Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd December 1823.
Reference Number: 18231203
Reference Number: f18231203-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace. Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 3d of DECEMBER, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. ROBERT WAITHMAN, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable ROBERT WAITHMAN , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; and Christopher Magnay , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; Anthony Brown , Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Baldwyn ,

George Beard ,

John Payne ,

Francis G. Francis ,

Henry Oertel ,

Charles Fincham ,

John Peckham ,

John Billenge ,

Lawrence Ingram ,

William Starkey ,

Thomas Newman ,

Benjamin Clutterbuck .

1st Middlesex Jury.

James Winter ,

John Kidwell ,

Henry Styring ,

John Wills ,

Samuel Keen ,

William Prichard ,

Robert Wilson ,

Henry C. Christian ,

Francis Fordenham ,

James Hummell ,

Thomas Annaford ,

John Crabtree .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Richard Grace ,

Isaac Reviere ,

Robert Mackey ,

Andrew Burnett ,

Charles Burton ,

William Tassey ,

George Sawyer ,

John Gibbens ,

William Marsters ,

William Hill ,

Richard Meller ,

John Newman .

3d Middlesex Jury.

William Simons ,

George Beard ,

Richard Cooke ,

Samuel Smith ,

Wm. Stevenson ,

Thomas Skelton ,

William Darling ,

Benjamin Smart ,

Richard Unit ,

Thomas Powell ,

Richard Green ,

John Bell .

4th Middlesex Jury.

Robert Wright ,

John Moore ,

John Grant ,

Peter Coull ,

James Castledon ,

John Cooper ,

Edward Enderson ,

George Plumb ,

Thomas Robinson ,

Robert James ,

Richard Evans ,

John Burt .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 3, 1823.

WAITHMAN, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Reference Number: t18231203-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

1. JAMES COMPTON and THOMAS DENTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hammond , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 26th of October , at Edmonton , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two coats, value 5 l., his property .

MR. WILLIAM HAMMOND . I am a medical man , and live at Southgate , in the parish of Edmonton. On Sunday night, the 26th of October, I went out about ten o'clock, returned in forty minutes, and about twelve missed these two great coats out of the surgery; I had seen them safe at nine o'clock. The persons had got over the wall, unbolted the gate, and forced open the door of the surgery, which is part of the house; they had forced the spring of the lock back - it is a common spring lock, and goes very hard; I am sure it was fastened, but it had not been locked inside - it was not double locked, but I am sure the bolt had caught; it could not be pushed open. I saw my coats again on the Tuesday, cut up - (looks at them;) I know them well, they are both mine; I have had them about a year and a half; one cost four guineas, and the other five. Compton had been in my service, and was discharged on the Saturday night previous, for being drunk - he drove me. Denton lives at Southgate.

Prisoner COMPTON. Q. The surgery does not join the house - A. It is in the yard; it does not join the house; two of my servants sleep over the surgery. The whole buildings are in a straight line, and within the wall. It is impossible that the lock could be unfastened; it fastens itself.

RICHARD CLARKSON . I am an officer. I had the prisoners in custody on the Friday after the robbery. Denton told the Magistrate something, and the Magistrate sent me with him to his house to fetch the coats. When we got there, he told his wife to fetch the coats to me; she brought me the coats' skirts in his presence, and said she had cut them to pieces, and burnt them all but the skirts.

JAMES BURTLESS . I live at Bow's-farm, near Southgate. On the Monday after the robbery, about eleven o'clock, I was at the Thatched House, public-house, Islington, and saw Denton offering these coats for sale; Compton was with him - they were like those produced. Denton had them both. They came together, had a pint of beer, and went away together. He was offering them to an old clothes man. I did not know them before, but am sure they are the men.

WILLIAM HALE . I live at Southgate. I stopped at the Thatched House with Burgess, on Monday morning, about eleven o'clock - the prisoners came up in a cart together, and stopped to give the horse some hay - I believe it was Denton's cart; he called for a pint of beer. An old clothes man came by; Compton said to Denton, "Go and sell him those two coats;" Denton called the man to him, and pulled the coats out of the cart; they were like those produced. He asked 2 l. for them - the man did not buy them; they were put into the cart again. Compton was a very little way from the Jew. Denton came to me and said, "If you hear any alarm about those coats, don't take any notice about it, the coats belong to Dr. Hammond." Compton could hear what he said. I was getting my horse ready, another clothes man came by - Denton offered them to him in Compton's presence, and after that he offered them to the pot-boy of the Thatched House; he tried one on, but did not buy it. I went away, and they drove off before me, towards Southgate. Denton knew me before very well.

THOMAS REEVES . I am a horse-patrol of Bow-street. On the 31st of October, Clarkson called on me to assist in taking the prisoners before the Magistrate. While he went with Denton for the coats, Compton was in my custody - I neither threatened or promised him; he said, "Where is Denton gone?" I said to fetch the coats - he said, "If Denton is admitted to see the Magistrate, I hope I shall, I have something to state, and will state it to you" - he said that on the morning of the 26th of October, he was in company with Denton, and again in the latter part of the day, and they agreed to go together to Dr. Hammond's to take his fowls - they waited at Denton's house till between ten and eleven o'clock, when a stranger to him came in and agreed with Denton to go with them, and between eleven and twelve o'clock all three proceeded to Dr. Hammond's house. Compton knowing the premises, he got over the wall, unfastened the gate, and let in the stranger. Denton remained at the gate to look out; they proceeded to the fowl-house. Compton broke open the out-house where the fowls are kept, and gave them to the stranger, who wrung their necks, and put them into a sack; they then came to the surgery, got in there, and took two coats - that he got the door open; he did not say whether by force or not, and as they came out of the gate, Denton said, "Here comes the patrol," and they waited on the premises till he had passed, and then proceeded. Denton left the gate, and they got to his house with the fowls and coats, and found him at home; they then agreed to go to the Cherry-tree, which they did, and stole some fowls, carried them to Denton's, killed them there, and took them to market next morning, but Compton said he never received any benefit from them. Denton was called in, and asked who the stranger was, he

said William Banks . All this passed in the absence of the Magistrate, but was repeated afterwards in his presence.

SAMUEL FITCH . I am a patrol, and was present when Compton made this statement - it was quite voluntarily.

MR. HAMMOND. My fowl-house was broken open that night, and ten fowls and a cock stolen - the neck of one was left behind, and there were marks of blood about, as if they had been killed. Compton had lived six weeks with me, and often took these coats into the surgery. The lock was broken off the fowl-house door, and the stable lock thrown into the path; the fowl-house is at the back of the stable. The coats cost nine guineas together, and had not been much worn; they are worth two guineas each - it is a spring lock, and will not keep open, it opens by a handle outside. We found it shut after the robbery.

COMPTON'S Defence. The fowls are kept in an open shed; it is not locked up.

DENTON'S Defence. On Sunday morning Compton came to me, and asked me to give him a ride to town - I said as he was out of place I would; he asked what time I should start in the morning; I said about half-past four or five o'clock - he asked if he might sit up in my house all night, till I started, which I agreed to. I had lent my cart, and as it was not brought home, at twelve o'clock, I went as far as my brother's stable to see if I could see the man coming with it. I was not nearer to the prosecutor stable than that, and at that time the young man came into my place, and in the morning I went to fetch my cart, and during that time the bundle Compton had was put into one of my flats, and afterwards put into my cart by Compton. I knew nothing of it till we got to the Four Swans, Bishopsgate, where Compton took his bundle and bag out, and went away with a friend of his, (who we met there,) and agreed to meet me at the Angel, public-house, Islington, at half-past ten o'clock - he came about eleven with one of the bundles, which he had taken out of the cart, and offered the two coats for sale there. I did not know who they belonged to till we got to the Thatched House. A Jew went by; he told me to offer them for sale to him, which I did before these two men, who I knew well. He saw me talking to Hale, and asked if I knew him; I said Yes, and then he told me whose the coats were, and I told Hale, fearing I should get into a mess about it; we drove on. He took his coats out, and left me.

WILLIAM HALE . He told me voluntarily whose they were, and offered them for sale twice after that.

COMPTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

DENTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-2

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

2. SAMUEL CROUCH was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Philip Henry Roper , on the night of the 21st of March , and stealing therein a clock, value 10 l., his property .

MR. PHILIP HENRY ROPER . I live in Manchester-street, Manchester-square . On the 21st of March, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I went up to my drawing-room - this clock then stood on a slab on the stair-case, and was not fixed. It was about twenty feet from the door, which was fastened, for I tried the door as I came out of the parlour, having lost two great coats from the passage shortly before. It has a spring lock, and cannot be opened outside but by force. I was alarmed soon after, and the clock was gone - I went and found the door ajar. I bought the clock of Captain Hall's executors, with the lease of the premises, three years ago, and gave ten guineas for it. Since it was stolen the maker's name has been erased, and a new top put on, and new handles; but I know it by the minute hand, which I had bent, and tried to straighten myself. I missed it on the 21st of March, and found it on the 15th of October.

JOHN THOMAS DUTERELL . I am a clock-maker, and live in Bond-street. I know this clock; I made it myself for Captain Hall, in January, 1819 - he lived where the prosecutor now does. The handles are now altered, and Pettigrell and Duterell our names are erased, and that of Grant inserted; I can see where it has been scratched out, and the handles are new. Mr. Hall gave me fourteen guineas for it.

Cross-examined. You sell many clocks I suppose - A. Yes. I have a private mark on this now, by which I know that I made it. I do not think I have sold another one of this description; I may have made two, but not more, not in a mahogany case.

SARAH WHEELER . I was in Mr. Roper's service. On the 21st of March, at ten minutes to nine o'clock, I went up stairs to put one of the children to bed, and saw the clock as I went up - I came down in twenty minutes, and it was gone. I had not been out of the front door that night, nor any of the servants.

HENRY FALKUS . I live in Adam-street, and have known the prisoner since 1807; he was then a gentleman's servant, since which he has bought clothes and unredeemed pledges. On the Saturday week, before the 1st of July, he came to me, and said his things were going to be seized for rent, and asked if I would buy a clock, and knowing him so long, I said he might bring it on trial for a week, which he did in about ten minutes - the price was 7 l. 17 s., and on the 1st of July, he called; I said I would keep it, and paid him - he gave me a receipt - he said he bought it at Robinson's rooms, of a young man who was going from town.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-3

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

3. SAMUEL CROUCH was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , at St. Mary-le-bone , three coats, value 3 l.; a pelisse, value 2 l.; a pair of pantaloons, value 1 l.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a gown, value 10 s.; a scarf, value 5 s.; a shirt, value 5 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; eight spoons, value 28 s., and a pair of sugar tongs, value 7 s., the goods of Cornelius Benton , in his dwelling-house .

CORNELIUS BENTON . I rent a house in Mary-le-bone-street , St. Mary-le-bone. On Sunday, the 31st of August, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving my wife at home, and returned about one with my wife, who had joined me, and found my back parlour door unlocked, a large drawer which was not locked open and ransacked. I missed the articles stated

in the indictment, which are worth about 15 l. I have lodgers.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you rent the whole house - A. I do. My wife's pelisse is worth 4 l.; I bought the cloth.

ELIZABETH BENTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out about a quarter to eleven o'clock, and double locked the back parlour door, joined my husband at chapel, and went home with him - we found the room open, and the drawer ransacked. Part of the property is here; here is a silk scarf, which I know by a join in the neck, and my own work is in it; it is worth 5 s. - here is my pelisse, which is nearly new, and worth 2 l. 10 s. - also a shirt of my husband's, a sheet, a neck handkerchief, a pair of pantaloons, and an old curtain, which were taken at the same time.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I found all these articles at the prisoner's room, on the 2d floor of No. 1, Adam-street, on Monday morning, the 1st of September, about ten o'clock; he was not at home, but a woman calling herself his wife, was; they were all in a chest, which was unlocked - there were ten false keys in the chest. I could not open Benton's door with them. I apprehended the prisoner about a month after, at No. 16, Gee's-court, Goswell-street.

Cross-examined. Q. He was not present when you found them - A. No. When he was taken, I asked what made him leave Adam-street, and asked how he came by the clothes - he said he dealt in old clothes, and got them in his business.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer, and was present in Adam-street, and in Gee's-court, where he was taken. I saw the same woman in Adam-street as in Gee's-court, in the house, but not in the same room. He said he bought the clothes found in Adam-street, and that the woman was his wife. I have seen them together since.

JOHN STAPLES . I was at Adam-street, and confirm the witnesses' statement. I have seen the prisoner and the woman together.

Prisoner. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

HENRY FALKUS . I know the prisoner, and believe he dealt in old clothes; he once lived at No. 1, Adam-street - I saw him there on the day of the search, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, running down the street. I had not heard of the robbery.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I went to Adam-street several times, but could not find him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18231203-4

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

4. EDWARD COMPTON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-5

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

5. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a bag, value 6 d., and 50,000 nails, value 3 l., the goods of John Thomas Taylor , his master .

WILLIAM HENRY HOLYLAND . I am nephew to Mr. Taylor, iron-master , of Thames-street - the prisoner was his porter . On the 10th of November, a little after eight o'clock in the morning, I was coming down the lane opposite the warehouse, and saw him come out of the door with a bag on his shoulder, and throw it into a light cart which stood at the door; it immediately drove away, rather quick. I could not see the driver for the angle of the lane. I went and told my father, who is also in Mr. Taylor's employ. Mr. Taylor was informed of it when he came to town; the prisoner was called into the counting-house, and Mr. Taylor charged him with it - he strongly denied it two or three times, but afterwards said it was true, and that one Jones, who was at the door knew all about it - Jones was once in our employ; he would not tell us who drove the cart. There were bags of nails and chains in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You could not tell whether it contained nails or chains - A. No; I supposed it to be nails by the look of the bag. He told the Lord Mayor that a man asked him to put a bag into the cart, but he did not know what it contained.

MR. JOHN THOMAS TAYLOR . The prisoner was in my service - he was called into the counting-house. I told him I was informed he had stolen a bag of nails; he denied it two or three times - I said I had abundance of proof, and he then confessed it. I pressed him to give up the receiver; he said he could not tell who it was, but Jones could tell all about it. I sent for Jones, who denied all knowledge of it. I examined my stock, and missed a bag of nails.

Cross-examined. Q. How did he confess - A. He said I know I did take it, and hope you will shew me mercy; he has lived several years with me.

DAVID DAVEY . I am an officer, and was fetched, and said to the prisoner, "Who drove the cart you put the nails into?" he said he did not know, but Jones did.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-6

6. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Keating , from his person .

THOMAS KEATING . I am a druggist , and live in St. Paul's-church-yard. On the 6th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Sweeting's-alley , looking at a picture shop, and felt my handkerchief go from my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner going in a direction from me; I followed and collared him; he pulled my handkerchief out of his fob. I gave him in charge. I observed nobody with him.

JAMES BENNETT . I am a constable. I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-7

7. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , an ingot of tin, value 20 s., the goods of Ebenezer Comfort , his master .

JOHN STANTON . I keep a metal and wire warehouse, in Shoe-lane. On the 27th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and put an ingot of tin on my counter - my boy said, "Have you brought the metal?" I said he must leave it till next day - he did so; he came about nine o'clock next morning; my boy took his address by my desire; it was William Ross ,

12, Princes-street, Barbican. I did not see him afterwards.

WILLIAM SHOOTER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner to Mr. Comfort's, with this ingot, which he claimed - the prisoner said he did take it, and would do all in his power to make his master amends.

EBENEZER COMFORT . I am a coffin furniture maker , and live in Hosier-lane . The prisoner was four months in my service. This ingot is mine - he acknowledged ledged taking it. I received a good character with him.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-8

8. WILLIAM BULL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a coat, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 10 s. , the goods of James Sayer .

JAMES SAYER . I am a painter , and occupy two garrets in Cloth-fair . On the 22d of October, at two o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, leaving these clothes in a drawer, which was unlocked, and the door also; I returned at five o'clock, and missed them. I found the prisoner in custody with them on the 25th; he is a stranger. The street door is generally on the latch.

WILLIAM CAYWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Sadler, pawnbroker, Bishopsgate-street. On the 22d of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned this suit of clothes for 17 s. I am sure of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me 1 s. to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-9

9. JAMES PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , a shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of Henry Keymer .

CHARLES MAY . I am shopman to Henry Keymer , linen-draper , Bishopsgate-street . On the 7th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner looking into the shop - I went to the door; he walked away, but afterwards came into the shop, put his hand into the window, and walked away; came again in a short time, and took this shawl out, and put it in his apron, and ran away - I followed and collared him; he dropped it. I brought him back with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against something, and picked this up, and carried it openly in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-10

10. SAMUEL GULLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a watch, value 3 l.; a chain, value 1 s.; a seal, value 8 s., and a key, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of William Thompson , from his person .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a pupil of Guy's Hospital , and lodge in Maze-pond, Borough. On the 10th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was by Blackfriars bridge - the Lord Mayor was returning from Westminster; I felt some halfpence jink in my waistcoat pocket - I immediately put my hand to my fob, and my watch was gone. I saw the prisoner with it in his hand, putting it into his pocket; the chain was hanging out of his pocket - I seized him, caught hold of the chain, and drew it from his hand; he said, "Now you have got your property let me go." I still kept my hold of him, and called for an officer, who came and took him. I produce the watch.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on this charge, and said, "I shall go from here to the Compter, from there to Newgate, and then to Botany." He escaped from me with the handcuffs on, but I took him again.

Prisoner's Defence. That man is a perjured rascal; is it likely I should state such a thing to an officer? I picked it up in the crowd.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-11

11. MARTIN PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a wrapper, value 1 s.; thirty-two pieces of printed cotton, value 40 l., and one thousand four hundred and forty-six handkerchiefs, value 13 l. , the goods of William Patterson and William Dudley .

MR. WILLIAM DUDLEY . I am in partnership with William Patterson - we are warehousemen , and live in Cheapside . On the 5th of November, a wrapper containing these goods, laid in the outer passage with others.

GEORGE LOCK . I am a constable. On the 5th of November, between one and two o'clock I was in St. Martin's-le-Grand, and at the corner observed the prisoner and two others lifting this package on a post; the prisoner took it on his back, and went a few yards down St. Martin's-le-Grand. I went up and said, "You have got a very heavy load, what does it contain?" (the others had gone down Newgate-street) - he said he did not know; I asked if he had a bill of parcels; he said No, that he was going to Gray's Inn-lane with it, and brought it from Mr. Cowley's in Lombard-street - I said if he was a regular porter he would have a knot; he said he would go with me to where he brought it from. I found the direction was covered with mud, but could see the name Dudley, London. I left it in a shop, and took him to the prosecutor's, which is about twenty-eight yards from the spot - he then said he had done it from distress.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am porter to the prosecutors, and know the package; it was safe at twenty minutes past one o'clock - it was clean then.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Ireland three months ago - I spent all my money; I was coming down Cheapside, and met two men, who said if I carried that they would reward me; I thought they were following me. I said I was going towards Gray's Inn-lane, as I lived there. I said I got it somewhere there, but could not find the house.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-12

12. DANIEL HEWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November, a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Charles Beale , from his person .

MR. CHARLES BEALE . I am a wholesale grocer , and live in Cannon-street. On the 29th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Abchurch-lane , and saw two lads standing, and as I passed them they followed

me. I felt them at my pocket, and immediately turned round - one passed me on the right, and the other went from me. I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I looked at them, and the prisoner caught my eye and ran off. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped before I lost sight of him - nobody but one of them could have done it. The handkerchief was produced.

THOMAS NASH . I live in Cannon-street, and saw the prisoner running down Abchurch-lane; he threw the handkerchief down, and was stopped immediately. I picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Beale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the Mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-13

13. CHARLES JAMES MOUNTFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , at St. Sepulchre , a bridle, value 3 s., and a mare, price 17 l. , the property of George Dancer , the elder .

GEORGE DANCER , JUN. My father, George Dancer , lives at Hurley, in Berkshire. On the 6th of November, at eight o'clock at night, I saw this mare safe in the stable of the Crispin, public-house, at Burnham, in Buckinghamshire , twenty-five miles from town - I had rode her there. I got up about seven o'clock next morning, and it was missing; the stable was locked over night. I went home, and told my father, and then came to Smithfield - I got to Smithfield on the 7th, about two o'clock in the afternoon, and found her in the market, with a bridle on; the saddle was left in the stable. A chimney sweeper was in possession of the mare; it is worth 17 l. I got an officer - the prisoner came out of a public-house, and the officer took him. I had seen him at Burnham the day before; he examined the mare's mouth as she stood in the stable. He asked where the mare came from I think, but am sure he said something about her. I am certain of him.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. On the 7th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw Dancer in Smithfield - he pointed the mare out; a chimney sweeper had possession of her. I went up and stopped him - he said it belonged to a person in the public-house. I sent Harker to the public-house with him while I held the mare - the prisoner was brought out, and caught hold of the mare, and said, "This is my property, take it from me who dare." I secured him. Dancer swore positively to it - the prisoner said something about it. I searched him, and found a spur in his pocket.

WILLIAM GRAHAM . I am a chimney sweeper, and am sixteen years old, and live at No. 2, Bishop's-court, Old Bailey; Thomas Greig is my master. On a Friday afternoon, between two and three o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the Old Bailey, with the mare, and asked if he was going to sell her - he said Yes, I asked if I might ride it - he said Yes, and I rode her into Smithfield; he followed me. I rode it up and down; Turnpenny came and asked how I came by it - I told him who gave me leave to ride it, and went with Harker to the public-house; the prisoner was brought out - he put his hand on the mare, and said it was his property. I did not know him before.

JOHN HARKER . I am a constable. I went to the Crown, public-house, with the boy - he pointed to the prisoner, saying, "That is the man who employed me to ride the mare." I brought him out to the mare, and asked how he came by it; he said he had it from St. Alban's, and swapped two donkies and a 1 l. note for it. Dancer claimed it, and it was returned to him.

GEORGE DANCER . I am positive it is my father's - he bred her.

Prisoner's Defence. About four o'clock on Friday morning. I was going to work, and met a man with a horse and mare on the road; he asked where I was going, and told me not to mind my work, but go with him, and he would give me a job to ride with him to Smithfield, and sell the mare for him, so I came with him to London - he gave me a good deal of beer, and told me to take this mare into Smithfield at three o'clock, which I did - this boy asked if he should ride it. I went into the public-house; I was stupidly in liquor, and did not know what I was doing, and soon after an officer came and took me.

JOHN HARKER . He did not appear intoxicated in the least.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18231203-14

14. LYDIA GOODHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , three yards of lawn, value 7 s. , the goods of Joseph Morris .

JOSEPH MORRIS. I am a linen-draper , and live at the South-end of Fleet-market . On the 22d of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came in, and bought a shawl of my man, which she paid 4 s. 4 d. for - he suspected she had stolen something, and went out and brought her back; she had a reticule basket in her hand, with a handkerchief over it, and under the handkerchief was this lawn, but the shawl she bought was in her hand in paper. I sent for a constable, who took it out of the basket; there were two other new shawls, and some vegetables in it. The lawn had laid on the counter, close by the shawl. She fell on her knees, and begged for mercy when the constable came.

EDWARD HANDLEY . I am servant to Mr. Morris. I sold the prisoner the shawl - the lawn was close to it; she did not ask the price of it. I observed her spread her handkerchief over it while she was looking at the shawl; she left the shop, and I missed it, and fetched her back - the handkerchief was at the top of her basket, and the lawn next to it; then some vegetables, and two shawls at the bottom, folded in paper. She was very much affected.

DANIEL TURNER . I am a constable, and found the prisoner's basket with the handkerchief on the top, and the lawn under it. She said she found the two shawls in the street - that she had laid her handkerchief on the lawn, and did not know she had got it, and must have taken it up by mistake with the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it up with the handkerchief by mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-15

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

15. JARVIS STREETER was indicted for stealing, on

the 21st of November , a hearth rug, value 2 s.; four pieces of carpeting, value 2 s.; a pair of stockings, value 2 s.; a cap, value 1 s., and a box, value 6 d., the goods of Martial Laurence Welch , his master .

MR. MARTIAL LAURENCE WELCH . I live in Wentworth-place, Bryanstone-square . The prisoner was in my service - I discharged him, but permitted him to stay some time at my house, and in consequence of suspicion, I took out a search-warrant, and went to No. 15, Fitzroy-row, where he lived, and found a hearth rug, a foraging cap, a pair of stockings, and a box, which are mine. He was present, and threw himself on his knees, and begged for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did he not say he received them from the servant, Ann - A. Yes; she denied it on her oath, in his presence.

MRS. WELCH. I only know the property to be ours.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not order him to throw these pieces of carpet away - A. Never. They were in different rooms. I gave him a small piece of druggett.

ANN HALL . I am servant to Mr. Welch. I never gave these things to the prisoner - I said so in his presence at Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the fear of losing your place your reason for saying so - A. By no means. I never gave him one of them.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I went with a search-warrant to the prisoner's apartment, and found the things in his possession. He said Ann gave them to him, and begged forgiveness.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I declare to God that my mistress gave me the things, and told me to throw them away, and Ann has given me several things, and told me not to let mistress know it.

ANN HALL . I gave him some old shoes and socks, but none of my master's property, nor ever told him to take any.

ANN OLDFIELD . I am the prosecutor's servant. I heard my mistress tell the prisoner to throw away some old carpet.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-16

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

16. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Newton , on the King's highway, on the 17th of November , at St. George , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l.; two seals, value 25 s., and a watch key, value 7 s., his property .

THOMAS NEWTON . I was mate of the ship Thompson , of Newcastle. On the 17th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the Standard, public-house, opposite the Royalty - I staid there from six o'clock until about a quarter to eleven, in company with the prisoner and four more of his companions; I was waiting for two female friends, intending to go to the Royalty. I had two pots of beer before the prisoner and his companions came into my company, and then I treated them with whatever they liked - I paid for six pots of beer, which we drank among us, and about half a pint of gin. I left there and proceeded down Ratcliff-highway, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and went up Bluegate-fields , at the door of No. 12, intending to go in there; Charlotte Gamble lived there - she and her female companion were with me; they came to me at the public-house, about ten o'clock. While I was standing at her door, the prisoner and four of his companions came up, and said nothing; but the prisoner clapped his left hand against my breast, and gave me a shove back with his right hand, and took my watch out of my pocket, and gave it to another one; they all started off immediately. My witness and her companion ran and called out, "Stop thief!" and the prisoner was stopped by the patrol, before he got out of my sight. I have not got my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What had you been doing in the early part of the day - A. I was on duty on board ship. I drank about a pot of beer before I went to the house. I saw the prisoner at the Standard directly I went in; they joined my company after I had drank two pots; we had some gin before us. I was rather intoxicated at the time I left the house. I was to have met Gamble and her friend there at six o'clock - she is a woman of pleasure. I had a glass of grog at one o'clock. Bluegate-fields is about three-quarters of a mile from the house. I felt the watch go, saw it in his hand, and made a grasp at it. I was rather intoxicated.

CHARLOTTE GAMBLE . I have known Newton eight or nine months. On the 17th of November, I lived at No. 12, Bluegate-fields. I saw Newton that night, at ten o'clock, at the Standard - I went there with a female; I had promised to meet him there at six o'clock. We stopped there about half an hour, and had a pint of beer, which I paid for. I saw the prisoner there; I did not know him before - he was in company with four more. I could not get Newton away, and I went and spoke to the watchman to help me out of the house with him - he was not much in liquor, but the prisoner and his companions wanted him to stop there with them. I went to sit down by him, and they shoved me out of the seat, and said I did not belong to him, and they would not let him go. When I got the watchman, he came away with me - the prisoner and two more helped him out of the door. Newton, I, and the young woman went away together, and they all five followed us, and one of them said if I did not let the man go, he would knock me down. When we got to my door, the prisoner shoved Newton back against the wall, and took the watch out of his pocket with his right hand, and as he was getting it out he put his thumb up to my throat, and almost throttled me. He gave the watch to one of his companions, and then ran away - I ran after them, calling Stop thief! Newton also ran. The prisoner was stopped, but he got out of my sight for a short time; I am sure he is the man who took the watch. I never saw him before.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure you never saw him before - A. Never. I was never at the Standard but once before. My friend is an unfortunate woman, and lived in the same house, but not in the same room. The prosecutor was a little in liquor, but not much; he was not tipsy. The prisoner pushed him in the breast with his left hand, and took the watch with the right, and at that time put his left hand to my throat; there is a gaslight at the door. I am certain of his person. Newton took his watch out at the public-house to see the time, and I saw his seal hanging out in the street; it is a silver

watch - I had often seen it - he had two seals and a key. Betsey Harris is the female who was with me; she was not bound over to attend here - she went before the Magistrate, but was not called. She went home last Monday to her mother's, who is very ill. Newton set up in my room all night, and did not go to bed.

JAMES CONNOLLY . I am a watchman. On the 17th of November, I was stationed in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell, and about the middle of New Gravel-lane, I heard the rattle spring, between eleven and twelve o'clock - I listened, heard it a second and third time, and heard a call of Stop thief! it came down the lane from towards me. I stopped under the gas lamp, and saw five men running towards my beat; I stepped into the middle of the road, and drew my stick ready to receive them - three ran on the left side, and two on the right; I collared the first who came up - he said, "I have not done it, that is the one who has done it," pointing to the prisoner. I directly let go of him, and laid hold of the prisoner, but still called Stop thief! after the others. The prisoner said, "I have not done it, the man you have let go has done it;" I said, "Somebody has done it, and I shall secure you right or wrong." The first person who came up was Gamble, the witness - she said, "Watchman, what have you got him?" I said, "Is this the man;" she said, "Yes, that is the man who robbed him, I will swear." The prisoner did not say a word. I searched him, but found nothing. Newton came up next, and said he was the man who had stolen his watch, and gave him in charge. The prisoner seemed out of breath.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw five persons in the road, at that time you saw none in pursuit - A. No; none of them were in sight at the time. Newton appeared tipsy, but I cannot say, for I was so flurried, having so many round me, but he appeared very intoxicated.

COURT. Q. How long after you stopped the prisoner did Gamble come up - A. About two minutes. I stopped him six or seven hundred yards from Bluegate-fields. I did not know the charge against him till Newton came up.

Prisoner. I am wholly innocent.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good Character.

RICHARD HAMILTON . I live in John-street, opposite the prisoner's father's, and keep a chandler's-shop. About half-past six o'clock in the evening of the robbery, I saw him at home - I took the newspaper over and a bushel of coals. It was half-past six to the best of my recollection - I have no particular reason for fixing the time. The Standard is half a mile off.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of youth and character.

Reference Number: t18231203-17

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

17. WILLIAM FAIRCHILD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , at St. Sepulchre , a gelding, price 30 s. , the property of Joseph Milton .

WALTER DOUGLAS FULLER . I live at No. 6, Honeysuckle-court, Moor-lane, Fore-street, and am foreman to Mr. White, horse-slaughterer, of Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross. On Tuesday, the 4th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to me there with several other boys; he had a poney, and asked if I would buy it; I said, Yes, and asked what he wanted for it - he said 15 s. I said I should give but 12 s., as it was so small; he said that was too little, but he supposed I must have it. I questioned him where he came from, and who he was - he gave me a name, which I do not recollect, but it was not Fairchild - he said it was his father's horse; I asked where his father lived; he said, "In Middle-street, Cloth-fair." I asked why his father wanted it killed - he said it was a very old horse, his father had had it ten years, and had no further occasion for it. I said we were very particular in buying horses, and should like to see his father, and would go to him with him, which he consented to very readily. I set off with him, leaving the horse in our slaughter-house, and when I came to Middle-street, the landlady came to the door of the house he said he lived in - I asked if she knew anything of him; she said No - he was present with the other boys. I then suspected him, and asked if any of the neighbours knew him - he said nobody knew him there. I asked if he was known at any public-house; he said No. I said, "You young rascal, you have stolen it I am certain" - he firmly stood by me, but at last ran from me, saying he would fetch his father. It was about four o'clock. I ran back towards the slaughter-house, and met my fellow-servant, who had the keys; the poney remained in the slaughter-house. I found out that evening where he lived, went there, and saw his aunt - but did not see him again till he was apprehended in Bartholomew-close, on the Thursday evening. I shewed the same poney to the prosecutor on Saturday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BERNARD. Q. Several other boys were in his company - A. Yes; he was the only one who spoke; 15 s. was more than its value to slaughter. One of the boys is named Crockett - the prisoner might have said his name was Crockett; he did not say it was Crockett's horse.

JOSEPH MILTON . I live at Walworth. On the 4th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I had a dark iron grey poney in Mr. Wood's field, between Stockwell and Camberwell - I went to fetch it about four in the afternoon, and it was gone. I searched everywhere, and found it on Saturday in a shed by Clerkenwell, in possession of Fuller. I had had it since the 12th of May; it is worth about 30 s. I have brought it here; it is a gelding.

Cross-examined. Q. The field is near Vauxhall - A. No; on Kennington-common.

WILLIAM CROCKET . I am twelve years old. (The witness appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath.) I live with my parents, in Little Bartholomew-close - my father is a traveller, and is now in Scotland. I have known the prisoner about six weeks; he lives in Great Bartholomew-close. One Tuesday, early in the last month, he came to me when I was at play in Bartholomew-close with one Drysdale, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and asked me to go with him to fetch one of his master's horses home - that Mr. Sadler was his master, and the horse was at grass on Kennington-common, and if I would go with him I should ride it all the way home - he said he was going to bring it home to have its tail cut. I and Drysdale went with him to Kennington-common; he took us there, and caught a little black horse; he tried to catch another at first, but could not - there were three in the field; he said he would bring

home two, as both were to have their tails cut; it was then about half-past two o'clock. I and Drysdale rode it all the way home, by turns, and when he got into Bartholomew-close he said it was his father's horse, and he was going to sell it - that his father said it was past work. He took it to Cow-cross; we both went with him - he asked Fuller 15 s. for it. Fuller said Bartholomew-close was in his way home, and he would see his father; he was to give 12 s. for it. I went to a house where the prisoner said his father lived with Fuller - he took him to a wrong house, and Fuller went to stop the horse that nobody should have it, and the prisoner went away, and told me afterwards that he went to Cow-cross to get it back, but the man would not let him have it - he said, "I got there before the man did, but they would not let me have it back - I will go and fetch my father;" he ran away, and I did not see him again till he was taken; this was when I was playing with Drysdale.

Cross-examined. Q. Your father is much absent from home - A. Yes. I go on errands for my mother; she does not let me play in the street often. I had been on an errand, and was playing when he came to me. I saw him again about five o'clock, when I was playing - I had been on an errand, and came out to play without my mother's leave. I got acquainted with him by playing about the close. He did not mention the name of Stone to me; he had a halter to fetch the horse with - it was a black horse. I was with him when he offered to sell it, and rode it about the close. I did not know where he lived. I never said it was my father's.

PETER DRYSDALE . I am twelve years old. (This witness, being questioned, appeared sensible of the obligation of an oath.) I had known the prisoner about a month - I became acquainted with him in Little Bartholomew-close, and have known Crockett about a year. On Tuesday, the 4th of November, he came to me and Crockett, and asked us to go with him to fetch one of his master's horses, and he would give us a ride all the way home - that he was going to Vauxhall-common to fetch it to have his tail cropped; he had a rope. We went with him to Vauxhall-common, and caught the horse; it was a little black one - we tried to catch another grey one, but could not; he said, "Catch the little one if you can, I may as well take that home too." We brought the one home, and rode it by turns to Bartholomew-close, rode it about there, and took it into Aldersgate-street; the prisoner told us to ride it about and he would come to us directly; he went to Sadler's yard, leaving us riding it up and down the street - he returned in about five minutes, and said he should take it to the knocker's. We went to Ford's, Cow-cross; Crockett rode it, and the prisoner asked if they would buy the horse, and wanted 25 s.; the man asked whose it was; he said it was his father's - he told him to send his father with it. He then led it away to White's, next door, and asked 15 s. for it; Fuller asked whose it was; he said his father's, and he wished it killed. Fuller asked where he lived - he said at the top of Middle-street - 12 s. was agreed upon, and he said he would go with him, and pay his father, and when we got to the top of Middle-street, he said he lived there, but his father and mother were out. A woman came down and said they did not live there - Fuller let him go, and he went away. I saw him again in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - he said he was going home.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you often played with Crockett in the Close - A. We generally played about there, and had been playing about an hour when the prisoner came up; he said nothing about having a letter to take from Stone.

Q. Was not the object of catching the second horse that you might both have a ride - A. Yes. We rode it about. He said his master was Mr. Sadler, stable-keeper, Aldersgate-street; he told me to ride it up and down while he went in there. He left the same horse at Fuller's, as he brought from the common.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. On the 6th of November, in the evening, I apprehended the prisoner in Bartholomew-close, at a house, up in the cock-loft. I said I took him for stealing a horse - he said voluntarily that he was led away by other boys, and pointed out Crockett, and said he was with him. Crockett's mother brought her son up next day.

Cross-examined. Q. He said they were in his company, and he did it at their instigation - A. Yes.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer, and was with Read when he took the prisoner, but did not hear the conversation.

The prisoner made no Defence. Four witnesses gave him a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of youth.

Reference Number: t18231203-18

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

18. JOHN HENNESSY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , at St. George, Hanover-square , thirty-one sovereigns, and a half-sovereign, the monies of Michael Connor , in the dwelling-house of William Quin .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Michael Connor .

WINIFRED CONNOR . I am the wife of Michael Connor - we live in Oxford-buildings , St. George, Hanover-square; we rent two rooms of William Quin , who lives in the house. On the 10th of November, between one and two o'clock, I put thirty-one sovereigns and a half into a box, in the back room, on the ground floor - I put them into the box in the presence of the prisoner, who lodged in the house. I went out at two o'clock; he asked how long I should be gone; I said not a great while. I returned between three and four o'clock - I had left the door locked, and found it so, but the back room window was open. A person in the yard could open it, and get in. Two large boxes were moved off the top of that the money was in, the box broken open, and the money gone; I had locked it and had the key in my pocket. I did not see him again till he was taken. I did not expect that he was going to leave - he had lived there four months, and slept in this back room, which we rented - he had new clothes on when he was taken. I had left nobody in my apartment.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not people up stairs - A. There might be. Anybody in the yard could open the window. He owed me 1 l. 11 s. 6 d., for rent, at 2 s. a week. I had asked him for it, but he could not pay me.

CORNELIUS HICKEY . I am a labourer. On the 11th of November, I saw the prisoner at the Highgate Archway-tavern, at twelve o'clock - I knew him before. When he saw me come in, he hung down his head, took up his hat, and was going away - I put my hand on him, and said he could not go, for he was accused of robbing Connor; he denied it. I called the landlord, and asked where I could get a constable - he said at Crouch-end; I went there, returned, and he was gone. I found him at Hatton-garden next day.

THOMAS SHORTER . I keep the Archway-tavern. On the 11th of November, Hickey and the prisoner were there. Hickey went for an officer, leaving the prisoner in my house. Several men promised to take care of him, but let him go - he had had a pint of beer, which he paid for in silver, and had a quantity of silver in his pocket. When I heard he was gone, I sent my brother after him; he brought him back. I was endeavouring to put him into the back parlour out of the way of some labouring men, who abused me very much, and threatened to break my windows. I was obliged to let him go, but sent a man to watch him - he ran as hard as he could a little distance - then went through a gate out of the road. I went in search of him with the officer, and found him in Maiden-lane, about three o'clock that day, in the road, asking a man about a coach - we took him to the watch-house. I saw him searched; twenty-nine sovereigns and some silver were found in his left hand breeches pocket; in a small pocket-book.

Prisoner. Q. How long did I stay in your house after being charged with this - A. I suppose half an hour from first to last. I told him if he was an honest man he had better stand his ground. Maiden-lane is about a mile from my house; he had left my house an hour and a half, and had crossed the fields,

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am a constable. I was fetched to Shorter's, and went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found twenty-nine sovereigns and two half-sovereigns on him; he said he received them from his brother, who came from Liverpool on the Saturday.

STEPHEN HARRIS . I lodge in the same house as Connor. The prisoner absconded on the day of the robbery - he used to sleep with me, and was never absent before. When he was taken he had new clothes on - I believe he was very short of money, for he had been out of work a long time. I had not seen his brother come to him on Saturday.

WINIFRED CONNOR . The pocket-book is not mine. I have no mark on the money - I had saved it up in service, and my husband saved part of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the house about the time the prosecutrix did, and went in search of work towards Islington, and met my brother at a public-house - he said he had arrived from Liverpool on the Saturday. I stopped all night with him, as he was accustomed to drink; I thought it best to take his money till he wished to have it returned. I stopped all night with him to take care of his money, and was to meet him at a coffee-house next day, and was going there when I went into this tavern.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18231203-19

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

19. JOSEPH LADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , twelve bells, value 3 l, the goods of William Lane , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BELL . I keep the Ship, public-house, Charles-street, Westminster . On the 2d of November, between seven and eight o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my house, with a party of eight or ten, to practice ringing the bells, which are my property. The prisoner asked for them two or three times - they continued ringing for two or three hours, and when they were gone I missed the bells; some went out at the front, and the others the back way. I took the bells with the lease of the house. I value them at 3 l.

SAMUEL DEAN . I live in Millbank-row, Westminster. On Sunday evening, the 2d of November, I was at the Ship; the prisoner was there, with three more; others were there, but not in his company; his party had the bells brought in, and used them - I left them there, and on Monday, the 10th, I went and found the prisoner at work in Gravel-lane, and said," I suppose you know what I am come about; the landlord of the Ship has lost his bells." I asked where they were; he said he believed they were in pawn; he took me to two or three pawnbrokers' shops in Gray's Inn-lane, and at Kendrew's we found them.

JAMES KENDREW . I am journeyman to Mr. Nicholls , pawnbroker, Gray's Inn-lane. On the 3d of November, twelve bells were pawned at our shop, for 10 s. Next day. I advanced 2 s. more, and the day after 3 s. more - they were pawned by John Yen .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES DEW . I am messenger of Queen-square. On the 21st of November the prisoner was given into my custody by the prosecutor; he told me voluntarily that he did take the bells, and gave them to Yen, who had pawned them in Gray's Inn-lane, and received only 2 s. 6 d. from Yen, out of the money - I found the pawnbroker's by his direction.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and was enticed, with another lad, to take the bells.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only. Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231203-20

20. WILLIAM BLACKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , forty-two yards of carpet, value 3 l. 18 s., the goods of William Pitt , in the dwelling-house of James Waterlow .

WILLIAM PITT . I live in Northumberland-place, Commercial-road, and have another shop in Crown-street , where this property was. James Waterlow rents the house. I was absent when this carpet was stolen.

HARRIOT SIMPSON . I live in Crown-street, nearly opposite Pitt's shop. On the 15th of November, about half past five o'clock in the evening, I heard somebody say, "that man is after stealing the carpet." I went up to my first-floor window, and saw three men loitering about Pitt's shop, and presently saw a man in a light coat cross towards the shop; he walked about for a few minutes; one of the others went into the shop, and came out without anything; the prisoner then went in, and brought out a roll of carpet. I ran down, and out at the door, but before I could get round the corner, he turned into Wilson-street. A man said he had got the carpet; being dark I

could not see the man, though I heard his voice, and saw the shadow of a man run round; he was brought back in a moment; the other man is not here. The prisoner is the person who took it - he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It was quite dark? - A. Yes - he crossed towards my shop. I have no doubt of him. He crossed towards my shop, and back again, before he took it. The gas threw a good light upon him. I had a full view of his person and face. I lost sight of him in the pursuit, and fell down. There was scarcely any one in the street.

EDWARD BROWNNESS . I received the prisoner in charge. The carpet was given to me at Mr. Pitt's shop in about twenty minutes.

MR. PITT. My shopman is not here. I saw the carpet safe between eleven and twelve o'clock that day inside the shop.

HARRIOT SIMPSON. I saw him bring out a roll of carpet about this size; I cannot say that it is the same.

Prisoner's Defence. On turning the corner of Crown-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw some people running; I ran with them. Several persons were before me, but a man laid hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-21

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

21. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , at St. George, Bloomsbury, five silver spoons, value 5 l., the goods of William Tibby , in his dwelling-house .

MARY TIBBY . I am the wife of William Tibby , baker, and live in King-street, Holborn . On the 19th of November, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner, who is a stranger, coming from up stairs, and go into the street. Knowing I had left the first floor door open, I ran up, and missed five table spoons off the dining-table, where they were ten minutes before. I came down, and called my brother to go after her with me. I pointed her out to him, and said she had stolen the spoons. He overtook her, and when I got up, she was delivering the five spoons to him out of her shawl or apron. She was taken to the watch-house. My brother gave them to my husband.

WILLIAM TIBBY . I was in the shop when my wife and brother brought the prisoner back. My brother gave me the spoons, which I gave to Furzman. She fell on her knees, said she had a husband in the workhouse, hoped I would let her go, and acknowledged taking them; they are worth 5 l. I rent the house.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am watch-house-keeper. I received her in custody, with four table and one gravy spoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I hope the Gentlemen will have more compassion on me than my prosecutor. I declare I never was in the house. A person said to me, "Lay hold of these spoons, while I tie my bonnet." I held them in my hand, quite open - I never moved nor ran - the young man came, and said "You have got my property." I said, "If so, take them." My husband died in the Navy, and I lost a son at Waterloo.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 65.

Reference Number: t18231203-22

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

22. JAMES VERNSCOMBE was indicted for stealing on the 10th of November , a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of James Haydon , from his person .

JAMES HAYDON . I live in Somer's-place, Somer's-town. On the 10th of November, about half-past three o'clock, I was in Bridge-street , as the Lord Mayor's procession was passing, and felt somebody at my outside coat pocket, where my handkerchief was. I thought it might be an accident, but saw the prisoner shuffling about, and took particular notice of him, felt in my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone. I followed him as far as Fleet-street, and charged him with the theft; he denied it. I said I was confident he had it, and in a short time he took it from his pocket, and threw it into my face. I laid hold of him, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS PRESTIGE . I am a patrol. I was in Fleet-street. The prisoner was pointed out to me. Haydon gave me the handkerchief. I searched him at the Compter, and found a silk handkerchief and pair of shears in his pocket. He said it was his first offence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it drop from the gentleman's pocket, and picked it up. Another young man ran away at the time.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231203-23

23. ALICE GIBBS was indicted for feloniously receiving a box, value 35 s., the goods of Thomas Dallimore and George Dallimore , knowing the same to have been stolen . Mr. LAW conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK EDGELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Dallimore, of Doctors' Commons. On the 12th of August I received a box from Weston , our delivery-porter, to be sent to Bristol, for Mr. Freeman ; it arrived at Bristol.

JAMES THURLOW . I know the prisoner by going with Weston to her house, in an alley in Moor-lane. I saw him give her a kind of snuff-box at the Swan public-house. He did not tell her where he got it from; in my presence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-24

24. JOHN M'LAUCHLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Payne , from his person .

THOMAS PAYNE . I live in Charlotte-street, Berkeley-square, and am servant to Lord A'Boyle. On the 14th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Smithfield-bars , going towards St. John-street. I thought I felt something at my pocket; put my hand down and missed my handkerchief; turned round, and saw the prisoner about two yards from me running away. I suspected him, and ran after him, and saw him throw it away. I picked it up, and caught hold of him without losing sight of him.

JOHN HARKER . I am a constable, and was on duty in Smithfield on Friday, the 14th of November, and met the prisoner running, and the prosecutor close at his heels. I laid hold of him at the same moment as him. He said it was not him who took it, and begged forgiveness, and he never would do it again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and went to Smithfield to get a job. I was running up to a man who told me to ride his horse, when this gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-25

25. DANIEL STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a printed bound book, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Ivey .

CHARLES IVEY . I am a porter , and live in Hartshorn-court, Moore-lane . On the 25th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I sent my son up into a room which I rented, in Moore-lane. He came running down, and said the door was broken open, and a man was in the room. I ran into Moore-lane, and saw the prisoner a few yards off. He turned into an alley. I only lost sight of him when he turned the corner. I stopped him, took him up to the room, found the door broken open, and all my books pulled out of my box, and put in the bed. I found one, "The Book of Knowledge," in his pocket. He was very resolute, and wanted a knife to stab himself, and kicked about. Three of us were obliged to hold him while he was searched. He had broken the padlock off the door with an instrument that was found on him.

CHARLES JOHN IVEY . I slept in this room. I got up at seven o'clock; the books were then in the trunk. My father sent me there between eleven and twelve o'clock. I saw the staple drawn, and the hasp hanging to the padlock. The door was fastened inside. I pushed it open, came down, turned my head, and saw the prisoner following me, and told a person down stairs to follow him, but he got out. He was secured. He resisted being searched.

JOHN BARNES . I am a constable, and took him in charge, and found a large holdfast in his pocket which the staple was drawn with. I found 19 s. upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 66.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-26

26. HENRY DOUGHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a watch, value 5 l. 5 s.; a chain, value 1 s.; a key, value 2 d.; and a seal, value 2 s., the goods of Abel Drewel , from his person .

ABEL DREWELL . I am a maltster , and live at Exeter. On the 10th of November I was in town, and had a gold watch in my fob. About four o'clock in the afternoon I was in Cheapside , as the procession was returning to Guildhall. I was stopped by a crowd of people, and could not proceed, and in less than a minute there was as great a crowd behind as before me. My daughter, who was with me, called out, and thinking to keep the crowd from her, I turned round, and almost immediately somebody called out to her, "Don't faint!" I could not turn about the pressure was so great. I put my arms up, and about two yards off I saw the prisoner's face to my face; he was pressing with great violence, calling out something which I could not distinguish. I said, "For God's sake don't press!" and the more I begged him, the more he pressed. I suspected nothing, but the moment he came up to me his hand was at my pocket. I felt my watch go, and saw his arm go from me. I directly caught hold of his jacket, and said, "You have stolen my watch." He said, "Don't tear my clothes." I held him till the constable took him; and have not found my watch. Somebody said in his hearing, he has given it into another hand.

MARY ANN DREWELL . I was with my father. I did not see the watch taken. I was extremely alarmed. Somebody said the watch was gone to another hand. I saw the prisoner advance towards my father just before.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I had seen the prisoner with four or five others near the prosecutor. He was behind a man who was next to Mr. Drewell. I saw his hand go by that man towards Mr. Drewell's breeches pocket, as I thought, and at that moment a strong crowd carried me fifty yards away, and in half an hour I found him in custody. Several gentlemen said in his presence that they saw it pass from his hand to another.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-27

27. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 104 lbs. of pork, value 2 l. 16 s. , the goods of John Andrew Glock .

JOHN ANDREW GLOCK . I am a pork-butcher , and live in St. John-street. Last Saturday I bought this pork at Mr. Dean's, Newgate-street . It was two carcases; I left them there while I went into the market, returned in half an hour, and they were gone. I have not found them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not see the prisoner - A. No; I never mentioned to any one that I had bought them. I have a relation who was with me at the time.

JAMES PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Dean. The prisoner acted as porter in the market. Glock bought two pigs, paid for them, and put them at the back of the shop about nine o'clock in the morning. The prisoner came in in about twenty minutes, and asked for two pigs, and mentioned some name which I did not understand, and said they were for a German. Glock has a brother. I asked him if there was one German or two. He said Yes, two brothers. I told him the pigs lay at the back of the shop, and saw him go out with them. He came to the shop again on Monday, not in custody; a crowd collected, and I do not know what passed.

Cross-examined. Q. This happened in Newgate-street - A. Yes; the business is generally over by eleven o'clock. The pigs were taken about a quarter to ten. It is common to send porters to fetch carcases to the carts. We expected to find him about the market on Saturday, but could not.

ELIAS JAMES . I am servant to Mr. Dean. I knew the prisoner by seeing him about the market. I heard of this business. I had lifted the pigs on the prisoner's shoulder. I knew him as a porter about the market. I went to look for him between nine and ten o'clock, but could not find him. On Monday I was informed he was in the market, and went to him, got an officer, and said to him, "Martin, you took two pigs from our shop on Saturday." He said "Me! I did not." I said he did, for I lifted them on his shoulder. He said I must be mistaken, but he would go down to the shop; he went willingly, and staid there while I fetched the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you describe him as wearing a yellow handkerchief - A. Yes. He said he did not fetch

them from our shop, it was from Bowles's, which is opposite our shop - he is employed by Sadler, who keeps a horse and cart in the market.

JAMES KEMP . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge; he said he did not take the pigs; but afterwards recollected himself, and said he took them from that shop, and put them in a cart; he did not know the cart or the man who sent him for them.

Cross-examined. Q. He at first said he did not take them from that shop - A. Yes; and afterwards that he put them into a cart a few yards off, and if he saw the man he should know him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a porter at the market. A man applied to me to load his meat, and sent me for two pigs at the corner of Rose-street. I went to Bowles's; they said they were not there. I then went to the opposite shop, and asked if a man in a brown coat had bought two pigs; he said there were two pigs belonging to the German. I said the man was a stranger to me. I took them, and the man gave me 6 d.

JAMES BARKER . I am sure he said it was a German.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-28

28. FREDERICK MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of James Vagan , from his person .

JAMES VAGAN . I am a seedsman , and live in Tooley-street. On the 27th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was on London-bridge , coming from the City - some waggons caused a stoppage. I felt a pressure at my coat pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, and seized him. He said he had picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Stockwell, and saw the handkerchief on the ground - I ran to pick it up, and before I could get to it, the gentleman collared me, and asked if I had a handkerchief; I said, No. He saw it on the ground, and picked it up. Two ladies told him I did not touch his pocket.

JAMES VAGAN . Nothing of the kind happened.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231203-29

29. THOMAS MOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Bates , from his person .

THOMAS BATES . I am a linen-draper , and live at Camberwell. On the 24th of November, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was at the end of Bridge-street, Fleet-street , having just got out of the Camberwell-stage, and was attending to a dispute about the fare - a mob collected, and suspecting there might be pickpockets about, I kept my hand on my watch and coat flap, and felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket, turned round immediately, and collared the prisoner, and charged him with it - he denied it. I was positive that he had it, and gave him in charge. I saw it found on him at the Compter.

DANIEL TURNER . I am a constable. I took charge of him, and found the handkerchief inside his trowsers, down by his knee. He had denied having any such thing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-30

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

30. ANN TURNER alias JEFFERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two sheets, value 14 s.; a pillow, value 4 s.; a blanket, value 4 s.; four pillow cases, value 2 s., and a flat iron, value 1 s., the goods of William Woods , in a lodging-room .

SARAH WOODS . I am the wife of William Woods - we lived in Haughton-street, Clare-market . The prisoner came to lodge with us about January; her husband came in the evening - they had the first floor, furnished, at 10 s. a week. He lived with her but a short time, and then went to Whitecross-street Prison, and then she moved into the second floor back room. This furniture was in that room. She afterwards moved into the lower room, and left in two or three months. She was charged with the robbery before she left, and apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. She has been tried before for stealing this property - A. All but the pillow. A servant named Wicks took the lodging for them. I supplied her with the pillow after her husband went to prison.

ANN WICKS . I was in the prisoner's service, and took this lodging for them on the 1st of January. Her husband was arrested on the 7th of February - I left on the 23d of March. After he was arrested she lodged on the second floor. I pawned a pair of sheets by her direction, at Turner's, in Brydges-street, while her husband was in prison. The blanket and pillow were also pawned.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you present when Mrs. Wood desired her not to trouble herself about the things, but get them out when it was convenient - A. No. I never knew the prosecutrix lend her things to pawn.

WILLIAM MARSH . I am servant to Mr. Turner. On the 26th of February, two sheets were pawned in the name of Wicks. for 7 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not the prisoner been to redeem them - A. When the first indictment was found, she came with the money to redeem them.

MR. LAW to the SARAH WOOD . Q. Do not you go by the name of Best - A. No. The name of Best is over our door; he is the landlord of the house. We occupy the house, furnished by Best, but these things are our own.

Prisoner. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

HANNAH STIPHING . I live in Stanhope-street. I lived in Wood's house at the same time as the prisoner. Mrs. Wood has frequently told me that she knew these things were in pawn, eighteen weeks before the prisoner was taken up, and that the servant had told her of it before she moved into the parlour, and told me that since she had known that, she lent her a sheet to pawn.

SARAH WOODS re-examined. I never lent her property to pawn. I have lent her money, which I have got by pawning things.

MR. LAW. Q Have not goods been pawned by your permission, and the produce of those goods lent to the prisoner - A. Not things from her room. I never lent her

anything to pawn. I have pawned goods to lend her money.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-31

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

31. CATHERINE SMART was indicted for wilful murder .

From the testimony of Messrs. Charles Mears and Holmes , and the Rev. Mr. Cotton , the Jury found the prisoner INSANE .

Reference Number: t18231203-32

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

32. JAMES REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , a clock, value 5 l., the goods of William Matthews , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a gardener , and live at Hoxton , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and rent the whole house. On the 24th of October, about twelve or one o'clock in the day, this clock was safe; it was not fixed - it was an eight day table clock. I had had it seven years; it cost me 5 l. at a sale - I pawned it last winter for 5 l.; I believe it worth that. I have pawned it for that more than once. About seven o'clock in the evening. I came home - my wife came to the gate with the lantern to light me with the horse, and during that time some one must have jumped over the rails, and stolen it. As soon as she brought me the light, she turned back and went in. She was not out of the house five minutes - a child five years old was left in the room where the clock was. My wife let me in at the bottom of the garden, which is at the back of the house. A person must have got over the fence, and got in at the front door, for the gate was locked. I know the prisoner by sight; he was not in the habit of coming to the house. I went to his house on this night, in consequence of information, but he was not at home - he was taken a fortnight afterwards, opposite the Rosemary Branch, public-house, near to where he lives - I could not find him before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not meet my employer a few days afterwards, and say you wanted Woolf, who had robbed you - A. This Woolf was suspected to have been with him at the time. I may have asked somebody about Woolf.

Q. Have you not had the children several times into your garden, and persuaded them what to say - A. No.; I have only told them to speak the truth; one of them nurses my child, and is often at my house.

HARRIET BROWN . I am nearly eleven years old, and live near Matthews's. I have known the prisoner two months; he lived by the Rosemary Branch; I knew him very well by sight. On a Friday night, two or three weeks before I went to Worship-street, which was two or three weeks ago, about seven o'clock, I saw him with a clock - he was going away from Matthews's; three more boys were with him; he was going towards the Robin Hood, which is near Matthews's; I am sure it was him. I did not speak to him - he had nothing over the clock - it was Matthews's, for I had seen it before a good many times. It was dark, but there is a gas-light by the Robin Hood. Jane Ruddle and I were playing by the Robin Hood - I used to play with Matthews's little girl often, and have often seen the clock. I nursed his child.

Q. Did you go and tell Matthews of it - A. Two boys, Findley and Gray, who were playing with us, went and told him directly. Matthews never told me what to say. I did not see where the prisoner came from.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . It may be thirty or forty yards from my house to the Robin Hood. My house is in the centre, between two gas-lights. My palings are near five feet high.

JAMES FINDLEY . I am eleven years old. I was at play with Brown, on a Friday night, not long ago, (five or six weeks ago, I think.) I know it was on a Friday, because I carry pots about on Fridays. I know the prisoner by having seen him several times before. I saw him between six and seven o'clock, with three more boys - it was nearer seven than six. I saw him hang a clock on Matthews's gate, while he got over the gate out of the garden, and then ran away towards the Whitmore's Head, public-house, with it under his arm, and went by the Robin Hood. I know it was Matthews's clock, because I have often seen it before.

THOMAS GRAY . I am thirteen years* old. I have known the prisoner about twelve months. He lodged up at the Rosemary Branch. I saw him with a clock, on one Friday night, about seven o'clock. Three more young men were with him. I saw him inside Matthews's fence. I saw James Reynolds and John Tover jump over Matthews's railing. He hung the clock on the rails before he jumped over, then took it off, and ran by the Robin Hood. We hallooed Stop thief! I do not know whether anybody went to Matthews; I did not. I am sure he was the person. Matthews has not told me what to say. I saw Matthews that night, and went with him to the Rosemary Branch, about eight o'clock. He asked for the prisoner there. I did not see Reynolds afterwards till he was apprehended.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me by the Canal one rainy afternoon - A. That was the day Matthews took him. He was by Kingsland-road bridge. I told Matthews, and he went after him.

JANE RUDDLE . I am nearly eleven years* old. I have known the prisoner a good while. I went before the Justice last Thursday fortnight. I saw him on the Friday fortnight before that. I was by the Robin Hood, with Brown and saw him run by the Robin Hood with Matthews's clock under his arm. I did not see him get over the rails. I knew it to be Matthews's, because I had often seen it before. Three more young chaps were with him. They said. "Mind you do not drop it." We hallooed out, Stop thief! but could see nobody to take him. There was not time to go and tell Matthews. They got away. Findley and Grey went to tell him directly. I do not know the other boys. Matthews has not persuaded me what to say. He told us what to say, for I did not know.

* These witnesses, upon being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the obligation of an oath.

Q. What did he tell you - A. He told me to say, that I saw James Reynolds run by with Mr. Matthews's clock. He did not tell me anything else. He only told me once or twice. He gave me nothing. All I have said is true.

Q. Be sure you tell nothing but the truth. Did you see him that night with the clock or not - A. Yes. I did not see him get over the rails.

Q. When did Matthews tell you this - A. As we went to Worship-street. He told me nothing else.

JAMES FINDLEY re-examined. Matthews never said a word to me. When I saw the prisoner go by with the clock, I hallooed Stop thief! and ran after him as far as the Robin Hood. I live behind the Robin Hood. I saw him down by Matthews's rails; he ran towards the Whitmore's Head. I then ran back, and told Matthews that some boys had been taking his clock away. He asked if I should know them. I said, Yes. I did not mention who it was; I only knew his name by what the other boys used to call him - Chummy. I told him what he was called. Gray went to him with me.

Prisoner. Q. What kind of a clock was it - A. An eight-day clock, on a stand. I had seen it three or four times in Matthews's house; it was a brass and mahogany case, with a glass door.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . The boys came to my house that night to tell me, but I did not see them, as I had run out before they came. I saw them when I came back. They said Chummy Reynolds took it. Grey said, a boy named Woolf was with him. I said nothing particular to the girl. The children all seemed timid, and asked what they were to say. I said, if they saw him run by with the clock, to say so.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the neighbours cry shame on you, for getting them into the garden, to persuade them what to say - A. Some of the prisoner's relations did. I went that night to the Rosemary Branch, where the prisoner lived.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I went with Matthews to apprehend the prisoner, and took him on Thursday, the 6th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, near his own house. I had been looking after him in the neighbourhood three times, but never went to his house. As I brought him to the Office, I came by Matthews's, and asked if he was there on the day of the robbery. He said, he was not, nor near it.

Prisoner's Defence. The children have been persuaded by the prosecutor to swear; and what they are persuaded to they will swear.

JOHN BICKNELL . I am a grocer, and live in Hyde-place, Hoxton. The prisoner has been occasionally in my employ for the last twelve months, carrying out parcels, up to the day of this robbery; he did not come to me afterwards - he did not come on the Saturday. I used to send for him when I wanted him; and did so once, but he was not at home. I employed him every day. He used to call for jobs; I paid him by the job, and owed him nothing. He was particularly honest to me. I have heard he has been apprehended once before, but I would employ him again; for, on the night of the robbery, the prosecutor came to me, and asked if I knew where George Woolf lived. Grey and his father were with him. Knowing Woolf to be a bad character, I pointed out his house. He then said he had lost a clock; that Grey had seen Woolf take it. I saw him again about five or six o'clock in the morning; he said he had not succeeded in taking Woolf.

Q. What connection had you with Woolf - A. None at all; not with Matthews, before that. I was walking up and down with an officer of Kingsgate-street Court, when they came up and asked about Woolf. I was then by the cottages, where the prisoner resided.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner and Woolf together - A. Several times. He has been kept out of the way ever since.

Q. From the time Matthews and Grey came to you, you did not see the prisoner again - A. No. He lives in Medland's-rents, Rosemary Branch.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I remember going with Grey on the night of the robbery, and saw a gentleman on the bridge - it might be the witness. I asked him for Reynolds and Woolf; but I do not think either of them were asked for. I had a boy with me to shew where they lived; and it is not likely I should ask where they lived; or whether I spoke to the gentleman I cannot tell. I went after both Woolf and Reynolds that night.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18231203-33

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

33. SAMUEL SHUTER stood charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with the wilful murder of John Dunbar .

MR. BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PENEN . I live in Sand-yard, Clerkenwell . The prisoner lived at No. 6. On Friday afternoon, about half-past three o'clock, I saw him and another man go down the yard, very much in liquor, He went into his own house, and in a very short time I heard screams of murder coming from his house, and saw him throwing his furniture out of his window. The neighbours went to him, and said, "You foolish man, what makes you break your furniture?" He then came down into the yard with his waistcoat and coat off, and challenged the whole of the yard to fight. He then went in, and began throwing his furniture out again, and breaking it; then came down, pulled his shirt off, and challenged the people to fight. He went up stairs, and was there half an hour; then came up the yard with his clothes on, and a weapon over his shoulder. He came up about four yards from my house, stopped all of a sudden, and flung the thing with great violence. It hit the post; glanced to the child, and immediately the child fell as if killed with a shot. He used both hands to throw it. If it had not been for the post, it must have severed the boy's head from his body. It struck him just over the right temple. I ran out, and he said to me, "Penen, what have I done?" I said, "You villain, you have murdered the child, go along with me." He said he would go any where, and made no resistance. I saw the child afterwards; it was John Dunbar; he was in a most shocking state.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He flung it with violence against the post - A. Yes; and from the post it glanced to the boy. The women in the yard had said, "Let us take him, and fling him in a blanket." That was half an hour before. There were still boys and women in the yard in different directions. The post was nearly in a straight line with the child. The weapon came in contact with the post as soon as it left his hand, as the post was not above three yards from him. He bears the character of a humane person towards children.

COURT. Q. What sort of a weapon was it - A. The broken part of mahogany table, four or five inches wide, and about two feet long. I had not seen Dunbar before he was struck.

Q. If it had not struck the post it would have gone clear

of the child - A. No, my Lord, the boy stood rather on one side of the post, about a yard from it. I cannot say whether he aimed at the child. He was just coming out of No. 3, when he received the blow. If the post had not been in the way, it would have gone straight on.

MARY NABEUR , I live in Sand-yard. On Friday afternoon, about five o'clock, I saw a number of persons collected, and saw Shuter in his shirt-sleeves, quarrelling with a number of low women who inhabit the yard. They were remonstrating with him in their way, but it was more irritation. I went up stairs, and heard somebody call out, "Bring a blanket, and we will loss him if he comes out again." I went down afterwards, and saw him coming up the yard with part of a mahogany table over his shoulder about an inch thick. A man said to him, "What do you mean to do with that piece of wood, give it to me." He said No; if he saw his wife, he would knock it about her head. He took and threw it. This little boy stood near a door, and two others stood near; a little girl stood behind Dunbar, who fell also. I heard the blow, but whether it was striking the boy or the post I did not know. The women began to scream, every one thinking it was their own child. They seized, but could not hold him. He began to get collected, and Penen collared him. The child's name is John Dunbar .

WILLIAM WELLS . I live in the same house as the child, and saw the prisoner come down the yard, and throw the wood violently with both hands towards the boy. It hit him on the left side of his head. I picked him up, and took him on my shoulders. He was insensible. I carried him into the house, sat him on a chair. The blood came out of his mouth. He died on the Sunday.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the wood strike against the post - A. Yes; it glanced from the post, and hit the boy.

HENRY WHITMORE . I am a surgeon, and live in Great Bath-street. I first saw the deceased on Saturday evening, about nine o'clock, at No. 1, Sand-yard. I had his head shaved, and then found a considerable tumefaction over the left hemisphere of the brain, and considerable injury done to the skull. He died next night, I opened his head on Monday, and found a fracture five inches and a half long in the principal side-bone of the skull, and another fracture commencing along the same bone, and across the whole forehead. I found three-fourths of an ounce of extravasated blood on the dura mater, which was caused by external violence, which no doubt occasioned his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you think there were two blows, or that one blow occasioned both fractures - A. I should think there must have been two blows; but an uneven piece of wood might have produced more violence on one part than the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no animosity towards any body.

GUILTY. Of Manslaughter only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-34

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

34. FREDERICK THOMAS and WILLIAM NAILER were indicted for feloniously assaulting Abraham Atkins , on the King's highway, on the 30th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 12 s.; a pin, value 1 s.; a sovereign, four shilling, a penny, and two halfpence, his property .

ABRAHAM ATKINS. I am a butcher , and live in Kingsland-road. Last Saturday night, I and three more young men were drinking together at the Duchess of York, public-house, with the prisoners and Thomas White . I have known them all for years. We first met between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I generally go out with them on a Sunday evening, but it was by accident that we all met. White and I had been together all the afternoon, at the King's Head and the Wellington, public-houses. We then went to the Duchess of York. White went home to tea, leaving me there. We had a pint of porter each at the King's Head, and a pint of purl between us at the Wellington. I had a pint of beer at the Duchess of York. Thomas came in and drank with me. Nailer came in soon after. White returned, and we all went to the Fox, public-house, about seven o'clock, and had a glass of gin and water between us. We were rather drunk when we left the Fox. It was then about nine o'clock. We then went to the Duke of York, public-house, and had four glasses of gin and water; I do not think we had more. We then came on towards home. It was about ten o'clock. All four left together, and were a little groggy, but knew what we were about, and could walk. When we got to the corner of the Duke of York , Thomas came up to me, and snatched my watch and my pin out. I thought it was done in a joke, and asked him for it, thinking he might break the glass. He put his hand to one of the others, but which I cannot say, or whether he gave it him. I asked him for them. He took no notice, but walked on. The tobacco dropped out of my pipe; and they shoved me down and took my money from me. We had then got about seventy yards from the Duke of York. I cannot say which of them pushed me down. I was stooping, but did not fall, for they shoved me down, and my money was taken out of my pocket as I laid on my back. They then let me get up. It was dark; there were no lamps. I cannot say who took my money. They used no violence; more than one of them took it, but I cannot say whether all three took it. They were all on the spot. I was not kept down above a minute. I thought it a joke, and followed them on a good way, but made no alarm. I came up to them, and asked for the money. They kept laughing, and said, "All stuff!" I said, it was no use playing their jokes in that manner. I left them in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and went home. They said they should go to Islington. Whether it was a joke or not I cannot say. I said, "You may as well give me my money;" but they went on by the Rosemary Branch without answering me. I passed Thomas on Monday night, in Shoreditch, as I was going to the Office, but did not speak to him. I have not seen White since. I have not got my watch, pin, or money since.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had been to five public-houses - A. White and I had; we were not merry got to the Fox.

COURT. Q. You thought it a joke; when did you begin to think otherwise - A. I thought it might be returned in the course of Monday, and in the evening went to Worship-street - they were intimate friends of mine.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. On Tuesday morning

I took Nailer in bed, at his father's, about six o'clock; he said he knew nothing of the robbery, but recollected being in Atkins's company on Sunday; we then went and took Thomas; he said, "I suppose you are come about Atkins's business;" he denied all knowledge of the robbery.

GEORGE DAY . I was with Mance. Thomas told me he was in Atkins's company at the Fox, in Kingsland-road, but had not heard that he had been robbed.

THOMAS'S Defence. I said I had heard of his being robbed. The officer kept asking me stupid questions - I said Yes and No to everything. If I had had his property I should have taken it to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-35

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

35. WILLIAM PARKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , three boxes, value 6 s.; a pair of drawers, value 6 d.; six shirts, value 3 l.; two rings, value 30 s.; ten pairs of stockings, value 3 l., and ten guineas, the property of James Jones Joyleafe , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Jones .

JAMES JONES JOYLEAFE . I live in Regent-street . Mrs. Sarah Jones keeps the house. I had three boxes in the attic, containing this property; it was all safe on Saturday the 15th of November, in the morning - I missed them at eleven at night - I told the patrol, who got out of the window, and immediately under the window, outside the house, found a hammer, which exactly fitted the marks on the window which had been broken open - the house must have been entered that way - my boxes were found in the next house (which the prisoner had the care of for Mr. Bagshaw), broken open, and every thing of value taken out.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Does Jones reside on the premises - A. Yes; she is the lessee - nobody slept in the adjoining house; it is used by Bagshaw to deposit vases in.

MICHAEL DOYLE . I am a patrol. I was on duty at twelve o'clock at night, and heard of this robbery. I went to the next house, knocked at the door for some time, and the prisoner let me in; he said he was in care of the house; I told him the next house had been robbed, and I must search that house: he appeared confused; I asked if any person was in the house with him; he said there was a boy, who he hired about a fortnight before, and he believed he could find that boy by going with us to his house; and then said he thought he could not find the house. We proceeded to search; he took a candle, and went on before us up stairs, and on the landing place in the attic floor are two closets - he opened one, and said, "Gentlemen, I suppose that is what you are looking for;" and there were the three boxes. I searched all over the house, and could find nobody but him - there were other empty houses in that range of buildings - the trapdoor of this house was shut - but I do not know whether it was bolted.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you mention to the Magistrate about his being confused - A. No. The prosecutor accompanied me over the house. A boy was afterwards apprehended and discharged.

THOMAS GOOK . I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house, and produce the hammer, which I received from the prosecutor. I compared it with the marks on the window, and found it corresponded. The prisoner had a bundle. I asked why he had his things tied up; he said, because he was going to leave the premises to-morrow. There was a piece of Indian ink in the bundle. I asked if Mr. Bagshaw knew he was going to leave; he said, he had no occasion to let him know.

Cross-examined. Q. Was anything said about the Indian ink before the Magistrate - A. Yes; he said he used it to practice drawing - he is a painter. I took Warne next morning by his information.

JAMES WARNE . I am shop-boy at the house in Regent-street. I left there a little before five o'clock on the day of the robbery, and went to a public-house in Leicester-square with the prisoner; staid three-quarters of an hour, and then went away. When I went to dinner, he told me to bring a hammer, to open some casks which had come out of the country. I did so; and a porter was there who opened the casks with it. I thought he might want it again, and did not carry it back. It is my father's, and is the one produced. I was to have gone on Monday, as usual. I was not in Regent-street after five o'clock. I did not go into Jones's house. The prisoner told me, in the course of the week, that he meant to leave on that night.

Cross-examined. Q. When did the porter leave - A. He and the prisoner left together at five o'clock, and went to the public-house. He did not desire me to leave the hammer. I told him I was going to move to No. 42, Monmouth-street, and he wrote it down. He was employed to paint this house. He kept the key, but I did not know that he slept there. He lodged at the Sun, public-house, in Haydon-street. I never knew him stay all night. There was no bed there.

MR. LAW to DOYLE. Q. Did not you see a light in the shop when you knocked at the door - A. I saw a glimmer of light before I knocked, but it was three or four minutes before anybody came. He had a candle and fire in the parlour behind the shop, and said he had slept there two or three nights on some saw-dust, which was scattered about the shop. He was dressed when he let me in.

MR. IVYLEAFE. Here is the hammer I found on the parapet. I cannot swear to this Indian ink, I had several pieces in my box, and some of this size. Nothing but papers were left in my box.

The prisoner, in a long defence, stated, that he was going to leave the house next morning, and was sitting up for the purpose of writing letters and arranging accounts; that he had slept there several nights, by laying sacks on the saw-dust. The reason of his not opening the door immediately, was on account of having put a desk against the room-door to barricade it, and he had to move it before he could get out.

MICHAEL DOYLE re-examined. He said he was going to write a letter to his master. There was pen and ink in the room. I saw two desks there. He shewed me that the staple of one of them was broken. He could not have moved those desks without breaking the vases.

JAMES WARNE . The desk was not broken open when I last saw it. I was with him for an hour and a half after five o'clock, and the house was empty all that time.

MR. LAW to the PROSECUTOR. Q. Did it not appear to you, that what was done could be done in an hour and a half - A. Certainly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-36

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

36. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a watch, value 2 l. 10 s.; a chain, value 6 d.; a seal, value 12 s., and a key, value 6 d. , the goods of William Bass .

WILLIAM BASS . I am apprentice to Mr. Limmington, of Newgate-market . This watch was safe in my box in the slaughter-house, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 2d of October. The prisoner assisted in the slaughter-house . I missed it at half-past six o'clock; I had not been out of the slaughter-house all day. I sent the prisoner close by the box for a candle, and had left the key in it - he was present when I missed it, and I said I suspected him; he denied having found it. After he went for the candle, I observed him leave the slaughter-house for about ten minutes. I gave him in charge that night.

JOHN ELLIS . I was in Mr. Limmington's service. Bass missed his watch. The prisoner had left the slaughter-house for a short time; he denied knowing anything of it. On Saturday morning, after he was committed, he sent for me and Noakes - we went to him at the Compter; he said he had a secret to communicate to us, that he had taken the watch out of the box, and delivered it to a man, named Randall, at the door, and Randall did not tell him what he did with it. He said this voluntarily.

THOMAS NOAKES . I went to the Compter with Ellis. The prisoner said he took the watch out of the box, and gave it to Randall. Randall was taken and afterwards discharged.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a constable. The prisoner told me he took the watch and gave it to Randall .

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-37

37. SAMUEL HADGCRAFT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 14 ozs. of tea, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies , to whom he was servant .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to a person or persons unknown.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GLASS . I am deputy assistant elder in the East India Company's service - the prisoner was also in their service, at 16 s. 6 d. a week, working from eight till two o'clock. On the 17th of November, he was employed in hooping tea chests ; the one in question only wanted hooping - I examined it that morning before he came, and took the number of it; it was not at all necessary to take the bottom off. After he had been at work on it, I had it removed into a back room, opened the bottom, and found the lead work was either cut or broken, and a hole made through it sufficient to get tea out, and a vacant space, so that some had been stolen; he was brought into the room, and told that he was suspected of having tea about him; he said he had not - I said I must search him - he took off his hat, and had none there. French told him he must strip, and on unbuttoning his pantaloons, I found about 14 ozs. of tea, in two large pockets, which came round him in front, and hung between his legs, so that no suspicion will arise from the appearance - it would not be noticed in rubbing him down at the gate. The hole was made by design.

Prisoner. Q. Sometimes a chest appears very sound, and yet tea will run out - A. This chest had no wood broken, only the lead inside; it could not have run out. The tea was loose in his pockets.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I am an assistant elder. On the 17th of November, I brought the prisoner into the room. We took the bottom off the chest, and a place was broken in the lead work inside, but the wooden bottom was perfectly sound; I had seen it before the prisoner worked on it - no tea could run out; the bottom must have been taken off to make the hole in the lead. I told the prisoner I suspected he had tea about him; he said, "Indeed, Mr. French, I have not," and pulled off his hat and shoes. I said he must strip; he let his pantaloons down - Glass laid hold of them, and said, "Here is the tea." I turned it out of his pockets, which were large, and hung so that nobody could feel it in rubbing him down - he is a tailor by trade. There were 17 ozs. of tea, and about that quantity was missing from the chest. It was of the same quality.

Prisoner's Defence. - I have been twelve years in the service, and did not intend to rob the Company. I have a wife and six children.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-38

38. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Peckitt , from his person .

THOMAS PECKITT . I am a tailor , and lodge in Goswell-street. On the 10th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the end of King-street ; the Lord Mayor's procession had passed, and I could not pass for the carriages - I did not perceive anything, but a gentleman told me my pocket was picked - I felt, and missed my handkerchief - the gentleman took hold of the prisoner, and took it out of his outside pocket - he denied having it, but said nothing when it was found.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a turner - I came up from Guildhall-yard; there was a crowd at the end of King-street; I saw the prisoner and two others with him pushing very hard, which induced me to watch - I told one of them he had better be off, and I directly saw a blue handkerchief pass from Peckitt's coat, and put into the prisoner's pocket. I told Peckitt, and took it from his pocket. A young man took one of the others, but he was discharged. The prisoner said somebody else must have put it into his pocket; he was nearest to Peckitt - I am certain one of the two took it.

JOSEPH MATTHEWS . I am a constable. I was at the end of King-street, and received him in charge. He said at the Compter that he did not know how it came into his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CUMMING . I am a drum-maker. I saw the prisoner and two other companious; directly Peckitt passed they looked at his pocket, and closed upon him. The prisoner and Fisher, who was also taken, shoved against him - Wells drew his hand out and shoved the handkerchief into his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. - I could not get across Cheapside, and seeing the handkerchief on the ground, I picked it

up, and put it into my pocket - stood about ten minutes, and was laid hold of.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231203-39

39. THOMAS PROSSER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 lb. of coffee, value 3 s. the goods of Joseph Maule and Thomas Maule .

MARTIN HALPEN . I am servant to Joseph and Thomas Maule , grocers , Fore-street. On the 20th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Basinghall-street , and saw the prisoner take this coffee out of my truck. I put the truck down and followed him - he ran as hard as he could - I gave an alarm, but lost sight of him as he turned the corner; he was stopped immediately - I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. - Q. Did not you say you did not know whether it was taken from your truck or not - A. He said he had not taken it - I said "Well, I'll take you to the truck, and we will see." I found it on the ground, about the spot on which he began to run.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-40

40. JOHN TATTERSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , four reams of paper, called middle yellow post, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Barber and Robert Smith .

SECOND COUNT stating it to belong to Thomas Wright .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am agent to H. Cooper and Co. paper-makers, Dover. I live in Broadway, Blackfriars. On the 24th of October, I received thirty reams of middle yellow post from them, numbered from 128 to 157. I wrote an order to Chester-quay, for four reams to be delivered to Wright, with other paper; it was all deposited at Barker and Smith's warehouse, at the quay; there were four reams in a bundle - I have since seen twenty-five of them at Wright's.

JOHN BARRETT . I am in the service of Joseph Barber and Robert Smith , at Chester-quay. On the 25th of October, at six o'clock in the evening, I loaded nineteen bundles and three single reams into Virgin's cart; he is Mr. Wright's carman. Mr. Barnes had ordered it all away.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear you saw it all at the warehouse on the 25th - A. Yes, at six o'clock; the outside was marked No. 1.

JOHN VIRGIN . I drive Mr. Wright's cart - he is a stationer , and lives on College-hill. On Saturday evening, 25th October, I went to Chester quay, Billingsgate, with an order, and received a load of paper, and drove up Thames-street, Gracechurch-street, Cannon-street, to Mr. Wright's, and took it out without counting it. I cannot say whether any was missing.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you set off from the quay - A. About six o'clock, and got to my master's about seven - the road was stopped. I do not know what sort of paper it was.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 25th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street, and observed a hackney chariot, it turned up Devonshire-street, into Devonshire-square, and drove to the archway, leading to Cutler-street and Still-alley, and stopped there - the first man who got out of the chariot looked at me, and ran away. I put my hand into the chariot, felt something in the bottom, and saw another person sitting in the chariot - got in, and seized him; it was the prisoner. I found these four reams of paper in the chariot, and ordered the coachman to drive to the Mansion House. The prisoner resisted, which made us get out of the chariot, but I got him in again - he said he knew nothing of it.

Cross-examined. Q. What made you suspect anything wrong - A. It leads to a bad neighbourhood, and there was nobody on the coach-box, except the driver - the prisoner resisted, and I tied his hands together. I am sure he did not come from the coach-box, and then into the coach.

MR. BARNES. This is the paper, and has the Excise mark, No. 132. 157. 158. and 156.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired this coach - a man was riding on the box, who ran away. I did not know the paper was in the coach.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-41

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

41. DAVID BENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 10 lbs. of horse-hair, value 7 s., and a bag, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Rhodes and William Rhodes ; a shovel, value 18 d., the goods of Daniel Buck ; a whip, value 18 d., the goods of George Gray , and a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Denton .

WILLIAM TEES . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas and William Rhodes , brick-makers . On the 24th of October, between seven and eight o'clock at night, the stable-gates were locked, the horse was in the stable, which is surrounded by a wall - the premises are at Hackney. I went to the stable at half-past four o'clock in the morning, and all these things, which were safe the night before, were stolen - the horse-hair was cut off the horse's tail. I found the prisoner in the cage, with Denton's coat on his back - he had worked for us once.

TIMOTHY READING . I am a patrol. On the 25th of October, between two and three o'clock in the morning I was in London-fields, about a mile from these premises, and stopped the prisoner with a bag, containing this horsehair, fastened to the end of the shovel, and the whip in his hand. I asked what was in the bag - he said it contained chaff. I made him put it down - he then said he had made a mistake, that it was hair, and he came from Mr. Rhodes, and one of the carters named John, gave him the hair.

DANIEL BUCK . I am carter to Messrs. Rhodes. I lost my whip and shovel from the stable - returned at half-past four o'clock, and it was gone. I found them at Worship-street.

HENRY DENTON . My great-coat was stolen from the stable.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-42

42. CORNELIUS HYAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , a till, value 3 s.; seven brass weights, value 4 s.; seven shillings, eighteen penny pieces, and sixteen half-pence , the property of Richard Maides .

RICHARD MAIDES . I keep a grocer's shop in Mare-street, Hackney . On the 4th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, going out at the shop-door, and immediately followed him. I lost sight of him just while he turned the corner - he ran as fast as he could. I followed him nearly a mile, and he was stopped. I had seen him throw down the till, but ran by it, still following him - it was brought back to me, with the money and weights stated in the indictment.

CHARLES VINCENT . I am a miller. I was going out of Maides' shop. I saw him running after the prisoner. I joined in pursuit, and saw him throw down the till, money, and weights in a lane, and picked them up.

GEORGE MERRICK . I am a journeyman baker, and stopped the prisoner, who was running - nobody was running before him. Maides came up and charged him with stealing the till - he said nothing.

(Till and weights produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the people running, and ran too - they turned several corners, and after running a mile, this young man seized me - there were a hundred people running.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-43

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

43. WILLIAM alias JAMES HAY was indicted, for that he on the 27th of October , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note (setting it forth No. 27,157,5 l. dated 20th August, 1821, signed W. R. West) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well-knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited against the statue.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to Samuel Minton , a like forged and counterfeit Bank note, with the like intent, knowing it to be forged and counterfeit.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, like the two former, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note, for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud the said Samuel Minton .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL MINTON . I am a wollen-draper , and live at No. 19, in the Minories , which is in the City. I have known the prisoner about six years - he has bought things of me. On the 27th of October, he owed me 3 l. 18 s. 3 d.; he came to my shop, about twelve o'clock that day, and said, "I have come to pay part of my debt." He has owed me the whole of it for five years next February - he tendered me a 5 l. bank note. I went over to my neighbour Johnson, to ask his opinion of it, and in consequence of what passed, I had him apprehended. I did not part with the note, till I gave it to Roberts the officer. I had shewn it to Johnson, but it was never out of my sight - he did not say how much he meant to pay me.

COURT. Q. Had you seen him often during the five years he owed the money to you - A. Only once; I passed him by accident. I spoke to him about the debt, four years ago, but not since, considering him in distressed circumstances, I thought it useless.

ISAAC JOHNSON . I am a linen-draper, and live in the Minories. On the 27th of October, Mr. Minton brought me a note for my opinion; (looking at one,) this is it - he shewed it to me. I gave it him again, and in five or ten minutes went over to Minton; he shewed it me again, and said in the prisoner's presence, that he was the person who gave him the note. I took it, and asked the prisoner his name and address, which I wrote on it, "William Hay, No. 3, Middle-street, Cloth-fair, I. J., 27 - 10 - 23." I remained there till Roberts, the officer came and took him and the note. The officer had been sent for before he gave the address.

MR. MINTON re-examined. I did not part with the note till I gave it to Johnson; it was the same I received from the prisoner. I had sent for an officer before he gave his address, but I do not think that he knew it, as I am certain nothing passed on the subject. Johnson came to my shop about ten minutes after I returned. I cannot say what made the prisoner remain so long in my shop. When I dealt with him, he lodged at a chandler's shop in Watling-street; I never knew him live in Middle-street.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a City officer. On the 27th of October, I was fetched, and took the prisoner - he said he received the note from his father, William Hay , who was a very respectable man, at Tiverton, in Devonshire. I searched him, and found some memorandums of no consequence, but no money, except a sixpence and some halfpence. He said he received the note through the hands of a man at a public-house in the Old Bailey, from his father.

MARY FLOOK . I am occupier of the house No. 3, Middle-street, Cloth-fair. The prisoner lodged with me, and left twelve months ago last June, but not since. I know nothing of him since, nor where to find him.

SARAH MILLS . I am the daughter of Matthew Mills , who keeps the Red Cow, public-house, Long-lane. I have known the prisoner between four and five years. On the 22d of October, he came to the house; I had not seen him for a year and a half, but he had been at the house one since that time, and owed us 4 s. 9 d. On the 22d of October, he came, and asked how much he owed, as he was come to pay it - I said 4 s. 9 d.; he put down a 5 l. note. My mother looked at it in my presence, and said she could not see the water-mark very plain; he then said he had it from his father in the country, and would put his address on it, which he did - this is it (looks at it;) he has written J. Hay, Tiverton, in my presence; we kept it till we heard it was forged, and then delivered it to Bennett. I marked it in front "Mr. Hay, 22 - 10 - 23" at the time. I gave him four sovereigns and 15 s. 3 d. I did not know where he lived.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a publican, and live in Charter-house-lane. I have known the prisoner rather more than a year; he owed me 2 l. 8 s. 6 d. I cannot say the date, but in October he came to pay me part of his debt; it was about the 18th or 19th. He put down a 5 l. note - I gave him three sovereigns and twenty shillings in silver;

he went away. I locked the note up in my cash-box, which I keep inside another box, and keep the key myself, and paid it away in a few days, to Sainsbury, a tax-gatherer. I had no other Bank note by me while I had this - Sainsbury wrote "Bennett" on it in my presence (looks at one.) this is it; it has "Bennett, 20 - 10 - 23," which he wrote. He came again in the next week; paid me 10 s. more of his debt, and gave me a 5 l. note, which I gave to my daughter, Sarah, to get changed. He told me he had it out of the country, from his father, at Tiverton, Devonshire, and was going to buy some clothes to go into the country for a fortnight, and should then call, and pay some more. I did not know where he lived.

JOHN SAINSBURY . I am a tax-gatherer, and live in Cowcross-street. (Looking at the note.) I took this from Bennett on the 20th of October - here is my writing on it.

SARAH BENNETT . I am the daughter of William Bennett . In October last, I saw the prisoner at my father's; he paid him a 5 l. Bank note, to take 10 s. out of it - my father gave me the note to take to Payne's, and get it changed; I brought the change, and gave it to my father. The prisoner said he was going out of town for a fortnight, and would then return and pay the rest.

ELIZABETH PAYNE . Bennett came to me on a Thursday, the latter end of October, for change for a 5 l. note; I gave her five sovereigns, and put the note into a drawer in the secretary, locked it up, and paid it away on Saturday to Browning. I put no mark on it.

JOHN BROWNING . I am servant to Mr. Whiting, baker, Moor-lane, Cripplegate. On a Saturday, at the latter end of October, I received a 5 l. note from Mrs. Payne, and delivered it to Mrs. Sanderson. I had no other 5 l. note.

SARAH SANDERSON . I am sister to Mr. Whiting. I received a 5 l. note from Browning at the latter end of October, about the 27th; this is it (looking at one.) I wrote "Payne" on it immediately as I received it.

LETITIA BECKETT . My husband keeps the Bells, public-house, Church-row, Aldgate. The prisoner lodged at our house for three or four months, and left in May or June; he called once or twice between that and October. When he lodged with us, he worked at Mr. Carpenter's, an engraver, at Aldgate; he owed us 1 l. 6 s., but printed some cards, which reduced the debt to 1 l. 3 s. 6 d. About the 16th or 17th of October, he came to our house - I did not know where he then lived; he said, "I have got some money for you, what do I owe you," and produced a 5 l. note. I asked if he had got work; he said No, his father had sent him some money from Tiverton, in Devonshire; that he lived in Cloth-fair. He wrote on the note himself, "J. Hay, 3, Middle-street, Cloth-fair." (Looks at one,) this is it. I wrote myself "J. Hay, Tiverton, Devonshire," on it, gave him change, and he left.

THOMAS CHARLES LEWIS . I am a printer, and live in the Minories. The prisoner was apprenticed to me; he is the natural son of James Hay , of Collypriest House, Tiverton. He came to me through the medium of a friend at Bath. I have written to his father, and had answers to the letters, but never saw him. The prisoner left me in November, 1818.

MR. JAMES BENNELL . I am a solicitor, and live in Copthall-court. I knew Mr. James Hay , of Collypriest House, Tiverton, Devonshire. I have known him about three years from this time, and was professionally concerned for him. He left this country for the East Indies in April, 1822, and died at Calcutta on the 12th of October, 1822. I have since managed his affairs. I have been to his house, and settled his affairs. I act for Lady Mary Hay , his widow. She did not go abroad with him. Letters of Administration were taken out by Mr. Gordon.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes, and have been so about twenty-five years. (Looks at the note uttered to Minton.) This is forged in every respect, paper and plate. It is signed "West," but is not his signature. The others are all forged in every respect. That uttered to Mills is signed "J. Robinson," but is not his writing. He signed 1 l. and 2 l. notes, when they were issued; but we have no cashier of that name, and none but cashiers sign 5 l. notes. Those uttered to Bennett are signed "Cluff" and "Whiting," but are not their writing. Cluff is a cashier, and Whiting is not. That uttered to Beckett is also signed Whiting, but is not his signature. They are all impressed from the same plate, I have no doubt.

WILLIAM ROBERT WEST . I am cashier at the Bank. The note purporting to be signed by me is not my signature. It is dated the 2d of August, 1821. I was ill at that time for three months, with a bilious fever.

(The note was here put in and read.)

Prisoner's Defence, written. I was out of work a considerable time, and not being able to make good my payments, and having sold or pledged all my clothes, I had no means left, being entirely destitute of friends; my father (my only friend) having left England some time, and is now in America. Having no person whatever to apply for the smallest assistance, and destitute and discharged from my lodgings, consequently driven to horror and the most wretched despair, I at length made application to my parish, St. Botolph, Aldgate, when they scrupled to relieve me; saying, I was a good workman and a young man, therefore I must go and get employment; but, alas! could not. They at length, by a repeated application, assisted with three separate sums of 2 s., 1 s., and 2 s., in nearly the space of three months, after which refused to do anything further. I then wrote to the Lord Mayor; but when I went to the Mansion House, the officers extremely ill-treated me - turned me out of the Office; neither would give my letter to his Lordship. With grief, anguish, and terrific despair, I went mournfully through the streets, not knowing what to do, being entirely without money - food I had not tasted for about three or four days. Having no place to retire or lay myself down to rest for sometimes three nights, during a week at a stretch; subject to the extreme severity of all weathers; and walking the streets all night much reduced me in health, and my clothes became almost indecent for me to appear in the day time, therefore masters would not give me work; on account of which, the violent struggles I had with my feelings became overpowered, through the innumerable difficulties I had experienced in my situation of poverty and distress; but still endeavouring to cherish my unblemished reputation against the powerful reproaches of a sinful world with a degree of Christian patience, supported by fortitude, as I was on the precipice of ruin. Yet, under all my calamities, I was at intervals cheered by the faint promises masters gave me, of giving me work on a future day; hoping, ere long, that the smiles of fortune would again prosper me, though slowly advancing. At last, walking the streets all night, as usual, I was going through Fleet-market, where the shambles are covered, I observed some paper under one of the butcher's blocks, and when I went and picked it up, & to my utter astonishment were the notes in question.

My mind being greatly exalted at the idea of meeting such good fortune in the extremity of deep distress, I naturally, with gratitude, went to those persons first that gave me credit, and paid them as much as I could conveniently part with, not in the slightest degree suspecting the notes forgeries on the Bank; but, on the contrary, after having received the change (being no judge of them), I certainly conceived them to be genuine, and legal currency. I therefore wish earnestly and conscientiously to appeal to you, my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, for one moment to allow the dictates of your own refined consciences to take their judgment-seats within your own breasts, to discriminate and, without prejudice, to investigate, whether, had I known these notes to have been forgeries, I should have presumptuously gone and offered payment of my debts to persons whom I have connection, and almost daily intercourse with. Doubtless, in such case, would I not immediately be pursuing an ignominious death, and inflicting upon myself the justice and extreme penalty of the law. Again, I wish to appeal to my Lord and honourable Gentlemen, the privilege of saying, could you suppose I should presume to be so ungrateful even to try to impose on those individuals, after having tendered me so many charitable services; on the contrary, it may be clearly visible I did not hesitate a single moment, from the strong impulse of motives of gratitude, but actually went, and certainly deviated not from the straight course of rectitude, to pay an honourable debt; in order that, should I ever require credit at any future period, I might obtain the same. Perhaps the question may now be asked, When I found these notes, why did I not advertise them? My reply is, that having suffered such excruciating pangs of hunger, and the terrific scenes of the inclemency of all weathers, caused me to transgress from discovering them. But had I been in circumstances above want, or even in work, I certainly should not have hesitated in immediately advertising, and should have given them up to whomsoever might have claimed them. The knowledge the whole of the gentlemen I changed the notes with have of my character, will bear the most penetrating scrutiny. The affliction I have already undergone, through my being within the walls of a prison, as I never was confined, or did anything to cause confinement, during the whole course of my life, has made a deep incision on my mind, that it will take long are it is healed.

The witness Minton, William Bennett , Beckett, and Mills, gave the prisoner an excellent character for honesty, sobriety, and industry.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, who stated that he believed him to be in distress, and knew he had been making urgent application for employment, in which recommendation all the witnesses joined.

Reference Number: t18231203-44

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

44. EDWARD COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a cow, price 9 l. , the property of Samuel Fox .

JOHN SIMMONS . I am steward to Mr. Samuel Fox , who lives in London-lane, Hackney, and is a surgeon . I know the prisoner, he is a milkman . On Sunday the 9th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw this cow safe in the field which Mr. Fox rented. I went to the field again on Monday or Tuesday, and it was gone. - There were other cows in the field, which were not my master's. I traced it over the hedge, where a rail had been broken.

JOSHUA DEAN . I am a labourer at Edmonton. About two o'clock on Monday morning, the 10th of November, I was on duty as private watchman to Mr. Knight, at Edmonton - it was a dark dull morning - I observed a man driving what appeared to me to be a cow, very fast by my box. I spoke to him - he gave no answer. I went after him, and came up to the cow standing in the road alone. I went a little further, told the watchman, and the cow and man passed us - we followed - he and the cow were standing in the road. I said, "Halloo, my friend; where are you going to drive that cow?" He said, "To Smithfield." I asked where he brought her from? he said from Bury-street. I told the watchman to put up his lantern - I looked the man in the face, and knew him perfectly well - it was the prisoner. I said I knew him, that it was all right, and left him. I do not think that he keeps cows. He returned presently, running the cow back again - went a little way down the road, and passed us a third time, and went down a bye lane leading to Church-street - I did not particularly notice the cow.

Cross-examined. by MR. BERNARD. - Q. It was a dark morning - A. Yes; I am not positive whether it was a cow or bullock - it had red sides, a white back, and white under the belly.

JOHN MANTON . I am watchman of Lower Edmonton. Between one and two o'clock in the morning I saw a bullock or cow, and man go by my box - I do not know him. I said, "You have got a short drove this morning;" and at two o'clock I was in Church-street, and heard something come down the Hyde-lane - I stopped; It appeared to me to be a man and a bullock, the same as I had seen before, and said, "What, has your bullock run from you?" He made no answer, but I took notice of the beast - it had two white spots under the horns, and a white stripe all down the back, red sides, white on the lower part of the tail and hock. I saw a cow in Fox's field three days after - it was the same, and had the same marks as the animal I saw in the lane. I only had a slight view of it, and do not know who the man was.

Cross-examined. Q. You had but a momentary view - A. No. I know the prisoner, but I do not know that he was the man - he turned his face towards the wall.

THOMAS SHAMBROOK . I attend to cows and sheep. I was coming to town with some sheep, and met a cow at two o'clock in the morning, at Lower Edmonton - a man was close behind her. I do not know whether he was driving her. I saw by the lamps that she had two specks on the forehead, and two white horns, a white back and belly. I noticed her so much, because I mind one so much like her, but it was not mine - she passed me, and was running fast, but I made a step before her, and then she stopped. I am certain of the cow. I picked her out from the rest, in Mr. Fox's field, on the Saturday afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw her before that morning - A. No. I am sure it was a cow.

THOMAS PELLAT . I am a watchman. I was calling two o'clock in the morning - Dean came to me, we went after the cow. I asked the man where he was going with it - he said to Smithfield, and brought her from Bury-street. I held my lantern up to his face. Dean said he knew him very well, and we left him - he had a beast, but I cannot say it was a cow.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the Thursday night following - he said he knew nothing of the transaction. I took Shambrook to the field, and he picked out a cow - it was on the Saturday week afterwards.

JOHN SIMMONS . I went with Gibson and Shambrook to the field - he pointed out Mr. Fox's cow from among others in the field.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to bed, with my wife, at nine o'clock that night, and got up at ten minutes to five in the morning.

WILLIAM CORKHAM . I live at Edmonton, in the same house as the prisoner. On the 10th of November, he went out about a quarter to five o'clock in the morning.

COURT. Q. How do you know that - A. I sleep on the same floor as him; he usually got up about five. I heard the clock strike soon after he went out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-45

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

45. ANN HYDER CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , nine sovereigns and a 10 l. note, the monies of Charles Byrn , her master : and ANN CLAY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

ADELAIDE BYRN . I am wife of Charles Byrn - we lodge in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square ; the landlord does not live in the house, but his son keeps a shop there. The prisoner, Ann Hyder Clay , was my servant; she slept at home. This money was in a box in my bedroom closet, which was locked, the key of the box was on the top of it. On Tuesday morning I went out about nine o'clock, having locked the closet. I returned about twelve o'clock, the door was as I had left it. I went out again at half-past two o'clock - returned at six o'clock, and about eight o'clock I went to the closet, found it still locked, the box was shut, but the money gone; the note was a Gravesend one. I immediately charged the prisoner with the robbery; she denied it. I had her apprehended, but nothing was found on her. We received the 10 l. note on Wednesday in a letter from the others prisoner. Ann Hyder Clay was asked if her husband had been in the room, she denied his having been there - she had no business in the room.

ANN CLERK . I lodge in this house, and saw the prisoner in her bed-room the second time Mrs. Byrn went out, I heard her talking to her husband. I had seen him in the house at twelve o'clock that morning. I saw him come down stairs, the first time Mrs. Byrn came home. They were talking very loud, he was in the house till four o'clock. I cannot say when the property was stolen.

ANN HIVERSON . I live in Jeffrie's-buildings, Newcastle-street, Westminster. One Tuesday evening, between eight and nine o'clock, Ann Hyder Clay's husband called on me and gave me a note to take to his mother (the other prisoner), which I did; it was wrapped in the leaf of a Bible, he told me to give his kind love with it, and say he was going into the country, and had sent her a 10 l. note. I took it to her next morning between nine and ten o'clock. She told me if I saw him to tell him to be off as quick as he could into the country, for they were after him. He had nine sovereigns, which he said he received from the country. The mother lived in Cooper's-place, Newport-market.

JAMES WAYLING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, Ann Hyder Clay , into custody at Mr. Byrns. She denied the charge. I asked if her husband had been there; she said he had been in the kitchen, but not up stairs. I said I was certain he had; she repeatedly denied it. I said he had been seen up stairs. She then said he had been in the sitting-room, but not in the bed-room. Next morning at nine o'clock I went to fetch her from the watch-house, and on our way towards the elder prisoner's house, I told her I had found that her husband and her had been in the bed-room together; she then said they had. We met the elder prisoner, who wished me to go to a public house while she fetched the younger prisoner's sister, which I did; she returned, and soon after went in search of her again till nearly twelve o'clock - the sister never came, and I took the younger prisoner to Bow-street, and in consequence of information, I went to Hiverson's, and about nine o'clock, that night, met the elder prisoner, near her own house, and asked if she had seen her son; she said not - I asked if she had received some of the stolen money from him; she said No. I took her up to her own apartment, and told her I was confident she had received it - she repeatedly denied it. I said I knew she had the 10 l. note, for I had the girl in custody who brought it to her; she then said, "I did have it, and have sent it to Mr. Byrn." As I took her to the watch-house, I said, "You had the 10 l. note in your possession all the time you were with me this morning, why did not you deliver it up?" she said she was afraid, she did not know what to do, she did it for the best.

Prisoner ANN CLAY . Q. Did I not come to you - A. I met her, but should have passed her if she had not called me. She had the other prisoner's breakfast, and was coming to the watch-house with it.

MRS. BYRNE. I was not at home when the letter inclosing the note came - I received it about four o'clock.

ANN CLAY 'S Defence. I went to the Lady's house to ask for some washing, and heard of this, but did not know my son was concerned. When I received the note, I thought I had better send it to the owner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-46

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

46. PETER NIGNAG and HENRY RODHAM were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John M'Donald , on the night of the 21st of November , with intent to steal .

JOHN M'DONALD. I live at No. 28, Manchester-street . On the 22d of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in my parlour, and heard something like a key being put into the street-door lock, and thinking it might be some of the servants letting themselves in, I did not go out. I keep no servants, but let the upper part of my house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What servants have you - A. An elderly lady, who keeps two servants; her grand-daughter and her governess were in the house at the time. I was not alarmed at all that night.

DONALD M'PHERSON . I am sergeant of the early watch. On the 21st of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I came into Manchester-street, and saw a man going into No. 28, very quietly - he entered the house, but I did not see him open the door. I crossed over -

found it was not shut - I pressed it, and found a resistance from within, and saw the reflection of a light over the door, which soon disappeared. I said, "I beg pardon, it is the watchman," and the door was immediately closed. I stepped a few paces back, and in two minutes the prisoner Rodham came out, followed by Nignag, who I tried to seize, but he ran away - I sprang my rattle and pursued - I lost sight of Rodham, but never recollect losing sight of Nignag till he was taken by a watchman in East-street. Rodham was taken before - they both ran in the same direction. I am positive of them both from their dress, but not from their features - they had the same coloured clothes on as now, but Nignag's coat was buttoned.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell at that time of night whether a man had a brown or black coat on - A. They wore dark clothes.

RICHARD STOKES . I am a watchman. I was in East-street - heard a rattle sprung, and met Rodham running as hard as he could towards me from Manchester-street; Nignag was close behind him - I seized Rodham - saw him put his right hand into his breeches pocket and throw something away which sounded like iron - this was opposite to No. 7, as near as I can state. I sung out "This man has thrown something away - I hope if any one finds it, they will give it to me;" and a boy afterwards brought me a skeleton key.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not a great many people running - A. Yes. The boy gave me the key, between nine and ten o'clock. I took him two streets from the prosecutor's house - there are two turnings into East-street; what he threw away, fell on the foot-path, as near No. 7, as I could tell - several people were pursuing, but they were foremost.

Q. If the boy had not found the key, could you have said where it dropped - A. Yes. I am sure it was between Nos. 7 and 13.

WILLIAM BUDD . I am a watchman. I heard the rattles springing, and ran to the corner of East-street, and met Nignag running as hard as he could. I threw him down, and secured him.

WILLIAM GEORGE . I live in East-street. On this night I heard the rattles spring, between eight and nine o'clock. I went out, and saw a mob, and a man in custody. I followed them to the corner of Manchester-street - returned home, stood at the door some time, and as I went to the Cock, public-house, I kicked against a key, and picked it up, about No. 7, East-street, on the footpath, about two yards from where I first saw the man in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know the man who was in custody - A. No. I found the key half-an-hour afterwards.

ELIZA BYGRAVE . I live with Mrs. Nicholson, who lodges at the prosecutor's. On the 21st November, about eight o'clock, I went out, tried the door after me, and am sure it was fast. There is a key-hole outside. I returned in an hour, and found it as I had left it. I swept the passage next morning, and found two matches.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is the other servant - A. She is not here; whether she opened the door, while I was out, I cannot say.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I found a piece of wax candle, and a knife on Rodham. Stokes gave me a skeleton key that night. I tried it to the door next morning; it opened it easily. The servant gave me two phosphorus matches.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-47

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

47. HENRY SOUTHGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a leather portmanteau, value 10 s. , the goods of John Bundy .

JOHN BUNDY . I am a trunk-maker , and live in Fleet-street . On the 28th of November, this trunk was stolen.

CHARLES DAVIS . I am porter to Mr. Bundy. I was standing at my master's desk; about a quarter to one o'clock, I looked towards the door, and saw the prisoner at the window; and, in about a minute, I thought I saw the glimpse of a trunk-going away. I ran to the door, and missed one - went into the street. The prisoner turned up Wine-office-court, and I apprehended him. I saw the trunk in his hand; he fell on his knees; a mob collected, and persuaded me to let him go, but I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never did such a thing before.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-48

48. JOHN TURNER , EDWARD JONES , and JOHN SMITH , were indicted for killing and slaying Thomas Carroll .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN SARSON . I live with my brother, a butcher, in Grub-street. On the morning of Sunday, the 26th of October , I was applied to by Thomas Carroll , to go with him to the Rosemary Branch, public-house, at Islington ; he called me up at seven o'clock, to go there, and after some time I saw the three prisoners. I saw the deceased put a sovereign into George Owen 's hands, and Hurd gave him twenty shillings, on behalf of Turner; they were to fight for the deposit. Turner stripped off his coat and handkerchief; the deceased did the same; they shook hands. Carroll said, "We will bear no animosity after the fight is over, but be good friends." They then fought for near fifty minutes; Carroll got a blow under the ear. Jones was Carroll's second, and Smith, Turner's. I did not see the blows inflicted. A brick-maker, and another young man, also took part, in seconding. Smith and Jones were not holding Carroll when he received the blow; he was carried off the ground by the brick-makers; we took him to the Whitmore's Head, public-house, where two medical men saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Carroll was a taller man than Turner - A. Yes; he had the best of it, and knocked Turner down several times. Smith and Jones were among the bye-standers, but seeing them fighting, picked them up. I did not hear them encourage the fight; they acted as seconds. I saw nothing unfair.

COURT. Q. How long were they permitted to fight - A. Fifty minutes; they were very much exhausted. Jones wished to put an end to the fight a quarter of an hour before it ended. Smith said they had better leave off, but they persisted in fighting. Carroll said he would be carried off the ground before he gave in. I did not express a wish

for them to leave off; there were a great many brick-makers there, and I was afraid to interfere. I knew of the fight before Carroll called for me. I was present three weeks before, when there was a quarrel. I took Carroll to his house, in Baker's-buildings, Old Bethlem - Dr. Read saw him.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I live in Ropemaker-street. Sarson's account is correct, as near as possible. I heard Jones persuade the deceased to leave off; he said he would be carried off the field first, and when Jones could not persuade him he had very little more to do with it; another young man took his place; Jones stood in the ring till the last. I saw Carroll fall - he was senseless after the blow was struck.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear Turner several times desire to leave off, and draw the money - A. Several persons in the ring said so. I went and persuaded Carroll to leave off, but he said he would be carried off the field first.

WILLIAM CALBECK . I have heard the witness's statement, and agree with it. I wished Carroll to leave off; he would not. Turner said he would draw his money, and leave off - Carroll said he would not.

JAMES MITCHELL . I live in Baker's-buildings, Old Bethlem. I saw Carroll brought in a coach to his father's, by Sarson; he was just alive, and no more.

SEPTIMUS READ . I am a surgeon, and live in Jewin-street. I saw Carroll at his father's house, on the morning of the 27th; he was insensible, and afterwards died. I examined his head - his death was occasioned by an effusion of blood on the head, produced by external violence. The muscles of the head were very much contused - I thought it must have been produced by repeated blows. I removed three ounces of coagulated blood from the brain; he lived a month and two days after it happened. His death must have arisen from violence of the blows in the fight.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-49

49. ELIZABETH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , two sovereigns, the monies of William Blamire from his person .

WILLIAM BLAMIRE . I am a painter , and live in Chamber-street, Goodman's-field. On the 2d of November, about one o'clock in the morning, I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated - I had been at work at Lambeth, till after twelve o'clock, and met the prisoner in Thames-street; she spoke to me, and I at last went down a court with her, and in less than two minutes, she put her hand in my fob, where this money was - I felt, and missed two sovereigns out of three; I charged her with it, she denied it. I brought her out of the court, and gave her in charge, and two sovereigns were found upon her. I had no mark on them.

JAMES SCOUSE . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor coming out of Coppin's-court , and asked what they wanted there; he gave the prisoner in charge for robbing him of two sovereigns - she denied it. I saw her searched in the watch-house, and two sovereigns found in the leg of her stocking. Blamire at first appeared much intoxicated, but the fright appeared to relieve him.

JOHN ALLINGHAM . I am a constable, and assisted in searching her. I found two sixpences in her left stocking, which she said he had given her. When she first came into the watch-house, she said she had no money at all. I found the sovereigns in her right stocking; she was rather intoxicated, and said it served him right, he ought to have paid like a gentleman. As I took her to the Compter, she said she was a fool not to have swallowed them. She was drunk then.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me 2 s. as I thought, and having no pocket, I put them into my stocking. He gave me the sixpences as we came down the court.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-50

50. THOMAS PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a mahogany board, value 10 s., the goods of Robert Booth , his master .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Robert Fauntleroy and Abraham Smith .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BOOTH . I was employed by the assignees of Mr. Astor, of Sun-street , to sell some property. I was responsible for the goods. The prisoner was employed by me on the premises. I put him in possession, and told him to let nothing leave the premises.

THOMAS CUMMINS . I was employed on these premises. On the 12th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and paid a few shillings which he owed me. He then insisted on standing treat. He sent for two pots of ale. Other men were there. I do not think he drank a drop himself. He then sent for half a pint of gin, and drank some of that. My tea came; I offered him some; he took about half of it - then said he wanted an ironing-board, and one he would have; I then thought of an old deal board, which I recommended to him, and said that he might have that as it was an old cast off painted board. It was then half-past seven o'clock. He wished us good night, and went away. I and Preston went home, and was sent for in about ten minutes by Mr. Astor, and missed a piece of mahogany from four pieces, which were safe in the workshop at four o'clock in the afternoon. It was cut for the cover of a piano-forte.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You pointed a board out to him - A. Yes. It had been used as a shelf. I brought it out and shewed it to him. He could not mistake one for the other.

JAMES PRESTON . I work with Cummins. His account is correct. The prisoner would drink no ale. Cummins recommended him some tea, to do him good and bring him round. Cummins shewed him the old deal board which he might take. It was not worth a shilling. The mahogany boards were not like that.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was the mahogany from the deal board - A. About sixteen inches. He was tolerably drunk. One board laid down, and the other stood up. I do not think he could take it by mistake.

WILLIAM HENRY ASTOR . The premises were mine. I continued on them up to the time in question. I did not authorise the prisoner to take anything away. I saw him in Sun-street, about a hundred yards off, between seven and eight o'clock at night, with a mahogany board on his shoulder, going towards Finsbury-square. I immediately went to the manufactory, and missed one. I sent for Cummings. The prisoner did not return.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say it was ever in your possession - A. I think it was the board. I only had a casual observation of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-51

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 8.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

51. ESUA ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , two pair of breeches, value 30 s.; a waistcoat, value 15 s.; a handkerchief, value 9 d.; a pair of boots, value 30 s.; three half-crowns, five shillings, and four sixpences , the property of Daniel Whitton .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL WHITTON . I am servant to the Honourable S. Berkeley , of Cranford Bridge . On the 19th of November, at seven o'clock in the evening, I left the property stated in the indictment in my room over the stable. The prisoner lived in the Countess's service nine months ago. I missed this property at nine o'clock, and between one and two in the morning Webb brought the prisoner to me with them. He gave me 13 s. 6 d., and said, "Here is your money, Daniel, which I had out of your pocket."

THOMAS WEBB . I live at Cranford. I heard of this robbery; went in search of the thief, and overtook the prisoner at the Green Man, public-house, seven miles off, at eleven o'clock, and found the waistcoat on his back. He had two pair of breeches, a handkerchief, and a pair of boots on. I took him to Whitton. He said, "Here is your money - I have spent one shilling."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-52

52. PRESTON CRUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of William Dockrill .

WILLIAM DOCKRILL . I lodge at Bow, at the Globe Tavern . On the 29th of October, these things were in a bundle, on a seat in the tap-room. I did not see the prisoner there. I missed it; and in about ten minutes it was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not the prisoner say, he took it up to give it to whoever it belonged to - A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a waiter at this house. The prisoner was there; I did not see him go out. Dockrill missed his bundle. I went out, and took it from under the prisoner's jacket, two or three hundred yards off, and told him it was not his. I do not think he said anything. He was taken in two or three minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say "You may have it. I took it, supposing it belonged to some of the young men" - A. I do not recollect hearing him say so, he made no resistance, and was rather the worse for liquor - he had been drinking with four or five companions.

JOHN MURDOCK . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty by the Globe, and took the prisoner; he appeared quite stupified, and said he thought it belonged to one of his comrades, he appeared to have been asleep.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, two of my companions had bundles. I awoke and found this on the seat, and thought it was theirs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-53

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

53. WILLIAM LUDLOW was indicted, for that he on the 1st of December at St. Mary-le-bone feloniously, without any lawful cause, was at large before the expiration of the term of his natural life, for which he had been ordered to be transported at the General Session of Oyer and Terminer, holden at Aylesbury, in and for the county of Buckingham, on the 8th of March. in the 2d year of his present Majesty's reign, (for burglary,) and was ordered to be hanged, but afterwards pardoned on the condition aforesaid , against the statute.

JAMES SHERIFF . I am keeper of the County Gaol at Aylesbury. I know the prisoner; he was committed into my custody in February 1820, and admitted to bail at the Summer Assizes, and appeared at the Lent Assizes, 1821, was tried and convicted. On the 14th of May, 1821, I moved him from our gaol on board the Justicia bulk, off Woolwich, and left him there, and have a receipt for his body, signed by Robert Smith , overseer of the hulk. I have a certificate of his conviction, which I saw Mr. Henshall , Clerk of the Assizes of the Northern Circuit, sign. The prisoner is the person stated in that certificate. (Certificate read).

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 1st of December I apprehended the prisoner in Homer-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. I did not know him before.

The prisoner made no defence.

JOHN DARKE . The prisoner worked for me fifteen months. Salmon took him from my work on the 1st of December. I am a carman; I have only known him fifteen months, which appears to be all the time he has been in England. I never had a better servant, and would willingly take him again; he was particularly attentive and honest. I believe he has two children, and his wife is pregnant.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of his good character.

Reference Number: t18231203-54

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

54. CHARLES DODDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , a saddle, value 3 l., and a bridle, value 10 s. the goods of Daniel Dowling , in his dwelling-house .

DANIEL DOWLING . I keep an academy at Highgate . On the 2d of November I lost this saddle and bridle, which I had seen in the coach-house two or three days before; the wash-house is enclosed in the same wall with the dwelling-house. The prisoner was nine months in my service, and left about August. They were new, and cost me six guineas.

GEORGE HOPKINS . I am hostler to Mr. Hunter of North Audley-street; the prisoner lodged with me at the stables for a fortnight, about two months ago; he was absent for a month, then returned and said he was out of

money, and would I let him lodge there again, which I did, and on Sunday night he brought a saddle and bridle in. I did not see it till morning, and had not seen him after four o'clock the day before. I saw him on the Monday morning in the stable with the saddle and bridle in a bag, he said he and an old cowman found them under an haystack. I said he must take them away, for if master saw them, he would wonder where they came from. I saw him again in about four hours; he said he had sold them to Timmings a Jew, for 8 s. they appeared nearly new.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am constable. On the 13th of November. I apprehended the prisoner at the Malborough-head, North Audley-street; he said he knew nothing about the saddle and bridle.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday evening a pen asked if I wanted to earn any money, and said he had a saddle and bridle under a hay-stack; if I would sell them he would give me 2 s. 6 d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-55

55. CHARLES DODDS was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , three coats, value 3 l.; three pair of trowsers, value 2 l.; a hat, value 12 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two seals, value 50 s.; and three razors, value 2 s., the goods of Daniel O'Mullane , in the dwelling-house of Daniel Dowling .

DANIEL O'MULLANE . I live at Mr. Dowling's. On the 7th of November, at a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, I missed this property out of my bed-room - it was safe at five o'clock. The prisoner had been footman to Mr. Dowling, and left in August. I did not sleep in this room while he was there. Here are three razors, two handkerchiefs, and a waistcoat, which are part of the property stolen. I am certain of them. Two of the razors have the name of "Young" on them, who gave them to me.

GEORGE HOPKINS . I am hostler to Mr. Hunter. On a Wednesday night the prisoner came to me at the public-house - I think it was on the Wednesday before he was taken. He asked if he might sleep with me, saying he had no money; and next day he went to Regent's Park Barracks, as he said; he returned between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and brought in a hat, three razors, and two handkerchiefs, and said he had them from a friend of his at the Barracks, and was to pay for them as soon as his mother sent him money from the country. He put them into the stable cupboard. They remained there with my things till the officers came, which was in the next week. I gave them all that belonged to him, and mentioned, in his presence, how he said he came by them; he said nothing to it. I saw him bring in a hat, shoes, coat, and and trowsers, on the Monday before he was taken, he said he had bought them out of the money he had received from his mother.

SAMUEL STEVENS . On the 13th of November I took the prisoner at the public-house, with Hopkins. We went to the stable. Hopkins produced three razors and a case from the stable cupboard. I searched further; and in the cupboard found seven duplicates, claimed by the prisoner; one for a handkerchief, and the other for a hat and handkerchief.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell , pawnbroker, Oxford-street. On the 11th of November, a handkerchief was pawned in the name of Johns, Davis-street, and on the 13th, a handkerchief in the name of Dodd, James-street - I cannot say who by, but the duplicates produced are what I gave the person.

JAMES HOLYLAND . I was present when the search was made. Stevens's account is correct. The prisoner claimed the duplicates.

MR. DOWLING. My house was under repair at this time, and a ladder was placed against the house, which leads to the roof. A person getting on the roof could get down to the prosecutor's room. I found his hat and gloves on the roof next day, so that the thief must have gone out that way.

DANIEL O'MALLANE re-examined. The value of all the property I lost is 6 l. My bed-room is on the third floor. I went on the roof, and found the window of a room I formerly occupied open - a person could enter there, and get to my room.

GUILTY. Aged 18. Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-56

56. ROBERT SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , ten silver spoons, value 3 l., the goods of George Vipond , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE VIPOND . I am a linen-draper , and live at No. 2, Hatton-garden - the prisoner came into my service in June, 1822; he was a servant in the shop, at 2 l. 10 s. a week - his wife was also in the shop; they resided in the house, my family live in the country. I had six silver tea, two desert, and two table spoons, which were only occasionally in use. The prisoner's wife managed the concerns of the house. In consequence of something which occurred, I had the prisoner apprehended on the 5th of November. I had him apprehended by Lee; his desk was opened, and among other duplicates found, there was one for these spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You lived once on Ludgate-hill - A. Yes. I knew the prisoner but a short time before he came to live with me. My shop-bills have the name of Vipond only on them.

Q. Look at this card. (handing it.) Have you ever seen such a one before - A. Yes. It says, "J. Shields, 2, Hatton-garden." I knew that he issued such cards; he was never a partner. I swear, that he had no interest in the business; his salary did not depend on the trade done. I sleep at Hatton-garden myself, and go to see my family occasionally. There is a female servant; the prisoner's wife hired her, and pays her; but I pay them again; she is my servant. His wife provides the meals, but at my expense. I never held out to any body that the prisoner was a partner. I may have paid for printing the last thousand cards that were printed - "R. Shields, linen-draper, 2, Hatton-garden."

Q. Have you not been straightened a good deal for money - A. No. I can get as much credit as I want.

Q. Have you not been denied credit, unless Shields guaranted payment - A. Never, to my knowledge. I know Marshall, never asked him for credit - the prisoner has bought goods without my direction.

Q. On your solemn oath, do not you know, that when

bills have been coming due, that goods have been sent to the pawnbrokers, to raise the money, to keep up the credit of your house - A. Never; and if I had known it, that man should not have remained a moment in my house. I never knew of such things being done. I never knew Mr. Hall refuse to leave goods at my house. I paid him for every thing as it came. I was a witness in this court, two or three times before 1811, but not since; mine is a tally-shop. I never take duplicates in payment for goods. I was never at the pawnbroker's; he left one of his cards with the pawnbroker, though he pawned the goods in another name.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did the prisoner keep your books - A. Yes. Here is an account of sales made out by him, and here is an invoice in his writing, made out on the very day he was taken; it is headed, "Mrs. Brown, to George Vipond ." He never pretended to call himself interested in the business. Here is his cash-account, made up to the 4th of September. When I first saw these cards, I shewed my disapprobation of it; it might be a month or two, after I commenced business; he said he had them done, to bring his own customers to the shop; he had himself been in business. There is no item in the cash-book of payment for them. I should not object to have paid for them; but never knew they were to be printed.

Q. Has he taken credit for his salary in the cash-book - A. He has debited himself for various sums.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Here is an entry in the cash-book of 2 l. 10 s., paid to Hall, on the 24th of October. Does it appear how he got the money - A. Certainly not; but on that day he gives credit for money received, and carries a balance forward of 13 l. 0 s. 10 d. from the day before; the payments are not so much as the receipts; the balance was in his possession.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Up to what date is the cash-book balanced - A. The 4th of November; it is then exactly balanced. I told him there should be 4 l. left, and he has written, "There ought to have been 4 l. in hand; it is supposed a payment must have been made, and not entered."

JURY. Q. In your return of assessed taxes, do you include the prisoner as a servant - A. Certainly I do.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 5th of November, I was at Mr. Vipond's, when the prisoner's desk was opened by a smith; some duplicates were found in it, which I produce; there was a small box in the desk, which Mr. Vipond did not wish to be broken open. The key of the desk, and this box, were found on the prisoner; the duplicate of the spoons was never in my possession.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Previous to opening this desk, had the prisoner been apprehended - A. No. He was not present when the lock of the desk was picked. I have twenty-seven duplicates, which Mr. Vipond did not claim.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took a key from the prisoner, which opened the little box. I took out the contents. Mr. Vipond delivered me the duplicate of the spoons.

MR. VIPOND. I got it out of the prisoner's desk, when it was opened. Mr. Hart and Palmer, my shopmen, saw me find it. I never used the desk myself; the prisoner kept the key.

WALTER MUNCASTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Skinner-street. To the best of my recollection, I received these spoons of the prisoner, on the 25th of October, in the name of James, for 2 l.; they are worth 50 s.; he left no card with me on this occasion; but when some shawls were pawned.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you be certain that he pawned them - A. I will not swear it. I have every reason to believe that he is the person. I did not know his name. I did not take the shawls in, when the card was left. I did not know Vipond's house, or any of his men. People often pawn in other names, without any bad intention.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do assert, that I never was his servant; we began business on the 1st of July. I was to bring the connexion, manage the business; and proved to him, that I could raise a connexion to raise 1000 l. a-year; he was to bring 500 l. and I 500 l. If we did not agree, the debts due were to be paid, and the residue divided; we were not to draw above 50 s. a-week from the trade; but it was never considered, that was to be my wages. I have rose a business of about 1000 l. a-year; all the goods that were pawned, were to keep up a good name, not having money; and he was so often out of town. I have advanced above 100 l. Mr. Vipond's name being bad in the City, he could not get credit from more than two houses; and I was obliged to pay money for goods; among other things, to Hall and Sons, for hats; they would not trust him a 14 s. hat. As to the balance of cash, it was in his own hands, and not mine; he could never make out his cash-account. When there was no money, I was obliged to pawn goods, and he knew it; he knew I had the cards, for he said to the printer,

"Send Shields 1000 hand-bills." This accusation is for nothing else, than to get me out of the business, I have raised, and kept Vipond in it. I was to have a half of the business, or the cards would never have been laying on his counter for six months.

MR. VIPOND re-examined. (Looking at a card.) I saw a card like this before he came to live with me. I knew they were circulated. The agreement was, that he should introduce his customers to the house, and I had this printed for the purpose. When I engaged him, he said he had nothing but what he stood upright in. I was obliged to lend him money before he could come. My cards and bills are headed "G. Vipond" only; no others were used in the shop by my authority.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you see the cards which you did not authorise the delivery of - A. Yes, when they were delivered at my house. No cards were used in the shop, by my permission, but mine. The first card of his was used before he joined me, to bring his customers to the house.

Q. Did he bring a cart load of furniture to your house when he came - A. No; he brought a few plates. The furniture is mine; he paid for it, as my servant, with my property: it is charged in the book.

GEORGE PALMER . I am in Mr. Vipond's employ. I came at the same time as the prisoner. Mr. Vipond then slept on the floor, in the parlour. The shop opened in a few days, I saw the cards stating that Shields' business would be carried on there. I believe they were circulated. Mr. Vipond must have seen them, for I have delivered them several

times to customers. There appeared a scarcity of money at times, for I have asked Shields for money, and could not get it. He has paid me in Mr. Vipond's presence. Mr. Vipond took his meals with him. I do not board in the house. I know goods have been pawned out of the shop; I have pawned some spoons by Shields's order. Some silk was pawned once, and I fetched it out. It was put into the stock again. Shields said they must go to make up a bill. I cannot say whether Mr. Vipond ever knew of it. He often left town, but was not absent long. I should imagine he must have known it. The prisoner certainly had an interest in the business; he conducted himself as master, and Mr. Vipond treated him as such. I believe he paid the shopmen every week.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. He acted as confidential man - A. Yes; the business was carried on in Mr. Vipond's name. I believe I pawned some linen by the prisoner's order, and fetched it out again.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. When these pledges were made, what became of the money - A. Mr. Vipond was in the country at the time. Shields said there was a bill due, and he did not know where to find the money. Mr. Vipond was acquainted with it when he returned, and that we had to borrow the money; but I do not know whether he knew it was on a pledge.

COURT. Q. How do you know Mr. Vipond was informed money had been borrowed - A. I heard Shields say he had borrowed money on three or four pieces of linen, to make up the bill; this was four or five months ago. It was 3 l. 10 s., which I had received on the linen. I have pawned things twice: I pawned the spoons eight or ten months ago, in Houndsditch, for 30 s. or 50 s. I gave the money to Shields. I have dined there at times; I then dined at the same table as Mr. Vipond.

BENJAMIN MARSHALL . I live in Catherine-street, Commercial-road. Shields was formerly in my service. I sold some goods to Mr. Vipond upon Shields's guarantee. I would not have left them without Shields making himself answerable; he verbally undertook to pay for them; they amounted to 30 l. I sold him some blankets in August, which come to about 16 l. Shields said he would see me paid.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. The order for the goods came from Shields - A. Yes. I saw Mr. Vipond when I called, but he did not interfere. Mr. Vipond applied to me for goods last Friday week; I was aware of this transaction, and refused him credit.

JOHN COULSON . I came to live with Mr. Vipond in May last. Shields generally paid the money. His wife lived in the house. The maid-servant treated her as mistress. Mr. Vipond treated Shields as his equal; cards were distributed publicly, stating that Shields would carry on his business at Hatton-garden. We treated Shields as master. I know some woollen cloth was pawned, to pay Hall for hats, as they had once refused to leave a hat without payment: it was about 3 l., I believe. Mr. Vipond did not know it.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did Shields tell you all this - A. He employed me to pawn them for that purpose about October, and I saw the very money paid from the till.

Q. Here is an entry in the cash-book of 3 l. paid Hall for hats - is there any credit given for the money raised - A. The balance here is 3 l. 10 s.

Q. Is there not on the same day a balance of 23 l. 18 s. - A. Yes; I cannot say whether this entry relates to that transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-57

57. ROBERT SHIELDS was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , in the dwelling-house of George Vipond , his master, one hundred and seventy-three yards of linen, value 16 l.; twenty-nine shawls, value 29 l.; seven cloths, value 4 l. 10 s.; ten yards of cloth, value 8 l. 10 s.; a scarf, value 50 s. eighty-eight-yards of silk, value 20 l.; and sixty-nine yards of cotton, value 3 l. 15 s. his property .

Mr. VIPOND. The prisoner was my servant , and had the principal management of my business, at a salary of 2 l. 10 s. a week. I never authorized him to pawn any goods for me, nor ever knew that he did. I have his cash-book made up to the 4th of November - there is no entry of any sum of money received for the goods stated in the indictment - he made the cash-book up on the 5th of November, at my request. I said "Is everything included?" He said "Yes; everything." I counted what money I had in my pocket, and said, "You cannot be correct, as I am 4 l. short." He then wrote the memorandum of it. I was once told, on my return from the country, that 12 l. 13 s. had been borrowed from a friend to pay a bill - he never intimated that it was a pledge. I made no reply - he was to pay it out of my property. On the 5th of November his desk was opened - Read took what duplicates were in the small box, and Lee those in the desk - they led me to different pawnbrokers, who are here - he has not given credit in the book for any of these articles.

WILLIAM READ . I found some duplicates in a box in the prisoner's desk - they relate to this property.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 19th of July two pieces of Irish were pawned with me in the name of Hughes, by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew the prisoner very well - A. Yes; I knew his name, and where he lived, for I had his card, which he gave me at a former transaction. I put H on the ticket, for housekeeper. I did not know that Mr. Vipond occupied the house.

MR. VIPOND. This is my linen - I was not in want of money in July - I have frequently lent the prisoner's brother-in-law money, and the prisoner knew that - I lent him 40 l. about that time. Since I have been in Hatton-garden I have never been in want of money - I have had 100 l. in my pocket for months together.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ever fail in trade - A. Yes, in 1820. I had prosecuted one Oldfield about that time, for keeping a gaming-house.

Q. At which you had been a player - A. Never in my life - I do not know whether he was ever brought up for judgment - I left it with my solicitor. A servant of mine had squandered my money there, and so I prosecuted him.

Q. Do not you know that Oldfield was never brought up for judgment, and that the Attorney-General has himself interfered to bring him up - A. I do not know it - I never attempted to have him brought up - I was never informed of any goods being pawned.

Q. Here is an entry of 34 l. on the 21st of July, what means had he of receiving that sum - A. It appears by

the book to be received by the collectors out of doors from 260 people. I have no petty cash books; his wife keeps a house-keeping book; there are no credit entries in it. I heard Marshall examined in the last case. I never applied to him for goods till after the prisoner was apprehended. The prisoner bought the blankets for me, and the invoice was made in my name; if he became responsible, it is without my knowledge; I paid for them. My private mark is on this linen. I never sell whole pieces of this quality; my stock was taken some time in July.

NICHOLLS re-examined. I have some cloth pawned for 1 l., and a remnant of cloth and kerseymere for 3 l. I gave the persons the duplicates produced.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am shopman to Mr. Chaffers, pawn-broker, Walling-street. I have two piece of silk pawned on the 2d of October by a man who I saw outside the court, for 5 l.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am servant to Mr. Reeves, pawn-broker, Snow-hill. I have some pieces of cambric pawned on the 8th of May for 10 l. I do not know who by. I have also a scarf pawned on the 16th of August for 25 s.; twenty shawls on the 14th of May for 9 l., in the name of Thompson; and some cloth for 3 l., in the name of Jones on the 7th of June; the duplicates are among those produced.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Should you know the man who pawned them - A. I should know the man who pawned the shawls. Tally shops often take duplicates for money.

WALTER MUNCASTER . I am a pawn-broker. I live in Skinner-street. I have nine shawls, pawned on the 15th of March, for two guineas and a half in the name of Jennings. I do not know who by. On the 27th of June three more were pawned in the name of Shields.

JOSEPH SARSON . I live with Mr. Stafford in St. John street. On the 4th of October 1822, forty-eight yards of linen were pawned in the name of Turner for 2 l. 15 s. On the 2d of November, three handkerchiefs and four pairs of stockings for 30 s.; the corresponding tickets are here.

EDWARD CALVER . I live with Mr. Fleming of Newgate-street. I have two pieces of cotten pawned for 30 s. on the 3d of October, by a much younger man than the prisoner.

ROBERT BEECHAM . I am a pawn-broker and live in Holborn-row. On the 9th of November 1822, two scarfs were pawned in the name of Jones for 2 l. On the 14th of June 1823, a piece of linen for 30 s., and two pieces on the same day for 2 l., in the name of Jackson, and on the 27th of September, eighteen yards of silk for 25 s., and fourteen yards for 20 s.; and on the 13th of August, thirteen yards of cotten for 16 s.; the corresponding duplicates are here.

MR. VIPOND. These articles are mine, and have my private mark on them; the stock was taken by the prisoner, and the account left in his hands to be cast up; he has never returned it to me; if they had been sold, they should be entered in a book. I find two pieces of silk corresponding in length with hese, which are entered in a fictitious name.

Q. Could all these goods go out of your stock without your knowledge - A. Yes, because they were taken at different times. I missed the twenty shawls, and asked him for them; he said they were gone upon approbation to Mr. Evans, his brother-in-law, they are entered on approbation to Evans.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a situation of two hundred guineas a year, and left it to go with him. We had fifty interviews; he always said I was to have half the business: he did not wish my name to appear, as I had take the benefit of the Insolvent Act; he said he had plenty of money to live on, and would go down and live with his family. On the 4th of November he laid a trap for me; he said he wished me to balance the cash; he always had the balance in his own hands. I had none, he is indebted to me above 100 l. for money paid on the partnership account; he has kept the book from me for the purpose of getting me out of this comfortable business.

JOHN COULSON . I am in Mr. Vipond's service. I have pawned things for the prisoner three or four times. they were taken publicly out of the shop. I never heard Mr. Vipond complain of missing any stock, he was generally in the shop. I never heard of Shields having wages. Mr. Vipond called him "Mr. Shields."

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What had you to do in the shop - A. Very little; I was an outdoor collector. I pawned some silk for 5 l., and gave the prisoner the money.

GEORGE PALMER . I am collector to Mr. Vipond. Once, when Mr. Vipond was in the country, a bill came in. Shields said it must be taken up, and requested me to get some money on some Irish. I pawned them, and met him in the Strand with the cash. Some other goods were pawned and taken out to show a lady at the Goose and Gridiron, and then replaced in the stock; it was never made a secret of. I was never told not to tell Mr. Vipond.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you never told Shields that he was liable to be turned away at an hour's notice if he acted improperly - A. Yes; Mr. Vipond threatened to discharge him once. but they were reconciled.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago was that - A. Eight or nine months; he had been drinking, and Mr. Vipond said, if that was not altered, he should dismiss him.

The witness Marshall repeated his evidence as in the former case.

GUILTY. Aged 34. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-58

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

58. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Shank Parrey , from his person .

MR. JOHN SHANK PARREY . I am an attorney , and live in Cateaton-street. On the 14th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-street , near Chancery-lane, walking with Mr. Gates and Mr. Pollock; I missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner putting a yellow handkerchief under his coat - I thought there was somebody with him. I seized him and took my handkerchief from him. He said hunger tempted him to do it. He appeared distressed.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable. I took him in charge - he said he was distressed and hungry. I found no money on him. I produce the handkerchief.

MR. PARREY. This is another handkerchief, and has been substituted for mine. I put a mark on it in the constable's presence, and here are initials substituted in its stead, it is not my writing - it is the same pattern, but a darker colour; mine had a hole in it, which there is not in this. I am certain I took my handkerchief from him.

THOMAS SMITH . It is the handkerchief the gentleman delivered to me I am certain.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work, and picked this handkerchief up by Chancery-lane, stood a moment, and then put it under my coat. I had plenty of time to escape.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-59

59. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Wright , on the 2d of December , with a felonious intent to rob him and his monies from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously and by force demanding the same, with intent to steal.

JAMES WRIGHT . I lodge at No. 12, Broad-street, Golden-square, on the first floor. On Wednesday evening last, a little before nine o'clock, I was walking in Fleet-street, between the Bolt-in-Tun and Fleet-market, at a slow pace, and met the prisoner; he gave me a daring and unusual look as he passed. I turned round, and observed him following me; he tapped me on the shoulder, and said he was in great want of money, would I assist him - I said I did not consider him an object of charity, and would give him nothing - he kept by my side till I got to the end of Fleet-street, talking all the way. I said several times if he did not go about his business, I would give him in charge. I was just turning the corner into Bridge-street , (I was going to see a friend in Blackfriars-road) - he caught hold of me by the collar, and swore with a violent oath, that money he wanted, and money he would have, and he did not care a d - n for his life. I did not see the watchman, but saw the waterman at a short distance, and desired him to call the watch, and the instant I said so, he let go of my collar, and gave me a violent blow with his fist on the head (I feel the effects of it now); at that moment, as he was going to repeat the blow, two watchmen came up, and seized him, and said they had seen what had passed. I never saw him before.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you recollect going up into a room with me - A. Never in my life.

Q. Were you ever in any room with me, in which Mr. Butler was in the chair - A. I never was in any room whatever with him.

JAMES FINNEY . I am a watchman. I was going upon duty, and just as I passed Mr. Waithman 's door, the waterman called me, and said a person was attacking a gentleman - I went up, and saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor a blow on the head; he was going to repeat it, as I collared him - I asked why he struck that gentleman; he said he would hit him again; he did not say why. We took him to the watch-house. I took him to Guildhall next day - he said nothing about it.

WILLIAM PITT . I am a watchman of Bridge-street. I saw the prisoner strike the gentleman a violent blow - I was about a yard from him - he would have repeated it if I had not prevented him - he said he would strike him again.

THOMAS SMITH , I was a constable of the night, and found the prisoner at the watch-house. Mr. Wright gave the account he has now. The prisoner seemed to say he had seen him before - Wright declared he had never seen him before. Nothing but a few halfpence were found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking on the opposite side of Ludgate-hill; I looked in at a shop, and the gentleman was looking in at the shop; he came and pushed up against me - I came away to the bottom of the street, went into Bridge-street, and the gentleman followed; he came up alongside of me, and asked if I had lately come out of the country - I said I had been up here about ten weeks, but had been in London before. I turned up the first turning on the right, to go towards the Temple - he followed me. I told him I was going to a house to see a young man, who had worked in Deptford Dock-yard; he asked if it was convenient for him to go with me - I said it was not convenient to take a stranger, for I knew very little of the man. He came on a little further, and asked if I had got work or not; I said I had had a bad leg, and was not able to do much work, and was rather short. We came to the house; he followed me up three pair of stairs - the young man was not there, but a man sat there nearly tipsy - I believe his name is Butler; we came down again, and before we came to Fleet-street, I asked him to recommend me to work, or help me to a trifle - he said he had no money whatever about him, but if I would go with him to a friend's house in Fleet-street, he would try and borrow a few shillings; we walked to the bottom of Fleet-street; I said, "If your friend lives here, now is your time, if you will let me have it;" he said if I did not go away, he would charge the watch with me - I said he had not behaved like a gentleman, that I had met with some of his kind before, and did not think him any better than he ought to be - he began calling me a rascal, and said, "There is a great many of your sort about, you want to extort money from me." I said the actions he used were not like a man, and he deserved a lick on the head, and struck him.

JAMES WRIGHT . I had come from Golden-square, and had not been on Ludgate-hill at all. I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-60

60. JOHN COATES and WILLIAM HERMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of a man unknown , from his person .

HENRY HUGHES . I am a watchman. On the 24th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was taking my children a walk in Fleet-street , and saw the prisoners near Shoe-lane; two gentlemen were looking in at a shop. Coates hit Herman over the elbow, and said, "Come along." They went up to the gentlemen. I saw Herman put his hand through Coates's arm, into the gentleman's pocket - Coates spread his frock as wide as he could, to hide Herman's hand, and in about two minutes, I saw Coates shove something into his coat. I immediately hallooed out Stop him! and put my child out of my

arms, but it screamed so; I returned and lost them, and in about twenty minutes, I saw them again in Fleet-street. A gentleman passed with his handkerchief hanging a little out, and in a minute it was gone. I gave my child to a woman, and followed them, but lost them again, and next night, when I was on duty, I took them in Shoe-lane

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-61

61. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a handkerchief, value 9 d., the goods of certain person unknown , from his person .

THOMAS THOROWGOOD . I am a constable. On the 10th of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of King-street , as the Lord Mayor's procession was passing, and saw the prisoner with two more, and saw him put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, take a handkerchief out, and put it under his coat - I called to the gentleman; the prisoner made off through the crowd - I laid hold of him; he stopped down, drew the handkerchief out, and was going to throw it away. I took it out of his hand, and took him to the watch-house; I asked who his companions were; he said he did not know them.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the mud.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-62

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

62. JOHN HODGE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a pistol, value 10 s. , the goods of William Day .

WILLIAM DAY . I am an auctioneer , and live in the City-road. This pistol was in a book-case at a gentleman's house, where I had a sale; I did not miss it till I came to sell the lot on the 17th of November. The prisoner was a porter at the sale,

JAMES ROBERT CASSELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. On the 17th of November, about two o'clock, a man in size and appearance like the prisoner, pawned this pistol.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 24th of November, I apprehended the prisoner at a sale in Hoxton - he said he was not afraid to meet the charge, and would give two sovereigns to find out who had done it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-63

Before Mr. Recorder.

63. JOHN NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , a watch, value 2 l.; a seal, value 12 s., and a key, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Rose , from his person .

RICHARD ROSE . I am a permit writer to the Excise . On the 6th of May, late in the evening, I was at the Star, public-house, City-road ; I was nearly drunk. I had a watch in my fob - I do not know at what time I left the house, or when I lost it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Worship-street, that you did not know the watch - A. I said it very much resembled it. The key and seal were gone.

ROBERT CLARK . I am porter at the Star, public-house. On the 6th of May, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I came in; Rose was there, rather the worse for liquor; the prisoner sat in the opposite side of the same box. Rose was taken sick. I took him into the yard, and, at the same time, Norton gave me a shove, and took Rose's watch out of his pocket. I could not follow him, because I was holding Rose - my master went after him, but could not find him; he never returned to the house. I knew him before.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not said you would be revenged on me - A. No. I never quarrelled with him.

JOHN TAYLOR , I was at the Star, public-house, and saw Clark taking Rose into the yard; Norton went, as if to assist. I did not see him do anything; he stopped about three minutes after Rose was in the yard, and then went away, and next morning I heard Rose had lost his watch, as he went out, I saw part of the watch in his hand, but did not suspect him.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a watchman. On the night in question, I heard of this robbery; and, about half-past ten o'clock, I was going over my beat, and found a watch about twenty yards from the Star, public-house.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. Thomas gave me the watch. Rose described it before he saw it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I apprehended the prisoner in Fish-street-hill, and told him it was for robbing a man of his watch in the City-road; he said that was all settled.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking at this house, and went home. Here is the watch I had in my hand.

(Producing one.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-64

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

64. WILLIAM WARRELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of June , a set of harness, value 5 l.; a saddle, value 1 l.; a bridle, value 10 s.; a net, value 10 s., and a sack, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Hanworth , Esq. which had then lately been stolen, he well-knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS HANWORTH , Esq. I am a magistrate , and live in the parish of Stanmore . On Monday the 16th of June, I missed a new set of poney harness, a net and a sack. I had seen them on Saturday in the stable; a quantity of bran was scattered about, and the sack which had contained it was gone. I have not found them. I had bought them all within six weeks, and gave above 13 l. for the set; it had been very little used.

JOHN WADWORTH . I live at Wotten. On the 30th of September, I went to the prisoner's house at Edgeware, about eight o'clock in the evening, and asked if he knew my son George; he said he did not, and afterwards that he did. I asked if he had bought any harness of him; he said at first, No and afterwards, that he had, and had bursed it, for fear it should be found out; he did not say where. I asked if he had paid my son any money on account of it; he at first said No, and then, that he had given him 9 s. towards 30 s. for it. I asked him to pay me the rest; he said he could not, but would give me 5 s. towards it - then said he would give me half a sovereign, and then 15 s., and would pay the whole next morning, by nine o'clock, if I

would meet him at his own house. I did not go, and have not seen him since.

JOHN ODELL . I am gardener to the prosecutor. On the 30th of September I went with Wadworth to the prisoner. Warrell's wife asked them to go to the back-room with her, which they did. They all three came out; and Wadworth asked me to go into the room with them, which I did; he, the prisoner, and his wife, were present. Wadworth read a letter to him from his son, who was in Newgate at the time. He read a bill for the harness to him, and that he had paid 9 s. out of 30 s., which the prisoner owned, and said he had buried it, but did not say where.

JOHN WADWORTH . I produce the letter, which I read to him. I asked if he had the articles; he said he had.

(Letter read.)

June 24. - Mr. Warrell. - To George Wadworth .

To a set of harness - 1 10

Received - 0 9

1 1

NEWGATE, SEPT. 29. - Mr. Warrell - I am under the necessity of asking you for the money for the harness I sold you in June. I think you have behaved very indifferent to me since I have been here. If you don't endeavour to pay the money, I shall write to inform Mr. Hanworth himself, and it will go very hard with you. I shall inform the gentleman of your goings on. I don't like to tell tales; but you do not use me well.

G. WADWORTH.

RICHARD PATTEN . I am constable of Great Stanmore. I was coming from Guildhall, and met the prisoner at the Green Man, at Paddington, and secured him. I asked about the harness belonging to Mr. Hanworth. He said he never had any harness in his life but one set, which he had from Newhill. I asked what made him go away; he said he went down to Stafford, to see his wife's friends, and had only been in town one night, and was going to see his wife. He afterwards said he would tell the truth, that he did buy it, and gave 13 s. 4 d. for it, and sold it for 17 s. 6 d. He did not say what harness it was, but I mentioned Mr. Hanworth to him. He afterwards said he did not buy it all; that Wadworth owed him money for eating and drinking, when he kept a cook-shop, and he brought the harness there and left it; after Wadworth was in prison, he sold it to pay what he owed him. He afterwards said he never bought it, but Wadworth buried it in his garden; he lived at Edgware, and did keep a cook-shop. I said Wadworth could not bury it, for he was in prison; he said it was buried in his garden, and might be rotten for what he knew.

Prisoner's Defence. I never told him anything about it.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-65

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

65. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , an umbrella, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Williams .

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a constable of St. Giles's. On the 28th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I was going up Smart's-buildings, directly opposite Mr. Williams's shop, in Holborn , and saw the prisoner come from the door and run off; I followed and overtook him, with this umbrella in his hand.

RICHARD WILLIAMS . I keep a shop opposite Smart's-buildings; my door was half closed, and this umbrella rather behind it. The prisoner was brought into the shop with it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231203-66

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

66. JOHN BROWN and WILLIAM DODD were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a feather bed, value 2 l.; four sheets, value 5 s.; and a gown, value 1 l., the goods of Mary Mills , in her dwelling-house .

MARY MILLS . I live in Dean's-court, New Round-court, Strand . On the 13th of September, I lost this property, and several other things, out of two boxes in the back parlour, which is used as a bed-room; the door was broken open; they were safe the night before Watkins slept there: the staple of the padlock was drawn. I went to Bow-street, and upon returning, Watkins had come home and gave me a hat, which I took to the Marquis of Granby, public-house, in Chandos-street, and sent a man in with the hat. The prisoner, Brown, came out with a paper cap on; I told him I wanted him; he immediately ran out, and went a back way right through the house; I followed, but he outran me. I got a search-warrant, and went with Stevens to Dodd's room, and found a pair of sheets.

JOHN WATKINS . I am a milkman, and sleep in this room. On the night of the 12th of September I went out about half-past six o'clock, padlocked the door, and put the key in the usual place for Mrs. Mills. I returned about nine, and found the bed gone, two boxes broken open, and the sheets and a tin can gone. I found a man's hat on the head of the bedstead, and gave it to Mills.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a patrol. On the 13th of September I went with a search warrant, and accompanied Mrs. Mills to No. 14 Vine-street, Lincoln's Inn, in consequence of information, and was directed to the front attic, and on the landing, near the door, I found a bed and one pair of sheets, and in the room another pair of sheets laying loose, not on the bed; Mills claimed them. On the 26th of October I apprehended Dodd in the same room; two women were with him; he sat by the fire holding the frying-pan. I spoke to the women, he immediately held his head down. I could not see his face for ten minutes, and as he would not turn it towards me, I touched him and said, "Dodd, I am come for you, I suppose you know what it is for," he said, "Yes; I intended giving myself up in a few days," and that he knew nothing of the robbery. I have the hat, bed, and sheets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. Stevens shewed this hat to me. I know it to belong to Brown. I have seen it on his head several times at the Marquis of Granby; I am certain it is his by a round patch on it. I apprehended him on the 24th of October leaning against a post at the corner of the Seven-dials; I said "Jack, where have you been all this time;" he made some mumbling answer; I collared him, and found seven keys, a crow-bar, and knife in his pocket, and a bag in his hat; one is a padlock key, the others are common ones, but the ward of one is forced off.

Prisoner BROWN. Q. Where have you seen me before

- A. In company with thieves at that house frequently before the robbery, but not since.

BROWN'S Defence. On the morning of the robbery I was in the Marquis of Granby, a man brought a hat in, and asked if any one owned it. I came out soon after and met Mills at the door; she said something about the hat, I walked away, but did not run. I returned in half an hour, went to my lodging and got my hat.

CHRISTOPHER QUIN . I rent the house where this property was found; a woman named Catharine Baker , whom Dodd cohabited with, was in custody about it; she has rented the room for two years, and is an unfortunate girl. Dodd was in the habit of coming to see her; no one but her lodged there; they used to fight at times, and then he would keep away for two or three months.

Q. Did you tell the officer that Dodd's lodging was up stairs in the house - A. I said he lived up in the garret with a woman.

STEVENS. I asked Quin which was Dodd's room, he directed us to the attic.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DODD - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-67

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

67. JOHN WEEKS was indicted for wilfully and maliciously administering to Eliza Turner , certain medicines, drugs, and herbs, with intent to procure her miscariage .

NOT GUILTY . *

Reference Number: t18231203-68

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

68. MARGARET STANTON was indicted, for that she on the 12th of October , in and upon Richard Stanton , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument did strike and cut him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

NOT GUILTY . *

* This case and the preceding one being of an indelicate nature, the evidence is omitted by order of the Court.

Reference Number: t18231203-69

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

69. THOMAS OUTTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , eight sovereigns, a half sovereign, sixpence, and a 10 l. Bank note, the monies of James Serle Metcalf , his master .

JAMES SERLE METCALF . I am a grocer , and live in Barbican . The prisoner was my errand-boy , he lived only fifteen days with me, but came with a good character. On the 11th of November, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I sent him with a 10 l. note, eight sovereigns, a half sovereign, and sixpence, to my brother, Mr. Thomas Metcalf , No. 18, Castle-street; he absconded; I found him in custody three days after. The 10 l. note has been stopped at the Bank, and I have got it.

THOMAS METCALF . I live in Castle-street, Falcon-square, the prisoner brought me no money on the 11th of November.

WILLIAM ROBERTSON . I am a tailor, and live in High-street, Bloomsbury. On or about the 11th of November, the prisoner and a companion came to my shop; his companion wanted some clothes for the prisoner. I sold him a suit for 2 l. 3 s.; the other tendered me a 10 l. note, which I got changed; he gave his address, " John Underwood , No. 26, Wood-street."

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. All your dealings were with his companion - A. Yes; he is about twenty-one years old.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 14th I apprehended the prisoner at the White Horse, public-house, in Chiswell-street; he said voluntarily, that on the morning his master gave him the money, he met one Vibrant (who had been a schoolfellow of his), who took the money from him, and they went to High-street, St. Giles's, and at a clothes-shop bought some clothes for 2 l. 3 s.; that Vibrant changed the 10 l. note, received the change, and took him to Twickenham; hired a room for a week, and after being there two days, Vibrant left him and came to town, with 6 l. or 7 l. of the money; that he had none of the money, and sold his waistcoat that day - he had none on. Vibrant is in custody. I have reason to believe that the prisoner sent somebody to let me know where he was.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer, and corroborate Vann's statement.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-70

70. JAMES VICKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a tea-kettle, value 5 s. 6 d. the goods of Martha Heriot and George Lissant Olding , from the person of Charles Trustee .

GEORGE LISSANT OLDING . I am the partner of Martha Heriot ; we are tin plate-workers , and live in Bishopsgate-street; Trustee was my servant . On the 25th of November, in the evening, I sent him for two tea-kettles, from the manufactory in Old-street, but he brought only one.

CHARLES TRUSTEE. I was in the prosecutor's service. I fetched two tea-kettles from Howard's, in Old-street. About a quarter past seven o'clock, as I came down London-wall , the prisoner came behind and snatched one from under my arm, and ran up Old Broad-street. I followed, and never lost sight of him, till he was stopped in the passage leading to Austin-friars; as I called Stop thief! he threw it away; it was picked up and given to me. I am sure he is the man. I charged him with it; he said nothing.

CHARLES GOODWIN . I am watchman of Austin-friars. I stood at the end of the passage, heard a call of Stop thief! and met the prisoner running without hat or coat on. Trustee followed and caught hold of him, and said he had robbed him of a kettle. I said, "You have got yourself into a hobble;" he made no answer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-71

71. BENJAMIN COX , ANDREW FENNER , and JOHN LEEDS , were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a set of printed cotton bed-furniture, value 50 s.; a silk gown, value 20 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; and a yard of baize, value 1 d. , the goods of John Burrell .

JOHN BURRELL . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Hoxton. On the 10th of November I was in Sun-street, Bishopsgate , with these things in my cart; my wife was in the cart with me - as I came by Acorn-street, I heard somebody

cry out, "Master, you have lost your bundle." I immediately pulled up, jumped out of the cart, and was directed down Acorn-street - I ran a few paces down the street, and Cox stopped me - I collared him; he said, "Halloo, what is the matter?" I said I have lost a bundle;" he said, "I have not got it." I let him go, returned to the cart, and from what was said went after him again, but he was gone. I found him in custody in about half an hour. My things were worth 7 l.

JOSEPH PERKINS . I am thirteen years old, and live in Lamb-alley, Sun-street; my father is a weaver - I am an errand-boy. About twenty minutes to six o'clock on this night I saw Burrell in his cart; the three prisoners stood on the pavement; Cox went across the road, behind the cart, peeped at the bundle, and came back; he went up again, jumped up behind the cart, took the bundle out, and went up Acorn-street with the other prisoners - I believe he gave it to Fenner, as I saw him come back with Leeds without it. I went behind the cart and said, "Master, you are robbed;" he stopped, got out, and ran up Acorn-street - I stopped by the cart; then ran into Acorn-street, and saw him holding Cox; he let go of him; I said, "Master, that is the man who robbed you;" he then ran away. I went to Worship-street in the cart, and saw the prisoners taken close by the George, public-house, in Angel-alley, which is near Acorn-street. I am sure Cox took the bundle, and believe the others to be the persons.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were you going - A. On an errand for my father. I have seen the prisoners use the George, public-house, which made me notice them. I was behind them, but as Cox came back with the bundle his face was towards me - they were all three walking together in the street before.

Q. Did not the constable tell you you would be punished if you did not swear to them - A. He said "My man tell the truth, and do not tell more than the truth;" that is all he said. I was never told to swear to them.

SAMUEL PAWSEY . I am twelve years old, and live with my parents, in St. Clement's-place, Lamb-alley. I was in Bishopsgate-street, about twenty minutes to six o'clock in the evening, going to school to write, and saw Cox get up to Burrell's cart and take a bundle out; the other prisoners stood on the pavement, on the left hand side. Cox gave the bundle to Fenner, and they all three ran up Acorn-street. I and Perkins went and told Burrell - he got out, and ran down Acorn-street, as we told him - we went there. Cox and Leeds came down the street - the bundle was then gone - Leeds was on the pavement, and Cox in the road. Burrell laid hold of him, and said he had lost his bundle. Leeds staid there till he let Cox go. I followed Burrell, and told him Cox had done it; he took us to Worship-street, and I afterwards saw them in custody, and was quite sure of them - I kept looking at Leeds and Fenner while Cox was taking it.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no acquaintance with them before - A. No. It was rather dark - nobody else was near.

THOMAS CLARK . I am nearly eleven years old, and live in Angel-square, with my mother, who is a laundress. I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw Burrell and his wife in a cart. I saw Cox jump up and take the bundle out; he came on the pavement first - the other prisoners were with him; he gave the bundle to Fenner, in Acorn-street. Fenner and Leeds had gone up there. I saw Burrell lay hold of Cox; Leeds was then on the pavement. Fenner had then got away with the bundle. Burrell let Cox go, and Pawsey told him that was the man who robbed him; he took us to Worship-street, and I saw the prisoners there that night.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in company with the other boys - A. Yes.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. Burrell brought the three witnesses to the office. Perkins said he knew the prisoners by seeing them at the George; we went there, and in the court leading to the George, I found the three prisoners in company. Perkins said, "Here they are" - looked them in the face, and said he was sure of them. Two officers were with me, we each took one - they denied it - I found a sovereign and 14 s. on Fenner.

THOMAS VANN . I secured Cox, and found 11 s. on him.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I took Leeds, and found 34 s. in his fob.

COX'S Defence. Perkins told my wife that the officers said they would lock him up, if he did not swear against us.

PERKINS. His wife came to me about a fortnight ago, and said, "What did you take my husband away for?" I said I went and told the truth. I said nothing about the officers.

COX - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LEEDS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

FENNER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-72

72. JOHN DUFFEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , eleven pairs of stockings, value 8 s. , the goods of George Muir .

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am shopman to Mr. George Muir, hosier , on Fish-street-hill . On the morning of the 11th of November, between half-past nine and ten o'clock, these stockings were about a foot within the door, with a ticket on them. I had been up stairs, came down, and saw a youth; cast my eye on him, and saw him hand them to the prisoner, who put them into his lap and turned down a court about twelve yards off. I laid hold of him with them, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS DREW . I received him in charge, and found a duplicate of a gown and shawl upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-73

73. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a napkin, value 16 d. , the goods of Richard Hogg .

ABIGAIL HOGG . I am wife of Richard Hogg , and take in mangling; the prisoner has been in the habit of bringing me things to mangle for the last nine months; she brought some on the 1st of November - I had two dozen and eight articles, and on counting them missed a shift; nobody but her had been there - I went and accused her of stealing it - she denied it - I went home - went to her house again, and found this napkin on the table, with the mark picked out - I had lost it three months, and paid the lady 16 d. for it.

MARIA PARKER . On the 10th of September my linen

came from Hogg's, and there was a towel deficient, marked I. M. P. No. 2 - this is it - there is a a faint impression of the marks - I can trace the letters by the needle holes, and a small part of the thread is left in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-74

74. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 18,000 coffin nails, value 37 s., the goods of Thomas Bethell , his master ; and JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

The prosecutor not being able to identify his property, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231203-75

75. EDWIN COX was indicted for feloniously forging a certain receipt, for payment of 3 s. 6 d., signed " Thomas Gardener and Co., 156, Strand" with intent to defraud William Thomas Hester .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

WILLIAM THOMAS HESTER . I am a journeyman printer , and live with Mr. Gilbert. On the 25th of July, on coming home to dinner at my house in Shoemaker-row , I found a bottle of dirty water, with a receipt, which I have kept ever since, and now produce. I do not know Mr. Gardener of the Strand; and on the last Friday in October (the 31st I think), in consequence of what I was told, I went and found the prisoner at Guildhall, charged with bringing another bottle to me, and calling it ink.

ANN HART . I live with Mrs. Hester. On the 25th of July, the prisoner rang the bell, and asked if my master was at home - I said No; he said he had brought two quarts of palm oil, to go into the country; he gave me a receipt out of his pocket-book, and said it came to 3 s. 6 d. I said Mrs. Hester was not at home, if he would call again - he said he could not, because he came from the Strand. I borrowed 3 s. 6 d. of the landlady, and paid him. I cannot read writing. I left the paper up stairs with the bottle. This was ten minutes before one o'clock; two children were in the room, but I remained with them. My mistress came home at one, and took up the same paper as he gave me. I saw the prisoner again on the day he was apprehended, and am sure of him.

ELLEN HESTER . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 31st of October, the prisoner came with a bottle of ink, as he said. I went down to him - he said he had brought a bottle of ink from some gentleman in Fenchurch-street; I opened the bottle, and found it was blacking and water. I gave him in charge. I had found this receipt on coming home on the 25th of July; it was under a jar on the table - I locked it up in my drawer, and did not give it to my husband till the examination; that produced is it. He returned it to me, and I have kept it ever since. We never dealt with Mr. Gardener.

(Receipt read,)

Received on the 27th of July, 1823, for two quarts of sperm oil, 3 s. 6 d, Thomas Gardener and Co. 156, Strand.

THOMAS GARDENER . I live at No. 484, Strand, and deal in oil, in partnership with my father, whose name is John. I do not know the prisoner, and never sent any sperm oil to Hester.

GEORGE YOUNG . I am a watch-maker, and live at No. 156, Strand. I do not know the prisoner.

The Court ruled this to be a fraud only. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-76

76. JAMES CHRISTMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , a coat, value 7 s., and a hat, value 8 s. , the goods of Henry Lind .

HENRY LIND. I am a mahogany chair-maker , and live in Abchurch-lane. On the 15th of September, about twelve o'clock, my coat and hat were on a table in the skittle ground of the Green Man, public-house, Half Moon-alley . I missed them in half of an hour. There were only six people in the ground. The prisoner had just left when it was missed.

PETER LEE . I work at Mr. Turner's, in Barbican, and lodge at this house. I saw Lind and three others playing at skittles - he put his hat and coat on the table, and in about three minutes it was missing. The prisoner was the only man who had left the ground.

JAMES BROWN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge last Thursday. Lind saw him next day and spoke to him as the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing in this ground, and lost two pints, and bid them good day - they saw me go out. There is a wheeler's yard behind the ground, where eight or ten people work, and a door leads into the ground.

PETER LEE . He never spoke a word - nobody could come from the wheeler's yard. There is a door communicates with it; all the back premises are open.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-77

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

77. ROWLAND HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , three books, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Denham , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-78

78. THOMAS PICTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , thirty live tame turkeys, price 4 l. 10 s.; three live tame ducks, price 3 s., and two live tame fowls, price 2 s. , the goods of Archibald Paris .

JOHN DUCKWORTH . I am bailiff to Mr. Archibald Paris , of Beech-hill, near Barnet , The prisoner was a labourer in his employ; our poultry was all safe on the 22d of November, at night. The watchman called me up at one o'clock in the morning; I missed all the turkeys and some more poultry. I rode towards Southgate, and traced a cart to Shoreditch by information, but could trace it no further. I could trace the poultry by footmarks and feathers within three hundred yards of the prisoner's house, at the Four Old-way, Enfield. I got a constable, and on returning met the prisoner; he had corded breeches on, and the knees were dirty with clay - the soil near the house is clay. The constable took him; he said he knew nothing about it. I found in the brook near our premises, the marks of corded breeches on the clay soil, about ten o'clock in the morning. The turkeys were all found dead.

SAMUEL LANGLEY . I am a constable. Mr. Raikes'

lodge-keeper, gave me information. I went and saw about thirty turkeys in Mr. Raikes' park, near the lodge, they were concealed in a sack and some bean-straw - we watched, but nobody came to fetch them. I had secured the prisoner before this, and asked where he spent his evening, he said, at the Crown, public-house, at Southgate, and left about eight o'clock, and went to bed.

CHARLES TURNER . I keep the Cock, public-house, at Southgate. The prisoner came to my house, on this night, for three pints of beer, and took it away in a can.

WILLIAM GLADWIN . On the 22d of November, at half-past seven or eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner at the Cat public-house, East Barnet, about three quarters of a mile from Mr. Paris's. I heard him ask one Frost, if he could have his horse and cart; he said it was gone out - he went away.

FREDERICK PROPSTRING . On the morning of the 23d of November, I searched the prisoner's house, but found nothing. When the prisoner was taken, he was dressed in corded breeches. I saw the marks of a person's knee on the clay soil of the bank - they exactly corresponded with the prisoner's breeches - there were footmarks - one person had been there with his shoes off, for there were toe-marks - turkey feathers were strewed about all the way, from the brook to the hen-house. I searched the prisoner, and found a snare in his pockets. I went to Mr. Raikes' park in the evening, and found a quantity of turkeys, two ducks, and two snares, exactly like that found on the prisoner.

JOHN BAKER . I saw the snare found in the park - there was turkeys feathers about it.

Prisoner's Defence. When they asked where I had spent my evening. I said, I had been to Southgate, to see a man, who was not at home. I went to the Crown, public-house, and met my brother, went with him to East Barnet - we went home - he went to bed. I sat in the house - went out again, to see a young man, who was out, so I took three pints of beer home, and supped - went to my bed, and gave my brother some.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-79

Before Mr. Recorder.

79. WILLIAM CUNNANE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , at Christchurch , a trunk, value 5 s.; a watch, value 2 l.; a coat, value 30 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a hat, value 3 s.; three hankerchiefs, value 10 s.; a shirt, value 4 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; five sovereigns; twelve penny pieces, and twenty-four halfpence, the property of William Higgs , his master, in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM HIGGS . I am a butcher , and live in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields , in the parish of Christchurch. I rent the ground floor; the landlord lives in the next house - the house is let out in tenements. The prisoner was in my service, and slept in the same room as me. I lost a trunk, containing the articles stated in the indictment, and five sovereigns and some halfpence; the hat and hankerchiefs were not in the trunk; it was locked. I saw it safe in my room, at four o'clock, on Thursday afternoon, and missed it about eight o'clock that evening. I have no other servant; he and I were the only persons who lived there. I left him in the room, about four o'clock, and went out; and, on returning, it was gone. I took him into custody next evening, in Whitechapel; he had lived with me a month. The officer has found the trunk, and all the things, except the shirt and trowsers; only 1 l. 9 s. was left, out of the five sovereigns - he lived with my brother for two months, and then came to me.

JOHN BOUTLE . I am headborough of Whitechapel. I received the prisoner in charge from Higgs about half-past six o'clock in the evening, searched him, and found Higg's hat on his head, and a silk hankerchief; and in his pocket I found the watch, and in his trowser pocket a purse, containing a sovereign, 9 s. 2 d., and a key. We asked him where he lodged the night before; he took us to Essex-street, and shewed us the house, and said he lodged up stairs I found an empty trunk on the second floor, there which Higgs claimed. I found another trunk in the next room, containing things which the prosecutor claimed; the key found on the prisoner opened it.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I went to the house in Essex-street, and in the trunk found a coat, waistcoast, two handkerchiefs, and one he had on his neck. Higgs claimed them, his trunk had been forced open.

WILLIAM HIGGS . The watch is mine. I have had it three years, it was given to me, and is worth 2 l. The purse is not mine, it is a new one; the trunk and clothes are mine, and the handkerchief found on his neck.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18231203-80

80. JOHN SWIFT BARKER was indicted, for feloniously killing and slaying Catherine Moody .

EDWARD WILLIAM SYMONS . I am chief clerk of the Thames Police. On the 11th of August, I accompanied the Magistrate, to the London Hospital, and took down the deposition of Catherine Moody , who was then in bed - the prisoner was present; she said, "I am a widow , on Wednesday morning last, I went into a tobacconist's shop, at Shadwell , for a quarter of an ounce of snuff, a person in the shop, very much like the prisoner, answered, No. I asked, why so? - he then shoved me out at the door - I fell on the pavement, and broke my right leg. I called out that it was broken - two men came out of the shop, dragged me round the corner, and left me. The person who threw me down was not present when they dragged me away." The prisoner asked if she was not drunk at the time, she said not. She did not die till three months afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was that declaration produced before the Coroner - A. No. The prisoner was examined once or twice before Mr. Ballantine, and ordered into custody, after the Coroner's verdict, and he was bailed before a Judge, and afterwards before a Magistrate.

JULIA GOLDING . I live in High-street, Shadwell, nearly opposite the prisoner, who keeps a tobacconist's shop . On the day in question, I saw Catherine Moody standing opposite his shop door - she seemed to be talking to the figure of a Highlander, which is at his door - she then walked into the shop. I rather think she was intoxicated. I then observed Mr. Barker bring her to the door - he took hold of her, and threw her down on the pavement. I cannot say whether she fell from intoxication or not. I think he did it to get her out of the shop, but not to injure her.

I thought she was hurt, but not injured - she lay some time, when two men came out of the shop, and dragged her across the street. Barker was not then present. I think the men are in his employ.

ELIZA WAYLAND . I live at Shadwell, my husband, is a coal-whipper. I saw the woman standing by the figure. I was opposite, and saw her go into the shop - she stayed there five minutes - whether she was talking to Barker, or the figure, I cannot say. I saw him move his hand, to desire her to go out, but she still stood there - he pushed her out. I cannot say whether it was with violence. I saw her fall, and immediately went away, as she shut her eyes. I thought her much hurt, and was frightened.

JANE TUDOR . I live at Ratcliffe-cross. I saw the deceased on the ground. Barker was inside his shop - the woman was not crying. I went to her and said "Good-woman, get up," she said, "I cannot, for my leg is smashed." I said, "Nonsense, get up, and go home" - she said, "I cannot, for the man has smashed my leg." Two of Barker's men came out, and said, "Where is your home," he said, "Heaven, when I get there," - they said, "We will take you there" - they took her up, and the blood issued from her leg. Spooner, the beadle, met her, they said they were going to take her to Market-hill, till she was sober - he said, "Take her to the wooden-bridge," which they did; it is just by. Spooner fetched a medical man - she was taken to the Hospital.

SAMUEL BRIANT . I attend at the London Hospital. On the 6th of August this woman was brought in with a fractured leg, and died on the 2d of November - the fracture certainly caused her death. I think she had been indulging in liquor.

WILLIAM SNOWDEN . I am master of a ship. I saw the woman go into the shop, and a man shove her out - it seemed to be done with great violence. I saw her fall, and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not said before that whether he pushed her or not you could not tell - A. I suppose he pushed her. On my oath he shoved her.

COURT. Q. You state in your deposition before the Magistrate, "a man laid hold of her by the shoulder, got her to the door, but whether he shoved her or not I cannot tell, but she fell" - A. I suppose he shoved her, with violence.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a headborough, and saw the woman when they put her on the bridge. I went for the doctor - she was in a drunken state.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-81

81. THOMAS GEORGE and JOHN FAWCETT were indicted for the wilful murder of Charles Gibson .

GEORGE GIBSON . I am a baker, and live in Bethnal-green-road. The prisoners are baker s, and so was my brother Charles, the deceased. About a fortnight before this occurred, there was a party of people at the Bird-cage, public-house, jumping in sacks - my brother and his companions came there - the prisoners were there. George went to my brother, and took a sack which laid by his side and said it was his; my brother said it was not; there was a quarrel about it, and Fawcett said, " My George shall fight you for a leg of mutton and trimmings." One shilling was put down by each party to bind the fight - they were to stake the money on the Wednesday following to make up the mutton. My brother did not go on the Wednesday to put down his stake, and it was fixed for Saturday night - he did not go then, and on Sunday night George came to the public-house next door to where we live, and asked my brother if it was to be a fight or not? - He said he did not care, if anybody liked to put down the money for them. It was then to be a sovereign instead of the mutton. Five shillings were put down by my brother, I believe; and on the Monday they met at the Pitt's Head Yard, Lucas-street - my brother was there - the prisoners came down about two o'clock, and the rest of the money was put down. They began to fight in a field in Bow parish , at ten minutes before three - about seven hundred people were present. Pell and Webb were present, and Martin - he was second to George. Pell was my brother's second - they fought an hour and five minutes - I stood inside the ring most of the time. A constable came into the ring and interfered, but was driven out by Martin and Fawcett - a ring was formed by the people - my brother was knocked down, and could not come to time again. The seconds remained there all the time encouraging them. Martin ran after the officer, and said if he did not get out of the ring he would knock his b - y head off. My brother was laid on a table in the tea-ground - then taken into a room, where he laid about twenty minutes, and died. The seconds came to him there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your brother was taller and stronger than George - A. No; George was rather the tallest. I was not second or anything else - Lloyd endeavoured to persuade him to leave off, but he would not. I cannot say whether he wished to leave off or not - they were very good friends.

Q. The fight was a trial of strength - A. Yes.

Q. When the dispute happened about the sacks, did not Fawcett say, "Tom, I'll have nothing to do with your fighting at all, and will not have you fight." - A. No; he encouraged it, and assisted by giving rum to Martin and George. Somebody gave my brother rum.

JUROR. Q. In what respect did Fawcett resist the constable's authority - A. He ran after him with a stick in his hand, and said, "Go out of the ring, you have no business with it."

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDEROAST. Q.Were you at the Pitt's Head when the money was put down - A. Yes; Barnes and Collins were there - they did not endeavour to settle it without fighting. George said he did not want to fight, but his master wished him. When my brother entered the ring, he said, if he was beaten he would be carried out.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a baker, and live in Bethnal-green-road. I was present at the fight - Fawcett was the instigation of it - Gibson is my fellow-servant - Fawcett is George's master - he was the first man who mentioned about fighting, for when George took up an empty sack, Gibson said it was his - he said it was not, and pulled it away. Fawcett said, "George shall fight you for a leg of mutton and trimmings." Fawcett attended the fight, and supplied them with lemons. The constable went into the ring twice, and desired them to leave off. Gibson said, "I think too much of my sovereign to leave off." Somebody hallooed out to put the constable out of the ring,

and the next time he went into the ring, Martin ran after him, and was going to hit him out of the ring, but he got away. I saw Gibson fall - he was carried out of the field insensible.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What the constable said you do not know - A. No; I was on the other side of the ring - I did not know then that he was a constable.

THOMAS ISAACS . I am a labourer, and live in Mile-end-road. The fight had just began when I entered the field; it appeared all fair - I left before it was over.

CORNELIUS WILLIAMS . I am a coal-meter, and live at Old Ford. I came up to the ring about half-past three o'clock - the battle was nearly over - both parties seemed quite exhausted. They had about twenty rounds, and after that I saw nobody interfere; the deceased fell backward on his head at the last round but one, and when they took him up the last time his legs gave way under him - I went away.

JAMES FAIRLEY . I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased before the Coroner's Inquest - I opened his head, and found extravasated blood on the brain, which caused his death, and was doubtless occasioned by violence. He appeared much injured and beaten about the head.

JOHN LLOYD . I am a constable. I was going to Old Ford, and saw seven or eight hundred people on the field, and saw Gibson on the ground, and his seconds throwing water over him. I advised him to leave off. He said, "No, I think of my sovereign; I will sooner die than lose the money." I went into the ring after two more rounds, and tried to get him away, but Martin said he would cut my b - y head off if I did not go out of the ring, and ran after me. Not having my authority with me, and there being so many thieves about, I was afraid to interfere.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Fawcett say he would do anything to you - A. He pointed his stick at me, and told me to go out of the ring, and said he would break my b - y nose if I did not, or something of that sort. He did not know me to be a constable,

FRANCES GIBSON . I am mother of the deceased. I went to Fawcett on the morning they were going to fight, and said I was come to ask him to prevent it - he said he should do no such thing, for if he did then, it would come on at another time, and he should fight the d - d young rascal, and he would back him for a sovereign - (George was present) - and he said after it was over he would find a man to do his work for three weeks, if it was necessary. I left him, but returned, and told him, I thought George did not want to fight. He said, "Go along, you d - d old b - h." This was at ten or eleven o'clock in the morning. My son was nineteen years old.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had there been any quarrel between Fawcett and your husband - A. Not that I know of. I never said I would transport the old villain, or that I would be revenged on him. I said I blamed Fawcett, and no one else.

JAMES FITCH . I am a watchmaker. I saw the crowd - the fight had began - I saw them fighting very hard, and I got into the ring at last, and saw Martin and a young man in a white hat second Gibson. Fawcett had a stick in his hand, and a lemon, and at times held the bottle - a man appeared to interfere, but I could not hear what he said. I got pushed about, and at last saw Gibson fall backward on his head. There was a round after that, and he then appeared quite senseless. About five or six rounds before the last, Gibson wished to leave off - I saw Fawcett and the rest of the seconds trying to make him fight again - he appeared trying to get off his second's knee - they seemed to try to keep him up, and make him go on again, and, about that time, the constable went into the ring.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean to say, that Fawcett attempted to prevent Gibson giving in, when he was on the other side - A. He went to him - this was a quarter of an hour before the fight ended. I was in the ring, with the mob at the time, I heard the deceased say, long before it ended, "I am all right now."

The Prisoner's Counsel, called the following witnesses.

WILLIAM BUTTRESS . I live at the Bird Cage, Bethnal Green, and saw the fight. Fawcett was not active, but quit the reverse - he walked round the ring, but as to doing anything more, I never saw him, I never heard him say a word about continuing the fight. One Chapman was time-keeper. Gibson's brother said, "Try another round."

COURT. Q. What time of the battle was that - A. About three-quarters of an hour after it began. Fawcett had a stick in his hand at first, but Wilson took it from him; he uses a walking-stick. I did not see a lemon in his hand, or give any drink to the parties, but will not swear, that he did not. I heard Fawcett say, at his own house, that he would have nothing to do with it.

JOHN H. GODSELL . I live in Globe-row. I was walking in the fields, and saw this battle. I went up exactly as it began. Fawcett did not appear active, but quite the contrary - he was quite placid, walking up and down with a little boy in his hand. I was too far off, to understand what passed. I did not know Fawcett. I do not recollect whether he had a stick, and did not observe a lemon in his hand. I was outside the ring, in a gig.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I know both the prisoners. George, I, and another went to the Pitt's Head, with intention of shaking hands and making it up. Gibson called George out, and said it was no use for them to fight for mutton for others to eat, but they would fight for a sovereign, and then it would he put in the newspaper. I heard Gibson say, D - n his b - y eyes, he would never shew his face in Hackney again.

GEORGE DUNNING . I live in Bethnal-green, and saw the fight. Fawcett was going backwards and forwards in the ring and did not appear active.

COURT. Q. Was he keeping the ring to prevent people breaking in - A. No; quite in a humble manner, walking about inactive. I cannot swear that he had not a lemon - I did not see it.

JAMES RICHARDS . I live in Gibraltar-walk. I did not know Fawcett before the fight - he did not appear active; I saw him with a stick. I was outside at times, and could see nothing.

HENRY CUTHELL . I live in Bethnal-green-road. I was in front of the ring nearly all the time. Fawcett did not appear active - my attention was principally fixed on him, for they said he was master of one of the men.

Q. Instead of looking at the combatants you looked at the master - A. I looked at them besides. Fawcett had

a stick in his hand at first, but a person took it away; that was half an hour before the battle ended - he used it as a walking stick. I did not see a lemon in his hand. He kept walking right round the circle.

GEORGE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Weeks .

FAWCETT - GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-82

82. ANDREW CONWAY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Margaret King , and with a certain sharp instrument striking and cutting her in and upon her left arm, with intent to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do her some grievous bodily harm.

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-83

83. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH . I am an auctioneer , and live at Fulham. On the 17th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I left this coat in my gig, opposite to No. 40, Drury-lane - a man was minding the horse. I missed it in about ten minutes, and was directed down Long-acre; but did not see the prisoner. I found him in custody with it that evening.

PETER MARTIN . I am a watchman of St. Mary-le-bone. A man ran up, and described a person to me at half-past five o'clock - I had seen the prisoner with a bundle a minute before - I went after him, and took him in Rathbone-place, with this coat tied in an apron. I took him to the watch-house, and in about three minutes Smith came and claimed it. The prisoner said the apron it was tied in was his - I asked how the coat got into it; he could not tell.

WILLIAM HAYNES . I was in care of the horse; the coat was on its back - I left for a minutes to put up a shutter and it was gone, and in five minutes I saw the prisoner in Hanover-street, with a bundle tied in an apron. I followed him to Oxford-street; he walked very fast. I told the watchman, who took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man passed me apparently drunk, in the first street on the right of Drury-lane - he threw the bundle down - I took it up and followed him, but lost him.

PETER MARTIN . He said nothing of this at the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-84

84. JOHN M'CANN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of Charles Casey .

CHARLES CASEY . I am a shoemaker , and live in Brick-lane . I saw the prisoner come into the shop, put his arm round, and take these shoes off a nail in the window - he ran out, and I took him ten yards off. They were picked up. He appeared in liquor, and had no money.

GEORGE PERSKY . I am a constable, and assisted in taking the prisoner - I heard him drop the shoes, and found them six yards from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two companions, got drunk, and was in my way home with my wife when the prosecutor laid hold of me, and charged me with this. I resisted being detained, knowing myself innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-85

85. JOHN LAVELL , JAMES HAMILTON , and WILLIAM LAVELL , were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 200 lbs. of hay, value 2 l. , the goods of James Corby ; and THOMAS LAVELL , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CORBY . I had a hay-rick on some land at Hanwell ; some of it was cut into trusses. On the morning of the 22d of November, I missed four hundred weight of it, which was safe overnight; we traced it across the field, over the Brent; a plank had been put across the river, and a piece broken off it. We traced it to Greenford-fields, about two hundred yards from Thomas Lavell 's house; we got a search-warrant, and went to the house; the other prisoners are his sons, and live with him: we found a little hay in the stable corresponding with mine. I had seen John and William Lavell , and Hamilton and Fuller, at work at a mill-pond, a quarter of a mile from the stack; I took Fuller on suspicion; and, from what he said, I searched Lavell's house again on Monday; pulled down some boards in the back bed-room, and found fifteen or sixteen trusses of hay concealed between the boards and cieling; it is low meadow hay, and all from one field, and corresponded in every particular with my stack. All the prisoners, except Thomas Lavell , were working at the mill-pond, and all ran away.

JOHN LEVICK . I am constable of Hanwell. I went with a search-warrant to Lavell's house, and after taking Fuller on the Monday, I went again, and took down a loose board, and found the hay between the boards and cieling. I had seen the prisoners working at the mill-pond, but when I went to take them, they had left; I followed them four miles, and found them in custody.

GEORGE LOVEGROVE . I am headborough. I went towards the mill-pond, and saw the three prisoners at work. A girl who was in the house ran to the pond, and got there before me, and they all set off running together; they surrendered after running five miles. Thomas Lavell was taken at Southgate.

JAMES FULLER . On the Saturday before this hay was taken, I was at work at the mill-pond, with Hamilton and James and William Lavell ; we went home at night; they live together; I went to bed, got up at seven o'clock, and went to Southall.

Q. When did you see the young Lavells again - A. I did not see them next morning. I know nothing of the hay being stolen.

Q. You are bound to speak the truth, and nothing but the truth. Do you swear you know nothing of this hay being stolen - A. No; no otherwise than I saw them, about a week before, put some hay up there over the house. John Lavell put some there before the job happened.

Q. What job - A. Why, before Mr. Corby lost his hay.

Q. What do you know about the job of stealing Corby's

hay - A. I know nothing of it, further than they made me intoxicated, and made me speak about it. The officers made me drunk, so that I do not know what I said.

COURT. If you are speaking false, it may be very serious. When was it that these persons made you intoxicated - A. On the Monday evening. They took me in the morning, about seven o'clock; they made me intoxicated in the evening.

Q. Had you said anything about it in the morning, before you were intoxicated - A. I told Mr. Levick where to find some hay, in the morning. I was not intoxicated when before the Magistrate.

Q. Where were you on Friday night - A. At home; I went home at seven o'clock, went down to Southall; had a pint of beer, and returned home about nine o'clock.

Q. Were you at Corby's hay-stack on the Friday night - A. No; I was not near it on Friday night nor on Saturday morning; I did not see them after I left them at work, till I went to work again at seven o'clock in the morning. I saw John Lavell and Hamilton put three or four bundles up in the place a week before I was taken. I never saw William Lavell put hay up there; I do not know where this hay came from.

JOHN LEVICK re-examined. I gave that man a pint of beer and some bread and cheese in the course of the day, and that is all. Nobody could give him anything in my absence, for I had the keys of the place. He was in a room at the public-house - I had the key. He was perfectly sober when I took him.

GEORGE LOVEGROVE . The witness was perfectly sober; I sat up with him all night at the public-house; he had only one pint of beer, and that the landlord gave him. There was a bed in the room where the hay was concealed; there is only one floor to the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-86

86. JOHN STEWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , a bag, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 2 s.; six coats, value 10 l.; a piece of cloth, value 2 l.; and two pairs of trowsers, value 1 l. , the goods of George Dana .

MR. GEORGE DANA . I live at Shropshire, but now lodge in Cumberland-place, New-road. On Saturday, the 22d of November, about five o'clock, I was driving my gig, with this bundle strapped under it; it was safe in Montague-square , and in Montague-street I missed it. I suppose, from the violent manner in which I drove, that it jolted out of the straps.

ROBERT ALLPRESS . I am servant to the Rev. Thomas Fuller , of No. 59, Montague-square. On Saturday, November 22, about five o'clock, I was standing at the door; the watchman was calling five o'clock; and said he saw something laying across the road, and picked up a brown bag, tied round with a cord. He untied the cord, and in it was a bundle, tied up in a shawl or handkerchief; he said he would take it to the watch-house, and if I heard any inquiry, I was to direct them there. I believe the prisoner to be the watchman , but I cannot say, he acknowledged at the Office that I saw him pick it up. I went to him at nine o'clock; he said he had given it to a man, who had owned it.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am serjeant of the watch of Mary-le-bone. On the evening in question, at five o'clock, I placed the prisoner as watchman in Montague-square, and on my different visits to him, till twelve o'clock, he reported that all was right, and at twelve he reported the same at the watch-house. On the following evening, at a quarter to eight o'clock, I visited him, and he reported. that on the evening before, about five o'clock, he picked up a bag, with some old clothes in it. I said, he had not acted by orders, in not telling me yesterday. He said he had done wrong; that he picked it up in the presence of Allpress, and gave it to some man, apparently a carter, who had come and claimed it shortly after he picked it up. I asked why he did not report it to me last night; he said he was sorry for it, and should know better in future.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. Between five and six o'clock on Sunday evening, I went to the prisoner; he said he had picked up a bundle on Saturday, and kept it in his box a short time, when a carman came to him, and said he had lost one from his cart, and he gave it to him - that the carman said it was dirty linen, and feeling it soft, he made no further inquiry. I asked if nobody else had inquired for it - he said "Yes, a tall gentleman, with mustachios" but having then given it away, he said he had not seen it: and after that he said, his reason for denying it to Mr. Dana was, because Mr. Dana's time did not agree with the time he found it. I asked how long had elapsed between the carman and Mr. Dana coming for it - he said, "Not above a minute," and that he thought it of no use to pursue the carman.

MR. DANA. My bundle was in a brown bag; when I returned with the gig, I inquired of all the watchmen about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, and shewed it to the servant; in about ten minutes a carter came and owned it said it was dirty linen, and I gave it to him; I never emptied the bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-87

London Cases,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

87. JACOB WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a pair of half-boots, value 6 s. , the goods of Charles Golding ; and WILLIAM DAVIDSON , for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

CHARLES GOLDING . I am a shoemaker , and live in Long-lane, Smithfield . On the 28th of October, in the evening, and between six and seven o'clock, I came home in a gig, and got James Davison to mind the horse; he brought in the nose-bag, and I found he had a pair of half boots on - I asked who made them - I never spoke to Warren about them.

JAMES DAVISON . I held the horse. The prisoner Warren made the boots which I had on, about a month before he lived with Mr. Golding; my father (the other prisoner) paid him for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-88

88. WILLIAM MOORE , JAMES FLEMMING , CHARLES LAYS , and THOMAS OFFWOOD , were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , four teaspoons, value 8 s.; a wooden till, value 2 s.; four half-crowns,

thirty sixpences, twelve penny pieces, and twenty-four halfpence , the property of John Norris .

ELIZABETH NORRIS . I am the daughter of John Norris , who keeps the Sun and Punch-bowl, Long-lane ; the prisoner Moore was drinking in our house all day, on the 3d of December; he put down 2 1/2 d. for a pint of beer, and said, "Don't take that farthing, it is bad." I said I thought it was; he pulled a quantity of chalk out of his pocket, and shewed the farthing to the customers. I said, "I cannot wait, give it to me when you come out." I missed my till from the bar counter, which was safe the minute before. The prisoners were all in the tap-room - I saw none of them go into the bar - it contained four tea-spoons, five keys, the money, and some account books.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. Between seven and eight o'clock last Thursday night, I heard of this robbery, went to the watch-house, and found Flemming, Offwood, and Lays there - I found three sixpences on Lays; I found Moore in Long-lane, and found 9 1/4 d. on him, and asked if he had received any money from his master that day - he said he had, and then that he had not. I found Gilbert in bed at twelve o'clock at night, and he gave me information.

JOHN NORRIS . I keep this house. I took all the prisoners except Moore to the watch-house, about nine o'clock that night, having found them at the Castle, public-house, in Long-alley. Flemming said he knew nothing about it. I said, "Then go about your business" - he said he would not.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. On the 4th of December, in the evening, Gilbert pawned three spoons, in the name of Pestel.

(Spoons produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a boot-closer, and work for Mr. Golding, of Long-lane. On the 4th of December, I was drinking at the Sun and Punch Bowl, public-house, with Moore and Pestel, and about twelve o'clock the other prisoners came in; we all sat drinking, and in the course of the afternoon Pestel proposed to me and Moore, to take away the till, which we agreed to. Moore kept Mrs. Norris in conversation while Pestel took the till - I was in the tap-room at the time. We agreed to meet in Old-street; I went, and Pestel was not there. I went again, and found him there - he gave me some books to destroy, and some keys. I destroyed them, returned, and found Moore in his company - we divided the money. I had 5 s. for my share. We went to another house, and drank there.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

FLEMMING - NOT GUILTY .

LAYS - NOT GUILTY .

OFFWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-89

89. JAMES WOODRUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK . I am a horse-keeper at the Saracen's Head . On the 24th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the stable with a blue coat on, and mine on under it; he was putting his own on over it. I charged him with it - he said, "Is it your's?" and pulled it off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD SKILLERN . I took him in charge - he seemed distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-90

90. JOHN GREENWOOD was indicted for a misdemeanour .

The Prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-91

91. PATRICK KILDAY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HAROLD . I am a pork-butcher , and live in Barbican . On Sunday morning, the 2d of November , about eleven o'clock the prisoner came, and bought a piece of pork, and gave me a half-crown; I gave him change - I had no other; I suspected it the moment he was gone, for on rubbing it it shewed copper. I shewed it to my wife, and kept it separate - on the following Sunday he came again, and asked the price of a hand of pork; my wife asked him 6 1/2 d. I offered it him at 6 d.; he put down a half-crown - my wife took it up and said it was bad; I said I suspected so - he immediately took it up, and walked out with it. I followed, and about six doors off he dropped the half-crown down the area of an empty house. Taylor got the key of the house, and afterwards produced it to me; it is very bright, but is dated 1819. The pork came to 1 s. 4 d.

MARTHA HAROLD . My husband's account is correct. The half-crown was not mixed with other money. I took up the one he brought the second time, and as he went out my husband said he had brought one last Sunday.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. On the 9th of November, I took the prisoner coming in a direction from Harold's. I went to the empty house, which Harold pointed out, and got from the area a half-crown, on Monday morning; we could not get the key before. I found two good shillings and a penny in his pocket, and three quarters of a pound of mutton chops, undressed. I produce both half-crowns.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. These half-crowns are both counterfeited, from one die, and have never been in circulation.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-92

92. JAMES WILSON was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-93

93. CHARLES LAWLER , STEPHEN COUCHMAN , STEPHEN QUICK , and EDWARD SHACKELL were indicted for a libel .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-94

94. JAMES PERCIVAL was indicted for perjury .

No prosecutor. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-95

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

95. WILLIAM M'DONNOUGH , was indicted for stealing,

on the 25th of October , two shillings, and twenty-five sixpences , the monies of Luke Brazier Valentine .

ELIZA VALENTINE . I am the wife of Luke Brazier Valentine , we keep a chandler's shop at Enfield Chase . The prisoner came into the shop, about three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 25th of October, and asked for change for a sovereign, and desired me to select all the thick edged shillings and sixpences, and all the large old halfpence. I selected some, and laid them aside on the counter, in two parcels of twenty-four shillings; it was two shillings, and the rest sixpences; some copper was also on the counter, in three parcels - while I turned my head to the window, to speak to somebody, I missed a parcel of silver, and said, "Where is the other parcel of silver" - he said, "Perhaps you have put it into the till, with the halfpence." I looked, and they were not there. I told him so, and said, there was nobody else in the shop, and he must have taken them - he made some excuse to go out, I followed him, and called for Crane, my neighbour, who came and detained him, and all the silver I missed, was found in his pocket, with some halfpence.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say, perhaps I had put it into my pocket, by mistake - A. He said so, but he denied having them; he offered Crane 2 s. 6 d., and me 1 s. to let him go.

WILLIAM CRANE . I was fetched, and secured the prisoner; the prosecutrix said, he had taken a parcel of silver off the counter - he said he had not, but if he had, he had probably put it into his pocket by mistake. I said, if you have got it, give it up - he said, I "have not got it," and put his hand into his right hand pocket, took out some halfpence, and five sixpences, and placed them down to nineteen sixpences which were on the counter, and said, "Now, all is right" - she had said, she had missed twenty-four shillings. I said, "Give up the rest," and put my hand into his pocket, took out a quantity of halfpence and silver - there were twenty-five sixpences, and two shillings, including the five he took out himself. Mr. Valentine came in - he said, "I'll give you 1 s., and this man 2 s. 6 d., to let me go." Seven shillings more were found on him, but no sovereign.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them, but knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-96

96. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a cap, value 6 s., and a pair of gloves, value 18 d. , the goods of John Jackson .

EDMUND BARTLEY . I am shopman to John Jackson , of Shadwell . On the 6th of November, about a quarter past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop window, with another boy. I had seen them looking in at the window - they stopped there for two minutes, then went on, and in a few minutes I received information, and came outside, and there was a broken square of glass, with a cap drawn through. I took it away, came to the door and in about five minutes, they came by again. I seized the prisoner, took him into the shop, and asked him where the gloves were, which had been in the window - he denied all knowledge of the cap or gloves - turned out his pockets, and there was nothing in them. I told him to pull of his hat, which he did very slowly, and the gloves were in it: they are my masters, and have the shop-mark on them, and were on the cap in the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the gloves - the other boy dropped them, and I picked them up, and was coming back.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-97

97. JOSEPH WAYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a hat, value 14 s. , the goods of Catherine Lloyd , widow .

JOHN HUGH LLOYD . My mother, Catherine Lloyd , is a widow, and keeps a hatter's-shop . On the 12th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, heard a noise, turned round, and saw the prisoner going out. I followed, and collared him, with the hat in his hand, on the otherside of the way.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not intoxicated - A. Not to my knowledge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly was intoxicated, and the hat was put into my hand by some boys.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-98

98. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a coat, value 6 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; four half-crowns; twelve shillings; four sixpences, and twelve penny pieces , the property of Florence Sullivan .

FLORENCE SULLIVAN . On a Sunday in October, about half-past eight o'clock, I went to bed, at a house in Maynard-street, St. Giles's - my coat and trowsers hung in the room, with four half-crowns, twelve shillings, four sixpences and eightpence, in my fob. I got up about six o'clock in the morning, and they were gone - the prisoner had lodged in the next room, since May, and was there that night. I met him about ten o'clock, with my coat and trowsers on, and secured him.

JEREMIAH DONOVAN . I am the landlord of the house. I saw Sullivan counting his money in the prisoner's presence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it - the coat is not his. I bought it in Rosemary-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-99

99. WILLIAM ANDERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a coat, value 3 l. , the goods of his Royal Highness the Duke of York .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Richard Gilbert .

SARAH GILBERT . I am the wife of Richard Gilbert , a musician in the Duke of York's band . On the 10th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my lodging, and said he came from Mr. Blaney and my husband for his best coat - I said I did not think he wanted it; he said, yes he did, for all the band had got their best coats on. I asked his name; he gave me some name, and said he belonged to the 1st Regiment, and was going to take the coat to the Swan stairs - I gave it to him.

RICHARD GILBERT . I never saw the prisoner before this, and never sent him for the coat.

JAMES BLABEY . I am master of the band. I never saw the prisoner, and did not send him for the coat.

JAMES WHITBREAD . I am a private in the Coldstream Guards. On the 10th of November, I saw the prisoner at my quarters, the Blue Posts, public-house, ripping the lace off the musician's jacket - he said he gave 15 s. for it. Farmer was holding the buttons - they stripped the lace entirely off, and went away; the prisoner came in soon after, and said he had sold the coat for 1 s., and Farmer sold the lace for 18 s.

JOSEPH FARMER . I am a porter. On the 10th of November, I saw the prisoner in Piccadilly, between twelve and one o'clock, with a bundle under his arm - he asked me to give him something to drink - I said I had no money - he said he had something that would make money; that he had bought a jacket, and would either pawn or sell it; he offered it for sale in the tap-room - nobody would buy it; he asked me to help him strip off the lace, which I did, and went with him to a house in Princes-street; he waited outside while I went in to sell it. I came out, gave him the money, and he said he had sold the coat for 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-100

Before Mr. Recorder.

100. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , four handkerchiefs, value 5 s. , the goods of William Webb .

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Burlington Arcade . On the 3d of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my back was to the door, and on turning round I saw the prisoner leave the shop, and missed four handkerchiefs from the shew-board, inside the shop. I pursued and stopped her a few yards off, and found them under her shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress caused me to commit this depredation. On the Friday before I was apprehended I came from Worcester, where I had been to bury my little boy, which left me destitute.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-101

101. ROBERT DALY , CHARLES SAMBOURN , and JOHN REEDY , were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one hundred and twenty yards of flannel, value 7 l. , the goods of Robert Hawkes .

ROBERT HAWKES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Glasshouse-street, Golden-square . This flannel was tied to the door-post, and is worth 7 l. - it was safe half an hour before I missed it - I immediately ran round the corner, looked up Warwick-street, and saw Daly running with it, half way up the street; it was a very large roll; I ran and got before him, turned round to take him, and he threw it in my face. I called Stop thief! and a gentleman secured him. Sambourn came up with a stick, and kept striking the gentleman, and said, "Let him alone, let him alone." I did not see Reedy.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was the flannel - A. In the street, tied to the door-post.

SAMBOURN. I did not have a stick - it was a cane; and I did not strike the gentleman. - Witness. Yes, he did - the gentleman was obliged to let go, and they both ran away, but were both secured without getting out of sight - two rolls were taken.

GEORGE HENLEY . I am a journeyman butcher, and live with Mr. Cox, in Glasshouse-street. On the 20th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, I was minding the shop, which is nearly opposite Mr. Hawkes's, and saw two men walking along the other side with a large roll of flannel - I suspected them, and went to Mr. Hawkes, who followed them. I could not leave the shop - they went up Warwick-street. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and caught Daly about ten yards from the shop.

ROSETTA PHILLIPS . I keep a clothes-shop, at No. 2, Crown-street, Soho. On Thursday, the 20th of November, about five or six o'clock, a man came into the shop with a roll of flannel.

Q. Did he sell it - A. I do not know, for I went into the shop, and left him with my husband; I found it in the shop afterwards. The officer came and searched the house next morning, and found it.

Q. You saw the man come in - A. Yes; but I went into the parlour. He spoke to my husband - I only went into the shop to throw some dirty water into the street. I was taken on Friday, but did not go to the office that day. I have not seen my husband since, nor heard of him.

Q. They took you up for receiving it, I suppose - A. They said they took me for finding the property in the house. I cannot recollect whether either of the prisoners brought the flannel.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am constable of St. James's. On Thursday, the 20th of November, I received Daly and Sambourn in charge, with a roll of flannel; and about half-past eight that evening, Reedy came to the watch-house to enquire for the other prisoners, and called one of them Roberts. Having heard that there were two rolls of flannel taken, I secured him, and found 23 s. 6 d. on him. I asked him several questions - he sent me to different places in Mary-le-bone, where he said he had got the money, but I found it was false, and in the morning I told him it was very wrong to send me to so many places. I neither threatened nor promised him. He said Sambourn had given him a roll of flannel, and he took it to Crown-street, to a Jew's shop, and that was the money he received for it. I went to Phillips's shop - they refused to let me search without a warrant. I got one, and found a small piece of flannel (which had been cut off the roll) under the water-butt, quite wet, and the roll was up stairs. Phillips has absconded.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer, and went with Webb to Phillips's, and found the roll of flannel on the top of the garret stairs, covered over with a shawl, and a piece cut off, under the water-butt.

MR. HAWKES. I believe this piece to be cut off the rolls - it is of the same texture, and there is that quantity deficient. They were both secured within five minutes from the time I lost it.

SAMBOURN'S Defence. I was walking down Warwick-street - heard a cry of Stop thief! a mob gathered - I walked on to see what was the matter - two or three gentlemen

struck me in the face; I up with my came and struck them, and ran away.

REEDY'S Defence. I was going towards Glasshouse-street with Charles Roberts , a bricklayer, who was rather the worse for liquor, and while we were in conversation, a stranger came and asked if I was in want of a job, which I gladly accepted, and told Roberts to wait for me at the corner of the street; the stranger put the roll of flannel on my shoulder, told me to follow him, and pointed out a shop where I was to take it to, and get a sovereign for it; he gave me a shilling, and we parted. Roberts was not there; and hearing some men were in the watch-house, I went there to ask for Roberts, and was detained.

DALY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SAMBOURN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

REEDY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-102

102. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a pair of shoes, value 9 s., and three brushes, value 4 s. , the goods of James Ludgator .

JAMES LUDGATOR . I am a corn-dealer , and live in Gloucester-terrace, Stepney . On the 10th of November I had been robbed, and was on the watch, and saw a person come into the garden gate, at day break; I went round to catch him as he came out, and found the prisoner coming out of the back gate; the officer secured him, and found the shoes and brushes on him. My boy had left the gate on the latch.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner go to Ludgator's back door and try the latch; he left it and came back, as the prosecutor's boy was coming out, and watched the boy, to see which way he went, and then went inside. I caught him as he came out, with two pair of shoes and three brushes under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-103

103. RICHARD LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 11 lbs. of lead, value 18 d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town , and am a butcher . This lead pipe was taken from a new stable I was building; it was not fixed, but laid in the stable-yard. I found the prisoner in custody with it, cut into small pieces. He has worked for me as a pavior.

WILLIAM FORTY . I am a Thames Police surveyor. I apprehended the prisoner in a marine store shop, in Crown-street, Westminster, kept by one Carey , offering this lead for sale; he had one piece in his hand; he tried to get out of the shop; I threw him down, and two pieces fell out of his hat - they appeared to be part of a pipe. He said he picked it up in Russell-street, Bloomsbury.

ZACHARY GARBUT . I am a carpenter. This lead appears to me to have been part of a pipe, of the same size as Somers's - it is flatted out; but I had cut the pipe myself in an oblong direction, and this is cut in the same way.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-104

104. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , a book, value 7 s. , the goods of Peter Wright .

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am the son of Peter Wright , a bookseller . I saw the prisoner reach into the shop, and take this book off the shop-board; I stopped him with it.

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I am a constable. I took him in charge, and found 3 s. 6 d. on him, and twenty-seven duplicates, all for books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-105

105. MATTHEW SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a curtain, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Galloway .

HANNAH GALLOWAY . I am the wife of Thomas Galloway. On Friday, the 31st of October, I missed this curtain from the back parlour window; we keep the Rainbow, public-house, in Queen-street, Ratcliff ; I found the prisoner in custody with it; he is a stranger.

RICHARD CARTER . I am a constable. On the 30th of October, at half-past eight o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in High-street, Shadwell, with this curtain concealed under his jacket; he said it was his own, and he had had it six months, and had just redeemed it, over the water; but he could not tell me who the pawnbroker was, or where he himself lived.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-106

106. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , forty yards of cotton, value 30 s. the goods of Simeon Brown .

ROBERT ST. JOHN . I am shopman to Simeon Brown , linen-draper , Cross-street, St. Giles's . On the 11th of November, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock in the morning, this cotton stood on a stool inside the door; a boy informed me a man had stolen it; I missed it, went out, and found the prisoner, about a hundred yards off, with a bundle under his arm. I secured him in Drury-lane with it.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer, and received him in charge; I found seven shillings and sixpence and a bad half-crown on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person dropped the property, and ran up the street; the gentleman took me, but I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-107

107. MARTHA SAVEALL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , five shillings, and a one pound promissory note , the property of Elizabeth Collens .

ELIZABETH COLLENS . I am a widow , and live in Essex. On the 12th of November, I was at the Red Lion and Spread Eagle, Whitechapel , and had five shillings and a Walden one pound note in my pocket; the prisoner had a bed in the same room as me; she locked the door; I had a bad cough during the night; she got out of bed and gave me her pillow, to raise my head; my pocket was under the bolster. I got up about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, and missed my money; I called Mrs. Gardener,

the landlady, up; the prisoner had just left the room, and was taken in about twenty minutes.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am a constable. I was fetched; Mrs. Gardener had stopped the prisoner, and charged her with stealing a one pound note and five shillings, which she acknowledged. I found two shillings on her.

JOHN CHILD . I am servant to Mr. Carroll, a shoemaker, and live five doors from Gardener. The prisoner came to the shop, and bought a pair of ladies' boots, which came to six shillings, and gave me a Saffron Walden one pound note; I wrote on it, "Saveall, Chelmsford, Essex," by her direction, and took it to Gardener's for change; Mrs. Gardener returned with me to the shop where she was waiting.

ELIZABETH COLLENS . It is my note.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231203-108

108. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , a pair of trowsers, value 30 s. , the goods of John Holmes .

JOHN HOLMES . I am a tailor , and live in High Holborn . On the 29th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, these trowsers hung in the doorway; a gentleman came in, and the prisoner immediately followed him, and while I was attending to the gentleman, the prisoner took the trowsers and went off; I secured him outside the shop with them.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-109

109. DAVID GERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , a coat, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Hill .

HENRY HILL. I lodge in Harper-street, Mary-le-bone. I was at work in Upper Grosvenor-street , and hung my coat up in the passage; it was safe at ten o'clock, and about half-past I was told it was stolen. I ran down, and secured the prisoner in Ree's-mews, Mount-street - I had followed him, calling Stop thief! and saw him drop it; it was brought to me.

JAMES WINTER . I was at work at this house, and saw the prisoner take the coat, and saw him throw it down. I picked it up; he had been looking in at the door five minutes before.

JOSEPH FROST . I am a constable. The prisoner ran by me with the coat on his arm - I pursued, and he threw it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it up at the door among the rubbish.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-110

110. JAMES GRAY and JEREMIAH CONNOR were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , two sacks, value 3 s. , the goods of John Ashdown .

THOMAS FROST . I am servant to John Ashdown , a baker , who lives in Arbour-square, Commercial-road . These sacks were safe on the truck outside the door, at eleven o'clock in the morning. I found the prisoners in custody with them about seven o'clock at night.

THOMAS GREY . I am a constable. About six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners in Sun Tavern-fields three or four hundred yards from Ashdown's - Gray had a bundle before him; I asked what he had got - he immediately let it fall; it was two sacks. I took them in charge.

ROBERT MARSTON . I was with the constable. Gray said he had brought the sacks from Mr. Robert's, of Trafalgar-square, and was going to take them to Rolfe, a milkman, who he lived with. I took the prisoners to Rolfe; he said Gray did not live with him, nor had he sent him for any sacks - Gray said. "Did not you send me for them? "he said, No, and in taking them to the office Connor said they found them in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRAY'S Defence. We picked them up.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

CONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One and Shilling Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-111

111. WILLIAM RUTHERFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , a blanket, value 2 s.; a sheet, value 2 s., and a quilt, value 4 s. , the goods of Henrietta Harper .

HENRIETTA HARPER . I live in Harris's-building , and am an unfortunate girl. The prisoner had gone home to stop all night with me - he went to bed. I went up stairs on the first floor, and came down as the watchman was calling nine o'clock, he was then gone with the blanket, sheet, and quilt. He had given me 4 s. 6 d. I found him in custody at ten o'clock with the sheet and blanket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is not your name Eliza - A. No; I never go by that name. He was not tipsy. I went up stairs to put the 4 s. 6 d. away, and had only left the room three or four minutes. I did not tell the Justice that I went out to get some supper.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner in Shakespear-walk, about ten o'clock, with the blanket and sheet - he said he had brought it from the London Docks, and was taking it to his ship.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had been to the Shakespear's Head, public-house. to look for the prosecutrix - A. Yes; he had been boasting at the public-house that he had taken them from her - he seemed sober.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a public-house, and found this girl - I gave her some drink. I gave her 4 s. 6 d. I went to sleep, awoke, and she was gone - I got up, and found my money gone from my pocket, and took the sheet and blanket for the money I had lost.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-112

112. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a violin, value 8 s.; a violin bow, value 2 s.; a time-piece, value 10 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s., and a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of George Howard .

GEORGE HOWARD . I lodge in Marchmont-street , and am a ground digger . The prisoner lodged in the third floor room with me. On Saturday, the 14th of November, I came home at eleven o'clock, and my time-piece was gone. I took the prisoner on the Friday following, and it was produced at Marlborough-street - the other things

were taken at different times. He did not come home till Sunday, and then said he had the violin and time-piece to shew a man, who would buy it.

JOHN BUCKLAND . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found a duplicate of the handkerchief and waistcoat on him.

JOSEPH PARKER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 25th of October, a time-piece was pawned in the name of J. Reynolds, and on the 7th of November the waistcoat; I do not know who by.

WILLIAM OXBORROW . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of November, a handkerchief was pawned in the name of Penny - I believe the prisoner to be the person; the duplicate found on him is what I gave him.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brewer-street, Golden-square. On the 1st of November, the prisoner pawned a violin and bow for 4 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them on Saturday.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-113

113. JAMES BLACKMAN and GEORGE CURTIS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November 125 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., belonging to Applethwaite Frere , Esq. , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

APPLETHWAITE FRERE, ESQ. I live at Chiswick, at Stanford-brook; a quantity of lead has been stolen from an uninhabited house of mine - I cannot say when it was taken.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a patrol. On the 18th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoners, on different sides of the way, in the Strand, each carrying a basket, which seemed heavy. I secured Curtis with his basket full of lead, and asked how he came by it - he said he had collected it about the country. Wotten took Curtis, and on the way to the office he denied all knowledge of Blackman; but at the office they gave their addresses both at one place, at Hammersmith. The lead weighed 105 lbs.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were they together when Curtis denied knowing the other - A. Yes. They got into conversation at the office.

WILLIAM WOTTEN . I was with Davis, and took Blackman, with a basket full of lead, about half a hundred weight; he said he picked it up in the road, and had had it some time, and Curtis knew nothing about it - that he lived in Bond-street, Chiswick.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell him you was an officer - A. Certainly; both gave their addresses, but I did not hear what the other said.

CHARLES JONES . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Frere's house, with one sheet of the lead, but could not match it. I drew the nails, and brought away what remained, and it corresponded with what I found on the prisoners; the edges appear fresh cut.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not mixed that you brought from the house with the rest - A. They have been together, but I know the difference between them - what I found on the prisoners is marked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-114

114. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a sovereign, the money of Thomas James Lawrence , his master .

DORINDA LAWRENCE . I am the wife of Thomas James Lawrence . We keep the Geneva Arms, public-house, Hays-court, Soho ; the prisoner was our pot-boy . On the 28th of October, at nine o'clock in the morning, Croker came to pay me a bill; I gave the prisoner a sovereign to get change - he absconded. My husband met him a fortnight after, and took him.

MR. CROKER. I went to pay a bill. Mrs. Lawrence gave the prisoner a sovereign to get change - he did not return.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-115

115. ELIZABETH READ was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a coat, value 15 s. , the goods of James Pink .

JAMES PINK . I am a carpenter , and live at Homerton , in the garret; the prisoner slept on the first floor. On the 28th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, my coat was safe; I went out, and missed it at ten at night - she absconded. On the 17th of November, I met her in Brick-lane, and told Gibbs, who took her. She said she had pawned my coat at Miller's, and torn the duplicate up.

GEORGE MOULTEN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Miller, of Kingsland-road. On the 28th of June, this coat was pawned in the name of Ann Tayler , Union-street, Kingsland-road; I did not take it in, but have often seen the prisoner at the shop.

ROBERT COUCH . I took her into custody. She said she stole the coat, and pawned it at Miller's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-116

116. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a quilt, value 8 s.; a bed-tick, value 4 s.; 30 lbs. of feathers, value 3 l.; four bags, value 2 s.; and a wrapper value 3 s. , the goods of Joseph Walker .

JOSEPH WALKER . I am an upholsterer , and live at Aldgate . The prisoner was eighteen months in my service, at 15 s. per week - I missed this property, with considerably more.

THOMAS WILLIAM HUMBLE . I am a milkman, and served the prisoner's wife with milk. They lived in North-street, Globe-lane; they owed me some money, and brought my wife a duplicate; I was not present, but when I came home I found a duplicate of two blankets and a counterpane; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and told her I would have nothing to do with the duplicate, but would keep it till they paid me; there was only one blanket in pawn instead of two, as the ticket stated. I asked him to go with me to the pawnbroker's to rectify it; he said he was too ill. I gave Lee the duplicate.

JOSEPH CARR . I am a shoemaker, and have known the prisoner nine months; he lodged in the same house as me for six months, in the one pair back room; he came to my room, and asked me to accept of the duplicate of a bed-tick, pawned for 7 s.; I did so; and when I heard he was taken I delivered it up.

WILLIAM WARRE . I am servant to Mr. Muncaster , pawnbroker, Skinner-street. I have a bed-tick pawned

on the 24th of March, in the name of Ann Smith , by a woman; the duplicate produced is what I gave her.

JOHN SPOONER . I am shopman to Mr. Williamson. I have a blanket and quilt, pawned in November, 1822, in the name of Ann Smith . We have taken the business of Mr. Stevens.

BETSY MIDDLETON . I am servant to Mr. Walker. I know this bed-tick to be my work - I made it some time in March.

Cross-examined. Q. How many have you made - A. I can make five in a day - I have been five years in Mr. Walker's service.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. Carr gave me a duplicate. I took the prisoner at his lodging, in Globe-fields, on the 13th of October, and found a bed-tick, several feather beds, and a quantity of duplicates for bed-ticks, pillows, and bolsters; the bags had feathers about them. I told him he had property there which did not belong him; he said, if so, it was more than he knew. I found a quilt, and an old bed-tick full of new feathers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-117

Second Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

117. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a bed, value 10 s.; a bolster, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 6 s.; a tea-kettle, value 6 d.; a saucepan, value 6 d.; an iron skellet, value 3 d.; a pail, value 3 d.; and a pitcher, value 3 d. the goods of Timothy M'Carthy .

The articles being let to the prisoner with a furnished lodging, she ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231203-118

118. JOSHUA WILLIAM VENNEY and JOHN SIMCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , two pairs of boots, value 8 s. , the goods of Robert Harvey .

ROBERT HARVEY . I am a shoemaker , and live at Edmonton . Venney was my journeyman, and Simcock my apprentice. On the 24th of November, Venney brought home a pair of boots - I found fault with them - he felt offended, because I would not give him more work - words occurred, and I said I was told that he came to me for no good. He said if I would go out with him, he would tell me something. I went backwards for my hat, and Simcock was at work in the next room. I said, "John, let us go and clear this matter up." We went to Mr. Sheath's, and found a pair of my boots. Venney said Simcock got them out of the shop, gave them to him, and he sold them to Sheath, and took two pairs to London. Simcock made no answer to it all.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that he denied it - A. No; at that moment he did not deny it - I never heard him deny it.

Q. You state in your deposition "Venney accused John of taking two pairs to London, which he denied" - A. Yes; that was a week afterwards. I said, if he returned to work and behaved well, I would take no notice of it, and the matter rested for a week.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not Simcock insist on going before the Magistrate - A. He did not insist. I offered to give up his time - he said he would not take it, for he would make me pay for it yet. We were always quarrelling - I never heard him deny it. He said I had not learnt him his business. Venney was never in the shop without my being present.

NATHANIEL SHEATH . I live at Edmonton. I bought a pair of boots of Venney for 2 s. 9 d.

ROBERT HARVEY . The usual price of these boots is 14 s. Venney hawked shoes about for me sometimes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-119

119. JAMES WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a cloak, value 2 s., the goods of William Watkins ; a pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s.; a pair of boots, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 1 s.; and a shirt, value 6 d., the goods of William Pink ; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Mary Youden , spinster .

MARY YOUDEN . I am daughter of Henry Youden . We live at Kensington . On the 5th of November the prisoner came and asked for lodgings, and said he was related to Mr. Lamb, a carpenter, who we knew to be a respectable man. He said he was going to be employed in Lamb's business all the winter - we let him a lodging, and he staid all night, and at a quarter to six o'clock my sister let him out, and told him he had something not his own. He said he had not - it was a pair of boots which he was going to get mended. She said they were Pink's boots, and he ran off, and she called after him.

HANNAH WATKINS . I let the prisoner out, as he could not open the door - he had a pair of boots under his arm. I said he had something not his own - he said he had not. I said they were Pink's boots - he said they were a pair he had brought over night, and flew off the steps. I pursued, calling Stop thief! and he called stop thief as well, and threw his bundle away, containing Pink's property, opposite Kensington Church, and was secured by the sentinel.

MICHAEL COLES . I am a plasterer. On the 6th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going into Kensington-square, and met a man very much resembling the prisoner, with a bundle, and heard a call of Stop thief! He immediately ran, and I after him - he dropped a bundle, and threw the boots across the road - I took it up, and he called stop thief himself.

CHARLES SHAW . I was sentinel at the Palace, and stopped the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-120

120. ROBERT WILSON and GEORGE THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , fifty yards of stuff, value 4 l. , the goods of Joseph Graham .

GEORGE PEACOCK . I am servant to Joseph Graham , linen-draper , Regent-street . On the 5th of November, there was a pile of stuffs two feet within the door. About a quarter past five o'clock, while I was attending to a lady, I heard them fall down - I jumped over the counter, ran to the door, and on the other side of the street saw a great many people, and a stranger produced four pieces of stuff. I gave them to the officer.

DANIEL REARDON . On the 5th of November I was in Regent-street, with Griffiths. I first saw the prisoners, in company with another, in King-street, Holborn, and followed them to Regent-street; they passed Mr. Graham's

shop several times, at last Thomas went up, stepped in at the door, and laid hold of the stuffs, the pile fell, he crossed over, and Griffiths laid hold of him. I ran over; he got from Griffiths, and dropped them. I followed him, returned and picked them up. I saw Wilson coming towards me; he pretended to be looking in at a doorway. I took him; he had a green bag, and was watching while Thomas took the stuff.

Prisoner WILSON. Q. How long was it before you took me - A. About three minutes; I took him at the end of Conduit-street, returning. Thomas ran towards Oxford-street.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I was with Reardon, and watched the prisoners and another man into Regent-street. I saw Thomas take the stuffs from the door; he ran over towards me - I laid hold of him with three pieces under his arm; he dropped them, got away, and ran down Conduit-street. A man ran out of a shop, and took him - Wilson was with him. I watched them all the way; he stood a few yards from the door, with a bag, ready to receive them. All three ran off together as soon as they were taken. I picked a bag up which Wilson dropped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILSON'S Defence. Does it appear feasible that I should stop on the spot ten minutes, which I did.

THOMAS'S Defence. I was walking down Conduit-street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran with the rest of the party.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 39.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-121

121. SOLOMON HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , a cap, value 6 s., the goods of Joseph Villomatt , from his person .

JOSEPH VILLOMATT . I am the son of Sophia Villomatt , widow - we live in Lucas-place, Bethnal-green. On the 23d of November, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was in Bethnal-green-road , going to chapel; an Odd Fellow's funeral passed, and I stood by a post to let it go by. A boy snatched at my cap, but did not get it - I laid hold of it, and then the prisoner snatched it off; I turned round, and caught him by the coat, and then he called to the other boy, who took it from him, and went off with it; the other had a hat on, and one in his hand. The prisoner's coat tore, and he ran off into my brother's arms, who kept him. We took him to my mother's house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you not hear that he had lost his cap - A. No; he had none on. The boy who ran off with it is bigger than him.

Prisoner's Defence. Some one snatched off my hat, and as I went along somebody collared me, and said I had taken another boy's hat off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-122

122. MARY ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a breast pin, value 10 s., the goods of Nevill Carter Bath , from his person .

NEVILL CARTER BATH . On the 31st of October, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in Piccadilly - the prisoner and another woman accosted me, and asked me to give her sixpence. I wished to get rid of them; they followed me a long way, and at last I gave her sixpence; she still followed me, down to Sherrard-street. I threatened several times to give her in charge, and in Sherrard-street (I had a cloak on), she put her head down to my neck, and took my breast pin out with her mouth. I secured her, and gave her in charge.

JOHN CAIN . I am a watchman, and received her in charge. Mr. Bath offered her 5 s. to return the pin - she denied it.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I am constable of the night. About half-past twelve o'clock at night, when the prisoner was in the watch-house, I found the breast pin in her left hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met the gentleman; he gave me 6 d., and after talking some time, asked me to step into a court - I was three-quarters of an hour there. The watchman told us to move on, and he charged me with taking his pin, which he gave me instead of money.

MR. BATH. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-123

123. ANN STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , twenty sovereigns, the monies of John Joseph Gutteridge , from his person .

JOHN JOSEPH GUTTERIDGE . On the evening of the 14th of November, I saw the prisoner in Leicester-square, and went home with her - I lost these twenty sovereigns; they might have fallen out of my pocket, and were found in the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-124

124. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Skeeles Wright , from his person .

THOMAS SKEELES WRIGHT . On the 30th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Gray's Inn-lane , and saw somebody going to the watch-house - I followed the mob, and met the prisoner and another person; they turned back and followed, and as I stood at the watch-house door, I felt my handkerchief drawn out; I turned round, and charged the prisoner with it; he was behind me - he denied it, and said he should scorn such a thing. There were other persons near enough to do it. The handkerchief was found on the ground.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-125

126. GEORGE HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of George Billis , from his person .

GEORGE BILLIS . On Saturday evening, the 15th of November, between eight and nine o'clock, I was standing in Short's-gardens , hearing a man play the violin - I had two gauges and a handkerchief in my pocket. I felt the gauges hit against my thigh, looked round, and saw the prisoner tucking my handkerchief into his bosom, took hold of him, and gave him in charge.

MORRIS QUIN . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in charge, and took the handkerchief from his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw nine or ten people together, and by the side of a path, saw a handkerchief on the ground, picked it up, and put it into my bosom. This gentleman followed me near three-quarters of a mile before he gave charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-126

127. WILLIAM OVEREND and FRANCIS SKINNER were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , four handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two frocks, value 3 s.; two caps, value 6 d.; a frill, value 1 d.; a ruff, value 6 d., the goods of George Lyall ; and a gown, value 2 s., the goods of Caroline Lyall , from the person of the said George Lyall .

GEORGE LYALL . I am a gardener , and live at Kensington . On the 10th of November I came to town, and was returning, a little before twelve o'clock at night, and passing the Palace gate ; I had a bundle containing these things on my left arm, and my wife on my right; a snatch was made at the bundle, and a second snatch got it away and turned me round, and I saw two soldier s in the road - they were the prisoners; I ran after them, and the one who had the bundle fell in the middle of the road; my bundle fell, and his cap fell off; I grasped at him, and the other struck me a blow which stunned me for a short time, but I got up, grasped at him, and then the other recovered himself, and struck me again; and the one I had hold of called out, "Kill the b - r, - kill him!" I hallooed out Watch! and they both set off; snatched up the bundle, and ran down Love-lane into the fields; I followed them, but returned to my wife - picked up my own hat and the soldier's cap. I am positive that Overend is the man who struck me.

Q. Were you not asked by the Magistrate if you could identify them, and said you could not - A. I told the Magistrate it was dark; but I am sensible of one, and do not see why I should favour him. I said I would not swear to them - not that I could not. I have kept the cap ever since, and produce it.

MARY LYALL . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I came home with him. I know very little about this, for the moment I missed my husband I fainted. I only know that the bundle was snatched from him by two soldiers - I saw them struggling with him on the ground, and the soldier dropped his hat. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN BARKER . I am a coach-painter, and live at Kensington. About twelve o'clock on the night in question, I was coming home towards Love-lane, and in the fields by Cromwell House (I and four more were together), just on this side of the house we met Overend, and five yards further up came Skinner, very fast; Overend had a bundle in his arms; they passed us; I followed them; Overend got into a ditch, and Skinner ran against a bar. I followed Overend and caught him - he was throwing the things away as he went along; I picked up part of them, and saw Skinner secured before I followed Overend.

ROBERT DUNN . I picked up some of the things in the lane - I live close by, and was called out of my bed.

OVEREND - GUILTY . Aged 22.

SKINNER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-127

128. JOHN KIRK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , nine books, value 12 s., the goods of Robert Fisk , his master .

ROBERT FISK . I am a bookseller , and live in Wigmore-street . The prisoner was about five weeks in my service; I had missed books, and told him to look after persons who came in, but his countenance changed, which rose my suspicion; and on Monday, the 17th, I sent him with a letter, and in about two hours he was found in custody, and the books found at Chamberlaine's.

JAMES B. CHAMBERLAINE . I am a salesman, and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's. On the 7th of September, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was called down, and found the prisoner in my shop; he produced three books for sale; I asked if they were his - he said Yes; that he bought one at Cheltenham for 12 s. I asked him the titles of them - he gave rather an incorrect account. I asked if there was anybody near who I could send to, to say they were his - he said his mother lived at Bayswater. I told him to go behind the counter, while I sent for an officer; he behaved in a most violent manner - got to the door three times, and seized the books. Several

bad characters were round the shop. I took him out, and met Bartlett, who took him.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned three books with me on the 8th of November.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Fisk owed me some money - I intended to redeem them when he paid me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-128

129. JOHN FAGAN and JOHN MARNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , a hat, value 20 s., the goods of James Theobald , privately in his shop .

JAMES THEOBALD . I am a hatter , and live in Rathbone-place . On the 21st of November I went out, returned about half-past four o'clock, and was in my private passage coming into the shop, and saw Fagan come out with a hat in his hand. I saw Marney inside the shop. I called to Fagan, and asked where he was going with the hat - he said, "I have bought it at that shop" - I said, I had my doubts about it, took it from him, and he ran away. I secured him, and asked if he knew the man in the shop - he said No. I took him into the shop - a mob collected; I saw Marney among them, and charged him with having been in the shop; he said he went in to buy a hat-band. I asked him how much he had to buy it - he said a penny. I desired him to come into the shop, which he did, and said he had no knowledge of Fagan. I got the constable, who took them; he broke from the officer afterwards.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Rathbone-place, nearly opposite the prosecutor's. I was standing at my shop door, about four o'clock, and saw both the prisoner's pass in company, talking together. I did not see where they went to; but in a few minutes I saw the prosecutor running after them.

CHARLES GAST . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge at the shop; and at seven o'clock I was taking them before the Magistrate, handcuffed, and when we came to High-street there was a whistle, and three young lads came up to them, whispered, and ran on; and when we came opposite to the Black Horse, public-house, High-street, Fagan slipped out of his handcuff, and ran into the Black Horse, and Marney ran up the street - I followed, and overtook him.

MR. THEOBALD . I followed Fagan, and brought him out of the Black Horse; he was trying to get under the people's legs in the tap-room. I took him to the officer; he called some persons to his assistance; they came, and said I was strangling him. I went to shift my hand, and he caught my finger in his mouth and tried to bite it. One of my daughters was in care of the shop.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I saw Marney running with the handcuff hanging to his hand - I seized and took him to the office. He denied all knowledge of Fagan, but I have frequently seen them together; and, after the examination, Marney had a cut in his hand. I said, "That looks as if you had put your hand through a pane of glass." Fagan said "No, it was not; for I was in his company last night, and he tried to steal a beef-steak off a man's plate, and got cut."

FAGAN'S Defence. I had been to buy a cap, and saw this hat laying on the step - picked it up, and a man stood next door, and said it must belong to the hatter. I was turning back to take it into the shop, and was knocked down.

MARNEY'S Defence. My hat being too large, for want of a hatband, I went to buy one. This hat laid on the step, and I told the girl of it - came out, and the gentleman asked me to walk in.

FAGAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARNEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-129

130. JAMES FERGUSSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , four yards of carpet, value 3 l. , the goods of William Samuel Ambrose .

RICHARD PALMER . I am shopman to William Samuel Ambrose , carpet-manufacturer , of Oxford-street . On the 11th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw something go from the door; went, and saw the prisoner about a dozen yards off, with a carpet on his shoulder - I walked after him, but when I got near, some person called out "Run Jem, or Bill" - he immediately threw it down, and ran into the officer's arms, without my losing sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far did he run - A. About a dozen houses off - it was at the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-130

131. SARAH EWINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , two sheets, value 8 s.; and a blanket, value 4 s., the goods of John Allen , in a lodging-room .

ANN ALLEN . I am the wife of John Allen ; we live in Church-street, Soho - the prisoner lodged in a furnished room of ours for six months. On the 10th of November I charged her with taking some things; she said if I would give her time she would get them out of pawn - I gave her a fortnight, but she did not. I never gave her leave to pawn them.

WILLIAM BILES . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Greek-street, Soho. I have a blanket, pawned for 2 s., by the prisoner.

JOHN SIMMONS . I am a pawnbroker, and have two sheets pawned, one by a man and the other by a woman - the officer has the duplicates given for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PROCTER . I am an officer. I found the duplicates of this property on the mantlepiece.

Prisoner's Defence. I took a person in to lodge with me, who took the bolster and two pillows. I pawned one sheet.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-131

132. WILLIAM YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 56 lbs. of lead, value 12 s., the goods of Walter Payne , and fixed to an out-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

WALTER PAYNE . I live in Brunswick-place, City-road . On the 11th of November, in consequence of information, I examined the roof of my brew-house, belonging to my dwelling-house, and found the lead taken

off. The officer produced some, which matched with what was left. I found a chisel behind the premises, and part of a case knife, which had cut the lead. I had seen it all safe on the 9th.

JOHN FROST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the night of the 11th of November, I stopped the prisoner in Whitecross-street, with this lead on his shoulder - he said he was to carry it for a man to Chequer-alley, for 6 d.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am an officer. I compared the lead - it matched with the roof completely.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and in distress, and going home one night, a man asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-132

NINTH DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

133. THOMAS WILKES was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 27th of October , nine planes, value 18 s., and five wooden struts, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt , he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOHN WALKER . I am foreman to Joseph Bennett and James Hunt , carpenters and builders . On the 27th of October, in the evening, I went with the officer to the prisoner's cellar, Davis's-mews, by South Molton-lane, and found this property - he is a carpenter . I saw him in about five minutes; he said he knew nothing of the timber. It was stolen on that very day; the marks were not defaced. I found his cellar flap open.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a watchman. I was near Wilkes's trap-door, and saw his boy put one of the struts down - I did not see Wilkes.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I found the timber in the cellar. He was in the mews, and said he knew nothing about any timber being there. The boy and man who were putting it down have absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-133

134. THOMAS BURTON and THOMAS BECKWITH were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 45 lbs. of lead, value 7 s. , the goods of James Lyons Seager , William Evans , and Robert Stafford .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to James Lyons Seager , and others, his partners.

JAMES GOODHALL . I am servant to James Lyons Seager, who is in partnership with other persons. I was superintending the building of a new distillery at Mill-bank , on the 24th of November, and missed some lead off the flat at the back of the building - I had seen both the prisoners cross the roof several times, and was determined to watch them, and in the morning I saw some lead folded up, and put under some ashes; I sent for Pople, and we marked it, and at half-past four o'clock, on their leaving work, I found it gone - I gave a signal to Pople, who secured them fifteen yards off. They worked on the premises.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. I saw the lead covered with rubbish, marked it, replaced it, and attended in the afternoon with Pace, for the men coming out, and about twenty minutes before five o'clock, the prisoners passed us, heavily laden - we followed and overtook them - Burton had four pieces of lead in his jacket pocket; one had my mark on it; he said he certainly had stolen it - that he had been a respectable man, and would rather be shot than be exposed in the way he should be. We found some solder at his lodgings.

THOMAS PACE . Pople's account is correct. I took Beckwith, and found five pieces of lead on him.

BURTON'S Defence. I am sorry that I have brought such disgrace on myself and family. I have four children.

BURTON - GUILTY . Aged 34.

BECKWITH - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-134

135. ALEXANDER BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a table cloth, value 2 s.; a bed gown, value 3 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 3 s., and a towel, value 6 d., the goods of Henry Werndley ; and a gown, value 3 s. , the goods of Mary Dormer .

HENRY WERNDLEY. I am a painter , and live in Chapter-street, Vauxhall Bridge-road - my shop is at the bottom of the garden. On the 27th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was up stairs, and heard some one cry out "Thief!" I ran down into Vauxhall-road, and saw two persons running, pursued, and came up with them in Pear-street, and took one, which was the prisoner - he had ran a quarter of a mile. I took him back; a man said "That is the man, I swear to him;" he denied it. This linen was missing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not lose sight of him - A. No; there are a great many turnings between my house and where I stopped him. He did not come out of a public-house.

JAMES STONE . On this morning I was in my cart, by the prosecutor's premises, and saw the prisoner and another man go up to the yard door, go into the yard, and the other brought some property out, concealed under his round frock. I said, "Halloo, young men, what are you doing?" - he threw the things down; I picked them up, threw them into the shop, and gave an alarm. Werndley pursued, and brought the prisoner back. I am certain of him; he said he was not there.

Cross-examined. Q. He took nothing - A. No. I saw him go into the yard with the other. I knew him by sight before.

THOMAS EVANS . I am a patrol. I heard the alarm - I saw Stone throw the things into the shop, and picked them up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-135

Before Mr. Recorder.

136. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a horse, price 16 l. , the property of Robert Roberts .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT ROBERTS . On the 23d of June, I had a horse to sell - the prisoner came to me, and said I had better send it to Romford-fair , that he was going there with his,

and I had better send mine with it, for it would fetch 16 l., and I and my son could meet him at the fair, and sell it; I gave him no authority to sell it. I and my son got to the fair about ten o'clock next morning; we went to sell it, or if he sold it to take the money, but he was not to sell it without our being present - he said he had sold it for 16 l., and gave my son a bill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-136

137. CHARLES WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , a sack, value 18 d.; and four bushels of oats, value 12 s. , the goods of William Daffarn ; and JAMES COWDRAY , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH MONK . I am proprietor of the Basingstoke coach. On the 2d of December, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I and Mills went to Armstrong's house - we could see from the window what passed at the Bell, inn, at Bedfont , where my horses stood. Wheeler is the hostler . I saw Cowdray drive his waggon up to within three yards from the window - his horses were taken out and put to bait, and in a short time I saw Wheeler peep round the corner of the yard, look round two or three times, and then saw him bring a sack nearly full of corn from the yard, and put it into Cowdray's waggon - it was a covered waggon - directly it was placed there, Cowdray came from the bar door, called "Charles." Wheeler answered - Cowdray asked him if the corn was put up? He said "Yes." His man, and Collins, a boy, were present. Collins was holding a lantern to Cowdray, who said "Is all right? - put the horses to;" which was done. Cowdray then came along by the side of the window where we were, with some silver, and asked Wheeler what it was? - I did not hear his answer, but saw Cowdray count 6 s. into his hand, or it might be more - one of them said to Wheeler, "We must have something to drink out of this." He immediately ran and fetched a cup of liquor, and all four drank together, and the waggon went off. Daffarn and I had part of a granary between us in this yard - I had no oats there. I noticed a particular mark on the sack which was mine. I followed the waggon, and stopped it at Staines, having got a warrant. I told Cowdray he must stop, for I wanted a sack of corn which he had in his waggon - he said he had no sack of corn in the waggon - he said he had only a small parcel of his own. I said I wanted the sack he had from Wheeler, of Bedfont - he made no answer. I got into the waggon, and took the sack out of the front of it. I said, "This is the sack I wanted." He then said he bought it of Wheeler, the hostler, and paid 9 s. for it. I gave him in charge, and sealed the sack up. There were four bushes in it. It is worth 12 s. or 12 s. 6 d. I returned and took Wheeler. I have been in the corn trade twenty years. I have compared a sample from the sack with that in Daffarn's granary - I have no doubt of their being from the same bulk - it is hedge-grown - the ends of the oats are very green, and some are black.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was not a lad named T. Collins in your employ - A. Yes; I have not brought him here; he was examined before the Magistrate - I thought he was the biggest rogue, and therefore have not brought him here. Wheeler said he had borrowed the sack of Collins - he had the care of the sacks.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They had a lantern; what time was it - A. Between five and six o'clock - the landlord was out with the prisoners while they were drinking - he is not here.

HENRY MILLS . I was with Monk watching them - we were within four yards of the waggon, and saw Wheeler come up with a sack - (he came out of the yard apparently,) and put it in at the front of the waggon - nobody was present then - he went into the yard, and in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour Cowdray came between the window and the waggon, and paid him between 6 s. and 9 s. in silver - the four drank some gin amongst them. Cowdray went on with the waggon - I kept in sight of him all the way; he did not stop till we stopped him at Staines. Monk got into the waggon, and said, "This belongs to me." It was taken into the public house, and contained four bushels of oats - it appeared full.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Cowdray was not present when it was put into the waggon - A. No, I did not see him with Wheeler till afterwards - he paid the money openly - our window was open, but there was no light in the room - they could not see us.

JAMES ARMSTRONG . My house is close to the Bell, inn. Monk and Mills were watching at my window up stairs - it is about the height of the tilt of this waggon. I was down stairs with a candle in the window, at work - I heard Cowdray call out "Charles, here is some beans for you." Charles went to the waggon and took them out, and soon after he pased with something on his back.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Anybody must see people at an open window on the watch - A. No; there was no light up stairs - they could see me with ease.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether 9 s. and the beans together would pay for the oats you cannot tell - A. No.

WILLIAM DAFFARN . I am proprietor of the Reading coach . I had some oats at the Bell, inn, and have seen the samples which Monk has, and believe they come from the same bulk, but am not so good a judge as him - four bushels of oats would come to 12 s. at that time, and could be taken without my missing it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You missed none - A. No; hedge-grown oats are generally green.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the landlord keeps oats there you cannot tell - A. I always understood not. I never heard that Wheeler dealt in oats; he was hostler to the yard; my horsekeeper had the care of it - he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-137

138. WILLIAM COCHRAN and JOHN BROOMFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , two half-crowns and four shillings , the monies of William Treharne .

There being nothing against the prisoners but the evidence of an accomplice, they were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231203-138

139. MARY YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , two sheets, value 4 s. , the goods of George Death .

GEORGE DEATH . I live in Wild-street ; these sheets were stolen from my second floor - the prisoner was a stranger.

ANN ING . I live at Death's; he is a publican ; I was in the bar, and saw the prisoner go by the bar with something in her apron. I stepped out of the bar, and asked what she had there; she said "Nothing." I found it was a pair of sheets - she said she was persuaded to do it - I asked who by - she said "Nobody."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My husband was out of work - I had drank a little, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-139

140. JAMES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 10 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER . I live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields , and am a cheesemonger . On the 22d of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner put his hand over the wire fence and take this pork from the window. I followed and took him ten yards off with it. I think he was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-140

141. MARY HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , thirty shillings , the monies of Amelia Tutin , widow .

AMELIA TUTIN . I am a widow, and keep the Blue Boar, public-house, Brewer-street, Golden-square - this money was in a bowl in the bar, with more money; the prisoner was in the tap-room - there was a disturbance - I went into the tap-room to prevent two men from fighting, and in five or ten minutes the witness called me, and the prisoner ran into the street, without paying for what she had had. I found only 5 s. in the bowl, out of about 40 s. - she was brought back directly, calling Murder! and was taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. There were other females in the tap-room - A. Yes, three.

MARIA HALL . I live in Well-street, Oxford-street - my husband is a linen-draper. I was in Tutin's bar, and saw the prisoner in the tap-room, and saw her come into the bar, put her hand into the till, and heard silver rattle - she put her hand into her pocket, and ran out - she was brought back in about ten minutes, calling Murder! and knocked down one of the men.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear you saw any money in her hand - A. No.

JOHN CANE . I am a watchman of St. James. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; the constable of the night searched her - she gave up a handful of silver; he asked her what quantity there was; she said, "I think about 1 l., of my own property;" he asked who she got it from - she said from three different people, and a woman outside the watch-house had given her some - that woman was called in, and denied it. I did not see it counted.

RICHARD HALL . I am a coach-maker. I was in the house when the prisoner came to the bar - I lodge there now - she asked for half a pint of gin; several girls were with her. The landlady went to quell a disturbance - I followed her, and heard that the prisoner had robbed the till; I ran out, overtook her thirty or forty yards off, and said she was wanted at the house she had left; she refused to return. I charged her with the theft - she still refused; I forced her back; she was crying Murder all the time. My foot slipped and I fell down, but she was secured.

Cross-examined. Q. She called for two half-pints of gin - A. Yes. I did not see the robbery committed. She did not knock me down.

MARY PROBIN . I was in the house, and saw the prisoner there - I stood by the bar - turned my head, and saw her with the till open, and her hand in it. I went and told the prosecutrix, and then went home. I live at No. 19, Queen-street, Golden-square. My husband is a gun-maker.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a patrol. I heard a noise in this house, and on entering the passage, I heard the prisoner say she had only 18 d. in her pocket - she was telling her friend so. This was before the robbery. I went in to clear the house; an alarm was given, and the prisoner brought back. She refused to be searched in the house.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say is, that the two ladies (the witnesses) forced me into the house, and made me drink with them.

MARIA HALL re-examined. I never saw her before, and did not force her into the house, or drink with her. I and Probin were standing at the door; she came up with another female, and came in - I did not invite her in

MARY PROBIN re-examined. I stood at the door with Hall; she came up, and said she wanted some gin, and would I treat her. I said, "If you want a glass I will treat you," and drank half a glass with her. I never saw her before. She had a young woman with her.

MARY ANN BEAUMONT . I am a dress-maker; the prisoner had been out of place three days, and lodged with me. On the 1st of December we had been to a party, and were going home about eleven o'clock, and as we passed the Blue Posts, the two witnesses were at the door; one of them, and I believe both, caught hold of the prisoner and asked her in, to have half a pint of gin; I wished her not to go - she did not at first, but they caught hold of her and forced her in, and used very ill language at the door. The prisoner then called for half a pint of gin - both the witnesses partook of it: they stood outside the bar; and they called for another half-pint - I drank none of it. There was a quarrel in the tap-room; Hall and Probin were very much intoxicated, and could scarcely walk - the prisoner was only a little so. The patrol came in, and turned these three women out of the bar (Hall, Probin, and the prisoner); the prisoner had gone into the bar with them in consequence of the quarrel - they were asked in by the waiter - he officiated as landlord; it was the witness, Richard Hall.

Q. When you went out, what was done? - A. Two men caught hold of the prisoner, and brought her back. I did not go back with her, for the door was shut - I went to the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 20, Lower George-street, Sloane-square; we had been to an Irish club, at a public-house in Brewer-street - it was a dance; a man was going over to Ireland; each person pays a shilling, to help him over; I am an Irishwoman. The prisoner had lived servant with Mrs. Coles, in the neighbourhood. She did not tell me what money she had.

Q. On your oath, did she not say she only had 18 d. - A. No. She mentioned something about it at the watch-house

door. I said I did not think she had much money - I did not know how much she had. She was charged with stealing money. She had not got as far as the door, when the man laid hold of her and pulled her back; she was not out of the house.

RICHARD HALL . I took her forty or fifty yards from the house - she was talking to this woman.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Have you never been engaged in prize-fighting. - A. I never fought a battle. I have been at six or eight fights. I am not related to Maria Hall.

MARIA HALL . I did not go out of the bar, but I heard her crying Murder! in the street.

COURT to BEAUMONT. Q. Now you have heard this - do you mean to say it is false - A. It is false. She had not got out of the house. It was not that man who took her - it was two young men. I did not hear her cry Murder! I was forced out, and cannot say whether she did or not. There was a scream of some kind, but I do not know which of the women it was - it did not sound like Murder. There were above twenty people in the passage - the house was full of people.

MR. CRESSWELL to MARIA HALL . Q. Do you live with your husband - A. Not at present. I live at No. 43, Well-street, and have a little independence.

GEORGE BRYERS . I am a hatter, and live in Pall-mall. I was constable of the night, and remember the prisoner being brought in. I asked her how much money she had; she said 23 s., and 23 s. and a halfpenny was found on her, and some duplicates, which I produce. One is for a pledge on the 1st of December, for 15 s.; another on the 29th of November, for 8 s.; another on the 26th, for 6 s.; and one on the 27th, for 9 s.

MRS. TUTIN re-examined. Probin and Hall might be rather the worse for liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-141

142. JOHN JEFFKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , nine yards of floor-cloth, value 29 s. the goods of Samuel Solomon .

SAMUEL SOLOMON . I am a broker , and live in Leather-lane, Holborn . I was alarmed, and missed this floor-cloth; ran out and seized the prisoner, ten yards off, with it. He said a man hired him to take it.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am a constable, and received him in charge. He said distress caused him to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-142

143. ISABELLA LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a coat, value 24 s. , the goods of Thomas Lindsey .

THOMAS LINDSEY . I lodge in Millbank-street . I was reading my Bible in my room on the ground floor; somebody came in, snatched my coat up, and ran off. I went to the door and called Stop thief! but the person was off. I found it at the pawnbroker's, within half an hour.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Strutton-ground. The prisoner pawned this coat for 6 s.; Lindsey came and claimed it in less than a quarter of an hour; she brought a shawl a few minutes afterwards, and I detained her; and asked her where she got the coat - she said from Smith, a blacksmith. She gave the name of An Brown, Perkins's-rents.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable, and took her at Lloyd's. She said a tall thin young man sent her with the shawl, and she found him at Alexander Burgees's, Perkin's-rents. I fetched a man from there; she said it was not him.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the coat to pawn, and then sent me with the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

144. ISABELLA LLOYD was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a whittle, value 5 s., the goods of Joseph Beyley , from the person of Ellen, his wife .

ELLEN BEYLEY . I am the wife of Joseph Beyley . On the 25th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was with a friend near the Pound, at Westminster ; my whittle was snatched off my shoulder; I turned round and saw somebody, but could not distinguish who. I found it at Lloyd's.

WILLIAM LLOYD . The prisoner brought this whittle to pawn about a quarter of an hour after she brought the coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-143

145. HENRY NUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , a half-crown and two shillings , the monies of James Elton .

JAMES ELTON . I am a gardener , and live in Castle-lane, Westminster . This money was in a basin in my clothes-box; the prisoner called a little after nine o'clock on Sunday morning, about some glazing he was to do for me. I was in bed, and my wife getting breakfast ready; I invited him to take breakfast - he consented. My wife went to the public-house to fetch him a glass of rum; a man came in for some money; my wife opened the box in the prisoner's presence, and gave him 12 s.; she sat down to make the toast; the prisoner sat opposite to her, and said he should like a relish; she gave him a herring to toast; he sent her out to fetch him two eggs; he then went to the box, opened it, and put his hand in; his back was towards me. I heard money rattle, jumped out of bed, and caught hold of his hand in the box, and said, "Are you going to rob me?" He pretended it was a joke. I said, "You have robbed me - and insist on your giving me what money you have taken." He denied having any; I said he should not leave. He gave me a shilling. I told him to go out of the room, and never come in again. My wife came in as soon as he was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was there not a little girl in the room - A. No. I have a daughter, but she is servant to a lodger. She never told me she was in the room, and was sure the prisoner did not go to the box. When the person came for some money, the prisoner went to fetch him some gin; he returned and said. "They will not trust me," and I gave him sixpence to fetch it. He was taken on the Monday week following.

Q. Did he not say he would not leave the house till he had his rule - A. He had it back. I found it on my bed. I did not know where he lived. My child came to the door just as he came back. I did not know that he had taken more than the shilling.

ANN ELTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner

called on Sunday the 2d of November - I fetched him a glass of gin; a carpenter called and was paid; there was then half a crown and three shillings in the box. I went to fetch him some eggs; the shop is twenty yards off, and when I returned my husband had just put him out of doors - I saw him at the door; he said my husband had accused him of robbing him; and when I went in, my husband said he had returned him 1 s., and he did not know what he had taken more. I went to the box and it was all gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you ask him to go back - A. I said "Will you go in?" but my husband pushed the door too; he did not want to come in; my daughter was not in the room; I never told the prisoner's mother that if he paid the expenses we would not prosecute. I did not write a letter to him - I cannot write.

THOMAS PACE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th, at the door of Tothill-fields Prison. The prosecutor gave me information on the day after the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. He was stupidly drunk on the bed, with his coat and hat on; when his wife went out, as she had refused to give him money for drink, he said to me, "Nunn, go to the box and get me a shilling;" which I did, and laid it on his bolster. I said, "You had better put it away, or you will get me into disgrace." He started out of bed, and charged me with stealing it out of his box. I called him a scoundrel, and said I would not stop in his house. I went out and told the neighbours, who came round. I remained there till Mrs. Elton returned, and told her her husband was a scoundrel and vagabond - that I would have struck him, if he had not been older than me, and I must have my rule; he took it from under his bolster, and she handed it out to me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-144

Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

146. OBADIAH LAWLESS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the goods of Edward Joyce , from his person .

EDWARD JOYCE . On Sunday the 9th of November, about half-past three o'clock, I was at Battle-bridge , at a fire, and saw the prisoner exactly behind me. I felt a tug at my pocket, looked round, and found him in the act of conveying both my handkerchiefs to another person about his own size - the officer seized him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me pick your pocket - A. No.

PHILIP RILEY . I am an officer, and was at the fire; saw the prisoner and another boy following Joyce - the other boy took hold of Joyce's left hand coat pocket; they turned round, looked me in the face, but did not know me; they followed him about ten yards; the other boy put his hand into Joyce's pocket, took out two handkerchiefs, and handed them to the prisoner; and the moment I seized the prisoner I found them on the ground.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me touch them - A. I did not see them in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them till the gentleman took hold of me; the other boy took them, and threw them down at my feet. I was running after the engine.

JOYCE re-examined. The prisoner was nearest to me when I turned round, by which I concluded that he took them; he was conveying them to another boy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-145

147. RICHARD PETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , a plane, value 6 s., the goods of Richard Craig ; and a piece of wood, value 3 d. , the goods of James Barton .

The prosecutors' names being Michael Craig and James Burton , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231203-146

148. WILLIAM SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 27 lbs. of horse-hair, value 18 s. , the goods of William Lewis .

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am a horse-hair-manufacturer , and live in Old-street ; the prisoner was in my service twelve months and left on the Saturday before, the 17th of November. I found some horse hair at Meris's which is mine - I know it by the tie of it.

MARTHA MERIS . I am a horse-hair-manufacturer. On the 17th of November, I bought 27 lbs. of hair of the prisoner, and sent for Lewis immediately.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am journeyman to Mr. Lewis. I can swear to this hair, as my master's manufacture, by my own work.

Prisoner. It is unmanufactured - Witness. It is manufactured by bringing it to a certain length. I have worked for Lewis nine years.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of different people.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-147

149. JOHN SHIRLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , three sheets, value 15 s., and two pair of stockings, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Shuter Boswell .

CHARLES SHUTER BOSWELL . I am a hosier , and live in Oxford-street - the prisoner was eighteen months in my service. On the 25th of October, I had occasion to remove the clothes off his bed, and the duplicate of a pair of stockings fell from his trowser's pocket - I got them out of pawn, and then took him up.

JAMES BASSETT . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet pawned on the 24th of June. I believe the prisoner to be the man.

WILLIAM BILES . On the 21st of October, the prisoner pawned a sheet with me, and on the 28th of August, a pair of stockings and a handkerchief.

ZACHARIAH ALLNUTT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of October, the prisoner pawned a sheet with me.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I searched the prisoner's box, and found the duplicates of this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner, put in a written defence, stating his intention to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-148

150. GEORGE TYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , five tea-spoons, value 10 s.; a pair of sugar-tongs, value 3 s., and a watch, value 1 l. , the goods of Eliza Freeman .

ELIZA FREEMAN . I live at Hammersmith . On the 25th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to sell lemons - the door was open. I came up from the kitchen, and saw him coming from the parlour, and asked what business he had there; he made no answer, but endeavoured to get away. I gave an alarm, and he was brought back - he had thrown his basket away. I missed this property from the parlour.

JOHN EATON . I keep this house. I was coming home, and near my own house, heard the cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running - he dropped a basket, and was secured by the beadle, who picked it up. The watch was found upon him, and the spoons were in his basket.

EDWARD EDGSON . I received him in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-149

151. JOHN THICKETT and JOHN PASBY were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , a frock, value 2 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s., and a gown, value 10 s., the goods of Richard Jones ; and two tablecloths, value 1 l. , the goods of Mary Jennings .

MARY JONES . I am a laundress, and live at Chiswick - my husband's name is Richard. This linen was in my care, and hung in Home-fields, about a hundred yards from the house, between two and three o'clock to dry, and in half an hour I was alarmed, and missed them. I found the prisoners in custody with them, at the Roebuck, public-house, Turnham-green, between three and four o'clock. There is a road runs through the field.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a baker. I was at Chiswick about three o'clock in the afternoon, and heard an alarm, received information, and followed three men to Turnham-green. I went and took the two prisoners. I saw Pasby throw away a handkerchief, containing two table cloths; they ran further, and threw away a frock and waistcoat, which was picked up, and given to me - the other got away. I told them they had stolen the things; Pasby said he picked them up in the lane, and that Thickett had given him a tablecloth. He claimed the handkerchief the tablecloths were wrapped in.

ELIZA FINALL . I saw Thickett take these things off the line; he threw the pegs down, got over the stile, and ran away - another young chap, who is not here, was with him. Pasby stood outside, and ran off with them. I saw them in company before, at two o'clock.

MARIA JENNINGS . My mother lost a gown from this drying ground; it was found when the prisoners were taken.

JOHN HOAR . I was walking round my father's ground, heard an alarm, and saw Thickett running from a mob, and stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THICKETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

PASBY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231203-150

152. ELIZA TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , four brushes, value 2 s.; a quilt, value 18 d.; a blanket, value 1 s.; six knives, value 6 d.; six forks, value 4 d.; a candlestick, value 6 d., and two towels, value 6 d., the goods of William Cattle , her master .

WILLIAM CATTLE . I am a carpenter , and live in Tottenham Court-road . The prisoner was in my service till the 4th of November - I missed these things while she was with me.

JOHN JONES . I took the prisoner in charge, for stealing a blanket and towel - she said if her master would go to No. 3, Rose-street, Long-acre, he would find his property.

WILLIAM CATTLE . I went to Rose-street, but found nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-151

153. REBECCA NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a watch, value 20 s.; a watch chain, value 1 s., and three keys, value 6 d., the goods of Richard Roberts , from his person .

RICHARD ROBERTS . On the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in a public-house - she followed me out, and stopped me about two hundred yards off, and asked me to go home with her - I refused; she snatched my watch out, and ran away with it; I followed her, calling Stop thief! the officer followed her into the passage of a house, and brought her out.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What young women were you with besides her - A. None at all. I was with a girl an hour before, and went to a house in the neighbourhood with her. I knew what I was about. I saw her in custody in half an hour.

COURT. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, that she accompanied you from the house - A. She followed me out of the house.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I was on duty in Wentworth-street, about a quarter past eight o'clock, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I followed and saw the prosecutor, who said, "That woman has robbed me of my watch" - she had run into the first door up the passage; I went in, and caught hold of the prisoner by the arm, and behind the door I found the watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prosecutor sober - A. He was not quite sober. It is a house which girls use - the door is always open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He had two women besides me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-152

154. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a ring, value 16 s.; an eye-glass, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; two towels, value 1 s.; two caps, value 2 s.; a yard of silk, value 1 s.; two yards of muslin, value 2 s.; and two yards of lace, value 1 s., the goods of Oscar Byrne , her master .

AMANDA ELIZABETH BYRNE . I am wife of Oscar Byrne . We live in Osnaburgh-street, Regent's Park . The prisoner was three months in our service. On the 24th of November, I put a 20 l. note and two 10 l. notes into the parlour cupboard, which I locked, and kept the key that night. I was going out early next morning, and sent the prisoner and the other servant to the cupboard for the tea and sugar; the prisoner left the keys in the cupboard. She went up several times; and, at seven o'clock in the morning, as I was going out, she locked the door and gave me the key. I returned at four, dined, and went to the cupboard, and

the notes were gone. I told both the servants of it. The prisoner emptied the cupboard, and after tea the prisoner searched everywhere, but the notes were not found. An officer came and searched her box.

THOMAS DRUMMOND . I am an officer. I was fetched, and questioned the servants about the notes, and on examining the prisoner's box, I found the articles stated in the indictment - she denied all knowledge of them - she unlocked the box herself. I found a piece of silk pinned under her gown; she unpinned it, and threw it down. I took it up, and she insisted on it that she never had it about her, and that none of the things were Mrs. Byrne's - that she picked the ring up in the passage - the child had the eye-glass to play with, and she put it into her box.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you mix the prisoner's box with the other servant's - A. No; the boxes were in different rooms.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very wrongly accused of it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-153

155. SAMUEL COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , a pair of shoes, value 7 s., the goods of William Marsh , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM MARSH . I am a shoemaker , and live in Baldwin's-gardens . On the 22d of November, about a quarter past five o'clock, the prisoner came in to buy a pair of shoes, and tried on six pairs, and at last found one to fit him, which came to 10 s.; he offered 9 s., which I refused, and shewed him some at 7 s., which did not suit him, and while I was putting them away, I missed a pair off the board. He was going out, wishing me good night - I turned round and secured him on the step, pulled him into the shop, found his trowsers were tied at the knee, and the shoes in them. He said I had not found them on him. He only had 4 s. 6 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing whatever belonging to him.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-154

156. MARY ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a sheet, value 3 s.; two pillow-cases, value 2 s.; and two blankets, value 6 s., the goods of Margaret Banks , in a lodging-room .

MARGARET BANKS . The prisoner and her husband took a furnished room at my house, and were eight weeks there. I missed these things, charged her with it, and she gave the officer the duplicates.

ROBERT HATHRILL . I am an officer. On the 24th of November I searched the prisoner. Her husband asked her what she had done with the things - she said she had pawned them. I asked her for the duplicates, and she gave them to me. She said she had pawned them unknown to her husband.

HENRY BOUCHER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a blanket, two pillow-cases, and a sheet, with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them for victuals, when my husband was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-155

157. JOSEPH ASHFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a coat, value 3 l., and a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER . I live in Mincing-lane . On Sunday, the 1st of November, my coat hung up in the office, with a handkerchief in the pocket; I missed it on Monday afternoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. On Saturday, the 1st of November, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Featherstone-street, St. Luke's, and saw the prisoner, with another - the prisoner had the coat under his arm, tied in the handkerchief. He made a signal on seeing me. I let them go on to Old-street, then laid hold of the prisoner, and asked what he had got - he said a great coat, which a man in Smithfield gave him to take to the Angel at Islington. I asked if any name was on it - he said "Yes, W. Palmer." I found that name on both coat and handkerchief. I advertised it, and the prosecutor claimed it. The prisoner said at the Office, that one Jones gave it to him to carry.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You never went to the Angel about it - A. No. He was three-quarters of a mile from Mr. Palmer's, going towards Islington.

THOMAS VANN . I searched the prisoner, and found four sovereigns on him. He refused to say where he lived.

Prisoner's Defence. Jones gaves it to me to leave at the Angel for Palmer. I have a witness to prove it.

JOSEPH BATT . I am a watch-case-maker. On a Saturday in November I met James Jones in Smithfield, with a bundle under his arm - he got the prisoner to carry it - he gave it to him at a public house, at the corner of Grub-street, to carry to the Peacock, public house.

COURT. Q. Who is Jones - A. A kind of horse-dealer. I knew him at Birmingham - the bundle was in a kind of yellow handkerchief. It was not opened - it was about three o'clock or a quarter past. I did not know the prisoner before.

Q. Why was the prisoner to take it to Islington - A. I do not know - he and Jones shook hands together. I do not know how long they had been acquainted. The prisoner said he could not stop, he had to go to Islington. Jones replied, "Why you might as well save me this journey, and leave this for Mr. so and so, and if he is not there, leave it at the bar." He said something about the name being inside the bundle.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-156

158. GEORGE REDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary Williams .

MARY WILLIAMS . I live in Wheeler-street, Bethnal-green . On the 13th of November the prisoner came into my shop with another boy, who bought a shirt, for 1 s. 8 d. The prisoner unpinned a waistcoat, and went out with it. I could not overtake him, but I found him in custody on the Saturday after, and am certain of him.

JOHN JOHNSON . I apprehended him on the 15th. He denied the charge. I have not found the waistcoat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-157

159. JOHN JACKSON and AMELIA JACKSON

were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , twelve shillings, the monies of Clipson Coward , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-158

160. WILLIAM MONTAGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , an iron pump, value 2 l. the goods of James Titmuss , and fixed to a certain garden belonging to a house of his .

JAMES TITMUSS . I live in Hackney-wick . In July last I bought a pump of the prisoner; he put it into a well for me, and I paid him for it; and on the 17th of November, about eight o'clock in the morning. I missed it, and found a walking-stick by the well, which I believe to be the prisoner's. I had seen him with one like it many times. I found the pump in Brown's manufactory afterwards. The prisoner was taken up that night. I told him he must be an infamous scoundrel to serve me so. He said he did it out of distress - that he had seven children, and his wife had just lain in.

JAMES BROWN . The prisoner put a pump down on my premises in Haggerston-lane.

THOMAS VANN . On the 17th of November I took him in charge, and took him to Titmuss - he begged for mercy, and said it was his first offence.

Prisoner's Defence. Titmuss's pump was ten feet long - this was thirteen feet, and is quite a different one, and is in four pieces, and Titmuss's is all in one piece.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-159

161. EDWARD PORTER was indicted for embezzlement .

GAWAN WILSON . The prisoner was my apprentice - I am a bedstead maker . On the 15th of November, I sent him to receive 14 s. from Mr. Barber, of Lamb's Conduit-street; he returned, and said he had received no money, and has never paid it to me - he acknowledged it afterwards; I found him at a house of ill-fame in George-street.

ANN BARBER . I am the daughter of Jame Barber. On Saturday evening, the 15th of November, the prisoner called for 14 s. for Mr. Wilson, and I paid him.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost part of the money coming home.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-160

162. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Port .

THOMAS PORT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Brook-street, Fitzroy-square : On the 27th of September, about nine o'clock at night, I heard a noise, turned round, and saw the prisoner moving something off the counter, and soon after he went to another counter; I saw a piece of bacon under his coat, and went to the door - I called to him; he did not answer. I overtook him in the street, and asked him for the bacon from under his coat; he was going to strike me. I took him back - it was found down the area of the next house, on the spot where he stood when he was going to strike me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-161

162. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , a basket, value 3 s.; sixteen phials, value 2 s., and 30 lbs. of kitchen stuff, value 6 s. , the goods of William Adams .

WILLIAM ADAMS . I live in Little Coram-street. On the 3d of December, I was in Great Russell-street , with phials and kitchen stuff in a basket - I hung it on the rails of the square while I went into Montague-street, returned in about three minutes, and it was gone. A servant at a door directed me up Montague-place, where I saw the prisoner with it - I called to him; he threw it away, and ran down the mews, and in Gower-street I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-162

164. JOSEPH CROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , a fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of John Pomfrett .

JOHN POMFRETT . I keep a poulterer's shop at Tottenham . On the 3d of December, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner reach his hand through the window, and take a fowl off the counter. I ran out and caught him - he threw it down.

The Prisoner begged for lenity.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-163

165. JOHN FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a coat, value 30 s. , the goods of James Paine and George Henry Basington .

JOHN BENNETT . I am shopman to James Paine and George Henry Basington , pawnbrokers . I only know the property - it hung inside the shop, near the door.

JOHN CHARLES YOWART . I am apprentice to the prosecutors. On the 17th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner three doors from the shop with this coat under his arm. I ran in and asked the shopman about it - I then ran after him, calling Stop thief! He ran a little distance, and then dropped it, and was secured without my losing sight of him. I picked it up.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I was near this shop, and saw the prisoner pass quickly with the coat under his arm. I turned the corner, and saw him running, on the cry of Stop thief! I pursued - saw him throw it down in Orchard-street. He was secured twenty yards further on.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-164

166. MARY HERRING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , three gowns, value 7 s.; a frock, value 8 d.; and a hat, value 3 s. , the goods of Dorman Vincent .

THOMAS KENDRICK . I am a beadle. The only witness who knows anything of this is absent through illness.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-165

167. WILLIAM GURNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , a coat, value 1 l. the goods of Thomas Rogers .

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a lighterman . I left the prisoner in charge of my barge, on the 20th of November, at Rotherhithe , He was my servant . The coat was in the cabin. I returned next day, and it was gone. I asked him where it was - he looked about, and said he could not find it. Next day, he said he would go and fetch it. It cost me 2 l. 6 s. a month ago.

DAVID GORDON . I am a salesman, and live at Shadwell. On the 20th of November the prisoner brought this coat, asked me to buy it, and said his master gave it to him. I gave him 3 s. for it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you drag me into the shop, and throw me 3 s. down, and throw the coat behind the counter - A. It is false.

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted to pawn it, and redeem it again, but this man forced me in, and made me sell it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-166

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13.

Middlesex Cases, Fourth Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

168. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a coat, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Smith ; a coat, value 5 s., the goods of C. Campbell ; and two coats, value 5 s.; and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of John Carfrae .

SAMUEL SMITH . I live in Fetter-lane . On the 16th of November, while we were at chapel, these things were stolen. I found a coat in the officer's possession.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner is your cousin - A. Yes. He went to sea, and returned in distress. We missed some victuals at the same time.

MR. PHILLIPS. My Lord, the prisoner wishes to plead Guilty to this charge, and throw himself on your mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 16. Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1 s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-167

169. ANN RYMER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , three half-crowns, five shillings, and six sixpences, the monies of William Eades , from his person .

WILLIAM EADES . On the 8th of November I met the prisoner in Mary-le-bone-street ; she appeared distressed, and begged a few halfpence - I gave her twopence, walked a few paces, and asked what she was going to do with it - she said, to take a glass of gin. I said, "I will go with you," thinking I would watch her, to see the object I had been relieving. She took me round the corner to a public-house door, gave my waistcoat a pull down, and took this money out of my waistcoat pocket. I seized her hand with the money in it, and held it till the watchman came up.

THOMAS LAWRENCE . I am a watchman. I was called at twelve o'clock at night, and found Eades holding the prisoner's hand with this money in it. She swore she would not deliver it up. I took it from her.

THOMAS GOOK . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with this money, and said the prosecutor gave it her by mistake instead of halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it to me to oblige him.

PROSECUTOR. I had nothing to do with her.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-168

170. THOMAS JONES and WILLIAM LEWIS THORNBOROUGH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , seven yards of linen, value 9 s., and nine yards of bombazine, value 15 s. , the goods of John Jones .

HARRIET JONES . I am the wife of John Jones . We live in Mincing-lane. On the 12th of November, in the morning, I went with my sister to the Horse and Groom, public-house, Theobald's-road, to call on Thornborough. He came in while we were there. Jones sat there. We had a pint of beer, and in half an hour went to the Three Canns, public-house, Laystall-street , with them - had a pot of beer there. My sister and Jones went to a wake - I and the other prisoner followed them. As we were going out, the landlord said, "There is some bread and cheese to pay for;" and having no money, I gave him my bundle, containing these things, to keep till we returned, as my sister had money. We went to the wake. Thornborough left us two hours, and then returned to the wake with two pots of beer, and my parcel. I opened it, and missed the bombazeen and linen.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not you order your sister to pawn the things to get some porter at the wake - A. No. I am married.

Q. The bill of parcels for these things is made out to Mrs. Lee - A. I was living with Mrs. Lee at the time. I did not call myself Lee before the Magistrate. I do not know where my sister is. - I did not authorise her to pawn them.

THOMAS KING . I keep the public-house. Both the prisoners came for the bundle. I gave it them as I received it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-169

167. THOMAS VIBRANT was indicted for feloniously receiving a 10 l. Bank note, the goods of James Samuel Metcalf , knowing the same to have been stolen .

JAMES SAMUEL METCALF . I lost a 10 l. note. My errand boy, Outteridge, has been convicted of stealing it. I have since received it from the Bank.

JOHN MANCE . In consequence of information from Outteridge. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked if he was with Outteridge when he bought some clothes - he said he was, that he himself tendered the note in payment for them, and received the change.

WILLIAM ROBERTSON . I keep a clothes-shop, in High-street, Bloomsbury. The prisoner and Outteridge came together for the clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-170

172. JOHN PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 2 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of Charles Foxall .

RICHARD FOXALL . I am the son of Charles Foxall , who is a cheesemonger , and lives in Cannon-street-road . I saw the prisoner by the window, heard the bacon drawn from the window, ran out, and asked what he had got; he said nothing. I took it from under his apron. He said he was distressed.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231203-171

Before Mr. Recorder.

137. JOHN GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a mahogany case, value 1 s.; four watches, value 12 l.; four pair of ear-rings, value 20 s.; four purses, value 3 s.; eighteen combs, value 10 s., and a pencil-case, value 10 s. , the goods of Daniel Burgess ; and

JOHN ASBURY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

DANIEL BURGESS . I live in Duke-street, and am a licensed hawker . On Monday, the 20th of October, I opened a stall at the Horse Grenadier, public-house, Oxford-street , and in the evening, between five and six o'clock, I packed my goods up to take them home, and went into the house to leave my board and baize - I was not there above a minute, and on coming out, my box, containing the articles stated in the indictment was stolen. I found a pencil-case, a pair of ear-rings, a steel purse and clasp, on Thursday, and a few days afterwards two tortoiseshell combs,

Prisoner ASBURY. Q. Was the box locked - A. I forget.

THOMAS ASBURY . I am the prisoner Asbury's brother. He came to my room on Tuesday morning, the 21st of October, before nine o'clock, I was in bed - he threw a steel purse and breast pin on the bed, and said, "There is a purse and breast pin for you;" he did not say where he got them. The officer found them in my room on Thursday morning. I live in the second floor back room, in Jones's-court, Buckeridge-street; he lived on the first floor front room, at No. 3, in the court. I get my living in Piccadilly, by holding gentlemens' horses, and calling coaches.

ELIZABETH JENKINS . I live at No. 13, Buckeridge-street, with the last witness. Asbury came and threw a purse and pin on the bed - we were both in bed - I did not ask where he got them. I believe he got his living in the same way as his brother. The officers also found a steel clasp, a pencil case, some snaps, and a necklace in my room. Jane Bibbs had brought them to me on Wednesday night, and on Thursday morning the officers came. The two prisoners lodged at No. 3. I never saw Groves with the property

JANE BIBBS . I am servant at the same house as Jenkins. John Asbury gave me a silver pencil case on the Monday night - also two tortoiseshell combs, a steel clasp, a pair of ear-ring drops, and four snaps. I kept them in my room till Wednesday night, and then took them up to Jenkins's room, to shew to her. My mistress called me down, and I left them there. I sleep on the first floor. The house is let to men and women. The officers came and found them next morning. Groves lodged with John Asbury .

JANE ALDRIDGE . I live on the second floor front room of this house, and go out to work. On the 20th of October, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, Groves came into my room, with a brown box in his hand - it appeared like mahogany - he wished to leave it while he got the key of his own room - he lives at No. 3; he returned in a short time, followed by John Asbury , who took the box up and carried it down stairs. Groves followed him - I had occasion to go to their lodgings to speak to the servant (Bibbs), who I found up in their room with them. The box was on a bed - there are three beds in the room; it was open - I saw several different articles, beads, trinkets, ear-rings, all in a heap.

Q. Did it not appear strange to you that they should have such things - A. I did not strike me; I said nothing about it; but as I was going out, Groves gave me a comb. He had been in my room on the Sunday, and I washed some things for him. I suppose it was for that; a young girl, who lived in my room, felt offended at having nothing given her, and asked me to give her the comb, which John Asbury gave me on the same night. I gave her the brooch and comb. She was taken up, and said she had bought them - the brooch has been produced.

Prisoner ASBURY. Q. Were not Groves and you in the room when I came home - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you hear Groves ask me to carry the box box while he fetched the key - A. No.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIED . I am a constable. On Thursday, the 23d of October, in the morning, Ballard, Wells, and I, went to this house, No. 13, Buckeridge-street - we got there before five o'clock, and found Bibbs in her room, and a tortoiseshell comb was found in a bandbox; on the second floor back-room were Thomas Asbury and Jenkins in bed, and in their room were a steel purse and two steel clasps. I enquired for a sailor, and was directed to the next room, where we found Groves on the bed, with his clothes on, with Aldridge, and another girl, named Thompson, was in the bed. We took the whole seven into custody. I charged Groves with taking the box - he denied it. I took him to the watch-house, and in going from there to the Office, he said voluntarily that he was determined to tell the whole truth, in consequence of Asbury cheating him and selling the goods; and that he had stolen the box. Asbury was not present - he was taken that morning.

JOHN WALES . I am an officer. I went with the witnesses - knocked at Bibbs's door; the comb was found in the bandbox; we went to the back room, second floor, and found Thomas Asbury and Jenkins, and in a small box were two pairs of ear-drops and rings, four clasps. In the next room I found Groves on the bed with Aldridge and Thompson. Groves denied his name, and denied the robbery. I think he gave the name of Jones. Bibbs gave me a ring off her finger. I took them all to the watch-house, and about eleven o'clock that morning I took Asbury in St. Martin's-lane. He denied the charge. When we got to the Office, I told him the other prisoners were in custody, he then said he did not steal it, but knew something of the robbery.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer, and went with the witnesses. I was the first who entered Groves's room, and asked if he was not known by the name of Sailor? He said his name was Groves. I have a brooch, a clasp, and a pair of ear-drops, given me by Thompson's uncle. I had questioned Aldridge closely what she had done with what was given to her? She at last said she gave them to Thompson.

JANE ALDRIDGE . This is the brooch Asbury gave me. I cannot speak to the other things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GROVES'S Defence. I am guilty, but Asbury was not with me. I gave him the things, but he did not know where I got them.

ASBURY'S Defence. When I came home on Monday. I went into my brother's room, which is next to mine. I saw Groves, Aldridge, and a young woman there, and the box on the bed. He said it was a box he got from his brother, and asked me to carry it up to the room for him, while he got the key. We both sleep together. I carried

it up - he opened it, and gave Aldrige a comb. I asked where he got it - he said from his brother, and laughed, and gave me several things, which I gave the young women.

GROVES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ASBURY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-172

174. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , an opera glass, value 4 s.; a box, value 2 d.; and thirty-two weights, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Gill .

SAMUEL GILL . I am a broker , and live in Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came to my shop to look at some damaged china. These things were on a night-table, by the door. They were about a quarter of an hour in the shop, looking at china, but bought nothing; and in two hours the officer called, and produced an opera glass and a box of weights, which I am certain are mine. I had not seen them myself that day.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am street-keeper to the Foundling estate. On the 18th of November I stopped the prisoners in Spelder-street, and took them to the watch-house. Johnson wished a woman to search him, and the woman found this opera glass and weights in a large pocket which she had before her. She said the weights were brought from the East Indies by her brother, and the opera glass was her own, and she was going to sell it. Lawson said they did belong to her, and that she knew her brother gave them to her.

Cross-examined by MR. GORDON. Q. Was Lawson searched - A. Yes. Lawson said Johnson told her she had them from her brother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON'S Defence. We were both together - one is equally as much in fault as the other.

LAWSON - NOT GUILTY .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

175. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a table-cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of John Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of John Davis . We live in Crown-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came into the shop to buy some bonnets - looked at some, but the price would not suit - they left without buying anything. This table-cloth was on the table with the bonnets. Cadby brought it to me in half an hour.

JOSEPH CADBY . I found this table-cloth in Johnson's apron. Lawson said it was her's, and she was going to pawn it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAWSON'S Defence. I stood outside the door, and did not know that she had anything; when she came out she shewed me a time-piece.

MRS. DAVIS. They both came into the shop. Lawson handed the bonnets to Johnson to look at.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

176. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a time-piece stand, value 18 d. , the goods of William Alexander .

ANN ALEXANDER . I am the daughter of William Alexander , who keeps a broker's shop , in Tunbridge-street, Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, between one and two o'clock, the prisoners came and asked if we had any damaged plates - I said No; and they looked at some damaged crockery; and in about a quarter of an hour after they left, Cadby brought this time-piece stand, which I had not missed. It was safe half an hour before.

JOSEPH CADBY . I stopped them twelve doors from Alexander's, and found this time-piece stand in Lawson's apron. She said it was her own, and she was going to get it gilded.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-173

177. HENRY HERBERT and ROBERT GENT were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a silver skewer, value 10 s. , the goods of Sir Robert Wigram , Bart. ,

JOHN MAILS . I am butler to Sir Robert Wigram , Bart., who lives in Connaught-place . On Sunday, the 23d of November, we had company - this large silver skewer was taken out of my pantry drawer, and used in a fillet of veal. On Thursday, the 27th, Herbert came for my linen, (his wife washed for me) - he was full an hour down stairs, in the pantry where the plate is kept. I had not seen the skewer after Sunday. On Saturday morning the officer brought it to me - I had not missed it; it has my master's crest on it. I never saw Gent at the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He was not in the house on Sunday - A. Not that I recollect; he might have been there. I tied my linen up myself, and am certain the skewer was not among it.

JOHN WENBURN . I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, pawnbroker, Oxford-street. On Thursday, the 27th of November, Herbert brought this skewer for sale, about half-past seven o'clock - it is worth a guinea. He said it was his own - I asked how he came by it; he said he found it in a hackney coach that afternoon, that he was waterman at a stand, and gave his name as Thompson, No. 24, Mary-le-bone-lane - that his coach put up at Willis's, High-street. I kept the skewer; I did not tell him my suspicions, but desired him to call next morning - he did not call till half-past five o'clock; Gent was then with him; I said, "I was just thinking about you, I am going about the skewer" - he said, "Can't you settle it now, I am in a great hurry, and have come a long way." I said I had not made enquiry yet, and asked how far he had come - he said, from No. 24, King-street, and that he was a coachman, and drove No. 42, and Gates, of Cumberland-mews, was the owner of the coach. I said he had given a false address, and gave him in charge. Gent began to be very insolent to the officer, and said he was with him when he found it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take down the conversation - A. I took down the address he gave. If the shop had not been full, I should have given him in charge the first time he came.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I was in Cotterell's shop, and heard part of the conversation, and took them in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HERBERT'S Defence. What he says is false. I always

took his linen out of the drawer myself, and the skewer was among it - the pantry is always open. I intended to take it back, but being in liquor, I asked the pawnbroker the value of it, and told him to take care of it, and I would call to-morrow for it. I took Gent to clear it up. I said, "I shall make an excuse, and say I found it in a coach;" he said he would say the same.

HERBERT - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined One Year .

GENT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-174

178. HANNAH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a milk pail, value 5 s. , the goods of Margaret Connell .

MARGARET CONNELL . I am a milk-woman . On Thursday, about eight o'clock in the morning, I left my pail, full of milk, at a door in Princes-street , while I went round the corner - I returned, and it was gone. I found the prisoner in custody with it on the following Sunday.

LOUISA STEVENSON . I live in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn. On Saturday, the 25th of October, the prisoner came to sell this pail - she said it was her own. I detained her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the street, and took it up, being in distress.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-175

179. GEORGE PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , six books, value 15 s. , the goods of Esau Child .

ESAU CHILD. I am a gentleman's servant out of place. I locked these books up in my box, at Lord Lansdown's stables , on the 28th of November, and on the 2d of December I found the box broken open, and the books gone; they were four volumes of Whites Farriery, a Prayer-book, and a Court Guide. I found the Court Guide the same evening.

HANNAH NEAL . I live at the Carved Lion, public-house, South-street, Grosvenor-square. The prisoner lodged there - I saw him taking four volumes of a book, also a prayer book, and a Court Guide out of a basket. I asked if they were novels; he said No. Three men besides himself sleep in the room.

JOHN CLARK . I keep the Carved Lion. After the prisoner was apprehended; he told me voluntarily that he had bought some books, and supposed they were stolen, and had thrown them down the privy. I saw the Court Guide in his possession the evening before.

THOMAS NEATE . I am a coachman. The prisoner was occasionally at Lord Ellenborough's stables, On the 1st of December, I was washing the Marquis of Lansdown's carriage, he came and talked some time with me, and then left - I did not see him go into the stable, but he might go in. I think he went away before me.

WILLIAM SWEET . I am porter at the Carved Lion. I saw the prisoner in the tap-room, reading the Court Guide, and saw him tear a leaf out of it the day before he was taken, and threw it towards the fire; it did not go in. I picked it up and gave it to Roberts.

ANDREW ROBERTS . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge, at the Red Lion, public-house, Clarges-street - he denied all knowledge of the books. I found the Court Guide in the privy of the Carved Lion, and Sweet gave me the blank leaf of it, with the prosecutor's name on it.

(Leaf produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of some bricklayers in the yard. I went to the stable, heard they were lost, and made away with them, being in fear of trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231203-176

180. JOHN CURTIS PURL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a watch, value 45 s., and a key, value 5 s. , the goods of James Andrews .

JAMES ANDREWS . I live in Union-street, Somer's-town, and am out of employ. On the 5th of November, the prisoner came to me, and asked if I had sold my watch, for he could find me a customer; he took me to a public-house in Leicester-square , and asked the time; I said it was eleven o'clock - he said then he should find the customer at home, and asked me for the watch to take to the man, and he would bring him back to see that I was the right owner of it - I gave it him, and waited there two hours, but he never came; he lived in Grenville-street, but I never could find him till the 19th, when he was in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not in my possession several times to dispose of - A. He had it once or twice, and returned it. He pawned it for me once, and has been to different shops with me to try to sell it.

WILLIAM OXBORROW . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch for 30 s., in the name of Weaver; he came in a great hurry, and said he was pulled up before the Magistrate, for driving furiously, and wanted the money to pay the penalty.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-177

181. SAMUEL STAPLETON and THOMAS ROBINS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 200 lbs. of lead, value 24 s., belonging to Sarah Freeman , widow , and fixed to a building belonging to her .

JAMES MILNE . I am clerk to Mrs. Sarah Freeman , widow. This building is in St. John's Church-yard, Westminster , at the back of her premises; it is a warehouse and stable. We received information, and on examination found full a ton weight of lead stripped from the gutters; it was both torn and cut - the edges appeared fresh. Some was afterwards produced which matched with what remained. It would take 40 l. or 50 l. to replace it. On the 21st of October, Stapleton was found on the premises, and given into my custody.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a builder. On Monday, the 20th of October, I examined these premises, and found three gutters stripped of the lead; and seeing some left, I thought they would come again. Sheen was set to watch; and on Tuesday, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I came out and saw some men lurking about - they spoke to each other and went away, and in about twenty minutes I heard Stapleton was taken. I went to the premises, and found the lead thrown from the gutters. 8 or 10 cwt. was stolen that night - about 2 cwt. was found.

MICHAEL SHEEN . I was set to watch the premises. I heard an alarm, and found Stapleton laying under the body of a cart, in the shed, and about half a hundred weight of lead laying five yards from him. He said he came to sleep there.

WILLIAM TREHEARN . I am horse-keeper to Mrs. Freeman. Sheen brought Stapleton to me. I locked him in the coach-house, returned to the premises, found the lead stripped off the roof, and nearly 2 cwt. rolled up and thrown down.

JOHN FRAY . I am a farrier, and live in Church-street. On the evening of the 21st of October, I saw two men (not the prisoners) lurking about these premises - I watched them from half-past six till twenty minutes to eight o'clock. Sheen came up. I went with him to the shed, and found Stapleton laying under a cart, on the premises. The gate had been padlocked - they could creep under the gate into the yard - the lead was just by him, and inside the shed I found a coat, which I am positive belonged to the prisoner Robins - I have seen him wear it - I knew both the prisoners before.

ANN MANGAN . I am servant at the White Horse, public-house, Orchard-street, Westminster. The prisoners frequent the house, and about seven o'clock on the night of the 21st of October, they were both at our house together in company, drinking.

ROBERT SIKLEMORE . I am foreman to the prosecutrix. I found an apron in the shed, close to some of the lead. I have seen Robins about the stable-yard, and think the coat is his.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended Robins at the White Horse, Orchard-street, on the 25th of October - he denied the charge. I asked how he came to leave his coat and apron behind - he said he did not leave them there on the Tuesday, nor had he been there; but he left his coat and apron there on the Monday night. He claimed the coat and apron produced.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. I went on Wednesday morning to compare the lead. I have no doubt of it belonging to the premises.

STAPLETON'S Defence. I went at night to have a pint of beer at this house, which Robins used, but was not in his company. I left the house at six o'clock, and went to Millbank, and on returning saw somebody crawl under the gate; curiosity made me go in, and I was apprehended.

ROBINS'S Defence. On Monday night, I was going by St. John's Church-yard. I had a waistcoat given me, with sleeves to it - I threw my coat and apron over into these premises.

STAPLETON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

ROBINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-178

182. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a jacket, value 13 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 13 s. , the goods of Richard Rood .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-179

183. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , a frock, value 2 s., and a gown skirt, value 2 s. , the goods of James Heatley .

JAMES HEATLEY . I am a grave-digger , and live in Church-row, St. George's in the East . This frock and shirt were in my care, on my mother's shop counter; I heard they were stolen - ran out, and found them at the prisoner's feet, in the street.

THOMAS RADLEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner and another man lurking about this shop door - watched them for ten minutes; one made a motion to the other - the prisoner went into the shop and brought these things out. I seized him with them in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-180

184. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a batten, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of John Turner .

JOHN CALLOW . I am servant to John Turner , who is a builder . This batten was stolen from a building of his in Moorfields . I saw it a week before. I have marks on it by which I know it. The prisoner worked on the premises as a mason's labourer.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 28th of November, I stopped the prisoner in Raven-row, Spitalfields, about one o'clock in the day, offering this batten for sale. I asked how he came by it - he said it was his own, and he had brought it from Westminster. He resisted very much, but afterwards said distress caused him to do it, and he got it from Turner's premises.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-181

185. HENRY TROW was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Godfrey .

THOMAS GODFREY . I am pot-boy at the Three Cups, public-house, at Bow . On Monday, I put my best coat on a chair in my bed-room, and missed it on Thursday. The prisoner is a recruit , and lodged two nights on the same floor.

HENRY POULSON . I am an officer. On Monday, the 10th of November, I apprehended the prisoner in Birdcage-walk - he denied the charge.

JOHN CHEESE . I am a pawnbroker, at Bow. On the 5th of November, the prisoner pawned this coat for 10 s.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-182

186. JOHN WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a pot, value 3 d., and 12 lbs. of honey, value 15 s. , the goods of Ebenezer Fox .

EBENEZER FOX. I am an oilman , and live in Oxford-street . On the 24th of October, about nine o'clock, I missed this honey off a cask in the shop, and found it on the 29th, at the office - it was safe in the afternoon.

PHILIP RILEY . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. I was at the corner of Compton-street at seven o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner go by, and as soon as he saw me, he ran - I followed him to Hampshire Hog-yard, and called to Hayes to stop him, which he did, and the pot of honey fell from his hand - the pot broke, but the string kept it together. He said he had it from a boy in Compton-street, and did it through distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HAYES . Riley called to me. I stopped the prisoner, and the pot fell from his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys brought it to me, and told me to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-183

187. HENRY COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , two gross of tooth brushes, value 30 s. , the goods of Charles Thomas Phillips .

CHARLES THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a brush-maker , and live in Rochester-row, Westminster - the prisoner was in my service, and could earn 6 s. 6 d. a day. On the 26th of November, in the morning, I was in the work-shop; he said there was a knock at the door - he went and opened it. I said I did not hear a knock; he said somebody wanted to speak to him round the corner. I went to the door, but could see nobody; he went home soon after, telling me he had to meet a young woman to go to his sister's in Chandos-street. I followed him, missed him suddenly, and on returning met him in Broadway, Westminster, and followed him to No. 8, Grenville-street, Somer's-town, having learnt that Bolton, a brush-maker, lived there; I went home, and missed three gross and a dozen brush handles. I went to Bolton that night - the prisoner did not come to work afterwards, and on Friday, I took him at his lodging - he denied the charge. I afterwards found six dozen and four handles, which I believe to be mine; he had made part of them himself. They cost me 18 s. a gross.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. By what do you know them - A. I know the prisoner's make from its neatness and general appearance; scarcely two in the trade work alike. He did not work every day in the week.

JOSEPH COOPER . I apprehended the prisoner, and went to Bolton, who gave the handles up willingly.

CHARLES BOLTON . I am a brush-maker. I bought these handles of the prisoner for 7 s. 6 d. - I knew him as a workman.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever know him work for himself - A. Yes; He used nine months ago to take them about to sell; it is a common thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-184

Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

188. MARY GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , a pair of spectacles, value 4 s.; a curtain, value 5 s.; four sheets, value 15 s.; three tablecloths, value 10 s., and three shirts, value 2 s., the goods of James Horwood , her master .

JAMES HORWOOD . I live in Poland-street . The prisoner was eight years in my service, and had every thing entrusted to her. I know this property to be mine.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am a constable. On the 2d of December, I was fetched to the prosecutor's - the prisoner gave me the key of her tea caddy, in which I found duplicates for all the property.

WILLIAM DANIEL . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned all the articles stated in the indictment, with me, except the sheets and spectacles.

SUSAN BOTTLEY . The prisoner gave me the spectacles to pawn for 5 s. - I could only get 4 s. on them, which I gave her.

ROBERT CUNNINGHAM . I am a pauper. The prisoner gave me a tablecloth, and frequently gave me things.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-185

189. ANN HARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , a gown, value 7 s.; two tea spoons, value 3 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a shawl, value 20 s.; two blankets, value 2 s.; a shirt, value 2 s., and a sheet, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Kerr , her master .

THOMAS KERR . The prisoner came into my service in October, and on the 27th of November, in consequence of suspicion, I had her apprehended. The property in Court is mine.

Prisoner. Q. I pawned them because you owed me 12 s. - A. I owed her three weeks wages, which was 10 s. 6 d.; she never asked for it. The property is worth above 40 s.

GEORGE BARBER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned all the articles stated in the indictment with me at different times, for 27 s. 6 d. in all.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am an officer. I apprehended her, and inside her stocking, I found twelve duplicates of the property produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner, I intended to redeem them when I received my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231203-186

190. MARY FLANNAGAN and ELIZABETH BUTTERWORTH were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , a child's dress, value 13 s., the goods of Thomas Stafford , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH SARSON . I am shopman to Thomas Stafford , pawnbroker , St. John-street . On the 17th of November, about the middle of the day, this dress hung at the back of the shop, and about six o'clock I missed it.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. About half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 17th of November, the prisoners came to pawn this dress - Flannagan gave it to me, and the other took the money. I heard it was stolen. On the 2d of December, Flannagan came to pawn two articles, and I detained her - she said a girl named Betsey gave her the dress to pawn. I knew her before, and did not think her the thief. She asked Butterworth what name it was to be pawned in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You knew Flannagan - A. Yes; she appeared to come to shew Butterworth the shop; she asked her if 7 s. would do for it, and Butterworth took the money.

JOHN VANN . I apprehended Flannagan, and in the evening her husband brought Butterworth to me.

JOHN FORBES . I apprehended Butterworth, by desire of Flannagan's husband, and told her I wanted her for the dress pawned at Matthews's - "Oh!" she said, "that belonged to another woman." I asked her for the duplicate;

she said she dare say she could find it. I searched her - she then said, "Oh! I lost it the same day, and told Mrs. Flannagan so." She endeavoured to run away.

BUTTERWORTH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

FLANNAGAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-187

191. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of a certain man unknown .

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I am a labourer in the East India House. On the 1st of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Piccadilly , and saw the prisoner, with another man, take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and run over between the coaches - I ran over and secured him. I could not find the gentleman. He was searched at the watch-house, but nothing found; but as I was taking him to Marlborough-street, I saw him putting something down his thigh, and there I found the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hammersmith, and was taken on this charge. I had a cotton handkerchief in my hat, and a silk one tied round my loins, in consequence of a weakness. The witness at first said the cotton one was what I took from the gentleman, but afterwards finding the silk one, he said that was it.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I found cotton one in his hat, but did not say that was it. He said he had no other but that in his hat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-188

192. ANN ADKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a bag, value 2 d.; a half sovereign, a crown piece, and a half-crown, the property of Samuel Robert Johnson , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-189

193. CHARLES GEORGE was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM DUTTON . I am a shoemaker , and live in St. Martin's-court . The prisoner was my errand-boy , and entrusted to receive money for me. I sent him to Mr. Todd, for 8 s. 6 d., which he never paid me.

LOUISA SOPHIA DUTTON . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 4th of December, I sent the prisoner to Mr. Dodd, with three pairs of shoes; he returned, and said Mr. Dodd had not change enough to pay. I asked him if I should enter them to credit - he said Yes.

JOHN TODD . The prosecutor brought me three pairs of shoes - I fixed upon one, and paid him 8 s. 6 d. for it. I have known him seven years - he bore a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-190

194. SAMUEL HYLLIER was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD PERRY , JUN . I am a market-gardener , and live at Fulham . I employed the prisoner to carry out milk - he never paid me 12 s. 6 d., on account of Shackell. The bill was sent in weekly - he told me he had not received it.

SARAH FORDER . I am cook to William Shackell . On or about the 21st of September, I paid the prisoner 12 s. 6 d. for milk for Mr. Perry - I paid him in half-crowns and penny-pieces. He wrote a receipt, signed quot; Richard Perry ," he brought no bill after that - I asked him for it, but he always made some excuse.

RICHARD PERRY . I gave him a bill every Monday, headed quot;To bill delivered." When he was charged with it, he said he bought a hat with the money.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-191

195. MARY BRYER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , a shawl, value 6 s., and twelve shillings , the property of William Flannagan .

WILLIAM FLANNAGAN . I live in Cato-street, Edgware-road . On the 3d of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I was fetched home; found my box broken open, and my wife's shawl gone, and 12 s. The prisoner lodged in the house and did not come home all night. I met her next morning, in Piccadilly, and secured her.

(Shawl produced and sworn to.)

MARY FLANNAGAN . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out to work - returned at half-past five o'clock - found the box broken open, a shawl and 12 s. gone, which were safe at one o'clock.

JOHN GOOK . I received the prisoner in charge; she had a small bundle, containing this shawl and a few dirty things and 4 s. 3 1/2 d.

THOMAS ROBERTS . On the 4th of December, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoner with this bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely took the shawl to put on - the money was given to me by my sister.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231203-192

196. CATHERINE HOOKER and ANN EVEREST were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , two sheets, value 10 s.; and three yards of linen, value 3 s., the goods of John Barber , their master and JAMES CLARE was indicted for feloniously receiving them, well knowing them to have been stolen .

The presecutor's name being John William Barber , the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231203-193

197. JOHN ARUNDEL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , a cloak, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Williams .

ANN WILLIAMS . I live in Quaker-street, Spitalfields. On the 10th of November, I left my cloak at my sister Evans's, in Mulberry-court, Long-alley , and it was found in possession of Elizabeth Richards , who is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-194

198. JAMES COLONY and WILLIAM LEARY were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , two pairs of shoes, value 7 s.; and a brush, value 1 s., the goods of Roger Hunt ; and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Jelly .

SAMUEL JELLY . I am footman to Mr. Roger Hunt , who lives in Lamb-lane, Hackney . On the 4th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I lost two pairs of my master's shoes, and a pair of my own, from the place where I clean them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MAGNUS . I am a constable. On the 4th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, I met the prisoners and another boy in Hackney-road, coming from Hackney. Leary had a bag across his shoulder, and asked if I would buy some shoes. I said I would look at them;

he had these shoes and a brush - I asked how he came by them - he said it did not matter to me - I said I suspected he had stolen them, and secured them. Colony said he would go and fetch his father, for he knew where he got them. Leary said he could fetch his father - the other escaped; they said they lived in Kingsland-road, and would shew me where they got them: they wanted to turn up Haggerston-lane - I said this was not the way they came, and at last they said they brought them from Hackney.

COLONY'S Defence. We went out to buy hare skins; the other boy went to this house and brought the shoes out, saying he had bought them.

COLONY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

LEARY - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-195

199. WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , twelve brooms, value 3 s. 6 d. the goods of Samuel Vincent .

SAMUEL DALTON . I am servant to Samuel Vincent , oil-man , St. John-street-road . On the 13th of November, about nine o'clock, I missed a dozen and two odd brooms from under the window outside the shop - they were safe at five o'clock.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a patrol. On the 13th of November I saw the prisoner in Cow-cross, with two more, about eight o'clock, carrying a bundle of brooms, and the others behind him, with two loose ones. I stopped him, and asked where he got them. He said from a street just by, and was taking them to his master, Barker, of Saffron-hill. I went to Barker, returned, and told him Barker had sent him for none. He then said the man gave them to him to carry.

Prisoner's Defence. Two young men asked me to carry them.

JOHN BARKER . The prisoner was three months in my service. I did not send him for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-196

200. EDWARD KEENE was indicted for stealing on the 15th of November , three pint pots, value 3 s. the goods of John Gilbert .

JOHN GILBERT . I am a publican , and live in Berwick-street, Oxford-street . The prisoner was frequently at my house. The three pint pots here are mine.

HENRY STOELL . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's apartments, on the 17th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, in James-street, Manchester-square, and found three pint pots. He had been brought to the watch-house, He said he picked them up in different places in the street.

WILLIAM EALES . I went with Stoell, and found the pots. I am a publican, and had given him in charge in consequence of what passed at my house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18231203-197

201. DANIEL LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , a portable desk, value 18 s. , the goods of James Hearn .

JAMES HEARN . I live in Ryder's-court, Leicester-square , and keep a broker's shop . I did not miss this desk till the officer brought it to me - I do not know when it was safe. I had not sold it, because it is not scratched off my books.

PHILIP RILEY . I stopped the prisoner in Buckeridge-street, with this desk - he was running, and said he had bought it of a man in Oxford-street, for 3 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-198

202. RICHARD MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 6 lbs. of candles, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Purcell and Thomas Whitford Nicholls .

THOMAS WHITFORD NICHOLLS . I am in partnership with Thomas Purcell - we are wax and tallow-chandlers , and live at Battersea. On the 3d of December, between four and five o'clock, while I went into a shop in Long-acre , these candles were stolen from the cart; they were shewn to me immediately afterwards. I know them by the paper they are in, and they are made to a particular pattern.

CHARLES GREEN . I was crossing Drury-lane into Long-acre, and saw the prisoner take this parcel out of the cart, and go down Queen-street. I told Reardon, who took him. I saw him drop them.

DANIEL REARDON . I was with Green - he hallooed to me. I followed the prisoner down Queen-street; he dropped the parcel, and I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231203-199

203. TIMOTHY MURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 11 lbs. of lead, value 1 s., and a brass cock, value 18 d. , the goods of George Langridge Williams .

GEORGE LANGRIDGE WILLIAMS . I live in Norton-street . On the 24th of November, at night, this lead and cock were safe in the shop - I missed them next morning - the prisoner has worked three years for me.

DANIEL REARDON . On the 24th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with this pipe - I followed him down Crown-street, to a dealer in marine stores. I saw Griffiths, and told him - we crossed and secured him as he came out, and asked where he got the lead - he said, what was that to me - I said I should see - he then said it belonged to his master and he was taking it to Tower-street; he had it still with him; I asked if his master lived in Tower-street; he said no; in Norton-street; and afterwards said he picked it up by Middlesex Hospital.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I was watching this shop - Reardon beckoned to me; I laid hold of the prisoner with the pipe - he made a great resistance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18231203-200

204. HENRY PAPE , was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Frederick Jones , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-201

205. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 3 lbs. of glue, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Martin .

ROBERT MARTIN . I am an oilman . The prisoner came

to my shop, and said he came from Mr. Musgrove, and ordered some tea and sugar to be sent home, and said he would take 3 lbs. of glue with him. I let him have it, and sent the other things home.

THOMAS MUSGROVE . I never sent him for anything.

COURT. This is a fraud, but not felony. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231203-202

206. THOMAS NATHANIEL STEERS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of Benjamin Poole .

HARRIET DEAN . I live in Great Barlow-street , with my aunt, who washes for Benjamin Poole . On the 4th of December, about two o'clock, I hung his shirt out to dry, and about a quarter after five it was stolen. The prisoner lodged with his mother, in our house.

ANN TAPPER . I lodge in this house. On the 4th of December, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner cross the yard to the privy. He returned, went up stairs to his mother's room for five minutes. I then heard him come down again - he crossed the yard to the same place, stood with the door half open, peeping out. I was at the window, and saw him come out to the end of the yard, and snatch at this shirt - he got it off the line the second time. I ran across the room, intending to stop him, but being ill, I had not strength enough to get down, and he went out.

HENRY BUCKERIDE . On the 4th of December, about half-past six o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutor's house - he denied all knowledge of the shirt, but said he would make it up if they would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to tea - went into the yard - went up stairs - came down into the street very quick, without going into the yard. A person came and said the landlady wanted me - I went to her.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231203-203

207. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , seven spoons, value 10 s. the goods of Thomas Arewater .

ANN STEWARD . I am cook to Mr. Thomas Arewater , who lives in Hackney-grove . On the 4th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, I came down into the kitchen, and saw the prisoner going out of the kitchen - he was a stranger. I went to him, he asked if I wanted to buy scowering-paper? The area-gate was locked upon him - he came down to ask me to let him out, and by that time I had missed the spoons and a silver knife from the kitchen closet. I said he had been into the kitchen - he said he had not, and offered to strip himself. I told him to go into the kitchen; he then knelt down, and said if I would not send for an officer he would tell me where the property was; he took me to the coal-cellar, and shewed me an iron spoon and a desert knife - the rest are still missing.

JOHN GARVA . I received him in charge - he said he put the spoons among the coals.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231203-204

208. WILLIAM WEEKS , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , a teapot, value 18 d.; three saucers, value 3 d.; and a milk-jug, value 3 d. , the goods of Richard Snell and John Robins .

WILLIAM ESSEX . I am clerk to Richard Snell and John Robins , who are canal carriers . On the 29th of November, I found the prisoner in among a stack of crates, in the warehouse; he is servant to a gentleman, for whom we are agents; he was stooping down between the crates - I told him to get up, took him to the light, and found some of this crockery in his pocket, and the rest on the ground. A bar of one crate had been broken, and there was a vacancy in it, sufficient to hold these things.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer. I was fetched, and found three saucers and a cream jug in the prisoner's pockets. The tea put was by the crate.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them lying by the crate, and put them into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .


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