bundle from behind the water-butt. I followed him as far as Peter's-street, and there lost him; there was a hole in the handkerchief, through which I could see that it was brown leather; it was the shape of a pair of boots. I cannot swear what it was.

ROBERT FRANCIS . I am a coachman. On the 9th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning, I left my boots in the kitchen of this public-house, where I live, and went to work; and about five o'clock Howell said they were gone. I followed to Cow-lane, but could not find the prisoner. I found the boots last Monday hanging up in Field-lane. I took the prisoner that evening, and charged him with taking a parcel in a handkerchief; he tried to escape.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You did not put the boots behind the water butt - A. No.

THOMAS BELL . On the 9th of December Francis came to me. I found the prisoner in a cook-shop; as soon as he got out, he made a rush, and got away; he fell down, and I secured him.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am watch-house keeper. I found two handkerchiefs in the prisoner's hat.

WILLIAM HOWELL . One of these is the handkerchief they were wrapped in; here is the hole in it. He was drunk. The kitchen is on the first floor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-158

365 PATRICK M'DERMOTT was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a half-sovereign, three-half-crowns, three shillings, and two sixpences, the property of Francis Blake , from his person .

FRANCIS BLAKE . I am a rope-maker . On the 6th of December I came from my master's, in Holborn, and went to the Brill, public-house, Somers-town . I fell asleep, and awoke between nine and ten o'clock, and found my jacket pocket empty. I had all this money safe in it at nine o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. This was on Saturday night - A. Yes; there were not many people in the room.

JOHN HARVEY . I was at the Brill, in the parlour, the witness gave me information. I looked and saw the prisoner take his hand out of Blake's left hand jacket pocket, and put it into his own; he was dozing, but was sober. I awoke him, and he missed his money; the landlord advised me to stop the prisoner, but I was afraid. I met

him an hour after, a quarter of a mile off, and said,

"We will have you to night;" he went off.

MARTIN PLUMBER . I was at the Brille, and saw the prisoner put his hand into Blake's pocket. I cannot say whether he took anything out.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18240114-159

366. HANNAH PHENIX was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , nineteen yards of hombazeen, value 19 s.; nine yards of silk, value 36 s.; six yards of sarsenet, value 12 s.; four pair of stockings, value 12 s.; two yards and three quarters of cambric, value 11 s.; six yards of calico, value 6 s.; one yard of crape, value 1 s., and two pair of gloves, value 2 s. , the goods of Edward Jones .

EDWARD JONES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Marchmont-street . On the 8th of December the prisoner had been to my house, and in consequence of information after she left, I went out and met her fifty yards from the shop, in about an hour and a half with this property.

EDWARD ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Jones. On the 8th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and bought the articles stated in the indictment; she told me to make out a bill, and take them to No. 9, Bidborough-street. I took them there, and she told me to make a separate account of what was for her mother, which I did. She said she would shew her mother the goods, and bring me up the money. I was up stairs; she took them down stairs, and absconded with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. She bought some for her mother - A. She said she would shew them to her mother, who was down stairs, and would bring me up the money. They were worth nearly 10 l.

ANNE JONES . I live in Bidborough-street. The prisoner came and took my first floor, the parlour, and kitchen, for herself, her mother, and servant; and said she must go and enquire the respectability of my house; she returned in a short time, and said it was all right, and wished to come in immediately. I asked for a reference; she gave me one, at Clapham. I said I could not go there that night, and she could not come in that day. She said there was a death in the neighbourhood, which would occasion a hurry, and she wished her servant in on that night, but I would not consent. She then said she would go out and order some things; she came back, saying she had bought some, and when the young man brought them, to shew him into the drawing-room: and in a few minutes the witness brought the goods, and soon after I found the door open - she was gone. I have never seen her mother. She was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she not paid you a deposit - A. Yes, 7 s. 6 d.

Mr. JONES. I took her a few yards from the lodgings, and asked if she had paid for them; she said if I would go back I should find all right.

Prisoner's Defence. I never intended to defraud him; I was going to shew them to my mother, who was at a friend's close by - I offered to shew him where I was taking them.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-160

367. JAMES HAMILTON and JOHN BOOKER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , two hundred and fifty-six deals, value 140 l. , the goods of Hutton Perkins .

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

HUTTON PERKINS. On the 1st of December, the prisoner Hamilton introduced me to one Schofield, and on the 4th of December he called at my house, and delivered an invoice of these goods to me, and desired me to attend at Lloyd's Coffee-house next day, to see Schofield, that we might enter into security for the amount of the deals; he represented himself as a broker employed by Schofield, and that he had a quantity of deals to sell for him. I went next day to Lloyd's, and saw him and Schofield; Mr. Mitchell came in shortly, and I agreed with Schofield to buy seven hundred and forty-five deals. A bill was to be drawn by Mitchell and accepted by me, for the deals. When that was done, a document of transfer was handed over to Mitchell to endorse; it was then handed over to me. The deals were at the Commercial Docks. I took my leave of Mitchell; and as soon as I got to the end of the street, Hamilton came up to me, and asked if I had got the transfer - I said Yes. He said it would be necessary to lodge it at the Docks that afternoon - I said that there was no occasion, that it would do when I was disposed to have them cleared. He said it was customary in the trade to lodge it with the Dock Company as soon as made out, and when that was done, the goods would be entered in my name. I went to the Docks with him, and lodged it at the clerk's office. The clerk said I must endorse my name on it, which I did, and then left. I wanted the deals to erect some machinery which is now in progress - their value is 156 l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How often has Hamilton dined at your house - A. The fellow has frequently called at my house; he has dined there in the kitchen, never in the parlour.

Q. Never with you - A. I have dined with him in the kitchen. I had known him for about a month before this transaction. He frequently called just as I was going to dinner - I cannot say how often - he may have dined there ten times at my table - he frequently dined with my servants when I was out - he was introduced to me by one Wood. I am a silk-manufacturer, and live in Church-street, Spitalfields; I have just commenced business, and am getting machinery ready.

Q. How much property had you on your premises at the time - A. Perhaps 50 l. worth of silk. Hamilton frequently left catalogues at my house, stating himself to be a broker. He was not my intimate acquaintance, but when he saw my dinner on table, from his shabby appearance, I could do no less than ask him to dine - we never dined in the parlour.

Q. Would your dinner go into the parlour if he had not been there - A. Yes; the servants dined with us. I never dealt in canvas. Hamilton said he knew a man who had some to dispose of - I referred that person to a Mr. Francis, who knew my affairs. I had 9000 l. left me in 1809, and was to come into possession of it in December; but about 350 l. has been advanced upon it - I cannot get it till that is paid.

Q. How were you to pay for the deals - A. By redeeming the papers, by which I could get the 9000 l. - I have friends who would advance money. I did not employ Hamilton

to make purchases for me, and to refer to Francis; I referred to Mitchell about the deals, as he was on 'Change at the time, and it was handy. I applied for some deals which another person had to sell, but bought none I suppose he was not disposed to credit me; I referred him to Mitchell. I never employed Hamilton as a broker; he was not to have a commission from me; he said he got one and a half per cent. from Schofield. I never saw him from the 5th of December till he was apprehended; he called at my house on the evening of the 6th, when I was engaged; I did not see him; he left no message for me; the servant said he called to borrow some money of the servants. I never called on Jury the carman, about moving the deals.

Q. On your oath did you, in the presence of your servant, direct Hamilton to get carts or barges to remove the deals - A. Never. I never said anything about turning them into money. I never paid Hamilton any money - I owe him none.

Q. Has he not gone over and over again to persons on your business - A. He stated himself in their employ, and wished to make a sale for them. I found the canvas came into the market illegally, and would not buy it; I wanted it to ship in exchange for silk. I never went to the Custom-house with him. I never saw Booker till he was apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How old are you - A. Twenty-one. I had commenced business a month before I saw Hamilton. A stock of silk would be useless till I got my machinery up. I never employed him as a broker; he always acted as broker for the opposite party - he applied to me to buy the deals - I never gave him authority to get them from the Docks - all the expenses were paid by Mr. Schofield, the importer. Francis lives in Watling-street, Commercial-road, in a private house - he is now making machines.

HENRY SIMBREY . I am out-door clerk at the Commercial Docks. I produce a document of transfer, dated the 5th of September, transferring to Mitchell seven hundred and twenty-five deals. endorsed

"Mitchell" and

"Perkins," as if both are interested in the goods. While I was at dinner Hamilton came to my house, and said he had come for some deals, in the name of Mitchell - that his name was Mitchell, and he wished to get the deals out by that evening's tide. I went to the door, and saw Booker about a hundred yards off. I went down to my office with Hamilton. He asked me two or three times to come and mark the goods off. I went and marked them off. Booker was then by his side, and never left him. Hamilton told me what goods to mark off. I marked off three parcels of deals. Moreland's craft had been waiting in the Docks for them the day before; and two hundred and fifty-six were shipped. I had marked off as many more, but there was not time to ship them. Hamilton followed me into the office - I gave him a note and pass for what were marked; he said he should be down early on Monday morning for the rest - he said his name was Mitchell.

Cross-examined. Q. If the transfer had been presented to you, signed by three persons, would you deliver the goods to that third person - A. If he had represented himself as that third person - no person whose name was not endorsed on the transfer could receive them.

JOHN MORELAND . I am owner of the craft. On Saturday the 15th of December, these deals were loaded in my craft, by Hamilton's direction; he did not mention any name. I did not see Booker. I took the deals to Lloyd's wharf, by Hamilton's direction.

THOMAS LLOYD . I have a wharf at Wapping. On the 6th of December, Moreland brought two hundred and fifty-six deals there. Before that, one Hornby had introduced Hamilton to me; he said he had a large quantity of deals, and had I convenience to land them. I asked if they were to go away immediately; he said it depended upon circumstances. I saw him there while they were landing. On Monday we did not finish landing, which he was angry at; and on Tuesday he came; they were all landed on Wednesday, and he brought one Brooford, and sold him a hundred of them; they were delivered on the 10th, to an order signed

"J. Booker" - the one hundred and fifty-six have been delivered to Perkins by the Magistrates' order. Hamilton expected that there was a larger quantity in the barge.

GILBERT MITCHELL . I was present at Lloyd's Coffee-house when a treaty was made between Schofield and Perkins for these deals; the endorsement on the transfer is my writing. I never authorised either of the prisoners to take the deals into their possession. I never saw them till they were apprehended. I was in company with Schofield and Perkins about ten minutes. I merely guaranteed the payment of the goods for Perkins. I am a surveyor at Lloyd's, and have been so for seven years.

Cross-examined. Q. The bill was drawn by you - A. I signed it as drawer. I have no doubt of Perkins's ability to pay it when due - I have known him twelve months. I think it is drawn at three or four months date. I took a memorandum of it, but have not got it here.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. On the night of the 13th of December, Hamilton was brought to the office - I searched him, and found a few halfpence in his pocket, and asked if he had any more money about him - he said

"I have not, so help me God;" but in the calf of his leg I found a bag containing a 5 l. note, twelve sovereigns, and some silver.

Cross-examined. Q. When officers get hold of money. it is difficult to get it back - A. I offered to return it if he could get the Magistrate's leave.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer, and was present when Hamilton was searched. I went to Brooford's premises and found one hundred deals. I went to the wharf and took possession of the rest. I found Booker in custody at the Thames Police, and in consequence of something I heard, I went to him in the New Prison. I told him who I was, and that I had only come from the prosecutor, who he had sent for; that he could say any thing to me, but I could do nothing for him. He said

"I know nothing of the robbery; Hamilton came to me and asked if I knew any body who would purchase some deals; I asked if they were all right; he said they were. I went with him to the Docks, and thought they were all right - he said that all he got above 7 s. each was to be divided between us. I went to Mr. Brooford, who bought one hundred for 42 l. 10 s.; and out of the money I stopped 5 l." I asked if he knew where the remainder of the deals were - he said they must be all at the wharf.

HUTTON PERKINS. The fair price of one hundred deals at that time would be 63 l. 18 s. The bill was at four months' date.

The prisoner Hamilton, in his defence, made an unconnected statement, the substance of which was, that the prosecutor's credit being bad, he had employed him to purchase goods of persons at credit, and sell the same for present cash at any price, in order to raise money to pay the 350 l. to get the documents from the attorney, which entitled him to 9000 l. That he had bought the deals in question, and was employed by the prosecutor to dispose of them.

BOOKER'S Defence. Hamilton called on me to go to the docks with him to meet Perkins, to dispose of the deals, and employed me to sell them.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am servant to the prosecutor; he has a woman servant occasionally, she sometimes makes the bed and cooks, and sometimes I do it. I remember when Hamilton first came to the house. My master generally dines in the parlour and I in the kitchen - he sometimes dines in the kitchen with me. Hamilton may have dined there eight or ten times; always in the kitchen. I understood that Hamilton had these deals to sell to my master, as a broker. I never heard my master tell him to dispose of them. They were bought to erect the manufactory. Francis has dined with us five or six times. My master has a maid servant now. I believe the last time that Hamilton called, he asked for my master. I said he was engaged. I told Perkins that he had called and asked for him.

MR. SCHOFIELD. I have seen Hamilton and Perkins together. He never said in what capacity Hamilton was engaged. I never understood him to be Perkins's broker. I sold the deals through my broker to Mr. Mitchell, as I would not trust Perkins, not knowing him.

HAMILTON - GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

BOOKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-161

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, JANUARY 22.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

368. JOSEPH NASH was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 1st of February , a cannon, value 40 s., the goods of John Marshall , he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HAINES . I am a carpenter. Before Christmas, 1822, I lived in the house of Captain Marshall , to take care of his property. There were three or four brass cannons in the store-room - I saw them safe on the 27th of January, last year, and missed them on the 9th or 10th of February. The key of the garden gate would unlock the store-room door, of which I had the key. Each cannon weighed about 100 lbs.

JOHN LOWE . I worked at Captain Marshall 's last year, and lived near his house, which is in Hertfordshire . I and Hughes went to the premises, about four o'clock one morning, about a year ago - Hughes had the key of the garden gate, which unlocked the store-room door, and we brought away six cannons; they laid at my house for a fortnight, under some rubbish; then I went to Pratt, the Paddington carrier. I wrapped the cannon in a sack, and went with him up to town. I had known Nash three years ago, and he had been at me to get this cannon; he said, Joe Haines told him there were cannons there, and if I would get them he would send a horse and cart down for them, and buy them of me; but the cart did not come, so I took one up to him - I had told him I had got them the next night, and he said he would come down next morning after them. He kept an iron shop at Paddington. Pratt stopped the cart at his door, by my order. I told Pratt that it was cast iron. I told Nash I had brought one of them up - he said he would weigh it, and I was to call in directly for the money. I went out, returned, and he said it came to 1 l. I should think it weighed above I cwt.

Q. When did you first tell this story to the Magistrate - A. About six weeks ago, when I was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You gave this account twelve months after it happened - A. Yes. I was taken up on suspicion of robberies which have been done about Edmonton.

Q. You cleared that suspicion by confessing thirty-two robberies - A. No; I only did one robbery - that was this cannon. I told about more robberies that were committed by other people, who told me of them when I was drinking with them; I did not help them. The prisoner did not charge me with stealing a shovel from his door.

COURT. Q. How many robberies did you tell the Magistrate you had heard of, was it twenty - A. I dare say it was pretty well twenty, if not more - they have been done at different times, within the last year. I live at Elstree.

JOSEPH PRATT . I am a carrier from Elstree. Eight or nine months ago, I was at my door - Lowe said he had a bit of old cast iron, and asked me to take it to town, as I was going there. I said I would. He lifted a sack into the cart; I helped him, and think it weighed I cwt. He followed, and stopped me at an old iron shop at Paddington, lifted it out, and carried it into the shop. I did not see who was inside the shop. I knew of no other name belonging to the shop but Mrs. Lloyd. I passed a fortnight after, and saw Nash's name up. Lowe and I had some refreshment at the Red Lion, public-house, which he paid for, and gave me sixpence. I heard of this robbery a fortnight after.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you the least idea of having taken a cannon - A. No. I have carried nothing else for him.

JOHN KEMP . I am a constable. The house Nash lived in is now pulled down; it was an old iron shop, His name was over the door half a year ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-162

369. SARAH LLOYD was indicted for a like offence . No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-163

370. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; and a wrapper, value 6 d. , the goods of William Jones .

WILLIAM BROWN . On the 8th of December I was on board the smack Search, which laid at Wapping . We had picked the prisoner up at sea, in an open boat, and

saved his life. I had a parcel in my hammock - I do not know what it contained - I only had the charge of it. We were all upon deck hawling the main-sail; he went down below and then set off. I found the parcel gone between six and seven o'clock at night, and found him next day in charge.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am street-keeper of Cornhill. On the 9th of December the prisoner was given into my charge. He denied taking this parcel - I found the wrapper upon him. He then said he had sold the property at Ratcliffe-highway for 4 s. 3 d., and took me there. I found a pair of shoes and a waistcoat. The shopkeeper said he gave 5 s. 6 d. for them, and that he said they were his own. He said it was the property he took out of the smack.

WILLIAM BROWN . This is the wrapper - the direction was found in his hat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-164

371. EGGET POOLE and WILLIAM BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 18 lbs. of mutton, value 7 s.; and 8 lbs. of beef, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Mead .

RICHARD LEE . I am servant to Thomas Mead , butcher , of Hackney . On the morning of the 13th of January the prisoners were employed to empty the privy , and had to come through the shop; they left between five and six o'clock, and about eight I missed this meat. I went to Poole's house that morning, and found him in bed; I asked his wife for my master's meat - she said, in his presence, that she had none. I said I would send for an officer. She then began crying, and produced a loin of mutton which I had missed. I asked Poole where the rest was - he said he would go and shew me. An officer came in; we took him to Baker's lodgings, and there found a shoulder of mutton and some beef, all of which I had missed.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I was fetched to Pool's house, and found the loin of mutton - Lee charged him with stealing it. He said he had it of a man who had bought a lot that morning, and would shew us where that man lived. He took us to Baker's lodgings, in Hackney-road, where we found a shoulder of mutton, two pieces of beef, and two more small pieces of mutton.

THOMAS MEAD . I missed this meat coming from market, and knew it when it was found to be mine.

POOLE'S Defence. I employed this man to assist me in the job. I kept in the yard, and never came through the shop till the cart was full. There was no liquor at four o'clock, and Lee sent us to the gin-shop. They would not trust him. A man then asked him if he could sell him any meat - he took this man to the shop with him, but whether he sold him any I cannot say. As we were going home Baker said,

"Here is a piece of meat Mead's man has given you, and he has given me a piece." I told my wife to take care of it, for he had robbed his master before, and I would take it back and shew him - but when I was in bed Lee came and asked for it. I said,

"You gave the carman some, and sent me some, and I intend to take it back." I went and told Mead so.

RICHARD LEE . I never gave it to anybody or sold it - They went through the shop while I went to see if the privy was empty.

POOLE - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-165

272. WILLIAM SMITH and JAMES BAKER , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , an iron scraper, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Slack .

DANIEL REARDON . On the 23d of December, in the evening; I saw the prisoners in Crown-street, Baker was loitering about a marine store shop, Smith saw me and gave him a shove. I watched them, and saw Smith pushing Baker on. I crossed over and took Baker, and asked what he had; he said, a scraper, and that it belonged to him; I turned round and saw Smith running off. Baker said he picked it up, and afterwards said it would save me trouble, that he got it at the corner of Phoenix-court, Long-alley, from a door. I went to Mr. Slack, who claimed it, and as I returned from the office, I saw Smith, and told Ballard to take him.

RICHARD SLACK . I live in Long-acre. I lost a scraper on the day in question, and believe this to be mine.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I saw Smith, with several others, about the office door; Reardon had described him to me, and I took him.

BAKER'S Defence. I lodge at a public-house in Catherine-street, Strand. I was at ten in the tap-room, and gave a man, who appeared a smith, a pot of beer for it. I went out and met Smith, who went with me to sell it.

SMITH'S Defence. I met him, he asked me to go with him to sell it; they would not buy it.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-166

373. SARAH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of William Lindsell .

WILLIAM LINDSELL . The prisoner nursed my wife. On the 8th of December I missed a shawl from the drawer, and found it in pawn. I know it by the spots upon it.

JOSEPH SARSON . I am a pawnbroker. I did not take this shawl in myself, but in the evening the prisoner brought the duplicate, and asked 2 s. 6 d. more upon it - she said it was her own. I gave her in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-167

374. JOHN WHALIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , two trays, value 4 s. , the goods of William Farlow .

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter, and live in Carlisle-street. Phillips is a dealer in marine stores, and lives in Crown-street, Soho. On the 15th of December, about nine o'clock at night, I was passing his shop; Mrs. Phillips called me in to ask a question about some boys who had been taken, and while I was there the prisoner came in, and offered two tea trays for sale; I asked where he got them - he said they were his own; I took him to the watch-house; he begged me to let him go. I said he had taken them instead of 3 s., for work he had done as a

tailor for a young man, that he did not know where he was, and would not tell who he was; he said next morning, that he got them from Mr. Cousins, Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields.

SARAH FARLOW . My brother, William Farlow live in Great Earl-street, Seven-dials; and keeps a broker's shop . I saw these trays safe on the 15th of December in the morning, and did not miss them till the 18th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES COUSINS . I live in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, and am a tailor. I have no knowledge of these trays, they were never in my possession. The prisoner appeared greatly distressed at the office, and seemed to feel his situation.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-168

375. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 26th of December , a pair of shoes, value 10 s. , the goods of William Lucken .

THOMAS LUCKEN . I am the son of William Lucken , shoemaker , Windmill-street, Haymarket . On the 24th of December, the prisoner came to work for my father, he brought his work home on the 26th about five o'clock in the evening, and asked for his money. I said, my father had some friends, and I did not like to disturb him. I turned my back to the window, and heard a jingle against the gas lamp, turned round, and saw a pair of shoes sticking out below his apron. I called my father, who said a pair was gone from the window; he then pulled them out, and said

"There they are, and I want my money."

WILLIAM LUCKEN . My son called me, I charged the prisoner with taking the shoes - he took them from under his apron, saying, "Here they are;" he told the Magistrate he only took them up to look at.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I merely took them to look at, and did not put them under my apron.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-169

376. JOSEPH EDEN was indicted for stealing on the 27th of November , a reticule, value 2 s.; a watch, value 10 l.; a chain, value 30 s.; two seals, value 20 s.; a key, value 1 d.; and two shillings, the property of Eliza Hunter , from her person .

MISS ELIZA HUNTER . I am single . On Thursday the 27th of November, at half-past three o'clock, I was in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury . I had my reticule-chain twisted round my finger. I had just crossed the street. The prisoner came on one side of me and snatched it from me; it contained the articles stated in the indictment. I could not swear to his person till he was brought to the office, which was on the Saturday; he was dressed quite different to what he was before; at the time of the robbery he had a brown coat and velvet collar. I pointed him out from several others at the office. He had turned round to see if I was pursuing him. I pursued him through several streets, and had him in view all that time, till I lost him in an instant. I have no doubt whatever of his being the man. I have found none of my property.

JOHN BURROWS . I am errand boy to Mr. Hunt, of Charles-street, Soho. I was in Charlotte-street, and saw the prisoner snatch the lady's reticule; I saw his face, and am sure he is the man. He immediately made off down Streatham-street. I was ten or twelve yards from him. I knew him again when I saw him at the office.

JOHN HERBERT REEVES . I am apprenticed to Mr. Spencer, of Vernon's-place. I was in Charlotte-street, and saw a person snatch the lady's reticule and run away with it. I have no doubt of the prisoner being the man, from his appearance and figure. I did not see his face. The lady pursued him, but I did not like to venture to follow.

PHILIP RILEY . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. Reardon apprehended the prisoner, and gave him into my charge. I had described him to Reardon from the description the lady had given me, a quarter of an hour after the robbery. I went, in consequence of information, to Ivy-lane, St. Giles's, and found this coat and waistcoat, (producing them) thrown down in the corner of the room on some coals carelessly, as if they had been just thrown off. It is a house of ill fame.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plaisterer, and live in Grenville-street, Somer's Town. Riley described the prisoner to me. I apprehended him on Saturday at Somer's Town. I knew him before, and have seen him wear a coat like this.

MISS HUNTER. I described him to Riley. He wore this coat; he put it on at the office, and I then knew him better.

Prisoner. I am entirely innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-170

377. JOHN GIBBS , JOHN SHEEN , and WILLIAM HAMSTONE were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of John Chandless , from his person .

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a milkman. On the 8th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was serving milk in Chancery-lane, and saw the three prisoners in company together by Lincoln's Inn-gate , following the prosecutor. Gibbs was close to him, Sheen by his side, and Hamstone behind him. Mr. Chandless crossed the road and through the gate; they followed him quite close. I put my pails down and followed, and just by the passage leading to the Student's hall , I saw Gibbs lift up Mr. Chandless's coat, and take the handkerchief out. Sheen was quite close to him, and Hamstone rather behind. I separated them. Gibbs ran towards me and I caught him; he struggled and threw the handkerchief down. I picked it up, and called to a gentleman to secure Sheen, which he did; and between six and seven o'clock that night, I described Hamstone to Wainwright, who took me to a coffee-shop, and I pointed him out there. I gave the handkerchief to Edwards.

THOMAS AKHURST . I am a porter to the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn. About half-past three o'clock I heard a bustle, and found Williams holding Gibbs. I took charge of Sheen. I had seen Hamstone in company with them a quarter of an hour before, in Chancery-lane.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. The prisoners were brought to the office. I found a good silk handkerchief in Sheen's hat.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am an officer. In consequence

of information, I took Williams to a coffee-shop, in West-street, and found Hamstone there - he immediately identified him. I asked if he had been in the neighbourhood of Lincoln's Inn - he said he had, and had seen Williams run after two boys; but he knew nothing of the robbery.

JOHN CHANDLESS . I was going through Lincoln's Inn, felt a snatch at my pocket, put my hand down, and saw Gibbs in custody of Williams, who had my handkerchief in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHEEN's Defence. I was walking before this gentleman, and by the side of another gentleman, and heard an alarm, turned round, and saw this man holding Gibbs; he said,

"Stop that boy;" the gentleman said,

"Does he mean you" - I said,

"I don't know, but I will go back with you."

HAMSTONE'S Defence. I was crossing the Inn, and saw a gentleman following the boys, but know nothing about it.

GIBBS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SHEEN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HAMSTONE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-171

378. JAMES GIBLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , two pieces of leather, value 2 s. , the goods of Oliver Owen , his master .

OLIVER OWEN . I am a currier , and live in Drury-lane . The prisoner was in my service. On the 24th of December, in consequence of suspicion, I marked two pairs of soles, and gave them to Lack.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. I received the pieces of leather, and gave them to Swann.

JAMES SWANN . I am servant to Mr. Owen. The soles were marked, and my master put me into the back parlour to watch, and about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, of the 24th of December, I saw the prisoner rubbing the counter down; he left off in the middle of it, took a pile of soles down off the shelf, selected two pairs, and put them into his bosom. He finished the counter, and went to clean my master's boots, and when my master came down, I told him, and took them out of his bosom myself.

MR. OWEN. I marked the soles, and put them on the shelf - they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence, written. I have been two years in the prosecutor's service, and am innocent. The property was found near to where I was standing cleaning boots, but I do not know how they came there.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-172

379. LOUISA WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st January , ten pieces of lace, value 2 s.; two caps, value 18 d., and a necklace, value 6 d. , the goods of Caleb Nesbit , her master .

ELIZA NESBIT . I am the wife of Caleb Nesbit - we live in Leather-lane ; the prisoner lived in my service for a fortnight and three days. I missed a necklace, and asked her if she had seen it - she said No; and on the 28th of December, I went out, and left her some work to do. When I returned, I found her in her bed-room, where there was a quantity of my things - I called her down, and next morning I went up stairs, and missed some lace caps, and other things from a bundle. I asked if she had opened the bundle; she said not; and next morning, I wished to discharge her - she would not leave me. This property was found in a bundle under the water-butt, in the back kitchen - she coloured up when I asked if it was her's - she said No. I asked when she put the things there; she would not answer. I said,

"Have you taken anything else of mine?" she said not. Everything in the bundle was mine. The necklace was taken from my bedroom drawer. Nobody but her had access to it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You found the necklace and lace in another bundle, which a man gave you - A. Yes; my caps were in the other bundle. Some of them were locked up in her room. The hostler has called her up in the morning.

JOSEPH GAYNER . I am hostler to Mr. Nesbit. On the 1st of January, the prisoner gave me a small bundle, and said it was some lace which her mistress wanted to buy of her, and she would not let her have it. I did not open the bundle, but put it in the stable, and when my mistress missed her property, I gave it to her. I was never in my mistress's room.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and received the property. The prisoner seemed sorry for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to Mercy . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-173

380. DANIEL MURPHY and HESTER HARNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a quilt, value 2 s.; a rug, value 18 d.; a saucepan, value 1 s.; a tea kettle, value 1 s., and a pail, value 1 s., the goods of John Jeeves , in a lodging-room .

JOHN JEEVES . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner Murphy took a furnished room of me on Thursday, and came in on Friday with Harnett, who passed as his wife - they remained four weeks with me, and left on the 29th, and I missed these things.

SARAH JEEVES . I was present when the man took the lodging - we have not found the things.

GEORGE BASEY . I am an officer. Murphy made a statement before the Magistrate, which was written down by the clerk, and is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-174

381. MARTHA LINES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a set of bed furniture, value 5 s.; a quilt, value 1 s.; two looking glasses, value 3 s.; a bolster, value 2 s.; two blankets, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 2 s., and a tea spoon, value 1 s., the goods of John Hughes , in a lodging-room .

JOHN HUGHES . I live in High-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 24th of December, I let the prisoner a furnished attic - on the 5th of January, we wished her to let a woman sleep with her; she seemed confused, which made me suspect her, and on the 5th of January, she went out with something under her cloak - I went up and missed this property. She came home at half-past six o'clock, and was taken.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker, and have a tea

spoon, a pillow, bed furniture, and two glasses, pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-175

382. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , a sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of John Norton .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 9th of December, I was on duty in St. John-street, and saw the prisoner loitering about several shops; lost sight of him for about ten minutes, and then saw him come back with a bundle, about two hundred yards from Norton's house, and secured him; I asked what he had got - he said a bit of cloth; I found it was a wet shirt.

CATHERINE NORTON . I am the wife of John Norton . I had washed this shirt, and hung it on a line out of window, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, and in ten minutes it was stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up at the end of a street, took off my apron, and put it in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-176

383. MARY HARDING and MARY RUSSELL were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , ten yards of calico, value 8 s.; five yards of flannel, value 6 s.; a shawl, value 10 s.; a pocket, value 3 d.; two sovereigns, and a half sovereign, the property of Abraham Murray , from the person of Johanna his wife .

JOHANNA MURRAY . I am the wife of Abraham Murray , patrol of St. George's. On the 12th of January, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I was in Parliament-street, Westminster, and saw the prisoners together; they asked me for relief, and begged me to give them something. I took them to a public-house at the corner of the street, gave them a quartern of gin and a penny loaf. I was going home to Portland-town, with a bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment. We parted in Parliament-street, but they came up to me again in the Hay-market. Russell said they would see me home, as I had been so good as to treat them - I said I knew my way, but they would keep close by me, one on each side, till I got into Conduit-street. The watchman was then calling ten o'clock. They said nothing to me, but Harding dragged my pocket from my side, and Russell took my bundle. My pocket was sown to my side, but she tore it off the strings; it contained two sovereigns and a half, with some papers. A gentleman's servant caught hold of Harding, and another took Russell; they were both immediately given to the watchman.

Prisoner HARDING. Q. Did you not drop the bundle - A. No; they snatched it from me.

ISAAC GRIFFIN . I am watchman of Conduit-street. I was calling past ten o'clock, and seeing a crowd on the opposite side of the street, I went over; a livery servant pointed out the prisoners, who were surrounded by people. The servant said, in their hearing, that they had committed a robbery on the prosecutrix; he gave me the pocket and bundle. I wanted him to come to the watch-house with me. Harding escaped out of the crowd; I sprang my rattle; two more watchmen came up and held Russell, while I fetched her back. The servant gave me the property, and went away.

(Property produced and sworn to).

HARDING'S Defence. I was never near her in Parliament-street; she came up to us in the Haymarket, and asked us to shew her the way to Oxford-street; I asked her for some drink, which she gave us, and went into another house, and called for three glasses more. Her foot slipped; a gentleman's servant was behind; the bundle fell from her, and, with her stooping, her petticoat string broke. She called the watchman, who came up; we made no resistance. The gentleman's servant said he knew nothing about it.

RUSSELL made the same statement.

PROSECUTRIX. I only went into one public-house - it is all false.

HARDING - GUILTY . Aged 30.

RUSSELL - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-177

384. MARGARET KELLY and MARGARET BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , two caps, value 1 s.; a bonnet, value 3 s.; and a pair of shoes, value 2 s., the goods of Ann Willocks ; a pair of shoes, value 18 d.; five caps, value 18 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s.; three shawls, value 5 s.; a shift, value 1 s.; three gowns, value 10 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; and two bonnets, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Blacklaw ; a shift, value 1 s.; and a pair of shoes, value 1 s. , the goods of the Directors of the Guardians of the Poor of St. Mary-le-bone .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH WOOD . Last summer, I was a pauper in St. Mary-le-bone Workhouse; the prisoners were also paupers there; we all three ran away. Bryan came and asked me to run away; I said I did not know where to go to; she then went to Kelly, who agreed to go, and I said I would go with them. We all went to bed at eight o'clock at night, and at twelve we all got up; we went across the yard, and got in at the little wash-house window into the laundry; Kelly set me to watch while they dressed themselves. We took nothing except what we dressed in, which was three gowns, three pairs of shoes, three shawls, a silk handkerchief, two flannel petticoats, two shifts, five caps, and two bonnets; they put a cap or two into their bosoms, and got out of window again, went to the gate, and found a ladder; got over the gate, dropped down the wall, and went into George-street, St. Giles's. Kelly took us there. She took out a purse of money, and said, there was eight or nine shillings; she afterwards felt for it, and said she had lost it. We staid two nights at Mrs. Pierce's, in George-street - it is a house of ill fame. They sent me to pawn a gown in Tottenham-court-road; I gave Kelly the ticket. We then went and lived at Allen's, in George-street, and slept there every night, all three together, for four months.

Q. How did you get your living - A. Kelly and Bryan went on the streets, and I was their servant for four months. I was then starving, and went back to the workhouse, and told the gentlemen the truth. Kelly paid Pierce for the lodging with a silk shawl and handkerchief. The things stolen all belonged to the paupers, except a shift and a pair of shoes.

JANE BLACKLAW . I am laundress at Mary-le-bone work-house; the paupers' clothes are in my care. The prisoners and Thorp went away in the night, about the middle of the summer; they had left the laundry between seven and eight o'clock at night. I locked the door and left all safe, and in the morning found the wash-house window broken open, and the door burst open, to get to the laundry. I missed the articles stated in the indictment; five caps and two handkerchiefs belonged to me. My husband's name is Robert. I have since seen a gown, a cap, and petticoat.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I apprehended Kelly in Church-lane, St. Giles's, and Bryan in Bainbridge-street. I had met Martin with a gown, took it from her, and went back to Kelly; she said the gown was her's, that she took it out of the workhouse when she ran away. I found a cap on her head, and the duplicates of two petticoats on her.

JANE MARTIN . Kelly gave me the gown to pawn, and the officer met me with it. I had been put out by the parish, and left my place - I fell into company with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HENRY RAINER . I have a flannel petticoat, which was pawned with me - I do not know who by. A duplicate found on the prisoner Kelly is what I gave the person.

KELLY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-178

385. GEORGE HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a wooden bowl, value 1 d.; five shillings, and four sixpences , the monies of John Ratcliff .

ALICE RATCLIFF . I am the wife of John Ratcliff , we live in Tyson-street, Spafields . On the 22d of December, about half-past nine o'clock, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, and heard a noise - went into the shop, and found the prisoner at the parlour door, just getting off his knees, and going towards the shop door - I followed him, calling Stop thief! he ran out as quick as possible. I gave the alarm, pursued him about sixty yards, and then left the watchman in pursuit, who secured him; and some time after he found the bowl with seven shillings in the mud - it was taken from my till, which contained more than that.

FRANCIS PARKER. I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and took him - I found no money on him, but six shillings in the mud.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Other people had passed that spot - A. I saw a man running after him.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge, and in about half an hour, I went in the direction he had come, and found the bowl and six shillings in the mud. He was without shoes, and said his mother was too poor to buy him any. I afterwards found a pair on the prosecutrix's area rails, and he claimed them.

(Bowl produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-179

386. ROBERT HORN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , twelve yards of flannel, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Watt .

ROBERT WATT . I am a linen-draper , and live in Broadway, Westminster. On the 14th of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was informed that two suspicious characters were luking about my place, and in less than five minutes I saw a piece of flannel gone from the door; I ran out and saw the prisoner with it, in custody.

JAMES BROWN . I was going into a shop two doors from Watts, and saw the prisoner take the flannel and run towards me; I secured him with it - he appeared distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy, in consequence of distress .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-180

387. PETER GLOVER , WILLIAM HIGGINS , and THOMAS RICHARDSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , eight shillings and two sixpences , the monies of Robert James Moggridge .

MARTHA MOGGRIDGE . I am the wife of Robert James Moggridge. On the 23d of December, at one o'clock, the three prisoners came into my shop in Tottenham-street ; we keep a coffee-shop ; they asked for three cups of coffee and two loaves, and paid me 8 1/2 d. in halfpence. They remained in the shop about two hours. I went into the next room, and my child called me, and said Glover wanted change. I immediately went into the bar and Glover stood there. I asked him what he wanted there, he said a hat; I said there was no hat there. I told him to go about his business and they all three went out together. The child immediately said something to me. I looked at the till and missed eight shillings and two sixpences. I immediately ran out, and saw all three running down on the other side of the way; and when they got within four doors of Tottenham-court-road, they all stopped, (not seeing me,) and I caught Glover by the shoulder dividing the money. I heard him say

"three bob," the other two immediately ran away, and he got from me also. I ran after him, and some gentleman stopped him.

Cross-examined By MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You knew them before - A. They may have been at the shop before, but I do not recollect them. We never suffer customers to go into the bar. I saw the money in the till three minutes before; the child told me when they were gone that they had taken the money out.

GEORGE HART . I am a painter, and was in Tottenham-court-road, and saw the prosecutrix following Glover; I assisted in stopping him. A pocket-book was found on him, containing six shillings and two sixpences; he said he took the money from the till and divided it between the other two boys. I asked who they were; he said Higgins and Thomas Richardson , and said where they lived.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he did not say that Higgins took it and divided it between him and Richardson - A. He said so at the watch-house.

GLOVER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

HIGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-181

388. RICHARD FITSIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a pair of gloves, value 1 s., and a coat value 25 s. , the goods of William Mitchell .

WILLIAM VICKEY. I keep the Robin Hood, public-house, Windmill-street . On the 27th of December, Mitchell was at my house; he took his coat off to dance to the fiddle. I sent my servant for his coat, and as I held it over to him, the prisoner said

"Give it me and I will put it on his back." Mitchell was tipsy; he took it out of his hand and held it up to put it on Mitchell, but went out with it across his arm. This was five o'clock; he returned about eight, and I detained him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was Mitchell the only drunken man there - A. Yes. My house is frequented by tailors.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a tailor . I was drunk, and might have sent the prisoner to pawn the coat, but I do not think that I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-182

389. HENRY DUFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , six live tame fowls, price 15 s. , the property of Samuel Austin Fuller .

JOHN FROST . I am an officer. On the 15th of December, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner and another man passed me in Brunswick-place, City-road. The prisoner had a bag over his shoulder. I asked what it was - he said fowls. I told my brother officer to take the other, and he threw two fowls away. The prisoner had four in a bag; he said they were his own, that his father would not allow him to keep them any longer, and he was going to sell them where he could.

SAMUEL AUSTIN FULLER. I live at Hoxton . I lost six fowls on the 15th of December, and found them at Worship-street. I kept them in a hen-house.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man asked me to carry a bag. I told him No. He said if I would he would give me 6 d., and if any one asked about them, I was to say they were my own, and directly the officer came he ran off.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-183

390. JOHN MOORING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , six sovereigns , the monies of John Smithson , his master .

JOHN SMITHSON . I keep the Royal Oak public-house the prisoner was my pot-boy . On the the 13th of December, I gave him six sovereigns to go and get silver for them, and he never returned. I found him in custody on the 15th, and charged him with it. He said he did not know what had become of it.

JOHN PARISH . I am a publican. On the 13th of December, at eight o'clock, the prisoner brought me a a sovereign, and I gave him change. He had a pint of beer, and said he thought he should be tipsy, and left three sovereigns and thirteen shillings with me to take care of, he came for them next morning, and I gave them to him.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. On the 15th, I took him into custody; he said he did not know what had become of his master's money. - He had new clothes which he said he had had ten years; but on going to the office, he said he supposed he should be fully committed, and go to the start.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a salesman, On the 13th of December, I sold the prisoner a hat, jacket, shirt, and waistcoat, for which he paid me two sovereigns.

- PETSON. On the 15th of December, I saw the prisoner with a sovereign. He said he was going to get change.

Prisoner's Defence. I met some shopmates, and got in liquor, and lost all the money but what I bought the clothes with, and was ashamed to return.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-184

391. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , three hams, value 24 s. , the goods of Robert Thorman .

ROBERT THORMAN . I am a cheesemonger , and live in High-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner is a higler , and dealt with me. I allowed him to unpack his goods in my shop, and on the morning of the 24th of December, I missed some hams. He came again that evening, between five and six o'clock. I charged him with stealing a cheese which he denied at first. I said nothing about the hams, but gave him in charge, and they were found in his cart.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not put a mark on it after you found it - A. No. I cure some of my hams, and mark them before I send them to be smoked.

COURT. Q. Was his cart at your door when he was given in charge - A. Yes, and a ham was found in it - I never sold it to him.

JAMES PHYBUS. I am servant to the prosecutor. When the prisoner was taken into custody he desired me to take his horse to his stable. I went and looked into his cart, and found a ham, which I knew to be my masters.

Cross-examined. Q. How many shopmen have you - A. Two; I once sold him a knuckle of ham.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner on a charge of stealing a cheese, nothing was said about the ham. His cart was at the door, and the ham was brought to me by Phybus.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am an officer. I have two hams which I found in the prisoner's stable, one in the manger and the other behind the door.

JAMES PHYBUS . I know the stables to be the prisoner's, he took me there to shew them to me. I was with the officer when he found the hams. I found another ham at his lodgings.

ROBERT THORMAN . The ham found in the cart is mine, and the one found at his lodging, and one of these found in his stable I can swear to, as it has a mark on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you sell him any hams - A. Only one, that was a Yorshire ham tainted.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a malicious thing on the part of the shopmen, who were in the habit of selling me hams, and I suppose they stole them, and so they deny selling them to me. They said if I would give them 1 l. they would make it up.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN. It is false, I never offered to let him go.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18240114-185

392. MARGARET COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a coat, value 4 s.; a pelisse, value 6 s.; a poker, value 1 s.; a pair of tongs, value 2 s.; a shovel, value 1 s.; a shift, value 3 s.; a bed gown, value 2 s.; and

two napkins, value 1 s. ; the goods of Martin Wilson , her master .

MARY WILSON . I am the wife of Martin Wilson . The prisoner came to nurse me in December, and while she was with me I missed the articles stated in the indictment; when I wanted to get up. I missed my pelisse, and asked her about it, she at first denied it, then said she had taken and pawned these things at different pawnbrokers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY LOVE . I am a shoe-binder. I was fetched to Wilson's, and opened the prosecutrix's box in the prisoner's presence; she missed things; and charged the prisoner with taking them; she told me to pacify the woman, and said she would tell me; that she had pawned the shift, bed gown, fire irons, and coat.

THOMAS ROLFE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Shadwell. On the 20th of December the prisoner pawned a pelisse for 3 s.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Ratcliffe-highway. The prisoner pawned a set of fire-irons with me.

HENRY HAWKINS . On the 16th of December the prisoner pawned a coat with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what I said, for I was so flurried.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-186

393. HENRY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a looking-glass, value 15 s. ; the goods of Philip Crofton .

PHILIP CROFTON. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Joseph-street, Brunswick-square . On the 3d of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was on my first floor, my servant called out - I missed a looking-glass from the shop, ran out and saw somebody in Cromer-street. I made enquiry, ran into Gray's Inn-lane-road, and saw the prisoner and another; the prisoner had the glass in his hand, and on seeing me laid it down in the field, and ran. I pursued and took him, without losing sight of him.

BENJAMIN BARRY. I am an officer. On the 3d of January, I saw the prisoner in the field behind my house, with the looking-glass. I heard an alarm, ran down stairs, jumped over the wall, and found the looking-glass against the wall.

JOHN AVERY . I am an officer. I heard the cry of, Stop thief! saw a number of people running, ran after them; and the prosecutor secured the prisoner, and gave him into my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that took it, but the other boy, and it was him who had it in his hand.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-187

394. WILLIAM BENNETT and JOSEPH STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a chaise harness, value 30 s., the goods of Thomas White , and a pair of boots, value 5 s. , the goods of John Witty .

THOMAS WHITE . I am a horse slaughterer , and live in Coppice-row, Clerkenwell. On the 3d of January I found this harness at the office, which is mine. I went to the stables on the same day, and found the tiles removed and marks where they had climbed up to get through the roof. A boy could not get up without assistance.

GEORGE WITTY . I am servant to Mr. White. On the 2d of January, I was at my master's stables, on Back-hill, and fastened it up between half-past seven and eight o'clock; every thing was then safe. Next morning I found the door locked but the window unbolted, and my boots gone.

THOMAS JONES . On the 3d of January, a little after ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners at a coffee-shop in Skinner-street, Snow-hill, with this chaise-harness. I asked how they came possessed of it. Stevens said he had taken it out of pawn that morning. I asked how he got it before he pawned it - he gave no answer. Bennett then called me aside, and said,

"The harness was stolen last night from Clerkenwell." I said,

"Then you know something about it?" He said,

"Yes: I knew it was to be stolen a week ago, and I was to find a purchaser."

Prisoner BENNETT. Q. I told you the other boy had told me that it was stolen - A. No; he said it was stolen.

EMANUEL VICKERY . I lodge with Bennett, in Holloway-row, Shoreditch; he was not at home on the night of the 3d of January. I went to the coffee-shop at the corner of Fleet-market next morning, and saw the prisoners with the harness on the table. Bennett was cleaning the bridle; he threw a handkerchief over it, and went out. I went over to Stevens and said,

"I think that harness has been stolen, for Bennett has been out all night." He said,

"No, for I took it out of pawn this morning." Bennett brought a man in to buy it, but he would not, as he could not satisfy him how he got it.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I went to this coffee-shop, and took the prisoners into custody. I found a candle on Stevens, and a pair of boots on his legs, which the prosecutor claimed. The harness was there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENNETT's Defence. I came down about nine o'clock in the morning. Stevens came, and said he had got some harness out of pawn. I polished it up. He said if I could find any one to buy it, he would give me something. I fetched a gardener, who I knew wanted some. I said it did not belong to me.

STEVENS's Defence. White's servant told me to say I got it out of pawn. I was to bring him part of the money - he told me to wear his boots.

GEORGE WITTY . I know Stevens, but never told him to do it.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-188

395. JAMES BRISTOW , SAMUEL LANGSTON , and WILLIAM SAMUELS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 6 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of Elisha Dowding .

ELISHA DOWDING . I live in Dalby-row, Hammersmith , and am a cheesemonger . On the night of the 25th of November I missed a loin of pork. I had seen the three prisoners lurking about my shop five minutes before, and on the 26th they were apprehended. The pork was about a foot and a half inside the door.

ESTHER TOLBOY . On the night that Dowding lost this pork, I saw the three prisoners about the door. I knew them before. I saw Bristow go on his knees and take a loin of pork off a basket at the door; the other boys were over the road pumping water into a pail at the time, and a waggon was going by. He went down Hogg-lane with the pork, and they followed him.

BRISTOW - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

LANGSTON - NOT GUILTY .

SAMUELS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-189

396. SAMUEL AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , forty cravats, value 4 l.; seven handkerchiefs, value 7 s.; and two sheets, value 20 s. , the goods of Mary Finding , widow .

MARY FINDING . I am a laundress , and live in Huntingdon-place, Hoxton . On the 23d of December I put this linen in a pan in my wash-house, and about a quarter past four I left the wash-house, returned about half-past five, and missed them. I found three of the cravats on the 23d.

CHARLES MEARS I am servant to a gardener, and live in Grove-street, Hackney. On Christmas-day I was crossing the fields, and the prisoner called after me; he had two white handkerchiefs, and asked me to buy them for 8 d.; they were wet, and he took them to my mother, who said if I did not take them back she would throw them on the fire. I went back to him in the field and asked for my money back. I knocked his hat off, and out fell another. I picked them up, and went to his mother and gave them to her, and said her son wanted to transport me.

CHARLES HARROW . On Christmas-day, about dusk, Mears came running up and said he had bought two handkerchiefs of the prisoner, who is my son-in-law; he gave my wife three handkerchiefs. I gave them to Goodluck.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I received them from Harrow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the fields, and Bill White , a black fellow, came up and said,

"Mind these for me." I said,

"Where did you get them?" He said he bought them. I put them into my hat, and presently he came up and said,

"Sell them to Mears." I saw Mears, and sold them to him, and gave White the money.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-190

397. JOHN MEMORY was indicted for stealing, on on the 2d of January , a gown, value 10 s. , the goods of Mary Elsbury .

MARY ELSBURY . On the 2d of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I took my gown to Mrs. Tilbrook's, Leader-street, Chelsea , to be mangled.

MARY TILBROOK . I had Elsbury's gown, and put it into a basket, inside the window - it stood about two yards from the door, and missed it next morning, when it was applied for.

JOSEPH COOPER. I am a constable. On the 4th of January, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Duck-lane, Westminster, coming out of No. 9, with something in his apron. I stopped him, and asked what it was; he said a gown, which he had got from one of the girls in that house - I took him back; he said to three-girls there,

"Charlotte, did not you give me this gown?" They all denied giving it to him - one was named Charlotte - she denied it; he said

"Then if I must tell you the truth, I found it last night as I came from Pimlico." It was quite wet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-191

398. JAMES MEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a hat, value 5 s., the goods of James Richardson , from his person ; and WILLIAM DUNSLOW was indicted for feloniously receiving the same well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the evening of the 8th of January, I was on duty at Chelsea, and was called into the Coach and Horses, public-house , and found a hat under the settle, where the prisoners sat - they were close to it.

PATRICK FITZGERALD . I live at Chelsea, with Mr. Mayo. On the evening of the 8th of January, I saw Mead take the hat off James Richardson 's head, as he went into the Coach and Horses, and give it to Dunslow, who was with him, and both sat down in the tap-room. Richardson was looking for it in the passage - Bartlett came, and found it under the settle, which was about fifteen yards from where they took it.

JOSEPH POINTER . I was at this house, and saw Dunslow bring a hat into the tap-room - Mead followed him in, and they sat down on the further settle. They put it under the settle; there were about twenty people in the tap-room. Richardson is not here.

DUNSLOW'S Defence. I found it there, but did not put it there.

MEAD'S Defence. I was drinking with Richardson at the Duke of York, public-house - we agreed to go to the Coach and Horses, and were larking, and by some means his hat fell off - I took it into the tap-room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-192

399. DANIEL NAGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 8 lbs. of soap, value 4 s., and 3 lbs. of starch, value 2 s. , the goods of Magdalen Swan .

ELIZA SWAN . I am the daughter of Magdalen Swan; we live at Wapping-wall . On the 6th of January, at seven o'clock in the evening, my sister called me; I ran into the street, and saw the prisoner at the top of the alley adjoining the house - it is no thoroughfare; I accused him of stealing some soap - he made no answer, but ran down the alley. It was dark, I returned to the shop, and missed three bars of soap and two parcels of starch. Nicholls produced the soap in a few minutes.

CHRISTIANA SWAN . On the 6th of January, I was in the back parlour, and saw the prisoner in the shop, taking things out of the window - nobody was in the shop. I told my sister, who followed him out; I followed her, and saw him standing in the alley adjoining the shop. She charged him with taking it; he said nothing, but ran down the alley.

JAMES KIRBY . I live next door to Swan. Christiana Swan called out; I ran out directly and went down the alley, with another man and a candle, and found the prisoner about the middle. He asked what was the matter; the other man said,

"You know what is the matter, you rascal - you have robbed the shop." We took him to the shop, and gave him in charge - the soap and starch were brought in.

JANE NICHOLLS. My husband lives at No. 2, in this alley. I picked up some starch in our yard, as if it had been thrown over, for the paper was burst. Three cakes of soap laid close by it.

EDWARD BEALE. I am an officer. I was called to the shop about seven o'clock, and took the prisoner. I found the scrapings of soap on his waistcoat buttons, and he had a large pocket behind his jacket which was greasy - he said it was bacon fat; I scraped it off, and found it was soap.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down the court for a necessary purpose, and declare my innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-193

400. GEORGE PILKINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , ten watch-chains, value 5 s.; three necklaces, value 12 s.; a pair of ear-rings, value 3 s.; and three napkins, value 6 d. , the goods of Jonathan Purchis Paine .

PHILIP RILEY . I am a patrol. On the 18th of December, about six o'clock, I was opposite Mr. Payne's shop, and saw the prisoner standing against his window, looking about him; he came from the window, and ran across; I caught hold of him, and took a knife out of his hand; and in his coat pocket I found the articles stated in the indictment. He said a man told him to do it.

JONATHAN PURCHIS PAINE . These things are my property. I left my shop for three minutes, and on returning found Riley with the prisoner. The window had been broken before, and I put a piece of glass over it; it was pushed down, and the things taken.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommend to Mercy . - Confined 1 Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-194

401. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a tub, value 3 s. , the goods of John Carpenter .

JOHN CARPENTER . I am a cooper , and live at Hatton-wall . On the 8th of December, I missed this tub, my boy brought the prisoner in with it.

JAMES CHOPPING . I am carpenter's servant. I missed this tub, ran out after the prisoner, and overtook him in Liquorpond-street, with it on his shoulder. He said he found it; I told him to come back; he then begged my pardon, and said he would do so no more, and that he was distressed.

REBECCA CHOPPING . I was opposite the shop, and saw the prisoner take this tub.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18240114-195

402. FREDERICK SPOONER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a pair of boots, value 14 s. the goods of Edward Atkins .

EDWARD ATKINS . I lodge in Crawford-mews, Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner lodged in the same room. I lost a pair of top-boots; he denied taking them, and left the lodging directly; and went to live in Bell-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PERRY. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street. On the 15th of November the prisoner pawned these boots.

H.R. BUCKRIDGE. I am an officer, and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not leave without telling him where I was going to. I left because he charged me with the theft.

PROSECUTOR. He told me where he was going.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-196

403. ANN WALTHOW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , thirty halfpence , the monies of Robert Dalton .

ROBERT DALTON . I am a butcher , and live in Peter's-lane, John-street ; the prisoner lodged at my house with her parents. I desired Handley to watch with me. I got under the staircase, and about a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning, heard her come down stairs quietly, she opened the door and went into my room, took up a 5 s. paper of halfpence, and was going up stairs with it; we went out and took it from her hand.

THOMAS HANDLY . Dalton's account is correct.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-197

404. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , nine brass weights, value 3 s. , the goods of William Henry Walker .

WILLIAM HENRY WALKER. I live in Hart-street, Covent-garden, these weights are mine. I have a mark on them. I did not miss them till the officer brought them to me.

SAMUEL BACK. I am an officer. On the 7th of January I met the prisoner in Villiers-street, Strand; he went into Buckingham-street; I stopped him, and asked what he had got, and found the weights in his pocket; he said they were his mother's. I took him to her; she said she knew nothing of them, only that he had taken them out with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in Doughty-street.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-198

405. MARY WHITTINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a sauccpan, value 2 s. , the goods of John Bullock .

JOHN BULLOCK. I am an ironmonger , and live in Seymour-place, Bryanstone-square . On the 25th of December this saucepan stood at the door, the prisoner was loitering about; my boy was going out, and gave an alarm. I went out, and saw her running with the saucepan in her hand; she saw me, and ran off. I overtook her; she had put it down.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-199

406. EDWARD WELLS and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of Isaac Phillips .

ROSSETTA PHILLIPS. I am the wife of Isaac Phillips , who keep a sale-shop in Crown-street, Soho . On the 15th of December, I was in the back parlour; two officers

brought the prisoners into my shop, and asked if I had any thing; I looked and thought I missed a handkerchief; they said they saw them take them out of the window; I do not know when I put it there; a pane of glass was broken, the handkerchief is not here. I might have sold it for all I know.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners about this shop a little before nine o'clock in the evening, on the 15th of December, standing together - Wells's arm was in the window, through a hole. I walked a few paces, then saw him take the handkerchief from the window and give it to Davis. I took Wells, and took him into the shop. Phillips said she had lost a handkerchief, and produced the piece it was cut from. Davis ran away with it. Gook brought him into the shop soon after, but the handkerchief was not found.

THOMAS GOOK . On the night in question I observed the prisoners close against this window - we watched them, and saw Buckland try to take hold of one of them. Davis ran about three hundred yards - I attempted to pursue, and was knocked down in the road. I saw him throw something away at the corner of Moore-street. I was knocked down, and Ewer took him.

WILLIAM EWER . I am an officer, and was with Gook. Buckland called out Stop him! Davis ran away, and I after him - he threw something from his left hand. I caught him in my arms in Great Russell-street.

WELLS'S Defence. The woman said she had not lost anything. Ewer said,

"Now, what is the use of saying that - you know you have."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-200

407. WILLIAM DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a cheese, value 33 s. , the goods of Thomas Drake and John Ellis .

THOMAS DRAKE . I am in partnership with John Ellis ; we are cheesemongers , and live in Shoreditch . I found a cheese at the office, which is mine (looking at it). Here is a place where I tore a piece of paper off it.

PHILIP CHARLETY. I am shopman to the prosecutors. On the 22d of December, between six and seven o'clock, this cheese was safe on the step of the door. I missed it five minutes after.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a constable. I met the prisoner between seven and eight o'clock, and another man, in Gun-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner had this cheese on his back, covered with a coat. I stopped him. He said a man was to give him a pot of beer for carrying it. He tried to escape, and the other man ran off. He said the man who gave it him was coming along - I waited, but he did not come, and I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say that the man behind gave it me, and ask you to take him - A. He said nothing of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who asked me to assist him in carrying a parcel. I took it a short distance, was stopped, and on looking for the man he was gone.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-201

408. WILLIAM WICKENDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a hat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Chapman ; and MARY TURPIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a hat-maker , and live in Strutton-ground. On the 1st of January, in consequence of information, I went and found the prisoner Wickenden in bed at his lodgings in Pye-street, and asked him what he had done with the hat. He said he knew nothing of it. I found it next day at Turpin's house. I will not swear to it, or say that I lost one, as I was not at home at the time.

SARAH HAWKER . I saw Wickenden, with three others, standing at Chapman's shop-window, and saw him take a hat off the window and run away with it - it was on a shelf by the door; there was a paper over it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. On the 14th, I went to Turpin's with a search warrant - she requested to go to fetch her husband; returned, and said,

"Here is a hat I have bought," (producing it;) and said she gave a man 4 s. 6 d. for it, It is an old iron shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-202

409. SARAH EVANS and JOHN GANDARD , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , thirty yards of ribbon, value 16 s. , the goods of William Pite .

WILLIAM PITE . I am a haberdasher , and live in the City-road . On the evening of the 9th of January, about ten o'clock, Evans came to my shop and looked at some ribbons, and bought a yard and a half, and then another yard. I missed a piece of ribbon, and threatened to send for a constable. She was sitting in a chair, and immediately threw a piece down. The man was in her company.

M. A. PITE. I was in an adjoining room, and saw Evans take two pieces of ribbon from the drawer and put them into her pocket. I came into the shop and told my husband, who sent for the officer. She then took it out of her pocket and dropped it.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I was coming by, and seeing a crowd went in. This ribbon laid on the floor.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am a constable. I had watched the prisoners in company from Old-street to this shop. They live together.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 47.

GANDARD - NOT GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-203

410. JOHN FOSTER , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , four coach cushions, value 8 s. , the goods of James Legg .

JAMES COLE . I am servant to James Legg . On the 25th of December I was driving his coach, which broke down in Earl-street ; I went home for assistance, and on returning, missed four cushions from it. I was absent four or five hours.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I was in a public-house in Earl-street, about ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner get in, and take the cushions out. I asked what he was going to do with them. He said the coachmaster sent him for them; he tried to get the glasses out, but could not. He took the cushions into the public-house. I asked who the coachmaster was; he said he was sent for them. I detained him; he knocked me down and tried to get from me, but I kept him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to the public-house, and asked if I might leave them there to take care of.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . It is false.

HENRY REDFEARN . I am the publican. The prisoner brought the cushions in. Bidgood secured him.

JOHN PROCTOR . I am watch-house-keeper. Bidgood brought him to the watch-house. He said the driver sent him for them; the driver came, and said he had not; he then said some man in Oxford-street sent him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a coachman in Compton-street, who said it was a shame that the coach should be knocked about, and I took the cushions out to leave at the public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-204

411. SAMUEL SALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , twenty yards of stuff, value 20 s. , the property of Matthew Rickerby .

MATTHEW RICKERBY . I am a linen-draper , and live in Pitfield-street, Hoxton . On the 6th of January, about five o'clock in the evening my boy alarmed me; I had set him to watch; he said a piece of stuff on a pile was moved; he called out again presently, and found it moved further, and immediately after he called out, Stop thief. I rushed out and saw the prisoner, who was running, throw it down. I secured him.

MARK BASSET . I am in the prosecutor's service, and was watching the goods. I saw the stuff on the pile moved twice, which was taken quite off the third time, and run away with. I gave an alarm; my master ran out and followed the man. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-205

412. DANIEL LIVERMORE , and JOSEPH HARVEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Alfred Argles , from his person .

ALFRED ARGLES . I am apprentice to Messrs. Stevenson and Co. On the 11th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was at Ball's-Pond . The prisoners had followed me from Islington, they pushed against me, I felt a pull at my coat-pocket - turned round, put my hand down, and the handkerchief was missing. I am sure they are the boys who pushed against me. They ran away as soon as I turned round.

GEORGE HEAP . On Sunday the 11th of January, I was on Newington-green, near the bridge; the prisoners ran by me together; I saw Harvey pass a handkerchief to Livermore, who threw it into a gravel-pit. I stopped them both two hundred yards off, and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners put in a written statement, acknowledging the offence, and expressing their contrition. They received a very good character.

LIVERMORE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HARVEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18240114-206

418. GEORGE SEGAR , JOSEPH SEGAR , and HENRY ST. PIERS , were indicted, for stealing on the 15th of January a shawl, value 24 s. the good of Samuel William Cousins , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a linen draper , and live in Norton Falgate . I knew all the prisoners by their frequently being at my shop. On the 5th of January the two Segars came, and St. Piers walked backward and forward: they bought some small articles, and after they left, I missed a silk shawl off the counter. They came again two days after, and bought some small things; I was at my desk; they did not see me; my shopman was serving them. One put his arm over the counter, and pulled a shawl over; then engaged the shopman's attention, while the other unbuttoned his waistcoat and put it in. I jumped out and caught them both outside the door, unbuttoned Joseph's dress, and found it; St Piers ran away.

JOHN AARON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of January, George Segar pledged a shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE SEGAR'S Defence. I was led away by a man who said

"Go in and get half a yard of cloth and take what you can find," he sent me to pawn the shawl, and gave us 1 s. each.

GEORGE SEGAR - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JOSEPH SEGAR - GUILTY . Aged 8.

Whipped and Discharged.

ST. PIERS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-207

NINTH DAY.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

414. JAMES WALSH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , a bag, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Fagg , Thomas Harrington , James Shrimpton , Nicholas Brown , Henry Whitmarsh , William Stevens , and John Church .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Fagg , and others his partners.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Ray .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RAY . I am a guard to the London and Exeter Auxillary mail , which starts from the Bell and Crown, Holborn. On the 5th of January, between half-past six and seven o'clock in the evening, while I was loading my coach at the Bell and Crown, the prisoner was standing by, in the yard; two or three more men were there; he stood there for about twenty minutes. I then observed him on the coach; and when I got up, I touched him on the shoulder and said

"Where are you going;" he said to Hounslow. The coachman and his brother were on the box. I had put a leather bag into the boot which contained sundry small parcels going to various places on the road; it was the last thing that I put into the fore-boot, which was not above half full - there was more space above it than would have held another bag of the sort. The boot is two and a half feet or three feet deep. I stopped at the Gloucester Coffee-house, Piccadilly, and put two or three deal boxes on the top of the bag, and nearly filled the boot. The coachman and his brother both got down, and immediately after that the prisoner got on the coach-box, and continued there while I was putting these parcels into the boot; and after that I went into the coffee-house for the weigh-bill, and called to the coachman that I was ready. I came round in a minute or two to get up behind, and saw a man standing behind pulling at the leather bag, on the near side, close to the fore wheel. The prisoner was assisting

him; they had each got hold of the bag, the prisoner stooping down and raising it up with his left hand, to case it out of the boot. The man on the ground could not have got it out without assistance.

Q. Must it have been removed from the place where you left it - A. Certainly; they had got above half of it out - they must have got the whole quite from the place where I had left it. A deal box which was on the top of it was moved, and caught at the top of the boot. I sprang forward, pushed the man away, and put the bag back again - turned round, and the man was gone - the prisoner got off the box as soon as he could, and moved towards the tail of the coach. I stood before him, and asked where he was going, two or three times, but he did not answer. I said,

"You told me you was going to Hounslow" - he said he had left a parcel in the City, and must go back for it. I said I thought he was colleagued with the other man, and gave him in charge - he said he was a gentleman. The boot of the coach has a wooden flap, and a leather cover over it. I had put them both down after putting the parcels in.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you responsible for the things in the coach - A. Certainly. I signed a deposition at the office. The prisoner asked me to pick up a glove which he had dropped, and I did so. The bag is three feet long; it is a soft leather bag. I cannot say whether it stood on its bottom, or its side. I twisted the top round. The flap opens against the coach - I do not know which of them opened the flap. I saw the bag partly out of the boot - it was certainly quite moved from the place I put it in.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How much space did the bag take up - A. It was about eight inches or a foot below the mouth of the boot; it could not be out of the boot at all without being lifted entirely out of its place, where I put it; or it could not have been so far out of the boot.

FRANCIS VICKERS . I am coachman of this mail. On the 1st of January, the prisoner got on the coach-box to go to Hounslow, and when we got to the Gloucester Coffee-house, he got off, and said he should go no further, for he had forgotten a parcel and would go and fetch it. On the 5th, he came into the inn yard, and rode on the roof, and in Piccadilly an alarm was given, just as I got on the box to start; I saw him stooping down; he pretended that he had dropped his glove on the near side of the coach; the guard gave it to him; I asked him if he knew the man who was with him, assisting to take the bag out; he said he did: he turned round to me and said,

"What is your fare to Hounslow?" I said, 2 s. 6 d. He said he only gave me 2 s. the other night. I said it was 2 s. 6 d., which he gave me, and was getting down. Kirk got down and assisted in stopping him: he was stopped on getting off the coach.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he knew the other man - A. Yes, I am positive of that. I told the Magistrate so. I did not see the guard put the bag in; the boot was nearly full, and is about two feet and a half deep I believe. The flap opens towards my feet; a man on the box can easily open it.

Q. Why do you say he pretended to drop a glove - A. Because I supposed he dropped it to take off our attention. It was dropped on the ground, not into the boot.

RICHARD KIRK . I am coachman of the Bath mail. On the 5th of January, I was on the Exeter mail, and saw the prisoner stooping down, helping to pull the bag out of the boot; another person on the ground, with one foot on the wheel, was pulling it out as quick as he could; the whole of it was not out; the mouth of it was out as far as it could get; the bottom of it was moved a considerable deal, it was as far out of the boot as it could come, the box being on it; they were both pulling it.

COURT. Q. Supposing the bag to have been put in after other luggage had filled up a space in the boot, might not the bottom of the bag be still resting on that other luggage - A. I do not think it possible; it must have been lifted from the place it had stood on, or it could not be so much out; the man on the ground pulled it down, and the prisoner put his left hand down to raise it up, to assist him.

JAMES CRANSTON . I am a coach-master. I was unloading my coach; a person on the ground was pulling a bag out of the Exeter coach boot. I saw him go up, step on the wheel spoke, then take hold of the bag; the prisoner laid hold of it at the same time; he laid hold of the same end as the other man, pulling it out; he let loose of that end and took hold of it lower, and pulled it still more out of the boot.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you saw the bottom of it clean out - A. No.

WILLIAM KENT . I am clerk at the coach-office. The proprietors' names are correctly stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. The coach stopped. I dropped my glove, and was stooping looking for it; the guard came by, I pointed to my glove, and he gave it to me. I never touched the bag I declare.

GUILTY.

Believing the prisoner lifted the bag from the place on which it rested, with intent to steal it, but was interrupted.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18240114-208

415. WILLIAM BRANDON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , a shift, value 3 s.; a pair of stockings, value 8 d.; and a quilt, value 9 s., the goods of James Clark ; a pair of boots, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Foy ; and a pair of shoes, value 3 s., and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward Lawler .

ELIZA CLARK . I am wife of James Clark ; we live in Peter-street, St. James's . I missed this property. The prisoner came to lodge with me on Monday, and on Friday evening I left him sitting by the Kitchen fire, and went out; returned in twenty minutes, and he was gone. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which I had left to air on a line in the kitchen. When he was taken, a pair of stockings and boots were found on his feet, which are part of the property.

JAMES CLARK . I met the prisoner in Lambeth-street, on the 20th of December, with the boots on his feet, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS FOY . I lodge in the same room, and went to bed at six o'clock, and when I awoke I missed my boots, which I had just pulled off - he was taken with them on his feet.

(Boots produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD LAWLER . I missed some stockings off the line, and my shoes from under the bed. I was out at the time.

THOMAS GOOK . I received him in charge, and took

the boots off; but he had no other stockings. He said he had sold the rest of the things in Petticoat-lane, for 2 s.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-209

416. CAROLINE VARLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , twenty-four steel ornaments, value 2 s.; twelve yards of tinsel lace, value 6 s.; three yards of gilt leather, value 18 d., and a pound of spangles, value 20 s. , the goods of Robert William Elliston ; and ANN WOOD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

HENRY BANKS . I am master tailor of Drury-lane Theatre . Varley was employed in the dress-making department, and had access to the materials. The articles stated in the indictment were in general use, on the work-table, on the 19th of December, and are the property of Robert William Elliston .

WILLIAM HENRY TYSON . I am clerk at the Theatre. On the 10th of December. I was watching in the Hall of the Theatre, and saw Varley go out - I followed her to No. 5, Princes-street; the name of Wood was over the door. She asked a person in the shop for Mrs. Wood, and was informed that she was not at home, but would be back presently - she waited a minute, and said she would call again. I stopped her at the door, and told her Mr. Banks wanted her - she returned with me after a little-hesitation. I waited outside of the room while she was searched.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a patrol. I was fetched to Mr. Winston's room in the Theatre. Varley was searched by a woman, but nothing found. I heard her say she had gone with intent to sell this lace to Mrs. Wood, and had taken it from the work room - she said she had nothing about her. I said,

"Then where is the lace you went to sell;" she said it was in her work-box, which she had hid behind the scenes. I took her there; she stooped down, and picked a bag up, put it into my hand, and I found this lace.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a patrol. I went with Cousins to Wood's, and found 2 lbs. of spangles behind the counter, also twenty-four steel ornaments, and some lace. She said she bought them of Varley.

VARLEY - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to mercy, believing her to be in distress .

Confined Fourteen Days .

WOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-210

417. SAMUEL STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , two horse cloths, value 40 s. , the goods of Philip Booth , John Gillyatt Booth , and Felix Booth .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Philip Booth , and others, his partners.

CHARLES MERRITT . I am carman to Messrs. Philip Booth and Co., distillers , Cow-cross. On the 15th of November, while my waggon stood in Duke-street. Whitechapel , these cloths were stolen off the horses. I found them at the office on the 13th of January.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. On the 18th of December, I executed a search warrant at the prisoner's house, in Duke-street. I found one of these cloths on a bed on the ground floor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not heard that it was a lodging-house - A. No; but I believe it is, for there were a number of beds in the house.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I found a horse cloth on a bed on the first floor, used as a blanket. I understood it to be the prisoner's house - other people lived there. I found the strappings belonging to them in the cellar.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a common lodging-house - A. There was a bed in every room.

PHOEBE WILSON. I used to go on errands for a young woman in this house. The prisoner lived in the front parlour. A good many men came in and out. I do not know who was master of the house.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18240114-211

418. HENRY HAYWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 lbs. of opium, value 30 s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to a certain person or persons unknown.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SLATER . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 13th of December, the prisoner was a labourer in the London Docks , engaged in unpacking and clearing opium - in consequence of suspicion, I took him into custody, and told him he had got something about him; he said he had nothing. I felt something hard at his side, and found a piece of opium on each side of him, under his shirt.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You told him he had something about him, which he had stolen - A. No. I did not mention his stealing it; he did not say it was given to him to carry out of the Docks, as smuggled. He expressed himself very sorry for it, and for the gentleman who had recommended him.

STEPHEN POPE . I am foreman of the South quay. The prisoner was employed to clear and pack opium, which was in the state like that produced. It is worth 15 s. per lb.

Cross-examined. Q. You missed none - A. No; I did not know how much there was, and therefore could not.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-212

419. JOHN AGGUS , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 lb. of opium, value 15 s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to a person or persons unknown.

JAMES SLATER . This prisoner was also a labourer in the Docks, and employed at the opium ; and when I took Haywood, the prisoner immediately took his hat off, and threw two pieces of opium and a handkerchief out of his hat into the chest. I took two pieces of opium from the box, one of which I know to be one of those he threw out, they both laid loose, and the rest was closely packed.

ARCHIBALD M'DONALD. I was with Slater, and saw the handkerchief and two pieces of opium in the box. I said

"This is what came out of your hat;" he said, No. Slater said he saw it come from his hat. I was going to take him away; he said, I had found nothing in his possession, and at the warehouse he said only one piece belonged to him, and the other to Haywood.

Prisoner's Defence. If the officer had come two hours

before, they would have found the same in our possession.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18240114-213

420. ELIZABETH VOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , a jacket, value 8 s.; and three yards of cloth, value 8 s. , the goods of Michael Henry Hart .

MICHAEL HENRY HART . I am a slop-seller , and live in Ratcliff-highway , the prisoner was employed in my business. I found a parcel concealed in my passage, containing a waistcoat and trowsers. I afterwards found a jacket in pawn. I never allowed her to pawn property.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You trusted her with work to do it out of doors - A. Yes, she did not have these to make out.

WILLIAM BROCKWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Latter, of Broad-street. On the 13th of January the prisoner pawned a jacket.

WILLIAM JUDD . I am an officer. I received her in charge, and Mr. Chandler gave me sixty-one duplicates, among which was one for this jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to mercy .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-214

421. WILLIAM NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , four pairs of stockings, value 9 s., the goods of Benjamin Poole , from the person of Mary, his wife .

MARY POOLE . I am the wife of Benjamin Poole . On the 29th of December I was going home, and had four pairs of stockings in my pocket, and by Finsbury-square , by some posts, a man met me, and ran against me. I turned to go between the next posts, and the prisoner stood behind me, so that I could not pass there; the people came up, and both walked off. I missed my stockings from my pocket, and called out; the prisoner was immediately brought back with them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You are not confident of his person, as he was behind - A. Yes; they could not have fallen from the basket, for I had fastened it down on both sides - I had bought them five minutes before. I never lost sight of him.

SAMUEL HOGG . I was in Chiswell-street, and saw the prosecutrix between the posts, by the square; two men in front of her, and one behind. I saw his hand come out of the basket, with a small parcel; the man in front ran off; and he ran down Providence-row. I followed and caught him with the stockings in his hand; he said he had picked them up.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it - A. Five o'clock, it was darkish, but I was not two yards from him.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing between the posts, and three men stood there, one of them dropped a parcel. I picked it up, and followed to give it to them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-215

422. ALEXANDER ANDREWS , JOHN MASON , and CHARLES LUCASEY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Robert Rutland , from his person .

ROBERT RUTLAND . I am a silversmith , and live in Lisle-street, Leicester-square. On the 17th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Oxford-street , somebody told me my handkerchief was stolen. I instantly felt and missed it from my coat pocket, and found it at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you any mark on it. A. No, I know the pattern - I had such a one in my pocket in this state.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a coach-maker, and work for Mr. Yates. I was in Oxford-street, and saw the three prisoners crossing the road quite close to Mr. Rutland; they left him suddenly, and I asked him if he missed anything. He felt, and missed his handkerchief. They went down Poland-street laughing. I followed them into Regent-street, as far as a public-house, in Prince's-street, got assistance, and secured all three in the house. They were never out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you first see them - A. Opposite Poland-street, they crossed the road after him - it was not a swept crossing.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer. Boston and a watchman brought the prisoners to the watch-house. I saw a handkerchief lying on the floor, between Andrews and Mason - the prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had he described it - A. He said it was a silk one, and he should know it if he saw it.

MASON's Defence. How was it possible he could see us laugh when he was behind us.

LUCASEY's Defence. He says he never lost sight of us, but at the watch-house, he said that he and the prosecutor went to a public-house to get an officer to take us.

ANDREWS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LUCASEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18240114-216

423. MARY QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , a sovereign, a half-crown, and a shilling the monies of William Marshall , from his person .

GEORGE WHITE . I belong to the Guards. On the 16th of January, between five and six o'clock, I was drinking with a comrade, Marshall was there. The prisoner was drinking with him. I saw her take 1 d. out of his hand, he pulled his money out to pay for liquor, and let some of it fall, she picked it up; it was a half-crown; she then snatched a half-sovereign out of his hand, and said

"It is a farthing, old man go and look for it." I said,

"It is a sovereign, give it him, or I'll fetch a constable;" she said she had not got it. Marshall was quite drunk.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I was drinking with the prisoner. I was quite drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-217

424. GEORGE RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , a crown, a sixpence, and 7 1/2 d., the monies of James Willoughby , from his person .

The prosecutor stated his name to be Joseph instead of James.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-218

425. CHARLES AVELING was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of January , two carpenters' squares, value 5 s.; and a gauge, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Lawrence .

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I am a carpenter , and live in Hampstead-road . On the 13th of January, I was at work at a house there, and left about half-past eight o'clock; I had locked the door; returned about nine, and found the staple drawn and the prisoner in the house; he had been painting there about a week before. He asked if his partner was there; I said No. He went away, saying he would see if he was in the other house, and in about a quarter of an hour I missed two squares and went to the other house, but he was not there.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 13th of January, the prisoner pawned one square with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-219

426. MARY DALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 4 lbs. of mutton, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I am a butcher , and live in Skinner-street, Somers'-town . On the 15th of January, the prisoner came to the shop; a person said something to me, I looked, and saw her drop two pieces of mutton into her basket; she saw me and ran away, leaving her basket behind, and I found four pieces of mutton. I ran and took her in a shop just by.

GEORGE WHITEHAIRE . I received her in charge; she acknowledged stealing it.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid for it before I left the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-220

427. SOLLY ISAACS and MORRICE MARKS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a hat, value 5 s.; and 1 lb. of beef, value 8 d. , the goods of James Brainwood .

WILLIAM WAYNICK . I am an officer. On the 15th of January, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I and Williams were at Limehouse, and saw the prisoners in company. I secured Marks, and Williams followed Isaacs, who attempted to go away; he threw a hat away; he was secured, and asked why he threw it away; he said it did not belong to him. I found a piece of beef on Marks; he said a man gave it to him for his dog. Isaacs said he bought the hat for 3 s. in Petticoat-lane.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I was with Waynick; his account is correct.

JAMES BRAINWOOD . I live at Narrow-wall, Limehouse. The hat is mine, and was stolen off my counting-house desk, after six o'clock in the evening.

MARKS's Defence. A gentleman was kicking this beef before him, and said,

"Here, my lad, if you have a dog, take it."

ISAACS' Defence. I was coming home, and bought the hat of a man for 3 s.

ISAACS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

MARKS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18240114-221

428. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , three quart pots, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Fearne ; one quart pot, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Godsel ; and a quart pot, value 1 s. , the goods of William Watt .

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am a boot and shoemaker. On the 8th of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Old-street, with a blue apron, containing all these pots - I crossed over, and asked what he had there. I secured him; he said he would go with me.

JAMES FEARNE . I keep the Blue Lasts, public-house. Three of these pots are mine.

RICHARD GODSEL. I keep a public-house in Baldwin-street, City-road. One of these pots is mine. I have lost six hundred within the last four years.

THOMAS MERTON . I am a publican. One of these pots is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to take them to a public-house, to see who they belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18240114-222

429. ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , a purse, value 2 d., and twenty-one silver coins, (not current,) value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Palmer .

CHARLES PALMER . I am steward of a ship . I came a-shore, having arrived only three days from the Cape, and went into the Brown Bear, public-house , and found the prisoner there, drinking with a man. I pulled out my purse to pay for my beer - it contained twenty-one pieces of silver, partly Foreign, and some old English money - she asked if I was going to sell it; I said I was, but not there. She said she would sell it for me; I said I could sell it myself - she said she knew where to get more than I could. She took it up, and off she went with them, saying that she knew the pawnbrokers better than me, and went out. The landlady said I need not be afraid, for she would come back, so I sat waiting for her to return, but she did not. I have not seen them since.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send me out to buy you a shirt - A. Yes, before that, and she brought it to me.

ABRAHAM ELLIS . I am an officer. About the 3d or 4th of December, Palmer described the prisoner to me - I could not find her till the evening of the 15th of January, when I took her - she said she had sold the coins on Tower-hill, for 6 s. 6 d.

CHARLES PALMER . She took purse and all.

Prisoner's Defence. He sent me out to sell it, and as I returned, I met an acquaintance of his, who took the purse from me.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18240114-223

430. ELIZA WHITELOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a half-bushel measure, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Joshua Johnson .

THOMAS JOSHUA JOHNSON . I am a lighterman , and live at Shadwell . On the 15th of January I lost my half-bushel measure from my shop.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am headborough. On the 15th of January I was in Ratcliff-highway, and saw the prisoner in a shop offering this measure for sale. I asked her about it - she said it was her property, and then that she found

it on Back-hill, and then that she found it on the Ruins - it was quite clean.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I believed the place was called Back-hill, or the Ruins.

THOMAS JOSHUA JOHNSON. I am not positive that it is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18240114-224

431. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , six shovels, value 2 s. , the goods of James White .

JAMES WHITE . I live in Oxenden-street, Somers'-town . On the 10th of January I missed ten shovels from my shop - I found them in possession of the officer.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 10th of January, at half-past four o'clock, the prisoner and another passed my door with these shovels under his arm. I went out and asked how he came by them? He said he had made them. I left them in charge of a person while I made enquiry, and when I returned the other ran away. The prisoner said he had made them. He appeared very much distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man had them. The prosecutor said at the office, that they were outside his door.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18240114-225

432. HENRY EDWARDS and JOSEPH UNDERWOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , two quart pots, value 2 s. , the goods of John Martin .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18240114-226

433. THOMAS HARDWICK was indicted for feloniously receiving two medicine chests, value 3 s., the goods of William Henry Fisher and others, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN H. WAGSTAFF. I am clerk to Messrs. Fisher and Co. chemists , Conduit-street. We lost two cheats on the 21st of December. Dynan has been indicted for stealing them.

WILLIAM DENNY . On the night Dynan was taken I was at the Coach and Horses, Bolton-street. The officers came. Prichard, the landlord, called the prisoner, who was in the tap-room, and said,

"Tom, there is a screw loose about the boxes you left here for Dynan." He took him into the passage, and was in private conversation with him when Hesketh came in. I saw the whole party together - this was between seven and eight o'clock at night. I went out, and afterwards saw him in Broad-street. He told me to fetch Prichard over to him, and about half-past ten o'clock I was at the Coach and Horses; the prisoner came in; Prichard said he ought to have been ten miles from town.

NOT GUILTY .


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