Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th September 1823.
Reference Number: 18230910
Reference Number: f18230910-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey: ON WEDNESDAY, 10th of SEPTEMBER, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Carr Glynn , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; and Christopher Smith , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; and William Brown , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julian Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Williams ,

John Bowie ,

Charles Richard Weller ,

William Jackson ,

Edward Petty ,

Thomas Quirrell ,

Arthur Owen ,

Thomas Charlton ,

Thomas Mitchell ,

John Clark ,

Joseph Sharp ,

Henry Verinder .

1st Middlesex Jury.

William Hammond ,

Charles Brown ,

Richard Hammond ,

Thomas James Annett ,

William Burgess ,

Walter Morgan ,

James Hanson ,

Thomas Griffiths ,

George Walmey ,

Thomas Harding ,

William Crawley ,

Thomas Taylor .

2d Middlesex Jury.

John William Clay ,

Carnes James Ford ,

James Davis ,

Samuel Smith ,

Ambrose Joy ,

Jonas Bateman ,

William Scholey ,

John Newman ,

Thomas Starling ,

George Alexander ,

Thomas Hutchinson ,

William Hott .

3d Middlesex Jury.

John Winterbourne ,

Thomas Elsam ,

Henry Lovelock ,

William Crooks ,

James Emberie ,

Thomas Miller ,

Alexander Crow ,

Richard Nunn ,

John Robinson ,

William Mansfield ,

George Johnson ,

Joseph Boyce .

4th Middlesex Jury.

George Parker ,

Richard Warwick ,

James Godlington ,

Edward Straw ,

Charles Allen ,

Thomas Wicks ,

George Seaward ,

William Henry Rose ,

Charles Godbold ,

William Little ,

Richard Underwood ,

Henry Tyler .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18230910-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury.

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

992. WILLIAM DARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , (being servant to Francis Dashwood , Esq. ) five silver forks, value 2 l. 15 s., the property of his said master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

LADY ISABEL ANN DASHWOOD . I am the wife of Francis Dashwood , who holds a situation at the Cape of Good Hope . I came to England to superintend the education of two of my children, who were under the care of Mr. Williams. I reside at No. 1, Montague-place, St. Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner was my footman, and had been so four years; I have been at Windsor for the last six months, and on the 7th of July, I sent him to the town house, and directed him to return to me; he never did; I then examined my plate, all of which was at Windsor, and missed upwards of one hundred and twenty pieces, consisting of spoons, forks, and other articles. I went to Windsor in January last; I authorised him to pawn eight spoons on the 5th of July, 1822, but never authorised him to pawn any more.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Has your Ladyship ever seen M'Carthy at your house - A. Yes; he was not admitted further than the door, to my knowledge.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday morning, the 31st of August, about two o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner in a Mews at Lisson-green, concealed in a hackney-coach; I asked his name; he said it was William Darby , and that he was nearly starved to death. I then asked if he lived with Lady Ann Dashwood , and he said he did. I told him I had a very serious charge against him, for robbing her ladyship; he made no answer. I took him out of the coach, and searched his pockets; he had nothing in them. I then took him to Mary-le-bone watch-house; he wished to see Mr. Williams, who afterwards saw him at the watch-house. I found in his shoe, between the inner and outer sole, three duplicates; I asked him if he had any more; he said he had had more, but they were destroyed; that one Daniel M'Carthy had got some more; he gave me his address, at No. 7, Dudley-court, near St. Giles's Church. I went, and left word for him to bring them; and when I returned, I found him in custody at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You found him in her Ladyship's neighbourhood - A. About half a mile from her house; he made no resistance. I left word at M'Carthy's house, that Darby wanted to see him at the watch-house, and he was to bring the papers which he had with him. He pulled his shoes off himself.

DANIEL M'CARTHY . I am a painter and glazier. I have hawked fruit about the town; and occasionally, within the last year, have sold fruit at her Ladyship's house; I dealt with the prisoner for it. During the time I was going backwards and forwards to the house, the prisoner employed me, eight or nine times, to pawn plate; he was indebted to me for fruit, and gave me the plate to pawn to raise money to pay me. I pawned it at Sampson's. I offered him the duplicates, but he desired me to take care of them; I delivered some of the tickets to him (looking at the three found on the prisoner); these are not any of them. I may have given him one or two, the rest were taken from me at the watch-house. I pawned the last property in December.

Cross-examined. Q. You were often at the house - A. Yes; the fruit was sold for her Ladyship. I never applied for payment to any one but Darby, as he always dealt with me. I have seen her Ladyship and Mr. Williams occasionally, but understood from Darby that he was the confidential servant. My first bill might be 3 l. or 4 l.; they might take 1 s. or 3 s. worth a day. I kept a shop in Castle-street part of the time. When I pawned the plate, I kept the money, as it was to pay me; when there was more than my bill, I delivered him the balance; I understood from him that her Ladyship wished it to be pawned. The last I pawned was for five guineas; at that time there was 6 l. 16 s. 5 d. due to me. I delivered the bills to Darby. I may have pawned to the amount of 18 l. or 19 l. in all. I served fruit regularly every day, for eighteen months, till her Ladyship went to Windsor; they sometimes took 6 s. worth at a time. I returned him 2 l. in December, and 10 s. or 15 s. at other times. I always went down the area, to the prisoner's room; I do not know where the plate was kept; I may have seen some in his room; I pawned the property as he gave it me - in the evening.

LADY DASHWOOD. I always gave the money to the cook to pay for the fruit; I thought the cook bought the fruit.

MARY GREEN . I am cook to her Ladyship; she gave me the money to pay for the fruit, which I gave to the prisoner every day.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see M'Carthy down stairs - A. I have seen him in the butler's pantry many times, for three-quarters of an hour or an hour; he brought the fruit in a basket; I have seen him come in when the prisoner was cleaning plate.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am watch-house-keeper. I have ten duplicates, given to me by M'Carthy at the watch-house; one for goods pawned for five guineas, on the 22d of September last, at Sampson's.

ROBERT LEWIS . I am shopman to Mr. Sampson, pawnbroker, Greek-street, Soho; here is one of our duplicates for goods pawned with us by M'Carthy, on the 24th of September, 1822, for five guineas. I produce the property; there are seventeen silver spoons and eleven silver forks, nine of which forks only belonged to her Ladyship, the other two are not worth 20 s. I should have advanced 4 l. 10 s. on her property. Here are five spoons, pawned on the 17th December, 1822, for 2 l. 15 s.; also six desert forks, pawned on the 31st of August, 1822, for 2 l. I have another parcel of goods also.

Cross-examined. Q. No one article is worth 40 s. - A. I should think the gravy spoons worth that, but will not swear it.

JAMES BASSETT . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison. I have a gravy, two table, and two desert spoons, pawned for 2 l. 15 s.

JAMES HALL . I have three desert spoons, pawned on the 19th of December, the duplicate of which was found on the prisoner.

JAMES GURNEY . I am servant to Mr. Morritt. I produce four table-spoons, pawned for 2 l., two of the duplicates found on the prisoner relate to them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-2

Before Mr. Justice Best.

993. SAMUEL HODGKINSON , JOSEPH MAXFIELD , and WILLIAM RAWLINSON , were indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-3

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

994. DANIEL SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing a telescope, value 12 s., the goods of George Williams , his master .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-4

995. BENJAMIN BARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 120 halfpence, the monies of Joseph Collyer , his master and employer .

JOSEPH COLLYER . I am a grocer , and live on Holborn-hill . The prisoner was in my service, as porter , for fourteen months. Having missed papers of halfpence, I got up at half-past six o'clock yesterday morning, and put a private mark on a pile of halfpence, on a shelf behind the counter. He slept in the house, and came down soon after six. I placed myself where I could not be seen, and saw him take one paper off the pite; I came out directly; he was then in the shop, but not behind the counter. About nine o'clock I sent for a constable, and told him I suspected him; he said he had nothing about him but what was his own. The five shilling paper was found in his pocket, with my mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. I believe he bore a good character - A. Yes.

GEORGE CORBYN . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge - I found the paper of halfpence in his breeches pocket; Mr. Collyer claimed it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-5

996. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , twelve pair of stockings, value 24 s. the goods of John Jackson Bridges and Richard Beeston .

RICHARD BEESTON . I am in partnership with John Jackson Bridges ; we are wholesale hosiers , and live in Wood-street. The prisoner was an occasional porter . On the 17th of July we missed a paper containing twelve pair of stockings.

ROBERT DENTON . I am in the service of the prosecutors. I was in the warehouse about six o'clock in the evening. The prisoner came to ask for employment, I told him there were no jobs for him. As he returned to the door, I thought I heard something fall from the counter; I suspected him, followed and stopped him, and asked him what he had got under his coat; he said nothing; I pulled out the parcel of stockings, and took them to Mr. Beeston, without securing the prisoner; he was taken in about an hour. I am sure it was on the counter when he was in the warehouse; he wished me not to inform the firm of it.

GEORGE GARROD . I am a draper. On the 17th of July I was in the prosecutor's warehouse, and saw the prisoner take this parcel, and informed one of the young men.

THOMAS CREWS . I am a constable. I apprehended him in a court in Fenchurch-street; he said it was about the stockings, and that he must have been drunk or mad.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to borrow 6 d., which was refused, and I took the parcel.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-6

997. SAMUEL ANSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a table, 4 s., and three deal boards, value 1 l. , the goods of George Heath and William Heath .

GEORGE HEATH . I am a carpenter , and in partnership with William Heath ; we live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 24th of August, about half-past four o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by a ring at the bell. I looked out of window, and saw a man, who said my property was being taken from my yard. I went down to the yard, in Angel-alley, where I saw three deals against the wall, about twenty yards from my yard; and further down the alley I found the table; my yard is walled round; they were there over night.

JOHN ANSON . I am a labourer, and live about two hundred

yards from the prosecutors'. I am no relation of the prisoner, but have known him about three weeks. On the morning of the 24th of August, I was awoke by the noise of some dogs; I got up, saw two men on Mr. Heath's wall, and two deals against the wall. The prisoner was lowering down a table from the wall. The watchman was calling four o'clock, and they ran into a house opposite to my window. I saw them take something out of the drawer of the table. This was in Angel-alley. While I was dressing myself the prisoner took a bundle under his arm, and the other took the table. I went down to find the watchman, but could not. I called up Mr. Heath, and took him to the place; they had left the deals and taken the table, which was found up the court where the prisoner lived, and about one hundred yards from the deals. I described the prisoner, and he was taken that afternoon, and am certain of him - I had seen him in company with the other man before.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not shew me 3 s., saying Mr. Heath gave it you, and you would stick to it that it was me - A. Heath gave me 3 s. for my trouble. I went up stairs directly, and did not see the prisoner again till he was apprehended.

SARAH BURNETT . I am a weaver, and live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate. On the morning of the 24th of August, about half-past three o'clock, I was called up by Anson, and saw the table, which had just been lowered, and two men on the wall. I knew the prisoner before, by seeing him in the neighbourhood - I saw him put a deal over the wall next to the prosecutors' wall; Anson called me to look at him.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Angel-alley; he denied the charge.

GEORGE HEATH . The deals are now in my yard; I know them by a chalk mark which I made for the sawyer. I know the table by its appearance; the table-drawer was stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed at half-past twelve o'clock, and the watchman could prove an alibi. Anson lives entirely by that woman's prostitution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-7

998. GEORGE HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , at St. Bartholomew the Great, one ewe sheep, price 30 s. , the property of Samuel Matthews .

SAMUEL MATTHEWS , JUN. I am the son of Samuel Matthews , a butcher , of Warwick-lane, Newgate-street . On Friday, the 1st of August, I saw this sheep in our yard, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon; it was to have been slaughtered that day - I saw it last about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon.

THOMAS WOOD . I am a drover, and live in Field-court, Islington. I have known the prisoner a good while; he is a drover. On the 1st of August, Mr. Matthews bought thirty-nine sheep. Which I delivered to his drover, Charles Lynch ; six of them were marked M on the near side, and were ewes; they had belonged to Mr. Moore.

CHARLES LYNCH . I received thirty-nine sheep, for Mr. Matthews, from Wood, about one o'clock on the 1st of August, some marked M, some B, and some C. I put them into the shed, in Sharp's-alley; I took twenty of them to slaughter that day, and sixteen to Holloway, leaving three ewes in the shed about half-past four o'clock; they were very lame.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a drover. On the 1st of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Smithfield, and saw a sheep pass me; the prisoner was driving it; he had a string round its neck, and his left hand on it, and his right hand wielding the tail, forcing it on as fast as possible: it being after market hours, I thought it was something wrong, and followed him to the corner of Cloth-fair, he turned the sheep into Cloth-fair; and there marked it with ochre down the back and across - I was too far to notice whether there was any mark before. I followed him to a butcher's shop; he turned the sheep into the shop, then took the string off its neck and tied its three legs; it was taken round a screen, where the butcher stuck it; I heard the sheep struggling after having been stuck. I then called the prisoner, and said,

"Harvey, you wretch, whose sheep have you got there slaughtering? some poor drover will have to pay for that." He then used a hard expression, and threatened to beat my brains out. I went from the shop with him, and ordered the butcher not to touch it till I brought somebody to witness the brand-mark, ochre-mark. I went with the prisoner over towards the other side of Smithfield; he said the sheep belonged to Dibbens, a butcher, over the water - I said,

"God bless you, George, if it is his; but I will not leave you till I know the rights of it." He came with me from there to near Long-lane, where I saw a drover, and asked him to come with me to look at the marks on the sheep. I said, in the prisoner's presence,

"Joe, I consider there is a sheep that has been wrongfully dealt with here, by Harvey; will you come with me?" but he refused - I said then I would find an officer. I went up Long-lane, and the prisoner left me; I found Stanton, and took him to the butcher's, who took the skin in his charge.

JAMES BARNES . I am a butcher, and live in Cloth-fair. I have frequently seen the prisoner. On the 1st of August, between five and six o'clock, he brought me a ewe sheep - I had not seen him on that day before; he asked me to slaughter it for it was lame. It was marked down the back and across the loins; the ochre did not appear fresh exactly. I saw no other mark on it. I heard Hughes ask whose it was; he said it belonged to Dibbens. I do not recollect Hughes telling me not to meddle with it; but as he said it was some poor drovers, I did not proceed further with it. The officer took the skin away, and on Monday, the 4th of August, I was fetched to the office; the prisoner was in custody. I have known him as a drover some time. The officer had the carcase on Saturday morning.

JURY. Q. Are you in the habit of receiving drovers' sheep - A. When sheep cannot walk they are in the habit of leaving them where they can. I had stuck the sheep before Hughes spoke, or I would not have done it.

JAMES SALE . I am a drover. About a quarter to seven o'clock, I had these sheep to take from Matthews's stall to Newgate-market; there should have been thirty-one of them. I counted them directly I got them out of the shed, and there was only thirty. I drove them to Newgate-market. The officer produced a skin to me on the Saturday - It was then marked along the back and across; it was not marked so when master bought them - I know it to be the skin of one of the sheep, as I had marked the three lame ones on the rump with ochre, which mark was on it then; I could

see a little of it, and swear to it being the skin of one of the three lame ewes, for it slipped aside while I was marking it, which made the ochre slip aside.

JAMES ROCKETT . I am a drover. Mr. Dibbens employed me on the 1st of August to drive four sheep out of the market; he was taking them home himself; I drove them out, and the prisoner put himself forward to help us oat with them - we got down Cow-lane; two of them ran back into the market, and one was run over. Dibbens told me to take it to Carpenter's, the butcher, to be killed, which I did, and persuaded him to take the other three home in a cart. I saw them put into the cart, and he went in the cart with them, being in liquor. This was about four o'clock - I went home, and came out about half-past six, and Harvey said he wanted to speak to me - he said he had picked up a sheep; I said that was nothing to me; he said it was all right, it was a gift - I said that would not do for me; I was going away, he called me back and said, Dibbens had four sheep, and if I would say he had five that would do, and he would see Dibbens, and if Dibbens would say there were five that would clear him. I said I would have nothing to do with it, and walked away - he wanted to talk further with me, but I would not. I heard Matthews's man (Lynch) the same night enquiring about it, but did not tell him what I had heard, as I did not know that it was his sheep.

JAMES STANTON . I am a constable. On the 1st of August, in consequence of what Hughes said, I went to Barnes, the butcher, and found a sheep stuck; It was skinned in my presence, and the skin delivered to me. I shewed it to Sales, who said it was Matthews's - he shewed me a mark on the rump, which I think slanted. On Saturday morning I found the prisoner in Mr. Carpenter's slaughter-house, with Dibbens - as soon as I went in he said,

"Stanton, here is a pretty bother about this sheep" (Dibbens's sheep then hung in the slaughter-house) he said

"Here is the owner of it, and I have done with it." I told him he must account to me for the sheep he found in Cloth-fair - he said that was Dibbens's; Dibbens said nothing to it. I asked Dibbens how he marked his sheep; he said sometimes one way and sometimes another. He shewed me the skin of the sheep at Carpenter's, and said that was his mark; it was not like the skin at Barnes's in the least - but Dibbens said he sometimes bought from different people, and then he marked them with their mark. I asked him whether the sheep I had got in Cloth-fair was his; he then pointed to the one which hung up, and said,

"That is mine;" that was all he would say; but he said the one at Carpenter's made up his right number, for he had but four. I told the prisoner he must go with me - he said he would not, and resisted a good deal, but I got assistance, and took him by force to the Compter. I have the skin, Matthews and his son both claimed it.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS . I saw the skin on the Monday after it was lost, and am certain it is my father's - there is the letter M on the side, and a brand mark; the ochre mark is drawn over it. We bought nearly two hundred sheep that day, but left only thirty-one in the shed.

JAMES SALES . This is the skin of one of the three sheep - here is a trace of my slant mark.

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past two o'clock I stood by the Ram Inn - Dibbens came, and said he had four sheep, and wanted me to take them home for him - I said I could not. Rockett came up, and said he would help him in with them, as the constables were clearing the market; he tied these four sheep down, and got drinking till near four o'clock. I told him to take his sheep home; he was so drunk he could hardly walk. I helped him with the sheep; two ran back, and one was run over - he said he had bought two more, and that he bought them of Veal, but did not know what was become of them. I found this one in the pens, and thinking it was his, I took it to the butcher to kill.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Sentence of DEATH Recorded, but not Passed .

Reference Number: t18230910-8

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

999. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for feloniously assaulting William James Humphries , on the King's highway, on the 17th of August , at Christ church, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a seal, value 30 s.; a watch-key, value 6 d., and part of a watch-chain, value 6 d. , his property.

WILLIAM JAMES HUMPHRIES . I am a brazier , and live in Paradise-row, St. George in the East. On sunday, the 17th of August, I went to dine with a friend, at the corner of Percival-street, Goswell-street - I left there about nine o'clock at night, and was returning home with my wife and family; I was quite sober. My wife had a child at her breast, and I was leading my eldest boy. I proceeded down Union-street, towards Spitalfields-church, and when I came to the corner of Gun-street , I saw the prisoner leaning against a post; he was alone - I am sure of his person. As I advanced towards the middle of the road, he met me, and made a spring at me, and struck me on the breast with his arm, and at the same moment took my watch-seal from me - the chain broke with the snatch, and part of it went with the seal, key, and ring; it was a gold seal, which I had taken out of pawn for 30 s.; the chain was steel. He rushed against my breast - I put my hand down, and missed it, and immediately pursued after him, calling Stop thief! I ran down Gun-street on the left-hand side of the way, and was interrupted by another, who struck me on the breast - I immediately recovered from the blow. I pursued the prisoner; he was out of my sight about a minute; when I saw him again he was stopped. I looked at him, and immediately recognized him, and am certain he is the person. I have found none of my property. When he got to the watch-house, I said it was a pity a young man should be guilty of such a thing, and if he would produce my property, or tell me where I could get it, I should be sorry to go on with the prosecution - he said he was innocent; I said,

"If you were it would be hard to swear against you if I was not positive," but I was certain of him; he was stopped within two or three minutes after the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was at

night - A. Ten minutes before ten o'clock; it was a fine star-light night, but not moon-light. I never saw him before; I only saw him as I was crossing the road; it might not be more than half a minute. I saw him leaning on a post. The gas-light shone right in his face. I was agitated when the push was given.

Q. Between the time of your seeing him, and your being robbed another person knocked against you - A. Yes, and when I got up there was a crowd of people holding him. I never said I might be mistaken in him - I said it would be impossible for me to swear to him, provided I had not such a good view of his face; his hat was on, but it did not hide his face. My eye was fixed on him as he leant on the post, and when he came from the post towards me, I looked steadfastly at his face. I do not know what became of the other man. The prisoner's landlady came to me after he was examined - I told her I was positive of him. I never said I would let him go if his friends would give me money. I was not agitated till I was robbed. I thought my watch was gone, and ran off immediately. I felt my seal safe just before.

JAMES TURRELL . I am a watchman. On the 17th of August, I was going to the watch-house at the end of Gun-street, and passing the end of Gun-street and Union-street, I saw the prisoner leaning against a post - I went up to him, taking him for a person I knew, but when I got close to him, I found he was not. I am certain he is the man who stood against the post. Two or three minutes after, I stopped at the opposite corner for a necessary purpose, and in the mean time I saw a man, woman, and children passing the post where he stood. I saw the prisoner step from the post to the edge of the curb, and lift his left arm up, but whether he took anything I do not know; he immediately ran down Gun-street, and the prosecutor called Stop thief; I immediately pursued the prisoner - he was stopped in Artillery-passage. I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner into the passage; he was stopped immediately - I am certain of him. The prosecutor came up, and asked us to stop for him to see if he was the person, and when he saw him he said he was. He was taken to the watch-house, and said there, that he was innocent. The people asked why he ran away; he said there was a window broken close to where he stood, and he was afraid they would take him for breaking it. I heard no windows broken, and next morning I looked all about the street to see if any were broken, but could find none.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say you examined every pane of glass in two or three streets - A. No. I examined the windows at five o'clock in the morning; I examined both sides of Gun-street. It happened on my beat, but was ten minutes before duty. I have been on that beat nine years, and never saw him before to my knowledge. I saw him for two or three minutes; but did not speak to him; there was a gas-light close to him; the prosecutor said another man gave him a blow on the breast. I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner; he was the first who was running; I was seven or eight yards from him, and did not see him throw anything away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Whitechapel, down Union-street, and saw a female, who turned down Gun-street; thinking I knew her, I went after her, and about three paces down the street, I heard something break, and heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running, and ran after him; whether he ran into a house or not I do not know. I went down to the bottom of the street; several people were running different ways - I was taken hold of, and asked what they took me for; they said they heard a cry of Stop thief! and did not know whether I was the man or not. This gentleman came up in two or three minutes - I said,

"Does this gentleman accuse me of robbing him?" he said,

"No, but I suppose if you was not the man you would not be stopped," and that he could not say positively that I was the man. I was taken to the watch-house, and there they asked if he was sure I robbed him - he said it was hard to swear to a man, and as so many people were alike, he would not swear, but no doubt as I was stopped I was the person. I declare to God that I am innocent. He was nearly an hour in the watch-house, and when the prosecutor was asked if he would give charge, he said if the constable thought proper he would. He persuaded him to give charge of me, and to enquire if I had respectable friends.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I never said I had the least doubt of his person. I stopped him in the street, and said I was the person who had been robbed, and wished to see if they had the right man, and immediately I looked at him I said he is the man, and never expressed a doubt of him.

JAMES TURRELL . The prosecutor always declared himself certain of the prisoner.

SUSAN HATCHETT . I live in Union-walk, Kingsland-road. I have known the prisoner seven or eight years; he was apprenticed to a Mr. Evans, of Old-street-road - he has lodged with me for the last two years, and is a paper-stainer, and an honest industrious character - his master has been dead some time, and since that he has been jobbing for himself. I saw the prosecutor the morning after this charge was made - I asked him what was the matter; he said this young man was in charge on suspicion of taking his seals and chain - he said the young man who had his seal was by the watch-house door. I said, why do you wish to take him (the prisoner) up then; he said I do not wish to take him up if he will tell me who has got my seal.

COURT. Q. How came you to go after this person - A. A person called on me (I think from the watch-house.) and asked if I knew Hughes, as he was in the watch-house on suspicion of taking a gentleman's seal. I am sure he said he was there on suspicion. I saw the prosecutor next morning at the watch-house, before eleven o'clock. Many people were by.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the prosecutor expressed a doubt of the prisoner being the person who robbed him - A. Yes, he did; because he said the person, who he believed had his seal, went by the watch-house door that morning. I said it was a pity he charged him, if he was not certain of him.

Q. Did he say he doubted about him - A. No; he said there were three or four in the gang, and he believed this young man was with them - but the man who he thought had his seal went by the door.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I saw this woman at the watch-house next morning - she came to the watch-house and said to the prisoner,

"Where is the man who says you

robbed him." I said

"Here am I;" she said,

"It cannot be' - I said

"Positively it is so" - she said,

"Oh! for God's sake let us make it up, will you go with me to Kingsland-road?" I said, No, I could do nothing; he was in charge, he was the man who robbed me, and I could not take him away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18230910-9

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1000. JOHN SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 3d of July , at St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for payment of 5 l., (setting it forth, No. 10,719, dated 11th August, 1821; signed R. Clough), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud John lckler .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18230910-10

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1000. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , at St. George, Hanover-square, nine neck chains, value 450 l.; fourteen ear-rings, value 320 l.; one ear-ring, value 1 l.; ten bracelets, value 85 l.; six crosses, value 145 l.; nine brooches, value 150 l.; a head ornament, value 30 l.; six lockets, value 30 l.; four gold rings, value 1 l.; two watches, value 40 l., and a jewel-case, value 15 l., the goods of William Henry Meyrick , Esq., in his dwelling-house ; and GILBERT DOWNES was indicted for that he, before the said felony was done and committed, in manner aforesaid, to wit, on the same day, and in the same parish, feloniously and maliciously did make, move, procure, aid and counsel, hire, and command the said James Clark , to do and commit the same .

MESSRS. PLATT and LAW conducted the prosecution.

LIEUT. COL. WILLIAM HENRY MEYRICK . I am a captain in the third regiment of Foot Guards . The prisoner Clark was a private in the same regiment, and acted as my livery servant for twelve months - I discharged him on Wednesday, the 13th of August; I had paid him his wages on the Sunday previous - he wore my livery, and continued my servant until the 13th. I had a Kingswood box, fourteen inches long, and six deep, containing the articles enumerated in the indictment, except the two watches and seals. The value was about 1200 l. or 1400 l. My house is in Berkley-square, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. I missed the box on the morning of the 14th - it usually stood in my wife's dressing-room, where we generally breakfasted; he was in the habit of coming into this room, and seeing the box and its contents, for he travelled with me, and I always took the box with me. I saw nothing of him after five o'clock in the afternoon of the 13th, till Monday following, the 18th, when he was in custody. I had advertised in the Newspapers on the 14th, and received a letter, purporting to come from Messrs. White and Dodson, in consequence of which, I went with Westcoat, the officer, in a direction for Portsmouth; but on the Guildford-road, about twenty-five miles from town, I recognized Clark in a chaise, with one Worger. On coming up with them Worger produced several articles to me, which had been in the box, and I identified them. Some conversation passed between me and Clark; he said voluntarily that he had broken open the box, in a copse by the road side, about two miles beyond Dartford, and left the box in the copse, and had disposed of the gold and silver watch, to two different persons in the town of Chatham; he could not name them. I discovered them by his description. Next morning I went to the copse, beyond Dartford, and the man at the turnpike told me where I should find my box; it was given up to me, about a hundred yards from the copse, by a person who had found it. I went to Chatham, and found my gold watch in possession of Slowman, a Jew; and the silver one I recognized in the window of one Price, at Chatham. When the box was found, some things still remained in it, in a secret drawer. All the property found on the prisoner was produced at the office, and sealed up in my presence, and have been in my possession ever since. Worger afterwards produced a chain. I have recovered every single article, and produce the whole, sealed up, also the box.

JAMES WORGER . I am a constable of Brighton. In consequence of information I received, I went to Portsea on Sunday, the 17th of August, and next morning I found Clark in a bed-room at the Blacksmith's Arms, public-house, there. I had great difficulty in getting admittance; I found several articles of jewellery in a chair in the room, tied in a blue handkerchief, with two shirts. I found the whole of the property, which is now sealed up, in a box, which I afterwards gave to the prosecutor. I brought him to town, and met the Colonel - he gave me the whole account of the transaction, which enabled me to find the watches. He said where he had thrown the box, and sold the watches. Here are a pair of diamond ear-rings, necklaces, and other property in this box.

COLONEL MEYRICK. The value of the property found by Worger is full 1000 l. or 1200 l.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. In consequence of information I accompanied Colonel Meyrick on the 18th of August, and met the prisoner on the road to Guildford, in custody. The Colonel's account is correct.

JOSEPH COOK . I am groom to the Colonel. On the 13th of August, Clark left his service, about five o'clock in the afternoon. In the course of that day, about three o'clock, he sent me to take a sixpence to the soldier, Downes, at the Hole in the Wall, public-house, in Grosvenor-mews, Berkley-square. I found Downes there, and gave him the 6 d., and told him to wait until Clark came - he was to get a pot of beer. He asked how long Clark would be? - I said I did not know, and left him in the taproom.

JOHN FISHER . I keep the Hole in the Wall, Grosvenor-mews. On the 13th of August, I saw both the prisoners there; the first time was about four o'clock - they had a pot of beer in the tap-room. I did not see Cook there: some servant came and called Clark out, saying Colonel Meyrick wanted him; he went out, and returned in twenty minutes or half an hour. Downes had waited there for him, and after he returned, they remained about five minutes, and went to the door, and had some conversation together there, and Clark went over to the Colonel's

house, and Downes left my house. In about ten minutes I saw Clark again; he then had something under his arm, like a box; but it was covered with a cloth - he went down towards the Bricklayers' Arms, public-house.

Prisoner DOWNES. Q. Did you ever see me in your house, in Clark's company before - A. Yes, frequently.

Q. Did I ever ask you to send your boy to Colonel Meyrick's to fetch Clark - A. He probably might.

ISRAEL REEVES . I am the landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms, Grosvenor-mews. The prisoner Downes came to my house on Wednesday, the 13th of August; Clark came into the passage, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, and called Downes out; Clark had a box covered with a whitish cloth - he said,

"Downes, come out, I want you;" he went out, and they walked away, along Little Grosvenor-street. Downes took the box as soon as they crossed the street, and carried it along Little Grosvenor-street, with the cloth still over it. I then lost sight of them.

JANE DRY . I am the wife of Adam Dry , musician, Gee's-court, Oxford-market. On the 13th of August, about a quarter past six o'clock in the afternoon, I saw both the prisoners there; Clark brought the box produced into my room, and put it in a chair - I know it by the lock. My sister-in-law let him in - Clark came up stairs first, put the box in a chair, and asked for Mr. Dry, saying he had something for him - he kept pushing the lock of the box: Downes said,

"D - n it, don't open it." I said my husband would not be at home until one o'clock. I saw no cloth; they did not remain in the room above three minutes, and took the box out with them. I let them out at the street door, and on returning found a cloth on the chair where the box stood, rolled up all in a heap. I gave it to the Colonel, who gave it to Collins in my presence.

Prisoner DOWNES. Q. Did you not say at Marlborough-street, that you could not swear I was the soldier who came with Clark - A. Yes; I doubted about it at first, but from seeing him twice at Marlborough-street, I can say he is the man.

COURT. Q. Are you clear that he is the man who came with Clark - A. No; I cannot swear to it, only his whiskers are dark, like that man's.

ANN DRY . I am sister-in-law to the last witness. On the 13th of August, I was sitting at the window at work, and saw Clark, and saw the back of a soldier; he went into my father's house, No. 12, (we live at No. 14) I saw him come down stairs, and come out; he then had something on his arm, covered with a white cloth - I saw Clark coming down stairs at the same time. They came out of my father's into my brother's, No. 14, where I was; I let them in - Downes was then carrying the box, uncovered; Clark received it from him before he entered the room - he asked if Dry was at home; he was not. The box was set on a chair, uncovered; they remained there about three minutes. Clark kept fingering the lock, and turned it over, and said,

"I have got something in here, which I want to give to Dry;" Downes said,

"D - n it, Clark, don't break it open." I cannot swear to Downes, but it was a soldier.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 14th of August, I attended at Marlborough-street, and saw Downes there in custody. I neither promised nor threatened him - what he said was not taken down. I heard him tell the Magistrate that he was with Clark the evening before, and accompanied him to a court in Oxford-street; but he did not know what court it was, and that he carried a box, which Clark had given him, and that he went up stairs in a house in that court, and the person not being at home they came down stairs again - that Clark then took the box, and they parted.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am a constable. I have a towel, which I received from Colonel Meyrick, in Dry's presence. I saw her deliver it to the Colonel; it is marked W H M 9.

WILLIAM JESSOP . I am a private in the third company of the second battalion of the first regiment of Guards. We marched into Portman-street barracks one Wednesday, on or about the 13th of August. On the evening of that day, about seven o'clock, I saw Clark coming out of Gee's-court, Oxford-street, with Downes, who had a red coat on, and a box, like the one produced, in his hand; it was uncovered - I am certain of his person; they appeared rather agitated when they saw us looking at them; they crossed over in the middle of Oxford-street, and called to a hackney coachman who stood there, and both got into the coach. Downes put the box into the coach; when the coachman opened the door, the coachman wanted to take hold of it to put it in, but Downes pulled it away, and put it in himself. They both got in, and drove towards Holborn. I saw no more of them.

Prisoner DOWNES. Q. How far were you from the coach - A. About a dozen yards.

WILLIAM BATES . I am a private in the third company of the second battalion of the first Guards. I was with Jessop about seven o'clock in the evening we marched out of Portman barracks; we were in Oxford-street, and saw Downes come out of Gee's-court, with a box in his hand, similar to the one produced. A young man was with him, who appeared to be a gentleman's servant: I cannot swear to its being Clark; they went over to a coach which stood in the middle of the street - one of them spoke to the coachman; he got off his box, and was going to assist Downes in with the box, but he put it in himself; both got into the coach, which drove towards Holborn. I thought I had seen Downes before, which made me take particular notice - he had a red jacket on.

RICHARD TOWNROW . I am coachman to Colonel Meyrick . I had this towel in use in the Colonel's service - I missed it on the morning of the 14th of August; I had used it on the morning of the 13th.

COLONEL MEYRICK. I have looked over all the property, and swear that it is mine - the box was locked. I know that the battalion changed quarters on Wednesday, the 13th of August.

CLARK. I have nothing to say in my Defence. I am guilty of the crime.

DOWNES'S Defence. I did not know that it was stolen property. I was drinking at this public-house, which we frequented, and the last time Clark came out, he said he must join his regiment that night - he said he had something at the Colonel's, which he did not wish to take to barracks, and would leave them at an acquaintance's, and told me to wait at the public-house till he came to me,

which he did, and gave me the box to carry. I left him in time to be at the barracks in proper time.

CLARK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of the disclosure he made; and by the prosecutor on account of his excellent character, and the statement he made .

DOWNES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-11

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1002. WILLIAM SMART was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , at St. George, Bloomsbury, eighteen silver spoons, value 10 l.; twenty forks, value 10 l., and a soup ladle, value 1 l., the goods of Samuel Heywood , sergeant at law , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WHALEY . I am in the service of Mr. Sergeant Samuel Heywood , who lives in Bedford-place, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On the 4th of August I saw the prisoner come up the area steps - I ran to the pantry, where I had left some plate, and missed the property described in the indictment. I called to the footman to pursue him, as I was undressed - I put on my coat and waistcoat, ran out, and saw him on the other side - the footman had got beyond him. I seized him, and told him to deliver up what he had under his coat to the footman; he did so, and a silver fork dropped from the parcel he was delivering. I took him back to the house. The value of the plate is above 20 l.

DANIEL HONE . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge. I have a spoon and fork of each sort here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to pass through this place, and about the middle of Bedford-place, a man came and asked me to hold these things; he said he was going to deliver a letter, and should overtake me if I walked slow. I had not got many yards before I was seized. I had them in my hand.

JAMES WHALEY . He had them under his coat. I am certain he is the man who ran up the steps. I took him as quick as possible.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230910-12

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1003. JAMES SNELL was indicted for stealing on the 8th of June , a mare, price 5 l. , the property of William Read .

WILLIAM READ . I am a butcher , and live at North Crawley, Buckinghamshire . I had a mare - the last time I saw her was about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon, the 8th of June, in a lane, about half a mile from my house. I had bought her in September previous - I missed it about eight o'clock the same night, and on the Friday following, I saw it at the Red Lion, public-house, Aldersgate-street; it had been fresh trimmed in the mane, heels, tail, and ears. I know it well by several marks on it; it is now in my possession.

THOMAS TURNER . I am a farmer. On Tuesday, the 10th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was riding along Whitechapel - the prisoner called out,

"Turner," and asked me to buy a four years old mare of him; I said I would not buy, but I would change it for one, if he had one to suit me, and asked where it was - he said he could not shew it to me then, as he was going into the City, but asked when I should be at my stable; I said between six and seven o'clock - I got home at eight. He called to me as I was going home, and said he was sorry he had sold the four years old mare; he was then on a mare, for which I gave him a mare and two sovereigns to boot. I took her to Romford-market on the Wednesday morning, and tied her up with another horse to sell. Mr. Lowe came up, and looked at her - I asked him to buy her for 8 l.; he fetched his father, who asked if I knew who I changed her with; I said with Snell. The prisoner was crossing the road at the time, and I pointed him out; Lowe said it was stolen. I asked him to go with me to the prisoner, which he did; I said,

"Jem, this gentleman says the mare I had of you is stolen" - he said he knew better, for he had changed for it on Tuesday morning. He went down the market to find the man who he had it of, and rode away on my mare, towards town. I rode after him nearly two miles; he got off the mare - I took it. He ran across the fields, and got away. I went back to Lowe, and he had the stolen mare at the public-house, and detained it for the owner.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. The father was not quite so certain of the mare - A. No; the son said he knew it. I have known the prisoner since Christmas, buying and selling horses at fairs, and at Smithfield - he lives near Whitechapel. He mentioned Baker as the man he bought her of. He saw me in the fair with the mare, three or four times before Lowe came up, and he brought three or four persons to buy her of me, and never tried to conceal it. I told him on Tuesday night that I should take it to Romford, and he said he should go there also, and that he had changed for this mare that morning.

Q. When Lowe claimed it did you not tell the prisoner you must have your own back again - A. Some people said so, and he rode off directly.

WILLIAM READ re-examined. I lost her from Broadmead, in a lane, fifty-two miles from town; it might have strayed.

WILLIAM BAYFORD . On Tuesday night, I saw Turner and the prisoner bargaining for this mare. Turner paid him two sovereigns, and took a dark bay mare home from the prisoner's stables. I think he said he changed it that morning with one Baker.

ABRAHAM LOWE . I live at Hackney. In consequence of my son and Read losing a mare on the same morning, my son came to town - I went with him to look after them. about twelve o'clock on the Wednesday, he said he had found Read's mare. I went up with him to Turner, and after some conversation I told him it was stolen; he pointed across the market to the prisoner; we went up to him, and Turner told him the mare he had changed with him the night before was stolen. Snell said it could be no such thing, for he had got two men in the market that saw him buy it the day before, and he would go to fetch them; he rode down the market, as if with that intent - Turner said,

"Snell, don't go away." We watched him till he got to the bottom of the market: Turner said,

"He is off;" he rode after him, but returned without him. On the same evening I returned to Hackney, and met the prisoner on foot, in some meadows, by Hackney-marshes, and asked where he was going - he said to the King's Arms,

at Bow, to meet Turner and the man he bought Read's mare of. I said he must go no further without somebody with him - he said he was not going to be taken by me, and immediately ran into the marshes, and I after him, calling Stop thief! Lethbridge ran out and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. On your oath, did he not say he changed for it on Tuesday morning - A. He did not in my hearing. He said he had two men who saw him buy it - he did not mention the name of Baker.

GEORGE LOWE . I am the son of the last witness, and live at North Crawley. I came to town to look for my mare and Read's, on the 9th of June, with my father. I found Read's mare cropped and trimmed afresh, in Turner's possession; I knew her immediately. My father told Turner it was stolen; he said he bought it of Snell, pointing to him. I stopped and held the mare. Turner went up to Snell, and told him it was stolen. I was at a little distance from them, and there being a noise, I could not hear what answer was made. I saw Snell ride down the market, and Turner after him - he returned without him.

Cross-examined. Q. A great many people were round - A. Yes, twenty or more.

JOSEPH LETHBRIDGE . I am a labourer. On Wednesday night, I heard Mr. Lowe call out Stop thief! and saw the prisoner, ran after him, and secured him.

WILLIAM ALGAR . I am a constable. I assisted in taking the prisoner - he said he hoped I should not hurt him, for he had done nothing wrong; that he was only a poor sailor, and had not been long from sea.

Prisoner's Defence. I changed the mare the same day as I changed it with Turner.

JOHN TENANT . I am a dealer in straw plait, and live in Gun-street, Southwark. The prisoner called on me, on Sunday, the 8th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, and dined with me; we took a walk in the afternoon, and returned between five and six. It turned out a wet evening, and he remained at my house all night; he went to bed about twelve o'clock - he breakfasted with me the next morning, between nine and ten, and remained with me till about eleven.

COURT. Q. What makes you remember the day - A. It was my birth-day. I have a wife, but no child or servant. I expected two friends from Norfolk, but they did not come.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-13

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1004. CHARLES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , four nose bags, value 20 s. , the goods of John Holyland

LUKE REDMAN . I am carman to John Holyland , a cart owner , of Broken-wharf, Thames-street . On Saturday night, the 9th of August, these nose bags were hung in the stable. I left the yard gates locked about ten o'clock at night; nobody could get over them - I returned about five o'clock in the morning, and missed these four bags, and found the prisoner in custody with them. He knew the premises well.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. On the 10th of August, between one and two o'clock in the morning, Murray brought the prisoner to the watch-house; he had two nose bags, and I found two more concealed under his clothes - he said he got them from a person who kept night carts.

BARNARD MURRAY . I am a watchman. Between one and two o'clock in the morning, the prisoner passed me in Great Distaff-lane, coming in a direction from Mr. Holyland's; he said he was going to Mr. Knight's, in Goswell-street, for victuals for his horses; that he was in Knight's employ, and had two nose bags in his hand. I took him to the watch-house, and found two more concealed under his jacket - he then said he had left Knight's carts on Bread-street-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-14

1005. WILLIAM CRAIG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , two tea chests, value 6 s., and 156 lbs. of tea, value 52 l. , the goods of Joseph Child and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

EDWARD VENN . I am a tea broker, and live in Bow-lane. On the 11th of March I bought six chests of tea at the East India sale, for Mr. Child.

THOMAS BROWN . I am clerk to the East India Company. On the 4th of August I delivered two chests of tea to Messrs Francis and Child, at the warehouse in Crutchet-friars; they weighed 70 lbs. each.

SIDNEY JOHN SMITH . I am a clerk in the East India-house Treasury. On the 30th of May, two chests of tea, Nos. 243 and 260 were paid for, for Messrs. Francis and Child.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know who came for them - A. They were paid for in their name. The goods are deposited in the warehouse till the parties send for them.

FREDERICK WOOD . I live in Hackney-road, and am in the service of Messrs. Francis and Co. Mr. Joseph Child is one of the firm. On the 4th of August, about twelve o'clock, I went to the East India warehouse to clear these teas. I put the warrant in a bag kept for the purpose, and left the warehouse without seeing the chests delivered.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you read the warrant - A. Yes; it was for the chests Nos. 243 and 260; I have my book here, in which I entered the numbers.

PHILIP HAWKINS . I attend the delivery of teas at the Crutchet-friars warehouse; Nos. 243 and 260 were delivered that day; I called them over, and signed the delivery paper.

JOHN EARL . I am warehouse-keeper in the Excise. On the 4th of August I issued a permit for the delivery of these two chests, in consequence of a request note.

C. W. SAUNDERS. I am tea-warehouse keeper, in the Excise. I gave out the permit for the delivery of-these chests.

JOHN HICKMAN . I am a labourer to the East India Company. On the 4th of August, between one and two o'clock, the prisoner brought me the permit for these two chests, and asked me where they lay. I called Price. my partner, who shewed them to him. I asked Price, in his presence, who they were for. Price had the permit in his hand, and said they were for Francis and Child. I said I was surprised at a truck coming from them, for I never knew them send

a truck before. The prisoner said that the carts were gone another way: he put the chests on the truck, and went away with them; he was alone. In about three hours the prosecutors sent for them, and we found they had been improperly delivered. I saw him in custody about a fortnight after, and am certain of him - his face was familiar to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Where had you seen him before - A. I think I have seen him in our yard, fetching teas; he was in my view nearly a quarter of an hour.

JAMES EVANS . I am surveyor of the Thames Police. On the 23d of August, I received information, and went with a search-warrant, to a stable in Seven-star-alley, St. George's in the East, and found a man there named Whitall; and in one corner of the stable I found a chest of green tea, not opened, and another standing on it, which had been opened, and only about 14 lbs. in it. I left it in charge of an officer, and went in search of the prisoner, whom I found at a house in Elbow-lane, and asked his name; he said Craig. I asked where he got the two chests of tea which were at Whitall's stable; he said he would tell me when he went to the stable; I took him there, and he said he bought it of Mr. Norman, of Sun-street, Bishopsgate, and hawked it about in a cart. I said the stable was an improper place to put tea; he said he was going to enter it on the Monday, and that he had lost the permit. I took him to the office. The chest weighed about 84 lbs.

JOHN NORMAN . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury, near Sun-street; the prisoner never bought two chests of tea of me; these chests were never in my possession; I have lived in Crown-street three years, and know of no Norman in Sun-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep a shop - A. Yes. He has bought tea of me, but never more than a pound at a time; I never sell whole chests.

MR. JOSEPH CHILD . I am in partnership with Mr. Francis and other persons; the prisoner was not know to me; I never sent him for this tea; we had bought it through Mr. Bell; they cost exactly 52 l.; we sent our carman for them, but they were missing; I found them three weeks afterwards, at the office.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-15

1006. MARY KELLY and ELIZABETH BROOKS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , two pair of shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of William Gibbs ; and CATHERINE TANIAN was indicted for feloniously receiving a pair of the said shoes, well knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a shoemaker , and live in the Old Bailey . On the 3d of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, Kelly and Brooks came in - Kelly tried on a pair of shoes, which fitted her, and she asked the price, which was 4 s. 6 d.; she offered me 3 s., which I refused, and both went away together. I immediately missed some shoes from the window; Brooks had stood close to the window - I sent my son after them. A pair of shoes were afterwards found on Tanian, and a pair on Kelly.

JOHN GIBBS . I was present when Kelly and Brooks came into the shop. I noticed Brooks at the window, taking up shoes and looking at them, while Kelly was trying on a pair; they went out together, and I after them, and saw them turning up Ludgate-hill, towards St. Paul's, in company with Tanian, who I had not seen before - all three went into a door-way. I was on the opposite side, and saw Kelly or Brooks give Tanian something, which she put into her apron; they crossed over the way, and went into a haberdasher's shop. Tanian waited outside - they came out, joined her, and walked slowly towards Fleet-market. I ran up the Old Bailey for my brother, and we followed them to Fleet-market. Kelly and Brooks saw us, and walked rather fast down to the middle of the market. I followed them to their lodging, in Lilly-street, Saffron-hill, and got a constable, who took them both, and found a pair of shoes on Kelly. My brother took Tanian, and found a pair of shoes on her.

WILLIAM GEORGE GIBBS . I went with my brother, and took Tanian at the end of the market, with a pair of my father's shoes under her arm - she said Brooks gave them to her. I went and saw the other pair found on Kelly.

JOHN SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I was applied to, and took Tanian, and on our way to the Compter, she said she did not steal them, but would tell me who did, and directed me to No. 13, Lilly-street, where I found the other prisoners, and took the shoes from under Kelly's petticoats.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KELLY'S Defence. This young woman took me with her to buy some ribbon. I went to look at a pair of shoes - I sat on a chair and tried them on; she stood at the window. I offered 3 s. for the shoes, which he would not take, and we walked out; she then said she had two pair of shoes; I said I thought the shoemaker was looking at her. Tanian came up, and she asked her to carry them home, and said she gave 3 s. 6 d. for them.

BROOKS'S Defence. I was in distress. We came out of the shop and met this woman - I asked her to carry the shoes; she said she did not think she could, as she had two children to carry.

TANIAN'S Defence. I met these two women in the market - Brooks said she had a pair of shoes for herself, and another for Kelly, and asked me to carry them while she went to another place. I had two children, and said I could not; she forced them into my apron, one pair fell out; they picked them up, and walked away. I told the officer where they lived.

KELLY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

BROOKS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

TANIAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-16

1007. JOHN BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , two pieces of linen, containing fifty-two yards each, value 4 l. 4 s., and three table-cloths, value 28 s. 8 d. , the goods of Thomas Holt , and others, his partners.

JOHN WOOD . I am book-keeper to Thomas Holt and others, who are carriers , at the Axe inn, Aldermanbury . I had frequently missed goods, and on the 12th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in the yard with a bundle on his back; he had no business there. I followed, and stopped him at the end of Maiden-lane,

and asked what he had got; he said two pieces of linen, and some damask table cloths, which belonged to one Murphy, which I knew to be false - he then said they belonged to one John M'Anotty, who I knew had nothing there, and took him back to the warehouse, and found they had been taken out of a box, which had been well corded up.

Prisoner. Q. When I brought them back, did you take me directly - A. No; I let him go till I spoke to Mr. Holt.

Prisoner's Defence. I have known the owner of the goods for years, and he has said that when I wanted cloth, if he was not at the place I might take it. I went to this box and took it.

JOHN WOOD . Hugh M'Anotty is the owner of the goods - he packed them to be sent to Brighton; his name was on the box.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-17

1008. CHARLES CORKHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Enoch Bowen , from his person .

ENOCH BOWEN . I live at Birmingham. On the 30th of June, about one o'clock, I was on Holborn-hill , and felt for my handkerchief, which I had used five minutes before, and it was gone - upon turning round I saw the prisoner near a window, and when he saw me looking at him, he stopped, and dropped my handkerchief - I picked it up, laid hold of him, and charged him with it; he said it was not him; that he had not took it upon his word. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman turned round, and charged me with it, but I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-18

THIRD DAY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1009. SAMUEL ABSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 6 lbs. of potatoes, value 2 d.; four bottles, value 4 d.; eight knives, value 3 s.; eight forks, value 2 s., and a book, value 6 d., the goods of Charles Herring , to whom he was servant .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. CHARLES HERRING . I live at Finchley . The prisoner was in my service as house servant . In consequence of suspicion, I employed Conway to watch my premises, and he afterwards produced some property. I thought that his wife was in service; she never came to my house.

JOSEPH GATES . Conway directed me to watch about the prosecutor's house. On the 10th of July, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner go round the house - he had nothing then; I afterwards saw him come out of the house with a basket - I followed, and secured him, and found two bottles of beer, and about a quarter of a peck of potatoes in it.

JOHN CONWAY . I am a constable. I desired Gates to watch these premises. I afterwards obtained a search-warrant, and searched the prisoner's lodging at Finchley, and found some knives and forks, soap, candles, wine, cider, and several other articles. I took him before a Magistrate, and produced the property in his presence - what he said was taken down in writing; (looking at the examination) this is signed by Mr. Owen, the Magistrate.

WILLIAM DAVIS . The prisoner rented a room at my house at Finchley; his wife slept there, but he did not - her room was searched by Conway.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Examination read. The prisoner says the knives and forks are Mr. Herring's - I had a few friends, and borrowed them. The cider and table beer are his. The potatoes the gardener gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. The property belongs to me; I bought and paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-19

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1010. WILLIAM BRITTON DYSON was indicted for the wilful murder of Eliza Anthony .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

ABRAHAM RADFORD . I am a coal-heaver. On a Thursday morning, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock, Williams brought a body ashore, which I helped to take out.

ELIZABETH BELL . I know the prisoner; and also knew the deceased, Eliza Anthony. The prisoner and her lived together as man and wife, at Mr. Williams, in Sherrard-street, for about three months; they left their lodgings, I believe, on Friday the 25th of July ; I dined with them that day, and saw them as late as nine o'clock in the evening, at which time I parted with them, in Brewer-street; they both said they were going to the play, and they both appeared very dejected. The prisoner came to me again, two or three minutes after twelve o'clock, to my lodging, and I just saw the deceased outside the door, but did not speak to her; they stopped about three minutes, and did not say where they were going. The prisoner came to my lodgings again between one and two o'clock that night - I met him on the stairs; he appeared very wet; I said,

"Where is Eliza?" he said,

"Poor thing, she is no more - she is drowned;" and he began crying. He followed me up stairs; I got a light; he was very wet indeed; he said they had been to the bridge together, and she had unfortunately drowned herself, and he had used every means in his power to save her, but could not; that they had been to the play; and that distress occasioned them to do it; that he meant to make away with himself - he was in a great deal of trouble, and was hardly himself; I could not understand at times what he did say; he remained in my room until between seven and eight o'clock - I then pressed him to pull off his wet things, he would not do it before. I knew he was very badly off in circumstances.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ever see a man in more anguish of mind than he was when he came to you - A. Never; he seemed in very great grief - I

had been intimate with him, and we had differed about his extraordinary affection for the deceased. He had asked me to let her sleep with me that night; I was not agreeable to it at first, but consented, at his great intreaty - I sat up for her till twelve o'clock, when he came to bring her - I saw him no more till he came in all over wet; every part of him was streaming wet; he said he had done every thing he could to save her, and wished me to go and alarm the people immediately; and told me to go and tell her mother, which I did; he would have gone himself, but he was not in a state to go; the mother lived in Boswell-court, Carey-street - she brought an officer at nine o'clock next night, and gave him in charge; he did not make the least effort to get away; he was a most humane and feeling young man I ever knew, and would not injure a worm.

COURT. Q. Have you been living with him - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw her at the door, did you ask her to come in - A. I called Eliza, and she ran by the door immediately, and I saw no more of her - I had differed with her once or twice about him, and with him about her; he begged of me to treat her well, saying that she was deserving of good treatment - I heard from him and from her that he had proposed marriage to her.

ELIZABETH MARY ELLIS . I live at No. 18, Sherrard-street, Golden-square. I know the deceased, also the prisoner, and Bell. On Friday evening, the 26th of July, about half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner and Anthony come out of their house, and go up Sherrard-street together.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I live at No. 11, Sherrard-street; No. 12 belongs to me - the prisoner and deceased lived there together as man wife, for between two and three months, and owed me 18 s. for rent, at 4 s. 6 d. a week. They left on a Friday; Anthony left at half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I did not see the prisoner at all that day. She did not appear depressed in spirits; she was always lively. They were distressed towards the latter part of the time.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not keep persons in your house whom you did not think of good character - A. I never saw a more decent moral pair in my life; he always behaved kind and affectionately to her - he appeared to have an extraordinary affection for her.

FRANCES HOPKINS . I lived in the same house as Bell. In July last I saw the prisoner when he came home, at twelve o'clock at night, and at two; he was very wet then - he was wet all over I believe; I did not feel his hat or clothes, but saw that he was wet. I saw his hat when I got up, and it was wet. As soon as he came in at two o'clock, I heard him say,

"Oh! Eliza, my poor Eliza," and that it was right that people should be informed that she was drowned - he wished Bell to awake me - I was half a sleep, and heard this before I had well opened my eyes. I got up about half-past six o'clock; he went out of the room while I dressed.

ROBERT RAWNSLEY . I am a watchman of Jermyn-street, St. James's. On the night, between Friday and Saturday, the 27th of July, I saw the prisoner coming from round the corner, from the Market-lane, about half-past one o'clock; he was knocking his hands about, and saying,

"My God, my God, what have I done. Oh dear, oh dear." I said,

"You have done something I am sure, and I shall take you to the watch-house;" I asked him where he was going - he went and rang the bell of Bell's house, and said,

"It is all right, it is all right." Holiday, who lodges in the house came up, and I asked if he knew the prisoner. He said

"My man what are you?" he said,

"It is all right, my name is Dyson;" Holiday said,

"Your wife I believe lodges above me" - he said, Yes. He opened the door with his key, and let him in. I noticed his clothes - the upper part of them were not wet, for I stood close by him for two minutes or more, but I did not notice his legs; if he had been very wet I must have seen it. I saw no wet about him. I did not notice him lower down than his body.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Grand Jury - A. No; neither before the Coroner or Justice. There is a gas-light close to the door. I could see as clear as I do now; there was nothing to lead me to observe his clothes - I did not feel them. I will swear the upper part was not wet; he had his hat on. I did not observe his hair. He was at the door when I noticed his clothes.

JOHN HOLIDAY . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the night in question, I saw the prisoner standing at the door in Jermyn-street, about a quarter before two o'clock - I asked what he wanted there; he made no answer. I opened the door; he went into the passage - I asked where he was going; he said,

"It's all right, my name is Dyson;" Mrs. Bell was at the bottom of the stairs; she went up, and he after her. I spoke to the watchman, went up stairs, and stood with the door ajar, and heard him say to Mrs. Bell that Eliza was drowned. I did not observe whether his clothes were wet.

Cross-examined. Q. Dyson knew you were an officer - A. I cannot say, but Bell did - there is a gas-light a few doors from the door. I had not seen him near the gaslight.

COURT. Q. When he said Eliza was drowned, did he speak in an agitated manner - A. I cannot think that he did. I was on the second floor at the time, and he above - he spoke as if alarmed. I heard him groaning after that. I could not see from the state of the light whether he was wet or dry.

ROBERT RAWNSLEY re-examined. When I noticed his clothes he was at the door - I could see clearly by the gas-light. Jermyn-street is a mile from the water side.

JOHN HOLIDAY . It was not light enough close to the door to see whether he was wet or dry.

JOHN RAY . I am watchman at the Speaker's house, a little above Westminster-bridge. On the night in question, I heard a cry of Murder on the river; it was a-man's voice to the best of my opinion. I looked towards the river, and saw a man in one of the boats, between me and the bridge - I cannot say whether any boats were further outside than the one he was in. I heard him cry out,

" Eliza Eliza , my dear" in a strong voice; he appeared much agitated - he was about a hundred yards from me. I afterwards heard him cry out for help, several times - I cannot say whether he was in the water at any time; I was locked in. and could not get out to assist without going through the house.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the state of the tide - A. It had been coming up about twenty minutes; it is very shallow at low water. It was a calm night.

GEORGE SALLOWAY . I am a waterman. On Friday night, the 25th of July, at a quarter before eleven o'clock, I left my boat, moored near Westminster-bridge, on the Middlesex side, under the arch. When I left it it was ebb tide, and there was not sufficient water for a person to drown; it was a-ground - the tide was leaving her. I went to the boat about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, and found her above Old Palace-yard, about a hundred yards from where I left it; she was fastened to another boat, afloat, in deep water, sufficient to drown a person. I went to Vauxhall in her, and observed a bonnet under the seat; it appeared to have been put there. When I got to Vauxhall I washed the boat - her benches, seat, and back board were very dirty, as if there had been a scuffle in it, as if one or two persons had scraped their feet all over. There was no water in it, except a little from rain; there are piles alongside the Speaker's wall, above the place where I found the boat - it was further out in the river than where I had left it, but there is a causeway two feet above the ground; she would not have been afloat at twenty minutes flood. She would not have floated between one and two o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. When you left her did you make her head fast - A. Yes, I chained her to the pier; it was high water about four o'clock; she was clean when I left her - there were mud marks about her in the morning, which shewed somebody had been in her who had been about the banks of the river. I found her between the speaker's gardens and the bridge; she would have been afloat at two o'clock where I left her.

COURT. Q. If a person comes from the bridge to the boat, is there sand or mud - A. A person might go to the bridge without getting mud, but might get mud in going from the bridge to the boat.

Q. A man not used to get a boat off, and fasten it again, might tread about on the back were the marks were - A. The benches and back board were muddy; a man standing on the back board must fall into the water - the part of it which stands up was muddy. The painting was scratched; the scratches were not there the night before. The mud on the back board appeared to be done by their scraping their feet against it; they could not stand on it without falling into the water.

Q. Suppose a person to be pushed over, behind the back board, might their feet come against it - A. They might. The marks appeared to me to be done by people struggling about. If they had walked in the mud, and then into the boat, there would be the prints of feet; but it was the scraping of feet. There was a watchman on the bridge right over the arch where the boat laid.

SAMUEL WILSON . I am a waterman. I have heard Salloway describe where he left the boat; she would hardly have been afloat at one o'clock, as the tide ebbed; she might have been afloat at half-past one, but there would not have been water enough to drown a person. The tide was running up at two o'clock, and would float a body upwards.

JOSEPH WOOD . I keep the Union tavern, Air-street, Piccadilly. The deceased had lived with me five years, as bar-maid , but left me twelve months since. The prisoner had lived with me as waiter . I know the bonnet produced belonged to the deceased. Bell and her had quarrelled.

Cross-examined. Q. The cause was jealousy - A. Yes.

MR. HENRY JEFFRIES . I am a surgeon. I saw the body of the deceased at the request of her mother, on the morning of the 1st of August - I understood it had been six days in the water. It was in a very advanced state of putrefaction. The head was exceedingly swollen, of a dark purple colour, and very much disfigured. I observed no other marks, except those of putrefaction - the head was swollen, which appeared to me to arise from extravasation of blood, and if my opinion be right, it must have arisen from external violence. I did not open the head; but it appeared to be from extravasation. I opened the body; the lungs were gorged with black blood, which proved she died from suffocation, from drowning. The appearance of the face arose in my opinion from extravasation of blood, in consequence of blows. I am not acquainted with any other cause, which could produce it than external injury previous to death. I do not think a blow on the body after death could produce these appearances. I do not think that the blow occasioned death, but occasioned the marks on the face. Suffocation from drowning was the cause of death.

Q. Does not suffocation from drowning occasion the blood to go towards the head, and produce swelling in the face - A. I do not know, but I suppose a person strangled would have the face black - the return of blood from the head would be prevented, and make it of a dark colour; but I make a distinction between strangulation and drowning. I never examined a drowned body before.

JOHN HARDING . I am a surgeon. I examined the deceased in company with Mr. Jeffries - the head was exceedingly swollen; there appeared marks of violence on the face, arising from extravasation of blood, produced by external violence, previous to death - they appeared chiefly on the left eye.

Cross-examined. Q. The state of putrefaction had considerably advanced - A. Yes. I have seen three or four drowned persons, after they had been three days in the water. I never saw one that had been six days under water.

Q. Does not putrefaction discolour and enlarge the body - A. Yes, but not the peculiar sort of discolouration - the head does not swell except from extravasation. The marks were distinguishable from the general swelling of the body.

COURT. Q. Was the skin of the face broken at all - A. No. I did not open the head, as I thought it evident without, that external violence produced it. The faces of all drowned persons are swollen, but not so much as this. Death from suffocation is followed by darkness in the skin to a certain extent; but the colour on this face was different - the discolouration would be all over the face, not partial, as this was.

Q. Would a blow of the humane hand produce it - A. I should think it would. I observed no marks but these; they were under both eyes.

Q. Would not suffocation produce the marks under the eyes without external violence - A. Not to this extent; it would be the same colour I should think. I consider in

my judgment that the marks were produced by external violence previous to death.

THOMAS CORBETT . I am a surgeon, and saw the deceased's body, and was led to suppose that external violence had been used, as there was a considerable discolouration, more under the left eye than any where else. In my judgment it must have been produced by external violence previous to death. The mark ran as a blow would, if produced by the side of a hand; it proceeded from under the eye, nearly up to the temple.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen many drowned subjects - A. Two or three; one had been taken out immediately after the accident - the other two had been two three days in water. A body being six days under water would certainly make a difference in its appearance; but I can judge what those effects would be. I have been seven years in practice.

COURT. Q. Would a blow given by the hand, producing such a mark, would it have stunned a person - A. I should think so, but if the body was so disfigured I cannot say on what part the blow was given. Dissection would have been the best way to ascertain the matter correctly - she was pregnant, and about five months gone.

THOMAS GASKILL . I re-examined the body before the Coroner's Jury, on the 2d of August, and observed the face and head a good deal disfigured and swollen. I examined the part particularly, and divided it with a knife, and found no extravasation, nor any one circumstance to induce me to believe that external violence had been used - I examined under the eyes, and cut open that part. I have often seen drowned persons, and saw nothing in this case different from what would arise from putrefaction and suffocation. When a body is immediately taken out of the water the face is dark, and the body swells eventually.

JOHN VEAL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the night of the 26th of July - he was in a very agitated state.

THOMAS STIRLING , ESQ. I am Coroner, and have the notes of what the prisoner said on his examination before me, which I took at the time. I cautioned him to be very particular in what he said. I have seen a great many bodies of persons whose death was produced by drowning, without suspicion of violence, and have seen all the appearances in them, which this body had. (Examination read.)

The voluntary declaration of William Briton Dyson , before the Coroner and Jury, empanneled to enquire touching and concerning the death of Eliza Anthony , taken the second day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-three.

WILLIAM BRITON DYSON , of No. 11, Sherrard-street, Golden-square, waiter, saith, that he and the deceased cohabited together, as man and wife, not being so; he knew another woman who claimed to be his wife, not being so. They were all together on that day and evening; was to quit that lodging on that day - quitted the house about nine o'clock on Friday evening, the 25th of July last, and proceeded by her desire to the Haymarket Theatre, and remained till the conclusion of the performance was over - they then went together to Jermyn-street; the young woman walked on, and I stopped at the lodgings of Mrs. Bell, according as she had made me promise that I would see her again that night; she enquired where this unfortunate young woman was, as she had appointed to sleep there that night - that I requested Eliza to do so, but could not prevail on her; left Jermyn-street with Eliza, and walked down the Haymarket to the Westminster-bridge, went down on the left hand side of the bridge; were some time talking on that side of the bridge, and then walked under the arch to the other side the bridge, and she got into a boat and I followed; she then got from that into another boat that was close by it - was some time in the boat talking to each other; was then standing with one foot on the side of the boat, and she was leaning on me to the best of my recollection. Suddenly found myself in the water; not able to swim, never being able to swim in my life, but struggling towards the young woman, as I supposed, in the water; got hold of the boat, and got into it, and looking round and not seeing the young woman there, I supposed she likewise was fallen in; called Help, help, help, several times - Murder and help, again. I then listened, but did not hear anything in the water, but presently saw something above the water, which I supposed to be the young woman - I then cried, Eliza my dear, and strived to push the boat to get towards her, but finding the boat was fast, went to the other end, and pulling a bit of rope, which appeared to fasten it, it came easily undone, and then with one of the things they row the boat with, pushed the boat towards where I saw the young woman above the water; my strength in the agitation was not sufficient to push the boat as I wished it to go - she had disappeared again below the water, and I saw her a second time; she appeared to sink under the water directly. I could not get near her with the boat, and dropped down the piece of wood I had in my hand, and prayed to God to spare her life. Could not for some time get the boat to that side of the water to get out of it. When I got out of the boat, I came up the stairs as far as the end of the bridge, saw a man apparently intoxicated, and a dirty looking woman; seeing him in liquor did not inform him of what had happened, but went straightway to the house where Mrs. Bell lodged at, and rung the bell - before she came down a person who lodged in the house came and unlocked the door; I walked in - the watchman came from the other side of the street - came to the door, and the person who lodged in the house, appeared not to know me; told them my name was Dyson, then went up stairs; left Mrs. Bell on the stairs, coming to answer the door - told her that poor Eliza was no more; and begged her to go to her mother. On farther recollection, thought she would not get in, there being a gate, and therefore delayed it till later in the morning. She went to her mother, and I remained in the room until she came back - some little time after she came back it was time for the young person to get up, who slept with Mrs. Bell, and I went outside the door till she had dressed herself. When I came in, Mrs. Bell requested me to take off my wet things - I asked her if she supposed dry things could be of any consequence to me after what had happened; she still persuading me, I pulled off my wet things, put on a dry shirt, and went into bed.

That it was my intention to destroy myself, and when the young woman found it was my intention, she determined on doing the same. I tried to prevail on her not to make away with herself, had written a paper, with an intent to put in my pocket, that I intended to drown myself - I accidentally left the paper on the table, and she got it and read it, and by that means it was that she found that I was determined to make away with myself.

(Signed)

WILLIAM BRITON DYSON .

MARY JOHNSON . I am the deceased's mother, and have seen her since she was taken out of the water.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner had proposed marriage to her - A. Yes. I refused him.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Believing both went to the water to drown themselves. The case is reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges .

Reference Number: t18230910-20

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1011. GEORGE ALDRIDGE was indicted for the wilful murder of William Aldridge .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ARGUS . I am a labourer. On Wednesday, the 30th of July, I was mowing in a field with the prisoner and his brother - we finished about seven o'clock in the evening. The prisoner said to his brother,

"B - r your eyes, you told master I could not mow more than an old woman;" he swore a great many oaths, and said,

"You know I can mow your legs off" - William said,

"You know you can't mow, and can't keep up in company;" the prisoner swore if he did not get out of his way, he would break his scythe in pieces - they both had their scythes in their hands at the time; the prisoner chopped at his brother's scythe two or three times with his own scythe, and at the third or fourth stroke he missed the scythe in consequence of his brother dropping his down, and stuck his brother in the side - his brother dropped his scythe, and said,

"I am ruined for ever," and walked out of the field directly, and went up stairs into a house. The prisoner kept on chopping the ground and the grass up, and said nothing; he stopped there. He seemed a little fresh, but not much in liquor. I went up stairs to see William - he died on the Friday morning at one o'clock. He struck at him three or four times; William never struck him. The prisoner stuck his scythe into a tree before he said anything to his brother.

Q. What did he strike the tree for - A. He seemed in a passion; we had been mowing together during the afternoon - there had been a heavy shower; his brother and him went in doors, and after they came out he used these expressions.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When a man says,

"I can mow your legs off," does not it mean, I can mow so fast that you cannot mow quick enough to get out of my way - A. Yes, that is the meaning of it. He said,

"I can mow your legs off;" his brother said,

"No you can't, you can't keep up in company." I had only known them a fortnight, and never heard them quarrel before.

Q. When the blow which stuck the deceased was struck, did he happen to turn his scythe - A. His scythe dropped down certainly, and the prisoner's scythe passed upwards, which it would not have done if the brother had not dropped his scythe; he had been standing with the blade up, and dropped it, which suffered the prisoner's scythe to pass over.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am servant to Mrs. Winchin, of Ryeslip. My mistress's garden joins the field where the men were mowing. I was in the garden on this evening, and heard them at high words; I went up to the hedge, and looked over into the field - I could not hear what passed but saw plainly; they were a hundred yards off. I think it was the prisoner who I heard swearing - he was whetting his scythe when I first saw him. I heard him say to his brother, that he could not mow, and never could mow in his life - I think it was the prisoner who said so; I saw him in the act of mowing, and cutting towards his brother, who appeared to be standing still; I do not think that he was mowing. I heard him use an oath, and say he would mow his legs up, meaning that he could mow better than him. I saw him cut towards his brother's scythe, and heard the scythes make a great rattling together. I think he cut three or four times towards his brother's scythe, and was too far off to say whether his brother struck again or not - I saw him attempt to keep the blows from his legs, and heard some one say,

"Stop, stop, there will be mischief, or an accident;" I cannot say whether it was the deceased or the third man. I saw the deceased drop his scythe, turn round, and go towards the house - he put his hands to his bowels, and said,

"I am ruined!" and saw the blood run.

Cross-examined. Q. The three men were in the field - A. Yes. The prisoner's brother was on his left, and he was mowing towards the left side. I do not mean that he was directing the scythe towards his brother's body. His brother put his scythe down, to stop him from mowing his way.

MR. BARLOW SLADE. I am a surgeon. I attended the deceased, and found him wounded in the lower part of his body - his bowels were nearly out; he died of that wound.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not the least intention to do it - it was a misfortune.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-21

1012. JOHN HILL , WILLIAM INSWORTH , and WILLIAM BLAGROVE were indicted for the wilful murder of Samuel Dance .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a labourer, and live at Ealing. I knew Samuel Dance ; he was a carrier - the prisoners are labourers . On the 8th of July, about a quarter before five o'clock, I was at the White Horse, public-house; Dance and the prisoners were there. When I went in, Dance sat by himself - he was rather in liquor; he got up, and Insworth collared him, and sat him down again; Dance moved to get up, and he sat him down again, and Blagrove went and put his hand up the chimney, and smutted his face - he said nothing, and Blagrove did it again. He moved to go out at the tap-room door, and Hill secured and threw him against the settle, violently - Blagrove and Insworth were both in the tap-room at the time, sitting down, but did not touch him at this time. Dance was thrown down so violently that we took him out of the tap-room - he could not get up himself. We washed his face. and I left him in the wash-house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long were you there - A. An hour; I left at a quarter to six o'clock. I saw a woman in a red cloak there. Dance did not appear much in liquor. Insworth's face was not blacked. They were larking with Dance.

RICHARD RUGGINS . I recollect Dance being thrown against the settle - I saw him fall; he was led into the wash-house, and his face washed. He had been there about an hour; they were singing and playing together.

JAMES SHIELDS . I saw the deceased pushed against the settle; Blagrove had hold of his coat flap, and Hill had his hand against his breast to set him down, but there was no intention of throwing him - he was very much intoxicated, and fell against the settle with his right side. I carried him out - he said,

"Oh, my loins," and groaned very much, but never spoke afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you leave the house - A. I was there all the evening. He fell down from intoxication.

- MATTHEWS. I keep this house. The deceased was taken home in about two hours. I took all the care of him that I could.

Cross-examined. Q. The care you took was to send him to the privy, and leave him there for two hours - A. No; I sent people to mind him - he might be there an hour. I sent him home in a wheel barrow, having nothing else.

G. J. R. G. DICKENSON. I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased on Saturday morning; two ribs were broken on the right side, and there was about two ounces of coagulated blood on the brain, which occasioned his death. A blow or fall against a hard substance would produce this - his general habit of body was continual intoxication; but whether it arose from intoxication I cannot say - the fall might extend the vessels. It is my opinion that the fall occasioned his death.

Cross-examined. Q. If he was drunk at the time, is it not probable that intoxication might rupture the vessel - A. Yes, without any blow. There was no external injury on the head.

COURT. Q. Considering that he was drunk, do you think the violence he received from being forced down accelerated his death - A. I do; when I hear that he was thrown down, I believe his death was accelerated by the rupture of a blood vessel. The rupture might be very gradual - he might only feel a head-ache for five minutes.

COURT. Q. You have heard that he was drunk, is it your opinion that the violence of the fall accelerated his death - A. Certainly if he fell; his head was injured. If he fell with sufficient violence to break his ribs, that might rupture the vessel.

HILL - GUILTY. Aged 28.

INSWORTH - GUILTY. Aged 20.

BLAGROVE - GUILTY Aged 50.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-22

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1013. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a coat, value 4 l., the goods of Louisa Blaauw , widow , in her dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BODY . I am coachman to Mrs. Louisa Blaauw , widow; she lives in Queen Ann-street, Mary-le-bone . On the 31st of July, about twenty minutes before three o'clock in the afternoon, I missed my coat out of a room over the coach-house - I saw it next day at Marlborough-street. The coach-house joins the back of the kitchen - there is a yard between the house and the stable - it communicates with the house. I sleep over the stable with my wife. I had fastened the doors with a pin, which they took out. It cost my mistress eight guineas, and is nearly new.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. On the 31st of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in Queen Ann-street, with this coat across his shoulders - I asked how he came by it; he said he bought it of a gentleman's coachman about a week before. I took him to Marlborough-street.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-23

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1014. JAMES WILLIAMS , WILLIAM SMITH , and JOHN FORD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Hay , about the hour of two in the night of the 25th of August , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a tea-caddy, value 5 s.; a telescope, value 10 s.; seven keys, value 2 s.; a bottle, value 2 s.; a shilling; a sixpence; four twopenny pieces; twenty-four penny pieces, and forty-eight half-pence , his property.

JOSEPH HAY . I live in the parish of St. Pancras , and rent the house. On the 25th of August, about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, I went to bed - I was the last person up; I fastened the house; the windows were fastened by the springs. I got up about twenty minutes before seven o'clock in the morning, and found a pane of glass cut, over the spring of the window, and the spring pulled back - the sash had been opened, and the sliding shutters pushed down, which enabled persons to get in. My till, which was safe overnight, was taken, and left in the summer-house in the garden, and its contents gone. I found the prisoners at the watch-house, and 4 s. or 5 s. worth of half-pence, a shilling, a sixpence and four twopenny pieces found on them, which money I had lost. I know the two-penny pieces. Williams had three of them, and Smith the other - Ford had 18 d. in copper.

JOHN REECE . I am sergeant of the night. I took the prisoners in Carmarthen-square, all three together, about three o'clock in the morning - it was quite dark; they were coming gently along. I asked what they were doing there at that time; they said they had been easing themselves. I took them to the watch-house - Williams took some biscuits out of his pocket, and gave the others some.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am the watch-house-keeper. I searched the prisoners, and found on Williams a half-crown, a shilling, two sixpences, 2 s. 7 d. in copper, and three two-penny pieces - I found on Smith 1 s. 7 d. in halfpence, a two-penny piece, a small knife, and a silver ring; and on Ford 8 1/2 d., and nine duplicates.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am an errand-boy. I found a tea-caddy, a phosphorus box, a dark lanthorn, some keys, and a crow bar in Carmarthen-square, on a Tuesday in August, and took them to Mr. Hay. I found them against the wall at the back of Mr. Hay's house, in the square, buried under some rubbish.

JOHN REECE . I know where these things were found - the prisoners were about fifty yards from the spot, coming from that way, and in the road from the back of Hay's house. The place is no thoroughfare.

JOSEPH HAY . The tea-caddy is mine. I lost some biscuits. I know the twopenny pieces; one of them is all over wax, it is bright. They had all four been in the till for years. I can safely swear to them.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I was going home from a raffle, and met this young man, and asked where he was going; he said towards Somer's Town - I said we would go together, and in crossing the square, we went to ease ourselves - the watchman took us, and this young man, who I never saw before.

SMITH. I have nothing further to say.

FORD'S Defence. I was going to Somer's Town, crossing the field, turned round, and asked these men if there was a thoroughfare, and then the patrol came up, and took me to the watch-house.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

FORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18230910-24

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1015. JOSEPH PARKER was indicted for stealing on the 31st of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of William Fitch , from his person .

WILLIAM FITCH . I live at Cranbrook, and am a grocer . On the 31st of July, about half-past one o'clock at noon, I was in Upper Thames-street - I felt my pocket move, put my hand down, and missed my silk handkerchief, and saw the prisoner with two others - I seized him, and charged him with taking it, which he denied. I thrust my hand up his waistcoat, and found it there, and gave him in charge.

RICHARD DADY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge. I saw two more go away from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it; but I have the name of the person who did.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-25

1016. WILLIAM CREAMER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Rainford Ensor , from his person .

JAMES RAINFORD ENSOR . I live at Totteridge. On the 16th of July, at six o'clock in the afternoon, I was on Holborn-hill , and did not perceive my handkerchief taken - but an officer brought it to me, and said he had a boy in custody at the foot of the hill; it was safe shortly before, and has my initials on it. He took me to the prisoner, who was in custody.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a night patrol. I saw the prisoner with another, older than himself, in Long-lane, and watched them with Baldry, till he got to Holborn-hill, and saw them go up to Mr. Ensor, and just by Hatton-garden, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from Mr. Ensor's pocket, turn back, and go down the hill; the other went down Hatton-garden. I was on the opposite side, and I called to Baldry, who was on the other side - he stopped him. I went after the prosecutor, and found the handkerchief between the prisoner's legs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BALDRY . I was with Carlisle, and saw the prisoner in Long-lane, with another boy, and followed them to Holborn, by Carlisle's desire - I saw him attempt a gentleman's pocket on Snow-hill. I afterwards heard Carlisle call out, Stop thief! and stopped him. The handkerchief was found on him. I am servant to Mr. Barnstaple, of Long-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy take a gentleman's handkerchief out of his pocket, and they ran and took me. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-26

1017. MARY FINIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a cap, value 3 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; a pair of shoes, value 6 d.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d., and an apron, value 1 s. , the goods of Moses Lyon .

MOSES LYON . I live in Ebenezer-square, Houndsditch ; the prisoner was nearly three weeks in my service. On the 6th of July, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon she was missing, and when my wife came home she missed these things. She was apprehended next morning with them on; she had 1 s. 6 d. a week, and her board.

RACHEAL LYON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I missed these things from the bed-room. I had taken her from the work-house, and gave information there, and found her there with all the things on, except the cap. I never gave her leave to wear them - she said she had not had the cap.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found all the property upon her, except the cap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress used to lend me things, and on Sunday I took the liberty to put them on.

ELEANOR HARRIGAN . I am the prisoner's aunt. The prosecutor came to me, and asked if my niece was at my house, for his wife had lent her a bonnet and shawl, and she had not returned with them, and in the morning the wife came, and denied lending her them, but said she had sold her a gown and an apron.

RACHAEL LYON . I never lent her the things - she left an apron and cap behind her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-27

1018. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of James Callen , from his person .

JAMES CALLEN . I live at North Green. On the 21st of July, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was on Snow-hill , and felt something at my pocket, and on looking round saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand - I seized him and took it from him. Another person was with him, who went away.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am a constable. I found the prisoner struggling with the prosecutor, and secured him. Mr. Callen gave me the handkerchief. He resisted very much - I was obliged to get assistance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a lad drop the handkerchief in Cow-lane, picked it up, and the gentleman accused me of it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-28

1019. JAMES NOWLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , nine half sheets of printed paper, value 14 s. 6 d., and six copper plate engravings, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Saunders .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am a bookseller , and live in Bartholomew-close - the prisoner was my out-door servant . On the 28th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I suspected him, and as he was going out of the shop I stopped him, and saw some numbers, consisting of ninety-six sheets found upon him, and some copper-plate engravings of the work - it would make sixteen shilling numbers. I asked how he could be such a villain as to rob me; he made no answer.

Prisoner. Q. Had I any salary from you - A. No; he took orders for publications, and was paid for the orders. I never allowed him to hawk books; he had no business to take anything till he gave orders for them.

HUGH DEVELEY . I am in the service of Mr. Saunders. On the 28th of August, I was at work in the warehouse - the prisoner came up, walked about, and went into the front ware room, where this work was, and I saw him let some numbers drop on the floor, and when I looked he was picking them up, and putting them into his pocket - he went down stairs very quick; I followed and overtook him before he got to the bottom, and asked where he was going - he said he was going away; I asked what numbers he had in his hand - he said nothing that I could understand. I took him up into Mr. Saunders's room, and took the numbers out of his pocket - he said he had bought them. I said I was positive that he took them out of the shop; he had said nothing to me about buying them before.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not between the stairs and Mr. Saunders's room - A. No. he was below the room.

JOHN SAUNDERS . He had given me no intimation of his intention to buy them.

HENRY DAVIS . I am a constable. I took charge of him, and found that the numbers correspond with what remained.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them merely to shew Mr. Saunders, who was sitting in a room by the shop, to ask if I might take them to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-29

1020. THOMAS LAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , eleven yards of figured silk, value 5 l. 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Henry Smith .

JOHN MURRAY . I am in the service of William Henry Smith , of Cloth-fair . On the 24th of August, at half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I stooped below the counter to pick up a yard measure, and on raising myself, I heard somebody enter the shop, and on turning round saw the prisoner with his arm in the window, taking a piece of black figured silk - he ran out with it. I pursued, and took him about eighty yards off; he had not it got then; it was afterwards produced, and measured eleven yards, and is worth 5 l. 4 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You only stooped to pick up a yard measure - A. No He was inside the shop with his back towards me. I ran out, leaving nobody in the shop, and lost sight of him about a second, turning the corner of the court, and was within five yards of him all the time. I did not see him throw it down.

EDWARD CHESTER . I am a publican. I was sitting in a house opposite Mr. Smith's - the door was wide open, and I saw Murray run out, calling Stop thief! I ran out and saw the prisoner running about five yards before him; nobody else was running from Murray. I lost sight of him as heturned into the passage; he was taken about a yard down the court. I saw the silk laying in the way he ran; and took it up.

Cross-examined. Q. You were pretty near him all the time - A. Yes; I did not see him throw it down; he might have done it without my seeing him, as Murray was between me and him.

THOMAS PRESTAGE . I am an officer. I was with Chester, and heard the alarm - we both rushed out. I saw the prisoner running, and Murray pursuing; I saw the silk on the pavement, and did not see it fall - nobody was near enough to drop it but him. I lost sight of him as he turned the corner, but am sure of his person - when I turned the corner Murray had hold of him. I had my eye upon him all the while, but he could drop it without my ing him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM ILES . I live in Cloth Fair, on the opposite side to Mr. Smith. I heard an alarm; ran to the door, and saw the prisoner run by, with the silk under his arm, I saw him drop it. Chester picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he dropped it - A. No; He is very much like the man; I swear he is the man; I saw him come from the door with it; if I had not have seen him for a week after, I should not have sworn to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Fleet Market, and heard a cry; seeing a young man running; I ran after him, plenty of people were following; I was rather the first, and was stopped in the court; the prosecutor came up in five or ten minutes.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-30

1021. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , a glass bottle, value 3 d.; and a pint and a half of oil, value 1 s. , the goods of Sir Charles Price , Bart , and Ralph Price .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL WRAY . I have lived with Sir Charles and Ralph Price for fourteen years - the prisoner was twelve months in their service. On the 21st of July, I saw a bottle of oil concealed behind the stove in the warehouse. I told Perry to be in attendance - the prisoner left a few minutes before eight o'clock in the evening. I observed him rather bulky, and found the bottle gone; I gave notice to Perry who took him. I charged him with stealing the oil; he said he merely took it to make some blacking.

JOHN PERRY . I am a street-keeper. I took the prisoner as he left work, and found the bottle of oil upon him - he said he was sorry for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence begging for Mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-31

1022. CAROLINE HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , five shillings and two sixpences, the monies of John Cannon , from his person .

JOHN CANNON . I am a sack-maker, and live in Aldermanbury. Last Saturday, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I had a pint of beer at the Fortune of War, public-house, Giltspur-street ; the prisoner and another woman were in the tap-room; I was buying oysters; they came over to me; the prisoner began to eat some, I put my hand into my pocket to pay the man 8 d.; I pulled out 14 s. or 15 s., the prisoner made a snatch at my hand, and got 6 s. or 8 s.; she dropped a shilling, and while I was picking it up, she escaped; she passed the house in about ten minutes, and an officer took her. I am sure of her person.

Cross-examined by MR. BERNARD. Q. This was the fair time - A. Yes; there might be fifteen people in the tap-room. I am sure five shillings and two sixpences were taken; I said at the time I could not tell how much she took.

JAMES NEWMAN . I am a constable. I had seen the prisoner come out of the public-house, and run down Cock-lane, calling murder; she came up Giltspur-street, in about five minutes, went by the door, turned back, and went into the tap-room. The prosecutor gave her in charge. I found five shillings, two sixpences and a half crown, down her bosom, and 8 d. in her pockets. I think she was intoxicated.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prosecutor drunk - A. He might be a little in liquor. Women often keep money in their bosoms.

Prisoner's Defence. He was very much in liquor, and made me have some oysters, and handed his beer about; he followed me out, and asked me to go into a show with him; we returned to the house; he took liberties with me; I hit his hand and ran out; he gave me a kick, and I called murder.

JOHN CANNON . I did not tell the landlord of the house of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-32

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1023. HENRY RIPP was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Benjamin Johnstone , from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSTONE . I live in Castle-street, Holborn, and am a wine merchant . On the 2d of September, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the end of Carey-street, Chancery-lane , and found the prisoner three or four times at my pocket, but did not speak to him - he was in company with two others, about his own age. He took my handkerchief from my pocket, and I saw him put it behind him, to his companion. I immediately seized him, and his companion picked the handkerchief off the ground, and seeing that I noticed him he handed it to me. I took the prisoner into custody.

THOMAS GARNEY . I am a constable, and received him in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Three boys were behind me - one of them gave me a push; then took the gentleman's handkerchief, and dropped it. The gentleman collared me because I was near.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-33

1024. JANE BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , twenty-five yards of linen, value 10 s., and twenty-four yards of lawn, value 15 s. , the goods of George Edward Woodhouse .

GEORGE EDWARD WOODHOUSE . I am a linen-draper , and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner was servant to Major Flemming, who lodged with me. On the 11th of August, having suspicion, I had her box searched, and this property was found in it. I had not missed it, but know it to be mine. I never sold it; she gave up the key of the box - I found two pieces of lawn, and one of Irish - the Irish was cut up into lengths; she seemed confused and took me aside, and hoped I would have compassion upon her, and drop the case. It cost me between 7 l. and 8 l.; she had been about six weeks in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you not reason to believe she has been led astray by a man who lives at Brighton - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES FROST . I am a constable. I was fetched - the prisoner gave me the key of her box, where I found this property.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-34

1202. WILLIAM THOMAS SCAIFE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry George Stahlschmidt .

HENRY GEORGE STAHLSCHMIDT . I am a coal-merchant , and live at Belvidere Wharf, Lambeth. On the 23d of July, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the Strand , and felt a pull at my pocket, I turned round, collared the prisoner, and took my handkerchief from his breast.

(Property produced and sworn to).

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a constable. I was over the way, ran over and took the prisoner from the prosecutor; I asked the prosecutor if he had robbed him; he said No; but he found the handkerchief in his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the prosecutor ask you only to lock me up for two hours, and then let me go - A. Yes.

MR. STAHLSCHMIDT. It is perfectly false. I did not say he had not robbed me; but that I could not swear that I saw him take it out of my pocket.

THOMAS DAVIS . When I went up, I said, has he robbed you; he said No; he said,

"Do you know him; lock him up, and then let him go;" I kept him till seven o'clock, when the office was opened. I did not think he would appear.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-35

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1026. JOHN WRIGHT and WILLIAM YOUNG were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Chamberlain , about the hour of one in the night, of the 17th of August , at St. Anne, Westminster with intent, the goods and chattels in the said dwelling-house then being; feloniously and burglariously to steal .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL CHAMBERLAIN . I am a coach-maker , and live Great Newport-street, in the parish of St. Anne's, Westminster , and rent the house. On the 17th of August I went to bed at twelve o'clock at night; my house was all fast, and the property safe then; I was disturbed about a quarter or half past one o'clock, and heard two loud knocks at the door; I sat up in bed and heard the street door open, ran down stairs undressed, and found a number of watchmen about, who said thieves were in the house; a shutter at the side of the shop (which is part of the dwelling-house) was pulled down, a person could then get in; there is no window; I found the door open; I saw Wright in about five minutes, with a stick in his hand, which was mine, and which I had locked in the front kitchen the night before; he was kept in custody, as Mr. Gazley followed him into the kitchen and recognised him, and said,

"Where did you come from, you are one of the men who broke into this house; look at yourself, see the condition you are in;" his clothes were all over filth and dirt, as if he had been trying to get over a wall; Wright said,

"Do not you know me?" Gazley said,

"I know you to be one of the men;" he said,

"My name is John Wright , I am a Bow-street officer." We took him up stairs, and he was recognised by the watchmen, who said,

"Wright, oh! Wright, a notorions house-breaker." He made no answer, but was taken to the watch-house, where I found Young in custody; he said he lived in Peter-street. I went home and examined the state of the house and found the iron bolt of the shutter burst off, the shutter forced down, and three coach plate-glasses, which had been taken out that afternoon, removed from where they were at bed-time, and placed near the door.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you keep a servant in the house - A. No; I fastened it up myself; they entered at the right-hand shutter by the door; when the shutter was moved anybody could get in; the bolts were broken; they were safe when I went to bed, I am sure.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. The shutter must have been forced down by somebody standing in the street - A. Standing in my yard; he might dirty his clothes by rubbing against the coach wheels; my kitchen is under the shop; we did not secure Wright in the kitchen, but followed him up stairs; he could not escape, for the front of the house was surrounded by watchmen; I gave him in charge immediately we got up stairs; Gazley is not here. I found a tinder-box and pieces of candle under the carriage where the glass had been taken out.

EDWARD MACE . I am carman to Mr. Gazley, and sleep at his house, which is next door to the prosecutor's. I had been to the stable with my master's horse, and returning about ten minutes after twelve o'clock, went to my bed-room, at the back of the house. I came into the front room with a light, looked into the street, and saw three men and a woman under a gas light over the way, the men were pointing to the house; I will not say that the prisoners were there at that time. I went and called master, and said I thought they came after no good; they went away at half-past twelve o'clock, and after the watchman had called half-past twelve, two men came back; they had not been at Chamberlain's door above a minute before there was a light, the shadow of the light appeared to come from his door; the shortest of the two men came back and looked up the street towards Newport-market where the watchman stood; my wife then came and said there was a noise in Chamberlain's back yard. I immediately went into the back room, put the window up, but could see nobody; I returned to the front room, and saw the two men, the shortest went up the street, and the other down the street from Chamberlain's door, the watchman then called one o'clock, and at half-past one, the same men both came back together from St. Martin's lane; they came right to Chamberlain's house, and the moment they came, I could see the shadow of a light again; the short man went away to the railing in front of Chamberlain's house, that was Young.

Q. Do you take upon you to say that was Young - A. Yes, I swear that; I am quite sure of it; he leaned against the post, and stooped over to see if he could see the watchman, and then crossed the road, and looked again for the watchman, then went up and stood at Chamberlain's door about half a minute, then got over my master's iron railing, squatted himself down behind a packing case, and I called the watchman.

Q. Where was the other man all this time - A. I could not see him; I think he was in the house. When I called the watchman, Young jumped over the rails, and ran away. I came down into the street with a light, and found the watchman at Chamberlain's door; he knocked at the door, a person opened it, but my light was put out, I did not see who it was. Nobody but about five watch-men, my master, myself, and another man, went into the house. I am sure Wright did not go in with the watchman: when I went in the watchman laid hold of him in the house; I found a screw-driver on the packing case behind, which Young had been concealed. I saw the watchman take Young.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you mean to say you saw the watchman take Young, or take a man - A. I can swear he took Young, for there was only the watchman and him there, his back was towards me at the time. I saw him take the same man as ran from behind the packing-case, I am sure he is the man. I saw him again at Marlborough-street, and knew him by his face; I had a view of his face by the gas light, he is the man; I cannot be mistaken, he is the man I call the short one.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. You saw him from a window, is that up two pair of stairs - A. Yes. Q. Who went into the house while you went down, you cannot say - A. The watchman was there before I left the window.

WILLIAM FLANS . I am a watchman. I recollect the alarm being given about half-past one o'clock at night, I went to Chamberlain's house, the door was not open then, two or three other watchmen were with me; I knocked at the door twice very loud, the prisoner Wright opened it to me, I asked him if he belonged to the house, he said,

"I do." I said

"Why don't you get a light;" he said,

"The boy is coming with one." I saw no boy, and called for a light outside the house, which was immediately brought, and I gave it to Wright, supposing that he belonged to the house; he took me down stairs, and pointed to a kitchen door, within, which he said he thought the thieves were. I broke it open by his direction, and we proceeded to look

up the chimney for them, found none, and Wright was recognized. I took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. There were other people in the house besides watchmen - A. None, except those who lodged there; Mr. Gazley came in afterwards.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a watchman. I had just finished my round and come to my stand, which is about fifty yards from Chamberlain's house, and heard a voice from a second floor window call

"Watch." I ran directly, he sung out

"they are breaking into the house, stop that man." I saw Young run from Chamberlain's door, followed and never lost sight of him till Lewis met and stopped him. I said

"What have you been doing?" he said he had been doing nothing at all. I brought him back, and said

"You must have been doing something, or you would never have run away;" he said he, had been easing himself there, and when he heard watch called he ran away; I said it was very simple to run away for that. I put him in the watch-house, returned and examined the place, there was no appearance whatever of his having been there for the purpose he stated.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see Young taken - A. Yes, in Newport-street, at the corner of St. Martin's-lane, he had not turned the corner at all.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am a watchman. About half-past one o'clock on this morning, I was about one hundred yards from Chamberlain's house, and stopped a man, who I believe to be Young, he was running from the alarm; the watchman had sprung his rattle; he ran from him into my arms; I was at the bottom of Long-acre, and delivered him to Edwards, who was following him.

DANIEL BOUGHAY . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house. I searched them, and found a small piece of candle in Wright's pocket, and a knife on Young.

WILLIAM ROBINS . I live in Chamberlain's house. I came down when the watchmen came, and saw a light there, it was knocked out by somebody.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. While the light was out any body could run out of the house - A. The watchmen were round the house.

YOUNG'S Defence. I had been to Paddington, and was coming down Newport-street, got over the rails for a particular occasion, and hearing the man call watch, I got over and ran away. I turned up St. Martin's-lane a little way, when the watchman took me.

WRIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

YOUNG - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230910-36

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1027. SAMUEL THOMAS FIELDING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Lane , on the King's highway, on the 1st of August , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch value 12 l.; a chain, value 3 l.; two seals, value 1 l.; and a key, value 5 s. , his property.

THOMAS LANE . I am a builder . On the 1st of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was walking up Hoxton ; it was light, I saw the prisoner, he came suddenly upon me, gave me a terrible blow on the throat, and snatched at my watch; I immediately collared him, and we struggled for some time; he had my watch in his hand, he forced it from my fob; but finding he could not get away, he threw it down, another person immediately sprang at it, picked it up, and ran off with it; I cried Stop thief! but he ran away, and I have not recovered it. I loosed my hold of the prisoner to follow the other man; he then followed and struck me a blow with his elbows to push me down, to prevent my following, and as soon as I recovered, I laid hold of him, and took him to the watch-house, nobody came to my assistance.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were you always sure that he was the man who gave you the first blow - A. Yes, certain. I never said it was the other man.

Q. He might have got off while you were pursuing the other man? - A. No, he ran to prevent my following the other man; and if he had ran the other way, he was sure to be taken, for it was in a very narrow passage, called Saunders-gardens, and it was very full of people.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I received him in charge.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor, as he received no personal injury .

Reference Number: t18230910-37

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1028. PETER DILLON was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Hogarth , on the King's highway, on the 10th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, four half-crowns, ten shillings, fourteen sixpences, one 5 l., and six 1 l. Bank notes , his property.

JAMES HOGARTH . I am a grocer and tea-dealer . On the 10th of April, 1821, I had been collecting money in the City, and at ten o'clock at night, I accompanied a black woman to a house at Cock-hill, Ratcliff . I was a good deal intoxicated at the time; on entering the room, a man with a wooden leg sat on the table. I cannot swear that it was the prisoner - a man and a woman, (who were tried here two years ago) followed us into the room. I wished to get out, thinking I was not safe; it was the general desire that I should treat all the company. I wished to go for the liquor myself, in order to get out, but was not allowed; a man stood at the door, and seeing my alarm, the wooden legged man said I owed him 3 l. - he threw me on the floor with the black woman's assistance, and took 12 l. 7 s. from my pocket, I have recovered none of it; they seized me by the neck-handkerchief, and attempted to strangle me; the man with a wooden leg asked if he should cut my throat two or three voices answered him

"Do so." I was left insensible in the room - when I came to myself, I made my way down, and called the watchman.

MARY ANN WIDMEYER . I keep the Grapes public house, Whitechapel. The prisoner came to my house on the night of the robbery, with a black woman, who had a child in her arms, he was very tipsy. The prosecutor was not there, but I have seen him with a black woman, but not the one who was with Hogarth.

CATHERINE KLENTH . The prisoner occupied a room in my house with a black woman, who they say committed this robbery.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I had a warrant against the prisoner in April, 1821, and used every exertion

to find him, and attended at Greenwich every pension day, but never saw him till October, when he surrendered, but said nothing about the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-38

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1029. EDWARD RAWLEY , WILLIAM NORTON , and GEORG E KING , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Rugg , on the 28th of June (he and others being therein) and stealing a shawl, value 10 s.; a vinagaret, value 2 l.; a cap, value 2 s.; a pair of scissars, value 2 s., and a veil, value 14 s. , his property.

CHARLES RUGG . I live on Muswell-hill . On Saturday the 28th of June, I was at home all the afternoon with my servants, and at six o'clock the prisoners were brought to my house, I missed the articles stated in the indictment from my drawing room, which is a front room on the ground floor, there is a garden about fifty yards long before the house. I think they got in at the window which might have been open; King and Norton produced all the property; I saw Norton in the garden between five and six o'clock.

JAMES BRETT . On the 28th of June, about half past six o'clock, I was with Woodward at the King's Head public-house, Crouch-End. My master had information that Mr. Rugg had been robbed, and said that the three lads were gone up Mount Pleasant; we went after them, and overtook the prisoners on Stroud Green, about a mile and a half from Mr. Rugg's. Woodward got up to them first; when I came up, Norton ran away and I after him; I saw a man and called Stop thief! he detained him till I came up; I took him to the other two. They were very loth to go back; we took them to Mr. Rugg's, who said he knew they were the persons who had been into his house, and if they would deliver up his things they might go about their business; they declared that they had got nothing; he said he knew they had, and the sooner they gave it up, the sooner they would go; King and Norton delivered up a good many things; Rawley said he had nothing; Mr. Rugg said they were to go about their business; I said they should not, and while I was speaking Francis came and took them. Mr. Rugg would not give up the property.

MR. RUGG. I have all the property here, and can swear to it. Rawley said he was perfectly unacquainted with the others, that they merely overtook him.

JOHN WOODWARD . I was at the King's Head, and overtook the three prisoners together; they appeared walking together towards Stroud Green. I was left in care of King and Rawley, as Norton ran away, but was stopped; we took all three to Mr. Rugg's, and the property was given up by King and Norton.

THOMAS FRANCIS . I am an officer. The prisoners were given into my charge. I found a sugar ladle and tongs in King's cap. They have not been owned.

RAWLEY'S Defence. I was selling fruit about, and these men asked me the way to Holloway.

NORTON'S Defence. We know nothing of Rawley, only asked him the way to Holloway.

JOHN WOODWARD re-examined. Rawley had a donkey and scales, and was selling fruit.

KING - GUILTY. Aged 17.

NORTON - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of Larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

RAWLEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-39

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1030. SAMUEL HADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , at St. Pancras, one coat, value 3 l. 10 s., one handkerchief, value 1 s., and two pair of gloves, value 3 s., the goods of Edward Ashdown , in the dwelling-house of Mary Charlton , widow .

EDWARD ASHDOWN . I am a carpenter , and live in Steven-street, Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. Pancras . Mary Charlton , a widow, keeps the house. The prisoner was a fellow lodger of mine. On the 1st of April. at six o'clock in the morning, I went to work, and on returning at nine at night, I missed a bronze colour great coat, a handkerchief, and two pair of gloves were in the pockets; it was worth 3 l. 10 s., and the gloves and handkerchief 4 s.,; I never gave the prisoner leave to take it; he left the house that day. I did not see him again till the 18th of August, when he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. I asked you the day before to lend me the coat - A. On my oath he did not; he called on me in Piccadilly, but said nothing about it. I bought it in November last for 5 l.

MARY CHARLTON . I rent the house. On the 1st of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Ashdown's room making his bed; the prisoner came in and took this coat off the peg. I said it was Ashdown's - he said,

"I know it ma'am, he has lent it me." I said,

"Is that all right;" he said,

"Yes; it is all right," and walked out with it. I was quite satisfied, and looked out of window, and saw a gig at the door; he laid it across the gig; I called to him,

"Is it right you should have this coat;" he said,

"Yes: I have borrowed it to put over my legs, as I shall be out late" - he never returned.

RICHARD KELSEY . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner. On the way to the watch-house, he wanted us to take him to his friends to make matters up, but Ashdown said he should go to the watch-house; he said voluntarily, that he took the coat. I asked what he had done with it. He told different stories, and at last said he gave it to a friend, who had pawned it, but where it was he did not tell.

Prisoner's Defence. I considered that I took it with his consent, and intended to return it, but my friend deceived me, and pawned it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18230910-40

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

1031. THOMAS HUBBARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , four sovereigns, and a handkerchief, value 2 s., the property of John Lucas , in his dwelling-house .

ELEANOR LUCAS . I am the wife of John Lucas , who lives at St. George's in the East . The prisoner lodged with me. I had four sovereigns in a small trunk on the first floor room, where he slept alone; it was locked, and I had the key. On the 4th of September he went out, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning. I had locked the sovereigns in the trunk at half past eight the night before; he was not at home then; the handkerchief was in another trunk, not locked, and belonged to a seaman, who had left it in my charge. I went into the room a few minutes after he was gone, unlocked the trunk, and missed the sovereigns; he had paid me a sovereign at nine o'clock that morning for

rent; he came home to dinner; I set his dinner before him, then fetched Judge. I took my handkerchief from his pocket, and said it was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you any other lodgers at that time - A. Yes; two, they are at home now. I washed for them all, they slept in the room above him. I do not know that I ever gave him a wrong handkerchief by mistake; I do not know whether they borrow linen of each other; anybody in the house could get into the room. When I took the handkerchief from him, one end of it hung out of his pocket. Nobody could give it him by mistake.

ANN PAGE . I know the prisoner by sight. On the 4th of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw him, and asked him to lend me 2 s.; he said he had nothing but a sovereign, and could not get change, but if I met him in the evening he would give it me. I saw him take four sovereigns out of his waistcoat pocket, and put them into another.

Cross-examined. Q. You are an unfortunate girl I believe - A. No; I am married, my husband has been away two years. I do not walk the streets; Lucas is not a friend of mine, her husband went to sea on the day this happened.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am an officer. On the 4th of September, about two o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Lucas fetched me, and pointing to the prisoner, who was sitting down; she said

"This is the man who robbed me." She made a snatch at his pocket, and pulled out a silk handkerchief; I took it from her; she said it was marked T. L.; I said it was so. I found 12 s. on him, and a new farthing; he said the handkerchief was among his things.

MRS. LUCAS. My husband went to sea that afternoon; I told him, but he could not stop to enquire about the robbery, as the ship was going that day.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did your husband leave the house - A. About half-past twelve o'clock; I never washed any handkerchiefs of this pattern for the prisoner; he went out about nine o'clock to get shaved, and returned.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-41

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1032. JOSEPH BRACE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Finch , about the hour of eleven o'clock in the forenoon, of the 12th of July , at Harefield, (no person being therein,) and stealing therein, one hat, value 18 d.; one handkerchief, value 3 s.; one gown, value 5 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; one jacket, value 5 s., and a pair of ear-rings, value 6 d. , his property.

JAMES FINCH . I am a labourer , and live at Harefield , and have no children. On the 12th of July, I went out, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, and returned at half-past twelve o'clock with my wife, and found the window taken out; any one could then enter the house; and the yard gate was taken off its hinges. I went up stairs and missed the articles stated in the indictment, from my bed room.

JANE FINCH . I am the prosecutor's wife; I went out to work at half-past seven o'clock, the window was fastened then; it did not open at all; I returned with my husband, and found it taken out. The property is worth 17 s.

FRANCIS WEEDON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, in consequence of information from Mrs. Finch, at Illingdon, about three miles from her house, on the 15th of July, and found the handkerchief round his neck; a hat on his head, and a pair of ear-rings in his pocket. He told me, before the Magistrate, where he had sold the other things; I went to where he directed me, and found a gown, waistcoat, and jacket, at a shop at Paddington, and another waistcoat at another shop; he said voluntarily that he certainly stole them, and wished to let the man know where they were.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18230910-42

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1033. MARY LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , being servant to John Haywood , in his dwelling-house, a watch, value 30 s.; a chain, value 12 s.; a seal, value 1 s., and four keys, value 7 s. , his property.

JOHN HAYWOOD . I live in South Molton-street ; the prisoner was my servant ; on the 14th of August, about half past seven o'clock in the morning, I left my watch in the privy, but did not miss it till half-past four o'clock in the afternoon; I immediately went to see if it was there, but it was gone; I went into the kitchen and asked her if she had seen it; she said No; next day, thinking she must know about it, I sent for an officer, and my wife searched her in the back parlour; it is worth 38 s.

MARY HAYWOOD . I searched her and found the watch under her left arm, and the chain over her shoulder, under her gown, close to her skin. She said nothing.

JOSEPH RAWLINS . I am an officer, I took her in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-43

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1034. WILLIAM HARRINGTON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Pierre Brochard , on the 27th of July , with intent to steal .

PIERRE BROCHARD . I live in Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury . On the 26th of July I went to the Opera, then went and supped with some friends, and about three o'clock in the morning I was returning home; I saw a man in the street following me; and when he saw me go up the steps he coughed in a peculiar manner. I took the key from my pocket and opened the door; the prisoner rushed out of the house, struck me in the face with his fist, pushed me back, and rushed by me - I immediately followed, and the watchman stopped him without my losing sight of him - I had gone out at seven o'clock, and left my father and mother at home. He ran towards Bloomsbury-square at first, but seeing the watchman he turned back towards me, crossed, turned down Bury-street, and while I was at the corner I saw him taken. I am certain of him, for I never lost sight of him. I went in doors; found nothing taken,

nor any of the inside doors opened; he had not got beyond the passage. He said I was mistaken in his person.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you the housekeeper - A. Yes; I keep an academy. It was not daylight; there are gas lights in the street. Perhaps if I had met a friend I should have known him without the gas.

COURT. Q. Without the assistance of the gas could you distinguish the features of a man - A. I think not.

JOSEPH CANT . I am a watchman. I pursued the prisoner; it was break of day at three o'clock; I took the prisoner at a quarter or twenty minutes past three o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-44

1035. CHARLES COE KALLMEIER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d July , at St. George, Bloomsbury; (being servant to George Gold Sadler ,) in his dwelling-house, fourteen yards of woollen cloth, value 15 l., the property of the said George Gold Sadler, his master .

GEORGE GOLD SADLER . I am a tailor , and live in Southampton-row, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury ; the prisoner was a journeyman in my employ. Between the 1st and 22d of July, I lost fourteen yards and five-eighths of blue cloth, worth 15 l. I saw it in the cutting room on the 1st of July, which is at the bottom of my garden, and connected with the dwelling-house, it is all enclosed by one wall. On the 22d of July I accused the prisoner of moving some calico, he said he moved it to measure some ferret, this roused my suspicion. I measured my cloths over, and missed this; and went to his lodging, where I found him. Mr. Hall, said in my presence,

"I am come to take you into custody, and where is Mr. Sadler's property;" the prisoner went to a table and delivered up five duplicates, three of them were for the property stolen; he said he was sorry for it, and hoped I would not prosecute him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not tell him if he would go with you and finish a jacket he was about, you would give up the prosecution - A. No, not any thing the sort; I asked him to return and finish one which he was working on, with a view to get him apprehended, and he did return. I have known him a long time, and have been his friend all through life, and supplied him with money when starving, and introduced him to my friends - I did not lead him into expences. I have seen a person who passes as his wife, but cannot say whether he is married.

JAMES SWEATMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, Holborn. I have three lengths of cloth, pawned by the prisoner at three different times, at the beginning of July, for 6 l. 7 s., one pledge is for 3 l., we advance more than half the value of the article.

Cross-examined. Q. It is very difficult to ascertain the identity of cloth without a mark - A. Certainly, there is no mark on it. I produced a wrong piece of cloth at the office, and the prosecutor swore that that was his by the list; that was pawned by the prisoner's father, who is a respectable master tailor; he belongs to a respectable family.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable. I have the duplicates which Mr. Sadler gave me.

MR. SADLER. These are the duplicates he gave me from the drawer; the cloth I said, I knew by the list was this; the cloths laid one over another; I said,

"This is mine, by the list;" and said with the same breath,

"No, it is not mine;" I thought I had hold of another piece.

JAMES SWEATMAN . His evidence at Marlborough-street was not as he now says. I produced the cloth, he took hold of it, examined it, and the clerk took down his deposition; and after he swore to the cloth, I said, by referring to my tickets, it was not the cloth, but some the prisoner's father had pawned; and at the second examination I brought the right cloth. The duplicates produced are what I gave for this cloth.

MR. SADLER. There is a mark on this cloth which enables me to speak to it; they were in one piece when they came to my house, and here is the end on one piece. I can swear to it from the shade and list, there are as many different shades in black as blue. I lost cloth of the same sort as the others.

Cross-examined. Q. All black cloth has the same shade with what is dyed at the time - A. I cannot say.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

CHARLES KALLMEIRE . The prisoner is my son, he has pawned cloth for me by my authority.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Reference Number: t18230910-45

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1036. MARGARET WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , two sovereigns, two half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences, the monies of Richard Hooper , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD HOOPER . I live in Rose-alley, Bishopsgate , and am a milkman . On Saturday, the 12th of July, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to me - she had formerly lodged with me for two months, and said she had called to pay the rent she had left due; she did not pay me. I gave her leave to sleep with my servant - she remained with us till Wednesday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, when I went out, leaving her at home; my wife went out soon after. On the Monday night I had seen 16 s. and a sovereign in the drawer in a table which was in the room where she slept with the servant. I gave my wife four sovereigns to put there. I returned at three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon - she was still in the house, but the money was missing. I said it must be her or the servant - she said she had taken none. I sent for a constable, who found a sovereign in her pocket, and a half-crown in her left pocket. I locked the drawer on Monday, and took no money out myself.

SUSANNAH HOOPER . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Sunday morning, I lent the prisoner 1 s.; she said she would pay me on Monday, when she fetched her box from the Flower Pot, which she did, and paid me. I received four sovereigns from my husband on Monday, which I put, with 20 s., in silver, into a little box, in a table drawer of the room where she slept. I locked the drawer and took the key; there was a sovereign and some silver there before. I went to the drawer on Wednesday at two o'clock, and found it unlocked; it appeared to have been forced by a knife. I found only three sovereigns and 11 s. 6 d. I got the officer, and charged her with it; she denied it, and said all her money was in her box - none was found in her box; but a sovereign, a sixpence, and some half-pence

were found in her pocket; she said it was her own. She was intoxicated every day, and did not pay us what she owed, which was 2 s. 6 d. The servant was not searched. The bed-room is on the ground-floor - the street door is kept open in the day-time. She was left alone in the room every morning after four o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. Is there not a mangle in the bed-room - A. Yes. Nobody but me and my servant work at it.

RACHAEL DAVIS . I am servant to Hooper - there is no other servant. The prisoner came to the house on Saturday night, and slept with me. A boy named Ned lived in the house - he went into the room as well as us, but did not sleep there. I saw that the drawer was a little broken on Wednesday. I did not look at it till two o'clock, when my mistress came home. I never saw the prisoner do anything to it.

HENRY MAGNUS . I am a constable. I was fetched - the prisoner denied the charge. I found a sovereign, a sixpence, and eight-pence farthing on her. I saw her moving her left hand, and found 2 s. 6 d. in it. There was a pair of new shoes in her box.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had resolved to leave the house, in consequence of improper proceedings occurring there, and as she refused to stop she was charged with this robbery.

HENRY MAGNUS . I know this house - it is very respectable; people go there for milk.

MRS. HOOPER. I only employ Ned to carry out milk; he does not go into the room once a week, and was out with me both days.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-46

1037. ROBERT WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , two seals, value 18 s.; a chain, value 20 s.; and a key, value 1 s. 6 d., the goods of William Gregory , from his person .

WILLIAM GREGORY . I have a house in the City, but live in Spa-fields. On the 23d of July, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I was going home. I had been drinking in the early part of the evening, but at the time in question I was not so much intoxicated - feeling myself giddy in the head, I stopped in the Pig-market , and there leaned against, or on the rails, with my back to the foot-path, and felt a person's hand round my waist, which brought me to a state of recollection. I turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me - I had a view of his face and his person; he had white trowsers on; he began to ask me a variety of questions, in a hurried manner, and during that time I felt my gold seals and chain either snatched or cut from me - I felt them go; the chain was attached to a ribbon; I immediately charged him with the theft, and he ran away; I ran after him, calling

"Stop thief," and secured him less than forty yards off, I suppose. I got hold of him, and at that moment the watchman came up, and finally secured him; I had not lost sight of him.

JURY. Q. Was it a dark or a light night - A. It was neither day nor twilight, but there is a strong gas light in the centre of the market.

Q. How could you identify the man? - A. He had white trowsers on, and the suddenness of the transaction led me to notice him; he could not have been above three or four yards from in yet any time.

Q. What do you call the early part of the evening when you were very much inebriated - A. About four or five o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Were you not so drunk at twelve o'clock, that you did not know what you were about - A. Yes, I was; I understood the Jury to ask what time I left my residence; I had not been drinking at four or five o'clock; I admit that at twelve o'clock I was very drunk; I spent the evening at Mr. Smith's; near Moorfields; I have only been there three or four times, and don't know the sign of the house. I was there the whole of the time; I cannot say at what time I left; I paid for something next day which I had broken at Smith's. I will not undertake to swear that I recollect anything that passed there - the ribbon was attached to my watch, and the chain next the seals.

Q. When your watch was down in your fob the ribbon could not be seen - A. Certainly it could, it was a very large ribbon. I have been told that a person at Smith's put my seals into my fob; I will not swear that I recollect leaving Smith's, or where I might have rambled before I went into the pig-market; I was finding my way home; I might have gone to the west end of the town to find the pig-market. I took the prisoner first; I never said that the watchman took him first; I was resting my stomach against the pens.

Q. Have you not said that immediately on turning round you taxed him with robbing you - A. I have not; I did not strike him; I believe I attempted to do it after he was in custody of the watchman, not before - I never said that I turned round and struck him immediately, saying nothing about his running away. I did not come up to him in Long-lane; I am not aware that anybody was with me, or talking to me in Long-lane. I went before the Alderman next morning; the hearing was put off, because it was said I was much irritated, but I swear I was sober; I have said I was sorry this occurred, on account of the prisoner's family. I have said I was sorry for this proceeding, but I coupled it with that remark. I went to Guildhall, thinking the examination would be there. I remember apologising to a person, believing I had been rather rude to him, being irritated. I never said I was come to quash the business; I have been at Smith's house; I was not drunk both times; I never charged any man with robbing me who was assisting me home when drunk. I know that on one occasion I was very ill at Smith's house, but did not lay on the floor, for Mrs. Smith offered me a bed, and I went to lay down. I never laid on the floor drunk there, that I recollect; I have spent the evening there three times, and called in twice, but only had a glass of cider and beer.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Who is Mrs. Smith - A. I had been to her house; she is the landlady of the public-house. I was there one morning, and she said

"I did not think you would have gone so far." I was with nobody till I arrived at the pig-market. I never expressed a doubt of the prisoner's robbing me.

COURT. Q. From the time you found his arm round your body till you stopped him did you see any person till the watchman came - A. There was no other person.

Q. When the watchman came up, did you say to the prisoner,

"Where is your pall" - A. I believe I did at the watch-house, from the observation which the watchman made. The impression on my mind was, that in these cases there is always more than one person.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a watchman my beat is in

Long-lane, and part of the pig-market; part of it comes into Smithfield - there are some rails there. On the 23d of July, I recollect seeing Mr. Gregory leaning on the rails - it was rather better than half-past one o'clock; there was a person on his right side, standing up, but what he was doing I cannot say. I was about ten yards off; it was not day-light - there was a gas-light in the centre of us; I could have distinguished them without that light, as there were other lights near. I heard the prisoner ask Mr. Gregory several times where he was going to, and which way he was going; I am certain of his person - the last question he asked was if he was going towards the bridge - I did not hear Gregory reply, but the prisoner jumped away from him, and Gregory went after him directly, calling Stop thief! Gregory stopped him himself. I never lost sight of either of them; he caught hold of him by one side, and I on the other. Gregory said he had robbed him of his seals and chain; he said he had not. Gregory accompanied us to the watch-house, at St. Sepulchre's-church - he told me not to collar him; I held his cuff, and he went on quietly. When we arrived at the watch-house Gregory laid the charge before the officer of the night; the prisoner said he had not robbed him; that he was a respectable man; he was searched, and his own watch, a penknife, and nineteen duplicates were found on him - I do not recollect whether the knife was in his waistcoat or trowsers pocket. I left Gregory at the watch-house, returned to the pig-market with my lanthorn, and went to the place about where the prisoner was stopped, which is between twenty and thirty yards from where they were at first - I could not see anything in the passing where the people pass, but went aside, and saw Godfrey pick up a gold seal in the enclosure, five or six yards from the path - it was thrown over the rails, nearly opposite the spot where he was taken, and two or three yards further on I found the chain, part of a ribbon, and the seal - I cannot say whether the key was with it; the ribbon appeared to have been cut rather slanting. I went to the watch-house - Godfrey would not deliver the chain and seals to Gregory till he described them, which he did satisfactorily, before he saw them. I believe he was a little in liquor; but he seemed more overcome with passion than liquor.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time was it when you first saw them together - A. Better than half-past one o'clock; I had been in Long-lane that night from ten o'clock. I saw nothing of Gregory till I saw him leaning on the pens; the prisoner stood by his side, asking him questions, but I never heard Gregory answer; I did not see him shew fight, or any blows pass. The pens are gathered up together. The seal was found near a wall, by a house; the other was two or three yards further on, on the left hand side, not on the spot they walked. I have seen Mr. Gregory twice since at the Mansion House, and twice at Guildhall, and saw him one night when he was going home, when my box was at the Bull's Head, public-house, at the corner of Smithfield-bars.

Q. Did you have any conversation with him - A. I had no business to have conversation with him. He told me the people wanted him to make it up; his wife said it should not be made up; she was with him. This was a little after ten o'clock one night. I never heard him ask the prisoner where his pall was, to the best of my knowledge I swear I never told him that he did. I had a glass of gin that night, but he drank none - I did not think it odd for him to treat me. I never saw him drunk at the examination. I cannot say whether he was drunk or sober. 17 s. or 18 s. were found on the prisoner; every thing found on him was returned. He was dressed in white trowsers, and a surtout coat; the coat was unbuttoned at the watch-house, to get to his waistcoat pocket. I cannot say whether it was buttoned when he was stopped.

COURT. Q. Did the ribbon you found fit the ribbon of the prosecutor's watch - A. It corresponded with it, and appeared fresh cut. He had a bundle of papers in his pocket.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am superintendant of the watch. Williams brought the prisoner to the watch-house between one and two o'clock; Gregory and the watchman came with him; Gregory charged him with having robbed him of a gold chain, two seals, and a key, and stated that he was coming through the pig-market, was taken very ill, and leaned over the rails for ease, and on a sudden discovered some person behind him; turned round and saw the prisoner, who had his hands round him, and he thought for improper purposes, but very shortly after he missed his seals, and on turning round, the prisoner ran away; that he immediately pursued him, calling Stop thief! that he caught him in the footpath, and at that instant the watchman came up and secured him; the watchman agreed to the statement, the prisoner denied the charge. Gregory was in liquor, and gave his account rather in a violent manner; he accounted for it by saying, he felt so indignant at the prisoner, supposing he wanted to use his hands to an improper purpose, that he was enraged. I went to the spot with Williams, and found rather a large gold-seal; Williams picked up a gold chain, seal, key, and piece of ribbon attached to it; there is an enclosure on one side of the footpath; these things were found about six yards from the footpath, both on one side, in such a situation as they would be if thrown there.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Where were the seals found - A. On the left hand side of the pathway coming from Barbican, on a vacant spot of ground in the pig-market, and about six yards from the path; there is a gate at the further end, which is generally shut, except on market days, to keep people from the vacant space; if shut, a person must get over to get into it.

Q. When the prosecutor got to the watch-house, do you remember his trying to strike the prisoner - A. He was prevented; I remember his saying at the watch-house

"Where is your pall?" I have since told him that he did say so; I think he acknowledged it, but will not swear it; the first examination was between twelve and one o'clock, and was put off on account of his demeanour. The prisoner had a variety of papers about him in different parts. I cannot say whether his coat was buttoned. I think the knife was in his waistcoat pocket, it was not open when it was found.

COURT. Q. Among the things found was there a watch ribbon - A. A ribbon was attached to the chain, it appeared to be cut as clean as possible; the prosecutor's watch had part of a ribbon attached to it, and it exactly corresponded with that part of it.

JOHN HARKER . I was officer of the night. Williams

brought the prisoner in about a quarter to two o'clock; Gregory charged him with taking his chain and seals; Gregory seemed rather violent and a little in liquor I think; but he gave his statement exactly as at the Mansion-house. I found a watch, chain, seals, seventeen shillings, nineteen duplicates, and a small penknife on him; he denied the charge, and gave no particular account of himself; Godfrey and Williams went out, Gregory remained with me till they returned, and brought what I now produce in the state it was brought in except that; the large seal was off separate, I have a piece of ribbon which I took off the watch in Gregory's possession; he described the seals and chain exactly before he saw them; I took the prisoner to the Compter.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Will you put the ribbon together, and say where they correspond - A. It has been rubbed about at the different examinations, the ends have been tezaed out, and do not correspond now, but they did; they appeared to me to have been cut; his coat was buttoned to the bottom when he came to the watch-house; I could not get at his waistcoat pocket without unbuttoning it - he had papers in his breast pocket, and in different parts. I will not say whether there were any in the same pocket as the knife. I believe Gregory said to him,

"I suppose you have a pall, where is your pall." I believe I told him at the second examination that he had said so - he said he did not see any pall, and did not know of any, that he might have used the expression, but did not think that he did; he talked very sensible, but seemed a little intoxicated, and in a great passion at the watch-house - he was the worse for liquor next morning at the examination, which was about twelve o'clock, the Alderman adjourned it because he was irritated in mind. The ribbon appeared to be cut clean, not torn.

WILLIAM GREGORY . They are my property, and were in my possession the night in question - I know it was safe before I was attacked; the watch was protected only by the ribbon.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long might this person be near you in the pig-market - A. I cannot say, I went to Smith's next morning, before I went to Guildhall, and drank some porter, nothing else. I do not think I drank a quart; I drank nothing else prior to going before the Alderman to the best of my belief - I have no recollection of taking spirits, a man named Keeve was with me; that the street-keeper was there, and drank with me. I did not have a glass of brandy, and another of gin at Smith's.

The prisoner in a long defence stated the case, he had witnesses to prove, that he left Golden-lane at half past one o'clock, and overtook the prosecutor and another at the end of Barbican; they asked where he was going, he said over Blackfriars-bridge, and he said he would walk with him; but on arriving at the sheep-pens, the prosecutor proposed going to the Bear public-house to drink, after which he stopped to lean against the pens in the pig-market, and on the prisoner enquiring if he was going on, he placed his hands to his small-clothes, and said,

"You have robbed me of my watch;" that the prisoner called him a scoundrel, and he might have struck him; the prosecutor called the watchman, and gave him in charge. The prisoner then stated the evidence he should produce, as appears from the following witnesses.

JOHN GEORGE TIBBS . I am an oilman, and live in Golden-lane. On the 22d of July, at seven o'clock, I came home and found the prisoner at my house; he came to settle some accounts for me, and when he had done that, he had some business of his own which he wished to do up stairs at my house, as after that he should be able to spend the evening with me - he came down between eight and nine o'clock; we supped and had some grog; he left my house at half-past one o'clock, he lives near the Coburg Theatre; he had a frock coat on, and some papers in his waistcoat pocket, supported by the flap of his coat; it was a single-breasted coat, and being buttoned tight, was the only way he could secure the papers; he said at my house he had lost some papers before, and took pains to button his coat, so as not to lose these - he buttoned it down to the bottom, nearly to cover his waistcoat pocket. I saw him mend his pen that night with a knife, which I believe he took from his waistcoat pocket; I do not know where he put it; it is five or six minutes walk from my house to Smithfield. Smith's house is the Golden Key, in Tenter-street, about ten minutes walk from the pig-market.

MARY ANN SMITH . My husband keeps the Golden Key, public-house, Tenter-street. Gregory was at my house the night he was robbed, and left about half-past eleven o'clock, the house was closed at eleven, but it might be twelve before I got him out; it was not above ten minutes past twelve I am positive; he was very much intoxicated, I do not think he knew what he was about exactly, he had been there three or four hours drinking. He was at my house three months before; he was drunk when he came in and went into the skittle ground; three bowls of punch were taken there, and when he came out he was very much intoxicated.

Q. Did he at any time lay on the ground at your house - A. Yes, that was three months ago. He was then so insensible, that I got two men to go and order a coach for him, and when they came in he had fallen down by the side of the door - he jumped up and accused them of robbing him. They had only lifted him gently up. He asked whether they wanted to rob or murder him. I could not get him out of doors for two hours. On the night of the robbery, before he went away, Mr. Smith told him his seals were in a very dangerous state, as he was not capable of taking care of them, and they were fastened into his waistband; but he was so intoxicated that before he went he took them out again, and went out with them in their usual state, the chain and ribbon were visible. For three months before, when he was in the skittle-ground, he lost the ring which fastened the watch to the chain, and I fastened it to the chain; the chain was shorter as the ring was gone. On the night in question no part of the ribbon could be seen, when his watch was in his fob. He broke a pane of glass which he has since paid for, he did not recollect breaking of it; and, moreover, he said he was a complete madman when drunk. He called next morning and apologized for his conduct, and paid for what he broke, and drank some ale and a glass of brandy; he drank some porter with some gentlemen who were playing there, and vomited in the parlour. Keeve was there at the time. He left our house at twelve o'clock that morning, and was by no means sober; he said he met a man in the pig-market, and felt his arms round his waist, and he felt so indignant that he turned round immediately, seized and held

him tight; I said

"Was it possible you could hold a man in that state." After he came from the wall, he said the man ran two or three steps - he has said many times that he was sorry for what he had done, and the proceedings might be quashed, and he should not have proceeded if it had not been for the officers. I said,

"Mr. Gregory, I am sorry you should have proceeded so far - you have not lost your property, and consider the man's family" - he said, if he had the least shadow of a doubt he should not have proceeded, but the officers had urged him on. I know nothing of the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Did he not say he was sorry for the proceedings on account of the man's family - A. He did.

RICHARD WILLIAM KEEVE . I travel round town for a silk shawl warehouse, in Maiden-lane. On the morning after this circumstance I called at Smith's, between ten and eleven o'clock, Gregory was there playing at bagatelle with the street-keeper. They and another person drank a pot of porter or half-and-half. I played one game with him myself for a glass of gin - all four had a glass each. Gregory was taken ill, and had a glass of brandy before - he certainly was in liquor; he said he had been robbed in the sheep-pens; that the person came to him and put his arms round his waist while he was sick; that the man ran a distance from him, but he overtook him - I had nothing particular to do, and accompanied him to Guildhall - nobody asked me - the Alderman requested him to come next day, that he might be more on his guard, and not quite so irritated. I told him if he would be advised by me, he would drop the subject - but I knew the officers had urged him on, and he has told me he would not have gone further if they had not urged him. I have seen the prisoner before, but never spoke to him.

DANIEL RICHARDS . I am a linen-draper, and live in Tenter-street. I saw Gregory at Guildhall on Thursday morning. The officer asked if he was inclined to proceed in the same kind of way as he had the day before. He shrugged up his shoulders, and said he should not - that he was so drunk the day before, he hardly knew what he was about, and must make the best of it - that he did not intend to proceed farther, and must put an end to it - that is the substance of what he said.

COURT. Q. We wish you to give us the exact words - A. That is the substance - he said he must make an apology for the behaviour the day before. The officer told him to go to the Mansion House.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Cannot you tell us the name of the officer - A. No. I lodge with Smith. I am not in any business now - I merely mentioned being a linen-draper, as I was servant to Messrs. Kinder, of Cheapside, eighteen months ago, since which I have been arranging accounts.

Q. What induced you to go to Guildhall - A. I heard the circumstance stated by Keeve, and from the description given of the violence of the prosecutor, and the respectability of the prisoner, I went from curiousity. The prisoner was a perfect stranger to me. Keeve mentioned about his respectability. It was talked of commonly in the house. I was a linen-draper on my own account for three years - that is five or six years ago.

MR. THOMAS HAGUE . I am a solicitor, in partnership with Mr. Seal - the prisoner has been four years in our employ. I have lost an arm, and he was in the habit of mending my pens, and generally carries a penknife in his waistcoat pocket. He mended pens for me on the 22d of July.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-47

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1020. MATILDA BELLWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , two sheets, value 12 s.; a pillow, value 4 s.; a bolster, value 4 s.; two blankets, value 5 s.; a quilt, value 3 s.; two curtains, value 5 s.; a coal scuttle, value 5 s.; two pictures, value 4 s.; seven pieces of china, value 2 s., and an iron, value 6 d., the goods of Mary Roether , in a lodging-room .

MARY ROETHER . I live in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 24th of May, I let the prisoner a furnished garret, at 4 s. a week - she left on the 31st of July, without notice. On the 4th of August, I had the lock forced, and found the bed-tick had been ripped open, and some feathers taken. I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JAMES GURNEY . I am apprenticed to Mr. Morritt, pawnbroker. I have a quilt, seven pieces of china, two pictures, a coal scuttle, two blankets, and two curtains, pawned by the prisoner on the 4th, 12th and 24th of June, 8th, 21st, and 28th of July, in the name of Ann Brown .

THOMAS MERCHANT . I am servant to Messrs. Jones and Co. South-street, Manchester-square. I have two sheets pawned on the 16th of June, a bolster on the 27th, and a pillow and case on the 16th of July, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Brown .

JOSEPH LIGHTFOOT . I am a pawnbroker. I have an iron, pawned on the 25th of July, for 6 d., by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH COLLINS . I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of August - she said she knew she was guilty. I found the duplicates on her.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-48

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1021. JOHN CRISP and WILLIAM COX were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Clark , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 21st of July , with intent to steal, and stealing therein a tea kettle, value 10 s.; two pair of shoes, value 4 s.; a gun, value 5 l.; two hams, value 12 s.; a tea-caddy, value 15 s., and a liquor stand, value 2 l. , his property.

ELIZABETH EVERARD . I am cook to Mr. Henry Clark , of Stoke Newington . On the 21st of July, I saw the house fastened up, and was the last person up, except my master, who always went into the kitchen after we go to bed. I got up about six o'clock, and found a square of glass cut out of the kitchen window, and the top sash down - I had hasped it the night before. The articles stated in the indictment were stolen. I found three phosphorus

matches on the kitchen table; one of them had been lighted. I have seen the tea-kettle since.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you see the tea-kettle again - A. Last Wednesday.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 23d of August, I apprehended Crisp, at a public-house, in Golden-lane; I found nothing relating to the robbery on him; I took him to the office, and heard him say something about Church, and told him he lived in Church-Row, St. Luke's; he said he did, at No. 5; I went there with Mance; this tea-kettle was there then, but I did not bring it away till the 31st. I found it on the fire-place.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you get the number of the house from him - A. He said No. 5; he kept the house, his wife was there; there were three lodgers. I will not swear that I brought the same kettle away as I saw on the 23d.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I apprehended Cox, on the 30th of August, at Enfield, at work, on his master's grounds, and asked him if there had been any of his property conveyed to his house by Crisp; he said No; there was nothing of his belonging to Crisp, but an old shirt; I took him to his house, and found in a bundle, a pair of shoes; he afterwards said that they had been given him by Crisp, and some had been left there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-49

1022. JOHN CRISP and WILLIAM COX , were again indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Henry Wyatt , about twelve in the night, of the 1st of July , at Hornsey, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, two caps, value 5 s.; a petticoat, value 4 s.; a gown skirt, value 3 s.; a night gown, value 6 d.; a shift, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 d.; the goods of Susannah Negus , spinster ; nine table cloths, value 50 s.; nine sheets, value 30 s.; fourteen shifts, value 5 l.; fourteen towels, value 7 s.; fifteen aprons, value 7 s.; thirty-six cravats, value 18 s.; twenty-four handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; four caps, value 8 s., and a shaving cloth, value 2 d.; the goods of the said Henry Wyatt , and a handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of George Wyatt .

WILLIAM PORTER . I am servant to Mr. Henry Wyatt , who lives at Hornsey . I do not sleep in the house. On the 2d of July, about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning, I went to the house. I got in by knocking the cook up. I went and found somebody had taken the wire pannel out of the dairy door; anybody could then get through; it was safe the day before; there were prints of feet in the garden; they had got a chair off the lawn, and got over the wall into the yard, which brought them to the dairy. I found some tallow-grease in the yard, close by the dairy door; it was not there the day before; a candle had been lighted there. I missed the shoe brushes, two pair of boots, and two pair of shoes from the knife-house, which stands by itself, and is enclosed in the same yard with the dwelling-house; the dairy is under the same roof as the dwelling-house, but you must come out into the yard to get into the house; they had only entered the dairy and knife-house. Three baskets of linen were taken out of the dairy; one of the baskets was set in the yard, but the linen gone.

SUSANNAH NEGUS . I am house-maid to Mr. Wyatt. On the 1st of July, I slept in the house, but was not alarmed. I fastened the house up; the cook and I were up last, and went to bed together - the last time I was in the dairy, was at dusk, the window was shut; when I got up in the morning, I found the wire pannel taken out, and missed three baskets of clothes. I have seen some of them since, part are my own and part my master's; there was grease outside the door, which was not there the day before; it appeared to be the droppings of a candle.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who had the management of the dairy - A. The cook; there is no casement, it is only the pannel of the door taken out, and secured by wire, to admit the air; it was secure the day before. It was dusk when the cook and I took the clothes into the dairy. I will not swear that she did not go there with a candle afterwards; it was dusk, between eight and nine o'clock; we went to bed between ten and eleven. I saw part of the linen at Worship-street, last Saturday week.

COURT. Q. Did the cook go into the yard, so as to put any grease outside - A. It is not likely.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I apprehended Crisp, on the 23d of August, and on searching his house, on that day, I found, among other property, some linen, part in a child's couch, and part in a deal box. I found his house out in the manner I said before.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I went with Vann to search Crisp's house; his account is correct. I took Cox, on the 30th of August, on this charge. I asked him if there was any property at his house belonging to Crisp, or that he had sent there; he said there was nothing but an old shirt. I searched his house, and found a handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Crisp lived in Church-row, Old-street - A. Yes, it is three or four miles from Mr. Wyatt's.

SUSANNAH NEGUS . The handkerchief found at Cox's is mine, and was in the dairy on the night of the robbery (looking at the property found at Crisp's house) here is a gown tail and muslin handkerchief, four lace caps, a double lace nightcap, a nightgown and petticoat of mine, a lace handkerchief, two lace caps of mistresses, and a shaving cloth; they are worth about 20 s.; the value of all the property stolen that night was 20 l. at least. There was a whole month's linen except the shirts.

Cross-examined. Q. Are not several of the things you have sworn to, without any mark - A. Yes, I swore to them at the office. The officers found other things which I could not swear to; they have not been produced.

COURT. Q. The wire-window was never taken out I suppose - A. No, it was fastened in with the beading; it is part of the door.

CRISP'S Defence. What things I had I bought at different times. I left the things at Cox's house.

COX'S Defence. I was working at Enfield, Crisp came and stopped two nights with me; I know him by working with him. I left him in bed when I went to work, and he left this bundle with my wife till he called again.

CRISP - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

COX - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-50

1023. The said JOHN CRISP and CHARLES BELLENGER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gittens , about

the hour of twelve in the night of the 22d of August , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, eight table cloths, value 4 l.; seven napkins, value 10 s.; two decanters, value 1 l.; a jug, value 10 s.; a bottle, value 1 s.; a set of castors, value 2 l.; a decanter stand, value 10 s.; two candlesticks, value 2 s.; a scarf, value 5 s., and a work box, value 2 s. , his property.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GITTINS . I rent a house at Highgate, in the parish of St. Pancras . I was the last person up on the 22d of August, and saw that my house was all fast. I got up about six o'clock in the morning; it was then light; the servant called me up; I found the parlour window broken open, which was fastened the night before with an iron bar; some holes were cut in it with a centre bit, so that the bar could be taken out. I looked round, and found a phosphorus match, which did not appear to have been lighted, and some tallow grease on the window seat which was not there the night before; I suppose they had a light, and dropped the grease; the candles and candlestick were taken away; I missed some table cloths, napkins, a scarf, a pair of candlesticks, a pair of decanters, a cut glass jug, a sallad bottle, a set of plated castors, a silver decanter stand, and work box, which were worth 7 l. or 8 l.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I searched Crisp's lodgings on the 23d of August, and found a cashmere scarf; he was not at home.

JOHN MANCE . I was with Vann, and corroborate his statement.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I apprehended Bellenger on the 29th of August, in Britannia-street, Islington. I had found the decanters, a work box, table cloth, and jug, at Ann Young 's. Bellenger said he found them in the back of his stable.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you know Bellenger - A. I have heard a good character of him.

ANN YOUNG . I am married and live at Islington. I found two decanters and a jug in a chest of drawers, belonging to Mr. Street, who lives with his wife in my room. I have seen Bellenger at my house, but never shewed them to him; I asked him how they came there; he said, he brought them there for safety, fearing his children might break them; I never gave him leave to bring them; I had only known him for five or six weeks. I believe he has three or four children; he has no place to lock things up.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not tell you he found them in a chaff room that was open to every body - A. He said he found them in the back way; his back way is open entirely; he said he left them, fearing his children should break them, that he might deliver them if there was an advertisement.

SARAH MIDDLETON . I am eleven years old, and am Young's daughter. Bellenger brought three decanters and a jug to the house, and asked if he should leave them there; I told him I did not know, for my mother was not at home; he left them there for safety. I had seen him about six times before.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he was afraid his children might break them, as he had nobody to take care of them - A. Yes.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. I know Crisp; I sold him a stock and centre-bit on Saturday the 2d of August; I asked what he was going to do with it, as he was not a carpenter; he said he was going to repair some gentlemen's stables in the country.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. There are a great many bits made of one size - A. Yes.

THOMAS GARTON . I tried this centre-bit to the prosecutor's shutter, and have cut part of it out; these holes are made by one of that size.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is it not an inch size - A. Yes; any one of that size would make these holes.

MR. GITTENS. The decanters and jugs are mine; the work-box and scarf are my sister's, who resides with me. I believe the table-cloth to be mine.

CRISP'S Defence. I never saw the shawl before.

Several witnesses, who appeared to the character of Bellenger, stated that his back gates were open late at night and early in the morning.

MARY ANN LAWRENCE . I know the prisoner's back premises are always open; there are no fastenings whatever, any one can get to the chaff-room with ease - he has no place to lock up things away from the children.

COURT. Q. Where do you live - A. In Drury-lane - He has no cupboard. My husband is a pawnbroker. I am a distant relation of the prisoner's; he has three rooms, one leading out of the other. I never saw any locks on the doors.

THOMAS GARTON . I went to Bellenger's house, and examined it; the chaff-room cannot be entered, for the door was fastened - he has a chest of drawers in his room - he could not find the key that day.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I saw this chest of drawers; the decanters could be put there without being broken; there were locks on the cupboards, but they were not locked.

ANN YOUNG . I live about half a mile from Bellenger's. I found the decanter's in Street's bottom drawer.

CRISP - GUILTY - DEATH .

BELLENGER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-51

1024. MARIA HEALY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , at St. Margaret, Westminster, twenty-six yards of lace, value 3 l. 10 s., the goods of Martin Hatfield , in his dwelling-house .

MARTIN HATFIELD . I live in Parliament-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster , and rent the house - the shop is part of the house.

SAMUEL WALLIS . I am shopman to Mr. Hatfield. On the 18th of August, the prisoner came into the shop and bought a yard and a half of thread-lace, and a yard of quilling, which came to 3 s. or 4 s. I saw her draw a card of lace off the counter into her lap. I watched her and followed her out, about one hundred yards, then brought her back, and found two cards of lace on her.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. She paid for what she bought - Yes; the lace was in the same box as that she bought; it was all on cards; she had a shawl on. I was at the opposite counter, and watched, suspecting her. She said she picked it off the floor.

RICHARD WILSON . I am a constable. I received her in charge with the lace - she said it was the prosecutor's property.

MR. HATFIELD. It is mine, and cost 3 l. at least. I would not sell it for that.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18230910-52

1025. CHARLES DIXON , JAMES DIXON , SAMUEL PHILLIPS , THOMAS THOMPSON , and MATTHEW CRAWFORD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Wood , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 14th of July , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a copper boiler, value 10 s.; two tea-kettles, value 2 s.; two saucepans, value 2 s.; a coffee biggin, value 1 s.; a cullender, value 1 s., and a candlestick, value 1 s. , his property.

ROBERT WOOD . I am a brazier , and live in Elliott's-row, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the 15th of July, about two o'clock in the morning, I was suddenly awoke by a knocking at my door - I got up, and by the light of the lamplighter's torch, I found my window shutter down, and the window broken, which I had fastened up myself the night before. I found my door was tied with a cord, got a person outside to undo it, and the lamplighter came in. I missed several copper and tin goods out of the window. I fastened the house up, and went into Boston-street, and at the end of that street there were several boys and girls lurking about some carts. I went to the end of Boston-place, and on looking round the corner, saw James and Charles Dixon , Phillips, Crawford, and one or two more, conversing together. I knew them before perfectly well - not hearing their conversation, I went into Boston-street, to get behind them, and when I came round the watchman came up - they had moved from where I saw them, and joined some girls and boys, and went in among some cottages; this was about half-past three o'clock in the morning. I then went home for a quarter of an hour - I returned again into Boston-street, and on looking round the corner, I saw Crawford and Charles Dixon place themselves against a white cottage, opposite Boston-street, and very soon after Phillips and James Dixon came up, and talked with them. Phillips had no jacket on, but a dirty waistcoat buttoned round him - he and James Dixon separated from the other two, and went to the end of Boston-place, where I had first seen them talking together - it was then about four o'clock. The parish labourers came to sweep the streets. I requested one of them (Pheney) to go to the opposite corner, and see what they were about; he very soon returned, beckoning to me. I went over, and found a basket containing copper and tin goods - I did not see the prisoners at that time; they were within ten yards of the spot where the basket was at the first conversation. I stopped and watched them, and in a short time observed Charles Dixon and Crawford coming up the back ground, behind Boston-place - they must have seen me, for I was directly in a line with it; it was day-light then. They came into Boston-street, and went up against the white cottages, where I had first seen them. I went to the corner of Boston-street, and saw Thompson bring a donkey out of one of the cottages, put it into a cart, and come down Boston-street, looking earnestly as he passed along; he must have seen me; he went to the bottom of the street, and immediately returned to the cottages - he did not go near the basket. I went and took up the goods, and the moment I brought them into Boston-street, in sight of Charles Dixon and Crawford, one of them gave a whistle, and I observed James Dixon running along my street, and passed the shop with great speed, towards the New-road, and Phillips went down a narrow pathway, among the cottages. I took the goods home, and the officer called that morning. I saw Phillips in the street in a few days, and made up to him - he turned, and saw me coming to him, and ran away; I called Stop thief! and he was at last taken. I was first called up about two o'clock - it was quite dark then.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do not you know there had been a raffle, and a dance at the cottage that night - A. I was informed there had; there was a great many boys and girls about the first time I saw them. I first went out about two o'clock, returned a little before four, and staid at home a quarter of an hour; returned to Boston-street, and saw Thompson with the cart a little before five. I did not see him before that time.

THOMAS PHENEY . I sweep the streets. On the 15th of July, about half-past three in the morning, I saw Charles and James Dixon , Thompson, and Crawford, talking to each other at the top of Boston-street, close to where the robbery was committed. The prosecutor was watching them. James Dixon and one of the others went round to the back of the houses where the things were, and went close to the things. I do not know that they touched them, as I was at a distance from them; they stood talking there about two minutes. I saw them stoop down close to the goods, and then go away. This was about half-past three o'clock.

Prisoner JAMES DIXON . Q. Did you see me within twenty yards of the basket - A. He was twenty or twenty-five yards off at first, but afterwards went close to it.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. On the 16th of July, I apprehended Charles Dixon and Crawford; on the 24th, I took James Dixon , and, on the 26th, Phillips was given in my charge by Wood. On the 30th, I found Thompson in custody at Worship-street. On the 24th of July, before I took James Dixon , I saw him in the New Road, about four o'clock in the morning. He ran away, on seeing me - I pursued but lost him, and took him in bed in St. Giles's in about an hour, and asked how he came to leave his breeches behind. He said,

"Behind, where?" I said,

"On the basket of tins." He said

"it was no matter, they were only an old pair." Wood had given me the basket with the breeches and a jacket on it. I produce them.

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am Phillips's brother-in-law, and am fifteen years old. I believe this to be his jacket. I have no doubt about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you and him on good terms - A. We do not live on good terms - my father is dead - I only say I believe that it is his jacket.

COURT. Q. When did you see him wear it last - A. About eight months ago. I have not been home for twelve months. I have been out in service.

JAMES GIBBS . I am an officer of High-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 23d of June, Phillips was at the office all day with this jacket on. I swear to it, for I took particular notice of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear to that identical

jacket - A. Yes; I saw it again at the office on the 16th of July; here are particular marks behind it - it is all stiff with beer, where he has been in the habit of carrying pots on his back. I recognized it as soon as he came before the Magistrate, buttons and all.

ROBERT WOOD re-examined. This jacket and breeches were on the basket which contained the property. I found it in a ditch, the goods have my own mark on them, and are worth 20 s.

Cross-examined. Q. When you were called up, was it light enough to see a person's face - A. Yes, very well, by the light of the sky.

COURT. Q. Could you distinguish a person's features without the lamp-light - A. Yes, the day was breaking - the lamps were lighted - the lamplighter was returning from relighting his lamps.

CHARLES DIXON 'S Defence. I and Crawford left work and went to a dance, about nine o'clock, and never moved out from nine till nearly half-past three; I then stood at the corner till it was time to get in doors. Crawford asked me to go with him to meet his labourers, which I did, and returned, but could not get in.

JAMES DIXON 'S Defence. I got up at half-past four o'clock - called Thompson to go to market; and, seeing Charles, I went and asked him how father was.

ELIZA SQUIRES . I had a raffle at my house on this night. Charles Dixon came there about half-past nine o'clock at night, and staid till near three; there was a violin and dancing - several women were there - thirty or forty people were there - my house is four or five hundred yards from Wood's. I am sure he was in the room all the while; he stood in a place where he could not go out without my seeing him; he was my partner several times. Crawford was also there, and left with Dixon. James Dixon and Phillips came in in the evening, but were not at the dance; I swear that Crawford and Charles Dixon never left the room all the time.

ELIZA JARVIS . I was at this raffle and dance; Crawford and Charles Dixon were both there; I danced with them. I am a poor woman, and go out to wash; they came in at half-past nine o'clock, and never left till after I did, which was just as it struck two. I left them there - they might go out without my seeing them.

ANN JONES . I am married, and live in Pleasant-row, Prospect-buildings, Old Lord's Cricket-ground. Thompson slept at our place several nights; he slept at my house on the night before St. Swithin's day; we made him a bed on the floor in our room; he laid down between ten and eleven o'clock, and when he awoke, he asked a person outside what o'clock it was; the person said between five and six.

COURT. Q. How far do you live from the prosecutor - A. About two hundred yards - my husband keeps a cart and donkey - we sent Thompson to Covent Garden-market with it that morning - he took his own donkey which he kept in our stable.

THOMAS PHENEY re-examined. Thompson was going towards Covent Garden with the donkey and cart.

JAMES DIXON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

CHARLES DIXON - NOT GUILTY .

CRAWFORD - NOT GUILTY .

THOMPSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-53

1026. SARAH HITCHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , at St. Mary-le-bone, a watch, value 1 l.; a seal, value 6 s.; a watch-key, value 3 s.; and a tea-caddy, value 1 s., the goods of John Barton ; and two watches, value 30 s.; a coat, value 1 l.; a pair of breeches, value 6 s.; a jacket, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; three sovereigns and ten shillings, the property of Thomas Church , in the dwelling-house of John Phillips .

JOHN BARTON . I lodge on the second floor of John Phillips 's house, in Little Mary-le-bone-lane, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . Thomas Church lodges in the same room, I have known the prisoner by sight for six or seven months, she is a friend of Church's. On the 30th of August, I went to work, and on coming home, about half-past four o'clock, I found the door broken open, the lock which was a strong one, was forced off; I missed a silver watch and several articles, which I found at the office on the 5th of September.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Phillips does not live in the house - A. Yes; he lives in the lower part, there is only one street door.

CAROLINE PHILLIPS . I am the wife of John Phillips . On the 30th of August, I saw the prisoner in the passage, she had been up stairs - she was going out, she returned to ask me if Mrs. Barton was out for the afternoon. I said she was in the country, but if she had any message, I would tell Mr. Barton; she said she would go over to the young man, and went away. I went out myself soon after.

CAROLINE ELIZABETH PHILLIPS . I am twelve years old. On the 30th of August, I was at home and saw the prisoner, she spoke to my mother, then went away, and came again afterwards when my mother was out, and went up stairs towards Barton's room, and was there about half an hour - I saw nobody with her - I did not see her come down, but heard somebody go out between four and five o'clock. I went up about half an hour after, and saw the washing bench moved from the back door, and placed against the front door.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see her go out - A. No; I was down in the kitchen; there are lodgers on the first floor; she might have come in three or four times without my seeing her.

THOMAS CHURCH . The prisoner is a relation of mine; I lodged in the same room with Barton, I went home, and found the place broken open and my things gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You was going to marry her - A. No, she is my cousin.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. On the 5th of September, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 18, James-street, Grosvenor-square. I said I was come for the watch she had got, she denied having any. I found five duplicates concealed in a tea-chest in her lodging - she told me they were there, they were all for the property stolen, I went and found the things at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you frighten her about this - A. No. I took her to Phillips's, and then she said where the duplicates were.

WILLIAM DANIEL . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, of Oxford-street. I have a watch pawned for 20 s., by a man in the name of John Shaw , I gave him one of the duplicates produced.

JAMES HILLYER . I am servant to Mr. Flint, I have a watch pawned for 15 s., by a person to whom I gave one of these duplicates.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am servant to Messrs. Neat and Son, Duke-street. On the 30th of August, a woman pawned a silver watch for 5 s., in the name of Ann Lee . My duplicate is one of those produced.

WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER JONES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat, jacket, breeches, and handkerchief pawned on the 30th of August, by the prisoner, for 30 s. I am sure of her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutors .

Reference Number: t18230910-54

1027. THOMAS PURSE and THOMAS PEARSON were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of George Giles , on the night of the 6th April , and stealing three waistcoats, value 15 s.; a pelisse, value 4 l.; four coats, value 3 l.; a cloak, value 2 l.; three spencers, value 3 l.; a gown, value 5 l.; a gold etwee case, value 6 l.; two brooches, value 3 l. 10 s., and a smelling bottle, value 4 s. , his property; and JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the said pelisse, well knowing it to be stolen .

GEORGE GILES . On the 6th of April, I lived in St. James's-street , I am a jeweller . I went out about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, leaving nobody at home, it is only a shop and parlour. I slept there the night before, and intended to sleep there that night. I got home at half-past ten o'clock, and found a key broken in the lock; the door was shut, but not locked, and all the place completely ransacked. I had locked the door when I went out - all the drawers were taken out, and every thing value able gone. I lost upwards of 300 l. of property. When Purse and Pearson were apprehended, they each wore one of my waistcoats. I have found none of my jewellery.

WILLIAM BOND . I am a constable. I apprehended Purse on the 22d of June, on another charge; and on the 30th, took Pearson, and took a waistcoat off his back on the 8th of July, and one from Purse on the 9th; I found the pelisse on Mrs. Bell.

EMMA GILES . I am the prosecutor's wife; this pelisse is mine. Pearson is the son of our washer-woman; it was worth three guineas when taken, but is now not worth 2 s.; when I lost it, it was trimmed with swansdown; cord has now been substituted for it. I know it by the pattern.

ANN BELL . I am a single woman. Mr. Spiller bought me this pelisse at Jones's shop for 30 s.; he keeps a public sale shop. I have often bought things there - it hung up in the shop. I went to him on the 25th of June, and asked him if it was stolen - he said, No, I need not be afraid of wearing it - this was after I had seen Mr. Giles. It had been turned, and that I turned it again.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You saw Mr. Giles on the 25th - A. Yes, I met him him in the Strand, and saw him after that at No. 4, Off-alley - it is difficult to speak to a thing after it is turned - all the work is taken out. I gave the full value of it. I wore it upwards of a month after Giles saw it. I bought it the end of April or beginning of May.

COURT. Q. How came you to meet Giles at this house - A. I met him in the Strand, and he told me immediately he got into the house, that the pelisse I had on was his; he gave me the name of Thomas, Cleveland-row, St. James's.

COURT. Q. All that passed between you, was his claiming the pelisse - A. Yes.

MR. GILES. These waistcoats are mine, and the pelisse my wife's. About five or six weeks after the robbery I met Bell in the Strand, wearing this pelisse; she is very much like Mrs. Giles's sister. Her two sisters had pelisses alike. I was going to speak to her, but found out my mistake; I merely went with her to find out where she bought it; I gave her a wrong address, not choosing her to come to my house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How do you know the waistcoats - A. By the make; here is a mark of soapsuds which I frequently make in washing myself; there is a cut at the corner; my waistcoats are all made in this way. My servant absconded the morning after the robbery.

JOSEPH SPILLER . I bought this pelisse for Bell; it hung close to Jones's door.

PURSE'S Defence. I bought the waistcoat of an acquaintance; it is hardly likely I should wear it at the second examination, when one was taken off Pearson before.

PEARSON'S Defence. I bought the waistcoat new of a Jew, in Long Acre, about the beginning of May.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-55

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1028. WILLIAM HEMPSTEAD and JOHN GAMBLER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Croe Flyne , from his person .

GAMBLER Pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

JOHN CROE FLYNE . I am an apothecary , and live in St. Thomas's-street, Borough. On the 24th of July, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Holborn , and felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket; I turned round, and found it in possession of Gambler; he immediately threw it to Hemptead, whom I also seized, and took it from him; two officers came up.

WILLIAM HANCE . I am a constable. I was on Holborn-hill, and saw Gambler take hold of the prosecutor's coat-skirt with one hand; he drew the handkerchief out, and threw it behind him to Hempstead; it was done so quick I cannot say whether they were in company. When I caught Hempstead, he had it in his hand.

WILLIAM WILSHIRE . I am a constable. I saw a crowd on Holborn-hill, and found the prisoners detained.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HEMPSTEAD'S Defence. I am a drover, and work for Mr. Miles, of Saffron-hill; I was taken coming from work; I am no companion of Gambler; I handed the handkerchief to the witness.

WILLIAM HANCE . I took hold of him and the handkerchief at the same time; he said he knew nothing of the other prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-56

1029. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing on the 27th of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Simon Phipps , from his person .

WILLIAM SIMON PHIPPS . I am clerk to a ship-broker, and live in Manor-place, Walworth. On the 27th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was going from Mincing-lane towards the Custom-house, with a handkerchief in my pocket, and was called back by some persons, and on feeling in my pocket, it was gone; I had not seen the prisoner, but found him in custody in Tower-street; my handkerchief was produced; he gave it to me himself; it is silk, and worth 2 s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What became of it after it was given to you - A. I put it in my pocket. and went home; it was a yellow handkerchief, and my name was on it I believe; but I have other handkerchiefs marked the same way. I will not be positive that the one produced is the identical one.

MR. RICHARD GEORGE TUCKER . I am a merchant, and live in Queenhithe. On the 27th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I stood in an office, at the corner of Mincing-lane and Tower-street, and saw Mr. Phipps step off the pavement to pass a gentleman; and at that moment, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and put it in his left breast: I ran out after him immediately, desiring another person to inform Mr. Phipps; the prisoner walked a few steps round the corner, and then began to run; I called Stop thief! he was not five yards from me, I overtook him without losing sight of him, collared him, brought him back to Mr. Phipps, and said this man has taken your handkerchief; he replied,

"I did not, I picked it up;" but I saw him take it from the pocket; he then produced it from his right hand coat pocket, and delivered it to Mr. Phipps.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in a shop - A. In an office looking through a window, I was within twenty feet of him; I did not see him change it from his breast to his pocket; I did not lose sight of him, even in turning the corner.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a constable, and was on duty in Tower-street, and was informed of this; I went to the watch-house and found the prisoner there - he was indignant at my detaining him; the prosecutor not being there, the Lord Mayor remanded him till next day; the handkerchief was not produced then; the prosecutor afterwards delivered it to me - it is marked W. P. and has a paint mark.

MR. PHIPPS. I threw the handkerchief among my foul linen the day after this circumstance; and when desired to produce it, I found another of the same pattern, and cannot say which is the stolen one; but the one the prisoner delivered to me was what I had in my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. Several people passed before me; I picked the handkerchief off the ground; Mr. Tucker immediately hallowed out Stop thief! I was taken, and said I picked it up, and if the gentleman would describe it, I would return it; he said it was yellow, and I immediately gave it him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-57

1030. THOMAS BEEMAN was indicted for stealing on the 1st of August , eleven printed books, value 40 l. , the goods of Benjamin Bensley ; and JOHN CAHUAC was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to be stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be three thousand sheets of printed paper, instead of books.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. BENJAMIN BENSLEY . I am a printer , and live in Bolt-Court, Fleet-street. Beeman was nine weeks in my service, as warehouseman , up to the middle of August, when he was apprehended - he had access to all the works which were printed. I finished an octavo edition of Lingard's History of England in June last. Beeman collated it principally; to see that the sheets were placed correctly. In consequence of information, I examined my stock, but did not complete the examination, till the latter end of August, and found I was fifteen or twenty copies short; eight volumes to each copy. I was printing it for Mr. Mawman. Mr. Fellows was his foreman; I accompanied him to Cahuac's shop, Blackman-street, Borough, on the 5th of August; I went in alone; he was a stranger to me. I said to him,

"Do you sell Lingard's History of England?" he answered

"Yes;" I asked the price, saying I should want several, he said

"He had them, and I could have them, and the price was 3 l. a copy." A gentleman was in the shop; I came out, joined Fellows, and we went in together. Fellows began to speak about an account due to Mr. Mawnan, and then said,

"However, that is not what brought me here exactly, but something much more important. I understand you have been offering about Lingard's History of England, at a very reduced price, which seems the more extraordinary, as you were at Mr. Mawman's sale not a month ago, and refused to purchase any." Cahuac seemed very confused, and said

"Oh, I never had but two, I have only got two." I said

"How can that be, for just now you offered me several;" Fellows said

"You know you have offered a respectable bookseller six within the last day or two, and therefore you had better mind what you are at." Fellows had a good deal of conversation with him, and said,

"Mr. Cahuac, you have at any rate been guilty of a great indiscretion, to say the least, in buying a book, so as to be able to sell at such a price already; pray who did you buy them of?" he said he bought them of a man. I asked what man, and where; he then said he bought them behind a counter. I asked what he gave, he said 2 l. 10 s. a copy, and paid the money down on the counter. I asked frequently of whom he bought them, he said he knew neither the name nor address, nor was he quite certain he should know the person, but thought he should; that the first circumstance which led him to purchase them, was a man calling representing himself to be a messenger from the Bench, stating that he came in behalf of a prisoner there; we asked him to take us to that man, as we were near the Bench; he said

"Oh, I don't know that he is a messenger; only he said he was;" I said,

"Really you give us no information, I am very sorry for your own sake, that you cannot give a better account," and left the shop

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have known Cahuac some years - A. I never heard his name before. Fellows told him, if it had not been for the auctioneer he would not have trusted him. I understand

that to be the first time he attended the sale. It was on the 5th of August we went to him; at that time we were not certain that any copies were actually lost - he said he had the copies, but they were at the binder's, being boarded for him. We went again ten days after, and seized some sheets, as ours, but found no copy of Lingard's History of England, on his premises - he was committed to Horsemonger-lane. I printed 1015 or 1025 copies. I rely on the number from the nature of printing; when paper is given out by one hand, it is wetted by another - if there is any trickery, the whole office must be aware of it, if they print less; it depends on my servants whether they are stowed away properly. I hear that four hundred copies were sold at the sale; 3 l. was the lowest price, with a copy given in with twenty-four.

Q. When Cahuac was informed you were robbed, did he not go about with you, and give every assistance he could to detect the person who robbed you - A. When he was apprehended, going along, he was terribly frightened, and offered to go to the gaol to point the man out if he could see him. Beeman was apprehended previously. We went to the gaol, but were not allowed to see the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He mentioned no name - A. No. Beeman was not a prisoner in the Bench. I have three or four warehousemen; they all have access to the warehouse. I may have a hundred men; they have no business in the warehouse.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was it the duty of any other man to collate the work - A. Clapperton and him collated it; it is put by as soon as collated. On going to Cahuac a second time, we found part of the wrapper of a magazine - I told him it was impossible that could have come into his possession in a fair way; he said he had many such things. I could only deliver 998 copies of the work, some of which are not perfect. I assisted in taking stock - we were nearly a fortnight about it at intervals.

BENJAMIN FELLOWS . I am principal assistant to Mr. Mawman, of Ludgate-hill; he is proprietor of Lingard's History of England; a new edition, in octavo, was printed this year, and a trade dinner given, at which the booksellers fix the price of books; there are sale prices, lowest sale prices, trade and publishing prices - the reduced sale price fixed at the dinner was 3 l. to those who took less than twenty-four copies, and those who took twenty-four had a bonus of one copy, that is the lowest price it could possibly be obtained at by any one. Cahuac was at the dinner, and heard this agreement; it was declared publicly by Mr. Mawman; being an article of importance he called the attention of the meeting particularly to it; those who did not buy at the dinner were to pay 3 l. 4 s., to be delivered in sheets only, not stitched. The trade price would be 3 l. 8 s., the selling price, in boards, is 4 l. 16 s.; to a general customer; it was stated at the dinner, that after that day nobody could have them under 3 l. 8 s. Mr. Bensley afterwards delivered 405 copies to Mr. Mawman, or his order. The trade dinner was on the 23d of April, and the work published on the 24th of June. It has never declined in price. Mr. Dowding, the bookseller, sent us some information, in consequence of which I examined Mr. Mawman's stock; there was no deficiency, in consequence of which I sent to Mr. Bensley, and went with him to Cahuac's shop; he went in first, came out, and I went in with him. I had a demand of about 20 l. on him, and after applying for it, I said I had an unpleasant business to mention; that I was informed he had copies of Lingard to sell much below the price. I was certain they must have been stolen, and that probably he would say from whom he had got them, and I should be obliged by his informing me. He hesitated for a moment, and then said he had bought two copies from a person in his own shop. I said I was sorry to find he was endeavouring to mislead me, for I could produce a person to whom he had within a day or two offered six copies. He then admitted that he had bought six, but had had no more. I urged him to tell me the name or address of the person of whom he bought them. He said he did not know his name or address; he went on to say that he had had various dealings with this same person during the three or four former months. I said I thought it strange he should buy quire books of a stranger. He said his dealings with the person commenced in consequence of an application from a messenger or turnkey of the King's Bench. I requested him to walk over there with me, and point out the person. He hesitated for a few seconds, and said he could not tell whether the man was or not what he stated himself to be. I said I thought it strange, as he declined purchasing a single copy at the sale, that he should venture on purchasing six of a stranger (six copies would be forty-eight volumes, five hundred pages to a volume). He said he thought the price asked by Mr. Mawman, 3 l. too much, and therefore did not purchase at the sale; that he gave 2 l. 5 s. a copy for these. Nothing further passed; we left the shop. I found three copies that day at Mr. Renshaw's, in Fleet-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At the time he said the person who offered them was in the King's Bench, Beeman was not in custody? - A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The only copies you found were three of Redshaws? - A. Yes, Mr. Bensley had delivered four hundred and five; they, of course, had got into circulation. There had been no reduction in price.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. On 14th August, about eight o'clock, in consequence of information, I apprehended Beeman in Fleet-street; I asked him to feel in his pockets, as I apprehended he had something not his own. I asked him to feel in his fob, as that was the only pocket in which he did not feel. He said he had no fob. I put my fingers into his fob, and found something interrupted my getting them in. I asked him to undo his waistband. I found he had a fob, and said

"You have a fob." He said,

"Well, if I have, there is nothing in it." It was doubled up; I unfolded it, and took out of the fob two papers. He said they were two memorandums of his. I asked what memorandums; he said only two memorandums that he took some time ago - I asked how long ago; he said between two and three years. I took him back to his master's, and the same evening went with Pople to his lodging, No. 13, Thomas-street, Stamford-street, and found among other things, this paper (looking at it) on a rack on the mantle-shelf. He was taken to Guildhall next day, and then to Union Hall. I produced the three memorandums there, and on the 16th went to Cahuac's, and executed a search warrant there, but found no Lingard's History. I had been there nearly all day on the 15th, but he was not

at home. I observed two or three account books on his counter. He came home that evening, and next day they were gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Beeman had an opportunity to send to his lodgings before you went - A. I went as quick as I could.

JOHN DOWDING . I am a bookseller, and live in Newgate-street. About the 26th or 28th of July, Cahuac called on me, and offered six copies of octavo, of Lingard's History of England, at 2 l. 10 s. a copy; he had none of them with him. I bought none, but sent to Mr. Mawman in about four days to inform him.

JAMES COOPER . I am a bookseller, and live in Fisher's-alley, Water-lane, Fleet-street, (looking at the paper found at Beeman's lodgings) this is my writing. On the 18th of July, I bought of Cahuac, at his shop, or agreed to buy, six copies of Linguard's History of England, octavo, at 2 l. 10 s. a copy, five copies only were delivered during my absence. I found them at my shop when I came home one day. My brother sent them to be boarded. On the 1st of August, I exchanged three copies with Mr. Renshaw, for Cumming's Digest - the other two copies were returned by Mr. Agg, the binder, as imperfect - in consequence of which, I went to Cahuac with a list of the imperfections; on the 2nd of August I left it with him; I told him I had made three perfect copies out of the five, and there was a list of the imperfections of the other two copies - he said he would see to it, and have them made perfect. Mr. Fellows called on me on the 5th of August, and after that Cahuac called at my shop on the subject of the sixth copy. I told him I was positive it never had been delivered - he said, he thought it had. I sent for Agg, who told him he only received five. After that I went to Cahuac, and told him Fellows had called on me, and asked me how I became possessed of the work, and I had told him I had them of him - he said that was right. I saw no more of him till the 14th or 15th of August, when he called, and said,

"I will take those imperfect copies of Lingard out of your way;" and I accordingly delivered them to him in my shop, which is in the City.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you been in the trade long - A. From fourteen years of age. I never saw him bring a copy to my shop - I was unacquainted with the market price of the work - there are persons called middle men, who go about exchanging books in different ways; when I delivered him the two copies, he took them away; they were in sheets very imperfect.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was a copy of Lingard offered to you, except by Cahuac - A. Not the octavo; he applied to me about them by note.

GEORGE COOPER . I am brother to James Cooper , and assist in his shop - five copies of Lingard were brought to the shop in July, Cahuac himself brought one, and his son afterwards delivered four. I sent them to Agg to be boarded, and received this list of imperfections (looking at a paper produced) from him, and believe I gave it to Cahuac's son.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you at home when he brought them - A. Yes, they were brought by day-light wrapped in paper; there was no concealment.

- AGG. I live in Temple-street, and bound books for Cooper. I received five copies of Lingard from James Cooper ; they were quite imperfect. I completed two copies, and sent the imperfections to Cooper, and by taking from the imperfect works completed another (looks at a paper) this is the list I delivered to James Cooper ; they were returned to Cooper, none of them being boarded.

JOHN RENSHAW . I am a bookseller, and live in Fleet-street. My brother bought three copies of Lingard's History of England of Cooper. I afterwards delivered them to Clinton.

JOHN CLAPPERTON . I am warehouseman to Mr. Bensley - Beeman was under warehouseman. He and I collated this work. (looking at Agg's list of imperfections). I found this on the desk in my master's warehouse in July, and asked Beeman where it came from. He said,

"It is just left." I said,

"This won't do - this is a very pretty note, where is the return or waste sheets - it is usual to return spoiled sheets, and we send perfect ones for them." He made no reply that I recollect. Here is some writing at the back of the paper which I believe to be Beeman's; I have seen him write two or three times a day. I put the paper on a nail, kept for the purpose.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are still in Mr. Bensley's service - A. Yes; nobody but me and him, and the three boys, have business in the warehouse - it is distinct from the printing-office.

Q. If Beeman had the paper to make up deficiencies, could he not have kept it in his pocket, and made them up secretly - A. Yes, unless he was careless enough to leave it there. He did not object to my looking at it. I put it on the nail to answer whoever might call for it, that I should not give those sheets. I told Beeman it was a very irregular note - no application being made. I turned it over and said, I believed the writing on the back to be Beeman's; he might have moved it if he liked.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you assist in taking stock - A. I counted the copies, and gave Mr. Bensley the account. I made as many perfect books as I could, and looked over the waste sheets and ascertained the deficiency - whole volumes, and parts of volumes, were deficient. I gave the paper out to be printed - we should have a considerable quantity more than we had.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you take stock so as to satisfy your mind of the deficiency - A. Yes, the work should run twelve or fourteen sets over one thousand, but it was under one thousand; nobody ever called for the deficiency with my knowledge. It is my place to look out the binders' imperfections. They leave the lists and call next day; there is

"Mr. C" written on the paper. I cannot say whether it was there when I first saw it. I cannot form a judgment whose writing it is in. It struck me strange that any book should be delivered out so imperfect; there is in one case twelve sheets wanting together.

This list was here read - it was an account of various sheets wanted to complete the work, and stated to have been bought of Mr Morgan, by Anderson, Piccadilly.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am a bookseller, and live in Piccadilly - there is no other of my name there. I bought none of Lingard in July or August, nor ever sent to Mawman's or Bensley's any demands for deficiencies. I never saw this paper till to-day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know

Beeman - A. Perfectly well; he was frequently at my house with books, and for books formerly.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you have bought Lingard, what did you give for it - A. 3 l. 12 s. in boards. I bought it at Whittakers'; the price in sheets was 3 l. 8 s.

MR. HARMER. I am a solicitor. I was present when Beeman was examined at Union Hall, what he said was not written down. I am certain that the paper found at his lodging was produced. I asked if he chose to give any account of it; he said he had it from some of the binders; he could not tell the name.

The papers produced were here read. That found at Beeman's lodging, written by Cooper, and delivered by him to Cahuac, was an account of imperfections and deficiencies; those found in Beeman's fob were two duplicate lists of various works, among which were eleven copies of Lingard's History of England, at 25 s. each; the prices annexed to all: the total amount was 18 l. 0 s. 6 d., and 9 l. 10 s. deducted us received.

MR. BENSLEY. All the books mentioned in this list are printed by me. I never sold Beeman any of them, or allowed him to dispose of them.

ALFRED POPLE . I am an officer. I produce three sets of Lingard's History of England, which I got from Mr. Bensley.

JOHN CLINTON . I got those from Mr. Renshaw, and delivered them to Mr. Bensley.

BEEMAN'S Defence. It was impossible for me to take a copy off the premises at any time, for I never went out of the office alone; as to the note found at my lodgings. I took it home on Saturday, instead of putting it on the nail; as to the note found in the desk, I shewed it to Clapperton, and said, I had told the boy who brought it, that it was impossible he could have the sheets; he said he came from Anderson's, Piccadilly; I wrote that on the back. I never saw Cahuac, till I saw him at Union-hall.

Cahauc put in a long written defence, stating that he never saw Beeman till he was in custody, but bought the copies in the fair way of trade, and if he had been allowed bail, he could have traced the man from the King's Bench, where he had originally been.

BEEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

CAHUAC - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-58

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

1031. JOHN FARRIER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a coat, value 2 l. the goods of William Morgan .

JOHN ARCHER . I am servant to Mr. Morgan, of Stamford-hill . On the 1st of August, at half-past five o'clock, this coat was in the coach-house, on the carriage-box; the door was a little open; the prisoner came into the forecourt. I went to hang the harness up, and saw the door close. I opened the yard door and saw the prisoner coming from the coach-house door; he asked if I wanted to buy any shavings. I found the coat in his basket, under the shavings - he ran off. I followed and secured him without losing sight of him.

JOHN CAMPBELL . I am a constable. I was about fifty yards from Mr. Morgan's, and saw the prisoner walking towards me; the coachman came out and called to him to stop, he walked faster and then ran. Archer followed, and he dropped the basket. Archer hallooed out, Stop thief! I secured him and found the coat under the shavings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was never in my hands. I was passing the gate, when a man dropped the basket at my feet.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-59

1032. SAMUEL BOTHAM was indicted for stealing on the 14th of August , five 10 l. promissory notes , the property of William Shirley .

WILLIAM SHIRLEY . I live at Staines. On the 14th of August, I gave my boy three letters for Hall; one of them was directed to Mr. Jordan, Cane, Oxfordshire; it contained five 10 l. notes, it was never delivered - the other two have been delivered; they contained no money; I have one of them which was sent to my sister.

WILLIAM HALL . I am coachman of the Southampton coach. Shirley's boy gave me three letters, which I gave to Carthy, and saw him give them to the prisoner, who returned in two or three minutes - I asked if he put all three into the twopenny post - he said Yes, at the corner of Albemarle-street.

EDWARD CARTHY . I received three letters from Hall, and gave them to the prisoner.

JOHN HILL . I keep the Post-office, at the corner of Albemarle-street, (looking at the letter) this was never put into the office, or it would be marked.

GEORGE GORDON . I live at Cane, I received no letter from Shirley.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-60

1033. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , two saws, value 4 s.; a square, value 1 s.; and an ounce of tea, value 6 d., the goods of James Harris ; and a basket, value 1 s.; three saws, value 10 s.: a square, value 18 d.; a spoke shave, value 9 d.; a carpenter's plough, value 10 s., and a chisel, value 3 d. , the goods of Walter Tucker .

JAMES HARRIS . I am a carpenter , and live at Winchmore-hill. On the 2d of July, I lost my tools from Mrs. Leach's shop at Southgate .

RICHARD CLARKSON . I am an officer. At three o'clock in the afternoon, I found the prisoner in the chapel-yard, at Southgate, concealed behind a grave-stone; he said he was easing himself; an ounce of tea was found on him. I found two panes of glass taken out of the chapel vestry window; Finch found these tools in a basket, about fifteen yards from the prisoner.

WALTER TUCKER . I am a carpenter. I lost my tools from Leach's shop.

THOMAS LEACH . I am a carpenter. The prosecutors were in my employ, and left their tools in my shop; I found the lock of the outhouse door forced off by a piece of wood; they must get over the paling to get there - the chapel is two hundred yards off.

SAMUEL FINCH . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in the chapel-yard, and found the basket and all the tools, about fifteen yards from him - some glass was cut out of the chapel window, and the casement open; I traced his footsteps from the window to where I found him.

(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Nottingham, and had a friend at Southgate; I went to a public-house to inquire for him, and remained there two or three hours; on returning, I had occasion to go into the chapel-yard, but know nothing of the tools. I had nothing to break the door open with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-61

Before Mr. Justice Best.

1034. THOMAS PURSE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Nicholas Ready Ledwick , on the King's highway, on the 22d of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l.; a chain, value 6 d., and a key, value 1 d. , his property.

NICHOLAS READY LEDWICK . On Sunday, the 22d of July, I was coming from a friend's in Jermyn-street, about nine o'clock in the evening - the prisoner turned round upon me just at the corner of Castle-court, Chandos-street , slipped up my watch, and pulled it out by the chain - it was quite day-light. I called Stop thief! another laid hold of me, and said,

"What is the matter;" I said,

"I am robbed, and there is the man," and he ran away with three or four more of the gang. I am certain of the prisoner's person, from his hinder appearance. I did not see his face - he used no violence. I went to Bow-street immediately, and described his person, as near as I could, and saw him at Bow-street on Wednesday, and have no doubt of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. It was done so suddenly you could not see his face - A. Not to notice it. I speak to him from his make, shape, and clothes. If I had met him four days after, I should not have noticed him; but when he was shown to me I knew him. I really believe in my conscience that he is the man. He was taken from my description.

WILLIAM BOND . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrole. On Monday morning, I received information of this robbery, and took the prisoner from the description I received, on Tuesday afternoon, about five o'clock, in Chandos-street, and asked where he was on Sunday evening, about nine o'clock - he said in a house in St. Giles's.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked where I slept, I said in St. Giles's. Two men were brought against me, who had a full view of the person who robbed Mr. Ledwick - neither could swear to me, but said it was a taller man. At my first and second examination, the prosecutor would not undertake to say I was the person; but at last swore to me, as he was instructed by the officers.

WILLIAM BOND. Two men were brought up, who are not here; he said he slept in St. Giles's, and was in St. Giles's at nine o'clock. Mr. Ledwick never doubted about him. I took one Pearson also; but the prosecutor could not swear to him.

MR. LEDWICK. These two men were very loth to come, and gave me a false name. I swore to him at first, and had no doubt at all of him.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, from the person only .

Transported for Life .

See page 395.

Reference Number: t18230910-62

1035. SAMUEL JOHN CHALFONT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , at St. Luke, a gelding, price 12 l. , the property of George Gotts .

GEORGE GOTTS . I keep the White Horse, livery stables, City-road . On the 22d of August, the prisoner hired a gelding of me, to go to Bromley, in Kent, and was to return next morning by eleven o'clock; he took it away, and never brought it back. On the 2d of September, I saw it in possession of Robinson's servant, who was exercising it in the City-road, and am sure it is mine - it is worth 12 l.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you shew him more than one horse - A. No. There was no conversation about selling it if he liked it - he asked the price of a small mare; I said I did not want to sell her. He was to pay 15 s. for the hire of it, and said he should return by eleven o'clock. I had a letter from him on Sunday, saying the weather was so bad he could not bring his wife home, and he should be back that evening or Monday morning; I have lost the letter - it was dated Bromley, Kent. I received no further communication from him.

THOMAS DAWS . I am foreman at Mr. Osborne's commission stables. On Friday, the 22d of August, the prisoner brought this gelding to be sold, and entered it in his own name. It was sold to Mr. Robinson, a coachmaster, for 12 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Robinson yourself - A. Yes; it was a very wet day when he brought it. He first called about five o'clock, to say he had a horse for sale, and wanted Mr. Osborne to advance 5 l. on account; that he had money to pay, and wished to sell the horse. I said I could not advance unless I saw the horse then, he fetched it - he said nothing of a man stopping him for money.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 47.

Reference Number: t18230910-63

1036. GEORGE AMBROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , at Heston, one watch, value 2 l.; one pair of shoes, value 8 s.; one jacket, value 27 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one round frock, value 3 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s., and a shirt, value 18 d., the goods of Charles Curtis , in the dwelling-house of John Woodward .

CHARLES CURTIS . I am hostler at the Coach and Horses, Hounslow , kept by John Woodward . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the house for the last twelve months. On the 3d of July, at ten o'clock in the morning, I missed the articles stated in the indictment from the hay-loft over the stable, it joins the dwelling-house, and belongs to it. The prisoner was in the house, and about the place at four o'clock in the morning; they were safe at twelve the day before, in my box which I found broken open. My watch. breeches, and jacket, were produced before the Magistrate - the value of all my property is 6 l.

WILLIAM PETERSON . I am a constable of Farnham. On the morning of the 6th of July, I apprehended the prisoner in the forest, near Farnham, and found a round frock, a shirt, a silk and a cotton handkerchief, and a pair of stockings on him. I told him, I apprehended him for a robbery he had committed at Hounslow, and began to search him for a watch; he said voluntarily, that Curtis had got his watch and other things again; that two persons pursued him from Chertsey, and overlook him, and promised, if he gave up the property, he might go about his business. I asked if either of them was a constable, he said he believed so, and that they were employed by Curtis.

WILLIAM MOORE . I have the watch, jacket, breeches, and shoes. I got them from the landlord of the Otter, inn, at Chertsey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS CURTIS . The prosecutor is my son. About half-past two o'clock in the morning, I found the loft window open, and called to the prisoner to know if he opened it; he said

"Yes," I told him to go and shut it, which he did. I went into the house again, and when I came out, I found it open again, and he was gone, and about ten o'clock my son missed his property.

BENJAMIN THORN . The prisoner delivered the watch to me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18230910-64

1037. JOHN GLASS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of George Doggett , about three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 5th of July , and stealing two gowns, value 13 s.; two books, value 7 s.; and two dresses, value 30 s.; nine pair of stockings, value 18 s., and four shifts, value 20 s. the goods of Eleanor Doggett .

ELEANOR DOGGETT . I lodged with my father in Phoenix-street, Bloomsbury ; the landlord did not sleep in the house. In November, 1822, about three o'clock, I went out, leaving nobody in the house. I returned at four, and found the outer-door, which I had fastened, broken off its hinges and forced in. I could not get in - I went to the window and found the sash half up; I got in and missed a band-box, which I had left in the window, it contained this property, except a gown and shift, which were taken from another box. I found a gown in pawn, in the middle of June last - we lost 5 l. worth of property. The prisoner told us, he was a messenger to the Mendicity Society, and used to visit us, and was at the house five days before the robbery, but never came after.

ANN DOGGETT . I am the prosecutrix's mother. When I came home all her property was gone. I went to St. Giles's for relief, and found the prisoner there; he ran away on seeing me. I caught him, and said,

"Don't you know me." He said,

"Yes, I do, Mrs. Doggett - how is your family?" I said,

"They are getting better, why do not you call to see us, as you used?" He said he had been in Kent ever since." I said,

"Why did you rob me?" He said, he did not. I told him a neighbour saw him come out of the window; he said it was not him, but a country-woman that robbed me.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am a beadle. I found a duplicate in the prisoner's pocket, which I produced to a pawnbroker at Paddington, and he gave up a gown (as the prosecutrix redeemed it), and kept the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-65

1038. MARY KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Dorkins , on the 9th of August , at Christ Church, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, twelve sovereigns and twelve shillings , his property.

SAMUEL DORKINS . I live at Cheshunt, Hertfordshire. On Saturday, the 9th of August, I was in Brick-lane, Whitechapel ; I went into a house with a woman, (not the prisoner;) and when I got in, another woman came into the room. I tried to get out, but the prisoner pushed me in, and said,

"You shall give me some gin, or pay me for being here." I said,

"No, I shall not give you gin, nor yet pay you." She said,

"D - n your eyes, I will have some." One of the women held the door, while the prisoner and another woman took my money from my pocket by force; they took altogether twelve sovereigns and twelve shillings; one caught hold of me by the side and tore my pocket, and the prisoner took the money out of my side pocket. I was holding the door all the while, trying to get out, being alarmed; they let me out directly they robbed me. I noticed the house so as to know it again. I went before the Magistrate immediately it happened, and went to the house with an officer, but could not find her. I saw her in Whitechapel on the Thursday afternoon, and shewed her to the officer, who took her. I am positive she is the woman - I never saw her before; they tore my breeches on getting the money; they could not get it without.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What are you - A. I buy hay on my own account, and sell it again. I have worked for Mr. Owen, of Cheshunt, for five years. I went to this house about four o'clock in the afternoon, and was quite sober, and only had a pot of beer since breakfast. I was not there ten minutes, before I tried to get out; the passage door was shut, but it was not dark. I was robbed close by the door; the prisoner came to the door when I was trying to get out, the other two held the door till she came in; as I was pulling to get out, she put her hands into my breeches pocket and took the money. I charged nobody but her with it. When I saw her, she stood tossing up for oysters; I did not speak to her, but fetched the officer; there was light in the passage; one Sweden had paid me the money.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. Dorkins pointed the prisoner out to me. I said,

"It is you, is it, who has robbed this countryman?" She said,

"Oh! he don't want me, I had none of his money - I am quite innocent of it." I told her she knew all about it. She said she had none of the money, but knew who they were. I said,

"Who are they?" - she said, she knew, but she had none of the money, and did not know where they were then.

The prisoner made no defence.

JOSEPH STEEL . I am a turner, and live in Motley-court, Chapel-street, Holywell Mount. I was directed to go to this house to see if it was a light passage. I went there in the middle of the day, and when the door was shut, it was so dark I could scarcely see my hand - it is a winding

stair-case, and there is no light. I could not know any person whatever out of the place.

COURT. Q. What do you know of this woman, how came you to go there - A. I was desired to go by her mother and father. I saw no window on the stair-case, I did not go on the stair-case - I could see no window any where as I stood - I found the door ajar I believe, and opened it, and was directed to take a view of it on behalf of the prisoner. I shut the door, and saw that it was so dark it was impossible to see a face - I saw nobody there. I recollect now that a woman came from above.

Q. Who took you there - A. The mother pointed out the house to me.

Q. Do you know whether this young woman lives there - A. I cannot take on myself to swear.

WILLIAM HALL re-examined. I went into the passage, but do not recollect whether there was a window in the side - there is an open slip where the people live - it is light enough with the door shut to see a person's face.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You would call it a dark passage - A. It would be totally dark, except for this slip which is near the street-door, and communicates with the room below, which has a regular side sash - if I met a person there, I should know him again, there may be a sliding shutter to this slip.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230910-66

1039. ALEXANDER LOGIE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December, four gowns, value 5 l.; a gown-body, value 10 s.; a scarf, value 12 s.; a spencer, value 12 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; a brooch, value 1 l.; two necklaces, value 19 s.; two thimbles, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 4 s., nine sovereigns and eighteen shillings, the property of Elizabeth Brown , in the dwelling-house of John Hill .

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am chamber-maid at the Ship Tavern, Charing-cross , kept by John Hill. On the 31st of December, 1821 , the prisoner and George Hipkins slept there together in a bed facing my room. I did not see them next morning. I lost the key of my box, and did not open it for two or three days, and then missed this property, and have recovered none of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Any stranger can have a bed at the Ship - A. Yes.

WALTER CAMPBELL . I am a shoemaker. On the 31st of December, 1821, I went to the prisoner's house to fetch Hipkins - he told me he was not at his house, but he knew where he was, and went to find him, returned and told me he would take me to him in the evening - and just before we were going to start, the officer came and apprehended the prisoner - he directed his wife where to find Hipkins - she took me to a public-house, where I found him, and took him into the country to work for me.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner, he said he had slept at the Ship with Hipkins - none of the property was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-67

1040. WILLIAM CLARENBOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , at St. Pancras (being servant to Thomas Jones ), in the dwelling-house of John Blake , one coat, value 15 s.; one waistcoat, value 5 s.; one pair of breeches, value 8 s., and one pair of pantaloons, value 10 s., the goods of Edward Sharp ; one hat, value 12 s.; two shirts, value 6 s.; one pair of boots, value 5 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of the said Thomas Jones , his master .

THOMAS JONES . I am a milkman , and lodge at John Blake 's, Constitution-hill, Gray's Inn Road, in the parish of St. Pancras , the prisoner was my servant - he carried out milk, and boarded with me. On the 25th of June, me and Sharp slept together, and on awaking in the morning the prisoner was gone, and Sharp missed his trowsers. I opened my drawers, and missed my shirt, stockings, hat, and boots, and have not recovered them - he was taken a month afterwards, and next day his brother brought me the duplicates of the clothes, with 18 s. to redeem them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was one Wells in the habit of calling at your house - A. Yes; I had been out the night before, and came home at ten o'clock, and had the hat and boots on then - the prisoner never came back to work. The value of all the property lost is 3 l. 5 s.

EDWARD SHARP . I am in Jones's service, and sleep in the same room. I awoke on the 25th of June, and missed the prisoner - my trowsers were gone, and a suit of blue clothes from my box, which I found at Hatton-garden. I did not see him again till he was taken.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a wheelwright. On the 22d of July, I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings, on St. Andrew's-hill, for stealing Jones's clothes - he said, he was very sorry for it, and that Jones would have every thing made good.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he hoped he would get his clothes back, being sorry for his loss - A. He might say that.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I searched him, but found nothing. I said,

"What have you been at now; you have been a long while out of the way, with this property of Jones's?" he said, Yes, he was sorry for what he had done, but it would all be made good. I asked what he had done with the property - he said the suit of clothes were pawned at Drew's, at Islington - and the hat he sold to a Jew for 4 s.; Jones gave me the duplicate. I took it to the pawnbrokers and found the clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he did not say what had become of it, instead of what he had done with it - A. No.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am servant to William Drew , of Islington. These clothes were pawned at our house. I did not take them in, the duplicate produced belongs to them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18230910-68

1041. ANN KIRWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , two pair of breeches, value 50 s., and two shirts, value 30 s., the goods of Richard Keene , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD KEENE . I live in William-street, St. George in the East . The prisoner chared at my house from February till August. On the 31st of August, I missed these

things - she had been there on the 29th. I had given her four shirts to take to Hall to wash.

CHARLES PURRETT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of August, the prisoner pawned a shirt for 6 s.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . On the 20th of June, she pawned a pair of breeches with me for 8 s.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of August, the prisoner pawned a hat for 6 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. I received her in charge, and found duplicates of this property in her bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the shirts to wash; he did not pay my wages, so I pawned them; as to the breeches, I pawned them by his wife's desire, as she could not get money from him.

RICHARD KEENE . My wife was never under the necessity of pawning.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-69

1042. SUSAN COURTNEY , alias ELIZABETH JONES , was indicted for that she, on the 22d of August last, at St Martin in the Fields , feloniously was at large without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the term, for which she was ordered to be transported, at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, the 16th of April, in the 57th year of the reign of his late Majesty, against the statute .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am one of the conductors of the Bow-street night patrol. I produce a certificate which I got from Mr. Shelton's office, of the prisoner's conviction and sentence of fourteen years transportation, on the 16th of April, 1817. I saw Mr. Shelton sign it - I apprehended the prisoner in Cockspur-street, in the parish of St. Martin, on the 22d of August last.

(Certificate read.)

SAMUEL DAVIS . I was turnkey of Newgate, in 1817, and attended at the bar in the April Sessions of that year, when the prisoner pleaded guilty to knowingly having a forged note in her possession, and was present when she received sentence - I am certain of her person, she went by the name of Susan Courtney . I am now turnkey of the King's Bench.

JOHN UPSON . I was present with Nicholls on the 22d of August; when the prisoner was taken, she gave us the name of Elizabeth Jones .

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18230910-70

1043. HENRY COCKERILL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , at St. Andrew, Holborn, a gold watch, value 7 l.; five gold seals, value 4 l.; two gold slides, value 5 s.; eight mourning rings, value 1 l., and three leather cases for rings, value 4 s., the goods of William Henry Booth , Esq. in his dwelling-house , situate in Lincoln's-inn; and SARAH MOORE was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 11th of August , the said gold watch, seal, and a mourning ring, part of the said goods, well knowing them to be stolen ; and JAMES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously receiving, harbouring, maintaining, comforting, and abetting the said Henry Cockerill , well knowing him to have committed the felony aforesaid .

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HENRY BOOTH , Esq. I am a barrister , and have chambers, at No. 6, Old-square, Lincoln's-inn ; I reside and sleep there; it is in Middlesex and extra parochial. On the 7th of August I left my chambers, to go into the country; and the day before I deposited in a cupboard under the window, a gold watch, with a gold seal fastened to it by a ring. I had deposited other property in a cupboard under the book-case some time before, but might not have seen it for three weeks before I left town - both cupboards were locked when I left town, and the key of that under the book-case was put in where the gold watch was. I took the key of that cupboard with me; I returned late on the evening of the 11th of August, and on the 13th or 14th, I missed the gold watch, seals, and key, and having heard of the prisoner's apprehension, I examined the other cupboard on the 16th, and missed several mourning rings and a gold musical seal. I do not recollect whether one of the rings had the name of Judd on it, as they came into my possession as executor; the watch was worth 7 l. I have known Cockerill several years, he is related to my clerk, and had leave to come to my chambers whenever he pleased. I have a private door which shuts my chambers in from any other, there is one common stair case.

JOSEPH CRAM . I am servant to Mr. Booth. He went out of town on a Thursday, and on Saturday, between seven and eight o'clock, Cockerill came to chambers, and said he wanted to write a note; he took a candle and went into master's room, where these cupboards are - I did not go in with him, he stayed there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour and then left; he came again on Sunday, but was only in the office, and I was with him all the time; he came again on Monday; I asked him to wait in the office till I came to him, to shew me the way into the City; I went away to dress myself, returned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and he was gone; I had told him master was coming to town that evening; he could have gone into master's room if he liked.

JAMES BUNCE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Ship-yard, Temple-bar. Cockerill brought a desk and box to my house, and desired me to take care of them. This was about a fortnight before I carried them over Blackfriars-bridge. He came to them several times. Thomas generally came with him. Thomas once came alone, and unlocked the desk, and locked it again, but what he did with it I cannot say. The prisoner Moore has often come to my house with Cockerill. I believe she was there on the Sunday before I carried the things. I know she was there on the Friday or Saturday before. Moore brought me a note from Cockerill, which I have destroyed, and, in consequence of that note, I took the box and desk over Blackfriars-bridge. Moore, and another young woman, went with me. I delivered them to Cockerill at the foot of the bridge, and received 1 s. for my trouble. This was on a Tuesday, I believe.

ABRAHAM SHUTE . I am shopman to Mrs. Morritt, pawnbroker. On the 11th of August, Cockerill pawned a seal, key, and slide, in the name of John Cockerill . I am certain of him; he looked very respectable at the time.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am shopman to James Turner . On the 11th of August Cockerill pawned a gold seal and slide, in the name of John Cockerill , Temple.

WILLIAM BURKINSHAW . I am shopman to Mr. M'Dowell, pawnbroker. On the 12th of August, the prisoner, Moore, pawned a gold watch at my shop; she said she brought it from her aunt, Sarah Moore .

JOSEPH RICHMAND FOLKARD . I am a pawnbroker. On the 12th of August, Moore pawned a gold musical seal, in a case, for 1 l., in the name of Ann Moore ; it is worth 30 s.; she said it was her aunt's.

GEORGE FROST . I am shopman to Mr. Hawkins, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. On the 11th of August, Moore pawned a mourning ring in the name of Judd, whose name is on it.

MR. BOOTH. The first seal produced has my arms on it; the other is mine, and was appended to the watch, which is worth 7 l., and the appendages, 4 l. I believe the musical seal to be mine, and that the rings were in my possession.

JOHN JUTSHAM . I am patrol of Christ Church parish. I saw Cockerill, Thomas, Moore, and another woman, at a liquor-shop over Blackfriars-bridge; they attracted my attention. I left the house, and saw them again in a quarter of an hour; it was then half-past four o'clock. Thomas was not with them then. They passed down by the side of the church, and by the watch-house. I took them; searched a box which Cockerill had on his back, and found four keys in it, one of which opens the writing-desk; they had no desk then. They appeared to be looking for somebody. I saw Thomas again at half-past ten o'clock at night, fifty or sixty yards from the watch-house, where the others were in custody, and took him. He was standing in the street with another man, whom I also took.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a butcher. On Tuesday, the 12th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, Thomas came to my shop, with another person. I was fetched to my shop; found them there, and took him into custody. He did not ask for anything in my presence; but I found a desk in the shop, which I produce. I had seen the whole party at the liquor-shop before; they had nothing then.

JAMES BUNCE . This is the desk I carried. I have seen Thomas open it. He was not with me when I took it over the water.

JOHN JUTSHAM . One of the keys found on Cockerill opens this desk, and in it is a crow-bar, and in a pocketbook in it are three duplicates of the property produced.

COCKERILL'S Defence. All I have to say is, that the young woman is innocent.

MOORE put in a written defence, stating that Cockerill gave her the property to pawn in her own name, and said it belonged to him.

COCKERILL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

THOMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-71

1044. JOHN BROWN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Smith , about the hour of four in the afternoon, of the 7th of August at St. John, at Hackney (no person being therein) and stealing therein two coats, value 27 s.; three sheets, value 12 s.; a gown, value 6 s.; a pair of breeches, value 7 s.; a shawl, value 3 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 5 s. , his property.

JOHN SMITH . I live at Hackney-wick, in the parish of St. John . On the 7th of August, at two o'clock in the afternoon, I went out, leaving nobody in the house - I fastened the doors and windows, and about half-past four o'clock, I was at work opposite, and heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner secured. I went up, and he was given to me. I was taking him to the watch-house, and on looking at his feet, I saw he had a pair of my shoes on, and asked if he had any of his own - he said, Yes, he had left them under the foot of my bed; where I found them. I found the window open, and the screw taken out, which I had put in before I left. I missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JAMES SIMCO . I live next door to Smith. On the 7th of August, I saw the prisoner put a bundle out of the window, and then come out himself, and get over the rails. I gave an alarm, and he was stopped without my losing sight of him. I saw him drop the property; it was given to Smith.

JOHN GARVA . I am an officer. Smith gave me the property.

JOHN SMITH . Here is a coat, gown, and shawl, which are mine.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18230910-72

1045. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, a mare, price 3 l. , the property of Thomas Heryatt .

THOMAS HERYATT . I live in Collingwood-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 20th of August, I lost a mare from a field at Lambeth - I had put it there that morning, and in the evening it was gone; I found it on the 29th, at Smithfield, in possession of Bartlett, who returned it to me. I am certain it is mine.

JAMES BARTLETT . I am a dustman. I bought the mare of Johnson, for three guineas, on the 22d of August.

HUMPHREY JOHNSON . I live at Pimlico. On the 20th of August, I bought the mare of the prisoner, for 45 s., in Duck-lane, and sold it to Bartlett - he said he brought it from Kingston, and gave me a receipt for the money, which I produce; (read.)

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 3d of September, I apprehended the prisoner in Pye-street, Westminster, and asked where he got the mare he sold to Buckthorpe's friend, (meaning Johnson) - he said he bought her at Wandsworth-fair, of a man named Johnson; that he had no receipt for it, and did not know where to find him.

Prisoner. Q. I told you I bought it at Romford-market - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought her at Romford-market for 2 l.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18230910-73

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

1046. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , five sovereigns, four shillings, and a sixpence, the monies of James Mills , and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

MR. HENRY MILLS . I am son of James Mills - my brother and myself are in partnership with him; we are wine and spirit-merchants ; the prisoner was in our service

I gave him five sovereigns and ten shillings to pay dock charges, for two pipes of wine, on the 18th of July, about eight o'clock in the morning - they would not amount to so much. He never returned, but was brought to us at ten o'clock at night, intoxicated.

Prisoner. Q. When I first came to your counting-house, was it not for the express purpose of your procuring me a situation - A. It was; he was to be with us till then - we never had any regular agreement with him - we paid him at the rate of 3 s. a day for seven weeks. There might be 3 s. due to him at the time he received this money.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS MILLS . I am son of Mr. Mills; my brother gave the prisoner five sovereigns and some silver. I saw him next morning; he told me he had shipped the wines and paid the charges, and was coming to bring the change directly; this was about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I called at his lodgings again, about half-past nine - he was not at home. I did not see him again till the 11th of August, when he was taken - this money was never brought to account.

ANN SEAL . I keep a public-house in the Minories; the prisoner came to our house on the evening of the 18th of July, and called for half a pint of beer; he set down looking over some papers, and said he had to go to the City Canal early in the morning, and did not know whether he had not better go that night - he stopped about an hour, and then said he should like to leave his money with me, and call for it in the morning; he gave me four sovereigns wrapped in paper, but after that requested to have one back, and asked my husband to go a little way with him, as he was rather intoxicated; he said he belonged to Mr. Mills, and my husband took him there. He came back next morning, and had his money, and slept at our house, that and the next night.

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended him, and told him I was desired, by Mr. Mills, to take him into custody; he burst into tears and said, he was extremely sorry for acting as he had, and begged I would allow him an interview with Mr. Mills. I took him there, but they would not hear him.

GEORGE AUGUSTUS MILLS re-examined. I spoke to him next morning, about withdrawing the money; he told me he had paid only 5 s. 6 d. charges, and was going to bring the change directly.

The prisoner in a long defence stated, that on returning from the Docks, he drank more wine than he should, it being a rainy day - and had tasted the wine he went to clear, which was very powerful; he found himself next morning at his lodgings, and missed most of his money - but recollected leaving it with Mr. Seal; there was still a deficiency which he could not make up, in consequence of which he did not return.

MR. MILLS re-examined. When we clear goods at the docks it is uncertain what the charges are; I thought there might be some deposit to make in order to clear the wine, which was my reason for giving him so much; he did the business we sent him to do.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-74

1047. THOMAS CUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , a hat, value 2 s., the goods of Alexander Rushton , from his person .

ALEXANDER RUSHTON . I am a tailor , and live in Wilmot's-buildings, Borough. On the 2d of July, about half-past two o'clock in the night, I was returning from a trade-club. I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated; and near the Holborn-end of Fleet-market , a man struck me on the head and knocked me down; my hat was on then - it was momentary; but as soon as I got up, I saw him running off with my hat. I called Stop thief! and pursued him. The prisoner was taken by the watchman. I have every reason to believe he is the man. I was much agitated, but when I gave him in charge in the watch-house he denied it; I got up immediately and took my hat off his head; he had his own concealed in his apron, and dropped it in the watch-house from between his legs. I believe I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not use violent language, and strike me a blow in the face before it happened - A. No, it is false; I did not strike him when he was in custody, to my knowledge; if I did, it must be at the watch-house; the hat was in a piece of canvass round his body - I call it an apron.

THOMAS FLEMMING . I am a watchman. On the 2d of July, about half-past two o'clock, I heard a cry of watch. I came into Bear-alley, and saw the prosecutor standing in a confused state, without a hat, and blood running down from his temple; it appeared a serious blow. I saw the prisoner about twelve yards before me, going up Bear-alley, walking deliberately away. I pursued and laid hold of him, as Rushton said he had been knocked down and robbed of his hat; I took him to the watch-house, Rushton followed and looked at him in the watch-house, and said,

"Why, you have got my hat on your head," and took it off - the prisoner made no answer, and appeared confused; he sat down and unravelled an apron which was round his waist; his own hat was concealed in it; it dropped on the floor; he took it up and put it on, and said,

"Here is my hat." When I heard the alarm nobody but him was in sight; he did not appear drunk; the prosecutor appeared confused, and said the blow had stunned him so he was insensible; he did not appear to me to be in liquor; he did not strike the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Was you the person who took me - A. Yes, I called to another watchman, but he never touched you - he had two black eyes when I took him - they appeared to have been done a day or more. He said nothing of anybody striking him.

WILLIAM SAGE . I am constable of the night, and was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in - Rushton claimed the hat on his head; it was handed to me, and he described it by a piece of cloth being sown behind, and the seam was leather - the prisoner said he did not know how it came on his head, and as he came towards me, his own hat fell from his apron - he was quite sober - Rushton had been drinking, but was not insensible - he bled from his temple, which was cut.

(Hat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Is it possible I could convey a hat into my apron without their seeing me. I was going home; the prosecutor was dreadfully intoxicated, grossly insulted me, and struck me several times, and being a little in liquor myself, I struck him again; and, during the struggle, we made an exchange of hats - he gave me in

charge for robbing him of his hat, and my own was found on the watch-house floor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life

Reference Number: t18230910-75

1048. JOSEPH MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , eight yards of cotton, value 7 s. , the goods of Edward Aldridge .

STEPHEN BRIDGES . I am shopman to Edward Aldridge , linen-draper , Minories . On the 20th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, the servant was in the area, and gave an alarm. I went out and saw the prisoner one hundred yards off running with this printed cotton, which hung on an iron over the threshold of the door two minutes before - I overtook him, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work, and walking in the Minories; saw a man take a piece of cotton down to show a young woman; this piece fell off, and I picked it up.

GUILTY. Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-76

1049. JAMES COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Edward Brown , from his person .

THOMAS WITHEY . I am a constable. On the 3d of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming along Hatton-garden, and saw the prisoner running furiously along, followed by Mr. Brown, and some other gentleman - before I could get up, the gentleman had caught him, and was bringing him back. I took him to the watch-house, Mr. Brown delivered the handkerchief to me.

MR. EDWARD BROWN . I belong to a public office, and live in Hunter-street, Brunswick-square. On the 3d of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Holborn towards home; and near Hatton-garden , I felt a slight touch at my back, turned round and saw a man (not the prisoner) who I suspected; I felt in my coat pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I then observed the prisoner running down Holborn-hill. I followed him; he turned into Ely-place, and when he entered a passage leading into Hatton-garden, I had got very close to him, and he dropped my handkerchief. I picked it up, continued the pursuit, and finding he gained ground, I called out - a gentleman followed - he turned round Charles-street, and in a gateway there was taken. I only lost sight of him as he turned the corners, and have no doubt of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to be passing the corner of Bleeding Heart-yard, when a gentleman said he wanted me, and detained me till the prosecutor came up - and at the office he said he could not swear to my picking his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-77

1050. JAMES BRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , half a bushel of oysters, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Christopher Fairbrother .

ELIZA FAIRBROTHER . I am wife of Christopher Fairbrother , and sell oysters at the corner of Wild-court, Wild-street. On the 8th of August, I employed the prisoner to carry half a bushel of oysters for me. I was going with him - I had known him for months. I crossed the road in Darkhouse-lane , to avoid the carts, and thought he was close behind me - but, on looking round, he was gone - he knew where I lived, for he told me so. I waited at home an hour; he did not come, but was taken in about three hours at Billingsgate. I said

"Young man you have not carried my oysters home;" he used a dreadful expression, and said he had not carried an oyster that day - another man came and abused me also. I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. Q. When you came to Billingsgate, you were very much intoxicated - A. I was not, I accused nobody but him of it.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a constable. The prosecutrix accused the prisoner of robbing her, and was positive to him - she was quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them; the man said if I produced the money for them, he would let me go.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-78

1051. JOHN EAGAN was indicted for assaulting John Ackroyd , on the 25th of August , and demanding his money, with intent to steal the same .

JOHN ACKROYD . I am a straw-hat-maker , and live at No. 2, Redcross-square, Cripplegate. On the 25th of August, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Dock-head, and was returning about eight, and was not at all in liquor. I turned down Wood-street five or six yards; the prisoner drew up to me from Cheapside; he had an apron on, like a working man, and said,

"Pray, Sir, will you have the kindness to tell me my nearest way to Sadler's Wells?" I said,

"Sir, I think you cannot go nearer than down Wood-street, and when you get to the bottom, turn up White or Redcross-street, that will take you to Old-street, then turn to the left, which will take you to Old-street-road, and you will be in a straight direction for Sadler's Wells." I walked on the pavement, and he continued in the road, where he was when he first spoke to me. He said,

"I am a perfect stranger in London, and have only been here a few days; and am a carpenter, and have been at work in the Commercial-road, and, to tell you the truth, I am so exceedingly exhausted with the heat of the evening, and fatigue of my day's work, that I am ready to faint." I said,

"Sir, I think you are an Irishman, by your accent; I have met with great hospitality in that country; I am known to the landlord of this public-house (the Woolpack, in Hart-street) close by, if you think proper to go in I will give you a little refreshment;" we went in, and the landlord said,

"Mr. Ackroyd, step into the parlour" - the tap-room is exactly at the entrance, and the door wide open; I said,

"Thank you, I'll step in here for a few minutes, we are not going to stop long." I ordered a pint of beer, sipped it, and gave it him to drink; and when it was gone, I said,

"Will you have any more?" he said,

"No, I am thankful for this." I got up and went out; he followed me, and as I left the door, he said,

"Sir, I think there is a person stands there, who is a very suspicious character." I said,

"Oh dear, it's

nobody who knows any thing of you or me; it is somebody who is going to take some beer, I suppose." I walked on and he behind me, till we came to Cripplegate-buildings.

"Now Sir," said he,

"I am as much at a loss which way to go, as when I first met you." I pointed over to Lower Whitecross-street, and said,

"Go right forward in that direction, and when you get to the top turn to the left, that is Old-street, and will lead you to Goswell-street-road." I had myself to go to Mr. Arnold's, a chymist, in Aldersgate-street, who I do business with; so my nearest way was to turn out of Whitecross-street, about a hundred yards, as far as the Grapes public-house, which I did, and then had to turn to the left; he was to go straight on; so I wished him good night, and he did the same, and left me ten or fifteen yards; then turned round quick and called after me, saying,

"Oh Sir, it strikes me at this moment, if you will tell me where Barbican is, I shall know where I am, and which way to go;" I said,

"Barbican, is within a few yards of where I am going; he joined me following me behind, at a short distance, and on crossing Redcross-street, he got a few yards before me - and we proceeded thirty or forty yards up Paul's-alley, he being a few yards before me; and when I passed the corner of the court, I said, I thought it was later than I expected as Mr. Reeves's, the pawnbroker's shop was closed.

"Now," said I

"if you take the first turning to the right, it will take you into Barbican, and then you will know where you are;" the words had scarcely escaped my lips, when he turned round as quick as lightning, and struck me a dreadful blow in the eye; I never had a morsel of rest for six or seven nights, the pain was so excruciating; he said,

"D - n your eyes your blunt or your life immediately." I collared him, and said

"You ungrateful scoundrel, sooner than I would give you a shilling, I would sacrifice my life on the spot;" I dragged him back towards Redcross-street; he cried out

"For God's sake, for Christ's sake, let me go, leave me alone;" but I was determined to have him punished. I held him at arms length, and he displayed all the energy and power imaginable, striking me whenever he could, in all parts of my body; I got him to the end of the court, called out Watch, and called for assistance, and in the course of a few minutes, I was surrounded by a number of friends, who I knew; the watchman came up and did not know the cause of the tumult. I had fast hold of him, he wished to get loose; he struck my heels; I fell with my head on the stones, but I never quitted my hold; he kept calling out,

"For God's sake let me go, you will strangle me." The watchman then interfered, but seeing he was a feeble man, I kept hold of him; he said,

"D - n your eyes, I am in the hands of the watchman, let me go;" but I would not till we got him to the watch-house. I then gave charge of him, for demanding my blunt or my life.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you come from - A. Bradford, in Yorkshire. I have lived in town since 1811 or 1812. I rent a first floor, and am married - we were about half an hour together. I have mentioned all the conversation which passed. Paul's-alley, is one side of Hall's brewery; the other side is a dead wall. I have lodged where I do now, since Good-Friday. I lived in Jewin-street before that; I once sold some goods on commission for Mr. Brown, of Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell; we parted because he could not supply goods. I took the benefit of the Insolvent Act in 1812 or 1813. I was never in prison but at that time. I did not owe 200 l.

JOSEPH SCARSE . I am a watchman, of Moor-lane. As I came down Red Cross-street, at a quarter to ten o'clock, I heard a cry of Watch; I crossed over to Paul's-alley, and at the end of the alley saw the prisoner and prosecutor scuffling. He gave charge of the prisoner. I took hold of him. He made no particular charge then, but said he had insulted him, or something to that purpose. He said nothing then to lead me to suppose he intended to rob him. We pulled him along, and in Red Cross-street he hustled with us, then turned round and tripped the prosecutor up. We all three fell together; I pulled him up, and the prosecutor kept hold of him by the neck. He said,

"Let me go, d - n you, I am in the hands of the watchman." He turned himself about, and hit the prosecutor over the face. The prosecutor kept hold of him till he got to the watch-house.

Q. While you and the prosecutor had hold of him, did you hear from the prosecutor any charge against him of attempting to rob him - A. No; blunt means money; I did not hear him say that the prisoner demanded blunt; but, as we went along, he said, I suppose you wanted to diddle me if you could. I heard nothing about blunt, but what passed at the watch-house I cannot tell.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is it from where you took him, to the watch-house - A. About a hundred and fifty yards; we might be about five or ten minutes going there.

JOSHUA TAYLOR . I was constable of the night. The prisoner and prosecutor were at the watch-house about five minutes before I came, as it was not ten o'clock. He gave charge of him for an assault, and said they were in Paul's-alley, near Reeves's door; that the prisoner walked before him, and turned round all of a sudden, and caught hold of the breast of his coat with both hands, and said,

"What do you mean to do; d - n you, have you got any blunt; d - n you, I will have your blunt." That he collared him, and said he should have none of his blunt; when a dreadful scuffle ensued, and both came down together, but he kept his hold. I took the charge down as an assault, and asked the prisoner. in the prosecutor's presence, why he had been guilty of this behaviour, and if he had struck the prosecutor. He said he had, and did not wish to deny it, and would strike him again, or any man who behaved indecently or unmanly to him. I asked what he had done. He said he had put his hand ***, and he would strike any man who did that to him.

JURY to ACKROYD. Q. When you came to the alley, you told him the first turning to the right would bring him to Barbican; how came you to send him up that dark alley - A. Because I was going into Aldersgate-street, and Jacob's-wells is a thoroughfare into Barbican.

To TAYLOR. Q. Did the prosecutor hear the prisoner say he had taken indecent liberties with him - A. Yes; I cannot say whether he made any reply - his eye looked red, and in the morning it had turned black.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-79

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Best.

1052. THOMAS JEFFERIES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Mitchell , about the hour of four in the forenoon, of the 13th of August , at Christchurch, (the said William Mittchell , and other persons being therein) and stealing therein a cannister, value 2 d., and three ounces of tea, value 15 d. , his property.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I live in the parish of Christ-church, Spitalfields , and rent the house. On the night of the 13th of August, I latched my door, but do not think that I locked it. My wife awoke me about a quarter to four o'clock; it was then light - I came down, and found the prisoner taking some things off the line down stairs - he ran out; I pursued him; the watchman took him, and found some tea in a cannister of mine upon him, which he had taken from my safe. My children were in the house.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. I apprehended him, and took the cannister from him.

(Cannister produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 63.

Reference Number: t18230910-80

1053. THOMAS WELLMAN and DAVID ATTFIELD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George William Breakspear (since deceased) about the hour of ten in the night of the 28th of August , at St. Mary, Islington, with intent to steal, and stealing therein six gowns, value 30 s.; a shawl, value 5 s.; a pelisse, value 3 s.; two skirts, value 5 s.; a jacket, value 2 s.; an apron, value 6 d.; a pillow case, value 6 d.; a looking glass, value 5 s.; a time-piece stand, value 6 s.; six pictures, value 30 s.; eight rows of beads, value 3 s.; a pair of bracelets, value 6 s.; a sovereign; two crown pieces, and two half-crowns , his property.

MARIA BREAKSPEAR . I am a widow; my husband's name was George William - we lived in City-gardens, City-road, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington , and kept the house. On the 28th of August he was living, I went out at five o'clock in the afternoon, and left nobody in the house, and returned at half-past ten; it was then dark. I had locked the door; I opened it as usual, and found my bed-room door broken open; but no outer door was broken. Wellman was in custody - they must have had a false key. I am sure I had shut the door, and took the key - it is a spring lock, and fastens without turning the key. I found a box under the bed broken open, and property stolen - I found part of it the same night. I have seen Wellman, but never near the house. A sovereign, two dollars, and two half-crowns, were taken from the box - the drawers were open, but not broken. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above 3 l.

MARY BEERE . I am wife of William Beere , and live next door to the prosecutrix, I saw her go out on the 28th of August, and heard her pull the door too, and at eight minutes past ten o'clock, in consequence of information, I called the watchman, and while speaking to him, I saw Wellman, with a man shorter than himself come out of the house, each of them had a bundle; they passed me, Attfield was not the other man; I called, Stop thief! and the watchman followed them, one ran up to Islington, and Well-man towards the City-road.

HENRY BEERE . I am son of Mrs. Beere, and am fifteen years old. I saw two men come out of the house with bundles. I cannot say whether it was the prisoners, but I saw a third man walking backwards and forwards before the door; I think he was stouter than either of the prisoners; we called Stop thief! the two men ran and then separated, the third man whistled and called, Dick, then walked towards the wharfs; a gentleman came out of the wharf-gate and spoke to him, and then he walked off.

EDWARD PALMER . I am watchman. I saw two men come out of this house; Wellman was one; he ran away and I after him; he had a bag in his hand - he threw it down, and ran six or seven yards further, when Bingham stopped him and I picked up the bag, it contains a quantity of linen.

Prisoner, WELLMAN. Q. How long after it was taken, was it picked up - A. Directly. I gave it to a man to hold, and I am sure it is the same.

JOHN BINGHAM . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. I stopped Wellman, in Macclesfield-street. Palmer was pursuing him, and in the morning I picked up a small crow-bar, about four yards from where I stopped him, and a few beads about thirty yards from where I stopped him, nearer to the watch-house, and in the road I took him there.

EDWARD KENDALL . I am a watchman, and assisted in taking him. Bingham's account is correct.

JAMES HANLEY . I am a constable. I went to No. 16. Helmet-row, on Tuesday the 2d of September. Attfield occupies a garret there; I found some letters there directed to him. I found a time-piece stand, a looking-glass, and an old painting there; he was not at home - Day waited in the room below for him, till twelve o'clock at night, we then saw him. I asked how he came in possession of the looking-glass and things; he said, on the Thursday night before, (which would be the 28th of August,) about nine o'clock, he bought the stand and picture at a house kept by one Templar, a cobbler, and that one Hammond was with him, and bought the looking-glass at the same time. I asked who they were bought from; he said he did not know; he said he left his room to go to his place to buy the property. I asked what messenger came for him; he said a boy was sent for him. I took him into custody, and afterwards took Templar and a boy.

Prisoner, ATTFIELD. Q. I told you I could describe the man, but did not know his name, except that he was called Jem? - A. he said something of that kind.

GEORGE DAY . I am a constable. I went with Handley, and stopped Attfield as he came in; he gave the account Hanley has stated.

JOHN FROST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the night of the robbery a young man gave me the bag.

WILLIAM TEMPLAR . I am a shoemaker, and live in Ratcliffe-court, John's-row. Attfield used to work with me. I cannot say whether he was at my house on the 28th of

August, as I am often out; these things were never at my house, either on the 28th or 29th I am quite sure. A young man lodges with me, and I am often out, but I know nothing of it.

ATTFIELD. He was at home, but at work, when a stout man, called Jem, sold them to me - Witness, I saw one Jem at the office, but never saw him before. Mine is a large room, and I sit under the window to work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. BEERE. It had been dark some time when they came out. I think it was dark about nine o'clock.

WELLMAN'S Defence. I was coming along City-gardens, walking towards the house, and heard the cry of Stop thief! a watchman came up, knocked me down; another watchman came up, and said,

"Where is the bag which he had?" and in ten minutes he brought up the bag, and it went from one to the other.

WELLMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ATTFIELD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-81

1054. JAMES SEABROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , thirty-seven pewter measures, value 2 l.; four spittoons, value 2 s.; five curtains, value 3 s.; four curtain-rods, value 2 s.; four casks, value 4 s.; a shovel, value 6 d.; a tin can, value 1 s.; three chains, value 10 s.; three tables, value 1 l.; a tobacco-box, value 4 d.; twenty gallons of rum, value 20 l.; four barrels of ale, value 9 l., and thirty gallons of cider, value 35 s., the goods of John Moren , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MOREN . I purchased the Tun and Half-moon, public-house, Wapping , of the prisoner, and took the stock. I quitted the house afterward, finding it was not licenced. I fastened the house up, and after that missed this property. I had paid the prisoner a bill of 17 l., and paid about 6 l. of it. He arrested me for the difference.

COURT. Q. There was a dispute between you about it - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-82

1055. HENRY MOWATT , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , three spoons, value 4 l., the goods of Thomas Spratley , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SPRATLEY . I live in Arbour-square, Commercial-road , and keep the Arbour Tavern . The prisoner was in my service as extra-waiter . On the 21st of July I had a supper party. When the meat was cleared away and the pies went up, I missed two table-spoons and a small one. The prisoner, who had been waiting at table, was also missing. I took him next morning. I gave 3 l. for one pair of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had they been long in use - A. No; they were not commonly used. He was occasional waiter. Nothing was found at his premises. When they were missed he was gone.

MR. HENRY PHILLIPS . I was employed to cook this supper. The prisoner brought me a table-spoon to wipe, and said he wanted two more. I gave him two gravy spoons off the shelf. He went away, between eight and nine o'clock, with them. I did not see him afterwards. They were missed in five minutes, and he was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. They had been in use a long time - A. One of them had. He did not sup in the house.

WM. LANGFORD. I was a waiter, and live in Philip-street. The prisoner did not give me any spoons. They were missed about half-past nine o'clock, and he was also missing.

ANN SPRATLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. We had seven spoons; three were missed on this night. I gave 3 l. for one pair three years ago, but they were not much used; the other was worth 18 s.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined one Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-83

1056. HENRY BARDON and JOHN ELGAR were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Thorn , on the King's highway, on the 13th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a purse, value 1 d.; three half-crowns, four shillings, and three sixpences , his property.

WILLIAM THORN . I am a labouring man , and formerly lived servant to Mr. Baker. On Saturday, the 13th of September, I was working for Mr. Thomson, a plumber and glazier. I went down the Edgware-road about eleven o'clock. I had been settling with my master, and had 13 s. 6 d. or 14 s. in an old pocket, which I used as a purse. I had been to a public-house, but drank nothing but a pint of ale; and when I was near the Hop-pole public-house, the prisoners met me, went by, and passed me again, then turned back. and met me again; I am certain of their persons. One of them hit me a violent blow with his fist, and knocked me down; the other knelt on my stomach, and held my hands down. I could not call for assistance, for they stopped my mouth. Elgar turned my pocket inside out, and took all my money, which was half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences. Elgar said,

"Now let us take the fellow by his heels, and drag him down to the Cut, and chuck him in, for then he cannot come to appear against us." The other said,

"No; let him alone, he has had enough of it." Elgar said,

"If you offer to cry out, or offer to make the least resistance, you b - r, we will kill you;" and then said he would drag me down to the Cut. Bardon then said,

"No; let him lay where he is, he has had enough of it, we have got his money, that is all we want." They then left me. I was not able to get up immediately, but did as soon as I was able, then went home, went to bed, got up early on Sunday morning on purpose to look for them. I went to and fro in the Edgware road, where I met the watchman. I went by the King's Arms public-house, and there saw them both sitting drinking. Nobody pointed them out. I only saw them at the window, which was open, as I passed. I knew them directly, and told the watchman those were the people. They did not see me looking at them, they were busy talking and drinking.

Q. Now, recollect that they are on trial for their lives - are you quite certain of them - A. I am perfectly well satisfied that they are the men. I have not recovered my money.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time of night was this - A. About eleven o'clock, or rather later; there are watchman on the road. I told a watchman of it the same night, immediately I could see one. I swear that I was not in the least the worse for liquor. I never said I only lost 4 s. 6 d., or that the other man knocked me down. I had been drinking at the Union, public-house,

Oxford-street. I told the watchman I could not think of the name of the public-house that night, but next morning I recollected it. I live in Wood's-mews, Grosvenor-square, and work for gentlemen's coachmen, in the stables - I had been working that day for a plumber, named Thompson, in Dorset-street, Baker-street, and had worked three days for him - he paid me 2 s. 6 d. a day; he paid me at his own house about seven o'clock. I had been doing nothing particular afterwards, except getting refreshment.

Q. How came you in the Edgware-road - A. I was walking down there - it is not in my way home; it was rather a light night. I was taking a walk; I think it was moon-light, but cannot say. I did not know the prisoners before - I saw their faces by the light of the lamps; it was on the side of the road, and nearly under the lamp; it was an oil lamp, and a fine night. The watchman who I first told of it is here.

COURT. Q. What made you go down the Edgware-road - A. Merely for a walk. I was a quarter of a mile from home when at the public-house - Edgware-road is not above a quarter of a mile out of the way. The watchman I spoke to overnight is the same I spoke to in the morning.

JOHN BARRELL . I am a watchman of the Edgware-road, and was so on the night of the robbery - I think the moon went down about twelve o'clock - it had been shining that night; this robbery was not on my beat. I did not see the prosecutor till a quarter past five o'clock in the morning; nobody complained to me of being robbed before that. There is a watch-box adjoining the Hop-pole; he complained to me about being robbed in the morning; his face was all over blood, which was dry, as if it had happened some time before, and his clothes spotted with blood, from top to bottom - he said he came to watch for them, and afterwards came and said he saw them. I got Carpenter's assistance - we all three went and took the prisoners in the house. He charged them with the robbery in their presence - they said nothing in the public-house, but on the road to the watch-house, before we got to Tyburn-gate, they both denied the charge. I cannot say whether there is a lamp where he was robbed.

Cross-examined. Q. At eleven o'clock all the watchmen were on duty - A. Of course. I did not see the spot where he says he was robbed - he said it was near the Hop-pole.

Q. If there had been two persons scuffling and attacking another, and talking about murdering him, must it not be heard - A. He told me one clapped his hand over his mouth; he told me of their threatening to drag him to the Canal if he made any alarm. The road is very wide. One Brewer was the watchman of that beat, and is so still. I heard nothing from him of any robbery - no other watchman told me he had heard anything of it - he said he had lost his purse and money. I believe he mentioned 4 s. 6 d. at the watch-house, but it might be 14 s. 6 d.

COURT. Q. Do the watchmen go their rounds, or are they always in their boxes - A. They go round; Edgware-road may be three quarters of a mile out of the prosecutor's way home.

The prisoners denied the charge.

THOMAS WHITAKER . I am a labourer, and work at ground digging. The two prisoners were in my company on Saturday evening, the 13th of September, at the Devonshire Arms, public-house, Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove. George and Kendal were with us - I was in the same box with the prisoners, from half-past ten o'clock till a quarter before twelve - we were all five in the same box, drinking porter - the prisoners were neither of them out of my company or sight during all that time - the house is nearly three quarters of a mile from the Hop-pole.

Q. How do you know the time so exactly - A. I had just taken my money, and went in to pay Robinson, the landlord, what I had had during the week, and never went out till a quarter to twelve o'clock - we then went out together.

COURT. Q. Who do you work for - A. I worked for Panton, of Lisson-grove, then. I now work for Johnson, of Stafford-street, Lisson-grove - Robinson is not here - I got home five minutes before twelve o'clock, for there is a clock facing me directly I go into the house.

Q. Who let you in - A. The door is left on the latch for me on Saturday nights - there was a light and a fire in my room - my father and mother live in the house.

Q. What makes you remember the night - A. Because there was a noise when we came out, of some Irishmen fighting.

WILLIAM GEORGE . I am a carpenter, and live in William-street, Lisson-grove. Last Saturday night, I was at Robinson's, public-house, Devonshire Arms, sitting in the same box as the two prisoners, and Whitaker and another man, who is outside - I do not know his name. I got there at half-past ten o'clock, and staid till a quarter to twelve. The landlord is very particular in shutting up before twelve. The prisoners were there when I went in, and we came out together - they were not out of my sight all the while.

COURT. Q. Do you know the King's Arms, public-house, where they were taken - A. No; I looked at the clock when I came out of the house.

Q. Are you at all acquainted with the man who is outside, and whose name you do not know - A. No, not at all; that was the first time I ever met him; he was not drinking with us, but having some beer. I never saw the prisoners before, and do not know where they lived. The Devonshire Arms is a quarter of a mile from the Edgware-road. I do not know the Hop-pole.

Q. Have you seen Robinson, the landlord, lately - A. I saw him this morning, at his own house; his face was tied up, but he can walk. I am in Mr. Cleave's employ, and have worked two months for him; before that, I worked with my uncle Capon. I have known Whitaker a good while.

ABEL KENDAL . I am a ground-digger, and live on Maida-hill. I was at the Devonshire Arms, Devonshire-street, last Saturday night, sitting on the left hand side of the tap-room going in, in a box or seat; I was sitting with Elgar, Bardon, and Whitaker.

Q. Who else - A. I forget the young man's name (looking at the last witness), that is him. I went there nearly at ten o'clock.

Q. Did the prisoners go there before or after you - A. We went in together, and staid from ten o'clock till about ten minutes to twelve - the prisoners were not out of my sight during that time.

COURT. Q. Where did you go afterwards - A. Home to bed. I looked at the clock coming out at the door.

Q. Have you ever been in the same room before with the person whose name you do not recollect - Yes, and have drank with him,

Q. I mean, George - A. Yes, I only drank with him once before, which was some time that week, at the same house; we drank our beer out of the same pot, and George paid for it.

Q. Did he treat you as a perfect stranger - A. I drank with him on account of a young man who was with him, and knew me - neither of the prisoners were there then. When we came out on Saturday, the prisoners crossed to the New-road, Baker-street; I left them and went home; we were a quarter of a mile from Edgware-road; I do not know the Hop-poles.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You drank with George once before in that week - A. Yes, several persons were drinking there at the same time; they were acquaintances of mine, and as I went into the house, one of them handed me the pot - George did not hand it.

WILLIAM THORN re-examined. The robbery happened as near twenty minutes after eleven o'clock as I can recollect. I am sure it was before twelve. I did not speak to a watchman in the evening, only in the morning. I spoke to none at night. I was glad to be out of the way.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not say, that as soon as you could, you spoke to a watchman, and told the same watchman of it again in the morning - A. I was glad to be off; I enquired for one, but could see none.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I was called to apprehend the prisoners at the public-house. Thorn's face was very bloody, he was cut over the eye very much, and his clothes were bloody - he charged the prisoners with the robbery. They made no reply, but went quietly away; but as they went down the road, they said they had not robbed the man, he was telling a very great falsity - they had not robbed him, or ill-treated him, and had not the money. They said they were at the Devonshire Arms, at eleven and at twelve o'clock, and could not be in the place he said; I did not ask where they had slept. The Hoppoles is full a mile from the Devonshire Arms.

BARDON'S Defence. The prosecutor was in the house drinking before we went in.

WILLIAM THORN. I was not in the house before them.

Six witnesses appeared to Bardon's character, and three for Elgar.

BARDON - GUILTY - DEATH .

Recommended to Mercy on account of his humanity in saving the prosecutor's life .

ELGAR - GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18230910-84

Before Mr. Recorder.

1057. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , thirty-three books, value 5 l., the goods of Thomas Barnes , his master, in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BARNES . I am a bookseller . The prisoner lived four or five years in my service, and was a very good lad. At the time in question I lived in Piccadilly , and was moving my stock to Swallow-street, and began to move on the 20th June, when I missed these books, and the prisoner had left me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you not often send books to a customer, who has a right to return them within a reasonable time - A. Yes, I found these in pawn, and redeemed them.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am watch-house-keeper. On the 19th of June, at night, the prisoner was brought to St. James's watch-house, and nine duplicates for twenty-five books were found on him, pawned for 2 l. 10 s. and eight for 12 s. He said he had pawned them, and meant to get them out again.

CHARLES POORE . I am shopman to Mr. Rochford, of Jermyn-street. On the 2d June, twenty-five books were pawned for 2 l. 10 s., by a man in the name of Littlejohn, Pultney-street. On the 31st of December, eight more were pawned. I cannot speak to the person, they were all produced to Mr. Barnes, who claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Who pawned them you do not know - A. No; we sometimes lend more on books than they are worth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 18.

Of stealing to the Value of 39 s. only .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-85

1058. SAMUEL BEAK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a truss of hay, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of James Hill .

JAMES HILL . I am a farmer , and live at Harrow ; the prisoner was my labourer . I missed hay several times, and on Sunday, the 26th of July, I got up in the night to watch, and a little before three o'clock in the morning the prisoner came. I was behind the stack, and saw him get on the stack which had been cut - he cut a truss up, and tied it up. I peeped out, and saw it tied up - and said,

"You are the fellow I have long suspected," he said nothing - I called out as if somebody was near to assist me, and he ran away - he had cut more, but not tied it up - he came to work on Monday, and I gave charge of him.

Cross-examined. Q. He is a hay-stacker - A. Yes; I never authorize him to cut hay.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - he said many people committed these things before they were found out; but it was his first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18230910-86

1059. JAMES BARRET was indicted for stealing on the 1st of July , a watch, value 5 l.; a watch chain, value 2 l., and three seals, value 2 l., the goods of William Pawley from his person .

WILLIAM PAWLEY . I live in Little Earl-street, Seven-dials. On the 1st of July, about half past one o'clock in the morning, I was at the Fox and Goose public-house, King-street, Seven-dials. I had been locked out the night before, and met Smith, who said he was locked out, and that he was going to walk the streets; we walked about for two or three hours, till we saw the King's Head public-house open in James-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner was there, and asked us to drink with him, and we asked him to drink with us; there was a bustle in the house soon after; and I told Smith to take care of his watch, and as his fob was very large, I put it into my fob and bound it up in my apron; I left the King's Head about seven o'clock in

the morning, it was then safe, and I was quite sober; the prisoner came out with us and went into the Fox and Goose with us; we sat down in the tap-room - Smith and I rested our heads on the table, and went to sleep; the prisoner then set in the opposite box to us; I am sure the watch was safe in my fob, for I bound my apron tight round it. I had not laid on the table long before Smith awoke me, and asked for his watch; I found my apron untied and the watch gone, and the prisoner was also gone - he was taken next morning, and I saw it taken from his watch pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You had no watch of your own - A. No, we were in the streets from eleven till three o'clock; we had about two pots of beer between us, and were none the worse for liquor - my apron could not come undone of itself.

JAMES SMITH . I am a pearl worker. On the 1st of July, I was locked out, and met Pawley in the street about a quarter to twelve o'clock; we had been together that night, but separated to go home; I met him again, and we agreed to walk about as it was a fine night - we went into the King's Head; the prisoner was smoking his pipe there; he came up to me with a pot, and said,

"I suppose you are locked out like myself, will you drink with me;" I did so, and passed the pot to Pawley; he afterwards drank with us - we were quite sober. We left the house about seven o'clock in the morning; I had given Pawley my watch to to take care of - he put it into his fob and bound his apron tight over it, it could not be seen. I said, I thought we could get in now - the prisoner asked which way we were going, and said he was going our way, and followed us without being invited - and at the end of King-street, he said if we would go into the Fox and Goose, he would treat us with whatever we liked - I sat down and went to sleep with my head on the table, being tired with walking about so long. I was awoke soon after by a young man - the prisoner was then gone - I awoke Pawley, and asked for my watch - his apron was loose about his heels, and the watch gone - I got an officer. I found the chain and one seal in pawn; a person afterwards brought me a seal which was attached to my watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you fall asleep directly you went in - A. We might have talked a few minutes - we were quite sober.

JAMES HENDERSON . I am a journeyman baker, and live in Crawford-street, Mary-le-bone. I was lodging at the Fox and Goose, at this time. When I came down stairs the prisoner was in the tap-room, and the two witnesses asleep. The prisoner said they were his friends, and Pawley had property to the amount of twenty guineas - and I said, he should awake them - he said, he was afraid of Pawley's dog - after that, he went over the table on his hands and knees and struck Pawley, who was too sound to be awoke. I saw him put his hand under the apron which was rolled up, and put his hand into his pocket he then came over the table and went out. I awoke Smith immediately, and the watch was missed - nobody but the prisoner could have taken it; nobody else was in the tap-room.

Cross-examined. Q. He tried to awake Pawley - A. He shook him but could not.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. On the morning after the robbery, I found the prisoner in Leg-alley, Long-acre, and asked what he had done with the watch - he said,

"I have got it in my pocket," and pulled it out with one seal I found the duplicate of another seal on him - he said, a young man, who was with him, had pawned the chain and kept the duplicate - that it was pawned somewhere about the Haymarket.

THOMAS PRICHARD . I am shopman to Mr. Temple, pawnbroker, Panton-street. On the 1st of July, this gold chain was pawned with me, between eleven and twelve o'clock by the prisoner for 30 s. I am certain of him.

JOHN GAMMON . I am shopman to Mr. Morrit, of Long-acre. On the 1st of July, the prisoner pawned a gold seal

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-87

1060. DANIEL HARVEY and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing on the 22d of July , a sugar bason, value 3 s.; a sugar stand, value 3 s., and a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. , the goods of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT . I keep the Stratford coffee-house, Oxford-street . On the 22d of July, these articles stood in the coffee-room, near the door - I went to the bar about ten o'clock, returned in two minutes and they were gone - I found them in possession of the officer in about half an hour.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am a carpenter, and live at Kensington. I was in Duke-street, Manchester-square; an old woman gave me information - I looked round and saw the prisoners in company in Duke-street, coming as from Oxford-street; I followed them up Edward-street, where they separated; Harvey crossed over towards Baker-street - Jones called him back, and they went across Portman-square - I saw something pass from one to the other - they went down Seymour-street, and then separated. Harvey's pockets appeared bulky - I crossed over and told a person to assist me - then ran and took Harvey; Jones went on towards Edgware-road, and was taken in my presence soon after. I am certain of his person. I took a sugar bason and stand out of Harvey's pocket, and the sugar tongs were found in his fob at the office, he said he had nothing but what belonged to him. and would not tell whose they were.

DANIEL ANSTEAD . I went with Allen, and assisted to take Harvey. He denied having any thing about him - I found the bason in his coat pocket, and sugar tongs in his fob.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY STOWELL . I took Jones at a public-house, in consequence of Allen's description. He refused to tell his name or residence, and denied being in Harvey's company.

HARVEY'S Defence. I was going to Mount-street after a situation; a man came up and said he was a countryman, and asked me to pawn these things, and he would give me 1 s. I was going to the pawnbroker's when I was taken.

JONES'S Defence. I never saw Harvey in my life.

HARVEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JONES - GUILTY Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-88

1061. BRIDGET HANNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , four sovereigns, a half soveregin,

and 7 s. 6 d., the monies of Owen Rogers , from his person .

OWEN ROGERS . I am a sailor , and lodge in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's. On the 29th of August, about eight o'clock at night. I met the prisoner at the foot of Holborn-hill. I had this money in my pocket; the gold was wrapped in paper, we walked to St. Giles's church; went into a public-house, and from there to a lodging, in Buckeridge-street . I was sober. I paid for the room, and sent out for half a gallon of beer - drank it between us, and in about an hour went to bed. I put my waistcoat and trowsers under the pillow and under the bed, and in about an hour and a half she wanted to go away. I turned round and found my waistcoat under the pillow, but missed the money; I sung out, and one of the women went for a watchman - nobody but her had been in the room. I had not been asleep.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I am a watchman, of George-street; the servant at No. 47, fetched me about twelve o'clock. I found Rogers charging the prisoner with stealing four sovereigns and a half, and 7 s. 6 d.; she denied it, saying she had no money of his. I found a shilling and some halfpence on her; a female searched her in the watch-house, and produced four sovereigns and a half, wrapped in a paper, and 5 s. 6 d.; she then became violent.

JANE FURZMAN . My husband is a housekeeper. I searched the prisoner, and in the corner of her shawl I found four sovereigns and a half in a paper, and 5 s. 1 1/2 d. she tried to get it from me.

SAMUEL COLLINGTON . I am a constable. The prisoner said she had no money, but when it was found she said it was her own.

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted to ill-use me. I kept the shawl in my hand, because I had this money there, and when he saw it, he swore to every farthing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-89

1062. ROBERT LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Jordan Hookham , from his person .

THOMAS JORDAN HOOKHAM . I am a bookseller , and live in Panton-street, Haymarket. On the 2d of July, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Greek-street, Soho, and turned into Rose-street , I felt somebody touch me, I turned round very quick - looked over my right shoulder, and saw the prisoner drop my handkerchief; he was close to me. I seized him and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL BOUGHY . I met Mr. Hookham bringing the prisoner to the watch-house; he said it was another boy and not him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Rose-street, the gentleman turned round, and collared me, and said you have got my handkerchief. I said no, and he picked it up, and said I had taken it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-90

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1063. JAMES SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanor . The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-91

1064. JOHN RAY was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-92

1065. JAMES SMITH and REBECCA WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , fifty-one yards and a quarter of linen cloth, value 2 l. 13 s.; one hundred and seventeen yards of other linen, value 4 l. 2 s. 3 d.; twenty-eight yards of twilled stuff, value 28 s. 6 d.; one hundred and twenty-one yards and a half of gingham, value 23 s. 3 d.; seven pieces of calico, containing twenty-eight yards each, value 5 l. 10 s. 3 d.; eight pieces of cambric muslin, containing twelve yards each, value 5 l. 4 s. 6 d.; seven yards of packing cloth, value 3 s., and a piece of hempen cord, value 1 s. 3 d. , the goods of Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Thomas Thorp , Alfred Thorp , and Robert Thorp .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to belong to James Davis .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

CHANDLER STEWART . I am warehouseman to Messrs. John Thomas Thorp , Alfred Thorp , and Robert Thorp . On the 27th of August, the goods stated in the indictment among others, were sold to Mr. Davis - made into a truss, and sent to the White Horse, Friday-street, directed to him at Southampton.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I keep the Southampton waggon-office. On the 28th of August, about five o'clock in the afternoon, a truss, weighing above 4 cwt. was brought by Messrs. Thorp's porter, and saw it loaded in the waggon - it started that afternoon about six o'clock. Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington are the proprietors.

THOMAS WALKER . I am servant to Messrs. Thorps. I conveyed the truss given me by Stewart to the waggon-office, and gave it to Mr. Jackson; it was directed to Mr. Davis.

ELIZABETH ROBERTS . I live in Merlin's-rents, Shoe-lane. On the 29th of August, between five and six o'clock, I was sitting in the court nursing my child; Watson, who lodged in the court, was up in her room. A coach stopped at the end of the court. Smith ran up the court from the coach. Watson came down to him, and they both went together to the coach. I saw him take a bed out of the coach, and give it to her. She took it up stairs; then he took out a large parcel in a sack or sheet, and followed her up stairs. She lodged at No. 6. I saw Barber looking out of her window.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was in the sack you do not know - A. No. I had seen Smith several times before, but never spoke to him. I understood that he lived with Watson. They were large bundles. He had top-boots on, which appeared soiled.

SUSANNAH BARBER . I live at No. 6, Merlin's-rents, on the second floor. On Friday evening, the 29th of August, I was at tea, and saw Smith come up the court. He appeared in a great hurry, and went up to Watson, who lived above me, and called her; she followed him down the court. and presently she came up with a bed, tied in a blanket, and he brought a large white parcel; he returned and fetched a sack, which had red letters on it. Watson's is the back room on the third floor. Smith frequently came to see her. I have seen him go out early and late of a morning, but did not see him come home at night. I saw him on the stairs-one evening, and saw him go out next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. When was that - A. I cannot say I do not know that he lived there. The white parcel appeared as much as he could stand under.

THOMAS WILDEN. I am a constable. On Friday, the 29th, in consequence of information I went to Merlin's-rents, and was on the watch from five o'clock till nine. I was on the other side of Shoe-lane, and saw Watson pass me with something in her apron. I asked what she had there; she said a gown of her's and her sister's, which she had had some time. I asked where she lived. She said in Shoe-lane. I took her into Merlin's-rents, and found a piece of gingham on her. The officers brought Smith down stairs. I sent him to the watch-house. We went into the room with Watson, and asked which room she lived in. She said she sometimes slept in that room, pointing to the back room, third floor; and there we found the bed, a bag with red letters on it, full of calico, and a piece of sheeting. She said the bed was hers. Smith said he knew nothing about them.

LEWIS FACHE . I am an officer. I and Jones went to this house on Friday. We found Smith coming out of the back bed-room door, on the third floor. I seized him, and said, you are the man I want; he said nothing, but wanted to go into another room. We took him down. His boots were unlaced, and his breeches strings undone, as if he was going to bed. He said he knew nothing about the things.

RICHARD JONES . Fache's account is correct.

PETER RING . I rent this house. The prisoners lodged in the back room, third floor, for five or six weeks. Smith took the room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

WATSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-93

1066. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a hundred and forty-three panes of glass, value 18 s., and a box, value 6 d. , the goods of James Arding the Elder, and James Arding the Younger.

JAMES ARDING . I am a carpenter , and live in Dorset-street, Fleet-street . The prisoner was my apprentice . On Sunday the 24th of August, I left home about seven o'clock in the morning, and dined with my father at Thames Ditton - the prisoner was in bed when I went out. I returned on Monday morning at ten o'clock, but did not go into the house till two o'clock. I then received information, and about four I called the prisoner into the counting-house, and told him he had been seen leaving my house with a box or drawer containing something, and asked what it was, and where he took it; he denied taking any thing out; he left the counting-house, and in consequence of what my clerk said, I called him in again, and said

"I am informed you are rather flush of money to-day; I should be glad to know how you got it?" He said his mother gave it him. I said I would see her in the evening; he went into the shop, and in about five minutes I found he was gone. He returned in an hour and a half in a great perspiration. I asked where he had been - he said, into Shoe-lane to buy oil. I said, it could not be so, and sent for an officer; we examined his box and found several letters, but none of this property. I said I was positive he had taken something, and should give him in charge. He then cried and said, if I would let him remain till morning, he would tell me all about it; but I gave him in charge for stealing a number of panes of glass; and on Wednesday morning, the officer brought me this letter (producing it), which I know to be his writing. I have glass on my premises, and missed two boxes of window glass from a room on the floor he slept; we searched Elliott's premises by a warrant, but could recognise no glass; but I found a box there which I have every reason to believe is mine, but have no mark on it.

(Letter read.)

To Mr. Elliot, glazier Little Gray's Inn-lane. Dear Sir, I am sorry to have to write to you - but it is concerning some glass I sold to you last Sunday morning, which I am now confined about in Gilspur-street Compter, and if you will give me a call before one o'clock to-day, I shall be obliged, as we can settle about it.

Your's J. SMITH.

Be sure to call to-day, as it is very particular, and I will explain it to you.

ELIZABETH ROFE . I was nursing Mrs. Arding, and saw the prisoner pass the window with the box of glass on his shoulder. I could see glass in it - it was about seven o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was it uncovered - A. Yes - I saw glass in it. It was a deal box, not painted. I told my mistress of it the same day.

DANIEL TURNER . I am an officer of St. Bride's. Mr. Arding sent for me on the 25th of August, to take the prisoner for stealing this glass. On going to the Compter, he said he took it and sold it to a poor man who he did not like to mention, as he had a large family. He afterwards said, it was Elliott, of Little Gray's-inn-lane. I went there next morning, and found Elliott lived near there. The letter was brought to me by the watchman, of Giltspur-street, from the Compter, to take to Elliott. I then went there with a warrant, and found the box.

WILLIAM READ . I went to Elliott's and found the box, but no glass in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the box painted - A. It is, I found it concealed under the table, but Elliott pulled it out - he deals in glass.

PAUL ELLIOTT . This box was on my premises; I cannot say who brought it. I did not take it in - a young man brought it on Sunday morning, and put it down from his shoulder - glass was in it.

Q. You was at home - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the young man - A. I cannot say. I cannot swear to the prisoner. I saw him at Guildhall. I did not know him then.

Q. Perhaps you told the Alderman so - A. I did, to the best of my recollection. I signed my deposition there; it was not read to me, nor did I read it. I looked part of it over, but not all.

Q. Attend to this -

" Paul Elliott says, that on Sunday morning last, at eight o'clock, the prisoner, John Smith , brought some old glass in a box and offered it for sale, containing a hundred and forty-three pieces, for which I gave him 12 s.; the box produced is what he brought it in." Now, do you mean to tell me you did not tell the Alderman the prisoner was the person you bought it of - A. I believe I did not. I cannot state who brought it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner to be the man who brought the glass - A. I do not on my oath.

I have no recollection of saying different. I am a dealer in glass.

MR. ARDING. I am in partnership with my father, James Arding . I believe the box to be mine, but I have no mark on it. We have many very similar to this - my glass is kept in boxes in the garret.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you missed anything - A. Yes; I missed glass. I received a premium of ninety-five guineas with him, he has complained of my neglecting him, but not lately; we have differed; I proposed to his guardian to take him away. I never said I should be glad to get rid of him, and did not want to keep all his premium. A Mr. Featherston has been repeatedly with me from his guardian, and wished me to obtain him a situation in the East India Service. I said I would do all I could; this was two years ago.

COURT. Q. Did Rofe give you information - A. She did one Monday, between two and four o'clock in the afternoon. I did not enter the house till two.

ELIZABETH ROFE . It was a box of this description I saw him with - but I thought it was not painted - I believe this to be the box.

JAMES ARDING . I have about forty boxes about my premises; there were about ten in the garret. I missed one which had a handle on it, but not this one; I did not know how many I had.

PRISONER'S DEFENCE, commenced by complaining of ill-treatment from the prosecutors.

"As to the glass I consider myself innocent - the woman cannot swear to the box - she says she saw glass, but I had no glass. Elliot cannot swear that I sold him the glass - and how can the prosecutor swear I stole it. I did not confess to Turner that I took it - Rofe says she saw me cross the street, and through a court - instead of which I went down Wilderness-lane

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230910-94

1067. JOHN SMITH BOARDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th July , three printed bound books, value 7 s. 6 d.; one printed book, in boards, value 2 s., and a card-case, value 1 s. , the goods of Lewis Marks , his master.

LEWIS MARKS . I am an engraver and bookseller - the prisoner was in my service five or six years. On the 15th of July, I placed myself in a room adjoining my parlour, looked through a hole in the wall - the prisoner was in the room waiting for me. I saw him go to a glass-case, and take out a prayer-book, two song-books, and another book - he put them into different pockets, and stood there till my wife came. I then went and got an officer, who searched him, and found them on him; also a case which I had missed some time.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am an officer. I went to Marks's, and found the books in the prisoner's pockets - he said he was sorry for it, and hoped his master would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took these books up to look at, his wife gave me the child to hold. I put them in my pocket for quickness, in order to take the child.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-95

6108. ELIZABETH SHIELDS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , a quilt, value 1 s., the goods of Peter Ring , in a lodging-room .

PETER RING . I live in Shoe-lane , and let the prisoner a lodging on the 15th of August, furnished, at 4 s. 6 d. a week. I went into her room on the 25th; she had refused to admit me the day before. I waited till she opened it, and asked her for my rent - she said she could not pay me. I missed two sheets, a blanket, and a quilt - she said she had pawned them, to buy fruit, at Blackburn's; she gave the officer the duplicates, and said she would make every thing good.

MORGAN JONES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these things with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-96

1069. HARRIET JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , a carpet, value 4 s.; three chairs, value 9 s.; a stew-pan, value 2 s., and a candlestick, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edward Roe and William Chapman .

EDWARD ROE . I am in partnership with William Chapman ; the prisoner was engaged to clean our office ; and on the 25th of June, I missed these things, and sent for Davis the officer, who found my chair and carpet at Mrs. Cox's; she came as usual next morning.

SARAH COX . On the 25th of June, the prisoner brought a carpet and chair to me, and said she was distressed. I lent her 2 s. 6 d. on it; she told me not to sell it, as she would fetch it on Saturday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-97

1070. PETER MADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , two gowns, value 10 s.; a whittle, value 8 s.; a book, value 5 s.; two caps, value 2 s; three aprons, value 2 s. 6 d.; a pair of shoes, value 1 s. 6 d.; an umbrella, value 5 s.; a tea-pot, value 2 s. 6 d.; a looking-glass, value 1 s.; a comb, value 6 d., and a pair of clogs, value 2 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Biddulph .

ELIZABETH BIDDULPH . On the 30th of July, I was leaving my situation, and left the articles stated in the indictment, for the prisoner to take to Mr. Brogden's, Old Bailey. I never received them; he was whitewashing at the house, and had carried a trunk safe the day before.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a plaisterer, the prisoner was in my service, and absconded on the 30th of July. I found him in custody in about a week, and charged him with taking these things - he said he sold them to a Jew for 25 s.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say it was two coats that I sold - A. He said he sold the coats, and this young woman's bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-98

1071. GEORGE BULL was indicted for stealing on the 20th of August , a pewter pot, value 18 d. , the goods of John Gwillin .

JOHN GWILLIN . I live at the Weaver's-arms, public-house,

Grub-street . On the 20th of August, the prisoner was in my skittle-ground about half past seven o'clock. I watched him for two hours, and saw him in different parts of the ground and kept my eye upon his companion. I missed a pint pot, and charged the prisoner with it; he denied it - I searched him, but could not find it - I sent for an officer - he kept shuffling about; I found his hand up his back, and saw the pot drop from his back - I picked it up.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am an officer. The prosecutor stated this in his hearing; he did not deny it.

Prisoner's Defence. I pulled off my coat to play, and soon after put it on; he came in and said I had a pot, and searched me; but on feeling my pocket, I found one in it; somebody must have put it there.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-99

1072. JAMES FURZE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Talfree from his person .

THOMAS TALFREE . I am a jeweller . On the 20th of July, I was walking over Blackfriars bridge with my wife; felt something behind - turned round and saw the prisoner drawing my handkerchief from my pocket - he took it entirely out; and put it under his coat. I seized and charged him with it - he denied it - my brother-in-law collared him, and he dropped it.

MRS. TALFREE. I saw my husband collar the prisoner; he denied taking the handkerchief, but I picked it up at his feet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I deny ever seeing it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-100

1073. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of George John Jackson , from his person .

GEORGE JOHN JACKSON . On the 20th of July, I was in Fleet-market , about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, and felt something at my outside coat pocket. I turned round, and caught the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he let it fall immediately on my turning round, and fell down himself, with fright I suppose, and I collared him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You saw it in his hand - A. Yes. I have made no enquiry about him.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief, and found another on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I fell into company with another lad - this gentleman's handkerchief hung out of his pocket - he persuaded me to take it; it is my first offence, and I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-101

1074. DANIEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a ring, value 6 s., and two keys, value 1 d., the goods of Thomas Green , from his person .

THOMAS GREEN. On the evening of the 10th of July, I was in Sun-street, Bishopsgate, at half-past nine o'clock, walking along, and as I came to Sun-square , I felt a snatch at my watch ribbon, and hit the man with my stick - he got my gold ring, and two keys; the swivel of the watch broke. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

JOHN MORGAN . On the 10th of July, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner snatch at the prosecutor's watch ribbon; I had seen him standing there for five minutes before, and am sure of his person. He ran down Sun-square; I did not follow him.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave no alarm - A. No. I went into my master's shop - he was not far from me; he went too fast for him. I went into the shop, being afraid to leave it; I did not know him before. I was very near him, and noticed his standing there. He had a black eye at the time; he went away and came again.

COURT. Q. Was there any light in the street - A. There was a lamp. I saw him before the Magistrate next day; his eye was black then.

DANIEL REARDON . On the 16th of July, between half past nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Bishopsgate-street, and followed him with two more towards Morgan's master's shop - he stood there a few minutes - went away and came back again, and all at once darted at the prosecutor and ran off; a cart came between us, or I could have secured him. But I am certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever see him before - A. Yes; I knew him personally before and knew he lived in the neighbourhood, but did not know where. I suspected him, which made me watch him; having seen him with bad characters - pickpockets; who I have seen lurking about. I am a plaisterer, and live in Grenville-street, Somers-town. He had a black eye.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner the day after the robbery, in Long-alley. I had seen him the evening before with two suspicious characters.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness swore at the Mansion-house, that he saw me pass his master's shop next day; and, if so, why not take me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-102

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1075. JOHN MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 27 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. , the goods of William Herbert .

RICHARD HERBERT . The prisoner was in the service of my brother William; he is building the new chapel in Regent-street . On the 7th of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, I saw him leave the premises with a basket - I stopped him and asked what he had in it; he said nothing that was wrong. I took him back, and found some lead in it; I cannot swear to it. He said he had it concealed for more than a week, and about an hour afterwards

he said it was not my brother's property - that he got it from another man.

RICHARD PARVIN . I can swear that this lead is the prosecutor's, for I delivered it on the premises on the 1st of July.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-103

1075. THOMAS WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a portmanteau, value 30 s. , the goods of William Lowndes and James Lowndes .

WILLIAM LOWNDES . I am in partnership with James Lowndes - we live in the Haymarket. I was out of town, and left my house in charge of my son.

JOHN ADAMS . I am servant to Messrs. Lowndes. On the 14th of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at work in the warehouse, which is a short distance from the shop, and saw the prisoner coming along with a portmanteau on his shoulder. Mr. Lowndes came up, and I heard a cry of Stop thief! he threw it down, and ran towards me; I said,

"You must stop" - he struck me on the mouth, but I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN JAMES LOWNDES . I was in the parlour, and saw the prisoner take the trunk from the shop window, and carry it on his shoulder. I followed him.

Prisoner. Q. Did not another man take it, and deliver it to me - A. No; the other took a hat box, and he took the trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I met an old man at a public-house, who treated me with rum and water; then said he had been to Mr. Lowndes's, and bought two portmanteaus, and would I carry one - he took one down, and offered it to me. I said I would take the largest; he gave it me, and said he would go into the shop to pay for it. I was drunk, and did not know what I was doing.

JOHN ADAMS . He was sober.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-104

1076. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , two coats, value 30 s., and a hat, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Boys

THOMAS BOYS . On the 1st of September, I lived in a cottage at Hampstead. I only know the property. I do not know when I lost it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Will you swear positively to them - A. I should not like to swear positively to them.

JOHN BUSTIN . On the 1st of September, I saw the prisoner at New-end, Hampstead, with another man; each had a bundle, they passed me, and then I pursued them, calling Stop thief! they were about half a mile from Mr. Boys's - the prisoner dropped the bundle; somebody picked up the coat, and secured him.

TIMOTHY COLLINS . On the 1st of September; I was at Hampstead, and saw Bustin - when the prisoner passed him he called Stop thief! I saw the bundle drop - picked it up, and about one hundred yards off, I picked up another bundle, and delivered them to Bustin - the prisoner kicked me, and said

"You b - r, I'll kill you." Had he kicked me an inch lower, he would have killed me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever been tried here - A, Yes. A long time ago; about some linen, when I was a little boy. I was drawn into it.

ANN BUSTIN . I am servant to Mr. Boys. On the 1st of September, about ten minutes before four o'clock, these coats hung behind the passage door, and the hat by the side of them. I shut the street-door and went out, leaving my mistress in the drawing-room, and when I came back, I found the window more open than when I left it, and the coats gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not doubt about swearing to the things - A. I can swear to my mistresses coats.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-105

Before Mr. Recorder.

1077. THOMAS SOUTH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a handkerchief value 10 s., the goods of Samuel Brook , from his person .

SAMUEL BROOK . I am a printer , and live at Finchley. On Thursday last, I was walking through the Strand, about two o'clock in the day, and near the end of Surrey-street , I felt my pocket suddenly lightened. I turned round, and caught a glimpse of my handkerchief in the prisoner's possession; he turned round, as if to look at a shop. I went up to him and charged him with it - he begged for mercy and gave it to me, ran across the street, and was taken within my sight.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking in at a newspaper office window, being in want of a situation, and on turning round saw this handkerchief on the ground, I picked it up, put it into my hat. I was taking it out again to call for the owner; the gentleman charged me with it.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-106

1078. CHARLES O'HARA was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , two table-spoons, value 15 s., and two soup ladles, value 5 s. , the goods of Sarah Bull , widow .

ELIZABETH CLIPT . I am servant to Sarah Bull , widow, of No. 10, Holles-street, Cavendish-square . On the 10th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I had just left these things on a sideboard, the street-door was open; I went down to the kitchen to fetch some water, returned in two minutes, and saw the prisoner run out of the passage. I gave an alarm, and he was stopped before I lost sight of him, and saw him put the spoons and ladle on a step in the square, as he ran.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Are you sure you did not lose sight of him - A. I did not; there was no crowd to hinder my view of him.

JAMES MITCHELL . I am a livery-stable-keeper. I was in Holles-street, and saw the prisoner come out of the house, and Clift following; she said,

"Stop that man, he has robbed the parlour;" he was stopped in my sight, in Cavendish-square, and given in charge. I found the property on Lord Brownlow's steps; he said I was no man for detaining him.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to meet the Paddington coach for a parcel.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-107

1079. ALEXANDER WARD and JOHN BROWN BOWDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a guitar, value 20 s. , the goods of Job Rutter and Daniel Moore M'Carthy .

JOB RUTTER. I am a musical-instrument-maker , and am in partnership with Daniel Moore M'Carthy. We live in Bond-street . On the 21st of August I lost this guitar. It was safe in my shop the day before. I found it at the office next day, and Ward in custody.

WILLIAM COTTON BATTLE . I am fifteen years old, and am servant to the prosecutors. On the 21st of August I was sweeping the pavement opposite the private door, and was crossing round to go into the shop, and met the prisoner Ward with the guitar, about a yard from the door; part of it was under his coat. I asked what business he had with it. He said something about a Mr. Jones; I took him back to the shop, and took it from him. I then knocked at the private door for assistance. He followed me, and was secured. I did not see Bowden.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVITT. Q. He made no attempt to go away - A. No; he said

"Mr. Jones," or some idle excuse.

Q. Did he not say he went into the shop, and accidentally brushed against the guitar and threw it down, and was ready to give it up again - A. No; he said nothing but Mr. Jones. He might have said he brushed against it and knocked it down.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. About seven o'clock in the morning I was watching the two prisoners, in company together, at the corner of Moor-street, Seven Dials, and followed them into Bond-street. They went into ten or twenty shops. I saw Ward go into this shop. I turned round and missed Bowden. I turned round again, and found Ward in custody. Bowden was on the other side of the way at the time Ward entered the shop. Battle charged Ward with stealing the guitar; he said he was very sorry for it. I took Bowden next day, at the King's Arms, public-house, in Moor-street. He denied being with Ward. I knew him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WARD'S Defence. I called in to ask for a piece of music. Nobody was in the shop. I knocked three or four times, and as I came out my coat struck against the guitar, and threw it down; I picked it up, and went to the boy to tell him. He accused me of stealing it. I asked to see his master, and told him how it happened, and in twenty minutes Yates came over, and asked for the property; he then took this guitar out of the window; it is not the one in question. I never saw Bowden.

BATTLE re-examined. He said nothing of the kind to me. He could not brush against it. There was a frame to keep it in. His arm might brush it down, but his coat could not.

BOWDEN'S Defence. If I was there, why did not the officer take me.

YATES. He had escaped, and I went over to take Ward.

WILLIAM FORTY . I was with Yates, and saw the prisoners, between seven and eight o'clock, at the King's Arms, and watched them. They went into several shops. This occurred while I went into a shop (where they had been) to enquire.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BOWDEN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-108

1080. SARAH BARBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., and a cap, value 2 s. , the goods of George Osborne .

GEORGE OSBORNE . I live in Queen-street, Chelsea . My wife is a laundress. The prisoner was employed to work for us. I missed these things on the 25th of June, and afterwards, found them in pawn by her directions.

JAMES HUMPHREYS . I am a constable. On the 28th of July I took the prisoner. She immediately told me where the things were pawned, and said she was sorry for it.

SIDNEY SMITH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Thomson, pawnbroker, Grosvenor-row, Chelsea. I took a cap in pawn on the 28th of June, of the prisoner, for 1 s.

- . I am servant to Mr. Smith, pawnbroker, George-street, Chelsea. A handkerchief was pawned with us for 1 s. 10 d. by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy. If they paid me my wages, I should not have robbed them.

GEORGE OSBORNE . We owed her 2 s. for that day's work.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-109

1081. BENJAMIN BAYLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , two pistols, value 10 s. , the goods of Henry Comte .

HENRY COMTE . I am a broker , and live in Whitechapel-road . These pistols were close to the window where a pane of glass had been broken. I missed them; and, in consequence of information, ran out, and saw the prisoner throw them from his pocket. He was secured.

MATTHEW GRAYSON . I live with my uncle, next door to Comte. I saw the prisoner stop by the shop, and throw something away behind him.

ZEBEDEE FURLE . I saw the prisoner's arm through the broken glass, and asked what he had taken. He said what was that to me. I held him, but not knowing whether I was doing right, I let him go again. I saw no more of him then. I am certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-110

1082. JOHN OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a truss of hay, value 2 s. , the goods of George Byng , Esq. , and JOSEPH WYMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN CONWAY . I am constable of Highgate. On Thursday, the 26th of June, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I saw two teams of hay of Mr. George Byng 's draw up at the Archway Tavern, Highgate-hill. Osborne drove the first team - Smith the other - the hostler (Wyman) came from the stable; Osborne gave him a truss of hay. Wyman took it into the yard; they did not see me; I was on Mr. Hunter's premises. The moment Osborne delivered the hay he drove on, without stopping to drink; the house was not open. Smith then gave Wyman a truss of hay from his team - he came out again, and Smith gave him a sack from under the cart, which contained about two bushels of something. I watched the teams away; then went home and wrote a letter to Mr. Byng, to inform him. I apprehended all three men by a warrant. Osborne and

Wyman denied the charge. Wyman denied knowing the men at all.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Waggons often call at this house - A. Yes, it is a public-house; I did not seize them, not seeing any money pass, and not knowing whether Mr. Byng had ordered it to be left there. I wrote to Mr. Byng the same day - he lives fourteen miles off.

Q. Do not men often borrow hay on the road, and pay it when they come again - A. I cannot say; I watched the teams back in the afternoon; the horses fed out of the usual crate as others, and I saw them put their own hay into the crate for the horses.

JOSEPH GATES . I am a tailor. I was with Conway on the morning of the 26th of January, and saw two carts come to the Archway public-house. Osborne delivered a whole truss of hay from his cart to Wyman, who put it into a crate, which stood to receive it. Osborne drove on, and the next cart came up, driven by Smith; he left a truss of hay, and something else.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a constable - A. No, Conway employed me to go with him. I was about six yards from the house; we watched for another opportunity to take them.

Q. Do you happen to be an informer - A. I have not laid many informations. I have been before Dr. Owen, as a witness, when informations were laid by Conway. I will not swear that I have not laid a dozen informations.

JOHN SMITH . I was in the service of Mr. Byng, and was at the Archway public-house, with Osborne; we had no business there. On the 26th of June, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I drove one team, and Osborne the other. Wyman was hostler at the stable. I have known him about six months. Our carts were loaded with hay. Osborne left one truss with Wyman to make some money of it; he took it into the yard. Mr. Byng did not deal with him. I was taken up for what I did, and allowed to be a witness, and have come from prison now.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Byng - A. Two years; my team was behind Osborne's.

Q. You do not know that he did not borrow hay, and this was to repay him - A. No, I never borrowed any. Conway took me up, but I had no conversation with him. Osborne has been fourteen or fifteen years with Mr. Byng. When I saw my master, I told him the truth. I had thirty-eight trusses in the waggon, one for the horses, and one to leave with the hostler.

MR. GEORGE BYNG . I gave Osborne no authority to sell hay on the road.

WYMAN'S Defence. They left the hay, and had it when they came back, which they often did before; they asked me to put it by, and I did.

OSBORNE GUILTY. Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Days .

WYMAN GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-111

1083. WILLIAM CUMBERS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 48 lbs. of butter, value 1 l., and a basket, value 1 s. , the goods of James Banks .

JAMES BANKS . I am porter at the Green Man and Still, public-house, Oxford-street. I had a flat of butter in my care. I had just taken it from the waggon. I saw the prisoner there from three o'clock in the morning till four or five, looking at the butter, and other goods standing there. There were nearly a hundred flats of butter there. I believe he was a hackney coachman, and belonged to the first coach on the stand. Between four and five o'clock, a waggon came up and left eight flats of butter, which were put on the pavement. I saw the prisoner, while I was looking at the bill, take up one flat; and I said,

"Don't meddle with that, for I shall not know where to find it." He made no answer. I went in doors to sign my name to the bill, and ten minutes after, one flat was gone. I followed and saw him in about ten minutes, and charged him with stealing it. He said,

"Steal a flat of butter! I know nothing of any butter." He did not appear to be wrong in his mind at that time. He was feeding the first horses in the rank.

JOHN ROOK . I am a job porter - I was near the Green Man and Still, and saw the prisoner take the butter and put it on his back. I hallowed out, and he dropped it at the corner of Regent-street, and ran off.

JOHN STAPLES . I took him in charge, with the butter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

JOHN ALLCOCK . I am a wheelwright, and live in Whitecross-street, and have known the prisoner twelve years. About twelve months ago, he had a fit of sickness, which affected his head, he has done work for me since, which I have been obliged to do over again myself.

NOT GUILTY. - Believing him Insane .

Reference Number: t18230910-112

1084. RICHARD CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a spoon, value 7 s. , the goods of the Dowager Duchess of Rutland .

The Court ruled, that the owner of the property was not sufficiently described.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-113

1085. HENRY DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , two pounds and a half of horse hair, value 2 s. , the goods of John Harpford .

THOMAS SPIVEY . I am in the service of John Harpford , who deals in horse hair - the prisoner was in the service of Mr. Yates, next door - this horse-hair was in a bin in the back warehouse, which we rent of Yates; the evening before this happened, we tied up a piece of horse-hair with a ticket in the middle, to detect whoever might take it. I watched on the morning of the 1st of August, about five o'clock, and saw a hand come through the boards and pull the hair through into Yates's premises. I waited eight or ten minutes, and heard Humphries saying,

"Harry, you are doing what is wrong." I went round into Magpie-alley, and found the prisoner in charge, and the hair with the ticket in it.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . I am a pewterer, in Yates's service the prisoner was near fifteen months in his employ. I saw him pull this hair through the boards. I then said,

"Harry, you have done a thing that is wrong;" he ran away, leaving the hair on the ground; we pursued, and brought him back.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did he get it off the premises - A. Yes; he bore an excellent character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-114

1086. PATRICK CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , five pieces of wood, value 18 d. , the goods of Samuel Baxter .

JAMES PERRY . I am servant to Samuel Baxter , a builder . On the 24th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Regent-street , and saw the prisoner cross the street and go into one of Mr. Baxter's houses, and come out with these boards - he said he was going to make free with them - they are worth 1 s. 6 d.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a dispute between him and me at a public-house. I buy shavings of the carpenters, and bought this among shavings.

JAMES PERRY re-examined. I have ordered him off the premises before, that is all the dispute I had with him; he had bought shavings there before, but the men would sell him no more - there was nobody in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-115

1087. JAMES COULSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , three books, value 18 d., and a pair of trowsers, value 20 s. , the goods of John Franklin Williams .

JOHN FRANKLIN WILLIAMS . I am a silk dyer , and live in Haughton-street, Islington . On the 11th of July, the prisoner, who I knew before, called and asked to go into my privy, my hymn and prayer-books were in the parlour, the trowsers were in the window, but were taken at a different time. I went out with him at a quarter past eight in the evening, returned at nine, and missed them.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am fourteen years old, the prisoner went out with my father in the evening; I am sure the trowsers were then in the parlour window; he came back alone in about five minutes, and said he knew of a place for me, and wanted pen and ink to write the direction, but I would not leave the room. I was looking out of the other window - he staid a short time and told me not to tell my father that he had been back, on any account; he went out with the tail of his coat wrapped round him - nobody but him had called - my little sister and I were alone in the house, and before my father returned, I missed the trowsers, and went to look for him, but he was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You had been in disgrace with your father - A. My father beat me, saying, I must have left the door open, or taken the book myself, and the prisoner said, it served me right.

MR. LAW to MR. WILLIAMS. Q. Had not you some conversation with the prisoner about your son before this - A. I said he had left the door open, and been at play while the books were stolen. I sent for the prisoner next day, to say I had a place for him, and then secured him.

DANIEL WARREN . I am a headborough. I apprehended the prisoner at Williams's house, and found a leaf of the hymn-book with Williams's name on it, he said, he knew nothing of it.

JOHN FRANKLIN WILLIAMS . This is the leaf of my hymn-book, my writing is on it - it was in the book that day.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-116

1088. THOMAS CALVERT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , a hat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Marriott .

WILLIAM MARRIOTT . On the 22d of July, I was at my master's, Mr. Minster's, Regent-street . The prisoner came in and asked for Mr. Phillips, who lived on the first floor. He took my hat off the counter and went out; he had his own on, but was intoxicated, and perhaps made a mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-117

1089. PATRICK DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a live tame fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of Jacob Sulan .

JACOB SULAN . I live in Montague-street, Brick-lane . I had about a dozen fowls, and missed one on the 31st of July, and found it dead in my yard, thrown behind a stove in the foundry.

JOHN OTTEN . I am a musical-instrument-maker, and live four doors from Sulan. I saw the prisoner on the 31st of July, between twelve and one o'clock, coming out of Sulan's foundry with a fowl, he threw it under a cart, took it up again, and threw it into the foundry-yard, and came out with the men, who were leaving work. I ran down stairs, and told Sulan who it was.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where were you - A. At work in my garret. I knew the prisoner before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-118

1090. JOHN EASTOP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a coach-glass, value 18 s. the goods of John Gower .

JOHN GOWER . I am a coachmaker , and live in the City-road; the prisoner worked for me about a fortnight before; this coach-glass was in the landau - I was out at the time.

WILLIAM HUGGINS . I am a patrol. On the 14th of August, about a quarter to one o'clock, I stopped the prisoner, going through the turnpike-gate at Battle-bridge, with this coach-glass under his coat; he said he was going to Kentish-town - I asked what he had got; he said, only a piece of paper, but I found the glass; he then offered me 5 s. to let him go, and said he would tell me where he got it. The other patrol asked him where he stole it; he said from Mr. Gower, of Old-street; part of Gower's premises are in Old-street; he was liberated from the watch-house next day, by mistake. I went to Gower's, and this glass fitted one of his landaus.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought in with this glass, and let out by mistake. I afterwards found him under the bed at his lodgings.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to stop by the side of a wall, opposite Penton-street, and found the glass there.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-119

1091. JAMES HALEY was indicted for stealing on the 3d of September , a sheet, value 3 s.; a shirt, value 1 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 d.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three caps, value 1 s.; a frill, value 6 d; an apron, value 4 d., and a petticoat, value 1 s. , the goods of Edward Kimpton .

SARAH KIMPTON . I am wife of Edward Kimpton , we live in Bermondsey New-road . On the 3d of September, between nine and ten o'clock at night, these things were in a dish in the parlour. I got up at seven o'clock in the morning and they were gone - I found them at the office.

SARAH KIMPTON . I am fifteen years old. I got up at six o'clock in the morning, and opened the door and went

into the yard, every thing was then safe. I sat down in the kitchen, and did not go into the parlour again till mother came down.

RICHARD CARTER . I am a constable. Gray stopped the prisoner in my presence on Tower-hill, about twenty minutes to eight o'clock in the morning with these things in a bundle; he said they were clothes he had brought from his mother, and afterwards that he had found them. I found a wet shirt round his body.

THOMAS GRAY . Carter's account is correct.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-120

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1092. JOHN HOGAN was indicted for, that he on the 10th of September , at St. Peter, Paul's Wharf, in and upon William Edward Wetton , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously and unlawfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did strike and cut the said William Edward Wetton , in and upon his left side, with intent feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully to kill and murder him, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to he to disable the said William Edward Wetton .

THIRD COUNT, the same as the two former, only stating the prisoner's intent to be, to do some grievous bodily harm to the said William Edward Wetton .

WILLIAM EDWARD WETTON . I am a baker , in the service of Mr. Burnet, of Thames-street. The prisoner came there about a fortnight before this circumstance, to ask for work; he assisted us three nights in the business, and then my master sent him after a situation; he did not come again till Tuesday evening, the 9th of August, and as a favour wished Mr. Burnet to let him work with us till Saturday, to learn a little, that he might be better able to go into his situation. Mr. Burnet allowed him, and about half-past eleven o'clock that night, when I came to work, he was down in the bake-house - I said

"How do you do, John?" he said,

"How do you do, Sir." I asked why he did not return on the day he left; he said, he did not like to trouble my master. I proceeded to work - and after that offered him a sack apron to assist us in making the dough; he said,

"No, happen to make it your self." I accordingly helped my fellow-servant Robins to make it, which took rather better than half an hour; and after I had washed my hands, I turned round to him, and said

"John, I don't think you are very fond of work, and that won't do - for in London, bakers work very hard;" (it might then be about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock;) he said, he liked work very well. I said, I thought, by his refusing, he did not; and that is all that passed. I then jumped up on the board, took up half a pound of meat, which I had bought, and some bread and beer, which master allows us, and said "John, will you have some meat?" he said,

"Ah, thank you." I accordingly made room for him to sit down by my side, which he did; I gave him about half my meat, he eat it and drank with me - Robins sat on the other board. After I had done, he removed from his place, and wished me to lay down, and said, he would mind time for me; I said, I did not particularly wish him to sit up, for I should be sure to awake - he said he was not tired, and would sit up; I said,

"I suppose you are fresh, as you have not been at work, and may sit up, if you are disposed, but I don't wish it." He asked at what time he should call me; I said, if he was awake, he might call me at half-past two o'clock. I laid down, covered a sack over me, and went to sleep - it was then about one o'clock - I slept till about twenty minutes past two o'clock, when I was awoke, by feeling some person cutting my throat - it was perfectly dark, for the candle was out; there was only me, him, and Robins in the place - I jumped off the board, and jumped against some person, who kept cutting at me, and just as I jumped off the board, I received a cut in the hand, and when I got my hand up to my throat, I felt the blood and the wound, and received a cut over my hand and finger. I called out Murder, and continued to struggle with him, as he continued to struggle with me. I felt that it was the prisoner, and could tell him by the feel of his body; he was stout, and I knew that it was not Robins, for he was calling for assistance. We struggled together for about five minutes - I was calling out all the time, and at last I threw him down, and fell uppermost upon him; I got up directly, and attempted to escape up the ladder into the shop - he was close behind me; I turned round on him, and felt a razor in his hand, and took it from him, and by so doing cut my arm.

Q. Was there no talking all this time - A. I was calling out, but he never said a word; he was catching his breath very hard, as if out of wind. As soon as I got the razor out of his hand, I attempted to make my way up the ladder into the shop - I got one foot on the ladder; he tried to pull me down, and when he found he could not, he ran upon a level behind me. I threw up the trap with my hand and all this while was calling out, and just at that moment, he endeavoured to put his hand into the left side of my neck, where it was wounded, and by so doing to tear the wound wider; he never said a word. I was calling as loud as I could all the while, and when I got into the shop the watchmen were knocking at the door, hearing me cries. He still continued to tussle with me, till he saw my master on the stairs with a candle - he then ran down into the bake-house, but before my master came down, I could see by the light from the lamps in the street that it was him, and swear to him, as the shutters do not go to the top of the windows; he went down into the bake-house, and was brought into the shop by the watchman, a very few minutes after, from the back-yard - he could not have got there without going through the passage, and up the coal place. My master let the patrol and watchmen in. The patrol asked him how he came to do it; he said he did not do it - that he was reaching for the razor over my head to cut his nails (it was in the paste-board box,) and after he cut them, was putting it up again, and it fell down, and cut my throat. During the three days he was there before, he used to lay down, and sleep very sound without any covering whatever, on the bare boards of the bake-house - this was a fortnight before.

JOHN ROBINS . I was in Mr. Burnet's service. On the 9th of September Wetton and I had slept in one bed-room

till half-past eleven o'clock, then went into the bake-house, and saw the prisoner there; Wetton asked me to make the dough along with John, the prisoner - I declined making it with him, because I knew he could not make it so well as Wetton; so Wetton and I made it; we might be half an hour or twenty minutes about it. He then asked John to come and have a bit of supper with him; he said, Yes, and supped with him on the same board, and I had my supper on the other side of the bake-house, and after supper Wetton was going to lay down - I had to get some coals, and when I came back, I sat on the board, and took a pipe of tobacco; they were then still eating - some rats came from under the trough; Wetton threw a knife at them; then Wetton went to sleep. I did not hear the prisoner say anything to him. I went to sleep, and was awoke by Wetton crying Murder; I kept on saying,

"What is the matter with you, are you mad," thinking he had awoke out of a dream; but I found him and the prisoner skirmishing together - it was quite dark. Wetton went up the ladder, and the prisoner behind him, and I after him. Wetton said,

"Murder, for God's sake come down Master, for I am murdered" - he said so frequently. I did not know that it was the prisoner, except from knowing that nobody else was there. My master came down in his shirt, with a light - I saw then that it was the prisoner who was struggling with Wetton. When the light came he went down into the bake-house, and I heard him crawling up the coals, next the bake-house, to get into the yard - two watchmen came in, and went with me into the bake-house, with a light - we could not see him; so we went into the yard, and there found him. One of the watchmen brought him in; he was charged with attempting to murder Wetton, and said he did not do it, that he had been paring his nails, and was putting the razor up again, and it fell out of his hand, on Wetton's neck. I saw Wetton covered with blood.

Q. What had you drank together - A. We had three pots of small beer, among us, not porter; a pot each.

JURY. Q. Was it usual to keep the razor open - A. It has no handle; it was in a box, on the ledge, on the brickwork - it could not be seen by anybody; it had been left there by a servant who was gone. I did not hear the prisoner say a word. I was so frightened, I rendered no assistance - I did not know what to be about. I really do not know how I got off the board, or what I did or said, I was so alarmed. We have no handkerchiefs in where we lay down. Wetton was covered with a sack, but his neck was not covered; he had his shirt and drawers on. The razor was not exactly above his head; it was quite blunt.

BARTHOLOMEW SCANLAN . I am patrol of Castle Baynard Ward. I was alarmed by the cries of murder, and went to Mr. Burnet's house as quick as possible. Another watchman was at the door before me. I heard a scuffle in the shop, and heard Mr. Burnett's voice, and heard a voice saying,

"He has cut my throat with a razor." I sent the watchman to one door, and told him to let no one out. I stood at the other, and knocked. Mr. Burnet opened it. I went into the shop, and saw the prosecutor all covered with blood. I could hardly see a bit of him but what was bloody. He was holding a cloth or handkerchief to his neck. I went into the bake-house, as they said the man was there, but he was not. I came into the shop, and the prisoner then stood there. They pointed him out as the man who had done it. He said nothing. I asked what induced him to commit so wicked or so rash a deed. He said he did not do it.

"Why," said I,

"there is nobody else to do it but you." He said,

"I was paring my nails, and the razor fell on his neck." I asked how he came by the razor. He said he found it in a box on the shelf, over the board which they make the bread on, and it fell from his hand when he was cutting his nails, and he pointed to his fingers, to shew me that he had been cutting his nails, but I cannot say that they had been cut. I looked round, and saw the blade of a razor laying on the shop counter. Wetton said in his presence that it was the blade of the razor he cut him with, and that he forced it out of his hand. The prisoner said nothing that I recollect. I took it up, and kept it. (Producing it.) I took him to the watch-house, returned, and assisted Wetton to the hospital.

JURY. Q. Were the prisoner's hands bloody - A. Yes; and his shirt; there was a great many marks of blood over his body. The razor was very bloody.

LEWIS FACHE . I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in. He was very much covered with blood. All the back part of his coat, his hands, and shirt were bloody, both back and front. I found an Irish silver coin on him.

JAMES BURNET . These persons were in my employ. About half-past two o'clock, in the morning of the 10th, my wife awoke me by saying there were cries of murder in the bake-house. I pushed up the window, to see if it was not in the street, then ran down with a light, and when on the stairs I saw Wetton standing at the bottom of the stairs wholly covered with blood. I enquired the cause. He said John Hogan bad attempted to cut his throat, as he laid asleep on the boards. Hogan was then about two yards behind him. I took him by the shoulder, called him a villain, and asked his reason for so doing; I do not recollect that he made any answer. I pushed him down stairs into the bake-house - a lodger brought me down the key; I opened the door, and let Scanlan in, and sent him into the bake-house, telling him to take the prisoner to the Compter. I asked Wetton if there had been any altercation between them; he said none. The prisoner was not present.

MR. HURLOCK. I am a surgeon. I was called to attend Wetton, on the 10th, between two and three o'clock in the morning, at the hospital, and found he had received a very extensive wound in the neck; the cut was of considerable extent; but very superficial, not deep at all; no material part had been divided. I observed no tearing or laceration - he had a small wound higher up the back of the neck, a small one on the shoulder, and others on the fingers; he had three or four wounds, none of which could be the result of an accidental fall of a razor; had the wound on the neck been of any depth, unless immediately stopped, it would have been attended with death; it occupied a full third of the neck.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the razor out of the box. cut my nails with it, and in throwing it up again, it fell on his neck - I made a leap off the board, and knocked out the candle with the side of my head; I made a grasp to catch hold of the razor again. He leaped off the board, and caught hold of me, and knocked me down; and when I caught hold of the razor, I let it go.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18230910-121

1093. GEORGE GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , a handkerchief, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Fourdrinier .

JOSEPH FOURDRINIER . On the 24th of July, I was on Ludgate-hill , and felt a person tug at my pocket, turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the hands of the prisoner - took it from him, and collared him. He said he did not take it - several people were passing. I gave him in charge.

ROBERT HESKETH . I took him in charge as the prosecutor brought him along the Old Bailey.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy, eight or ten years old, took the handkerchief - I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder, and told him of it; he immediately knocked me through a pane of glass, and gave me a black eye - then he followed the boy, and took it from him.

JOSEPH FOURDRINIER . He stated this at the Mansion House; but never told me a boy had taken it. Nobody touched me on the shoulder.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-122

1094. JOHN YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , four hundred and thirty-six halfpence, and two-pence , the monies of Henry Forsyth .

HENRY FORSYTH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Broadway, Blackfriars . On the 18th of July, about two o'clock, I was dining in the kitchen - heard somebody in the shop - went up and found the prisoner there; he asked if I wanted my chimneys swept. I asked who he came from - he said he was in business for himself - seeing that he held his arms in a suspicious manner, I took hold of him, and found two papers of halfpence in his side pockets, which I immediately recognized as mine - and asked if he had any more, he said not. I told him to take off his hat, and there I found two more 5 s. papers, they were wrapped in the leaves of the same book I packed mine in - he acknowledged it, and pleaded distress. I looked and missed four papers from the end of the shop.

JOHN HARPER . I took the prisoner in charge - he said it was his first offence, and begged to be let go.

HENRY FORSYTH . Here are the halfpence, they are tied up in the

"Memoirs of Mary Crick ."

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-123

1095. MARGARET DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , four gowns, value 34 s.; two frocks, value 15 s.; a pelisse, value 10 s.; a petticoat, value 18 d.; six neckerchiefs, value 6 s.; a shirt, value 10 s.; three pair of stockings, value 18 d.; a pair of shoes, value 4 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; six frills, value 6 s.; seven caps, value 7 s., and a veil, value 3 s., the goods of Richard John Draper , her master .

RICHARD JOHN DRAPER . I am a china-dealer , and live in St. Sepulchre's ; the prisoner came into our service on a Monday, and absconded on the Saturday following, and this property was missing.

MRS. DRAPER. I am the prosecutor's wife. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the night she left - they were safe about eleven o'clock - she left after that time.

JOHN JUTSHAM . I am a watchman. On the 26th of July, Saturday, at half past twelve o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in Blackfriars-road, with a bundle, containing this property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master turned me out of doors - somebody gave me some liquor. I returned for my clothes, and being intoxicated tied up these things with my own.

GUILTY Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-124

1096. JOHN HODSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a pair of trowsers, value 18 s. the goods of Robert Essex .

SPENCER SMITH . I am servant to Robert Essex , pawnbroker , Aldersgate-street . On the 31st of July, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was behind the counter, and saw the line moving - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running up Falcon-square, with a pair of trowsers on his arm - I called Stop thief! He threw them down, and I picked them up.

GEORGE CRUX . I was coming from my house, in Falcon-square, and met several people calling Stop thief! The prisoner was running towards me with the trowsers; he threw them down as I laid hold of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them from the door. I saw another lad throw them down, and picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-125

1097. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , two decanters, value 30 s. , the goods of Robert William Wright .

ROBERT WILLIAM WRIGHT . I live in Bishopsgate-street , and am a cut-glass-dealer . I found the prisoner in my shop, and gave him in charge. I know these decanters by a private mark.

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I am servant to Mr. Wright. On the 28th of August, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was dusting the desk at the end of the shop, and on turning round saw the prisoner behind the counter, with these decanters in his apron; he asked where Johnson, a tailor, lived - I said I knew no such person; and asked what he was doing with the decanters; he said he wanted to know if they would do for Johnson - I took them from him, and he acknowledged taking them from the window.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-126

1098. GEORGE LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , sixteen sheets of printed paper, value 6 s. , the goods of Stephen Couchman .

STEPHEN COUCHMAN . I am a printer and bookseller ; the prisoner was my apprentice . I printed a book entitled

"A Voice from London;" the officer found it. I have trusted him with large sums at different times.

THOMAS DONELL . The prisoner breakfasted at my house every Sunday morning, as my wife washed for him. About

the beginning of April he brought me some printed papers to take care of, saying his master gave them to him, and he was going to bind it. I afterwards gave it to the officer.

STEPHEN COUCHMAN . I never gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the book merely for the purpose of reading it, and intended to return it - he wanted to get rid of me, to make room for two apprentices whom he was to have large premiums with.

STEPHEN COUCHMAN . I had a premium of fifty guineas with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-127

1099. SARAH ARCHER and MARY ANN COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a sovereign, four half-crowns, eight shillings, and four sixpences, the monies of Joseph Brown , from his person .

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a baker , and live in Bridgewater-gardens. On Sunday morning, the 13th of July, about one o'clock, I was in Long-lane , and saw the prisoners together; they occupied the pavement - I passed between them, in order to get by, and Cook caught hold of me in a very indecent manner, so that I could not go on for a moment or two. I said,

"You have hurt me very much; don't do that again." They followed me, and said,

"Be d - d if you shan't go with us." I said I wanted nothing with them. Cook caught hold of my coat - I put my hand against her breast, and said,

"I want nothing with you;" and at that time she put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took my money - I caught hold of her hand. Archer came behind her, and received it from her. I heard a sixpence fall. I let go of her, followed and took Archer - I took her to the watch-house, returned to the spot, and found a sovereign and 14 s. 6 d., about a quarter of an hour after. Cook was taken in ten minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Cook passed her hand behind you - A. No; across mine. We found 5 s. 9 d. on Archer. I lost no pence. I cannot say that she received it.

COURT. Q. What money had you before you met them - A. A sovereign and about 20 s.; the sovereign and 14 s. 6 d. were found about fourteen yards from where the sixpence was dropped. I might not have had more than that.

JAMES KNIGHT . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm; went to the spot in Carthusian-street; saw Archer; and Brown gave her in charge for robbing him of 2 l. She denied it, and on turning she dropped 2 s. Cook came running down the street, calling out,

"Sal;" and Brown said,

"This is the woman who took the money, and gave it to her." Cook denied it. I took her.

THOMAS CORAM . I am a watchman. On the 13th of July, in the morning, I went to the spot, hearing a cry of

"Stop thief!" and saw Archer running up Carthusian-street. We overtook her. Brown gave her in charge. He borowed my lanthorn, and picked up 6 d., and in Aldersgate-street she dropped 2 s., which I picked up. Cook came running after her, and he gave her in charge. When we returned from the watch-house we picked up a sovereign and 14 s. 6 d., about twenty yards from where we found the 6 d.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am a constable. 5 s. 9 d. was given to me. The parties were quite sober.

ARCHER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

COOK - GUILTY Aged 24.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-128

1100. JOSEPH ASHFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , nineteen yards of woollen cloth, value 16 l., the goods of William Brown , in his dwelling-house .

STEPHEN WHITE . I am servant to William Brown , a tailor , who lives in Barbican . On the 3d of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was taking down the shutters, and crossing the shop with them, when Plumpton came and spoke to me. I turned round, and missed a piece of cloth off the counter, which I had put there overnight.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw nobody take it - A. No; I am sure it was not sold.

JAMES KELLY . On the 3d of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Barbican, and saw the prisoner and another with him go to Brown's shop. When the man crossed the shop with the shutters the prisoner followed him in, and came out with a roll of cloth, and ran down Barbican with it, and I after him, but lost him. I knew him before by sight. I saw him in Bunhill-row several times, and told Van next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him several times; where - A. Walking in Bunhill-row; and always ran for Vann; but he was gone when we came. I thought it was not right to give an alarm till I got an officer. He was about one hundred yards from me. I was by Red Cross-street. It was dark cloth.

JURY. Q. What made you look at him - A. Knowing him, I was induced to watch him.

GEORGE PLUMPTON . I am a shoe-maker, and live opposite Mr. Brown. I did not see the prisoner go into this shop, but saw him come out with the cloth. He walked towards Smithfield. I had no reason to suspect him; but thought it strange, as the shop was just open, it struck me all might not be right. I fastened my own door, and ran over to White; then ran up Jacob's-well-passage, but saw nothing of him. I have no doubt of his being the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before - A. No; I saw his face as he came out. I heard no cry of Stop thief! nor saw the witness pursuing him.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 3d of July, about eight o'clock in the morning, Kelly gave me information, and described the prisoner to me, and fetched me several times, saying that he was at the Rose and Crown, Bunhill-row, but I was always too late. He fetched me on the 11th, and I found the prisoner coming out of the Rose and Crown. He answered Kelly's description. I took him. He denied the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is this house from Brown's - A. Nearly half a mile. I know Kelly. He lives with a respectable bedstead-maker.

JOHN MANCE . I am a constable. I went with Vann, and took the prisoner, who Kelly pointed out. He said he was never in Barbican.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the transaction. I never saw the witness in my life. He looked at me for ten minutes, and said not a word. If I had been placed among other people, he would not have known me.

THOMAS VANN . He pointed him out before we took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-129

1101. JAMES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , six pieces of tape, value 2 s. 2 d.; ten pieces of wrapper, containing twenty-four yards, value 30 s.;

five ounces and a half of twist, value 10 s. 6 d.; two lbs. of worsted, value 4 s. 6 d.; twelve shawl tassels, value 3 s., and twenty-four pieces of bobbin, value 1 s. 11 d., the goods of John Woolmer , his master .

JOHN VENABLES . I am shopman to Mr. John Woolmer , haberdasher , Cripplegate , the prisoner was in his service. On the 29th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the water-closet, and saw him standing on the cill, putting something on a beam; as soon as he was gone, I went and examined the beam, and found a dozen of tape, No. 145. I replaced it, and the same day went again - it was gone. On the Thursday, I found two dozen of bobbin there, which was mine. On the 1st of August, I found two dozen and fifteen of bobbin, which went in the evening. On the 5th, I found half a dozen of tape, and fetched Mr. Woolmer, who examined it - he placed an officer, at the door, and in the evening when the prisoner was going home, the tape was found on him - he said it was his first offence.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable. I was sent for and took the prisoner, and found the tape in his pocket - he said it was the first he ever took.

The prisoner put in a written Defence begging for Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-130

NINTH DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1102. EBENEZER TOMS was indicted for stealing, a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Hector , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230910-131

1103. DJENA , BAUXA , MOOSTEIN , and DOWLET were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a boiler, value 35 s. , the goods of Robert Taylor and John Pedlar , and WILLIAM GARDENER , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

ROBERT TAYLOR . I was one of the owners of the ship Upton Castle . I sold her at the end of July or beginning of August; some boilers were left on board; they were not sold with the ship; they were for the use of the Lascars, and were the property of myself and John Pedlar .

WILLIAM RAYNER . I was mate of this ship, and on the 6th of August I gave Djena a pass to take two boilers from our vessel to the Barkworth; they laid ashore, close by our vessel, in Wigram's Dock, Blackwall; the prisoners were boiling rice in them; Djena was our Serang, or boatman , and the others were mariners on board.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The Serang is a person who the other men look up to - A. Yes. They don't like other persons to use their cajee pot, they have a sort of superstition about it.

FRANCIS DAVIS . I am gateman of the Dock. I saw four black men going out with a pot, they said they were going to the Barkworth with it - I said they could not go further without a pass; they went and brought one, it was about five o'clock in the afternoon.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 8th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was opposite Gardener's shop, in Ratcliffe-highway; he is a brazier and coppersmith - I saw six or seven black men come out; Bauxa, Moostein, and Dowlet, are three of them

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Gardener carries on a very extensive business - A. Yes. He gave us every information. I found the pot on his premises the next day, not concealed at all; he pointed it out directly, and said he bought it of some Lascars.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames Police surveyor, and was with White, and saw the Lascars come out of Gardener's house. I looked through the window, and saw the boiler in the scales. I went there next morning with a warrant. and asked Gardener if he had bought a boiler last night, of some Lascars; he said he did, and there it was - I said it was stolen; he said, if he had known it he would not have bought it. I asked if he put it down in his book; he said no, but he chalked it on the counter, and shewed me the memorandum of it, and said he gave 35 s. for it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was admitted to bail by a Judge - A. Yes.

CHARLES READ . I am an Inspector to the Gas Company. I saw seven or eight Lascars looking into Gardener's shop, and six or seven inside. I saw Gardener pay them for the copper, which was in the scales. I cannot swear to the prisoners.

WILLIAM WARREKER . I am porter to Mr. Gardener, and was in the shop when he bought this pot of the Lascars; all the prisoners but Moostein were among them. I afterwards put it into the back shop for convenience.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there anything secret in it - A. No. He refused to buy it till the Serang said it was the men's property.

DJENA'S Defence (through an Interpreter). It is my property, according to the custom of the country.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-132

Before Mr. Recorder.

1103. JAMES LOWNDSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a necklace, value 5 s.; an ink stand, value 6 d.; a pair of ear-rings, value 2 s., and a brooch, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Coombs .

CHARLOTTE COOMBS . I am the wife of Samuel Coombs - the prisoner lodged with us; these things were in a chest of drawers, in his bed-room - I left the key in them on the 7th of August, and on the 11th I missed them. He slept there alone; I told him he had stolen them; he denied it, but afterwards said he had pawned them, and destroyed the duplicates. I live in Cotten-street, Poplar .

JOHN FLYGER . I am a broker. I bought the ink stand of the prisoner on the 10th, put it in my window, and Coombs claimed it.

ALEXANDER BUCK . I am an officer of the Customs. I met the prisoner one evening - he said he was distressed, and asked me to lend him 1 s. on the duplicate of a brooch, pawned at Wood's, which I did, and redeemed it. He bore a good character.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-133

1104. GEORGE FLETCHER was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-134

1105. THOMAS POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Sarah Wilson , spinster .

SARAH WILSON . I live in Galway-street, Bath-street, City-road , and have apartments on the first floor. Two years ago, I met the prisoner in Finsbury-square, about five o'clock in the afternoon - I had seen him before, in company with a gentleman; he asked me to go out on horseback with him; I consented, and he went home with me - my watch was on the table; he noticed it, and said one of the hands were broken, and he would get it mended, and return with it that evening; I entrusted him with it for that purpose, and did not see him again for twelve months after, when I met him in the City-road, on one of the Paddington-stages - I stopped the stage; he got down. I asked him for my watch; he said, that going from my house that evening, he was arrested, and put into the Bench, and had since that been to France, and brought me home a chain and seals to the watch, and if I would let him go home, he would return at seven o'clock that evening with them - we parted, and I did not see him again till three weeks ago, and then gave him into custody. My watch was produced at Worship-street; it is worth 10 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often did he call with this gentleman - A. Frequently, for two years before; he might call alone. I knew his name, and where his uncle lived, and have told persons to enquire there about him - I did not go to his uncle's myself; I did not meet him at the Theatre after the watch was taken. I am certain he never gave me 2 l. for it.

Q. You are a young lady who see company - A. Yes, I am. He did not visit me as such, but his friend did. His friend has been abroad ever since.

WILLIAM JAMES BOLTON . I am an attorney, and live in Wynyatt-street, Goswell-street-road. About the later end of January last, I lent the prisoner 1 l. upon the duplicate of a watch and three seals, pawned at Ashman's, in the Strand, for 3 l. 10 s. I redeemed the watch in August, and have it here - I paid 6 s. interest, from November last. I had seen him wear the watch for twelve months prior.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long - A. Three years; he was in a respectable attorney's office. He frequently wore the watch, with the seals attached.

COURT. Q. Have you seen it in his possession further back than a year - A. It may be a year or two. I cannot say.

PRESS KNIPE . I am an officer. On Friday night, three weeks ago, I understood that a lady in Cheapside, had lost her watch. There was a mob, and I found the prosecutrix holding the prisoner, and accusing him of stealing her watch; he wanted to go to the watch-house. I took him to the Compter - he acknowledged receiving the watch; he said he took it from her house; but that he had seen her two or three times since, and had given her 2 l. for it - she denied that.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he gave her 2 l. for it at the Theatre, and if she returned the 2 l., he would return the watch - A. That was before the Magistrate.

SARAH WILSON . This is my watch. The seals are not mine - he never gave me any money; it is totally false.

The prisoner, in a written Defence, after alluding to the prosecutrix's situation in life, stated that while the watch was at the watchmaker's, he met her at Covent-Garden Theatre; where she said he might keep it by giving her 3 l. - that he had only 2 l. about him, which he gave her, and on meeting her three weeks ago, in Cheapside, she demanded it, and gave him in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-135

1106. JOHN EALES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a saddle, value 20 s., and a bridle, value 5 s. , the goods of John Boot .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE CULVER . I am servant to Mr. Boot, who lives at Chigwell . On the 30th of July, at night, this bridle and saddle were safe in the stable. Next morning at five o'clock they were gone.

JOHN BOOT . I lost my bridle and saddle, and found them on the following Monday, at Beacham's. The prisoner had been in my service a few weeks previous.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What was he - A. He worked as under gardener; he said he received it from Robert. I have a servant of that name - he is now with me. I did not think it necessary to bring him here.

JOHN BEACHAM . I live in Whitechapel-road, and am a harness-maker. I bought this saddle and bridle of the prisoner, on the 1st of August, for 15 s.; he said they were old ones, which his master had given him.

MR. BOOT. I never intimated that I had done using them; they were in use at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-136

1107. THOMAS CANE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a watch, value 30 s., the goods of John Woodley , from his person .

JOHN WOODLEY . I am shepherd to Mr. Passingham, at Heston. On Saturday night, the 12th of July, about twelve o'clock, I had been at a public-house at Hounslow , and coming back the prisoner asked if I was going home; I said, Yes. I was sober - he asked if I had got my watch; I said Yes, and asked why he wanted to know; he said I had better give it him, or very likely I should be robbed before I got home - he lived at Hounslow. I have met with an accident, which prevents my defending myself. He took it from me - I did not give it to him. I thought he meant to return it. I went on Monday, and asked him for it - he denied having ever seen it. He was taken into custody three weeks after.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVITT. Q. Have you not often drank with him - A. Yes. I was not tipsy that night: I have been tipsy at times, and thrown my money about - he has taken care of it, and given it to me afterwards. He walked some way with me, and said I had better let him have the watch - I did not object to his taking it from my pocket, having no idea that he meant to steal it.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable. In consequence of what passed at the prisoner's examination, I went to Edmonds's, who delivered the watch to me.

RICHARD EDMONDS . I am a watchmaker in Brentford-end. About three weeks before the prisoner was apprehended, I bought this watch of him, for 14 s., repaired it

and sold it to a neighbour. Cook came about it, and I got it back.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner, on the 2d of August - he said he knew nothing of the watch; but told me next day, voluntarily, that Woodley gave it into his hands, and he sold it to a watchmaker at Brentford-end.

Cross-examined. Q. He said at first that he did not steal it - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-137

1108. GEORGE CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , an umbrella, value 3 s., the goods of John Vincent , from the person of Sarah Ann Vincent .

SARAH ANN VINCENT . I am eleven years old, and live at Heston. My father's name is John. I was coming from school, about five o'clock, in the afternoon, on the 28th of July, close by the fields, between Lambton and Heston - my umbrella was shut up. A man came and said if I did not give it him, he would strip me. He took it out of my hand; there was nobody near, and he got away. I saw the prisoner again before the Magistrate, two or three days after, and am certain he is the man; my cousin, who is younger than I, was with me.

THOMAS ROPER . I am a labourer, and live at Heston. I saw this child crying bitterly; another girl was with her, and said a man had snatched an umbrella from her. I had met the prisoner about a hundred yards off, about five minutes before they cried out. I am certain of him.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable. On the 20th, I apprehended the prisoner - he said he had taken the umbrella. I told him to hold his tongue, but he would confess.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-138

1109. WILLIAM HAWKINS , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , five shillings and eight sixpences , the monies of John Lord .

ROBERT G - . I am shopman to John Lord , oilman , Cromer-street . On the 4th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the back of the shop, turned round, and saw the prisoner behind the counter, taking the money out of the till. I got up, and stopped him behind the counter, and took five shillings and eight sixpences from his hand. He said he had never done so before. There were two more boys at the window, who walked away in about a minute.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I received him in charge, and took the money from his hand.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-139

1110. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Shoosmith .

WILLIAM SHOOSMITH . I am a linen-draper , and live in Oxford-street . On the 25th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, these handkerchiefs were pinned inside the door. A person informed me they were stolen, and pointed the prisoner out. I took her about five yards off, and found them wrapped in her apron. She was very troublesome.

CHARLES GAST . I am a constable. I took her in charge. She said she would not go without seeing my authority.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the court, near his house. I passed his door; he called me back; I turned, and asked if they were his; he said Yes, and sent for an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-140

1111. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a hat, value 6 s. , the goods of John Rackett .

The prosecutor stated his name to be John Barton Rackett . the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230910-141

1112. EDWARD MEMORY and GEORGE SHEARLY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Wesson .

THOMAS WESSON . I live at Wandsworth, and drive a cart about with tares. On the 15th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Regent-street , and missed my coat from under some hay-bands in my cart. It was safe five minutes before, and could not have dropped out. I found the prisoners in custody next day, but have not found it.

HENRY ROGERS . I live at the Regency Arms, Regent-street. Wesson's cart stood opposite our window. He went to deliver a bill, and I saw Memory lift up the bundle of hay-bands, and draw a large dark coat out of the cart. Shearly followed him, with a pipe in his mouth, and no hat on. He was on one side of the cart, and Memory on the other. They walked a little way, and then ran. I did not go after them, as I knew Memory very well before, but not Shearly. I am certain of them both. Wesson came up in five minutes, and I told him of it, and informed the officer. They were taken in about five minutes.

CHARLES DEW . I am a messenger of Queen-square office. On the 15th of July, about two o'clock, I was informed of this robbery, and between four and five o'clock found the prisoners together in James-street, Westminster. Shearly had a pipe in his mouth, and no hat.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am an officer. I went with Dew, and found the prisoners in James-street. I have seen them in company frequently.

MEMORY'S Defence. I met Shearly by Westminster Infirmary. He asked me to walk to Chelsea with him, and while I was talking to him, the officer took us.

SHEARLY'S Defence. I was returning from Richmond with some salmon, about four o'clock. My sister sent for me; I started to go to her, and met Memory; I asked him to go with me, and the officer took us.

MEMORY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SHEARLY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-142

1113. WILLIAM PLAYER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a blanket, value 6 s. , the goods of Edward James Cotsford .

EDWARD JAMES COTSFORD . I am an auctioneer , and live in Shoreditch . This blanket was in my shop. On Sunday, the 30th of June, about ten o'clock at night, I heard a noise, and found my private door open, and the prisoner with one foot on the step. Another door must be opened to get at it. I asked what he wanted. He muttered something. He had something in his hand, which I thought was a great coat. I went into the parlour for a light, and in returning to the door, saw him running down the street. I ran round another way, and met him running into his own house, in George-street, with the blanket in his hand. I seized him, and he threw it down, and gave him in charge; returned, and missed the blanket. It was safe on Saturday night. The prisoner pretended to be very drunk, but ran very well.

JOHN SEERS . I am a stationer. I sent a number of blankets to Mr. Cotsford for sale, and believe this to be one.

Prisoner's Defence. If he thought I stole it, why go to my house, and offer to make it up.

EDWARD JAMES COTSFORD . His father came to me, but I never wished to make it up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-143

1114. WILLIAM ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I live in Portland-place , and am servant to Mrs. Parker; these shoes were in the servants'-hall, at half-past three o'clock, when I went out; they were stolen about an hour after.

JOHN SILVESTER . I am servant at this house. I was in the pantry about four o'clock in the afternoon, and heard the prisoner come into the passage; I went there, and saw him turn out of the servants'-hall, with his back towards me, and asked his business; he enquired if Sir Robert Sheffield lived there; I said, No; he then asked if any charcoal was wanted, and said he had been to Sir Robert's, and got an order, and as he turned to go out I saw the shoes in his pocket; immediately called to him to stop; he ran, and dropped one shoe on the steps - I caught him, with the other in his pocket. The area door was shut, but not locked.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I received him in charge, with the shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the deepest distress. I have a wife and child, and had no victuals for them for three days.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-144

1115. THOMAS STITCH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of John Hambleton .

JOHN HAMBLETON . On the 5th of August I lived in Colvill-court , and am a gentleman's servant ; the prisoner lived in the next room alone - this handkerchief was in a chest of drawers at eleven o'clock, when I went to bed, and at five in the morning it was gone; I had not locked my door. I told the landlord of it, and enquired about it in the house. The prisoner did not sleep there that night. I saw him at nine in the morning, and asked if he had found a handkerchief; he said,

"No, so help me God, I have not, or you should have it." He was taken up on the 16th for smuggling. I went into his room, and found the handkerchief.

MARY PIKE . I lodged in the house. On the 15th of July, a Revenue officer came. I saw the handkerchief found in a box under the prisoner's bed. It was known to all the lodgers that it was lost. The prisoner claimed the box it was in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it at half-past one o'clock, entering the house, and never heard that he had lost one. I told the landlord two days after that I had found it.

WILLIAM M'COMBIE . I am landlord of the house. He never told me he had found it. The prosecutor told me he had lost it at a public-house, or in the passage, but never said a word about losing it from his room.

JOHN HAMBLETON . I never told him so. I am certain it it was in my drawers. I never heard that he had found one.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-145

1116. JOHN SULLIVAN and JANE HEATLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , two plants, value 5 l., and two garden pots, value 2 d. the goods of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH . I live at Stoke Newington, and have a nursery at Islington . On Sunday morning, the 6th of July, about eight o'clock, in consequence of information, I missed two plants, which I had seen safe at four in the morning. I found the prisoners at the watch-house with them on the Monday morning. I am certain of their being mine; one is a particularly rare plant, the auricaria imbricator, from South America, and is the rarest plant we have in the country; it is worth five guineas; the other is the vitus illustrica, worth five shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were they planted in the ground - A. No, in pots in the green-house.

JOHN PADDINGTON . I am watchman of Park-place, Back-road, Islington. On Sunday morning, the 6th of July, at half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner Sullivan over in Smith's nursery, and Wheatley outside the pales. I was calling the hour, and I saw them just before I set out to call the hour; they were about a hundred yards from my box. I saw Sullivan hand over what appeared to me to be blue flowers, and as I came along calling the hour, Wheatley met me, and when about thirty yards from her, I saw her with flowers; before that, I saw her put these two pots down on the front of a gentleman's house. I came up to her and said,

"Where have you been rambling to all night." She said,

"I have not been rambling; I have been in bed with my husband." A brother watchman came up. I said she had no business there; and I went to Sullivan, who was still over in the nursery, and said,

"What business have you here?" He said, he was ordered there. I asked, who by; he said, by his master, Mr. Potter, a bricklayer, of White Conduit-fields; he said Mr. Smith gave him orders to send a man to take care of the nursery, and his master sent him there; I collared him, and we took both to the watch-house, with the plants, which Mr. Smith claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. Who has had them since - A. Mr. Smith. I saw them in Wheatley's hands, and saw her set them down on the coping-stone. I did not see the plants in her hand till she came to the coping-stone.

JOHN HALL . I am a watchman at the top of Barnsbury street. I was calling half-past three o'clock, and coming down John-street, opposite the nursery, I observed one of the pales had been pulled down. I crossed the road immediately, and saw the print of a foot in the soil, and outside the place were loose blue flowers, and on looking up the road, I saw Wheatley about fifty yards off. I went up to her, and said,

"What have you got there?" She said,

"A few flowers." I said,

"Then, you must come with me." Two men immediately came up; one said,

"What are you going to do with the poor woman - you have no charge against her, and have no business with her." I said,

"I had a reason for what I was doing." One of them immediately said,

"Come, I'll give you two shillings to let her go," and she offered me a shilling herself. I refused, and in going towards the watch-house, she said,

"I am not well - don't go so fast;" and in turning in to Barnsbury-street, she said,

"Let me take a pinch of snuff;" she put her hand into her pocket, but took no snuff out. The men came up again and laid hold of me, and wanted to take her by force, but I sprang my rattle and they set off. I took her to the watch-house. Sullivan was inside the place when I first took her, and Paddington was speaking to him. I did not see Paddington speak to Wheatley myself; we took them to the watch-house, and Mr. Smith claimed the plants.

Q. You found her with a bunch of flowers in her hand? A. No, she had put the plants down before I came up - she was fifty yards from where I saw the flowers strewed about; the plants were kept in a house close to the paling.

MR. SMITH. I know these plants to be mine; I found the pales broken, and footsteps inside the garden, and a good many flowers gone.

SULLIVAN. The woman is innocent of the crime.

WHEATLEY'S Defence. I know nothing of the plants.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WHEATLY - GUILTY Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-146

1116. CHRISTOPHER SAVILLE was indicted for stealing on the 8th of July , a bedstead value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Bartlett .

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am a furniture broker , and live in Chandos-street . On the 8th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, this bedstead was stolen. I found the prisoner in custody with it; it was safe against the door post a quarter of an hour before.

CHARLES HAWKER . I am a plaisterer, and live next door to Bartlett. I saw the prisoner in Cecil-court with this bedstead, and Mrs. Bartlett following him; she desired me to stop him, which I did; he said a man gave him 1 s. to carry it - that he did not know where the man was. I told him to take it back to where he brought it from; he took it to Bartlett's shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me 1 s. to carry it, and told me which way to go.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-147

1117. ELIZABETH STOCK was indicted for stealing on the 28th of June , twelve yards of linen, value 9 s., and six yards of plaid, value 3 s. , the goods of George Edward Woodhouse .

CLEMENTS FRANCES . I am shopman to George Edward Woodhouse , linen-draper , Oxford-street. The prisoner was servant to Major Fleming, who lodged in our house. On the 28th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, she was, going out. I heard her footsteps, and thought she was going up stairs beyond where she ought to go; I followed her out and lost sight of her; I got a watchman - this plaid was in an upper warehouse. She returned between ten and twelve o'clock; we unlocked her box, and found twelve yards of linen, and five or six yards of plaid, she said it was half a piece, and she had pawned the rest.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-148

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1118. GEORGE DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , six pounds of soap, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of John Proudfoot , the elder; and JAMES BARNETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PROUDFOOT , JUN. I am son of John Proudfoot , tallow-chandler , Redcross-street . Day was our errand-boy , and had no authority to take goods out to sell. On Saturday morning, the 16th of August, in consequence of suspicion, I watched him. I let him in at half past seven o'clock, and went up, as if to breakfast, but remained on the stair-case. I had placed half a hundred weight and a stool on the soap, so that it could not be taken without moving one of them and I put the soap knife in the drawer. In a very few minutes, I heard him move the stool and weight, open the drawer the knife was in, and heard him cut the soap, and throw the knife into the drawer; he then opened the cellar flap and ran down. I immediately informed my father; I had counted the soap on the previous night, and on going down to a bin, which had contained fifty two cakes, I missed two; nobody but him had been in the shop; my father engaged him in the shop, while I went into the cellar - I could not find the two cakes, but found the others concealed. I sent him into the Borough after dinner, and watched him - he went into Maid-lane, and remained there two hours. I went home before him, and when he returned, I asked where he had been so long; he said the customers had kept him - he went home at night, and I followed him, he lives in Aldersgate-street; he went in a direction for Smithfield, and near Bartholomew-close; he went down some alleys and I lost him. On Monday morning, I told him what I had seen; he said he had taken the soap away on Saturday night, and told me where he had put it to take it again on the Monday morning; and in consequence of what he said, I went with two officers to Barnett's house, Field-lane, he keeps an old shoe-shop, no other business was carried on there. Harrison and Botfield went with me, we found him at home, at half past twelve o'clock, and told him we had come to search the house for some soap; he said nothing; we found part of a cake of curd, and four squares of Windsor soap

under some linen in a chest of drawers, in the back room. I directed the officers to look under a bed in the same room; he said it would not turn up, but they turned it up: he then said,

"Under that bed is all the soap I have got;" we found a large chest under it, and one rather smaller which contained thirty one pounds and a half of soap, and the large chest appeared to have been full; it would have contained a hundred weight and a half; he was very much agitated and confused, and said he had taken it in exchange for goods, but did not say of whom or when; we took him before the Justice. When I took Day; I asked him how he got the property away on Saturday; he said he took it away in the dust kettle - and under Burnet's bed we found the very two identical cakes covered with cinders, they were cut in half.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long was Day with you - A. Ten or fifteen months; he gave me no information that I was not in possession of before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you find Burnett's wife there - A. I did.

Q. Did he not say he did not know that there was any thing there that did not belong to him - A. No, not in my hearing; there is a glass door, looking into the shop, it had a curtain to it. The two cakes of soap are worth 3 s. 6 d.

ANTHONY HARRISON . On the 18th of August, I went with the witness, an officer, and another person to Burnett's house, No. 16 or 17, Field-lane, he keeps a shoe shop. I saw him in the front shop, and told him I had a warrant, he immediately walked into the back room with me - I said my warrant was to search for soap, he seemed alarmed, and said nothing. I found four squares of scented soap, and a cake of curd in the drawers. I proceeded to lift up the bed - he said nothing to me, his wife then said,

"You will, find all I have got there." I found twenty-one cakes in a box, and another large box, which appeared to have had soap in it.

Q. When the wife spoke, did he say anything - A. No; two cakes in the box appeared to have been in ashes, he gave no account how he got it.

Cross-examined. Q. It was the wife who said

"That is all I have got" - A. Yes, he was present, and said nothing, but was flurried; Mr. Proudfoot was there all the time.

JACOB BOTFIELD . I am an officer, and went with Harrison to search Burnett's premises. Harrison said he came to search for soap; he said he knew nothing about soap - Mrs. Burnett was inside, two squares of Windsor soap was found in one drawer, and two in another. Before we went to the bed, Mrs. Burnett said,

"There is all the soap you will find under there." Burnett made no reply that I heard.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. All he said was, that he knew nothing about it - A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then he gave no account how, or where he got it - A. No; but previous to our searching, Harrison told him a boy used to bring the soap there - he said he knew nothing about it; he did not ask his wife how it came there. I was there a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes.

MARY MORTIMER . I live opposite Burnett. I have seen Day twice; he came one week-day to Burnett's, and had something with him, but what I cannot say, and on the Sunday before Burnett was taken; Burnett was at the door when he came on a week-day, but I do not know whether he was on Sunday. Mrs. Burnett gave me soap twice to take to my sisters; Mr. Burnett was not at home at the time. Mrs. Burnett told me to take 1 s. 3 d. a cake for the first, and give her the money - she sent me three times to Mrs. Kimpton, and I got the same price for her.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You received it from Mrs. Burnett, and never had anything to do with Mr. Burnett - A. Never; she always told me to bring her the money, and not let Mr. Burnett see it if he was at home.

JOHN PROUDFOOT . I did not see the person who uttered the words about the soap, and I may have made a mistake.

DAY'S Defence. I became acquainted with Burnett, by buying a pair of shoes of him, four or five months ago; he asked where I worked, I said at a tallow chandler's, he asked if I could get any thing.

DAY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

BURNETT - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-149

1120. ISAAC HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , three hundred-and-sixty yards of ribbon, value 10 l., the goods of Thomas Payne , well-knowing the same to be stolen .

There being no evidence but the principal in this case, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230910-150

1121. JOHN BOSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , a watch chain, value 2 s., and two watch keys, value 1 s., the goods of John Morton , from his person .

JOHN MORTON . On the 9th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Bishopsgate-street ; a man snatched violently at my watch, the chain broke, and he got the chain and seals; the prisoner was taken in about an hour, and being bad in my head, I could not swear that he is the person, to be certain of him, but he is the man who was taken.

JOHN MAGNUS . I am ten years old. I have known the prisoner above two years. On the evening of the 9th of September, I saw him near Angel-alley, and saw him snatch this gentleman's chain away. I saw the chain come off in his hand, and two keys with it - he ran up the alley - I did not call Stop thief, the prosecutor gave an alarm, he was taken that evening at the George public-house, by my father.

ELIZABETH BRIDGES . I am twelve years old, and know the prisoner. Last Tuesday week I was sitting at the door eating my supper, near the corner of Angel-alley, and saw him run by, I saw nothing in his hand, but I saw the prosecutor running after him.

HENRY MAGNUS . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, about nine o'clock, being informed, that Jallop had committed the robbery, that is the name he goes by. I took him to the prosecutor's, who picked him out from among about a dozen, and said he thought he was the man - he denied it, and said, he should be positive before he spoke.

Prisoner's Defence. Magnus brought his son to swear to me at the second examination, but I am as innocent as a child unborn.

JOHN MAGNUS . My son swore he saw him take the chain, he told the prosecutor so at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-151

1121. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a wooden cask, value 2 s., and 61 lbs. of stone blue, value 4 l. , the goods of John Henry Keen and others, his partners.

ISAAC GOODRICK . I am warehouseman to John. Henry Keen and others, who are blue-manufacturers , and live on Garlick-hill. On the 10th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I received information, went up the hill and saw the prisoner with a cask on his shoulder, and stopped him in St. Thomas Apostle; it belonged to my masters, and contained 61 lbs. of stone blue. I asked where he got it - he said a man gave it to him to carry, and promised him 1 s. I told him to take it back, he endeavoured to escape - we struggled together, another man came up, gave me a blow on the head, but I kept hold of him.

WILLIAM JOYCE . I saw Goodrick leading the prisoner by the collar in St. Thomas's Apostle, and assisted in securing him. I have the cask.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-152

1122. JAMES PRETTY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 7 lbs. of horse hair, value 7 s., and four pieces of woollen cloth, containing eight yards, value 24 s. , the goods of Richard Henley .

RICHARD HENLEY . I am owner of the hackney-coach , No. 1147, and my coach stood in Fann-street, Aldersgate-street , on the 30th of July; and next morning I went and found the blue cloth lining and horse hair taken away - it was new, and cost me 5 l. I have some left of exactly the same quality as what is found.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am marshalsman. On the 31st of July, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner and another, (who escaped) in Chapel-street, Grub-street, a quarter of a mile from Fann-street - the prisoner had a handkerchief full of horse-hair in his hand, and in his hat was some of the blue cloth, and some in his pocket. I found a knife on him, the other dropped something, which Mills picked up - he said the other man gave it him to carry.

RICHARD MILLS . I was with Harrison, and saw the prisoner with another, who ran up the alley directly he took the prisoner, and dropped some cloth from under his coat, and his hat fell off with horse-hair in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from the New Road, and coming down this street, I met this man with a large bundle tied up, he asked me to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-153

1123. JAMES PEARSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Forrest , about the hour of one in the night of the 31st of August , at St. Andrew by the Wardrobe, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one pair of shaft chaise springs, value 2 s. 6 d.; one brush, value 6 d.; and one pair of scales and weights, value 20 s., the goods of the said Thomas Forrest ; and five planes, value 5 s.; one oil-stone, value 6 d.; one two-feet rule, value 6 d.; one centre-bit stock, value 2 s. 6 d.; two saws, value 2 s.; one spokeshave, value 6 d.; three gauges, value 1 s.; one bill, value 6 d.; one box, value 6 d.; three chisels, value 4 s.; one square, value 6 d.; one hammer, value 4 d.; one pair of compasses, value 3 d.; one pair of pliers, value 4 d.; two gimlets, value 2 d.; one centre-bit, value 3 d.; and one brass-cock, value 4 d. , the goods of William Archer .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the said goods in a dwelling-house, and afterwards burglariously breaking said dwelling-house to get out of the same.

Two other Counts, the same, only stating the house to be the dwelling-house of the said William Archer .

WILLIAM ARCHER . I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Forrest , who lives in Earl-street, Blackfriars . On Sunday morning, the 31st of August, I was called up about one o'clock by Jones. I looked out of the window, and saw my-son-in-law bringing a man by his collar. I dressed, and came down into the counting-house, and found all the articles stated in the indictment moved from the places where they were the night previous. They were taken from the counting-house cupboard, and put on the desk, ready to be taken away. He brought the prisoner into the counting-house. I said the scales were gone. He pointed to them, and said.

"There they are, Sir." They were on a chair. I said

"Here is a drawer gone." He pointed to it, and said,

"There it is." I asked for the key of the cupboard. He shewed it to me on the desk. I gave him in charge. We found the counting-house window lifted up. There are no shutters to it, as it is enclosed in a yard. He said he got into the yard at half-past eight o'clock, and secreted himself by a waggon.

THOMAS CHONE . I sleep in this house. On the 30th of August, about one o'clock in the morning, I came home, unlocked the gate, and on entering the passage I saw the counting-house door open. I turned aside, and put my hand on a man's back behind the passage door, just outside the counting-house. I brought him out to look at him by the gas. It was the prisoner. I knocked up my father-in-law; took a light into the counting-house, and found these tools moved out of the cupboard. Four cupboards had been forced open. I found he had bored above the lock of the desk with a gimblet, and sawed it about three-fourths of an inch deep to get it open. He said he hid himself behind a waggon about eight o'clock at night among some straw, and after that got in at the window.

JOHN JENKINS . I am a watchman stationed opposite Mr. Forrest's gate; he called me over, and I found the prisoner in custody, and the goods on the desk. I found a common knife on him. The saw and gimblet he had been using were the prosecutor's.

MR. ARCHER. The counting-house is part of the dwelling-house. It is enclosed within the same wall, but is not under the same roof. One wall enclosed the whole. The whole wharf is enclosed from the street, and from the river. He could not get out any way.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Sentence of Death recorded, but not passed .

Reference Number: t18230910-154

1124. ANN GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , three-quarters of a yard of woollen cloth, value 8 s. , the goods of Daniel Britten , Jun.

MR. JOHN BRITTEN . I manage the business of Mr. Daniel Britten , of Basinghall-street . The prisoner was in our service. On Saturday, the 15th of July, a piece of cloth laid on a pile, near where the prisoner was working, and on Monday I found it had been undone, and a yard and three-quarters cut, and rolled up in a different manner - it was torn across. I put it in the same situation, and desired the foreman to look at it every time he went up, and about two o'clock he gave me information; I found a hand round it, which I had not put on. I fetched an officer, who searched the prisoner, and found three-quarters of a yard concealed under her gown. I then measured the cloth, and found that quantity deficient - my servant girl found it on her. I compared it with my cloth, and found it corresponded exactly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any interest in the business - A. None; he has no partner. The prisoner and her mother were occasionally employed by us; it is not the custom to pay women with remnants of cloth, nor are they perquisites. I may have given her mother a remnant of cloth, and may have given her a bit, perhaps, as broad as my hand. The cloth this was cut from, is delivered to the person who sent it to us. I have no mark on it - it is superfine cloth; the list corresponds. I have sold her cloth of various descriptions.

COURT. Q. Did she say that anybody had given it her - A. No, my Lord; she begged for mercy.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. The young woman was searching the prisoner, and I found the cloth wrapped round her - she said it was the first time, and begged forgiveness.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-155

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1125. MARY SHUTE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , twelve towels, value 15 s.; two sheets, value 2 s., and a frock, value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Bury ; and SARAH EVANS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to be stolen .

MARY HAMILTON . I am house keeper to Lady Charlotte Bury , at Sydenham. On the 24th of July, I made up the articles stated in the indictment, in a parcel, to send to the Isle of Wight, and gave it to Jones, the carrier. On the Monday following, I received information respecting it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES JONES . I am the Sydenham carrier. I received a parcel from the last witness, and took it to town. I gave it to Bargrove to take to Lad-lane.

RICHARD BARGROVE . I received the parcel. I had to go to Brick-lane, and took it with me. I met Shute in Whitechapel, about three o'clock in the afternoon - we went up Brick-lane together. I delivered a parcel in Osborne-place, and came away, and met her again; and went with her to her lodging, and remained there about five minutes, and I put the parcel on a chair, Shute took it up, and ran down stairs with it - I never saw her afterwards until she was taken, on the Tuesday following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you known her - A. I never saw her before. I was quite sober - I said nothing to my master about it till it was found out, but I was going to tell him of it.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer. On the 24th of July, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I stopped the prisoners in White's-row; Evans had the parcel - I asked what it was; she said it was some clean linen, which was her own - I asked to see it; the first thing I saw was the frock. It contained linen and some letters - they declined saying more.

MICHAEL HUGHES . I was with Almond, and saw the prisoners together; Evans had the apron; his account is correct. I had heard of a man being robbed, which made me look after them.

SHUTE'S Defence. He came to my lodging, and left it with me to pawn.

EVANS'S Defence. It was given me to pawn.

SHUTE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

EVANS - GUILTY Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-156

1126. CHARLES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , six yards of cotton, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Windsor Allen .

FRANCIS SOAMES . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Windsor Allen, pawn-broker , Clare-market . On the 20th of August about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner standing within our shop-door. I called to him; he made no answer. I went round and found he had taken a piece of cotton off the bar against the wall. He stood there with one end of it in his hand; and the rest on the ground. When he saw me he dropped it, and I secured him. He said he wanted to know the price.

BRIDGET ROACH . I saw the prisoner unpin the cotton and take it in his hand; he was half in liquor. I do not think he wanted to steal it, as he never moved.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking down a pair of trowsers, which were pinned to this cotton, to ask the price, and it was dropped. I had unpinned it five minutes before the gentleman came.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-157

1127. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. the goods of Abraham Ackerman .

ABRAHAM ACKERMAN . On Thursday, the 10th of July, I sent Leavins into Tottenham-court-road for a pair of shoes, at ten o'clock at night; he did not bring them back. On the Sunday following he pointed out the prisoner to me, and I asked him if he wanted a job. He said, Yes. I said I would give him one; he saw Evans, and said he would go no further until I told him what job it was. I secured him.

THOMAS LEAVINS . I am nearly ten years old. I was

bringing the shoes to Mr. Ackerman, and just by King's-square-court, Carlisle-street, I met the prisoner. He asked if I would go on an errand for him, and he would give me 2 d. He said, it was not far, and took me into a dark street in the Strand , and shewed me a door where I was to go. He said he would wait at the top of the street, and said I must let him hold the shoes, and I gave them to him; he then gave me a bit of paper; I went and gave it in at the door, and when I came back he was gone. I was afraid to go home - it was ten o'clock at night. A gentleman took me home, and on the Sunday following I met him in Portland-street, Soho, and shewed him to my master - he was secured.

GEORGE OWEN . I am an officer; I took him into custody on this charge - the shoes have not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-158

Before Mr. Recorder.

1128. ROBERT SUMMERS was indicted for stealing five sacks, value 7 s. , the goods of Samuel Ryland and Joshua Knight .

THOMAS BURROWS . About three weeks ago, I saw the prisoner at Douglas's wharf, where I ply as a coal-porter; he brought a bundle with him, and came and asked me to go with him to the Cannon, public-house, in Hungerford-street. The bundle was a sack rolled up, and tied round with string. He said I was to draw two shillings of Hornsby, the landlord, for this bundle, and tell him they were to be delivered to Reuben Purfit ; he went with me to the Cannon; he carried the sack to the door; then gave it to me, and I delivered it to Hornsby, and received two shillings. I gave the prisoner the two shillings. He and I went into a public-house in Villiers-street, and had some beer, and parted.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Who do you work for - A. Douglas and Co., or any one who employs me. This might be three or four months ago - it was a small bundle, and did not contain above one sack; it was certainly a sack; he said that Purfit had sent him with it. I understood nothing wrong by it. My rooms were searched, but I never understood that I was suspected of it. I was not taken up.

JAMES HORNSBY . I kept the Cannon, public-house, in Hungerford-street, until the beginning of June last; I remember Burrows coming to my house, about a month or six weeks before that; a person was with him who did not come into the house, but stood at the door. Burrows brought what appeared to me a sack or two sacks, rolled up and tied with string. I was in the bar; he said he had got a parcel from Purfit, and was desired by Purfit to ask me to lend him (Burrows) two shillings to pay the man for bringing the parcel, and Purfit would pay me when he came in the evening to take the parcel. I took it, and lent him the two shillings.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say it was a whole sack - A. No - I am sure I delivered Purfit the same parcel. It might be sneaking for what I know.

REUBEN PURFIT . I know Hornsby; he left the Cannon, public-house, ten weeks, or three months ago. I am a coal-porter, in Scotland-yard. About fourteen weeks ago he gave me a sack rolled up, but not tied round - he never asked me for anything. I took the sack home - my room was searched. I kept the sack in my room, and used it as a rug - they took nothing out of my room in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you do with sacks - A. We use them in our business. I paid Hornsby nothing for it. I do not think it was so long as four months ago. I was taken up on suspicion of stealing it. It was a corn sack - it was not fit for the coal-trade.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. On the 12th of August I searched Purfit's lodging, and found a sack lying on the hearth before the fire, marked on both sides

"Ryland and Knight."

Cross-examined. Q. He was taken up as the thief? - A. As the receiver.

SAMUEL RYLAND . I am in partnership with Joshua Knight . The prisoner was in our employ, at Scotland-yard, as watchman. The sack is our property. When we send a quantity of meal from our premises in Scotland-yard, he always accompanied it to see it delivered, and see the sacks safely brought back. I never authorised him to sell or give them away. We placed great confidence in him, and thought him an honest servant.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you not occasionally let out sacks? - A. Yes, to persons in the neighbourhood, on hire. We cannot have lost this one more than nine months. He has nothing to do with collecting the sacks which are lent out.

Prisoner's Defence. All the sacks under my care I sent home safe.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-159

1129. GEORGE WADWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , an ass, price 2 l. , the property of Samuel Johnson .

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am a labourer , and live at Old Brentford. On the 7th of August my ass was in a field at Edgware fair , at half-past eight o'clock in the evening; it was then safe. I had been offered two guineas for it. Next morning it was gone. The prisoner had bought several things of me at the fair that day. About nine o'clock next morning I saw him selling it on Hampstead Heath, and secured him. He had two other asses with him.

JOHN SCOLE . I let out chaise and donkeys, at Hampstead. On Friday morning, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner driving three asses over the Common; I asked if they were for sale; he said, Yes; he asked me 1 l. for that claimed by Johnson, and afterwards said 15 s. Johnson came up and claimed it. I assisted in securing him.

THOMAS MUNDAY . I took the prisoner into custody. The prosecutor claimed the ass.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought two donkeys at the fair for 35 s. I got to Hampstead in the morning, and found this ass with them, and could not beat it away. I was stopped by a man, who asked the price of them; I said it was not mine; and while we were bargaining the prosecutor came up and claimed it.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I saw him at the fair two or three times that day; he had no ass them. I found it in his possession about nine o'clock in the morning; I traced him by inquiry. It was a male.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-160

1130. ELIZABETH WELLING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 5 lbs. of soap, value 3 s. , the goods of Richard Stevens .

GEORGE STEVENS . On the 27th of June, I was in my father's shop - the prisoner came in about two o'clock, to buy a gill of oil; I served her, and she left. I looked out of doors, and saw she had some soap under her arms - she had bought none. I missed two pieces, which were safe when she came in. We sent for an officer.

RICHARD STEVENS . I am a soap-boiler , and live in Chapel-street, Somers' Town . I sell soap by retail. The prisoner used to come to my shop. I went to her room, and found her there - I charged her with stealing the soap; she denied having any. I sent for a constable, who turned down the bed, and out the two cakes of soap fell.

THOMAS MONDAY . I went to her lodgings - she said she knew nothing about the soap. I found it in the bedstead.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-161

1131. JOHN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Clement .

RICHARD CLEMENT . I am a linen-draper , and live in High Holborn . On the 1st of August, this shawl laid on the counter. My shopman gave me information - I went out, and found the prisoner, and charged him with stealing it - he denied it. I found it in his hat.

EDWARD PARRY . I am shopman to Mr. Clement. Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner came in, and asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs, which were shown to him in my presence. He bought none; he then asked to look at stockings, and while the young man was gone to fetch them, I saw him take the shawl off the counter, and put it in his hat. I informed Mr. Clement, who secured him just outside the door - he had it in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was much intoxicated, and know nothing of the matter.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable, and received him in charge. He shammed drunkenness before the Magistrate.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-162

1132. SAMUEL HALLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a watch, value 2 l., and a seal, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Lamb , from his person .

RICHARD LAMB . I am a gardener out of place, and live at Kensington-gore. On or about the 1st of January, I was in Hammersmith church-yard, going home, and got into conversation with a woman, and walked with her. I had seen her before. The prisoner came up, and stopped me. I am sure of his person. I knew him well before, by seeing him in a boat. He was employed about the barges. He came up, and said something which I did not hear. I asked him if he meant to rob me of my watch. He said nothing to me, but got hold of it, and I got hold of it. We were both tussling for it together. He got it away, and 10 s. out of my pocket.

Q. What became of the woman - A. I do not know what became of her. We were walking together when he came up. They went off together, after robbing me. I did not know where she lived. I gave an alarm, but did not see him again till the 24th of July. I gave information as soon as I could.

Q. Did you not cry out, Stop thief! - A. There was nobody there. I met a person, and told him of it. They went towards the water-side, and I followed them.

Q. There are a good many houses about - A. Yes; I told several people of it two or three minutes after; as Walker, who is here came up, who had met the prisoner, and accosted him by his name. That was in my presence. I told the man the prisoner had robbed me of my watch and money. He said he knew him. He said,

"Hallet, is that you?" and he answered Yes; and the woman was close by at the time.

Q. Did not you immediately lay hold of him - A. No; they went off. I was four or five yards from them when the man spoke to him. I pursued as far as I could, and lost him. I had the woman taken up a few days after, and she was discharged. She lives somewhere in Hammersmith, but I do not know where. I was quite sober. I asked Walker where the prisoner lived, and understood it was on board a barge called the Good Intent. Walker did not run after them, but said he knew them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not the woman you met a common prostitute - A. I did not know it then. I did not go with her for that purpose. I met her as I was going to the church-yard, between the Broadway and the church. She came up to me. I did not tell her to leave. I never charged her with the robbery. nor ever preferred a bill against her. I had her taken up for being in company with him. A bill went before the Grand Jury, and was thrown out.

Q. On your oath, had not you the man taken up before Mr. Hanson, the Magistrate - A. Yes; I preferred the bill against the woman some time in April.

Q. Did you not tell his Lordship she was taken up four or five days after - A. It was in April, not before. I rather think it was in April. I quit forget when it was.

Q. When was this man first taken up - A. On the 24th of July. He was never discharged. He was never taken up before by me or my directions. I knew he belonged to a barge.

Q. Why not give information to the officer, and have him taken up - A. I did not; he was gone. I told the officer next morning that he belonged to the Good Intent. I knew that before the robbery.

Q. Had you Mr. Walker taken up on this charge - A. Yes; at the time the girl was taken. I cannot say exactly when it was.

Q. COURT. You have been in company with Walker; have you not learned from him when he was taken up - A. It was in April Sessions. I cannot say when it was, or in what month; Walker went as a witness against the woman. I did not charge him with the robbery.

Q. On your oath, do not you know the man at the bar has been constantly in his employment, from January till he was apprehended, and be very cautious how you give your answer - A. The officers were after him every day. I do not know what he was about. I had been to the George, public-house, but was quite sober.

Q. On your solemn oath, was not Walker locked up on

this charge all night with the woman - A. I believe he was a little while.

JURY. Q. Did you not say you asked the prisoner whether he was going to take your watch - A. Yes; he had hold of it then.

RICHARD WALKER . I am a smith, and live at Hammersmith. On the 1st of January, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was going through the church-yard, and saw the prosecutor with a girl of the town. The prisoner was behind them, going the same way, towards the turnstile, to go into the town. As soon as they got out of the church-yard I lost sight of them. They went towards the town. There are houses all the way to the town. I passed the prisoner, and followed them through. I asked the prisoner if he knew who they were. The woman went by the name of Sal Bury . I said to the prisoner,

"Is your name Hallett?" He said Yes. I did not see Lamb again till I was called upon by an officer, two or three days after, and informed of the robbery. I had not heard of it till then. While the prisoner was behind them, the prosecutor said he had lost his watch. He did not say the prisoner had done it, or I could have taken him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-163

1133. NICHOLAS BULLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Bygrave , from his person .

THOMAS BYGRAVE . I am a land agent , and live in Clement's-inn. On the 28th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was on the Strand side of Temple-bar , coming towards the City - my handkerchief was safe just before, and as soon as I got through the Bar, I felt for it, and missed it; Waddington came up to me, and asked if I had lost anything - He said I think I know the man, and went up Shire-lane; I followed him, and in Carey-street, between Shire-lane and Bell-yard, he collared the prisoner and charged him with the robbery; he denied it - he took him into a public-house, and searched him, but the handkerchief was not found then - he took him to Hatton-garden, and in crossing over Chancery-lane, the handkerchief fell out of the bottom of his trowsers.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You missed it on the City side of Temple-bar - A. Yes, I was not more than three yards through the Bar.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a turner, and live in Peter's-lane, Cow-cross, and have been a constable. On the 28th of June, I was going down Fleet-street, and saw Mr. Bygrave coming towards the City, the prisoner was behind him, I saw him lay hold of the prosecutor's pocket; he let go of the coat, and then walked towards Shire-lane, where he turned up. I informed Mr. Bygrave, and we followed him together - we came up with him about the middle of Shire-lane. I said,

"Nick, I want you;" he said,

"What for;" I said,

"I suspect you have robbed this gentleman of his handkerchief;" we searched him, but could not find it. We were taking him to the office, and in crossing Chancery lane, one corner of it came from under his trowsers, and I pulled the rest out.

Cross-examined. Q. You were only four doors from the City, when you first saw him touch the coat - A. Yes, the prosecutor was walking gently, and gazing over the other side of the way; he let the coat tail drop, and passed the prosecutor before he got to the Bar; I did not see it taken - he could not have taken it in the City.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked my foot against the handkerchief coming through the Bar; nobody owned it, and I put it in my pocket hole, but I had no pocket.

GUILTY Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-164

1134. WILLIAM CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , three shirts, value 24 s.; a frock, value 7 s. 6 d.; a set of bed furniture, value 1 l.; a pair of sheets, value 28 s., and a basket, value 1 s., the goods of Robert Jones , from the person of William Jones .

WILLIAM JONES . I am fourteen years old, and am the son of Robert Jones - my father is a currier , and lives in George-place, Holloway. On the 10th of June, about one o'clock, I was taking a bundle of linen to Mr. Roberts, Bells-buildings, Fleet-street, and in Gray's Inn-lane, near Mecklenburgh-square, the prisoner came up to me, and asked me to go to No. 3, Mecklenburgh-square, to ask for a trunk - I was to ask for Miss Wilson, who, he said, was his sister. I said I would, if he would mind the basket, and I went, leaving it in his care. I rang the bell, and found Miss Wilson lived there, but she knew nothing about the trunk; I returned in about minutes, and he was gone with the basket. I do not know what was in it - it has not been found. I saw him again on the 25th of June, at the bottom of Britannia-row, Islington. My father was with me, and I told him he was the man - he went for a constable, and was taken in the fields begging. When the constable came, he ran away, before I mentioned what he had done. I am quite certain of him - he was dressed the same as when he had the basket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you leave Pentonville - A. About twenty minutes past twelve o'clock. I got to Gray's Inn-lane nearly at one - he told the Justice he could prove he was elsewhere at twenty minutes past twelve. I always said it was near one o'clock when I saw him.

Q. Had the prisoner and your father any words a few days before - A. He had been talking to him the same day about ringing the bell; my father fetched me, and I said he was the man.

JURY. Q. When he sent you on this message was he dressed as he is now - A. No; he had a black coat and waistcoat, and shabby boots with a piece cut out, and blue pantaloons, and was dressed the same when he was taken, and had the same boots on. I looked at the clock at the Rodney's Head, public-house, when I set off.

GEORGE FRUIN . I am in the coal trade, and work at No. 1, Field-street, Battle-bridge. On the 10th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was sitting at a public-house door; this boy came and enquired if I had seen any man with a basket of clothes. I told him no, and he went away across the fields. A few minutes after, I saw a man come from Wellington-street, with a basket of clothes on his head, and his hat in his hand; he had a black coat and waistcoat, blue trowsers, and shabby boots, with a hole cut in one of them - the boy having asked about a basket, made me notice him. The prisoner is the man. I saw

him before the Magistrate on the 28th, and am certain of him. The boy came to me again, and I told him which way he was gone, and he went after him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you drive a coal cart in the streets - A. Yes. I was eating my dinner at the door, it might be about half-past twelve o'clock. I did not look at the clock, the boy did not describe his dress to me. I know it is the same face. I described his dress to Jones before I saw him. I saw him coming down the street - I am near sighted, but the street is narrow.

DANIEL WARREN . I am a constable. Mr. Jones came to my house, to go and apprehend the prisoner. I went down to the Britannia public-house, Islington; he pointed out the prisoner, who was going up Queen's Head-lane. I told William Jones to go round and meet him at the top of the lane, fearing I should not overtake him. I went towards him, and before I got half way up, he returned back into the fields. I let him pass me, and took particular notice of his dress and the boots he had on - he went forwards and returned four different times, and when he saw me making haste towards him with Jones, he ran away. I pursued and took him; Jones was always positive to his person; he had a blue coat, blue trowsers, spotted handkerchief, and boots - the right boot had a bit cut out - the boy had described the dress before I saw him - he denied the charge, and said he was begging.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there not a bull-fight in the fields - A. I saw none - he gave different accounts of his lodging, and I could not find them out - he took his boots off at my desire, and I produce them.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing more of the charge than what I heard at the office. It is totally founded in fraud. I told the Magistrate I could prove where I was at the time of the robbery. The constable said I had a bad pair of boots on, and offered me a pair of shoes for them.

THOMAS STEVENSON . I am a stone-sawyer, and work with Mr. Hawkins, Clement's-lane. On the 10th of June which was the day of the boat-race on the Thames, I saw the prisoner at the Black Horse, public-house, Old Boswell-court, where I lodge. I first saw him there at two minutes past twelve o'clock, and left him there twenty minutes after twelve, for I looked at the clock - several people were in the house. I believe he was dressed in black. Mrs. Deer keeps the house. I returned there at a quarter before two o'clock - he was in the house then, reading the newspaper. I had seen him at the house at times before, but did not know where he lived.

MARY DEER . My husband keeps the Black Horse, public house. On the 10th of June, the day of the rowing-match for Mr. Kean's prize, I saw the prisoner at our house between twelve and one o'clock - he staid till near three, when he went to the rowing-match. I saw Stevenson talking to him.

Q. Was he in the house all the time till he went to the rowing-match - A. I think he was. I was in the tap-room most of the time - he could not be absent without my knowing it. I did not notice his dress.

COURT. Q. Was your house full or empty - A. There were not a great many people there - he usually staid at our house an hour or so.

Q. Had you any reason for noticing how long he staid on this day - A. Yes; he was by my meat, which was roasting most of the time - he was not absent from twelve to one o'clock, because he was by my meat while it was roasting. I took the meat up about half-past one - he was talking to me nearly all the time - he was always dressed in black. I did not know him as beggar - he always paid his way - he was at our house every day.

Q. Then you had no reason to notice him one day more than any other - A. I should not have noticed it, but my mother coming to town the evening before, brought the day to my mind. He said,

"Who is that lady - I think I have seen her before?" I said, it was my mother, and then he shook hands with her. That was between twelve and one o'clock. I saw him every day till he was taken up. He generally came about that time; he seldom had above a pint or two of beer; he staid longer that day, on account of going to the rowing-match. I have no bar-maid; I always attend the tap-room, and my husband the bar. The prisoner paid me his reckoning that day (in the tap-room, I believe). The bar commands a view of the tap-room. He shook hands with my mother at the tap-room door. She has left town. I know she came on the 9th, because it was the day before the rowing-match. He never spoke to my mother before in my presence; she had just come in from walking. I always go into the tap-room at twelve o'clock. I looked at the clock; everybody when they are cooking looks at the clock. He did not leave from twelve to one o'clock, because I was there all the time. He was not absent long enough to go there; he never went out of the house. I have tried of course to bring this day to my memory.

Q. Then at first you had no recollection of it? - A. Not till I turned it over in my mind. Two or three particular circumstances brought it to my mind; one was, a man calling, with a saw, who went away at twenty minutes past twelve, for he looked at the clock, and said that was the time. I cannot say whether the prisoner had his dinner there that day; he might have had it while I was having mine.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. From twelve to half-past one o'clock was he continually talking to you in the tap-room? - A. Yes. He lodged in Clare-market, with one Collison.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a watchman of St. Clement's, and am also a porter; and live in Clement's-lane. On the 10th of June I went to the Black Horse, at a quarter to one o'clock, and might have staid there an hour, or an hour and a half: the prisoner was there all that time; he was not out of my sight above five minutes. I left him there at two o'clock, or a quarter past, and asked him to go with me to see the rowing-match, as I could procure him part of a boat; he said he would. I went home, got my wife ready, and called for him about three o'clock, but he was gone.

COURT. Q. Did you know him before? - A. I have known him nearly twelve months, by meeting him at the Black Horse. He was dressed in dark clothes; I believe a black coat and waistcoat, and blue trowsers. He sat on the same settle as I did.

Q. Close to the fire? - A. No, close to the window, about twenty paces from the fire. I believe he sat there all the time, but I was not in conversation with him all the time. A joint of meat was cooking at the fire. I was engaged, and did not notice what Deer was about. I did not see the prisoner near the fire; he was three or four feet

further from the landlady than I was; he sat in the window, and I outside. He could not be near her while she basted the meat. I do not think that he dined there. The landlord was in and out, serving beer. I dare say he saw the prisoner. There are two servants who served beer. I am sure of that. I did not notice anybody talking to Mrs. Deer, I cannot positively swear whether he shifted his seat or not. He need not have passed me to go out. I did not observe him near Mrs. Deer while she was cooking. He lived in Holles-street, Clare-market.

JURY. Q. As you sat in the tap-room could you be seen from the bar. - A. I understand the prisoner is a tailor. Mrs. Deer's mother came to town the night before. I saw her at the bar. The prisoner did not speak to her in my hearing.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230910-165

1135. MARY SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , two half-crowns, and a sixpence, the monies of Henry Hill , her master .

JOSEPH JEFFS . I am shopman to Mr. Henry Hill, a grocer , who lives in Gooch-street . The prisoner has been in his service for four or five months; there was another servant in the business, and a boy. This money was in the till. My master used to go into the country, and the other servant and I had the care of the till. On the 30th of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, I got up - the prisoner was always up before me. I asked my fellow-servant for the key of the shop, but he came down. I opened the door with the key, and then I opened the street-door, and in consequence of what he said, I slept in the shop the next night, and concealed myself behind some curtains all night; and in the morning, before the shop was opened, I saw the prisoner come with a strange key, and unlock the shop door - she then ran to the till, opened it, and put her hand in; I heard silver rattle. I had counted the money in the till overnight; it was 21 s. in shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns. She went away, into an adjoining room, and locked the shop door after her. I then saw her put the money in a piece of paper or rag; she then went away. I jumped down from where I was, unlocked the inner shop door, and opened the shop, and directly the other man came down, I told him, but never told her of it myself. He went off to my master's uncle, who lives at Vauxhall. She was taken up as soon as the young man returned from Vauxhall; and charged with this, in my presence, about half-past eleven o'clock, that night. I never mentioned what I knew, until I was before the Magistrate.

Q. Why not stop her when you saw her commit this offence - A. I did not; I was always on good terms with her. I counted the money the moment my fellow shopman came down - there was only 15 s. 6 d. left.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you quite sure it was not a man who took the money - A. Yes, positive. My fellow-shopman ordered me not to detain her. I did not go up and tell my master of it, because I was ordered not.

COURT. Q. Did you ever tell your master that you suspected the till was robbed - A. My master was often missing money. The shopman ordered me not to tell my master. He set off to tell my master's uncle, as we thought the uncle knew better how to act - we marked the money with a cross.

JOSEPH WICKS . I am a constable. I was sent for between eleven and twelve o'clock, to take charge of the prisoner - Hill and the young man accused her of taking money out of the till, which she denied. I searched her, but found nothing on her. She opened all her boxes, but I found no money.

JOSEPH JEFFS re-examined. She went out two or three times that morning - I did not hinder her. I have been nine years in the house.

HENRY HILL . I did not see this money marked, or know anything of it. I received a good character with the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-166

1136. WILLIAM NEWINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 2 s., the moneys of John Taylor , to whom he was servant .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Pulteney-street . The prisoner was my servant , and lodged in the house; I missed money from my till. On the 7th of August, I marked eight half-crowns, and put them into the till, also sixty shillings, and twenty sixpences; I marked them all with a shoemaker's awl. About dinner time, (one o'clock,) I sent the prisoner for some beer; and while he was gone, I took all the money out of the two tills, and put this marked money in, except two half-crowns and one shilling, which I gave to a man, and desired him to buy a piece of bacon with them; he came and laid that out and three-pence more, several other customers came in. After dinner, I came into the shop with the other shopman; I said

"William go in and get your dinner" - he stepped down below, I took all the money out of the till, and found adeficiency of 1 s. 6 d.; I sent for an officer; I then took him into the room, and said,

"William, here is an officer, I suspect you have some of my property;" the officer desired him to pull out his money, he pulled out 20 s. and 1 1/2 d. - he put them down before me, and I picked two of the shillings out which I had just marked; I said,

"I have suspected you a long time, and now find it is true; I shall give you in charge;" he said,

"No, Sir, you will find I have not robbed you." I told him it was no use denying it, and the officer took him. Upon looking my money over, I found nine half-crowns, one of them not marked, fifty-five shillings and twenty-two sixpences, two of them not marked.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; I desired him to produce his money - Taylor claimed two shillings from amongst it, and pointed out his mark.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-167

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1137. MARGARET LLOYD and CATHERINE THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , five shillings and three sixpences, the monies of Edward Cartwright , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230910-168

1138. JOHN GAVELL was indicted for embezzling 1 s. 8 d., which he had received, by virtue of his office, as a letter-carrier in the General Post-office , for the postage of a certain letter .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOSEPH MOULES . I am inspector of letter-carriers to

the General Post-office. I know the prisoner, he acted as a General Post letter-carrier. Every letter on which the postage was paid, he should write on it paid, and the sum he received, and send it up in his paid bag, and he would be charged for it on the following morning; this is the regular course of business - He had been in the office, since March 1818. The receiving of letters is distributed into walks - his was Wardour-street walk (looking at a letter.) It would be his duty to send this letter up in his paid bag, if the postage was paid - it is directed

"to S. R. Hopwood, 16th Light Dragoons, or Queen's Lancers, D. Troop, Calcutta or elsewhere."

WILLIAM HOPWOOD . I am a messenger of the Parochial office, and live in Poland-street. On the 8th of January I wrote a letter, and on the Saturday following the postman came to receive his weekly pay for letters. I delivered the letter to the prisoner - it was the one produced; I paid him 2 s. for the postage, and received some halfpence in change. I met him in Poland-street, some months after, and told him I had received no answer to my letter; he said, he could not be answerable for packets. I expected the letter to reach my son before he got to Calcutta, as he had just left the river. I am sure I paid him a shilling.

JAMES AUSTIN . I am assistant inspector of letter-carriers. On the 23d of May, in consequence of information I called on the prisoner, and was induced to search his drawer. I found this letter in it, together with others (looking at some) these are some of them. There were fifty-six in all, most of them were deliverable in the prisoner's district; six of them were letters on which he must have received the postage; fifty were letters in which the postage had been paid in the country, but were not delivered. Foreign letters are all post-paid in this country. There were six foreign letters, the postage of which he ought to have received and accounted to the office for; the one in question was among them. If he could not discover the persons to whom the fifty were directed, he ought to have returned them to the Returned Letter Office, after having kept them a month to make enquiry. Some of them are many months old.

COURT. Q. Is it part of his duty to receive foreign letters - A. Yes, he is bellman; the letter has no post mark on it.

WILLIAM HOPWOOD . I gave him the letter towards the afternoon, before he came round with the bell; he came to receive the money for the week's letters. I knew him as bellman and letter-carrier, and as such gave it to him as a friend, thinking it would be more safe.

JAMES AUSTIN . The bellman commences his duty at five o'clock, he received this on his collecting money for postage; it is his option whether he gives credit or not. I cannot say he received it in the course of his office, they are restricted to the hours of from five to six o'clock to receive letters.

The Court ruled that the letter was not received by the prisoner by virtue of his office.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-169

1139. SAMUEL GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Robert Gillman , from his person .

ROBERT GILLMAN . On the 23d of July, about a quarter past two o'clock, I was in Newgate-street , and felt somebody taking my handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner with it in his hand - he immediately dropped it. I seized him and charged him with it, he made no answer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman ran after me, and accused me of this, there were several people there.

Confined One Year .

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18230910-170

1140. JOHN LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of a certain person whose name is unknown, from his person .

JOHN DRYDEN . On the 4th of August, I was in the pig-market, in Smithfield , and saw the prisoner, in company with another boy, snatch a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket; his companion took it from him, and ran off with it. I told the gentleman immediately, but he did not stop. I pursued, calling Stop thief! I lost sight of them - but a few minutes after, I saw both of them at Smithfield-bars.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was at the corner of Peter-street, the last witness was enquiring for an officer, saying two boys had robbed a gentleman. He described them, I took him down into Black Boy-alley, the prisoner stood there with two others, he turned down Field-lane - we ran down another way and took him; he said he knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing at marbles - he came and took me. I asked what I had done; he said if I did not hold my tongue, he would knock my d - d young head off, and when he got me to the office, he accused of this, which I am innocent of.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-171

1141. CHARLES GRANT and JOB ILSLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Charles Elwell Jackson , from his person .

CHARLES ELWELL JACKSON. I am a grocer . On the 3d of September, about two o'clock, I was in Bartholomew-fair ; the officers spoke to me; I felt and missed my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What part of the fair were you in - A. Between Duke-street, and Cloth-fair; there were a great many people there - it was sale a very few minutes before. I went with the officer, who secured the prisoners, but found nothing on them.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Islington. I was at the fair, and saw the prisoners together for a quarter of an hour. I saw them go up to Mr. Jackson - they were joined by a third; I saw Ilsley go up and hold Mr. Jackson's right hand coat flap up, and take a red handkerchief out. I told Mr. Jackson, and he went with me and took Ilsley.

Cross-examined. Q. There were a great many people there - A. Yes - I was there from curiosity. I have often been here on such cases as these.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plaisterer, and live in Somers-town. I met Colton in the fair, just by the wild-beast shew; he asked me to watch the two prisoners, and

I did for a quarter of an hour. They fell into company with a third man; they went close to the prosecutor, and Ilsley put his hand into his right-hand pocket - the other two were close by his side; he handed it to the other. Grant was looking on. I took him on the spot - he kicked at me - I could not hold him without assistance.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever been a witness here before - Yes, this Session - I job about for myself - I know Colton, because he lives near me. I was a witness with him, against another man here.

GRANT'S Defence. I was going from Guildhall to the Compter. Colton came up, and said he should get no reward for transporting me, and if I could make up a little money, he would throw the bill out.

WILLIAM COLTON . There is an officer in court who walked behind him all the way to the Compter, and will prove that I said nothing to him.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I live in Spafields. I happened to be at Guildhall on a charge of robbery, and met Coulton with the prisoners, and hand-cuffed my prisoner to them. Colton desired me to go near to them, as he was afraid one of them would strike him - he never spoke a word to them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-172

1142. VICTOR LAMBERT ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , a half handkerchief, value 2 s. 5 d. , the goods of Joseph Perry .

JOHN FOX. On the 17th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was behind Mr. Joseph Perry 's counter, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs. I saw him take a half handkerchief and put it into his pocket. I immediately called Mr. Perry, and told him of it. I detained the prisoner and sent for an officer, who searched him and found it on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where is your shop - A. In Houndsditch - he spoke broken English. I saw him put it into his pocket - he denied having it, and attempted to escape.

JOHN FORRESTER . I was sent for and searched the prisoner in the back room, about thirty feet from where he had stood, but could find nothing. I laid hold of him to take him to the watch-house, and saw something glance at his feet, which I found was this handkerchief - it must come from his trowsers. I was alone in the room with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there many people in the shop - A. Two or three - they were not near me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy half-a-dozen handkerchiefs - this gentleman said he missed a handkerchief, and saw me put it into my pocket - I said, I did not; he went for an officer, who stripped me, but found nothing, and told me to go about my business.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-173

1143. MARY CLIFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one basket, value 1 s., and 24 lbs. of cherries, value 7 s. the goods of William Castleton .

WILLIAM CASTLETON . I am a gardener , and live in Kent. On the morning of the 22d of July, I brought twenty-eight sieves of fruit to Fleet-market , and went to lay down, leaving them in care of the porters in the market. I returned in about an hour, and missed a sieve of cherries, worth seven shillings, and the basket worth one shilling.

THOMAS ELSTON . I am a porter in Fleet-market. About three o'clock in the morning, I heard of these cherries being missed. I went round Skinner-street, where I met the prisoner coming out of Turnagain-lane, with the sieve of cherries on his head. I took them from her, and took her to the watch-house, and sent for, and awoke the prosecutor and I showed them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to meet a waggon coming with cresses, a woman offered me 6 d. to carry the sieve to Golden-lane, this gentleman stopped me - I told him so.

THOMAS ELSTON . He said nothing of the kind.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230910-174

1144. GEORGE WHITTAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , one coat, value 3 s. and a pocketbook, value 1 s. the goods of John Jordin .

JOHN JORDIN . On the 24th of July I was in Fleet-street; I took my coat off. folded it up, and put it in my basket. I was working at the pipes at the Globe tavern. I went to turn a cock, and when I returned, in half an hour, I found the officers had the prisoner and coat in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Was the basket standing on the bottom or laying on its side? - A. On its side, in Peterborough-court, Fleet-street .

ROBERT HESKETH . I am an officer. On the 24th of July I met the prisoner in Fleet-market, just above Peterborough-court; I crossed over, watched him, and saw him go into the court: he stopped, came out again, and turned into Shoe-lane, and went about one hundred yards. I asked what he had got; he said, his coat, which he had on his arm. I found he had this under it. I took him back to the court, and found the prosecutor soon after, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up about three yards from the basket, laying on the pavement.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-175

1145. GEORGE MAYDEW was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a printed bound book, value 1 s. the goods of John Clark , from his person .

JOHN CLARK . I live at Walworth. On the 3d of September I was at Bartholomew fair . An officer touched me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost anything. I put my hand to my pocket, and missed a small book, which the officer immediately produced.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Might it not have been half-way out of your pocket - A. I cannot say.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I was at the fair, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and I saw the prisoner sounding several people's pockets. I saw Wiggins, and desired him to watch. I saw him go up to Mr. Clark, stand three or four minutes, and then take the book out, and immediately bolt. I went up to Clark, and when I came back Wiggins had taken him.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose there were a good many people there - A. It was very thin. There was plenty of

room to walk about. There were several persons behind him looking at the shews. He did not go off above a yard.

JOHN WIGGINS . I was at the fair, and saw Jordan, who directed my attention to the prisoner. I did not see him take the book, but saw it in his hand. He dropped it, and tried to put his foot on it. I collared him, and picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he attempt to run away - A. He turned round sharpish, and went between me and Jordan.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-176

1146. THOMAS SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one bag, value 6 d.; and twenty lbs. of Columbia root, value 8 l. , the goods of William Wakeman .

FRANCIS SLATER . I am a waggoer. I had a package in the bed of Mr. Wakeman's cart for Mr. Herring, of Aldersgate-street. I put it there about two o'clock in the afternoon, and on turning out of Bishopsgate-street into Artillery-street , which was ten minutes after I put it there, I missed it. I do not know what it contained, and could not have jolted it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 8th of September, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming up Artillery-lane with this parcel on his arm. He made a little resistance and dropped it, and said he picked it up. I produce it. It contained Columbia root.

STEPHEN OLIVER . I assisted in taking him. I was at the corner of Artillery-lane, and heard somebody call for help. I turned round, and saw the prisoner and officer struggling together. The bale laid on the ground.

ROBERT BENSON . I am agent to William Wakeman , carrier of the White Bear, Basinghall-street. This package was in our waggon.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground in Artillery-lane. Nobody being near it, I picked it up, and was looking at the direction when this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-177

1147. JOHN COATES and STEPHEN KEVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Jacob Thomas , from his person .

JACOB THOMAS . I am cashier at Messrs. Praeds and Co. On the 30th of June, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was in Cornhill , and felt an unusual jerk at my coat pocket, turned round, and caught the prisoner Kevan by the neckcloth, and found my handkerchief in his hand - he was in the act of dropping it. I pushed him into a shop, and secured him; Coates, who was near him, turned round on my left-hand; I said,

"I will have you in a moment or two" - he walked up Cornhill. I requested a gentleman to take him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see it taken - A. No. There was only the two prisoners near.

HENRY GOULDIN . I was in Cornhill, and saw both the prisoners behind Mr. Thomas, and as I came within a yard of them, Coates made a short bolt off to the left, and the hand kerchief fell at Kevan's feet - Mr. Thomas turned round, and picked it up, collared him, and took him into a bookseller's, and asked me to catch Coates, which I did, and fetched an officer.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When you first saw them, were they not going in opposite directions - A. No. Coates made a sharp step off to the left - I do not mean to say that he had it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was it when Mr. Thomas turned round - A. On the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KEVAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Year .

COATES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-178

1148. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Spooner , from his person .

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a linen-draper , and live in Chiswell-street. On the 12th of September, at nine o'clock, in the morning I was in Bull's-head-passage . I put my hand to my left-hand pocket, and felt it fall against me - I turned round, and found the prisoner in the act of putting my handkerchief under his arm. I collared him - he said it was not him, but the man who was next to him. I said to the other man,

"If you are not an accomplice assist me." The prisoner said the man picked the pocket, and he picked the handkerchief up. I gave him in charge - he tried to get out of his coat sleeves.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys walking behind the gentleman - the handkerchief dropped; I picked it up. He turned round, and seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-179

1149. HENRY FORRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one gun, value 28 s.; one tumbler, value 5 s.; two shot belts, value 5 s.; a powder flask, value 1 s. 6 d.; 4 lbs. of gunpowder, value 8 s.; 2 lbs. of shot, value 6 d.; a bottle, value 2 d.; a pint and a half of wine, value 4 s., and a main spring of a gun-lock, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward James Bond , his master.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM THOMAS BOND . I am the prosecutor's brother. I have a plate, tumbler, and main spring of a gun, which I received from Mills.

EDWARD JAMES BOND. I am a gun-maker , the prisoner was in my service as shop boy for about three months, and was left in care of the house on alternate Sundays. On the 13th of September, I sent him to Green, a workman of mine - he returned to me, and shortly after I saw my brother, who brought me the things which he has produced. I called the prisoner to me, and neither threatened nor promised him. I said Henry,

"Did you take these to Mills?" he said, he did, that he received them from a friend of his, a young lad, who he had been acquainted with for three years. I said,

"How came your friend by a gun with my name on it - and how came he by these things which are of more value than the whole gun together?" he said, it was given him to repair by his friend, that he did not know his name, but at last said his name was Daniel Davan , who lived with Mr. Benningfield, a tobacconist, in Goodman's-fields. I know this to be my

property. I never sold it, or gave him authority to take it. I have seen several things at Benningfield's house.

DANIEL DAVAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Benningfield; I have known the prisoner about half a year. I first met him in the Tenter-ground. I was at Mr. Bond's house, on one Sunday, about five weeks ago, and saw the prisoner and a youth named Godfrey there. Mr. Bond was out; we broke a board of the cellar down, and got two bottles of wine out, drank it, and threw the bottles away; some wine was found at my master's; the prisoner's brother brought that to me - he afterward brought me a gun and gunlock. I took the lock back to him at Mr. Bond's house, as he said he wished to have the name taken out - he brought all the things which were found at my master's.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you enter the cellar and get the wine - A. No, Godfrey did, he was the smallest boy.

JOHN BENNINGFIELD . Davan was in my service, the articles produced were found at my house. I afterwards found a bottle of wine, and a few flints.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am street-keeper. I went to Benningfield's, and received these articles. The prisoner said voluntarily that they were all articles he had taken from Mr. Bond.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-180

1149. ANN HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a sheet, value 4 s. the goods of George Todd .

ELIZA TODD . My husband, George Todd , keeps the Salutation Tavern, in Newgate-street . The prisoner chared at our house. I missed some sheets, and sent for Honey, who found some duplicates upon her. I believe she was distressed.

HENRY HONEY . I searched her, and found on her a duplicate of this sheet.

WILLIAM STAPLES . This sheet was pawned with me - I cannot say who by.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-181

1150. JAMES GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a wrapper, value 1 s., and sixty-nine yards of canvas, value 3 l. , the goods of William Staining and Thomas Staining .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Philip Norris .

THOMAS STAINING . I am in partnership with William Staining ; we keep a booking-office in the Borough .

PHILIP NORRIS . - I am carman to the prosecutors. On the 11th of September, about half-past one o'clock, I stood with my cart at the corner of Old Change ; I left it a few minutes, and on returning missed a truss, containing a large roll of canvas, and found it in Wilkinson's possession - the direction was torn off, and one end cut open.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I went to the prisoner's lodging, in Nag's Head-court, Golden-lane, at half-past two o'clock, and saw him come out of the court with this roll of canvas on his shoulder. I let him go to Whitecross-street; then stopped him; he said it was his own - that it was sent him from his brother, at Manchester, and I had no right to inquire about it. I met Norris, who claimed it - one end was cut open, and the direction torn off.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Old-street, with it on his shoulder - he gave me 1 s. to carry it to Wood-street, he treated me with a pot of beer and I was intoxicated - and when I looked round for him he was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-182

1151. MARY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , six yards of ribbon, value 3 s. the goods of David Simpson .

MARY BLANDFORD . I am shopwoman to David Simpson , haberdasher , Bishopsgate-street . Last Saturday, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to ask for some black ribbon, which I shewed her. She took two pieces, and inquired the price of one, while she concealed the other under her apron.

WILLIAM READ . I am shopman to Mr. Simpson. I was sent for, and asked the prisoner if she had any ribbon. She drew her pocket out; I put my hand in, and found a piece of ribbon in her pocket. She said she was unconscious of it, and pleaded intoxication; she was a little so, but knew what she was about.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-183

1152. JOHN KIRWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of a certain person unknown .

No witnesses appeared.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-184

ELEVENTH DAY, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22.

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

1153. WILLIAM TIMMINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s. the goods of Richard Gill .

CATHERINE CLARK . I am servant to Richard Gill , saddler , who lives in John-street, Islington . On the 24th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw these sugar-tongs safe, and between six and seven in the morning they were gone from the safe in the garden, which has a high wall round it. I found the prisoner in custody with them in about a week. He was a stranger.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure of the property - A. Yes; I have been five years in my master's service, and know them.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 25th of June, about eleven in the morning, I took the prisoner in Suffolk-street, Pancras, with a sack on his back. I stopped him to ask what he had there. He said nothing but dust. I found 10 lbs. of bacon in the sack. He resisted a great deal. I took him into a public-house, and was told he had secreted something about his person. Cooper came, and took these tongs out of his breeches.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he found them - A. No.

RICHARD COOPER . I am a constable of Pancras. I found a pair of sugar-tongs in his breeches.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-185

1154. WILLIAM MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , a plane, value 3 s., and a trying square, value 18 s. , the goods of Thomas Crowl .

THOMAS CROWL . I was working for Mr. Basset, in Argyle-place, Regent-street . In consequence of missing tools, I concealed myself on the shop floor, and about half-past twelve o'clock at noon I saw the prisoner come in and take this plane and square off the floor, and put them into his pocket. I came out and took him. He said he had come in for shelter from the rain. He belongs to the Philanthropic Society.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Could he put the plane into his pocket. Did you not say at the office you found them near where he stood - A. No; I took them out of his pocket.

WALTER CAMPBELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge with the tools.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-186

1155. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , a live hog, price 30 s. , the property of William Coffil .

WILLIAM COFFIL . I am a dealer in pigs , and live in Rochester-row, Westminster . This hog was in my yard, at the back of my house. I saw it on the 26th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. On Sunday morning, between six and seven I missed it. I found it on the 28th in the prisoner's stable, in Duck-lane, fastened in. I know it to be mine. He said it was lying just by his place, and he opened the stable-door, and drove it in. It could not have strayed, as my yard has a fence three feet high.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If he had stolen it he might have killed it, and made away with it - A. Yes; I found an ass in the stable; I believe it was padlocked, but am not certain.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable, I went with Handley and the prosecutor, and found the hog, with an ass, in the prisoner's stable, in Duck-lane. The door was padlocked - I forced it open. We went to his lodging, and asked where his stable was; he hesitated, but his wife told us in his hearing. I told him to get up; he went with us to the yard - I went to the first stable, and took out the hasp - he said that was his stable. I found the hog in the next stable, which had his name chalked on the door. He said he knew nothing of anything in that stable.

Cross-examined. Q. When you found the pig, he was not there - A. No; we took him there afterwards. He told the Magistrate it had strayed, and he put it there.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this pig on the dunghill. I used to keep my two donkeys separate - I put one into my brother-in-law's stable, and this pig followed it in; being tired, I shut it in, and came out next day to find the owner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-187

1156. CHARLOTTE ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a blanket, value 10 s.; and a sheet, value 2 s., the goods of Elizabeth Yates , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH YATES . I live in Ranelagh-walk, Chelsea . The prisoner took my back room, first floor, furnished, at 2 s. a week, on the 9th of July, and came into my room on the 13th, intoxicated. I asked her for 1 s. I had lent her, and told her she had pawned a shawl of my lodger's, which made me suspect her - she did not come in all night, and next morning I missed a blanket and sheet, and have never found them.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. On the 16th of July, I took her in charge; she told me where she had left the things; but I did not find them.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-188

1157. SARAH ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , a plane, value 18 d. , the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a bedstead-maker , and live in Lamb-square, Clerkenwell-green. The plane was taken off my bench, in a kitchen, in Great Earl-street, Seven-dials , while I went next door to look at some workmen. The prisoner lodged in the house, and she had given me great caution to take care of my tools. I went round to the pawnbroker's, and received information, and on coming back I met the prisoner, and said,

"Now, bring my plane back if you please;" she said,

"I know nothing about you or your plane either." I said,

"You have been offering it to pawn, will you go to the pawnbrokers' with me" - she went, and they said she was the woman who brought a plane, but they would not take it in; she denied it, but I gave her in charge, and found it next day at Stapleton's. Her husband is a carpenter, but does not work in the house.

MARIA WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Stapleton. I have seen the prisoner several times, and saw her bring a plane and sell to my mistress, for 1 s. 3 d. Smith claimed it next day.

SARAH STAPLETON . I keep this shop, and think the prisoner is the woman who sold me the plane, and said it was her husband's. There was a mark on it; she said her husband made it to make it go smooth.

CHARLES CASTLE . I am a patrole. I took her in charge at a public-house in Seven-dials. She denied the charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-189

1158. WILLIAM BRAY and FRANCIS AUSTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , five tea-spoons, value 2 s. 6 d.; a table-cloth, value 10 s.; two napkins, value 4 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d., and six tin pans, value 6 d. , the goods of Henry Maxwell .

MRS. ANN MAXWELL . I am the wife of Henry Maxwell . We live in Union-place, New Road . I saw this property on the night of the 9th of July; Bray had been in the habit of coming to our house daily to receive goods, and by that means became acquainted with the house - I heard he had been sleeping in the church-yard for six weeks; I had intended to send him to India. On coming down stairs on the morning of the 10th of July to breakfast, I missed the property - I found somebody had got down the grating and through the wash-house window, and taken them from the kitchen - I found the kitchen poker had been

used to break open a pannel. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. In the evening the constable brought Bray to me; he denied the charge. I know nothing of Austin.

MARGARET THOMPSON . I live in East-street, Manchester-square; Austin came to me at eight o'clock one morning, and brought 1 3/4 lbs. of rags, which I gave him 7 d. for; I did not particularly notice them, as I was feeding a young child - but when I opened them, they appeared linen torn up. I knew his parents, who lived fourteen years in the neighbourhood. Mrs. Maxwell claimed them.

SAMUEL MEAD . I work for a plaisterer. Bray came up to me about five o'clock one afternoon before he was taken, and brought six tin dishes; he said he found them in some dust, and asked me to buy them - I said I had no money, and they were of no use to me. He then asked me to give him a piece of bread for them, which I did. I kept them in my pocket till I heard of his being taken up; I then went to Mrs. Maxwell, and gave them to her.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable; I apprehended Bray; Austin was brought to the office by his brother. I took Bray in Conway-court, close by Mary-le-bone Office; I told him it was for stealing things of Mrs. Maxwell; he made no answer. I found a pair of stockings on his feet, which Mrs. Maxwell claimed. I examined the premises; the persons had got down the grating into the area and into the wash-house, by breaking a square of glass, and sliding the window back; the poker was bent, and part of the pannel broken out of the door, so that he could get into the kitchen. Bray directed me next morning to Thompson's, where I found the rag. I found a table-cloth, two napkins, and a tea-spoon, at Austin's mother's.

MRS. MAXWELL. The property is mine. The rags are a table-cloth which we had used the day before; it was too good to tear up.

AUSTIN'S Defence. I did not know they were stolen.

BRAY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

AUSTIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-190

1159. THOMAS HUNTER and ROBERT SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a pair of boots, value 20 s. , the goods of John Skinner .

CHARLES OLIVER . I am shopman to Mr. John Skinner , boot-maker , of Blenheim-street, Bond-street . On the 7th of August, about noon, these boots lay on the shop-board; I was in the back parlour, and heard somebody come in; I looked, but could see nobody. In about five minutes, I heard somebody come in again, and saw Smith taking the boots and go out with them; I ran out, and only lost sight of him in turning the corner - I overtook him in Hanover-square; he had not got them then. I am certain of his person, I charged him with it; he said, he was going to meet a gentleman at Charing-cross, and was going by our shop at the time I ran out. Hunter was brought to the office the same day with the boots.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. I suppose you rose a cry of Stop thief - A. Yes, I lost sight of Smith for a moment, as he turned the corner.

GEORGE CAMBER . I am an artificial flower-maker, and live in Blenheim-street. I was at the first floor window, opposite the prosecutor's shop, and saw a young man in a striped waistcoat, whom I believe to be Smith, come round the corner into Woodstock-street alone; he stood close by Skinner's door; he then came from the door and went down Blenheim-street, and spoke to Hunter. I am sure of him; he then went back, and I saw him go into Skinner's shop and come out without anything; he went down Blenheim-street, I did not see him speak to Hunter again; he returned and went into the shop again, and brought out a pair of boots; the shopman ran out, calling Stop thief! I saw him throw the boots under the shop window. I saw him again in half an hour, and will not positively swear to him; he had a striped waistcoat on when he was taken. I picked up the boots, and took them into the shop; then went into the square, and found him then in custody. I am sure Hunter is the man who Smith spoke to - I saw him at Marlborough-street, pointed him out, and he was taken.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. Hunter was given into my charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I was in Hanover-square - this man came up and took me - I never saw Hunter till he was taken.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

HUNTER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-191

1160. JOHN DYER and EDWARD LONG were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , two sheets, value 12 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 9 s.; and two books, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Cory .

DYER pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable of the Foundling. On the 27th of August, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the two prisoners together in Guildford-street. I watched them for half an hour, and then lost sight of Dyer, and in half an hour afterwards I lost sight of Long. I remained on the spot until about six o'clock, and saw them in company again; I still watched them, and stopped them on suspicion. Upon searching them, I found two books and a handkerchief on Long. The place where I stopped him was half a mile from the prosecutor's. A parcel of duplicates were found on Dyer, and also the handkerchiefs and books found on Long. Dyer said at first, the property belonged to him, and afterwards that it belonged to his brother. Long said Dyer gave him the books to carry for him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Long deny giving Dyer the books - A. No; he said he lent them to him to read, and the handkerchief also.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a constable. On the 27th of August, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners in Great Coram-street. I followed them to Guildford-street, and there took them into custody. I found a duplicate of two shirts and a handkerchief on Dyer, and a handkerchief on his neck, which Mr. Corry claimed. Dyer admitted giving Long the books.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am servant to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, Baldwin's-gardens. On the 26th of August a shawl was pawned - on the 2d, a sheet for six shillings - on the 5th, another, and on the 15th, another - they were all pawned by Dyer.

MR. JOSEPH CORRY . I live in Everett-street, Brunswick-square. I know nothing of this robbery. I might have been out of town at the time - the property is mine - I had let my house to a tailor, for whom Dyer worked. I never saw Long there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-192

1161. HARRIET DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , twenty sheets, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Kennedy .

THOMAS KENNEDY . I keep a lodging house in St. Giles's . I saw these sheets safe the morning before they were stolen. I have eight rooms, and five or six beds in some rooms. I missed ten pair next morning. I saw the prisoner about eleven o'clock, and in consequence of information had her taken. I found nine pair at Rodnams, in Seven-dials - she took me there - my name is on them at full length.

JANE REECE . I am shopwoman to Mr. Rodnam; the prisoner and a man brought these sheets to our house. I bought them at the rate of 2 d. a lb. I did not open them, nor know how many there were. She offered them to me as rags - they weighed 30 lbs. I paid her the money, as she appeared to belong to them. If I had opened the bundle, I should not have bought them at all - she kept the money herself.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am beadle of Bloomsbury. The prisoner came to Marlborough-street, in consequence of two girls being in custody, who were suspected of this - they were liberated, and she detained.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who asked me where I could sell them. I took him to this shop, but never had the money.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-193

1162. MARY ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 20 lbs. of rope, value 18 s. , the goods of William Vincent .

WILLIAM VINCENT . I am a rope-maker , and carry on business at Stepney . On the 29th of August, about eleven o'clock in the day, I saw this rope safe in my ground - it weighed 20 lbs. I missed it, and saw it afterwards at Shadwell, where the prisoner was in custody. She came backwards and forwards to my house - she has been a great many years in a very respectable business.

DANIEL DARBY . I am a rope maker, I work for Mr. Vincent - I saw the prisoner bringing it off the premises on the 29th of August, between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I did not stop her, supposing she had my master's permission to bring it. I informed my master next morning.

RICHARD LEE . I am a cord-winder. On the last Saturday in August, the prisoner came to me with this rope, and asked if she might leave it with me until the afternoon. I live nearly a mile from her; she did not call for it, but on Sunday morning, her husband and son came for it.

WILLIAM FORSTER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. Brown, who is now dead, gave the rope into my care.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded Distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-194

1163. SAMUEL GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , a jacket, value 2 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. , the goods of Daniel Dundway .

DANIEL DUNDWAY . I live in Hampshire. I came to town to look for work, I lodged at Mr. Turner's, at Highgate , the prisoner slept in the same bed. I undressed and went to bed about eight o'clock in the evening of the 14th of July; the prisoner went to bed at the same time - four other persons slept in the room; I awoke at two o'clock and he was gone, the rest remained. I missed my jacket and trowsers, and found them about a fortnight ago - he was taken into custody.

JAMES TURNER . The prosecutor and prisoner lodged at my house. The prisoner came about the 7th of July; he appeared a labourer . Dundway came to lodge there a day or two before - he was very ill, and when I went to take him his breakfast, he said his clothes were stolen, and 3 s. 6 d. The prisoner was apprehended at Totteridge.

BARNARD FITZPATRICK . I am a labourer at Highgate. On the 14th of July, I slept in the same house, but not in the same room. I heard the door open and shut, but do not know what it was about - I hallooed out, but no answer was given. I saw the prisoner on the day he was taken, and asked him what made him take the money - he said there was very little money to take.

THOMAS BRETT . I am a constable. I took him in charge, he said he was drinking at the time. I found the trowsers on John Riley , who is gone to Ireland, and the jacket on Lowe.

THOMAS ROACH . I am a labouring man. On Tuesday morning the prisoner came to Finchley-common, and got a job with my master - he had the jacket and trowsers on then which are now produced. I saw him exchanging the trowsers with Riley, he sold the jacket to Lowe for 1 s. 3 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-195

1164. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th June , a coat, value 2 s.; a pair of shoes, value 3 s.; a shift, value 3 s.; a gown, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 1 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s.; six caps, value 2 s.; a pair of stockings, value 6 d., and three handkerchiefs, value 18 d. , the goods of Mary Garton , widow .

MARY GARTON . I am a widow, and live at St. James's poor-house. On the 14th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was at the Duke of Wellington, public-house, Princes-street, and had these things in a bundle; I was enquiring for a lodging; the prisoner came in; I knew her before. She said she would give me a lodging, and took the bundle from me, saying, she would carry it for me; we walked together a little way. I went to leave a basket at a house, and when I came out she was gone - I have found nothing. I met her seven weeks after, and charged her with it, she said she had none of my things, and used bad language - she went into a wine-vaults, at the corner of Crown-street, and by going out at another door, escaped me.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am a constable. On the 18th of August, I took the prisoner in charge. She and the prosecutrix had both been paupers - she refused to say where she lodged, or what she had done with the things.

Prisoner's Defence. She was in liquor. I said, if she would go with me, I would provide for her; but she got dancing with the men. I lost sight of her, and never touched her bundle.

EDMUND PEPPER . She said the prosecutrix was drunk, but said nothing about her being with the men.

MARY GARTON . I was not drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-196

1165. HENRY HARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , twenty-eight yards of calico, value 3 s. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I am a linen-draper , and live in Sloane-street . On the 8th of September I lost this printed calico from outside the door. It was put out in the morning between six and seven o'clock, and was the top piece of a pile. Two ladies gave me information. I went out, and caught sight of the prisoner running in New-street. I collared him in the Brompton-road, and this calico fell from him. He begged forgiveness.

JOHN CANNING . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was not on the pile, but laid on the pavement. I was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18230910-197

1166. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for embezzlement .

ANN MARIA RATCLIFF . I am a single woman, and by trade a baker . The prisoner has been in my service ten months or a year, and received money for me, which he should account for immediately as he came home. Langhorn was a customer of mine; she owed me money. I asked the prisoner if she had paid him; he said, No. I discharged him on the 24th of August, 1822. I saw Langhorn next week. He was apprehended in July last, and has never accounted to me for money received of her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He was very active in getting you customers - A. Yes; he had 8 s. a week. I advanced his wages (as he got customers) to 1 l. I never asked him to make up money which they did not pay. He gave me the money as being paid by the customers. There was a dispute between him and my brother, in consequence of which he left. I never offered to give up the prosecution for money. I do not think I ever said, if his friends paid me I would give it up. I told his father I would not hurt him if he would give security for the money he had received. He would not do that unless I received him into my service again, and stopped it out of his wages.

SARAH LANGHORN . I live in Union-street, Somers'-town. I dealt with the prosecutor. On the 24th of June, 1822, I paid the prisoner 3 s. To the best of my knowledge I gave him 3 s. I must have given him a shilling. The week after the prisoner left the prosecutrixes service, a bill was sent me amounting to 2 l. 9 s. I had paid it all but 4 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not you have given him a half-crown, a sixpence, and halfpence - A. I gave him no halfpence. I remember paying him.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of July, at a baker's shop in the Borough-road. I told him I took him for embezzling 30 l. from the prosecutrix. He confessed his guilt, and afterwards asked how much she charged him with. He then said it was between 20 and 30 l., for he kept a book, but it was not so much as 30 l.

Prisoner's Defence. When I engaged with her I was to have half out of every ten loaves sold. I was induced to give credit, and have paid bills out of my own pocket. I became indebted to her in consequence of giving credit, and intended to pay her all. An account of it was made out. I had words with her brother, and left. She offered to take it by instalments.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230910-198

1167. JOHN PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , a till, value 1 s.; thirty pennypieces, and sixty halfpence , the property of Joseph Wiltshire .

JOSEPH WILTSHIRE . I keep the White Horse, public-house, Mile End . On the 19th of August, about eleven o'clock, I went out, returned in an hour, and the till and money were gone; 5 s. or 6 s. worth of copper were in it.

ELIZABETH MANNING . I live opposite to the prosecutor's. On the 19th of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out with a box under his arm. He was a neighbour, and I thought nothing of it. On the Friday following I heard Wiltshire had been robbed. There were three of them came out, but the prisoner was the one who had the box. (Looks at the till); it was a box like that.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a constable. On the 24th of August, in consequence of information, I took the prisoner, and told him it was for robbing Mr. Wiltshire of his till - he denied it; I found nothing on him. I apprehended him at his father's house; he was denied to me, but I heard the yard door go down - I went backwards, and found him in the privy. The till was brought to Wiltshire, about half an hour after.

THOMAS COOPER . I accompanied Gibbs - his statement is correct.

JOSEPH WILTSHIRE . The till is mine. A young woman brought it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it. The witnesses have said that right or wrong I shall leave the country.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230910-199

1168. PROSPER MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Thompson .

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a carter , and live at Turnham-green. On the 25th of July, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, the cart was at the top of James-street, Covent-garden - I had just unloaded it; the coat was then safe. I missed it in half an hour. The prisoner was taken about four o'clock.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am patrol of Drury-lane. I saw the prisoner about four o'clock in the morning, with another, in Great Queen-street - one of them had a bundle. As soon as they saw me, they turned into Queen-street, and from there into Great Wild-street. Before that, they

were coming toward me - I ran round to meet them; they set off as hard as they could; I followed them through several courts, sprung my rattle, and took the prisoner with the coat on his back - he said he found it; he pulled it off, and threw it down. As we went along to the watch-house, he offered me the coat if I would let him go. I made enquiry, and found Thompson, who claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the road, and was going to the market to ask who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-200

1169. WILLIAM PATMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a sheet, value 2 s. , the goods of John Hill .

JOHN HILL . I keep the Cross Keys, St. John-street . On the 31st of July, I lost a sheet, which had come round some meat - I missed a variety of things. The prisoner was employed about the yard, and knew of my loss, but said nothing. In consequence of information I received, I gave him in charge.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the 31st of July, I apprehended the prisoner in the yard - I told him it was for taking a meat sheet; he said he was in the stable, and did take it, and gave it to Allensby to make aprons of.

ELIZABETH ALLENSBY . I live in New-court, St. Peter's-lane. I know the prisoner by sight. On the 30th of July, he gave me this sheet to make into aprons for him - it was in four pieces, and he gave me eleven yards of tape to make them with. My husband worked for Mr. Hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found a piece of wrapper, which I thought of no consequence, and took it to make aprons, as it is customary to find porters aprons.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230910-201

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1170. LYDIA STEVENS and THOMAS KNIGHT , were indicted for misdemeanours .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM COLTON . On the 11th of July, I was in Sun-street, and saw the prisoners go by me about twelve o'clock, towards Bishopsgate-street. I followed them in company for three quarters of a mile, they separated at Adams's shop; Stevens went in, and Knight waited at the corner, about twenty yards off, and when Stevens came out, I went in, and from what I heard I watched them - they went together to Morgan's milk shop. I saw Knight hand her something; he stood in a corner about forty yards off, while she went in, bought some eggs and got change - then they joined company, and went away together. I went into the shop and received a sixpence, which they marked before they delivered it. They then went to Bullock's shop, near Little Britain; Knight stood at the corner, while she went in and came out with a sheet of writing paper - I went in, Miss Bullock marked a sixpence and gave it to me. Reardon was with me, we took them into custody. I asked Knight what he had in his hand, he said nothing; I forced it open, and found a bad sixpence; I found ninepence in halfpence, and some potatoes in his hat, and some in his coat, and two or three good shillings about him. I found the eggs and paper in Stevens's hand, but no halfpence; she had no bonnet or shawl on. I produce the three sixpences.

DANIEL REARDON . I am a plaisterer, and live in Grenville-street, Somers-town. I was with the last witness, and have heard his statement, it is correct.

Prisoner KNIGHT. Q. What did you give Colton at the Compter door - A. Nothing. The prisoner was going to throw something away, and Colton took a sixpence out of his hand.

MARY ADAMS . I am the wife of Robert Adams , we live in Throgmorton-street. On the 11th of July, the prisoner came into the shop, between two and three o'clock, for two raspberry tarts, and begged me to give her fresh ones, as they were for a sick child. She opened her hand, and said,

"I have only got these three-halfpence and a sixpence, which you must give me change for." On looking at it, I saw it was bad, and returned it; she said, she would return in half an hour, if I would put them aside. She went out, and Colton came, and I told him what had occurred.

MARTHA GEORGE . I am servant to Mr. Morgan, cow-keeper, to Fore-street. I saw the female prisoner on Friday, the 11th of July; she came for two eggs, which came to twopence. She said, she had only three halfpence, and I must change a sixpence, which I received from her; I took it up to my mistress, who gave me fourpence, which I gave her. I saw her deliver the same sixpence to Colton, it was marked.

JEMIMA MORGAN . I am the wife of William Morgan , Fore-street. George was my servant; she brought me a sixpence, I gave her fourpence. I kept it separate until Colton came, when I gave it him, after marking it.

ELIZABETH BULLOCK . I live with my father, who is a stationer, in Little Britain. On the 11th of July, a woman came into the shop; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner; she asked for a sheet of black edged letter paper, which I gave her; she gave me a sixpence, I gave her fivepence change. Colton came in directly after, I gave him the sixpence; he marked it before I parted with it; this is it (looking at it.)

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL , assistant to the Solicitor for the Mint, proved the sixpences to be all counterfeit, and of one die.

STEVENS'S Defence. I met Knight, and told him to come with me while I fetched some errands, which he did; I received no money from him, I did not know it was bad.

KNIGHT'S Defence. I had no bad money about me, and gave the woman none.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18230910-202

1171. SARAH ASH , GEORGE SINGLETON , and HENRY HEDLEY were indicted for misdemeanours .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-203

Middlesex Cases, Third Jury.

1172. EDWARD POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a looking-glass, value 25 s. , the goods of James Paterson .

WILLIAM SIMPSON PATERSON . I am the son of James

Paterson. On the 16th of July, about eight o'clock, my father was coming from the parlour, and called out

"Stop thief! there is a glass stolen." I ran into Bedford-place, and saw the glass on the pavement broken, and the prisoner in the hands of the beadle. I had seen it safe ten minutes before. We live in Vernon-place.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am beadle. On the 16th of July I saw the prisoner running round Bloomsbury-square into Bedford-place, and there I took him; he did not attempt to get away - he put the glass down carefully - I think it was broken by accident.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-204

1173. THOMAS STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a watch-key, value 7 s. , the goods of Abraham Harris and Lewis Harris .

ABRAHAM HARRIS . I am in partnership with Lewis Harris ; we are pawnbrokers , and live in the Strand . On Monday, the 18th of August, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was called up, and found the prisoner in custody in the passage, and two gold watch-keys gone from the window. The shutter was loose, the pin stolen, the glass broken, and part of the shutter cut away, so as to enable a person to put a wire in. The prisoner was the last boy in the shop on Saturday night; this was Monday.

EDWARD LOMAS . I work for Mr. Ashton, who lives opposite to the prosecutors. On the 18th of August, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner working at the shutters; he had a pitcher stood by his side - a little girl came up, and he took it up and went away - I went over and took him as he was going into a wine-vaults, and said,

"What have you been doing at the shutters?" he said,

"What shutters?" I found a wire in his hand, which was bloody. I gave him in charge, and found the shutter had been cut and the glass broken.

THOMAS PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Ashton. I saw the prisoner with the wire, working at the shutters; and as he went away. I called to Lomas to stop him. I saw him throw a key into the gutter - it was picked up in my presence and given to Lomas, who secured him.

THOMAS THURNAN . Early on the 18th of August I was in the Strand, and saw a key lying on the ground; I stopped to pick it up, but another man took it. The prisoner was in custody of Lomas at the time.

JOHN WITHEY . I am a street-keeper, and took him in charge - I have the key and wire - I found a bent nail in his coat pocket; there was also a ticket attached to the key which was picked up under the window. The house appeared to have been broken open in the night, for there was the mark of a crow bar under the window.

Prisoner's Defence. They say it was done at five o'clock; I was not out of bed at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230910-205

1174. GEORGE THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a gown, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Adams .

JOSEPH ADAMS . I live in Field-lane - my wife keeps a mangle. On the afternoon of the 12th of July I was taking some linen home, and had three gowns with it. The other woman told me something was gone out of my basket, and pointed out the prisoner; I followed him and took the gown from under his coat.

Prisoner. Q. Have you got the woman here - A. No; he said,

"You old *** I will knock your eye out if you don't let let me go;" I could not detain him, he had so many palls.

JOHN BARNSLEY . I took the prisoner in charge the morning after the robbery; he said it was only a joke.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230910-206

1175. RICHARD TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , three sovereigns, a half sovereign, and ten shillings , the monies of James James .

JAMES JAMES . I am a saddler , and live in Joseph-street, Brunswick-square. The prisoner was in my service - the money stated in the indictment was given him to get some leather from Jones and Co. in Piccadilly; he went out, and I did not see him again till he was taken, which was on the 9th of September.

WILLIAM BARNES . I found the prisoner, and gave him in charge for this transaction; he said he was very sorry - that his master had behaved extremely well to him, but it was now too late - and acknowledged taking it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230910-207

1176. THOMAS NAPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a pair of boots, value 10 s., the goods of William Vinicombe , privately in his shop .

FRANCES VINICOMBE . I am the wife of William Vinicombe ; we live in Tabernacle Walk . On the 28th of August, about a quarter to three o'clock, I saw the prisoner with these boots in his hands, walking fast away from the shop - I went out after him - he dropped them and ran off, but was stopped - they had hung up about a yard inside the door; I saw them safe ten minutes before.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am a constable. I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230910-208

1177. ANN WILSON and ELIZA BOWERS were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , a blanket, value 3 s.; two sheets, value 4 s.; two knives, value 6 d.; two forks, value 3 d.; a bason, value 4 d.; a milk-jug, value 2 d.; and a towel, value 3 d., the goods of William Rowe