Old Bailey Proceedings, 22nd October 1823.
Reference Number: 18231022
Reference Number: f18231022-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 22d of OCTOBER, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; and John Atkins , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; John Crowder , Esq.; and John Key , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Howard ,

William Greve ,

William Holt ,

Tobias Mitchell ,

John Fletcher ,

William Moore ,

John Eddles ,

John Cooke , Jun.

Joseph Hanwell ,

William White ,

William Turner ,

Richard Cleobury .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Leonard ,

Edward Gower ,

Thomas Mason ,

Thomas Adams ,

John Cooper ,

John Parker ,

George Farr ,

Robert Hance ,

Charles Frederick Woolcott

Evan Davis ,

William Dover ,

William Mead .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

John Weale ,

Robert Grimwood ,

Benjamin Bishop ,

Henry Pinnock ,

Henry Pettifer ,

John Mullins ,

Stephen Knight ,

Samuel Harman ,

William Moore ,

Henry Pickford ,

Thomas Wells ,

Robert Vizer .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 22, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18231022-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Park.

1302. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for that he, on the 15th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone, in and upon Elizabeth, his wife , feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully did stab and cut her in and upon her head, left arm, and both her hands, with intent feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, of his malice aforethought to kill and murder her .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable her.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grevious bodily harm.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH SCOTT . On the 15th of September, I had been to Clerkenwell; the prisoner (who is my husband) had been discharged that day from Clerkenwell, upon his own recognizance, to keep the peace towards me. I lived in High-street, Portland-town, St. Mary-le-bone - I had not lived with him for three years, but he knew where I lived. I was going home, and at the top of Park-street, Regent's-park , I saw him in company with a young man; he was coming towards me - he came up, seized me by the throat, and put his arm round my neck, and pressed his thumb closely against my throat; he put his hand down again. I said,

"Scott, don't come near me, nor trouble me, I don't wish to bring you into any more trouble, go along" - he said,

"I can follow you as long as I like," and called me a wh - e. I asked the young man for protection, and if he could get me a constable; upon which he pushed Scott by the shoulder, and said,

"Go along Scott." I then left him, and crossed the top of Park-street, to an apple-stall, where a man, woman, and boy stood, and asked if the watch was set - the boy said it was not set till eight o'clock; (it was then about seven) I said I would stop there till the watch was set, and get a watchman to see me home. The prisoner came to me, put his left arm round my neck, and said something which I could not distinctly hear - he then said,

"I have not got a knife you know, but I will murder you on the spot;" I thought he was going to cut my throat from the position he was in, and put up my hand, and he began stabbing towards my throat - I received the stab in my hands; he had then got me off the pavement into the road. I screamed out Murder! as loud as I could, and when I got from him, I saw several people about.

Q. Did he cut your hands - A. Yes, and my left shoulder and arm. I screamed out Murder, and saw several men and women collected. I ran towards a man who stood with his face towards me, stood behind him, and put my arms round his waist, in order to keep him between me and Scott, and said,

"Oh! save me, he has stabbed me, and I am a dead woman." The man separated my hands, and pushed me away - I staggered along. Scott caught me again, put his arm round my neck, and again began to stab me over the left side of the temple. I put up my left hand, and caught hold of something in his hand, which felt like the ring part of a key; I held his hand for a minute - he got it away, and stabbed me behind the ear, on the right side, and then I received several stabs on my right hand, and one over my right breast - I got from him and attempted to run, but could not, and said to somebody,

"Pray take me to Mr. Lucas, the surgeon." I heard a voice say,

"Oh! stop him, he has stabbed me on the thumb." I was taken to the surgeon's; some of my wounds were slight - I had eight on my left hand, two on the left temple, one on the forehead, one at my right ear, two or three small ones at my right hand, and one over my right breast.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How long have you been married to him - A. Nineteen years; I lived sixteen years with him, but not on good terms. I know Sinclair - we never quarrelled on his account. I separated from the prisoner three years ago the middle of next winter, and never lived with him after. I had a child two years ago last September; it is now dead - the hospital books will prove when it was born. I should think the wounds were made with scissars; he is a tailor , and uses scissars.

Q. How long had you been alone when you met him - A. The last person I spoke to was Mr. Hart Davis, coachman; that was in Greek-street, Soho. Nobody was with me when the prisoner came in sight, nobody ran away. I live in a house which belongs to Sinclair; he is my cousin, and does not reside there, but took it in his name for me to live in.

Q. You say he said,

"I have not got a knife," did

he not say,

"I have not got a knife, or I would murder you" - A. No, he said,

"I have not got a knife you know, but I will murder you on the spot." I felt no pain at first, but felt the blood running down - I did not scuffle with him, except to get away. I put my hand to my throat, and thought I felt the ring part of a key in his hand - it might be scissars.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Sinclair is your cousin - A. Yes; he put me in the house to let it, for his profit, in order that Scott should not turn me out, and take the goods - they are there in his name, that Scott should not seize them.

COURT. Q. How long had he been in custody upon your charge - A. From the 24th of July; he was discharged on the 15th of September, a little after one o'clock. I had not been home before he attacked me. I am a laundress, and had been collecting my linen. I never said a word to him after he left the Court, till he came and attacked me - I had not seen him.

WILLIAM OWEN LUCAS . I am a surgeon, and live in Carlton-place, Regent's-park. The prosecutrix was brought to my house, about seven o'clock in the evening of the 15th of September - she was wounded in the forehead in several places, and had one wound on her temple, one on her left arm, and wounds on her left hand and fingers, and on her other hand. I perceived next day some trifling pricks of an instrument on her breast. I forgot to mention a wound on the side of the lower part of the right ear; it was an incised wound, and appeared to be inflicted by a narrow sharp pointed instrument - the wound on her forehead extended to the scull; that on the temple had divided the artery - one on the left arm had torn part of the muscle, and the others had divided the skin of several of the fingers, nothing more. None of the wounds except that on the temple were at all likely to produce death.

Q. Were they likely to do any considerable harm - A. One of those on the finger has injured the nerves, so that at this time she is not able to move them. Her wounds are now all healed.

Cross-examined. Q. The cut on the ear appeared to be inflicted with a narrow sharp instrument, was it such a wound as might be increased by her turning away, supposing a puncture was intended - A. Certainly, it might be; the extension of the wound was a greater injury than the puncture would have been. I think it was done with the violence of the man striking her, and tearing the instrument out, her moving away might extend it.

Q. When you say an artery was divided, you mean it was larcerated - A. I consider it so much divided that she might have bled to death if neglected; it was cut across; I did not examine the exact state of it, for I healed it by pressing it. The wound that penetrated to the scull was a very slight depth. I have ceased to attend her for the last fortnight or three weeks - I very soon healed them.

COURT. Q. One of the wounds might have produced death if it had not been stopped - A. Yes, my Lord.

THOMAS OLIVER . I keep livery-stables near Regent's-park. On the 15th of September, about seven o'clock I was in my yard, and heard screams, went out, and in the road saw a man and woman struggling in the foot-path; the woman extricated herself from him, and ran into the middle of the road - I thought her face appeared bloody; he attempted to follow her; I pushed forward, and prevented him, and as I put my hands upon him I received the point of something at the end of my thumb, and received a trifling wound. I collared him, and requested my man (Argust) who was behind, to take a knife from him, as I thought he had one - he took a pair of scissars from him, which were bloody.

THOMAS ARGUST . I am Oliver's servant, and took a pair of scissars from the prisoner, which I produce; they are bloody. I have had them ever since.

CATHERINE MERMOT . I live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town, and was present at the beginning of this affair, walking in the street - the prosecutrix was coming towards Portland-town; I first saw her opposite Park-place, and saw nobody with her - a man was with the prisoner. The prisoner and she were close together when I first saw her.

ELIZABETH SELIS . I was at the end of Park-street, and saw the prisoner and prosecutrix quarrelling. I heard him call her very bad names - she said,

"Never mind what I am, if I can get anybody I will give you in charge;" she got from him - he got away. A man laid hold of him, and wished him to go away with him; he got away, and said he would knock the man down. He pulled something from his waistcoat pocket. The woman had then got to the apple-stall.

THOMAS BLOOMER . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

Prisoner. I leave my case to my Counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix .

Reference Number: t18231022-2

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1303. RICHARD CORDWELL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Buckle , on the King's highway, on the 9th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 6 s., and a hat cover, value 1 s. , his property.

ROBERT BUCKLE . I am a gardener , and live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea. On the 9th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, and two doors below the Duke of York, public-house, I saw the prisoner coming along with a gang of six or seven; he separated from them, and knocked me down with his fist. My hat was then taken off, and he ran off. I called out when I recovered myself; I ran home, and applied at Queen-square next morning, and told the officer the prisoner's name - I had known him well for upwards of two years, and have not the least doubt of him - there was a lamp about forty yards off. He was taken that morning; I have seen him loitering about the streets, and heard him called by his name.

ISAAC DUTTON . I live in Royal Hospital-row, and work with the prosecutor. I was coming from Covent-garden, about twenty minutes before eleven o'clock, and as I came into Paternoster-row , saw Buckle knocked down, and his hat taken - the man who knocked him down ran away - I cannot say whether it was the prisoner, as I did not know him before. I saw him in custody next day. There were five or six of them; they went off in different directions.

JOHN WEALE . I am an officer of Queen-square, and

saw the prosecutor on the 10th of October, about twelve o'clock, and in consequence of what he said, I went to Chelsea after the prisoner, and told a person I wanted him - he afterwards came to the office, and said,

"Do you want me;" I said there was a charge against him for taking a man's hat, and detained him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1304. JOHN SCOTT and MARY SCOTT were indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Gardener , on the King's highway, on the 3d of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a pocket, value 2 d.; a half-crown, a shilling, two sixpences, a penny-piece, five halfpence, and two farthings , his property.

JOSEPH GARDENER . I am a cordwainer , and live at the Duke of York, public-house, Chelsea. On the 3d of October, about dusk, I was at another public-house; I do not know the sign - the prisoners were there; I asked them to shew me to the Duke of York, where I lodge. They took me the wrong road, into the Five-fields ; I said they were taking me wrong, and I should go no further - the man then caught hold of me by the collar, put his legs behind me, and threw me down; the woman stopped my mouth while the man knelt on me, and tore my pocket from my jacket. He said to the woman several times,

"You d - d h - h, give me the knife;" but I think he tore it off. I had 10 s. in that pocket at first, but a soldier put his hand into my pocket before that, and took some money out - I felt and found I had some money left. I felt, a half-crown there after the soldier robbed me. I fell asleep in the public-house, and they were in my company all the time. I had been at work with the man, at Lewis, near Maidstone. I counted my money before them, when I awoke; there was then three half-crowns, and 2 s. 6 d. in silver. They went away when they robbed me, leaving me crying Murder. The watchman brought them back.

JAMES QUICK . I am a watchman. I was coming up Eceleston-street, at twelve o'clock, at the corner by the Five-fields, and heard a terrible scream of Murder - I went towards the sound, and met the prisoners coming along, stopped them, and asked what was the matter - the man said there was nothing the matter with him; I insisted upon his stopping, and going to the man who was knocked down; he ran away, but I caught him, and took them to the prosecutor, who gave them in charge. The man was rather in liquor - I found the prosecutor's pocket on him, with a half-crown and 4 s. 10 d.; he said he had taken nothing more than that.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a watchman. I was about a hundred yards off, heard an alarm, and went up. Quick's account is correct.

CHARLES RICE . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house - the man pulled the pocket out of his own waistcoat pocket, and said I am guilty.

Prisoner JOHN SCOTT . I said I took it but not with intent to steal - Witness, He told the Magistrate so, but said to me,

"I am guilty of taking the man's pocket, but this is all that was in it."

JOHN SCOTT 'S Defence. I knew the prosecutor by working with him - we agreed to come to town, and in the road he fell down and fainted. I fell in with him a few days after, and we were drinking all day; he was locked out, and was going home with us, and fell down at different times, and pressed me to take his money, to take care of; we were both drunk. The last time he fell down, I put my hand to his pocket, which hung by two or three threads, and it came off. The watchman came up - I said I had not the money, not wishing to give it to him, and at the watch-house I said I took it, but not with intent to rob.

JOHN SCOTT - GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

MARY SCOTT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-4

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1305. WILLIAM KITSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Pitt , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, of the 17th of September , at St. Giles in the fields (the said Richard Pitt and others being therein) and stealing therein two watches, value 3 l.; a ring, value 5 s.; ten sovereigns, three crowns, twenty-six half-crowns, and fifty-nine shillings , his property.

RICHARD PITT . I live in Brownlow-street, Drury-lane , and am a dealer in metal . A single man lodges on my second floor, and one in the attic - there is a private door; both the lodgers and myself have the key of it. On the 17th of September, I went out at the private door three times within an hour before the robbery; my lodger was at home, and might have left the door open. About eleven o'clock, I was going to the first floor, and met the prisoner on the stairs, between the first and ground floors - I said nothing to him, thinking he might have come down from the lodger; his looks excited my suspicion. I ran up, saw my first floor door open, looked in, and saw my bookcase broken open, and cash gone - I ran down, out at the passage door, and saw him running seven or eight doors down the street; I followed, and on recovering my surprise called Stop thief - he was stopped in Belton-street; I only lost sight of him for an instant, as he turned the corner; I was ten or twelve yards from him - I did not see anything thrown away. I collared him when I came up, and said he must go with me - a crowd collected, who were disposed to rescue him, but I held him fast. A man stepped up, and offered his assistance - he helped me to take him to Bow-street, and in the way I saw him throwing the money about the street; he also threw a silver watch down, which I knew to be mine; a man in the crowd picked it up; it was delivered to Cousins, at Bow-street. At the office ten sovereigns, three crowns, and other silver, amounting to 16 l. 19 s. in all, a gold ring, and two silver watches were produced, all of which are mine, and were safe half an hour before I met him on the stairs.

WILLIAM COUSINS . I am a constable of Bow-street. The prisoner was brought to the office - I searched him, and found a bunch of keys upon him, some of them are skeletons. I saw a watch, a gold ring, ten sovereigns, two half-crowns, three crowns, and 36 s. 6 d. found on him; the other watch was delivered to me by a stranger, and twenty-four more half-crowns, and 5 s. 6 d. were given to me, which he had thrown away. I found another key on him. I went to Pitt's after the examination, and found a

chisel between the wall and book-case, which appeared broken open by an experienced hand with that chisel.

RICHARD PITT . The watch found on him is mine, and the other which was picked up; I know them well. I lost cash amounting to the sum produced, and in these coins.

Prisoner's Defence. The money belongs to myself. I received the watches from a person. Cousins said if the money was mine, I should not have it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

Reference Number: t18231022-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1306. WILLIAM LEDDINGTON and JOSEPH FARMER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Bull , widow , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, of the 7th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone (no person being therein) and stealing therein a bed, value 3 l.; a bolster, value 15 s.; three pillows, value 30 s.; eight blankets, value 5 l.; four counterpanes, value 6 l.; seventeen wine glasses, value 10 s.; five rummers, value 7 s.; a mustard glass, value 2 s.; a pepper glass, value 1 s., and a piece of baize, value 3 s. , her property.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

AGNES TOMLINS . I am employed by Mrs. Bull, to take care of a furnished house of hers, No. 54, Wellbeck-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - it had been let to a family, but at the time in question was empty. Mrs. Bull lives in Hollis-street, Cavendish-square. I sleep in this house whenever it is empty, and slept there on Sunday, the 7th of September. About a quarter to eleven o'clock, I left the house to go to church - I locked the area gate, and the housekeeper's room window was fastened down and the door locked - I doubled locked the street door; both doors were fastened. I returned a little before one o'clock, and found the street door open, also the housekeeper's room window, and the area gate open. I went up stairs, and missed a bed, bolster, pillow, three blankets, and a piece of calico from the drawing-room floor, and from the second floor front room two large pillows in white cases, and two blankets, and out of the drawers four clean counterpanes, and a blue and white curtain, and from the back room two blankets, and a piece of calico, and from the dining-room a piece of baize, seventeen wine glasses, five rummers, a pepper and mustard glass, and four cut salts, My own boxes, and another servant's were broken open and stripped. I had left nobody in the house. An old woman who lived there with me went to church before me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When would that woman return from church - A. She dined out, and did not return that day. Nobody but me had the key; she could not get in without my letting her in.

WILLIAM HOWARD . I know Farmer. On the 7th of September, near half-past ten o'clock, I saw him in Wellbeck-street, passing the end of Bentick-street, towards Cavendish-square - he was then alone. I saw him again, standing with Leddington, at the corner of Queen Ann-street, Wellbeck-street, by a shoemaker's shop; this was a few minutes after; they stood opposite the prosecutrix's house - I am sure of them both. I spoke to Farmer, and asked if he had got a situation or not. About the 16th of September, I saw them go into a public-house together, and gave information to Westcoat, but they were gone. I was with the officers next day, when they were apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. A servant out of place. I did not know Leddington before, but knew Farmer very well; they were both together when I spoke to him, but while I was talking, Leddington walked too and fro. I was five or ten minutes talking with Farmer, but did not speak to him. Leddington had corded breeches, dirty stockings, and a short jacket on.

Prisoner FARMER. Q. Where did you see me first - A. Crossing the end of Bentick-street.

Q. You get your living by swindling and playing bagatelle - A. No. I lived last with the Reverend Mr. Jeffries, of Barnes, and left him last January.

SUSANNAH LEWIEN . I saw the prisoner Leddington with another man, in Mary-le-bone-lane, at the corner of Bentick-mews, which leads into James-street, about twelve o'clock in the morning of the 7th of September; they had two very large bundles, tied in blankets. I thought he was a servant, moving bedding from one stable to another - I saw them go down the mews, and in the afternoon heard of this robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe the face of the man - A. No, I could not see his face. I observed his small clothes, shoes, and stockings - he has the same coloured clothes on to day.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to swear to him by his breeches - A. I did not see his face.

HARRIOT CUNLIN . I live at No. 25, James-street; Farmer lodged in the same house. On the 7th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, he came to his lodging - Bentick-mews has steps leading up to James-street. Another man came with him. I did not see either of their faces when they came, but Leddington is the man who came down stairs from the room about an hour after - he had knee breeches on; I did not see Farmer afterwards. When they came in they brought two large parcels, wrapped in blankets; they were large enough to contain beds, and went up stairs. Farmer's room is on the second floor - his wife lives there with him. The bundles were so large they concealed their faces.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Leddington anything on his head when he came down - A. He had a bundle on his shoulder, not so large as those which went up; I only saw him as I entered my room door, for a second or two. I saw that he wore breeches, but I had seen him come backwards and forwards to the house before, and knew his face, and saw his face when he came down; he is pock-marked.

COURT. Q. Are there any other lodgers up stairs - A. A man and his wife have the front attic, and a gentleman has the back attic.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You cannot say Leddington did not come from the attic - A. He always came to visit Farmer. I have seen them in company before.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. On the 10th of September, I searched Farmer's room - it was the second

floor back room, and found two wine glasses and three tumblers. I saw Stowell find a bed, bolster, two pillows, some blankets, and one or two counterpanes; all on the the bedstead. A piece of baize was also found,

HENRY STOWELL . I accompanied Hooker to this room, and found a bed, bolster, two pillows, three blankets, a quilt, and a green baize. While we were waiting there for Farmer, Leddington came into the room, and went out again. Nothing particular passed.

Cross-examined. Q. The persons in the house knew what you came about - A. They did. I do not think that Leddington knew me - his house was searched a week or ten days after this.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you tell the people of the house that you were coming to search - A. No. I was there two or three hours before Leddington came in; the people of the house knew what I came about, and might have informed him if they chose.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Farmer's wife in the room when you went to search - A. She was, and when Leddington came up; she did not tell him we were come to search. I would not allow her to leave the room. I did not suspect Leddington at that time.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am an officer, and know Leddington. On the 7th of September, he lodged in George-street, St. Giles. I went there on the 26th of September, and found a blanket, a counterpane, two pillows, fifteen wine glasses, three rummers, a pepper cruet, and a mustard pot. I took Farmer in consequence of information from Howard, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I took Leddington at his own house. Farmer's house had been searched before.

Cross-examined. Q. Farmer was taken first - A. Yes; Leddington was taken three hours after, standing at his own door.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went to Leddington's with Westcoat, whose account is correct.

SARAH BULL . I am a widow, and have a lease of this house, in Wellbeck-street, and entrusted the witness with the care of it; it is in St. Mary-le-bone parish. (Looks at the property found at Farmer's) they are all mine, and were made under my inspection. The bed is worth 13 l., and the bolster 15 s. - the wine glasses I believe to be mine by the pattern; the baize covered a table. The pillow and blanket found at Leddington's are fellows to those found at Farmer's, and here is another pillow. The fifteen wine glasses I also believe to be mine; I lost exactly seventeen. Here is eight blankets, and four quilts which are also mine,

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any mark on the glasses - A. No. I know the pillow found at Leddington's, by the work in it. I live in Holles-street, and never slept in this house - I let it out; I have had it twenty years, and pay the rent and taxes.

LEDDINGTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

FARMER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18231022-6

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1307. BENJAMIN DEATH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , a watch, value 2 l.; a watch chain, value 16 s., and two seals, value 10 s., the goods of William Graham , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GRAHAM . I live in Grenfield-street, Commercial-road , and am porter to a wine merchant. On the 3d of October, I went out about half-past eight o'clock, leaving my wife at home, and the watch on the mantleshelf. The prisoner was often at my house. About half-past four o'clock, in consequence of what my wife said, I went home, and looked for the prisoner, but did not find him for ten days; then found him at Woolwich, and asked him what he had done with what he took away from my house - I did not mention what; he said he would tell me when I was alone. We went into another room, and he said voluntarily that he had pawned the watch for 10 s., in Ratcliff-highway, and sold the chain in Tooley-street, and one seal in Oxford-street, and another seal and a key at another place. I went to different shops with him, and found the watch and chain - the other things were sold.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am apprentice to Mr. Cordery, a pawnbroker, of Ratcliff-highway. On the 3d of October, before dinner, this watch was pawned in the name of Evans - I have not the least doubt of the prisoner being the person, but cannot swear to him.

JOSEPH ROBERTS . My father is a jeweller. I have part of a gold chain, which I bought of the prisoner, on the 3d of October, for 16 s. - he first asked the value of it, and afterwards came and sold it, and said he found it in the dirt in Gracechurch-street.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-7

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1308. MATILDA THORN was indicted for that she, on the 15th of September , upon Peter Taylor , did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did strike and cut him, with intent of her malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be to disable or do him some grevious bodily harm.

PETER TAYLOR . I live with my father, in Castle-street, Poplar, and am in the service of Mr. Hutchinson, a cooper - the prisoner's husband was his clerk. On the 15th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, his wife, were at words, and my master sent me to see what it was about; they had just come from Lambeth-street. When I got to the door, the prisoner was looking out of window, and would not let her husband in, and was laughing at him; he sent me to fetch an officer - I could not find one, came back, and knocked at the door; Mrs. Smith opened it. I said,

"Is Mr. Thorn within" - he called out,

"Yes, Peter, come in;" I went in; Smith shut the door, and I got about half way along the passage, and the prisoner rushed out of the kitchen, and struck me on the head with a knife; it cut my head - she turned me out, and shut the door. I had my cap on. I put my hand up to my head, and found butter on it, and some blood, and went to the surgeon.

AMELIA SMITH . I was at the house, and went with the prisoner that morning to Lambeth-street - she and her husband were quarrelling. I let the boy in, but did not see her strike him, or notice any revenge or violence in her

manner. Her children were eating bread and butter. I cannot say whether she was cutting bread and butter at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-8

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1309. JOHN HYDEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Worman , about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 25th of September , at Edgware (no person in the same dwelling-house then being) and stealing therein four blankets, value 20 s.; three sheets, value 8 s.; a shirt, value 1 s.; a shift, value 6 d.; a gown, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s., and a quilt, value 3 s. , his property.

SARAH WORMAN . I am the wife of John Worman ; we live in Edgware parish, and keep cows . On the 25th of September, I went out about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, to carry milk, and left nobody in the house. I fastened the wash-house door with a staple and hasp, inside, locked the front door, and took the key - I returned about twenty minutes past nine o'clock, and found the door forced open with a wedge, as I suppose. I missed four blankets, three sheets, a shirt, a shift, a gown, two petticoats, and a quilt, and found the prisoner in the cage next morning, with them - he is a stranger.

JOHN BROWN . I am a labouring man. In consequence of information, I looked after the prisoner, and found him about a mile from the prosecutor's, sitting under a hedge, naked, putting on a shirt, which Worman claims. He had the other property in his possession, which I delivered to the prosecutrix.

SARAH WORMAN . I have kept the property ever since. Here is a blanket and counterpane - I have left the rest at home. The lowest value of the whole is 2 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on the road, and saw a man who overhauled my bundle, and said I was not the man, I might go on - then they followed me, and said I had robbed the house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18231022-9

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1310. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , in the dwelling-house of William Weaver , to whom she was servant , a watch, value 10 l. , his property.

AMELIA WEAVER . I am the wife of William Weaver - we live in the Edgware-road ; he is a revenue officer , and keeps the house. The prisoner was five weeks in my service. On Sunday, the 1st of September, I saw my husband lock his watch up in a chest of drawers in the front kitchen; it was a gold hunter. The prisoner left next day, and on Wednesday, about four o'clock, I missed the watch; she had called on Tuesday for her clothes, and was there on Wednesday, and said she had heard of a situation in Montague-square. I had left the keys in the drawers for three hours on Monday. She called again on Saturday, and was detained.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am shopman to Thomas Wadmore , a pawnbroker, of Tottenham Court-road. On Thursday, the 25th of September, about half-past one o'clock, the prisoner pawned this watch - she said it was for Mrs. Harrison, No. 49, Upper Thornaugh-street; she formerly lived servant with her. She asked 4 l. on it, which I gave her, and would have advanced 8 l., for it is worth 10 l. I am sure she is the woman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I unfortuneately engaged in this situation. The witness had a good character of me, from Bury-street, St. James. I found this a house of ill-fame, and told her I would have her severly punished for hiring me - she and three women came down and ill-treated me. I was obliged to lock myself up in my room all night, and left them next morning, called afterwards for my clothes, and on Wednesday called for 3 s. they owed me, and was taken into custody.

A letter was here read, which the prisoner had addressed to the prosecutrix - it contained the most revolting expressions, and desired her to produce four women upon the trial, who were in the house at the time the prisoner left.

AMELIA WEAVER re-examined. I have lived in the house eleven years, and pay 55 l. a year, rent - it is not a bad house. I am above fifty years old, and live with my husband. The prisoner's account is very false - I do not keep a bad house. Nobody lives there but a gentleman and lady, who I believe to be married; they are quite respectable people. I received a letter like the one read, about a week ago; I owed her nothing - I paid her on Monday. The persons named in the letter formerly lived with me; they are all quite respectable, and had nothing to do with this matter.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-10

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1311. BENJAMIN FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , five shillings, the monies of Dorcas lliff , his mistress .

DORCAS ILIFF . I am a baker , and live in Bishopsgate-street - the prisoner was five years in my service. On Monday, my servant gave me information, and I marked 20 s., in shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns, and put them into the till on Tuesday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, before business began; there was no other money there. At nine o'clock I looked in the till, and missed three shillings, and between eleven and twelve o'clock missed two more, and sent for an officer - he was searched in the parlour, but not in my presence. My marked money was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you married - A. I am a widow. My daughter and a young woman serve in the shop; but he never does - his business is to deliver bread, and bring home the money; he was very punctual in his accounts. My daughter was not in the shop that morning. I scratched some of the money with a pen knife, punched some with a gimblet, and marked some with the letter W.

ELIZABETH BILLING . I am servant to Mrs. Iliff. The prisoner never served behind the counter, and had no business there; he slept in the house, and was up all night. On Tuesday, about nine o'clock, when he was going out with the bread, he pulled me out of the corner; I saw him put his hand into the till, take something out, and put it into his bosom - I told my mistress of it; she was in the shop at the time; she looked into the till, and stood close by him - he came round, and took some bread

out of the window; but he should have asked me to hand it over the counter to him. He went out directly, and returned in half an hour. The constable was afterwards sent for. My mistress's daughter was in the parlour all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you and him good friends - A. Always. He took the money before my face; I said nothing to him, but thought it best to tell my mistress, and told her immediately. I had seen something done on Saturday, which I did not mention till Monday. I am her niece. Nobody else was charged with this - nobody was searched but the prisoner.

MRS. ILIFF. I examined the till after Billing told me, and missed 3 s., and two more between eleven and twelve o'clock, then called the prisoner into the parlour, and sent for an officer. Nobody but the prisoner was searched.

STEPHEN HALE . I am a tobacconist, and live next door to Mrs. Iliff - she fetched me about eleven o'clock, and I fetched the constable, and saw him search the prisoner in the parlour, and find 23 s. 6 d. in his trowsers pocket, and 2 s. in an inside waistcoat pocket, near his breast; one of them was marked; Mrs. Iliff claimed it; he said nothing to the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say it was a false charge - A. He did not; he had a flannel jacket, and a waistcoat with a breast inside pocket. I do not recollect whether both shillings were marked.

THOMAS SAPSWELL . I am a constable. I was fetched, and found the prisoner in the parlour, and told him he was charged with robbing the till; he made no answer. I found 2 s. 3 1/4 d. in his inside waistcoat pocket - Mrs. Iliff claimed them immediately, and said how they were marked - they were then in her sight. I searched a pair of his trowsers up stairs, and found a sovereign and three shillings; she claimed two of the shillings - he said nothing to it.

Cross-examined. Q. She told you how she marked the money - A. She said she could swear to the mark.

MRS. ILIFF. I can swear to two of the shillings found in his pocket - they are what I put into the till; two of those found in his trowsers are also marked, and mine.

Cross-examined. Q. One has a scratch across the head, is that your mark - A. Yes; another has a punch mark. I had marked them overnight.

JURY. Q. Had he an opportunity to go up and change his trowsers - A. He did not change them; he was at home an hour and a half, and could go up stairs; the men have a room to themselves. The till was locked, but the key left in it; the servant said he pulled her from the corner to get to it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-11

1312. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a paper box, value 8 d.; 7 lbs. of pork, value 3 s. 6 d.; a whittle, value 10 s.; three shifts, value 3 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; two muslin caps, value 6 d., and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am the Enfield errand carrier . On the 27th of September, my cart stood in Leadenhall-street - I stopped at the Bull inn, to deliver a message to the book-keeper. I went about three steps up the gateway, and on returning saw the prisoner standing on the foot-board, taking this box out - it contained the articles stated in the indictment. He jumped off, and ran away with it; I pursued, and stopped him with it in his hand. I had brought it from Enfield to Gracechurch-street.

JOHN PYFINCH . I received him in charge with the box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man stood by the cart with a whip in his hand, and his knee, bound up as if lame - he said if I would take that box, and deliver it in Bishopsgate-street he would pay me - this gentleman came and laid hold of me. I was so frightened I had not power to shew him the man.

JOHN PYFINCH . He said nothing of this sort till he got before the Lord Mayor.

JOHN SMITH . Nobody of that description was near.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-12

1313. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , at St. Michael-le-Quern, a handkerchief, value 4 d.; forty-two pairs of stockings, value 5 l., and eight night caps, value 4 s., the goods of William Bark , in the dwelling-house of Edward Gardner .

WILLIAM BARK . I am a hosier , and live at Leicester. On the 3d of October, I was on a visit at Mr. Edward Gardner 's, who keeps the Oxford Bible warehouse, in Paternoster-row . I had forty-two pair of Angola worsted and cotton stockings, worth 5 l., tied in a handkerchief, with eight night caps - they were all new. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was ill in bed at Mr. Gardner's - this parcel laid on a table in the hall. The prisoner was quite a stranger to me. I had not seen them some time, being confined to my bed - I was told they were gone, I saw them afterwards at Guildhall, and knew them all.

WILLIAM RICHARD THOMAS . I am servant to Mr. Edward Gardner . I saw these stockings a quarter of an hour before they were stolen - they were tied in a handkerchief, and put into a bag, and laid in the hall, up one pair of stairs; the prisoner was a stranger. I was in the warehouse on the ground floor, and saw a man pass through the passage, with a bundle - he went into the street; there is a door at the bottom of the stairs, leading from the warehouse; it was kept locked, and the key hung up by the latch; any one could take it down. I went to the door, which should have been locked, and found it wide open. I went into the street, and saw the prisoner about seven houses off, and another man with him - the prisoner had the bundle; I ran after him; they separated before I came up to him - they walked very fast. The prisoner went towards St. Paul's-church-yard; I never lost sight of him, and came up with him in Cannon-alley, and laid hold of him with the bundle, and asked where he was going with the parcel; he said he was going into the country; he had a riding whip in his hand. I said it was not his, and he must come back with me - he then said he had found it. I brought him back, went for a constable, and gave him in charge. I knew it to be the prosecutor's parcel.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I was the person who was in the house - A. No, for I was at a distance, and the candle between us. The man had the bundle in his right hand, and so had the prisoner when I took him.

BENJAMIN EASON . I am porter to Messrs. Suttaby and Co., Stationers'-court, and live in Boy-court, Ludgate-hill. On the 3d of October, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner passed me with the bundle, six or seven doors from Mr. Gardner's - there was another man with him. Thomas ran by me; I asked what was the matter; he said nothing. The two separated - the prisoner kept the bundle. I saw Thomas lay hold of him, and assisted in bringing him back. When we got him to the house, he said it was impossible he could have taken it, for that he had a horse waiting for him at the Saraceu's Head, Snow-hill - he was given in charge.

JOHN TONGUE . I am constable of Farringdon Ward. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Michael-le-Quern. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner - he said he picked it up. The prosecutor claimed the property before the Alderman.

WILLIAM BARK . They are mine, and are tied up now as before. I am certain of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I feel too sensible of my situation. I had been spending the day with friends at Islington, and on returning home, in Paternoster-row, I found a parcel on the pavement, and picked it up - I enquired of a man if he had dropped it, and going along the witness stopped me.

CHARLES LEE SINGLETON . I live at Ball's-pond, and am a wholesale jeweller - I live with my father. I do not know the prisoner, but I was passing along Paternoster-row, with my sister, about a fortnight ago, to go to the coach with my sister - the prisoner was walking before me, and turning round the corner of the court into St. Paul's-church-yard, I saw a large bundle; this gentleman stepped into the road and picked it up, and had not got many yards before a gentleman laid hold of him - he said

"Is it yours?" and he said,

"I think it belongs to Mr. Gardner." The man who took hold of the prisoner said so.

Q. Where was that - A. In Paternoster-row, by the corner of the court leading into St. Paul's-church-yard. My sister is at home, very poorly.

Q. Who was the young man who laid hold of him - A. I do not know, some working man it appeared to be.

Q. Was it the witness, Thomas - A. I do not recollect, indeed. I think he had a lighter jacket on; he was about the size of Eason; I cannot swear to him. The man took hold of him round the waist.

Q. Did you ask what it was for - A. No. I was passing with my sister, and heard him say,

"That is not yours," and I thought they might both be quibbling for the prize. The prisoner was about as far from me as I am from your Lordship, when the person laid hold of him.

Q. Was it in Paternoster-row - A. If I recollect he was turning into the court; I did not take particular notice. He was turning round, going into the alley; I cannot say whether he was in the alley. The bundle was similar to the one produced - it is very large.

Q. Then you stopped to know how this happened did not you - A. No, your Lordship: the young man came up; the prisoner said he would go back and see who the bundle belonged to.

Q. Now what you say is taken down, and I caution you, will you swear that the prisoner said he would go back and see to whom it belonged - A. He said he would go back with him. The man said it belonged to Mr. Gardner; he said

"I will go back with you, and see if it does."

Q. You swear that - A. Yes. My sister was with me at the time, laying hold of my arm.

Q. What followed then - A. Why, the young man went back. He was laid hold of by one on each arm I believe.

Q. Of course you enquired how this happened - A. Why, I did not think proper to leave my sister unprotected. I asked a person how it was, and he said the parcel was stolen.

Q. He said the parcel was stolen; of course then you told him, No, this man has not stolen it, for I saw him pick it up - A. I believe I did. I said I saw him pick it up.

Q. Upon your oath did you say you saw him pick it up - A. Yes, I did my Lord. I did not speak to the persons who laid hold of him. I spoke to a few persons who collected afterwards.

Q. You saw him pick it up, then he could not have stolen it - A. No.

Q. Did you tell the men who laid hold of him so - A. No; he was gone away. A few people came up, and some conversation ensued.

Q. You saw them take him away as the thief, why not tell them that you saw him pick it up - A. I thought they might be quibbling for the prize. A few people came up, and it was to one of them that I said so.

Q. Did you not say to the man, what business have you with it - A. I did not.

Q. You did not say he was not the thief, for you saw him pick it up - A. It did not occur to me.

Q. How came you not to tell them you knew he was not the thief, because you saw him pick it up - A. I cannot account for it. The two men came up, and they went off immediately. My sister lives in the same house as myself, at Ball's-pond, Glebe-terrace. I never saw the man before.

Q. Did you go to the house to see where they took him to - A. I asked afterwards, and understood he was sent for trial - I did not go into the house; I asked some porter at the door. I was passing down Paternoster-row last week, and the circumstance came to my recollection - I asked a man (who stood at a bookseller's door, near the passage) what became of that matter - he said the person was sent for trial. I did not go into the house.

Q. Why not go into the house, and state what you knew - A. I thought if I could be of service to the unfortunate man, I would come here and speak, and this morning I called at Giltspur-street Compter, and was told he was going to be tried.

Q. Then, till about a week ago, you did not know there was any charge of felony - A. Not till I called in Pater-noster-row.

Q. You did not suppose there was anything of theft in the case - A. No. I asked the porter at the bookseller's door, how the matter rested - I did not know the porter, and cannot tell the number of the shop; it did not concern me.

Q. Will you swear upon your oath, that you were near that man at the time he was stopped, and your sister with you - A. Yes, certainly. I was going to the coach with my sister.

Q. There were two men in this transaction - A. Only one came up; the prisoner was alone.

Q. Was he alone when you saw him pick it up - A. Yes; nobody was with him. Nobody separated from him at all.

Q. Then from the time you first saw him he had no companion - A. No. I first learnt that he was going to be tried last week; the man told me he was sent to gaol. I have not been subpoenaed here. I called at the Compter this morning, and they said he was gone to Newgate, and I went to Mr. Wontner, who gave me an order to see if he was the same person. I looked through a window, and saw that he was the same person. I swear positively that I never saw any person near the prisoner.

Q. You saw the two following him - A. One of them ran past me; they laid hold of him almost immediately.

RICHARD THOMAS re-examined. The men were both dressed much alike. I rather think the witness is like the other man; there was not a single soul in the street, but the prisoner's companion.

Q. Was there a young man with a woman on his arm near the spot - A. There was not.

BENJAMIN EASON re-examined. Q. Did you see the man who separated from the prisoner - A. Not to take particular notice of him. I did not see the witness with a lady near the prisoner. I saw no person at all near us.

Q. If there had been a young man, and a young lady with him, must you have seen him - A. I think I must. There was no such thing.

Q. Did the prisoner say he would go back and see whom it belonged to - A. Mr. Gardner's porter said,

"You must come back, for it does not belong to you;" I believe he said,

"I will go." There was no young man or woman near the spot. It took place in Cannon-alley, about half way down.

Q. Then at the time he was stopped was he just turning out of Paternoter-row into the alley - A. He had got about half way down.

JURY. Q. Was it possible for you to pass a gentleman and lady, close to the prisoner in Cannon-alley, without pushing them aside to take hold of the prisoner - A. There was nobody in the alley but Mr. Gardener's porter, me, and the prisoner; if there had been a lady and gentleman there, I think I could have passed them without pushing against them, but I could not help observing them - there were no such persons. He had got close to the public-house door.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18231022-13

1314. JEREMIAH HALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John William Bridges , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAM BRIDGES . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Broad-street. On Saturday last, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I was just by Holborn-bridge , going into the City, with a silk handkerchief in my pocket. A gentleman called to me, and shewed me my handkerchief - he had the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a broker, and live in North-street, Finsbury. I was on Holborn-bridge, and saw the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Bridges's pocket, take a handkerchief out, and put it into his breast - I seized him, and called Mr. Bridges. He threw it down while I turned round. I picked it up.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I took him in charge, with the handkerchief

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and saw the handkerchief laying down, went to pick it up, and this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-14

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1315. JOHN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a yard of woollen cloth, value 7 s., a yard and a half of flannel, value 3 s., the goods of Matthias Matthewson ; a yard of woollen cloth, value 7 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of Matthias Anderson .

MICHAEL SMITH . I am a linen-draper. On the 18th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prosecutors came to my shop - I sold them some things; one of them had a bundle; they were about half an hour in the shop. The prisoner came in, and looked at some calico, which he said would not suit him. I was attending to some customers, and saw the prisoner take the prosecutors' bundle off the counter, and run off with it - he was followed immediately. I lost sight of him, and saw him again ten minutes after with the bundle.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the corner of Dock-street, in Well-street, about three hundred yards from this shop; he was running, and some sailors were following him - they produced the bundle, and said he had stolen it - he denied it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Some people said you were mistaken in the man - A. No; he was the first who was running; it was open day-light.

MATTHIAS MATTHEWSON . (Through an Intrepreter.) I am a sailor. I was in Smith's shop with a bundle; Anderson was with me. I put the bundle on the counter. I saw the prisoner in the shop - Smith said he had taken it; I pursued, and took it from under his coat. The constable took him about ten minutes after. The people were calling Stop thief.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see anything but his back - A. He ran out with it. I am sure he is the man.

MATTHIAS ANDERSON . I was in the shop with Matthewson - he had a bundle; my waistcoat and handkerchief were in it. I did not see it taken; but heard it was gone, ran out, and found it on the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-15

1316. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the

11th of October , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of John Watson , from his person .

JOHN WATSON . I live in Lincolnshire. On the 11th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was opposite St. Giles's church , going towards Oxford-street, and felt my silk handkerchief taken out of my outside coat pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner, who set off running, and I after him. I lost sight of him for two or three minutes, and before he was stopped saw him drop the handkerchief - he was alone. It was given to the constable, who returned it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD WARD . I was servant to a grocer, but am out of place. I was walking with Mr. Watson, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from his pocket - I followed him, and saw him drop it; he ran through a public-house - I pursued, and never lost sight of him. An officer came up, and took him.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-16

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1317. JOHN BEST was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , three ear-drops, value 1 s.; a purse, value 6 d.; four sovereigns, four crowns, two half-crowns, and nine shillings, the property of William Barry , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH BARRY . I am the wife of William Barry , a hair-dresser , who rents a house in Rosemary-lane . On the 11th of July, I hired the prisoner for a fortnight, at 10 s. per week, and his board, as my husband was from home for that time; he was with me from Friday until Tuesday, the 15th. He had no money on Tuesday, for I lent him 6 d., and that afternoon he asked me to go to the grinders, for some razors, which were there, as he could not do without them - I went, leaving him in care of the place. I was gone about two hours, as I stopped out of the rain - when I returned, the shop door was fastened; I went in at the side door, and he was gone. I missed this property, which was in a brown silk purse, in a small box, in the first floor room, in which I had left the key, but I locked the room door, and put the key into the kitchen closet. He heard me tell my son that morning, that I had not paid my rent, as my landlord was out of town, and that I had the money in the house ready for him. He never returned for his few days' wages, nor for a neck handkerchief and waistcoat, which he has left there. I never saw him again until he was in custody. I went to his lodgings, but could not find him.

Prisoner. Q. You have lodgers - A. Yes; two honest people.

JOHN NASH . I am a hair-dresser. I saw the prisoner at the Red Cap, public-house, at Holloway, on Wednesday, 16th July, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. I had known him for two years; he gave a boy a penny to fetch me to drink with them; he changed a half crown to give the boy the penny, and then another to pay for drink; he was tossing with the hostler, and lost a pint of gin, which came to 1 s. 6 d. and changed a sovereign to pay for that and for some bread and cheese and for his bed, as he had slept there the night before. I saw more sovereigns in his hand - a few words occured, and he threw down a sovereign, and wanted to fight me for it - I refused. I heard of this robbery a day or two after, and apprehended him in Chandos-street.

Q. Have you had any previous quarrel with him - A. About fourteen months ago, about his robbing my mother-in-law. I did not see him after that till he sent for me to the Red Cap. I told him he must have robbed somebody of that money; he said his master was dead.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my place, it being a very low neighbourhood. I did not like to work there, on account of my character. I never saw the money, I always had money of my own; the prosecutrix was always pressing me to drink gin - she drinks four or five glasses a day. I never saw twenty shillings in the house.

SARAH BARRY . I do not drink gin. I always gave him a glass, when he came early in the morning, and about eleven o'clock always asked if he would have beer or gin.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-17

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1318. JOHN ALDRED FALCONER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , a pair of bracelets, value 5 l.; a buckle, value 2 l., and an eye-glass, value 10 s., the goods of Maria Brown , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Brown .

ELIZABETH BROWN . I live in Princes-street, Westminster , in a house belonging to a Mr. Garnur. My sister and I occupy the first floor and kitchen - we are both single, and work at tambour work. I have known the prisoner about twelve months - he visited at our lodgings. The last time he was there was on the 5th of September. I was alone in the room - he was with me about an hour. The property stated in the indictment laid on the table in a box. I took them out of the box to shew him, and afterwards went out of the room, leaving him there. I was absent about half an hour; the servant saw him going out and called me up - he said he would call again and see me on the next day or on Monday. About ten minutes after I looked into the box, and found the property gone. I went into the City next day with my sister, and met him in Cheapside, and walked with him as far as Tyburn-turnpike; he went into a house in St. George's-terrace (as he said) to dinner, and said he would be out in an hour, and if we would wait, he would come to us. We waited some time - he did not come out, and we sent two officers in, who apprehended him. I have understood since, that he only took them in a joke. I have visited him twice since he has been in custody - I saw him in Newgate three days ago.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. At the time he left the house, he spoke to you - A. Yes; we met him next day, and talked with him. I am not sure whether the hour had elapsed when I sent the officers into the house - it was a private house - we were on very friendly terms. I know one Marisco, a Polish gentleman, my sister was once on the point of marrying him.

COURT. Q. How long were you in the prisoner's company before he went into this house - A. We walked from Cheapside, and talked about the trinkets - he said he had not taken them - he allowed us to see where he went.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I did not see the prisoner till after he was taken into custody, which was on

Saturday, the 6th of September. I told him I was sorry to see a young man of his appearance charged with such an offence, and I must search him. He said it was a conspiracy to extort money from him - he was charged with stealing jewels from the prosecutrix. I searched him, and found nothing on him; he was remanded in consequence of the evidence of the two witnesses, and another who has not since appeared, and at his re-examination, I said

"One of those ladies has told me you gave her a duplicate of part of the property;" he said it was not part of the property the ladies complained of. I said it was very foolish of him, if he had done so; he then said,

"You will find the rest at my lodgings." I asked what he meant by the rest; he said

"You will find an eye-glass and buckle between the mattress and bed." I went, but found nothing of the sort, returned, and said

"I must search you again; you had better not deceive me any longer," and while searching him, I said the women would not prosecute him if they got the property back; he said,

"Well, I will deceive you no longer," and produced the eye-glass, and said he really did not know where the rest was.

MARIA BROWN . I live with my sister. I have seen the prisoner before, where we lived before, but not in Princes-street - we have been there five months. I have known him about twelve months. I missed these trinkets about a quarter of an hour after he left the house, and saw him next day in Fleet-street, and walked with him to St. George's-terrace - we told him he had taken the trinkets. The eye-glass produced is mine, and was in my box on the day it was missed - it had a steel chain to it then, there is now a ribbon - I am sure it is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not been married - A. No. I have seen one Mr. Maresco - he is now abroad. I never married him. When we met the prisoner, he did not attempt to leave us - he visited my sister on a friendly footing.

The prisoner received a most excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-18

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1319. JOHN HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , in the dwelling-house of Mary Sutherland and William Annadale , to whom he was servant , a sugar-bason, value 2 l.; a milk ewer, value 1 l.; two table-spoons, value 1 l.; six rings, value 2 l., and two cups, value 10 s. the goods of the said Mary Sutherland , and one ring, value 1 l. , the goods of William Annadale .

WILLIAM ANNADALE . I am a surgeon , and live in Queen Street, Westminster - it is Mary Sutherland 's house, but I pay part of the rent - she has a share in my business; an allowance is made out of the business for the rent of the shop, we both live in the house, she pays the taxes - it is her freehold. The prisoner was servant in the shop and waited at table. On the 1st of October, in consequence of information, I missed a silver sugar-bason, worth rather less than 2 l., and other articles as stated in the indictment - he had been about three months in my service. Mrs. Sutherland had been visiting at Brompton for four or five months, but had not deserted the house; she had the key of the cupboard in which the plate was kept; only the spoons were in use.

JAMES KILLICK . I am shopman to Mrs. Rochford, Jermyn-street, St. James's. I have known the prisoner about two years. On the 14th of July, he pawned a mourning ring, in the name of Doherty, for 12 s. - he had often pawned for that person. On the 3d of August, he pawned another mourning ring, for 12 s. On the 15th of September, he pawned another, for 5 s.; on the 2d of September, a sugar-bason; on the 27th, a table-spoon for 8 s., and a milk-pot for 1 l. 13 s., and on the 9th, another spoon, all in one name. Mr. Annadale attended my family, and on the 27th, I went to his house, and thought I saw the prisoner there. On the 29th he came again; I asked if I had not seen him in a doctor's shop in Westminster; he said, No. On the following Wednesday, I gave information to the prosecutor. He came on the 30th to pawn four rings, and I detained him, and asked where he brought them from; he said from Mr. Doherty. I said they were stolen from Mr. Annadale, whom he denied knowing. I took him there in a coach, and in the coach he threw away the duplicates I had given him for the goods, and two keys, which I have since delivered to the prosecutor.

MR. ANNADALE. One of these keys opens my sideboard drawer. I have been in the habit of seeing the property for years past, and know it to be Mrs. Sutherland's. The prisoner came to my service from Mr. Doberty.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-19

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1320. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Thomas , about the hour of two in the night of the 20th of October , at St. James, Clerkenwell, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein three silver spoons, value 6 s. , her property.

ANN THOMAS . I live in Exmouth-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell ; my father-in-law and mother live with me - but I rent the house.

CHARLES HURLEY . The prosecutrix is my sister-in-law. I slept at the house on the night of the 20th of October, and went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock - the servant was the last person up.

MARY REARDON . I am servant to the prosecutrix. On the night of the 20th of October, I went to bed after one o'clock, and was the last person up. I forgot to bar the wash-house shutters. I was disturbed about two o'clock by the watchman. I got up, and went into the wash-house, and found the window-sash thrown up. I am sure I had left it shut - it is a glazed window - the shutters are inside. I had closed them, but not barred them, and the sash was quite closed. I found nothing broken - I missed three silver salt spoons.

GEORGE HARPER . I am a watchman. The prosecutrix's house is on my beat. I went round at two o'clock, and found every house safe. I returned to my box in twenty minutes, hung up my lanthorn, looked up Easton-street, and saw two men opposite the prosecutrixes house - they crossed over to the iron railing of the house. I walked up the street, they went away, and turned round Wood-street, within one door of the house. I looked, and saw the wash-house window open. I called a watchman from Easton-street, and left him to watch while I knocked at the

door four or five times, and sprung my rattle. Hurley came out on the balcony undressed; five or six watchmen came up, two of them went in at the window. Hurley let me in, and we found a quantity of house-breaking implements in the front parlour, and a pair of shoes, matches. tinder-box, and dark lanthorn; and as I was going to call five o'clock, I saw a young man who said I was called for by somebody in Exmouth-street. I ran there, and Bellamy said the robbers were in his cellar. We found the prisoner in the coal cellar, which is three doors from the prosecutrix's house - he was sitting down in a corner, without any shoes on. I took him to the watch-house, and tried the left foot shoe on him - it fitted him exactly; he said he did not know how he came there. He could have got into this cellar by getting out of the back door of Thomas's house, and getting over two walls. I have found none of the property - his hands were black with coal dirt.

BENJAMIN BELLAMY . I live two doors from Thomas's. I was alarmed about three o'clock, and was present afterwards, when the prisoner was found in the cellar of a house belonging to me, which I let to another person; he had no shoes. I saw a pair of right and left shoes tried on him at the watch-house; they fitted him. There is a wall in Thomas's yard, not four feet high on her side - he could get over there on to a water but, and into my yard. At day-light I found under that wall a crow-bar and a glove, which corresponds with one found in the prisoner's hat.

CHARLES HURLEY re-examined. I was present when the prisoner was taken, and found the house-breaking implements on the table. I saw the salt spoons on the sideboard the evening before.

ANN THOMAS . I left the salt spoons on the sideboard at night - they were gone in the morning, and have not been found.

THOMAS GARNER . I am a watch-house keeper. Hurley delivered the implements to me; they are five skeleton keys, a small crow-bar, lanthorn, and phosphorus box. I saw the shoes fitted on the prisoner - they fitted exactly.

MICHAEL TAYLOR . I am a watchman. I assisted Harper in making the search; his account is correct. When I got to the house, Hurley was on the balcony. The prisoner was at last found in Bellamy's cellar.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house. Bellamy gave me a crow-bar and glove. I found the fellow glove in the prisoner's hat, which was on his head; I found the cork of a phosphorus bottle in the house; it fits the phosphorus bottle. I tried the crow-bar to a secretary in the house, which had been broken open - it fitted it.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found two matches on him, which correspond with the matches in the phosphorus box.

Prisoner's Defence. I was extremely intoxicated on the night in question, but am wholly innocent of the robbery - as to the matches, they are only pieces of wood, which I use to light my pipe; the shoes do not belong to me. I live down in a kitchen at Battle-bridge, and suppose, in my intoxicated state, I must have got into this cellar.

BENJAMIN BELLAMY . He was not in the least intoxicated.

GEORGE HARPER . He was perfectly sober. When I got to the prosecutrix's house, the back door was open; a person could then get over the wall into this cellar; the feet of his stockings were very dirty with coal-dust, but not muddy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18231022-20

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1321. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a book, value 6 s. , the goods of John Wilton .

JOHN WILTON . I am a bookseller , and live in Gray's Inn-passage . On the 20th of September, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a book off my stall-board; it was Boyer's French and English Dictionary. I went after him - he began to run, and when he got about fifty yards he dropped it. I called out Stop thief! and picked it up. He was gone some distance - several pursued. I lost sight of him, but am certain of him - he was brought back, and said,

"You know me, Mr. Wilton, my name is William Bland ; you had me transported before, and I have done this out of revenge" - I immediately said,

"I do know you, and am sorry you should have come back again." He had been sent to the Penitentiary, about May, 1819.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Might he not have said,

"I am not likely to have done this, when I have been transported before" - A. No. I did not notice his face - it was done in broad day-light. I stood at the door at the time, and he at the other end of the window. There were three persons looking at books.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner running, and secured him. Mr. Wilton gave me the book - he said he had stolen it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is true, I have been sentenced to transportation by the same prosecutor - I was sent to the Penitentiary, and after four years restored to society; since which I have been employed as writer, to Messrs. Marshall and Co., of Carey-street, and had on this day got into the service of Mr. Russell, of Long-acre, and was about his business at the time. Is it likely I should again go to the shop, when I had been imprisoned so long for a former transaction? Without giving himself time to think whether I was the person, he concluded that I was. Any one dressed the same as me might be taken.

JAMES COLLINS re-examined. He said Wilton had transported him before, and he supposed he wished to do so again. I asked Wilton what he had done, as I only took him because he was the first who was running - he said,

"I suppose you mean to transport me again." I did not hear him say he had done it out of revenge; he might have said so. I was present all the time, close to him, but took very little notice of the conversation.

MR. WILTON. I cannot say that he took the book, only from his own words. I believe he was discharged from the Penitentiary three weeks before this transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-21

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1322. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , thirty yards of sail-cloth, value 30 s. , the goods of William Gregory .

ROBERT HARRIS . I am in the service of William Gregory , who lives in High Holborn. On the 13th of October, I was serving in the shop, and saw the prisoner crossing Southampton-street , with this piece of sail-cloth, about thirty yards from our shop - I stopped him immediately with it, and brought him back. He said,

"Pray let me go, I'll never do so again." I had seen it safe in the shop, within a week before.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You did not catch sight of him till you came up to him - A. I had seen him go out at the door, and ran out, and caught him with it.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I was in the shop. Harris ran out, and came back with the prisoner and goods in two or three minutes. When he was brought back, he begged us to pardon him, and let him go. I gave charge of him. It was kept in the window; a person at the door could reach it by coming two or three yards into the shop.

GEORGE STIRLING . I received him in charge, and heard him ask for forgiveness. He said he would never do the like again, for he was going to sea in a day or two.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he under alarm at the time - A. Very much so.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-22

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1323. JONATHAN COHARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Chandler .

JAMES YOUNG . I live in the Borough. On the afternoon of the 18th of September, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Cock-hill, Ratcliff , looking through Mr. Chandler's shop window, with two more. I saw the prisoner go into the shop, and take a pair of shoes out of the window. I followed him; he ran off, and threw them down - I took him - one Rogers picked them up, and gave them to the officer - he laid down, and refused to go back - I carried him some distance, he then said he would walk.

MARY CHANDLER . I am the wife of William Chandler . I was in the room behind the shop, and heard a man halloo out Stop thief! I went into the court, and saw Rogers pick up a pair of shoes, which laid at the shop door; he gave them to me. Rogers marked them. The prisoner was brought back in a quarter of an hour; he said he hoped I would forgive him - that his mother was a widow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Confined One Week and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231022-23

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1324. THOMAS RUTHERFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 14 lbs. of brass, value 9 s. , the goods of Charles Hawkes .

JAMES FAGG . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner go into a shop in Clerkenwell, on the 7th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening, and put a large piece of brass into the seale. I went into the shop, and he was putting another piece out of his pocket. I asked where he got it; he said, at last, from a house close by, and that it was his master's, who lived in Long-acre. I took him towards there, and he said,

"I may as well tell you the truth, my master is Hawkes, of Drury-lane," and he dropped another piece going along. I went to his lodging, and found more brass in his box.

CHARLES HAWKES . I am a brass-founder , and live in Drury-lane. The prisoner was my apprentice - his time expired in July, but he remained in my service. I have the mould here which this brass was cast in, I never sell it in this state.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The things found at his lodgings may have been given him by you - A. They may. I placed great confidence in him.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18231022-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1325. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , two gowns, value 5 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; a scarf, value 1 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; and an iron, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Willey , widow.

MARY WILLEY . I am a widow , and live in Woodstock-street . The prisoner lodged, and slept in the same bed with me. On the 18th of September, about seven o'clock, I went out to work, leaving her in bed - I came back a little past eight o'clock, and missed these things from under my bed.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am shopman to James Giddons , a pawnbroker, of Lisson-green. I produce a gown, pawned on the 18th of September, in the name of Ann Smith , in Charles-street - I do not know who by, but do not think it was the prisoner, as the person appeared about thirty years old.

WILLIAM GRAHAM . I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown, petticoat, shift, and an old silk scarf, pawned by the prisoner, between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of the 18th of September, for 2 s. I am sure she is the woman - she pawned them in two lots, in the names of Wood and Green.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. I apprehended her on the 19th of September - she confessed taking the property, and said the gown was pawned at Giddon's, and the rest at Graham's, and that she had destroyed the duplicates.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-25

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1326. WILLIAM WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 lbs. of copper, value 1 s.; a file, value 1 s., and a hammer, value 1 s. , the goods of John Braithwaite .

CHARLES LEE . I am foreman to John Braithwaite , engineer - the prisoner was in his service on the 8th of October. On that day, he asked leave of absence for a day or two; I gave it him. As he went out, I suspected, and followed him, and charged him with having a piece of copper about him - he begged me to take it, and let him go like a vagabond as he was. I took him back to the

counting-house; and fetched a constable, but when I returned he had produced the copper - I knew it to be my master's. A new file was found on him, which I knew to be ours. He had been two or three years in my master's service, and had from 18 s. to 26 s. per week.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the file up. I wish to express my sorrow for the offence.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-26

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1327. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two silver spoons, value 10 s. , the goods of Ann Glover .

ANN GLOVER . On the 9th of October, I employed the prisoner to take a box to the coach office - it was not quite ready when he came, and I told him to wait in the kitchen. I missed two tea spoons off the tea tray, in the kitchen, soon after he was gone.

ISAAC LYONS . I am a jeweller, and live in High-street, St. Giles's. A boy brought two spoons into my shop, and offered them for sale - on my questioning him, he pointed to the prisoner, as having sent him with them. I asked him where he got them - he said a man at the corner of Oxford-street gave them him to sell.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did take them.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18231022-27

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1328. JAMES GREGORY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Rice Davis , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 3d of October , at St. Giles without Cripplegate ( Mary Ann Davis and others being therein,) and stealing therein a pair of boots, value 1 l.; a great coat, value 30 s.; two sheets, value 10 s., and a night cap, value 1 s. , the goods of the said Rice Davis.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

RICE DAVIS. I rent a house in King's Arms-yard, Whitecross-street, in the parish of St. Giles Cripplegate Without , and am a milkman . On the 3d of October, I went out about half-past two o'clock, and left my cow man, Mary Ann Davis , and another person in the house - I returned at half-past three o'clock, and found the wall on one side of the back bed-room door broken one foot square, to enable a man to put his hand through, and undo the bolt, and get in. The prisoner was in custody. I found the sheets tied in a handkerchief at the foot of the bed; and in a hole which was made in the hay loft, I found a pair of boots and a great coat of mine; he had left a pair of shoes and his own hat behind there. The prisoner had been in my service for thirteen months, and knew the way of the house, and knew I was always out at that time. My things are worth more than 30 s.

COURT. Q. Would the hole enable a person in the hay loft to get into the room - A. Yes. My wife went out before me. My daughter Mary Ann is eleven years old.

CHARLES JARRATT . I am a waiter at the Grapes, public-house, Whitecross-street, opposite Davis's. In consequence of information, about four minutes after three o'clock, I went over, and found the prisoner in the bedroom, adjoining the hay loft - he had a red night cap on; I watched him some time, and saw him pulling the sheets off the bed. I then went in and brought him out, and took him into the loft - he had neither shoes nor hat on; he asked leave to get them from among the hay, and did so. I looked into the hole in the middle of the hay, where they were, and found a great coat and boots. There was a hole broken through the lath and plaister wall, from the loft into the bed-room, so that the door could be unbolted. Davis's daughter and a person were in the house. The room is part of the dwelling-house.

JAMES KEMP . I came in after Jarratt, and found the prisoner at the top of the loft stairs, searched him, and found a knife and three duplicates on him. The clothes were delivered to me.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in Kemp's custody in the loft, and found a great coat concealed amongst some trusses of hay, and on looking further I found a large hole broken through the wall, which is about five inches thick; a hand could then reach the bolt. I went to the other bed-room, and found the pannels of that door split to pieces, the beading cut down, and the pannels pushed in, so that a hand could undo that door also - it must have been done with a knife. The prosecutor's house is in the City.

RICE DAVIS. The property is all mine, and was safe when I went out - the handkerchief they are tied in is not mine. The boots were in a bag, which does not belong to me. They are worth 3 l. 1 s.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18231022-28

1329. HENRY POND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , a shirt, value 3 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; two pairs of stockings, value 2 s., and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of James Swift .

JAMES SWIFT . I lodge in King-street, Cow-lane, Smithfield . The prisoner slept with me for three nights, in the front garret - three more men slept in the same room. On the 10th of October, Sunday, I went to bed at ten o'clock; he came to bed about the same time. I got up about day-light; these things were then on the table. I left him in the room, with some more of the lodgers, returned on Tuesday, and my things were all gone, and he had left - he was apprehended with my shirt and shoes on.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the Thursday, and afterwards heard of this robbery. I went to a coffee-shop in Drury-lane, and found a box belonging to him; he claimed it, and gave me the key, but it was not locked. I found two pairs of stockings, and the duplicates of a shirt and a pair of trowsers. Swift claimed the shirt and shoes he had on.

ROBERT JONES . I lodge at the same house. The prisoner left the house at nine o'clock on Tuesday morning, before Swift returned. I met him on Thursday, in Holborn, and told him Swift's clothes were stolen; he said he knew nothing of it. I gave charge of him.

CHARLES PAYNE . I am apprentice to Mr. Reeves, of Snow-hill. On the 13th of October, a shirt was pawned in the name of Pond - I cannot say who by, but the prisoner

has often pawned things, and nobody but him pawns in that name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231022-29

1330. JOHN JOSEPH and SAMUEL CUMBER were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a milk jug, value 20 s., the goods of Sophia Bull and Mary Bull , privately in their shop .

MARY BULL . I am in partnership with my mother, Sophia Bull , who is a widow - we keep a silversmith's shop , in Leadenhall-street . On Saturday morning last, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop; I was called down to them; Cumber asked to see a watch key; I sent up for my keys. Two silver jugs were on the counter, full of milk, and while I was serving them, I saw milk running out of Joseph's cap - I said that was a strange place to carry milk; he ran out immediately, and I laid hold of Cumber - the servant followed Joseph, who was brought back with it. Cumber was at the door, going out, when I laid hold of him; I had not shewn him the watch-key.

JOSEPH ANDERSON . I am a blacksmith. I was coming along St. Mary-axe, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Joseph running up Brown's-building - I ran round another place, met and stopped him; he dropped the milk jug, which I picked up, and took him to the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CUMBER'S Defence. I went in to buy a key - this boy came in after me; I know nothing of him.

JOSEPH. I know nothing of this lad.

JOSEPH - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

CUMBER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-30

1331. EDWARD DORMEDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a bundle of paper (called small-hand), containing forty quires, value 5 s. , the goods of Samuel Davis .

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a tallow-chandler . On the 27th of September, I missed this bundle of paper from a loft at the top of my house; I never saw the prisoner in the house - he was brought to me by Page. I frequently heard a noise over my head at night, but never thought the loft was being robbed.

JOSEPH PAGE . I am a constable of Cripplegate. On the 27th of September, Gibbs sent for me, and said,

"This boy, who only came out of prison yesterday, has been robbing again;" he gave charge of him - this was in his mother's room. I went into the garret with him, and saw this paper strewed about the room, and asked where he got it; he pointed to the window, and said,

"I got it from the top of the house." Davis lives five doors from Gibbs's, where the prisoner's father lodges. He said he got out of Gibbs's window, and got the paper off the top of the houses. I got on the roof; he followed me, and pointing to Davis's loft, said,

"I got it out of that loft."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years. For the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18231022-31

1332. JOHN FRANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , from the person of William Sanders , a pocket-book, value 6 d.; a banker's draft, for payment of and value 8 l. 8 s., and a 5 l. Bank note , his property.

WILLIAM SANDERS . I live in Tower-street, and am clerk to Mr. Bowring. On the 17th of October, my pocket-book, containing a 5 l. note and a cheque for 8 l. 8 s., was in my outside coat pocket, between twelve and one o'clock - I was at the corner of Rood-lane and Fenchurch-street; just as I got to the top of Rood-lane , I thought I felt a man's hand in my pocket, turned round, and the prisoner's hand was close to my coat; nobody but him was near; he crossed over the way, and then I seized him, and said I thought he had something belonging to me, which he denied - (the pocket-book was found under a gateway, where I first laid hold of him;) I asked him to go with me to a constable, who lived close by, and on the way, he broke from me, and ran off. I lost sight of him for a short time - I called Stop thief! and he was secured. Nobody but him was within reach of me.

JURY. Q. Was it found where you seized him, or where you felt his hand in your pocket - A. Where I seized him, after he had crossed.

MR. ANDREW STROTHER . I am a wine-merchant, and live in Fenchurch-street. On the 17th of October, I found this pocket-book under the gateway, leading to our counting-house, opposite Rood-lane. I shewed Mr. Sanders the spot. It contained a draft for eight guineas, and a 5 l. note.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road - the prosecutor was about twenty yards off; he crossed, and said,

"I suppose you have my pocket-book" - I said I had nothing of his, and would go where he liked. He stopped half an hour talking to me. I went with him to the constable.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-32

1333. DANIEL DRISCOLL and JAMES MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Henry Blakelock , from his person .

HENRY BLAKELOCK . I am a solicitor , and live in Sergeant's Inn. On the 24th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going through St. Paul's-church-yard with a friend; I was called back, and saw a gentleman with my handkerchief - I went to him, and found him holding the prisoners, he said he saw Driscoll take it from my pocket, and throw it to Moore. Driscoll asked me to forgive him, and said he had found it.

ISAAC FLETCHER JOHNS . I am a haberdasher, and live in Little Ormond-street. I was in a shop in St. Paul's-church-yard, and noticed the prosecutor and his friend passing, and the prisoners following them. I saw Driscoll take the handkerchief out of his pocket, just as he passed the door, and give it to Moore. I ran out, and seized them. Moore was putting it under his smock-frock - he struggled, and got from me. I called Stop thief! and he threw it down - I pulled Driscoll to it, and picked it up. Moore was stopped and brought back.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I was passing, and received them in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Driscoll presented a petition to the Court, begging for its lenity, and stating that he had been seduced by others into bad habits.

MOORE, Pleaded distress.

DRISCOLL - GUILTY . Aged 14.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-33

1334. THOMAS BUCHANAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , a copper cann, value 20 s. , the goods of Robert Friend Sweetenburgh .

ROBERT FRIEND SWEETENBURGH . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Great St. Helens . The prisoner was my servant . I missed this cann about a month before he was apprehended. On the 8th of September, I charged him with stealing it; he said he had lent it to Messrs. All-cock and Co., who are friends of mine - I afterwards found it at the Mansion House, produced by a pawnbroker. He lived three months with me.

WILLIAM BELCHAMBERS . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas, a pawnbroker, of the Borough. On the 23d of August, the prisoner pawned this cann for 8 s. I had known him for two years.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I took him in charge - he said the cann was lent to Messrs. Allcock and Co.; but afterwards said if I would go over the water, he would then shew me who he had lent it to. Next day I was going over the water with him, and in Lombard-street, he produced the duplicate of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master left on Saturday, without paying my wages, and having no money, I took this to get victuals.

MR. SWEETENBURGH. He never applied for money - I offered several time to advance him money.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-34

1335. SAMUEL CANDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of Jonathan Potter .

JONATHAN POTTER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street . On the 24th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out - these shoes were then in the window. On returning, I found the prisoner in custody.

REBECCA POTTER . I am the prosecutor's wife. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I stood at the back of the shop; the gas was lighted - the prisoner came and asked to see these shoes, which stood in the window; I gave them to him; he said they were too wide, and pointed to another pair, and while I was reaching them, he ran out with the first - I followed him some yards, caught him, and took them from under his coat. He returned without resisting. I was alone.

JOHN LEMAN . I received him in charge, and found only 2 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded Distress.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-35

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

1336. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Henry Holden Turner .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HOLDEN TURNER . I am a solicitor , and live in Percy-street . On the 11th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house - I went into the passage; he was swearing, and appeared intoxicated. He said he had brought a letter from the captain of an India ship; but had lost it, and could not return to the captain without a memorandum from me, that he had called; expecting something from a captain, I went into my room to write a note, but upon looking out of window, saw him going out with my coat; I pursued, and took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded intoxication.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-36

Before Mr. Recorder.

1337. HARRIOT COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a knife, value 6 d.; two shillings, two sixpences, nine halfpence, and six penny pieces, the property of Samuel Fenn , her master .

SAMUEL FENN . I am a baker , and live in Bell-street, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner chared at my house for four or five years. On Saturday, the 20th of September, I missed 3 s. from my desk, and in the afternoon another shilling, and between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I got Smith, a neighbour; we marked two shillings, five sixpence, eighteen penny pieces, and ten farthings - she came again on Saturday morning, about half-past six o'clock, and between seven and eight o'clock, I missed two shillings, two sixpences, and 10 1/2 d.; it must have been taken with a false key. I had lost a key of my desk two years ago. I fetched an officer; she was asked to produce her money, which she did after some time, and among it was two shillings, a sixpence, four penny pieces, and a halfpenny, marked. She denied having any key, but one was found upon her, which opened my desk.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. It is a common key - A. No, it is not. I did not suspect her before.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a broker. I marked this money on Saturday night, by Fenn's desire, locked it in the desk, and took the key home with me - there was other money there not marked. I returned at half-past seven o'clock in the morning; the prisoner was sent up

stairs; I then opened the desk, and missed two shillings, two sixpences, four penny pieces, and three halfpence, of the marked money, and 1 s. 5 d. of the unmarked money - she was charged with it, and declared she had none but her own. I asked her to produce what she had; she hesitated, but at last produced two shillings, a sixpence, four penny pieces, and five half-pence, marked, and a sixpence unmarked. I asked how she got that money; she said her mistress paid it to her, at seven o'clock on Saturday night - I had not marked it at that time. I said she must have a key of the desk, which she denied. I saw her putting something under her stays, and found it was a key, which opened the desk.

The prisoner begged for Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231022-37

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1338. RICHARD LEEWORTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , five sovereigns, the monies of William Newling , his master and employer .

WILLIAM NEWLING . I am a tailor , and live in the Commercial-road, the prisoner was my apprentice , I took him from the Refuge for the Destitute, three months before this - he had been there two years - he behaved well. On the 28th of August, I gave him five sovereigns to pay Mr. Wells, of Bishopsgate-street - he never returned. I found him three weeks afterwards at a public-house at Windsor, in consequence of information, and charged him with it - he acknowledged it, and said he would not do it again, that he had spent it all but 18 d., which he gave me.

WILLIAM ONYON . I am in Mr. Wells's service, and attend in the shop. Newling was indebted to my master, in August last - the prisoner brought no money on the 28th; he had been at the shop several times previous, but not on that day, nor since.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-38

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1339. JAMES TIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , two quarts of wine, value 5 s.; one quart of brandy, value 5 s.; three bottles, value 6 d., and 6 lbs. of candles, value 2 s., the goods of James Durand and James Blakeney , his masters and employers .

HENRY YATES . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 15th of September, I was in Long's-court, St. Martin's-lane, and saw the prisoner go into the shop of a dealer in marine stores, followed him, and asked what was under his jacket; he said it was nothing to me. I said I was an officer, and insisted on knowing - he then said it was a bottle of white brandy, which he bought of a man in the street for 3 s. I took him to his master, and asked Sayce if he allowed him to carry away spirits - he said No, and that he had suspected him for two years. I went to his lodgings, and found six more bottles, and 6 lbs. of candles, which he said he had bought at different times.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He told you at once, who his master was - A. Yes. The bottles found at his house contained spirits.

WILLIAM SAYCE . I manage the business of James Durand and James Blakeney . The prisoner was two years in their service - he was brought to me by Yates, with a bottle of white brandy - we had some of that description in use; only two or three bottles had been drawn as samples three or four hours before. He was employed in that part of the warehouse where the cask lay. I believe it to be my master's - the candles found at his lodgings are such as we use in the cellar - they are made for that purpose - he was never allowed to take spirits.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not always at home, I sup pose - A. No. I have no mark on the bottle - my master took him into his service in consequence of his distress - it is common brandy - he might have bought the candles.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-39

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1340. ELIZABETH JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a watch, value 40 s.; two seals, value 20 s.; two keys, value 6 d., and a ribbon, value 2 d., the goods of Robert Gibbs , from his person .

ROBERT GIBBS . I am servant to a gentleman in Cavendish-square. On the 24th of September, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Regent-street, and as I crossed Oxford-street , was accosted by a female, who asked for drink. I passed on - she kept by my side, and a few yards further, I saw the prisoner sitting on some rubbish - the woman went up to her and said something, the prisoner instantly sprang from the rubbish, attempted to cross me, and at the same time snatched my watch from my fob. I instantly seized and accused her of it - she positively denied it, struggled, and by some means got down on the pavement. I looked to see that she did not hand it to the other; the watchman came up, and I gave her in charge - she was then on the ground; he insisted on her getting up - she refused - he made her stand up, and the watch was found under her clothes.

THOMAS PIPER . I am a watchman. I came up, and found the prisoner on the ground, holding her gown rather up - her hand was under her clothes. Gibbs said she had his watch I lifted her up - did not see it fall from her, but picked it off the pavement, exactly on the spot where she had laid; she said it was her husband's, and desired me not to give it him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with two women; this gentleman came up, spoke to one of them, and turned up a passage with her, stopped there some time, came back, and said he had lost his watch, and they were going to take me - I fell down and resisted, but never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-40

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1341. ELEANOR M'CARTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , four half crowns, the monies of William Kellam , from his person .

WILLIAM KELLAM . I am a tailor , and live in Brook-street, New-road. On the 22d of September, I was in Dean-street, Hampstead-road, late in the evening. I met the prisoner in Tottenham-court-road, and went with her to a house. I had four half crowns and six shillings in my

pocket. I staid with her about ten minutes, she went away first - I followed her, and directly I got into the street, felt in my pocket, and missed my money. I had given her 2 s. I went to a watchman, who found her in a passage in the street, in about five minutes, and found three half crowns and a shilling on her. She said next morning, that it was mine, and wanted me to take it, and let her go. I was quite sober.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found three half crowns and a shilling on her - she said it was her own; next morning, she said it was the man's money, and desired me to give it him, and let her go.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him and another man, they took me to a public-house, and treated me; the other man asked him to pay for the liquor; he said he had no money. I left them, and met him again; he took me to this house, and said he only had 2 s., gave me one, and the landlady the other - his money was not found on me. I had three half-crowns of my own.

WILLIAM KELLAM . I did go into a public-house with her and a friend.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-41

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1342. THOMAS SCURRAH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a watch, value 25 s., and seventeen sovereigns, the property of Patrick M'Keevan , from his person .

PATRICK M'KEEVAN. I am a journeyman tailor , and lodge in Queen-street, Golden-square . The prisoner was errand boy at a public-house, and slept in the same bed with me for a week. On Monday, the 17th of August, he got up about five o'clock. I asked why he got up so soon; he said he was not well. I fell asleep again, and awoke about eight o'clock - he was gone. I did not see him again till last Friday, when he was taken. I missed a silver watch, and seventeen sovereigns from my pocket, I had saved it out of my earnings. I worked in Great Portland-street. I gave information, and described him to Ballard, on the morning of the robbery. I have found none of it.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. About the 17th or 18th of August, the prosecutor gave me information, and described the person, and last Friday, I found the prisoner in custody, and accosted him by his name - he answered to it. I charged him with robbing a young man who he lived with in Queen-street, Golden-square - he denied it, and said he did not know where Queen-street was. I said

"Queen-street, Golden-square, where you lodged after you left the public-house;" he said he did not know where it was - he had not lodged there. I asked where he went when he left the Coach and Horses, public-house, Dover-street - he mentioned somewhere near Smithfield. I said, I must fetch the young man whom he had robbed, and see if he knew him. I did so, and asked if he still denied living in Queen-street - he did; the prosecutor said instantly, that he was the man who had robbed him; he said he never saw the prosecutor, but afterwards admitted knowing the prosecutor, and having lodged in Queen-street. I searched him, but found nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with him for a week, being out of place. On the morning in question, I took what things I could, and left the others to pay the rent. I told the officer, I did not know Queen-street - that I lodged near Golden-square, but did not know the name of the street. I met a man going up stairs as I came out.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-42

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1343. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , two half crowns, fifteen shillings, and four sixpences, the monies of Michael Conner , from the person of Mary his wife .

MARY CONNER . I am the wife of Michael Conner , a labourer , we live in Oxford-buildings. On the 6th of October, I was going to redeem a pledge, and had 25 s. in my pocket; a fight was going to take place in the Edgware-road . I went towards the mob, and while I stood there, I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round, laid hold of the prisoner's hand in my pocket, and held it while I gave him three slaps of the face, and said,

"You monkey, you have been picking my pocket;" the mob desired me to let the child go, and I did. I felt in my pocket, and missed all my money, except 3 s., turned round again, and laid hold of him - a constable came up and took him. I said he had picked my pocket, and that I had 25 s.; he then said he had 25 s. belonging to his mother, who was a drunkard, and gave it to him to take care of. I said,

"I have 3 s. left, so that you have not got 25 s." - he was searched, and only 14 s. 6 d. found on him.

SAMUEL CHEESE . I am a constable. An alarm was given, I went up, and found Conner holding the prisoner; she said he had robbed her, and mentioned 25 s.; he said

"Yes, I have 25 s., my poor mother gets drunk, and gave it me to take care of." I found 14 s. 6 d. in his side pocket; he said he supposed he had lost the rest, but afterwards said two lads about eighteen years old gave it him; his pocket appeared to be made for the purpose, it ran down the face of his coat from top to bottom.

GUILTY . Aged 8.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-43

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1344. CHARLES HILLIARD and THOMAS RAVEN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Stewart , from his person .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WOODS . On the 17th of September, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Chancery-lane , coming out of my father's house - he is a law-stationer. I saw Mr. Stewart walking with a friend - the two prisoners went up to him, followed him a little way. Raven then took the handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to Hilliard, who was close by. I crossed over, and told Mr. Stewart, who went after them with me. I pointed them out, and charged them with it. Raven said it was more likely that I took it, and cried - a crowd collected, they were taken into a bootmaker's shop. I put my hand down the prisoner Hilliard's breeches, and took the handkerchief

out. I had seen him put it there, it was half way down his thigh.

MR. WILLIAM STEWART . I live in Lee-street, Burton-crescent, and am an attorney. I was in Chancery-lane - Woods came up - I missed my handkerchief - his account is correct; he found it on Hilliard, and gave it to me - they denied knowing each other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HILLIARD'S Defence. Written. I was in possession of the property, but not with any intent of robbery; seeing it thrown down, I picked it up, and walked on my father's business. I know nothing of the other prisoner.

HILLIARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

RAVEN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-44

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1345. JANE MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a watch, value 30 s., the goods of William John Huckett , from his person .

WILLIAM JOHN HUCKETT . I am a carpenter , and live at Ball's-pond. On Monday, the 29th of September, I was in Kingsland-road, and met Mrs. Freeman, who I had known many years - the prisoner was with her. I gave them 6 d. to get drink; Freeman asked me home to tea with her - I went, and after tea gave them more liquor. I got up about half-past four o'clock to go; Freeman said she wanted more gin; I said I had no money - they asked me to pawn my watch; I refused; Freeman pushed me on the bed, and said I should not go. I fell on the bed, and the prisoner snatched my watch, and ran off with it; I followed, but could not find her. Freeman went with me, and described her, and the officer took her. I believe Freeman was as much implicated as her. I was sober. She was taken on the Friday.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it to me, and tell me to do what I thought proper with it - A. No; I refused to have it pawned; she snatched it from my hand. I had money, but did not choose to spend more.

JOHN SMITH . On the 29th of September, I apprehended her - she said he gave it to her to pawn, for 5 s.; but she sold it to a man, who she did not know, for 13 s.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-45

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1346. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , three sovereigns, and a half-crown, the monies of Joseph Wilson , from the person of Susannah, his wife .

SUSANNAH WILSON . I am the wife of Joseph Wilson , a Chelsea pensioner . On the 3d of October I was with him at Chelsea, when he received his pension, and gave me three sovereigns, half a crown, and a sixpence. I put it in a piece of whitey brown paper, and put it into my pocket. About twelve o'clock we went to the prisoner's apartments, in Royal Hospital-row, dined with her and her husband, and staid till three or four o'clock - we drank all the porter at dinner - I took my money out to pay for more, and she saw it; she and her husband went to shew us the way home; she took us into the Duke of York, public-house; we had a glass of gin and water between us two, and staid there near an hour; it was then dark; we went into another public-house, in Sloane-square; Cluiff, a lodger of hers was with us; we had two glasses of gin and water between us five, came out, and before we parted my husband asked if I had got my money; she was near enough to hear it, and before I could answer she was gone. I felt and missed it all; we went back to her house; she had not got home - we got some officers and went again, and found her alone, but found nothing - her husband left us a quarter of an hour before we parted.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you receive the money - A. About twelve o'clock; we had a little porter before we went to her house - my money was safe at the Duke of York - I did not shake hands with her at parting - I accused nobody else of it; I do not know Oglesby; we returned to the Duke of York, thinking she might be there - my husband looked round the room there for the money, thinking she might have left it there. I was perfectly sober.

JOSEPH WILSON . I received my pension on this day, and gave my wife all but 2 s.; and opposite the King's Arms, public-house, in Sloane-square, I saw the prisoner take her hand out of my wife's pocket, and pull out a paper somewhat similar to what the money was wrapped in. I asked my wife if her money was safe; she set off before my wife could answer.

Q. Why not immediately seize her hand - A Being a friend I did not like; till I was sure she had it - I called her back, and called to Cluiff - neither of them returned.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time did you come into her company - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon - I spent 3 s. 6 d. myself; we had oysters, and four pots of beer among six of us. I was quite sober - my wife was not perfectly sober. We came out of the King's Arms, about six o'clock - I went after her, but did not see which way she went; we found her in an hour and a half, very much intoxicated - I then went to the Duke of York, by desire of the officer, to write my address; and hearing she had been drinking at several houses, I looked about there; I never accused Oglesby of it. Cluiff had left us five minutes before I saw her take the money - she was off directly.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

JAMES OGLESBY . I was at the prisoner's room between six and seven o'clock on this evening - Wilson and his wife came in - I was going to fetch her husband, and the prosecutrix said I was going out with her money; she had given me nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-46

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1347. JOSHUA VALENTINE and WILLIAM DALTRY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , thirty-six yards of printed cotton, value 36 s., the goods of John Maynard , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 6th of October, I and Skillern were on duty in Whitechapel-road, I saw Valentine coming towards me, and asked what he had about him - he said, Nothing. I opened his waistcoat, and found a piece of blue print there, and part

of it down his trowsers. I took him to the watch-house, and asked if he had any more; he said, No. I found another piece in his hat; he said he found it all together - there were two persons by him - I cannot say whether Daltry was one of them.

RICHARD B. SKILLERN . I was with Hall, and stopped Daltry, who was about one hundred and fifty yards from Valentine; he and another ran down Plumber's-row - I found a piece of printed cotton down his trowsers; he said it was his own - I asked where he got it; he said, I must find that out.

ELIZA MAYNARD . I am the wife of John Maynard , linen-draper , of Sermon-lane, Limehouse . On the 6th of October, in the afternoon, I was in the back parlour, and heard a footstep in the shop, but saw nobody; this cotton was afterwards brought to me; it is all ours, and was safe at three o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

VALENTINE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

DALTRY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-47

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1348. WILLIAM ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two loaves of bread, value 18 d. , the goods of James Rattray .

DAVID DRUMMOND . I am servant to James Rattray , baker , Bull-street, Piccadilly. On the 16th of September, about twelve o'clock, I put my basket down at a door in Albemarle-street , and left it for a few minutes; on returning I missed two loaves, and having seen the prisoner about all day, I suspected him, and set somebody to watch him. An alarm was given, and I pursued him, calling Stop thief! and saw him throw two loaves down - he was secured.

JAMES WILD . I was in Albemarle-street, and saw him running away - he threw two loaves down, and was secured.

JAMES GOOK . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner in Bond-street, running; he said he did it from distress - I found 2 s. 6 d. on him, which he tried to throw away.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-48

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1349. SAMUEL ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , a bill of exchange for payment of and value 6 l. , the property of John Hall .

JOHN HALL . I keep the Crown, public-house , in Rupert-street, Goodman's-fields. The prisoner was a furniture-broker . I have employed him to collect small debts. One Ledyard called on me, and asked me to give him the cash for a bill of 6 l. I gave it him. The prisoner was present, and offered Ledyard 5 l. for it. I gave him 6 l. - he owed me 20 s. - I gave him five sovereigns, and kept the bill in my possession about three weeks, and the prisoner told me he had a friend who would discount it. I gave the bill to him for that purpose. He made the proposition himself. I told him, if he could get it done at five per cent. I would give him a glass of grog for his trouble. No particular time was fixed for him to bring the cash. This was about the 18th or 25th of August - I asked him for the money a day or two after; he said his friend was out of town, and he could not get it done; he returned it to me afterwards, and in three or four days said his friend was in town, and asked for it I gave it him. I asked him for the money next day; he said his friend was not at home - I saw him every day till he was taken up, but he never gave me the money.

MOSS MOSES . I am a slopseller. The prisoner owed me 5 l. 13 s.; I pressed him for the money, and on the 10th of September his brother-in-law gave me this bill.

COURT. There is no proof of a felonious intent at the time he took the bill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-49

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1350. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 6 lbs. of tapioca, value 8 s.; 4 lbs. of sago, value 6 s.; 1 lb. of macaroni, value 4 s.; 2 lbs. of vermicelli, value 2 s., and 2 lbs. of cocoa, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Barclay , Esq.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am in the service of Robert Barclay , Esq., banker . On the 26th of September, I received a parcel, containing the articles stated in the indictment, in a bag, from the banking-house, to carry to his dwelling-house at Low Leighton; I put it in the fore part of my cart - I got about two miles, and then missed it. I had been walking before my horse. I looked forwards, and saw the prisoner running with it; I hallooed Stop thief! and he was stopped - he had dropped it. I never lost sight of him.

RICHARD MIESON . I am servant to a grocer at Hackney. I saw the prisoner take the parcel off the cart, and told Osborne - we pursued him, calling Stop thief! he was secured, and I brought him back. I had seen him throw the parcel away.

SAMUEL LEECH . I am a watchmaker. I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner brought back. They were going to let him go, but Osborne had him detained. He was taken to the watch-house with the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-50

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1351. JOHN BIRIMNGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a watch, value 30 s.; a key, value 6 d., and a ribbon, value 1 d. , the goods of Patrick Riley .

PATRICK RILEY . I lodge in Crown-court, Pall Mall . On Tuesday, the 5th of October, I went out after nine o'clock, and left my watch hanging up on the wall; it had two cases, and a ribbon attached to it. I came home before nine in the evening, and it was gone - I had locked my room door. The prisoner slept in the same room five or six weeks, and had left a week before.

HANNAH SMITH . My mother keeps the house. I went up, about eleven o'clock in the morning, to make Riley's bed - he had given me the key. I unlocked the door, but did not go in, as I was called down, and left it open; I went up again about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon. I went into Brown's room, which is next to the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner go into Riley's room - he came out immediately, and said he had been for a knife, which he had left behind him; I went in afterwards to make the bed, and missed the watch from the wall.

SARAH BROWN . I lodge in the house, and was in Riley's room that morning - I took a bonnet there to put it out of the way. I saw the watch hanging there. Smith was afterwards in my room; I saw her and Riley talking together - nobody but him had been up stairs.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner a week after the robbery. I found a knife on him. We met Riley, who said,

"John, how came you to do this?" he said,

"Oh! dear," and did not deny it.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my knife in the room, and got a job at Edmonton. I returned for it on the Tuesday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-51

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1352. MARY DAVIS and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a watch, value 1 l. , the goods of James Marlow .

JAMES MARLOW . I belong to the ship Margaret. On Sunday, the 21st of September, I was in the Minories, and saw the prisoner Smith talking to a man; it rained hard. I lost my road, and the man said to her,

"There is a drunken sailor, you had better follow him" - she walked with me, and shewed me the way towards my lodging. she took me to a room - I sat down. Davis came in; I asked if she was mistress of the house; she said Yes - she went out again. I took my watch, and put it into my hat, which was on the table. Smith sat by my side; then jumped off my knee, and left me directly. I took up my hat, and my watch was gone. I could see no number on the door; so I made a scratch on the door-post with my knife. I informed Avery; he took the two prisoners - I saw them in custody two days after, and am certain of them. I was with no other woman.

JOHN AVERY . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Sunday night, about eleven o'clock, I met the prosecutor coming out of Cable-court, Cable-street - he said he had been robbed of his watch, and took me to the house where he had made a notch on the door-post. I searched the room, and found nobody. A person could easily reach to the table by coming to the door. From his description of the women, I apprehended the prisoners on Monday night, two doors off, in bed together. They declared their innocence - I secured them. Marlow saw them next day. Another female was at the bar with them; he pointed them out directly.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-52

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1353. CHARLES FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 19 lbs. of sugar, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Tatton .

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I am a constable. On the 17th of October, I was in Seven-dials, about half-past eight o'clock at night, and saw six or eight young men on the opposite side; the prisoner was with them; he crossed over to the same side as I was, and had a sugar loaf in his apron - I asked him what he had there; he said what was that to me; he made some resistance, I called for the watchman. I insisted on knowing where he was going; he said to No. 9, Greek-street, Soho. We said we would take him there - we went about six yards; he then turned round, and said,

"No, I'll go to the watch-house." The prosecutor afterward claimed the loaf.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I am servant to Thomas Tatton , a grocer , Gerrard-street. This sugar was taken from our shop; Collington came and asked if we had lost anything, and upon looking we missed this. I know it to be ours; it has a mark in my writing on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Langley-street, Long-acre, I went up a dark place for a necessary purpose, and found it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-53

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1354. JAMES HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a coat, value 15 s.; two pairs of trowsers, value 15 s.; a waistcoat, value 3 s.; a jacket, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., and a sixpence , the property of James Callender .

JAMES CALLENDER . I am the master of the Jack Tar, vessel , which laid off Rotherhithe . On the 20th of October, I was sleeping in the state room. I hung my clothes up, and about half-past twelve o'clock, I heard somebody in the cabin - I jumped out of bed, and caught the prisoner with my clothes - he dropped them on the floor, and asked for mercy.

DANIEL BLY . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-54

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1355. JOHN MEE and FREDERICK FOSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a timepiece, value 35 s. , the goods of Samuel Monk .

ELIZABETH MONK . I am the wife of Samuel Monk , who is a cabinet-maker , and lives in Church-street, Hackney . On the 29th of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw Mee going out of the shop with the timepiece under his arm. I ran out, and called Stop thief! and saw him going up the church steps. I lost sight of him, but saw the time-piece laying in the church-yard - I picked it up - the prisoner was secured. I did not see Foster.

JOHN CHARLES GARVA . I heard an alarm, and saw Mee running, with something under his arm. I stopped him - he had dropped it by that time. I saw Foster join him in the Church-yard, about ten yards from Monk's shop - he ran with him - they kept close together. I then saw Foster throw the time-piece down - I had not seen Mee give it to him - he got out of my sight, but Mee never was. I am positive Foster threw it down.

WILLIAM OGAN . I am a shoemaker. On the 29th of September, about half-past three o'clock, I heard an alarm, and ran into the church-yard. I saw Foster throw the time-piece down - I am certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MEE'S Defence. Written. I took a walk towards Epping, fell asleep in a field, and on returning, met a man, heard a cry of Stop thief! ran with a woman, and a boy said I was one of the gang, and he had me taken. Daltry and Foster, who are now in custody, are the persons.

MRS. MONK. I am certain Mee is the man, who ran out with it.

MEE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

FOSTER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-55

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1356. WILLIAM WILLIS and RICHARD SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two butter-flats, value 5 s., and 80 lbs. of butter, value 3 l. , the goods of James Parker .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the property of John Hudson , John Jennings , Isaac Summers , and Thomas Green .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PARKER . I live at Byster, in Oxfordshire. On the 7th of October, I sent some flats of butter to town by Hudson, the waggoner - they would arrive on the 9th; some of them were for Mr. Jennings - there were tickets on the flats. I have seen these tickets and flats since.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the tickets in the butter - A. There is always one inside the flat, and another outside; they correspond with the quantity of butter sent - they are put in by the dairy-man, whose writing I know. Cooper and Wilson belong to the butter sent for Jennings.

JOHN HUDSON . I drive a waggon for Mr. Parker. I got to Newgate-market at a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, and brought the flats in the same state as I received them - I delivered them to Shaw. The two brought here now are two of those I delivered to him - they were directed to Mr. Jennings.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know how many you brought - A. No, nor how many I gave Shaw. I can tell that none were stolen on the road by the loading.

HENRY PYBUS . I am servant to Mr. J. Jennings, of Newgate Market. On the 9th of October, between five and six o'clock, we received butter from several dairies, but none from the prosecutor - I expected some from him. My master lives at Islington, but his stall is in the market.

GEORGE STEVENS . I keep a wine-vaults, in Ivy-lane. I know the prisoners by sight, Willis was a porter, and Shaw was a jobbing porter. On the 9th of October, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw them at my house - they each brought in a flat. I do not know what they contained, but they were heavy - they had a quartern of gin. Shaw went away, and Willis said they wanted somebody to carry these two flats of butter up to the Pitt's Head, public-house, Old-street, and that he would meet the man there with them. Pashley came in, and I sent him with them to the Pitt's Head - the waggons unload in Ivy-lane,

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was Willis there when Pashley came in - A. No, he went away. Shaw was gone before Willis spoke about them.

THOMAS PASHLEY . I am a porter. On the 9th of October, Mr. Stevens employed me to take these flats of butter to the Pitt's Head, Old-street. I afterwards saw Turnpenny there. After I got in, Shaw came in, and said

"That is all right" - I had not spoken to him. In about eight minutes, Willis came in, and said

"D - n your old eyes, you ought to have been here sooner, or have nothing for your trouble." Turnpenny came and took them in charge. I took the flats.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. They had not been opened at all - A. No.

HENRY TURNPENNY . On the 9th of October, I accompanied Mr. Summers to the Pitt's Head, and found the butter in the passage, and Pashley there, and in about a minute I saw Shaw - I was concealed behind the door, and came forwards. The porter said to me,

"That is him." I waited a little, and Willis came in. I then went out of the parlour, and said to them both

"Do you belong to this butter?" they both denied knowing anything of it. I had the flats opened in their presence, and there were two notes in them, with Cooper's name on them, and the quanty contained in each flat.

MR. BERESFORD. I was present before the Alderman, when the prisoner were examined. Mr. Payne, who is ill, took down what they said. I know his writing - my recollection enables me to say it is taken correct. Shaw said he received three flats out of a narrow wheeled cart in Newgate-market, and was ordered to take them to a Mr. Stevens. Willis said he merely assisted him to carry them.

RICHARD WAGER . I am a porter. I know Shaw. On the 9th of October, about a quarter to six o'clock in the morning, I saw Shaw turning the corner of Hope-passage, leading from the market into Ivy-lane, in a direction to Stevens's, with two flats of butter on his shoulder; a man whom I do not know came up to him, and took the top flat from his shoulder; he walked half way down the passage with it, then turned round to Shaw, and said

"Come on nobby," Shaw said

"No, d - n my eyes, it won't do this morning;" the other man said

"Never mind, come on," and they went off together in the same direction, and went into Stevens's.

HENRY PYBUS re-examined. Shaw goes by the name of nobby - he had no orders to go to Steven's.

JAMES PARKER . The tickets on these flats are in the usual writing that comes with the butter.

(Flats produced and sworn to.)

SHAW'S Defence. The waggoner says he delivered it to me, but they are always pitched on the pavement.

WILLIS'S Defence. Shaw asked me to carry the flat into Stevens's, and get them sent to the Pitt's Head.

SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WILLIS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-56

1357. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , two gold chains, value 8 l. 3 s., and four pairs of cornelian tops and drops, value 24 s. , the goods of George Pickering .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of William Horne .

GEORGE PICKERING . I am a jeweller , and live in Banner-street, Finsbury. On the 30th of September I sent these articles to the coach-office, by my boy - to the Cross Keys, in Wood-street, directed to Messrs. Hart and Hyams, Canterbury. I sent them to go by the three o'clock coach. On the 4th of October, I found the prisoner in custody, with one chain and two pair of ear-rings.

WILLIAM KEMMISH . I am thirteen years old, and was

in Mr. Pickering's service. On the 30th of September, I saw these articles put into a parcel, which I took to the Cross Keys, and delivered to a person in the coach-office, and paid 2 d. for booking; he took it off the counter. I do not know the prisoner - I saw two pair of drops and tops and a chain, before the Alderman, on the Saturday following.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I am porter to the Dover coach, which goes through Canterbury. A few days previous to this circumstance I had leave to go out of town, and got the prisoner to do my business in the office, having known him some years - it would be his business to carry the parcels from the office to the coach, which sets off from the Bricklayers' Arms. I returned on the 27th of September, but not being very well, he continued in my situation. I gave him 10 s. 6 d.; and on Tuesday evening, the 30th of September, he came to me. I went to the office next day, and heard the parcel was missing.

STEPHEN SIMPSON . I am porter at the Cross Keys, and was there on the 30th of September, in the bookkeeper's office; the prisoner acted as porter to the Dover coach for Harris - I saw him take this parcel, directed to Hart and Hyams, of Canterbury, off the counter; and put it into his side pocket. I did not suspect him, it being a small parcel - I thought he put it there for safety; it was enquired about next day, and I mentioned what I had seen - I told him to take care of it, when he put it in his pocket, and to give it to the guard. When it was enquired for he was drunk in the stable, and was taken that evening.

HENRY POLDEN . I am guard of the Dover coach. On the 30th of September, I received several parcels from the prisoner, but none for Hart and Hyams, to my knowledge. We arrived at Canterbury at four o'clock in the morning; and on looking at the way-bill this parcel was missing.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure I did not give it to you - A. Not to my knowledge. I believe he gave me three.

Q. Did I not tell you they were all of consequence - A. No, or I should have remembered it; he counted the parcels to me, and the number he mentioned was right by the way-hill. I counted them after him, but one Mr. Potter, a passenger, had several parcels, which were entered as parcels, and some as baggage - I might have counted one of his. I locked the boot up immediately. I found I had one of Potter's parcels in the boot, which was not entered in the way-bill.

ROBERT HESKETH . I am a day patrol. I was fetched on the 1st of October, and took the prisoner - he was intoxicated, I found a pair of tops and drops in his great coat pocket - another pair, and a gold chain were given to me by Harris. When he got sober, I asked him how he came by those found on him; he said he found a parcel at the Bricklayers' Arms, which appeared to have been run over by a coach wheel, that he delivered the parcel that was missing to the guard, and told him it was a valuable one, and to take care of it; he said the things given me by Harris, were also in the parcel which he picked up. On the Friday following, we found out Mr. Pickering.

JOSEPH HARRIS re-examined. I found the prisoner drunk in the stable. I searched him, and asked what he had done with the parcel - he said he gave it to the guard. I found the gold chain in his pocket, and the ear-rings in his hand - this was the day after the parcel was stolen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the parcel at the Brick-layers' Arms, very much smeared with mud, picked it up, and found these articles, and offered to sell them at the Cross Keys, and Bricklayers' Arms.

HENRY POLDEN . I am sure I did not drop any parcel which he gave me.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-57

1358. HENRY MATTHEWS , CHARLES SIMS , and WILLIAM SCARERS were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 140 lbs. of lead, value 20 s., and five fixtures (i.e.) five brass cocks, value 5 s., belonging to George Dickin , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be fixed to a building of his.

GEORGE DICKIN . I am a wine-merchant . The house No. 34, London-wall, St. Stephen, Coleman-street , belongs to me, but was empty at this time.

JOHN DUCK . I am in the service of Mr. Walker, cloth-worker, who lives opposite this house. On the 1st of October, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the morning, I was looking out of window, and saw the three prisoners come out of No. 34. I went after them as far as Cripplegate-buildings - I was close to them. Matthews had a load on his head, in a wrapper - they made a stand there, and then went on to the corner of the buildings. Matthews went on - the other two stopped at the corner. I went into a gin-shop for assistance, came out, the two men went round the corner, and Matthews threw the lead off his head on the pavement, put his hat down by the side of it, and was going after the others, leaving it behind, and got about fifty yards, when I collared him; the others were not taken till Wednesday last - I am certain of them all, for when they stopped, I stared them in the face, to notice them. I picked them out from others when they were taken. I found Matthews's wrapper contained lead pipe, and brass cocks, with a ball, among it - he had a knot as if he was a porter - the lead weighed 1 1/4 cwt. I went into the house, found all the pipe cut away, and the cocks; we matched the pipe to the place, it tallied with what remained.

Prisoner SCARERS. Q. Do not you recollect having seen me in Basinghall-street, since this happened - A. No. After the examination, he said

"You knew my face to-day, and I shall know you another day."

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I work for Mr. Walters, and saw three persons come out of the house, and watched them from the window till Duck got up to them. I am quite certain the three prisoners are the men.

CHRISTOPHER HALL . I am an officer. I took charge of Matthews, opened the wrapper, and found the lead, brass cocks, and ball; the pipe weighed 1 1/4 cwt - part of them matched. I apprehended the other two prisoners last Wednesday, at the Apple Tree and Mitre, public-house, Chancery-lane - Duck was with me, and pointed them out from ten or twelve others who were in the room. Matthews said, he was hired by two men to take the lead to Newgate-street.

Prisoner SCARERS. Q. Did you not see me on the 4th of October - A. I think I did. Duck was not with me.

MATTHEWS'S Defence. I was hired by two men to carry it. They said they would follow me to Newgate-street.

MATTHEWS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

SIMS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

SCARERS - GUILTY . Aged 22

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-58

1359. HENRY RICHARD GREY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a bat, value 10 s. , the goods of James Jones and James Watkins .

MARTIN SUTTON . I am servant to Mr. Bradley, Brownlow-street, Spitalfields. On the 29th of September, the prisoner pawned a new bat for 7 s., in the name of John Smith .

Prisoner. Q. You said I had a blue coat and white apron on - A. I thought he was dressed so.

JAMES JONES . I am in partnership with James Watkins - we are hatters. The prisoner was in our service; this hat is ours; it hung in the shop for sale. I never saw him wear a blue coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-59

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

1360. HENRY SEARES and MOSES WESTBROOK were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , two waistcoats, value 3 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; a shirt, value 1 s.; a yard of calico, value 6 d.; half a yard of velveteen, value 6 d., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of William King .

WILLIAM KING . I live at Hanwell, and am a labourer . On Sunday, the 14th of September, I had just bought these clothes, and had them in a bundle. I laid down to sleep in a lane between Hanwell and Sunbury , about one o'clock in the day, with the bundle by my side. I was sober. I missed it about half-past one, when I awoke. Seares was near me, and I asked him about it; he said he saw two men take it, and go towards Hanwell. I asked why he did not stop them, and awake me - he said he did not know anything about that.

JAMES BOLTON . I am a constable. On the 15th of September, I took Westbrook; he said he knew nothing about it, and would go where I liked. I found the trowsers and a yard of calico in the kitchen where Seares lodges; his mother was shewing them to a person as her son's property; and on Thursday I took him - I could not find him before; he kept from home; he lives at Sunbury, about a mile and a half from where the robbery was committed.

JOHN HALL . I am a labourer, and live at Sunbury. I was standing at my gate, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and Seares threw some velveteen over my rails; my boy picked it up.

ARTHUR WEEDY . I am a labourer, and live at Sunbury. I was with King when he bought the clothes; and about three o'clock that afternoon saw the prisoners with his bundle - I knew it to be the same - it was tied in a large red handkerchief. I told King of it half an hour after. I saw Westbrook with it at first. I knew them both before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SEARES' Defence. I was not within three-quarters of a mile of him when he lost it; he had been beating his wife, and was very drunk.

WESTBROOK'S Defence. Seares' father told me, if I should meet him, to tell him to come home. I saw him in the brick field, and asked why he did not buy some things his father told him to buy; he said he had; he took me down the lane, and threw the bundle over a hedge to me - I returned it to him.

ARTHUR WEEDY . I was with King all the afternoon - he was not intoxicated.

SEARES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

WESTBROOK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-60

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1361. JAMES FIELD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Andrew Kerry , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 13th of October , at Edmonton, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a pair of breeches, value 6 s.; a shirt, value 2 s.; six stockings, value 2 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , his property.

SUSAN KERRY . I am the wife of Andrew Kerry - we rent a house in the parish of Edmonton . On the 13th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I went to bed, and saw that the doors and windows were fastened. Between three and four o'clock, my husband got up to go to work - I got up, and fastened the door after him, went to bed again, and got up rather before six o'clock; it was then light. I did not go to the washhouse when I let my husband out, but at six o'clock, I found the wash-house window broken, and the door open - somebody must have got over the gate to get to it; it is a sash window; a person could put his arm through, and unbolt the door; there are no shutters to it - I missed a pair of breeches out of a washing tub, a shirt, a pair of stockings, four odd ones, and a pocket handkerchief. I had them to wash, and had left them in water the night before.

JOSEPH HARPER . I am a patrol. On the 14th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming from Edmonton, towards town, with with a bundle under his right arm, and asked what was in it; he said a shirt and a pair of breeches of his own; that he brought them from Harford. I examined them; the breeches were clean and wet - I took him to the watch-house, found another shirt in his hat, and a white bag, and some stockings in his pocket.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable, and have the property,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

ANDREW KERRY . I am the prosecutor. I have known the prisoner sixteen years - he lodged eleven years with me, and I always found him honest, sober, and just, and believe he was in distress.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18231022-61

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1362. JOSEPH SHEPHERD was indicted indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Poole , Esq. , about the hour of three in the night of the 28th of September , at Great Stanmore , with intent to steal, and stealing two geese, value 5 s., 20 lbs. of cheese, value 10 s.; 8 lbs. of veal, value 4 s., and seven pair of stockings, value 10 s. , his property.

JOSEPH IRISH . I am servant to Mr. Charles Poole , who lives at Stanmore. On the 29th of September, at night, I fastened the outer door, and know that the larder window was secure. I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, and was disturbed about half-past three, by the dog barking, and a noise. I got up immediately, and found the house all safely locked up, till I came to the scullery door - I found a chopper forced into that; I took it out with difficulty, got out, and found the outer door open, and that the thieves had entered by the larder window. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and a pair of reins, a bridle, and girths were taken from the stable. Mr. Poole, jun. and I went in pursuit, and traced footsteps some way, and while out, I received information from a man. I went to Edgware, and met Dolling with a bundle, containing some of the property, and afterwards found the prisoner in custody. I do not know him.

JOSEPH DOLLING . I am a watchman of Edgware. On Monday morning, the 29th of September, at half-past five, I was going off duty, and met one Westwood, coming as from Stanmore, with a bundle; and then met the prisoner, with a bundle under his arm - I said,

"Halloo, Shepherd, you are in a hurry;" He said he was going up the road to work - I said,

"I think you have got something which you should not have," and collared him; he said,

"I have only got a little bit of beef, pray let me go - I will give you anything in the world." I took him to the cage, and put the bundle in my box; went after Westwood; lost him; returned to my box, and found the bandle contained two geese; he gave me a pair of reins and a bridle from under his frock, and a pair of girths were in his hat. I produce them. I shewed the geese to Eversley.

JOSEPH IRISH . I know the bridle, reins, and girths to be my master's property; they were taken from the premises at the same time as the property stolen from the house; the cloth they were wrapped in was taken from the house.

JOHN EVERSLEY . I am in the service of Mr. Poole, and look after the poultry - I saw the geese in possession of Dolling, and knew them. I had picked them, and am certain they are my master's - they were only rough picked.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming on the road from Hornsby, and picked this parcel up in a field.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18231022-62

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1363. GEORGE FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , at St. Pancras, a watch, value 20 s.; two seals, value 6 d.; a watch key, value 1 d.; a sovereign, three crowns, four half crowns, and five shillings, the property of James Lacy , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES LACY . I am an umbrella-maker , and live in Tottenham-place, Tottenham-court-road, St. Pancras , and rent the house. The prisoner, who lived pot-boy at a public-house, lodged with me, and slept in the front parlour, where my box, containing this property, stood. He slept there on the 14th of October, and about a quarter to eight o'clock in the morning I missed him, found the box broken open, and the property stated in the indictment gone. I had known him several years.

SAMUEL LACK . On Sunday night last, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came to me in Russell-street, called to me by name, and said he wanted to give himself up to me, for the officers were after him, and he did not want to be pulled and hauled about - that he had robbed Mr. Lacy, of Tottenham-place, where he lodged, of between 2 l. and 3 l., and a watch - and had nothing to eat since eight o'clock the day before. I gave him refreshment, and went next day to Lacy; he said he had sold the watch for 10 s., and spent the money.

Prisoner's Defence. Six or seven persons lodge in the room. I did not break the box open, but found it open; and, on lifting it up, took the money and watch.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18231022-63

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1364. MARY ANN GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , four napkins, value 5 s.; six towels, value 3 s.; a table cloth, value 5 s., and three pillow cases, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Patrick Briers , her master.

ELIZA BRIERS . I live in Charles-street, Manchester-square , with Edward Patrick Briers , my brother. The prisoner was in his service till she was apprehended. Baker produced some property to me.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Upper George-street, Bryanstone-square. On the 24th of September, Welch brought me four napkins and six towels to pawn, and in consequence of what she said, I went into the street to see who sent her with them, and found the prisoner, who said she did send Welch to pawn them; that they were her own property. She gave different accounts of where she lived - that she was married, and her husband was in the Guards. I gave her in charge, and before the Magistrate, she gave Mr. Briers' address.

ANN WELCH . The prisoner sent me to pawn these things, and held my child outside the while.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Before my late mistress died - she said my present master and mistress were to pay my doctor's bill, as no nurse had been employed, and I had injured my health by attending to her. After her death, a renewal of my complaint increased the bill - it amounted to 3 l. 9 s., my present mistress said my wages should be stopped to finish payment of the bill - I objected to it, and they were going to part with me on the Saturday, as this occurred on Wednesday. I should have had 15 s. to take, deducting the doctor's bill. I was in great distress.

MISS BRIERS. My mother is lately dead; she attended on her, but I had another woman. She might have said this in my absence. The prisoner was not paid extra for her labour. The things were locked up in a box; it was not broken open. All that was due to her was not paid; she had applied for it, but it was inconvenient - her health

has been impaired, but I cannot say whether it was in consequence of attending my mother.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-64

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1365. HENRY MILLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a coat, value 25 s. , the goods of James Milner .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Lumsden .

JOHN LUMSDEN . I am gardener to Mr. Milner, who lives at Bush-hill, and is a packer . About the 4th of September, in consequence of information, I went to the patrol, who apprehended the prisoner on the 22 d. I lost a great coat out of one of the bed-rooms.

DAVID TAYLOR . On the 4th of September, when I was getting up, on looking out of window, I saw a person go down Mr. Milner's premises, with a coat under his arm; I told Davis - we both went after him, and found the prisoner with the coat under his arm; he said a person gave it to him to take to Winchmore-hill, and so we let him go with it - we then went and told Lumsden.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You did not know whose coat it was - A. The gardener's. I had not seen it before. I saw him in a field, on Mr. Milner's premises; it is surrounded by a hedge and ditch, and has no footpath. I saw him get over the ditch.

DANIEL DAVIS . I am servant to Mr. Milner, and saw the prisoner with the coat - I knew it to be the gardener's, and told him so; but did not know but what the gardener had sent him - he said we might go and see where he carried it.

THOMAS REEVES . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 4th of September, the witnesses informed me of this. I enquired for the prisoner, but could not find him at his house till the 22d - I have known him five years. I found him at his mother's, put him in the watch-house, and asked what he had done with the coat; he said he knew nothing of it. I brought the witnesses to him; they said he was the man. Lumsden said,

"How came you to steal my coat?" he said,

"Because I was in distress; I do not know who has got it; I sold it to a Jew in the street, for 5 s."

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-65

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1366. GEORGE M'KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a coat, value 30 s., the goods of William Saunders ; and a shawl, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Blackwell .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I am a servant out of place, and live in Turk's-row, Chelsea. On the 11th of September, I was at the General Howard, public-house; Blackwell , who deals in clothes, introduced the prisoner to me, as a tailor - he had a coat of mine, and shewed it to the prisoner to ask the value of it - it was wrapped up again in Blackwell's shawl, and put on the parlour table. I and Blackwell went out together, leaving the prisoner there, and in about five minutes, heard the coat was gone - I have not found it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been long in the parlour - A. No. Three friends of mine were there.

HENRY BLACKWELL. I live in Royal Hospital-row, and am a pensioner . I was at the General Howard, and fetched Saunders's coat to shew the prisoner; then folded it in my shawl, and laid it on the table - we went out, leaving him alone in the room, returned in about two minutes, ran back for it, and found it was gone, and the prisoner also. I did not see him again till pension day.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you first go into the house - A. A little after three o'clock. I knew him to be a tailor. I saw two persons in the room, who looked like Jews. The prisoner said it was worth 7 l. new. The Jews came out with us - I saw it on the table when I left the room - I intended to return for it. I left him alone in the room.

CHRISTOPHER THORNBER . I am a pensioner, and am waiter of the General Howard. When the witnesses went out, I went into the parlour to wipe the tables - the prisoner sat there alone; he laid his pipe down, took the bundle up, and walked out with it under his left arm. Blackwell came in, and enquired for it.

Cross-examined. Q. You swear you saw him take it away - A. Yes. I knew him before. I did not know but it was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I fell asleep on the form, and when I awoke the bundle was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-66

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1367. RICHARD POWIS and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a copper pot, value 5 s. , the goods of William Kennedy .

WILLIAM KENNEDY . I am a broker , and live in Little St. Andrew's-street, Seven-dials . On the 20th of September, I saw both the prisoners on my area rails; I am sure of them both - they were in company. They crossed over, and stood a moment, as if looking at the window - then went away, and returned. Powis took up a copper pot, and Williams said,

"Go;" I followed, and took him with it, about three houses off. Williams stood before the shop, and said Powis had stolen nothing, and I had no right to detain him.

EDWARD RANDALL . I live in Little St. Andrew's-street, and saw the prisoners together, close to my door, for an hour. Powis unpinned a pair of trowsers, which hung at my door - I afterwards saw him with this copper pot.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner Powis pleaded distress.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I was looking at the window, but never saw him take anything.

POWIS - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-67

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1368. WILLIAM ROE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , two live tame fowls, value 2 s. , the goods of John Hanbury .

ANN FARGUES . I live with my parents in Pultney-terrace, White Conduit-fields. On Sunday, the 19th of October, Hanbury's chickens were running about. I saw the prisoner take two, and told Hanbury, who went across the

fields, and brought him back - he had not got far when I called out.

JOHN HANBURY . I am a compositer. I was in bed - Fargnes alarmed me; I ran out, and took the prisoner about three hundred yards off; he stopped, and asked what I wanted, saying he was an honest tradesman, and did not take them; he wanted to give his address, and go away. I found the chickens half a field off, in the way he had run. The others were close to the house with the hen.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were they young - A. Between two and three months old. I had a brood of nine. I find he bears a strictly honest character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-68

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1369. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , a birdle value 13 s.; a pair of reins, value 3 s,; a pair of hames and traces, value 15 s.; a pad, value 10 s., and a breeching, value 6 s. , the goods of John Richardson .

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am a coachmaker , and live in John-street, Oxford-road. On the 15th of September, the prisoner called, and asked if I had room for a phaeton to stand, which belonged to a dancing master in Frith-street; he said he himself lived with Smith, a stable-keeper, in Clipstone-street, and wanted to borrow harness to bring the phaeton, and then to take away a chaise. I asked if he knew Smith's brother, who kept a public-house in Oxford-street; he said, Yes, he was a stout man. I saw my man deliver the harness to him, and saw no more of him nor the phaeton - he was apprehended on the Friday following, and denied ever seeing me before. I was flurried, and perhaps if it had not been for the officer, I should have knocked him down. He was frightened, and said he sold it at Westminster, for 15 s.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am a harness-maker, and live in Marlborough-place, Great Peter-street. On the 12th of September, the prisoner sold me a horse collar for 1 s., and said he had an old chaise harness, which he had bought of Mr. Richardson, the lottery-office keeper's coachman, and would bring it next day, and on the 15th he brought it, and asked 25 s. for it - I agreed to give him 18 s., paid him 2 s. 6 d. in part, and on Wednesday paid him the rest.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-69

1370. JAMES SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a collar, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Russell .

THOMAS RUSSELL . I live in Weymouth-mews. On the 12th of September, the prisoner came and said a gentleman at his father's wanted to put a chariot out to hire, and he wanted a collar to bring it away - I called my boy down, who said he knew him; he was to bring the chariot that morning, and take away a chaise on hire, but I never saw him again.

WILLIAM SHARP . I bought this collar on the 12th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-70

1371. MARY TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , a tea-pot, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Harlow .

WILLIAM POOLE . I am servant to John Harlow , jeweller , Norton Faldgate . On the 20th of September, I saw the prisoner come and take this tea-pot, which stood near the door - she went about twenty yards. I followed, and took her with it.

BARNARD GLEED . I received her in charge; she belongs to respectable people. I believe she was brought into this by drinking - she was sober at the time.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18231022-71

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1372. JOHN WAYS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a tanned horse hide, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Freeland .

THOMAS COOPER . I am street-keeper of Bethnal-green. On the 12th of October, I saw the prisoner with another man, who had a hide under his right arm; they were walking one after the other, close together. I went up to the other man, and asked what he had got; I thought it was a bundle of linen - he made no answer; but the prisoner came behind him, and pushed him on - the man then ran to the corner, by the public-house. Jones took him, and took him in there to know what he had got; then the prisoner came behind, drew the hide from under his arm, and ran away. I followed the prisoner; he fell down - I secured him with it under his arm. Gibbs came and took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How far from the prosecutor's did you see him - A. In James-street, opposite the warehouse, about a hundred yards from the warehouse. I do not know whether he heard what I said to the other man.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am an officer. Cooper sent for me. I found two knives and a key on the prisoner, which will open an inner door where this property is kept when it is singly locked, but not when double locked. The other man escaped.

THOMAS FREELAND . I live at Bethnal-green, and have a warehouse in James-street. On Sunday, the 12th of October, this hide was brought to my house - I know it to be mine, by a mark on it; it was wrapped in one of my men's aprons, marked T. F. - he has absconded. I have known the prisoner some years; he used to be drinking with my men.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any mark of your own on it - A. It is the dresser's mark. I bought all the man had at the fair. I have missed property to a great amount. The key will unlock the door when single locked, but will not turn it a second time - but they can easily pull the bolt aside then. I have often found it on the single lock when I had double locked it. I have been robbed almost every Sunday for the last three years, to the amount of 300 l. in all.

JAMES GREEN . I am a silk weaver. On Sunday evening, the 12th of October, I saw the prisoner talking with another man, and afterwards saw a man come down Granby-street,

opposite James-street, with u bundle, and the prisoner after him. I ran for an officer. They came in a direction from Freeland's premises, in company together; we were going to take the man into a public-house to search him - the prisoner came and snatched the bundle from under his arm.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-72

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1373. ANN CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , two pairs of shoes, value 1 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; four shirts, value 1 s.; three aprons, value 1 s.; three cravals, value 1 s., and a frock, value 6 d., the goods of Mary Walker , to whom she was servant .

MARY WALKER . I am a widow . The prisoner was twelve months in my service, and was to leave on Wednesday, but left before that, and I missed this property.

SOPHIA GORDON . I live with my sister at Hoxton, and have known the prisoner three years. On the 12th of September, when I came into my sister's room, I found her there - she laid this bundle down, and said it was crockery and glass, which she had bought, and told me to open it, and put it upon the shelf. She said she had had words with her mistress about some keys which were lost, and her mistress said she had got in at the window. I asked what it all meant; she said she could not stop there, and went away. The bundle remained till my sister came home - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

JANE COCKERELL . I am Gordon's sister. I found the bundle in the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18231022-73

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1374. SUSAN FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , two handkerchiefs, value 8 s., the goods of Ann M'Farlane , to whom she was servant .

ANN M'FARLANE. I am a laundress . The prisoner was four or five years in my service - I missed a variety of articles. I suspected her, charged her with it, and she gave me the duplicate of a handkerchief.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Islington. On the 20th of September, the prisoner pawned a handkerchief for 1 s. 6 d.; I have known her three years.

JAMES DREW . On the 13th of January, the prisoner pawned a handkerchief with me.

SARAH SHORT . On the 20th of September, the officer found the duplicate of this handkerchief on the prisoner; I redeemed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took nothing but the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-74

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1375. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , two blankets, value 7 s., the goods of Benjamin Gingell , in a lodging-room .

SARAH GINGELL . I am the wife of Benjamin Gingell ; we live in Shakespeare-walk, Shadwell . On a Sunday in September, the prisoner took a lodging for one night - he got up at eight o'clock in the morning, went out, and in consequence of what I heard, I went and found him in White Lion-street, and said,

"You villian, you have robbed me of my blankets;" he turned round, struck me in the breast, and said if I did not let him go, he would cut my liver out - I would not, but he slipped from me, got away, and was taken three weeks after - he threw the blankets into the middle of the street. I am sure he is the man.

- ATKINSON. I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on another charge, and the prosecutrix recognized him among five other persons; she pointed him out immediately, and he did not deny it.

THOMAS SELTY . I am a watchman. On the 30th of September, the prisoner took a lodging at my house, and paid for his bed, and got up about half-past six o'clock - I missed a sheet, and took him twelve days after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-75

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1376. JOSEPH IRWIN was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

BARNET WINSLADE . I am parish clerk of St. John, Westminster, and produce the marriage register, by which it appears that on the 2d of February, 1817, Joseph Irwin , was married to Mary Bilton , spinster.

ANN WARNER . I am the sister of Mary Bilton , and witnessed this marriage - the prisoner is the man who married her; she is now alive.

HANNAH CLEVERLY . I knew the prisoner for some time by the name of William Johnston , and on the 11th of December, 1819 , was married to him at Islington church; he said he was a batchelor. I was living with my uncle, who is a tradesman, and have lived in gentlemen's families. He lived three years and three months with me, and travelled with goods. I have no family.

Prisoner. She took my property to her friends, and then led me such a life, I could not live with her - Witness, It is false. He got all the property he could from my relations. Not being able to write himself I conducted his correspondence, and always gave him a regular account; he never complained of my squandring his property. I never parted with money unknown to him.

Prisoner's Defence. My first wife was a prostitute in the streets. I had just returned from the East Indies, and picked her up, and through her friends persuasions, I married her.

ANN WARNER . My sister was in service when he married her - she was not a prostitute.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-76

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1377. JOHN HOOD was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of September , of a certain evil disposed person, a screw jack. value 5 s., the goods of William Wilson , he well knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES COBB . I assist Hayes, the Twickenham carrier. On the 20th of September, I went to the prisoner's house with a basket, which had a printed card on it, with the name of John Hood , Isleworth. I saw the prisoner at work in the shop, with another man, and asked which was Mr. Hood - he said he was. I said I had a parcel for him; he said

"A parcel for me, where did it come from?" I said from London, and that it was in the cart - he followed me to the cart - I shewed it him; he said he knew nothing about it; a young man who stood by said

"Why, it is directed to you, I should take it in" - he then told me to take it in, and paid the carriage.

BENJAMIN PRICHARD. I am an officer. In consequence of what Wilson said, I fetched the prisoner from the public-house, told him he had received a parcel the other day, containing stolen property - he denied all knowledge of it. I said it was useless denying it, there was a man who could prove the delivery; he said

"Oh! them d - d jacks, they are in the shop," and appeared confused - he turned back as if to go away. I took him into the shop - he pointed to the jacks, and said,

"These are what I received in the hamper," and shewed me the hamper.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-77

1378. HENRY MORGAN was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SCOTES . I live at Hampstead, and let out horses and chaise ; the prisoner was employed to drive Mrs. Stodhart, from Hampstead to Finchly, and back for 6 s., on the 30th of August, and to receive the money - the chaise went father than was agreed upon. I never saw him or the horse and chaise till Monday morning, when I found it at the Bull, public-house, at Highgate, and had 3 s. to pay.

DR. JOHN STODHART . On the 30th of August, I was at Finchly, and saw my lady in the chaise - she told me to pay the prisoner 8 s., which I did, and 1 s. for himself.

Prisoner's Defence. The horse was knocked up, and I put up at the Bull, was going home next morning with the money, got drunk and lost it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231022-78

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1379. PETER READ was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a baker , and live in Long-acre; the prisoner was my foreman , carried out bread, and received the bills, and should settle with me every evening; he has not paid me two half-crowns received of Taylor, on the 20th of September - he paid me no money that day.

ANN TAYLOR . I deal with Smith. On the 20th of September, I paid the prisoner two half crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. I understood that she paid it on my own account, as I was told to leave no bread without the money. I used to leave it with her, and pay for it myself, and afterwards receive it from her.

GEORGE SMITH . I never knew him pay money which he had not received. I did not refuse to trust Taylor.

MRS. TAYLOR. He never trusted me on his own account.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-79

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1380. HANNAH RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , six books, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Rivington , John Rivington , and John Cochran .

JOHN HOLMES . I am in the service of Messrs. Rivingtons, booksellers , in the Strand ; these books were on some shelves near the door; a person could not come in to take them without being observed.

GEORGE STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Newby, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. On the 18th of September, the prisoner pawned six books with us, in her own name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-80

1381. DANIEL MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of William Bawden .

WILLIAM BAWDEN , JUN. My father is a shoemaker , and lives in Tyler-street, Carnaby-market . On the 13th of September, the prisoner came into the shop with another person, who bought a pair of shoes; and while my father was giving him change, the prisoner took a pair, and put them up his back. I seized him, and he threw them down behind him.

WILLIAM BAWDEN , SEN. On the 13th of September, the prisoner and another person came into my shop, and while he was paying me the prisoner took a pair - the man who bought them said,

"Don't hurt him, he is a friend of mine." He ran away, and somebody called out,

"Cut away, Mike, you are free." I secured him in Gardner-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-81

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1382. MARGARET STEWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October, 1822 , a shawl, value 15 s. 6 d. , the goods of Abijah Penny .

FRANCES PENNY . I am the wife of Abijah Penny, and am a dress-maker, and live in Ely-court, Holborn . On the 3d of October, 1822, the prisoner came to me as the house-keeper of Lady Erskine - I was on the second-floor, this shawl was laying in the room when I opened the door to her - she pretended to faint, and said she had given a coachman a sovereign and a shilling instead of two shillings, and he had abused her, and made her ill - I asked her to sit down - I did not know her before. I gave her some brandy, and when she recovered, she said she came from Dr. Tweedy, of Ely-place, that she was housekeeper to Lady Erskine, and wanted me to make mourning for six female servants. I got her a pen, and she wrote down what was wanted, and I was to go to Thompson's, No. 125, Leadenhall-street, for the materials for the dress, and to go next morning to No. 20, Jermyn-street, St. James's, to see her ladyship, and receive further orders - she was about an hour with me. I let her down stairs, and the moment I returned, I missed my shawl, which I had pulled off not twenty minutes before she came in. It was about half-past eight o'clock when I let her out - she ran up Holborn, which arose my suspicions. I did not see her again for a twelvemonth, but am quite certain of her person. I have not found the shawl, nobody but her had been in the room, except a man, who brought a bedstead - I never suspected him. I have the order she

wrote. I did not go to Lady Erskine, but went to Leadenhall-street - there was no No. 125, nor any Mr. Thompson.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not a man and woman in the room - A. They brought the bed, and a little girl six years old was there - I was moving at the time; she said she had been to the lodging I had left, and that Lady Erskine had sent her footman there, who could not find me.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-82

1383. MARGARET STEWARD was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , a silk dress, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of Richard Rees .

MARY REES . I am the wife of Richard Rees , of Poppins-court, Fleet-street - I am a dress-maker. On the 22d of October, 1822, the prisoner came to me to make some mourning for Lady Erskine's twelve servants, and said her ladyship lived at No. 20, Jermyn-street. I had a silk dress in a drawer, with some muslin - my servant was in the room. The prisoner was about two hours there, and wished for paper to write a letter to Mr. Hart, linen-draper, Holborn, for me to get the materials for the mourning; she said the linen-draper was waiting with the things, but was obliged to return, as the footman who had been sent could not find me. I sent my servant to buy paper for her to write the order, and while she was gone, she asked me if that was a servant, I said Yes - she desired I would ask her to step out, as she did not wish to be in the company of servants, and when she brought the paper, I sent her away. She wished for something to eat, and I went out to get her something - I was absent about five minutes, leaving her alone in the room - she staid an hour after that. I had put this dress in the drawer just before she came in. She asked me to lend her a shawl, to go home in, and 3 s. to pay a coach, which I did, and directly I let her out, she went off hastily, without wishing me good night, which excited my suspicions. I immediately looked into the drawer, and missed these things - they are worth 2 l. 15 s. I shewed Mr. Hart the letter next morning - he declined supplying the goods. I did not go to Lady Erskine - she said Mr. Cheesborough, of Racquet-court, recommended her to me. I enquired of him, and found it was false. I saw her again on the 12th of September, and can swear to her positively.

RICHARD REES . I saw the person who gave this order to my wife, and am certain it was the prisoner.

RICHARD HOOLE . I received the prisoner in charge on the 12th of September.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-83

1384. ELIZABETH ROWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , two tea-spoons, value 3 s.; three sheets, value 10 s.; four blankets, value 12 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; a bolster, value 4 s.; a table-cloth, value 2 s., and a quilt, value 3 s., the goods of Nicholas Buckerfield , in lodging-room let to her, to be used in the lodging .

The lodgings being let to the prisoner's husband, instead of herself, she was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18231022-84

1385. GEORGE THRUSH and ISAAC BARROW were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of William Robert Gardner , from his person .

WILLIAM ROBERT GARDNER . I am a engraver , and live in Carmarthen-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 8th of October, I was passing through Lombard-street , about half-past ten o'clock in the morning - the two prisoners followed close upon me - I had passed them. I felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket - nobody but them were near enough to take it. I put my hand down, and it was gone. I seized Thrush immediately - Barrow stooped for half a minute, and then walked off. Thrush denied having it. I called out after Barrow, who ran down St. Swithin's-lane, turned into the Post-office, and I lost sight of him, as I could not get Thrush along. I saw Barrow in custody in about a minute and a half, and said,

"You have stolen my handkerchief;" he produced it from his pocket - part of it might have hung out of my pocket.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. I was in Lombard-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I caught Barrow in the passage of the Post-office. Mr. Gardner came up with Thrush, and said

"Where is my handkerchief;" he immediately pulled it out of his pocket. I found another on him, which he said was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THRUSH'S Defence. I met this young man - we came along together; he picked the handkerchief up in Lombard-street, and the gentleman laid hold of me.

BARROW'S Defence. Thrush and I came down the street together. I picked the handkerchief up and walked away.

THRUSH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BARROW - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-85

1386. JOHN YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , at St. Leonard, Foster-lane, in the dwelling-house of Richard Parry , his master, a box, value 8 s.; a purse, value 6 d.; a key, value 1 s.; a piece of paper with a stamp thereon, denoting the payment of 3 s. 6 d., value 3 s. 6 d.; two sovereigns, two crowns, ten half-crowns, sixty shillings, and ten sixpences, his property; three promissory notes for payment of, and value 1 l. each; one bill of exchange for payment of and value 600 l.; one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 31 l. 16 s. 9 d.; one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 36 l. 15 s. 9 d.; one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 48 l. 11 s.; one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 65 l. 3 s.; one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 63 l. 10 s., and one other bill of exchange for payment of and value 42 l. , his property.

RICHARD PARBY . I live at No. 22, St. Martin's-le-grand, in the parish of St. Leonard, Foster-lane . The prisoner was in my service, as porter , and occasionally kept my books - he boarded in the house, but did not sleep there; he lived nearly twelve months with me, at different times; he came in February, and left in May - that was the last time he was in my service. On Saturday, the 3d of May, the bills and property stated in the indictment were safe in my cash-box, which I kept locked in my bureau. Mrs. Parry and myself went to church, on Sunday, leaving him and two other servants at home; the bureau was in the dining-room, on the first floor - the servants would not be on that floor. We returned from church about half-past twelve o'clock, and the maid servant immediately asked her mistress if she had locked the dining-room door - she said No; we found it

locked, and the key gone. The lodgers on the second floor had gone to chapel - we waited till they came home, to see if they had locked it. I got into the room by a ladder, found the bureau forced open, also the inner cupboard of the bureau, and the cash-box gone, with its contents - the prisoner was absent. I did not see him again till he was apprehended, about a fortnight ago - he had received his wages on the Saturday night. He said when he first saw me,

"I suppose I must go to the counter," and his wife begged me not to prosecute him.

RICHARD PARRY , JUN. I am the prosecutor's consin, and lived in the house. I and the prisoner were left at home on Sunday. I went out, leaving him and the maidservant in the house - they were the only persons there. I do not know whether the lodgers were gone to church or not. I returned about half an hour before my cousin - the prisoner had then left the house, and the room door was locked. I thought he might have locked it because I was out; when my cousin returned, I got in through the window, found the bureau forced open, and the cash-box gone, and in about an hour, I went with the officer to the prisoner's lodgings - he and his wife were gone; we found the cash-box in the room, with the bills in it, but the money gone; some of the clothes he wore that morning were in the room.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, and found part of his clothes, and the cash-box, containing all the bills but one, for 31 l. 16 s. 9 d., and the key of the room door was there, but no coin was left. On the 11th of this month, the prisoner was passed from the Borough, as a pauper, to St. Leonard, Foster-lane, and recognized as the man.

MR. PARRY. This is my cash-box, and the bills are mine - the one for 31 l. 16 s. 9 d., was returned to me by post; they were all in the box that morning. I have only lost the money. I took him from the parish, gave him 5 s. a week, and boarded him.

JOSEPH WILLIAM BRANCH . I am a constable of Aldersgate. On the 4th of May, I heard of this robbery, and went to Mr. Parry's, but did not see prisoner till the 11th of October - he said what he had to say he should say at another place. I saw the prosecutor and him together.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am an officer. The house the prisoner lodged in belonged to me. I let it out in tenements - the prisoner rented the room the box was found in. He left the key at my house on the Sunday. I did not see him again till he was apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I hardly know what to say. I am a poor man, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 47.

Reference Number: t18231022-86

1387. ABRAHAM AARON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a silver instrument, gilt with gold, and set with diamonds, and a ruby, called a pointer, or hand, value 30 l., and a silver chain, gilt with gold, value 40 s. , the goods of Moses Ansell .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to different persons.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MOSES ANSELL . I am secretary at the synagogue, in Duke's-place ; the books of the law are kept in a place called the Ark - it is always locked, except during divine service, and the keys in my possession; the law is written on vellum, and read by a reader on all days of worship. The 27th of September was a Sabbath and festival, and on that day, the book of the law was taken out, and read; the hand or pointer in question, is kept in the ark - it is silver-gilt, set with diamonds, and has a silver-gilt chain to it - it is used to point, as the reader reads the law, to guide his eye - it was used that morning, and returned into the ark, by the reader, about twelve or one o'clock; and at five o'clock, I went to the synagogue, and missed it - it cost above seventy guineas.

JOHN BARNETT . I am a bookbinder, and have known the prisoner a long time. On the 27th of September, in the evening, he came to me, and said he had got the pointer out of the synagogue. I was flurried at the moment, and did not know what to do - he did not produce it; he said, if I would buy it, he would sell it to me. I said I would have nothing to do with it, and the best thing he could do would be to return it to his father, and have it returned to the committee; he said he wanted money, and wished to dispose of it. I thought I had better consult my father, and went to the synagogue to him - he came home. I told him of it, and he went away. The prisoner took the pointer out of his bosom at a public-house. where I saw him, and shewed it to me for a moment - it was round his neck; he opened his waistcoat, and took it out, and put it in again. I was urging him to take it back; my father then came to the public-house, and said as nobody was at home, he wished us to come and sit with him - we went; the prisoner's father and brother were concealed in the kitchen, ready to take him.

LEWIS BARNETT . I am father to the last witness. In consequence of what my son said, I desired him to take the prisoner to the public-house, and keep him there. I got his father to my house, then fetched him, and they took him home. I did not see the pointer.

WILLIAM TRIPP . I am an officer of St. James's, Duke's-place, where this synagogue is; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house to me - the pointer was produced at the watch-house; he said voluntarily at the watch-house, that he stole it, that he unhooked it, and did it no damage, and that he offered it for sale to Barnett.

LEWIS PIKE . I am beadle of the synagogue. I believe I saw the prisoner in the synagogue, on the 27th of September; I took him into custody, at ten o'clock at night, in bed, at his father's, and took him to the watch-house. I saw him next day in the lock-up room of the Mansion-house; he said he secreted himself in a cupboard under the staircase, at the further end of the synagogue, and staid there an hour after service, then went to the ark with a key, which was left in some other place, and opened the door with it, and took the pointer out - that the bells and other ornaments made such a noise, he was afraid to take any more, and he got out when they opened the ladies' gallery.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-87

1388. FRANCIS SWEENEY and HUGH GILMORE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , a

writing desk, value 5 s.; two rings, value 12 s., three sovereigns, and two half sovereigns , the property of Peter M'Candlish .

PETER M'CANDLISH. I keep the Globe chop-house, George-street, Mansion-house . My writing desk, containing this ring and money, was on the second floor - the room was not locked - a customer can easily slip up stairs. On Tuesday night, the 22d of September, it was stolen. Sweeny, who was my servant, had been discharged on the Saturday previous, but was in the house at six o'clock that night.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How long have you known him - A. Nine months - he was a good industrious lad.

JAMES WEEDON . I am shopman to Mr. Farrow, slop-seller, Fleet-market. On the 23d of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner's together. Sweeney said

"You b - r, Jack, help me with this." I looked, and saw the desk under his coat. I watched them up George-alley, in company together, and about ten minutes after, saw them cross the market, and followed them into a house in Bear-alley. I returned to my master's shop, and told Buckridge, the beadle, shewed him the house, went up stairs soon after him, and saw the desk - he had them in custody, and at the watch-house, Buckridge found a key which opened it, and we found the prosecutor out.

CHARLES BUCKRIDGE . I am ward-beadle. I found the prisoners at a house in Bear-alley, with the desk, and papers in it, which led me to M'Candlish.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SWEENEY. I know nothing of the other lad.

GILMORE'S Defence. I stood in Fleet-market, and was accosted by Sweeney, who had a small box; he said

"Jack, take this box," which I did, and he took me to the house. I had no idea of its being stolen - I never saw him before.

SWEENEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months .

GILMORE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-88

1389. EDWARD BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Edmund Blewitt , from his person .

MR. EDMUND BLEWITT . I am a student for the bar, and live in Elm-court, Temple. On the 16th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Budge-row , in earnest conversation with Mr. Wragg - he turned round, and said

"This boy has got your handkerchief." I saw the prisoner alone, with it in his hand.

THOMAS WRAGG . I was with Mr. Blewitt. I saw something flash by, turned round, and saw the prisoner putting the handkerchief behind him. I seized him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman took me into a shop, and marked it with ink.

MR. BLEWITT. I could not find the mark at first, and was told to mark it, to know it was the one I took from him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-89

1390. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Fuller , from his person .

WILLIAM FULLER . I am clerk to Mr. Warman, tea-dealer, Strand. On the 19th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Ludgate-street, near St. Paul's - Roll's spoke to me, and I missed my handkerchief from my pocket - he immediately seized the prisoner. I saw him drop it before he was seized - there were two others, who I suspected to be in his company.

JOSEPH HENRY ROLLS . I am clerk to Messrs. Crocker, and Co. Watling-street. I was walking with Mr. Fuller, and noticed several persons lurking about, and about two doors from St. Paul's, I saw Mr. Fuller's handkerchief go from his pocket - the prisoner was close by. I turned round, and saw him drop it in the road, and seized him; he said he had not had it in his possession, but had just come from his master's - the persons who were lurking about were gone then.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was about six yards behind the gentleman, and two young men before me; as I crossed over, the gentleman turned round and took me, and said I had the handkerchief, searched me, but could not find it - he afterwards found it on the ground, and said he saw me drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-90

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 27.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1391. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a gold pin, value 5 s. , the goods of Benjamin Bossom ; and JOHN BURY was indicted for receiving the same, he well knowing it to be stolen .

BENJAMIN BOSSOM . I am servant to Mr. Doyle, of Knightsbridge ; the prisoner was the errand-boy , and slept in the house. On Sunday, the 21st of September, I missed my gold pin, which I had left on the bed-room table the night before. I had gone to my father's, and did not miss it till I returned.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN HOLMES . I am servant to Mr. Doyle. On Monday, the 29th, the prisoner told me, he had sold this pin at a toy-shop, in Sloane-street. I had asked him on Sunday, if he had seen it - he said No. I went to Bury's shop, saw his daughter, and told her I had come for it. I afterwards went with the officers.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. His daughter told you at once, that it had been sold there - A. Yes, for 9 d., and said it was sent to be polished, and I should have it when it came back.

CHARLES ALLEN . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 29th of September, I went with Holmes to Bury's shop. I saw Bury the last time I called, and asked him to shew me the pin, which I had seen, when I called with Holmes; his daughter shewed it to me in his presence. I asked if he objected to my taking it, and I would leave my watch

as security - he said I might have it if I paid for it, and afterwards said I might take it without, which I did.

Cross-examined. Q. You said you wished him to appear at Bow-street, to see how he got it - A. Yes. I went to him next morning - he said he was busy, and could not attend that day - he came next day by a summons, and was detained.

JENNINGS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

BURY - NOT GUILTY ,

Reference Number: t18231022-91

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1392. SARAH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a pair of leather flaps, value 4 s. , the goods of George Roathwaite .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ROATHWAITE . I am a currier , and live in Bear-street, Leicester-square . On the 18th of October, about four o'clock, the prisoner asked me to give her credit for a pair of patent skirts - she was nearly a quarter of an hour in the shop. I was engaged with another person, and the moment she was gone, I missed a pair of flaps.

JOHN GRANT . I am a saddler, and live in Hart-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner came to my shop, and produced these flaps, for me to make a chaise-saddle with. I worked for her husband, who is in the trade.

CHARLES BRINSLEY . I am the prosecutor's servant. Grant delivered me the flaps.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18231022-92

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1393. WILLIAM PATTERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN DIMMOCK . I am a linen-draper , and live in Holborn. The prisoner was in my service for above twelve months, and entrusted to receive my money. On the 3d of May, here is an entry of his writing, in the day-book; it is an entry of several articles sold to Hutchins - it is not his business to make entries in the day-book - I keep a clerk for that purpose. I have the day-book, in which entries are made of all the monies received; he has entered no amount whatever of money received from Hutchins.

ELIZABETH HUTCHINS . On the day in question, I went to the prosecutor's shop, and bought goods, amounting to 2 l. 3 s. The prisoner served me - I paid him a sovereign in part - he said he did not wish me to pay it unless it suited me. He went to the till with the sovereign; I cannot say whether he put it in. I told him to take care of it; he said he had put it into the till.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Has he not set up a tally shop himself - A. Yes, in Goswell-street; I called there on Michaelmas-day, and said I was going to settle with Mr. Dimmock; he said very well. I said nothing to him about it after I heard of the sovereign not being entered. I ordered goods amounting to 2 l. 3 s., and paid him 1 l. on account - he was attending to no other customer.

MR. DIMMOCK. He never accounted to me for this sovereign - there is no entry of his having received any money all that week - he should have entered the money as received, in the waste book, but had no business to make any entry in the day-book. The rule is, for the person selling goods to call them over to another, who enters them, and puts the name of the person receiving the money against it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What is the amount of goods sold according to the entry - A. 1 l. 3 s. If the clerk was absent any other young man might make the entry, but not the one who sells the goods. He left me in August or September, and I understand has set up in business for himself.

Q. Might not this money have been put into the till - A. No. Each shopman has a separate till with a look to it; all ready money should be entered in the book; they give their money up to me every night; I compare it with their account; his being in business could not injure me. Mine is a tally shop; there was no difference on or about the 3d of May between the cash and the entries. He should give credit for 1 l., and enter 1 l. 3 s. as due. The whole goods should be entered, and if he forgot to enter 1 l. as paid, still the money should have been in the till.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-93

Before Mr. Recorder.

1394. JAMES MELVILL was indicted for feloniously selling a certain piece of wrought gold, called a watch case, with a mark used by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, which mark had been transposed and removed from another gold watch case; he well knowing the same to have been transported and removed, against the statute .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BARROW . I am Deputy Warden in the Assay-office, Goldsmith's-hall. Persons who work gold and silver plate, have a stamp with their initials on it; a book is kept at the office, containing an impression of the punch, and the name of the persons using them. I find by the book that the prisoner's punch was the letters J. M.; it is entered in this book by Thomas, who is now dead - I know his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know anything of the entry, except what you find in the book - A. No.

MR. LAW. Q. Does the hand-writing of Melvill appear against it - A. Yes; the entry is

"new mark, April 3, 1822, James Melvill , 13, Spencer-street, Clerkenwell, Richard Thomas ."

BENJAMIN PRESTON . I have seen the prisoner write, and saw him sign this book.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am weigher at the Assay-office, and have been so nearly six years. On the 8th of October, I received from William Smith , the prisoner's boy, three gold watch cases, to be assayed and marked - I delivered the same cases to City, next day; he returned them to me, and I gave them to Smith - he came again on the 14th with more.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you attend the assaying - A. No.

WILLIAM CITY . I am a drawer in the Assay-office. On the 8th of October, I received three watch cases from Richards. I have two of the same cases here; they are for hunting watches - the other was a double case. The top part of the hunting cases we call the cover, and the

lower part, the bottom; in double cases, the outside is called a bottom, and the inner one the middle bottom. The stamp on a hunting case is a variable letter, denoting the year, and the figures 18, denoting that the gold is 18 carats pure, which is the standard - the mark impressed on the bottom is a crown, above the figure 18 on the center - a leopard's head on the left, and a variable letter on the right. The stamp on the bottom of a hunter would never be impressed on the middle bottom of a double case - that would be only a crown and 18. We call the flat surface only the bottom, and all the rest wires - we only stamp the bottom. A small bottom being introduced into large wires, would denote that all the case was of the same quality; it would appear as if all had been assayed. When I received these cases, I put the mark on them, and a private mark of my own on the bottoms and wires; then gave them to Richards to deliver.

Q. On the 14th of the same month did you receive any more cases from Richards - A. Yes, two hunting cases, and found they were the same as had been assayed on the 8th, except that new bottoms had been substituted - my private mark was upon all the wires, and in consequence of this the prisoner was apprehended. I searched his shop with two officers, and found a quantity of gold cases partly made, and not marked, and one loose bottom, with the mark on it, it had been cut out of a case, which had been assayed. We never stamp cases without the wires being attached to them. I found the prisoner's day book on his premises - here is an entry of two gold cases having been sent home on the 10th, to Mr. Tyrer; there is no other entry of gold work, having been sent out after the 9th, when these cases left the hall. The weight and prices of the cases are not entered - we went to Tyrer, who lives in Northampton-street, and found Bellows there; he gave me two double bottomed gold cases - upon examination, I found my private mark on the bottoms; they were bottoms of the cases assayed on the 8th - the wires were different, and had never been assayed; the bottoms had been transposed into new wires - the middle bottoms had the letter, and 18, instead of the crown, and my private mark was on them; they had been transposed from the covers of hunters; the new wires contained more metal than the original ones. I produce the hunting cases sent on the 14th, and the cases found at Tyrer's. The prisoner's shop is in his yard - there is a little boarding to separate where the gold is manufactured, from the silver work. Bellows gave me a bill of parcels, which corresponds with the entry in the book. There is a bruise on one of the cases found at Tyrer's.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I believe you have been a watch case maker yourself - A. Yes. The bottoms and wires are manufactured separately, and afterwards joined. I believe the wires of large cases are stamped, as well as the bottoms, if they will admit of it, but with a different stamp; the business of a silver case maker, is distinct from gold case makers.

Q. When a bottom or cover is stamped, it can only be extended by a hammer - A. Hammering, or going through a flatting-mill, that would flatten the mark, but not obliterate it; it would spoil the beauty of it The marks are perfect on these cases - I should think they had not been flatted. Cases are often spoiled in finishing after they are marked; they should be sent back to be remarked, we should then keep them a day.

Q. Is it not very common to put on another rim to save that day - A. Never, the case is always sent back.

Q. In consequence of the trouble and expence in making a new cover if the wire is spoiled, might not the workman put a new one without the master's knowledge - A. In a small shop, like the prisoner's, I think not. Whoever superintends must know it, as it requires gold to do it. There is no duty upon watch cases; the mark is to denote the quality.

MR. LAW. Q. If a case is spoiled do the Company charge anything for re-stamping - A. No; the damaged part comes back with it. I only found two boys in the prisoner's shop; no journeyman. If the damaged part was not delivered to the master, he would find a deficiency. The cases produced do not appear to have been flattened - it is not necessary to extend it to put on a larger wire.

COURT. Q. What is the value of a carat of pure gold - A. I believe about 3 s. 6 d. This stamp denotes that there are 24 carats, 18 pure, and 6 alloy; every additional carat of alloy would be 3 s. 6 d. in the manufacturer's pocket. One of the cases sold to Tyrer weighs 1 oz. 12 dwts., and more than half of that is the weight of the wires; they would be about 12 dwts. A carat is the 24th of an oz.

MR. ALLEY, declined entering into the question whether the new wires were adulterated or not, the statute not requiring that proof.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was in the prisoner's employ, and took the cases to the hall to be stamped - he kept no journeyman, while I lived with him, which was four or five months; he had two apprentices, who generally worked upon silver - he and his brother worked on gold; his brother had left him about a week before; I took the cases to the hall the last time - I took three on the 8th, with a memorandum, which I gave Richards, and next day I got them back, and delivered them to my master; and two or three days before the house was searched he sent me with two gold cases to Tyrer's - I had seen them on my master's workbench before. He told me in the kitchen that there were two gold cases on the board, and to go and get them, and take them to Mr. Tyrer's; I took them off his board, and as I was going along one of them jolted out of my pocket, and when I got there I found a brass edge and pillow plate had fallen out. I took a bill with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner superintended the silver business - A. Yes, and his brother the gold. I worked in the shop myself drawing wires; there is a partition between the gold and silver departments. My master always worked on the silver bench; till lately he worked on the gold. I believe his brother was canvassing for a situation; he did not leave the house entirely till my master was taken. I have not seen him since - I cannot say he has fled. My master attended to the gold work for a fortnight or three weeks before he was apprehended - he had vary little to do with it till then.

Q. Was not his brother the person who melted alloy and manufactured gold - A. Yes. His brother came back after looking for the situation, but did no work then. Before that my master principally attended to the silver; he had a great deal of silver work. I have heard high words

between them, about his brother making a mistake in the gold work. I have not been to the house since my master was taken.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have not been to the house since - A. I went next morning; they opened the door a little way. I was not let in.

Q. Did you see the brother at work on the day you took the cases to Tyrer - A. No. I saw the prisoner at work on gold cases that morning, washing them out - they were like the cases I took; I saw no others in the shop. I do not know how the brother was paid, or whether he was a partner.

JOSEPH BELLOWS . I am foreman to J. H. Tyrer, watchmaker, Northampton-street. On Friday evening, the 10th of October, about six or seven o'clock, Smith brought two gold cases and this bill, and about half an hour after, I found a brass edge and pillow plate missing, and found a bruise on one case. I delivered the same cases to City and another gentleman, who came from Goldsmiths'-hall.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you much dealing with the prisoner - A. Not much; we have only known him a few months. He bore the character of an honest respectable man. I have occasionally seen his brother - I saw him the evening the gentlemen called; he called at our house after the prisoner was taken; I have not seen him since. I have had no occasion to look for him. We dealt with the prisoner.

JAMES DUFF . I believe this bill to be in the prisoner's hand-writing.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 14th, I apprehended the prisoner. I went to his house next day, and found his punch mark.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I took the prisoner into custody, and as I was going to the office with him, I told him he was charged with transposing stamps; his answer was,

"And what offence is that?" that is all he said - he said nothing about his brother.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not say whether it was gold or silver stamps - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I have but one remark to make, that is to assure you I had no kind of direction in the gold part of my business, and however painful it is to remove the blame to my brother, I must say he had the whole direction of that department, and for the last eighteen months, I never manufactured a gold case.

ALFRED READ . I am apprentice to Mr. Melvill. The gold and silver work are quite different branches. Mr. James Melvill attended to the silver, and Mr. Frederick to the gold exclusively; there is a division in the shop, between the gold and silver benches - you cannot see in the silver department what is going on in the gold. I have heard him and his brother dispute about mistakes in the gold business. I have not seen Mr. Frederick since my master was taken. I have been to the house. Mr. Frederick made the cases that went to Tyrer.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What was made by the brother - A. The two cases that went to Mr. Tyrer; his brother was not a partner - every thing was done for the prisoner's benefit. I remember receiving from a witness for the prosecutor two cases; they were returned to me.

Q. Were they returned to you as having transposed stamps on them - A. Not to my knowledge; I was not told so. His brother left the house the day he was taken. He had ceased to work for about a week before.

Q. What has become of the two cases given you by the witness - A. I do not know.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You say the brother left about a week before, where was he - A. Canvassing for a situation - he came home every night, and left the day the prisoner was taken; he managed the gold department till a week before.

COURT. Q. Have you seen the cases sold to Tyrer since Frederick made them - A. No. They were not altered, to my knowledge. I had not seen them since he made them. I have seen the prisoner go into the shop when his brother was working on gold cases; he was paid by the piece. I have not looked for the brother. I lived in the house before my master was taken, but have been with my friends since; trade has been suspended. I was never sent to enquire after the brother.

THOMAS ELSAM . I live in Kingsland-road. On the Thursday or Friday before the prisoner was taken. I called on his brother about a situation he was after, and saw him in the shop at work. I cannot say what work he was about - it was about nine o'clock in the evening.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-94

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1395. PHOEBE ALLEN was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously assaulting John Allen , with a sharp instrument, and cutting him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN ALLEN . I was waiter at the Horse Shoe, in Star court, Fleet-street ; the prisoner is my wife . On the 20th of September , she was charing at the Horse Shoe, and had been there most all the week. I was cleaning the bar window, between eight and nine o'clock, and saw her in the act of throwing a knife at me, and lowered my head to escape it - it went through the window, and fell into the court. I went on with my work, and in about a quarter of an hour breakfast was ready. I went into the tap-room, and she was cutting bread and butter; she had a knife in her hand, and said, if I said that again she would stick the knife into me.

Q. What had you said - A. We had had a few words about a female servant, and I said I did not care a d - n about any woman; she said, if I repeated that she would stick me. I made her no answer - my fellow-servant came and caught hold of her, when he heard her say this, as she was making a stab at me - he held her for a moment, and thinking her temper was cooled - he let her go, and she immediately came and made a stab at me as I was in the box. I saw her coming - I rose up, and she stabbed me in the left arm; and using a bad expression, said,

"I'll do for you." I think the blow was aimed at my body, but I received it in my arm.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who is Ann - A. The female servant; my wife had accused me of improper conduct with her; she came to me for 5 s., which I

allowed her. I desired Yates to go to the back door, and call Ann - she asked what I wanted with Ann.

Q. Did you not say I want her to use her, to be sure - A. I never said

"use;" my wife asked for 5 s. I allowed her - I said she should have it in the course of the day.

Q. Did you not say Ann was going away for a week, and you wished to accompany her - A. No; she was bothering me about Ann - I said I did not care a d - n about any woman - she might have struck me in the moment of irritation.

COURT. Q. How long after she was cutting the bread and butter did she cut at you - A. She had not put the knife out of her hand. I will not swear there was not more irritating language passed.

WILLIAM SMITH . I saw the prisoner strike Allen with the knife; she seemed in great anger, as if they had been at words - she was in a great passion, and said,

"If you do that again, b - t you, I'll stick the knife into you."

SAMUEL DEWE . I saw Allen cleaning the windows; he and his wife seemed on good terms, as I thought; and soon after she asked for 5 s., which he refused, and words ensued.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-95

1396. MARTIN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 44 oz. of bees-wax, value 6 s. , the goods of John Lewis and Joseph Collyer , his masters.

JOHN LEWIS . I am in partnership with Joseph Collyer ; we are merchants , and live in Mincing-lane; the prisoner was twelve months in our employ; we had a considerable quantity of bees-wax, and suspected we were being robbed.

JOHN THOMPSON. On the 9th of October, about a quarter to eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come from the prosecutors' warehouse and stopped him - I found 2 1/4 lbs. of bees-wax in the crown of his hat; he said he had nothing about him, but when I found it, said he took it from the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-96

1397. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , two wine glasses, value 18 d. , the goods of Edward Green .

SOPHIA GREEN . I am the wife of Edward Green; we keep the Magpie and Stump, public-house, in Fetter-lane . On the 22d of September, the prisoner and another came in for a pint of beer, and while I was serving other customers, two glasses were taken off the counter. She had left the house, and in about three minutes was stopped, and the glasses found on her.

RICHARD JONES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the two glasses in her pocket. I thought she was rather intoxicated - she at first said they were her own, and was not willing to give them up. She called at my house, and asked me to come out. I could not understand what she said.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know they were in my possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-97

1398. ANN JEFFERIES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a gold pin, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Little , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18231022-98

1399. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Gilbert , about seven o'clock in the night of the 12th of October , and stealing four silver tea-spoons, value 10 s.; a table-spoon, value 10 s.; two mourning rings, value 40 s.; a pencil-case, value 10 s.; a brooch, value 2 s.; two hundred and forty penny pieces; and four hundred and eighty halfpence , his property.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a butcher , and live in Long-lane . On the 12th of October, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, and merely shut the door, but did not lock it - the lock catches. I left a small pug dog tied in the kitchen, but no person in the house. I was passing the house about half-past seven o'clock, and heard the dog barking - I stood opposite the house some time - a man looked me in the face as I crossed over - another came up and asked me what it was o'clock - I took out my watch, and told him a quarter to eight, but it was too fast. In about five minutes two men opened the door and came out - I immediately ran across and secured the last one, who was the prisoner. An officer came up and took him, and asked what business he had in the house - he made no answer. I went into Charter-house-street soon after, to pursue the other man, and there found a quantity of halfpence - a small housewife, a few needles, and an empty box, which were in the house when I left, were found on the prisoner. I had let the servant have the key, and did not go in for some time.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Your door has a spring lock - A. Yes; I tried it, and am sure the lock caught.

JOSEPH PEARMAN . I am officer of the night. On the 12th of October, I saw the prisoner and Gilbert scuffling by the door; he sung out

"Thieves!" and I caught hold of the prisoner. I searched him, and found seventeen picklock keys, a phosphorus bottle, matches, and dark lanthorn on him; two of the keys opened the door easily - I also found a housewife, a few needles, and a box on the prisoner.

GUILTY - Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-99

1400. JAMES SHADGWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Andrew Begbie , from his person .

ANDREW BEGBIE . I am a baker , and live in the Kent-road. On the 7th of September, I was at a stationer's window, in Cheapside ; felt a hand in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which was safe just before. I turned round, and the prisoner was behind me.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I am an officer. I was present, searched the prisoner, and found the handkerchief in his breeches, down by his thigh.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Ludgate-hill, and picked up this handkerchief, and in Cheapside I was stopped.

ANDREW BEGBIE . It happened in Foster-lane, about sixty yards from St. Paul's; he walked some way before I seized him,

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-100

1401. ANTHONY ROGERSON was indicted for arson .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SWAN . I am a printer , and have premises at No. 76, Fleet-street ; it used to be called White Lion-court; it is a narrow passage - on the left side are a range of buildings, which I occupy as a printing office; on the right is another range, which is divided by a staircase. I let the prisoner one of the rooms on the ground floor, as a fencing academy; it is about forty-five feet long, and twelve or thirteen wide; the fire-place is on the right, about twenty-five feet from the door, measuring transversely; the room above him was occupied as a printing-office, but is now empty; the room over that is Mr. Bingham's printing-office. On the 7th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, my attention was called to the prisoner's room; the coals were then strewed upon the floor, and water thrown over them to extinguish them; the partition was burnt in a place about twenty-five feet from the fire-place, and about a foot and a half from the door.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. When burnt through it would communicate with the stairs - A. Yes. I am lessee of the premises. I have seen my boys use very bad conduct towards the prisoner; he took one of them before a Magistrate, and had him committed.

WILLIAM TWOPENNY . I am twelve years old, and am errand boy to Mr. Edgerley, who lives in this building. On the 6th of October, I was at work on the first floor; not over the prisoner's room, but on the right hand side of the staircase - I heard a cracker go off about half-past eight o'clock; the men went down stairs; I knocked at the prisoner's door, got no answer, went up again, and about a quarter past nine o'clock I went down and saw the fire burning the partition, about three or four inches from the prisoner's door, and half a yard from the staircase; lighted coals were dropping through the partition. I alarmed the men, who came down, broke into the room, and found about two shovels full of coals, alight, piled up against the partition, and the room full of smoke: - we put the fire out - the grate had no coals in it, the bars were quite warm; the coals were across the room, quite away from the stove. I went to look after the prisoner - I was present with Downes, and met him by Mr. Medburst's, on the other side of Fleet-street, nearly opposite the passage, and went with him to the watch-house; he said he saw the place alight, and put the key in his pocket and went away - he said so to Cousins, at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he saw the wainscoat alight - A. He said he saw the place on fire; there were eight boys about the premises, some of them used to plague him. I know nothing of squibs or papers of gunpowder being put under his door, nor about the handle of his door being daubed with filth - Mr. Drury's pressman had let the cracker off - I have heard the boys talk of playing him tricks, but do not know what the tricks were. I know nothing of the key of his door being stolen, or holes being bored in his door.

WILLIAM DOWNES . I am apprentice to Mr. Bingham, printer, whose office is over the prisoner's room; there is a room between them. On the 6th of October we were printing, and had paper and books there belonging to Mr. Wooller. I heard a noise soon after nine o'clock, went down, and saw the prisoner's door burst open. Philp and Twopenny were there; the coals were scattered round the room by the door; the partition was red hot, but not in flames; the coals were in flames, and the room full of smoke - water was thrown on them - the grate felt quite warm, and a few ashes remained at the bottom - the coals could not have got on the floor by accident. I had seen the prisoner go out of his room about half-past seven o'clock that evening, with a female - I saw him shut the door, but am not sure that be locked it - and heard him say that the premises had been burnt down twice before; that they considered it was by accident, but he considered it was done on purpose. I saw him afterwards in custody of the watchman, and one of the boys. I heard him say, with an oath, that he saw the place on fire when he came away - that he did not care about the house, and would leave it burning - he seemed intoxicated, and stamped about.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was present when this was said - A. Philp, Twopenny, and Downes, who are printers' boys, and Gogan, a journeyman, and Plumber, a printer, were present - Moore, the constable, I think was present, and must have heard it. I never played tricks with him.

Q. Did you not tell Mary Baxter , that you meant to have a d - d good lark with blackey that night - A. No. I told her, about six o'clock, that they meant to have a good lark.

Q. Who were

"they?" - A. One Parsons was going to let a cracker off - that was generally known.

Q. You said

"Old woman, which way is blackey gone" - A. I asked which way he was gone, and said, they meant to let off a cracker, and asked, if he would come back, and that when he did, they were going to have a good lark with him - I did not say we; he is often tipsey, and quarrelling, and I consider him as bad as the rest, as he took so much notice of them.

COURT. Q. Did you mention before the magistrate, about his saying he saw the place on fire, and did not care a d - n about it - A. No. I was not asked the question. I stated it to the Grand Jury. I did not remember it at the time.

EDWARD MOORE . I am a patrol of St. Bride's. On the 6th of October, about nine o'clock, my attention was called to the prisoner's room by a young man - I went there. I found it broken open, and about a shovel full of cinders drawn from the wainscoat, and scattered about, and water thrown over them - a hole was burnt through the wainscoat - the fire was then out - the bars of the grate were hot - the fire could not have been a great while out of it - there was nothing in the grate. I went in search of the prisoner, and found him at the watch-house about ten o'clock that night, and took him to the counter. He kept saying he was innocent.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not tell you he set the place on fire - A. No - I never heard anything of the kind.

COURT. Q. Were you with him at the watch-house at the same time as Downes - A. Yes. I did not hear him say he saw the place on fire, or anything to that effect. I did not consider him intoxicated.

EDWARD COUSINS . I am a constable, and was at the watch-house; the prisoner was brought there about half-past nine o'clock - he declared his innocence - he was at the watch-house half an hour before I got there. I asked him for the key of the room - he pulled it out, and said

he would give it to nobody, till he gave it up to Swan at Christmas, but not before. I do not think he was quite sober. I went to the premises in about two hours - a hole was burnt through the partition. I have brought part of the partition here.

Q. You examined the room - A. Yes - there appeared to have been a good fire in the grate. I did not hear him say he saw the place on fire, and left it to be burnt. Moore was at the watch-house when he was first brought, but I was not.

JOHN PHILP . I work for Mr. Edgerley, at these premises. On the 6th of October, about seven o'clock, or half-past, I heard a noise, and sent Twopenny down, and about nine o'clock he gave an alarm. I went down with several others, and broke open the door - the coals were against the partition, in a heap, and the partition burning. I went with Moore in search of the prisoner, found him in Fleet-street - a boy was with me then, but not Moore; he said

"Are you going to murder me, or cut my throat, or what." I went to the watch-house with him, and staid till Cousins came; he said

"D - n the fire, I saw the fire alight, and locked the door, and came out, the premises do not belong to me;" he repeated it several times. I do not know whether this was before or after Cousins came in.

Cross-examined. Q. Moore was standing close to him at the time, was not he - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the magistrate about his saying this - A. No - I did not think of it at the time.

JURY. Q. You are on your oath, and the man's life at stake, be careful what you say - had you not been having a lark with him - A. No - I had not been there for three weeks before till that night - not a single word was uttered to me about a lark. I do not think I saw Downes till the door was burst open.

JURY to DOWNES. Q. You were privy to a lark being played with him - A. I knew it was to be played - a squib was hung to a string, and put through his trap door. I should think the wood would burn through in the course of a few minutes.

Q. If the fire was taken out of the grate two hours before this time, would it be warm - A. I should think not.

CHARLES SPRINGSGUTH . I am apprentice to Mr. Dean, who has an office in Crown-court. On the 6th of October, I was on these premises - the errand-boy gave an alarm. I went down on the first floor, and saw the boards all on fire - we burst open the door, and found lighted coals placed against the wainscot, and the partition burnt through. I helped to put the fire out. I got Moore, and found Rogeson on the opposite side of the way, and went to the watch-house with him, and remained there till Cousins came - he did not appear to me to be in liquor; he said

"D - n fire, I see fire light burn, come out, lock door."

COURT. Q. Did you mention this before the magistrate - A. I was not asked.

Q. You were told to state all you knew - A. Yes. I did not think of it.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating the charge to be founded in conspiracy, to oblige him to quit the premises; that he had received every possible insult from the printer's boys, who had put fire-works under his door, and find a pistol through a hole into his room; he had not insured the premises, and therefore could have no interest in destroying them.

ANN WILSON . I know all the printers' boys, who have been examined. On the 6th of October, I was at the prisoner's academy, looking up his linen, several fire-works were let off - he said he had been annoyed by them all the evening - three squibs came under the door while I sat there, and a pistol was let off - I was alarmed, and wished to leave - I left in about ten minutes, and as I went through the court, three of these boys said

"D - n him, we will do for him to night," and while I was buying a pennyworth of pears at the bottom of the court, one of the boys came and said to the woman,

"Do you know where blackey is gone?" she said she did not; he said

"Do you know if he is going to return to night, for if he will not, we are going to have a d - d lark with him." I went home

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What led you to his room - A. I cleaned his apartment - he does not live at the academy. I left the room between seven and eight o'clock - he came down the court while I stood there, and said he was going to his washerwoman, to take the linen away - there was a middling fire in the grate when I left - I threw a few coals on.

MARY BAXTER . On the 6th of October, I was at my stall. Downes came to me and said

"Old woman, which way is blackey gone?" and asked if I thought he would return that night, and said

"if he does not, we mean to have a d - d good lark with him" - I am sure he said we. One evening, about a month ago, I was in the prisoner's room, lighting the fire, and he complained that he had lost his key, and while I was there, it was thrown under the door, and a person ran up stairs.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you - A. I used to light his fire and sweep his room in the morning, as the other woman could not do it in the morning. Wilson was present when Downes said this

JOHN COOK . I have known the prisoner about fourteen months. A few evenings before this occurred, I was coming down stairs, and saw lighted paper and gunpowder poked under the prisoner's door - he assisted in putting it out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-101

1402. JAMES FAHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , eighteen shillings, and two sixpences , the monies of Barnabas Flaxman .

BARNABAS FLAXMAN . I was on Snow-hill, on the 15th of October, and saw the prisoner - he asked me if I wanted a situation - I said Yes I did not know him; he said a gentleman had spoken to him for a servant. I went with him to a public-house; he wrote me a note to the gentleman, and after that, said he would go with me himself, for the gentleman would be in town in about half an hour. I went with him to the Exchange; he told me to wait on the steps until he came back, which he did in a few minutes, and pulled out one or two sovereigns, and asked me for change. I gave him 18 s. and two sixpences - he turned away without giving me the sovereign, and said he would be back in a minute or two, and would give it to me again - he never came at all.

ROBERT POPE . I took the prisoner into custody. I live at the bottom of Lloyd's Coffee-house. I have often

seen him there. I took him last Sunday, when he was on the stairs with a poor sailor lad.

Prisoner's Defence. I came down in about an hour and a half, and he was gone.

GUILTY Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-102

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1403. THOMAS LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a brace, value 2 s., and a file, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward May and Aaron Morrit , his masters.

The prosecutors did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18231022-103

1404. ABRAHAM ALEXANDER and WILLIAM BRAZIER were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a cask, value 6 d., and three gallons of spruce, value 12 s. , the goods of William Summerland .

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a watchman. On the night of the 18th of September, about eight o'clock, I saw three persons coming up a dark entry towards Nightingale-lane, one after the other - the middle one had a cask on his shoulder. Alexander, who was the man behind, sung out

"Drop it, Drop it" - it was dropped. I picked it up, and turning round, seized Alexander - the others ran off.

WILLIAM SUMMERLAND . I keep the Crown, public-house, Merlin's-rents, Nightingale-lane . Alexander was in my tap-room, with several others, on this evening, for an hour and a half, and about half-past ten o'clock I saw several of them go out. There was a three gallon cask of spruce in front of my bar, an hour before. The watchman came and asked if I had lost anything, and I missed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE COLE . I am a goldsmith. I was at the Crown, and saw Alexander there - Brazier came in afterwards; they sat together in one box, with several others. I saw them all go out of the tap-room, and after that found Alexander at the watch-house. He denied having been to the Crown.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a constable. On the 19th of September, I took Brazier in Star-alley.

ALEXANDER'S Defence. I went to the Crown to meet a man, who owed me 8 s., and found several people, who said I should find him at the Golden Anchor. I was going home, and saw two men with the cask; they dropped it almost on my toe, and ran off. I knew myself innocent, and stopped.

ALEXANDER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

BRAZIER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-104

Before Mr. Recorder.

1405. JOSEPH SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , thirty pairs of boots, value 3 l., and four pairs of shoes, value 12 s., the goods of Thomas Crawley , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18231022-105

1406. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Baxter on the King's highway, on the 29th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 30 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; a key, value 2 d., and three half-crowns , his property.

JOHN BAXTER . I am servant to Mr. Rolph, a publican, who lives at Camberwell. On the 29th of September, I went with my brother and brother-in-law, to the Three Crowns, public-house, Mile-end, about nine o'clock at night. I then lived with my brother at Stratford; we staid there till between eleven and twelve o'clock. I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated, but my brother-in-law would carry me on his back - I was not too tipsy to walk, but he said I was. My brother stopped behind. The prisoner asked my brother-in-law if he should take me; he had been in our company drinking. My brother-in-law left me in his possession, and went back to my brother - I did not object to his carrying me; he took me down a lane, and asked for my watch; I said I had none; he took me a little farther, threw me down, put his hand over my month, and took my watch and money. I tried to cry out, but his hand was over my mouth. I asked him the way to Stratford, as I was never in the lane before. I met three men, who took me down the lane into the road. When I asked the prisoner the way, he took me up, and threw me down violently, and said that was the way. He ran one way and I the other. I did not mention what had happened till next day, except to the men who shewed me the way home. I got home about twelve or one o'clock, and told my brother. I have recovered my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Neither of your brothers are here - A. No; they live at Stratford. It was Stepney-fair time. I have been living with Rolfe since, and not with Ellis, the officer. My brother went to Whitechapel office next day, and Ellis came to our house in the evening. I did not tell the prisoner's attorney that the examination would be at Bow-street. The prisoner's father-in-law returned me my watch last Sunday week, and I received 2 l. before that. I was as sensible as I am now.

Q. Do not you know that the watch was taken from you because you was so beastly drunk you could not take care of it; did not your brother tell you so - A. No.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a constable of Bow-street. About the 1st of October, I heard of this robbery, and apprehended the prisoner at the Three Tuns, public-house, at Bow, last Thursday night, and said I wanted him for robbing Baxter. He said he was very sorry for what he had done, and blamed his wife for urging him to do it. He said he had pawned the watch. The prosecutor had recovered it before I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Your business lays at Bow-street office - A. No; not particularly. My station is principally in Whitechapel. I take my charges to Lambeth-street, generally.

Prisoner's Defence. We were all in liquor. This lad's brother-in-law took him on his back, then asked me to carry him, which I did, and we both fell down. I know

nothing of taking the watch, but found it in my possession next morning.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person only .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-106

1407. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Smith , on the King's highway, on the 22d of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 8 s. , his property.

JOHN SMITH . I am a journeyman hatter , and work for Mr. Hart, Lamb-street, Spitalfields. On the 22d of October, about a quarter past eleven o'clock at night, I was passing the Windsor Castle, public-house, on the City side of the bridge, in the City-road - the prisoner came up to me with a man, and demanded some halfpence to get a pint of ale; they were strangers to me. I told them I had none. The prisoner struck me on the left temple with his fist, and made me stagger; he then took my hat off, and ran away with it - the other man followed him. I pursued, and got my hand round his neck, endeavouring to get my hat from under his right arm - he threw me down; I held him, and he fell down also - he got my fingers into his mouth, and bit them. I called out Watch and Murder; the watchman, a young man, and several others, came up directly - the other man ran away. The prisoner was secured with the hat under his arm. I held him till the watchman came up, and then let go - he ran some distance, but the watchman secured him; somebody picked the hat up, and gave it to me. I never lost sight of him; he appeared very drunk.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He is one of Mr. Pickford's men - A. Yes. I did not think he was larking; his companion laughed. I did not throw stones at him. He came up to me in a reeling drunken way.

JOHN FOWLER . I am the watchman - my beat is on the bridge. I saw the prisoner running along with the hat under his arm, ten or twelve yards from the prosecutor. I stopped him, and asked if it belonged to him - he dropped it, and offered me 1 s. to let him go.

Cross-examined. Q. He had a cut on his head - A. Yes; he fell against the wall and cut it. He was very much intoxicated.

GEORGE HOOKER . I am a shoemaker. On Wednesday evening last, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, I heard the cry of Watch and Murder, and saw the prisoner running along by Pickford's wall, with the hat under his arm - I stopped him; he appeared drunk, and offered the watchman 1 s. to let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN INWOOD . I am a watchman. I came up on hearing the alarm, and assisted in securing him. I asked how he came to bite the prosecutor's finger - he said, that in the skirmish he felt something in his mouth, and bit it, not knowing what it was.

Prisoner's Defence. It was all a lark. The boy was saucy, and I knocked his hat off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-107

1408. ISABELLA SULLIVAN , CATHERINE FITZGERALD , and ELIZABETH CODEY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Barnes , with intent to rob him, and his monies from his person feloniously to steal .

The prosecutor had accompanied two women to a house of ill-fame, and was detained for payment of 1 s. for the rent of the room. The Court ruled that this was not an assault with intent to rob.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-108

1409. SAMUEL WINSTANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , seven brass cocks, value 18 d.; a brass burner, value 6 d., and 2 lbs. of metal, value 1 s. , the goods of the Gas-light and Coke Company ; and WILLIAM COWLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer. On Monday, the 20th of October, about half-past seven o'clock at night, I was in Vine-street, Chandos-street, with another man, and saw Cowley behind the counter of an iron shop - there was a woman in the shop; she gave Cowley a cloth; he shook this metal out of it, and put it under the counter. I was looking through the window. I went in, and asked what he had got from that woman - he said, Nothing. I said I was sure he had, for I saw it, and shewed him my staff - he then handed two or three gas-pipes from under the counter. I said they were not all, I was sure; he then gave me seven cocks and a tube from under the counter, where I had seen him put them - I asked if they were all - he said Yes, they were all he had received; that it weighed 3 lbs., and he had given 1 s. 6 d. for it. I cannot say whether he had paid the woman any money, as I turned my head to call Godfrey. I took the things into my possession, and gave the woman in charge of Gray, and went with her to the White Horse, public-house, St. Martin's-lane - I saw Winstanley there; Gray shewed him one of the cocks, and asked if he had sent his wife to sell anything; he said he had; that he worked for the Gaslight Company, and had picked them up by a little at a time. They weigh 3 lbs., and are worth 1 s. 6 d.

THOMAS GRAY . Winstanley's wife was given into my charge. I took her to the White Horse, and produced the cocks to the prisoner; he said he gave them to her to sell; that he worked for the Gas-light Company, and picked them up about the premises, but previous to that I took him and his wife to Cowley's, and asked him if he bought that metal of the woman, and produced it to him; he said he had bought the cocks, which weighed 3 lbs., and gave her 1 s. 6 d. for them, but did not own to the pipes. He promised to appear next day, but did not. I went to his house, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He told you he had sent a message to the office - A. No, he said I never told him to come.

JOHN EATON . I am store-keeper to the Company. Winstanley was employed as a labourer. About the 19th of October, I ordered him to clear out a room at the Horseferry-road station; I had put three dozen old cocks into a drawer there, the week before; he had access to them. Upon hearing this charge, I missed ten - here are seven of the same description. I have no doubt of their being the Company's property, and here is a burner I know well.

Cross-examined. Q. There are men they call fitters-up - A. Yes; they work for anybody, and take away old

materials. It is not unusual to find such things in old iron shops. I only know the cocks by their general appearance, but this burner I am sure was in the room a week before.

FREDERICK WINDSOR . I am store-keeper to the Gaslight and Coke Company. Cowley was in their employ eight years ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not a great deal of old pipe and materials sold daily - A. Yes.

WINSTANLEY's Defence. I have been seven years in the service, and two years ago, I was at work in the street with the fitters-up, and have had some of these things ever since.

COWLEY's Defence. I considered it nothing but old metal. The woman said her husband picked it up among some rubbish - I gave her 6 d. a pound, which is the full value.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-109

1410. THOMAS PROSELYTE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 100 lbs. of lead, value 20 s. , the goods of William Wilkinson .

JOHN FROST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 9th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner going along Chiswell-street, carrying a large piece of lead on his shoulder - I went and asked what he had got - he said a piece of lead, that a Mr. Vaughan, a master-carpenter, in Moorfields, gave him; that he and Vanghan were in a contract together, and gave him the lead as his share. I said I should go and see who Vaughan was; he took me to a house in Moorfields; I was not satisfied and detained him - I found the house belonged to Mr. Wilkinson, and was under repair - it weighs 127 lbs.

HUGH CLARK . I am a patrol, and was with Frost; his account is correct.

WILLIAM WARD . I live in Paradise-street, Finsbury. I have lived with Mr. Wilkinson, the upholsterer , for thirty years. I never delivered the prisoner any lead - I have seen him at work on Mr. Wilkinson's premises - I never authorised him to take any lead.

JOHN BAKER . I am a carpenter, and was working on the premises - the prisoner worked there as a bricklayer's labourer.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I am journeyman to Mr. Wilkinson - the prisoner worked on the premises as a bricklayer . I knew nothing of the lead being stolen.

MR. WILLIAM WILKINSON . The premises belong to me. The officer produced the lead - I went and missed some; the gutters had been taken down, and the lead locked up in a room; we missed a cross gutter.

JOHN BAKER re-examined. The whole roof was lowered down, and the gutters with it, two days before the prisoner was taken.

WILLIAM WARD . The roof was taken down, but the ends of the cross gutters remained; this lead matched them, and agreed in length.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-110

1411. JOHN COLLETT and JOHN ANNEREAU were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , thirty yards of floor cloth, value 5 l.; seven yards of holland, value 5 s.; and five screw nuts, value 6 d. , the goods of John Hayward .

JOHN HAYWARD . I am a floor-cloth-manufacturer , and live in Mile-end-road . On the morning of the 27th of September my man came to me and gave me information.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. On Saturday morning I apprehended the prisoners in Little Collingwood-street; they were passing a house I was in, at the back of the prosecutor's premises. I had heard of the robbery, and at No. 4, in Collingwood-street, on the first floor, found this piece of floor-cloth. Johnson occupied the house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is her name Johnson or Williams - A. Johnson. I stopped the prisoners in consequence of what she said. I believe she is a woman of the town - it is a very low neighbourhood.

R. B. SKILLERN. I was with Hall; his account is correct.

PHILIP BLAKE . I am a brewer, and live in Whitechapel-road. I was in company with Hall, and saw the floor, cloth found behind the door. I never saw the prisoners in the house; I fetched Johnson from another house, and found the holland and screw nuts in the same room.

MARY JOHNSON . I lived at No. 4, Collingwood-street, alone - I have known Collett three years. On the evening before the robbery, Collett told me to be at home, (I did not know him before.) I did not stay at home. On the Saturday morning, between one and two o'clock, when I got home, I saw the floor-cloth in the room up stairs, and about twenty minutes after, Collett brought the holland and screw nuts, and gave them into my hands; my door can be opened by pulling a string - Collett knew that; Annereau followed him in, and they both took the floor-cloth up stairs, and told me to open the door to nobody until they came next morning, between nine and ten o'clock, and if not, at six o'clock in the evening - they came between nine and ten o'clock together. I was in a neighbour's house, with the officers, when they passed, and they were taken before they got to my house.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your name - A. I go by the name of Johnson, my married name is Stevens - my name was Lloyd before I married. I see company at times, but since Christmas have got my living by needlework; the officers came to me between eight and nine o'clock. I had not then told them anything. Annereau was never in my house but twice before. I was sober when they brought the holland - they knew how to open the door.

JOHN HAYWARD . The property is mine, and was taken from my premises, which are only enclosed by a sliding door, but they are surrounded by a high wall, and some of my people live on the premises.

COLLETT's Defence. She is a common prostitute - s it possible I should know how to open her door, having been there but twice?

ANNEREAU - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

COLLETT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-111

1412. GEORGE ABSALOM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , nine handkerchiefs, value 9 s. , the goods of John Simmons .

JOHN DAVID SIMMONS . I am the son of John Simmons , pawnbroker , Monmouth-street . These handkerchiefs hung inside the door on the 10th of October, tied up together. I was out when they were stolen. I came home between twelve and one o'clock, and from what the witness said, I went out after the prisoner. I found him in New Compton-street. I charged him with stealing them. He feigned intoxication. I found them in his hat, and brought him back. They have my father's shop ticket on them.

CHARLOTTE ESTHER . I was passing Simmons's house, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchiefs and conceal them under his coat. I gave information, and am certain he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-112

1413. WILLIAM CUMMINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a silver spoon, value 2 s. , the goods of William Culbard .

WILLIAM CULBARD. I am a fishmonger , and live in Gracechurch-street . I did not miss this spoon until the officer brought it to me; it was kept up stairs usually. The prisoner was in my service two months, and had left me five or six days before.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in East Smithfield. On the 13th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner offered this spoon in pawn. I asked where he got it. He said from his mother. I told him to fetch her. He refused, and I detained him, and said, if he did not give up the person he stole it from, I would give him in charge. He then resisted, and struck me in the face, and I gave him in charge.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office charged with stealing the spoon, which Culbard claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-113

1414. CATHERINE HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of October , from a certain evil-disposed person, a copper stew-pan, value 20 s., the goods of James Hames , well knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES HAMES . I am an appraiser , and live in Duke-street, Manchester-square . On the 17th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I missed this stew-pan from my shop; it was safe three hours before. Next morning, about ten o'clock, I found it in Gee's-court. The prisoner was in the shop. I told her it had been stolen from me. She said she bought it of a particular friend, of whom she had bought things before: that she knew where she lived, and would fetch her in a few minutes. I said,

"Fetch the thief, and I will prosecute her." She then said the person told her she had been working at a gentleman's house, who was not able to pay her, and gave her this to sell. She went to fetch the person as I thought. I took the pan to the office, then went into Barrett's-court, where I had seen her go, and met her coming out of No. 8, with two men. They all declared the thief was not there, and had not been there all night. She afterwards said the woman was called Blind Mary, being blind of one eye. I went to the officer, and told him to look for the man who lived in the prisoner's house, and about three o'clock that afternoon she came to me with the daughter of the woman she accused as the thief, and said she was come to beg I would not prosecute the thief or her; and both said, if the mother and her were convicted, one would have seven years and the other fourteen. I said I would prosecute unless she produced her, as I was certain she could if she liked, but if she did she might look for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time in the morning did you first go to the shop - A. About ten o'clock. The pan stood outside the door, exposed for sale, with my mark chalked inside it. She came voluntarily to me. Afterwards a man came to me, who calls himself her husband; she was taken next morning. She said at another time, that the woman she bought it of was drunk on the bed when she went up. I asked why she did not bring her down. She said she promised to follow. She brought a young woman to the office herself.

WILLIAM ALLICK . I am a beadle. Hames gave the prisoner till evening to find the woman she bought the pot of. I was then desired to take her. I went three different times to the house, but could find neither her nor her husband. On Saturday she was brought to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the office to insist on the beadle's coming to take the daughter and another woman, who I heard was concerned. The daughter acknowledged to me the night before that she had received the money her mother got for the pan. I gave myself up at the office.

WILLIAM ALLICK re-examined. My brother officer brought a girl to the office, and I believe by the prisoner's request. I have searched for the mother, but cannot find her. She took me to a house opposite, No. 8, in Barrett's-court, as the house she lived in.

RICHARD BULLARD . I am a cooper, and live in Gee's-court, opposite the prisoner's - she is married. On the evening in question, about seven o'clock, I stood at my door with Mawn, the broker - the prisoner came over to me with this stew-pan, and said,

"What may I give for this, a woman has brought it;" I weighed it in my hand, and said if she gave 7 s. she could not hurt, taking it as old copper. I did not examine it. Her husband not being at home, she did not know the value. Blind Mary was at the door looking after her.

COURT. Q. You advised her to buy it as old copper - - A. Not as old copper; I considered it as old copper. It was dark; I have now a better sight of it. Mawn, the broker, lives in Henrietta-street - I will be bound to say it is not worth above 7 s. Blind Mary used to lead her husband about begging. I went after her, and found she lived at No. 8, Barrett's-court; I went there with the prisoner, but could not find her - she was not laying drunk on the bed. I was about with the prisoner three or four hours, to get a warrant to apprehend the woman. She did not abscond.

JAMES HAMES . The value of it as old copper, is 12 s. - it cost two guineas and a half, and will fetch 30 s. now at any market. I marked it at 28 s., as the lowest price; it is equal to new.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-114

1415. CATHARINE DACRES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , seven sheets, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS . I am a sawyer . The prisoner lodged in my house for five weeks, in the top room; these sheets were in a basket in a lower room - I missed basket and all, about eight o'clock in the evening of Saturday, the 4th of October - they were safe ten minutes before. I did not see her again till Tuesday, when I found her at a public-house, and gave her in charge - she had given no warning; her husband went to look for her, and he never returned.

ALLEN BLISS . I was in the street, near Bond-street. about eleven o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner with a sheet round her, and another round her knee - she asked me to buy them. I told her they were Morris's, as I knew she lodged there; she said a gentleman gave her a guinea, and she had taken them out of pawn. I said Morris would transport me, if I bought them. I told him of it next morning - we both lived with him once.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-115

1416. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 50 lbs. of lead, value 15 s., the goods of William Austin , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

WILLIAM AUSTIN . This lead was fixed to a dormer window of a house I was building in King-street, Finsbury . On the morning of the 2th of September, I found the prisoner in custody with it - it was safe a week before - he is a stranger. I compared it to the dormer, and it matched.

WILLIAM TIPPER . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. On the 25th of October, at ten minutes past eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Castle-street, City-road, with a bag containing lead - two others were with him. I secured him, and asked what he had got - he said he did not know. I took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. I received the lead from Tipper, and compared it with the dormer - it fitted exactly - it is new, and weighs 51 lbs.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-116

1417. RICHARD GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , sixty penny pieces , the monies of John Scott .

ELIZA SCOTT . I am the wife of John Scott , and keep a chandler's shop, in Paradise-row, Chelsea . I used to trust the prisoner with goods till his pension was due. On the 23d of September, he came to ask for provisions. I thought he had had enough for himself, and said I could not let him have it to sell; he then asked for 1 s. - I refused, but told my daughter to give him some bread and butter; he followed me into the back room, and insisted on having two 5 s. papers of penny pieces that were on the drawers. I insisted on his leaving the room; he went out in half an hour, and in about ten minutes, I missed a paper of penny pieces, told an officer, who took him in a quarter of an hour, and found three penny pieces, and 2 s. 6 d. in silver on him - he had a clean shirt and handkerchief on, and before that, he had no shirt on - nobody but him could have taken them.

LUKE NIXON . I am an officer. I took him in Jew's-row, about three o'clock, and told him the charge; he said

"Oh! I shan't go," and struck me; another person who was with me secured him. I found a half crown, and three penny pieces on him.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-117

1418. CHARLES PEACOCK and WILLIAM COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , a live tame goose, price 6 s. , the property of John Rough .

JOHN ROUGH . I am water-bailiff to the City, and live at Fulham , and keep geese on the Green. On the 22d of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, I turned out three geese, and about twelve one was brought to me in a bag, alive - I knew it to be mine.

JOSEPH BALL . I am a gardener, and live at Fulham. I saw a person, who is not here, throw something at the goose, and knock it down - the prisoner Collins held a bag open, while the person who knocked it down put it into the bag. Peacock was in their company all the time. I ran out, and gave information, and he ran off with them. I found them in custody, in about ten minutes, and am certain of them.

JAMES FLOYD . I am gardener to Mr. Rough. I turned three geese out, and about twelve o'clock, saw Collins with this one under his arm - its feet and tail were out of the bag - all three were in a gang; they came by my master's. I heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoners were stopped. Peacock ran a quarter of a mile, but was brought back.

JOHN SMITHERS . I am a patrol. I have the goose.

WILLIAM ROUGH . It is mine.

COLLENS'S Defence. I saw it lying on the Green in a bag, and took it up - a man said,

"Put it down," and I did so.

PEACOCK's Defence. This man overtook me, and asked what it was o'clock; a man came by in a cart, took him, and then me.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

PEACOCK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-118

1419. HENRY WARD and the said CHARLES PEACOCK , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September, a pair of sheets, value 8 s.; a blanket, value 5 s.; and a looking-glass, value 18 d., the goods of James Labdon , in a lodging-room .

ANN LABDON . My husband's name is James - we live in Bennett-street, Westminster . Early in September, I let Peacock a room for a few nights; he afterwards brought Ward, and I then let them the back parlour, at 5 s. 6 d. a week, furnished - they were to pay equal shares; they took it on Saturday, and on Wednesday morning, between five and six o'clock, I heard a bustle in the room, and saw Ward go down with a bundle - I ran to the door and called to Peacock, and said,

"Pray let me have my room - I don't mind; I will forgive you the rent;" he said he was naked, and into the room I must not come - he bolted the door and got out of window. I got into the room at night, and missed this property. I never saw them afterwards.

JAMES LABDON . I went after the prisoners, and found Ward about a week after he left - he was rescued in Duck-lane, but I caught him next night.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I took Ward at the White Lion, public-house, in Duck-lane, among about sixteen bad characters, who tried to rescue him. I got him to the watch-house with much difficulty, but found nothing on him.

WARD's Defence. The things I took out were only my linen for the wash.

PEACOCK's Defence. What the woman says is very wrong - I came back to the house afterwards.

WARD - GUILTY .

PEACOCK - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-119

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1420. JOHN HILL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Dove , on the 30th of September , with intent to steal .

GEORGE HALL . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Dove linen-draper , Newgate-street . On the 30th of September, the prisoner was brought into the shop by a gentleman, who said, in his presence, that he had been attempting to take a piece of Irish out of the window, through the glass. I went away, and do not know what he said to the charge. The gentleman is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-120

1421. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA COX . I am the wife of William Cox . On Saturday, the 4th of October, the prisoner came into our shop, in Little St. Thomas Apostle, for a threepenny mug, and gave me a shilling - I thought it good, and gave him change. Bluison came up, and asked me, in the prisoner's presence, if it was good. I shewed it him, and he said it was bad. The prisoner ran out, but was caught a few doors off - he threw the mug down on the step of the door. I marked the shilling, and gave it to Bluison.

GEORGE BLUISON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner in Cox's shop - I went in when I saw him pay the shilling, and said,

"Is that a good shilling?" The prosecutrix said,

"I think it is," and rung it on the counter; he slipped by me, and ran out - I pursued and took him twenty yards off. I searched him, and took out 5 s. 6 d. in copper, and three good sixpences. He had four eggs, some apples, pears, biscuits, and other trifling articles. Caesar looked down close to where he stood, and found two bad shillings rolled up in paper, separate one from the other.

ELIZABETH CAESAR . I was in the shop when Turner was being searched. I found a bit of paper where he had stood, wrapped up, and containing two shillings, which I delivered to Bluison.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint. The three shillings are counterfeit, and of the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold two whips to a man in Bishopsgate-street; he paid me in copper - my wife keeps a shop - I thought it would be useful to her, and kept it - I did not know the shilling was bad.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined One Year . - and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18231022-121

1422. MICHAEL TOBIN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-122

1423. THOMAS MORFORD was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JAMES PEARCE . I live with Mr. Waghall, brickmaker, at Ewell. On the 30th of May I brought a mare to Smithfield to sell. I saw the prisoner and another person at the corner of a street by Smithfield Bars. The prisoner crossed the road; his companion followed him. The prisoner asked the price of the mare. I said 5 l. He offered 3 l. I refused it. He then asked if I would take 3 l. 10 s. I refused. He left me, and in about twenty minutes I saw him down on the pavement, near Charterhouse-lane. His companion left him, and came and asked me to move the mare down there, which I did. The prisoner asked me to move her up and down, which I did. He then offered four sovereigns, which I refused. The prisoner then said,

"Come, young man I will treat you with a pint of porter for showing us the mare." We went to the Red Cow, public-house, in the lane. I had a pot of porter, which the prisoner paid for, and while we were drinking it, his companion said, if I would take 5 s. out of the five sovereigns, they would take the mare. I consented. The prisoner said we must have the bridle, cloth and saddle into the bargain, which I refused, but said I would buy him a new halter, or give him 1 s. to buy one. I went into the market, leaving them in conversation. I returned with a halter; the prisoner took it out of my hand, and put it on the mare: His companion gave me five sovereigns. I gave him 5 s. He told his companion to take her to the Ram and give her a feed; he asked for my master's address, which I gave him; he asked how far I had to go. I said fourteen miles; he said I had better go by the coach immediately, as I could go for 1 s. I then suspected the money was not good; I rung it, and told him I thought it was bad. He assured me it was good. I came down into the market, and went into a shop and shewed it to a gentleman, who said it was counterfeit. I never lost sight of it. I came out, and got Hull's assistance; he went with me to Stainton. I shewed them the five sovereigns. We went and found the prisoner in the market. Stainton told him he was concerned in passing bad sovereigns; he said he had nothing to do with it. Two more were found on him at the Compter, with my master's address in his pocket-book.

WILLIAM HULL . I am an officer. I attended in Smithfield on the 30th of May, and went with Pearce in search of the prisoner, and found him. I took him to the Compter. On searching his right-hand pocket, I found five good shillings and a few halfpence. He pulled a small bag out of his left-hand pocket, containing two bad sovereigns, which I marked in his presence.

JAMES STAINTON . I am an officer. I was on duty in Smithfield, and took the prisoner. He said he knew nothing of it. He was trying to get something out of his coat as Hull was searching him, I put my hand in, and took out this pocket-book; it contains direction of Mr. Waghall, Ewell, Surrey.

JAMES PEARCE . He wrote that direction himself.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money as good,

for two horses I had sold the day before in Blackfriar's-road.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-123

1424. JOHN BUTLER , JOSEPH WRIGHT , and WILLIAM DAFFIN , were indicted for a conspiracy .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JONES . I am in the service of Messrs. Russell and Co. of the Bell Inn, Friday-street, and have been so thirteen years. In Michaelmas, 1822, I began to deliver parcels. The Excise Office was in my district, I had a delivery-book and tickets to correspond. The book was to be signed by the person who received the parcels; the amount of carriage and the address was entered - the amount included the carriage and cartage, and is entered in a column in the book. I have a ticket also mentioning the name and the amount of carriage. About March, 1822. I was in the habit of going to the Excise-Office with parcels; the three defendants were employed in the warehouse-keeper's office as porters - when I went to deliver parcels I saw all three of them; on one occasion Wright and Butler asked what I was going to stand? Daffin was present; it was soon after I began to deliver parcels. I told them I got nothing by the parcels, and could not afford to give anything. This conversation passed a dozen times before I consented to do it. They always spoke to me in this way, and generally all three were present. After this conversation I made out a fresh ticket, and destroyed the original one. The tickets I brought to the porters were backed by one of them, with the name of the place it came from. I then took it to Mr. Smart's office, and got the money. The signature in the book was close to the sum charged, and was signed by the porter. I made no alteration in the delivery-book, but I made out a fresh ticket several times, for the purpose of charging more than the original, and more than was stated in the delivery-book; the delivery-book was not altered. Smart paid me the sum on the new ticket. I believe it was in July, 1822, that I first consented to this plan. I continued to do so until the 14th of October last; on that day I took four parcels to the Office, and delivered them to Butler, and told him that from that time I would have nothing more to do with overcharging. He said I need not be afraid of having 1 s. on three which came to 9 s. I went there after that day, and Butler told me, in the presence of the others, that it was found out. He said it was blown, and desired me to take no notice of his knowing anything about it.

Q. When Smart paid you, what was done with the overplus money - A. I gave them money to drink, or went over the way and ordered drink for them; we divided the rest of the money between us; sometimes I would give them 6 d. out of the overcharge, and at other times a pot of beer; I did not give them exact proportions of the overcharge. The next time I saw Butler was before the end of October; he came to me at the Bell, and wished me not to tell that he knew anything of it; I would not satisfy him - I told him I should do the best for myself.

Q. Turn to the delivery-book of the 18th of July, 1822. Do you recollect delivering on that day any parcel at the Excise-Office - A. Yes, a parcel is charged here 18 s. 8 d. including cartage; I saw the entry signed by Butler; he signed it when I delivered the parcel. The ticket I took with me that day I destroyed, and made a fresh one. Butler knew I had destroyed it and made a fresh one at the time he signed the book. I believe this to be the ticket (looking at one) it is my writing, but is not dated. I have overcharged 8 d.; I charged it 19 s. 4 d. On the 20th July, 1822, there is an entry signed

" John Wright ;" I saw him sign it. The charge in the book is 10 s.; I charged 11 s. 3 d. on the fresh ticket. I accounted to my master for 10 s On the 22d of July I find an entry signed by Butler, charged 16 s. I destroyed that ticket, and charged 16 s. 6 d. on the new one, which money I received from Smart. On the 25th of July there is another entry signed by Butler, charged in the book 2 s.; I made out another ticket for 2 s. 6 d. This was a small parcel, and in these cases the porters do not indorse the back of the tickets. I received 2 s. 6 d. from Smart for it. On the 12th of August there is an entry signed by Butler charged 3 s. 6 d.; I destroyed the ticket, and charged one 4 s.; Smart paid me this sum. On the 17th of August there is an entry signed by Butler, for 2 s.; and another on the same day, signed by him for 1 s. 8 d. I have charged on the new tickets 2 s. 6 d. and 2 s. 9 d. On the 22d of August there is an entry of 2 s.; I charged 2 s. 6 d. On the 23d of September a charge of 11 s. 8 d.; I made out a fresh ticket for 12 s. 2 d.; Butler endorsed it. On the 26th of September there is a parcel charged 19 s. 3 d.; I charged 19 s. 9 d.; Butler endorsed the ticket. On the 3d of October here is an entry signed W. Daffin, charged 2 s.; I have charged 2 s. 6 d. Here is an entry on the same day of 14 s. 3 d. signed by Daffin; I destroyed the original ticket, and charged on the new one 14 s. 9 d. I made out these new tickets in the office, in the presence of the porters; sometimes they were all there, and sometimes not. Butler wished me, on the 14th of October, to make a greater charge than I did; I was going to put the 6 d. on; all the defendants were in the office; Butler said I might as well add 2 s. as 6 d. I said I did not like to go to such an extent. He said I need not be afraid, for if anything happened he would let me know of it. Here is five parcels, signed for by Daffin on the 10th, charged 7 s. 3 d. - 16 s. 9 d.; two for 6 s.; 4 s. 1 d. I charged more for them all; 9 s. for the 6 s. - 17 s. 3 d. for the 16 s. 9 d. I have no ticket for the others. Butler looked over me while I made out these tickets, and Daffin was opening the parcels. Butler indorsed these two tickets. Butler said there should be two tickets made for the two parcels, and I might as well add 2 s. as 6 d. On the 30th of September here is a parcel charged 14 s., signed by Wright; I destroyed the ticket, and charged 14 s. 6 d. on a new one, with his knowledge. I gave the surplus money on the 10th to Daffin, in the presence of all the defendants.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Can you recollect the day when this wicked system commenced - A. It was in July. I never did such a thing before. I did it by their permission. I always carried blank tickets with me, as I sometimes lost my tickets, or had none for porterage or empty boxes, and was obliged to make them out. I never got any printed. Chace, the clerk, knew that I carried blank tickets, and my master also knew it. I got them out of the drawer, which is always open. Chace

never knew of my making an overcharge. He knew I had blank tickets to use, if necessary.

Q. Were you ever at Bow-street - A. I was taken there eight weeks ago out of spite and malice, and charged with stealing. Mr. Russell bailed me. I have heard no more of the charge.

MR. BERNARD. Q. Was it before the last Sessions that you were sent to Bow-street - A. Yes; and after this charge was made, it has not been proceeded in. I used to send the liquor over to the prisoners. Chace always entered the parcels, and made out the delivery tickets. He has seen me take blank tickets.

COURT. Q. Did he know for what purpose you took them - A. He knew I filled one up when I lost one, or one was wanted for porterage. He has seen me take them, and never told me not.

JURY. Q. Were you discharged from Bow-street, or held to bail - A. Discharged; my master became bail for my appearance on the following Thursday, which I did, and was discharged.

WILLIAM SMART . I am superintending clerk of the Excise stores. My duty is to pay for all parcels that come from the country. The duty of the defendants was to assist me. When large parcels are brought into the office, they cut them open, to see where they come from. The delivery-book is brought to me. I look at it, and pay the ticket; when very busy, I have asked them to sign the delivery-book. It is not their particular duty. I paid all the tickets produced, according to the amounts charged upon them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. All the defendants came to your office recommended by Noblemen - A. Yes; Butler has been there four years; and the others a year and a half.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am the second clerk in the Store-keeper's Office of Excise. When Smart is not in the way I officiate for him. On the 22d of September, 1822, I find by this book, that I officiated for him. I find a parcel charged 12 s. 2 d. which came on that day. The ticket was indorsed in the hand-writing of Butler, and is signed in the delivery-book by him, and only charged there 11 s. 8 d. His signature is close to the sum charged.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Whoever is in the office endorses the parcel, and sends it for payment - A. Yes; and signs the delivery-book.

JOHN CHASE . I am in the service of Messrs. Russell and Co. Jones was out of the employ nine months, except for that time he has been there as long as me, which is eight years. Jones was delivering porter when I first went there - the Excise-office is in his district. I make the entries in the delivery-book; he was furnished with a book of the charges. I have seen the several tickets produced - they are not made out by me, but by him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He left you for about nine months - A. Yes; it was not for any dishonesty that I know of. I never knew of his having a blank ticket; if I had I certainly should have prevented it. I never suffered one to be taken away, and never saw him take one, or I should have hindered him. March, 1822, was the time he came back - he was delivering porter before he left.

HENRY EVANS . I am assistant in the coach-office. I remember Butler coming to the office soon after the discovery - he asked me if Jones was on the premises; I said if he was he would find him in the yard.

BUTLER - GUILTY .

WRIGHT - GUILTY .

DAFFIN - GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-124

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1425. HENRY WORMS and SOLOMON WORMS were indicted for feloniously receiving two iron weights, the goods of Samuel Bye , they well knowing the same to have been stolen .

SAMUEL BYE . I am a green-grocer , and live in Beauchamp-street, Brooke's-market. On the 14th of October, two weights were stolen from my shop, after seven o'clock in the evening. I found them next morning, in Worms' back premises - they keep a marine store shop, in Fox's-court; about a hundred yards from my house. I called on them, and asked if they had lately bought two weights - the prisoner Henry said, we have not; the son said,

"We have, father," and fetched them out - the boy who took them received 3 1/2 d. a piece for them; they are worth 2 s. 3 d. each. The boy who took the weights is named Ballard. I told the prisoners they ought to know better than to purchase such things of a boy. The father said to the son,

"If you have bought them, fetch them;" the son said,

"You gave me 2 d. to help pay for the last weight I bought" - he did not deny it at the time, but he did at Hatton-garden. Ballard said he received 2 d. from the elder prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Ballard go with you to Worms's shop - A. Yes; he said he took one at a time, and another afterwards, that the younger prisoner gave him 3 1/2 d. each for them, and that the son got 2 d. from the father, in part payment for one. I do not know whether the weights are standard - I have not had them tried since they were stolen. The younger prisoner said his father was not at home at the time.

GEORGE BALLARD . I first took one weight to Fox's-court to sell; I took it out of Bye's shop. I saw young Worms, who gave me 3 1/2 d. for it. He asked if I had any thing else to sell; I said, Yes, and he said,

"Go and fetch it." When I brought the second weight, he said he had only 1 1/2 d., and went to his father for 2 d. to make up the sum.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the father present - A. Yes, he was in the shop when the son asked for the halfpence to pay for the second weight; he was not there when I took the first. It is a large shop, and he was attending to his business: it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. Old Worms took the 2 d. out of his pocket.

SAMUEL BYE . Ballard told me that young Worms asked his father for some halfpence - I know nothing farther about it myself. I heard the son say,

"Father, we bought the weights last night." The ring only is wrought iron.

MATTHIAS WELDHAM . I am a constable. The weights were given to me by Mr. Bye. The father surrendered at the office.

THOMAS ENNIS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Brook's-market. I saw Ballard, who said he should like these weights. I said,

"Do not take them, for if you do, I'll tell Mr. Bye."

The prisoners called the following witnesses.

ANN EDWARDS . I am servant at the Rose, public-house, Hatton-wall. On the evening of last Tuesday fortnight, the elder prisoner was at our house; he had two glasses of gin and water, a pint of half and half, and two pipes of tobacco. I am sure he was there after nine o'clock that evening, because I take out my beer exactly at nine, and I found him there when I returned - I believe he had been there a length of time, but I cannot say. He was taken to Hatton-garden Office next morning, and I was sent over as a witness.

SARAH WORMS . I am daughter to the elder prisoner. I was at home yesterday fortnight. I do not remember the boy Ballard coming there on that day - I was at home from five to ten o'clock in the evening; I remember lending my brother 2 d. to pay for something. It was long before nine o'clock.

LEWIS WORMS . I am brother to the last witness. I went home about half-past eight o'clock; I do not live at my father's. I was told he was at the Rose - I did not leave the house till the watchman cried nine o'clock, when my father had not returned.

- DUNN. I live in Fox's-court, and know the prisoners. Sometimes I go to the Rose - I was there on the night in question, and saw the prisoner there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-125

Before Mr. Recorder.

1426. JOHN TEW was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of July , a book, value 2 s., the goods of our Lord the King , he well knowing it to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Venables .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a constable of Marlborough-street. In July last I passed by the prisoner's shop, in Barrett's-court, Oxford-street; he keeps an old book-shop. I asked for Blackstone's Commentaries - he appeared to suspect my intentions. I bought an old dictionary. After some hesitation, he said, he had an odd volume of Blackstone. I wished to see it; and he produced this book (produced.) He said, he had just torn the cover off it. I asked what he wanted for it - he replied 6 d. I said he might as well let me have the cover; and he did so. I then said the book had been stolen from Marlborough-street office, because it contained the office mark, in gilt letters - he said perhaps it might. I went to the office, and found such a book had been lost.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is there only one book deficient at the office - A. No. It was a mere waste paper price; he made no sort of difficulty about it.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. A volume of Blackstone was missed in April or May. This is the book. The set are worth 1 l. - it is the eleventh edition, dated 1791; it has the name of the office on it in gilt letters.

Cross-examined. Q. Waste paper of this description is worth 3 d. per pound - A. Yes. I know Thomas Venables . I think that if this book was perfect, it would have been worth 2 s. or 3 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-126

1427. THOMAS KEDDY , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , a Russian hide, value 5 s. , the goods of John Bird , his master.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BIRD . I live in Hatton-garden, and am a bookbinder ; the prisoner has been in my employ seven or eight months. I received information from Mr. Reeve, a pawnbroker. The officer came and took the prisoner, before I knew any thing of the matter. His apron was taken off, and a skin was found under his waistcoat, bound round his body; our manufactory is in the adjoining house.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I am an officer. I was sent for by a young man, belonging to Mr. Reeves, of Snow-hill; he said a man was waiting to pledge a skin; in consequence of this, I went to the prosecutor. I shewed the skin to Mr. Bird. I took the prisoner into the back premises, and unbuttoned his clothes. I found another skin round his body; while taking it from him, he put something in his mouth, and swallowed it; I supposed it to be a duplicate. I found a part of another duplicate, which had droped in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it from want. I have a wife and three children, and this is my first offence.

MR. BIRD re-examined. His wages were 34 s. a-week, and he could get 5 s. or 6 s. more at over work - I believe he has a wife and three children.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-127

1428. MARY ANN PEARSE , was indicted for stealing on the 4th of October , one sovereign, the money of Samuel Bolton , from his person .

SAMUEL BOLTON . I live at Wallingford, in Berkshire, and am a labouring man . On the 4th of October, I was in London. I came up to receive my pension at Chelsea. I went to the George and Ball public-house, St. Ann's-street, Westminster ; there was a woman there drunk - it was near Westminster Abbey. I went there between six and seven o'clock. I had had some beer, but was not quite drunk. I believe I had a pot of porter there. I had a sovereign and some silver in my pocket; I was sober enough to know that; I had been with a woman before, but I was sober and solid then. I had been in company with women during the day. I do not know whether they were women of the town. I had some beer with them, on my way from Chelsea. After I got to the George and Ball, I went to sleep - there were several other men and women in the box with me. I awoke in half an hour, and missed all my money - the button was broken off my breeches pocket. I do not know that I went to the George and Ball with another woman. There was a black woman came with us from Chelsea - she might have gone into the public-house. I do not know who took the money.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am the landlord of the George and Ball - this man came to my house a little intoxicated; a

black woman came in five or ten minutes afterwards - she appeared to be acquainted with him - she said she had been in the habit of going to Chelsea with him for six years. They sat in the front of the bar at first, and then went into the tap-room. I saw the prisoner at my house that day. I do not know whether she sat in the same box with Bolton. I did not hear him complain of losing the money. When I heard of it, I caused the prisoner to be taken into custody. The men had not left the house. The prisoner was bustling by the bar, and said she was going for a pipe - she is known by the name of Lady Ann Barrymore . She denied stealing it; some shillings and sixpences were found on her, but no half crowns.

JOHN WESTERLAY . I am a seaman. I was at the public-house, and saw a black woman with the prosecutor, in the same box. I saw the prisoner in the house - she had two glasses of spirits, and some beer; she said she was just come out of Tothill-fields prison - she went and sat down by Bolton, who was asleep. The black woman went out for a few minutes. The prisoner had only been there a few minutes, before she jumped up, and said,

"Come along," to me. I went to the door with her - she said I have eased him, and gave me 1 s. I never saw her before. I have heard talk of Lady Barrymore. I went and told Mr. Austin, because I supposed the man had lost his money, My master went in, and awoke him - he said his money was all gone. The prisoner was brought, or came back.

THOMAS AUSTIN re-examined. I had changed a sovereign for the prosecutor, and gave him six half-crowns - he said he had lost half crowns.

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am a private soldier. I was at the public-house - the prisoner sat on the left of the prosecutor. I did not see her leave him suddenly; I saw her hand in his pocket - I did not speak to her; she went out shortly after. The black woman was not near him at the time. She did not come back that I know of.

EDWARD LIMWELL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - she had two half-crowns and some halfpence, but no sovereign.

ELIZABETH MARSH . I keep a straw bonnet shop, in Tothill-street. On the 4th of October, I sold one to the prisoner; she gave me three half-crowns, about seven o'clock in the evening. I am sure it was her; she had other silver besides; I did not see a sovereign among it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-128

1429. JACK BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , five handkerchiefs, value 10 s. , the goods of Cornelius Wright .

ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I am the wife of Cornelius Wright , who is a confectioner , and lives in Southampton-row, Russell-square . The handkerchiefs were taken out of the linen drawer. The prisoner was a servant to a lodger of mine - I saw them on the Saturday before the Tuesday when they were missed; he had no business in that room, except to deliver a message. I did not discover the robbery till the lodgers had left the house. Two drawers were broken open. I followed him to the Pultney Hotel, where his master had gone to lodge - I found the handkerchiefs and the other articles under the bed which the servant said belonged to him. The prisoner denied the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. (Through an Intrepreter.) The servant had some things of mine, and I took them by way of reprisal. I am a Lascar, and cannot speak any English.

SAMUEL DIGGINS . I went to the Pultney Hotel, and found the prisoner there; I found these handkerchiefs between the bed and the sacking. The prisoner said at first, they were given to him.

MRS. WRIGHT re-examined. The handkerchiefs produced were her property. I never heard the prisoner complain against my servant for taking any part of his property.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-129

1430. MATTHEW SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , a bed tick, value 10 s., and a petticoat, value 1 s. , the goods of William Poole .

MARY POOLE . I live in Brook-street, Ratcliff . On the 22d of September, I left this bed-tick in a drawer in the front room two pair; it was stolen - I found it in pawn.

JAMES TELFER . I am journeyman to Mrs. Ashford, of Broad-street, Ratcliff. I took the bed-tick in pawn on the 22d of September, about mid-day, of the prisoner, but I never knew him before. Mrs. Poole saw it next day; she claimed it. He was apprehended next day.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-130

1431. ELIZA MILLS and CAROLINE WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a purse, value 6 d., and five sovereigns, the property of George Abel , from his person ; and EDWARD HAYNES and SARAH COLLINS were indicted for feloniously receiving, harbouring, and maintaining the said prisoners, well knowing them to have committed the felony aforesaid .

GEORGE ABEL . I live at No. 7, Powell's-place, City-road, and am a woollen-draper . On the 10th of October I had my purse, containing nine sovereigns, in my watch fob. Between eight and nine o'clock in the evening I met the girls Mills and Williams in Brydges-street, near Drury-lane. They asked me to treat them with something. I said,

"Yes, my girls, what will you take?" They said they would have some apples. I treated them with some at a stall. I asked them if they would have any gin, and I went with them to have it at the corner of White Hart-yard. I went to a house in Eagle-court, White Hart-yard , with them, in the first pair back room. They both went in with me. In three or four minutes I pulled out a crown, and Mills snatched it from me. I did not then take out my purse. I said,

"Why do you act in that way? Do you suppose that I have no more money?" and pulled out my purse at the time. I was rather fresh. She did not return the crown-piece. Williams snatched the purse from me. I then remonstrated with her, and while I was making a piece of work about it, the servant (Collins) came up stairs, and demanded 2 s. for the room. I told her what had happened, the girls then run down stairs. I attempted to follow them, but was prevented by Collins' laying hold of the collar of my coat; she stopped me on the landing of the stairs. I got from her in about a minute. When I got to the door, the two girls were out of sight. I called out, Stop the two girls! When I got to the bottom

of the stairs, Haynes threw me on the stairs. He got his hand in my neckcloth, and attempted to throttle me. I struggled with him for a quarter of an hour. Some boys, seeing us struggling, gave information to the Police, and the officers came to my assistance, and Haynes was taken into custody. They searched the house, and found the two girls hid in the cellar. Collins was not taken at that time. I have not seen the purse since, but I hear it is found.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Do you rent a house - A. Yes. I have a lodger, and a wife and child. This happened between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. I went for the purpose of prostitution, no doubt. I made the excuse for not paying, because the other girls had robbed me. I was going after them when Collins stopped me. She was not in the room when the purse and crown was produced. It was my intention to give Mills the crown, but she took it first.

BARNARD MACK . I am a builder. I was passing by at this time, and heard two men struggling on the stairs. I saw it was Haynes and Mr. Abel; the door was open; Abel was down, and appeared rather tipsey; Haynes had hold of him by the neckcloth, and held him down; I heard the prosecutor say he had been robbed of a 10 l. note; I did not hear him say anything else. They pulled each other down stairs. They were up five or six steps when I first saw them - the door was then shut. I stopped in the court until the constables came. I am quite sure the prosecutor said he was robbed of a 10 l. note. I did not tell the Justice so, because I was not asked the question.

JOHN PASK . I am beadle. I went to this house a little after nine o'clock, in consequence of information. I found the prosecutor sitting in a chair in the parlour. Haynes was sitting near the fireplace. The prosecutor was in liquor, but was aware of what was going on at the time. He said he had been robbed of a purse and eight or nine sovereigns, and that he had been ill-treated by Haynes, and shewed me marks on his neck as if of knuckles and nails; blood also appeared. He said Haynes did it, which he did not deny. Haynes is not the keeper of the house. Abel described the two girls; I had seen them before. During the time I was there, two officers came to my assistance. I saw the two girls brought up out of the cellar. Collins was afterwards brought up. Abel did not make an accusation against Collins until he got to the watch-house.

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I am a patrol of Bow-street. In consequence of information I went to this house. Abel said he had been robbed of eight or nine sovereigns and a purse. I asked him if he should know the girls? - he replied that he should. The women quite corresponded with his representation. He charged Haynes with using him very ill, but did not say in what way. I did not look at his neck; his clothes were dirty, and his neckcloth turned round. I went into the cellar and found the two girls. We brought Mills and Williams up stairs, and the prosecutor said they were the girls that had robbed him. - Saunders found a dollar on Mills. They both denied it; Mills did not say how she came by the dollar. Collins was afterwards found by Saunders in the dust-hole. Abel made no charge against her at that time. He said she had very ill used him, and she ought to be taken up. I afterwards went and took her into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The prosecutor was some time before he made a charge against Collins - A. Yes, some minutes.

WILLIAM TRIPP . I was standing in Catherine-street, and went to the house to know the cause of the row. I was there before the officers, and saw Haynes and Abel struggling on the stairs. I heard Abel say he would be d - d if he would go out, as he had lost a 10 l. note. I am sure he said

"note." I saw Haynes lead Abel by the collar into the parlour; I remained at the door, but did not go into the house, and saw the officers come.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am a Bow-street officer. Haynes sat by the fire with a child on his knee, when I went into the house; Abel stood by the fire. He said he had lost a purse containing eight or nine sovereigns - it was made of chocolate print, in the shape of a bag - that the prisoner Haynes had stopped him from running after the girls. Haynes said he would not tell us why he treated him so; he said they had been scuffling together, and asked him if he belonged to the house? he said

"No." Another person came in and said he belonged to it. I found Williams first in the cellar; they were part of the way up stairs. The two girls answered Mr. Abel's description. I found Collins afterwards. I asked her what she did there? she said she was frightened. I searched the cellar, but did not find the property, and only found a dollar on Mills, which she said Abel had given her. Abel said that she took out his purse, and held it up to let them know that he had more money, and would not act dishonourable. I found about 7 s. on Mr. Abel, and a cheque for 10 l. or 12 l. in his pocket-book.

HAYNES's Defence. The landlord of this house is a relation of mine, and keeps one of my children - I went there to see it - there was a scuffle between me and the prosecutor, but I did not assault him.

MILLS's Defence. I received 5 s. from him, but know nothing of the purse.

WILLIAMS's Defence. I was in the room with him and Mills, but positively deny robbing him.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

MILLS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year .

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

COLLINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-131

1432. WILLIAM NASH , and ANN his wife , were indicted, for that they, on the 16th day of October , at St. James, Clerkenwell, did put off certain pieces of silver coin, of the denomination of half crowns, to wit, three half-crowns, for less value than the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JANE BARTRAM . I am the wife of Thomas Bartram , a smith; we live at Little White Lion-street, Seven-dials. Avis, an officer of Bow-street, introduced me to a person of the name of Fidler. I went with her to No. 1, William-street, Spa-fields - twice on the 10th of October with her, and again on the 11th, by myself. Avis gave me two shillings and a sixpence - I had no more money about me - it was all marked before it was given to me. He put the mark on one of the letters, I think it was I. I went

about eleven o'clock on the 11th, and tapped at the window, because Fidler told me to do so - I did not tap the day before. Mr. Nash came to the door; when I went in I saw Mrs. Nash, as I then understood her to be - they were both in one room - she was sitting rubbing some half-crowns with some stuff; she had some white stuff on her right hand, and some liquid on her left, and was using both; she asked how many half-crowns I wanted; she put her hand under a cloth and pulled out four; the white stuff was thick, like paste. Mr. Nash followed me into the parlour and remained. I saw a candle by her, and she held the half-crowns over it, in the flame, and then put each into a separate paper. I paid her 2 s. 6 d. for three, and put them into a little bag. The officers stood at the door, and took the bag when I went out; they rushed by me just as I came out; one of them asked me of whom I got the half-crowns, I said from the lady, pointing to the female prisoner.

GEORGE AVIS . I have heard the evidence of the last witness as to the transaction; what she mentioned with respect to myself is true. I had her in sight the whole of the way. Taunton took the bag with the three half-crowns from her, as she came out of the house. When I went into the room the prisoners were standing by the table - I took them, and handcuffed them together. I told the woman to keep away from the table; the right hand was not confined, and she cooked the cup off the table, which contained some white liquor - I found some white powder. There were thirty-three half-crowns and twenty shillings uncoloured. I searched the table drawer, and found five shillings and two sixpences, base money, in a finished state. I saw Taunton search Ann Nash , and take 2 s. 6 d. out of her left hand - they were the same I had marked in the presence of my brother officer, and gave to Bartram.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I produce a bag with three half-crowns, which I had of Jane Bartram . I was with Avis. I searched the female prisoner, and found in her left hand 2 s. 6 d., which had been marked in my presence.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I have been assistant to the solicitors of the Mint for many years. This money is all counterfeit. They are merely washed. The twenty-seven (produced) are from the same dye. There are twenty shillings unfinished. They have been cast from the pattern of a real Mint shilling. Here are four shillings and four sixpences which have been cast in the same way.

WILLIAM NASH 's Defence. I was in the room, but knew nothing of the transaction. I was busily employed in making a bird-cage.

ANN NASH 's Defence. The male prisoner is not my husband, though I go by his name.

WILLIAM NASH - GUILTY .

Confined One Year and Whipped .

ANN NASH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-132

1453. ANN NASH alias ANN SMITH was again indicted for a like offence .

JANE BARTRAM , I went to the house of the prisoner, on the 10th of October, in company with Fidler - she went in first. The prisoner said,

"How many there are, who get a living in this way;" I said,

"Yes." The prisoner said she had gone to Croydon-fair, and passed fifteen; I understood her to mean half-crowns; she asked how many I should want - I said three. She went to a table drawer, and brought out a great many half-crowns in a bag. When she gave me the half-crowns, I was about to put them into my pocket, and she said,

"No, they will rub;" she took them from me, and wrapped them in separate papers, to prevent their rubbing. She asked if I wanted any more; I said

"To-morrow will be the best buying day, (Saturday)" - she said she always thought that was the best day herself. She asked if I should want larger or smaller. I had received 2 s. 6 d. to purchase them, from Avis; but the silver had not been marked - I had no more money of my own, and gave her the same money I had of Avis. He accompanied me to the spot, and I gave him the money when I came out. I did not see the man (Nash) in this transaction. I had three half-crowns for one good one.

GEORGE AVIS . The statement of the last witness is correct. Fidler was the person who gave me the information. Bartram was hired to assist in the discovery. I did not see the man on that day.

MR. POWELL. The three half-crowns produced are counterfeits, and from the same die, as in the former case.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231022-133

1434. ELIZABETH BEVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one trunk, value 3 s. and a frock, value 2 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Thomas , her mistress.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . I live on Tower-hill, and am a tobacconist . The prisoner was in my service five months - she was the only servant I had. I missed the trunk out of my bed-room the day after she left; she left my service without my knowledge; she turned out what was in the trunk. At the time she took it, it contained some pieces of silk, and things which were of no use to her - there was a frock in the same room, which she took away. She was taken up on the 30th of September. I have seen the frock since; the officer brought the trunk. A person sent for me, and informed me, that she was in her house - I and found her dressed in my frock.

JOHN HOGAN . I am a constable. I was sent for to Norwich-court, East Smithfield; the prisoner was there, and had this frock on - it was owned by Mrs. Thomas. The prisoner told me to go to No. 4, Chandler-street, Goodman's-fields, and I should find the trunk; I did, it was a bad house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-134

1435. ELIZABETH PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , two shirts, value 10 s.; one gown, value 6 s., and one apron, the goods of Court Hincken , her master .

MARTHA HINCKEN . I am the wife of Court Hincken, and reside in Brazier's-alley, Wellclose-square . The prisoner used to char at my house. On the 8th of October I took twenty-one shirts down to wash, out of which I missed two. I gave her the gown to mend, and went out to collect in some debts; she came at seven o'clock that morning, and I went out between eight and nine, and returned in an hour and a half - she was then gone, and

did not return. I saw her on the same day, about two o'clock, but had not missed my property then, and asked the reason for her going away, but she gave none. I went back, and looked over the things, and missed two shirts, but I did not miss the apron, until the officer found it in her room; she was taken up on Sunday. I went to her room, with the constable, and she threw the apron at me; she denied taking the shirts. One was found at the pawnbroker's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LINWOOD . I am apprentice to Mr. Cordroy, pawnbroker, Ratcliff Highway. I took in this shirt on the morning of the 8th of October, from the prisoner, for 18 d. I have known her for three years.

THOMAS DAWSON . I am a pawnbroker, and produce a gown, which was pledged on the 8th of October for 3 s. It was claimed by Mrs. Hincken.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates of part of the property upon her.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-135

1436. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing on the 20th of September , a basket, value 1 s.; two half-crowns, four shillings, and seventeen sixpences, the goods of Margaret Jordan , spinster , from her person .

MARGARET JORDAN . I live at No. 21, Nelson-street, City-road, and am a single woman. On the 20th of September I was going home, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I had been into Beech-street on business; I had a basket in my hand, which contained a purse, in which were seventeen sixpenny pieces, two half-crowns, and four shillings. I was walking arm-in-arm with Mrs. Marquis; we were going up Golden-lane ; I saw a young man standing at the corner of a court in the lane - I believe they call it Basket-alley. The prisoner snatched the basket out of my hand and ran up the court; we both cried out Stop thief! and ran up the court after him; he suddenly made a stop and let down his apron. I never lost sight of him; he ran sixty yards before he stopped, and was laid hold of. I said,

"What have you done with my money and basket?" He said he was not the person - the person who took it had gone through into Whitecross-street. The watchman came up and laid hold of him - the basket was afterwards found in the alley; the watchman picked it up and brought it to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it a light night - A. It was, both from the moon and gas. I never saw him before - I did not see him drop the basket - I heard it fall, and heard the money rattle; it was thrown on a dunghill. There was no person in the court except a woman, who we ran by. There was nothing in the basket besides the purse of money, a key, and two thimbles. I did not ask the prisoner whether he was the person who took it.

LYDIA MARQUIS . I was in company with the prosecutrix on the 20th of September - we were returning home; at the corner of an alley we saw a tall young man, who appeared stooping forward as if looking for some person. He snatched the basket from my friend's hand and ran up the court - I ran up with her, and called

"Stop thief!" He ran to the bottom of the court before he stopped. There was no other man running; I caught him, and laid hold of his apron - It was round him when he snatched the basket, but he let it down afterwards. I am sure the prisoner is the person; I perceived him throw something away, but what it was I could not tell; I did not see it picked up; I saw the basket afterwards; I was before my friend in seizing him.

Cross-examined. Q. He stopped himself. - A. He made a stop as if to cause us to overrun him. When I saw him throw something away, I did not stop to tell Miss Jordan, because I was so confused.

JOSEPH SIMONS . This alley is near White's-yard, and in the county of Middlesex. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran up the court toward White's-yard. The prisoner stopped when I first saw him. The young women charged him with robbing them of a basket. I found the basket in Basket-alley, and took them to the watch-house. They told me what it contained. I found it afterwards, but not the lid, nor the contents. The prisoner denied the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he searched - A. The officer searched him. I believe 8 s. 6 d. was found on him, but I do not know in what coin. The young lady said there was seventeen sixpences in the purse. I did not find the key and thimble on him.

JANE BILLINGSLEY . I live in Basket-alley, Golden-lane. I saw the prisoner at the corner of Golden-lane. I was near enough to see him snatch the basket out of the hand of Miss Jordan. I was passing at the time, and was just by the side of him. He ran up the alley, but I did not follow. I saw the basket in his hand, and the young ladies run after him. I did not see him again till he was in the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the basket found - A. I gave the watchman a light to search for it; I was present. I was also present when the prisoner was searched. It was near half an hour before he was searched.

MARGARET JORDAN re-examined. When he took the basket the lid came off.

THOMAS HARRISON . I heard the spring of the rattle. Simons had got the prisoner by the collar when I came up; he was pretending to fight. Two persons attempted to rescue him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the basket. Is it likely, if I took it, and they saw me throw it away, that they would not have gone and picked it up, instead of following me to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18231022-136

Second Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1437. JAMES THOMAS and GEORGE OWEN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a gown, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Baker .

WILLIAM LUMPTER . I am a constable of Poplar. On the 9th of October, about four o'clock, I was going to Mrs. Baker's, Well-street, Poplar , and about one hundred yards on this side of her house I met a cart with two young men, a boy, and a woman. I went up to Mrs. Baker's. She said she missed a gown. I then went after the cart, and overtook it near Hollis, the pawnbroker's. The prisoners and the woman were in the cart. A boy came out of the shop, and said,

"Mother, they won't let me have

it, you must come yourself." I told them all to come out of the cart, I went into Hollis's, and found a gown corresponding with the pattern which the prosecutrix gave me. I then took them to the watch-house. The woman asked me what I wanted. The prisoners said nothing.

SUSAN BAKER . I live in Well-street, Poplar. On the 9th of October, Margaret Collins came to my house about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, with the prisoners and a boy; I knew her before, but not them; she asked me to take her into the yard, which I did. Owen was on the step of the street-door. Thomas, and the boy, were in the house. I came back into the house, and found them all there. The boy said he would go and buy some corn for the horse. The prisoners went with him. I went to my drawer, and missed a gown, which was safe when they came into the house, as I had had it in my hand. They came back in a quarter of an hour; I charged them with it. The prisoners said they were innocent. The boy said,

"Don't make a bother, mistress, if your gown is gone, you shall have it again." Owen said he would not have such a thing happen for 5 l. as to be in their company if any thing was stolen. The boy said,

"Don't make a bother, and I'll go and fetch it, but I have not got the money." The prisoners said,

"What do you want of money." One gave him 1 s. and the other 6 d. They went out altogether to see where he went for it. The officer came, and I gave him the pattern of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-137

1438. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , ten penny-pieces and ten halfpence, the monies of Jane Ryan , from her person .

JANE RYAN . I am a widow , and live in Milk-street, Spitalfields. On the 18th of October, about eleven o'clock, I was going to Spitalfields market . I had 2 s. in halfpence and seven or eight penny-pieces in my left-side pocket. Just as I entered the market there was a crowd. A man took me by the hand, and helped me through the crowd, being lame, and then said,

"Poor woman, go straight forward." I thanked him. Izard came up, and said I had lost something. I felt in my pocket and missed 15 d. or 16 d. I then saw the prisoner by me, but had seen her do nothing.

MARY IZARD . I was in the market, and saw a man leading the prosecutrix. I saw the prisoner hoist up her gown, and take a handful of halfpence and penny-pieces out of her pocket, and go away with them. I called to my husband, and he stopped her, as she was putting them into her pocket. I fetched Ryan back.

BENJAMIN JOSEPH DALLIMORE . I live in York-street, Commercial-road. I heard Izard call to her husband to stop the prisoner; he did so; while she was putting her hand into her pocket, some of the copper fell on the ground. She was searched in the market, and five penny-pieces and thirteen halfpence found on her.

ISRAEL MULL . I searched her at the watch-house, and found 11 1/2 d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I had scarcely got into the market before I was secured, and charged with this. I had three halfpence in my hand, and they wanted me to give them my money.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-138

1439. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a half handkerchief, value 6 d.; a purse, value 6 d.; a crown piece, two shillings, and a sixpence, the property of John Pinnock , from his person .

JOHN PINNOCK . I am a soldier . On the 17th of September, I went into a public-house at Chelsea , and had a pot of beer; I put my hat down by my side, with these handkerchiefs in it. The prisoner came and asked me for some beer - I gave her some; she sat down by my hat. I saw her take the handkerchiefs out of it; I endeavonred to get them from her - she struggled, and said she would take care of them, and I should have them, so I went on drinking, and thought no more of them. I went to another house, and she followed me - Davis was in my company; I went up into his room, in Jew's-row, and she followed. I sent for half a gallon of beer, which we drank; they wanted me to send for more beer - I refused. I engaged a bed for myself, and paid 1 s. for it; she offered to stop with me, and put my breeches under the pillow. She got into bed in her clothes. I had a 5 s. piece, and 2 s. 6 d. in my purse. I fell asleep the moment I got into bed, and awoke at eleven o'clock, found her gone, and I missed my purse from my pocket. I found her that night, near Jew's-row, with one handkerchief tied round her head, and the other round her neck. She denied robbing me. I gave charge of her - she then said she had had the money, and would give it up if she was allowed. The watchman found 1 s. 1 d. on her.

THOMAS SIMONS . I am a watchman. I found a purse in her bosom, with 1 s. 1 d. in it. She swore, and said she had spent the rest.

(Purse and Handkerchiefs produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was very drunk when I met him; he gave me the handkerchiefs to take care of for him. I asked him for 4 s. - he said he had no change; I went with Davis's daughter to get change. I saw a man in distress in the street, and went to take care of him, and told the watchman I had left a drunken man in bed.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-139

1440. MARY ANN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , a bag, value 2 d., and four sovereigns, the property of John Ward , from his person .

JOHN WARD . I am a coal-whipper , and live in Union-court, Gravel-lane. On the 10th of October, I saw the prisoner in Blue Gate-fields, and went to the Seven Stars, public-house, with her - I pulled out my bag, containing five sovereigns, changed one, and had 4 l. 15 s. left. It hen went with her to a house in Blue Gate-fie lds, and put my money in a bag, in my fob, and put my breeches on the floor, under the chair, and went to sleep - I awoke about six o'clock, and she was gone. In consequence of information I went to No. 8, Dock-street, and found her there; I said if she would give me the four sovereigns, I would say nothing about it. She said she had not got a farthing - she threw her pocket at me; there was no money in it. I sent for an officer; they then pressed her to give me my money - she then threw a handkerchief at me, which contained four sovereigns and eight shillings.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the money to get

something out of pawn - A. No, I did not. I have known her eight years. She swore she had not seen my money.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. The prosecutor sent for me about eight o'clock one morning. I asked the prisoner how she came by the sovereigns; she said he threw them into her lap the night before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-140

1441. MARY ANN SMITH and JANE M'DONELL were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , a watch, value 5 l., the goods of Alexander Campbell , from his person .

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL . I live in Redcross-street. On Monday, the 6th of October, about half-past ten o'clock, I was going through Golden-lane , and met the two prisoners - they asked for some gin; I agreed to give them a glass each. I felt my watch safe, and as I went to pay for the liquor, one of them said she would have her glass next morning. I came out, and was in their company a quarter of an hour. M'Donell stood talking to me a little while - Smith moved a little way, and then set off, using bad language. I missed my watch, and pursued, but lost them. I told Vann of it. I was sober.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 7th of October, Campbell complained to me. I went to Golden-lane, and found the prisoners at a public-house. I asked them if they were with a man at the Goat and Cherry Tree, public-house, the night before - they denied it - I took them there, and asked the landlady, who said, they were there with a man, who drank no liquor - that they had a glass each, but one of them left her's till morning. M'Donell had a new pair of boots, which she said she bought that morning for 9 s.

MARY GRADY . My husband keeps the Goat, at the corner of Cherry Tree-court. On the 6th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoners came in with the prosecutor, and had two glasses of gin - one left hers till morning.

SMITH'S Defence. This man followed us into the public-house - we said we wanted nothing of him, but he would pay for our gin. We left him, and next morning I bought a pair of boots in Newgate-street. Vann asked if I was not in Cherry Tree-court last night; I said, No - I did not know he meant the public-house. The prosecutor offered to make it up for 5 l.

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL . I never offered to make it up. My watch was safe when I was in Smithfield.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-141

1442. JOHN BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , fifty yards of linen, value 5 l., and nine handkerchiefs, value 1 l. , the goods of Christopher Crook and Charles Crook .

CHARLES CROOK . I am in partnership with Christopher Crook ; we are linendrapers , and live in Piccadilly. On the 20th of September, our apprentice brought me a letter containing an order for these goods, which I ordered him to get ready for him. While he was looking them out, I questioned the prisoner (who brought the letter;) he said he was servant to a relation of Mrs. Douglas's, and had just come from Mrs. Douglas, of Montague-square, and was going to Highgate. I suspected him, and placed myself opposite the house, to take him as he came out - he turned to the right. I took him, and said he must go to Mrs. Douglas with me first. He had the goods in his possession at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-142

1443. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , four deal boards, value 10 s. , the property of Martin Stutley .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am an errand-boy, to Mr. Martin Stutley , builder . On the 21st of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming along the passage, from the yard, with four deal boards - told Rogers, the foreman, and he pursued.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am foreman to Mr. Martin Stutley . Chapman gave me information. I went and found the prisoner in New-street, about 120 yards from the premises, laying the boards down under a window - he said he was going to Drury-lane. I desired him to take them back, which he did. We gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Brown, a carpenter, in St. Martin's-lane - he asked me if I was willing to earn 1 s.; he took me to a public-house, and gave me several glasses of liquor - he then took me to this yard, pointed to the boards, and said,

"Carry them to Drury-lane." I was going to take them up - he said,

"Not just yet, we will come for them presently?" and, in about an hour, he held the gate open, while I got them - I turned round into New-street, and missing him, turned back, and was taken.

WILLIAM ROGERS . He said a man desired him to carry them.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . A black man stood at the gateway.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-143

1444. GEORGE GRIFFITHS , WILLIAM REYNOLDS , and RICHARD BEAUCHAMP were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , a pair of scales, value 4 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Whiting .

ELIZABETH WHITING . I keep a chandler's shop in Pancras-street . On the 14th of September, the three prisoners came into my shop, a little before ten o'clock in the evening. Reynolds asked if I had a lodging - I said I should have a room to let on Monday, and he might take it then - while I was talking to him, I saw a hand pass over the counter, and in a few minutes I missed my scales - I saw them on the counter, but Griffiths's hand was over them - I said,

"you have got my scales, I will not be robbed before my face" - and took them from him, and said,

"he off this moment, or I'll have you taken;" they all went away - Colton came in, and spoke to me. I went after them; Griffiths had moved them a little way from where they stood, and got them under his hand. I cannot say he meant to steal them.

DANIEL REARDON . I was with Colton, in Bedford-square, about half a mile from Pancras-street. I watched the prisoners into the prosecutrix's shop - one of them stepped out a little, while I looked round, to see if any one was looking after him - Beauchamp came to the door, and looked out. I crossed over, and saw the prosecutrix in a tussle with Griffiths, and called Colton; they walked out, and ran into Tottenham Court-road. I secured Griffiths.

ELIZABETH WHITING . We had no tussle.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was with Reardon - his account is correct. Griffiths dropped some screws out of his pockets. I found some more in his pockets.

GRIFFITHS'S Defence. Reynolds went in to ask for a lodging; I leaned my arm on the counter, and might have moved them, but had no intention to take them.

REYNOLDS'S Defence. They were not off the counter; but might be moved a quarter of a yard - my back was towards Griffiths all the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-144

1445. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , six cruets, value 12 s.; six castors, value 9 s.; a mustard-pot, value 2 s., and a sugar-basin, value 7 s. , the goods of Nathaniel Soloman , his master; and GEORGE GLOVER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

NATHANIEL SOLOMAN . I am a wholesale glass-merchant , and live in Chiswell-street. The prisoner Sullivan was in my service. In consequence of information, on the 9th October, I went to Glover's shop, in Vine-street, Mutton-hill, about three or four o'clock - he is a dealer in marinestores . I took a cut cruet off his board, and asked him the price - he said 5 s. 6 d. for three of them. I said I would have them, if he would get me a frame, and I would call for them to-morrow - he said,

"Oh, I have plenty ordered, and expect them in every moment, and you shall be sure to have it." I called again, about six o'clock, the same evening, and said, that since I saw him, I had seen a friend of mine, a publican, who would take two dozen dram glasses, if he could get them exactly to measure - he went out for a measure, and measured one; I said that would do. I then went home, sent for an officer, and informed him. I looked out all my dram-glasses, and laid them straight, so that I could tell if any were removed; and about half-past seven o'clock I went out, telling Sullivan, to lock up the warehouse as usual, and then go home. I went out before him, and told the officer to watch him. I returned in a few minutes, and found some of the dram glasses gone. I went to Glover's about eleven o'clock next morning, took up a cut castor, and cruet in a frame, which I had ordered, and said,

"If you will get me a cruet of the size of this, I will take them;" he said I might depend on having them. I went home, counted my cruets of the size and pattern I had ordered, and found the drawer contained one hundred and twenty-eight - they were in the upper warehouse - I took care that nobody should go up there that afternoon but Sullivan. I did not go out until seven o'clock, and desired Sullivan not to leave till half-past eight. I happened to return about ten minutes past eight, he had then left. I went up stairs and counted the drawer, and missed six cruets.

Q. On Monday did you and the officers search Glover's house - A. Yes, and found these six cruets there, and all the property stated in the indictments. He was present.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who went up stairs after you went out you cannot say - A. No. I marked four or five of the cruets, but they were not taken - they are made to my pattern. I never saw any of this size elsewhere - there are patterns very like it, but not exactly. Sullivan was an industrious boy - I never heard of my children putting things into his basket in a frolic.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What quantity does the cruet contain - A. I never measured it. The one hundred and twenty-eight were all one size - I swear to this by the size, pattern, and quality of the glass, and the cutting.

JOHN SHIRLEY . I am an officer. On the evening of the 9th of October I watched Sullivan from the prosecutor's house. He came out about eight o'clock. I followed him down to the door of Glover's house; he stopped there; turned round quick to look at me. I turned round not to be noticed, and on turning back missed him all in an instant, and went away. I watched him into a public-house in Type-street next night, and on Monday evening went with the prosecutor to Glover's.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I assisted in searching Glover's house. I found the property stated in the indictment in the shop window exposed for sale. I produce it. He deals in glass. I consider him a dealer in marine stores; there was glass, iron, wire, lamps, and old things in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Has he dealer in marine stores written over his door - A. I think not. I never noticed whether he has a name or anything up.

WILLIAM LEE . I went with Read, and know nothing more. He has stoves, iron, locks, keys, and other goods in his shop. I believe he has

"locks fitted with keys" written over his window. He has lived nine months in the neighbourhood.

NATHAN SOLOMAN . This property is mine.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you a private mark on it - A. No. Here are thirteen castors; I missed six that night. I should know them find them wherever I would, by the size, quality, glass, and pattern. They were made for me by Johnson and Co., of Birmingham, who are in a large way. It is customary not to make goods of one pattern for two houses; if they did my custom would leave them immediately. I have sold none of them. They came in about six weeks ago. I received one hundred and forty-four. I do not know what became of the rest.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I took eighteen of them to Wolf, a glass dealer, by the London Hospital, a week before I was taken.

GLOVER put in a written Defence, denying all knowledge of Sullivan; that he had shewn the goods to the prosecutor publicly, and every thing was exposed openly for sale; that it was strange any house should manufacture for the prosecutor exclusively; that he sometimes bought at a wholesale house, and sometimes of hawkers, and when goods are put together could not tell one from another.

JURY to SOLOMAN. Q. Had Sullivan an opportunity of seeing Glover after you gave him an order for the cruets - Yes; he went to dinner, and went out after that into Glover's neighbourhood.

QUESTION to SHIRLEY. Is there any passage near Glover's where the boy might have gone down - There is a turning six or eight yards from the house, but he had passed it and got close to the door when I missed him.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy . - Confined 3 Months .

GLOVER - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-145

1446. SARAH ASKEW was indicted for stealing on the 27th of September , two pairs of boots, value 3 s., and four pairs of shoes, value 5 s., the goods of William Hayhow , privately in his shop .

William HAYHOW . I am a shoemaker , and live in the New Road, St. George-in-the-East . These shoes and boots were kept at the back of my shop in a box, and never sold. They were safe on the 27th of September. I saw them that night at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had not seen the prisoner in your shop - A. No.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . On the 27th of September, I was in the prosecutor's shop. The prisoner came in with a little girl; she said

"Fit this child with a pair of shoes," and immediately went out, leaving the child and a basket there. She was absent about ten minutes, and came back after the child was detected in taking the shoes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-146

1447. WILLIAM WORCESTER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS EVANS . I keep the Old Hats, at Ealing . In July, 1822, the prisoner was my servant ; I gave him a bill and receipt for 5 l. 1 s. 3 d. to deliver to Mr. Carruthers and receive the money. He absconded. I saw him thirteen months afterwards, and had him taken.

MR. CARRUTHERS. I produce a receipt which was left with me for this money. I do not know whether I paid it to my servant or to the person who brought the receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-147

1448. JOSEPH HASTING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a pocket-book, value 18 d. a purse, value 2 d. six shillings, and a sixpence , the property of Eliza Mortimer .

ELIZA MORTIMER . I live in New Court, Duck-lane, Westminster . The prisoner went home with me on the 21st of October, at night, and stopped all night with me. He gave me one shilling, which he saw me put into my purse, which I put into my trunk; he gave me another shilling and stopped until half-past four o'clock in the morning; I then went to get a young woman to sleep with me for the rest of the night, and as I returned I met him going out; he shook hands with me. I laid till half-past seven; then missed my pocket-book, money, and duplicates.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday night, and found the purse in his fob. After he was committed his wife informed me I could find the pocket-book in Vine-street, which I did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and she persuaded me to go home with her; she let me out at five o'clock.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to mercy . Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: t18231022-148

1449. SUSANNAH JUSTICE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. an umbrella, value 2 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s., a bed-gown, value 6 d., a apron, value 6 d., a pair of stockings, value 18 d., and a cap, value 6 d. the goods of Richard Dalton .

RICHARD DALTON . I am a labourer , and live in East Smithfield . On the 21st of September the prisoner came to my house between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. I knew her before; I gave her her breakfast, she stopped all night, and on Monday, between five and six o'clock she went out and never returned. I missed this property, and found her that evening at Knightsbridge, and asked her what she had done with the shoes; she threw down the duplicate of the handkerchief, and the shoes were on her feet. I took her to the watch-house; my wife's shift and pocket were found on her.

SARAH DALTON . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I never allowed the prisoner to wear them, or take any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. She told me to put them on. They encouraged me to do what I have.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-149

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1450. SAMUEL MILLION was indicted for stealing, on the 19th day of May , one sofa, value 2 l. the goods of Luke Farrell .

LUKE FARRELL . I live in Chester-street, Curtain-road, and am a chair-maker and sofa manufacturer , On the 19th of May I sent a sofa to Tottenham Court-road. My wife went with it.

ISABELLA FARRELL . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 19th of May I went out with a sofa on speculation. It was towards the evening of the day; I called at Mr. Lawrence's, No. 258, Tottenham Court-road. The prisoner carried the sofa and I walked by his side; he said he would carry it no further; I begged permission of Mrs. Lawrence to let it remain in her warehouse till the following week, which she granted. When I called for it they told me it was gone. The prisoner had no permission to call for it.

LUKE FARRELL . I gave this man no order to fetch it; I never saw it again; he would not tell where he had sold it. I have not found it or who has the possession of it. It is worth 2 l.

ALICE RUSSELL . My daughter lives at No. 258, Tottenham Court-road. I remember Mrs. Farrell leaving a sofa at the house on Saturday evening. It was fetched away on the next Monday by the prisoner, who brought it there. I was present when he took it away. He said Mrs. Farrell would not take the money, (35 s.) my daughter had bid for it - she wanted 40 s. I asked if he would know the frame as it stood among a number; he said

"Yes, it has a honeysuckle back;" I pointed it out. My daughter keeps an upholsterer's shop. I sent the boy up stairs to see if my daughter would give any more; she said she would not, and he took it away. I saw Mrs. Farrell on the following Wednesday.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I met the prisoner on the 22d of September, in the Lower Road, Islington; I told him his company was required in Worship-street, to answer for the sofa. He said he had sold it for 25 s. at some place at the West end of the Town - at a shop, but

he could not say where; that he should know the shop if he saw it, but could not point out whereabouts it was.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

One Year , and publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231022-150

1451. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a sovereign , the money of John Smart .

JOHN SMART . I live at Mrs. Darton's, in service. I had a sovereign in my trowsers, on the Saturday night, when I went to bed. The prisoner slept in a room adjoining - there were six of us slept in the same room. I missed the sovereign on the next morning. I hung the trowsers over my head. I went to bed about ten o'clock, and got up at eight next morning; the prisoner had got new clothes on next morning; he came to my bed, and said he would pull the blanket round me, to keep me warm, and then went to his room; he did not take it at that time - he was taken up on the same day. I get my living on board a ship. I have known him two months.

HENRY BERRYMAN . I am a publican. These parties lived in Brown Bear-alley . The prisoner brought me a sovereign on a Sunday morning, for change, between seven and eight o'clock. I afterwards heard he was charged with stealing one. He was brought to my house.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a constable, and took up the prisoner. I heard him say afterwards that he would make it up, with the prosecutor. I found a new handkerchief and a knife on him - he said he had bought them that morning.

JOHN SMART . None of the other persons got up that morning before me.

Prisoner's Defence. I lately came home from sea, and received eleven sovereigns from my captain. This was the last I changed, on the Sunday morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-151

1452. ELIZABETH SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , a shirt, value 18 d.; two caps, value 18 d.; a pair of pattens, value 6 d.; a spoon, value 6 d.; and a shawl, value 2 s., the goods of Lawrence Russell ; and a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Alexander Anderson .

ISABELLA RUSSELL . I am the wife of Lawrence Russell , and live at No. 1, Ratcliff-highway . My husband is a blacksmith . I did not miss all these things on the 30th of August. Alexander Anderson did not lodge with me. His waistcoat was found in the prisoner's box; she lodged in my house. I missed an apron, and had her taken in custody on suspicion. I searched her box, and found other things. I found her intoxicated at Anderson's house. I desired the officer to take charge of her. The ticket of the shirt was found on her at the watch-house. There were two of my caps found in her box. The shirt was kept in my bed-room. She did not say how she came by the duplicate.

Prisoner. She knows they were things she lent me; the caps she gave me; we wore each others things. Witness. I never gave her them. I had nothing to do with pawning the shirt. I lent her the shawl when she came up here last Sessions for her expenses. I never wore her things.

WILLIAM MOLE . I am a pawnbroker, and produce a shirt pawned on the 12th of August, but whether by the prisoner I do not know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM PADMAN . I am an officer, and took charge of this woman. I found a duplicate of the shirt on her.

MARY ANDERSON . I am the wife of Alexander Anderson . This is my husband's waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer there knows this woman lent me a shawl to come up here last Sessions to take my money; she also lent me the pattens and cap, and the shirt to pledge, because she pledged my chemise; she has the ticket of it now, and will not give it up.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18231022-152

1453. ANN TOOTING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Farness .

THOMAS FARNESS . I live in Ratcliff-highway , and am a draper . I did not see the prisoner in my shop until she was brought in.

LOGAN TAYLOR . I am a tailor. I live in Marmont-street, St. George's in the East. I was passing by the prosecutor's shop on the 15th of October, and saw a woman standing at the door looking at some handkerchiefs. I passed the shop ten or twelve yards; then turned round, and saw the prisoner put her hand in between the handkerchiefs and the door, and draw out a piece of dark cotton; she then came up to me, and I said,

"What have you got in your apron?" She paused a bit, and then said it was some of her children's clothes. I then took her back to the shop. The prosecutor turned the cotton out of her apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18231022-153

1454. JAMES VALLANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , four pieces of leather, value 5 s. , the goods of Henry Wicks .

THOMAS WICKS . I am son of Henry Wicks , who lives in Golden-lane, Barbican , and is a leather-cutter . The prisoner came into our shop on the 23d of September, and asked for a pair of eighteen-penny soles. I shewed him seven pairs. He asked my father to shew him some top-pieces, - they are the heels. While I was putting away the soles, and my father was employed looking out the top-pieces, I saw him take the soles off the counter, open the door, and run out, I jumped over the counter, opened the door, and cried out, Stop thief! but he was out of sight.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Guildhall that you thought I was not the man, because I was taller - A. I said so at first, but you stood on a stone.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the shop of Mr. Wicks to buy some leather; he asked me if I did not come there to buy some last week? I said No. He said I did, and brought a woman with me, and that we stole some leather, and I was given in custody and taken to Guildhall, where the boy ( Thomas Wicks ) saw me, and came forward and

charged me with robbing his shop. I deny most solemnly having ever been at the shop, nor had I been in Golden-lane for weeks before.

THOMAS ALGRAVE . I have known the prisoner seven years; I was at Guildhall when the prisoner was there, and saw the boy Wicks there; I heard him say the prisoner was the man. He did not express a doubt in my hearing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18231022-154

1455 MARY WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a shawl, value 10 s. , the goods of John Parry .

ELIZABETH PARRY . I am the wife of John Parry ; he lives in the same family with me. I am housekeeper to J. Bartley, Esq., Devonshire-place . I lost a shawl on the 11th day of this month from a room on the basement story. The prisoner was laid hold of, and I was called down. The shawl was produced.

STEPHEN BRYANT . I am a parish-officer; I was near Mr. Bartley's house, and saw the prisoner down the area of No. 37, Devonshire-place. I waited three or four minutes, and saw her go into the house. She came out in about two minutes, and said to me, when I accosted her, that she wanted to get her child into some school, which was the reason for her going to the house. I found the shawl in her hand. She said it was her own property. I found the dessert knife, half-crown, and duplicate now produced, on her.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-155

1456. DANIEL WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 30 lbs. of rope, value 10 s. , the goods of Griffith Jones .

GRIFFITH JONES . I live in Brick-lane, Spital-fields , and am a bag and sack maker . This rope hung on a nail on the outside the door: it was taken from my shop on the 10th of this month. I missed it about five o'clock in the afternoon.

DAVID ROBERT JONES . I am the son of the last witness. I saw the rope about three-quarters of an hour before I was told it was gone, and saw it afterwards on the prisoner's shoulder, just by Spital-fields church, about 60 yards from our house. I laid hold of him, and he admitted that he took it.

Defence. I picked it up near Spital-fields church.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18231022-156

1467. SAMUEL BLACKMAN was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I am a coal-dealer , and live in Hare-street, Bethnal-green. The prisoner was formerly in my employ; he used to receive money for coals he carried out; he carried coals to Elizabeth Turner on the 27th April, 1822, at that time he had only been with me two days; he remained with me no longer; he gave me no notice of his intention to leave; he only took one bushel to her on that day; there was not a previous bushel due; the charge was 1 s. 5 d.; he was entrusted to carry the change for a sovereign; I gave him 18 s. 7 d. to make up the pound; he went with it, and took the sovereign, as I have been informed, and went off with it. He was taken up on the 7th of this month.

ELIZABETH TURNER . I dealt with Mr. Griffiths; last year the prisoner brought me a bushel of coals, the price of which was 17 d.; I told him to bring me change for a sovereign; he brought the change, and I gave him the sovereign. I am quite sure that he is the man.

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON . I took this man up, and told him he must go with me. He then turned round and saw the prosecutor, and said he had taken the sovereign, and was very sorry for it. He told me where he left the sacks. I found them at the place he represented.

Prisoner's Defence. About two months before I was taken up I was driving a cart down Whitechapel, when I met Mr. Griffiths. He accused me of the robbery. I told him I did receive it, and would pay him the money. He said he would see me again, and I waited for him, but he did not come.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-157

1457. JOHN CANE was indicted for manslaughter .

GEORGE EVANS . I am a journeyman dyer. On the 24th of September , about one o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Worship-street . I saw two drays turn up Worship-street - they were quite close to each other - there was a driver with the first, but not with the other - it was not the prisoner. They belonged to Hanbury and Company. I saw the deceased leaning up against the wall; there was no footpath on that side of the way; the deceased was on the near side of the dray, as it went along - there is room for two carriages to pass abreast. I do not know that two drays could so pass - there is plenty of room for one - the first dray passed the man - the second threw him down, and the wheel went over his skull, and killed him on the spot. The prisoner was a few yards behind the dray - he was laid hold of at the time. I saw the deceased on the ground, and his brains among the dirt. I ran up to the office, and told the officers what had happened - they took him as he came by. He said he could not help it - the first dray was not wider than the other. I cannot say whether the deceased was drunk or sober. He stood upright to try to save himself - the wheel was near enough to crush him.

WILLIAM BARNES . I am a journeyman dyer. I was with the last witness. I saw the two drays - there was a driver with the first. The first dray passed the man without doing him any injury. I saw the second dray - there was no person with it to prevent mischief. The prisoner was behind it - the deceased stood upright, to try to keep clear of it - part of the dray caught hold of him, and threw him down, and the wheel ran over his skull. The drays were going at a moderate pace. I cannot say how far the driver was behind.

THOMAS SALISBURY . I am a silk-warper. The deceased was on the opposite side of the way to where I stood. I saw him walk round the corner of the street, before the wheel went over his head. He went on that side the way where there is no pavement. I saw the first dray pass - there was a driver with it. The second driver

might be about twenty yards behind - two or three houses off. If he had been up with the dray, the accident would not have happened. The prisoner was stopping near a sadler's shop - it was within three doors of the corner of Worship-street.

GEORGE TUNWELL . I am a journeyman dyer; I saw the deceased cling up to the wall as close as he could - the driver of the second dray was three or four doors from it when the deceased was killed.

JOHN MARSH . I am an officer. The deceased was known by the name of John Tucker . I took the prisoner into custody; he had then got thirty yards from where the man lay - he was behind the dray when I laid hold of him. Both the drays had stopped; he said the second dray was his. I went and measured the ground - it was thirteen feet wide - the width of the dray was about seven feet. If the driver had been there the accident would not have happened.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along my apron-string untied, and I stopped to tie it. I never saw the unfortunate man until I saw him under the wheel.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-158

1459. JOHN OLIVER and THOMAS LONG were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a copper kettle, value 10 s. the goods of Edward Gander .

EDWARD GANDER . I live in the Commercial-road . I am a tin manufacturer and brazier . On Saturday, the 4th of October, a kettle was stolen off a hook in the shop.

HENRY WHITE . I live in Catherine-street, Limehouse, and am a cheesemonger. In consequence of something I had heard, I was watching the prisoners, who were with two other boys. Long went into the shop and stood about two minutes; he then came out and spoke to the other three boys outside; he then went in again, and Oliver followed him - Oliver turned round and took the copper kettle off the book, and came out, and Long followed him. The instant Oliver came out I seized him with it, and afterwards took Long. The other two ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 12.

OLIVER - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18231022-159

1460. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , six silver tea spoons, value 1 l., and a quilt, value 2 s. , the goods of Lack Kearns .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18231022-160

1461. JOHN ASH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM COLTON . I live at No. 7, White-hart-row, Battle-bridge: I am a constable. On Sunday, September 28, about nine o'clock in the evening, I observed the prisoner come, with two more, and run from the corner of Dean-street, Oxford-street . I saw them run after a gentleman, and one of them tried to strike him. I spoke to the gentleman, and they crossed over to another person. I watched them carefully down Oxford-street, towards St. Giles's. I saw the prisoner stoop forward, and whip the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, and put his hand under his coat. They were all three together, and all ran away. I pointed out the prisoner to Reardon. I went over to the gentleman and stopped him, and told him what had happened. He said he would come forward, but the lady with him would not allow him. I do not know his name. I pressed him hard for it. I afterwards saw a parcel of people running, and went up and found the prisoner struggling with Reardon, near Soho-square. The handkerchief has not been found.

DANIEL REARDON . I live in Grenville-street, Somers-town, and am a mason. Sometimes I work for Mr. Smith, and sometimes for myself. I am acquainted with Colton. I was with him on the 28th of September, in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner there with two other men, in company together. I watched them half an hour. I saw Ash go up to a gentleman with two others, and the prisoner took a handkerchief from his pocket. They were going down the street, towards St. Giles's. I saw the prisoner rush down the street, and attempt to strike a gentleman. I saw him and the two others cross the way. I crossed near Dean-street. When Ash flew up to the gentleman, (who had a lady with him,) the other two were behind him. Directly I saw him take the handkerchief out, I crossed the street. There is a short street near Grafton-street. The prisoner ran round the coach-stand, and I after him. One of the coachmen struck me with the whip; the other two ran away. I thought Colton would pursue them. There was a gentleman who was present when we stopped, but he is not here. The prisoner was so violent I was forced to get him into a door-way to hold him; he kicked his shoes off in the struggle. I saw him fling the handkerchief between the wheels of a coach. I went afterwards to the stand, and the coaches were gone. There were only the watermen left. I do not know the other two men that were with the prisoner. I have worked very lately at my business as a plasterer; I worked at the Foreman's house about a month ago; I have sometimes jobs every day in Somers'-town. I have not been in constant work, but do jobs when I get them.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery. I was going to my sister's.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18231022-161

1462. THOMAS HENSHALL was indicted for stealing two live tame fowls, value 14 s., and a rabbit, value 1 s. the property of John Whibley .

JOHN WHIBLEY , I live at Fulham , and am a coal-dealer . I kept rabbits in a hutch in the yard. I lost two of them. I saw them safe at eleven o'clock in the morning on which they were taken. I did not miss them till I came home in the evening. The prisoner had lived with me two months ago. I discharged him, and told him not to come on my premises again.

SARAH KILLICK . I knew the prisoner while he was in the service of Whibley. I saw him come out of the yard with two game fowls and a rabbit. The fowls had then gone to roost, and the rabbits were in the hutch. I spoke to him three times; I called him by a nick-name he went by. I never saw the fowls or the rabbits again.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where were they - A. The fowls were under one arm, and the rabbit under the other. I asked him what he had got. I went back to ascertain what he had taken. I told him to stop. I was afraid to go nearer to him. It was about eight or nine o'clock in the evening.

JAMES MINNIGAN . I am a hair-dresser, and live near the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner on this night; I knew him before; I could only see one rabbit; I was in a grocer's shop when he came by. He was taken about ten minutes afterwards, near his mother's door.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Everybody knew where his mother lived - A. Yes. I was standing by the door when he passed by me. I never said to any one that it was a puppy.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. I received information and went to his mother's, and found him on the roof of the house - it was after dark; he said he knew nothing about the rabbit - I have not seen it since.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18231022-162

1463. JOHN ROWLANDS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one scarf, value 10 s. , the goods of Lawrence Finn .

SARAH FINN . I am the wife of Lawrence Finn , who is a fancy glass-worker . The scarf lay on the table. I live at No. 19, Harrison-street, Gray's-Inn-lane-road . I had it half an hour before the prisoner came to my house, from his sister-in-law, for a bottle of home brewed ale. I asked him to sit down, and went to fill the bottle, and told the servant to take him a glass to drink. I afterwards found that the scarf was gone; I told Avery, and he got it back again. He had put it in his pocket.

JOHN AVERY . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the shawl in his coat pocket. He said he had no friends.

Prisoner's Defence I throw myself on the mercy of the Court. I admit I did it, but it was through misfortune.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18231022-163

1464. STEPHEN LARKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a jacket, value 3 s., a handkerchief, value 1 s., and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Freebody .

THOMAS FREEBODY . I am a mariner . The things were taken from my birth in the ship, which laid in the Export Dock, East India Docks . The prisoner had nothing to do with that ship; I was looking out of the cabin window, and saw the prisoner taking some things away under his jacket; I followed and seized him, and asked where he got them from; he made no reply.

JOHN LAKE . I am a constable at the East India Docks. I saw the things after Freebody had hold of the prisoner; he appeared in great distress - he had nothing about him. He said he had left his ship about a fortnight ago.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18231022-164

1465. MARY FOX and MARIA FOX were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , two sheets, value 2 s.; a bolster, value 3 s., and a coverlid, value 2 s., the goods of Daniel Manning , in a lodging-room .

SARAH MANNING . My husband's name is Daniel - he lives in Steward's-rents, Great Wild-street . The prisoners took lodgings of me in the begining of last March, on the second floor, at 5 s. a week; but they left on the 9th of April - they had the use of these things. I went up to ask for rent, and missed one of my bed curtains - they said they had pledged it. I turned down the bed, and found the sheets and quilt were gone - they said they had also pledged them. I found part of the bed-tick cut off - feathers and all gone. I missed fire-irons, and other articles. I sent for a constable, and had them taken - they are mother and daughter.

GEORGE POND . I am the beadle. I saw the state of the prisoners room - the bed was cut to pieces, and the tick quite spoiled.

PATRICK CARMOODY . I am a watchman. I went up stairs with Mr. Pond, and saw the bed cut into pieces - there was about half a yard in length cut off - the tick was completely spoiled.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HEPPER . I am apprentice to John Geddy , a pawnbroker, of Stanhope-street; I produce two sheets, which I took in pledge, on the 3d of March, for 3 s. The young prisoner (Maria) pledged one on the 4th of March. I am sure as to her.

FRANCIS WHITE . I took in this quilt on the 4th of March. I do not know that either of the prisoners pledged it.

MARY FOX'S Defence. I did not pawn them.

MARIA FOX'S Defence. Whatever I am, my mother is quite innocent; indeed she is.

MARY FOX - NOT GUILTY .

MARIA FOX - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .


View as XML