Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th June 1823.
Reference Number: 18230625
Reference Number: f18230625-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 25th of JUNE, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Sowley Holroyd , Knt., one of Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julian Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Edward Gerrard ,

John Newton Dunn ,

Joseph Guthridge Jacobson ,

Charles Brook Bradshaw ,

William Wilson ,

Jonathan Woolley ,

James Burnett ,

William Bury ,

John Logan ,

John London ,

Joseph Stevens ,

John Lane .

1st Middlesex Jury.

James Hoare ,

James Clarke ,

William Walker ,

Rupert Kirk ,

Richard Jones ,

Jeremiah Bridgman ,

James Graham ,

George Enekie ,

Thomas Mercer ,

Robert Willis Hall ,

Alexander Ottery ,

John Kent .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

George Francis ,

Henry Childs ,

William Walker ,

John Scott ,

Isaac Corney ,

Richard Ford ,

John Harvey ,

John Jarvis ,

David Flemming ,

John Moore ,

Richard Smith ,

Daniel Redford .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 25, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. SIXTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18230625-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

855. WILLIAM BASSETT and JOHN MOAKES were indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of our Lord the King, on the 4th of June , and stealing ten coats, value 10 l., the goods of our said Lord the King; one coat, value 5 l., the goods of James M'Donnell ; two pair of trowsers, value 3 l., the goods of Thomas Powys ; one pair of trowsers, value 1 l., the goods of Mark Beaufoy , and two waistcoats, value 1 l., the goods of John Lynn .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house, of His Royal Highness the Duke of York , and the ten coats to be his property.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ALLEY and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN DYCHE . I am quarter master sergeant of the Coldstream Guards, and have the care of the regimental stores at Knightsbridge barracks . The store room forms part of the barracks, which are the property of the King. There were a quantity of great coats, tied up in bundles of ten each and some in lesser quantities, and marked with the stamp of the regiment. Captain Mark Beaufoy is the adjutant, and sleeps in the wing of the building. Colonel James M'Donald has the command of the batallion stationed there. On the 4th of June, between four and six o'clock in the afternoon, I saw all the coats safe in the store room - I tried the door again about eight o'clock, and it was locked; I went again between five and six next morning, and found a hole in the roof, and a quantity of coats gone. The hole was not in the roof the evening before; it was two or three yards from where the coats are kept. I missed ten coats - the bundles appeared to have been undone, and some taken from each; they were intermixed. There was a black coat, and a pair of pantaloons there on the evening before, which I also missed. I found the ten coats at the Thames Police Office.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. On the morning of the 5th of June, between one and two o'clock, I met the prisoners in Upper East Smithfield - I stopped them and asked where they were going; they said a little further - they had each a regimental great coat on. Bassett had two pair of pantaloons under his coat; one pair was linen, and the other kerseymere - I took them from him, and desired the watchman to assist in taking them to the watch-house. While he was taking Bassett along, Moakes slipped off his great coat and ran off - we caught him again; I am certain of him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You only saw him for a short time - A. No; he was brought back in five minutes.

JAMES SIMMONS . I am a patrol. I was in East Smithfield. Harrison's account is correct. Moakes threw his great coat off, and ran away - I picked it up. He was stopped under a strong gas lamp. I am certain of him.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a watchman. I was present, and saw Moakes run down St. Catherine's-lane, and caught him about fifty yards from some ruins, which he passed. I knew him before, and am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he any bundle when you first saw him - A. No; he had two pair of pantaloons.

JOHN BOWMAN . I am a watchman. I remember Moakes being apprehended. I found eight soldiers' great coats up by some old ruins in St. Catherine's-lane.

THOMAS HARRISON re-examined. When I first saw them, they were coming down the street, and might have passed the ruins; but there was a turning between them and the ruins.

JOHN DYCHE . The two coats which the prisoners had on, were both stolen from the store room - they are numbered and marked 129 and 646, by which I know that they were safe the night before.

Cross-examined. Q. Have they never been worn - A. Never. I recollect their being in the store room perfectly well.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Were those found in the ruins stolen at the same time - A. Yes. If they had been issued they would have been marked outside as well as in. Both the prisoners are in the regiment.

WILLIAM COOPER . I am a private in the Coldstream Guards. I know these pantaloons to belong to Captain

Thomas Powys - they were in the store room on the night of the robbery.

BASSETT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

MOAKES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230625-2

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

856. THOMAS KNAPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , twenty-two yards of cloth, value 16 l., and one suit of clothes, value 2 l., the goods of John Jackson , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN JACKSON . I am a tailor , and live at Shadwell - I have two shops. On the 20th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, this property was in the opposite shop, where I do not live; I had left there about two minutes, and gone over to the house, and stood at my door - I saw the prisoner pass the window with some cloth under his arm; I went over immediately, and found nobody in the shop. I went out again, and saw him running down the street very fast with it - I followed, and overtook him with this cloth and a suit of clothes under his arm, and gave him in charge. He had taken the cloth off the counter.

THOMAS ESHEEBY . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the evening of the 20th of May, about half-past eight o'clock, I took him in charge with the property. The waistcoat and trowsers were in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-3

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

857. JOHN HENDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , at St. Mary, Islington , he being apprentice to Charles Tulley , three sovereigns, and a shilling, the monies of the said Charles Tulley , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES TULLEY . I am an optician , and live in Territ's-court, Upper-street , St. Mary, Islington - I rent the house. The prisoner was my apprentice , and slept in the house; he had lived two years with me. On Monday, the 19th of May, about eleven o'clock at night, I put ten sovereigns and ten shillings into my scrutoire drawer; I marked them all. The scrutoire stands in the back parlour - I locked the drawer, and put the key in the bookcase, where I usually kept it, and left the book-case unlocked. Next morning about half-past seven o'clock, my son called me down - I went down into the back parlour, where the prisoner sat in a chair; my son was picking three sovereigns and a shilling off the floor - the prisoner had put his foot over them, and endeavoured to hide them under the carpet; he got up and came to me, and begged me to forgive him - I said nothing to him. He said he was very sorry for what he had done, that he would never do it any more, and would serve me night and day if I would not prosecute him. My son laid the sovereigns and the shilling on the table - I took them up, and produce them - they are three of those I put there the night before.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What age is he - A. About seventeen years; I never enquired his age particularly. I have not got his indentures here - he was apprenticed for seven years.

WILLIAM TULLEY . I am the son of the last witness. I remember my father marking the money, and putting it in the scruetoire, and the key in the book-case. Next morning about half-past six o'clock, I concealed myself on the stairs, and heard the prisoner go to the workshop behind the house, then heard him go to the back parlour, and unlock the door - the key had been left in; he went in; I heard the scrutoire drawer unlocked and opened; I waited a moment, and heard it shut again, and heard the book-case door shut - I came down, and found him coming out of the parlour; I asked him what he did there - he said he was going to open the shutters; I said as he was there he might as well open them; he went and opened them. I said I was afraid he had been doing something wrong, that he had been taking money; he said, "What money?" I said I must open the drawer and see; I did so, and missed three sovereigns and a shilling - he said he knew nothing of them, that he had never taken any money. He sat on a chair; I saw him stoop, and endeavour to put something under the carpet - I stooped down, and found the three sovereigns and a shilling laying on the floor; I picked them up, laid them on the table, and charged him with taking them, which he voluntarily confessed. I had seen my father mark them, and knew them to be three of those he put there the night before.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this - A. About half-past seven o'clock. I watched him from the moment he got up - he could not have taken them at different times.

The prisoner made no Defence, but one witness gave him a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth, by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Reference Number: t18230625-4

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

858. CATHERINE BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , two sovereigns, the monies of Pascol Paoli Field , from his person .

PASCOL PAOLI FIELD . I lodge at the Hungerford coffee-house, Strand. On the 27th of May, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was in James-street, Covent-garden - the prisoner followed me; I desired her to be off repeatedly; she kept catching hold of me. I said I should give her in charge if she persisted in annoying me; she then desired something to drink; we were passing the King's Arms , and in order to get rid of her I took her in, and while I was telling them to give her something, she thrust her hand into my pocket - I had a silk purse, which contained four sovereigns, a half-crown, and a sixpence; I had seen it while supping at the Hummums. She took the purse out; I saw it in her hand - she ran from me into a crowd of persons, who were in the room; I kept my eye fixed on her, and followed her. I seized her, and drew her out of the crowd; she told me to let her go, and denied robbing me. I made towards the street door, and gave her in charge. She entreated me not to expose her, but if I would go to the next street she would return the purse; I followed her there, keeping hold of her; she

gave me the purse; I examined it, and found two of the sovereigns were taken out of it; she had turned round before she gave it me; she might have taken it out then, or when she ran into the crowd. I told her she had robbed me of two sovereigns, and if she did not return them I would charge the watch with her - she denied it. I met a watchman, and gave her to him - she appeared agitated at the watch-house, and kept moving her mouth about - the watchman seized her by neck, and one sovereign fell from her mouth. She appeared from the motion of her throat to have swallowed the other. I found a farthing put into my purse instead of the sovereign. I was perfectly sober.

JAMES WARREN . I am a patrol. I took her in charge. Ashton seized her by the neck, and the sovereign dropped from her.

JAMES ASHTON . I saw her at the watch-house, seized her by the neck and throat, and the sovereign dropped - she had said she had no money at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in company with several men and women; he asked me to drink, but gave me nothing; then followed me out, and said I had robbed him. The sovereign was one a gentleman had given me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-5

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

859. RANDOLPH HOLLWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , a picture, value 15 s. , the goods of James Smith .

SAMUEL CHARLSWORTH . I live in Princes-court, Princes-street, Westminster , On the 17th of June, at a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I was looking out of my two pair of stairs window, and saw the prisoner under the window, talking to another person; he went into Mr. Smith's house, next door, and brought this picture out - I immediately called out Stop thief; he immediately dropped it, and ran off, but was pursued and taken.

Prisoner. Q. Had I a hat on - A. Yes. I could discern his features. I lost sight of him before he was taken.

FRANCIS RHINA . I am a watchman. I was on the opposite side of the way, and heard a cry of Stop thief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with a picture in his hand - I went towards him; he dropped it, and ran off. I followed him round Duke-street, into the Park, and lost sight of him for half a minute, and found him concealed by the Treasury. I knew him before very well, and have no doubt of him.

JAMES SMITH . I am a carver and gilder , and live in Princes-court, next door to Charlsworth. I heard a rattling against the wainscoat in the passage, and immediately after a cry of Stop thief! I ran into the passage, and missed the picture. I ran out, and followed the people into the Park, and when the prisoner was taken I returned, and found the picture at my house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable. I received him in charge with the picture from Smith.

Prisoner's Defence. I was six weeks out of work, and was walking through the Treasury, stopped to drink some water at the pump, and was charged with the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-6

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

860. NATHANIEL DAISLEY was indicted for steal- on the 4th of June , a hat, value 16 s. , the goods of Richard Johnson and Richard Thomas Gill .

THOMAS PRICE . I am shopman to Richard Johnson and Richard Thomas Gill , hatters , Regent-street . On the 4th of June, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening the prisoner came into the shop, and said he wanted a hat - I asked what price he would go to; he said 19 s. or 20 s. I fitted him with one at 19 s. - he said he had not got the money to pay for it then, but would pay for it if I would send some person home with it. I called the boy, and sent him with it.

MARSHALL NEWTON . I took the hat, and went with the prisoner to Lower Seymour-street - he took it of me at a door, and said he would bring me out the money. He came out in about two minutes, and said, "My master is not at home, if you will bring the bill about ten o'clock in the morning, you will get paid;" I said I would bring the hat up next morning - he said there was no occasion for that, for he had spoken to the shopman, and told him he was not sure he should pay him that night, and if not he would send it in the morning - he said he was going further. I watched him into Sommerset-street; he knocked at several doors, but went in at none, and then turned towards Seymour-street again; I lost him, and knocked at the door where I had left the hat, and asked for it. A lady made some enquiry, and then the butler said he had fetched the hat away. I did not go to the house next morning.

GEORGE KEYMER . On the 4th of June, the prisoner came to No. 9, Lower Seymour-street, and asked to speak to a youth named Richard Parker , who was servant there - I said he was not at home, but might come home soon; he said he was going further, and asked to leave a hat until he returned. I put it in the hall; he returned in a short time, and asked for Parker, who had not returned, and took the hat away.

RICHARD JOHNSON . On the 4th of June, the prisoner came into our shop, and bargained for this hat to be sent with him to Lower Seymour-street - the boy was told by Price not to leave it without the money. On the Sunday following he passed me in Regent-street; I knew him - he ran down Jeremy-street; I pursued, and secured him, and took the hat off his head. He said he had paid for it - we never received the money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

Reference Number: t18230625-7

861. ANN BING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , two half-crowns, and five shillings, the monies of Henry Wilson , from his person .

HENRY WILSON . I am a hackney coachman . On Tuesday morning, the 20th of May, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Little Dean-street, Westminster - I was standing at the corner of the street for a necessary purpose; she came up, put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took out two half-crowns, and five shillings. The two half-crowns were marked. She ran from me - I caught her. I had twenty shillings in my pocket, but

only missed 10 s. I told her she had robbed me of two half-crowns, and after some time she returned them, and said it was only fun - I said she had 5 s. more; she said it did not belong to me - I gave charge of her. She gave 4 s. to Mr. Munday, the watch-house keeper. I was quite sober.

GODFREY STEVENSON . I am the watch man. I saw Wilson running after the prisoner - he gave her into my charge. She was rather in liquor, and he was sober.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner go up to Wilson, and heard him say she had robbed him of two half-crowns; she laughed at him, and gave him two half-crowns back. They turned down Dean-street. I did not see her running away.

RICHARD MUNDAY . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought in with 4 s. in her hand. The prosecutor charged her with robbing him of two half-crowns, which he laid on the table, and 5 s. - I demanded it of her; she threw 4 s. on the table. I found nothing on her.

HENRY WILSON . Here is my mark on the half-crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. I was much in liquor, and am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-8

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

862. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , a shilling, and four sixpences, the monies of William Knight , from his person .

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I live in Orchard-street, Westminster. On the 15th of June, I was bathing at Milbank , and on getting out of the water, I saw a number of persons coming towards me. The prisoner was one; I knew him before - he came, and asked if I had any money - I said No. He said he wanted 1 d.; I said I had none; he said he would have one. I felt in my pocket, and found three farthings, and gave it him, and told him he was welcome to it if he would go away - he said he wanted a comb; I said I had not one. On taking the three farthings out of my pocket, the silver in my waistcoat pocket jerked. I put the waistcoat under my legs; he snatched it from me, and took it away across the road, and took the silver out, and threw the waistcoat back - I put it on. I knew him by the name of Hacket. I told him he had taken a shilling and four sixpences - he swore, and said it was untrue, that there was nothing in it but a few buttons - there were some buttons, but I am certain the silver was there too. I put my things on, and pursued, but lost sight of him. I saw him on the Thursday night at a public-house in Orchard-street, and charged him with it; he denied knowing me.

THOMAS DAGNALL . I received him in charge at the public-house. Knight gave the same account, and said the prisoner was the man.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-9

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

863. WILLIAM BRENAN and DAVID ROACH were indicted for stealing, on the 17th May , three pair of boot fronts, value 6 s.; twelve pair of shoe quarters, value 5 s.; eleven pair of shoe vamps, value 5 s.; and a calf skin, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Hutchinson , their master .

ROBERT HUTCHINSON . I am a currier , and live in Frith-street, Soho . On the 16th of May, from information I received, I found eleven pair and a half of shoe ramps, and two pair of boot fronts concealed under the stairs, leading to the cellar. On the following day I ordered Whitehorn, the porter, to conceal himself and watch. I sent Brenan into the cellar to fetch some oil, and the last time he went Whitehorn returned before him, and from what he said I called Brenan several times from the cellar; I was obliged to send my son to fetch him before he came - I then told him his conduct was very plain, and he had better disclose all he knew of the robbery. I sent my son with him to the leather room, which is below stairs; they brought up the shoe vamps and fronts, which were the same I had marked the evening before. I had them taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many people have you about your premises - A. About twenty generally. Brenan has been about a year and a half with me - they were both in my service. The coarse leather was kept down stairs, but not this. All the people have access to the cellar.

WILLIAM WHITEHORN . I found these things under the cellar stairs, on Friday evening, the 16th of May, about eight o'clock. I watched next day by my master's order, and saw Brenan go down to them, and put his hand on them, and go away without taking them - he saw me concealed, and asked what brought me there, and I asked what brought him there - he made no answer. I informed my master.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were you concealed - A. Opposite the stairs. He took none of the leather away.

ROBERT HUTCHINSON , JUN. I live with my father. I went to the cellar stairs, and called Brenan up twice; he came up at the second call. I accused him of robbing my father before my father spoke to him, and said if he expected mercy, he must confess the whole - he took me down stairs, and gave me the Wellington fronts from under the stairs, and the vamps from another cellar; it was altogether when I first saw it.

WILLIAM WHITEHORN . The property was altogether when I saw it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-10

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

864. JOHN BOUNDS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , four boots, value 20 s., and a bag, value 3 s., the goods of George Barker , and a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Day .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

REBECCA FOZARD . I am a laundress at Mr. Barker's chambers, in Holborn ; I was there until about ten minutes past nine o'clock on the morning of the 16th of June, and left the windows a little way open - it is on the ground floor. When the prisoner was taken I found a bag with four books by the window.

THOMAS WALDEN . I am clerk to Mr. George Barker . On the 16th of June I got to the chambers about half-past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner there on looking in at the window - I went to the door, and found it shut. I saw him with a bag under his arm. I went to fetch Mr.

Fozard, and returned with him; he threw the blinds up and asked what he did there; he said he was dusting the chambers for the laundress, and came out at the window.

JAMES FOZARD . Walden called me. I went to the chambers, and saw the prisoner at the window - I asked what he was doing there; he said he was a clerk - I called Walden; he told him he was dusting the chambers for the laundress. I pulled him out of the window. My wife opened the door, and found the bag containing a pair of trowsers, and four volumes of Brook's digest.

HENRY ELSLEY . I know the books to belong to Mr. Barker, and the trowsers are Thomas Day 's.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230625-11

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

865. SARAH DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , two gowns, value 20 s; two petticoats, value 8 s.; a shawl, value 10 s.; a bonnet, value 14 s.; a pair of ear-rings, value 7 s.; a pocket book, value 1 s.; a basket, value 1 l.; eight half crowns, and twenty-eight shillings, the goods of John Limberd , to whom she was servant .

LUCY LIMBIRD . I am the wife of John Limbird - we lodge in Charles-street, Covent-garden . I hired the prisoner on the evening of the 24th of April, and on the 26th we left her in care of our apartments and the children, early in the morning, and about one o'clock I went home, and found her gone - she had given no notice. I had given her 13 s. to pay for something which was coming home. I left a purse containing thirty-five shillings, in half-crowns, sixpences, and shillings, under the bed - this was gone with the rest of the articles stated in the indictment.

DANIEL MANVELL . I am beadle of Lothbury. The prisoner was given into my charge by Bolton, on the 19th of May. The prosecutrix claimed the bonnet and shawl she had on.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-12

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

866. JAMES DUFFY and JOHN KELLY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of William Hemp , from his person .

WILLIAM HEMP . I am a Sheriff's officer , and live in Searles-place, Carey-street. On the 16th of June, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Giltspur-street . I felt something at my pocket, and on turning round, I found Duffy close behind me, and Kelly close behind him. I missed my handkerchief, which was safe five minutes before. I accused them of it; Duffy moved a little on one side, and I saw it drop from Kelly - I seized him and took him to the Compter. Duffy ran off down Cock-lane, but was brought back in about ten minutes. My handkerchief was picked up. I gave them in charge.

Prisoner KELLY. Q. Was it dropped before or behind me - A. Rather before him - it appeared to be conveying from one to the other.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge at the Compter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS ALLINGHAM . I am assistant to Mr. Hemp. I was walking close to him; he turned suddenly round, which drew my attention - I turned and saw he had Kelly by the collar; the handkerchief lay on the ground close to him - one of the prisoners must have dropped it. Duffy ran down Cock-lane; I pursued, he was stopped near Snow-hill, without my losing sight of him.

KELLY'S Defence. I was walking in Giltspur-street, with my fellow prisoner, and behind these two gentlemen, I saw nothing pass, but the gentleman turned round and collared me.

DUFFY'S Defence. A cart was coming along, and I ran between the gentlemen to get out of the way.

DUFFY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

KELLY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-13

867. JAMES FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , a watch, value 25 s.; two seals, value 1 s.; a chain, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of John Boswood .

JANE ELIZA BOSWOOD . I am the wife of John Boswood ; we live in Silver-street, Wood-street ; the prisoner had been waiter at my house; he had left about a fortnight, but came backward and forward. On Tuesday evening, the 20th of May, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I missed my son's watch from his box. The prisoner had no business up there. We keep a public-house . I found it in pawn on the 22d. The handkerchief was in my husband's coat pocket, which hung on the ground floor, over the stairs; it was missed on Tuesday morning. He used to sleep in my son's room. Legg brought me the duplicates, which I gave to the officer.

CHARLES JOSEPH BOSWOOD . I am the son of the last witness, and am seventeen years old. I locked the watch in my box on Sunday night, and kept the key myself; I went to the box at one o'clock on Monday, it was safe then; I missed it on Tuesday night, between nine and ten o'clock; the box was still locked; I went down and told my mother; I saw it again on the Thursday.

JANE LEGG . On Thursday morning, the 22d of May, a few minutes before seven o'clock, the prisoner came to our house, No. 2, Winchelsea-court, Monkwell-street, and asked if he might leave his coat there; he lodged at No. 9, in the court; we knew that he worked at Boswood's, and gave him leave, and about twelve o'clock he came and said he wanted something out of his coat pocket; he took his coat off the chair and pulled something out of his pocket, but what I do not know; he threw his coat down in the passage and went away, and in the course of the day I was sweeping the passage, and under the mat I found three duplicates wrapped in paper close to where he stood to take something out of his pocket; I could not make out what they were for, but saw something was pawned for 25 s., and took them to Boswood, having then heard that the watch was stolen.

HERBERT COLE FOX . I am an auctioneer. I was at Boswood's when the watch was missed, and next morning was in the bar when Legg brought a duplicate of the watch and handkerchief; I went to the pawbroker's and found them; I know the watch to be Boswood's; I went with the pawnbroker to apprehend Roe, who pawned it.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. I was sent for on the 22d, and took the prisoner at Boswood's - he was accused of this robbery, and made great resistance. I was

obliged to handcuff him - he tried to throw me down as we went along. I found the property at the pawnbroker's; then went to the Compter, and asked him what he had robbed Boswood of; he declared his innocence. I shewed him the duplicate of the handkerchief - he immediately put his hand to his forehead, and said, "I am a guilty man;" he called God to witness that he knew nothing about the watch, except being told at Stepney fair that it was lost. I produced the duplicate of it, he then said he was a guilty man.

Prisoner. Q. Can you look me in the face, and say I resisted at first - A. Certainly; he tried to push by me, and I handcuffed him.

JOSEPH HALL . I am servant to Messrs. Murray and Co., pawnbrokers, East Smithfield. On the 19th of May, between four and six o'clock in the afternoon, this watch was pawned in the name of Flemming, but not by the prisoner.

JOHN STORR . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves , Redcross-street. On the 19th of May, a handkerchief was pawned in the name of Flemming. I have no recollection of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Two people slept in the room the watch was stolen from, and many had access to the room. I was in the house at the time it was lost. Legg says she saw me drop the duplicates. The reason of my leaving my coat there was, I came home early, and my landlord being a watchman, I did not like to disturb him. It is not likely that I should put duplicates in an open pocket, or pawn them where I am known.

JOSEPH HALL . I have known him some time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-14

868. JAMES MORGAN and EDWARD PETTIFER were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of John Radford , from his person .

JOHN RADFORD . I live at Winchmore-hill. On the 6th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking in Long-lane with a friend, and near Smithfield I perceived something at my coat pocket, felt, and found my handkerchief out - I caught it as it fell. I put it inside, and saw the prisoner behind me - Pettifer passed me on the left hand; Morgan came between me and my friend. I walked forward, and looked Pettifer in the face; he turned his head from me - an officer came and took him, and desired me to hold him, which I did, while he ran across Smithfield and brought Morgan back. My handkerchief had been drawn quite out - I caught it in falling. Nobody but them were near enough to take it; it could not have dropped by accident. I think Morgan was nearest to me.

ROBERT BARNES . I am a floor-cloth manufacturer, and live in the City-road. I was with Mr. Radford, and assisted in stopping Pettifer, who was close at his elbow.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a City officer. I was in Long-lane, and saw the prisoners in company with another, and watched them from Charter-house-lane, down to Smithfield. I saw Morgan lift up Mr. Radford's pocket, put his fingers in, and draw the handkerchief a little way out; he went twelve or fourteen yards further, and Morgan took it quite out - the other two were close behind, covering him; I was on the other side, and saw Mr. Radford put his hand back, and lay hold of it. I ran over - he went and looked Pettifer in the face. I said, "Hold him while I fetch the other;" I ran across Smithfield-bars, and caught Morgan. The other escaped down Long-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PETTIFER'S Defence. I was going to my lodging when Carlisle seized hold of me.

MORGAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PETTIFER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-15

869. EDWARD ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , three lobsters, value 2 s. , the goods of James Ebenezer Saunders .

MR. JAMES EBENEZER SAUNDERS . I am a fishmonger . I saw three lobsters at the Mansion House, which I knew to be mine - they were taken out of my boat at Billingsgate , which contained 1500.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Should you know all the rest as well - A. I should know them all; they came from a particular port.

WILLIAM BUCK . I am a watchman. At three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Saunder's boat, which laid three or four boats from shore. I saw him take the lobsters. I found one in his hat, and two about him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you see somebody else in the boat - A. There was a man sorting them - the prisoner was behind him.

WILLIAM BROWNNUTT . I assisted in taking the prisoner. I found one lobster in his hat, and two in his bosom. He begged to be let go.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-16

870. ELIZABETH WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , two yards and three quarters of bobbin lace, value 5 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Strelly , her master .

THOMAS STRELLY . I live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate , and am a linendraper . The prisoner was my housemaid - she was discharged on the 16th of June, having lived three weeks with us, and next day, in consequence of information, I went to a green grocer's, and found some bundles. The officer went and took her - she claimed the bundles, and I saw two yards and three quarters of new bobbin lace found in them, which I know to be mine. I have the piece it was cut from, and it matches.

JOHN FIELD . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and found the lace in the bundle. She acknowledged that it was the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-17

871. MARY DYER and MARY M'DONALD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a purse, value 1 d., and seven sovereigns, the property of John Fussell , from his person .

JOHN FUSSELL , I am a paper-maker , and live in Peter-street, Cow-cross. On the 6th of June, I had seven sovereigns in my purse, which was in my trowsers pocket - I lost it in Red-cross-street , after eleven o'clock at night. I

had drank three pints of beer with a friend, at the Black Swan, public-house, behind the Bank, and was intoxicated, but not insensible. The prisoners accosted me as women of the town - I did not go with them, but when I came to a court, they each shoved me up three or four yards. I felt their hands about my person, and called watch many times. I shifted my money from my breeches to my coat pocket; but M'Donald snatched it out, and ran away with it. I held Dyer and took her to the watch-house - M'Donald was taken a week after. I am certain of them both. I went with them for no improper purpose.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How much had you drank in the course of the day - A. I cannot say. I am certain of the prisoners. We called at a public-house, and there I saw what they were. I took a glass of beer with them. They pulled me in there. I called the watchman while they were pushing me, and Dyer put her hand over my mouth to hinder me. When M'Donald was taken she denied it.

CHRISTOPHER HALL . I am a constable. Dyer was brought to the watch-house. I afterwards took M'Donald, from the prosecutor's description, on the 14th of June, at her lodgings in Crown-court, Golden-lane - I had seen her the night before, and told her of it - she said she was not guilty, and should not go out of the way. I said I would bring the prosecutor to-morrrow to see her, and told her to be at home; she said she would, and I found her at home. I took the prosecutor there, and asked if she was the woman; he said, "Let me look," and asked if her name was M'Donald or Smith - she said, No; he said, "Well, you are the woman, I'll swear to you;" I found 6 s. 7 d. on her. He was rather intoxicated, and I think a little insensible when he brought Dyer in, and told me he could not swear to the woman who had escaped.

DYER'S Defence. He has spoken very false. This woman was not with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-18

872. MARY DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , two shoes, value 7 s. , the goods of George Clark .

GEORGE CLARK . I am a shoemaker , and live on Ludgate-hill . On the 14th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come into the shop - she said nothing, but turned round and went to the door; I followed and found two shoes under her shawl, which she had taken off the floor. She denied having anything.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking through the window - a man came out, and pulled me into the shop, and asked what I had in my apron; he picked the shoes off the ground, and said I had them.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-19

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, JUNE 26.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

873. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES WARD . I am a baker , and live in Glasshouse-street . The prisoner was in my service, and entrusted to receive money for me , and settled with me every day when he came home. I have asked him eight or ten times about 11 s. 7 d., due from Skelly - he always said it was not paid; he left me five or six weeks ago, and in about a fortnight Skelly came, and gave me information. I never received the money. When he was apprehended he said he should be glad to settle it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you pay his wages - A. No; he summoned me for 22 s., and I told the Commissioners I had paid his laundress's bill. I played at cards with him once, but did not lose; we played for a new hat - his fellow apprentice lost. When he left me he went to live with a baker four doors off; I took him there. He was not answerable to me for Skelly's debt. I never said he was gone to get my customers away, and should not live long there. He desired me to pay his laundress.

LUCY WARD . I am the prosecutor's wife. I asked the prisoner repeatedly about Skelly's money; he always said it was not paid.

JANE SKELLY . I live in Crown-court, Little Poultney-street, and dealt with Ward. I paid the prisoner 4 s. 3 d. the week before Good Friday - he wrote a receipt on a paper, which I have lost in removing. I afterwards paid him a bill of 5 s. and odd. He called afterwards and said he had received my money, but there was a dispute between him and Ward, and I was not to say that I had paid him; but I went and told Ward.

Cross-examined. Q. When you paid him 4 s. 3 d., you still owed money - A. No; I had more bread afterwards. I paid him four shilling pieces.

Prisoner's Defence. I had paid my laundress myself.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230625-20

Before Mr. Recorder.

874. JOHN BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a purse, value 1 s.; nine sovereigns, and a half-crown, the property of William Goodrich , from his person .

MR. WILLIAM GOODRICH . I live at Woolen-house, Glocestershire. On the 17th of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Oxford-street , and had nine sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, and a half-crown, in my purse, which was in my coat pocket. A person called out that my pocket was picked - I felt, and missed it. I had seen the prisoner close behind me just before - I looked round, and a person said he was in custody. I found him so, with my purse in his hand.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner about five minutes before this, and watched him - he went close to Mr. Goodrich; I saw him put his hand into his pocket; he then ran across the road into a public-house. I followed and took the purse out of his hand.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I just picked it up, and was going to leave it with the publican in case a reward should be offered.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-21

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

875. HENRY CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , fourteen yards of carpet, value 3 l., the goods of Aaron Henry Hart , privately in his shop .

AARON HENRY HART . I am an upholdster , and live in the Strand . On the 23d of May, I was called down, and missed this carpet from the window, and was told the thief was gone along the Strand. I ran out and took the prisoner in Catherine-street, about two hundred yards off, walking with it on his shoulder. Being a remnant it is only worth about 38 s. He said a man gave him 6 d. to carry it. I find he bears a good character.

HENRY LEWIS . I was working at Mr. Hart's, and saw the prisoner pass the door about eleven o'clock in the morning; he came in at the door to look at a beautiful table which was there - I did not suspect him; he saw me and went away. I went behind a partition to remove some things, and in half a minute returned and missed the carpet from the window. A woman came to the door, and said a man had taken it. I called Mr. Hart, and we went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner at the corner of Catherine-street; he was taken with it. I asked how he could think of doing such a thing when I was so near; he said a man gave it him at the corner of Waterloo-street - I said I knew better, he then said it was his first offence.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am an officer. Hart gave the prisoner and carpet to me in Catherine-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man on Waterloo-bridge, who asked if I wanted a job, and said he would give me 6 d. to carry it to the Piazza.

GUILTY. Aged 20. Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-22

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

876. SARAH HAZLEWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , at Christ church, Spitalfields , two tin boxes, value 4 d.; a stocking, value 1 d.; twenty-four sovereigns; sixteen crown pieces; two hundred shillings, and eighty sixpences, the property of John Winsbury , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH WINSBURY . I am the wife of John Winsbury ; we live at No. 19, Wheeler-street, Spitalfields - the prisoner lodged at our house. On the 26th of May, I lost 40 l. and upwards; there were twenty-four sovereigns, and a great number of crowns, shillings, and sixpences; it was kept in a small drawer in my bed-room on the first floor, part in a tin box with the letter T on it, part in a bag, and part in an old stocking, and twelve shillings were loose - it was all in one drawer. I went up stairs at a quarter to one o'clock in the day; the room door was then locked, the drawer shut, and the keys in them. I sent my little girl, who is five years and a half old, up stairs to see if the infant who laid in that room was awake; she called, but being busy I did not hear her, and the prisoner answered, "I will take him down;" she was upon the first floor, and brought me the child down, my little girl came first, and gave me the key of the bed-room; they both came together, and supposing the door to be locked, I put it in my pocket; she could not then have been in the room, but a short time; she left the child with me, and went out of the house, and returned in about five minutes; my little girl offered to go up stairs with her, but she said, "I am only going for my bonnet" - she went up alone, and in about two minutes I had occasion to go up to the room for a paper of copper, and when I came to the door, and took out the key, supposing it to be locked - I found it shut, but not locked; I went in, and found the two top small drawers open; the one nearest the door had my caps and frills thrown out upon the floor, but nothing taken; my husband's shirts and handkerchiefs were thrown from the other, and the box, bag, stocking, and money, taken; 9 s. were taken from the loose 12 s., and a shilling from a shilling and two sixpences, which were in the corner of the drawer. I instantly came down stairs, and ran to the next house, No. 18, to fetch the prisoner as my friend; (I had not seen her go out) I did not see her there, but I called out, "Mrs. Hazlewood, I am robbed of all my money;" I heard her make some answer. I ran back directly, and went up to the bed-room - she followed, and one of the lodgers fetched Adams, the officer, who searched the second floor lodger, whom I suspected; he then searched the prisoner, and found 18 s. 6 d. on her - she said she was going to the Court-house to pay 8 s. for her son or daughter, and that the 10 s. 6 d. was her own. She left my house immediately after the search, offering to fetch my husband from Marylebone, where he worked; she came back, and sat down; I scarcely saw her before her mother fetched her, and she was out all night. She had slept at home every night but one, for the last nine months.

BENJAMIN EDWARD MATTHEWS . I am the prisoner's son-in-law, and lived at No. 18, Wheeler-street, next door to the prosecutor's. On Monday, the 26th of May, I went home to dinner, about one o'clock, and found the prisoner in my room; she said, "Ben, you must not go to work, but take this money to my mother" - she gave me some sovereigns out of a tin box, I cannot say how many, but suppose about twenty; and some silver out of a stocking - there were crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; she gave me the box, bag, and stocking, and told me to throw them away; she did not say why. I threw them over the pailings, into a stone-yard, opposite the Vinegar-yard, in Old-street, as I went to my grandmother's, who lived in Newington-buildings, City-road; my grandmother was not at home - I found her at Mr. Moore's, Stoke Newington, and gave her the money, which I received from the prisoner. She did not tell me where she got it. My grandmother went and fetched her while I waited in Shoreditch; we then all went on together, and as we went up Shoreditch, she asked what I had done with the money - I said grandmother had got it. I do not know whether my grandmother heard this. We went into a coffee-shop in the City-road; the prisoner had then got the money; I had not seen it returned to her - she counted it, but how much there was I cannot say. There were sovereigns, crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; the same kind of money as she had given me, and after counting it, she said she had got all Mrs. Winsbury's money. We came out. She said she had promised to buy me something a long while, and gave me three sovereigns and some silver to buy a watch with.

Q. Did neither of you make any observation when she said she had all Winsbury's money - A. My grandmother

was out of the room. She told me that when she went up for her bonnet and shawl, the door was not locked, and she went in and took the money. I do not recollect saying anything to her. I bought a watch at Latter's, in the City-road, I have seen the box and stocking since. Mance and Vann apprehended me in the afternoon of the 29th of May, and next morning I gave information about it when I was examined, but not before.

WILLIAM BROCK . I am shopman to Mr. Latter, City-road. On the 26th of May, about six o'clock in the afternoon, I sold Matthews this watch, seal, and key, (looks at them) for 4 l. 6 s.; he gave me three sovereigns and 26 s. in silver.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer of Worship-street. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of Christchurch, Spitalfields. On the 29th of May, I and Vann went to Matthew's apartments, and found a watch, which I have produced. Next day I went to Smith's stone-yard, nearly opposite the Vinegar-yard, and found part of a stocking, three or four yards from the pailing. On the Monday following I went with Matthews to his master's workshop, near London-wall, and he took from between the bricks and floor a bill of sundry articles, bought at Pearson's, upon which 9 l. had been left in part payment.

CUTHBERT RUMFORD . I live with Mr. Pearson. This bill is my writing. On the 27th of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, I gave it to the prisoner, or a young woman who came with her; they both dealt for upholstery goods, and the young woman paid me 9 l. in part payment, in her presence. The whole amounted to 12 l. 13 s.

PRUDENCE BLAKE . On Tuesday evening, the 7th of May, the prisoner and her daughter brought me some bed furniture, a shawl, a white dress, and a remnant of flannel. Ann Matthews , the prisoner's daughter said that they had got them from a tally shop, and did not wish to take them home till they had part paid for them - that Benjamin Matthews should not know of it. I delivered them to Vann. I have known her twenty-two years - she bore an honest industrious character.

JAMES SMITH . I am a stone-mason, and have a yard in Old-street-road. I found, three or four yards from the pailing in my yard, one small box, enclosed in a large one, on Tuesday, the 27th of May, and gave them to Vann.

THOMAS VANN . I produce them.

ELIZABETH WINSBURY . These are the boxes which were taken from my drawer, and the stocking. There was no money in one of the boxes; there is the letter T on the other. The prisoner's daughter is the wife of Matthews, and lodged at No. 18, next door to me. I had not seen her at my house that day, and have no reason to think she had been there.

JURY. Q. How long was it from the time she brought the child down, till you went up - A. Five minutes. Nobody could come in without my seeing them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Two witnesses gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

Reference Number: t18230625-23

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

877. GEORGE BEAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , at St. Leonard, Shoredith , eighteen yards of woollen cloth, value 20 l., the goods of John Bowles Lucombe , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BOWLES LUCOMBE . I am a woollen-draper , and live in Crown-street, Finsbury , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - my shop is part of the dwelling-house. On Wednesday, the 18th of June, about one o'clock in the day, I missed an end of superfine blue cloth, which I had seen on the counter, about four yards from the door, quarter of an hour before - the door was open. I had been absent part of the time. I found it at the Mansion House on the Saturday following.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 18th, about one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate, about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's, and coming in a direction from there, with this cloth in his arms, without any paper on it. I followed and seized him near Hounsditch - he went at a sort of jog trot, and called out John or Jack, but I saw no one with him. I seized him and asked how he came by the cloth; he said he had brought it from the new market, and was going to Still-alley - I said I would go with him to the new market. He said if I would go to Still-alley, the gentleman would satisfy me about it; but I took him to the Mansion House, and marked the cloth before I parted with it, and know this, which I produce to be it.

MR. LUCOMBE. It is mine - I know it by two or three holes in it, where there have been damages, and I have the list of it which matches. There are eighteen yards, which cost me 24 s. a yard.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18230625-24

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

888. ROBERT ROE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , at St. George, Hanover-square , in the dwelling-house of William Donovan , twenty guineas, twenty half-guineas; one hundred sovereigns; one hundred half-sovereigns; ten seven shilling pieces; three hundred crown pieces; one 100 l., one 30 l., three 10 l., and three 5 l. Bank notes, and a Bank post bill, for payment of, and value 80 l., his property .

MESSRS. WALFORD and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DONOVAN . I live at No. 292, Oxford-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, and am a fishmonger - I rent the house. On Sunday evening, the 22d of December, I went out at half-past five o'clock, to go to chapel, and left the house in care of Kenaley and Griffiths - Griffiths had to go to Duke-street, to feed the horse, and would then go home. When I went out my doors and windows were safe. I gave the boys leave to sit in the middle parlour to tea; but the inner parlour, where this property was, was locked, and the key in my pocket. I had twenty sovereigns and two cheques in a drawer, with the key of the iron chest. The iron chest was enclosed in a cupboard by the fire place in the same room, and had a vast quantity of silver, crown pieces, and guineas in it; some of them light - also a great many sovereigns, seven shilling pieces, half-guineas, and Bank notes; all the money together amounted to above 600 l., cheques and all. I was fetched from my brother's about nine o'clock, went home immediately, and found my daughter

and Mrs. Broadfield, the lodger. The inner room door was open; a piece of a picklock key was afterwards found in the lock - the drawer was wrenched open, and the lock hanging to it; the cheques and money were gone - they amounted to 70 l. together. The cheques were for 18 l. and 30 l. odd. The key of the iron chest was in the drawer. I unlocked the chest, and every farthing was gone and my market clothes which laid on the top of it were thrown into the middle of the room - the drawer had a patent lock upon it. An enquiry took place at Marlborough-street; I charged Kenaley with it, and about the 11th of February published bills, offering a reward for the apprehension of Chandler, and Robert Roe alias Bob Jones alias Bob Whitbread - I meant by that a man who lived at No. 22, James-street; the bills were stuck up in that neighbourhood, about the 11th of February. I could not find the prisoner. I afterwards went to a house where I understood he lived, but could not find him - I saw him at Marlborough-street afterwards, charged with an assault, and asked him if his name was not Bob Whitbread; he said it was not, that it was Jenkins, and he was a gentleman's servant - the constable said, "Your name is Bob Whitbread , I know you well;" I went to make further enquiry, but he was discharged for the assault, on Saturday, through a mistake. I found out on the Monday following that he lived at No. 28, Bett-street, New-road, Commercial-road - I went there with two officers, and saw them find a tool which appeared to have been made out of a shoemaker's rasp (a piece of which was broken off,) and a rent book. I afterwards saw the tool tried to my drawer, which I have here; the marks appear exactly to fit the tool. I am positive the prisoner is the man who called himself Jenkins. Griffiths has since left me, and I cannot find him.

ELIZABETH DONOVAN . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I came home first on the night of the robbery, and found Kenaley at the door, the back parlour open, and all in confusion - this was about half-past eight o'clock. Things remained in the same condition when my father returned.

MARY ANN BROADFIELD . I lived at Donovan's house at this time, and was at home all the evening. The house was unusually quiet.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where do you lodge - A. On the second floor; there is a dog which barks at strangers, but it did not bark.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisoner in his room, at the top of Bett-street, St. George's East, and took him to the watch-house - I had been and searched that room before with Blabey, and found the tool made out of a rasp; I tried it to the chest of drawers at Donovan's house - I had some doubts about its corresponding with the marks there, and on further examination I thought it could not be the instrument used, for they shewed me the dents, and they were small holes, and this instrument would leave small notches. When I took the prisoner, I went up to his room, knocked at the door, and asked for Robert Whitbread ; his wife asked what I wanted - I said I had a charge against him, and desired her to open the door; she refused; it was at last opened - I asked if Robert Whitbread was there; he said, "Yes, I am here."

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You had a warrant against one Robert Whitbread - A.Yes. I had been to the room before with that warrant; it was open then, and a little girl there. When I went to apprehend him, I knocked at the door which was locked - I told his wife my name, and that I had a warrant, and said, "Is he in;" he answered, "I am in" - I said, "Then I must take you, you must come out;" he said he should not for he had been in custody for it before, and discharged. When he opened the door, I said, "Are you Robert Whitbread ;" he said, Yes, and I brought him away. The drawer and tool are here.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I am a Thames police officer. I went with Wilson, and found the tool and a book - I tried the tool with a drawer at Donovan's house; it has been in Donovan's possession some time; but before I parted with it, I took an impression of it on wax. In my judgment the marks on the drawer answer it in every description. I have been an officer ten years, and frequently compare such things.

COURT. Q. Was Wilson present when it was compared - A. Yes, and he compared it; we both thought that it matched.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you say Wilson thought so - - A. Yes; both appeared to think so; he expressed so too at the time.

WILLIAM WILSON . I did not express an opinion about it - I always doubted its being the instrument. I never recollect telling any one that I thought it was.

THOMAS COOK . I am a carpenter, and have the drawer belonging to the prosecutor's chest; it is now exactly in the same state as when I received it; (applying the tool to it) the impression of the marks are visible - here is a mark where the rasp is broken. The number and distance of the notches on the rasp, and the impression are the same.

Cross-examined. Q. In the center of that lock is there not an impression of a smaller tool - A. Yes; there must have been more than one tool applied.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Two tools have been applied, but this must be one of them - A. Yes.

WILLIAM DONOVAN . This is my drawer; it is in the same state as when I came home.

ELIZABETH NASH . I live in Bird-street. In December last I lived in James-street, near Grosvenor-square; the prisoner lodged in the next room to me. On the Sunday before Christmas-day, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, he came home in a great hustle with two or three more; they came up to his room together, and afterwards went down together, and about half past eight o'clock the prisoner came in again with two young men: I heard them very merry, and thought they were going to cards; I heard money jingling, and curiosity led me to get on the top of my bedstead and look through a hole in the wainscoat; I could see into his room, and saw money on the table as if they were paying the money down; I saw a good bit of gold and a quantity of silver, but cannot say how much; the silver was five shilling pieces; there seemed a good many. The prisoner was one of the men, and I think Thomas Chandler was another of them. I saw no cards; I could see all over the table, if there had been any I must have seen them. I know that before this the prisoner was very low in circumstances; his bed lay on a

mattress on the floor; and a day or two afterwards he seemed very prosperous; I saw his little boy playing with a five shilling piece; his wife came to pay Clayton 1 s., and I saw she had a large purse of gold; this was between the Sunday and Christmas day; they appeared very well off then, and lived well, and on Christmas day had a turkey, pork, and a large plumb pudding for dinner, and in that week bought a set of china, and bedding and bedstead.

Cross-examined. Q. You nursed his wife with a child - A. Yes; in April - I told the Magistrate what I knew of this. I believe I told him about the gold and five shilling pieces, but I was so overcome, I do not know; there were three men with him in the room; he had gone out about six or seven o'clock that evening and came in with them. I peeped through the hole, because I suspected they were at cards.

MR. WALFORD. Q. When did he leave James-street - A. Directly after the papers were put up about him.

ELIZABETH CLAYTON . I live in Brown's-court, Green-street, Grosvenor-square. When the prisoner lived in James-street, I lodged in the room above him; he was very poor indeed before Christmas, they had borrowed sixpence of me on the Tuesday before Sunday the 22d of December, and my little girl pawned a good many clothes for them. On the Monday morning after the Sunday, his wife gave my daughter a sovereign, to fetch things out of pawn - she gave me two sovereigns to buy a bed tick with, and they lived in the greatest splendour. On the Christmas day, they had turkey, and on the Sunday following a goose. He left on the Sunday morning after the bills were posted; one was posted opposite the door, and that morning, some things were moved away, and next morning all the furniture was moved. The bills appeared on Wednesday or Thursday. I never saw him after that. His wife also gave my daughter a light guinea to redeem some things.

SARAH COOLEY . The prisoner lodged with my husband, to the best of my knowledge, but he is a very altered man. I think he is the man - mine are weekly lodgers. He lodged with us four or five months, and left about four months ago; it was before Lady day. I did not see him after the bills were posted. He sometimes paid a fortnight's rent, and sometimes three weeks together. I believe this rent book to be my husband's writing.

HARRIOT CLAYTON . I am the daughter of Mrs. Clayton. I know the prisoner and his wife. I was employed by his wife to pawn things thirteen or fourteen times. In the Christmas week she sent me to get them out of pledge. I changed about four sovereigns for her, and a guinea - they took the guinea.

AMELIA TEULOT . I live at No. 22, James-street, at Cooley's. I knew the prisoner's wife, but not him. Just before Christmas, they were in distressed circumstances, and towards Christmas they were better off. His wife gave me 27 s. to get seven pledges out, and at another time 25 s. to redeem things. I do not know of their buying anything.

Cross-examined. Q. You had as good an opportunity of observing as other people - A. No; I was out a good deal. I lodged in the garret.

WILLIAM PALMER . I know the prisoner. On the Sunday night, before Christmas day, I saw him at the Victory, public-house, at the corner of Bird-street and Oxford-street (which is within fifty yards of Donovan's) with Chandler, Kenaley, and Strong; it was dusk - the gas was lighted - I cannot say the time. I did not see them talk together.

Cross-examined. Q. How many were there - A. Four.

MR. ANDREWS to MR. DONOVAN. Q. Did you go before the Grand Jury to find the bill - A. Yes. Kenaley was examined before them, and is here now; he was examined as a witness before the prisoner was apprehended.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Under the advice of counsel you do not call him - A. No. He was examined as an accomplice.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18230625-25

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

879. HERBERT GILBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , twenty-six spoons, value 3 l.; six silver coins, value 20 s.; twenty ozs. of silver, value 50 s.; two buckles, value 2 s.; two seals, value 30 s.; a gold pin, value 2 s.; a pepper castor, value 3 s.; a pair of ear rings, value 1 s.; an amethyst, value 1 s.; a cornelian, value 1 s.; thirteen knives and forks, value 20 s.; seventeen boxes of plate-powder, value 6 s.; a mustard pot, value 1 s.; one hundred and fifty engraved shop bills, value 7 s.; six bed hooks, value 1 s.; a saw, value 1 s.; a bag of rouge, value 1 s.; three boxes, value 3 s., and a half guinea, the goods of Robert Garrard , James Garrard and Sebastian Garrard , to whom he was servant .

SEBASTIAN GARRARD . I am in partnership with Robert and James Garrard ; we are goldsmith s and jeweller s, and live in Panton-street, Haymarket , the prisoner was in our service. On the 20th of May, in consequence of information, I sent for Jefferson; my brother Robert told the prisoner he suspected he had robbed us, he made no answer; the officer searched his boxes, which were in a large closet on our premises, he pointed them out himself; they were not locked. Jefferson found two spoons, a small piece of silver, a pearl ring, six silver coins, a light half guinea, a gold pin, a watch key, a silver seal, a pepper castor, an ear ring, three dessert spoons, four nuts, a bundle of burnt lace, and other things, which I know to be ours. He said nothing to it.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am an officer. Mr. Garrard's account is correct; he said he was very sorry for what he had done, when the property was found, and said he lodged at No. 13, Burton-street, Walworth, and that there was a spoon or two there in the bed-room drawer; I went there and found eighteen spoons, a pepper castor, a pair of ear rings, an amethyst, and cornelian, three boxes, twelve knives and forks, some shop bills, a mustard pot, some rouge and plate powder.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230625-26

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

880. THOMAS BOLGER , and RICHARD EVANS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , a live tame fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of William Hinchcliffe .

WILLIAM HINCHCLIFFE . I am a mason , and live in Paul-street, Shoreditch . On the 23d of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening. I saw my cock fowl, and

missed it next morning from my area. I saw it again on the 27th.

FRIEND ALEXANDER . I am a watchman. On the 24th of May, about half past four o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner's by the City-road turnpike, walking towards Islington, in a direction from Shoreditch; they passed me. Evans had a bag in his hand; I called to Sheen to stop them, he called to them and they stopped. I asked Evans what he had got, he said a fowl, that it was his own, and he brought it from his mother's, and was taking it to Islington, to sell to Bolger's master. I took them to the watch-house.

GEORGE SHEEN . I am a watchman. Alexander called me. Evans had the bag first, and I saw him give it to Bolger. Evans said he was going to take it to Bolger's master to sell; that he brought it from his mother, who lived in Petticoat-lane. Bolger said his master lived at Islington, opposite the Peacock, and was a wire-drawer. I could find no such person there.

BOLGER'S Defence. I met him as he was going to sell his cock.

BOLGER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-27

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

881. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , four bottles, value 1 s., and seven pints of wine, value 11 s. , the goods of Martha Mills .

MARTHA MILLS . I keep the Red-cow, public-house, Long-lane . On the 26th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house, and had half a pint of beer, which he warmed; he complained of being ill and went to the water-closet; he afterwards staid in the tap-room a long time; this wine was locked up in the cellar; he left and came again about two o'clock, and had a pint of beer, and went to the water closet, which is in the cellar; I went into the bar between four and five, and was informed some wine was stolen; a gentleman ran into the cellar; I afterwards saw two bottles of wine found in the prisoner's pocket. I gave him in charge.

JAMES HALL . I was in Mill's bar, and in consequence of information, I went into the cellar, and found the prisoner there; the wine cellar was open; I caught hold of him, and said what are you about; he was under the wine cellar; the water closet is by the wine cellar door; he said he had been to the privy and was adjusting his clothes. I collared him, and said you have been robbing the cellar, and found a bottle of wine laying horizontally in each of his pockets, which appeared to have been made for that purpose. I found two more bottles of wine in the beer cellar, between the water closet and wine cellar. A man who came in with him jumped out at the back window when the alarm was given.

MARY MILLS . On the 26th of May, the prisoner came to my father's house, with his wife and a man, they went into the parlour, called for a pint of beer, and in a short time he went into the cellar; I went to the top of the stairs afterwards, and saw his shadow at the further end of the cellar, beyond the water closet. I came from the stairs; his wife met me in the passage, and asked for a glass of rum; she detained me several minutes at the bar, and when I had served her, she took me by the, and said I need not be alarmed, for it was her husband, had gone below. The wine cellar was locked, but it was found forced open.

HENRY SALMON . I am a pot boy. My young mistress sent me to the cellar; I found the door open, the prisoner came out of the privy and went in again. I went to the end of the cellar, returned and stood on the stairs; he immediately rushed out of the privy, and went into the wine cellar. I heard the bottles rattling and told Hall.

JOHN HARKER . I received him in charge, he said he was a tailor, but would not say where he lived.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-28

882. JOHN ISAACS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of a certain person, whose name is unknown , from his person .

JEREMIAH MITCHELL . I live with a linendraper, at the corner of Fleet-market . On the 9th of June, I was placing the goods in the window, and observed the prisoner drawing a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, whom I have not seen since; he slipped it between his legs, turned round and saw me in the window; I held my finger up to him, jumped out, and slipped out at the side door, and saw him running along the market, I called out stop him; he was stopped. I brought him back and took the handkerchief either from his hat or bosom; he said it was his first offence, and made no resistance. I do not know the gentleman; he did not perceive it taken.

THOMAS PRESTIGE . I received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-29

883. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 24 s. , the goods of Philip Barnard and Thomas Hatton .

SAMUEL BARNARD . I am nephew of Philip Barnard, who is in partnership with Thomas Hatton , they are wholesale linendrapers , and live in Cheapside . On the 7th of June, about seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the warehouse, and took a piece of print off a pile, and put it under her petticoat; she could not see me; she turned round and tried to put it up more secure. I jumped from the counter, laid hold of her, and took it from her.

JAMES KEMP . I am a constable. I took her into charge; she appeared rather is liquor, and said it was her first offence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-30

884. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , a great coat, value 40 s. , the goods of George Marmaduke Harrison .

GEORGE MARMADUKE HARRISON . I live in Russell-street, Covent-garden. On the 24th of May, at half past nine o'clock at night, I got off my chaise, in Lime-street , and was absent about twenty-five minutes, leaving a boy in charge of it; my coat was on the back. I heard an alarm, and came out, and it was brought into the house.

GEORGE HUMPHRIES . I was holding the horse, while Mr. Harrison went into master's house, and as I stood at the horse's head, I saw the coat drawn from behind. I immediately went behind, and saw the prisoner with it on his arm; I laid hold of it, and called out, he let go and ran off. I caught him three or four doors off, without losing sight of him.

JAMES WILSON . I was in Lime-street, minding a horse which the prosecutor's friend had, and saw the prisoner with the coat, and saw him secured.

WILLIAM HORMSEY . I am a carman. I was in Lime-street, and saw the prisoner with the coat, and the boy following him. I took him; another man came up and struck me over the eye, and tried to rescue him.

WILLIAM WOCESTER . I took charge of them both, the other was committed for an assault.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The coat laid down and I picked it up.

GUILTY , Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-31

885. JOSEPH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing on the 3d of June , a bag, value 6 d., and 68 lbs. of ginger , the goods of Daniel Mogine .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-32

886. REES JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , being servant to Robert Morrison and John Morrison , one yard and a quarter of calico, value 1 s., and a quarter of a yard of cloth, value 5 s., the goods of Robert Morrison and John Morrison .

ROBERT MORRISON . I am in partnership with my brother John, we are tailors and woollen-drapers , and live in St. Paul's Church-yard ; the prisoner was in our service, as cutter . On the 13th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, when I came home, I went into the shop and found a piece of calico folded up in a peculiar manner, and thrown under a shelf, behind some list, where the prisoner worked; he was taken next day, and I went to his lodging at Acton's house, and found nine pieces of cloth doubled, they were cut out of cloth, and two pieces of calico, about a yard and a quarter each, one piece of the cloth had a customer's name on it; in Jones's writing.

MARIA KNIGHT . I am servant to Mr. Morrison. About nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner cut the calico off the roll; he folded it up and put it in his pocket; I called my mistress and told her, he left about eleven o'clock; before my master came house; I afterwards saw him take the calico out, and throw it in the place it was found in.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you been set to watch - A. No; I was down by the sky-light, cleaning a cupboard out; there were other men in another part of the shop. I told the prisoner that night what I had seen; he said it was false; he staid till near eleven o'clock, he usualy left at nine, but said he would wait till my master came home, but he did not. He came to work next morning; he desired my mistress to send for a constable to search him.

ANN MORRISON . I am the prosecutor's mother. Knight gave me information. I went on the stairs to see if my servant was in the shop. The prisoner came forward and asked what I wanted; I said not him, and went back, but returned; he came forward and said "What do you want." I said "Not you, you have put something in your pocket," he said I might search him if I thought proper. I declined, but told him there was something I knew of; he said if he had known I was so mean as to watch him, he would have been more on his guard; I said I would have the shop shut up, and he might come and set with me or the servants, till my son came home; he staid till half past ten o'clock.

THOMAS JONES . I was shopman to the prosecutor. I lodge in the house; I saw the pieces of cloth produced by master, with the name of Tole on it. I believe it to be my writing, it is my business to cut the lengths for the garment, and then the prisoner cuts the shape. I had cut off cloth for a coat for Tole, (Looking at it.) I cannot undertake to say it is my writing, as it is a good deal rubbed, but I believe it to be mine; it corresponds with the rest of the cloth in make. I can trace the letters T. and 1 s.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear it is your writing - A. It is not plain enough. I have since given out more cloth for the collar of Tole's coat.

MR. MORRISON. I will swear that is Jones's writing.

MARY ACTON . I live in Edmund's-place, Aldersgate-street. The prisoner lodged with me for five days. Nine pieces of cloth were found in the room he occupied.

REES HARRIS . I am a constable. Acton delivered me the cloth.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-33

887. ROBERTUS MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , two saws, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Rehden and Edward Godson .

CHARLES REHDEN . I am an ironmonger , in partnership with E. Godson; we live in Aldersgate-street ; on the 2d of June the prisoner came into the shop and asked to see some saws, which were shewn to him, but did not suit; he said he wanted one seven inches long; he then asked for a flush bell-pull; we had none to suit, and while I was putting the saws away I heard him draw one out of a paper, turned round, and saw it in his hand; I put the parcels away, and asked if he wanted any thing else; he said a brad-awl; I gave him some and came round the counter, and charged him with taking a saw; he denied it; Mr. Godson came up and took one out of his pocket, and our man took one out of his trowsers; I asked if he had any thing else; he said No, but a small parcel dropped from him containing ninety-two duplicates, eighty-seven of which were for saws.

THOMAS TUNNICLIFF . I am servant to the prosecutor. I found a saw inside the prisoner's trowsers; he said he was distressed, but he had a great deal of silver.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-34

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, JUNE 27.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

888. WILLIAM LANGFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Thomas Maynard , from his person .

THOMAS MAYNARD. I am an ironmonger , and live in Grove-street, Camden-town. On the 29th of March, about eight o'clock at night, I was opposite St. James's chapel, Pancras ; my pocket had been picked about five minutes before, by a child, whom I took the handkerchief from, and put it in my pocket; I perceived somebody walking close behind me: he turned back suddenly; I then felt and missed my handkerchief, and immediately laid hold of the prisoner, who was about three yards from me, putting the handkerchief into his trowsers; he slipped from me as I had gloves on, and ran over to the burying ground, and threw something over there, and was stopped about three hundred yards off with my handkerchief in his hand, he escaped next day, and was retaken, three weeks ago, but I was in Devonshire, and could not prosecute him.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. Mr. Maynard delivered the handkerchief and prisoner to me - he escaped from me next day, with his handcuffs on, and was taken three weeks ago.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-35

889. THOMAS BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , nine shillings; eight sixpences, and a halfpenny , the monies of Sarah Brooks , widow .

SARAH BROOKS . I am a widow, and keep a chandlers-shop , in East-street, Manchester-square . On the 6th of June, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming out of the back room, and saw the prisoner reaching across the counter, with his hand in the till; he ran out; I followed him, and called Stop thief! he was stopped in my sight. Thirteen shillings and a halfpenny was brought to me. I missed silver from the till, but cannot say how much.

WILLIAM FURNESS . I am a hair-dresser. I heard Brooks calling after the prisoner; I followed and stopped him; I had seen him go round a carriage and stoop, as if to put something down. He said he had done nothing, and resisted a good deal.

SAMUEL B. NASH . I am a baker, and live in Marylebone. I saw the prisoner running in Baker-street, and people following him; he ran behind a carriage, took something from his pocket, and put it behind the carriage wheel. I went there and picked up nine shillings, eight sixpences and a halfpenny, which I gave to Brooks. He was stopped directly.

JOHN STAPLES . I am a constable. As I was taking him to the office, I told him it was a bold trick; he said she had got it all back.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-36

890. EDWARD RYAN and WILLIAM MILLER were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Clement Harris , from his person .

CLEMENT HARRIS . I live in the Hackney-road with my father. On the 3d of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Church-street, Hackney , where a crowd had collected, to see a balloon go up - a man tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief. I felt in my coat pocket and missed it. I saw it taken out of the trowsers of one of the prisoners.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I was at Hackney, and watched the prisoners for about five minutes. Mr. Harris stood against a tree, they both got close behind him. I saw Miller lift the pocket open, while Ryan put his hand in and took the handkerchief out - he shoved it into his breeches. I told Harris - my brother caught one, and I the other, and found it between Ryan's thighs. He said he picked it up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You prosecuted two boys last sessions, on this same evidence - No; it was a very different case - there was a great crowd. I find the prisoners bear a very good character.

JOHN GOOK . I am the last witness's brother. I saw the prisoners standing behind Harris. I saw their arms move; they then walked away. I said to my brother, "They have robbed him." I took Miller and he Ryan, and found the handkerchief in his trowsers.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see them touch the pocket - A. No; I was on the other side of the way.

RYAN'S Defence. I picked it up.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-37

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

891. ELIZABETH BROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a watch, value 3 l.; a seal, value 1 l.; a key, value 1 s., and a chain, value 1 s., the goods of Elizabeth Ewer , widow , in her dwelling-house .

CLEMENTINA EWER . I am daughter of Elizabeth Ewer , and live in Sycamore-street, St. Lukes ; the prisoner lodged with us. On the 13th of June, we were at needle work together in the back parlour; she said she would work by time. I saw her go and take the watch off the nail, in the front parlour, but cannot tell what she did with it. I remained therein quarter of an hour, and about half past eight o'clock, we went into the front parlour to breakfast; she came in to me in two minutes, and after breakfast went into the back room, to put her things on to go out to work - she went out in about five minutes, and my nephew went into the back room to see the time, and the watch was gone - she told us she worked in Addle-street. I went there after her, but could not find her. I met her in Goswell-street, and said "What have you done with my mother's watch?" she said she had not seen it, since she took it off the nail in the front room, and hung it on the nail in the back room. I said I was sure she had it, and she should go home with us, which she did, and we sent for an officer, but nothing was found on her. We have not found it. Nobody went into the back room before my nephew - we have lodgers up stairs, but the door between the two rooms was open all the time. I never saw it hung in the back parlour myself.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. She told you she was going to fetch it - A. Yes. The nail in the back parlour is near the window; it could be reached from the yard had the window been open, but it was not.

COURT. Q. Where does the window look to - A. The yard. We have two lodgers, who have children.

CHARLES EWER . I am the prosecutrix's nephew. I was in the yard on this morning, and looked through the window, and saw the watch hanging on the nail, and saw that it was half-past eight o'clock. I went to see what time it was after breakfast, and it was gone - the prisoner had gone out about five minutes. Nobody had been in the room but my aunt and her. I am sure none of the lodgers had been down.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this a large yard - A. Yes; two houses communicate with it.

ELIZABETH EWER . This watch was mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about hanging it so near the window - A. No. I said nothing to her about the window being open, for it was fastened with two gimblets. I spoke to her once before about hanging it there when the window was open. I sat opposite the window and saw her with her bonnet in her hand, leaning over the table towards the window - the looking glass stands in the window. I did not see her put her hand up. She said she should not be home to dinner.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. I took her in charge - she said no man should search her, so Mrs. Ewer searched her.

CLEMENTINA EWER re-examined. When I met her she was about fifty yards from our house, coming towards it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-38

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

892. VALENTINE HODGSON and SARAH BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , three yards of woollen cloth, value 2 l.; three coats, value 1 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 12 s.; three sheets, value 7 s.; a table cloth, value 1 s., and a counterpane, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Morris .

THOMAS MORRIS . I am a tailor . The prisoner Bailey worked for me, at my house in Cow-cross-street , and lodged there with Hodgson, as her husband. On the 14th of May, having missed things, I sent for Avis, the constable, and gave them in charge.

JOSEPH SERGEANT . I am shopman to Mr. Stafford , a pawnbroker, of St. John-street. On the 7th of January, a woman pawned a pair of trowsers in the name of Ann Martin , Cow-cross-street, and on the 12th of May, the prisoner Bailey pawned a table cloth in the same name. I am certain of her.

CHARLES SAUNDERS . I am servant to Mr. Whitaker , of Long-lane. On the 2d of May, Bailey pawned a waistcoat for 8 s.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoners, and found the duplicate of the table cloth on Bailey - she said her husband had been ill, and she meant to redeem the property again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

HODGSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-39

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

893. WILLIAM HINSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , six shirts, value 3 l.; three waistcoats, value 15 s.; seven cravats, value 7 s.; two pair of drawers, value 5 s.; three pair of trowsers, value 10 s.; seven handkerchiefs, value 2 l.; nine pair of stockings, value 10 s., and a night cap, value 6 d. , the goods of Abraham Songest .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Henry Blaauw , Esq.

ABRAHAM SONGEST . On the 9th of June, at six o'clock in the evening, I brought this dirty linen out of Mr. Blaauw's house, in Queen Ann-street, and put it in my barrow, which stood at the door, while I went down the area for my hat. I returned in two minutes, and two of the bundles were gone. I called out, and Lloyd directed me towards Dutchess-street, ran, and saw a man near Dutchess-mews, running with a bundle under his arm - I called out, but lost sight of him; I saw one of the bundles in the mews, in the way he went, and desired Simmes to take care of it. I ran on, and in Portman-place found the prisoner in custody.

EDWARD LLOYD . I am servant to Mr. Pitt, who lives exactly opposite Mr. Blaauw's. I saw the prisoner and two others about two doors off - the barrow stood at the door; they passed by, and stood at the corner of Mansfield-street - Songest brought up two bundles, and when he went down again, one of the prisoner's companions ran to the barrow, and took two bundles, handed one to the prisoner, and all ran down Mansfield-street together. I went out, and found him in custody in Portland-place.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am servant to Mr. Hunter. I stood at the door in Mansfield-street, and saw the prisoner and two others come up from Queen Ann-street - one of them had a bundle; they ran up Dutchess-street. The one with the bundle and another ran up the mews, and the prisoner ran up Portland-place. I pursued, and saw him stopped.

WILLIAM HICKSON . I am servant to Henry Blaanw , Esq. I put the articles stated in the indictment in this bundle.

GEORGE SIMMES . I saw Songest in the mews - he told me to take care of the bundle, which I did, and gave it to Staples.

JOHN STAPLES . I have the handkerchief it was tied in.

WILLIAM HICKSON . This is Mr. Blaauw's.

LEWIS LAWREL . I was at Prince Esterhazey's stables. I ran into Portland-place, and the prisoner was given to me to hold - he struck me over the face and got away, but was taken immediately.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman accused me of robbing the barrow; I said it was false - he treated me ill, and aggravated me to strike him.

LEWIS LAWREL . I did not treat him ill.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230625-40

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

894. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , twenty-five watches, value 75 l.; nine watch cases, value 25 s.; nine seals, value 2 l.; two watch keys, value 5 s.; three rings, value 5 s. 6 d.; a tin case, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Burton , in the dwelling-house of Christopher Harvey .

JAMES BURTON . I am a watchmaker . My shop is in Carey-street, under Lincoln's Inn gateway . On Saturday the 21st of June, at nine o'clock, I came to my shop with

the articles stated in the indictment, in a tin case, which was wrapped in a red silk handkerchief. I put it inside the shop, and I believe on the counter. I rent the shop of Christopher Harvey , who lives and sleeps in the house. I was about three minutes taking the shutters down; I looked at my regulator, it was then ten minutes past nine o'clock. I went out of my shop and locked the door, returned in two or three minutes, and the box was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Has not the shop a roof of its own - A. There is a room above it. Harvey sleeps in the house I suppose. He is not here.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On Saturday morning last, about half past nine o'clock or rather later. I was in Chequer-alley, White Cross-street, and met the prisoner with this basket under his arm, the tin case was in it covered with three large live lobsters and two cabbages. I asked what he had got there, he said he had been to market. I put my hand into the basket, and said "Why here is this on box, where did you get this, and where are you going with it?" he said "I am going to my father's, pray come with me." I took him into a shop - my son came in and searched him. The case contained the articles stated in the indictment, he said he was paid to carry it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS VANN , JUN. I was with my father - his account is correct.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a green grocer, and live in Fetter-lane. Last Saturday morning about five minutes past nine o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and asked if I had got any potatoes, I said No; he then asked for two cabbages, and while I was looking them out, he picked out three live lobsters, and took from under his coat a red bundle, containing something which from its appearance, I believe to be this box; he asked if I could lend him a basket, saying that he lived at a pawnbrokers in Fleet-market, and wished to carry them down there, and offered to leave me a deposit for it, but I said there was no occasion; he put the bundle in the basket, the lobsters and cabbages over it, and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he with you - A. Four or five minutes. White Cross-street, is about a mile from my place, and beyond Fleet-market. I have no doubt whatever of him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday morning about five minutes past nine o'clock, I was in Long-lane, a gentleman who alighted from a chaise cart in Long-lane, gave me two shillings and sixpence to carry it to the flower pot, in Bishopsgate-street, and leave them in the name of Mason. I was going to my father's first.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-41

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

895. MARTHA SHAW and ANN POWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , a hat, value 10 s., the goods of George Davis , from the person of Elizabeth Davis .

ELIZAAETH DAVIS. I am seven years old, (the witness being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath) and live with my parents, in Tarling-street. One day in May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, in the morning, I had leave to go to Stepney-fair with my brother and sister, who are five and six years old - these two girls followed me and asked me to go into a swing; I said I had no money, they said they would treat me. I would not go, they followed me round the fair. I was coming home - but walked about thinking to miss them, but they followed me, and at last, Shaw took hold of the top of my hat, took it off, and both ran away with it together. Shaw said a wicked word to Powell, and told her to run - they had bonnets on. I saw their faces, and am sure of them. I saw Shaw at the watch-house two or three hours after, and am sure of her. I should have known her if I had met her. It was an old seal skin hat.

MARY ANN DAVIS . I am this child's mother - she went to the fair the day after it was over, and about twelve o'clock, two boys brought her home without her hat - she described the girls to me and the officer, and said one was lusty, and had a black bonnet, and the other had a black bonnet, very much torn, with blue or red ribbons; I do not know which. The officers took her to the watch-house, where Shaw was, about three o'clock that day - she said directly, that that was the girl who took her hat, and that the other was a thin girl. Powell was taken on the Monday following - she knew them both the moment she saw them.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer, and found Shaw at the watch-house, the girl described her correctly before she saw her, and from her description we took Powell. I asked Shaw how she could rob a child like that - she said she did it, and gave the hat to Powell.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I took Powell in Cow-cross, and asked if she knew Shaw, she said "I know what you want me for, it is about the hat; I did not take it, but Shaw did, and threw it down in a passage," that Shaw asked her to take it off the child's head, but she would have nothing to do with it. I afterwards found the hat on Saffron-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZA FISHER . I bought this hat of a girl in the week of the fair, but cannot say who she was.

SHAW - GUILTY . Aged 15.

POWELL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-42

896. JOHN MACINTOSH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , a watch, value 20 s.; a chain, value 2 d.; two seals, value 4 d., and a key value 1 d., the goods of Samuel Collins from, the person of Eliza, his wife .

ELIZA COLLINS . I am wife of Samuel Collins , who is a calico printer . On the 3d of June, about half past two o'clock in the morning, I was at Hyde Park-corner, and saw the prisoner as I came through the gate at Knights-bridge; he is a watchman . I was going home to Wandsworth - it was a very wet night; he said "You seem very wet," I said I was wet, cold and tired, and asked if he knew where I could go to dry myself, and get some refreshment; he took me to Tattersall's-yard, about twenty yards off; the house was not open, and I sat down under the arch of the door till half-past four o'clock, because I was so very tired, I could go on no further, and expected the house to

open every minute, he came to me at half-past four o'clock, and said I could go to his own house with him. I never saw him before; he took me to the Almonry.

Q. That was not the way to Wandsworth - A. No my Lord, but he said he would take me where I could dry my clothes; he took me to a house in the Almonry . I asked why he could not take me to his own house; he said he lodged at a public-house, and I should be more comfortable there, if it had been an open shed, I should have been glad to stop, I was so wet and extremely tired. I sat down on a bed, and in a about five minutes fell asleep, I cannot say whether he was then in the room or not; he said he was going to stop. I took off my gown, but nothing else, I had eaten or drank nothing since ten o'clock, and was perfectly collected. I awoke about seven, and my watch was gone from my pocket, where I had put it, when I pulled my gown off. I went to the watch-house about eight o'clock - he was brought to me about six that evening.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you take me to a public-house, when I came off duty - A. We went into one, he had a glass of gin and I drank a little. I did not ask him for a lodging; he said he would take me to his own house, where I could have a comfortable breakfast. I told him to ask the landlady of the house for some water, to wash the tail of my gown, and he hung it up to dry; he saw that I had a watch.

WILLIAM LECASE . I am a watchman. The prosecutrix came to the watch-house, to complain about eight o'clock, and took me to shew me the prisoner's beat - he lives in Rochester-row, Westminster, (not at a public-house.) I went there about half-past eleven o'clock; he was out - we walked about there, and met him at half-past five o'clock, and asked if his name was Macintosh, he said "Yes, I suppose you have come about the woman and the watch," I said Yes; he said "Well then it is up stairs." Timbrell joined us - we went up and found it on his table.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable, and was with Lecase. He said he knew where the woman lived, and meant to give it her, if she did not come for it. I asked where she lived, he said at Kentish-town. I said she lived further; he said "Oh! Yes; I believe it is Hampstead."

ELIZA COLLINS . The watch is mine. I did not tell him where I lived. I had three or four shillings in my pocket; he did not take that.

Prisoner's Defence. She said she was coming from Hampstead, on her road to Wandsworth, to her sister who was in labour, but was so weak she could not proceed further. I took her to a shelter and when I left duty, she asked me to get her a lodging, and said she was not married, but afterwards that she was. I got her this lodging, and told her I lived next door to a public-house - she fell asleep, leaving the watch on the bed - a third person came into the room, and finding no lock on the door, and I took the watch to take care of it. I could find nobody in the house, or I meant to apprise the landlady of my intention.

ELIZA COLLINS . I was perfectly sober - my pockets were on the bed, and the watch in them. I saw a girl come into the room.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-43

897. JOHN BARRACLOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , two table cloths, value 2 s.; two towels, value 1 s., and an ink stand, value 1 s. , the goods of John Sirkett .

These articles were let to the prisoner with a furnished apartment; the indictment not being under the statute, he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230625-44

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

898. WILLIAM BUTLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , three chamber-pots, value 18 d.; six jugs, value 1 s.; two basons, value 8 d.; a bowl, value 4 d.; two salt holders, value 1 s.; four mugs, value 6 d., and a mustard pot, value 1 d. , the goods of Benjamin Cox .

BENJAMIN COX . The prisoner was my servant . I sent him out to hawk this earthenware about on Tuesday; he never returned. I met him on Friday; he said he had sold part and spent the money, and left the rest at a house on the road.

COURT. This is no felony. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-45

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

899. JOHN PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Windover Fry , from his person .

WINDOVER FRY. I am a letter-founder , and live in Broad Street-buildings. On the 13th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was going through Butler's-alley, Moor-lane , the prisoner was walking behind me, my attention was attracted by his suddenly turning round, and running off. I felt my pocket and missed my handkerchief, and stopped him at the end of the alley, without losing sight of him, and found my handkerchief under his arm pit, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Butler's-alley at all; two boys passed me and I picked it up in New-court, the gentleman came up and asked if I had seen two boys, I said, Yes.

MR. FRY. I did not ask if he had seen two boys; he said two had run by.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-46

900. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Day , from his person .

THOMAS DAY . I live in Surry-square. On the 19th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was at Billingsgate , talking to Mr. Colburn, a fish salesman, in the middle of a crowd, and thought I felt a hand in my right hand coat pocket, felt, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used just before. I turned round, and saw the prisoner drawing backward, seized him by the arm, and found it in his hat - he said nothing, and I took him to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-47

901. JAMES FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a cask, value 3 s. 6 d., and five quarts of rum, value 1 l. , the goods of James Jervis .

JAMES JERVIS. I keep the Castle, public-house, Castle-street, Holborn . On the 10th of June, about one o'clock in the day, I discovered that my cellar window was forced open, that some one had then got in, and forced the cellar door open, and stolen this cask of rum. The officer came in a few minutes. I found the prisoner in custody with it at Guildhall. It must have been done in the night.

JOHN CLARK . I am a watchman of Castle-street. On the 10th of June, about three o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Castle-street, with this cask in a bag, and asked how he came by it; he said he got it from a public-house facing the Old Bailey - I asked if it was a watering house; he said he did not know, but would shew it to me. I put him in the watch-house, then went and enquired at the different public-houses, but could hear nothing of it. He afterwards said it was smuggled liquor, and he had brought it from Wapping, that a man was to give him 2 s. to carry it to the corner of Oxford-street. Jervis's name was on a label on it. I found the bolt of his cellar door wrenched off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, begging for Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-48

902. JOHN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Dicketts , from his person .

THOMAS DICKETTS . I am a tailor , and live in Hemlock-court, Carey-street. On Sunday, the 8th of June, I was in Water-court, leading into Fleet-street , going home, several people were passing - I felt something behind at my coat pocket, looked over my shoulder, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; he was passing it to another boy - there were four of them in company; one appeared older than him. It was safe just before. I secured him with it - the other three got away. A friend took one of them, but let him go, as the prisoner kicked his legs and bit his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to).

MICHAEL MULHOLLON . I am a surgeon, and live in Dean-street, Holborn. I was passing through the court, and saw the prisoner commit this offence. I caught hold of three others, who were with him, but the prisoner kicked and bit me.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-49

903. CHRISTOPHER PARKINS and GEORGE BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 19 lbs. of waste-paper, value 4 s. , the goods of Sir Peter Pole , Bart. , and others, his partners.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 19 lbs. of paper.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GREGORY SMITH . I am clerk to Sir Peter Pole , Bart., who has other partners - they carry on their mercantile concerns at No. 18, Nicholas-lane . On the 10th of June, in consequence of receiving a letter from abroad, I went to some boxes in the counting-house, and missed some letters and documents, which induced me to watch, and about eight o'clock in the evening, I placed myself under the gateway, having seen the prisoners coming down the lane, and go in at the street door. Perkins was servant to the proprietor of the house, and had the care of the counting-house. I saw Baker come out first with a bundle in his hand - I stopped him, and took it from him; he said it was only waste paper. Parkins said he was driven to take it from distress. I found seventeen different boxes had been nearly emptied of their papers.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where were they kept - A. In boxes under the desk, not locked up.

JOHN EVANS . I am a constable. I took the prisoners and paper in charge. I have known Parkins from a child - he bore a good character. Baker is a ticket porter .

(Property produced and sworn to).

BAKER'S Defence. I lodged and boarded with my fellow prisoner, assisted him in his business, and went with him to clean the counting-house out. He directed me to carry the paper to his house.

PARKINS'S Defence. My family have had the care of the offices for fourteen years. I thought this paper of no value, and did not take it with any felonies intent. I have an execution in my house, and if convicted my wife and three children must throw themselves on the parish.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

PARKINS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-50

904. JOSEPH PRIOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Barber , from his person .

JAMES BARBER . I am a grocer , and live in York-street, Westminster. On the 11th of June, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing through the Old Change , and about half way down, a person said my pocket was picked. I felt and missed my handkerchief, and saw it laying before me - the prisoner was within a yard or two of it. The officer immediately secured him.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. I was in the Old Change on the day the children went to St. Paul's, and saw the prisoner with six or eight others, whom I suspected, and saw them attempt person's pockets - I kept my eye on them, and knocked down one of them. Mr. Barber just passed at the time, and I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief from his pocket - I seized him, and immediately saw him drop it; he said he would not go with me. I took him to the Compter, and afterwards took him to a public-house for refreshment - he was handcuffed to another prisoner, who had some friends with him, and I took the handcuffs off - the prisoner immediately said "Now I should like to floor you," and immediately struck at me. I had great difficulty to secure him, and as I brought him to Newgate he threatened to stick a knife into me. I found another handkerchief on him, marked T. W., and a card of buttons.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I assisted in securing him. He resisted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along with the buttons

in my hand - the officer came and said I took this handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-51

905. THOMAS HITCHING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , seven pair of gloves, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Plant .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-52

906. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a box, value 2 d., and three shillings , the property of William Allen .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-53

907. THOMAS WALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a pig, value 42 s. , the goods of Isaac Brown .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 130 lbs. of pork.

HAMMOND PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Bowles , salesman, Newgate-market . I saw the prisoner come out of our warehouse with this pig on his shoulder, and asked where he was going with it; he said "Down to the cart" - I said it did not belong to him, took him back, and made him lay it down. He said he would go and see for the man who had bought the pig - I gave him in charge. Isaac Brown had bought it, but it was not delivered - he has no cart.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a constable. I saw him come out with the pig, and took him in charge - he was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-54

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 28.

Middlesex Cases Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

908. WILLIAM DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , a deal board, value 6 s. , the goods of Samuel Baxter .

NATHAN DAVEY . I am a carpenter, and live in Regent-street, in the service of Samuel Baxter , a builder. I left this board safe in the parlour of No. 60, at half-past one o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody with it next morning, and knew it to be the same.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. On the 2d of June, I watched the prisoner in Regent-street, from one, till near four o'clock, and saw him stop at the door of No. 60, for about seven minutes; he then lifted the latch up, went in, and brought out this board - I stopped him with it. He said his mate had given him 1 s. to carry it, and that he had not brought it out of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. My mate said if I would fetch it, he would give me 1 s.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-55

Before Mr. Recorder.

909. ELIZABETH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , a jacket, value 25 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 1 l., and a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of John M'Cawley .

JOHN M'CAWLEY. I am a seaman . On the 31st of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I was in Angel-gardens, St. George's, East - the prisoner had taken me into a house there, about ten o'clock at night. I was awoke by the watchman; all my clothes were gone, and the prisoner also - she was taken that afternoon.

JANE TALDER . I live in Angel-gardens. The prisoner took my room as a lodger on Monday night, and was only four days there. I never saw the prosecutor till four o'clock on Friday morning; he had the counterpane over him, all his clothes were gone.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT . I am a constable. I apprehended her at the Blue Gate, public-house, on Saturday afternoon; she denied the charge, but as I took her to the watch-house, she said she did not sell them herself, but gave them to another person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and so was he - he said he had no money, but if I would pawn his clothes, he could get money in the morning. I was called up at six o'clock, and gave the landlady the clothes to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-56

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

910. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , seven spoons, value 3 l.; two rings, value 1 l.; eight yards of silk, value 2 l.; a shawl, value 1 l.; a dress, value 2 l.; a spencer, value 10 s.; a skirt, value 3 s.; four gowns, value 1 l.; five shirts, value 1 l.; six pair of stockings, value 12 s.; a handkerchief, value 4 s.; a night gown, value 3 s.; two yards of calico, value 2 s., and three sheets, value 5 s., the goods of Helen Ireland , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Robert Ireland .

The prosecutrix stating her name to be Helen Christianna Ireland , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230625-57

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

911. MARIA WILLIAMS and HANNAH HUTCHINS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , at St. Andrew, Holborn , thirty-three yards of poplin, value 2 l., the goods of Miles Metcalf , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES WILSON . I am shopman to Miles Metcalf , a linendraper , who lives in High Holborn . On the 20th of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was called down from tea, and found the prisoners in the shop, and as they were going out, I said I suspected they had something which did not belong to them; Hutchins denied it - Williams desired her to give it up if she had anything; she still persisted that she had nothing. I sent for a constable, and before he came Hutchins took the poplin from under her clothes, and gave it to me - it measured thirty-two yards, and is worth exactly 40 s., it cost us 1 s. 4 d. a yard - we should sell it for 5 s. or 6 s. more. Williams begged hard to be let go, and said she would take the print away, and pay the money if we would let them go; she said nothing about the poplin. Hutchins said she had never seen it after she had given it up - she could not account how it got under her petticoats. They at first said they had not enough to pay for the print, which came to 8 s. 3 d., but 14 s. was found on one of them.

JOHN LATIMER CLARK . I am servant to Mr. Metcalf; the prisoners came to the shop, and both asked to see a printed cotton; I saw Bow the shopman who is not here, shew them a great many. I was behind the counter opposite to them, about a yard from them; they were about ten

minutes looking at them, and did not like any of them. I saw Hutchins convey a piece of figured poplin under her petticoat; she rather stooped to do it; Williams was close to bet, she did not put it on the side Williams stood, but Williams came on the other side of her at the time, and held up a printed cotton, while she was doing it, and asked me the price of it. I immediately ran up stairs and told Wilson, who came down with me, they were than paying 1 s. deposit for a print - they were going out, and he said, he thought they had something which did not belong to them, Hutchins denied it. I left them with Wilson, while I fetched Collins, the officer.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a constable. I was fetched. Wilson gave me the poplin and the prisoner's in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I was coming along Holborn, and met Hutchins very much in liquor. She asked me to go with her to buy a gown, and I went with her, not knowing that she meant to steal.

HUTCHINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-58

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

912. GEORGE LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , a 5 l. Bank note, the property of Edward Lee , in the dwelling-house of Henry Smith .

HENRY SMITH . I keep a public-house at Limehouse . On the 26th of May Edward Lee came to my house with the prisoner; they were in the parlour. The prisoner went out in quarter of an hour; the prosecutor then came out with notes in his hand, and asked my wife to count them; she said there was five 5 l. and two 10 l. notes; he said, then his cousin George had robbed him of a 5 l. note. We followed and overtook the prisoner; the prosecutor said, "Cousin George, you have robbed me of a 5 l. note." He said he had not gone one about him. We went into a public house; I searched him with the prosecutor's assistance, and found a 5 l. note in the lining of his hat; he said, "Well, I must abide by the consequence;" that he only took it in a joke, and was going to tell his brother of it. He was knocking at his brother's door when we took him. He said his cousin owed him 2 l. 10 s. for rent and 2 l. for going to Greenwich.

WILLIAM BROAD . I took him into custody; he offered to return it at the watch-house, and gave his cousin 3 l. to boot.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-59

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

913. JOHN GUTTERIGE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , twelve brooms, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Bowyer .

JAMES CLAYTON . On the 19th of June I was in town with Thomas Bowyer 's waggon, which had ten bundles of brooms in it. I was going through Edmonton ; the patrol called to me, and I missed one bundle; he brought the prisoner forward with them on his back. He said he picked them up in the road, which was impossible, for they were under the tilt in the bed of the waggon.

JOHN AVIS . I am a patrol. About half past nine o'clock at night, I met a gentleman in the road, who gave me information. I met the prisoner near the waggon with the brooms on his back; he said he picked them up; they could not have fallen out; there was a man asleep in the waggon; he was following the waggon, and called to the man to stop after I asked about them; he was rather in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up, and could hardly drag them to the waggon, I was so drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-60

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

914. CHRISTOPHER M'CAR was indicted for stealing on the 6th of June , a sheet, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Smith .

ABIGAL SMITH . I live at Marylebone . On the 3d of June, the prisoner come to us in great distress. I went out often to the pump for water, and as I returned met her going out; she said she was going to sell some caps which she had made. I said she should not go out without me, as I had lent her the muslin to make them; she pushed me back, and in the struggle, I saw the sheet rolled up under her gown. I am sure it is mine by the colour, it was half bleached - she got down stairs and was apprehended next night. I have not found it. I missed it immediately she was gone.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my charge by some woman.

Prisoner's Defence. When I got up in the morning she said she had nothing to buy a breakfast with, and said she would pawn the sheet, which she did. I had nothing to do with it.

ABIGAL SMITH. I never said a word about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-61

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

915. JOHN GOTTE was indicted for arson .

MESSRS. BOLLAND, ANDREWS and MARSHALL conducted the prosecution.

ANN GIBBS . I am the wife of William Gibbs . On the 1st of February, 1811, I took a lodging at the prisoner's house, in White Cross-street . I think it was No. 196. I saw him in the shop when I went; it was not then open for business, a bill was in the window, stating that the upper part was to let, the prisoner shewed me all over it, except the kitchen and cellar; he took me to the first floor, the back room of which belonged to him, and the front room was entirely empty - he said that was not to let; he took me to the second floor, and said that was to let, and shewed me the rooms above. I said they would be too large; he said that he would let me the second floor, at a dollar a week, and we might have the use of the rooms above, for he should never use them. I said my husband must see them, that he was in the cabinet business, and asked if he might work on the premises, he said Yes, up stairs; and in two or three days, I took my husband up and found the prisoner at home - we were to take possession, on Saturday the 7th of the month at 5 s. 6 d. a week, and he was to be paid every week - we went in on the 7th, and slept there, and for the first two or three days, I observed there was nothing in the place, and asked how he came to take such a large place, and have no furniture; he said, he had been very unfortunate, that he had been burnt out at Bermondsey. I said "God help you and I will lend you every thing you want." He slept in the one pair back room; the doors were always open, and in that room, there was only a new

tent bedstead, a new bed, a pair of new blankets, and a pillow; but no sheets, and a leather trunk by the side of the bed, but neither table or chair, there was no female servant, only a boy, there were no candlesticks, but a bottle was used for one. I offered to lend him crockery, seeing there was nothing but a bason in the place; he had a parlour behind the shop, and in it was a set of old fire irons, two or three old chairs, and an old deal table; a water barrel in the yard - counters in the shop, and a stove in every room as fixtures. I have mentioned every thing that I ever saw in the house. I had a great deal of furniture, and offered to sell him some, when I had been in the house about a week, he said he was going to furnish the first floor front room for a gentleman whom I had seen. I had seen a respectable gentleman setting on the counter, and he said that was the gentleman, (I offered to sell him furniture, he said No; he had a German who would sell him some.) I made tea for them, and said "I hope there is going to be a rational being in the house, for you are none." Two or three days after this, I came down stairs, and found the first floor front room shut, which before was always left open, the stair case was very dark, unless it was open. I said "Gotte, what induced you to shut that door? I cannot see the way down;" he said "I have got some beautiful chairs in the room," I said "When did they come in, I must have seen them;" he said "Last night, and I am going to have a beautiful table in to day." This was Thursday, the fire happened on the Monday following. On Friday, in my curiosity, I peeped through the key hole, but could see nothing - the shutters were never shut, and I could see all through the room. On the Saturday my husband went out of town; he came down stairs, and paid the prisoner 5 s. 6 d., and said he was going to St. Alban's; he said "Is your wife going;" my husband said No; he said "She ought to go, it would do her good." Gibbs said I could not and went out, and soon after I was bringing down a pail of dirty water, and slipped on the stairs, and came in contact with the door of this room - the pail went against the door as well as myself and forced it open - I fell into the room, and there was nothing whatever to be seen, but the stove - the pail rolled into the shop. I went down and said "Gotte, your boy must go and wipe this dirty water up, for I have fallen into your room, and how could you tell me such stories, that you had such beautiful chairs, and there is not a thing in the room?" he merely laughed and said, there would be bye and bye. On the same afternoon, he asked me to lend him a hammer and chisel. I went up to the garret (where my husband kept his tools) for it, and to my surprise, in the front garret were two sacks full of shavings. I took the hammer and chissel down, and asked how he came to take shavings up stairs; he said he bought them so cheap, and bye and bye he could not get them.

Q. Before that, had you remarked his going to the garret - A. Repeatedly, I said to him, "What makes you go up stairs after we go to bed?" he said he went up to see the comet; we generally went to bed at eleven o'clock, and I had observed him go up stairs, five or six times after that - the boy always slept with him. He had no furniture whatever in the garret. On Sunday morning I came down stairs, and saw him in the shop about nine o'clock, as I was going out to breakfast, with the mother of a young woman who slept with me. I said I was going out to dinner; he said so was he, and asked where I was going. I said to Shadwell; he seemed rather alarmed as I thought, and said "Shadwell, Shadwell, who do you know at Shadwell;" I said two or three people and named them, and asked if he knew them, he said "No; where do they live?" I said near the church, and what was his motive for asking; he said he had no reason, only a friend of his was burnt out at Shadwell; I said "Good God you deal in fires. you burnt out, and your friend burnt out! God help us" - before I left, I said "If you go out, how am I to get in?" he said he would leave the key at Stones, the Rum Puncheon, public-house over the way. I went out and returned, to the best of my recollection, about half-past two or three o'clock, as I changed my mind and went home, instead of dressing for dinner; I went over to Stones for the key, it was not there, and I came to the door, and found the door shutter up, which had never been the case during the fortnight I was there. I turned the handle of the door and it opened, it had been locked but the bolt had not gone into the hasp. I stopped for a moment fearful of going in, as I thought he was out, and somebody might have gone in. I threw the street-door wide open, and thought I would not go up, but walked through the parlour into the back yard, when I came to the parlour, I saw the hearth stone taken up and standing on its edge, against the side of the fire place, and Gotte on his knees; a sack of shavings laying on his left side, with the mouth towards him, on the right-hand side a tin can, what had been in it I cannot say, it was like an oil can with a spout to it - there was a lighted candle on the hob; he had some shavings in his left-hand, and was pushing them in between the boards with my chissel, where the hearth had been - he did not see me. I stood for a moment there; tapped him on the shoulder, and said "For God's sake what are you at, put that hearth down" - he did not answer me. I said "For God's sake put it down, for Gibbs will break his legs;" (as he had to cross that hearth in the morning, to the yard to wash his hands;) he seemed alarmed, and and raising himself on his arm, said "It shall be put down. It shall be put down." I said, "What are you doing?' he said "The shavings are wet, and I put them here at the top of the oven to dry, because they shan't smoke, when I light the oven." I said "I dont care what you are doing, only whatever you do, I will have that hearth put down," - he said it should. I think this place was over the oven. I went out immediately, (without going up stairs,) to a friend's house where my husband came - we went home together, between eight and nine o'clock, and slept at home; nothing particular occurred that night - we brought two friends home with us, who went home. On Monday morning I took some meat down to the bake-house, to ask him to bake it for me; he said No; he should not light the oven that day, as he had plenty of pastry left. I had never been in the bake-house before - a day or two previous to that, I had observed to him that he only had a sack; or part of a sack of flour in the shop; he said, "Oh dear, I have plenty in the cellar below." On the Monday, I saw three sacks of shavings in the cellar, and a quantity of coals strewed along the place, with shavings and chips of wood in a careless kind of way, but saw no flour. I said, "I thought you told me you had so much flour here;

more lies; it is like the chairs, you have nothing but shavings;" he laughed and said they would come bye and bye.

Q. Now was there any place below where he could have flour besides where the oven was - A. No place whatever. On the Monday evening a friend supped with us, and went away about half-past ten o'clock - I lit my friend down stairs, and then the leather trunk, which was always at his bed side stood on the right hand counter with the lid up; I asked if he meant to fill it with money, as copper money was in it - he laughed, and made no answer. I said "This is not the way to get rich, you are selling two-penny cheese cakes for a half-penny," and I bought one; he said they were very stale, and he should bake fresh ones next day. I went up, sat down with my husband, and in quarter of an hour heard our dog growl; I said, "There is that wretch coming up stairs again" - our door was open, and he came into the room; Gibbs offered him some beer, he drank and looked round our room, and said what beautiful paintings we had - I said, "What makes you go up stairs in this manner of a night;" he said to see the comet, and went up. We went to bed about eleven o'clock, and were awoke by the screaming of the dog, and found the room in a black smother - I said, "Oh! God, what is the matter." Gibbs jumped out of bed, opened the door, and the flames came into the room; he shut the door immediately, sat down on the bed, and said, "Oh! dear we are lost." I heard the cracking of the fire all about me - we had a small bench in the room; he wrenched out one of the iron bars from the window, took me by the neck and shoulders, and dropped me on the tilings. The flames were then in the room. I went along the tilings, clung to the chimney, and with the help of my husband and the fireman got away by the back of the building, and with a ladder we got down.

Q. When Gotte came to your room had he a candle - A. Yes, and carried it up to the garret a light. I took refuge at Pye's, in Shrewsbury-court. The gentlemen of the fire office came to me next day, and I gave them every particular. I saw no more of Gotte for six or seven years after, when I was walking in Holborn, and cast my eye on him just as I came to Dean-street - he saw me, and got among the people at a caricature shop, turned from me, and looked at the pictures in the window - Miss Ryder, (who is now dead,) was with me. I let go her arm, went up to him, and said, "You wretch, you are the wretch that set me on fire;" he turned round, and with his left elbow struck me on the breast, and said, "Bl - t you, you b - h," and got away - I fell down from the fright, was taken into a shop, and sent home in a coach. I did not see him again till Sunday morning, the 14th of May last, the day after a fire had happened in New-street, Covent-garden - he came into a public-house opposite to where the fire was, with a man, and asked for a box which he had left there the night before. I immediately caught hold of him, and said, "What Gotte, what another fire! what burnt out again!" he did not answer, but asked again in an agitated manner for his box; the people gave him a tin cannister, such as sweetmeats and nuts are kept in. I then turned him completely round, and said, "Do you know me? what another fire! what burnt out again!" he said, "Yes, Yes, I know you, Yes, I have lost every thing now." I got to the door, and as he came out, collared him, and said, "You once escaped from me, but now you shall not" - he said not a sentence till be got into the street, and then said, "You b - h, what do you hold me for?" I said, "I will let you know, for God's sake somebody come and help me; send for an officer, for he shall not go from me." I was surrounded by firemen, who said, "This is the man who was burnt out over the way." I said, "Get me an officer;" one came at last, and I gave him in charge of Davis.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you live then - A. In Brick-lane, Whitechapel. Gibbs belongs to the East India Company's service, as he did then, but since January, 1812, till now he has been a Bow-street patrol. I believe I have always given the same account. I was examined two or three times at Bow-street, and believe all I said was taken down. I mentioned about the beautiful chairs to Mr. Richmond, the clerk of Bow-street, who was taking down my deposition, and also that he borrowed a hammer and chisel of me. It was between twelve and one o'clock in the day when I was down in his bake-house. I suppose we were awoke by the fire from a quarter past eleven to a quarter past twelve o'clock; he was in our room about a quarter to eleven. I went to lodge there quite by accident, and had no acquaintance with him before; he shewed me all the premises when I went to look at the lodging. I did not expect a fire, but thought he was a rogue, and was going to cheat the landlord of the rent and taxes. I know he had nothing in the house.

Q. Does the fire place in the back room stand in the road to the yard - A. Directly opposite it. The pail of water my husband had up stairs was to wash his feet.

Q. What light was there in the back room on the Sunday - A. A window looks into the yard.

Q. When you opened the front door, a great deal of light would come in - A. It might; I walked in gently, being fearful, nothing disturbed him - he was too intent on his business.

Q. Were you at that time Mrs. Gibbs - A. No; I have lived with Gibbs twelve years - I have been his wife eleven years. I was divorced from Mr. Atkinson by the Ecclesiastical Court, when I was about seventeen years of age; he died in December, 1811. I married Gibbs in August, 1812, having lived with him for twelve years before. I had not lived with Mr. Atkinson for fourteen years.

Q. When you met the prisoner in Holborn, the persons assembled heard you called a b - h, and saw you knocked down, but yet he got away - A. I do not know that they heard it. I fainted and saw nothing of him. I was examined in Pape's room the day after the trial. I do not know whether they took down what I said. I believe Sir William Rawlings was present. I went to the Eagle Office, as a gentleman offered to give Gibbs 5 l. I stated every word there. I think they had a book before them, but cannot say whether they took down what I said. I went before no Justice about it. I knew Clark who once kept a public-house, at Bow-street, and knew Drakeford .

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am the husband of the last witness, and am a Bow-street patrol. In 1811, I was a labourer at the

East India warehouse, and worked as a cabinet-maker. On Saturday the 7th of September. I went to lodge at the prisoner's house, in White-cross-street, the parlour behind the shop, had two or three old chairs and a table in it, the whole not worth above seven or eight shillings. I never saw his bed-room that I recollect. On the Saturday previous to Monday the 23d, I went to St. Alban's, returned on Sunday evening, and slept with my wife. I was absent all the next day, and came home between five and six o'clock - a friend supped with us, and left five or six minutes before eleven o'clock; Mrs. Gibbs let him out, and came up stairs; the prisoner came up in quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, our door was open, he came in, I asked him to drink with me, which he did, and went up saying he was going to see the comet. I went to bed directly, and about twelve o'clock, as I suppose, my wife awoke me, the dog was making a noise; I got up, opened the door, and the whole place was in flames, they were rushing from down stairs, and also descending from the garret. I shut the door directly and made my mind up to be burnt in the room, for I was almost suffocated in opening the door, but I had got a work-bench with only two legs to it, I put a leg between the bars, but it broke. I pulled out the other, and broke the bar down from the window; put Mrs. Gibbs out on some tiles; told her to keep to the left, which led to the brewery wall; followed her to a stack of chimneys; got on the wall, and escaped - no alarm was give to me from below. I heard no cry of fire, or anything till I found it myself. All my furniture was burnt. I saw the prisoner two or three mornings afterwards at the Eagle Office, but had no conversation with him. I heard him say he came for his money, the clerk told him, if he came any more about it, he should be taken up - he went out and I saw no more of him. The gentlemen had been and examined me and Mrs. Gibbs about it, before that.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did the clerk take down what you said - A. No; when we were at Pape's house, Mr. Rawlings was present and other gentlemen. I did not see them take anything down, my wife told them the man had nothing in the place, and there was no doubt but he had set it on fire, and told what she had seen. I was appointed a patrol about six months afterwards. I passed the house he lived in, in New-street, almost every night, but never saw him there, and did not know that he lived there. I never observed his name over the door. I looked about for him, but did not know where to find him - his shop in New-street has been often open till one o'clock at night, when I have passed.

MR. MARSHALL. Q. You did not know that he resided in New-street, till after the fire there - A. No.

WILLIAM BEETHAM , ESQ. I am Secretary to the Eagle Insurance Office, and was so in 1811. I produce a policy of insurance on a house, No. 196, White-cross-street - a claim was afterwards made upon the office, for a loss in that house; here is the first claim - a second was made with an affidavit annexed to it, which I produce. I do not know the prisoner. The office never paid anything on the claim.

JOHN HURCOMBE . I was in the Eagle Insurance Office in 1811. The gentlemen signing this policy were directors at that time - two of them are now dead. I witnessed it as being executed by them, but cannot swear that I saw it signed, as many are probably signed without my seeing it done; but they were invariably delivered to me by the directors, as their act and deed before I attest them, and as their seals.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I dare say a great many are executed in the course in the day - A. Yes. I am generally present, but I may occasionally be called out of the room. Forty or fifty are handed round to the Directors together, and they say, "I deliver these as my act and deed."

GEORGE MANCHEE . I have known the prisoner since 1811. I believe the signatures to this affidavit and the schedule to be his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you often seen him write - A. Yes. I do not swear that it is his writing, but believe it to be.

The documents referred to were here read - the policy was dated the 9th of September, 1811. Total amount insured 700. The schedule stated the loss and damage to be as under: -

s. d.

Household Furniture, Apparel, Watch, Trinkets, and Books, which were enumerated

70 16 9

Stock in trade, and fixtures 149 0 2

Building oven and furnace 53 0 0

Purchase of Lease eleven years and three quarters, 40 of which was paid in advance

120 0 0

392 16 11

To this schedule was affixed an affidavit stating the schedule to be a correct statement of the property damaged and destroyed, and that 242 3 s. 3 d. was the just value of the same.

MR. LAW to MR. BEETHAM. Q. Is not the premium charged on the goods doubly hazardous - A. Yes. The affidavit was filled up at the office. The sum of 242 l. 3 s. 3 d. is a mistake since discovered. It is common for persons to insure to the amount they expect to have on their premises. They must prove the actual loss.

WILLIAM STUCK . I am a broker and butcher. In 1811. I lived at No. 197, White-cross-street. I did not know my next door neighbour. After the fire happened, I went to the Eagle Office, and saw a man there making a claim about the fire - I do not know whether it was the prisoner or not. I went to look at the ruins the day after it happened - the back of the house was down; part of the floor was left in the first floor, and in the shop; I saw no remains of furniture. When the house was re-built I saw the oven, my belief is that it was not injured the least in the world - I could not see that either the oven or brick work were damaged. I claimed 40 l. of the office for damages, and received 30 l., and had the goods returned, which made up the demand.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long after the fire did you see the oven - A. A year and a half or two years; when the ruins were removed.

ESTHER STUCK . I am the wife of William Stuck . I do not know the prisoner. A man came to out house before the fire - he was a pastry-cook by what he said; it was the man who lived next door - I believe the prisoner to be the man, but cannot swear it; I had known him as

master of the house for about three months. He came and asked me to recommend him a washer-woman; this was the first week he came into the house, and always after that he brought his linen to me to be washed, and three or four days before the fire, he came, and said, "Here is my linen, Mrs. Stuck, but don't let me have them back on Saturday night as usual, but let them be till I send for them;" they were fetched by a lad, a week or a fortnight after the fire. I had sold him a water-but, some fire-irons, and a table - I was only paid for the table. The value of the whole might be a 1 l., or less.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before the fire did he get you to have his linen washed - A. It might be three months; it was when he first came into the house; he was then building his oven. The bundle might contain three or four shirts, more or less.

JOHN CARMICHAEL . I am a baker and pastry-cook, and live in Little Russell-street, Drury-lane. I have known the prisoner sixteen or seventeen years - he lived with me as journeyman in 1812 and 1813. I had several conversations with him about this fire; he told me it happened in consequence of the falling in of the oven; that he was awoke in the night by a noise like thieves breaking in, and when he opened the door, the fire was on the stairs; that he shut the door directly, and pulled his bedstead to pieces, took the post, and broke the iron bars from the window with it, and escaped. I used to urge him to prosecute his claim; he said he had a friend who was pursuing it. He did not tell me the amount.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He did not say he went to examine the oven, and found it had fallen in - A. No; he said the reason of the fire was the oven falling in. I think he said there was a lad escaped with him - I said when he had such a good witness as that why not prosecute his claim. He did not mention any other persons in the house. He was arrested in my service, and took the benefit of the Lord's act.

JOSEPH SABERTON . I am a fancy biscuit baker. I first knew the prisoner in 1808, and lived three years with him at Shadwell, and left him early in 1811 - he still lived at Shadwell. I then went to live with a different master in the same line. I saw him afterwards in a shop in Whitecross-street, and found he lived there; I called two or three times, and the fourth time that I called he shewed me his first floor back room, the parlour behind the shop, and the bake-house - this was two or three days before the fire. Seeing iron bars to his bed-room window, I said, "Gotte, your bed-room looks like a prison with these iron bars;" he said it did, that he intended to take out the two irons bars in case of fire, or an accident, for while a person was striving to take out those two iron bars he might be burnt to death. He shewed me the bake-house - the iron work of the oven was much superior to anything I had seen of the kind before, but not since. I do not recollect observing his furniture or property. His boy came to my lodging on the evening of the fire, in consequence of which I went to Gotte's, and believe I got there about ten o'clock he wanted me to sleep there all night, to help him complete an order to make biscuits and cakes. I said my health was indifferent, but agreed to stay - he got salmon for supper. We both went to bed together in about half an hour from the time I got there. I was awoke by a dog barking, and awoke him, and said, "Gotte, here are thieves, or something in the house?" he made no answer. I immediately heard something fall very heavy, and a dreadful cracking; I thought it was fire. I shook him again, and said, "Gotte, for God's sake get up, for the house is all on fire;" he made no answer. I immediately jumped out of bed, and he after me - he immediately opened the bedroom door, and said it was impossible for us to escape down stairs; the fire was raging up the stair-case. I was dreadfully alarmed, and asked him where the window was; he said it was close to me. I turned round, and perceived it, felt about, and found two iron bars on the left hand side, but on the right there were two missing - he said the casement would open, but in my fright I burst through the casement, and fell out on the wash-house, and got into the yard. I had scarcely recovered myself when he threw a trunk out of that window - he came out the same way as I did; he did not appear hurt. I saw an old door which lead into a court - I forced it open, and he made his appearance just then, and asked me to take hold of the end of the trunk, which I did, and we carried it somewhere, which I suppose to be Pape's. I never saw the trunk afterwards. I remained at the house about a quarter of an hour - I had nothing on but my shirt. Pape lent me shoes and a great coat. Gotte had something slightly about him, but what he had on I cannot say. I went back to the place about ten o'clock next morning, and saw him sitting at Pape's, talking to a fireman.

Q. Before you left the bed-room did you observe whether he did anything with the bedstead - A. He did not; he followed me almost directly. Nobody broke any of the bars out before I got out. I saw him in Whitecross-street a day or two afterwards; he said he had applied at the office for his insurance, but did not state any amount.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you not live with him after the fire - A. I worked with him for three weeks in Round-court; I could have found him at any time if I had wanted. Shavings give a better heat to bake biscuits, particularly if the oven has been heated before.

Q. Is September, when carpenters are at work, a better time to lay in shavings than Christmas - A. Yes; I was articled to him at Stepney, it was Gotte and Lambol. We eat our salmon on a table. I cannot say whether it was deal or mahogany. I do not recollect seeing above two or three chairs in that room, or any being in the bedroom - we both went to bed at the same time; from the difficulty I had to awake him, I have no doubt of his being really asleep. When he opened the door I saw flames coming up from below, but there were none coming down; a few minutes more would have been our certain destruction. I made a spring and got through the window easily, without squeezing; he came and staid at my father's for five or six weeks afterwards, and went to the ruins every day - we lived about three hundred yards off.

Q. You lived with him in Round-court afterwards, was his name on the door - A. Yes, in a shabby manner; he went to New-street, nearly four years ago, the last time I saw the house, there was "Gotte pastry cook and confectioner," in large letters up, that was about twelve months ago; he had a good business there. I worked there

at times, and slept there; he had me and another man, and two apprentices. I was with him in New-street, about four months. I remember his employing one Gaskin an attorney to recover his claim. I lost my clothes at the fire, and never got a farthing allowed.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ask him for any compensation for them - A. No; he said if he got his insurance he would make me a little. Gaskin called on me to ask a few questions about the fire. I do not know that any thing was done after that.

JURY. Q. Was the trunk in the chamber, where you slept - A. I believe it was; the bars were all up when I observed to him that he was living in a prison, they must have been removed afterwards - the trunk was not large. I think it was more than one man could carry - we were to get up at three o'clock in the morning to work - no preparation was necessary over night.

WALTER BIGGS . I am a tin-plate worker, and live in Baldwin-street, City-road. I lived at the corner of Henry-street., and Old-street, in 1811, had dealings with the prisoner; he came to me soon after the fire, to say he had been to the office, and should soon get his money, and if any of the people applied to me from the office, to know what amount of goods he had had of me, I was to say to the amount of 50 l. I had not sold him goods to near that amount; the last time I sold him goods was in 1810, when he lived at Shadwell, and they were under 10 l., and that was all.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did he never pay money for things, which you do not book - A. I never recollect it. I supplied him with 10 l. worth of goods in the course of two years - he generally paid by instalments - the utmost amount in my books against him is 6 l. or 7 l.; he had paid it at the time of the fire, they were utensils in trade. I told him, I would say no such thing, that I would examine my books and say what he had had.

ELIZA BROOKS . In 1811 I lived in Shrewsbury-court, White-cross-street. On the morning of the fire, Gotte came to my house with a young man, they were in the shirts, and had a leather trunk. Gotte stopped about five minutes, and then said he would go and fetch his small clothes, and returned with them; he went through the back yard for them. I followed him out, and observed his house on fire at the top; there was a great body of smoke at the top, I did not stop to look further - when he returned, he said to the young man, we must take up the trunk and go - they did so.

GEORGE MANCHEE . I went to the prisoner on liking as an apprentice, at Shadwell, in the early part of the summer of 1811, I remained with him five or six weeks - the premises were burnt down, and he went to live in a private house, near the Commercial-road. I also went to live with him in Whitecross-street. On the night of the fire, he told me he wished to see Saberton. I fetched him to the house that night, and I went home, being very young then, I wanted to get to my playmates, and he said "Well if you go home, Saberton shall sleep with me." I knew of no preparation for any order. I left between eight and ten o'clock; nothing had then been done to the oven. I returned next morning, and the house was burnt down. I saw Gotte in Shrewsbury-court, and asked how he escaped, he said he got out of his bed-room window. I asked if he was hurt, and I think he said not much. I asked how Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs escaped; he said he believed they were safe There was not much furniture in the house. There was a bed, bedstead, box and trunk, in the sleeping-room, as near as I recollect, and in the parlour, there might be six oldish chairs, with I think hair bottoms, there might be a little crockery. I never remember above one or two sacks of flour coming in; there might be a sack or two that night.

COURT. Q. Do you know when the window bars were altered - A. No, my Lord. I remember seeing them all up. I slept with him a very few nights before, but cannot say whether they were there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The box was in the bedroom - A. I believe so; there was no bason stand there. I think there might be, 18 l. of furniture altogether, including stock, and every thing; 40 l. would cover the furniture, stock, coals, flour, and all the moveables. I was only fourteen years old at the time.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Before he sent you for Saberton. had you told him you must go home - A. I think so.

THOMAS BAKER . I am a coal-merchant. In 1811, I lived in White-cross-street. My attention was directed to the fire about eleven o'clock, when the alarm was given. I came out and could see nothing of it, I ran into Shrewsbury-court, went up, Pump-court, and met Mr. Gotte, coming out of his house by the back door, which led into Shrewsbury-court; he was then dressed, the same as I am now, and had a trunk about eighteen inches long in his hand. I said "For God's sake what is the matter, where is the fire, he said "Hush, hush." I stopped a moment or two, and saw the flames breaking out backwards, and Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs making there way out of the second floor window. I saw Gotte again in about a quarter of an hour, on the other side of White-cross-street, looking at the fire, with the same trunk in his hand, and dressed the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You saw him full dressed about eleven o'clock walking into the court, with the trunk, and nobody with him - A. Yes; he was not agitated but seemed as unconcerned as I am now.

GEORGE BANTON CARR . I live at Edmonton - the house No. 196, White-cross-street, belongs to me.

WILLIAM PYE . I live in Shrewsbury-court, and did so when this fire happened, and was awoke by Mrs. Gibbs, calling for assistance. I dressed as fast as I could; ran down and found Gibbs not quite descended from the ladder; there was a strong thick black smoke. in the lower part of the house, I thought it was in flames, both at top and bottom, but did not think there was any burning in the centre. I saw the premises next day. Gibbs was collecting a few things that were partly burnt - the front part of the second floor was still standing, and the back burnt. I did not notice the first floor - the dog lay down dead in the shop. I afterwards saw the things dug out of the ruins. The iron bar which Gibbs wrenched off, was brought to me with several planes.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You saw that the back was burnt - A. Yes. the back part of the first floor being built of wood was consumed. The brick work was standing.

HUGH STONE . In 1811 I lived in White-cross-street, on

the opposite side to the fire. I cannot now swear that the prisoner is the man who lived in the house, but the man who lived there came to my house at the time with a trunk, and said, Gibbs had got out; he had his breeches on, and I believe every thing else, but not buttoned.

MR. ADOLPHUS to SABERTON. Q. You and the prisoner were in your shirts that night - A. Yes. I recollect going into no house but Pape's. I did not see Mrs. Brooks that night.

The prisoner in a long written address, stated that he was utterly at a loss to account how the fire happened, unless occasioned by the oven - that he escaped in his shirt, with only a trifling article of dress and a box - that he certainly took up a plank by the side of the hearth, which was broken, but denied placing shavings there. Having no means of prosecuting his claim, he entered into Carmichael's service, and was arrested for the charges of erecting the oven - that for the last nine years he had lived in public situations, carrying on business with his name over the door. He denied telling Carmichael that he had forced the window bars away with the bed-post, and concluded by protesting his innocence.

WILLIAM CLARK . I keep the White Lion, public-house, Edgware; before I went there I kept the Marquis of Granby, public-house, in Bow-street. I know Mrs. Gibbs, and would not believe her on her oath.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Be kind enough to tell us why - A. She was at my house once when Randall stated that a person had come in for change for a sovereign. I looked into my till, and missed a crown piece and some silver, and said,

"Why Randall, I have just taken a crown piece and some silver, and it is all gone." It was said that my wife (as they supposed, but meaning her) had taken it out of the till - Randall said, "That woman has got it, and is putting it into her right hand pocket;" I said, "Mrs. Gibbs, you have got it. Randall saw you put it in your pocket;" she said, "No, I have not got above a shilling." I insisted on seeing what she had - she pulled out a crown, a half-crown, some shillings, and sixpences, and the man who paid me the crown said, "I will take my oath that is the crown I paid you." Q. Why not prosecute her - A. Knowing her to be an officer's wife, and my house being dependant on the officers, I thought it best to tell her to leave my house, and not come there again - she said she was sure she had not done it, but I turned her out. I met her husband some time after, and told him of it, but he treated it very lightly indeed. I never saw the prisoner before to day.

JOHN RANDALL . I was at Clarke's house, when this transaction happened.

THOMAS DRAKEFORD . I am a baker, and live in Wilstead-street, Somer's Town; Mrs. Gibbs lived next door to me in 1812; I have known her ever since, and would not believe her on her oath.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Why not - A. In 1820 she abused my child in the street, and said I was a reputed thief; the child came and told me; I went to the door, and asked why she said so; she said I was a thief and a reputed thief, and her husband could prove it; and if so why not take me?

Q. Had you ever been in custody - A. Yes; at Bow-street, on a wrong charge, for receiving a mare knowing it to be stolen; I was confined from Tuesday to Friday, then discharged, and gave evidence here against the thief.

Several witnesses appeared to the prisoner's character, and said that his name was over his door in New-street, in large letters.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-62

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 30.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

916. SAMUEL WILLIAM MILES was indicted for that he, on the 9th of June , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeit Bank note, for payment of 5 l., with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating his intent to be to defraud Richard Davis .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a broker , and live in Windmill-street, Tottenham Court-road . On the 9th of June, about ten or half past ten o'clock in the evening; the prisoner came to my shop; he was dressed in a kind of midshipman's jacket, with yellow buttons at the sleeves, and asked if I had got a seaman's chest; I said No - he asked if I had any kind of chest - I said I had; he asked to see it. I took him in and shewed him one, which he agreed to give 12 s. for, but afterwards changed his mind, and asked if I had got a trunk; I then shewed him another trunk - he said he wanted two; the first I shewed him would not do, and the next I sold him for 30 s.; I took him into my little parlour; he said "You know my father very well". I said very probably - he said "You know Miles, my father, very well," I said "Yes; very well." - he then said he had been to the East Indies, that he had a large sum (150 l.) to receive next day, and also shewed me a letter purporting to be for 173 l., and said it was an order, he had from the ship-broker, or merchant's to receive for a brother seaman of his.

Q. Was that distinct from the 150 l. - A. Most assuredly - he then pulled a 5 l. note out of his pocket book, and asked me to give him change. I gave him three sovereigns and ten shillings. (Looks at a note,) this is it; I saw him write upon it, "Mr. S. Miles, Clyde, East Indiaman, East India Docks." - he said he should want the trunk taken down to the docks, and could I get him a porter. I got Thomas Simmons to take it down for him - he ordered me to get him a chest on the following day, and said he did not mind the price, if it was two guineas, and he would call for it next day. I got it, but he never called. I saw the trunk afterwards in possession of the officer at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When was he taken up - A. On the Friday morning following, the 14th,

I saw him at Bow-street. Stevens came to me and said he had got him. I went there, expecting to see the same man. I think I had some recollection of him before he brought the note - but I am not positive. I did not know that I had ever seen him before, till he mentioned about his father. I had but one candle in the shop, and cannot say whether he wore his hat all the time - he was with me about quarter of an hour - no person come into the shop while he was there - but he had a man with him.

THOMAS SIMMONS . I am a labourer, and live in Kirkman's-place, Tottenham Court-road. On the 9th of June Davis sent for me to carry the trunk - the person who bought it went with me. I cannot swear that the prisoner was the young man; but believe him to be - he was in Davis's parlour. I first saw him by the door. I was to go with him, and followed him with the trunk below St. Giles's church, opposite the Waterloo public-house; as we went along, he said; I am not going far, and when he came there, he called a coach. I put the trunk in, he gave me 6 d., and said master would pay me the rest, and I came away.

Cross-examined. Q. You were only a minute in the shop - A. No; I walked behind him all the way - he said nothing else to me. I had no opportunity of seeing his face.

CAPTAIN DRIVER . I commanded the Clyde East Indiaman, a licensed ship. I arrived at Gravesend on the 18th of May last, - the vessel came into dock on the 19th or 20th of May, and was in the East India docks on the 9th of June - the prisoner was not in her at all.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been master - A. This last voyage, which lasted thirteen months out and home. She has only made two voyages. I quit her directly she gets into the river.

MR. JOHN WONTNER . I am keeper of Newgate. The prisoner came into my custody on the 7th of March, and was tried by Mr. Recorder, on the 21st of April, and acquitted - he came in again on the 12th of May, and was discharged by proclamation on the 19th of May.

THOMAS RICE STEEL . My father keeps a law-stationer's shop, at No. 12, Chancery-lane. I believe the prisoner to be the man (but cannot speak positively) who came at nine o'clock in the evening, of the 31st of May, and said he wanted a warrant of attorney, to secure money - he was dressed like a sailor with naval buttons, and said he wanted to leave some money he had got in a friend's hands, who was to give him a warrant of attorney as security, as he did not wish to spend it. I said he had better go to an attorney with the warrant, he said he was going to one in Red Lion-square; that he was going to sea; he mentioned a sum, which I think was 300 l. I looked at the list and saw the stamp duty was 3 l., gave him a stamp and told him the charge was 3 l. 1 s. 6 s. - he put down a 3 d. note. I asked his address, which he wrote on it that if, (looking at a note,) this is it, here is "Captain Blaye, Clide frigate;" this was written at the time, by the person to whom I gave 1 l. 18 s. 6 d. change. I did not mark it myself till the 5th of June, when I took it to the Bank, to show my father's name upon it, "Mr. T. Steel, No. 12, Chancery-lane, 5th June, 1823," and knew it to be the note the person gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. You are speaking of what happened three weeks ago - A. Yes. I had no particular reason for taking notice of him - only he gave me a history of what business he wanted it for.

COURT. Q. Look at him, and say what you believe - A. I believe him to be the man, but cannot swear to him.

JOHN WILSON . I am apprentice to Mr. Collins, law-stationer, of Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane. On Wednesday, the 4th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for a warrant of attorney stamp, to receive 170 l., and told me he was second lieutenant on board the Clyde frigate, a 74 - he was dressed in uniform; I took him for a midshipman. We had not got a stamp, but said I would get one for him. I took him to several shops which were shut up - I at last took him to Mr. Houghton's, Chancery-lane; Washington served him. I staid there, and introduced him as coming from the trade; he bought a stamp, which came to 2 l. 0 s. 1 d., with the trade deduction - he paid for it by a note. I accompanied him into Fleet-street, and conversed with him, and am sure he is the man. I knew him six or seven years ago when we were at school together.

Cross-examined. Q. How far does Washington live from your shop - A. About three minutes walk, He was about a quarter of an hour with me. I never had the note - he took it out of his pocket-book, and gave it to Washington. He wore a short jacket without flaps, and had his hat on all the time. I knew then that he was a school-fellow of mine. I asked how he did.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long were you at school together - A. About a year and a half. When he came in I said, "How do you do Sam?" and he said.

"Oh, Jack, how do you do?" he said he had been to Bombay, and had just returned. I asked him about the situation he was in, but said nothing about school. I have no doubt of having been at school with him.

CHARLES WASHINGTON . I am managing clerk to Mr. Houghton, of Chancery-lane. On the 4th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and Wilson came together for a warrant of attorney stamp, to secure 170 l.; I served him - it came to 2 l. 0 s. 2 d.; he paid me a 5 l. note - I said nothing to him, but marked it with Mr. Collin' name, as his apprentice came with it; (looks at one,) this is it. I have written "Collins, 4, 6, 28, O. W. on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you taken many Bank notes that day - A. Not that I know of. I put Collins's name on it, and put it in the till with other notes. I saw Mr. Houghton take them out next morning; he asked me of whom I took this, saying that it was bad. Collins's clerk had not been there before on that day; they never come to us for change. I received no other note from him that day.

JAMES GIBSON . I am a flower-stand maker, and live in the New-road. On Wednesday, the 4th of June, I saw the prisoner at my shop, about two o'clock in the day - he was dressed in a kind of naval uniform, and said he wished to look at some of my flower baskets; I asked what kind - he ordered six small ones at 1 s., and three at 2 s. each, and then asked the price of a three branch flower-stand; I asked 23 s. for it - he took out a paper and pencil, and began to calculate, and made them 1 l. 15 s., and said it was a good deal of money, could not I take something less for the stand, as he wanted to make a present of it to a friend,

filled with flowers. I took off 1 s., which he agreed to. I then told him the baskets were not complete, they wanted another coat of paint, and if he would leave his name and address they should be sent home in the evening; he asked for paper, and wrote "Mr. Knight, No. 6, Euston-place, New-road;" this is the paper (looking at it.) I said, "Why I know Mr. Knight, I have done business for him;" "Oh! have you" he said - he then said, "Shall I pay you for them now, or when they are delivered;" I said it was immaterial to me, it would be just as well when they were sent home; he paused for a moment, and at last said, "I may as well pay you now, and then it is done with;" he took out his pocket-book, and took a 5 l. note out. I had no change, and said I would go, and get it, and just as I was going out, he said, "Stop, let me write on it" - he took it, and wrote on it

"Thompson, ship owner, Rotherhitbe;" this is it (looking at it) - he wrote this before I took it out, and I wrote "Knight, 6, Euston-place, "on it myself. I went to the Adam and Eve, public-house, and got change, and am sure this is the note.

Cross-examined. Q. It was his own proposal to write on it - A. It was. He did not say whether it was his own name or the person he took it of. I knew Thompson to be the person he took it of, as he mentioned Knight's name.

BENJAMIN BIGGS . I am servant to Mr. Gibson. I remember the prisoner being at my master's shop, on the 4th of June, very well. I carried the three flower-pot basket home - I followed him with it; he took me within three doors of No. 6, Euston-place, and then said he did not wish me to carry it any further, he would carry it himself - he took it from me. I left him, and cannot say what he did with it.

MR. WILLIAM KNIGHT . I live in Euston-place, and know nothing whatever of the prisoner. I never sent him to buy a flower-stand - I understand one was brought to my door. I was not at home, but believe it was not taken in. I had given no direction about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know anything of it except from your servant - A. No. Euston-place is near Euston-square - there is Euston-street across the road, with more than six houses in it. A person of my name lived next door to me; he left in February - his name was Richard Knight . A man and his wife live there to let the house.

JOHN HOWISON . I am a watch-maker, and live at No. 5, Charlton-place, Islington. I have known the prisoner some years; he came to my house last Friday week, which I think was the 13th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, to purchase a watch; he said he had come from India about a fortnight, in the Clyde Indiaman, and had made a very prosperous voyage; that he had made about 170 l. and was going to Brighton next morning to see his father; that he had booked his place, and wanted a watch. I had none complete; he said he wanted one that evening, and should like to have one of my make, for I had made one for his brother. I said I would endeavour to get him one from some of my friends in Clerkenwell; I went, but did not succeed; I returned, and told him I could not get him one till the morning; that did not seem to suit, and I shewed him some I had in an imperfect state, and said I could complete one in twelve days; he agreed to have it, and took out his pocket book and asked if I could change a note; I asked if it was a large one; he said 5 l.; he took one out; there was a piece torn, but it hung to the end of it; he asked for a pen and ink, and said if I would give him change he would give me 1 l. deposit; he wrote something on the note, and I wrote under it - (looks at the note) - here is my name on this, by which I know it, and I have no doubt of its being the one he gave me; there is a piece torn off the same corner where the piece hung. I do not know what he wrote on it, but he wrote very near the word Bank, and here is "Clyde ship, S. M.," written there. I think I sent my boy to the public-house; he brought me five sovereigns; I gave them to the prisoner, who gave me a sovereigns; I said, "Mr. Miles, you may as well let me have two as I am in a little way, it will be of service." He said he could spare but one.

Cross-examined. Q. When he came you did not know his name - A. Yes; he asked for a pen and ink himself - my boy is not here, he wrote on it before the boy took it, and I wrote on it at the same time, I had no other 5 l. note that day.

Q. I am told he was in custody at the time you mention - A. I am sure he came on the 13th of June; but may be mistaken, in saying it was Friday week - his brother lived with me nine years ago.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 14th of June, about a quarter before one o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner at the Yorkshire Grey, public-house, Brydges-street, Covent-garden, he had gone in there to drink with a young woman. I took him to the watch-house, and returned with the young woman to her lodging, No. 10, Phoenix-alley, Long-acre, and found a trunk, which I brought away afterwards, and shewed it to Davis, there was nothing in it. I saw a sailor's uniform in the room, and various articles of the girls.

RICHARD DAVIS . Stevens shewed me the trunk, it is the same I sold the prisoner, and had been two years in my possession.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of Bank notes, at the Bank, and have been so between twenty-four and twenty-five years, (looking at the note uttered to Davis;) this is forged in every respect - paper, plate, and signature - it is signed

"J. Robinson;" he was a signer of small notes, but not of 5 l., (the witness examined the other four notes produced, all of which he declared to be forged in every respect. Two were signed "Robinson," and two "H. Whiting," and declared all five to be impressed from the same plate)

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen many forged notes of late - A. Not a great many. Those I have seen have not all been from one plate. There is a mark in these resembling a water-mark, but it is not one, it is impressed afterwards.

A JUROR. Q. Have you ever known forged notes to be paid at the Bank, and not discovered till the good one was brought in - A. That has happened.

JAMES ROBINSON . I am employed at the Bank, and was a signer of small notes, when they were issued, but never signed fives. This is not my signature.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it a good resemblance - A. It is not. I could tell immediately, that it was not mine;

here me two others with my name, but neither of them are my signature. They bear some resemblance to it.

The Note was here put in and read.

The prisoner read a long Defence, contending that there was no convincing proof of his knowing the notes to be forged - that sailors often involve themselves in difficulties, which they could not satisfactorily explain, and protesting his innocence.

MR. ANDREWS to MR. WONTNER. Q. Was the prisoner tried here - A. He was tried here once and acquitted. Mr. Recorder particularly expressed that he ought not to have been charged with the offence. He came afterwards to me stating that he had got a ship.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18230625-63

Before Mr. Recorder.

916. ROBERT PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , six iron hoops, value 6 s. , the goods of Daniel Burn .

WILLIAM GAWEN . I live with Daniel Burn , a ship chandler . These hoops hung over the dust box at the wharf, Lower Shadwell - the prisoner was taking the dust out - his basket came in contact with a beam; I heard something jingle, and followed him to the dust cart; he put the basket in without emptying it; I pulled it out, and found three hoops in it, and three more in the dust - he said he knew nothing of them, but they were in his basket.

WILLIAM BUCHANNAN . I am servant to Mr. Burn. These hoops hung in two parcels, three or four feet over the dust box; the prisoner appeared much in liquor - he was driving his cart away when I found these hoops.

ROBERT ATKINSON . I took him in charge - he said he found them in the dust. He pretended to be very drunk, but gave a sudden turn, and struck me very hard, tore my coat down, and made great resistance.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-64

917. JOSEPH WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , a pair of trowsers, value 4 s., and two pair of boots, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Sheppard .

JOHN CHAMBERS . I am servant to Thomas Sheppard , pawnbroker , of Exmouth-street . On the 27th of May, these things hung at the door, and about eight o'clock at night a fruit woman alarmed me. I ran out, and found the prisoner about fifty yards round the corner with them under his arm; he threw them over the rails and I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN STOW . I am a constable. I took him in charge - he pretended to be intoxicated; but resisted a good deal, and was perfectly sober at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and found myself in the watch-house next morning, and knew nothing of what happened.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-65

918. WILLIAM SAVAGE , GEORGE SAVAGE , CHARLES MARSH , and THOMAS FOOT , were indicted for the wilful murder of William Cousins .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a plaisterer, and live at the Red Lion, public-house, St. John-street . On Wednesday, about a fortnight ago, about a quarter to three o'clock in the afternoon, I was present when William Savage and the deceased were fighting; they fought for three quarters of an hour, and had a good many rounds - the deceased hit Savage twice to his once at the beginning, but afterwards got weak. I saw him fall at the last round, but did not see the blows given. Marsh and George Savage were seconds to Savage, and Foot and one Saunders were seconds to the deceased. He was carried away to Mr. Titterton's, the surgeon's, senseless, and died in five hours. He was not sensible after the fight.

WILLIAM DEAMER . I am a brick maker, and worked in the same field as William Cousins , and know all the prisoners. There was a quarrel relating to something which happened overnight, and the prisoner William Savage challenged me to fight - I declined, and Cousins, said, "No, he is a married man, and has got a family, I will fight for him;" this was on Tuesday - he stripped, and would have fought immediately, but Savage declined as he thought him in liquor. Next day about two o'clock, I saw Savage with two or three more coming out of the field, and a little after three o'clock, I saw the fight - they threw their hats up, went into the ring and shook hands; the deceased had the advantage at first; it lasted nearly an hour. The deceased got weaker, and before the last round sat down on Foot's knee, apparently weak, but in as good spirits as ever. I do not think Marsh assisted as a second; he only gave him a drop of water out of a bottle. At the last round but one, Saunders went to Savage, and said that the deceased was done. George Savage threw up a handkerchief in triumph, and the ring broke. The deceased rose from the second's knee, went round to Savage, and fought another round; he was knocked down. I assisted in taking him to the surgeon's.

JAMES SHARP . I live at Hornsey. I was passing, and saw them shake hands - Savage appeared strongest; there was a good deal of science displayed. At the last round but one the deceased appeared in such a state that he ought not to have been allowed to fight any longer; I wished them not to fight, telling the seconds that murder would ensue; the reply was, "He will stand another round;" I believe it was Saunders who said so, and cannot say whether all the parties heard it - the consequence of another round was that the deceased made an effort to strike Savage, but was too weak, and Savage struck him three times. When I interfered I did not observe that any of the parties attempted to stop them. The blow that knocked him down was on the jugular vein - he dropped immediately. Savage did not wish to fight any more, but the deceased with the assistance of his seconds did fight.

Prisoner FOOT. Q. You say the deceased's seconds wished him to continue the fight, was that not Saunders - A. Yes.

JAMES YOUNG . I am a watchmaker, and live in Rosamond-street. I was present; it appeared a fair fight - the deceased was in so weak a state at the last round but one, that he certainly should have been taken off the ground - he had no chance at all. I was on the opposite side of

the ring to Sharp, and did not hear him interfere. I saw the last blow; the deceased was hit as he fell. Savage cut him under the ear; his eye fixed directly. I saw none of them endeavour to binder the fight. Saunders is the only man I recollect.

Prisoner WILLIAM SAVAGE . Q. Before the last round but one, did I not go and shake hands with the deceased - Yes; they shook hands together; the deceased was afterwards taken into the ring by the two seconds, one holding each arm; he did not appear able to support himself; a handkerchief was thrown into the air, but who by I cannot say.

- RUSSELL. I saw the three last rounds; the deceased was knocked down at the last round but one, the seconds said it was all over and threw up a handkerchief. Savage came round, and offered to shake hands with the deceased; he would not; he was very weak, and I thought not able to stand against it. I heard his seconds say he was done, and could not fight any more, and then George Savage threw up his handkerchief - he seemed to get up full of spirits, to the last round, but was very weak; he rose from his second's knee. I did not see them conduct him into the ring.

JAMES TITTERTON . I am a surgeon. The deceased was brought to my house; his death arose from a blow under the right ear. I bled and cupped him, but he never recovered his senses. I found several small vessels had burst on the brain.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am clerk to Mr. Handley, solicitor, of Pentonville. I saw this fight - the deceased was in an extremely exhausted state before the last round, and appeared incapable of fighting longer. I did not hear Sharp interfere; I was about five yards off. I saw the last round - he came with his seconds, but I do not believe that he was led by them; it was given out before that that the battle was decided, and William Savage offered to shake hands with him, but he refused - I did not see any exertion made by the seconds to hinder the last round, nor recognize Marsh as being concerned.

GEORGE SAVAGE 's Defence. I was passing, and saw a ring forming for a fight; when I came up I saw my brother and the deceased stripped; he had no seconds, and said, "George, come and pick me up, as I have nobody to take my part," so I went - Foot said the deceased should fight no more. I threw up my handkerchief to signify that it was over, ran for my brother's clothes, and when I returned they were fighting again.

FOOT's Defence. I and three more were passing, and ran to see the fight - we stood arm in arm. Saunders was the only person I knew; he said, "Come Tom, strip, I want you," and thinking he was going to fight, I stripped. When I saw Cousins getting the worst of it, I told him not to fight any more; but he would not hear me, and always arose as the time was called; we persuaded him not to fight; but he said he would have another round.

MARSH's Defence. I was unknown to the other prisoners, nor was I present at the commencement or conclusion; but was merely passing.

WILLIAM SAVAGE - GUILTY . Aged 31.

GEORGE SAVAGE - GUILTY . Aged 35.

FOOT - GUILTY .

Of Manslaughter only. - Confined One Month .

MARSH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-66

London Cases, Before W. Arabin, Esq.

919. JOHN HELWELL was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-67

920. EDWARD BARTHOLEMEW , was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , a basket, value 4 s.; a bag, value 1 s., and 20 lbs. of tea, value 5 l. , the goods of James Ware .

THOMAS WHISTON . I am a constable. On the 22d of June, about twenty minutes to seven o'clock. I was in Skinner-street, and saw the prisoner crossing the road, with a basket in a bag on his arm. I ran over and asked what he had; he said nothing. I lifted up the bag and saw it was tea, and held him till Pearman came over, and took him, while I went after another man, whom I saw with another bag, but he got off.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How far from Fleet-market did you stop him - A. About one hundred yards.

JAMES WARE . I live in St. George's-place, Walworth. I left my shop about three o'clock in the afternoon, of Saturday, the 21st of June, another person remained there till eleven o'clock, I did not return myself till seven o'clock of the morning of the 23d, and found the door had been opened without the key - the tea cannisters scattered about the shop and all empty; three loaves of sugar, 12 lbs. of coffee, a basket and bag were also stolen, and on Wednesday, in consequence of an advertisement, I saw this property, and knew the bag and basket - the tea is green and black mixed, and is about the quantity I lost.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not sleep at this house - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Fleet-market, about six o'clock on Sunday morning, and found it by the side of some baskets, and took it home, thinking it might be advertized.

DAVID THOMAS . I have known the prisoner ten or twelve years, and was with him when he found this basket on Sunday morning; he was going over the water with me at the time, and in Fleet-market I saw him pick it up. I said "Take it home, you will get something, it will be owned."

COURT. Q. Were you walking with him in Skinner-street - A. No; we opened it in Fleet-market; it was about seven o'clock, there were a good many people about. I had called on him to go to the Borough with me; he was to introduce me to a lawyer. I went on and left him, as he told me where to find the person I wanted.

Q. Did he send for you when he was taken before the Magistrate - A. No.; I knew nothing of it till Friday, about two o'clock. I went to Canterbury on the Monday morning by the Gravesend boat.

Q. Did you see any more baskets at the place - A. There were market baskets there; this stood on the top of one or two of them, opposite the prison, and being different from market baskets, it caught his eye I suppose. It was on the ground at first.

Q. Why take up that more than another - A. There was no other of value - we moved the sack and saw it was tea.

THOMAS WHISTON . The man who ran away was about

the witness's size; they appeared in company. The prisoner said, he had a witness who saw him find it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-68

921. MARTIN BULMER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Thomas Brunton , from his person .

MR. THOMAS BRUNTON . On the 12th of June I was at the North gate of St. Paul's , as the children were coming out, and felt something at my coat pocket; put my hand down and my handkerchief was gone. I could see nobody whom I suspected, and in about half an hour, two officers accosted me in Newgate-street, and shewed it to me. I was not certain that I had one in my pocket, or I should have looked more about.

THOMAS GOODHALL . I am an engineer of Clerkenwell. I saw Mr. Brunton at the North-gate of St. Paul's, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from his right hand pocket, put it under his apron, and go away as quick as he could through the crowd. Colton took him in my sight, and took the handkerchief from him. I met Mr. Brunton in Newgate-street afterwards, and he claimed it.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. Goodhall and I were together, and from what he said I followed, and took the prisoner in Watling-street, and found the handkerchief under his apron.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He had a large basket with him - A. Yes; he left that with a girl, while he went after the gentleman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Billinsgate with my basket, and stood to see my brother come out, as he is in a charity school, and picked the handkerchief off the ground.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-69

922. JOHN IRWIN was indicted for a fraud .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-70

923. JOHNSON GILLIGAN was indicted for a misdeamour .

JANE MORITY . I am a laundress , and live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street . On the 15th of May, about twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner came and looked at a room which I had to let, and asked when he could come. I said he should have an answer at two o'clock; he called at two, and my husband told him to call on Saturday, he left a pair of stockings with me to wash, and a handkerchief to hem; he came on Monday, about two o'clock, and asked if he could have the lodging. I said No; he called the next day for his things, and asked why he could not have the lodging. I said it was let; he took his things which came to four-pence; he gave me a sixpence. I gave him two-pence. I shewed the sixpence to somebody, and being bad, I went after him, as I saw he had a good many more. I met him coming out of Dale's house, and told him it was bad; he said "Come in, I'll change it," and produced another, which Dale said was bad; he then produced a shilling; Dale gave him two sixpence for it, and then said "That is bad, return me the six-pence," which he did. Dale said "Why don't you give the women a good one"; he said he had no more money. Dale seat for an officer, who found four half crowns, and some sixpences on him. I gave the sixpences to Smith.

THOMAS DALE . I keep the Red Lion public house. Mority came in, and charged the prisoner with giving her a bad sixpence; I said it was bad; he gave her another, which was bad also; I offered to give him two for a shilling, which he gave me, and I found that was bad, and while I sent for the officer he put four or five more bad sixpences into my hand, and a leather purse, which I gave the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you refuse me a glass of beer - A. Yes; because I considered him in liquor.

THOMAS SMITH . I took him in charge, and in his breeches pocket found a bad half crown; the purse contained four half crowns; Dale gave me a shilling and five sixpences, and Mority one sixpence.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint; the sixpences, shillings, and half crowns are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and changed a sovereign with a traveller. I remember finding the purse in the court.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find sureties for Two Years then to come .

Reference Number: t18230625-71

924. SAMUEL WELLS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BARNARD conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD BROOK , ESQ . I am a goldsmith , and live in the Poultry . On the 21st of May, about one o'clock in the day, I went to my shop window, and on endeavouring to take out a tray, found it would not move from its place, but on moving it about, we got it out, and found the print of a large instrument sticking to it; my young man took it out, and on examination I found some one must have put his arm through the iron bar, and had bored a hole of an inch diameter close to where my valuable property was. I went to the watch-house, and at the hour of setting the watch, I questioned them all, and gave them directions; I told Willsher to watch my premises, and if he saw any suspicious characters to take them into custody. My dwelling house is in St. Mary, Colechurch, and in the ward of Queenhithe.

ROBERT SANTY . I live with Mr. Brook; his account is correct. I found the instrument, which had been broken; the hole had been made in the window stall, corresponding with the instrument, it had gone into the tray.

JOHN WILLSHER . I am watchman of Cheap ward. On the evening of the 21st of May I saw Mr. Brook; I had seen the prisoner several times before that; the first time was on Monday morning, the 19th, shortly after midnight, on the north side of the Poultry, going towards the Mansion House; he passed me; I looked at him, seeing him lurking about; I stood still, and saw him turning round to observe me, and on going round my beat again he met and passed me, and went back towards Bow church. I lost him, and in the course of the night he passed me again, and went towards the Mansion House, and crossed over to Mr. Brook's side of the way, and on coming to the top of my beat I met my father; he passed Mrs.

Brook's house, and went round by the side of a board; my father afterwards watched him. I saw him three times in the course of that night in the Poultry, and saw him again on the Wednesday morning between twelve and two o'clock, as I was coming up the Poultry, round Mr. Deputy Brook's house, I saw him there, and am quite sure of his person - there is a strong gas-light there. At ten o'clock on Wednesday night Mr. Brook gave me directions to watch his house, and nearly at one o'clock he passed me; I ran and told my father, and we followed him up Cheapside and took him.

JOHN WILLSHER . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner several times, first on Monday morning, the 19th, three or four times, from twelve to two o'clock, loitering about the Poultry, Old Jewry, and Cheapside, and saw him pass Mr. Deputy Brook's house. I saw him on Wednesday morning, near one o'clock, pass the end of the Poultry, just by Mr. Deputy Brook's, and I saw him again next night, about half-past twelve o'clock, passing along Cheapside, and took him, and saw the officer find a handle of an instrument, a clasp knife, and a bent nail on him.

EDWARD ANSELL . On the 22d of May, I was constable of the night for Cheap Ward. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, about half-past twelve o'clock. I searched him, and found the handle of an instrument on him, a crooked nail, and a knife. The handle fits the part of the instrument found in Mr. Brook's window.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work, and happened to go to the fire. I moved some goods from Lambeth, and coming home late was stopped. I gave my name at the watch-house, and was never in a Court of Justice before.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230625-72

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, JULY 1.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

925. WILLIAM POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , two sheets, value 5 s., the goods of John Jameson , in a lodging-room .

JOHN JAMESON . I keep a public-house in the Haymarket . On the 12th of June, the prisoner took a bed and paid 1 s. 6 d. for it. I saw him go out about seven o'clock in the morning, sent my servant up stairs, and from what she said, I sent the boy after him, and he brought him back - he unbuttoned his clothes and produced a sheet which was wrapped round him, and another from his hat; he said he did not know what induced him to do it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-73

Before Mr. Recorder.

926. THOMAS SHAW and SARAH SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , two watches, value 2 l., the goods of Samuel Baggs , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL BAGGS . I am a watchmaker , and live in South-street, Berkley-square . On the 2d of February, 1822, I missed a silver hunting watch, and on the 9th of March, in that year, I missed another; they hung in my shop. I had no regular female servant - the prisoner Sarah chared at my house every Saturday. I have no shopman, but workmen come occasionally. On the 28th of May last, Lawley brought me a watch to repair, which was the one stolen on the 9th of March.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long did she continue to work for you - A. Till about three weeks after the 9th of March.

WILLIAM LAWLEY . I am coachman to Mr. Portman of Bryanston-square. About May, 1822, I bought this watch of Marks, who I knew before - he travels with a box. I gave him six guineas, and another watch, worth about two pound ten shillings for it, and seeing Baggs's name on it, I took it there to be repaired.

LEWIS MARKS . I live at No. 8, Sugar-baker's-yard, King-street, Aldgate, and am a watchmaker and dealer. I believe the watch produced to be the one I bought of Cashmore, who I had known for years as a respectable wholesale dealer.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you lived in Sugar-baker-court - A. About fifteen months; before that I lived two years in Three Tun-alley, Middlesex Hospital. I believe it to be the watch, but do not positively swear it - perhaps fifty may pass through my hands in a month.

JOSEPH CASHMORE . I deal in watches, and live in Cutler-street, Houndsditch. I sold Marks a watch twelve or fifteen months ago, which I bought of Samuels - it was one of this description, but was only an hour in my possession. It had Baggs's name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. You are a pretty large dealer in watches - A. I sell some thousands in a year. I recollect selling it at a good profit without putting it into my pocket, at our exchange. I do not book goods which I buy there.

ISAAC SAMUELS . I live in Ratcliff-highway, and sell watches and clothes. I sold two watches to Cashmore for 5 l., which Mr. Baggs afterwards claimed. I cannot read, and should not know either of them again - they were hunting watches. I changed them with the prisoner Thomas, last April twelve months. I gave him a silver hunter, and 3 l. for them, at Chelsea - I had seen him there the quarter before, on Pension day, and tried then to deal with him for one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. A great many pass through your hands - A. Yes. The pension day is generally the first Wednesday after quarter day. I cannot swear that this is either of the watches.

JOHN BUCKLAND . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners in Marylebone-court. Samuels identified the man as having bought the watches of him, and he said "I had them of this woman," pointing to his wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-74

927. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , at St. Pancras , four shirts, value 4 l.; fourteen cravats, value 10 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s.; twelve pair of stockings, value 6 s.; three night caps, value

6 d.; one pair of braces, value 1 s.; two waistcoats, value 10 s.; one pair of drawers, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one watch, value 2 l., and two pair of gloves, value 1 s., the goods of James Jewell , and one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one pair of drawers, value 2 s.; one pair of breeches, value 1 l.; one coat, value 2 l.; one box coat, value 1 l., and one gold band, value, 3 s., the goods of Benjamin Johnson , in the dwelling-house of George Heath , Esq .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES JEWELL . I am groom to George Heath , Esq., who lives in Euston-square , part of the front of the house is in the square - there is a door leading to the garden, and another to the stable yard. I sleep over the stable, the wall of which joins the house, and it is all within one fence. On Sunday morning the 22d of June, at nine o'clock, I went in to breakfast; I came up from breakfast, about twenty minutes after nine, and saw the prisoner coming out of the stable yard; he said, "Where is the privy;" gave me a push and ran away. I called the watchman, and opened a little door which he pushed too, and in the stable yard I found a great bundle; he must have thrown it there, for the things in it were in the stable, at nine o'clock, hanging on pegs. I went into the stable, and missed my box, my watch, and some things which laid on the ground; my box was found in a field, it had contained the articles stated in the indictment, as mine, (enumerating them) a watch was taken which I have not found, my grandfather gave it to me - I also lost two pair of gloves, and Johnson's things were gone. The value of what I lost is 16 l. or 18 l. The coachman and I went up and missed all these things, I afterwards went to the prisoner's lodging, with Limbrick and Lee, and found a few handkerchiefs, an old shirt and a night cap - they had been in the box, that was left in the field, they were all locked up safe just before I went to breakfast, When the prisoner rushed by me, I looked at him very hard, and am certain of him; he was dressed as he is now; I saw him in custody the next day but one, about eleven o'clock in the morning, in a room, with about thirty others, and pointed him out.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him before - A. No; he stopped at the door first, and then pushed by me; he was in my sight two or three minutes; he turned back and then ran again. I went to shut the door to hold him in, and am quite sure of him; if I had met him in the street I should have said, he was the man, and called somebody to take him - all the servants were at breakfast, and nobody left in the stable.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am coachman . Jewell called me about twenty minutes after nine o'clock. I did not see the thief; he pointed to a bundle in the yard, with his clothes, a pair of stockings of mine, a new pair of boots and a cap. It had been moved down stairs into the yard - he could not have gone out of the gate, without tumbling over it. I had been in the stable from five to nine o'clock, and left Jewell there, my things then hung up safe - a waistcoat, pair of drawers, breeches, a coat, a box coat, and a gold band, were taken quite away. The yard is completely enclosed by a wall and gates, which communicates with the house. The prisoner is a perfect stranger.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in Mr. Heath's service - A. Sixteen months. I never heard of his having any other name but George.

JURY. Q. Did Jewell say he saw somebody go out of the gateway - A. Yes. I took a man in the fields with the box; he did not attempt to run away - it was then empty.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. We asked the prisoner where he lived; he said, at No. 6, Coppice-row, Clerkenwell, and I knew that he lived there. I accompanied the witness there, and in the one pair back room, I found five handkerchiefs, a shirt, a night cap, a stock, some pieces of leather, and a bodkin cask. The prosecutor's house is in St. Pancras parish. The prisoner did not say in which room he lodged. Lee went with me.

WILLIAM LEE . I accompanied the witness to No. 6, Coppice-row. The prisoner told me he lodged in the one pair back room there, and in that room I saw these things found in a trunk.

Cross-examined. Q. How many children did you find there - A. One. I had taken him and his wife into custody at a public-house together; she said I should find two children in the room. When I came back I asked her if that was her only room; she said it was. She had not been in custody above half an hour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. ADOLPHUS to JEWELL. Q. Were you present when the box was found in the field - A. Yes; in the fields by Old Pancras-church; it was then empty, the man was taken to Hatton-garden, and discharged; he did not attempt to escape; this was twenty minutes after the robbery.

JURY. Q. Are you quite positive, that the prisoner is the man who passed you - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18230625-75

928. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wiggett , about the hour of six in the forenoon, of the 26th of June , at St. Andrew, Holborn , ( William Middleton and others being therein) and stealing therein three coats, value 5 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 2 l.; a waistcoat, value 10 s., and a table cloth, value 10 s., the goods of the said John Wiggett .

JOHN WIGGETT . I am a milkman , and live at No. 12 Little Gray's Inn-lane, Holborn , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn. The prisoner was in my service. Last Thursday morning, about half-past five o'clock, I went out, and left nobody there - I locked the outer door, which leads into the passage; the street door was left on the latch. The prisoner did not sleep in the house, but used always to go and milk the cows , and come to the house with me a little before seven o'clock. I returned about half-past six o'clock, and found him in the front room, on the ground floor - the door being forced open, and he had the articles stated in the indictment in his hand, tied up in a table cloth. I laid hold of him, and asked what he had there? he said nothing. I have lodgers up stairs. The clothes are worth about 8 l. together, and were taken from my drawers; two of the coats had been worn some time; the other is nearly new. The staple of the door had been forced off. I gave him in charge; he was only a fortnight in my service. I did not enquire his character.

JURY. Q. Are you a married man - A. No. My cows are kept in Gray's Inn-lane. He did not do his usual work that morning. Middleton and other lodgers were at home at the time he was taken.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner in charge with the bundle containing this property. He said another person sent him to do it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18230625-76

929. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a linendraper and live in Parliament-street - the prisoner was in my service for about a fortnight, and entrusted to receive money on my account. Monk and Owen were customers of mine. On the 26th of May I desired the prisoner to collect from them; he went out, and never returned; but was apprehended in about a fortnight. He never paid me this money.

ELEANOR MONK . I live in Little Denmark-street, and owed Mr. Thompson 1 l. 6 s. 9 d. I paid the prisoner a sovereign of it on the 26th of May - he wrote it off the bill, which I have lost. I paid the rest on the 28th, and told Thompson I had paid it.

ANN OWEN . I live in Drury-lane. I owed Thompson some money, and on the 26th of May, I paid the prisoner 9 s. 6 d. in part. I gave him two half-crowns and some other silver - he wrote a receipt on the bill, which I produce; (read).

JOHN THOMPSON . I believe this to be in his hand writing.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-77

930. MARY ADAMSON and ANN HANDS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , fifteen yards of stuff, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Reed , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM EDGE . I am servant to Thomas Reed , linen-draper , of High Holborn . On the 17th of May, about twelve o'clock at night, the prisoners came into the shop together, and asked to see some shawls - Hands looked at them, and offered 2 s. 6 d. for a 3 s. 3 d. one - a woman coming in accidently knocked down a pile of stuffs. Adamson said I need not trouble, she would pick them up and did so, replaced them, and returned to the counter. I suspected she had something under her clothes. They heard me send for a watchman, and Adamson tried to push by me to get out, and in so doing the stuff dropped from under her clothes, and caught by the selvige of her gown.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. It fell near the door - A. It fell from her I am positive; this shop is in Whitecross-street. My master lives in Holborn.

GEORGE GRAY . I am in the prosecutor's service. I saw Adamson pick the stuffs up, and when she returned to the counter she appeared bulky. I saw the stuff taken from under her gown.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was she from the pile - A. About a yard and a half.

(Property produced and sworn to).

ROBERT LOCK . I took them in charge, and found 5 s. 6 d. on Hands.

ADAMSON'S Defence. He searched me, and then said, "I have lost nothing, but will make you two suffer for what I have lost before."

ADAMSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

HANDS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-78

931. MARY ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a bed tick, value 3 s.; a blanket, value 4 s.; a pillow case value 3 d., and a flat iron, value 6 d., the goods of John Powell , in a lodging room let to her .

JANE POWELL . I am the wife of John Powell ; we live in Playhouse-yard . These things were let to the prisoner and her husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-79

932. ELIZABETH JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two sheets, value 9 s., and a blanket, value 7 s., the goods of Martin Martino , in a lodging-room let to the prisoner .

CATHERINE MARTINO . I am the wife of Martin Martino , we live in Saffron-street . I let the prisoner a furnished room about the end of January. A man came on Sunday, who she said was her husband - she left on the Tuesday week following without notice, and took the key with her. I did not open the room till Saturday, and then missed these things. I have not found them - she was apprehended a fortnight ago.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-80

933. FRANCIS CREED was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , thirty-six penny pieces , the monies of William Wiseman .

WILLIAM WISEMAN . I am a grocer . On the 14th of June, I was at dinner in my back parlour, heard a noise in the shop, and found my neighbour speaking to the prisoner; he asked me for a penny worth of figs - I served him; he went away - my neighbour pulled his arm aside, and found he had a quantity of penny pieces. I opened my till, and missed thirty-six. He was brought back in a few minutes with thirty-three, and said he got them in Smithfield for holding horses.

EDWARD ASKEY . I live next door to Wiseman. I saw the prisoner at the end of his counter, which is not the place for customers; he was coming round from behind it. I stood at the door, and directly he saw me, he asked for a penny worth of figs, and as he passed me at the door I asked where he got the penny pieces, which laid all along his arms - he said they were his own, and I let him go. Wiseman opened his till, and missed three shillings. I fetched him back, and found he had thirty-three; they were then in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them in Smithfield; I go there every Monday and Friday. I went to the shop for figs.

GUILTY . Aged 8.

Transported for Seven Years; Recommended to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18230625-81

934. JOHN CLIFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a pint pot, value 1 s., and a glass, value 1 s. , the goods of John Cornish .

JOHN CORNISH. I keep the Wilmington Arms, public-house,

Yardley-street, Spa-fields . On the 7th of June, about four o'clock, I was fetched to the London Spa, public-house, and found the prisoner in custody with this pot and glass, which were taken from my tap-room, and both have my name on them, they were safe at two o'clock. I do not remember seeing him in the house.

WILLIAM SHELLS . I am waiter at the London Spa. I stood in the bar - the prisoner passed me in the house; I thought he had something under his arm, followed him out, and asked what he had there; he said nothing belonging to me. I found the pint pot buttoned up, and three tumblers fell out of his hat, two of them broke, and the other he took up and smashed. I sent for Cornish, whose name was on the pot.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in a brick-field.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Two Years , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-82

935. ALEXANDER FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , two pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the good of James Stanton .

SARAH STANTON . I am the wife of James Stanton, shoemaker , of Peerless-row . The prisoner lodged with us two months, and worked as journeyman . We missed these shoes on the 13th of June.

JAMES STANTON . I am the prosecutor's son, and keep the books. On the 13th of June, about half-past eight o'clock I locked the room door - there was then twenty-one pair of shoes there. I returned about ten o'clock, and missed two pair.

JAMES BURNETT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Field-lane. On the 13th of June, about nine o'clock, the prisoner sold me two pair of women's shoes for 3 s. I sold one pair. Stanton claimed the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-83

936. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a pair of breeches, value 5 s. , the goods of David Alexander Fleming .

STEPHEN SWINEY . I am servant to David Alexander Fleming , pawnbroker , of Whitechapel . On the 7th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, I missed these breeches from the door - they were safe in the morning.

CHARLES HADLAND . I am an officer. On the 7th of June, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner at the corner of George-yard, Whitechapel, with these breeches under his arm - he avoided me, which made me stop him, and asked how he came by them; he said he bought them in Shoreditch. I asked him to shew me the shop - he said he did not chose.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentlemen gave them to me to pawn for him; he said he bought them in Shoreditch.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-84

937. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a gown, value 5 s. , the goods of John Bond .

SARAH BOND . I am a dress maker, and live in Old-street. My husband's name is John. On the 10th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I sent my son to take this gown to Jerusalem-passage.

JOHN BOND . I am twelve years old. I was sent with this gown, and overtook the prisoner at the corner of Ironmonger-row - I knew him before, having played with him. I said, "Lay hold of this gown a moment while I go over the way to buy a halfpenny worth of walnuts," and when I returned he was gone. I found him in custody three days after.

RICHARD LEE . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Hoxton. On the 10th of June, this gown was pawned in the name of John Lewis . I believe the prisoner to be the person.

RICHARD CONSTABLE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th, and asked what he had done with the duplicate of the gown he had stolen - he would say nothing about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me to hold, and told me to walk on to the bottom of Old-street - I turned up Goswell-street by mistake, could not find him, and pawned the gown that I should not do away with it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230625-85

938. DAVID MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , seven-eighths of a yard of silk, value 10 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Drew .

CHARLES DREW . I am a tailor , and live in Whitechapel-road . The prisoner came in to buy eighteen yards of list; I went under the counter to get it, and during that time he drew this silk out of the window, through the rail; I missed it, went round the counter, and found it in his hand; he said he picked it off the ground to prevent its being damaged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The door shutting threw this silk off the rail, I picked it up, and put it on the rail again.

CHARLES DREW . He did not put it on the rail; it could not have fallen out of the window.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-86

939. JOHN WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , two brushes, value 5 s. , the goods of Edward Clark .

EDWARD CLARK . I live in Hunt-street, Spa-fields, and am a painter . On the 20th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I was painting a house in Noble-street, Wilmington-square . I saw the door open, I went in and found the prisoner in the parlour, putting these brushes in his pocket.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I took him in charge, and found them upon him, with some sash weights and lines.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230625-87

940. JOSEPH WISKINASKI was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , two planes, value 2 s., and a chisel, value 3 d. , the goods of George Bush .

GEORGE BUSH . I am a carpenter . About the 10th of January 1822, these tools were stolen from my brother's

shop, in Old Gravel-lane , where I worked - the prisoner lived on the premises adjoining the shop, I found the chisel in his room.

EDWARD ROACH . I am a carpenter. About fifteen months ago, the prisoner sold me the duplicate of two planes, for a shilling. I redeemed them, and have them here.

EDWARD THOMPSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, on the 12th of June; he said he sold the duplicate to Roach, but he had bought them two years ago, at an old iron shop in Whitechapel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the planes in August, 1822; but know nothing of the chisel.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-88

941. JOSEPH WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 8 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Richardson .

SARAH RICHARDSON . I did not miss this bacon, till the officer brought it to me, and cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-89

942. WILLIAM FEAR was indicted for stealing, on the the 31st of May , a hat, value 10 s., the goods of James Hunt , from his person .

JAMES HUNT . I live at Bermondsey. On the 31st of May, I had been to the Royalty, and at eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Rosemary-lane; he is a watchman ; I asked him the time - we went into a public-house, and had some ale. I said I was going to my aunt's on Tower-hill, to sleep; he said I could stop in his box if I liked, and did so. I was not drunk, but wanted to be up at four o'clock, and about half past three in the morning, we went to the Crooked Billet, public-house, and stopped there till six o'clock, for I got rather intoxicated and wanted to go home, but he took me to his house. I went to bed there, his wife awoke me about twelve o'clock, and I missed my hat - she said that somebody had taken and pawned it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me to pawn it - A. Never.

FREDERICK LINDER . I am servant to Mr. Mathews, pawnbroker, of the Minories. On the 31st of May, between seven and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned this hat for 6 s.; he used our shop constantly.

THOMAS OSBORNE . I am a constable. On the 31st of May. Hunt came to me. I went and asked the prisoner, why he detained the hat; he said it was pawned, and gave me the duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence. I would have redeemed it, if they had given me time. I was very drunk, and did not know what I was doing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-90

943. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Joseph Pitt , from his person .

JOSEPH PITT , ESQ. I am a barrister of Lincoln's-inn. On the 6th of June, about two o'clock in the day, I was in Bell-yard , and missed my handkerchief; turned round and saw the prisoner running away. I followed and saw him drop it. I seized him and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230625-91

944. RUTH KENDRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a box, value 1 d.; fifteen shillings, and three six-pences, the goods of Michael Haley , from the person of Ann Haley .

ANN HALEY . I am wife of Michael Haley , we live in Brackley-street. On the 17th of May, about twelve o'clock at night. I had been to market with my son, and in White Cross-street , there was a crowd; some women were going to the watch-house. I had a child in my arms - the prisoner stood by my side, and as soon as she went from me, I put my hand down and missed a box from my pocket, containing this money. I seized her and said, she had taken it - the watchman came and took her. She then stooped down and said she had just picked it up. My pocket had no hole in it.

JOHN BROWN . I am a watchman. I had some people in custody, the prosecutrix said she had lost her money. I went up and saw her take the box from the prisoner's hand, containing 16 s. 6 d.

(Box produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18230625-92

London Case, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

945. THOMAS WILLIAM BALEY and JOHN THATCHER , were indicted for conspiring by undue and fraudulent means, to deprive the just creditors of the said Thomas William Baley , of certain goods and chattels, value 200 l.; he being insolvent, and likely to become a bankrupt .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CHITTY conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN COLE . I am attorney for the assignees, under a commission of bankruptcy against the defendant Thomas William Baley , and produce the commission, also the proceedings under the commission, by which it appears he was declared a bankrupt on the 2d of November, 1822. I saw the declaration signed by the three Commissioners. I produce the provisional assignment, dated 2d of November, and an agreement dated the 19th of November, appointing William Stratton and Richard Groom , assignees - many creditors proved under the commission.

Cross-examined by MR. CUMMINGS. Q. Were the defendants examined before the commissioners - A. Several times, as appears by the proceedings.

Q. Did the assignees go down to Worth, at any time and seize the goods in question - A. I have no knowledge of that, except as communicated to me as a solicitor. I was present at a trial at Horsliam, between Thatcher, against the assignees and the messenger's man, and was a witness. I gave directions after the trial for the goods to be delivered up, in pursuance of an agreement, between Mr. Lee, the defendant's attorney and myself.

Q. Did you not on the trial agree, on the part of the

assignees, that if the verdict was in favour of Thatcher, you would deliver up the goods to him - A. I have no recollection that I did, and do not believe that I did, for it was left as a question for the Jury to say, whether the goods were to be given up, independant of the trespass; I do not believe, that I made any arrangement at the time of trial. Mr. Lee's clerk called on me at the inn, after the trial, and stated that as the Jury had found a verdict for the plaintiff; he presumed I should not detain the goods. I said I should not subject my clients to another action for trespass, but intended to move for a new trial, and instructed a man who had possession of them, to demand them the moment he gave them up. Mr. Baley passed his last examination, on the 1st of March, 1823.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If Mr. Lee's clerk had come to you before the trial, would you have directed that the goods should be delivered up - A. Certainly not. I did so after the trial with a protest,

Q. Will you swear that no arrangement took place previous to the verdict - A. I will not swear it, it might; but I do not believe that it did. A broker named Piper was employed to take an inventory of the goods, and he was afterwards employed by Baley, to make up his accounts. I was present at a meeting, when Piper gave some explanation to the accounts, but believe it was not on oath; I was only present part of the time. I asked Baley some questions relating to these goods; the Commissioners said they were not satisfied, but the question of property must be tried elsewhere. I believe my partner paid Thatcher's expences for attending the examination.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you call a witness to attend before the Commissioners, are you not obliged to pay his expenses - A. Certainly. The goods in question were at Worth, at the time of the trial, the messenger under the commission, was in the house with them.

JONATHAN STRATTON . I was clerk to Mr. William Stratton , the petitioning creditor under Baley's estate; he is a smith and ironmonger, and had furnished goods and done work for Baley, to the amount of 208 l., and lent him 25 l.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Are you Mr. Stratton's brother - A. Yes. Mr. Groom the assignee, lives nearly opposite Gerrard's Hall tavern, Basing-lane, which Baley kept. I was at the inn repeatedly doing business on my own account. I went down to Worth one morning by coach. I was not present when any of these goods were packed. I saw a waggon at Worth, on Monday night and assisted in unloading them. I apprehend that some of it was wine by hearing bottles shake. I told my brother of this a week or a fortnight after. Worth is twenty-nine miles from town. Thatcher came down with the caravan, and said he had bought the goods of Baley. I told him to let me know when he paid Baley, because he owed me money; he said he had paid him, and could not help it - the goods were not concealed from me. I said I wanted to get the money paid, which was borrowed of my brother William. I went there to take dimensions for goods at the inn at Worth, of which Thatcher appeared the landlord.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you sleep at Worth that night - A. Yes; Baley was a debtor of mine at the time. I went there to measure for goods, and merely lent a hand to unload - the waiter of Worth and the waiter of Gerrard's Hall, were there; it was about eleven o'clock at night. I told Thatcher at the time, that I was a creditor of Baley's, and he said he had got a few articles for his opening dinner. It was a newly established inn. I have signed Baley's certificate - my debt was 107 l. there was no piano-forte in the caravan.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The caravan arrived at eleven o'clock at night - A. Yes; it contained a good many hampers and boxes.

JOHN FLOWER . I was in the service of Mr. Baley, at Gerrard's Hall inn, before, and after his bankruptcy; he was a tavern keeper, wine and brandy merchant, and traded in wine and brandy. On Friday, the 18th of October last, about eleven o'clock in the morning, he desired me, if any person called, to say he was not within. Mr. Stratton and Mr. Walter called that morning; I knew they were creditors, and denied him to them; he was at home at the time. I informed him I had denied him; he did not blame me; he had told me to deny him, saying, he was ashamed to see so many people enquiring for money. The first time I saw Mr. Thatcher was in September last, when he came to Gerrard's Hall to enquire the character of a bar maid who had lived with Mr. Baley. They appeared then not the least acquainted; he called again in a few days, and resided at the house a night or two, and then went into the country again. When he first came he told me he had taken a new inn at Worth on the Brighton road, and shewed me a plan of the road; he staid at the house two or three days, at first as a guest, and had his meals in the coffee room; he afterwards had his meals in the bar; guests did sometimes dine in the bar. On Sunday evening, the 11th of October, I came home after eleven o'clock; Mr. Baley and Mr. Thatcher were sitting in the bar; the servants went to bed shortly after; I was called into the bar almost as soon as I came in; they seemed glad that I had come; Baley said they had a job they wished me to do for them; I went into the kitchen to supper; the servants went to bed, and Baley called me into the bar about twelve o'clock; they desired me to stay there, for they should want me bye and bye. They went up stairs for an hour or more, then called me up, and desired me to pack some china; there were things packed up before and after I went up; three or four dozen knives and forks, and a great many plated spoons and forks, dishes and covers, sheets, table cloths, crockery, and a silver punch ladle; they were all marked "Gerrard's Hall." The linen was marked with permanent ink. The packing continued till near three o'clock; the things were brought down into the passage leading to the coach office, which was the common passage of the inn. Baley said to Thatcher, "Here's a punch ladle, you may as well have that." Some writing paper was packed up among other things. A van was hired to convey them all to Worth; it was at the house by nine or half past nine o'clock. I and Thatcher went down to Croydon in a return chaise, and joined the van there about two o'clock, and went on with it to Worth; I saw the van call at Mr. Green's, in Bread-street, and know that it called at another place for goods which were never in Mr. Baley's possession. I assisted in taking the goods out of the van at Worth. Mr. Stratton and I returned to

town together next day. The piano-forte and wine did not go down with these things.

Q. On the Monday morning did any money pass between the defendants - A. Not at that time. I saw money pass between them once - I believe it was on the Wednesday following, or about that time. When I came to town on the Tuesday, two men were packing wine; there were several hampers, and it was sent off in a caravan to Worth. The piano-forte was taken away in Messrs. Clementi's caravan. I do not know where it was going; it was after I came from Worth, that I saw money pass between them - I saw twenty sovereigns at a time, on the bar table, and Thatcher had some more in a bag by his side. On the Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday after I came from Worth, I was desired to send for some stamps; a printed pattern was given me to get some like it, but I think plain ones were got. I sent for them - two or three were got I think, but cannot say how many. I took them into the bar - (looking at some stamped receipts,) one like these was shewn to me as a pattern. I know these to be in Mr. Baley's hand writing. (Looking at a letter) this is also his writing. (Looks at a tin cash box;) Mr. Baley had a box like this in pattern and form.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Thatcher first came to enquire about a bar-maid for the inn he was going to start at Worth - A. Yes. I went out at eight o'clock on the Sunday morning.

Q. Was it not said that Thatcher wanted crockery, wine, and linen to open his inn with - A. Yes. When I first came in Baley was writing in the bar; they ordered more paper twice. They appeared to be taking an account of what things they were packing.

Q. Would it not be very inconvenient at an inn, to be packing in the day time - A. Yes. The things were all taken up into the room on Saturday - the servants assisted in taking them up. The defendants might have packed them themselves if they chose. The hampers were placed in the passage, which was the most public part of the tavern. The servants and guests must have seen them, and persons in the street might have seen them. Mr. Groom lives nearly opposite. I saw Thatcher pass money to Baley. I was at the trial at Horsham.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever ask Thatcher to buy wine - A. When he came about the bar-maid, he waited an hour before Mr. Baley came in; I asked him to take a glass of sherry - he said it was very good; I said I knew my master had a great quantity, and as he was going into business, he could serve him well - at that time my master had not seen him. Mr. Dibbin, the landlord was a creditor; the passage the goods were in leads to the coach office. I dare say the caravan stood before the door two hours being loaded; it might have been done in half an hour if they liked - it was in sight of Mr. Groom's house; two strange men packed the wine. Mr. Baley was at the London coffee-house six years with me; his general reputation was as an honest upright man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The goods were carried up on Saturday - A. I helped to carry some crockery up myself, and put them in the private dining-rooms. Nobody could tell what was in the hampers by seeing them; they were tied with strings. Baley kept a wine book; he merely kept the accounts of tavern dinners in it; it was intended for a wine book, but was not used as one. If I received orders for wine I entered them in it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not a permit book kept - A. Yes. Wine going out would be entered there by Baley.

COURT. Q. Did you ever know a caravan hired to convey goods away before - A. No, my Lord. I have known wine sent out two or three hampers at a time. The wine was directed to Thatcher - I cannot say how many hampers there were; there should have been permits for all of it, or it is liable to be seized. The Excise officer comes once a fortnight. Some wine was sent to the West end of the town about the same time as this. I have seen wine sent in a cart to Mr. Clark, beyond Croydon.

Q. Did Baley leave himself materials to carry on his business without these - A. Yes; there was a large quantity of things. I have carried it on for the last seven months with what was left.

JURY. Q. Is not Mr. Dibbin ill - A. He has been ill along time, but was about when this happened; he always slept at Gerrard's Hall; the van was loaded in the street, not in the yard. It was common to load things in the street, but this was a private spring van - nothing is ever loaded from the waggon yard through the passage, except on Sundays, and after dark - the inn gates were open at the time.

WILLIAM STRATTON . I am an ironmonger, and a creditor of Baley's; my brother managed the business with him. After the commission was issued, I went to his premises, and found the stock of wine materially reduced. I went down to Worth on the 7th of June, to the tavern, by the coach, with Mr. Groom and Clisby the messenger; we went into the parlour, took some refreshment and stopped there, and found Mrs. Thatcher, there - we called her in, in the evening and made a search, and found several dozens of wine in the cellar - we also found some table cloths marked. "Gerrard's Hall," at full length in indelible ink - the marks on the knives had been ground out - a double branch plated candlestick, and some spoons were all thrown together in a cupboard in the bar, some of them papered up and others not - they were not locked up. Mrs. Thatcher did not like to give up the keys, while Thatcher was out; the sheets we had on at night, were marked in the same way, and the pillow cases; some of the sheets had holes picked in them, as if there had been an attempt to pick the marks out - we found some French wine, and some soy and Noyeau, in a room at the top of the house. Mr. Groom brought a trunk which was opened in my presence, and in it was the tin box produced, these receipts, and this letter (looking at them) were also in it - we left the messenger in possession of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. CUMMINS. Q, Your brother had informed you, of these goods going down to Worth, a long time before - A. He might say something about it, but I do not think he knew what they were - he did not tell me of it till just before I went down, not till after the commission was issued. The waiter took us into the cellar by Mrs. Thatcher's order; she would not let us go into her own bed-room - I think she said somebody was in bed there, and was very reluctant in admitting us

to the room where the French wine was. I saw different goods in different rooms, marked "Gerrard's Hall." There might be twenty bottles altogether of French wine, Noyeau, and some soy. The house was furnished with new furniture - some linen in a washing-tub was marked "Gerrard's Hall;" there were two or three dozen knives in the room where we were; some of the marks were quite effaced - they all appeared to be rough ground.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Mrs. Thatcher knew perfectly well what you came about - A. Yes. The sheets we slept on were marked; we told her our business about seven or eight o'clock, and went to bed about nine or ten. The pillow I slept on had the mark picked out.

RICHARD GROOM . I am a creditor of Baley's, and went to Worth with Mr. Stratton and Clisby, on the 7th of January, to the King's Arms, inn, kept by Thatcher; he was not at home. Clisby and I went to the house of one Whitehead, and found the tin box produced, in a box there - we brought it to the inn; Mr. Stratton forced the lock, and found these papers in it. We dined at the inn. The knives and table cloths were marked "Gerrard's Hall;" there appeared to have been an attempt to grind the name off the knives. In the evening we told Mrs. Thatcher our business, and searched the house, and found some plated goods and linen in the bar. We slept in a two bedded room; the bed linen was marked "Gerrard's Hall," and on other beds we found linen marked the same - some marks appeared as if an attempt had been made to take them out. I saw a grand piano there, which I had frequently seen at Gerrard's Hall. We left Clisby in possession.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Did Mr. Stratton remark the table cloth being marked - A. I dare say we talked about it. Some people who came in the coach lunched in the same room, and went on with the coach. I do not recollect seeing any linen not marked Gerrard's Hall; some of the marks were picked out, but part of the letters left left; several appeared torn off.

Q. At the trial at Horsham, was it not agreed on both sides, that in the event of a verdict for the plaintiff the goods should be delivered up - A. I believe there was something of the kind.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your house is nearly opposite Gerrard's Hall - A. Yes. I was a creditor at the time the goods were moved.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You was only a creditor a few months before - A. No; he only commenced business in March, and never paid me any money. I do not recollect seeing the caravan at the inn; I was told of it about the time that he became bankrupt. He owed me 140 l. for repairs of his house.

JOHN CLISBY . I am messenger under the commission. On the 7th of January, I went to Worth, and found the principal part of the linen marked "Gerrard's Hall," and about ten dozen knives and forks, the marks in which had been ground down, but were visible. Some of the table linen appeared to be scraped. I found a quantity of plated candlesticks and branches thrown in the corner of the cupboard, like rubbish; I found a vast quantity of wine in the cellar, principally port; some wine and sauces in the top-room. I was left in possession a short time. Thatcher came down on the 9th, and on the 11th I was succeeded by another messenger.

Cross-examined by MR. CUMMINS. Q. Did you take an inventory of the goods - A. No. I had no authority to do it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How did you know Gerrard's Hall goods - A. By the marks. There were no marks on the sheets or pillow I slept on.

WILLIAM HASEY . I was waiter at the Kings Arms at Worth from the time it opened. I remember goods coming down in the van early in October. Thatcher was not at home when they were opened; they contained crockery, plated goods, knives, forks, hard-ware, and a basket of linen was taken up stairs. "Gerrard's Hall" was stamped on the knives - there were some plated dessert forks; a very handsome castor stand, egg stands, two dozen tea spoons, ten candlesticks and branches, four plated dishes and covers, a dozen and a half of cups and saucers, a breakfast service, articles of china, and five or six dozen plates and dishes. I saw the linen afterwards - it was marked "Gerrard's Hall." I saw some of the table linen afterwards, smeared, so that I could not discover the mark as before. Thatcher saw them unpacked, and told me that they came from Gerrard's Hall. On the Thursday after that fifteen hampers of wine came down in the same van - I should think there were three or four dozen in each hamper; there was no wine in the house besides that, either before or after. Thatcher told me it came from Gerrard's Hall. A piano-forte afterwards came down in Messrs. Clementi's caravan. There were two or three pair of very coarse sheets, which did not come from Gerrard's Hall. There were no plated articles but what came from there. An opening dinner was proposed, but it did not take place; at the time it was to have been a quantity of knives were sent to a blacksmith, to erase the marks. Mr. Baley was at the King's Arms, inn before and at the time the piano came, he appeared at first as a guest, but afterward had intercourse with Mr. Thatcher, and did not at times conduct himself as a guest, particularly on the 9th of November, when he assisted in getting up the dinner - he used the piano-forte himself, and nobody else. I believe he kept the key; he was in town when the assignees came down. I saw a trunk brought from Whitbread's, who was Baley's servant; he lived a little below the King's Arms, inn. I directed the assignees to his house. I have seen the trunk they brought away in Baley's possession, at the King's Arms, (looking at a letter,) I have seen Thatcher write, and am sure this is his writing. I had known him about a fortnight before I went to live there; he wished me to deposit 150 l. in his hands, and take a share in the posting business. I had not the money, but deposited 20 l. as security for glass and my good conduct about three weeks after I entered his service, which was in September. I never saw any large sum in his hands; he was not an opulent man - quite the reverse. I was with him nearly five months, and got my 20 l. back, by three or four different payments, the last of which was 6 s.; I have lent him a pair of small clothes and a handkerchief at times, and particularly to wear when he went to take out his licence; application was frequently made for small sums of money, and not paid. Baley was at the house for two or three

days together - a bill was made out for him, the first or second time of his coming, but was never paid. I received all bills, and never heard of this being paid.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. He dined in the bar - A. Sometimes. I never recollect customers dining in the bar, they have had bread and cheese there, and paid Thatcher for it; the goods were all used publicly at the inn - when I went into the house, there was nothing there but what was mine; some upholstery afterwards came down, and furniture from different people.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Gerrard's Hall, was a well furnished inn - A. What rooms I have seen were; no furniture came from there except the piano. I only saw eight or twelve dozen of knives, all of which had the name erased. I frequently asked him for money before the assignees came, as I wanted to leave, as his situation did not suit me. I only waited to get my deposit. I never quarreled with him particularly. He once set Whitbread to carry a tub, and having hurt himself, I said he did not treat him like a christian.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether you quarreled or not, did he produce you as a witness at Horsham - A. Yes.

JOHN ALCOURT . I am a blacksmith, and live at Worth, at the latter end of the last year, I ground the marks out of about a hundred and fifty-six knives, for Thatcher; the marks were "Gerrard's Hall Tavern." I was told to grind it out; it was so deep in some, I could not, my charge was 3 s. 6 d.; I applied for it two or three times, but could not get it.

Cross-examined by MR. CUMMINS. Q. Was there not a dispute about your account - A. Yes; my account was 2 l. 16 s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He supplied you with goods - A. A few, but I applied for money before I had any goods.

WILLIAM BANNISTER . I was formerly proprietor of the King's Arms-inn, at Worth. Thatcher took it of me without a premium. I saw Baley there when the piano arrived. I helped to carry it up; Baley said it was a fine piece of music and cost him 150 l.; he took the key from the man who brought it. I saw him about the house three or four times, and thought him a guest at first, but afterwards he appeared more like a master; he had fowls there, and bought corn of me which he paid for himself. Thatcher appeared to have no money.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You gave the place up to him - A. Yes; he had tap and all, and I became hostler. Thatcher was not present when Baley took the key of the piano.

WILLIAM NOAKES . I know Thatcher; he had a farm in Berkshire, which he left at Lady-day, 1822; he told me his stock was taken for the rent; and when he took this inn, he said if somebody would lend him 500 l., he thought he should do better than at farming.

The documents found in the defendant Baley's box were here read. There were three receipts to J. Thatcher, signed T. W. Baley, for the sums of 46 l. 11 s., 61 l. 4 s., and 30 l., for the various articles mentioned in the evidence, and another for 106 l. 10 s. for wines, with the bills annexed; also the following letter, proved to be in the band writing of the defendant Thatcher, the post mark of which was 11th of October, 1822, addressed to Mr. Baley, Gerrard's Hall, Basing-lane:-

"White Horse Cellar.

"Dear Sir - Not having the pleasure of seeing you before I left, I shall feel obliged to you or John to send thirty cards by Pearson's man, he will call for them, for the Gloster Coffee-house. I hope to see you by Monday morning, and hope you will, in the interval, get what cash you possibly can together, as every day is a great loss to us, as on Monday next I wish to have some refreshment ready for the coach, and if you have any thing you can send, Steadman calls on Tuesdays and Fridays: but whatever you do, for God's sake, keep it to yourself, and not let John or any one know our concerns, as it is for your own good hereafter, as you will always find I do every thing for the best interest of both parties, for if one do bad the other does the same, for it is like man and wife. I think I should tell John's wife, when you have done with her, she may go and see her friends for a few weeks, for the more strangers about us at first the better; they know nothing, and then there is no talking, and so you will find it.

Yours, amp;c.

"J. THATCHER.

"P.S. I wrote this last night for the waiter to put in the post to-morrow, and destroy it as soon as read. Excuse haste: the ladies I shall employ are steady, middle-aged, and most respectable."

JOHN FLOWER re-examined. My wife lived at Mr. Baley's in town; she is now lying in.

MR. CUMMINS to MR. STRATTON. Q. When you went to Worth did you take possession of these goods on the supposition that Baley was in partnership with Thatcher - A. Not exactly so; we took possession of them because we found not only the bills, but the receipts in Baley's cash box, and therefore concluded if he had been paid for them he would not be in possession of the bills and receipts. I told the messenger to seize only those things marked "Gerrard's Hall," but he said he knew his business better than I did.

MR. GROOM. I never supposed them to be in partnership.

MESSRS. CUMMINS and PHILLIPS, addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendants.

BALEY - GUILTY .

THATCHER - GUILTY .

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-93

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JULY 2.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

946. HOLIDAY SOLOMON and ISAAC SOLOMON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two cart springs value 15 s. , the goods of Farmer Edwards .

FARMER EDWARDS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in the Commercial-road. My cart stood in Berkley-mews, Colchester-street . The prisoners have a stable in the same yard. I found the cart broken in pieces, and the springs gone.

JAMES TYNELL . I have the care of the stable-yard. On the Thursday evening this cart was entire, and between six and seven o'clock next morning, the springs were gone, and about ten o'clock that morning, I met the

prisoner Isaac with one of them in Somerset-street, covered with a piece of sacking - he was bringing it out of the yard; I told him to bring it back, and he did. I then went into Holiday's father's stable; I saw him there, and said, "Where is the other spring?" - he said he would send a boy for it. I went again in a few minutes, and found it at the stable door.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. This is an open yard - A. Yes. Holiday was taken in the stable half an hour after.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a constable. I took them in charge, and fitted the springs to the cart - they belonged to it. Isaac said Holiday gave it him to take to Mitre-street; Holiday said he found them on a dung hill in the yard, and sent Isaac with them to Mitre-street, to the person who they belonged to. He is lame, and said he could not go after the thief.

FARMER EDWARDS. I have a warehouse in Mitre-street.

ISAAC SOLOMON 'S Defence. I saw a mam with them on his shoulder, but the instant he saw me, he threw them down and ran off. I picked up one and was taking it to the prosecutor.

HOLIDAY SOLOMON - GUILTY . Aged 29.

ISAAC SOLOMON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-94

947. DANIEL WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , an iron rest, being part of a turning lathe, value 20 s. , the goods of Humphrey Levy ; and FRANCIS STYLES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

HUMPHREY LEVY . I live in Rathbone-place. This lathe was sent to my workshop in Steven-street - I did not miss it, but on the next day, I found it in Styles's warehouse in Golden-lane; he said he bought it of Williams, and said he had given him 2 s. for it - it is an iron rest. I could not re-place it for less than 1 l. Williams was three weeks in my service.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Styles keeps a general tool mart - A. Yes; it is a very extensive warehouse.

Q. You saw it in the open warehouse - A. No; I went in, and asked for a rest - this was placed on another; several were shewn to me. I said I wanted one of great power; this one was not with the others, but stood on a lathe in the shop; there was nothing to conceal it, but it was not were the others were kept; it was shewn to me at last.

Q.Was he not bound over as a witness against Williams - A. He was bound over in bail to appear if a bill should be preferred against him, and if not, to give evidence. I told him I must indict him - he called me all the d - d rascals in the world, and said he had got out of my hands.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am journeyman to Mr. Levy. I saw the rest safe about a fortnight before it was lost. I went with him to Styles's; Williams was then in custody - I waited on the opposite side of the way, with the constable, and afterwards went over - my master asked to look at several tools; I saw the rest on a lathe in the middle of the shop, and knew it. Styles said he bought it of Williams (mentioning his name,) for 2 s.; my master could not get one under 1 l. They are often sold without a lathe. It stood by itself; the others were another lathe or two off. He asked my master 12 s. for this one.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Without a lathe it is of no use for general purposes - A. It cannot be used without a lathe, and is of little use without one, but is valuable as it is difficult to get one to fit; he might have it on hand for years. The foreman attended to us, but Styles was just by; the foreman said to him, "This has been stolen;" he said, "I am sorry for it, I know who I bought it of" - he crossed the shop then, and came and told me the name.

WILLIAM BARRATT . I am a constable, and went to Styels's with a warrant. The foreman called Styles, who came - I told him I had a warrant to search his place; he exclaimed against the person who sold it him. Levy was in the shop ten minutes before me.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You allowed him to go up stairs to dress - A. Yes. The Magistrate permitted him to go at large from time to time. He said Williams told him it was his father's property, and Williams did not deny it.

WILLIAM'S Defence. I asked Styles 2 s. 6 d. for it; he said it was not complete, and gave me 2 s.

STYLES'S Defence. This is a wicked and unfounded charge. I have been thirty years in business, and conducted it in an upright manner. The prisoner came and said he had an old iron rest which belonged to his father, who was dead, and he had had it twelve years. I said he might bring it, which he did in quarter of an hour. I have people to prove it can be manufactured new for 5 s. I told the prosecutor I was an honester man than ever stood in his shoes - he said, "I'll work you for that, I'll stick to you."

WILLIAM BISHOP . I am clerk at Marlborough-street. The prisoner Styles was not bound over to answer any charge, only to appear as a witness.

CHARLES BATE COOK . I am foreman to Styles. I was present when Williams brought this rest into the shop, and asked Styles 2 s. 6 d. for it. Styles asked if he was sure it was his own; he said it was, that he had it before he was apprenticed, and had it twelve years, and it was his father's, before he died. Styles gave him 2 s. for it; it is old cast iron and not complete without the lathe, and is incomplete as a rest; there is no tye screw to it, which would cost three or four shillings.

COURT. Q. What did it cost to make it - A. About 4 s. 6 d. He brought it between three and four o'clock in the day - it was put on a lathe in the middle of the warehouse, every body must see it; it was the first one I shewed to Levy when he came. I produced the book in where I entered it; when we bought it we did not enter the persons name, as we did not know it till Levi told us. I shewed him several rests, at 8 s. and 10 s. each, they were complete. I asked him 12 s. for this, but then we were to make it complete. I should not have asked him so much but he was a Jew, and has bought things of us before, and I have lost the sale of goods, because I did not ask him a price that would allow beating down. I cannot say what articles he has been for; there is the entry of it in the book.

COURT. Q. Did you buy nothing but on Monday, as

no article is entered on any other day - A. He entered the whole week's purchases under Monday - we bought these on Monday.

WILLIAM STYLES . I am the prisoner's nephew, and was present when Williams came; he said the rest was his and he had had it for twelve years that it had been his father's, he brought it in about a quarter of an hour, and asked 2 s. 6 d. for it. Styles gave him 2 s. it was put in the middle of the warehouse.

JOSEPH GILBERT . I am an iron-founder. This rest is worth nothing, but as old iron, which I give 4 s. a cwt. for. I think 2 s. a fair price. Styles keeps an extensive warehouse for lathes and tools.

JURY. Q. What would you charge for that, to make it - A. Two-pence a pound; it weighs 40 lbs.

ROBERT KNIGHT . I am a lathe and tool-maker, and live in Dyer's-place, New-road. I would not give above 2 s. or 2 s. 6 d. for this rest to sell again; it is not as they are now made, and wants a tie screw, which would cost 4 s. 6 d. or 5 s.; it would then be worth 16 s. to sell.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

STYLES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-95

948. WILLIAM DRAGE and SAMUEL RAINBIRD were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two live tame deer, value 10 l. , the goods of Andrew John Nash .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing 200 lbs. of vension.

THIRD COUNT, for stealing 200 lbs. of meat.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ANDREW JOHN NASH , ESQ . I live at Edmonton . I had two tame deer, which I kept in a stable; they would feed out of my hands, and knew all my family.

THOMAS COCKLE . I am servant to Mr. Nash. On Saturday night the 17th of May, between six and seven o'clock, I put the deer up in the out-house, and locked the door, and tied a hurdle to the window, to prevent their putting their heads out, next morning, I found the hurdles cut down, the deer gone, and a good deal of blood in the stable; the thieves had got in at the window.

SAMUEL LAWRENCE . I went to the out-house, about six o'clock, on Sunday morning, to let the deer out, the door was fast as usual, but the window bar cut down, so that a man could get in and out; the deer were gone, and blood on the floor. I found a collar that had been on one of them; also a red cap, by the door.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I was fetched on Sunday the 18th, before seven o'clock in the morning, and traced the blood all the way from the out-house to Enfield; within a hundred yards of Rainbird's house, which is about two miles from Mr. Nash's. Mead was with me; we found Rainbird at home, and a quantity of blood all over his clothes, and a quantity of liver and lights on the table, and some frying on the fire, which I knew to be deer's flesh - we handcuffed him. Mead opened the cupboard door and found three deer's legs; two of a buck and one of a doe. Mead brought down two long quarters of venison - we found one skin and a head hanging up in the back wash-house, and the entrails in a washing tub, and on a dung-hill near his house, we found six shanks. Lawrance claimed the skin and head directly.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you mean to say, there was a tract of blood for two miles - A. Yes; there were intermissions of two or three yards, and then blood again. I found part of the deer's pluck at his father's.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable, and was with Gibson, at Rainbird's. I afterwards went to Drage's, between ten and eleven o'clock, and found him at home, and in his bedroom, I found part of the thigh, heart, and two kidneys, with a knife all over blood, and in the wash-house, I found a spotted deer's skin; the rest of the thigh was boiling on the fire; the red cap was produced to him; he laughed and said

"D - n it, you may as well let me have my cap, for I shall want it when I get to prison, and it is too bad to take the venison away, you may as well send me a leg."

SAMUEL LAWRENCE, I know these to be the skins of the deer's. I brought them up and am certain of them - one horn is longer than the other.

MR. NASH. I know them well, and know their countenances, as well as my own children.

DRAGE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

RAINBIRD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-96

949. THOMAS MIHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of John Savery Brooking , from his person .

JOHN SAVERY BROOKING . I live in the Strand. On the 17th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was between Arundel-street, and Norfolk-street, in the Strand , and felt something at my pocket, which made me turn round. I saw the prisoner close behind me, and another behind him. I seized and charged him with picking my pocket; he denied it, but I saw my handkerchief in his left hand, while I was turning round; he was passing it to his companion, but dropped it. I picked it up, and recognized him, as having attempted my pocket a few hours before - the other went off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-97

950. JOHN PURSE and SAMUEL CAMP were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Miles Crow , from his person .

MILES CROW . I live in Southampton-buildings. On the 24th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was with a friend looking at a fire in Featherstone-buildings , and put my handkerchief quite to the bottom of my pocket to secure it - somebody said my pocket was picked; I looked round and saw Camp in custody, and the officer take it from his bosom. Purse was taken immediately.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I stood at the corner of Bedford-row, and saw the prisoners come up following Mr. Crow, and watched them, having seen them attempt people's pockets just before. I saw Purse take a handkerchief, out of Mr. Crow's pocket, and immediately give it to Camp, who put it in his bosom. I seized and took it from him.

JOHN BRADBURY. I saw Purse take the handkerchief, and give it to Camp. I seized Purse.

PURSE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CAMP - GUILTY Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-98

951. HENRY PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a leather case, value 2 s., the goods of Coleman Lyon Phillips , from his person .

COLEMAN LYON PHILLIPS . I live in the Minories. I was looking at the fire in Red Lion-street , felt something warm at my pocket, put my hand down, and missed this segar-case, and my purse was nearly drawn to the top of my pocket - I felt a hand going from my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner drawing his hand from me, and collared him immediately. I have not found it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. There was a great crowd - A. Yes. I was a good deal pushed about.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I saw Mr. Phillips at the fire; he called Stop thief! the prisoner ran suddenly from him. I stopped him; he said he had lost his hat, and was going to look for it - it was afterwards brought to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-99

952. JOSEPH BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , ten quarts of spirits of tar, value 5 s.; a tin case, value 5 s., and a padlock, value 6 d. , the goods of William Erskine Cochrane , Esq .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Manuel Jose .

MANUEL JOSE . I live in Richardson-mews, Warren-street, Fitzroy-square, and am in the service of William Erskine Cochrane , who contracts for lighting the streets . On the 18th of June, I delivered six gallons of spirits of tar to Rogers, in a tin case with a padlock to it.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am a lamplighter. I put this can of tar down in Henrietta-street, Brunswick-square ; I was going to use it, and in five minutes was told it was gone. I got off my ladder, and came up with the prisoner with it on his shoulder - another person who was with him ran off.

EDWARD HEDGES . I am a beadle. I took him in Russell-street; he said he did it from distress. He has 1 s. 6 d. a day from the parish.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-100

953. THOMAS COOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a coat, value 15 s.; a hat, value 5 s.; eight shillings, and two sixpences, the property of William Clark ; and sixty penny pieces the property of Joseph West .

SECOND COUNT, stating the coat, hat, and penny pieces to belong to the Overseers of the poor of St. James, Clerkenwell .

JOSEPH WEST . I am master of Clerkenwell workhouse . The prisoner has been a pauper there from his infancy, being rather deformed. On Wednesday morning, the 21st of May, between five and six o'clock, the gate-keeper called me; I found the lodge broken open, and the prisoner was missing. I found he had got out at the back gate, as the key had been taken from the lodge. We found him on Friday, intoxicated, with Clark's coat on.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am porter at the gate. I saw the prisoner last about ten o'clock, when he went to bed. I got up between five and six o'clock in the morning, found the lodge door open, and 9 s. of mine, and a coat and hat stolen.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am porter at the house. I saw the prisoner between eight and nine o'clock at night, and about five o'clock in the morning I saw the gates had been opened, and the prisoner gone.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I was at the workhouse gate, and all of a sudden the prisoner came and struck at me with a stick - I got up, and said "Cooley, why do you serve me in this way?" he said, "I did not mean it for you, I meant to have killed that old b - r, Clark." The stick had lead at the end of it - he was very drunk.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I claim that coat. I was at the Nagg's Head, public-house, at Enfield, and bought it of a man for 3 s.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-101

954. JOHN COOK was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM MOULES , JUN . I am a coach broker , and live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner was three weeks in my service, and entrusted to receive money for me. On the 7th of June , I bought a lot of goods, and sent him home to my grandfather, about six o'clock in the evening, for eight sovereigns and a five pound note, as they came to more than I expected, and never saw him afterwards; he was apprehended in about a week.

WILLIAM MOULES . I am the prosecutor's grandfather. On the 7th of June, the prisoner came and asked for ten sovereigns and a five pound note, for my son, which I gave him - he never returned.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather in liquor at the time, and as I returned, met a friend, drank with him, and lost the 5 l. note somehow. A young man met me, and said I had better go and lay down with him, which I did, and he robbed me of the ten sovereigns.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-102

955. MARY CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , two caps, value 15 s., and ten yards of lace, value 1 l., the goods of Mary Marshall , widow , privately in her shop .

ELIZA HART . I am shopman to Mary Marshall , of Cranbourne-street . On the 27th of May, the prisoner came and bought a lace cap, at 10 s. 6 d., paid 6 s. deposit, and at half-past six o'clock she called again, and paid the 4 s. 6 d., and asked to see some lace - I shewed her several lengths in a basket, and cut her off a yard at 3 s.; she paid 1 s. on it, and went away, and in a minute I missed two pieces of lace - she left a key behind her. She came again next evening at half-past six, and asked for the lace, paid for it, and bought a yard more. I turned my head occasionally to get things, and missed a piece of lace and

a cap. I sent for a constable, who took her up stairs, and brought down three pieces of lace and a cap.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I was sent for, and in her bonnet found three pieces of lace and a cap.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor - she left these things on the counter, on purpose for me to take them. I do not know what possessed me to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-103

956. WILLIAM CUMMINGS and JAMES HATFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 oz. 2 dwts. of gold, value 20 s. , the goods of John Marsh .

JOHN MARSH . I am a gold watch case maker , and live on Clerkenwell-green . Cummings was my errand boy ; Hatfield is a stranger. On the 6th of June, I received information, and at one o'clock charged him with robbing me of gold sweepings - he denied it. I sent for Ann East ; he still strongly denied it. I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him, and went to Hatfield's lodging - we found him coming out, and in the room in which his brother lodged, found some gold sweepings tied in a blue handkerchief. I sifted it, and found 1 oz. 2 dwts. of gold among it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where are the sweepings put - A. They are put in the forge, and burnt before they are washed; this had been burnt. He knew the value of it.

ANN EAST. My husband is a porter. About half-past six o'clock in the morning, I saw Cummings let Hatfield into his master's premises - I was in care of the next house; one of them spread a handkerchief on the passage floor. I pushed the door open, and saw them put the sweep washings into the handkerchief; Hatfield called me an old b - h, and told me to go and mind my own business. Cummings staid in the house, and I followed Hatfield with the bundle some distance - he dared me to go and see where he took it. I left him in Clerkenwell, and told Mr. Marsh about seven o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see where it was taken from - A. There was a tub, pestal, and mortar in the passage; nobody is allowed to go through the passage while the sweepings are being fined. He said if I followed him much further I should get myself into a scrape.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable. I took charge of Cummings - he said Hatfield persuaded him to do it. I found the sweepings at Hatfield's lodging.

CUMMINGS'S Defence. I am extremely sorry for the offence.

CUMMINGS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

HATFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-104

957. THOMAS LEADER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. , the goods of James King .

JAMES KING . I am a seaman . My trowsers were on board the Winchelsea, which laid off Poplar . The prisoner was a lumper on board - I missed them from the quarter deck, and found him behind the water cask, in the act of taking them off. He had them on under his own.

ROBERT MARSTON . I took him in charge, with them on under his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He might as well swear to my jacket, for I bought these trowsers an hour before, for 3 s. 6 d. When he said he had lost a pair, I said I have bought a pair, and you shall have them if they are yours.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-105

958. ANN PEMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , six pewter pots, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Jenkins .

THOMAS JENKINS . I keep the Plough, public-house, Museum-street, Bloomsbury . On the 21st of May, the prisoner was taken with these pots; she used to fetch beer from the house, but generally in her own mug.

JOHN WALES . I am a constable. On the 21st of May, about four o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner in Charlotte-street, and searched her for a watch, and on searching her apartment, I found six pots tied up in a bag, and put in a basket - she said she had them at different times from Jenkins, when she was nursing a woman who lived in a court near him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The basket came from a person who I nursed. We moved in a hurry.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-106

959. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a bag, value 3 d.; a yard of gingham, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 d.; one half crown, three shillings, and two sixpences the property of Sarah Evans , from her person .

SARAH EVANS . I am a single woman , and live in Cable-street, with my brother. On the 24th of June, I was going home, and in White Lion-street , a man came up and snatched the bag, containing the articles stated in the indictment out of my hand, and ran down Little Ayliff-street. I ran after him. I lost sight of him for five minutes, and was stopped; he was of the same size and appearance as the prisoner.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a porter. I was in Colchester-street - heard a cry of Stop thief! ran towards the noise; the prisoner was the first person, I saw running in a direction from White Lion-street, and stopped him; he immediately put his hand to his hat, and suspecting he he had something there, I found the bag in his hat, with its contents, except the money, which was in his hat in paper.

JOHN BROWN . I am a constable. The prisoner was bought to the watch-house with the bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home; some people were going along, who snatched the lady's ridicule, they threw it down; I picked it up, put it into my hat, to run after them, when I was stopped.

GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-107

London Case, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

960. GEORGE HARPER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

HENRY WOOLRICK . I am a Scotch warehouseman , and live in Cheapside . On the 19th of May , the defendant came to our warehouse, saying he had come from Hubbard and Co. (I do business with Messrs. Hubbard and Brown, of Henrietta-street;) he said he came for four pieces of six-four nain sooks at 3 s. 4 d. a yard; that he wanted to shew them to a customer of theirs. I said it was not usual, to send out a quantity on sale or return, that one piece would do as well as four, and if that suited the customer he should have the other three pieces; he said he would only take one piece, I said "I should be sending by Hubbard's house, and our man should enquire whether it suited, or I will send the other three pieces;" he took one piece away, and on the following Saturday, I met him in St. Paul's Church-yard; he ran off, I overtook him in a court near Thames-street, and gave him in charge; he said he had pawned the goods at Sowerby's.

GEORGE HUBBARD . I am in partnership with Joseph Brown , we deal with Mr. Woolrick; the prisoner was never in our service. I never saw him till he was in custody.

THOMAS SOWERBY . I believe the prisoner to be the person who pawned this piece of goods with me on the 19th of May, for 27 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-108

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

961. JAMES MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , two scarfs, value 23 s., the goods of Thomas Saunders , to whom he was servant .

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Phoenix-street, Spitalfields . On the 3d of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I went up to the loom and missed two scarfs, which were safe the evening before; the prisoner was my servant, and slept in the workshop that night, but was gone, and next day I saw him in custody.

JOHN DUKE . I am draw boy to the prosecutor. On the 3d of June, at half-past five o'clock, I went to work, the prisoner let me in. I went up to the workshop with him, and saw him cut two scarfs out of the loom; he then said he was not ready for me, and I might go to the door, for quarter of an hour, which I did; he came down and went away. I do not know that he had any thing; he ran up the street and did not return.

WILLIAM COLTON . I apprehended the prisoner at Hackney, on the 3d of June; he said he had lost the scarfs.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-109

962. JAMES ROE was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 19th of May , from James Fleming , one watch, two seals and a chain, the goods of John Boswood , well knowing the same to be stolen .

CHARLES BOSWOOD . On Tuesday, the 19th of May, I missed my watch from a box, in my bed-room. I found it in pawn. Fleming was tried here for stealing it.

JANE LEGG . I live in Winchester-court, Monkwell-street. On the 22d of May, I found three duplicates under the mat in our passage, one of them was for this watch. Fleming had thrown his coat down in the passage that morning.

HERBERT COLE FOX. I was at Boswood's when the watch was lost. On the 22d of May, I found the prisoner; the pawnbroker immediately recognized him as the man who pawned it, which he denied.

JOSEPH HALL . I am servant to Murray and Co., pawnbrokers, East Smithfield; the prisoner pawned this watch in the name of J. Fleming for 25 s. He lived next door to us for two years.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18230625-110

963. RALPH FREEMAN ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , twenty shells, value 20 s.; two pieces of amber, value 4 s., and a piece of wood value 3 d. the goods of Richard Thatcher .

RICHARD THATCHER . I live in Newman-street , the prisoner was employed at my house four days, repairing a cabinet of shells . I moved on the 24th to Wardour-street, and on the 26th, as I passed Earl's shop, I recognised these shells, which I had not then missed. I went home and missed about thirty.

JOHN EARL . I am a cabinet-maker, and deal in shells. On Friday last the prisoner brought two shells to sell for 5 s., and said he had a relation who brought them from India; next day he brought all the rest, and asked 30 s. for them, I gave him a writing desk and 5 s. 6 d. for them.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I apprehended the prisoner, and in his box, found a piece of varnished wood and a shell; he said he had sold all the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an apprentice ; my master will take me back.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-111

964. MARY BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , a cap, value 4 d.; a gown value 8 d.; a pinafore, value 4 d.; a frock, value 1 s., and a shawl, value 2 d. , the goods of William Simmons .

ELIZABETH SIMMONS . I am the wife of William Simmons , who is a gardener and lives at Bethnal-green . On the 19th of May, these things laid on a chair, in my room. I went to drink tea next door, and left the street door wide open; returned about six o'clock, and saw the prisoner going down the garden, and missed this property. I sent my daughter after her. Nevill held her while I took the keys from her.

ELIZABETH SIMMONS . I went after her, and asked what she wanted, she said nobody. I said "You must, or why come in" - she said, she wanted one Brown. I saw the corner of the frock hanging out of her pocket - my mother came and took the frock from her.

SARAH NEVILL . I stopped the prisoner with the property; she was in liquour.

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-112

965. MARY BRADLEY , BRIDGET CONNER and ELIZABETH DYNAN were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a trowel, value 2 s., the goods of Stephen Capon ; a gown, value 4 s., the goods of William Chenery , and a pair of boots, value 1 s. , the goods of Edmuund Watling .

STEPHEN CAPON . On the 22d of May, between twelve and one o'clock, while I was at dinner, my trowel was stolen from a house in Euston-square .

JOSEPH CADBEY . On the 21st of May, I took the prisoner's in charge, with another who has escaped, they were all together, one of them had a basket of flowers with this trowel, and a pair of boots under them. Conner acknowledged stealing the towel and boots; the other property was taken from a different place.

CONNER'S Defence. The girl who escaped must have put it in my basket.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I heard her say she took the trowel and gave it to her aunt.

CONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days .

BRADLEY - NOT GUILTY .

DYNAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-113

966. JOHN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a tea kettle, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary Maria Brumfitt .

MARY MARIA BRUMFITT . I keep a stall on Clerkenwell-green . On the 24th of June; Finn came and told me something. I looked round; saw the prisoner, and said to him, "How could you think of stealing my kettle, you have stolen it and given it to another man." I collared him.

ELIZABETH FINN . I saw the prisoner take this kettle from the stall and give it to another man, and make signs for him to make away with it, which he did; he staid there ten minutes before he took it.

HENRY DAVIS . I ran after the prisoner and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood at a public-house door, the prosecutrix came up and asked about the kettle. I knew nothing of it. I have been a constable myself, and have brought many desperate characters to Justice.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-114

967. RICHARD DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a shawl, value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Hilkiah Samuel Young .

HILKIAH SAMUEL YOUNG . I live at Bethnal-green . On Monday, the 23d of June. I took the prisoner into custody; he said "Oh; Sir, I did not take the shawl and handkerchief, that is the boy which took them." (Pointing to another boy.)

ELIZA YOUNG . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the morning of the 23d of June, I was in a room behind the shop, and heard a very low footstep - went into the shop and saw the prisoner going out, with this shawl and handkerchief in his hand. I stopped him by the door; he asked if we sold cotton handkerchiefs - my brother came into the shop and saw me take the things out of his hand, and boxed his ears, and let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EBENEZA YOUNG . I saw him in the shop and boxed his ears; he is the boy.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-115

968. DAVID EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a hat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Horlor .

JOHN HORLOR . I am a hatter , and live in Chiswell-street . I was at the back of my shop, and heard a hat was stolen. Willis ran out and brought the prisoner in with it.

JOHN WILLIS . I followed the prisoner down Grub-street, and took him with it in his hand. He begged to be let go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-116

969. WILLIAM HAGGER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , a bushel and two pecks of oats, value 6 s. the goods of Frederick Pursord .

FREDERICK PURSORD . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Stoke Newington . On Sunday, the 22d of June, I missed a bushel and a half of corn from my bin; a person must get over two walls to get it. Suspicion fell on the prisoner; he was taken, and brought to me, and said he was very sorry for it; that he had gone into my stable and taken corn, and had done it once before.

THOMAS ATKINS . I am an officer. I apprehended him.

JOSEPH HARE . I am servant to Mr. Pursord; I put a sack of corn in the bin on Friday, and gave the horse two feeds on Saturday, and on Sunday missed a bushel and a half.

ROBERT CORNOCK . The prisoner was in my service. On Thursday, the 12th June, he said he could get me some corn. I thought he was going to a regular shop, and gave him money to pay for it. When he was taken I found corn in my loft in a bag which did not belong to me.

COLLINGWOOD FINCH . I am a bricklayer. On the 15th of June, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming in a direction from Mr. Pursord's stable to Mr. Cornock's house, with about a bushel of something in a bag.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-117

970. MARY ANN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a table cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of John Waddington Laws .

ELIZABETH LAWS . I am the wife of John Waddington Laws; we live on Saffron-hill. On the 15th of March I left a table cloth at Mrs. Walker's, went for it in the evening, and it was gone; the prisoner boarded with me at the time; I did not send her for it; I never saw her again till she was taken.

LUCY WALKER . This table cloth hung on my line; the prisoner said she would fold it up; she went away with it; she had slept at my house for two months before. I never saw her afterwards.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended her.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-118

971. CATHERINE POWER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , a shift, value 2 s.; two gowns, value 6 s., and a plate value 6 d. , the goods of Frances Wall .

FRANCES WALL . I lived in Dorset-street ; the prisoner lodged in the next room; I moved to Molineaux-street on the 25th of May, and next day missed these things.

HENRY STOWELL . I apprehended the prisoner at her lodging in Dorset-street, and found the shift on her back; the gown was in a bundle over the bed, and a bed gown on the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shift, and know nothing of the other things.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-119

972. SARAH RUTHERFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a whittle, value 10 s.; a bonnet, value 10 s.; a purse, value 1 s.; a shift, value 1 s.; a pocket, value 2 d., and three shillings , the property of Ann Leman .

SARAH LAPPAGE . I am nurse at the Middlesex Hospital ; the prisoner was assistant nurse - Leman was a patient; she is too ill to attend. On the 24th of May the prisoner went out and was to return next morning, but did not till Thursday. I told her these things were missing: she said she had left the shawl at her mother's.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer, and took her into custody; she produced a purse with two duplicates in it, and said they belonged to Leman, also the bonnet and shift she had on, and that she had left the shawl at Hart's.

BARNET HART . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street. On the 29th of May the prisoner came to the shop, pleaded distress, and got me to lend her 3 s. on this shawl; she was to call for it in two or three days.

Prisoner's Defence. Leman lent me the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-120

973. SARAH RUTHERFORD was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of Lindsay Bell .

MARY BELL . I was a patient in the hospital. My husband's name is Adam Bell .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-121

974. ROBERT SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , a pair of pistols, value 12 s.; a draught board, value 1 s.; two ink-stands, value 6 s.; two lamps, value 2 s.; three plates, value 3 s.; fifteen wine glasses, value 15 s., and a medicine chest, value 8 s. , the goods of Henry Brougham .

HENRY BROUGHAM . I am a broker , and live in Ryder's-court ; the prisoner was my servant ; on the 20th of June I found three ink-stands at Pemberton's, who is not here, and knew them to be mine. I came home, and charged the prisoner with stealing them; he begged for mercy, and begged I would not prosecute him.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-122

975. WILLIAM SEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a jacket, value 15 s., the goods of Thomas Bradley ; and three jackets, value 30 s., and a waistcoat, value 10 s. , the goods of John Brice .

THOMAS BRADLEY . I am a post boy at Hampton Court . On the 31st of May I lost a jacket from the King's Arms stables . The prisoner is a stranger.

THOMAS BRICE . I am a post boy at the King's Arms . I lost three jackets and a waistcoat from the stable.

RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, the 1st of June, about two o'clock, I met the prisoner in a lane by Bushey Park, with a bundle containing this property; he said he bought them at Kensington; but afterwards said, "D - n me, I stole them, and you may find out where."

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up about half a mile before I met him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-123

976. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , three coats, value 15 s., and waistcoat, value 16 s., the goods of Arthur Neile ; and a shawl, value 1 s. , the goods of John Howlett .

ARTHUR NEILE . I am a tailor , and live in Bartholomew-close ; the prisoner worked one week for me; he came again on Monday, the 19th of May. I went next door for three quarters of an hour, returned, and he was gone; I missed these things.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you pay him his wages - A. All but 2 s. 8 d,; he had it as he wanted it; I had had words with him eight years ago. His wife treated me and the officer with drink the day he was apprehended. My wife does not live with me; she has been tried for bigamy; I was never tried in my life; I never went by any other name.

JOHN FROST . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of May the prisoner pawned three coats and a waistcoat in the name of Scott, Cow-cross-street.

LYDIA HOWLETT . On the 19th of May, I was in care of Neile's shop; I went out for a few minutes, leaving the prisoner there with these clothes, and when I returned he was gone with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you lodge there - A. No; I work at the tailor's trade. He said he would not go to work till his balance was paid - Neile was not at home, and he went away.

Prisoner's Defence. He was drinking all the week, and on Saturday night gave me 5 s., and promised me the rest on Monday, and when I came I said I would not go to work till I was paid; he told me to make something of these old things, but not to let this woman see me take them out. He owed me 38 s.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-124

977. JOHN SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a handkerchief, value 6 s. , the goods of Hannah Bowles , spinster .

HANNAH BOWLES . I lodge with the prisoner's mother in Ogle-street ; he does not live there. I went out on Saturday morning, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and left a handkerchief on the table, returned in the afternoon, and it was gone. I saw him next day, and charged him with taking it; he denied it.

JOHN SYMONDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Monmouth-street.

On the 24th of May the prisoner pawned a handkerchief in the name of Graham.

JOHN WRIGHT . I apprehended him on the 29th; he said he knew what I wanted him for - that he had pawned the handkerchief, and lost the ticket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-125

978. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st May , a shirt, value 5 s., and a shift, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles Williamson .

MARY WILLIAMSON . I am the wife of Charles Williamson . On the 31st of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I missed this shirt and shift, which hung in the yard to air. I saw the prisoner about an hour before, at the corner of the house.

JOHN WATSON . I am a cabinet maker. On the 31st of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Williamson's door, with his hand on the latch; I went into Bunhill-row, and when I returned he was still there, and said he was waiting for another boy, who was going to give him a halfpenny.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a constable. On the 2d of June I apprehended him; he said he found the things at Barbican.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Barbican. On the 31st of May the shirt and shift were pawned, I do not know who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18230625-126

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, JULY 3.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

979. BARNEY CORPER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Ward , from his person .

WILLIAM WARD . I am a dyer , and live in the Borough. On the 19th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I was at Stepney-fair , and had a handkerchief in my pocket; I did not miss it till Boston shewed it to me. I had not seen the prisoner at all.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a carriage maker, and live at Hampstead. I was at the fair, and saw the prisoner there and two other lads; I did not see them speak together, but all three pressed close on Mr. Ward, and then they all suddenly left him; I laid hold of the prisoner, who dropped the handkerchief from his hand; he was in the act of putting it into his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-127

980. HENRY HAYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a handkerchief, value 4 d., and nine shillings , the property of George Palmer .

JANE PALMER . I am the wife of George Palmer . On the 10th of May, about ten o'clock at night, I went into Atwell's shop, and had nine shillings tied up in a handkerchief, and left it on the counter. The prisoner was the person who served me. I returned in a few minutes, and nobody was in the shop. The mistress came out and sent for him; I asked him for the handkerchief which I had left on the counter; he said I must have taken it myself, for he had never seen it, and abused me very much.

JAMES ATWELL . I keep the shop; the prisoner lived five or six years with me, and is an apprentice ; the handkerchief was given me, and I gave it to the officer.

HANNAH BARR . I live at Atwell's. About a fortnight after Palmer left her handkerchief I saw the prisoner washing it in the kitchen; it appeared to answer the description of hers; I said nothing to him, but told my mistress. He took it away, and on the Saturday following I saw him take it out of his bosom, he used it, and left it on the kitchen table; I gave it to my mistress; Palmer claimed it, and he was taken on Monday.

MRS. ATWELL. Barr gave me the handkerchief; Palmer claimed it. The prisoner went out on this night, wishing me good night, and left the door open.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a constable. On the 26th of May the handkerchief was delivered to me. The prisoner said he had an uncle, and he wished the woman would take the money back, and not prosecute him.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and washed it; I could not tell whose it was.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230625-128

981. LUCY TIBBIT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , fifty yards of bombazeen, value 3 l. , the goods of John Baker Eland .

GEORGE WATERMAN . I am shopman to Mr. John Baker Eland , of Holborn . On the 21st of June, between seven and eight o'clock at night, this bombazeen was on a frame within the door; I was told it was taken, ran out, and found the prisoner a hundred and fifty yards off with it.

WILLIAM SALTER . I am fifteen years old, and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. I was passing Mr. Eland's shop, and saw the prisoner take the bombazeen, and put it under her shawl; I followed her up Brownlow-street, and told two men, who stopped her with it while I ran and told them at the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230625-129

982. WILLIAM GWYNNE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a handkerchief, value 8 s., the goods of John Addison , from his person .

The prosecutor did not attend. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-130

983. MARY WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a watch, value 2 l.; a seal, value 1 d.; a key, value 1 d., and a ribbon, value 6 d., the goods of John Deves , from his person .

JOHN DEVES . I work at a distillery at Bromley. On the 23d of June, about half past ten o'clock at night, I went with the prisoner to a room in Black Lion-yard ; she ran down stairs suddenly, and I after her, as I missed my watch; she was taken that night, and a new ribbon which I had in my waistcoat pocket was found on her. I have not found the watch.

SAMUEL DEAN . I am a watchman near Black Lion-yard; I saw the prosecutor about eleven o'clock; he described the prisoner's dress and person; I knew her before, and about one o'clock saw her coming, but when she saw me she turned back. I took her, and found a new watch ribbon on her.

(Ribbon produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230625-131

846. CHRISTOPHER HOLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Chadwick .

MR. THOMAS CHADWICK . I live at Nuntley, in Gloucestershire. On the 24th of June I was looking at the fire in Featherstone-buildings , and had a handkerchief in my pocket. The constable spoke to me. I felt, and missed it - he had hold of the prisoner.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable of St. Sepulchre. I stood at the corner of Turnstile , and saw the prisoner with another. Mr. Chadwick stopped to look at the fire - the prisoner and one Newman went up to him; the prisoner took hold of his pocket, and immediately drew this handkerchief out, and tucked it up his jacket. I stood close behind and laid hold of him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT BRADBURY . I am an engine turner. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief, and seized Newman.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230625-132

985. JOHANNA BOX was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , nine shillings, the monies of Mary Crawley , from her person .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18230625-133

986. MARIA HUGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s., and eleven shillings, the property of William Broderick , from his person .

The prosecutor was not present. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-134

987. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , a pocket-book, value 18 d., the goods of Robert James Butt , from his person .

ROBERT JAMES BUTT . I am a solicitor , and live in Hampton-street, Gray's Inn-road. I was at the fire in Featherstone-buildings , between ten and eleven o'clock, and had my pocket picked of my pocket-book, but did not miss it till I got to my chambers. The officer brought it to me next day.

HENRY YATES . I am a constable. I was at the fire, and do not recollect seeing Mr. Butt; but saw the prisoner with another man, in the thickest of the mob, in the act of picking pockets. I observed him for quarter of an hour, followed him out of the mob, seized him, and told him I had seen him take a pocket-book out of a gentleman's pocket, which I had; but cannot say who the gentleman was. I found this pocket-book in his left hand pocket, with Mr. Butt's address in it - he said he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not picked it up above a moment.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-135

988. HANNAH PURDIE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , a sheet, value 3 s.; two pillows, value 2 s.; a blanket, value 3 s.; a bolster, value 3 s., and a kettle, value 2 s., the goods of Erasmus Grint , in a lodging-room let to her and her husband .

MARGARET GRINT . I live in Monmouth-street . The prisoner took a lodging at No. 31, Monmouth-street, for a year and a half, and lived there with her husband all the time. I missed goods, and gave her in charge.

GEORGE LEDGER . I have a bolster and blanket, pawned on the 14th of October. I do not know who by.

ROBERT LUCAS . I have a sheet and two pillows, pawned fifteen months ago.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230625-136

989. ROBERT GROUT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , four pieces of leather, value 2 s., and 2 lbs. of brads, value 1 s. 8 d. , the goods of Edward Coulter .

EDWARD COULTER . I am a shoemaker and live in Philip-lane, London-wall ; the prisoner is my nephew. On Friday morning last, about five o'clock, I missed these things, which were safe in my shop the over night. I saw them in the watchman's possession.

CHARLES LENCHALL . I am a watchman of Holborn. On Friday morning at five o'clock, I stopped the prisoner on Great Saffron-hill; he was offering these brads for sale to a shoemaker; he said they were his uncles'. I found four pieces of leather in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (Writen.) I have neither father or mother, and am destitute, and under these circumstances have been induced to commit this offence, which I sincerely regret.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years; Recommended to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18230625-137

990. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a shawl, value 6 s. , the goods of John Dent .

JOHN DENT . I am a linendraper , and live in Crawford-street . On the 26th of June, about half-past ten o'clock at night, this shawl was missed from the passage where it hung, and in about ten minutes I found it down the area of No. 42.

EDWARD ROBERTS . I am shopman to Mr. Dent. I saw the prisoner take this shawl. It hung on the top of the door. I ran after him, and saw the watchman stop him.

HUMPHRY ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I stopped him, and saw him drop something by the area.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230625-138

991. ELIZABETH CHIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , a shawl, value 7 s., the goods of Nathaniel Trewett , to whom she was servant .

SUSAN TREWETT . I am the wife of Nathaniel Trewett; the prisoner was in our service ten days - I took her out of the work-house at 1 s. 6 d. a week; this shawl was on a chair in the bed-room. I laid down about two o'clock, and it was safe. I missed it about four - she had then left the house.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am an officer. I apprehended her in Oxford-street, walking with some girls - she denied the charge.

JOSEPH KING . I am a pawnbroker. On the 20th of May, the prisoner pawned this shawl.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: o18230625-1

NOTE:- In the case of JOHN WILFORD and CHARLES NIBBS , tried last session (vide page 275.) The Twelve Judges have decided that the dwelling-house was correctly stated in the Indictment, as the dwelling-house of George Gillings. The prisoners have accordingly received sentence of DEATH .


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