Old Bailey Proceedings, 9th April 1823.
Reference Number: 18230409
Reference Number: f18230409-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 9th of APRIL, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET . 1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Charles Abbott , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Hullock , Esq., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and John Atkins , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St . Julian Arabin , Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Teminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Samuel Noakes ,

George Cranige ,

Charles Waite ,

Alexander Jardine ,

John Carlisle ,

Frederick Snell ,

William Lloyd ,

William Parker ,

Archiles Cruise ,

James Cramp ,

John Bullock ,

William Edwards .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Rice Langley ,

John Augustus Nicholay ,

John Rutland ,

Samuel Castle ,

John Patterson ,

George Hobbs ,

Andrew Robertson ,

Griffith Humphrey ,

Andrew John Tenpenny ,

George Wells ,

George Padmore ,

James Hammond .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

George Trehern ,

Thomas Nott ,

James Hay ,

John Jefferey ,

George William Case ,

Samuel Platt ,

Jonathan Holding ,

Benjamin Bradford ,

William Shaw ,

Joseph Thompsey ,

Walter Owen Hills ,

John Knight .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 9, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

Reference Number: t18230409-1

485. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , 90 lbs. of copper, value 4 l., the goods of Sir William Paxton , Knt., and others his partners, on board a certain vessel, in the Navigable River Thames .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to other persons.

RICHARD CARTER . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 2d of March, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner in the Commercial-road, with a bundle on his shoulder, and asked him what he was carrying, he said,

"Copper;" I said, I thought something was wrong, and that I must see it - he told me I had no occasion to look for it was copper. I took him into a public-house, and found it was copper done up in canvas; it was in three square cakes. I said it was marked, and I must take him to the watch-house; he said,

"I hope Mr. Carter you won't do that as you know the consequence will be I shall be convicted and have to pay a penalty of 5 l.," and it would be better for me if I had 5 l.; I said I must do my duty, and took him to the office. He knew me before.

MR. WILLIAM KERSHAW . I am in partnership with Stewart Majoribanks , Esq. In February last, (I think the 26th or 27th) the prisonerapplied to me, and said he understood there was a cable on board the ship Mellish, which was for sale; (I did not know him before) I said it was an old one, and he had better go on board and see it - he returned to me the next day or the day after, and said he would purchase it. The price was 70 l., which he paid, viz 20 l. in money and a bill for 50 l., which was regularly paid. He expressed a wish to go on board and chop the cable up - I gave him an order to go on board, and do what he pleased with it.

CHARLES ROLLS . I am clerk to Messrs. Williams and Greenfield. On the 26th of February, I delivered 1218 cakes of copper, marked W. and G., to Voss - they were put into the barge from the warehouse. I sent out no other copper of that description for a month before; but some was sent out a week or ten days afterwards, but none so early as the 2d of March. The copper produced is part of that I delivered; I speak to it from the initials, quality, and size. It is worth about four guineas.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the value of the largest piece - A. I should think not less than 50 s. All the copper goes through my hands. The mark W. and G. is put on in casting it.

JOSEPH VOSS . I am lighterman to Messrs. Bell and Taylor. I received one thousand, two hundred and eighteen cakes of copper from Rolls, on Wednesday, the 26th of February; I delivered them on board the Mellish, at Blackwall, in the Thames, outward bound, part on the 27th and the remainder on the 28th of February.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you on board all the time - A. Yes, and had them locked up under hatches.

JOSIAH SULY . I am in the employ of Messrs. Majori-banks, as rigger and labourer on board the Mellish. I was on board in the afternoon when the copper was put on board, both on Thursday and Friday - it was stowed in different places in the hold, and on Monday the 3d of March, I found three cakes stowed in different places from where they originally were. Other goods had come on board so that we could not get to the copper to count it without unlading the vessel.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You have not ascertained how much remains on board - A. No. There were thirty labourers employed on board getting in the cargo. I had not observed the prisoner on board.

GEORGE HARVEY . I am foreman of the labourers on board. On Thursday, while the copper was putting on board, I saw the prisoner there, he went between the decks, and said he had come to buy a cable - I do not know how long he stopped. He was there again on the Friday.

MR. KERSHAW re-examined. Mr. Majoribanks and I are the sole owners of the vessel. These cakes of copper are much smaller than the usual size. They cost 1 s. 1 d. per l b. - one weighs 56 lbs., and the others 28 lbs. each.

Prisoner. I am a dealer in marine stores. I have no more to say.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-2

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

486. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the

20th of November , from the person of Thomas M'Kinnon , a 100 l.; a 20 l., and a 5 l. Bank notes, and 4 l., in monies numbered , his property.

THOMAS M'KINNON. I am a colour manufacturer . On the 20th of November, I was in Whitechapel - the prisoner accosted me, and I went with her to a house in Chapel-street, Commercial-road - I never saw her before. Soon after I got into the house I was taken sick; she was with me at the time. She left the room, and I suspected I was robbed, and missed 129 l. odd; it consisted of a 100 l., a 20 l., and a 5 l. Bank notes, and the rest in gold and silver. It was in my right hand breeches pocket. I raised an alarm - this was about eight o'clock at night. A man named Archer offered to assist me - he led me round several streets, but did not find her. I knew the numbers and dates of the notes, and stopped them next morning - they were 100 l., 19,834, 11th of October; 20 l., 3948, 24th of October, 1822. I do not know the number of the 5 l. note.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went to a house of ill-fame - A. Yes - I was in the house about quarter of an hour; there was a light in the room. I described her to the officers.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I keep the King and Queen, public-house, in Chapel-street. On the 20th of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner - I served Archer with two pints of beer; a man named Griffiths came in after him, and asked for a man in a fustian jacket; I called Archer out to him - they spoke together, and then went away again - the prisoner was behind him. Griffiths called Archer out, and said,

"Come along, it's all right" - they all went out together. I had frequently seen the prisoner in their company - Archer was tried here afterwards. M'Kinnon has since shewn me the house he went to - I know the prisoner lived there at that time.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a slopseller, and live in Cable-street. A girl of the same size and appearance as the prisoner, came into my shop on the 20th of November, about nine o'clock at night, with Griffiths, who produced a 100 l., a 20 l., and a 5 l. note, and asked me what notes they were, I told him - there was a name on the back of the 100 l. note, but it was blotted; the name of the signing clerk was Tarquer or some such name. He said if I would change the others he would lay out 5 l. in clothes, I refused, and they left. I followed them, and lost them in Rosemary-lane. I mentioned it to Plunkett.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am an officer. On the 20th of November, about nine o'clock at night, I saw Lewis, and went with him in pursuit of the man and woman, but did not find them; from his description of the woman, I suspected the prisoner. I saw M'Kinnon next day, and he said she was a short stout woman.

GEORGE DYER . I attend here for the Bank. I produce the 100 l. note, No. 19,834, dated 11th of October, 1822; it came into the Bank on 23d of December - it was signed Triquet. The letters Triq are still on it.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of March, at the corner of Aldersgate-street; I had been looking for her ever since the 20th of November, but could never find her.

HOWARD LEWIS . Here is

"Ward, November 9th" on the note - I am certain it is that Griffiths produced.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were they with you - A. Above five minutes; there was a light in the shop.

MR. M'KINNON. I know this note by the number and date.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230409-3

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

487. RICHARD GRIGG was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sir Charles Pole , Bart., on the King's highway, on the 15th of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a gold chain, value 2 l.; three gold seals, value 2 l., and a gold key, value 1 l. , his property.

SIR CHARLES POLE , BART. On the 15th of March, about ten minutes before six o'clock in the evening, I was close at my door in Harley-street - my servant had gone before me, and the door was open. The prisoner made a rush at my watch; he seized the chain which broke, and separated from the watch, and he ran off with it - I gave the alarm of Stop thief! and followed him with my servant and others; he turned into Devonshire-street, three doors from my house, and into Devonshire-mews, where he was taken and brought back to me by my servant and others; he said he hoped I would forgive him as it was the first time. My chain and seals were delivered me - I have them now.

WILLIAM DAVIDGE . I am servant to Sir Charles Pole . I pursued the prisoner - he was knocked down by somebody in Devonshire mews, and I secured him. I saw the chain and seals found within five yards of where I took him.

Prisoner's Defence, Written. Between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was going up Upper Harley-street, in my way to Paddington-street, to see a friend - I heard a cry of Stop thief; looked up, and a man immediately passed me; I followed him with others, he turned into Devonshire-street; we did not then see him, but concluding he had gone into the mews, we took that way, and fifty yards down the mews I was pushed down by the witness, who said,

"Oh! I have got you;" I replied you are mistaken, I am in pursuit of the thief, who is gone on before; but he took me back to the gentleman at the house, who said

"I have lost my chain and seals, have you got them, or, are you the person who took them;" being alarmed, I only declared my innocence, but the man who stopped me said he saw no one pass before me, which induced the gentleman to suspect I had robbed him. A person brought the chain and seals, which were found a short way from where I was pushed down; this strengthened the suspicion of my guilt, and I was taken to the office - these are the general facts of the case. The mews is a thoroughfare, and the man who stopped me was one hundred yards down, and the cry of Stop thief! had not reached his ear till we entered the mews in pursuit; the man we were pursuing was two hundred yards before us, therefore he could have passed the man unnoticed, and reached Weymonth-street.

JOHN LOUGHBOROUGH . I stopped the prisoner, and knocked him down. I was cleaning a carriage in the mews, and heard the cry of Stop thief! he was the first

who came down the mews. I saw the chain and seals picked up.

SIR CHARLES POLE . I swear positively that he is the man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18230409-4

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

488. THOMAS BARNES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Lucas Houghton , about the hour of one o'clock, in the night of the 19th of February , at Edmonton, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a clock, value 12 l.; a tea-caddy, value 20 s.; eight ounces weight of tea, value 3 s.; a spoon, value 1 s.; three coats, value 3 l.; an umbrella, value 1 l.; a table cloth, value 1 s., and two books, value 20 s. , his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. LUCAS HOUGHTON . I am a law-stationer , and have a country house in the parish of Edmonton . On Wednesday evening, the 19th of February, I was there, and was the last person up, and saw that the house was fastened up carefully. About seven o'clock next morning the servants, White, and Bye, called me up; I examined the premises and found somebody must have got down the grating where the coals are let into the cellar; it was lifted up - they had then got into the cellar, and cut away the wood work of the kitchen door, and undone the bolt; they had undone the kitchen window, and got out that way. I missed a table clock from the parlour, two volumes of a folio Bible, two great coats, and a body coat, an umbrella, a cloak, and a table cloth - my keys were taken out of my body coat with my pocket book, and left behind on a table. I also missed a tea caddy, which had been filled with tea a day or two before, and a silver caddy spoon in it. I went to town immediately, had hand bills printed, and distributed at the pawnbrokers, and on Friday, the 21st, I had information, and went to Mr. Button's a pawnbroker, Battle-bridge, and saw my great coat and the tea-caddy, still locked, and the spoon in it. The prisoner was a servant of mine; he had left me about nine months, and had been in a situation at Ponder's-end - he lived in Edmonton; I saw him on the Thursday evening after the robbery on the top of the Edmonton coach, at the Flower Pot , Bishopsgate-street; I went home on the same coach, and entered into conversation with him; he said he had not been to Edmonton for two days, that he had been in London after work; (this was the day on which I discovered the robbery.) I went home on getting to Edmonton, and had him taken into custody at his lodgings - he was searched, and four knives found upon him, and some tinder in a paper, and a file - one knife appears to fit the place in the door, where the wood is cut off; the constable fitted it. We found the feet of the stockings which he had on were muddy, as if he had been walking without shoes. I saw footsteps by the house in the morning, but did not notice them.

JOHN WHITE . I was in the prosecutor's service. At six o'clock my fellow servant called me up; it was light then. My master was afterwards called up. I observed the house in the situation described, and saw some hand marks on the top of the grating, and some footmarks, out of the kitchen window, on the ground, upon a flower border - they appeared to be made by a person without shoes, as there was no heel mark.

MARY BYE . I am servant to the prosecutor. I got up at six o'clock in the morning, it was just day light then. I went down, and found the house broken open, but saw nobody near the house. When the constable came he examined the premises.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. Mr. Houghton sent for me about eight o'clock in the morning. I saw some candle grease outside the kitchen window where the person had got out, and the print of a footmark on the flower border, which appeared to have been made by a person without a shoe; some more footmarks were on the gravel, at a greater distance from the house, these had shoemarks, and the appearance of a piece of leather having been put on at the toe, fastened on with four nails, the marks of which were visible. When I took the prisoner into custody, there was a piece of leather on his shoe with four nails - I said,

"Barnes, you ought to have put the leather here the contrary way;" it corresponded in appearance with the marks on the ground, I did not fit it. I went to his lodging to enquire for him about nine o'clock that morning, but did not find him - I was in search of him all the day, and in the evening took him. I found some pieces of wood at the house, and in his lodging three knives, and one in his waistcoat pocket, with the tinder and file. I fitted the blade of the knife to the piece of wood, it appeared to correspond with the impression; a piece had been broken out at the point of the knife, and there was a notch left in the door where it did not cut, and one piece of wood has the mark of the broken part. I asked where he had been all day; he said he had been at work at Tottenham, and said nothing about coming to town on the stage. Mr. Houghton was not with me. The file was in the paper with the tinder.

WILLIAM EDGE . I lodged in the same room as the prisoner at Edmonton, but not in the same bed. He came home at half-past nine o'clock on the night of the robbery, and got up and went out as the watchman was going past two o'clock; he did not say where he was going. I got up at half-past seven; he was not in bed then - I saw him again in the evening.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you awake all night - A. No. I sleep pretty sound.

DANIEL BUTTON . I am a pawnbroker of Battle-bridge, seven miles from Edmonton. On Thursday, the 20th of February, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned the coat and tea caddy. I looked at the caddy and asked where he got it; he said his wife bought it at a sale - I asked for the key, he said,

"Oh! the key is of no consequence, you will not have it long, I only want 1 l. on the two." I asked his name, he said,

" Lewis Tayley , Newington-green;" I asked where there, he said at a house opposite the Bull. I lent 14 s. on the coat, and 6 s. on the caddy. I saw a hand-bill next day and gave information to the prosecutor, who came on the Saturday morning and claimed them. I went to the House of Correction, saw the prisoner, and said he was the man.

Cross-examined Q. You never saw him before - A. No. I am certain of him; he was in the shop five or ten minutes. I wrote him two tickets. I was busy hanging out things, and watched him into a public-house

I described him to the prosecutor. The value of the caddy is about 13 s., and the coat 25 s.

MR. HOUGHTON. I know them; there is a cypher on the caddy, and the spoon in it. I also know the coat. The three coats were worth three guineas, and the clock twelve guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I never told Gibson I had been working at Tottenham. When I was going home on the coach, Mr. Houghton asked if I could get no work; I said I had been to town yesterday and again that day. When I got up in the morning, I thought it was five o'clock; the moon shone so bright into the room. I tried to get work at Tottenham, but could not, and went to town, and in crossing the fields to Newington, I overtook a man, who asked me to pawn the caddy and coat for him, and said he would give me some bread and cheese, and beer, and 1 s. - he came to Battle-bridge with me; I asked what name I should pawn them in; he said Tayley, and when we had had refreshment we parted. He said he might see me at Edmonton. This man has been brought into prison since, and put into the same ward as me - I got the Governor to move me as I did not like to be with him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18230409-5

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

489. HENRY PESTELL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Richard Birkenshaw , about the hour of eleven, in the forenoon, of the 9th of March , at St. Mary, Islington, (no person being therein) and stealing therein eight waistcoats, value 30 s.; fourteen handkerchiefs, value 18 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 7 s.; a pair of shoes, value 3 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 10 s.; three shirts, value 12 s.; three aprons, value 2 s.; a ring, value 12 s.; a pin, value 6 s.; twelve pounds of tea, value 20 s., and four pounds of coffee, value 5 s. , his property; and JOSEPH HATCHETT and JAMES DAY were indicted for feloniously receiving two waistcoats, value 8 s., part of the said goods, well knowing them to be stolen .

RICHARD BIRKENSHAW . I am a grocer , and live in Dorey-row, Holloway, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . On Sunday morning, the 9th of March, a little after eleven o'clock, I went out, leaving nobody at home, and taking the key with me - I returned about half-past eleven o'clock the same evening and found the door still locked; I unlocked it and went into the shop - I observed my drawers taken out of their places and put upon the counter. I went and fetched Mr. Spence, my next door neighbour; we got a light at his house, and went into the shop, and found a large screw driver and chisel - we then went up stairs into the sitting room and bed room, and found the boxes broken open, and my clothes all thrown about; I looked into a little box where I kept my money and missed twelve sovereigns, also a great quantity of wearing apparel. We then went down into the kitchen below the shop, and there found Pestell laying asleep against the door; I sent for the watchman, who took him to Islington watch-house, and there found upon him five handkerchiefs, three pair of white cotton stockings, and other things which were mine. I examined the house; they had got in at the front area door by taking out a piece where the bolt went into the post - that door opens into the area, so that they could pull it open; they had another door to enter into the kitchen, a pannel was taken out of that, and the bolts undone, which were bolted before - the shop door was forced also. I missed a quantity of tea, sugar candy, almonds, raisins, rice, and eight waistcoats, worth about 25 s., and other articles as stated in the indictment, worth more than 6 l. together. I had seen the prisoner Pestell several times before - he lived within twenty yards of my house; his father is a gardener. I do not know the other prisoners.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am a constable. I searched Pestell at the watch-house, and found six handkerchiefs, three pair of stockings, and a waistcoat on him, some in his hat, and some concealed in his trowsers - I produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SPENCE . I accompanied the prosecutor into the house, and found it in the state he has described. I should think it must have been done during church time.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended Hatchett on the 15th of March, in Duvalls-lane, Islington; Day was with us, he had been taken before.

JOHN TAYLOR . I apprehended Day on Friday, the 14th of March, in Hornsey-road, Islington. I had been to search Day's house on Monday, the 10th of March, but found nothing; but while I was searching I saw Hatchett outside. On the 14th I had information, and went down the Hornsey-road, and took Day - I said I came for some property stolen from Mr. Birkenshaw; he said he knew nothing of any property - I took him to Worship-street; he there said if he could get bail he could recover part of the property; that he knew where it was, it was not at a house, but in a field; the Magistrate said he could not have bail, but we might take him down with us, and get the property. Gleed and I went with him down the Hornsey-road, on Saturday, the 15th, Hatchett came out of a gentleman's house with a ladder; Collins my brother officer stopped him till I came up; Day then stopped with me while Hatchett, Gleed, and Collins went some where and brought back two waistcoats. Day had said that Hatchett knew where the property was as we came along from Worship-street. I left them in Gleed's custody at the Cock, public-house at Islington.

BARNARD GLEED . I accompanied Day, Taylor, and Collins. We met Hatchett in the Hornsey-road, and took him; I said,

"I am come for you about the robbery at Holloway; from information I have received you have got part of the property;" he said he had not, but he knew where it was; he then took us over a bank into a field, he got up into a tree, stooped down into the body of it, and took out two waistcoats and threw them down; he said he had them from Pestell, at the Plough, public-house, Hornsey-road. I handcuffed them, and took them to the office. We had left Day behind with Taylor.

Prisoner HATCHETT. It is false - I said I had them from Day.

GEORGE COLLINS . I heard Hatchett say he had the waistcoats from Pestell at the Plough.

RICHARD BIRKENSHAW . The waistcoats are mine - I have frequently worn one of them, the other is new. We did not take Pestell to the Plough in the way to the watch-house.

CHARLES STREET . I am a watchman. The prosecutor fetched me to his house, where we found Pestell.

PESTELL'S Defence. These two men are innocent of receiving the goods knowing them to be stolen.

One witness gave Pestell a good Character.

PESTELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

DAY - NOT GUILTY .

HATCHETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-6

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

490. RICHARD BEETHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a coat, value 30 s., the goods of Laureat Holmes ; a coat, value 20 s., the goods of John Hickey ; and a coat, value 10 s., the goods of John Carroll , in the dwelling-house of Peter Morris .

LAUREAT HOLMES. I lodge in Mr. Morris's house in Cato-street . The prisoner lodged there for nine nights, and slept in the same bed as me. On the 20th of February, I missed a great coat and a silk handkerchief; I had put my coat over the prisoner, who went to bed before me, as he said he had a very bad cold, and asked me to do so. I awoke at half-past three o'clock; he was in bed then, and the coat over him - I awoke again between four and five o'clock, he was gone and my coat and handkerchief - the room door was wide open, and the street door also. Hickey and Carroll slept in the same room as us; they missed their coats also. Mine was worth 30 s.; I have not found it. The prisoner was taken at six o'clock the same night.

JOHN HICKEY . I slept in the same room. Holmes awoke me, and I missed my body coat from the chair by the bed side, it was a new one - I gave 19 s. per yard for the cloth, which measured one yard and five eighths - I had had it four months, but only wore it on Sundays.

JOHN CARROLL . I lodged in the house. Holmes awoke me - I missed my body coat from a closet in the room.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a constable. I found 17 s. on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I let three men in drunk; it is a house where they come in at all hours.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-7

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

491. JAMES SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , two pewter pots, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Watts .

SAMUEL WATTS . I keep the Plough, public-house, in Rochester-row, Westminster . On the the 26th of February, I missed two pint pots; I went out and took the prisoner, about half an hour after, in Vincent-square, with them in his apron; there was one belonging to another person in his hat. I had not seen him in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-8

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

492. HUGH NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 7 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of Joseph Wood .

JOSEPH WOOD . I am a butcher , and live in Ogle-street, Goswell-street . On Saturday, the 15th of March, I was serving a customer in the shop, and saw the prisoner outside - I asked what he wanted; he made no answer. I went to weigh a joint of meat, and missed a quantity of pork - I pursued and caught him with it.

WILLIAM SHIRKS . I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor following the prisoner - the pork was on the ground about a minute before he was taken.

JOSEPH WOOD re-examined. I took the pork from him, he did not drop it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some boys running; the pork laid on the ground.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-9

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

493. WILLIAM JEFFERYS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a jacket, value 6 s.; a waistcoat, value 1 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I lodge in Limehouse causeway . On Sunday, the 2d of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and took a lodging for a week; he fetched his chest and clothes; I helped him carry them up stairs - he came down and sat by the fire, and then went up stairs; the landlady went up soon after, and found him in the room where I slept; he had no business there. A young man missed his night cap about eight o'clock; I then missed my clothes; he was in bed - I went to him, and asked if he knew anything of them, he said, No; but I found them in his bag. I sent for the watchman, and gave him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-10

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

494. JAMES STEWART and JOHN COX were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a necklace, value 2 s., the goods of Maria Bradley , widow , from the person of Amelia Bradley , spinster .

The name of the prosecutrix being Mary Ann , and not Maria, as stated in the indictment, the prisoner were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-11

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

495. ROBERT EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a watch, value 3 l.; a seal, value 6 l., and two keys, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Welch Whittard , from his person .

THOMAS WELCH WHITTARD . On the 5th of April, I went with my cousin Charles, to the White Horse stable yard, in Holborn - the prisoner came in after us; he asked if we could tell him where the coach office was; I said, No, and asked him which was the house door; he said he could not tell, and immediately snatched my watch out, and ran up the yard, and across Holborn into Turnstile - my cousin pursued him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You never saw him before - A. No. I am certain of him; he had corderoy breeches and a blue coat on. I saw that before he robbed me.

CHARLES WHITTARD . I went into the inn-yard with my cousin. The prisoner came and asked for the coach-office; I said I did not know where it was, and asked him if he knew where the door was; he said

"No." My cousin said,

"Charles, he has got my watch." I pursued him, and caught him at the corner of Turnstile. I am certain of him.

GEORGE HEATH . I was at the corner of Turnstile. I saw Mr. Whittard take the prisoner; there was something in his hand, which he threw down; I could not see what it was. Tyndal picked it up.

GEORGE TYNDAL . I picked up the watch. I saw the prisoner throw it down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230409-12

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

496. MARY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , a pair of sheets, value 5 s.; a blanket, value 4 s.; an iron, value 6 d., and 20 lbs. of feathers, value 18 s., the goods of William Bishop , in a lodging room, let to her .

The lodging being let to the prisoner's husband, and not to her, she was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-13

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

497. FREDERICK BOUGHTON and MARY ANN , HIS WIFE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a ring, value 5 s.; a seal, value 5 s., and forty-one sovereigns, the property of Alexander Duff and William Brooks , from the person of Joseph Rogers .

WM. PARKER. I keep St. Botolph's watch-house. The female prisoner came to me on the 1st of March, about five in the afternoon, and brought me nineteen sovereigns and a gold seal, and said they belonged to a man who was intoxicated, and who was then at her house asleep, and desired me to take care of it for him. Went over to the house afterwards, and saw the man. She came about an hour after, and wanted money from me to go to market. I refused, and went over to the house, and found the man dressing himself. I told him she had given me nineteen sovereigns; he said he gave her 36 l. to take care of.

COURT. There is nothing to bring the charge home to the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-14

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

498. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , eight gowns, value 24 s., and three shifts, value 3 s. , the goods of Ann Howard .

ANN HOWARD . I was servant to Mr. Hats, and left him on a Saturday, and went to lodge at Islington . The prisoner lodged in the same house. I left my clothes there, and got a place at Dr. Duncan's, and sent the prisoner to fetch my clothes on the Monday; she did not return. I neither saw her or my clothes till she was taken. I have since found some of them. I asked her why she took them; she said she did not know.

JAMES MAHONY . I am a constable. On the 13th of March I took the prisoner at the Crown, public-house, Seven Dials. She came down stairs, and brought a bundle of clothes and her box from her bed room. I delivered them at the watch-house.

JAMES ASHTON . On the 13th March Mahony delivered this bundle into my charge, with the box and bundle. Howard claimed the bundle, also a shift and pair of stockings in the box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-15

LONDON CASES, before Mr. Recorder.

499. JOSEPH STARKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 60 lbs. weight of lead, value 10 s. , the goods of William Good .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

JOHN BRADEY . I am street-keeper of Broad-street. On the 27th of March, between three and four in the afternoon, I was standing close to the Bank Coffee-house, and somebody called me. I found the prisoner stopped by a man; he was scuffling with him. I asked what was the matter. The man said the prisoner had lead about him which belonged to the Bank. He put his hand in his bosom, and pulled this lead out, and said,

"That is all I have got." I took him inside the Bank gates, and found two more ingots of lead on him, with the word

"Bank" stamped upon them; each weighed 28 lbs. I secured him, and found 7 l. 9 s. 6 d. on him and a silver watch.

WILLIAM GOOD . I am plumber to the Bank of England. The prisoner was in my service between seven and eight years. I generally send the Bank about a ton of lead at a time, in ingots; they are cast in moulds, with the word

"Bank" written on them. I never sold ingots to any body but the Bank.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When did these go to the Bank - A. They never order more till the rest is consumed.

WALTER PAYNE . I am clerk of the works at the Bank. I know the lead. When we receive the lead I always lock it up. Nobody has the delivery of it but myself. I gave out, on the 26th of March, eight ingots to the prisoner for one flashing, to be melted into the stone. He would not have to go out of the Bank gates with it. The work was to be done inside the building. He had worked there for more than six months.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Payne always gave me the key to help myself.

WALTER PAYNE . I delivered the key to the porter to give out a certain quantity. I was in the yard, and saw him take them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-16

500. FREDERICK DENMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a half sovereign , the money of the Reverend James William Bellamy , clerk.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THE REVEREND JAMES WILLIAM BELLAMY . I am a clergyman , and principal master of Merchant Tailor's school . Benjamin Winter was a scholar under my care for two years and a half. I have seen him several times since Christmas about his settling in life. I received a letter purporting to come from him; I sealed that letter up with half a sovereign in it, and delivered it to one of my servants, directing it to Mr. B. Winter; I told the servant to deliver it to him, or to any person calling in his name. I subsequently received other letters similar to that, and always sent them back in the same way, but all of them containing larger sums than the one in question. The letter was signed R. Winter, and requested the loan of 10 s.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You ordered it to be delivered to whoever called for it - A. It was left at my door by a young man who said he would call in a quarter of an hour for an answer.

ROBERT TOWNE . I am servant to Mr. Bellamy. He

delivered me the sealed letter; I put it on the dresser for Crouch.

JAMES CROUCH . I am servant to Mr. Bellamy. On the 22d of February I took a letter in; the prisoner brought it, and I gave him the answer to it in the same state Towne delivered it to me.

Cross-examined. Q. He was totally ignorant of the contents for all you know - A. Yes; he called for the answer before; it was not ready, and he called again.

BENJAMIN WINTER . I know the prisoner. I never wrote any letter to Mr. Bellamy for money, nor ever commissioned the prisoner to write any. I had no knowledge of his application to Mr. Bellamy; he never delivered me any money. I knew him by the name of Frederick Milton, Whitworth . He knew I was upon good terms with Mr. Bellamy.

Cross-examined. Q. You were frequently in his company - A. Yes; we went to different places together. He sent letters to people in my presence, and I believe he received answers to them; and some enclosed money. I never received any money in a letter. I had mentioned Mr. Bellamy's name to him as a gentleman disposed to do a generous action. I wrote a letter about a situation, as the prisoner said he could get me one. I never saw any of his letters to Mr. Bellamy till after this was discovered. I have seen him write letters to persons who he expected would do him a generous action; he was to reap the benefit of them himself; I had nothing to do with it. I never received any money whatever from him - he never paid any tavern bills for me. There was a letter which he wrote for me in consequence of my writing a bad hand; I delivered that to a friend of mine, and waited for the answer. I mentioned my brother's address to him, and he wrote to him, representing himself as Lieutenant Whitworth, and that he could get me a situation. I had told him Mr. Bellamy's address, and that he had assisted me, and told him I had an uncle named Wheeler. I have seen the prisoner since he was apprehended, and told him that he was in danger of being transported; that it was entirely owing to himself, and said I should pity him. I knew what he was charged with at that time. Mr. Bellamy had shown me the letters.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you first become acquainted with him - A. A week before he was taken; he introduced himself to me on Saffron-hill. The first transaction between us, was his sending a letter to Sir Alexander Proctor , commander of a vessel; he said, by signing his name to it, I should get the situation; that letter was written partly by him and partly by me. A letter came to Mr. Bellamy while I was there; Mr. Bellamy shewed it to me, but I had no knowledge of it. The prisoner was apprehended in consequence of it.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You met him on Saffron-hill - A. Yes, at an eating-house - he came up stairs, and introduced himself to me. I was out of employ at the time.

MR. BELLAMY. In consequence of what passed between Winter and me, the prisoner was apprehended, and brought to my house - I charged him with this; he said he had made the application, and received the money, and trusted I would forgive him.

The prisoner in his Defence, stated that by the prosecutor's request, he had exerted himself to get him a situation - that he had got him to write letters in his name, to Mr. Bellamy, by his consent. He came, and said

"his uncle would forgive him if I let the blame fall on me."

MR. BELLAMY. Martin brought him to my house two hours after the letter came.

Prisoner to WINTER. Q. Did you not authorize me to write in your name, to Mr. Deveux, of Bishopsgate-street, for assistance - A. That was written in my name, and carried by me - that was to be applied to my use.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-17

501. JOHN SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 18 lbs. of iron, value 5 s. , the goods of James Walker .

JAMES WALKER . I am a smith , and live in William-street, New Bridge-street. My manufactory is in Harp-alley , the prisoner was in my employment. On the 25th of March, about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning, I went to the manufactory, and found him coming down stairs, and asked where he was going; he said, he should not be gone five minutes; I said he should not go, as he had done that so often; he insisted upon going, and after he was gone, it occured to me that he had something about him. I followed him into Cow-cross, and saw him go into an iron shop, and just as he entered the door, I sprung upon him, and took a piece of iron from him. The officer found two other pieces in his pocket, he begged for mercy; he earned 4 l. a week, and therefore I refused to pardon him. I have advanced him 45 l. to get his family out of distress.

WILLIAM KELLY . I am in the prosecutor's employ, I saw the prisoner leave the premises. I know the iron to be Mr. Walker's property.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am beadle, I found two pieces of iron upon him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-18

502. LAWRENCE WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 36 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., and forty-six Dutch tiles, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Curson Hansard , fixed to a certain building belonging to him .

SECOND COUNT, not stating them to be fixed.

MR. THOMAS CURSON HANSARD . I have some premises in Patemont-row , under repair, which are my sole property.

HARBART JOHN WARD . I am a bricklayer, and was employed on the premises. I had sent the prisoner as a labourer there the day before this occurred; Mr. Hansard called on the 26th of March, and gave me information which led me to Kerby's where I found a basket, containing a number of Dutch tiles and lead, which was cut in three pieces. and weighed about 40 lbs.; they fitted to each other. I took them to the premises, and missed some lead from a gutter by the side of a chimney, which had been pulled down the day before. I measured the lead, and from the manner it was folded, I have no doubt it was removed from the gutter. It had not been moved by my direction. I was repairing the premises for Mr. Hansard. I noticed the day before, that one of the fire places was lined with

Dutch tiles, and white washed over, and had told the bricklayer to take them down and send them to my house, but they never were sent. As the prisoner came out of the office next day, I told him I was very sorry he should have acted in such a way, and that he was a different man to what I thought him; he smiled, and said misfortunes would happen.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the tiles were taken down by your men, you cannot say - No. When I last saw the lead, it laid in the gutter covered with tiles. He only came to work for me the day before.

RALPH SMITH KERBY . I am a constable. On the morning of the 26th of March, before ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder, coming round the corner towards Newport-street, The tiles were at the top, but from his manner of carrying it, I thought there must be something heavy underneath. I followed him into Shoe-lane, to one Green, a dealer in marine stores; he put the basket on the floor. I asked what he had got; he answered nothing. I asked where he brought it from, he said, from the Old Bailey. While I was looking into the basket, he tried to get by me. I seized him, and struggled with him for ten minutes, and secured him. I produced the basket to Mr. Hansard that morning. The edges of the lead were bright and fresh cut.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18230409-19

503. MARTIN MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , two bags, value 2 s. 10 d.; four pecks of peas, value 10 s.; a peck of beans, value 2 s. 6 d.; 4 ozs. of onion seed, value 1 s.; 4 ozs. of carrot seed, value 6 d.; 4 ozs. of leak seed, value 1 s., and two quarts of radish seed, value 3 s. , the goods of John Fair , and others, his partners.

JOHN FAIR . I am a seedsman , and live in Blackman-street, Borough. On the 28th of February, I sent the cart into the City with these seeds. Field, my carman, drove.

JAMES FIELD . I am carman to Messrs. Fair and Co. On the 28th of February, I had these seeds in the cart. We delivered bags of seeds at different inns. I went down the yard of the White Horse, Cripplegate , leaving the horse and cart standing there. Every thing was safe when I took the book out of the cart to take there. I returned in five minutes and met the prisoner carrying a bag on his shoulder, and a good many more with him. I turned back and saw that it was my master's; they took him and the bag into the booking office. I know it to be my master's.

JAMES DOLLMAN . I am porter at the White Horse, Cripplegate. I saw the cart at the gate. A woman came down the yard; in consequence of what she said, I ran to the cart, and saw the prisoner down London-wall, about thirty yards from the cart, with a bag, running. I stopped him, and he threw the bag down on my feet; I picked it up, and another man caught him in my sight.

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I live in Bunhill-row, and was coming up Cripplegate-buildings, and saw a man take the bag out of the cart, and give it to another, who put it on the prisoner's shoulder, and told him to run. I pursued him down London-wall, and saw him throw it down, he was secured.

ANN BUTCHER . I am sister to Davis, and was with her. I saw four or five men round the cart, and looked up the gateway, the others stood on the opposite side, and a third walked round the cart; a tall man let down the cart tail, and took out a bag, and gave it to another man, who put it on the prisoner's shoulder. I am certain of him. I saw him turn the corner of London-wall. I gave information; he was brought back in a few minutes.

WILLIAM HUNT . I laid hold of the prisoner as I came out of Currier's-hall; he was running, and two women and two men were following him. He threw the bag down, and I stopped him.

JAMES TOMKIN . The prisoner was delivered to me with the bag; it was directed to Coventry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-20

504. JOSEPH TUNNICLIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , two yards of figured sarsnet, value 7 s.; one yard and a half of lavantine silk, value 9 s., and a yard of florentine silk, value 8 s. , the goods of William Leaf , and others, his partners.

WILLIAM LEAF . I am a warehouseman , and live in the Old Change. I have two partners. The prisoner was employed by me for three months; he boarded in the house, but lodged out. This property was in my warehouse shortly before it was taken. The officer came to me on Monday morning, the 24th of March, and asked if I had a lad named Tunnicliff, and produced these articles, which I knew to be ours - I compared them with the pieces in the warehouse, from which they had been cut, without our knowledge. The prisoner was then in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Did you receive a good character with him - A. Yes. The silk matches the pieces they are cut from. There is an irregular mark in the warp, which tallies exactly.

JAMES SHAW . I am an officer of Farringdon ward. On the 22d of March, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he had this silk, one piece in each trowsers pocket, and the other in his coat pocket. He was too drunk to speak or open, his eyes. A young man who had been drinking with him said they both lived with Mr. Leaf, who claimed the property.

Cross-examined. Q. In what state was the other young man - A. Tipsy, but not so much so as him. The young man said he knew nothing of the silk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-21

505. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , two yards of black silk serge, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Wood , to whom he was servant.

CHARLES WOOD . I am a tailor , and live in Ivy-lane, Newgate-street. The prisoner was in my service as foreman .

ESTHER COLLIS . I am a piece-broker, and live in

Cloth-fair. On the evening of the 21st of March, I bought two yards of black silk serge of the prisoner, for 6 s. Mr. Wood saw it next morning, and claimed it - the prisoner was brought to my shop at the time, and said he had sold it to me.

FRANCIS BURTON . I am a piece-broker. Mr. Wood called on me; I told him such a piece of silk had been offered me the night before by the prisoner. I afterwards saw it at Collis's; it appeared to be the same piece.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Wood's house - he at first denied it, but afterwards said where he had sold it, and went with me to Mrs. Collis's; she had given it up to Wood before that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230409-22

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 10.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

506. JOHN FAULKNER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a glass bottle, value 20 s. , the goods of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am a surgeon , and live in Ann-street, Manchester-square . On the 17th of March, this bottle was in my window. About half-past nine o'clock at night I heard the curtain drawn aside, and found the door open - I saw the prisoner about three yards of with it. I called Stop thief! he ran off, and in putting the bottle down he broke it. He was secured without my losing sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-23

507. WILLIAM KITCHENSIDE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 30 cwt. of potatoes, value 6 l. , the goods of George Atkinson .

GEORGE ATKINSON , I am a potatoe salesman , and live at Hoxton. On the 14th of March, I was discharging a cargo of potatoes at Griffin's Wharf, in Tooley-street - the prisoner came up and bought 30 cwt.; he said he had not got the money with him, but if I would send them he would be sure to send it back by the carman. I sold them for ready money on delivery - he gave me a card,

"S. Robson, Covent Garden-market, and No. 119, Drury-lane." I booked it, and made out a bill in that name. Smith took them, and had orders to be sure to bring the money back. He said he would send some silver back for them, and not copper. They came to 6 l. 9 s. - I never received the money.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a carman. I took the potatoes to Drury-lane - the prisoner stood in the shop; I asked him for the money; he said he was going down, and would pay my master for this load, and buy another. He rode about a hundred yards in the cart with me; then jumped out and ran away.

SAMUEL ROBSON . I keep the shop in Drury-lane. I had bought these potatoes of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-24

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

508. JAMES BYNON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a bill of exchange, for payment of and value 30 l. , the property of William Devey .

WILLIAM DEVEY . I received a 30 l. bill of exchange from Joseph Johnson and Co., drawn by Bynon; whether it was James or John I cannot say - it was accepted in the name of Smith, and was due on the 3d of March; on that day I delivered it to Wright to take for payment. I have not seen it since.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am clerk to the prosecutor. On the 3d of March I took the bill for payment, to No. 19, Millbank-street, Westminster, at a grocer's shop - it was accepted by James Smith , and payable there. There was a woman behind the counter; I asked if that was Mr. Smith's; she said it was, but he was not at home - I shewed her the bill, and she sent a child to tell him he was wanted - I delivered the bill into her hands. The child went out and returned in two or three minutes with the prisoner. The woman in the interim beckoned to some person in the street. When the prisoner came, I asked if his name was Smith, but got no answer - the woman immediately put the bill into his hands, and he put it into his pocket, and then gave me his card, with the name of

"Bynon, Little James-street, Gray's Inn-lane," on it - he said he should detain the bill, and that it had been got from him in an improper manner. I said I wished him to accompany me to our counting-house, in Holland-street, Blackfriars, and he went willingly - Mr. Devey was from home; I went to the Coal-exchange, Thames-street, for him, but before I returned the prisoner was gone - I had told him I was going there to enquire for him; it is about a mile from the counting-house. He had not said he would wait until I returned. I did not see him him again till he was in custody.

MR. DEVEY. I took the bill of Johnson's and Co., coal merchants, at Vauxhall, for goods sold and delivered; it had their endorsements on it, but I cannot say to whom it was payable, whether to the drawer's order or not. I think it was made payable to the drawer's.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You knew no Bynon - A. No. Johnson has admitted to me since, that he never had value for the bill.

ELIZA FIELD . I live with Mrs. Smith as servant. When Wright came in, mistress sent me for Mr. Bynon, whom I had seen before; mistress told me to see if I could find Mr. Bynon. I found him standing at the butcher's shop nearly opposite; I think it was between one and two o'clock; when we got in, Wright held the bill in his hand, he asked Mrs. Smith, if that (Bynon) was Mr. Smith, she said

"No, that is Mr. Bynon," he then held the bill in his hand towards Mr. Bynon, who took it out of his hand, folded it up and put it in his pocket; as he put it in, he asked Wright where he brought it from, he said from Mr. Devey, coal-merchant. Mr. Bynon, then took out a card, and said Here is my card; I shall detain the bill, as it has been fraudulently kept from me; he then went out of the

shop; Wright turned to Mrs. Smith, and said, he should look to her for the bill.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 28th of November, I placed this bill in the hands of Mr. Hatch, who offered to get it discounted by Johnson, a coal-merchant; he came to me and said, it was not convenient for Johnson to give the cash that day, but he would give a cheque for it next morning. Johnson avoided it for four or five days, and at last wrote to Hatch, stating that he detained it in part of 50 l. due to him from Hatch. I applied at Union Hall, for a summons, but the Magistrate would not interfere, but refered me to a solicitor, but Johnson took no notice; I therefore waited at Smith's. When it became due the girl fetched me; Mrs. Smith, handed it over to me; I put it into my pocket, and gave the young man my card as he states.

JAMES TIMOTHY HATCH , I live in Nile-place, New Kent-road. I received this bill from the prisoner to get discounted. I went to Mr. Johnson, who had previously offered to discount for me, he asked me to endorse it, which I did; he said if I would call on Saturday, he would do it. I went, the clerk desired me to come on Monday, which I did, and Johnson said it was not convenient; he made the same excuse five times. I at last asked him for the bill, he said he was going out of town, and would leave it with his clerk. I went next morning, he said, if I would go down to Vauxhall-walk, it should be sent. Bynon and I went, and in half an hour the clerk brought me a note. I have never received the bill or money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-25

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

509. GEORGE ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Searing , on the King's highway, on the 10th of January , at St. Mary, Abbott, Kensington, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a handkerchief, value 6 d.; two ounces of tobacco, value 9 d.; a half-crown; a shilling, and two sixpences , his property.

JAMES SEARING . I am a labouring gardener , and live at Hammersmith. About a fortnight after Christmas, I had been to Mr. Pocock's, Whitefriars, and received 8 s., and on my return I went into the Goat, public house, at Kensington, and called for a pint of beer, and had it in the tap-room. I found four men there in company together, and in good humour, and quiet. We got into conversation; they said they supposed I was a pensioner, and had just been to get my pension, and said.

"Old cock, you are a hearty cock; drink with us." I said,

"No, gentlemen, I am not used to drink with strangers." They said, Oh, then I was above it, and pressed me. I did drink with them, and put my pint into their pot. I mentioned the name of Ralph Stockley , of the Half-way house; one of them said they knew him d - d well, and would shew him in five minutes; that he had buried his wife the week before. We all set off together to see Stockley; it was between Kensington and Hyde Park ; it was a little past nine o'clock in the evening. We got to the end of the high wall, and then a tall man, who they called Smith, was alongside me, on my left; my right hand was to the wall, and the prisoner was close at my heels on the right, next the wall, and the other three were outside. The tall man turned his head towards me, with the pipe in his mouth, and said,

"Old cock, you'll see Stockley in a moment," and on coming to the end of the wall they tripped me up, knelt upon me, and caught me by the throat; his knees were on my right chest; my head laid against the ditch; he screwed my neck round to the left, and the prisoner took my handkerchief and money out of my left pocket. It was a half-crown and two shillings in silver in my left-hand jacket-pocket; I lost a sixpence, twopence-half-penny, and some tobacco in a paper, from my right-hand pocket. I received no blows, but was very much hurt in the chest; I had two ribs broken, and my lungs injured. The prisoner was one of the four men in the house when I went in; he was sitting on my left, and talking about Malta. I was confined to my bed several weeks in consequence of the injury, and attended by the doctor. They all left me on getting my money, and ran down the lane. The watchman came on; I crawled down to the turnpike with him, and with assistance I got to Hammersmith that night. I did not see the prisoner again until I recovered, when he was in custody, in the cage, at Kensington. I went to the Goat afterwards, and the landlord knew me.

Prisoner. Q. What time did it happen - A. A little after nine o'clock in the evening. When I called on Cole, the landlord, he said he had heard of it.

Q. Did you know me before you saw me that night - A. I was never in his company, but had seen him frequently before, driving a glass coach at Kensington at one time.

Q. Did you turn back to look behind you after you left the Goat - A. Yes. I saw him on my knees, taking the money out of my pocket. He was close at my heels all the way under the wall.

WILLIAM COLE . I keep the Goat, at Kensington. About a fortnight after Christmas, one evening, between eight and nine o'clock, the prosecutor came to my house; the prisoner and three more were there, and had a pot of porter; the prosecutor called for a pint; the prisoner and his companions were talking to him; I heard some name mentioned; I think it was Ralph Stockley . The prosecutor was enquiring about him; they said they knew him, and would shew him. The prosecutor and all four men went away together, and turned towards town. The prosecutor appeared to be sober, and so was the prisoner and his companions. I did not see the prosecutor again for a month a two after. I had heard nothing about him until he came - I recollect his being the man who was in his company. Neither the prisoner nor his companions ever came to my house afterwards, to my knowledge; nor did they frequent it before. I have sometimes seen the prisoner driving a hackney-coach. I do not know what house he frequented. I am positive he is one of the four who were talking to the prosecutor, and who went out with him.

Prisoner. Q. Were any more persons in the tap-room besides us four - A. Not any.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I took the prisoner into custody on Thursday, the 20th of March, as he came out of the Marquis of Granby, public-house, at Kensington. The prosecutor had described him to me the night before; Butler was with me. I fetched the prosecutor, who immediately

said he was the man who took the money from his pocket, but not the man who used him ill.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not represented to you that I had not been out of that place from the time the robbery was committed - A. I told him he was charged with a highway robbery; he was very particular in enquiring when and where it was - I have seen him about before. I have endeavoured to find Smith, but cannot.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the charge. I went to the public-house with Smith, to have a pint of beer; two more came in, who were strangers to me, but Smith knew them - we sat down together, and they began talking to the prosecutor. When I came out, I turned to the right, towards a corner for a necessary purpose, and went straight home. It is unfortunate for me that he does not know the date when it happened, or I could have brought respectable witnesses, who knew I was at home at the time. The Magistrate particularly asked if he saw my hand in his pocket; he said he felt me, that he could not tell it was my hand, but he thought so. I had not been out of the town a long time before or since, and could have been taken if I was wanted. I have known Smith some time; he is a stone-mason.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18230409-26

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

510. JOHN MOUNSEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Dane , about the hour of seven in the night of the 29th of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein a silver mug, value 2 l. 10 s., and fifty gold pins, value 7 l. , his property.

THOMAS DANE . I am a jeweller , and live in Regent-street, Oxford-street . On the 29th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was behind my counter; it was dark - I heard a crash of glass at the shop window, which is plate glass; it made a great noise. I looked to the window, and saw different things in motion; I ran out at the private door, and saw a person running, whom I believe to be the prisoner; he was close at the corner of Castle-street - he turned along Castle-street; I followed crying Stop thief! Upon getting into Castle-street, I saw him again. He went down three turnings before he was taken, and was therefore three times out of my sight - I found him knocked down, and on the ground, in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square - I pulled him up, and brought him back to the shop. Lloyd delivered me a silver mug, value 2 l. 10 s., and a cushion, containing fifty gold pins, value 7 l. 10 s.; I had seen them in the window two hours before. I gave them to Sellers.

HENRY LLOYD . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running in Castle-street; I tried to stop him, but he threw himself round, and passed me. I saw a silver mug in one hand, and a cushion of pins in the other - I am certain of him. I joined in the pursuit, and saw him knocked down and taken - I never lost sight of him. I saw the cushion and mug, which I picked up and delivered to the prosecutor.

THOMAS FALKUS . I stopped the prisoner, and tripped him up - the silver cup was in his left hand. I fell down with him, and did not notice the cushion. Lloyd took up the cup.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I produce the property.

THOMAS DANE . They are mine, and have my shop mark on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and they stopped me. I never had the things.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18230409-27

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

511. BENJAMIN PIPER and WILLIAM PIPER were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Mary Haggar , Letitia Haggar , and Hannah Haggar , with intent to steal .

The prosecutrixs did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-28

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

512. DANIEL DENNE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Miles , on the 9th of March , at Edmonton, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a scarf, value 20 s. , her property.

ANN MILES . I am servant to Mr. Bury, who lives at Southgate, in Edmonton parish. On Sunday evening, the 9th of March, at seven o'clock, I was coming down the road, towards my master's house, and was about half a mile from the house - a man ran after me, and caught hold of me; I begged of him to let me alone; he said he would not - I said,

"If you don't you may depend on it it will be worse for you;" he then let go - I went on a little way, and he laid hold of me again, and threw me down by the side of a ditch, and said,

"D - n you, if you speak again I'll murder you." He behaved very indecent to me; took up my clothes, and undid his own - I screamed out; he laid upon me, and endeavoured to posses himself of my person. Mr. Sandilands came up; he then got up and took my scarf, and ran away with it. I have seen him pass the house before, but never spoke to him. The prisoner is the man, I am certain of him. I saw him again on the Monday.

Prisoner. Q. Did I take the shawl off your neck, or off the ground - A. I do not know.

ROBERT SANDILANDS . I live at Southgate. On Sunday evening, the 9th of March, I was at home with my family - two young girls under fourteen years of age, came into the house about seven o'clock, and said there was a man murdering a woman below my house; I immediately went out with a candle, which I gave into their hands, and proceeded to the spot as fast as possible, and found the prisoner on the top of the prosecutrix in the ditch; I am sure it was him. I knew the prosecutrix before - I heard her cry in a faint voice, when I got within a short distance of her,

"Oh! my father" - seeing him in that situation, I said,

"You d - d rascal, what are you at," and in stooping down to lay hold of him he jumped up, stooped down, and took her scarf off the ground, and ran off; it lay close by her - she immediately jumped up, threw her arms round my neck, and cried,

"Oh! my father," and fainted. Joseph Bitcheno was behind, and pursued the prisoner while I attended to her. I knew the prisoner before; he has been in the neighbourhood from about last June.

JOSEPH BITCHENO . I was coming towards the young woman one way, and Mr. Sandilands was coming the other. I met him just on the spot; I saw the prisoner upon the prosecutrix; I had heard her crying out before I came up, and that brought me to the spot. Mr. Sandilands said,

"You d - d

rascal what do you do here;" he immediately jumped up, and I saw him take the scarf from her person - I am sure he took it from her person; he ran off, I pursued, and overtook him about a quarter of a mile off; he dropped the scarf in the way - I did not take it up. I am sure he is the man - I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not appear in liquor - A. I do not know him sufficient to say whether he was or not. I am twenty-two years old. I am positive he took the shawl from her person.

ANN MILES re-examined. Q. Had you yourself taken off your scarf - A. No, if it was off me, it must have come off in the scuffle.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, but that I was drinking at the public-house all the afternoon, and got intoxicated - I could get no more beer at the house, and went to another, and stopped there till between seven and eight o'clock, came down the road, and met two lads, who said,

"There is a woman going on before you, catch hold of her;" I went and caught hold of this woman, in a lark, not intending anything. My hat fell off, and my handkerchief fell out - I picked it up, and that is what they saw.

JOHN EARL . I am an officer. The prosecutrix brought me the scarf; it was brought to her house by a person who found it.

ANN MILES. Mr. Inwood's man brought it to me, and I gave it to the officer.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18230409-29

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

513. ANN NORRIS and SOPHIA FRAZER were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Borkett , on the 3d of March , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, three half-crowns , his monies.

GEORGE BORKETT . I work at the gun trade . On Monday, the 3d of March, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was returning from the country to town, to work, and was looking in at a shop window in Whitechapel ; the prisoner Norris came up, and stood at my side, and asked me to go with her to have a drop of beer - I accompanied her to her house, as she called it, in George-yard, Whitechapel, into a room up stairs, and gave her 1 s. to send for a pint of beer - she called Frazer, who was on the stairs, gave her the shilling, and told her to get a pint of beer; she went, and returned in about ten minutes, without any, and demanded money for the room; I gave her sixpence; she said that was not enough, she would have more before I went, and then I gave her another shilling, (Norris was in the room all the time); she demanded more; I said I would not give more - then one came on my right side, and the other on my left, and Frazer forced her hand into my breeches pocket, and took out three half crowns, and ran down stairs; Norris ran before me, and placed herself across the stair case, that I should not follow; she said,

"Don't shove me" - she kept me there about a minute, and then said,

"Now you may run after her;" I ran down into the street, and saw Frazer turning the corner into the next street - I followed, but when I got to the corner, I could see no more of her. I immediately went to Lambeth-street, and told Combes, the officer, and in the evening we went to look for them, and met them walking together in Whitechapel, going towards Aldgate church. Combes took them, and just before he got to the office, Frazer said to me,

"Young man, I'll give you the three half crowns back, if you don't swear to us" - I told Combes, and he told me not to take it. I am certain they are the women. I was sober when I went to the house. I live at Chingford, and did not know this neighbourhood before.

ROBERT COMBES . The prosecutor came to me about two o'clock, on the 3d of March; he appeared quite sober - I told him to come again in the evening; he did so, and we went to Whitechapel, and he pointed the prisoners out to me; I took them. I did not hear Frazer offer him any money.

Prisoner NORRIS. Q. Did you not take another woman - A. Griffiths took one in the dark; the prosecutor immediately said she was not the person - we walked on and met the prisoners.

NORRIS'S Defence. Being an unfortunate girl, I came out between seven and eight o'clock, and met Frazer. This good man came up, and said we were the two women who robbed him. I know no more of it than a baby unborn.

FRAZER'S Defence. I met Norris, and asked her to walk with me. Combes came up, and said we must go with him. I never saw the prosecutor.

NORRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

FRAZER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21

Reference Number: t18230409-30

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

514. THOMAS FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, five guineas; twelve sovereigns; four half guineas; one crown piece, and six shillings, the monies of Thomas Norman Hackham , in his dwelling-house ; and JOHN FLETCHER was indicted for that he, on the same day, at the same parish, well knowing the said Thomas Fletcher to have done, and committed the said felony, did feloniously receive, harbour, and maintain him .

THOMAS NORMAN HACKHAM . I live in Church-lane, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . I employed the prisoner Thomas Fletcher , on the 25th of February, to sweep two chimnies for me; one on the ground floor, and the other up stairs - he came and swept them, and after he was gone, I missed a small bag, which contained twelve sovereigns, and other money from my mantle piece, in the upper room, where he swept the chimney - I saw it there when I got up that morning, before the chimney was swept, and I missed it in quarter of an hour after. Nobody else had been in the house, but myself, for I had just moved in - I had slept there. I had called him in out of the street; I went in search of him - I supposed he lived in Wentworth-street, and went there; I did not see him, but I saw John Fletcher , and told him he had got a boy, who swept my chimney that morning; he denied it; I said I should search further, for I had lost property amounting to about 20 l. - I went away, and applied at Lambeth-street office. Coombes returned to the same house with me, and found John Fletcher there; we told him one of his boys had swept my chimney that morning. and he said I might look at the boys; there were some boys in the room; one of them seemed to me to be the boy, but I was not quite certain; and while I was hesitating about him, Thomas

Fletcher came in, and directly I heard him speak, I knew him, and told Combes to take him in charge. I said I wished to see where the soot was deposited; some of them took me up to the garret - I then said if they would restore the property, I would give them 5 s., and say no more about it. I cannot say whether the prisoners heard this. An old woman, who had gone up stairs with me, told them to go and get the money; John Fletcher went out, and brought in the bag; Combes took it. I am quite sure Thomas Fletcher is the lad who swept the chimnies.

ROBERT COMBES . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went with Mr. Hackham to John Fletcher 's house; his mother lives next door to him, and is in the same business. We went to John Fletcher 's first; he declared his boys had not been out that morning, and that he knew nothing at all about any money; his boy came down, and the prosecutor thought that was him at first - presently Thomas came into John's house; the prosecutor said that was the boy who swept his chimnies; he did not deny being the boy. John said he worked for his mother next door, and not for him. We then went to his mother's, went up stairs, and began to search the room. The prosecutor went up to the soot room with John, the mother, Thomas, and another boy - I heard the prosecutor say to him, if he would tell the truth and give him his money, he would give him a crown, and would not hurt him; he had charged Thomas with stealing the money when he first came in, and he said he had not seen it. I went up, and told the prosecutor he was doing wrong in making promises, and threatened to take Thomas away, and then Thomas said, when he sifted his soot, he found this bag in it, and that he had done two more jobs that morning, and could not tell who it belonged to; that his brother had taken it to take care of for him, and he meant to advertise it. John then went out, and fetched the bag and money in, and I took them both into custody. When I got to the office, I counted the money, and found twelve sovereigns, five guineas, four half guineas, a crown piece, and six shillings. John had said more than once, that he knew nothing about the money.

THOMAS NORMAN HACKHAM . This is all the money I lost.

THOMAS FLETCHER 'S Defence. As I was in the street, this gentleman called me to do his chimnies, and I did them. He asked where I lived, and I told him. I did my work and went away, and in quarter of an hour, he came, and told my brother, he had lost some money, and a boy named Fletcher had done it; my brother said he knew nothing about it, and directly he sent for an officer. My brother made me go up and search the dirt - I went and found the bag, and when the gentleman came again I came down, and he said it was me. I took him up to the room where the soot was, and he said he would give me a crown to say where it was - I then said I gave it to my brother to put away safe, and my brother fetched it.

JOHN FLETCHER'S Defence. When the gentleman came to my house, and asked if a sweep lived there, I said, Yes, and that my name was Fletcher. I shewed him my boy; he said it was not him; my brother sat by the fire - I asked if he was the boy, he said No; that the money was on the mantle piece overnight, but he had not seen it that morning, and it might have fallen down into the ashes for what he knew. When my brother found it, there was a crown piece and six shillings among it - before that he had said there was only a few shillings among it.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner Thomas, a good Character.

T. FLETCHER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

J. FLETCHER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-31

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

515. SOPHIA BRAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , at St. John, Hampstead, in the dwelling-house of George Paxon , twenty-five needles, value 6 d.; a purse, value 6 d.; three sovereigns, and three 10 l., and one 5 l. Bank notes. the property of William Hamilton Bazing .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE PAXON , ESQ. I live in High-street, in the parish of St. John, Hampstead . I have been an upholsterer, and have a shop and warehouse there. I have known the prisoner many years; she and her husband were in my employ in February last. She had access to the warehouse, and to the sitting-room, which the family used. On Friday, the 7th of February, I received a dividend at the Bank, of 61 l. 10 s., it consisted of six 10 l. notes, a sovereign, and a half sovereign. Mr. Bazing is my son-in-law; I paid him the next morning four of the same 10 l. notes, I received at the Bank; twenty-one sovereigns, and a half sovereign. I have no doubt that I paid him four of the same notes I received at the Bank.

WILLIAM HAMILTON BAZING . I am a timber-merchant, and live at Pangbourn, Berks. At the time in question, I was living with my father-in-law, the last witness, and about the 7th of February, I received from him, four 10 l. notes, and 21 l. 10 s. in gold - I recollect that the notes were new. I immediately took the money down stairs, and asked my wife for her purse; she said it was in her reticule - I took the purse out of the reticule, put the notes in it, and returned it to the reticule, and saw no more of it - I kept the gold myself. On the 1st of March, in consequence of what my wife said, I went to Bow-street, got a search warrant, and went to my father-in-law's house at Hampstead, and saw the prisoner on her return from dinner. I was not present when the officer searched her; but I afterwards went with him to her house, in Horse and Groom-yard - we there found a box, which was locked; we took the box to my father-in-law's, and the prisoner produced a key, which opened it, and in it we found my wife's purse, containing two 10 l. notes, and a 5 l. note, which the officer took into his possession.

MRS. SARAH BAZING . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 8th of February, I saw him put the 10 l. notes into my purse; I had no occasion to look at them for a fortnight after, when I changed one of the 10 l. notes and received 7 l. in change. I gave my brother change on the 27th, for a 5 l. note, which I also put into my purse, and put that into my reticule, and laid the reticule on the piano-forte, in the sitting-room, at my father's house, and on the 28th, I missed my reticule, and its contents; there was a quarter of a hundred of needles also in it.

THOMAS FORD . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 1st of March, I accompanied Mr. Bazing to Mr. Paxon's, and saw the prisoner in the counting-house, sitting at work - I searched her, and found in her pocket, a 5 l. note, put into a small piece of leopard skin. I then went to her own house, where I found a box, which I brought to Mr. Paxon's, and asked her for the key of it - she said she had something to say to me; I had neither promised or threatened her; she gave me the key, and said she found the purse on the ground, that the purse was in that box - I opened the box, and found two 10 l. notes, a 5 l. note, and a paper of needles, inside the purse. She said she had paid a butcher's bill with part of the money. While she was untying her pockets, I thought she was a long time about it; she threw her pockets on the sofa, and some gold was afterwards found on the sofa.

MRS. BAZING. The purse is mine; the needles are No. 7, which is the size I lost. I went out with my brother on the 27th, after seeing it safe, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and took my reticule with me, and brought it back. I had no occasion to open it while I was out.

GEORGE HYDE . I am a clerk at the Bank. On the 7th of February, I paid these two 10 l. notes, as a dividend for stock standing in the names of Loveday and Paxon. I paid six 10 l. notes; these are two of them.

MR. PAXON. That is the dividend I received. I am co-trustee with Loveday.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had she worked for you - A. I suppose ten years; I believe she has six children - five of whom are at home - if her character had not been good I should not have trusted her upon my premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the purse going out of the back kitchen.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor in consequence of her character and family .

Reference Number: t18230409-32

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

516. MARGARET READ was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a sovereign; a half guinea, and a half sovereign, the monies of Robert Clayworth , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT CLAYWORTH . I am a poulterer ; I live in Whitechapel-road, in the parish of Bethnal-green ; the prisoner was my servant . On Sunday morning, the 30th of March, I went to change my clothes, and left a sovereign, half a sovereign, and half a guinea in my breeches pocket, which I left in the room adjoining the bed-room. I had not looked at my money after Saturday night. I had only three pieces of money, for I had them in my hand. About nine o'clock on Sunday evening I went to my breeches pocket, I missed the money, and accused the prisoner of taking it. She said she had never seen it. On Monday morning I called in the officer.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I was fetched on the Monday, and asked the prisoner what she had done with her master's money; she said she knew nothing about it. I searched her pockets, and found a purse containing 1 s. 6 d. which she said was her own. I asked her what money she had; she said she had none at all; that was all she had. On searching further, in the hem at the bottom of her petticoat I found a sovereign sewed in, and a half sovereign in the hem of her gown. I said if she did not tell me where to find the half sovereign I should take her things off. She said she had no more; I did not find any more.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the bed room when I was sweeping it.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the amount of 30 s. only .

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-33

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

517. JOHN HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 45 lbs. of lemon peel, value 3 l., and 25 lbs. orange peel, value 2 l., the goods of Mary Ball , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARY BALL . I am a widow, and live in Spitalfields . I work for distillers and druggists , in preparing Seville oranges, and lemon peel for them. The prisoner worked for me some time back, but not for the last eight weeks; he had not assisted in preparing any of the property in question. On Monday morning, the 23d of March, I went out, about seven o'clock. I cannot say whether I left the door locked, as I leave it open sometimes, for the peel to dry; I shut it, and left nobody in the house. There was about 65 lbs. of orange and lemon peel on the first floor - it was dry and fit for sale; I should have sold it for 6 l. I returned about eight o'clock, and every bit of it was gone. I applied to an officer.

Prisoner. Q. Does not the place belong to me - A. No. He has worked with me - I have cohabited with him, but not at this place.

ANN ABBOTT . I am the wife of Peter Abbott - we live next door to Mrs. Ball. One Monday morning, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of her back room, with a bag on his back - he went into the privy, and came out again with the bag. I saw orange peel hanging out of it - he went through the yard, down the back passage, and went away with it; he saw me, and said,

"I've done the old b - again."

Prisoner. Q. You have worked for me - A. No, I have worked for Ball. I have seen her pay him for work.

JOHN HOWE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in St. Clement's-church, Strand, on Tuesday, the 25th of March - he said he did take the orange peel, but he considered it as much his property as hers, for he had helped to prepare it, and had not been paid for it.

Prisoner. I have a witness.

THOMAS BECKETT , I know that the prisoner and the prosecutrix lived together for five or six years, in Rosemary-lane, in different places. The work chiefly laid on him; it is too fatiguing for a woman. I never saw him at the house in Spitalfields.

JANE HARRIS . I live in Steward's-rents. On the 21st of March, the prisoner and prosecutrix called on me; she found the prisoner there, and they went home much united - they were at Beckett's, who lodges at my place.

JAMES MURPHY . I know they lived together, and on the 16th of March, I went to her room in Wentworth-street; he was in bed there, and she in the room. After the examination at Bow-street, Abbott said to Ball,

"You old faggot, if I had known the case, I would not have

gone in, and taken a false oath, which I never did before."

MARY ANN MURPHY . I was at Bow-street. I heard Abbott any to Ball, "D - n your soul, you old faggot, I have taken a false oath this day on your account, and if I had known what it was I would not have done it." Abbott had asked her for money, which she did not give her.

MARY BALL re-examined. I live in Wentworth-street. I had followed the prisoner to Beckett's with more property. I went there, and said I was his sister - he promised to give me part of the property back, and I left. Murphy was never at my place, nor did Abbott ask me for money as we left Bow-street.

ANN ABBOTT re-examined. I did not ask her for money, or say I had taken a false oath. I saw the witnesses at the office - we were obliged to have a constable to guard as away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-34

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

518. THOMAS WHITNEY was indicted for that he, on the 17th of January , feloniously did by menaces, (i.e.) by threatening to charge and accuse James Dowsett , the younger, with having been guilty of committing sodomitical practices with a man unknown, demand money, &c. of him, with intent to rob him and his monies from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal .

SECOND COUNT, omitting to state the nature of the alleged charge.

JAMES DOWSETT , JUN. I live in Squirry-street, Bethnal-green. On the 17th of January, between five and six o'clock, I was returning home from my warehouse in Lawrence-lane, and stopped at the corner of Bell-square, Moorfields, (I shewed the spot to Mr. Wontner,) for a necessary purpose. A man stopped by me apparently for the same purpose; he was a stranger; then another man came up and laid hold both of me and the other person. I cannot recollect the person to swear to him. I had not buttoned up my clothes at that time, he said,

"I have caught you, I have caught many so." I said,

"I don't know what you mean," he said, we had committed an unnatural crime, and he would take us to the watch-house, if we did not give him some money. The other man seemed frightened, and asked what he wanted, he said, he must have 10 l. between us. The other man said, he would give him a sovereign and his watch. The man then said, I must give him 5 l. I said, I did not know what he meant, and that I had no money, I had done nothing to cause any suspicion, and that it was a false charge; then the man who laid hold of me, said, he must go home with me, and I must give him some, and as I came along, he asked, if I would give him 50 s. The other man continued with him. I said, I had no money, (nor had I any,) he then asked for 1 l., and then he asked, if I had any money about me, I said No; he then asked if I had a watch, I said, No. They went on with me to my own door. I stopped there and he asked for 10 s., I said, I did not think I had so much in the house, he said, I must go in and get what I could, and bring it out, and they would wait until I brought it out, I went in and told my wife all that had happened; I heard a knock at the door, I went out at the back door, to my father-in-law and told him all that had passed; he lives three quarters of a mile off. I stopped there all night, and returned to my house next day between nine and ten o'clock, and found the prisoner in the house; my father-in-law was with me, and asked him what he wanted, he said all the blunt he could get. He asked what he meant, he said, he must have four sovereigns. He asked how he got his living; he said, he was a bookbinder and would write his address down, and wrote something on a paper which is lost. I don't know what it was. An officer was sent for and he was detained.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I wanted you to go with me to the other man - A. No.

MR. WONTNER. I accompanied the prosecutor to a spot which he shewed me, it is in the City.

ELIZABETH DOWSETT . I am the wife of the prosecutor, he came home on the 17th of January, from the warehouse between six and seven o'clock, he seemed rather alarmed and trembled, and said, two men were waiting at the door; one of them had accused him of a crime that he did not know the name of, and told me the particulars; he had scarcely finished before I heard a knock at the door, he then went out at the back door; I went to the street door, and saw two persons, I could not say whether the prisoner was one of them; it was dark; I asked them what they wanted, one of them said,

"Is the young man the weaver at home," I said he is not; one of them said it is false, and used a very improper expression, and said he had better come forward and face him like a man. I shut the door and heard a knock again; I went up stairs and opened the window, two persons were still there, I asked them what they wanted, they said to see the young man; I said he was not at home, they said it is false - I said I would be on my oath that he was not, they said I was a false woman; they would not take my word. I said, if they had any message to leave, I would tell him when he came home, they said it was not a woman's business, and they would not leave their message. One of them asked if I had a husband, (that was a different man to the one who spoke before,) I said Yes; they asked if he was at home, I said No, he then said

"Why do not you open the door and let the gentlemen in to search the house, then we shall be satisfied whether he is there or not;" I refused, he then said to the other,

"Why do not you break open the door;" the other said, he had better come forward, and face it like a man, it would be better for him, and asked what public-house he used, I said I did not know; then a voice which I am certain was the prisoner's, asked what sign of public-houses there was near, I said I did not know that; there was the sign of the Hoop near; they then consulted together and the prisoner's voice said,

"Suppose we meet him here to-morrow morning at his own house, at nine o'clock," the other said,

"It shall be so" - they called up to me, and said they would meet him there at nine o'clock, and it would be better for him to face them like a man, they then went away, they were at the door about half an hour, I went to my father's and found my husband there, I told them, and I went home. The next morning my father came early, and the prisoner came between nine and ten o'clock; I opened the door to him, he asked if the young man was

at home, I told him to walk in; he did so; I shewed him into the back room, where my father-in-law was waiting for him; I then fetched my husband's uncle Samuel, and after that I heard him tell my father, he was come to get what blunt he could. My father asked him what he meant, he said he would not take less than four sovereigns; my father asked what it was for; he said to give to the other man who was with him the over night; my father asked where he was, he said, at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Fleet-market, or the Mail Coach, Fleet-street, he could not tell which.

JAMES DOWSETT , SEN. I am the father of the prosecutor. I live in John-street, Bethnal-green, and am a weaver; I first heard of this on the morning after it happened, I went to my son's house about nine o'clock, and about three quarters of an hour after, my son's wife let the prisoner in, he was shewn into the room where I was; I asked what his pleasure was, he asked if the young man was at home, I said

"What is your pleasure with him;" he said, to speak him privately, very particular, and what was for his good, I said, I suppose you are one of the chaps that followed him home last night, he said, he was. I asked what he came for, he made no reply, I sent for my brother and when he came, the prisoner said,

"This is not the person I want." We asked what he came for; he said, for what he could get. I heard him use the word blunt, I asked him how he got his living; he said his father was a respectable man, a liveryman of the City, and that he was a stationer and bookbinder, living in Fenchurch-street. I said it was a pity his father did not know it, and if he would give me his direction I would let him know it. He said he could do his business without his father. I went up then for a piece of paper for him to write his address, and then left him as the officer was come; he never offered to take us to the other man.

Prisoner. Q. You said,

"I suppose you are one who was accused with him" - A. No. I said, I suppose you are one of the two who followed him home.

SAMUEL DOWSETT . I am the prosecutor's uncle. I first heard of this on the following morning. I got to the house about a quarter to ten o'clock. The prisoner was in the back room. I asked what he wanted. He said,

"You are not the young man, I want the young man I was with last night." I said,

"I am sorry I am not the young man you want, I wish I was, for if I had been you would not have got off quite so easy as you did. I wish I had known as much last night as I do this morning, I would have had you and the other one put in the watch-house." I then asked him how he got his living. He said his father was a respectable man, and a liveryman of the city of London. I said,

"I am very sorry he has not got a very respectable son." He then said his father was a bookbinder, living in Fenchurch Street, and that he followed the business. I went there, but could find no such person. I then asked what he came for. He said, to get what blunt he could, to take it to the other man. I asked where at - he said, at the Mail Coach and Horses, Fleet-street, or Fleet-market, he did not know which. The officer came and took him. He never offered to shew me where the other man was. He wrote something on a piece of paper for a direction, but what it was I do not know. He afterwards said his father was a chimney-sweeper, and lived in Northumberland-alley, Fenchurch-street - which I found was right.

WM. PUNNELL. I am a weaver. I live near Mr. Dowsett. On the night of the 17th of January the prosecutor came to me - I am his father-in-law - he gave this account. My daughter came some time afterwards - I saw her home; and next morning, about a quarter to ten o'clock, I went to his house, and found the prisoner there. I said,

"What is your business here" - He said, he was one of the party who was with Dowsett last night. I asked what he was come for - The word blunt was mentioned - I thought he meant money. I said,

"What is blunt" - he said he must have four sovereigns to take to the other person. I asked him where the other person was; and why he did not come with him. He said he was to meet him at the Coach and Horses, or Mail Coach, in Fleet-market, or Fleet-street. The officer came and took him. He wrote on a piece of paper,

" Thomas Whitney , Northumberland-court, Fenchurch-street."

WILLIAM COLLYER . I am an officer. I was sent for on the morning of the 18th of January, a little after ten o'clock. When I entered the room I asked him a few questions about his business - he answered, as the last witness has stated. He said he came for four sovereigns to take to the man. I took him in charge. He said he was no thief, and I need not confine him as such. I said, if he did not make a better tale out before the magistrate he would be committed. I advised him to send for his friends to speak for him.

The prisoner in his defence stated, that he was going on an errand, and had occasion to stop at the corner of Bell Square, that the prosecutor also stopped for the same purpose, when another man came up and accused them. Dowsett said, if he would let him go, he would give him any thing. The man asked for 5 l. from each; and Dowsett said, if he would come home with him he would give him what he demanded. But when he got close to his house, he said, he did not think he had so much, but if he appointed where to meet him, he would bring him the sum on Wednesday. The man refused to wait. Dowsett said, if he came to-morrow, he would meet him and the prisoner. That he went in, and the man kept menacing him (the prisoner) about what he would do if he did not procure him some money. Being terrified, he did not know what to do. The prosecutor did not come out, and the man getting outrageous at his not coming out, a female answered out of the window, that Dowsett was not at home, but had left word for him to call at nine o'clock next morning, when he said the prisoner might fetch him to meet the prosecutor, at the Coach and Horses, at nine o'clock, or bring the money. That he, the prisoner, never spoke to Mrs. Dowsett; nor did he use the word blunt at the house.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-35

579. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a purse, value 2 d.; a sovereign, a crown piece, two half crowns, eight shillings and two sixpences, the property of Edward Williams , from his person .

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in St. Agnes Terrace, Tabernacle-square. On the 20th

of March, about twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Grace church-street. I was sober. I had been drinking at Deptford. She asked where I was going. I said home. She asked me to accompany her. I had a green purse containing this money in my breeches pocket. I walked with her a little way up the street, and turned up Half Moon-alley ; I stopped with her a minute or two; then she ran away, and called to me to follow her and go home with her. She turned into Leadenhall-street; I stopped looking at her, and saw her turn into Leadenhall-market; I did not go after her, but put my hand to my pocket and missed my purse; I then went after her, but could not find her; I told the watchman; I went down to Lime-street, and met with her in Lime-street with a cloak under her arm, which she had on before; I stopped her and said she had robbed me; she denied it. The watchman came up and took her; I saw her drop the purse when he took her; the silver was in it, but not the sovereign; I knew the purse to be mine; she had asked me for a shilling, but I gave her nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you not a little tipsey - A. I was not; I am sure she is the woman; the alley is not very dark; I did not pull out my purse or give her any money; I had nothing to do with her.

SAMUEL WARD . I am watchman of Lime-street. On the night of the 20th of March, about twelve o'clock, the prosecutor came to me by the private door of the India House; I saw the prisoner first, and then I saw the prosecutor go after her, and say "You are the one who robbed me." She denied it; I endeavoured to search her, and saw her throw the purse down; I picked it up, and asked the prosecutor what he had lost, he said a sovereign, and 18 s. or 19 s. in a green purse; I found 19 s. in silver in it, but no sovereign; he described the purse by a hole at the end of it; he appeared sober. When the constable searched her, a sovereign fell from her bosom without any paper; the prosecutor said his was wrapped in paper.

JAMES SHEPSTONE . I am an officer; when she was brought to the watch-house I desired her to move her handkerchief, and the sovereign fell from her bosom.

The purse being brown, instead of green, the Jury found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-36

520. MARY M'GRALE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the goods of Israel Alexander .

EVE ALEXANDER . I am the wife of Israel Alexander, livery stable-keeper ; the prisoner came into our service on the 12th of February, without a character, only till I got a servant. One handkerchief was in my husband's drawer and the other is mine; I missed some other things - she left on the 26th of February - I missed these things after she was gone, and went with an officer to her father's house, where I found her; this was on Tuesday, the 4th of March; a handkerchief was found on her neck, which was my husband's, and the other was found in an old box in the house; she said she bought the handkerchiefs at a pawnbroker's, for 2 s. The officer took her away before he found the second handkerchief; they have no initials on them, but were marked 1820; the mark upon one is now altered to 1821; the figures 182 are my own work.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a constable; I went to No. 8, Rose-alley, Bishopsgate-street, and found the prisoner there - Mrs. Alexander claimed the handkerchief found on her neck; the prisoner said she bought it at a pawnbroker's, in Aldgate.

HENRY JOHNSON . I am clerk to Mr. Alexander - I went to the house and saw the property found.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Soon after I came to the prosecutor's service, I found it was a dangerous place to live at, as they had transported a former servant. I quitted the place without notice, as they bore such a bad character; in consequence of which this prosecution has been commenced. I am perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-37

521. JOHN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a canvas bag, value 2 d.; six sovereigns, a promisory note for payment of and value 100 l.; a warrant for payment of and value 35 l. 5 s.; and another warrant, for payment of and value 20 l., and a 5 l. Bank note , the property of George Draper Mann , and Draper Brewman Woodward .

GEORG MANN . I am in partnership with Draper Brewman Woodward ; we are stationers , in Cornhill ; prisoner came into our service on the day this happened. On the 19th of September I lost a bag containing the property, it was in the till - he came in the morning to supply the place of our own lad, who was taken ill; he had no business at the till, or behind the counter - about five minutes before I left the shop I put all this property into the bag, preparing to go home; it was between seven and eight o'clock; I went down stairs, leaving him alone in the shop; immediately I was down I heard a swift step in the shop; I ran up, and the prisoner was gone; he ought not to have left. I looked towards the till, and saw it partly open; I had left it quite closed, nobody but him could have opened it - the contents were gone. I did not see him again till he was in custody, at the Mansion House, last Wednesday week - I have recovered none of the property.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . I am a marshalsman. On the 26th of March, I was opposite the Mansion House, and seeing a crowd, I crossed over to them - the prisoner was there, and the prosecutor's boy accusing him of robbing his master; I detained him. Mr. Woodward charged him with it - I asked him what he had done with the cheque; he said he threw it away with other papers, in Fleet-street. I asked him if the money was all in gold; he said No, there was a 5 l. note, and gold and silver, amounting to about 11 l.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-38

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 11.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

522. THOMAS ROBY and JAMES EAST were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , two bushels of coals, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Joseph Atkins .

SECOND COUNT, charging East with receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen.

JOSEPH ATKINS . I deal in coals , and live at Harrow. Roby was in my service - East lives in the neighbourhood, and drives a team . On the 3 d of March, between five and six o'clock, in the afternoon, I was coming along the road, and saw Roby get off one of my carts; he had a corn sack, containing about two bushels of coals. I got over a hedge to watch - East was driving his team just behind. They stopped their horses, and the corn sack of coals was shifted from my waggon to East's. Roby was bringing coals from the wharf. I went up, and asked what he had done with them; he said he knew nothing of it. I went and found them in the fore part of East's cart; he drove his team to his master's, where I secured him.

THOMAS KENDRIC . I am a carpenter. I was with Atkins, and saw the sack on East's cart.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-39

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

523. CHARLES JAMES KERFOOT was indicted for falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange, (setting it forth dated Manchester, 5th of January , 50 l., signed for Richard Ainsworth , Son, and Co.; Peter Ainsworth ,) and addressed to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co., with intent to defraud James Mann .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same, as true with the like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, for forging and counterfeiting a certain endorsement on the said bill, as follows, (" Edward Hamnet , and Co.,") and for uttering the same, with the like intent.

JAMES MANN . I am a riding master , and live at Brighton. I first became acquainted with the prisoner on the 1st of February - he resided at the Steyne-hotel; I believe he was there eight or ten days after I first knew him, and hired saddle horses of me. I went out with him twice myself, and he had a horse several times after that; he borrowed 2 l. of me. On the 11th of February, about nine o'clock, he sent to me for a horse by the person who had been in the habit of coming from him before; I let the person have it, and expected it to be returned in about three hours; it was not returned that day, and in the evening, about eleven o'clock, I enquired at the hotel, but he was not there. I waited till twelve o'clock, and then set off to town, on horseback; I arrived between six and seven o'clock; and met him in Holborn, between ten and eleven, on my horse. I seized it by the bridle, and took him to St. Giles's watch-house, and at a public-house opposite Marlborough-street Office, he proposed to pay a bill he owed me and my expences, to be liberated. I went to the office, and returned to him - he said he would pay, and Furzman asked what means he had of paying; he said he had a bill that he would send to the Bank - he produced a bill; it was given to Furzman to send or take to the banking-house of Jones, Lloyd, and Co., to see if they would honour it. I saw him write on the back of it. Bartlett took it to the bankers'; he was detained till he returned, and said it was a forgery.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. He had hired horses and returned them - A. Yes; but never kept them beyond a day. He knew he was to remain in custody till the messenger returned from the bankers'.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer. I was present when the prisoner produced the bill, which I now produce - he endorsed it in my presence,

" Charles James Kerfoot ." I had asked what means he had to settle with the prosecutor; he said he had no cash, but a bill on Jones, Lloyd, and Co., and he had no doubt they would accept it, and he could get it cashed, and then he would settle with Mr. Mann. He asked if I could send anybody with it, who I could trust. I gave it to Bartlett in his presence, to take to Jones, Lloyd, and Co.; he brought it back. I marked it before I gave it to Bartlett.

BARTLETT. I took the bill to Jones, Lloyd, and Co. I made a mark on it when I returned, and know it again - I saw the prisoner endorse it, and dried it by the fire, at his desire. I was told at Jones, Lloyd, and Co's. that it was forged. I gave the same bill back to Furzman.

JAMES CRAWLEY DRAKE . I am a clerk to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co. Ainsworth, Son. and Co. are correspondents of our house, and are in the habit of drawing bills on us; they were signed for Richard Ainsworth , Son, and Co., by Peter, and sometimes by Richard, Ainsworth. I frequently see the signature of Peter Ainsworth , and am acquainted with it - (looks at the bill,) this is not the signature we are in the habit of honouring for them. I believe the signature we honour to be the genuine one, but I never saw Peter Ainsworth in my life. I believe he was in the South of France at the time this bill is dated.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You never saw them write, and cannot say whether it was their writing, or the writing of any one authorized to sign for them - A. I consider that the signature we honour is their's - they date their bills from Halliwell, but I believe they have a house at Manchester.

Bill read.

COURT. The indictment charges this to be with intent to defraud Mr. Mann - it is clear he could not be defrauded.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-40

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

524. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously cutting and striking Mary Elizabeth Harding , with intent to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do her some grievous bodily harm.

MARY ELIZABETH HARDING , I live in London-wall. On the 21st of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I accompanied the prisoner's wife, Mary Marshall , to where her husband (the prisoner) worked, in St. Mary-axe - she had been separated from him; I had known her two or three years, but I never saw him before this happened; she and I waited together a few minutes, (it was then a little past eight o'clock,) and I saw the prisoner come out, she said,

"Marshall, is that you," and caught hold of his coat. I said,

"Don't be in a passion," (she did not appear in a passion;) he said,

"Yes, what do you want;" she said she came for 3 s., her weekly sum, and that it was a great deal too little. He said if she was not satisfied with that, she should have no more, and he would sooner leave the country - there was a great deal of talk. She said,

"It's a hard winter, and I am in debt for rent,

give me a shilling or two more" - he gave her the three shillings, and said he had no more for her. She tried to persuade him to give her more; he said he had had good advice from four or five Magistrates, and he would fix her - she said if he would not hear her in the street, she would go home to his house - they then parted; she lived at No. 4, Moor-lane. I told him he must pardon my interfering, but the poor old lady had been very ill, and was in arrears for rent and 3 s. was very little; he asked if I lived in the same house as her, I said No; we parted, she went home, and about quarter before ten o'clock I accompanied her to his house; I went in with her and was told he was a bed - I sat down and got into conversation with the woman of the house for a short time, and he came out of the bed room on the same floor; no message had been sent to him; I suppose he heard our voices - I think he was dressed, but his night cap was on - he came out with a sword in his hand, and brandished it about, and said

"d - n your eyes I'll kill you both." The people of the house ran round the table; his wife got up and run. I was struck to the ground by the fright; I tried to go up stairs, but not knowing the house, I got into a corner; he struck at me with the sword; not a word had passed between us before; the clock had struck; and his wife said

"That is my clock," I worked hard for it; I was the first person he struck at; the first blow I received was on the head. He looked more like a madman than a man in his senses. I received a blow on my shoulder also. I got in the corner as I was afraid of my life; he called out

"Come out d - n you, or I will kill you or murder you." I said "I will come out, but do not strike me;" his wife had got to the door and got out; but she was wounded on her arm. I had got the poker and shielded it off; his wife opened the door and cried murder, and the watchman came up. I believe I received four or five blows; the people of the house had run up stairs crying murder. I had one wound in the shoulder, one in my hand, and one in my head. They are nothing to mention. I was bruised in my arm; he struck with the sword, but I suppose it must be with the left side of it; his wife had been separated from him two or three years. I never saw him before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you first saw him in the street, did not the wife take hold of him by the collar - A. No; she took hold of his waiscoat by the breast. I told her not to be in a passion. I went to make peace between them. I went to accompany her.

Q. Thinking her not a match for him - A. I do not think she was; one son lives with her; another is married, and lives with him. I was sober and believe she was; I never saw her in liquor. I did not threaten to break the windows, nor did she - she went there to fetch her son, and persuaded me to go with her.

Q. You found the supper table spread, and seated yourselves - A. I did not sit down till I was asked; we were laughing when he came into the room. I took and held the poker up, but never flourished it; but by God's providence it saved my life.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am assistant to a surgeon. I was called up, by the prosecutrix, about one o'clock. I examined her wounds - she had one on the back of her head, a very slight one, and a slight cut on each shoulder - the blow on one shoulder must have been done with the same stroke as that on the head. There was also a slight cut on her thumb; they appeared to be done by a sharp instrument - none of them were at all dangerous. I dressed them three or four times - they were perfectly healed.

Cross-examined. Q. If you were not a surgeon you would not call them wounds - A. I should call them slight wounds.

Q. Was it more like striking at her; or flourishing about - A. I should think striking at her.

THOMAS MATSON . I am a watchman. On the 21st of February, between half-past ten and eleven o'clock, my attention was drawn to the house, by hearing female voices calling murder, and watch, repeatedly. I got within the threshold of the street door, and saw the shadow of a man, with a cutlass in his hand. He shut the door in my face. The prosecutrix and the wife were then outside the door. The wife lifted up her arm, and shewed me where she was struck; Harding had a cut on her head, the blood was running down on her neck. I persuaded them to go to the watch-house. I heard no more of it. Marshall's wife knocked at the door. I heard a man's voice, saying,

"If you don't go about your business, I'll blow your brains out." She seemed in a violent passion to get in, and said it was her house. I took both the women to the watch-house, and on the following day they got a warrant.

Cross-examined. Q. I dare say they talked loudly - A. They had not much power to speak - they were too much confused. The wife knocked at the door, in a great passion, and said it was her house. I think she had had a drop - the prosecutrix appeared sober.

The prisoner, in his defence, stated that his wife had been in the habit of getting intoxicated for the last twenty years, pawning his property, running him in debt, and cohabiting with other men; in consequence of which, he was resolved to live no longer with her, and allowed her three shillings a week; but on the day in question, he met the prosecutrix and her, who abused him much in the street; and as he was going to bed, he was greasing his sword, to prevent its rusting, and, unfortunately having it in his hand, he went out with it, hearing them abuse him, and not intending to injure them, he said,

"Go out of the house." The prosecutrix caught up the poker, and brandished it at him; he lifted up the sword to ward of the blows, and she might have received a cut, but not intentionally; for had he intended it, one blow must have been mortal.

MR. WILLIAM BOUSFIELD . The prisoner was in my service for four years, and was by no means quarrelsome, but behaved well. Understand his wife has been very obnoxious to him. I saw the prosecutrix on the 23d; her wounds were very trifling. The prisoner has been an old soldier; and, if he had intended to give her a blow, he would have destroyed her instantly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-41

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

525. THOMAS GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one mare, price 30 s. , the property of Thomas Winks and John Alexander .

THOMAS WINKS . I am a costermonger , and go out with a cart, and live in Leader-street, Chelsea. John Alexander is in partnership with me. We bought this mare about a month before the 20th of March - it was our joint property; it was a dark bay mare, and blind. We used

to turn it out in the Five Fields, Chelsea . I missed it about six o'clock on Thursday night, the 20th of March - I had seen it in the fields about three o'clock that afternoon. I received it on the Saturday, from Jenkins, by order of the Magistrate, and knew it to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was it blind with both eyes - A. Yes, and old, and not worth above 30 s., I should think, for any body to work with.

GARRARD BUCK . On Thursday, the 20th of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at Hyde Park-corner alone - I was sweeping a crosssing; he came up to me, and asked if I could ride a horse; I said Yes - he said he would give me 18 d. to take a horse for him down to Fleet-market; he had none with him. I said I would; he left me, and returned in about half an hour - I saw him coming along; a man was with him leading a horse in the road, and another man dressed as a soldier. It was a dark brown horse, and I think was blind - he came up and asked me to lend him three half-pence to pay the turnpike, and he would give me a handkerchief as security for the money; I did so, and received the handkerchief. I saw them go through the turnpike - he gave the halfpence to the man who led the horse - all the three men came through with the horse; I did not see him again till he was in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not particularly notice the horse - A. No; I cannot be positive to the colour, or whether it was blind; I think it was - the soldier was in his company. It was not dark.

ROBERT JENKINS . I live with Mr. Rhodes, of Sharp's-alley, Cow-cross; he is a horse slaughterer. The prisoner came to the yard on Thursday afternoon, the 20th of March, about five o'clock; another man was leading the horse, and a soldier with them - it was a dark brown mare, blind with both eyes, and very old. The prisoner asked if I would buy it, I said Yes; he asked 20 s. for it - I offered 14 s.; he said he had been bid 16 s. for it; I then agreed for 16 s.; I had not enough money about me, but gave him 10 s. in the yard, and went and borrowed 8 s. of Mr. Bagnell - then we all four went to the Castle public-house, in Cow-cross. I paid him the 6 s. there, had something to drink, and they left me; I never saw him before. The prosecutor came and claimed it. I delivered it to him and his partner at Worship-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it fit for any thing but slaughter - A. No; I gave the full value, and do not think it was fit for work - we should have killed it, if it had not been owned - very few words passed between us. He said he bought it in Smithfield-market.

WILLIAM WOOTTEN . I am an officer. I apprehended him in Palace-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it for 14 s.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18230409-42

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

526. ELIZABETH FRANCIS and MARY ANN SCOTT were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Passmore , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 6 l.; a chain, value 5 l.; a seal, value 1 l., and a key, value 1 d. , his property.

WILLIAM PASSMORE . I am a bricklayer . Last Wednesday week, about half past twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoners in Bow-street, as I was going to the Rainbow, public-house, King-street, to sleep. I heard somebody talking, and met them coming up Bow-street - they asked me to give them a glass of something to drink - I went with them to the Brown Bear, public-house; I drank nothing. We left the house - when we came out they asked for something to eat; I took them to a house a door or two from the Brown Bear, and gave them something, but took nothing myself. We came out; they asked me to go home with them; I walked up Bow-street with them to Broad-court , and when we got under the archway, I said I must go back to the Rainbow, and wished them good night. Previous to this, as we went up Broad-court they stopped behind several times, and whispered to each other, and when I turned round under the archway, Francis said to the other, 'now now'; they immediately came, and both clasped me round the waist, and Scott snatched my watch from my fob - they both ran off as hard as they could, and I after them; Scott turned round, put out her hand and gave something to Francis as they ran; I could not see what it was. When they came down to the middle of the court they ran different ways - I followed Scott, and took her half way down the court - I felt my watch taken; I had looked at it in the eating-house, and am sure I had it in the court. While I was holding Scott, and calling Watch! the people collected, and six or seven minutes after Francis returned, and asked what was the matter - I have not found the watch; it was worth 10 l., with the appendages.

Cross-examined by MR. PENDERGAST. Q. You were going up Bow-street, and turned towards them - A. No; I had drank a little, but was perfectly aware of what happened. I was very near them when I saw something pass between them - she handed out the same hand as she took the watch with.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am watchman of Broad-court. The prosecutor called Watch! I went up as quick as possible, and he gave both the prisoners into my charge, for stealing his watch. I took them both to the watch-house. The prosecutor was rather intoxicated.

FRANCIS GUILTY . Aged 22.

SCOTT GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing from the person only.

Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-43

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

527. JOHN READ , MATTHEW KELLY , and JAMES M'NIFF were indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Jones , on the King's highway, on the 3d of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 2 s. , his property.

DANIEL JONES . I am a milk-man , and live in Hall's-rents, St. Catherine's. On the 3d of March, about ten minutes past eight o'clock, I went to the Sampson and Lion, public-house, Butcher-row, East Smithfield - I went into the parlour and stopped three quarters of an hour. I took my watch out before I left the room, and it wanted three minutes to nine o'clock. Three men and two women were in the parlour - the three men were walking about. While I was taking up my stick, a fourth man came in, but I did not take much notice of him. The prisoners Read and Kelly,

are two of the three. When I came out I left the four men and the two women in the parlour - I went out at the front door, turned up against a railing for a necessary purpose on the right hand, and then proceeded down the steps, and saw two men on the left; one on the right as if waiting for somebody to come down - when I got on the last step, the one on the right put his right hand on my fob, and his other hand on my collar - he put his hand outside my apron, took hold of the watch chain, and demanded what I had got; the other two, on the left, directly seized me by the throat, and throttled me so that I could not call for assistance. I attempted to strike the one who seized my chain, with my stick, but being so close, I had not power to strike. A struggle ensued, and one of the two said,

"You b - r, if you don't let go, we will do your job for you." I still struggled with them and got one of them towards the door of Lucy Johnson , in Helmet-court - she came out, and I was struck on the head, knocked down and my hat knocked off. While I was down, the man who held the chain fell with me, by my stick getting entangled between his legs and mine, that pressed my apron strings tighter, so that they could not get the watch. I was kicked on both sides. I endeavoured to turn myself, and then I was able to cry Stop thief! Lucy Johnson came out, assisted me up, and said she would lead me home. We had not got three paces, before one of them knocked me down in the kennel, and then she cried out murder, and ran into my house, which was only a few yards off. She put my hat on my head when she came up, and on being knocked down again, it went off; I do not know how it went from me. - There was no light but when they knocked me down a second time, a female came, and held two candles, and I could see the persons run up the place, and saw one had white stockings on - he was the person who had been in the parlour that night. One of them wore white stockings, but I do not know which. There was a tall man among them, who was neither of the prisoners - I only saw three men when I was attacked.

LUCY JOHNSON . On the night of the 3d of March, I heard a scuffle on the steps; I did not get up directly, but presently heard a cry of Stop thief! I then opened the door, and went out; it was dark - the lamp gave a very bad light. I saw Jones, who I knew, laying on the ground, a short distance from my house, and three men at a little distance from him - I helped Jones up. I found his hat a little way from him, and put it on his head - he appeared exhausted. I said to them,

"Why don't you go about your business, and let the man alone." I had not seen them do any thing. I led Jones towards his house; the three men followed; one of them took hold of my arm, and said,

"He has robbed a man of his handkerchief," and while I was speaking, the other two knocked Jones down - he got up, and was knocked down a second time. I said,

"You'll kill the man." Two of them went up the steps; one of them, a short man, who wore white stockings, had Jones's hat in his hand. Neither of the three prisoners are the men who held my arm, I am certain, for that was a tall man. I cannot say that either of the prisoners is the one who had the hat. A woman came to the door of No. 7, with candles, and then they went away.

JULIA BATES . I am the wife of John Bates , who keeps the Sampson and Lion, public house. On the 3d of March, Jones came to my house, and went into the parlour, where the three prisoners were - there was also a fourth man, taller than them, and two women - one was the wife of Sweeney, the tall man; and the other was the wife of one of the prisoners, but I do not know which. They had all four been to the house before, and sometimes used it. They have lived in the neighbourhood for years. When Jones went, he left them there; and in eight or ten minutes, they all four went to the door - the women remained. They all returned in about ten minutes, and went into the parlour. I did not see whether they brought any thing with them. They stopped nearly an hour after, and went away together with the women. Two other young men had been in after Jones left, and stopped till after the prisoners left. I cannot say, whether either of them had on white stockings. I found a hat in the parlour next morning. I do not know who brought it there. It was delivered to Jones's servant.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Since the transaction, have not some of them been at your house drinking as usual - A. Yes; the two young men came in after Jones went out, and before the four returned - the prisoners were drinking at my house the night before they were apprehended; they are respectable tailors, and have lived in the neighbourhood many years.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners. I took Kelly and M'Niff on the 10th and Read on the 11th.

DANIEL JONES re-examined. I sent my servant to the public-house next morning, to enquire if they knew the three men who had been there, and the hat was given to her; it was the same hat I wore that night - I had only drank 6 d. of gin and water. I was unable to go out till the Friday following, being so unwell through this.

Cross-examined. Q. One of the three men was very tall - A. Yes; taller than either of the prisoners.

LUCY JOHNSON . I know the man who held me by the arm; it was neither of the prisoner's. I had seen that man at the Sampson and Lion that night, when I went for the newspaper; there are two doors to the bar, one on the steps and the other in front. I went in at the door on the steps, and that man came in at the other door facing me, and asked for a pot of beer; a glass of gin and water stood on the bar; he asked if it was engaged.

JULIA BATES . I remember Johnson coming for the newspaper; a glass of gin and water stood there; a man came in and asked for a pot of beer, and asked if it was engaged. I said Yes; but I could make him another; his name is Sweeney, he is one of the four who were in the parlour, and went out with the other three and returned with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-44

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

528. GEORGE HIPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , in the dwelling house of John Minshaw , twenty-four sovereigns, one 20 l., and fifteen 10 l. Bank notes, and two Bank post bills, value 15 l. each, the monies of John Edmunds .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling house of Albialbon Horlock.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EDMUNDS . I live at Ambleside, Westmorland. I

came to town in December, 1821, with my son, who was going to China. On the 17th of December we both slept at the Dundee Arms, Wapping , in a double beded room. We went to bed a little past eleven; I had these notes and bills in my pocket book, and in my purse was twenty-four sovereigns and a half guinea. I did not lock my room door. I have the numbers and dates of all the notes. When I went to bed my pocket book was in one trowser pocket and my purse in the other; when I awoke, about seven o'clock in the morning, my trowsers were on the floor, close to the chair; I believe I had put them on the chair; I was not disturbed in the night. I had received the 10 l. notes at the Bank a few days before, and at that time took the numbers and dates; they were all dated the 5th of November, 1821, and numbered from 6117 to 6131, both inclusive. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You cannot say where you left your trowsers - A. I generally leave them on the chair; I have no doubt but I did so then. The people of the house told me there was no visitor but us, and so I did not lock the door.

EDWARD BEAL . In December, 1821, I was waiter at the Dundee Arms. Mr. Edwards and his son came there. I saw the prisoner there that evening with another person named Durley, alias Smith; they came together, and both slept there in one room on the third floor. They went to bed between nine and ten o'clock, and left about seven next morning. They had blue trowsers and Wellington boots on when they went away, very muddy, and would not wait to have them cleaned. The prosecutor slept on the second floor.

Cross-examined. Q. Your house is for the reception of travellers - A. Yes; many leave early in the morning; it depends on what time a vessel starts.

HENRY MORIATT . I am a carpenter, and live in the London-terrace, Commercial-road. In December, 1821, the prisoner lived at No. 12, Albion-street, Commercial-road, and one Durley, who also went by the name of Smith, lodged with him. On the morning after the robbery, I saw them both at Alexander Logie 's house, No. 11, Samuel-street - they both wore blue trowsers and fustian shooting jackets. I missed them from the neighbourhood two or three days after, and did not see them for nine months, when I saw the prisoner taken. I saw them in Samuel-street the day after the robbery - they had a great deal of money. I never knew the prisoner follow any business.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you do not know whether he has any rich relations - A. I understand he has. He shewed me the sovereigns, and said he had done it, and could do it again, and almost pointed out the house where he did the robbery. He said there was a board sticking up to tell where he had done the robbery.

Q. When did you do your last work - A. On Saturday; I worked for Mr. Christian. When I knew him, he lodged at my brother's house, which is the way I knew him. I never saw him with much cash before.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a bricklayer, and live in Chapman-street. In December, 1821, I saw the prisoner at a public-house, on the evening after the robbery, on the day of the fight at Moulsey-hurst, shewing sovereigns and silver in both hands; he said he had done it, and could do it again - he was at the same house the next night, and had a hunting watch, which he said he had bought. I did not see him again till the 31st of December 1822, - I then went to the police, and had him apprehended.

ALEXANDER LOGIE . I live in Catherine-street, Commercial-road. On the 18th of December, 1821, I went to Moulsey-hurst - the prisoner was one of the party, and Moriatt also. I saw Durley alias Smith there; he and the prisoner were dressed in Wellington boots, blue trowsers, and fustian shooting jackets, and new silk hats. The prisoner and Durley paid all the expences of the trip between them. Warren, the Excise-officer, is my brother-in-law; the prisoner bought a new silver hunting watch of him, on the 19th of December, 1821. The prisoner, I, and the party at the fight, had agreed to meet next morning, at the Star, public-house, and they came to us again in the evening, at the Roe-buck, public-house, Commercial-road, and we were to meet them next morning in Albion-street - we went there, but did not see them. A woman at the door said, the officers were in the house, and we had better go. I met the prisoner that day, and asked how long he had been from No. 12, Albion-street; he said not long - I said,

"Have you not had some curious visitors there this morning," he said, No. I said if he had done anything he had better not go there again - he swore at me, and went away towards Albion-street, and in ten minutes after he came running to me, and begged of me to run with him; we both run to a public-house, at the back of the London Hospital, and had some refreshments; he said it would not be proper for him to be seen in Albion-street again, and begged I would not betray him - I said I would not. I saw him next day at Hackney. The last time I saw him was the 1st or 2d of January, 1822, and from that time not till eight months after.

JAMES EVANS . I am a Thames Police officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the Wellington, public-house, in company with some others. I asked if his name was Hipkins, he said

"No, George Taylor ."

THOMAS EARLY . I am a slopseller, and live in the Minories. On the 18th of December, 1821, about nine o'clock in the morning, I received a 10 l. Bank note, from a person named Howard Lewis , in payment for two shooting jackets. I have seen a jacket which resembles one of them. I paid the 10 l. note to Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. On the 18th of December, 1821, a person who called himself Durley (when he was apprehended) bought two shooting jackets of me, and paid for them - I had none, and got them both from Mr. Early, who lives near me. Durley presented the 10 l. note in payment, which I gave Early - I was to take 2 l. I asked his name and address, and indorsed it with what he told me. The jackets were a fourth and fifth size. Durley was afterwards apprehended with one of them on. (Looking at a 10 l. note;) this is it, here is

"Jones, James-street, Commercial-road," which is the address he gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. You was once tried here - A. Yes, seven years ago, and afterwards at Clerkenwell, and acquitted both times.

THOMAS EARLY . This is the note I received from Lewis.

WILLIAM JUDD . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 20th of December, 1821, I went to No. 12, Albion-street, Commercial-road, and saw a girl there - I asked for Bob and George; she said they were out. I searched the rooms, and found a blue surtout coat. I know Durley, I saw him at the office six months after the robbery, dressed in this shooting jacket, which was taken from him, (producing it) - he has been tried since.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk at the Bank. The 10 l. note produced, was paid in by Jones, Lloyd, and Co.; it is No. 6120, dated 5th of November, 1821.

JOHN EDMUNDS . The number and date correspond with my memorandum.

EDWARD BEAL re-examined. The Dundee Arms belonged to John Minshaw , but George Albialbon Horlock occupied it. I have seen him pay the rent to Minshaw. He gave his name to Evans at the office.

JAMES EVANS . He gave me his name as George Abialbon Horlock .

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-45

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

529. JOSEPH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Dunn , about the hour of four in the afternoon, of the 24th of February , at St. John, at Hackney, (the said Samuel Dunn and others being therein,) and stealing therein a shawl, value 1 s., his property; and a cloak, value 3 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of Charlotte Dunn , spinster .

CHARLOTTE DUNN . I am the daughter of Samuel Dunn - we live in the parish of St. John, Hackney . On Monday, the 24th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the front room on the ground floor, and found the window open - I had been there about half-past three o'clock; it was then shut. My father was at home from three to five o'clock. There is no fore court; the window opens to the road - I missed a cloak, a silk handkerchief, and a shawl, which were lying on the table at half-past three o'clock; it is a sash window, and could be thrown up from outside. I saw the property again on the Wednesday in possession of the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Was you last person in the road - A. Yes. The window was shut quite close. My mother and I were sitting together, and my father up stairs.

SAMUEL MILWOOD . I live at Hackney. On the 24th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner jump over a hedge into a field, where I was, with a bundle of things; he ran towards Margaret-street, towards town. I followed and saw his face. When he got up to the canal, I saw him throw the things in - I took them out, and delivered them to Algar afterwards, and gave an alarm. He was brought back in a moment - I secured him. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. How far was I from you - A. He passed close by me - I was cleaning the ditch out. I saw his face plainly, and called to him to stop; but he would not. When he was brought back, he said the handkerchief that contained the things belonged to him. I pulled them all out of the canal directly, and saw him knocked down.

WILLIAM ALGAR . I produce them.

CHARLOTTE DUNN . This is my cloak, which is worth 3 s., a handkerchief is mine, and a shawl of my mother's, worth 1 s. A decanter and stopper were missed.

Prisoner's Defence. The man took me to a boy, who gave the alarm, and said it he said I was not the man he would let me go. The boy said he saw two men running, but I was neither of them.

SAMUEL MILWOOD . The boy said as we could not find the owner of the things, he would have nothing to do with it. He had dropped a decanter stopper.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230409-46

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

530. JOHN TOOMEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, thirty-one yards of carpet, value 3 l. 10 s. the goods of Benjamin Linsey , in his dwelling-house .

BENJAMIN LINSEY , JUN. I live with my father in Shoreditch . He is an upholsterer and his name is Benjamin. On Monday morning last, at eight o'clock, I was going from the shop which is part of the dwelling-house, to the country-house, and could see by a mirror every thing that passed in the shop. I saw a man in a fur cap come into the shop about three feet, and take a piece of carpet from the window near the counter. I ran out, he saw me and threw two pieces of carpet down in the street; about eighty yards off. I picked them up and he was secured; there were thirty-one yards and a half of carpet, worth 3 l. 10 s., it belongs to my father. It was the prisoner. I did not know him before.

HENRY COVENTRY . I was opening my father's shop about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's, about eight o'clock in the morning and heard the cry of Stop thief! I went out and the prisoner was running down Swan-yard. I stopped him; Linsey was pursuing him; he had a fur cap on.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18230409-47

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

531. ANN REASON was indicted for stealing, on the 3 d of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, three sovereigns, six crown pieces, and twelve half crowns, the monies of John Kempshall , in the dwelling house of John Craige .

SARAH KEMPSHALL . I lodged in the house of John Craige , No. 12, Circus-street, in the Parish of St. Mary-le-bone . I have a son named John. The prisoner came to me one Thursday night, having left her place, and I let her lodge with me; she stopped nearly five weeks, and slept in the same bed, and occupied the same room as myself While she was with me, my son gave me 6 l. to take care of - the prisoner did not know it. There were three sovereigns, some crown pieces, and half a crown. I took out my drawer, and put the money behind it, and put the drawer in again - it was wrapped up in a silk handkerchief - the drawer would shut close with it there. I did not lock it, as I had no key. This was about three weeks

before she left. I went out every day to work - I left her in the room. I was sometimes absent all day. I did not look for the money until my son spoke to me about it. She had then been gone away to her place nine days - we missed the money, and had her taken the next day.

JOHN KEMPSHALL . I am the son of the last witness. I gave her 6 l. - three sovereigns, 2 l. in dollars, and the rest in half crowns; we went to look for them, in the drawers, about three weeks after, and it was gone.

ROBERT WILLIANS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 8th of April, at No. 28, George-street, Manchester-square, where she was in service. She opened the door, and I said, I wanted to speak to her, about some money lost by the prosecutor, at No. 12, Circus-street. She said, she knew nothing at all about it - she had the newspaper in her hand, and said,

"I must go up to my mistress, for she is very ill a bed." I said,

"Are there no other servants in the house." She said,

"No." I allowed her to go up stairs; I stopped in the passage; she came down in two or three minutes, with a water bottle, and said,

"I am going to get some water for my mistress." She went down, and stopped longer than I thought necessary; and when she came up, I asked her what had made her so long. See said, she had been filling the kettle. I then went down stairs with her in the front area, and found some wearing apparel, quite new, thrown there behind an empty beer cask. I said.

"This is what made you stay so long down stairs." She said, she was very sorry for it; and, if I would accompany her to her friends, she would make the money good, - I had neither promised nor threatened her. The wearing apparel consisted of a bonnet, silk scarf, bombazeen and cotton gown, and some muslin. I asked her where the rest of the money was. She said, she had laid it out in those things; and she mentioned the prices of the different things, which came to above 5 l. Her box stood in the kitchen, with the key in it, but I found nothing there.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix is a false woman; she first encouraged me to rob my father's house, and then to leave it; and, because I would not consent to what she wished, she has prosecuted me.

Two witnesses gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18230409-48

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

532. EDWARD WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Magnay , from his person .

WILLIAM MAGNAY , ESQ. I live in Queen-street. About three weeks ago, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking along Coleman-street , and turning round into London-wall , I felt a jerk at my pocket. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner putting my handkerchief into his bosom. Nobody was with him. I immediately siezed him, and on challenging him with it, he offered to restore it. I sent for Drinkwater, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. - Q. He was quite alone - not with a gang - A. No. I have made enquiry, and find him and his parents have been separated for several years; and, in consequence of that, he may have been neglected - his father makes him no allowance.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner - he said nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-49

533. JANE PACK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a table cloth, value 2 s. the goods of George Todd .

ELIZABETH TODD . I am the wife of George Todd , who keeps the Salutation tavern, in Newgate-street . The prisoner has worked for me occasionally, washing and ironing in the house, until the last five weeks. I have lost several things. I found a table cloth at the pawnbrokers, on the 25th of March. She was taken up on the 24th, and told me she had pawned my table cloth, and other things.

WILLIAM BENHAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker of Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square. On the 7th of October, a table cloth was pawned by the prisoner, in her own name, for 2 s. - I knew her before.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am a constable. On the 24th of March, I went to her lodging at the Carpenter's Arms, public house, Burton Crescent. I found her in Newgate-market the next night. I told her she had been robbing Mrs. Todd - she denied it. I went home, and searched her lodging, and found thirteen duplicates there, and one for the table cloth among them.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-50

534. JAMES BREATHING was indicted for stealing, on the 2 d of March , a deal box, value 1 s., and 15 lbs. of snuff, value 4 l. 15 s. 2 d. , the goods of George Colee .

GEORGE COLEE . I am book-keeper at the Bull-inn, Leadenhall-street . I had a deal box under my care to be sent by the waggon to Suffolk, directed to John Ray , Lanham. It was brought in about half-past four o'clock on Saturday, and next night I saw it in the possession of the constable, it still had the direction on it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Had you a porter named Cooper - A. No; he was horse-keeper - he left some days after the box was lost; I have not seen him since, but believe he can easily be found; he was before the Magistrate at the same time as the prisoner - the prisoner said Cooper handed it to him, and employed him to take it - Cooper went out of the way two days after.

EDWARD HOARE . I am clerk to Messrs. Sikes and Co., snuff-manufacturers, of Redcross-street. They sent this box to the Bull-inn - I was fetched when the prisoner was apprehended, and asked him how he came by the box; he said he found it behind the Royal Exchange.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say that Cooper gave it to him there - A. No; nor did he say any thing to the Alderman about Cooper in my hearing.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a constable. On Monday night, at half-past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Paul's-alley, Redcross-street; I asked him what he had under his coat, he said what was that to me - I said I insisted on knowing - he said he was only going a little way with it, and that he picked it up somewhere about Whitechapel; that he did not know what was in it. I took him into Mr. Reeves's, broke it open, and found it was snuff; a bill in it lead me to Mr. Sykes's - he said

nothing about Cooper then. But two days after he said Cooper gave it him; he also said he had sent a private letter to the Alderman that contained all about it. I took Cooper before the Alderman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-51

535. MARY SOUTHWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a shawl, value 30 s.; two gowns, value 30 s.; two aprons, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 5 s.; a night-gown, value 1 s.; two napkins, value 1 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d.; a frock, value 10 s.; two yards of lace, value 2 s.; and a printed bound book, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Joseph Ingram , her master, in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH INGRAM . I am a book-binder , and live in Tooke's-court . The prisoner was eight days in my service - we had a character with her.

SARAH INGRAM . I am the wife of the prosecutor. These shawl and gowns were in a chest, unlocked, in the back room on the second floor, which is our bed-room - I had not missed them until they were found. She left the house between one and two o'clock in the night - the key was in the door - I did not hear her go out - she went to bed about eleven o'clock, and at ten minutes before two o'clock the watchman brought her back, with all the articles stated in the indictment. I do not know when she took them, or whether separately or not.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. They were taken from different places - A. Yes.

JOHN JONES . I am a watchman. On the 27th of February, a few minutes before two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Castle-street, Holborn, with a box under her arm - she said she was going to her aunt's; I told her she must come to the watch-house - she said No, she must go to her aunt's, for her mistress said she must. I asked who her mistress was; she said Mrs. Ingram, and took me to the house; I knocked, and brought Mr. Ingram down - the box contained the articles stated in the indictment, among other things of her own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to mercy - Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-52

536. MATTHEW JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Mitchell , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 25th of March , at St. Martin. Ludgate, (the said John Mitchell , and others, being therein), and stealing therein two pair of shoes, value 12 s. his property.

JOHN MITCHELL . I am a shoemaker , and live in Creed-lane, in the parish of St. Martin's, Ludgate . On the 25th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was up in the first floor, my wife and the lodgers were at home - I heard the cellar bolt drawn aside - it is at the bottom of the stairs, inside the house; I thought it might be one of the lodgers; my wife went down in about three minutes - I followed and ran out; a woman passing delivered me two pair of new shoes, which were mine, and had been taken from the window. The shop door was shut and bolted when I went up stairs - it has a private bolt to it, and he could not get into the shop without going into the cellar and pulling a string to undo the bolt - I only missed these two pair, which are worth 12 s.

ANN MITCHELL . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I had been up stairs about two hours; I am certain the shop door was bolted - I heard the bolt drawn aside. We had but one lodger at home, he was on the second floor - I heard the cellar bolt go, but heard no footstep - I sat quiet, and heard the shop door unbolted then ran down stairs, and saw the prisoner in the shop; he had a smock-frock on, and a stick in his hand, I was afraid to lay hold of him, but followed him, and called stop thief, and saw him throw away the shoes, he then turned round and said,

"Woman, why do you call stop thief after me, I have no property about me." I said,

"That is nothing to me, you have broken my place open" - I will not leave you. He was secured without my losing sight of him. One Knight stopped him, and gave him to Potter.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Guildhall that you did not see me throw away the shoes - A. No.

ELIZABETH HOLMES . I live opposite Mitchell's. I was sitting at the window, and heard Mrs. Mitchell call out, stop thief, and I saw a man in a smock frock throw away some shoes into the yard opposite. He was out of my sight in a moment; I did not observe his countenance. A woman picked the shoes up, and gave them to the prosecutor.

SARAH SARTINE . My husband is a cabinet-maker. We lodge at Mitchell's. I was coming home about three o'clock, and saw Mrs. Mitchell running after a man in a smock frock. He was afterwards brought back.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge, with the shoes. I found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I just passed the door when this woman came out, and sang out stop thief. I turned round and said,

"What do you want with me." She said,

"You just came out of my shop."

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18230409-53

537. THOMAS TILYARD and WILLIAM COOPER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a deal box, value 1 s., and nine wrappers, value 27 s. , the goods of David Duthoit .

SAMUEL KINGSBURY . I am foreman to Mr. B. Blakesley, box-maker, Friday-street . Mr. Duthoit lives opposite to us. On the 1st of April, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw four men come down the street in company, and then separate; two of them stopped at my master's door, and looked at Mr. Duthoit's warehouse, which made me notice them. The prisoners were two of the four; I sent for Jackson, the officer, to be on the watch - I saw the prisoner standing next door and go over to Mr. Duthoit's door. Tilyard placed himself by the doorpost, and Copper went in and brought out the box from the inner door, put it down close by Tilyard at the outer door, looked down the street, then put it on his shoulder. I went after him and stopped him ten yards

off - Tilyard ran off, and the officers stopped him; Cooper threw the box down, when I took him. The other two men were waiting about and ran off. The box contained nine wrappers.

RICHARD GARRATT . I work for Mr. Blakesley; I saw the two prisoners at Mr. Duthoit's door - Cooper brought the box out and went up the street; I went with Kingsbury and stopped him - he threw it down; Tilyard ran off.

JOHN EVANS . I am porter to Mr. David Duthoit , hosier , of Friday-street; I saw the box safe in the passage ten minutes before it was taken. I saw somebody going out of the passage - I went to the door, and saw Cooper running with the box; Kingsbury took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN JACKSON . I am a constable; Garratt came to me - I went into Friday-street, and saw Cooper go from the door with the box on his shoulder. I collared Till-yard.

TILLYARD'S Defence. I am a stranger to Cooper, but was merely passing at the time the box was stolen.

TILLYARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-54

538. WILLIAM MEANS and WILLIAM SHARBOARD were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 80 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of Charles Calvert , John Calvert , John Forster , and Edmund Sexton Pery Calvert , and fixed to a building of theirs .

BOUGHEY HEPWORTH . I am in the employ of Messrs. Calvert, who have premises in the Ward of Dowgate. On Saturday, the 8th of March, between five and six o'clock, Mr. Church called on me, saying, some boys were taking some lead off an empty house, in Red Bull Yard . I went with him into a house which commanded a view of the premises. I saw Means cutting away the lead from the gutters in front of the house, and a little boy with him. We went down, and got into the house by the staircase window, and found the sink cut away. I went up stairs, and found the house a complete wreck; the tiles and partitions all torn away; the gutters taken away; the edge of the lead was quite bright; the pipes too were cut away, and gone. There was a window open at the back part of the premises. I found the prisoners down in a place where Mr. Calvert's empty butts were; we took them to the watch-house. On Means we found two steels, two flints and two matches, and a small piece of lead in his pocket, fresh cut - but nothing on the other. I asked what they had done with the lead they had cut away. Sharboard said I should find five pieces down by the cellar flap. We found about 3/4 of a cwt. there. There has been about a ton stolen in all. Sharboard said, they had lived in the house four days, and had had a fire there, made of wood torn from the wainscot. They said they had sold it to a man over the water, at Chain-gate. I have known Sharboard a long time, and believe he has a good character before.

WILLIAM CHURCH . I was with Beer - his account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MEAN'S Defence. - I went down the yard, and saw the cellar flap open, walked in, went up, and saw the lead laying in the gutter; I went and told this boy of it, he went in with me, and we cut a bit of it.

MEARS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

SHARBOARD - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-55

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, APRIL 12.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

539. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a cask, value 10 s. the goods, of Nicholas Charrington and others, his partners.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PRENDERGAST conducted the secution.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a cooper, and live in Field-lane. On the 14th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon I was coming down the New-road, near Euston-square , I saw two drays, one of which the prisoner was with, and the other belonged to Mr. Charrington. I saw the prisoner take an eighteen gallon cask of beer off Messrs. Charrington's dray and place it on his own - another man assisted him The dray was standing still at the time. He drove towards home.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. - Q. Have you never said that it was dark - A. It was towards dusk. I was thirty or forty yards from the dray - the letter T was chalked on the cask; I said nothing to him, but informed Mr. Basset, the cask inspectors, eleven or twelve days after, a bill was posted up, offering a reward of 5 l., that lead me to him.

Q. That induced you to go him - A. That lead me to him; but it was not particularly for the money. I only know the prisoner by sight. I have called at his house. He is a brewer. I have been at work nearly all the winter. When I have no work on my own account, I do journey-work.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was the reward offered for this theft in particular - A. No; for any person stealing casks. I was attending a Captain, who I expected to go abroad with, which prevented my giving information, for if I had gone abroad I could not have given evidence.

COURT. Q. Did you go to the drayman and tell him the cask was stolen - A. No; I do not know whether it was the draymen who assisted him, I thought he was aware of it, so I did not tell him.

CHALES HESELTINE . I am an Excise officer. I was at the prisoner's premises, in York-street, Pentonville, on the 14th of 15th of February, and saw an eighteen gallon cask of Charrington's there, full of beer - their name was on it. I asked him how he came by it. He said he had it from Swain, a brewer, in Somers Town; I put a chalk mark on it. There was the letter T on it besides; I saw it again the next day empty, and placed it in a corner; Messrs. Charington's name was still on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Does it not frequently happen that casks get mixed - Q. Yes. I survey his premises every day.

THOMAS BASSETT . I am an inspector of casks to the society of brewers. On the 17th of February. I went to the prisoner's premises, and saw a cask of Charrington's with their private mark on it. I saw it again at Bow-street empty. I saw about six other casks, some chipped and disfigured, with the names off.

FREDERICK BATH . I am clerk to Messrs. Charrington, and Co. The cask is theirs, their name is still on it. Casks frequently get mixed.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer of Bow-street. I executed a warrant on the prisoner's premises, and found the cask among others there. I searched the premises and found two instruments which are used by coopers, they were concealed between the ceiling and a wooden partition. I heard him examined at Bow-street, he said he found this cask empty on the road by Euston-square, on the evening of the 13th or 14th, this was not taken down writing.

JOSEPH HALL . These tools are used by coopers, to shave the inside of pails and tubs, they are of no service to a brewer, except to scratch any thing out.

Cross-examined. Q. Are they not used to clean casks out - A. Never; casks are scrubbed out not shaved.

JOHN SWAIN . I am a brewer and live at Somers-town, the prisoner has dealt with me for two years and a half for beer; he always brought his own casks for it. I never sent him any cask of Charrington's I sold him no beer in February.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-56

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

504. JOHN HAYDON was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of George Causley , on the night of the 11th of March , and stealing, 28 lbs. of cheese, value 10 s. , his property.

GEORGE CAUSLEY . I live in Mount-street, Bethnal-green . My wife keeps a chandlers shop. On the 11th of March, between nine and ten o'clock at night. I was sitting in a little back room; nobody was in the shop; I heard a noise of glass falling,; I then went in and saw a man's hand inside the window; he had hold of a cheese. I called Stop thief! I saw the cheese go out of the window in the man's hand; there were two candles in the shop, one stood near the window, and the other at the end of the shop. I saw his face as I went towards the door distinctly. I opened the inner shop door leading into the passage, but when I came to the street door, I found it tied with a cord, so that I could not immediately open it. I gave it three sudden jerks, and the gimblet which fastened it gave way. I ran out with a stick, and in about an hour I met him in Church-street, going into the King's Head, public-house. I said nothing, but sent an officer to take him. I missed the two other pieces of cheese from the window; when I returned, after he was taken. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is there a door dividing the parlour from the shop - A. Yes; but it was open. I saw his face distinctly, when I ran into the shop, both the shop candles reflected a light in the window - six of them go to a pound.

JOSEPH CROW . I live in Collingwood-street, Bethnal-green. I was passing on the opposite side of the street to the prosecutor's shop, about five minutes past nine o'clock, and saw three men standing there - one of them stood at the prosecutor's door, one at the middle of the window, and the other on the other side of it. As I passed, the one who stood at the middle of the window, turned round, and looked at me - I went on. I know none of them.

ANN CAUSLEY . I was in the room with my husband. The candles were long sixes, and gave a middling light.

Prisoner. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

ELIZA TOWNSEND . My aunt keeps the King's Head, public-house, Church-street, Bethnal-green. I was in bed when the prisoner was taken at our house; he came in about six o'clock, and remained there till a little before eight o'clock - there is a clock in the tap-room, where he was, but not in the parlour. He came in again about a quarter past eight o'clock, and remained till twenty minutes or half-past nine, went out, and returned a little before ten, and was in the tap-room when I went to bed. I am certain of the time, as I look at the clock to see when to take out my beer.

COURT. Q. Then he was in the tap-room at first - A. Yes, and in the parlour afterwards. Some men were in his company; a man, a plaisterer, went out, and returned with him the second and last time.

JANE GOUGH . I was on a visit at the King's Head, and was in the bar all the evening. The prisoner came in about six o'clock, and staid till a little before eight; then went out for twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour, and staid till a quarter to nine, and it might be a little after nine when he went out again, and was back between twenty minutes and half-past nine, with a man, and never went out till he was taken.

GEORGE ADAMS . I am a baker, and was at the King's Head on the night the prisoner was taken, from six to eight o'clock - he went out five minutes to eight, and returned about twenty minutes after. I had been out for my supper, and returned before him, and saw him in the turnpike-house. I remained at the King's Head till half an hour or twenty minutes past nine, and left him there.

WILLIAM FAIREY . I am toll-taker of Shoreditch turnpike. The prisoner came there about eight o'clock, and stopped a quarter of an hour, on the night he was taken.

THOMAS REEVES . I am a plaisterer. I went to the King's Head about half-past seven o'clock on this night, and remained there with the prisoner till half-past nine - he went out a few minutes before eight, and returned in twenty minutes after. I left him there, and next morning heard he was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-57

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

541. MAURICE HOULIHAN was indicted for that he, on the 7th of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, in and upon John Leacy , a subject of the King, feloniously maliciously, and wilfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously &c., did strike, cut, and stab him, in and upon his breast and hands, with intent feloniously &c., to kill and murder him, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN LEACY . I am a smith , and live in Gray-street, Manchester-square . The prisoner is my uncle; he lived in Peter-street. On Monday, the 17th of March, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, I went out of my room to the chandler's shop, to buy a candle - I returned in about five minutes; my room is the back garret. I pulled the street door to when I went out, but I do not know whether I shut it or not. When I came back I put the key in the key hole, and opened it. I went into the passage; I had no light. There was a man inside the door, who said,

"Is that Mr. Leacy," I said it was - he asked if I was not going to force the law against him, for robbing me - I said, were it not that he had robbed me I would not. I know by the voice that it was the prisoner; he said he would give me more reason to do it, and rose his hand to strike me; I put up my two hands up to catch his, and I caught a knife in his hand - he drew it through my hand, and cut it. He struck at me with the knife, and cut me in the breast; I had hold of the knife all the time - he thrust it through my hand into my breast; it penetrated through my clothes, and the skin of my breast - he only struck me once; we caught each other, and struggled about. I ran to the stairs. I received a cut in the back part of my left hand in the struggle; I cannot say whether it was done by accident or not. Two women came down from the first floor, with a light in their hands; he then went out at the street door, taking the knife with him. The wound was not very deep in my breast - I had seen him two days before this affair; we had no quarrel. I suspected him of breaking open my box. I met him in Oxford-street, and told him so, and desired him to send me home what he had taken from me, or I would go before a Magistrate for a warrant - he told me not to bother him; this was all that passed. I did not see him again till I found him in the passage. I went to the watchman the night it happened. Both my hands were cut. I did not go to the doctor at all about it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me in Oxford-street the morning it happened - A. I had been at work all day.

JANE WEAR . I live in the same house as the prosecutor; on the night of the 17th of March, I and my sister heard a dreadful scuffle in the passage about half-past ten o'clock. We heard the door bang to, which made us go down, as it shook the house, it went with such violence. We both went down with a light, and saw him in a very bad state - there was a candle in his hat on the ground, he opened his bosom and shewed me a wound, which was bleeding at his breast and his hands also.

MARY GREATHEAD . I lodge at the same house. The last witness is my sister. On the night of the 17th of March, about half-past ten o'clock, we heard a scuffle in the passage and went down - the prosecutor's hat was laying on the ground and a new candle. The door was shut with such violence that it brought us down. I found the prosecutor in the passage; he opened his shirt and I saw a wound in his bosom and the blood running down. The blood was also running across the back of his left hand.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 18th of March. Leacy came to the office and produced the clothes he wore that day. Here is a mark on the shirt which the knife went through, and also on his jacket and apron.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that the prosecutor had run away from Ireland last summer; and in order to gain the affections of the prisoner's wife, had represented her as inconstant, in consequence of which the prisoner left her for six months, and found she was living with the prosecutor, and on going to demand her the prosecutor produced a spring bayonet, and threatened to run him through, and swore he would put an end to his life, and if his wife returned to him he would be her butcher. That upon her returning to live with the prisoner he detained her box, clothes, and some duplicates; it then went on to state as follows: -

"he took his oath that if she would come and stop in the passage he would bring her box down. She went, he locked her in the privy, fetched his bayonet down, and swore he would take her life if she did not go up to his room, which she was obliged to do, and he kept there till six o'clock the next morning, with his spring bayonet drawn for fear she should scream. She told me this on the morning of the 15th, and I went to his room to correct him - found the door unlocked and brought the box away, it being mine - he went to swear a robbery against me, but could not make it out, and so he swore I way-laid him in the passage and stabbed him, and that he saw me by the light of the lamp, and there is no lamp near the door - this is a plot between him and my wife to take my life that they may live together."

HANNAH KENEFIE . I live in Gee's-court, Oxford-street. The prisoner was in my room on the night this lad says he was stabbed; it was St. Patrick's-day - it was half-past ten or eleven o'clock when he left my room - he was drinking part of a gallon beer with his wife and child and my husband; he came in about eight o'clock - I know the time, as I am in the habit of carrying out milk and thought it time to go to bed - I usually go to bed between nine and ten o'clock, only we were merry making; his wife lodged with me when this happened, and he lodged with me twelve months ago. I live about two hundred yards from Gray-street; he lodged in Peter-street at the time.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , on the 3d Count. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor .

Reference Number: t18230409-58

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

542. DONALD CLAYTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Lewis , on the 8th of April , ( Mary Cowell and others being therein), and stealing seven handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; two yards of stuff, value 2 s.; a shift, value 1 s.; a table-cloth, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 3 d.; a waistcoat, value 6 d.; a hat, value 5 s., and two coats, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Welch .

ROBERT WELCH . I lodge in the house of Mr. Lewis, in Clement's-lane, Clare-market . On Tuesday last, about half-past one o'clock, I went home to dinner - I had left my room-door locked - I pulled out the key to unlock it, and found it gave way; I pushed it open, went in, and

found the catch that receives the bolt of the lock was forced off; the prisoner was in the room - I asked what he did there; he said,

"Oh! let me go, I have taken nothing." I said I do not know that; I went across the room to a box which I had padlocked in the morning, and found the padlock forced off, and several things taken out and placed in a chair behind the door. I took him to the watch-house - several things were lying on the floor, and two sticks which had hung on a nail were lying there too; a hat had been taken from the box and put in a chair, also a shawl of my mother's, who lives with me, but was not at home - two boxes had been opened. Some handkerchiefs were in the chair, but I do not know from which box they were taken - nothing but the hat belonged to me. I cannot say whether Cowell was in the house when it happened.

JOHN SCOTT . I took him in charge and found a pair of stockings in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 65.

Of stealing only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-59

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

543. FREDERICK JOHN WILLIAM NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , at St. Mary-le-bone, a clock, value 6 l.; three seals value 2 l.; two pair of earrings, value 15 s.; two necklaces, value 5 s.; a ring, value 10 s.; a silver box, value 3 s.; a tea pot, value 3 s.; a milk jug, value 1 s., and a trunk, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Johnson , in her dwelling-house .

MARY JOHNSON . I rent the house No. 4, Spring-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On some night in March last, about nine o'clock at night, I was down in the kitchen; I heard the street door bang; I ran up and missed the clock out of the front parlour; I had been there about half an hour before, but did not notice it. The front door was fast when I left the parlour; nobody had been out for three or four hours before. I immediately went down to the watch-house and found the clock - a small red trunk, a tea pot, and cream jug. The trunk contained the other articles as stated in the indictment. I had seen them all safe about two o'clock that afternoon. The trunk was in the bed-room on the same floor as the parlour. The cream jug and tea pot were in the front parlour, the window of which was open, there is a palisade before the door.

RICHARD GARDNER . On the night of the 26th of March, I was in Spring-street, about nine o'clock and saw two men standing on the middle of the street. At that moment a man came out of Mrs. Johnson's door with something, (I do not know what it was.) The men ran across to him, and with an oath told him to make haste. They joined him and went down Spring-street, and down York-place. The servant came out calling watch; I directed the watchman which way they were gone; they had passed close me, and to the best of my belief the prisoner is the man who came out of the house, he had a long dark blue coat, but I can not speak to his face. It was dark.

THOMAS PERRING . I am the watchman of Spring-street. On the 26th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, when I was in York-street, I heard the call of watch; I went into Paddington-street, and saw a hackney-coach moving on; and just as I overtook it, it stopped, as one of the springs gave way. Another coach was close by the side of it; I went between the two coaches with my lanthorn; both the doors were open. There were four men in the coach which had broken down; two of them got into the other coach, the third man went off, and the fourth was the prisoner; he had a clock in his hand. I was holding my lanthorn up, he said,

"Watchman I don't want a light, thank you." He was going to hand the clock to the coachman of the coach which had been called, I said,

"I will hand that in myself if you please." I took it from his hand and kept it, and when he got out himself and was getting into the other coach, I collared him; he asked why I did that. I said, I had information that a clock was stolen, and suspected him; he said it was his own, and that he was a clock-maker by trade. I put the clock into the coach and sprang my rattle; but on taking him towards the pavement he struggled; gave a turn and both his coats came off. I dropped them and seized him round the body and sprang my rattle; the watchman came; one of the other men were taken, and both taken to the watch-house. I searched the prisoner and found a small red trunk in his pocket, and also a tea pot and cream jug, fourpence halfpenny and two duplicates. The other man was not detained. I gave the property up at the watch-house, the prosecutrix claimed it before it was out of my sight, I know that produced to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Why was the other discharged - A. I do not know; there was a mistake about it. The prisoner said they were his own property; not that they were given him to take care of.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I produce the property, which I received at the watch-house, on the morning of the 27th - it was locked in a place we have for the purpose.

MARY JOHNSON . I went to the watch-house, and found the property on the table, and examined it. I gave six guineas for the clock six months ago. They are all mine.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any other name - A. My name is Mary Davis , but I have been always called Johnson for the last five years. I have lived with Johnson, but am not married to him - I am well known by that name. I have had the house two years, and took it in that name. I have not gone by the name of Davis since I have been in the neighbourhood - I have not been called Davis for the last five years; I do not live with Johnson. I am owner of the house, and the goods are my own.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Subject to the decision of the Twelve Judges, whether the property be accurately described as belonging to Johnson .

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutrix.

Reference Number: t18230409-60

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

541. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , five lambs, value 25 s. the goods of Thomas Canham .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CANHAM , ESQ. I have a house at Twickenham , and a farm-house a short distance off, where my bailiff lives. The prisoner was my shepherd . In February I had some lambs; in consequence of something that passed, I went to the prisoner with my bailiff, and questioned

him about five lambs which were missing. He said there were more than five missing, and they were dead, and he sold the skins to those people who would give him most money for them - he had no authority to do so. Next day he expressed his regret that he had told an untruth, and said only five were missing, and he had sold the skins to one Saxton. He was taken into custody on the 24th.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been your shepherd - A. Since the 15th of April last. He came from Hampshire.

Q. Did he not say he took them, believing them to be his right, for when a ewe had two one was his - A. He said he had a right to all that died. He mentioned no name but Saxton.

DANIEL BERKSHIRE . I am bailiff to the prosecutor, and live at his farm at Twickenham. On the 8th of February, there was a hundred and six lambs. I counted them that day. There was another after, making a hundred and seven. I saw them every day, and missed none of them. I had asked the prisoner how his flock was, once or twice; he said very well. They were counted on the 15th of March, and then there were only a hundred and two. I asked what had become of the others; he said they had died, and that he had sold the skins to those who would give the most for them. He afterwards said he had sold them to one Saxton.

Cross-examined. Q. How many did he say he had sold - A. Five. He said he was entitled to them in the country he came from; that when they foaled double, and the lamb died, it was his from lambing to shearing time; or he was to have a guinea and a month's board. He said so when he was first spoken to about them. He continued at his duty as usual, and was taken seven days after.

FRANCES HOLYLAND . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of March, at a public-house, at Hounslow-heath. He said he knew what it was for, that he had expected it this three days; that it was for selling three lamb's skins for three halfpence each, to Saxton, on the Heath. I called on him when he was in prison, and particularly cautioned him what he said. He stated he had sold two lambs to Mrs. Clark's little boy, at the Cross Lancers, Hounslow-heath; that he considered them his property, and that he had 1 s. 6 d. for one, and 2 s. for the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Who desired you to go to him in prison - A. I went about some sheep, which he was not implicated in.

RINA CLARK . I keep the Cross Lancers, at Hounslow. I came into the house on the 20th of September, and the next day, or about that time, the prisoner came in to have some beer - he was a stranger. My little boy wanted lambs. The servant went and spoke to the prisoner about it. He said,

"Very well, my little man, I'll see about one for you when there is one to spare." Next afternoon he brought one; I gave him a bottle. He got a quill and milk, to show the child how to make it suck. The lamb was weak, and I put it into a box with hay. He then went into the tap-room, and had a pot of beer. I gave him 1 s. and he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not ask for the shilling - A. No; I gave it him for his trouble. I should think the lamb had been foaled a day or so.

JOHN CLARK . I am the son of the last witness. The prisoner came to my mother's for refreshment, at different times. I saw him after he gave my little brother a lamb, as my brother had told me he had given him another. I gave him 2 s. for his trouble. I saw both the lambs afterwards. We have them now both alive.

Cross-examined. Q. They were both young - A. About four days old I should think; they were very weak, scarcely able to stand.

The following witnesses were called on the prisoner's behalf.

JAMES COOPER . I have been a shepherd in the county of Middlesex for sixty years. Whenever a weak ewe had lambs, for the benefit of master he always allowed me to take one away - shepherds always have that liberty. The skins of dead lambs belong to the shepherd, and no man living can deny it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am the son of the last witness, and have been a shepherd twenty years. When a weak ewe has two lambs, we always take one away to preserve the other; the shepherd has it; master knows it; but I do it without his leave.

JOSEPH BURTON . I was shepherd to King George the 3 d. for one year, and then went to Northumberland; if there was two lambs we always had the privilege to take away one; and if they died, we always had the skins till shearing time; and after that, they become master's.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Then the more that die, the better for you - A. No; the skins are not worth above one penny or three half-pence.

THOMAS SAXTON . I bought six skins of the prisoner, or three halfpence each - they were lambs which had died.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-61

Before Lord Chief Justice Hullock.

545. CHARLES MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , eight pair of shoes, value 3 l., the goods of John Chard , his master, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CHARD . I am a shoemaker , and live in Saint Mary-le-bone . The prisoner was my apprentice for about a year and a half. I missed a pair of strong men's shoes on the 8th of March; and on the 9th I went after him, and found him at his brother's, in Homer-street. I called him out of the room, and said,

"Let me have what you have got of mine." He took me into the street, and begged I would not discharge him. I asked what he had done with the shoes. He said, he did not take them with intent to keep them, but he had got a customer for them, and he would bring me either the money or shoes in an hour. I never authorised him to sell any. He then left me and went in doors. Ward afterwards brought me a pair of shoes. I saw the prisoner about fifty yards off at the time, watching him. He came to work next day. I told him Ward had brought a pair. He said he had five pair at a pawnbroker's, he was very sorry, and did not know but there were more; and that he had one pair in pawn in Stingo-lane, and one pair in Crawford-street. I fetched an officer - he said, he did it for drink.

THOMAS SMITH . I am apprenticed to Mr. Gideon, pawnbroker. I have five pair of shoes, pledged by the prisoner, - one pair on the 3d of January, for 5 s., one pair on the

6th December, for 6 s.; one pair on the 20th December, for 6 s.; one pair on the 17th, and one on the 28th of January. I knew him before. I always thought he lived with his father, and pawned them for him.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Bryan, Upper Park-street, pawnbroker. On the 20th of February, the prisoner pawned a pair of shoes, and on the 8th of March he brought another pair - he said he pawned them for his father.

GEORGE HOWELL . I am servant to Mr. Jenkins, pawnbroker, Crawford-street. On the 28th of February, the prisoner pawned a pair of shoes, which he said he brought from his father, a shoemaker.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230409-62

Before Lord Chief Justice Abbott.

546. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a pair of boots, value 25 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; and a handkerchief, value 5 s.; the goods of John Carpenter , in the dwelling of Thomas Walklett .

JOHN CARPENTER . I am a coachman , and lodge at the Cock, public-house, at Hackney , kept by Thomas Walklett ; I had a room to myself there. On the 8th of March I missed my clothes - I had seen them about ten days or a fortnight before - I found them in possession of Foster.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I and Brown went to a clothes shop, in Cable-street, Whitechapel, on Monday, the 3d of March, in consequence of information, and found the prisoner in the shop, with a bundle. I asked what he had. He said, a pair of boots and a waistcoat. We took him to the office, searched, and found on him a pair of breeches under his own trowsers. He said he bought them at Romford a few days before. We advertized them, and Carpenter claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at Romford.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-63

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

547. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a jacket, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 9 s., and 16 s. , the property of Andrew Olson .

ANDREW OLSON . I am a merchant seaman . On the 1st of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I lost the articles stated in the indictment. The 16 s. was in my waistcoat pocket, in a basket in the forecastle of my brig - I had put them there about eight o'clock in the morning I found them at the pawnbroker's about eight o'clock.

JOHN FIELD . I am shopman to John Reynolds , a pawnbroker, of Shadwell. On Saturday afternoon, the 1st of March, about five o'clock, the prisoner pawned a jacket, and waistcoat for 10 s. Olson came in the evening, and claimed them, and on Monday, a boy brought the duplicate to redeem them - he took us to a Jew's shop at Shadwell, where I found the prisoner, and asked how he came by them; he said he bought them in East Smithfield. I detained him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a man in a public-house in East Smithfield, for 8 s. - he said he had just come out of the hospital, and was going to Gravesend. I pawned them, and on Monday went to sell the duplicate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-64

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

548. JAMES WIER , GEORGE GOLLEGE , and WILLIAM CHRISTY were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition, only, with killing and slaying Sarah Wildbore .

HENRY WILLIAM HUGHES . On Friday, the 2d of March, I lived in Old-street-road . I knew Sarah Wildbore - she had been to see me that day - she was seventy-two years old; she left my house about half-past eight o'clock - it was dark. She lived at Pentonville - I lit her out, and stopped at the door with a light in my hand; she was crossing the street towards a doctor's shop, which threw out a great light, and before she could get across, a cart came in contact with her; it was galloping - three men were in it. The horse or the shaft struck her down, and when she was down they called out; but before the cart went on, after she was down, they struck the horse with the whip; they pulled up directly. I was going to pick her up, but as several people went to her assistance, I run to take the number of the cart. Wier was the man who had the whip in his hand; he followed her into the shop, and said he was very sorry, and seemed so - he almost fainted away. The cart was going towards Shoreditch church. She was taken away in a coach, and died next day in St. Bartholemews Hospital.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. In what part of the road did it happen - A. Near the turnpike. The doctor's shop is on the left hand going towards Shoreditch - the cart was about six yards from the doctor's - there was a strong gas light from the shop. It was a small horse, not a pony.

WM. THOMAS EVANS . I am a bookseller, and live in Brick-lane. I was in Old-street-road; it was dark. Just as I got opposite the doctor's shop, I heard a cart running along at a furious rate - I turned round to look at it, and instantly saw the woman under the horses feet; I ran to her assistance. I had heard no cry for her to get out of the way; but when she was down there was a cry of Hallo! Three men were in the cart - I ran and took the woman by the hand, she apeared motionless. I assisted her into the shop - Wier came in, and said he was very sorry for what had happened, and she had better be taken to her own house than to the Hospital. I assisted her to the Hospital in a coach.

Cross-examined. Q. Wier said he would pay the doctor to attend her - A. I did not hear that; he was very anxious about her. She was about two yards from the footway.

GEORGE BELL . I am a carver and gilder, and live in Sutton-street. Clerkenwell. I was in Old-street-road - I had passed the doctor's shop, and saw three persons in the cart, driving at the rate of eight or ten miles an hour, between a trot and a gallop. I heard a scream, which I think was from the persons in the cart; it was after the woman was down - I assisted her to the shop. Wier

seemed much affected, and said he would rather she went home. and he would pay the expences.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the other two had nothing to do with it, that it was his misfortune - A. He did. The wind was very high, and blew in their faces. The doctor's glasses reflected a light, which dazzles the sight.

MR. GEORGE PERRY . I am a surgeon of St. Bartholemews Hospital. I saw the deceased immediately she was brought in; she was bleeding from a cut on her head, which penetrated to the bone, and the flesh had fallen down - I gave her to the care of another gentleman next morning. After death we found six ribs broken, and the collar bone also; she died in the morning. This injury was the cause of her death.

WIER'S Defence. I drove to Soho, and met my fellow prisoners; we were perfectly sober - on returning at the rate of about six miles an hour home, the wind was high, and the rain beat in our faces, and when we got into the dark, we received a sudden obstruction. Gollege called out

"For God's sake pull in;" I did so, got down, and found the deceased under the cart, and was much concerned. I offered to pay all expences, and went next day to ascertain her state, attended the Coroner's Inquest, voluntarily, and was committed here.

WIER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

GOLLEGE - NOT GUILTY .

CHRISTY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-65

549. MARIA SHARPLING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a shawl, value 2 l.; seven yards of crape, value 33 s., and five scarfs, value 5 l. 8 s., the goods of Joseph Scraf , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Genese .

It appearing that these articles were the joint property of Joseph Scraf and another person, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-66

550. ELEANOR HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , eight watch ribbons, value 6 s. 8 d.; eight rings, value 8 d.; eight slides, value 8 d.; three pair of braces, value 3 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d.; a hawker's licence, value 4 l., and fourteen sovereigns, the property of Michael King , from his person ; and SARAH CONNER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to be stolen .

MICHAEL KING . I am a licensed hawker , and live in John's-court, West-street; I was returning from the country about half-past two o'clock in the morning of the 19th of March. I was sober and met Holland, she asked me to go home with her, and took me to a house in George-alley , on the first floor. I had twenty-six sovereigns and twenty-six shillings loose in my breeches pocket. The other articles stated in the indictment were in my inside-coat pocket, I was about an hour with her; and being fatigued I fell asleep, and was awoke by feeling her hand reaching over me to get my pantaloons from under the pillow. I seized her with her hand in my trowser's pocket; I told her to deliver my money four or five times, she would not. I called for assistance as loud as I could - I kept the door fast to keep her in; the watchman came and the officer of the night; I gave charge of her - twelve sovereigns were found in her pocket - I found only twelve left in mine, two were entirely gone. I had counted them about three hours before I met her; I had been with nobody else. I saw Connor in bed in the next room; I had paid her 1 s. 6 d. for the room - when I first went, she appeared to be the woman of the house - my licence was taken. The constable found all my property.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. - Q. How long had you been in town - A. I had just come in Hyde-park way; I had drank nothing since dinner, and was sober.

ROBERT EVANS . I am a watchman, my beat is on the side of Fleet-market; I went to the house in George-alley, hearing a cry of murder between the hours of two and three o'clock in the morning. The prosecutor complained of being robbed and ill used. I demanded admission and got in; I found him on the first floor, holding the bed-room door, and preventing the woman from coming out, there was another female there named Lewis. King was undressed with his trowsers in his hand, Holland also ran down stairs undressed, but finding the door fastened ran up again into Connor's room. King said he had twenty-six sovereigns when he came into the house; he could only find twelve in his pocket. I found Holland in Connor's bed; I saw twelve sovereigns and some silver found in her pocket; the tin-box, with the licence in it, was found between Connor's bed and the mattrass; there were also three pair of braces, eight watch ribbons, and one or two handkerchiefs. Before Holland was searched she said she had nothing at all. The man said if she would give up the money he would say nothing about it, but she denied having any; when the property was found Holland said

"it's all over with us now;" I had asked Connor who the woman was that was in her bed - she said she did not know any thing of her being there; and as soon as I went into the room I saw Holland in the bed - she had run into the room about ten minutes before.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Connor in bed when you went into the room - A. No; she came down stairs, and let me in - Holland ran into her room after that, and Connor went in four or five minutes after to dress.

THOMAS M'LEONARD . I am the watch-house keeper; I went to the house after Evans; King was on the stairs partly undressed - he charged Holland with robbing him; she was taken into the room where they had been. I did not see her in Connor's room - she declared she had no property about her. I found nothing on her; I went down stairs and afterwards went to Connor's room, she had got to bed then. I found the goods under her bed, tied up between the bed and mattrass; there was three parcels, the prosecutor claimed one, and the others were Connor's stays and pocket. Holland dressed to go to the watch-house; I then searched her again, and on taking off her pocket, she said,

"All that is there is mine." I found there was twelve sovereigns; she said at the watch-house they were given her by a countryman. As we went to the Compter the next morning, Holland said very likely in the hurry when the watchman came she must have placed the property under Connor's bed - Connor appeared to me not to know how they got under the bed;

her stays and pocket were quite on the other side, not near the property.

HOLLAND'S Defence. I know nothing of the robbery; the sovereigns were given me by a country gentleman, at the Axe-inn, Aldermanbury.

CONNOR'S Defence. I know nothing of it, only when I heard the alarm of murder and robbery and a knock at the door, I jumped out of bed, opened it as quick as I could, and when I came up the prosecutor was holding Holland; she ran into my room - the watchman went in and said she was in bed; she jumped out and I jumped in, being undressed.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Life .

CONNOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-67

551. FRANCIS ROSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Pump , from his person .

BENJAMIN PUMP . I am clerk in the Commissiarat department, and live in Cannon-street-road. On the 27th of February, about noon, I was walking very fast through Eastcheap , and suddenly heard a light foot-step behind me and a jerk at my pocket, I turned round and found the prisoner in possession of my handkerchief; I took him into a shop and gave him in charge.

THOMAS CORNEY . I am clerk to a dry salter; I was passing down Eastcheap behind the prosecutor, the prisoner was between us. On a sudden Mr. Pump turned round and seized the prisoner, who had the handkerchief in his hand. I had not noticed him before.

JOHN EVANS . I am a constable; I took him in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-68

552. ROBERT SIMPSON AYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , (being servant to Thomas Flint ,) two pair of silk stockings, value 15 s. 6 d.; seven pair of stockings, value 27 s. 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; two pair of gloves, value 2 s. 4 d., and three quarters of a yard of linen, value 6 d. , his property.

MR. THOMAS FLINT . I am a haberdasher ; I live on Fish-street-hill . The prisoner was my shopman for six months - in consequence of suspicion on the 2d of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I sent for him into the counting-house, and told him I was dissatisfied with him and intended to discharge him, and that I suspected he was not honest, and that before he went I should insist on his boxes being searched; they were kept in his bed-room. Mr. Sharp first searched them, and produced five pair of stockings to me - he was allowed to go away; in a few hours after I searched the box in his presence, found two handkerchief and the remainder of the articles stated in the indictment. I cannot say whether there was one or two pair of silk stockings in the box; one pair appeared to have been worn once - I know them well to be mine, from their pattern, quality, and manufacture. I claimed all the property in his presence.

GEORGE H. SHARP . Mr. Flint, is my son-in-law. The prisoner went willingly with me to search his box; I found five pair of cotton stockings; he said I should find nothing in it but what was there when there was a search about the porters. I was present also when Mr. Flint searched, and found the silk stockings and handkerchiefs, and claimed them. He acknowledged that he stole them all, and told Mr. Flint where he took them from and when; previous to that he said he bought them of his uncle. When I searched, I found a pair of white silk stockings in his pocket, which had been worn once; he wondered how they came there, and said he bought them near Middle-row.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What share have you in the business - A. None at all. The box had been searched six or seven weeks before, when our porters were detected in robbing us; he gave me his keys willingly; the box was in the back house, which is kept locked all day.

MR. FLINT. I held out no promise or threat to him; he said he bought the cotton stockings of his uncle, but on my finding the other things, I said

"You have taken these. It is of no use denying it - where did you get them from" - he said he took them all, and hoped I would have mercy on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-69

553. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a bed, value 40 s., and a wrapper, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Dear .

ROBERT DEAR . I am carman to Mr. Holyland, and live in George-court, Bennet's-hill, Doctors'-Commons. These things were in my waggon, near Broken-wharf, Thames-street ; about eight o'clock at night I missed them; I had seen them safe three minutes before. I saw nobody near. Mr. Jackson, the officer, shewed me them next morning; it had been opened.

JOHN RAMSDEN . I am a labourer. Dear bought the bed of me; I know it to be the same.

JOHN JACKSON . I am an officer. On Saturday night, the 15th of March, about half past eight o'clock, I was in the Old Change, I saw four suspicious characters. I saw the prisoner come from behind them with the bed on his back; he was about three minutes walk from Broken-wharf - I stopped him, and asked him what it was - he said it was the same inside as out - I questioned him; he said he fetched it from his master's, and was going to take it home; that his master lived at No. 12, Catherine-wheel-alley. I took him to the watch-house. I went to 12, Catherine-wheel-alley, which is kept by a widow woman, who knew nothing of it. When I returned to the watch-house, I found he had escaped through the bars of the windows; and on Tuesday, at ten o'clock in the morning, I met him with a person I knew, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-70

554. JOHN NEEDHAM and THOMAS HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 100 lbs. of lead, value 23 s., the goods of Charles Hammerton , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

MR. CHARLES HAMMERTON . I live at Whitefriars . On the 14th of March, I missed some lead from the bow window of my house, over the counting-house; it is a terrace to the river, and about twelve feet from the ground. I saw some lead at Guild-hall, and had it compared with the premises and am positive of its being part of the same. The nail holes correspond and it matched with what was left, it had been torn off the house, it is my property. I have been in possession of it for thirty years.

WILLIAM HENRY KING . I am ward beadle of St. Andrew parish. On the 14th of March, about half past eight o'clock, I and another officer stood in Shoe-lane; Coles passed me with something under his arm; I followed him and found it was lead. I secured him; the lead was claimed by Mr. Hammerton. I searched Cole's house, and found more lead which Mr. Hammerton claimed. Both correspond with each other.

THOMAS WILDON . I was with King; his statement is correct.

JOSEPH COLES . I keep a blacksmith's shop in Field-lane, Holborn. I was stopped with the lead. On Monday morning the 14th of March, the prisoner Needham came into my shop, and asked if I bought lead, and what I gave for it, I said 16 s. a cwt.; he said he was pulling down a shed, and about half past eight o'clock at night, he brought it to me. I said it was a very unreasonable time to come, and to take it away and to bring it to-morrow. He said No, that it was his own and he would leave it till to-morrow, and come then for the money; he referred me to No. 9, Tudor-street, Blackfriars. I took up the smallest piece of the lead in my hand to go there, and see if it was all right, and in Shoe-lane I was taken into custody, they told me it was shed lead and I was certain it was not, which made me go, Needham came alone in the morning to enquire if I bought lead - he brought none then. They came both together at night and each carried one piece of lead. I sometimes a cwt. of lead a day to fix rails with. I have

"dealer in marine stores," written over my door, because an officer told me it would be better; but I do not buy or sell marine stores.

JOHN BARNSLEY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners at Cole's shop on the following morning, when they came to the shop, Mrs. Cole sent for me, I told them I took them for stealing the lead they had brought there the night before; they said they had brought it there but they had found it. Needham said he lived in Fox and Knott-court.

HENRY HUGHES . I am the watchman, about half-past eight o'clock, I was told two men were going along Fleet-market with lead. I went down Field-lane and saw the two prisoners, but they had no lead, they were against Coles door; one was by a court just by, and the other came from the door. I had not got my watchman's coat on, so that they would not suspect us, but on looking at us, Needham run off up Safforn-hill, and Hill up the court, and got away. I went to the watch-house and told the beadle, returned with him and saw the prisoner, near the same spot again, and the moment they saw me Needham called out,

"Here is the pigs and grunters coming, and away they run." I knew Needham before.

NEEDHAM - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-71

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 14.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

555. THOMAS BAMFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , a looking glass, value 20 s. , the goods of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS , JUN. I am the son of John Davis, and live in Rathbone-place . The looking glass was on a table, about two feet inside the shop; there is an iron railing before the shop which was open. I saw the glass safe about half past ten o'clock when I went out.

THOMAS MALLARD . On the 31st of March about, twelve o'clock, I was at work at Mr. Davis's sale-room, which communicates with the shop. I saw the prisoner at the door for a short time, he then went away with something under his arm towards Oxford-street. I overtook him at the end of Rathbone-place, with the glass under his arm.

JAMES ADAMS . I saw the prisoner in Rathbone-place. going towards Oxford-street, with a glass in his hand, he ran down Charles-street, into Soho-square. I pursued him and saw him stopped.

JAMES BURDEN . On the 31st of March, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner with the looking glass. Mallard took it from him; he then ran across into Charles-street, and I followed; he turned round in the square, holding up his fist and said,

"Will you take me," I still pursued him; he knocked me down and a gentleman stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-72

556. HEAPHY GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , three pewter-pots, value 2 s. , the goods of James Sarell .

THOMAS DUDMAN . On the 28th of February, in consequence of what I heard, I went to South Molton-street, and found the prisoner in custody of a boy, she had a basket - I took her to the corner of the Haunch of Venson, public-house, and asked her for the basket; she refused it. I took it and found five pewter pots in it. The landlady asked how she came by them; she made no answer but begged for mercy.

JAMES SARELL . I keep the Running-horse, public-house, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square. Three of these pots are mine; I had missed a great many.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence; I was in a state of starvation.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18230409-73

557. CATHARINE BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a sovereign, three half crowns, eight shillings, and six sixpences, the monies of James Murray , from his person .

JAMES MURRAY . Early in the morning of the 1st of March, I was under the Piazza of Covent Garden , and saw the prisoner with four or five girls; they asked me to give them some gin. I went into a public-house, the prisoner rushed in after me, and said, I had better give them some. I told the landlady to give them half a pint of gin - I pulled out my purse and paid for it. I then had 1 l. 18 s. 6 d., and came out, they rushed out after me. The prisoner thrust her hand into my pocket, and took my purse and money out. The others pushed against me. I called the watchman and pursued her - I am sure she was the one who took it.

Prisoner. Q. You recollect receiving a sum of money from Bousfield and Fitzgerald to prosecute me - A. I have not received money to prosecute her. I swore to Bousfield and Fitzgerald at the watch-house; they were in her company.

EDWARD BARRY . I am a watchman. About half past two o'clock, on the morning of the 1st of March, the prosecutor called to me, and described the prisoner to me. I knew her by his description. I took her at night, and said,

"Now Kit you have done him." She smiled, and said she had. I said,

"He thinks worse about the purse, than about the money." She said,

"Yes, it was as pretty a steel purse as ever a man put into his pocket; and Barry, you shall have it to-morrow night."

Prisoner's Defence. I left him in company with five females; and why does he not swear to the other two, who are in the prison, as well as to me - he is paid not to prosecute them.

MURRAY re-examined. The bill was thrown out against the other two. Their friends came home to me several times, and asked me to take money not to prosecute them. I said I must do my duty; and one night a friend came and offered me 5 l. I said, if they gave me 10 l., I would prosecute. He put down 16 s., and said, that is yours. I took it up, threw it down, and said, I would not have it - he went away, so I put it in my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-74

558. JAMES CURTIS and JAMES ALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 80 lbs. weight of lead, value 38 s. , the goods of George Richard Pound .

JOHN COLLINS . I live in Gastignia-place, St. Luke's . I slept at the top of the house. On the 17th of March. I heard a noise on the roof of the next house, like lead rolling. I immediately got out, threw the window up, and called the watchman, and told him to take care nobody came up the area, or out at the door. He stood there with his lantern. I dressed myself and came down. The man who had the care of the premises, and lived opposite, came down in his shirt, ready to open the door - I went to the door to prevent an escape. They came down and said they could not find them. I went down into the cellar, and Allis was taken. I took Curtis coming up from the cellar into the front parlour - through a hole which was left for the hearth.

DONALD M'DONALD . I was in care of the house and sleep opposite. The watchman alarmed me between one and two o'clock in the morning. The house belongs to George Richard Pound. I went on the roof with others, and found the lead rolled up. I had seen it on the Friday before it was separated from the building. We searched the premises, and took Allis in the cellar, and asked who else there was - he said only one. Curtis was secured getting up from the cellar, through the parlour floor. The lead was moved nearer to a hole, which was made in the roof, than on Friday - it is an unfinished house. They could not get in without moving a board from the area; and must have replaced it after they got in.

GEORGE WALTERS . I went with M'Donald on the roof - we found three pieces of lead rolled up - a hole was made in the roof. When the prisoners were at the watch-house, I asked Curtis how they got in. He said, that they moved a board which was up against the window; that they had been to the play, and got in there to sleep. Curtis gave up a knife.

JAMES ARNOLD . I am the watchman - Collins called me - I waited at the corner of the street. I then went into the house, and saw Curtis come up out of the cellar.

CURTIS'S Defence. I went to the play, and my mother being ill, I did not like to disturb her. I went there to sleep - hearing people come into the house, I got into the cellar, being afraid.

ALLIS'S Defence. We both went to the play, and went in there to sleep.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ALLIS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-75

Before Mr. Recorder.

539. HELEN LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a blanket, value 3 s. the goods of David Hamilton .

DAVID HAMILTON . I live in Little Dean-street, Westminster . On the 11th of March, I missed a blanket from my first floor back room. The prisoner lodged on the second floor with her parents. I saw the blanket again the next day at the pawnbroker's, and knew it to be mine.

THOMAS RAVENSCROFT . I am in the employ of Mr. Barker, pawnbroker. I took this blanket in pawn, on the 10th of March, from the prisoner, in her own name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was with a girl, who asked me to wait at the door while she went in and brought these things down, and asked me to pawn them, as I was known at the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-76

560. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value 6 d.; and a key, value 6 d. ; the goods of William Farrer .

WILLIAM FARRER . I am a letter carrier , at Hanwell . On the 3d of April, I left my watch hanging over the mantle-piece, in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock. When I returned, between twelve and one, it was gone.

CHARLOTTE FARRER . I am the wife of the last witness. I was in the parlour when my husband went out; the watch was safe. I missed it about a quarter before

eleven. The street door was shut. I had left the parlour and gone into the bed-room for about ten minutes. I heard nobody come in. The door opens without making a noise. The prisoner was brought to the house in custody, with the watch, about three o'clock.

SAMUEL ABBOTT . I am a carpenter, and live at Hanwell. I stopped the prisoner between Knightsbridge and Kensington. I was in a horse and cart, and heard of the robbery - Springhall was with me - we found the watch in the prisoner's left hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SPRINGALL . I live at Hanwell. I saw the prisoner going towards the prosecutor's house, and about eleven o'clock I heard the watch was stolen. I afterwards saw it found upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it about a quarter of a mile from Hounslow.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-77

561. ANN LAND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a pair of half-boots, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of James Beswick .

JAMES BESWICK . I am a horse patrol of Hounslow-heath . On the 2d of April I lost a pair of half-boots out of the stable - they were safe between ten and eleven o'clock, and I missed them about four. I went in pursuit, and found the prisoner at a lodging-house about a mile off, and charged her with taking the boots. She said she had been in the stable, but took nothing from it - she afterwards took me to Filbrook's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARY FILBROOK . My husband is a post-boy. We live at Hounslow. The prisoner came and opened our door a little after four o'clock, and offered a pair of women's half-boots for sale, and asked 1 s. 3 d. for them - I bought them of her. I live about a quarter of a mile from Beswick. She said she was in great distress, and did not know where to go. I am certain of her.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them, or sell them. A young girl came and took me to the door, and asked for some water. She brought out the boots, and said the lady gave them to her. She sold them to this woman, but I did not go in.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-78

562. RICHARD LEE and JOHN HANCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , 13 lbs of Bacon, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Bunce .

PATIENCE BUNCE . I am the daughter of Thomas Bunce . We live in Northampton-row, Hackney . The bacon was on the counter. Lee came into the shop a little before nine o'clock in the evening. Hancock was waiting outside. Lee snatched the bacon, and they both ran off with it together - I pursued. They dropped it about two doors off, and got off. I saw them again next day - I knew them both before, and am certain of them.

THOMAS EATOUGH . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners in Highbury-place next day, and told them it was for stealing bacon - they denied it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEE'S Defence. I was not near the place.

HANCOCK'S Defence. I met Lee in Grays-inn-lane, he went home to sup with me, and went to bed at half past nine.

LEE - GUILTY , Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and publicly Whipped .

HANCOCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-79

563. GEORGE PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a writing-desk, value 30 s. , the goods of James Emery .

ANN EMERY . I am the wife of James Emery , cabinet-maker , Carthusian-street, Charter-house-square . The prisoner came to ask if we sent out men to put up beds, and said he wanted a table. My husband shewed him some, which he measured with a bit of tape, and said it would do, and went away, saying he would call in half an hour. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 26th, he came again, and said he was sorry he could not come at the time he stated, but would come at nine o'clock next morning; which he did. I opened the door to him, and told him my husband was in bed - I left the shop for two minutes, to call the apprentice; and on returning, he was gone with the desk. I found it a week after in the possession of the officer.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Golden-lane, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, of the 27th of March, on another charge; he had this desk in his possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came from China, and engaged with Captain Turner, of the Royal George, who sent me to Mrs. Emery - and she told me to take the desk and shew him.

JAMES EMERY . He never said a word about the desk.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were five other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18230409-80

564. AMELIA WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a cloak, value 7 s. the goods of Robert Copeling .

MARY COPELING . I live in St. Giles's. The prisoner lodged six months with me. On the 20th of March I missed this cloak.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I found the prisoner concealed in a turn-up bedstead; she said the prosecutrix had threatened her a long time, and she should see what she would do. I found the duplicate of the cloak on her.

ABRAHAM SHUTE . I am shopman to Mr. Marriot. On the 20th of March, the prisoner pawned the cloak, which she had done several times before, saying it was lent her by the prosecutrix.

MARY COPELING , re-examined. I knew she had pawned and redeemed it before, and found fault with her for it. She has pawned things by my direction.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-81

565. THOMAS WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a saw, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Pepper .

CHARLES THOMAS PEPPER . I was at work with my father's saw at a house in Regent-street - his name is Robert. I went down stairs for a few minutes, leaving it in the parlour. The door was open. On coming up, I saw the prisoner going out at the door: I missed my saw and pursued him. I found him in Silver-street, Golden-square, with it

under his coat; he asked me how I came to think it was mine, and refused to give me it at first, but did afterwards.

WILLIAM HEWER . I am a constable. I saw him running away from the prosecutor, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-82

566. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Osborne ; and a set of fire-irons, value 5 s. the goods of Charlotte Powles , widow .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am a servant out of place , and lodged at Charlotte Powle 's, a widow, who keeps the Green Dragon, public-house, in St. James's . The prisoner was a stranger. My handkerchief was in my bed-room, on the second floor; the fire-irons were in the club-room, on the first floor. I found the prisoner at the foot of the stairs, on the ground floor, between four and five o'clock, with the fire-irons. I took her into the parlour and found my handkerchief under her petticoat; she was very abusive.

Prisoner. Q. I came into your bed-room to look for my husband, and you took liberties with me - A. It is false; I don't know her husband.

JAMES BUSHELL . I am servant to Powles. The fire irons was taken from the club-room - I saw them safe about ten o'clock in the morning. The prisoner was a stranger - I met her on the stairs; she gave me the fire irons. She said nothing about her husband then.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in search of my husband, who I understood had been there all night - this man behaved very indecent to me, and I slapped his face; he followed me down, and said I had taken his handkerchief, it was found under the bench in the room.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-83

567. SARAH BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , three shirts, value 12 s., and a towel, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Bishop .

CHARLOTTE BISHOP . I am the wife of Joseph Bishop ; we live in Cromer-street. The prisoner worked for me about three months - I am a laundress. I missed a shirt, and sent her to a lady in Woburn-place, to tell her, and on the 21st, I gave her two shirts to take to Mr. Haine's, No. 5, Seamour-place. I called on Monday - they had not been delivered. I found them in pawn.

SAMUEL LOVEDAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 15th of March, the prisoner pawned a shirt in the name of Ballard, James-street, for 4 s. 3 d.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Nathan-place, New-road. On the 22d of March, two shirts were pawned for 6 s., and on the 1st of March a towel, for 1 s., in the name of Ann Brown .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES FORSTER . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner, and found three duplicates on her.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-84

568. JAMES TURNER was indicted for embezzling six shillings, and six halfpence, which he had received on account of Benjamin Wait , his master .

BENJAMIN WAIT. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Hollywell-street. The prisoner was in my service about fifteen months, and entrusted to receive money for me, which he should pay to me directly. On Saturday, the 11th of January, I sent him to Mr. Coles, with candles amounting to 6 s. 3 d.; he never returned, but was taken in the begining of March, at Charlton, in Kent.

JACOB COLES . I deal with Waite. On the 11th of January, the prisoner brought me candles, which came to 6 s. 3 d. - I cannot say in what coin I paid him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-85

569. JAMES TURNER was again indicted for embezzling five sovereigns, and four shillings .

BENJAMIN WAIT . I sent him on the 11th of January, with 5 l. in silver, to Mr. Dixon, and sent 4 s. worth of goods also to Dixon - he was to receive 4 s.; he did not return or send the money to me.

WILLIAM DIXON . I keep the Horse and Groom, public-house. On the 11th of January, the prisoner brought me 5 l. in silver, for his master - I gave him five sovereigns for it, and paid him four shillings for goods which he brought.

BARNARD GLEED . The prisoner was given into my charge, and said he had lost the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge receiving the money, and must have lost it when some boys were fighting in the Commercial-road. My master knows I am innocent, and my brother is too poor to pay the money, or I should not be here.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-86

570. JOSEPH ROGERS was indicted for embezzling fifty sovereigns, which he had received on account of Alexander Duff and William Brooks , his employers .

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am in partnership with Alexander Duff ; we are silk manufacturers , and live in Spital-square - the prisoner was our journeyman . On Friday, the 28th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, I gave him a cheque for 50 l., and told him to go to Messrs. Vere and Co., and get me fifty sovereigns - he did not return. I saw him on the Monday following, at the Thames Police office. He had lived four or five years with us.

CHARLES HENRY POWELL . I am clerk to Messrs. Vere and Co. I have a cheque drawn by Mr. Brooks: the prisoner asked for sovereigns, and I paid him fifty.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a beadle. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of March, in consequence of suspicion. He said he had been in an East Indiaman, and had brought the money from there - he had left the nineteen sovereigns with Boughton, who keeps a brothel; I though this story was not true, and detained him - he then sent for Mr. Brooks. The woman brought nineteen sovereigns to the watch-house.

(See page 184.)

Prisoner's Defence. I fell in with an old shipmate, who asked me to lend him 25 s. I unfortunately drank with him to such excess, that I lost my memory, and got into this woman's house. I believe my master's money was then safe. In the morning she asked if she should take care of it - I remember her taking it from under my

pillow, and at night a fellow seamen came and said if I did not go over to the watch-house, I should lose every farthing - I went and found nineteen sovereigns there. I must have been robbed of it.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-87

571. MARIA BOWKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , six tea spoons, value 18 s.; a shawl, value 5 s., and a scarf, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Bishop .

CHARLOTTE BISHOP . I am the wife of Joseph Bishop , and am a laundress. The prisoner came to me as servant - I had a character with her which proved false. She went away between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, without notice, or waiting for her wages. I was out at the time, and on returning missed the articles stated in the indictment, which were there that morning. I found her next day at Spa-fields' watch-house.

WILLIAM DOCKER . I am a pawn-broker. I have a shawl and scarf pawned on the morning of the 6th of March, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Kendrick , No. 20, Oakley-street, for 8 s. I am certain of her.

(Property produced and sworn to).

THOMAS COLE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Waterloo-road. I have six tea spoons pawned on the 6th of March, in the morning, for 12 s., by a person about the prisoner's height, in the name of Mary Bishop .

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230409-88

572. CHARLES WASEM was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a coat, value 12 s., and a shawl, value 1 s. , the goods of William Bullock .

WILLIAM BULLOCK . I am a taylor and live in White's-row, Spitalfields ; I saw this coat taken from over my door. I ran out and found the prisoner about a hundred yards off, with it under his arm. I called Stop thief! he looked round, I saw his face; he turned the corner, dropped it, and was secured. I am certain of him. I have see him before.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner struggling with the prosecutor and took him in charge; he said he would go with me as I was an officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm and run to the bottom of the street, the prosecutor got hold of another man, and said

"I have got you, you rascal;" the man said it was me; and so he took me.

GUILTY Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-89

573. JOHN BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , two pieces of wood, value 1 s. 3 d. the goods of William Marshall .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-90

574. GEORGE BUCKERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a coat, value 15 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 7 s.; two pair of stockings, value 5 s.; two neckerchiefs, value 2 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Andrew Helder Doncaster .

ANDREW HELDER DONCASTER . I am an ironmonger ; and live in Cambden-row, Bethnal-green. These articles were in my chest, which was unlocked; I missed them out of it on the 27th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning. Hopkins was bringing it to Walbrook for me. I have not found them.

JOHN HOPKINS . I am errand boy to Mr. Morgan, wholesale ironmonger - Mr. Doncaster is his clerk. On the 26th of February, I had his box on the truck about a quarter before eight o'clock at night. The prisoner came up to me near a doctor's shop in the Bethnal-green-road, and asked how far I was going, I said to the Mansion-house - he said he would push behind for me as far as he was going; I was glad of his assistance, as it was very heavy. I put the handle down to have a rest in Church-street , and, on turning round, saw him running away with something under his arm. I pursued him a good way, calling Stop thief! - he got away; I found a sheet and handkerchief laying by the chest. An officer came up and put them in - he helped me with it to Walbrook. Mr. Doncaster was very ill, but when he recovered he missed these things out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the trunk closed while you went in pursuit - A. Yes; and when he came up it was well corded. I found the cord cut - I never saw him before, but am sure of him - my back was towards him when he was pushing - it was dusk; but there was gas lights. I saw him again in about an hour; I pointed him out myself - he opened the turnpike-gate for me, and then I saw him plainly, as there are two gas lights there. The officers took me to about five public-houses to look for him. I described him as having a velvet collar, a flock hat, and being marked with the smallpox.

ANN DONCASTER . I am the wife of the prosecutor, and put his things in the trunk, and when it got to Walbrook these were missing - it was corded up.

JOHN ISAACSON . I am a constable of Bethnal-green; I heard the alarm and came out of my house, and saw the boy, who said the trunk was robbed, and the thief had gone down a turning - I found the cord cut. He said the man had a very rusty velvet collar, and a flock hat, and was pitted very much with the small-pox. Gibbs and I went with him and delivered the box at Walbrook, then returned to Bethnal-green - we went to four or five public-houses, and when we got to the Bladebone public-house, there were nine or ten people in the tap-room. The boy went into the tap-room before me; he came out and said, the man who did it was standing in the corner smoking his pipe. I went in and took the prisoner - he denied it; he answered the description given by the boy. I found 10 s. 2 d. on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see no other man in a velvet collar and flock hat - No; not answering the description given by the boy - he cried when he went home to his master and seemed much agitated. The cord was not cut clean - it must have been done with some instrument; I found no instrument upon the prisoner - none of the property has been found.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am an officer; Isaacson applied to me; I saw the boy safe home. In an hour and a half we went with the boy to different public-houses - he described the man to me; and as I knew the prisoner, it answered the description - he fixed upon nobody until he

got to the Bladebone; we stopped at the door and sent him in; he came out and said,

"The young man who robbed me is smoking his pipe." I went in and called the prisoner out by his name - he denied the charge - he lives in Gibraltar-walk, about a hundred yards from where he ran away from the truck.

Cross-examined. Q. You took him at the public-house next to his lodgings - A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-91

575. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a box, value 1 s., and 18 lbs. of soap, value 11 s. , the goods of James Hunt .

EDWARD HUNT . I am in the service of James Hunt , tallow-chandler , and live in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 24th of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner with this soap at Bow-street - it was safe at six o'clock on the evening of the 22d, in a box just inside the door.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON . I am a constable. On Saturday the 22d of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I met the prisoner with this box of soap on his shoulder in Drury-lane; he went up Dunstan's-court, and came round into Drury-lane again; he was looking round him - I secured him and asked what he had; he said something; I asked who it belonged to - he said

"Find out." He said he had been after it five nights.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up the Strand about half-past six o'clock; a man dressed like a tradesman gave it to me to carry to Oxford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-92

576. FRANCES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , a table cloth, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Oliphant , to whom she was servant .

ANN OLIPHANT . I am the wife of Thomas Oliphant , and live in Richmond-street, St. Luke's . The prisoner was my servant , and lived three weeks with us; I discharged her on the morning of the 31st of March - she came back about two hours after to fetch a small bundle, and to pay me four shillings which she owed me. I had put the table cloth in the kitchen while she was gone, and missed it about five minutes after. I went after her to a neighbour and found her, and asked to look in her bundle - she said she had none. I found the table cloth in the bundle, which was in the room where she was - she told me she had sent it away to her sister's.

Prisoner. Q. Did it not lay near my dirty linen. - A. No; her bundle was tied up when I put it there.

THOMAS JANETT . I am an officer. I received her in charge with a bundle, in which was the table cloth - she said she had put it there my mistake.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that I had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-93

577. WILLIAM HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , two sheets, value 5 s. , the goods of John Duggan .

CHARLOTTE DUGGAN . I am the wife of John Duggan ; we live in Buckingham-row, Westminster . The prisoner came to lodge at our house on the 28th of February, and went away about ten o'clock next morning, without paying; he said he would give me a reference in the morning. About nine o'clock I went up and met him on the stairs - he gave me a key. I saw nobody with him, and he went out; I went into the room and missed the sheets - I called my husband, who went after him.

JOHN DUGGAN . I am the husband of the last witness, and followed him nearly half a mile before I got sight of him; I took him, and found the sheets on him, concealed about his person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-94

578. JAMES HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a copper saucepan, value 3 s. , the goods of James Ringer .

JAMES RINGER . I am a broker . I live in Mary-le-bone-lane . On the 18th of March, about a quarter before four o'clock in the afternoon, the copper was stolen from outside my door. I ran out and took the prisoner about fifty yards off with it in his hand - he said a boy gave it him. I had seen him and a boy lurking about.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy took it and gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-95

579. FRANCIS HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , a whittle, value 5 s., the goods of Avis Downes , from her person .

AVIS DOWNES. I live in Red Lion-street, Kingsland-road. On Sunday morning, the 9th of March, I was returning home through the Kingsland-road, about half-past eleven o'clock, and as I came by Shoreditch church , a young man said to me

"The dog is fond of his mistress

"I had a dog with me - he then snatched my whittle off my neck; I saw no more of him, and ran towards the church. I called Stop thief! and he was secured in five minutes - I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS GARLICK . I am a watchman; my box is on the spot. The young woman called out that she had lost her whittle; I ran across the road where the prisoner was running very hard - he turned back and dodged me, and was taken with it under his coat - he said he picked it up.

JOHN STOCKWELL . I seized him, and found it under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm; ran up and saw the whittle in the road, and seeing a woman and two watchmen at the end of the street, I took it to them, thinking it belonged to them, and was taken by the watchman.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230409-96

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

580. RICHARD DEAN was indicted for stealing, on

the 8th of April , one packet of pins, value 4 s. , the goods of William Thomas Nichols and Thomas Cooper .

FREDERICK BESANT . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas Nicholls and Thomas Cooper , pin and needle-makers , in Grace-church-street . The prisoner is a stranger to me. On the 8th of April, these pins laid on the counter - the prisoner and another boy came into the shop about seven o'clock in the evening, just as the porter was shutting up, and the dog went out, I went after it, and on returning I met the prisoner and the other boy with the pins. I went into the shop and missed them, and sent the porter after them; they were brought back in about five minutes. I am certain he is one of them. The other escaped, and has never been taken.

RICHARD BINFIELD . I am clerk to Messrs. Nicholls and Cooper. I was in the counting-house and heard the pins were stolen; I went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner running across the road, and when he saw me near, he threw the pins down; I took him by East-cheap; the porter picked them up.

CHARLES BROXUP . I was in the shop; the prisoner and another came in, and asked for a halfpenny worth of pins - they watched Mr. Besant run out after the dog, and while my back was turned they caught up the pins and ran out. I missed them directly and ran after them; the prisoner ran as hard as he could, and threw them down as he crossed the road; I picked them up. He was secured.

JOHN COUSINS . I am an officer. He was given in my charge with the pins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy - Fined One Shilling and Discharged. - His father engaging to send him abroad.

Reference Number: t18230409-97

581. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a great coat, value 2 l. the goods of William Simpson .

JAMES CORKER . I am servant to William Simpson , who lives in Whitechapel. On the 1st of March, about half past twelve o'clock in the day, I was driving his gig in Jewin-street, Cripplegate , and missed a great coat from the seat, I looked back and saw it laying on the ground in the middle of the road. I saw the prisoner about a foot and a half from it; he stooped down, ran round the chaise and then ran off; I called to my master to stop him as he was on before, and he was secured. It could not have jolted off.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was walking along Aldersgate-street, and seeing a crowd. I ran and took the prisoner.

JOHN CRIGHTON IKLER . I saw the gig going along; the prisoner went behind, and pulled the coat out, which hung behind - the young man turned round and then he dropped it; he stooped down that he should not be seen, and went on the pavement; he put his hand in his pocket and walked away, as if he knew nothing about it. I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined. by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was the chaise - A. About ten feet from me, going on; he was between me and the chaise. I was at my father's door. I saw him go off the pavement to the chaise; the sleeves of the coat hung down, and I saw him take it, and then drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-98

582. JOHN PARTERIDGE was indicted for that he on the 17th of February , being servant to George Knight , did steal two wine labels, value 7 s., and a ladle, value 3 s. , his property; and JOSEPH PARTERIDGE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to be stolen .

GEORGE KNIGHT . I am a working silversmith , and live in Westmorland-buildings, Aldersgate-street. The prisoner John was my warehouseman ; he worked at piece work. In consequence of something that happened on the 27th of February, I found these articles at Upsall's, the pawnbroker, in Barbican. The prisoner had access to them; I had not missed them, but seeing other goods of mine in the window. I went in, and found these.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Barbican. On the 27th of February, Mr. Knight came into my shop - I shewed him two wine lables and a ladle, which I received on the 17th of February, from Joseph Parteridge in pawn, in his own name. I knew him before.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman, I apprehended John Parteridge - I had known him some years; I said I was sorry to tell him his father was charged with pawning Mr. Knight's property, to the amount of 17 l., and I was ordered to take him into custody for stealing them; he was agitated. I found nothing particular on him. He walked with me to Duke-street, and he was unwell; it was necessary to take him into a house - he was lamenting the distress he had brought on his wife and family. I asked him whether it was a fair question if his father was wicked enough to induce him to rob his employers; he said No, his father did not. I asked him whether the property was pawned - he said he pawned none, but met his father by appointment in different places, generally in the street, and his father gave him what he pleased, but he knew nothing of any pawnings.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was Mr. Knight present at this conversation - A. Yes; I suppose he heard all that passed. I said nothing to induce him to confess. We had a shilling's worth of brandy and water between us three.

GEORGE KNIGHT re-examined. I have made a mistake - I did miss these articles about a week before. I have seen his father at my house, but do not know that he ever came beyond the passage.

Cross-examined. Q. You was present at the time the marshalsman speaks of - A. Yes. I was so agitated that I hardly knew what I did, and the prisoner was much more so agitated. I heard conversation to the effect stated by Hawkins. He said his father met him by appointment to receive goods.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-99

583. JOSHUA JESSOP was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Owen Owen , from his person .

OWEN OWEN . I am a student at St. Thomas's Hospital. On the 7th of March, I was in Fishers-alley, Water-lane , about five o'clock in the afternoon, and felt something at my right hand coat pocket, and on feeling, I missed my handkerchief. The prisoner stood close behind me, and I collared him; he denied taking it, but afterwards produced it from under his coat.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am an officer. He was given in my charge with the handkerchief. I found 5 s. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-100

584. EDWARD SHERIDAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Patrick Ford , and with a certain sharp instrument, striking and cutting him with intent to murder him ,

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or him, do him some grievous bodily harm.

PATRICK FORD . I am a plaisterer - the prisoner is also a labourer ; we never worked together before the night of the 27th of March, when we were working at a shop in Fore-street , for about two hours, and engaged in knocking down the ceiling in Mr. Robinson's shop. He had sent us some beer; we were drinking together, (I and the prisoner) - nobody else was in the shop; the boy might be there. He said I had been telling some lies about him to his master that morning; I said not - he said that I had; I said

"Let it be; let us sweep up the shop, and I will ask my master before I go home to night." He made no answer - I went to lay hold of the birch-broom, at the end of the shop, I turned my back to him to get it, he then came behind, and struck me on the head with a hammer, on the temple; I fell against the counter - he said,

"You villain, you are not killed yet; I'll give you another blow" - he was going to give me another blow, but I caught his hand, and prevented it; he did not strike me afterwards. I had taken the broom to sweep the ceiling down. I had not doubled my fist at him. I was cut on the head, and it bled immediately - I knew him by sight before; we often spoke, but I never worked with him before; I am quite certain I never offered to strike him; we never drank together. We are both Irish, and come from Galway - I never had any dispute with him. I had not been to work all day until seven o'clock in the evening: I had drank no spirits except the gin; had a share of two pots of beer at dinner. I was walking about all day - he was as sober as I was. I could get no work in the afternoon.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. What time did you get up - A. About six o'clock; but could get no work. I met a friend about two o'clock, and drank with him; there was two pots of beer between three of us; no whisky nor spirits. I gave him no provocation; he came behind me and struck me on the head; I am sure he struck me behind - I did not pull him off a plank, nor pull the plank away; we had not finished work - I gave him no provocation whatever; I did not kick him - I gave him the fist when he wanted to give the second blow. I was knocked senseless against the counter, but when I recovered, I struck him.

Q. Is not the blow in front of your head - A. No, on the side. I have known him two years, but never drank with him.

COURT. Q. Was there a scaffold in the room - A. Yes; we did not quarrel till we came on the ground.

MR. JOHN DOBSON . I am a chemist and druggist. This man came to our house about nine o'clock; I looked at his head - It was a slight cut just across the forehead, about half an inch long; I cannot say with what instrument it was done - it was not with a sharp instrument; it was more of a bruise than a cut, though it was cut through the skin; had it been done with a sharp instrument, it would be a clear wound.

Cross-examined. Q. You see the prisoner and prosecutor - would it be possible with the prosecutor's back turned from him, to have hit him in the forehead, unless he faced him - A. It is certainly much more like facing than being behind him. It was a slight wound.

WILLIAM MARKWELL . I am an officer. I have a hammer and a hat.

PATRICK FORD . That is the hat I wore; I cannot say which end of the hammer he struck me with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-101

585. JOHN HINTON was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH HEWITT . I am a coal-dealer , and I live in Monkwell-street. The prisoner was in my service - he received one penny for every bushel of coals he carried, and was to receive the money, and bring it to me immediately. Sarah Wait ordered some coals, on the 25th of January; she owed me four shillings - he never accounted to me for it; he left on the 3d of March. I did not find this out till he was gone - I frequently sent him for the money; he always brought back an answer, that she was not at home.

SARAH WAIT . I paid the prisoner four shillings for coals bought of the prosecutor, when he brought them, which was in January.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave my master the money - he never sent me after it again - he was very neglectful at his books.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-102

586. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , three wrappers, value 3 s., and eight pieces of shalloon, value 4 l. , the goods of Daniel Britten the younger.

JOHN FIELD . I am in the employ of Mr. Daniel Britten , junior, cloth worker , Basinghall-street . I was in the house about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, and about twenty-five yards from the warehouse door; hearing the cry of

"Sweep" very loud, I stepped back, and saw a person holding the door open outside, and the prisoner with one knee on the ground, and his arm grasping this bale; he had it nearly on his shoulder; it was two feet nine inches off the ground; he moved it from a corner. I ran forward; he ran out; I secured him in White Rose-court, without losing sight of him. He had left the bale behind him. He had no business there whatever.

Prisoner. Q. Is it possible I could move it - A. He did lift it up; it weighs 133 lbs.; he lifted it off the ground and placed it on another bale.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I could not carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-103

587. ESTHER CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 44 s., the goods of John Bickers and Robert Nash , privately in their shop .

ROBERT NASH . I live at Aldgate . On the 24th of March, about half-past four o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop; a young man attended to her who is not here, I stood at the door for two minutes, and on returning into

the shop saw a piece of print in her apron; she was looking at calico. I charged her with stealing it, and took it from her. She wanted me to let her go.

JOHN LAMBS . I saw Mr. Nash (my master) take the print out of her apron. She asked him to let her go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18230409-104

588. DAVID EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Good , from his person .

WILLIAM FOX . I am a gentleman's servant. On the 23d of February, I was walking along Bridge-street , at twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the evening; and going towards Fleet-market, I saw the prisoner walking behind Mr. Good, who was in company with another gentleman and a lady. The prisoner put his right hand into Mr. Good's coat pocket, drew the handkerchief out, and ran off. I told Mr. Good; we pursued him; he ran into the watchman's arms. I am certain he is the man; he threw it down as he ran - I never lost sight of him; a boy picked it up.

JOHN GOOD . I was walking in Bridge-street. Fox said I was robbed, and I felt, and missed my handkerchief. I pursued the prisoner; I lost sight of him on turning the corner, but nobody else was in the street. The handkerchief was picked up and given to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-105

589. ROBERT AYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , one gross of buttons, value 18 d. , the goods of Thomas Flint .

ANN MOSS . I am shopwoman to Mr. Thomas Flint, haberdasher , Fish-street-hill . On the 11th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and asked for buttons; I shewed him several gross of wire buttons; he bought three gross, and then asked to see pearl ones; I shewed him four gross. I was called away, and on returning to him found only three gross on the counter; I had counted them, suspecting him before - I charged him with taking one; he denied it; we desired him to give them up, Mr. Flint came down; he then offered to pay for them, saying, it was of no consequence whether he had them or not; there was the money. He at length pulled them from under his coat.

MR. THOMAS FLINT . I was fetched down. The prisoner denied the charge; I sent for a constable; he then endeavoured to force me to take the money; and after very intimidating conduct he produced them from under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. As soon as I produced them I offered the money for them; Mr. Flint would not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-106

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 15.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

590. RUTH HODGKISS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , two shillings and a sixpence , the monies of William Lambourn .

WILLIAM LAMBOURN . I keep a public house in Little Denmark-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner was my servant . On the 12th of March, I was in the kitchen, and could see her in the bar. I saw her put her hand in the till and take money out; I had sent her to the bar for a basin of sugar. I ran and caught her by her right hand; she would not let me open it, but threw herself down, and the moment I loosened her hand she dropped 2 s. 6 d.

Prisoner's Defence. I took him the sugar, went away, and then he wanted to see my hands, and as I had taken a lump of sugar I did not wish him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230409-107

591. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 48 lbs. of soap, value 24 s. , the goods of Richard Proctor Williams .

RICHARD PROCTOR WILLIAMS . I am a carpenter and live in Southampton-street, Pentonville . On the 12th of March, about half-past eight at night, I missed this soap from the window; I made enquiry, and was sent for to the Wellington, public-house, about a quarter before nine o'clock, and found it there. The prisoner said he was out of employ, and on his return home met a man who gave him a 1 s. to carry it to Islington.

BENJAMIN CATMALL . I am a labourer. I met the prisoner with this soap, another man was with him; I passed him, but turned back and took hold of the prisoner. The other man dropped part of the soap; he said the man gave it him to carry - he did not attempt to run away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for employ, when a man offered me a 1 s. to carry the soap to Islington, and without hesitation I agreed to it. Three men immediately came and asked what I had got, I said soap which that man gave me to carry - he immediately ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-108

592. JOHN JUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , three dishes, value 3 s.; a plate, value 2 d.; a butter boat, value 6 d.; 2 lbs. of pork, value 1 s., and 2 lbs. of mutton, value 1 s. , the goods of William Denby , Esq.

WILLIAM ISNELL . I am servant to Colonel William Denby , of Percy-street, Tottenham-court-road . On the morning of the 11th of March, the watchman alarmed me. I went down stairs to the larder and found a bundle containing these articles in the area, and the prisoner under the area steps; I knew him before - his mother lived servant next door; he appeared to lay there as if he was asleep - he had taken them from the larder.

JOHN HARFIELD . I am the watchman; I heard a knocking in Percy-street like something breaking down the area of No. 12. I went across and saw the shadow of some man in the area. I rang the bell and sprung my rattle - I went down and found the prisoner under the steps, apparently asleep; he jumped up - I collared him. He could give no account of himself. I found some butter in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of it till I found myself in the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-109

593. JOSEPH M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , two pair of stockings, value 4 s.; four shirts, value 20 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Christopher Gray .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-110

594. JAMES MARN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a truck, value 10 s. the goods of William Hamilton .

WILLIAM HAMILTON . I am a porter . On the 14th of March, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I chained my truck up in Covent-garden-market , and next morning about half-past five I missed it.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a constable; Hamilton informed me he had lost his truck. I went to Potter, who lives in Pye-street, and found a pair of truck-wheels and an axle-tree, which Hamilton claimed. I then went and apprehended the prisoner, and asked what he had done with the body - he said if I went to Mr. Gardener's, in King-street, I should find it there, which I did.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a cow-keeper; and live in Pye-street. I met the prisoner in Orchard-street - he said,

"Will you buy this - I bought it on Saturday, but want the money to go to market with." I gave him 5 s. for the two wheels and axle-tree.

JAMES LUDFORD . The truck body was left at my place - I do not know by whom.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-111

Before Mr. Recorder.

595. JANE WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , four gowns, value 2 l.; a scarf, value 1 l.; a shawl, value 10 s.; a cloak, value 10 s.; a pair of earrings, value 1 l.; two rings, value 10 s., and a cap, value 3 s. , the goods of Barnard Joseph .

ELIZABETH JOSEPH . I am the wife of Barnard Joseph , we live in Cutler-street, Carter-street, City . The prisoner, about three years ago, lived with us as servant for a year and a half. On the 4th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, she called to see me, and stopped until two o'clock. On the same morning I put one of these gowns away in the drawers in the bed-room on the first floor. All the things were then safe - we were in the kitchen below; she went away about two o'clock; I have no lodgers. The street door is generally open - I did not miss the things till Thursday afternoon, the 6th of March. She had told me she lived at No. 11, Goldsmith-place, Hackney-road, and that her sister lived in service at No. 17, there. I went to her sister on the Friday morning, but I found nothing there; I found every thing but a gown at Wyatt's, a little higher up; also the fragments of a gown and shirt which had been cut up, I am sure they are mine.

GODFREY ELIAS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday, the 7th of March, at Wyatt's; I told her she was suspected of robbing Mrs. Joseph - she denied it. Wyatt and the prisoner went up stairs and brought this property down. She then said,

"What will become of me."

CHARLOTTE WYATT . I live in Margaret-place, Hackney-fields. I took the prisoner in to sleep for a few nights, at the request of my neighbours. She slept in a small back room. She had a small hand box, and two bonnet boxes, with her; and was frequently in and out; and could bring things in without my seeing her. I keep a haberdasher's shop. Mrs. Joseph called on me on Friday, with Elias. I called the servant down. Mrs. Joseph said, she suspected her of having articles which she missed. She said she knew nothing of them. They asked her to fetch her box down, which she refused. I took Mrs. Joseph up to her room - there was a part of a gown cut up on the bed, which Mrs. Joseph claimed - her box was unlocked, and Mrs. Joseph took from it the rest of the things. and brought them down into her presence. The prisoner seemed agitated.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-112

596. THOMAS BROOM was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-113

597. HENRY BUSHELL and JOHN BARLOW were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , at St. Pancras, a watch, value 5 l.; two seals, value 30 s.; a watch key, value 20 s.; and a watch chain, value 5 s., the goods of James Broughton , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. LUCY BROUGHTON . I am the wife of James Broughton . We live in Pratt's-place, Cambden-town, in the parish of St. Pancras , he rents the house. The watch hung over the chimney-piece in the parlour - it was a metal gilt watch, gold seals, a gold key, and a metal chain. I saw it about twelve o'clock on Thursday last. hanging up. There is a garden before the house. I had been in the garden in the morning, and left the street door open, but the gate locked. I went down into the kitchen for a few minutes. There was a ring at the bell; my servant looked through the kitchen window, and said; there was a boy at the garden gate with earthenware. I desired her to say we wanted none. While I stood in the kitchen, we heard a noise in the parlour - I think one of the windows were up. I looked through the kitchen window, and saw a man going from the door. The earthenware man was gone. The garden gate being locked, the man must have got over. I only saw his back. I ran into the parlour, and missed the watch. I ran and unlocked the garden gate, and gave an alarm, and then saw two men running (they had no earthenware). One of them appeared the same size and appearance as the person who ran from the street door. One of the two called out to the other to stop. I saw them pursued, and heard they had made their way into the fields. I ran through the house, went out at the back door, and met them both - they were then standing by a pond, about forty yards from the house. I told one of them he had stolen the watch. He said he had not got it; a little boy who stood by said,

"Ma'am, if you have lost a watch, I think I saw one of them put it into the pond." Some persons came up and took them, and searched them at the public-house. The watch was brought to me wet out of the pond. I am certain the prisoners are the persons who were running when I got to the garden gate; and I think nobody else could have put the watch in the pond. it is worth at least 7 l. or 8 l. together. I have had it ever, since.

Prisoner BUSHELL. Q. Did you see me at the gate -

A. I only saw the man's back who went from the street door - I think it was Barlow.

GEORGE CRISP . I am fourteen years old. I live with Mr. Polley, a weaver, at Cambden-town. On the 10th of April, at about half past twelve o'clock, I saw the lady at the back of the house, and the prisoners running. They went and stood at the corner of the pond. They were the only persons there. The lady said,

"Stop! you have got my watch." Bushell said he had not got it. I saw Barlow with his hands in his breast - he pulled something from it, and threw it in the pond. I could not be certain what it was. I ran directly and got the watch out of the pond. It had a chain, seal, and key to it. I gave it to the lady. Two men came and took them.

RICHARD WHITE . I am a clerk in the post-office. I went after the prisoners. I saw Barlow come out of Mr. Broughton's door, he jumped over the wall; and at the back of the house, by the pond, I saw Bushell in his company. They had ran seven or eight hundred yards before they got to the pond. I saw them secured.

MARY ANN DIX . I am servant to Mrs. Broughton. The bell rang. I looked through the kitchen window, and saw a man standing at the gate. I could not see who he was. About ten minutes after I heard a noise in the parlour, and alarmed my mistress. I looked out, and saw a man getting over the wall. I ran up stairs, ran out, but could see nobody. The man who rang at the bell was about the size of Bushell.

MARTIN LLOYD . I live next door to the prosecutor. I saw both the prisoners in company together; they made across a vacant piece of ground; Barlow sat down on some stones, while Bushell went and rang at the bell. I had seen them at the Southampton Arms, public-house, just before, and then each had a bundle of wood - they then separated, and Bushell went to the bell; Barlow directed his attention much to Bushell while he was at the garden gate - they were then about thirty yards distant. I had my suspicions, seeing that they had no stock of wood. I was dressing at the time, and thought I would put on my clothes and go down; but before I could get them on, I heard the alarm, and saw Mrs. Broughton opening the front gate to let out the servant, and several people runing round to the pond. When I was dressed I found them custody. I went to the public-house, and mentioned what I had seen. Bushell said, I had no business with it; that they were in custody, and I had no right to say any thing about it.

Prisoner BUSHELL. Q. Did I not go away after ringing the bell - No. I did not see you leave the gate.

WILLIAM DAY . I am a constable. I found the prisoners in custody at the public-house. Mr. Lloyd said he had watched them - Bushell said he had no business with it, as they were in custody.

BUSHELL's Defence. I rang the bell to see if they wanted any wood; nobody came, and I went away.

BUSHELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

BARLOW - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18230409-114

597. THOMAS KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , at St. James, Westminster, in the dwelling-house of Sarah Boyd , widow, two sovereigns; fourteen shillings, and a 5 l. Bank note , the monies of Jean Louis Gardie .

JEAN LOUIS GARDIE . I am a silver chaser , and lodge in the first floor of Mrs. Sarah Boyd 's house, a widow, in Glasshouse-street, in the parish of St. James . The prisoner was my servant , but did not live in the house - I keep my money in my bureau; I saw it safe on the evening of the 19th of March, I left it unlocked. There was a 5 l. note, two sovereigns, and fourteen shillings. On the following day, about two o'clock, I missed it - he was often left in the house when I was out. I have got the number of the note from the bankers' since. I had left one of my workmen at home to pay a bill with it, if it should come while I was out (he is not here). I did not see the prisoner after I missed the money, until his apprehension, which was last Thursday. I had given him warning to leave on the next Saturday; the 20th was Thursday. He bore a good character.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoner last Friday morning at his house in Willer-street, Tothill-fields - I told him he was charged with robbing his master, and asked what he had done with the money - he said he had spent it; I asked him how much it was; he said 7 l. 14 s. I asked him where he had been since he committed the robbery; he said he walked to Bath to see a relation, and had been absent till the day before I took him. I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. My master did not use me well; he kept me short of victuals. I heard he was going to send me away, and not knowing what for, I did this. I always did my best to serve him - this is the first crime I was ever guilty of.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character, and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18230409-115

599. JAMES PRYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , three half crowns, nine shillings and a sixpence , the monies of John Challinge .

JOHN CHALLINGE . I am a coal hawker , and live in Charlotte-street, Hampstead-road. About the 5th of March, the prisoner met me, and asked for employment - I had employed him before. I said I had no work for him; he said if I gave him only his victuals, that would satisfy him. As we went along, he said he knew where to sell the coals - he took me near Saffron-hill, and told me to stop at the end of the street, and he would go to an old lady, and ask her to buy them - he returned, and said she wanted two bushels, but she had no change - they came to 3 s. I gave him three half crowns, a sixpence, and nine shillings; he told me to measure the coals while he went and fetched the sovereign. I waited about an hour, he did not return. I saw him twice about a week after, but he ran away from me; I met him a third time; he stopped, and said he was very sorry for what he had done, but he would bring the money on Monday. I let him go, intending to give him in charge when he came on the Monday, but he never came. I gave information, and he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not know where my father lived - A. I went to his father, but he would not tell me where he worked.

JOHN UPSALL . I apprehended him on the 20th of

March; he said he did not intend to steal the money, but got drunk and spent it.

GUILTY Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-116

600. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 6 lbs. of mutton, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Summers .

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a butcher , and live at Pancras. The prisoner has dealt several years with me, and is as good a woman as ever lived. I think this happened by mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-117

601. JOHN TAYLOR and JOHN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a saddle, value 30 s.; two cart-tugs, value 10 s.; two sacks, value 2 s.; and two horse-rugs, value 5 s., the goods of Edmund Mills ; and two coats, value 10 s., and a pair of shoes, value 10 s., the goods of Francis Honey ; and a coat, value 7 s. , the goods of George Rutter .

MR. EDMUND MILLS . I am a dry salter , and have a house at Twickenham . These things were in my stable.

FRANCIS HONEY . I am servant to Mr. Mills. On Monday evening, the 17th of February, I left these things safe in the stable, a little past seven o'clock - I went to the stable about seven the next morning, and on opening it, I missed all of them, and found the window wrenched open. The saddle was brought back on the Wednesday evening.

GEORGE RUTTER . I am servant to Mr. Mills. I locked the stable about half-past seven o'clock, and went in the morning, and found the window broken into. I lost a coat.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners at the Red Lion, public-house, Twickenham-common, on the 11th of March, on another charge - I knew them before. I found two duplicates concealed in the lining of Taylor's hat, for the two coats. While they were in custody, I heard Brown say to Taylor,

"Jack what have you done with those two duplicates, don't let them be found on us;" Taylor said,

"No, they can't find them, for I have them safe inside the lining of my hat;" they did not know I was near them. I then searched and found them there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where were you - A. By the round-house window, which is only a grating. Brown's friends live at Twickenham.

SAMUEL EAST . I am a constable. On the 11th of March I saw Webb find two duplicates in Taylor's hat lining.

JOHN COOK FOLKARD . I am a pawnbroker of Brentford. On the 5th of March, a coat was pawned in the name of Jones; I do not believe it was by either of the prisoner's; one of the duplicates produced is what I gave the man. I think he was taller than either of them.

PHILIP HUMPHRIES . I am a pawnbroker of Isleworth. On the 5th of March, a coat was pawned with me, in the name of J. W. Whitton. I do not know who by, as I did not take it in; one of these duplicates is what the person received.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I went to Brentford on Friday, and in the Cannon, public-house, I bought these duplicates of a man whom I had often seen at market, for 4 s.; they called him Jack. I told Brown I had bought them, and at the watch-house said I should put them in my hat, that they should not be lost among the straw.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am the prisoner's brother, and live at Twickenham, he sleeps in the same bed with me. On the 18th of February, we went to bed, between nine and ten o'clock. I got up about seven in the morning, and left him in bed; I had met him in the town the night before, between seven and eight o'clock; he went home with me and remained with me till the afternoon. I am hostler at the George, at Twickenham.

COURT. Q. Do you know Taylor - A. Yes; from a child. I very seldom saw him and my brother together - we slept at my father's on the Common. I heard of the robbery next morning; he slept with me every night. I went to know where he was, and found he was in custody; he said he was charged with stealing two coats from Mr. Mills, and I told the people outside the office that I slept with him at the time. Mr. Mills lives about two hundred yards off. I did not go and tell him what I could prove. I did not tell Webb, for he is no friend to a poor man. My father and mother, and brother Henry could also prove it, but they are not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-118

602. GEORGE SEAGER was indicted for embezzelment .

JACOB HEWLINGS . I am a straw-hat manufacturer , and live in Hanway-street. The prisoner was nearly seven years in my service, and was entrusted to receive money for me; Miss Cummings owed me 1 l. 1 s. 6 d. The prisoner should account to me as soon as he received money; he never gave me the money, I asked him about it. It was not his duty to enter it in the books. I enquired of him about this account among others; he acknowledged that he had received it, and I gave him in charge.

HARRIOT HAMPSHIRE . I live with Miss Cummings. On the 13th of February I paid the money in question to the prisoner with a sovereign, a shilling, and a sixpence and saw him write this receipt.

(read.)

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at his master's house, and told him it was for receiving his master's money, and applying it to his own use; he said he had received about twelve different sovereigns.

The prisoner put in a paper, stating his contrition for the offence, and begging for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-119

603. JOSEPH SMALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a watch value 20 s., and seven seals, value 7 s. , the goods of Jane Cooper , widow , and WILLIAM HEAD was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JANE COOPER . I am not a widow I was never married.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-120

604. PETER SWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a box, value 6 d., and twenty-five lbs. of raisins value 12 s. , the goods of Thomas Winter .

THOMAS WINTER . I am a grocer , and live in Banner-street, St. Lukes , a box of raisins stood on a cannister inside my door; I saw them when I opened the shop, about

half-past seven o'clock in the morning. We were at breakfast in the back parlour, and saw somebody come in and go out of the shop; I ran and missed the raisins, and saw the prisoner with the box under his arm, about twenty yards off. I followed and took him with them.

CHARLES HINDE . I was passing at the time, and saw the prisoner in custody; he dropped the box on the pavement.

THOMAS BARNETT . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me and confessed his guilt.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I had just passed the shop, when a man asked me to carry the box to the end of the street, and he would give me a few halfpence; I took it without hesitation, when the prosecutor seized me, the man ran away. I did not state this to the Magistrate as I was advised not.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-121

605. JAMES RIDLEY , and WILLIAM SCOTT were indicted for stealing a pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Bell ; and two pewter pots, value 3 s. , the goods of John Hills .

THOMAS SPARKS . I am a milkman. On the 10th of March, I was standing at my father's door, in Hertford-street, Fitzroy-square, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, and saw the two prisoners take three pots off the iron railings in Hertford-street - I ran and told Mr. Bell; I did not see them taken.

JOHN BELL . I keep the Globe, public-house , in London-street. Sparks gave me information; I went after the prisoners, and saw them in company, in Russell-place. I called Stop thief! Ridley put two pots down, and they ran off. Ridley went down a mews, and Scott down Howland-street; they were secured. The other pot was dropped at the corner of Cleaveland-street - that belonged to me.

JOHN THEAKSTON . I heard the cry of Stop thief! Scott ran towards me, and ran down Foley-street, where I secured him - he said he had got nothing.

JAMES PERRY . I saw Scott in Cleaveland-street; he took a pot from his breast, and threw it down, and ran off; he was secured. Bell's name and sign were on the pot.

JOHN HILLS . I keep the Roebuck, public-house , at the corner of London-street - I serve beer in Hertford-street; two of the pots are mine.

WILLIAM FRISBY . I am coachman to General Boyer - I was coming out of my master's door, in Russell-place, and saw Bell following the two men in Howland-street. A pot with Hill's name on it, was put down by one of them.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a constable. I secured Ridley in a stable-loft, in Howland-mews.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RIDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and twice Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-122

606. JOHN HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 25 lbs of mutton, value 12 s. , the goods of William Freeman .

The prosecutor stated his name to be John William Freeman , and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-123

607. JOHN HILL was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 24 lbs. of pork, value 14 s. , the goods of Francis Heath .

FRANCIS HEATH . I am a pork-butcher , and live in St. John's-street-road. On the 14th of March, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my shop and said he wanted five legs of pork for a supper for Mr. Hocker, of St. John's-street, who I knew, he brought a clean tray with him. I put three legs of pork, weighing 24 lbs. into it - he wanted to take them himself, but I sent my own servant with them. I told him to bring the money back; he went away with the boy, but the boy returned without the money or meat. I apprehended him next night at a butcher's shop in the neighbourhood.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did not you doubt about his being the man - A. Never; I knew him well. I desired the boy not to leave them without the money. I should not object to give Hocker credit.

CHARLES LAY . I saw the prisoner in my master's shop; he had three legs of pork weighed and a tray, and was dressed like a butcher; he asked for them for Mr. Hocker - my master gave them to me with strict orders to take them to Mr. Hocker and receive the money for them. I went out with the prisoner, and by the turnpike he told me to go on to Mr. Hocker's, and I went there till he came as he was going back to master's again; he overtook me before I got to Mr. Hocker's, and said he had got two more legs of pork; left two sovereigns for them, and I was to bring the change and those other two legs to Mr. Hooker's after I had delivered these; I followed him down the road into Rosamond-street; he took me to the Red Lion, public-house, and called for a pint of beer, pen, ink, and paper, and went into the tap-room and made out a bill for three legs of pork - he took two away first; he was gone about five minutes - he then came for the other, and told me to wait there for there was a gentleman coming to ask me the price; he then took the other leg away. I waited twenty minutes; he did not return - I went back to my master's, and asked for the other two legs, but found it was a trick - I saw him again next night, and am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Should you have left them with Hocker - A. Yes, if I had the money.

Q. Has not your master told you when you came here not to say that you should part with it without the money - A. Yes; he did tell me so - he did not threaten to beat me; my master certainly did tell me before I left the shop with the pork, that I was not to leave it without the money.

SAMUEL HOCKER . I am a butcher; I never saw the prisoner except at the office, and gave him no authority to go to Heath's for pork.

FRANCIS HEATH re-examined. I have talked to the boy about this. I always told him to tell the truth.

JAMES LIMBRICK . I apprehended the prisoner, and found part of the pork at the Fleece public-house, in St. John's-street.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-124

608. SAMUEL READY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , six yards of oil cloth, value 18 s. the goods of John Barker .

JOHN BARKER . I am an upholsterer , and live in Titchfield-street. On the 28th of February I was informed this oil cloth was taken from the shop; I ran up to the end of Foley-place, and heard the prisoner say to his companion,

"What a go it was for him to take the oil-cloth," - they both ran down Portland-street; I followed, and opposite Riding-house-lane, Towers, the constable beckoned to me - he had found the oil-cloth, which is mine, and worth 18 s. he said the prisoner was one of the party, and I took him.

JAMES TOWERS . I am a constable, and deal in earthenware. I live next door to Barker. On the 28th of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was called into my shop, and observed the prisoner and another boy passing over my area rails from Mr. Barker's shop. One of them had the oil-cloth under his arm - they were in company with each other. I went out and turned to my left - saw nobody; turned again, and by that time they had got to Foley-place. I am quite certain of the prisoner - I saw them again in Foley-place. The man who had it was waiting to see if he was followed, and seeing me threw it down and ran off. I threw it into a public-house, and pursued him, but he got off. As I returned I met Barker, and saw the prisoner before him. I secured him; he said he knew nothing of it.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am footman to Dr. Bartlett; I was in Towers's shop - I saw the prisoner and another go up to Mr. Baker's shop and take the oil cloth; the companion carried it away. I told Towers, who pursued; I am sure of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home, and in Titchfield-street, saw a young man pass me with this oilcloth under his arm, the prosecutor followed, and I ran too - he dropped it, and I went about my business - the prosecutor laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-125

London Cases, before W. Arabin, Esq.

609. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 15th of October , twenty copperplates, value 100 l., the goods of Joseph Mawman , knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Joseph Mawman , Thomas Payne , and Josiah Taylor .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN FELLOWS . I am clerk to Mr. Joseph Mawman , of Ludgate-hill. Pearson was our porter. We had about 7 cwt. of copper-plates in the warehouse. On the 5th of March some were missing. White, the apprentice, went to make enquiry. I then charged Pearson with it. He denied any knowledge of it; but after some time, and under some inducements, he made a confession. In consequence of what I learnt from him, I went to Field-lane, and saw a person, named Gray. Part of the house was a green shop, and the other part an old iron shop. From the information of Pearson, I went on the 7th or 8th of March, to the prisoner's house in Giltspur Street. I asked what he had done with his stock when he quitted the old iron trade, - to whom he had sold it - I did not mention Field-lane. he said he sold it to one and Nathan; that man was the only person he did business with, except the hawkers who came about to buy small quantities of brass and copper. Nothing further passed. Before this, the officers had brought him into the presence of Pearson, into our counting-house. Mr. Mawman asked Pearson if that was the person to whom he had sold the property. He said,

"Yes, Sir, it is." Robinson said, he never saw him, nor had he ever bought a plate of him. Robinson was then taken to the Compter, and I asked him about his stock, as I before stated; and in consequence of what I learnt from Mrs. Gray, I went to the witness Ham. The value of the property may be 100 l. or 500 l., it depends on the sale of the work.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was Pearson in custody when you first saw the prisoner - A. Yes. He said he dealt with Nathan for the stock he had on hand when he left off business.

BENJAMIN PEARSON . I was porter to Mr. Mawman, and was charged with stealing this property. The prisoner kept an iron shop in Fleet-lane. I took some engraved copper-plates there for sale, about April, 1822. I got them from master's warehouse. He paid me 4 d. per pound. I received that day 10 s. or 12 s. for them. They were wrapped up in paper. I knew they belonged to the Dilitanti society. The paper on them was marked so; he never asked who I came from, or who I was - his wife and child were present. There were engravings with the plates - the children laid hold of them, and his wife said,

"My dear, you had better burn them." I do not know whether he did or no. After he left the shop Mrs. Gray succeeded him. I went to sell her some copper-plates, which I also stole from master. I asked if she bought old copper. She said, Yes. She bought some of me after she had taken time to enquire about it. I told her I had sold some to the man who kept the shop before. When she paid me, she told me she had been to Mr. Robinson about them. I have sold some to another person who lived in Clerkenwell.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you lived with this gentleman - A. Five years; on and off. I did not know the value of them; some of them were quite clean. I was examined four times, and then admitted as an evidence - his wife and daughter were in the shop; he gave me the money himself, and took the ready-reckoner to cast it up. I sold him some in October; the last I sold him was about a week before he went to keep a cook-shop, in Giltspur-street, which was in September. I sold them to him on the day on which I stole them.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is he the man to whom you sold them - A. He is; the conversation about burning the prints, was in his presence - he gave four pence a pound for the first lot, and six pence for the last.

HANNAH GRAY . I succeeded the prisoner in his shop in Fleet-lane; he carried on a tailor's business, and an iron-shop there. I believe Pearson to be the person I bought 23 lbs. of copper of, in September; they were engraved plates. The prisoner called on me, and in consequence of what Pearson said, I told him a person had been concerning some copper-plates, he said I might give him six pence a pound; and they were perfectly safe, meaning that I might deal safely with him. Pearson came afterwards and I refused to buy any more.

Cross-examined. Q. He was to share no profit in them - A. No. I thought he meant to say they were honestly

come by. His old iron business was managed by his wife; he left the shop in October.

WILLIAM HAM . I am a brass-founder, and have known the prisoner five years, and frequently bought metal of him; he brought me copper several times in the course of the last year; there were plates among them; some of them were engraved

"Dilitanti Society" I gave him seven pence half-penny, and eight pence half-penny a pound for them, which was the price of metal. I saw one before the Justice which corresponds with what he sold me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he sell you any in September - A. Yes; I believe he did not know what they were - I melted them as old copper. I had some of the same description last week, from a respectable house in Shoe-lane; when they are worn they become old copper, and it is impossible for a man not acquainted with engravings to know whether they are worn or not.

MR. JOSEPH MAWMAN . I live in Ludgate-street. These plates belong to me, and Mr. Payne. I have the care of them; it is impossible to state their value. I bought half of them at Mr. White's sale, under an idea there would be a second volume of the work, and if so, they would be worth 1500 l. or 1000 l. I have no doubt but the common value of them is 200 l.

COURT. Q. What becomes of worn-out plates - A. Many are scratched across, so as not to be used, and sent to the coppersmith, either by my clerk or myself. There are collectors who give much more than copper-smiths for them, but these are in a high state of preservation; and I think it impossible any one could suppose them worn out. I cannot say how the trade dispose of their plates.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of March.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-126

610. MARTHA PORTUGAS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , six yards of lace, value 6 s.; six yards of thread net, value 2 s.; half a yard of muslin, value 1 s. 6 d. and four sovereigns , the property of John Weaver Long , her master and employer.

ELIZA LONG . I am the wife of John Weaver Long , publican , Nicholas-lane . The prisoner was in our service. On Wednesday, the 26th of March, I went up to my bedroom, and found my drawers broken open; she had left me the night before - her master and her had had a few words, and she went, as he said she might go if she liked. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and four sovereigns out of a purse. I had seen them on the Sunday. She had left a bundle behind her; I sent for an officer, who found a handkerchief in her bundle. A week after somebody called for her bundle; I followed the person home, and gave information. The officer went to her lodging and found the property.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 3d of April, I was sent for - I found the prisoner in Threefox-court, Long-lane, and took her to the prosecutor; she denied the charge. I found a room-door key, a street-door key, and the key of her box, in her pocket - I asked where she lived; she refused to tell me; I locked her up in the Compter; and went to a room in White-Street, Moorfields. The key found on her opened the door. I found two pieces of muslin, a piece of net, and two pieces of lace, and two muslin handkerchiefs. The prisoner claimed a handkerchief which I found in the same drawer; she never would tell me where she lived.

WILLIAM MERCHANT . I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's house, and found a handkerchief in a bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I never saw the sovereigns.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, believing it to be her first offence .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-127

611. CHRISTOPHER SANDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a packet of pins, value 4 s. , the goods of William Thomas Nichols , and Thomas Cooper .

FREDERICK BETHAM . I am servant to William Thomas Nicholls , and Thomas Cooper , pin and needle-makers , in Fenchurch-street . On Tuesday, the 8th of April, at seven o'clock in the evening, while the porter was shutting up the prisoner came in. The dog ran out, and I went to fetch him in; the prisoner and another boy passed me; I sent the porter after them; I missed a quantity of pins; I am confident he is one of the boys.

JOHN CARTER . I am an officer. I took the other boy into custody; I know the prisoner was his companion.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-128

612. JOHN DUNKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , four pair of stockings, value 3 s., four handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and five sovereigns, and a 5 l. banknote , the property of David Lyons .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-129

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

613. ELEANOR VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; four pounds of butter, value 4 s.; and three pounds of beef, value 1 s. , the goods of Patrick Wallace .

PATRICK WALLACE . I lodge in Norfolk-street, Strand . Yates brought this property to me. I know the trowsers; the prisoner's sister was cook at the house; she has absconded.

HENRY YATES . I am an officer. On the 29th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I was watching and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house. I stopped her and asked what she had got; she said it was nothing to me, and found she had a pair of trowsers, some butter, and beef; she said she picked it up at a gentleman's door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-130

614. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , at Tottenham, a waistcoat, value 11 s. , the goods of Joseph Davis .

JOSEPH DAVIS . I am a tailor , and live at Tottenham . On the 20th of March, I found my door open and this waistcoat gone from the window.

ESTHER DAVIS . I am the prosecutor's wife, I found the shop door open which I had shut ten minutes before. I

missed the waistcoat, and seeing the prisoner running away, I followed with Grant, who stopped him.

JAMES GRANT . Davis pointed him out to me. I took him and found he had got the waistcoat on, under his own.

THOMAS FRANKLIN . I am an officer. I took it off his back. He denied having it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a hawker.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-131

615. NICHOLAS MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , four sheets, value 20 s.; a table cloth, value 2 l.; five towels, value 4 s.; and two aprons. value 2 s. , the goods of John Nixon ,

HANNAH HAND . I am servant to John Nixon , who lives in Mutton-lane, Hackney . On the 18th of February, about a quarter to six o'clock, I missed two sheets off a horse, in the back kitchen, and five towels off the lines in the garden.

JOHN MILES . I am a dismounted patrol. On the 18th of February, about a quarter to six o'clock,; Berwis stopped the prisoner in my presence, in Hackney-road; about half a mile from Nixon's, with this linen in a bundle; he said he found it. I went to the house and found a center-bit, and some chissels; he said he was a milkman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BERWIS . When I first saw the prisoner another boy was with him, who ran away, when I took the prisoner, he said they were old clothes, which he brought from the Cat and Mutton, public-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out with my milk; I turned down by the canal-bridge, and found this bundle. I stood there a quarter of an hour; nobody owned it, and I thought I would take it home. I meant to advertise it. I used no violence to him.

JOHN BERWIS . He claimed a black handkerchief which the bundle was tied in, and he had no handkerchief on his neck. I found a horse pistol at his lodgings.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-132

616. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a watch, value 20 s. , the goods of Samuel Lush .

SAMUEL LUSH . I am a fruiterer , and live in Pear-tree street, Goswell-street . On Sunday the 30th of March, a little before nine o'clock. I was laying on the bed; a knock came at the shop door; my wife opened it. I heard a man's voice; and got off the bed; I sat on the chair, and heard a man buying some fruit, and saw the prisoner take the watch off a nail over the mantle piece; I went and tried to take him, and in the scuffle, the watch was dropped. He got away and was apprehended on the Thursday. I am certain of him, he left his hat behind.

SUSAN LUSH . I am the wife of the prosecutor's. I opened he door to the prisoner. I only know that he is the man who came for the fruit; after he was gone I found the watch on the ground; where he had been struggling with my husband.

JOHN LOCK . I am an officer, I apprehended him on Thursday.

JOHN VANN . I know that the hat which was left behind, to be the prisoners.

Prisoner's Defence. The hat is not mine.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-133

617. WILLIAM LENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value 6 s., and a ribbon, value 2 d. , the goods of George Mason .

GEORGE MASON . I live at Kentish-town - the prisoner lodged in my top room. I left my watch hanging over the parlour fire place - his wife and sister lived with him. On the 9th of April, at nine o'clock at night, I left him in the house, and on returning my watch was gone; my wife charged him with it when he came home, and he struck her, so, I had him taken to the watch-house.

REBECCA MASON . I am the prosecutor's wife. I missed the watch, and charged the prisoner with it.

HENRY THREADER . I am servant to Mr. Flemming. On the 8th of April, the prisoner pawned the watch.

RICHARD DEYKIN . I was present at the prisoner's examination, what he said was taken down. I saw him sign it; (read) -

"Having heard the deposition of the witnesses, the prisoner says it is true, and that it is his first offence."

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-134

618. ELEANOR LEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of John Nash .

JOHN NASH . On Saturday, the last day in February, I slept at Tuttle's, in North-mews, near Berkley-square , and on Monday morning I missed a shawl out of my bundle.

CHARLES TUTTLE . I keep the house. The prisoner was five weeks in my service - she absconded on Sunday. I got a search warrant, went to the King's-arms, public-house, Ryder-street, searched her apartments there, and found the shawl.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I found the shawl in her drawer.

Prisoner. I leave it to your Lordship, as they swear so hard against me.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-135

Before Mr. Recorder.

619. WILLIAM TRAPP was indicted for that he, on the 21st of March , at All Saints, Poplar, in and upon Charlotte Rookes , widow , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, maliciously and wilfully, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously &c., did strike and cut the said Charlotte Rookes , in and upon her head, with intent feloniously &c. of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intention to be, to disable the said Charlotte Rookes .

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be, to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHARLOTTE ROOKES . I am a widow and live at Mr. Horne's at Poplar ; he is vestry clerk of Poplar. On the 21st of March, a little after two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner called at the house; I opened the street door to him; he asked if Mr. Horne was at home; he was not, and I

said No; he then asked if Mr. Horne's brother, (who lives with him) was at home, I said No. Catherine Fillaroy was in the house by accident; she does not live in the house - I had known the prisoner when a child, but had not seen him for years; he said he came from Mr. Montague, (who is treasurer of the parish,) that he had a note from him for Mr. Horn. I said Mr. Horne was at his office at the Townhall; that he had better go there and he would see him; he said it was something very particular, and Mr. Montague requested it might be left at the house. The Townhall is about three hundred yards from the house. He asked me to lend him a pen and ink to write something on the letter. I turned round from him to go into the front parlour for the pen and ink, and he shut the street door and followed me, I got into the front parlour, and was opening the book case to get the pen and ink, and then received two blows at the back of my head, which stunned me very much; there was nobody else near me; he had something in a handkerchief under his arm when he came in.

Q. What further passed - A. I turned round to see what it was, and he tripped me up; I fell on my left side, and immediately I was down I received three blows on the side of my head, from a weapon which was afterwards produced; it was a little hatchet. I was hardly able to move; I had no power to move till the blood ran profusely down to my mouth which I think revived me. I then seized him by the neckcloth and said,

"Oh you murdering villain." He then dragged me out of the front parlour into the passage; I was on my feet but I do not know how I came there; I continued to hold him all the time, and when in the passage he tripped me up again; I fell on my right side and there I received several blows on the left side with the same instrument. I still held him by the neckcloth, and he said,

"Let go, you won't let go;" these were the only words I heard him speak; at that instant I heard a violent rapping at the street door; before that, I had screamed out as loud as I could.

"Fillaroy! Fillaroy," and then he put his fingers into my mouth to prevent my screaming; I bit his finger very hard, this was before I was dragged into the passage; I kept screaming as loud as I could; I do not know whether I could he heard outside the house.

Q. Well, you heard a rapping at the door - A. Yes; I still held him by the neckcloth and dragged him towards the door; I opened the street door, still holding him; a vast concourse of people were at the door, to whom I said,

"Come in, I am murdered." Some one took the prisoner, and I know nothing more about it. I was taken into the parlour and a surgeon came to my assistance; I do not know whether I walked into the parlour or was carried; he was brought to my bed-room next day for the Magistrate to take my deposition in his presence; I kept my bed for a fortnight.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This happened a little after two o'clock in the afternoon - A Yes Sir. I live in the High-street, not in a lone house, it is a very public place, where coaches pass at all times, there are shops opposite; it is a narrow street, and no area before the door; the house lays low. I had not seen him since he was a child; there was no malice or ill will between us. I know his mother very well, and go to the same chapel as her; she does not belong to the same class as me. I have told all that passed, there was nothing of anger or provocation, nor any words, it was done so very instantaneously; he had not spoken a word in anger or demanded any thing.

Q. There was really no cause present, or past, that you could assign for it - A. None at all. I screamed during the whole transaction, calling

"Fillaroy" - I do not know that I called murder. I have no reason to believe that he was ever at the house before. I have lived there twenty-six years.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Are there blinds to the parlour window - A. Yes, very high ones - there is a garden at the back of the house which is divided from the fields by a ditch only.

COURT. Q. Does his mother sit near you at chapel - A. No, she sits in the gallery and I below - I never observed him with her. I recollect that there is a bridge over the ditch, which could easily be let down, and a person might escape into the fields. His mother is a straw bonnet maker.

CATHERINE FILLAROY . I was at Mr. Horne's house on this day; I called at two o'clock and was in the back parlour when the prisoner came; I did not see him; I heard a rap at the door; Mrs. Rooke opened it; a voice said

"Is Mr. Horne at home," she said No; he said,

"Is his brother at home," she said No; I heard her go from the passage into the front parlour, and then heard her immediately scream out in a most violent manner. I immediately made my way out at the back door, I got over the pales of the next house, ran through the house and gave an alarm; then knocked at the door; a mob instantly collected. I saw Mrs. Rooke partly open the door; she said,

"Come in, for I am murdered." I was too much alarmed to go in again, but saw the prisoner brought out.

DANIEL TALBOT . I am a letter-carrier. I was passing the house at the back of a stage, and heard a very violent scream of murder. A mob collected round the door - I jumped off, pushed the door open, and saw Mrs. Rookes behind the door, screaming, and blood running all down her, from her head; the prisoner had hold of her behind, pulling her away from the door. I made a snatch at his right wrist, and he let go of her immediately. I did not perceive any thing in his hand at that time; he let go with the other hand immediately, and I took hold of that wrist, held both wrists, and said

"You rascal, what have you been about here;" he said she had been very much ill-treating him; he tried to lift up his hands - I pulled them down, and said I would stand no nonsense with him: by that time a number of people rushed in and seized him by the collar, and assisted in securing him, I pulled him into the back kitchen, on the same floor. Coltman, the officer, came in, bound his hands, and took him.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. This is a very public situation - A. Yes; at the time I seized him, a child ten years old might have pulled him down, he was so confused, and turned as pale as ashes.

JAMES MONTAGUE , Esq. I sent no note to Mr. Horne. by the prisoner - I never saw him before - (looking at the note) this is not my writing, nor have I any knowledge of it.

JOSEPH HANSON . I am cow-keeper to my father. I was passing Mr. Horne's house at the time of this transaction, and saw a crowd at the door. When I went in, I saw the

prisoner - he had a chopper in his right hand, covered with a handkerchief. I saw him drop it, and picked it up; the handkerchief was pinned over it. I shewed it to Coltman, he gave it me back again to carry to the watch-house, which I did, and delivered it to Mingay; it felt damp, it was unpinned at the watch-house - the chopper seemed dry at the watch-house, when it was unpinned - the wet on the handkerchief was blood.

JOSEPH COLTMAN . I was a constable at this time. I was coming along - saw a crowd, and went into the house - went in front of the prisoner and told him to be quiet; two people had hold of him; as I was taking him to the watch-house, he asked where I was going to take him - I said I should take him before the magistrate, and asked what could induce him to commit such an outrage as that - he replied, that he should not say any thing. I then took him to the watch-house, and searched him there, and found upon him two cords, which I now produce in the some state in which they were then; each has a noose at the end.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. There is no slip or running knot - A. No.

THOMAS EDWARD MINGAY . I am a constable. I saw a crowd and went to the watch-house, and found the cords and hatchet on the table. I produce the hatchet with the handkerchief on it, in the same state as before; the handkerchief was damp with blood - here are several spots on it now.

Mr. GEORGE BAILLIE . I am a surgeon. I went into the house, hearing a noise, and thinking my assistance might be wanted. I went in the back way, and found some slight resistance within, at the back door, as if somebody wished to get out, for a second. I then went in, and found the prisoner in custody, and Mrs. Rooke in the front parlour, in an agitated state, and her face covered with blood. I found a small wound on the right temple, rather contused, which had divided an artery, from whence the blood had proceeded. I stopped it instantly; there was another wound on the left side of the head, that was a contused triangular wound: there was another on the back of the head - that was a cut, and must have been made with the corner of the sharp part of the hatchet; but from the shape of the triangular wound, I think it was made with the back of it. She was much agitated, and nearly fainted, and kept her bed a fortnight, I have attended her till now. I was there the next day, when the magistrate attended, to take her deposition. I apprehended danger, fearing fever might come on, but not from the wounds themselves.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You think the triangular wound was made with the back of the hatchet - A. Yes; had the wound in the forehead been in a more fleshy part, I should have called it more of a puncture - it was the depth of the skin - a good deal of blood flowed from the artery. The wound in the head was an incision about three-fourths of an inch long, and not above an eighth of a sixth of an inch deep. The back wound must have been done with the sharp part, no other part of the instrument could have done it. I found the prisoner very much agitated, and almost fainting.

THOMAS HORNE . I am master of this house - my premises are open behind - there is a marsh land at the back - a person could easily escape.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know nothing of the prisoner - A. I knew him perfectly well; there had been no quarrel whatever between us of any sort; he lived some distance from me; he has been maintained at our work-house, and relieved as a pauper. All I know of his having been in an ill-state of health, is his being sent from the work-house to the hospital last Christmas twelvemonth, with a venereal complaint.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Had you any reason to suppose that his mind was affected. - A. Not the least.

COURT. Q. Were you at all aware of his having business with you - A. Not the least; I had not seen him for six or nine months before this affair. I never knew him considered as having his intellects affected at the work-house.

The paper brought by the prisoner as a letter was here read, it was as follows: -

"Directions for sailing along the eastern coast of Great Britain from Orfordness to the Penthland Frith, and among the islands of Orkney and Shetland. Directions from Orfordness to Foulness, including St. Nicholas and Hasborough. Description of the bays, with their depth of water, and the side they are to be kept on in sailing from Lowestoff to Foulness."

The prisoner being called upon for his Defence, declined saying any thing, and his Counsel called the following witnesses.

JOHN TRAPP . I am the prisoner's father, I am a shipwright by trade, but have not done business in that way for seven years - since the war I have been in the straw-bonnet trade; he lived with me when this unfortunate circumstance happened, he was twenty-six years old last December - he had a paralytic stroke seven years ago which affected his instep and leg; since which time he was first employed as clerk to Mr. Hatton, of Great St. Helen's, and afterwards acted as usher at a school; he has lately been very much given to study, and was remarkable for seclusion, the most so of any one I ever knew - his health was so bad that he declined his place as usher two years ago last June; since that time he has been employed twelvemonth as a ladies' shoe-maker down to December last - the cause of his leaving that employ was the rupture of a blood-vessel, but I do not know where, there was a great discharge of blood; he was under Mr. Frampton's care, as an out-patient of the London Infirmary - his conduct has materially altered since that, he gave many evidences of his derangement of mind. I I have observed, for many years past, a temporary derangement of intellect; after he had in a measure recovered from the paralytic, he left home and went to Bristol without any intimation; a week afterwards I received a letter from him, saying he was there and in want of money to come home - this was about seven years ago; we sent him money and he returned - he was absent rather more than a week; he had no relation there, only he had heard me say I was born there; after his return he was a considerable time out of employ, but by means of an advertisement obtained a situation with Mr. Hatton, as an accountant, where he continued between two and three years; left him in August, 1820, and immediately engaged as usher to Mr. Gilson, and staid with him till Midsummer, 1821; his health was evidently on the decline while with Mr. Gilson, and at the expiration of the

holidays he was too ill to return, which he intended, and declined going again - after that he manifested an unusual dejection of spirits, such as I ever witnessed before, and as much as in him laid, secluded himself entirely from the observation of the family and society; he scarcely ever attended meals - we never could prevail upon him to come down stairs. I had remonstrated with him on the mode of conduct he pursued, and said the probable consequence of this seclusion would be injurious to his health - this had no other effect than making him, if possible, more secluded than ever.

Q. Did he give any reason for this seclusion - A. Not the least; he was hardly able of communication, he was so little communicative, I never knew the like. Some time after this he went to Mr. Cole to learn the shoemaking business, and left him in December.

Q. Now come to the last two or three months; has he been at home since he left Mr. Cole - A. Yes; we observed some particular traits of his conduct, which I always considered savoured strongly of insanity, some of which came within my own knowledge - on several occasions when he entered his room where he secluded himself, he has did himself behind the door to avoid observation. This seclusion has increased within the last three months, and caused fearful apprehension on our minds, as it respected his personal safety - we were fearful lest he should destroy himself from, despondency.

Q. From despondency of spirits, or derangement - A. The derangement I considered would arise from the lowness of spirits; I considered he had evident marks of temporary derangement arising from his spirits, dejection of mind, and intense study. He would not be seen by me for two or three days together frequently, though he was in the house, and he shunned me, particularly since I remonstrated with him - he never was so communicative as the rest of my family; he kept up stairs in his room, and scarcely ever went out. He spent his evenings at home either reading or sleeping; reading was his employment all day - he has lately been much disposed to make himself master of the Latin tongue. I believe he was pretty competent in mathematics, before this seclusion, so as to apply it to navigation - he knew geometry and mensuration, but was not so correct in them as I wished.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How long is it since he left off being a shoemaker - A. In December; he used the tools requisite.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What you have related as to your fear of his destroying himself arose since December - A. We had fears prior to that, but stronger since; he had occasional relief from the parish, but I do not know when. He worked at shoemaking at Mr. Coles's, not at my house. The habits of seclusion took place at my house.

MR. HORNE. He received relief from the parish about twelve months ago.

SARAH TRAPP . I am the prisoner's mother. At two particular times he has been affected in such a way as to cause considerable alarm; the first was seven years ago; he was very ill for some weeks. We missed him one morning at breakfast, and found him sitting in his room with his legs across, and when called to breakfast we could get no answer from him; we were obliged to take his breakfast up to him for some weeks after, he refused to come down, and at the end of some weeks he lost all appetite, and had a paralytic attack - he was more communicative at this time, and applied to the London Hospital. When he recovered he was not able to walk without crutches, and was absent for a week Last December he was taken very ill with a spitting of blood, and from that time he remained at our house night and day; he had lived at home for the last twelve months, and about five weeks after December, he complained of great pain and illness, and went again to Dr. Clapton, at the London Hospital, as an out patient.

Q. Did he appear to mix with the family or was he secluded - A. Till we observed this change, he was as the rest of the family, but since he confined himself wholly to his bed-room. He only went to the Hospital once, and was bled, and then he was seized in this melancholy way, and went no more - I think the last time he went to the Hospital was in February, after that he confined himself altogether to his bed-room, till evening, when he would go down into the yard at the back of the house, and remain there alone for two or three hours; this was his habit when the snow lay thick on the ground, ancle deep - this happened constantly from the time the alteration took place - we have frequently gone down to see where he was. There is no out-house in the yard; he was in the open air, and that in all the severity of winter. On the Tuesday before this affair, I was ill in bed, and in consequence of what I was informed of, I had my son and daughter called up, and desired them particularly to keep a watch over him - I had some time before that gone into his room, and found him in such a posture that I apprehended he contemplated suicide. The door opens close against the wall, and he had pushed a chair against the door, which was ajar, and stood in the corner, where there was scarcely room to stand. An unusual change had taken place in his conduct, for he was of such habits, he used to shun every body before, and I was informed of several things, such as his running down stairs naked, and he went out on the Tuesday towards evening for the first time after his seclusion - this was on the Tuesday before this happened; he returned about nine o'clock. I was confined to my bed at the time.

Q. Did the charge you gave your son and daughter arise from any fear you had of his doing mischief to himself or others - A. I thought his injuring any one was the most unlikely thing in the world, for from his infancy he was the most harmless inoffensive temper, and was often imposed upon.

MARY TRAPP . I am the prisoner's sister, and am younger than him. I remember his coming home about Christmas. He broke a blood-vessel; since that time his conduct has been considerably altered. He secluded himself from the family. I do not think that he had any books, but I cannot say; he kept close to his room, and would have nothing to say to any of the family; and we had great difficulty to get him down stairs to meals. Sometimes he had them up stairs, and sometimes would come down - we had to call him five or six times before he came. I suffered considerable anxiety of mind about about him. I went into his bed-room one day, since

Christmas, and saw him behind the door, and was horror struck when I saw him, and could not speak to him, he was in such a situation - standing behind the door, close in the corner, looking down on the ground, with his hands up to his mouth. I immediately went out of the room - there was a chair near the door, but not behind it. This was after he left Mr. Cole, in the early part of the time, when he began to seclude himself.

Q. What struck you with horror when you saw him - A. I considered he was contemplating self destruction.

Q. Had he any means of self destruction by - A. Not that I saw; but from his strange manner before, and his keeping from the family, I thought so; and during the hard winter, he retired every night into the back yard, and staid three or four hours, when the snow was on the ground.

Q. Was he in the open yards; or is there any covering - A. He used to remain in the privy. I have frequently made observations to him, but could get no answer. On the Wednesday before this melancholy occurrence took place. my mother charged me and my brother to keep an eye on him; for, on the night before, he came home at nine o'clock - I let him in - and the first thing he did was to fix his eyes, in a wild manner, upon me, and put up his left arm, as if to ward off a blow. He then went to the end of the passage leading to the yard; then turned, and fixed his eyes again as before; then he went down to the kitchen. I went up and told my mother, I did not know that I had done any thing to offend him, but he looked at me, as if he would murder me - and so I told her. I never had any words with him, or any disagreement in my life. And once (I think it was on the Tuesday) he came down to dinner, and was some time down before I observed him, and then I saw he was naked, all but his trowsers. He had neither shirt, or any thing on. He was in the room sometime before I observed him; I was at needle work, and a female lodger talking to me, so I did not observe it immediately - he did nothing. I observed him in that state for about half an hour; sometimes walking, and sometimes standing against the mantle-piece. We did not speak to him. I cannot tell whether the children were in the room. My father was out, and my mother was ill a bed. My brother was not there. I never saw him commit such indecencies before - quite the reverse. I never heard him express any dislike to Mr. Horne - he always spoke of him with the greatest respect - saying, Mr. Horne had always behaved uncommonly well since our circumstances had taken an unfortunate change. He was very weak. We had a small chopper in the house - but the one produced does not look like it - I do not think it is ours.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How often did he shave himself - A. I cannot tell - he did shave himself.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He had no razor when you saw him behind the door - A. No. I have frequently heard him talking, or muttering to himself; and, being uneasy, have listened at the door, but could never make out what he said.

SUSAN FALSHAW . I lodge at the prisoner's father's, and have lived there two years; but, for the last six months I have noticed several things in the prisoner's behaviour - his keeping up stairs all day; and going into the yard every evening; and remaing there two or three hours on cold nights, when the snow was ancle deep; and besides, the next morning the blood has been on the privy when I have gone there. I have observed this several times when I went to the privy of a morning. If we met on the stairs, and he was coming down, he would run up - he always avoided me. On the Tuesday previous to this occurrence his mother was ill. I went down stairs, and was standing at the front window with his sister - the door between the two rooms is half glass. I happened to turn my eye, I saw him walking backward and forward, in the room, as fast as he could, naked, all but his trowsers. I did not mention it to his sister; but, before a quarter of an hour, he came across to the room, and stood before the glass, and began combing his hair as fast as he could. I I left the room as soon as I could. I thought it very singular, when he would never come into my presence at any other time; and that he never could be in his senses to have done so; and said so to his sister; he looked very wild at me when he came into the room. I observed that he looked very evil at me for the last five or six months, but could never think what it was for - his looks were very unpleasant. During the two years I have been there, I can safely say, he has not exchanged half a dozen words with me.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You thought he was out of his mind, by coming before the glass to comb his hair - A. I thought it strange. I never saw him do it before - he looked very wild, and had no shirt on.

JOHN HATTON . I am an accountant and live in Great St. Helen's. The prisoner came to me on the 4th of February, 1817, and left in August, 1819, he was very attentive to business, and an honest well tempered humane man, inoffensive, peaceable, and quiet.

SAMUEL GILSON . I live at Poplar, and, am a schoolmaster; he lived twelve months with me and left at Midsummer 1820; he was humane, inoffensive, not quarrelsome or malicious.

WILLIAM COLE . I live in Brunswick-place, Poplar. He worked with me from January to December. 1822, and left in consequence of breaking a blood vessel, he was honest, remarkably steady, and very good natured.

Q. Did you observe any thing remarkable in him - A. One morning, about six months ago, I went into the workshop, he looked at me rather wild, and said

"Master I'll thank you to lend me two solwins" (meaning sovereigns I suppose); I said

"What is the matter with you, have not you had your breakfast?" he said,

"I have had a little bit of a breakfast. I have eaten four rounds of toast an inch and a half thick. but that is nothing to what I eat at times." I left the shop and was absent all day.

MR. ALLEY. Q. How long did he work with you after that - A. About two months.

Q. Except that nonsencical observation he acted very well - A. Yes.

THOMAS EDWARD MINGAY , re-examined. Q. Did you converse with him at the workshop - A. I spoke to him two or three times but he gave no answer, he was there a very short time, he only said

"No," before the Magistrate.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor on account of his youth, and previous good character .

Reference Number: t18230409-136

620. THOMAS CORFIELD was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Bartley , on the King's highway, on the 29th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person against his will, a pocket book, value 1 s.; two sovereigns and a shilling , his property.

JAMES BARTLEY . I am a carpenter , and live at Somers-town. On the 29th of March, about twelve o'clock at night, I was going in a hurry for some sugar, and just as I turned the corner of Charlton-street , (my little boy was with me;) two men came behind, and one gave me a blow on the back of my head, which brought me to the ground, on my face and hands; my boy called out,

"Corfield do not kill my father." They then took my pocket book, containing this money, from my coat pocket. I called murder and the watchman came up. The prisoner was one of them. I saw him rifling my pockets; it was a moonlight night, and very near a coffee house, which has a strong light; they turned back, and went down Churchway. I followed but they got off. I told the watchman his name. I knew the prisoner before; he lodged with me in 1821. He was apprehended last Saturday.

Cross-examined by Mr. PRENDERGAST. Q. There had been a quarrel between you - A. He owed me money for rent; we had a dispute in October, 1821; he broke into my room, and dragged me out of bed, and broke every thing in the room. I indicted him and he gave false bail; I had a Bench warrant against him; I told the watchman he had robbed me. I did not go to his house for him, as I did not know where it was; he keeps two or three places, I went to Phoenix-street with the constable. When he was apprehended I told this story; the Justice ordered him to Clerkenwell; he said the bench warrant was enough. I did not see him after the robbery, till he was apprehended. I was perfectly sober; I did not see him before he struck me; after I received the blow, one of them said;

"You villain, you have knocked down a child." I am certain it was his voice.

JAMES BARTLEY , JUN. I am thirteen years old. I was going to the grocers with my father, and at the corner of Charlton-street, two men came up to my father and said,

"What made you knock a child down," and as the words came out of his mouth, he hit him by the side of his head, and knocked him down; I called out,

"Corfield do not kill my father"; then he said,

"You rascal, if you make a noise I'll kill you"; the skirts of my fathers coat turned up, as he fell on his face and hands; Corfield felt in his pocket, and took his pocket-book out, and ran away with it. I knew him before; he used to live in our house; I told my father who the man was; he did not know who it was; I did not tell the watchman. I saw him about a mouth after in Wilstead-street, as I was going to school, I was alone and did not call after him, my father told me whenever I saw him again to follow him. I saw him two days after, but was afraid to follow him. I saw him two or three times, but was always alone. The prisoner took the pocket-book, but the other man knocked my father down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did your father tell you that he did not see him - A. Yes; he was stunned for three minutes. I saw him walking up and down Harford-street, but did not know he lived there, till a shoe-boy told me so, and then I told my father; this was before the robbery.

JOHN ALSTEAD . I am a Bow-street patrol. The prisoner surrendered himself to me on a Bench warrant I had against him for assaulting the prosecutor before this. I took him to Bow-street; we waited two hours at a public-house for the prosecutor to come - he then said he was a rogue and a robber, and was going to say what he had done, but I sent him to the office. This was on the 12th of April; he had given me notice on Thursday that he should be ready to go with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I was in bed at half-past ten o'clock on this night.

ELIZA HERRING . I live in Harford-street, Somer's-town. The prisoner has lodged a year and a half with me. On the 29th of March, he was not well; he came home in the evening - I cannot say whether the clock had struck ten, but I fetched his candle before the watchman went half-past ten. I was up myself till half-past twelve, it being Easter-eve; he did not go out again. The prosecutor knew where he lived, for he has come and insulted me several times before the robbery, and asked for the prisoner. He did not come after the robbery.

JAMES BARTLEY re-examined. I called there about six months before the robbery - she said he had left her, so I did not go afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-137

621. SARAH THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , three sovereigns, the monies of Andrew Romer , in his dwelling-house .

ANDREW ROMER . I am a tailor , and live in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane . On the Tuesday before Easter, I hired the prisoner as a servant . These sovereigns were in a drawer, which was divided into two parts, on the ground floor room; she was in the room every day - on Friday I unlocked the drawer, and gave her money to buy soap, and saw the three sovereigns there then; I left the key in the drawer - she returned with the soap, and went into the room, put on her bonnet, and said the draft came in at the door; she went on washing, and a little before ten o'clock asked for a halfpenny to by some potatoes, which I gave her; she went out, and never returned. I went into the room, found the drawer open, and the sovereigns gone - I did not see her again till the 25th, when I charged her with it - she said nothing.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I apprehended her at a lodging house in Wentworth-street. The prosecutor charged her with this; I asked how she came to do it - she made no answer.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing 20 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-138

622. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a coat, value 3 s. , the goods of Joel Tilt .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-139

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

623. ELEANOR THE WIFE OF BRYAN M'KENNA alias M'CORMICK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , at St. Dunstan in the East, in the Mansion-house

of our Lord the King, called the Custom-House, a 5 l. Bank note , the property of Henry Gardner ; and BRYAN M'KENNA alias M'CORMICK and CHARLES GRUBB were indicted for feloniously receiving the same well knowing it to have been feloniously stolen .

SECOND COUNT, the same only stating the note to be the property of John Morgan Peters .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, The same as the two former, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of Eleanor King Kelly.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MORGAN PETERS. I am a clerk in the Custom-house, and was so in February. On Saturday, the 8th of February, I went to Messrs. Bosanquet and Co., with a cheque, and received a 5 l. note, four sovereigns, and a half - I wrapped the money in the note, took it home, and on the Monday morning brought it to the Custom-house, and deposited it in my drawer in the long-room, about ten o'clock. I wrote

"Bosanquet and Co., February 23," on it when I took it - it was quite clean then. I left the Custom-house between a quarter and ten minutes before four. I had been away from my desk several times in the course of the day; and had been out of the room; but I saw the note safe when I left the Custom-house. I looked to see that it was safe, and locked my desk. I opened it next morning upon returning, and it was gone. I desired payment to be stopped at the Bank; and, in consequence of information on the Thursday, I went to the Bank with Mr. Stokes, and soon after we got there, the prisoner, Charles Grubb , came up. Mr. Lees, who was present, questioned him as to when, and where he had taken the note. He stated, that it had been taken at a coal-shed in Margaret-street, Hackney-fields, which he kept; and from a person (whom he believed to be in a public office.) for a debt of about 17 s. 6 d., and that he did not know the person's name. On being further questioned, he said, he would point out the person's house, if he could not tell the name. It was proposed that Stokes and Lees should go with the prisoner to see where he had taken it. I left them at the door of the Bank; and, as I parted with them, as soon as I crossed the way, I looked back to see if they were going on, and saw the other male prisoner join them. I believe the female prisoner is servant to Miss Kelly, housekeeper at the Custom-house, as I have seen her several times dusting the desks of the long room.

Prisoner, ELEANOR M'KENNA. Q. Did you take your keys out of your desk - A. I did I swear that; I had them next morning when I came.

Q. Had you a second key to your desk - A. Yes, formerly; but I had lost it. I had made enquiry about it - it was a key of my desk, and a larger one attached to it. I had lost them a few days before, and never recovered them.

JAMES STOKES . On the 13th of February I went to the Bank with Mr. Peters, and saw Grubb there. A note was shewn me by Mr. Lees, which Grubb had produced. I asked Grubb where he got it. He said his brother had taken it the day before at a coal-shed, in Margaret-street, Hackney; that he lived there, and kept that coal-shed. I asked of whom he thought his brother had taken it. He said, he thought of a gentleman, who held a very respectable situation under Government. I asked why his brother did not write the name of the party on the back of it. He said, he did not think that that was of much consequence - his brother knew it to be good. I asked, whether, if I went home with him, he could point out the house where the gentleman lived who gave him the note. He said, he thought he could. We left the Bank, and as we got outside the door, I observed the other male prisoner standing on the opposite side. He came over to us immediately, and Grubb introduced him to me as his brother. I said to him,

"I understand you took a 5 l. note yesterday?" He said, he had not taken it, but the boy whom he employed to carry out coals had taken it, and brought it in to him; that he had taken 17 s. 6 d. out of it for a score, and gave change for it. We went on towards Hackney, and when we had got about a hundred yards beyond Shoreditch church, the prisoners both stopped, and said,

"It is of no use taking you any further Sir, we are sorry we have took you so far - we found that note yesterday in Petticoat-lane." I said,

"It is a pity you did not state this to Mr. Lees, at the Bank." One of them said, in the presence of the other, that he was sorry he had told a falsehood about it; and asked, if I thought there was any chance of their having the note restored to them. I said, I could not answer that, they must return to the Bank with me. They agreed to return, and when we got to the Refuge for the Destitute, in Shoreditch, Grubb slipped away, and got away. I told M'Kenna he must go back with me. He said, he was sorry Grubb was gone away, he supposed he was frightened. I returned to the Bank with him, and requested Mr. Lees to keep him there while I fetched Mr. Golding from the Custom-house. We were too late for an examination at the Mansion-house that day. We went to Wentworth-street to look for Grubb, but did not find him there. As we passed Petticoat-lane, M'Kenna pointed out the corner of a court, and said,

"That is the very spot where I found the note." I asked if it was wrapped up in any thing. He said, No, it was folded up. I asked if any thing was wrapped in it. He said there was nothing in it.

Prisoner GRUBB. Q. What time was it - A. Between one and two o'clock. I think it was a very fine day.

Q. Did you not wait several times for me to keep up with you - A. No; I believe M'Kenna was on first, I kept about a yard from him, and was about another yard from Grubb. I do not remember waiting for him, I did not observe that his shoes were bad.

COURT. Q. Where did he slip away from you - A. Close at the Curtain-road turnpike. I had seen him not two minutes before; I did not observe him go, but when I looked for him he was gone.

JOHN LEES . I am an inspector of the Bank of England. I produce a 5 l. note, which I received in the secretaries' office, in Grubb's presence; I asked where he received it. he said his brother, who kept a coal-shed and potatoe warehouse in Margaret-street, Hackney, received it for a score; that he did not know the person's name, but dare say his brother did; that it was not marked, but he had brought it to the Bank, as it was very much inked. Mr. Stokes set off with him to point out where it was received; and in two minutes they returned with M'Kenna. Mr. Stokes said,

"Oh here is his brother; he was waiting for him outside." I asked Grubb if that was his brother - he

said it was; and M'Kenna said he was so - I said,

"Then you can tell us who you received the note from" - he said,

"I did not receive it myself, it was my boy received it"

"I asked if it was from a regular customer - he said he did not know the name, but had no doubt his boy could show us the house; and it was agreed that Stokes should go with them for the boy to point out the house - and Grubb said he understood it was taken from the wife of a person in a public office. I was not present when the note was brought to the Bank; it came to me in this inky state; and the reason they assigned for bringing it, was having inked it by accident.

Prisoner GRUBB. Q. When I brought the note did not you ask me to step aside, as you had something particular to say to somebody - A. No; I believe it is the course of business in the secretaries' office, to ask people to call again in an hour.

Q. I was asked to call again in an hour - it was then near twelve o'clock; I returned five minutes before one - A. I do not know myself that he was there more than once, but I believe he had left the note, as it is the usual course when notes are stopped.

MR. PETERS. The note was clean when I had it - here is

"Bosanquet, and Co." on it, in my writing.

JOHN FRIAR . I am clerk to Messrs. Bosanquet, and Co. On the 8th of February I paid a draft of 7 l. 10 s. 6 d. drawn by Joseph Calroe and Son, with a 5 l. note, dated 13th of January, No. 1499; it was clean then - (looking at it) this is it.

THOMAS PENDEGRAST . I am a coal-dealer, and live at No. 24, Chicksand-street, Osborne-place, Whitechapel. On Wednesday night, the 12th of February, about six o'clock, or half past, the female prisoner came to my house, and said she had been to the west-end of the town, on an errand for Miss Kelly, and was rather fatigued; she sat down a few minutes, then presented a 5 l. note to me, and asked me to change it; it was dirty. I do not know whether it was ink or dirt; I took down the number - it was 14991, (looks at it) I said,

"I don't like the appearance of it; I am afraid it is a bad one, but if you like to let it lay in my hands till tomorrow, I will take it to the Bank and get you the change" - she left it with me, and was to call next morning for the change. She said it belonged to her fellow-servant - I cannot write, but can make figures; I put down the number while it was in my possession; I gave it to my wife, who put it into a little box, and shortly after I went to my club.

ELIZABETH PENDEGRAST . I am wife of the last witness. On the 12th of February the female prisoner brought this note to my husband, (looking at it) he took the number of it - it was so dirty he refused change, she went away and left it; and at half past nine that night, Bryan M'Kenna came, and said Nelly had sent him for the note. I knew Nelly and him before, and delivered him the same note - my husband had given it to me in her presence; I was in and out of the shop when she brought it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a city officer. I took the female prisoner to the Compter; she stated to me that she gave the 5 l. note to her husband, and that she found it against the door of the Long-room, Custom-House - and on the 18th, she told me she found it on Tuesday, about five o'clock in the afternoon, with two sovereigns, and a halfcrown. When I apprehended Bryan M'Kenna, he pointed out the place in Petticoat-lane, where he said the note was found. I went next morning to Grubb's apartment, and found him in bed, at M'Kenna's house.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am a City officer. I accompanied Mr. Golding and Mr. Peters. M'Kenna pointed out the place where he said he found the note - next morning we took Grubb, at No. 64, Wentworth-street, which is M'Kenna's house; as we went along Leadenhall-street, I asked Grubb where he found the note, he said in Thames-street, I said

"Upper or Lower" - he said

"Lower" - I asked him in what part; he said about the middle. On the 15th, the female prisoner said to me voluntarily that she gave her husband the 5 l. note to buy shoes, for herself and him; and that she found it in the Long-room.

CHARLES LUXMORE . I am porter at the Custom-House, and have been so since it was built. Miss Eleanor King Kelly is the house-keeper; she sleeps in the house, and has fourteen female servants, who all sleep there, and a man servant besides. The female prisoner was her servant; she came in September, 1822.

THOMAS WHITMORE , ESQ. I am principal clerk in the secretaries office, Custom-House - It belongs to the Crown; part of it is in the parish of St. Dunstan, in the East - The whole of the Long-room is in that parish I believe.

ELEANOR M'KENNA. I have to say that the men are perfectly innocent of any guilt attached to the crime; and I wish to ask the prosecutor if he is in the habit of trusting his keys to any person besides himself.

MR. PETERS. I never trust them with any body.

BRYAN M'KENNA. My wife being the principal, I forbear saying anything.

GRUBB'S Defence. I trust this will have considerable weight on my part; I was requested by M'Kenna to get change; had I the least idea of the note being stolen, it is not likely I should go to the Bank; and having an hour given me to call again, my returning proves I knew nothing of the transaction. I examined the note and saw it was good; as to the prevarication, knowing it was good, I only used those words to get it changed.

E. M'KENNA - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

BRYAN M'KENNA - GUILTY . Aged 27.

GRUBB - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-140

624. JOHN PURDY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Blogg , about eleven o'clock, on the night of the 22d of February , at St. Botolph without, Aldersgate, and burglariously stealing therein, three amethists set in gold, value 15 s.; and seven pieces of wrought gold, value 25 s.; the goods of George Blogg , and the said James Blogg .

GEORGE BLOGG . I am in partnership with James Blogg ; we occupy the same dwelling-house jointly, it is in the parish of St. Botolph without, Aldersgate. The house is up a court in Aldersgate-street . On Thursday night the 20th of February, I was at home, nobody else was in the house; I was sitting in the warehouse, and heard the house bell ring; it rang a second time; I did not go to the door; I then heard the lock of the door being tried; I went to the room above with a brace of pistols, I looked into the court, and saw two or three men come up at a time; this continued for about two hours, till about half

past ten o'clock; there was a light in the court, and I could always observe them making to the door, but could not distinguish any particular person. Next night I went with my brother and two other friends into a house, the ack windows of which look on to my door; we placed ourselves at the back window of this house. and observed two persons go up at a time; five separate times, they rang the bell and knocked as before, and looked up at the house to see if any lights were moving. I kept my station till half past ten o'clock; there was nobody in the house to answer the bell; I saw a number of persons watching about. On the Saturday night I took the same station, to watch with two friends, and saw them come up in the same way; ring and knock, and about half past ten o'clock, two men came up with a ladder, placed it at the window, and one mounted half way up; then a boy came down the court which disturbed them; he came down the ladder, and they carried it away; two more returned in about ten minutes with the ladder, and placed it against the house, one of them went up, and lifted the window up and got in, and the other carried the ladder away; I kept my post, and in about five minutes a party of five arrived with the ladder, pitched it at the window; two of them, mounted it, when one of the gentlemen who were on the watch gave an alarm, and I went to the passage leading to the court to prevent their escape, and met two men coming out, I presented a pistol to one and my friend did the same to the other which stopped them, and in a few minutes some persons rushed in, and pushed us out of the court into the street, and on turning my arm, my pistol fired and the man got away; I was thrown down; we chased the party and came up with the prisoner; my brother took him; I came up within fifteen seconds, and found him in custody. I went into the house and missed three amethists set in gold, and some more work which was in progress; I went to the watch-house with the prisoner, he asked if I would swear he was in the house. I said No, for I have every reason to believe he was not, for I consider him one of the party who did not enter.

JAMES BLOGG . I am the last witness's brother, and joint owner of the house. On Saturday the 22d of February, I went to watch the house, and saw a man knock at the door twice; I think he also rang; a man came and stood and looked up the court at him and went away; after that I saw two men come up the passage, take a ladder from under it and place it against our window; a man went half way up it, a boy came running up the court; the man directly dropped from the ladder, placed it where they took it from and went off. In half an hour a man came up the court, looked up at the house and went away; two men came up, (apparently the same) and one got into the house with the ladder, the other put it back in its place, and after that five men came with the ladder again, three of them got on it; a signal was given for us to run out, they observed this and immediately began to descend, and at that moment, I went down to the street door, and through the court, and found a stoppage in the passage of some persons; my brother's pistol went off; one of them crossed the street, and ran towards Jewin-street, on the other side of the hackney coaches; I followed on the other side, and at the end of Jewin-street, a person caught hold of the prisoner by his coat; he was running and was with the others in the court; I saw him cross the street; the tail of his coat came off. I had not lost sight of him till then; I first saw him at the end of the court, with the party I am certain; it was not possible for any other persons to come into the court, so that he must be one of them.

Q. In what situation did you first see him - A. Among the others with the ladder; whether he was on it, or at the foot, I cannot say, but I am sure he is one of them; when he was caught his coat skirt gave way; I followed immediately, and caught him by the back of his coat and neckcloth, and took him without losing sight of him and have not the least doubt of his being one of the persons.

Prisoner. Q. You said at Guildhall you could not swear whether I was inside the court or not - A. My memory will not serve me to say what I said there. I will not swear that I did not say so; but I should think I did not say so. I said I saw him on the steps of the court, which are at the end of the court, quite away from our door. I had not seen him in the court, but on the steps at the end of the passage; but before that I saw him at the foot of the ladder. I saw him near my brother, on the step at the end of the passage - he appeared in contact with my brother, forcing himself from him. The man who got into the house made his escape through a trapdoor on the roof.

GEORGE BLOGG re-examined. I did not see him in the court, not to know him.

THOMAS PINNOCK . I am a lamplighter. I left my ladder in the court, on the night of the 22d of February.

MATTHEW BORROW . I live at Aylesbury. On the night of the 22d of February, I was passing the end of this passage, and heard a cry for assistance. I immediately ran across the street, and saw the prisoner, and several others, endeavouring to rush out of the passage. A gentleman, dressed in a white coat, was keeping them in the passage. I immediately rushed into the passage, and endeavoured to secure the prisoner - at the same time a pistol went off, and they all made a rush together. I slipped down the step, and left my hold of the prisoner - he ran towards Jewin-street. I followed, and saw him taken, and taken to the watch-house. I did not see him lose his coat tail. I had an opportunity of seeing him in the court, and kept my eye on him till he was taken. I did not lose sight of him when I fell - he is the man.

THOMAS HALMARACK . I am a linen draper, and live in Aldersgate Street. On the 22d of February, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was going by; as I passed the entrance of this passage, I saw a man rush from the entrance, and run across the street - I am sure the prisoner is the man; I never lost sight of him, but pursued him across the street some distance; and when about two yards from him, I saw him throw away a small parcel. I immediately seized him by the skirt of his coat, which gave way, and I have it here. I do not know what became of the parcel.

MR. SEPTIMUS READ . I am a surgeon, and live in Jewin-street. On the 22d of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I was at the end of Jewin-street, and crossing Aldersgate-street, I struck my foot against something,

and picked up a skeleton key. I then found a paper, with four other keys by it. It was in the road, in Aldersgate-street, six or eight yards from the corner of Jewin-street.

HALMARACK re-examined. We took the prisoners six or seven yards up Jewin-street. He threw the parcel away in Aldersgate-street, very near the coach stand, four or five yards from the corner.

WALTER WEST . I am apprenticed to Messrs BlOGG. On the 22d of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I left work - the workshop is part of the dwelling-house. I left three amethysts in my work drawer, which was not locked - they were safe when I left; and about ten o'clock next morning, I got through the loft door on the roof, and found two keys in the gutter, which I had left in the drawer with the amethysts.

THOMAS TURNER . I am a watchman. At half past eleven o'clock at night. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw persons run, and saw the prisoner stopped. I took him in charge. He said he had lost his hat, which was a new one, and cost 18 s. After taking him to the Compter, I went to fetch the ladder, and somebody gave me a new hat. I took it to Guildhall on Monday, and the prisoner claimed it.

WILLIAM BOND . I had the prisoner in custody, on the 22d of February. His coat was without a skirt. I have it, it matches with the skirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to see my aunt, who was very bad; and as I came along, I saw a few people in the court, ran up, and a pistol was fired directly; a person tried to catch hold of me; I happened to run, they tore my coat, knocked my hat off, and accused me of this robbery.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18230409-141

625. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for embezzling, on the 8th of February , seven hats and three bonnets, which he had received on account of William Richard Waddelove , his master ; and MOSS MARKS , for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, charging Pearce with stealing, and Marks with receiving them.

ROBERT FLINT . I am servant to W. Beal and Co., Castle-street, Southwark. On the 8th of February, Pearce brought five old bonnets from Mr. Waddelove to be altered, and enquired about seven hats and four bonnets, which had been sent the day before. I delivered them to him.

WILLIAM ROBERT WADDELOVE . Pearce was occasionally employed by me. On the 8th of February, I sent him with five old bonnets to Beals, and to ask why the or-others were not sent, but did tell him to bring them.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am a constable. I apprehended Pearce in Broad-street, Bloomsbury; and next day went with the prisoner to a house in Field-lane, and saw Marks with a bag, containing a hat, and three bonnets. Brown, who was with me, said,

"That is the man I sold part of the property to," and I took him - he lives in Field-lane.

GEORGE BROWN . Pearce lodged in the same room I met him in the Strand one Saturday morning, in February, and went with him to the Borough. He said he was going with some hats and bonnets. I waited on the bridge till he returned with some hats in a bag. I carried the bag part of the way. We came to Field-lane; he wished me to sell the hats. We were to have a pair of shoes each with the money. He gave me a hat in Field-lane; I took it into one Solomon's shop but did not sell it. In the evening I went to the west end of the town with him. We went together to Marks's shop in Field-lane. Pearce sold him some bonnets for 7 s. 6 d. - this was Saturday; and on Monday I sold Marks two of the hats for 15 s., and gave Pearce the money; and on Thursday I sold him another of the hats for 7 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see how many hats he had - A. No; I sold them publicly in his shop; he keeps a clothes-shop. I agreed with Solomons for some of them.

ROBERT FLINT . The hats are worth twenty shillings each.

PEARCE'S Defence. This man asked me into a public-house; then asked me to take the hats out, and said

"Let me sell them" - I said No; and while I was reading the paper, he took them and sold them without my consent; and entirely contrary to my feelings.

MARK'S Defence. Brown and Furzman passed my door. I called Furzman back, and shook hands with him, and asked him to walk in. As to the hats, Brown bought clothes which came to 2 l. 6 s. - he gave me twenty-six shillings, and asked me to take the hats for a week or two, till he got more money.

FURZMAN. He did call to me and shook hands - I have known him some time. I found the goods in his yard; he had them in his hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-142

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

626. NICHOLAS CALLAGHAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELEANOR TIPPER . I am shopwoman to Mrs. Button, a pastry-cook of Holborn. On the 19th of March, at seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and asked for two penny worth of cakes; I gave him four buns - he told me to wrap them up in paper, for they were for his master's children, and gave me a half crown, which I sounded, it was good, and I put it in the till, and gave him change - he then said,

"Stop, I have got halfpence." I returned him the half-crown - then he said,

"No, I have not," and gave me a half crown again, which I thought was the same, and put it into the till without looking at it - there was no other there. He went out; a little boy in the shop named Punch, told me to examine it, which I did, and found it was bad. I gave it to my mistress half an hour afterwards. I am certain he is the man.

MARGARET BUTTON . I keep the shop. I kept the half crown separate from any other, and afterwards gave it to the officer. I am sure it is the same.

CAROLINE COOK . I am servant to the prosecutrix. On Monday the prisoner came and asked for a 1 d. cake - I gave it him wrapped in paper. I had heard how Tipper had been served; he gave me a half crown, which I sounded, it was good - Tipper came out, and put it in the till - he then said he had got change; she gave it him again. He took out a half crown and a penny - we both said that would pay for the buns; he said it would not, and gave her another half crown; she pretended to go for change, but shut the door. My mistress sent for an officer.

He forced the door, and ran out - Tipper followed and caught him.

ELEANOR TIPPER re-examined. I was there on Monday, and watched him - Cook's account is correct; he pulled me from the door, and ran out; I followed, and stopped him in Cow-lane. He offered me good money for the bad to let him go. I gave the half crown to Shuter.

WILLIAM SHUTER . I took him in charge, and produce the two half crowns.

JOSIAH SEWELL , clerk to the Solicitors of the Mint, proved both half crowns to be counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw her before.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years to come .

Reference Number: t18230409-143

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

627. JOHN COOK was indicted for stealing, various carpenters' tools, value 36 s. 6 d. , the goods of James M'Gill .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-144

628. THOMAS GENGE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , fifty-six yards of silk, value 12 l. , the goods of Thomas Huxtable .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HUXTABLE . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Elder-street, Norton-falgate. On the 16th of January, the prisoner applied to me, stating that he knew a great many respectable people, and wished to sell goods for me, at 2 1/2 per cent. commission. I let him have fifty-six yards of lutestring, worth 12 l., upon his promising to return the money or goods that night, or by nine o'clock next morning - he did not come next morning, and I sent my apprentice after him; but did not see him for two days, when he came to my place, and said he had fallen down on Blackfriars-bridge, and hurt himself; that he had sold the goods with some gloves to Mr. Attfield in the country, and wanted more goods; that he had an order upon Messrs. Fry's, bankers, for 50 l., by letter, which he did not produce. I never saw Attfield; he gave me this paper, (looking at it) - I was to keep it, and he was to send a copy of it to Attfield, to remit up the money; I have not received the goods or money. I had delivered him other goods, between the 18th of January, and the time this letter was written. I found the property in pawn on the 28th of February, and went to the Sun, tavern for the prisoner, but he had absconded.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You knew him before - A. Yes; he lived at a wholesale house. I met him in the street - he said he was selling goods on commission. I had three transactions with him.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. He was to bring the money or goods back next morning for the first goods - A. Yes. I let him have more in consequence of his stating that he had an order to receive money at Messrs. Fry's, on the 15th. I have found another piece of goods in pawn, which I supplied him with.

Letter read.

"To Mr. Wm. Attfield , Please to remit to me, by return, at Mr. Huxtable's, 37 l. 1 s., and credit yourself with me for the amount, write by return, yours &c.

T. GENGE.

18th of February.

Mr. Huxtable. The answer to the above, you have full liberty from me to open, and put the contents to your account.

T. GENGE.

SAMUEL SHARP . I am servant to Mr. Huxtable. On the 17th of January, I went to the Dolphin, public-house, Ludgate-hill, to the prisoner, and asked if he had sold the goods, and if not to let my master have them, as a person was coming to see them; he said he had sold them, and would call on my master at six o'clock that evening.

JOHN HAWKES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of January, this lutestring was pawned for 7 l., in the name of Thomas Genge - I believe the prisoner is the person; he said it was his own. I have some slight recollection of the prisoner's features.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. On the 1st of March I apprehended the prisoner in the Poultry.

Prisoner's Defence. I regularly purchased the goods - he gave me credit for a fortnight, and as a proof of it, he gave me his printed bills of parcels, not being able to write well, he asked me to make the invoice out before him, and I did so. I never made use of any subterfuge whatever. The invoices are in the officer's hands.

SAMUEL SHARP . I produce some invoices.

MR. HUXTABLE. I gave him no invoices; he asked me every time he came to give him my direction, as he could send me some good customers, and having no cards I gave him my printed bills of parcels; but I swear that the writing upon them was not done in my place, or with my consent. I frequently give these bills as directions.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Do not you usually apply to your customers to write invoices themselves - A. No; I cannot write well; but my apprentice or son make them out.

Q. Did you tell one Welchman that you gave him credit for the goods and invoices - A. I did not. I never entered them in my books - I keep no books.

HENRY WELCHMAN . I am a linendraper, and live in Long-acre; I was in the Fleet-prison for a contempt of Court. The prosecutor told me he gave the prisoner credit, and furnished him with bills of parcels.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you buy duplicates - A. I do not. I have bought four of the prisoner. which he said he had purchased - I have no reason to believe they were the prosecutor's property.

Q. On your oath did he not tell you they were the silks described in these bills - A. Certainly. I never saw the prisoner write.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-145

Before Mr. Recorder.

629. CUTHBERT BRAMHAM . was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating it to belong to other persons.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

ANN CRICK . I am the wife of James Crick , we keep a public-house, in Devonshire-street, Portland-place. On the 19th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came in; he had a sheet rolled up; a young man said in his presence, that he wished to sell it. I opened it and saw a crown upon it, and shewed it my husband, who said it was Government stores. I returned it to him.

EDWARD FROST . I live in George-street, Portland-place. I saw the prisoner in the tap room, with the sheet which he offered to sell me for 2 s. I told him to unroll it and let me see it; he said no he would sell it by weight if I liked. I said I would have nothing to do with it.

JAMES CRICK . I am a publican, the prisoner came to my house; the sheet was brought to me by my wife, it was marked No. 12, with a crown, I said I thought it was stolen and told her to deliver it back, I saw her give it to him; he wrapped it up in his great coat; I asked where he got it; he said it was his own, and he intended to sell it; I told him to leave my house; he said he would not, till he had a pint of beer, and was very saucy; so I gave him in charge.

MICHAEL MORRIS . Crick brought the prisoner to the office; I found the sheet wrapped up in his great coat.

MARY NASH . I am assistant nurse at Chelsea-hospital , the prisoner was an in-door pensioner , this sheet belongs to his birth, which was No. 12.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor and did not know the sheet was wrapped in my coat.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-146

630. ELLIS NEEDHAM was indicted for that he, on the 5th of November , did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:-

Jersey, 21st of October, 1822.

Ninety-five days after date, pay to the order of Mr. John Colville , 66 l. 18 s., value received, as advised for Smith, White, and Co.,

S. H. SMITH.

Accepted, JAMES PACKWOOD .

To Mr. James Packwood , Carpet-warehouse, Ratcliff-highway, London.

with intent to defraud John Kinnear .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with a like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS. for forging a certain endorsement of the said bill, in the name of

" James Stamford and Co." and for uttering and publishing the same as true,

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KINNEAR . I am a merchant and live at No. 10, Norfolk-street, Strand. I first became acquainted with the prisoner ten or twelve years ago (looking at a bill.) I received this from him, about the beginning of November last, in part payment for goods which had been delivered to him by me, he gave it me at my house in Norfolk-street. I asked him about the drawer's in Jersey; he stated that they were carpet and woollen manufacturers of respectability in Jersey; I made no further enquiry; he endorsed the bill in my presence,

" Joseph Stamford and Co." Before that time, I had learnt from the prisoner that Stamford was his partner, that he resided in Northamptonshire, where he had considerable freehold property, and that Stamford was to advance between two and 3000 l. in the business, which he (Needham) was to carry on as his partner; this passed in August last. The bill was in my hands on the 27th of January; when it became due it was not paid; the answer was that the acceptor was a bankrupt; in consequence of which I wrote a letter to Smith, White and Co. of Jersey, to Mr. Packwood, and to the endorsers; the Jersey letter was returned by the dead letter office. I could never find any such persons at Jersey. I have sent my clerk over there since this charge has been preferred. I did not see the prisoner after the bill was returned, but after other bills endorsed,

"Stamford and Co." had been refused payment; I enquired of him particularly about Stamford; he was very angry at my pressing the enquiry, and said the bills would be taken up in a few days, and that it was not Stamford and Co's business to take them up, but the acceptors, and previous endorsers. Not being able to get the money from any one, I pressed him for the address of Stamford; he said I should hear of him at Mr. Jermaine's, upholsterer, Cumberland-street, New-road; I have not been there myself. I expressed my disapprobation, at his representing Stamford as a man of such property in Northamptonshire, when I had ascertained that he was only a porter to Mr. Jermaine; he then said that although only a porter, he had by his industry saved money, and possessed several freeholds in the neighbourhood of London.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you lived in Norfolk-street - My family went there in June last.

Q. Where were you then - A. I was a prisoner in the Fleet, living in the rules, at Mrs. Hoare's, No. 45, or 46, Ludgate-hill. I was discharged from the Fleet on the 26th of October. I had been there a year and a half. I was eight months of that time in the walls.

Q. Was it not twelve months and upwards - A. I cannot speak to it exactly, but think it was not.

COURT. Q. You certainly must recollect within a month or so - A. I think it was about eight months.

Q. You state yourself as carrying on business as a merchant - you must know whether people were giving you credit within the walls - A. They gave me credit within the walls and without.

Q. Were you more than twelve months in the rules - A. I was admitted to a day-rule before, (hesitating) I think I was eleven months in the walls; I was moved there by habeas, from Ilchester.

Q. Were you a prisoner at Ilchester - A. Yes; for two years. A circumstance comes to my recollection now, by which I know I got the rules in April.

Q. Will you swear it was not more than fourteen months before you got the rules - A. Certainly; I think I was removed to the Fleet on the 14th of May, and in April in the next year I got the rules. I continued doing business at Mrs. Hoare's, till the end of January.

Q. Who took you to Ilchester gaol; was it one of the officers of the King's Bench - A. Yes; from the King's Bench prison. I had received sentence, on the floor of the King's Bench court.

Q. Was a gentleman named Mosley Woolfe on the floor

at the same time - A. He was and Lewis Levi . We were convicted of a mercantile conspiracy.

Q. On your oath have you not said that you transacted your business with the prisoner, at Mrs. Hoare's house, in Ludgate-hill - A. I received the bills in Norfolk-street. I stated to the magistrate, that the prisoner represented Stamford as a freeholder in Northamptonshire - and that he was to advance 2 or 3000 l. I said I took another bill, partly on the credit of the endorsement, but not this; he handed me over 4 or 500 l. worth of bills at once; it was in Norfolk-street, subsequently to my being discharged from the Fleet. The prisoner gave me a character on my trial for a conspiracy. The bills were left with me three or four days before I delivered any goods for them; I paid them all away long subsequent to the delivery of the goods. I know Mr. Wagstaff, but do not know that he carried on business under the firm of Stamford and Co. - I had not seen him more than once at the time of this transaction. The prisoner has done business with me and for me to the amount of many thousands. I should think he did 2000 l. worth of business for me, while I was in the Fleet; he has done business for me by agency, for five or six years past. I have done business to the extent of about 2400 l. with Wagstaffs, who are now bankrupts. I have endeavoured to get money on those bills, on which his name has been, but not to put an end to this prosecution. I made no such proposal to Levi or to Isaacs, but he did to me; he said he came with a view to serve me, and wished to get me my money - he said the prisoner had been drawn into it, and that Wagstaff was the man I ought to prosecute; I did not ask him if Needham's family would accept bills to the amount; I referred him to Mr. Cope, my attorney, and urged him to go there.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he ever call on you when Cope your attorney was present - A. He spoke to me as we came out of Marlborough-street - Mr. Cope advised me to refer him to him. Isaacs proposed my giving up this charge, and to prosecute for a fraud; and said probably I should get the money from Wagstaff in that event; he urged me to prosecute Wagstaff, and make Needham a witness. I remember advising Cope to go to Isaacs; he said it was his business professionally to call on him.

Q. What induced you, after your discharge from the Fleet, to continue at Mrs. Hoare's - A. A great many people called upon me there, and it was convenient for me to meet people there, who I did not wish to come where my family were, annoying me at meals, and out of business hours, and it was a convenient counting-house.

COURT. Q. Can you recollect the amount of the fraud for which you were sent to gaol - A. I think there was an affidavit made, that the fraud would have amounted to 50,000 l. but the amount in the indictment was about 10,000 l.

FRYER TODD. I am clerk to Mr. Kinnear. I went to Jersey, in March last, to enquire respecting the house of Smith, White, and Co. but could discover no such house; I advertised in four newspapers, and enquired at the Custom-House agents, and bankers, and went to five villages; I found one White, and Co. and presented the bill there; they denied all knowledge whatever of it.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. - Q. You were sent after this prosecution was commenced - A. I do not know that; he had gone to the public-office before that - I have been with Mr. Kinnear four months.

Q. Where did he find you - A. He has been at my house years ago - I first became acquainted with him about 1817, in Curzon-street, May fair.

Q. Was he a merchant there - A. I am sure I do not know. Mrs. Kinnear came to my house, in Curson-street. I do not know where he lived then; it was an invitation which came from my wife; it was an evening party. I did not know where he lived - The first residence I knew of his was at Battersea; some years elapsed between his visiting me in Curzon-street, and my seeing him again - I did not know where he lived.

Q. When did you know him live at Battersea - A. In 1821; that was after he was prosecuted.

Q. After - A. Mrs. Kinnear had a house there.

Q. On your oath, do not you know he was in gaol in 1821 for a conspiracy - A. I do not, I only heard it from report.

Q. How came you to say he lived at Battersea, when you knew, from report, that he was at Ilchester - A. I might have been informed afterwards.

Q. After when - A. After I came into his employ. I do not know what year he was in gaol. I went to see Mrs. Kinnear, at Battersea. I did not ask where he was. I heard, by report, that he was at Ilchester, but never saw him there. I saw him in the Fleet. I was a prisoner there when he came from Ilchester. I was sent there in January, 1822, till March; he was a ruler there at the time I came.

Q. Do you mean to say he was in the rules of the Fleet in January or March, 1822 - A. After March. He was not within the walls in January. He might be at the commencement of January. I believe he was not in the walls. I have seen him come in and go out. During the time I was a prisoner there, he was not within the walls.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are quite sure you met him at one of Mrs. Todd's routs - A. Yes. I renewed my acquaintance with him in the rules of the Fleet. I did not doubt his being convicted of a conspiracy.

Q. And yet you became his clerk - A. Yes. I never accepted bills for him. I have been a merchant, and became a bankrupt twice, and was discharged once under the insolvent act - that was in March, 1822. I lived thirteen years in Bury-street, and then went to Great Winchester-street.

JOHN PAGE . I am clerk to Mr. Kinnear. I have been so at various periods since 1817. I knew he was at Ilchester. He came to the Fleet in 1821, and was within the walls about five months, and not more. I believe he took the rules at the latter end of September, 1821, and went to live at No. 46, Ludgate-hill. I was his clerk, from May 1821 till the end of January 1822; and from September, 1822 to the present time. In October last, the prisoner owed Mr. Kinnear about 500 l. I saw this bill in Mr. Kinnear's possession; the endorsement,

"Stamford and Co," is the prisoner's writing. I have no doubt of it. When it became due I wrote to Stamford, Colville, and to Smith, White, and Co. - the letter to Smith and Co. was returned. I saw a man at Marlborough-street office, answering to the name of James Stamford , at the time this charge was made, he was a round shouldered man, about the middle size and height. I have not seen him since.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. How many

times have you been Mr. Kinnear's clerk - A. Three. From February 1817 to 1819, and the other times, I have; mentioned I went into his service directly he came from Ilchester. I have a perfect recollection of this bill. I called on Colville, one of the endorsers, at St. Mary Axe. I do not believe there was any connexion between him and Kinnear. I recollected the prisoner handing this bill, and several others over. I copied them upon paper, at Ludgate-hill. I copied them there in the back room; they were afterwards taken by Mr. Needham, into the front room. I do not know that I ever saw them afterwards. The goods were not all furnished at once. I know J. and H. Wagstaff, they dealt with Kinnear. I understood they lived in Skinner-street.

Q. Were you ever at the house of Stamford and Co. in Fore-street - A. Never.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you the slightest reason to believe there was any connexion between Kinnear and Colville - A. None.

COURT. Q. Perhaps you attended the Court of King's Bench on the trial of the conspiracy - A. I was occasionally in Court. I heard the charge.

Q. Did you leave any situation to go into the service of this infamous conspirator - A. I had been clerk to Mr. Keats, an army contractor; I left him previous to Kinnear coming to town; I had no employment; I have looked for no other since.

HENRY COPE . I am attorney for this prosecution, and attended the examination at Marlborough-street; a person named Jeremiah Stamford , of Cumberland-street, attended there, and previous to the last examination I called at his house to give him notice to attend; he was porter to Mr. Jarmaine, and lived in North-street, Manchester-square. I saw his wife. A dead man in a coffin was shewn to me as Jeremiah Stamford . I have made every enquiry, but cannot find him.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. How long have you known Kinnear - A. Two years; I first became acquainted with him by arresting him on a bill for 200 l. before he went to Ilchester.

Q. Where did your acquaintance begin - A. I went to the Fleet to him after he came from Ilchester, to see if he would pay the money. I am now a ruler myself, and have been so once before. There is a large sum of money due to me which I cannot recover, and so I have been arrested.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you a certificate of the burial of Jeremiah Stamford - A. I have; at St. Mary-le-bone, on the 12th of March.

CHARLOTTE STAMFORD . I am a widow; Jeremiah Stamford was my husband; he died on the 6th of March; we lived at No. 15, North-street. I attended with him when he was examined at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you know any thing of Wagstaff - A. No. I know my husband was in the habit of accepting bills, but I do not know for whom; a great many bills came for acceptance; he was clerk to Mr. Jarmaine, and had 20 s. or 15 s. a week. I had no landed property in Northampton. He died of a broken heart in consequence of this business.

MR. ALLEY proposed to call the clerk of the police office to read the evidence given by Stamford before the Magistrate. The Court ruled, that as he could not be a competent witness without a release, which he had not at the time he gave his evidence, it could not be received.

GEORGE BLACKBURN . I am a wine merchant, and know the prisoner; he carried on business as Stamford and Co., and represented to me that Stamford was a man of considerable property.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You made the prisoner a bankrupt - A. Yes; I had no communication with Kinnear on the subject; I was his security to the warden of the Fleet; I never justified bail for him.

DANIEL WADE . I am a hackney coach driver, and knew Stamford. He was clerk to the club I belonged to for thirteen years. The hand-writing on the bill is very much like his; I should rather say that it was than, that it was not his.

The prisoner, in a long defence, stated, that he embarked in life with most respectable connexions, as an insurance broker, but met with considerable losses, when one Lec, of Liverpool, insinuated himself into his favour, and procured acceptances to a large amount from him, which got into Kinnear's hands, who struck a docket against him, and kept harrassing him till Kinnear went to Ilchester, and since his return, he (the prisoner) had accepted several bills for him - that in July last Wagstaff, who was a friend of the prosecutor's, and who represented himself as a man of property, applied to him to become one of the firm of Stamford and Co., representing Stamford as a man of considerable property, and being treated as a partner, he accepted and endorsed bills in the name of Stamford and Co. - that he derived no benefit from it, but Messrs. Wagstaffs were the principals in the concern, and carried on business in Fore-street, in Stamford's name.

JOHN TAYLOR . I was clerk to John Wagstaff up to January last, and was so upwards of three years - he is a carpet manufacturer, and lived in Skinner-street. I know a house was taken in Fore-street, to which we sent goods - I have seen a man named Stamford, and know his hand writing; the endorsement on the bill is not his writing.

Q. Do you know from whom Needham had that bill, for the purpose of getting it discounted - A. From Mr. John Wagstaff . I cannot swear that I saw it delivered, but it is debited to the prisoner in our accounts. I have given him many bills by desire of Wagstaff.

JOHN HILL WAGSTAFF . Q. Did you take this house in Fore-street - A. No.

Q. Who did - A. I did not; it was not taken for my business, nor did I carry on business there. (Looks at the bill,) I never saw this before.

Q. Look at your bill book, and then say if you persist in swearing you never saw this bill before; (he does so) - A. I never did. I was not a partner with Stamford and Co., nor do I know who was.

NOT GUILTY.

There were five other similar indictments against the prisoner, by the same prosecution, but no evidence being offered, he was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230409-147

631. ELIZABETH HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , two sheets, value 1 l.; three shifts, value 6 s.; a table cloth, value 3 s., and a bed gown, value 1 s. , the goods of Felix Fisher Creswell .

LOUISA CRESWELL . I am the wife of Felix Fisher Creswell ; we live in Ducket-street, Stepney - the prisoner

was my monthly nurse . On the 28th of February, I missed these things; she had the care of them, and had left the night before. I enquired for her, and on the 2d of March, she came to me - I gave her in charge.

JOSEPH TILLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Abley, pawnbroker, Mile-end. On the 3d of January, the prisoner pawned a shift for 2 s., and on the 21st of February, a sheet.

JOHN DILBRIDGE . I am servant to Mr. Wakefield, pawnbroker, Mile-end-road. I have a sheet, shift, and table cloth, pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN STONE . I took her in charge, and in a chair close to where she stood, and which she pointed to, I found these duplicates.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-148

632. JOHN FAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a set of furniture, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Phillips .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Daniel Ratcliff .

DANIEL RATCLIFF . I am a smith , and live at Arlington. I bought this furniture at an auction at the Green Dragon, public-house, for 15 s., it belonged to Richard Phillips - I paid nothing in advance. I went to fetch it on the 4th of April, and it was gone.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. On the 5th of April, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at Heston, about three miles from the Green Dragon, with this bed furniture under his arm - he said he came from Staines, and a gentleman there gave it him to deliver to a master butcher at Hammersmith. Thompkins the officer came up, and then he owned that he had stolen it at a public-house about four miles off, where there was a pond before the door, which answers the description of the house.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-149

London Cases,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

633. THOMAS TOBEY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am warehouseman to Messrs. William and James Cook , Manchester warehousemen , Cheapside . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to our house for goods, on account of Miss Priestly, of Cambden-town, who dealt with us. On the 15th of March, he brought me an order, which has been mislaid; it purported to come from Miss Priestly to send by the Hampstead coach five pieces of Irish linen, a hundred and eight handkerchiefs, two shawls, and eight tippets; he said he was going by the same coach, and would take them with him - he looked out the handkerchiefs himself; the porter tied the goods up. I did not see him take them away. After he was apprehended, he told me he wrote the letter himself; the invoice of the goods was found upon him - he said he lodged in the room No. 8, Brown Bear, public-house, Bow-street.

MARY ANN PRIESTLY . The prisoner has been in my service, but was not so on the 15th of March. I gave him no authority to order these goods, nor have I received them.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On the 18th of March, I was fetched to the Brown Bear , Bow-street, and in the room No. 8, I found these goods with a quantity more claimed by other persons.

(Property produced and sworn to).

WILLIAM SMITH . On the 18th, I apprehended him by Mr. Cook's door - he had a parcel then containing four pieces of Irish. I found 8 l. upon him, and seven different invoices.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-150

644. CHARLES DEITZ was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-151

645. ABRAHAM SAMUEL alias ROMAINE , GEORGE TAYLOR , THOMAS HARRIS , and WILLIAM ALLENSBY , were indicted for a conspiracy .

MESSRS CURWOOD and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH MARKS . I live at No. 3, Petticoat-place, and am the wife of Philip Marks . On the 11th of November, he was in Cold-bath-fields prison, charged with an offence - he was remanded for a week. I did not know John Ryan till then. While my husband was confined in Newgate, I saw Samuel in Petticoat-lane - I knew him before by sight. He acted as a lawyer. He said,

"Mrs. Marks, I understand your husband is in trouble. I know the officers who have taken him, and if you have got any money I could settle it." I said, I had no money, but how much did he want. He said he would enquire, and let me know. Next day I was waiting at home with Mary Ryan ; we were drinking coffee when Samuel came up into the room, and asked to speak with me. I said, he had no occasion to be afraid, for it was Ryan's sister - (Ryan was in Newgate with my husband). He then said, he had seen the officers, and could settle it for 20 l. I said, I had no money, and did not know what to do. He said, it wanted three weeks to the sessions, and perhaps I could get it by then. Next day I went to my husband, and told him. In consequence of having seen my husband, I saw Samuel again, two or three days after, he came to my place. I said, I was getting the money ready as fast as I could; that I had seen my husband, and he was satisfied. I sold my bed, bedstead, drawers, two tables, and a stove for 7 l.; my friends advanced me 3 l.; and Mary Ryan gave me 3 l.; I got a coat and breeches from Ryan's son in Newgate, which I pawned for 20 s.; I pawned my wearing apparel for 2 l.; this was all I could raise. Samuel came to me several times. I told him I had got 16 l., and promised if he would take it I would give him the other 4 l. after my husband was discharged. He was to take the whole of the money, and divide it all among the officers, and I was to give him 4 l. to make up the 20 l. He said, he would trust to my generosity to be paid for his trouble afterwards. In the course of conversation, I said, I was not satisfied that he was doing right by me, unless I saw some of the officers. He said, he would soon satisfy me. In the evening I was sitting with Mrs. Ryan; a boy came and said I was wanted at the Three Pigeons, public-house,

Houndsditch. I went there, and and saw Taylor and Samuel. Taylor said,

"Make yourself happy, for it shall be all right." I asked where the other officers were. He said, they were all under him, and he could satisfy them, for he could do as he liked with them. I drank with them - nothing more passed then. They came down to me once after that, and I was sent for again to the Three Pigeons, and saw Taylor and Samuel in the back parlour alone. They told me to make myself as happy as I could, for I should soon have my husband at home. It then, I believe, wanted about a week to the sessions. After that I saw Samuel almost every day, he told me the bill was to be thrown out; that the sessions began on a Monday, and Tuesday was appointed for the bill to be thrown out. I was to attend Clerkenwell sessions to see they were doing right by me. I attended, and saw Taylor, Samuel, Harris, and Allensby there, all speaking together. I waited in the Court until I heard the bill called out

"not found against Ryan and Marks;" and when I came down the steps of the Sessions House, Samuel and Taylor took my arm, and said,

"Come along home, and get the money." They called a coach. The money was to be given the moment the bill was thrown out. I and Samuel, and his son, and Mary Ryan , went inside, Taylor rode outside, on the coach-box. The coach drove to the corner of Sun-street, Bishopsgate; we got out, and Taylor and Samuel agreed to meet at the Fleur-de-lis, public-house, Houndsditch. I went home with Samuel to get the money. I told Mary Ryan to wait in Houndsditch for me. When I came back, I said to her,

"Mary, here is the money, I am going to settle the business;" and when I came to the steps of the Fleur-de-lis, Samuel said to me, give me the money. I did so, and he went into the back parlour to Taylor. They came out, and Taylor said,

"Make yourself happy, for all is right." They asked me to drink. I said I could not, for it was tea time. Taylor called out

"Tea for six." The landlady asked me to take tea with her, which I did. After tea I went into the back parlour; Taylor and Samuel were drinking - there were other people (strangers) in the room. I bid them good night, and went away. Next night a stranger came to me, saying, I was wanted at one Green's chandler's shop, in Petticoat-lane. Taylor had told me his sister livid there. I went with Mrs. Ryan, and saw Taylor. I said,

"What is the matter" - He said,

"There is a nice bother with the officers, they are not satisfied, and are going to prefer another bill against your husband." I cried, and said,

"I do not know what in the world to do, for I have not another shilling in the world to bless myself with." He bid me stop while he looked for Romaine. I stopped near an hour, he never returned. I then went to the Three Pigeons, and saw Taylor and Romaine speaking together. I cried to them, and said, I did not know what I should do, for I was distressed to the utmost. Romaine said,

"Never mind, I will provide you two counsel;" and Taylor said

"Never mind, when it comes to the Old Bailey I'll try and save your husband." I left them satisfied, and did not see them after. On Sunday morning I was at my place, and somebody said there was a true bill found against my husband. I did not see them again until the day my husband was tried here, I then saw Taylor and Samuel. Taylor said,

"Make no noise, make no bother, I'll try and save your husband yet." My husband is now in prison. He was tried on the Tuesday after I heard the bill was found, and has never been at liberty since. - (See December Sessions, page 46.) I saw Samuel after the trial, and told him I was very much hurt at his wickedness, and I did not know what to do. He said,

"For God's sake, do not say any thing. I'll do any thing in the world to serve you - I'll give you your money back again." After this, an enquiry was made, and I was summoned to Marlborough-street about it. This was a week or a fortnight after my husband was tried. Before I was examined I saw Samuel. He said if I would say what he told me, he would save my husband, and be a witness for me, and told me to say, I gave the officers the money, instead of giving it to him - and I did tell the Justice so.

COURT. Q. Did you say that, on your oath - A. Yes, I did.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Samuel's after that give you any money - A. Yes; I told my friends the whole concern - he sent and came to me, and said he heard I was going to tell the truth, and put him in it, and if I did not do it he would give me 4 l. to prosecute the officers to keep him out of it. He gave me 4 l. in the presence of James Isaacs .

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. When did you give the 16 l. to him - A. The night the bill was thrown out; I cannot recollect the date.

Q. You gave it him, but swore you gave it to Taylor - A. Yes; My husband is now at Woolwich.

MARY RYAN . I have a brother named John Ryan ; he was taken up on a charge of robbing a gentleman of his watch. The first time I ever saw the last witness was in Newgate. One day in November last I accompanied her from Newgate to her house - a knock came at the door, Romaine came in, and said

"I want to speak to you" - she said

"this is Ryan's sister, what you have to say say before her, you need not be afraid." He then sat down on the table, and said

"Well Mrs. Marks, I have seen the officers, and can settle it for a score, as" Harris the officer wanted 10 l. out of it as he was the chief witness on the prosecution - she said

"I have not a halfpenny in the world, but I will see what I can do;" he said,

"It wants three weeks to the sessions, and you have good friends, and must do your endeavours" - she said she would see her husband next day; she sold goods to a broker for 7 l. - I went to Newgate with her. My brother told me to do what lay in my power for him, and I gave three sovereigns to Mrs. Marks, which was all I could raise. I went to her again two or three days after. A boy came and fetched her to the Three Pigeons; I went with her - Taylor and Romaine were sitting in the parlour. Romaine said,

"Do not fret, it shall be all right with your husband and said

"Now you are satisfied." I went away; I never saw Romaine before this transaction. The day I understood the bill was to be found against my brother I attended at Clerkenwell, and saw Romaine and Taylor in deep conversation, going in and out. I staid all day, and at night heard somebody say

"no bill against Ryan and Marks" - we came down the steps; Taylor took hold of Mrs. Marks with one shoulder and Romaine on the other; a coach was called, we got in with her, Romaine, and his son. Taylor got on the box and rode to the end of Sun-street - got out, and Taylor said

"I have an acquaintance in Houndsditch who keeps

the Fleur-de-lis, we will meet there" - he went away. I went home to my mother, stopped there two or three minutes, then came and met Marks in Houndsditch, and went with her to the Fleur-de-lis. Romaine was with her when I met her - she shewed me the money in the street in his presence, and when she got inside the door she said

"Here is the money," and counted 16 l. into Romaine's hands - he called Taylor, and they went into the back parlour together. I staid a minute or two; Romaine and Taylor went out, called for tea, and I went away; another bill was found, and my brother is transported for life. There was an enquiry about it before the Magistrate afterwards, and Romaine said if I would say what he told me he would regain my brother's liberty, for it was not too late, and he would be an evidence against the officers - he told me to say the money was paid into Taylor's hands instead of his, and by saying that one word, I need not fret, for it would regain by brother's liberty. I did say so, it was not true, but I would have said any thing else to regain my brother's liberty.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Can you tell me the day of the month on which the money was paid - No. I never said it was on the 20th to my recollection.

ELIZABETH RYAN . I am the wife of John Ryan . I know Mrs. Green, she lived in Petticoat-lane. I understood she was sister-in-law to Taylor - I was at her shop in December last when Taylor came and Mrs. Marks was there. I went with her from there to the Three Pigeons, Houndsditch. I met Taylor and Romaine there together - Mrs. Marks said,

"Good God, what shall I do, I have spent all my money." Taylor said at Green's there was the devil to pay - that there was not money enough for the officer, and they were going to file another bill - he left Mrs. Marks and I in the shop together for a quarter of an hour, telling her he would go to look for Romaine - we stopped half an hour, and as he did not come we went to the Three Pigeons, and found him and Romaine together. Mrs. Marks cried and said

"What shall I do, I have spent all my money and have none to find Counsel." Romaine said

"Do not say any more, he shall have two Counsel" - Taylor said

"My good woman keep up your spirits, I'll do all in my power at the Old Bailey that nothing shall affect the men."

LEVI GERSHON . I am a broker, and live in Middlesex-street, Spital-fields - Marks sold me some furniture.

MR. ALLEY, we will admit that she got the money in the best way she could.

JOSEPH GRAVES . I am the landlord of the Three Pigeon, Houndsditch. I know Romaine and Taylor very well - there were frequent meetings in December last between them - Marks and Ryan were present at the meetings. I heard Taylor say to Mrs. Marks on one occasion that all would be right; from what I heard I understood him to say her husband would be home that night - they said her

"old man" would be home that night,

SUSAN NICHOLLS . My husband keeps the Fleur-de-lis, public-house. I remember that when the sessions were on, Marks was at our house, and Taylor. - I do not know Romaine; there was some more with them - They had some rum and water - Mrs. Marks stopped tea with me.

JAMES ISAACS . I am clerk to Mr. Downs, an attorney. I know Marks, and also Romaine; they called on me together, once or twice at my house. One day previous to the sessions before last, I think it was January sessions; they felt a wish for me to go on with the prosecution against Taylor, Allensby, and Harris - Romaine gave Mrs. Marks 4 l. towards the prosecution; I refused to take it.

MR. ALLEY. Q. He offered to return the rest of the money when he could get it - A. Certainly not.

An ignored bill against Marks and Ryan, was produced from Mr. Shelton's office; the names of witnesses endorsed upon it were George Cotton , Taylor, Harris, Allensby, and Gleed; also a true bill against the same parties, and endorsed by the same witnesses; but Gleed's name struck out.

There being no evidence against Harris and Allensby, a verdict of NOT GUILTY was here recorded for them.

Mr. ALLEY addressed the jury on behalf of the defendants Romaine, and Taylor, and called the following witnesses.

GEORGE COTTON . My pocket was picked in Pall-Mall. I was bound over to prefer a bill against Marks and Ryan, for the offence, and did so; the Grand Jury asked me if I had any witnesses - I said no; it did not strike me that it was necessary to tell them to call the constables, as their names were on the back of the bill. Taylor is a constable of Clerkenwell; he collared the man who robbed me; he was at the door of the Grand Jury room with me. I was called in first; we were all four at the door.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Whether the other witnesses were called, you do not know - A. No; I was told I might go; the Grand Jury said they had done with me.

COURT. Q. Were you examined a second time - A. Yes my Lord. Allensby came to me and said I must appear again.

BARNARD GLEED . I am a constable, and was a witness attending on this occasion; and was at the door of the Grand Jury room, ready to be examined, but was not called. I knew nothing of an agreement not to attend.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You was not in the secret - A. No; I was examined here on the trial. Mr. Cotton and Taylor were called in before the grand jury, but nobody else.

Q. That was upon the first indictment - A. Yes. Allensby afterwards told me he had been to Sir George Farrant about not being called.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am one of the officers indicted; I attended ready to be examined by the Grand Jury. I knew of no conspiracy; Taylor said nothing to induce me not to attend; I never saw Romaine except at the Sessions-House.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you by when Mr. Cotton's pocket was picked - A. Yes; I saw Taylor seize the thief, in the act of doing it; and I believe Allensby saw the same; we were all four at the Grand Jury room door. I believe Taylor went in first; I was called in but not examined.

ROMAINE - GUILTY .

TAYLOR - GUILTY .

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-152

NINTH DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 18.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

646. THOMAS COATES and WILLIAM SIMCOE

were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a coat, value 5 s.; a pair of breeches, value, 2 s.; four blankets, value 2 s; four candlesticks, value 2 s; three quilts, value 18 s.; the goods of Christopher Coates ; and two coats, value 15 s, two waistcoats, value 5 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s , the goods of Richard Coates

RICHARD COATES . I have the charge of my father's premises, and live in Ray-street . On the 24th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out leaving the property mentioned in the indictment, in the kitchen. The waistcoats and trowsers were my own - I padlocked the kitchen, and on returning in half an hour, I found the padlock broken, and the property all gone, I made enquiry, and went to the Two Brewers, public-house, where I found the prisoner Coates, (who is my brother) with the waistcoat on - while I went for an officer, he escaped; I found Simcoe with a bundle of bedding, and a duplicate in his hand, of part of the property.

CHARLOTTE LAWRENCE . I lodge at Coates's. On the afternoon of the 24th of March, two knocks came at the door, I opened it - the two prisoners came in, and went into the kitchen; I closed the door, and when I got half way up stairs, I thought I heard the kitchen door forced open - I went down for a pitcher of water, and Coates was laying something on a blanket, which by the size appeared to me a bed - I went up stairs to the window, and saw Coates go out about six yards, he then came back and beckoned Simcoe; he had a large bundle on his back; I followed them to the Two Brewers - returned and told the witness.

Prisoner COATES. Q. Were not the bundles tied up, when I went into the kitchen - A. No.

JOHN CROSS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of March, in the afternoon, Simcoe pawned some clothes with me for 14 s.

EDWARD FAIRCLOUGH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of March, Coates pawned a waistcoat with me.

WILLIAM THISLETON . I apprehended Simcoe about a quarter past three o'clock, and found 14 s. 11 d. on him, and a duplicate. I found a bundle at the house, containing the bedding, &c.

JOHN WATSON . I apprehended Coates next day.

COATES Defence. On the Wednesday prior to this affair, I went to White Cross-street, Prison, to see my father with my brother; my father wished to have some private conversation with me, and would not let my brother stop; he told me, he should want some clothes and money. I went on the Monday and found nobody at home; I went to Vine-street, and saw this man, and asked him to carry a bundle or two for me; he waited at the public-house, while I went and pawned some for money to take to my father.

SIMCOE'S Defence. I am a porter, and was standing at my beat, with my knott, this man hired me to carry the bundle; I stopped at the head of the stairs while he went down, he took me to the public-house, to have some beer, and took something out to pawn, to get money for his father, and sent me to pawn some, and when I returned the landlady said I had better stop, for the officer had been about it - so I waited and refused to give the money up.

WILLIAM THISELTON . He said he pawned them by Coates's order, and should not part with the money till he came.

RICHARD COATES . He had not been with my father; my father wished him not to visit him.

COATES - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIMCOE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-153

647. WILLIAM DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a coat, value 5 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 9 s. , the goods of Richard Farrer .

RICHARD FARRER . I live in Hill-street, Finsbury-square . On the 19th of March, the prisoner lodged at my house; I missed my coat and trowsers, they were safe the day before; I found him with them on the next day; I had lent them to him several Sunday's to appear decent in; I asked why he took them, he said; he intended to return them; he was never out of the house a night before; he said he had been to a dance.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no idea of stealing them, he had lent them to me several times, and I had often put them on without asking leave.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-154

Before Mr. Recorder.

648. JOHN ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 39 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., the goods of Aaron Bray , and fixed to a certain building of his .

AARON BRAY . This lead was fixed to a gutter, over a building in Red Lion-yard, Holborn . It was safe the day before it was missed; some lead was afterwards produced, and fitted to some which was left in the yard, it belonged to the premises.

JOSEPH BATTON . I am watchman of St. Andrews. On the morning of the 14th of March, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Shoe-lane, with a bundle under his arm; I asked him what he had got, he said it was his own property; I took him to the watch-house and found it was 39 lbs. of gutter lead; I went to where he said he lodged, and found he had left there some time; I went to Red Lion-yard, about ten o'clock in the morning, and found more lead lying there; I compared it, and it corresponded exactly, with about 27 lbs. in the yard; it appeared to me to have come off the roof,

JACOB FREWIN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Batton with the lead; I questioned him, he said he found it in the neighbourhood of Highgate; I said it was an unusual hour; he said he was looking for work, which made him so late, it was tied in a neck handkerchief, and he had no handkerchief on, I found a knife on him which appeared to have recently cut lead, it was fresh broken, the edges of the lead were quite bright; I saw it matched with what was left, in the yard it corresponded.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. There was not all that was stolen - A. No, about half of it.

AARON BRAY . I saw the knife which was found on the prisoner, the bloom of the lead was still on it. He was employed on the premises by me; I know the knife to be his, for he lent it me a few days before; he lived with me one year and a half. My son discharged him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-155

649. SAMUEL WADDINGTON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-156

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

650. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2d of March , 98 lbs of copper, value 4 l. the goods of Sir William Paxton , Knt. , and others, his partners, then lately before stolen by some person unknown, he well knowing it to be stolen .

The same evidence was given as upon the prisoners trial, as a principal in this offence, page 179. It is presumed useless to re-state it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-157

651. SAMUEL BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , two hams, value 10 s., the goods of Farmer Edwards , privately in his shop .

FARMER EDWARDS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in the Commercial-road . On Thursday morning, the 20th of February, about ten o'clock, I put these hams in the window, which was open, and afterwards went out.

THOMAS SPRATLEY . I am a publican. On the 20th of February, about three o'clock, I was standing at my door in Arbour-square, and saw the prisoner passing with two hams - a parcel of boys were running after him. A man came up, and took the hams from the prisoner, and told the boys to go away - I went up and told him I thought he was stealing them for him - two people took them from him, and I took charge of the prisoner. The man said the prisoner had no parents.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-158

652. JACOB GOLDSMITH and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , eighteen handkerchiefs, value 4 l., the goods of Thomas Bew , privately in his shop .

CHARLES STEVENS . I am shopman to Thomas Bew , linen-draper ; he lives at Pimlico . On the evening, of the 10th of March, the prisoners came in - Allen asked for a 1 s. pair of gloves; I turned round to get them, and saw Goldsmith move to a corner, by the window - I went up, took hold of his arm, and said,

"What have you got;" I unbuttoned his coat, and found these handkerchiefs under it. Allen said,

"I don't belong to that boy, I'll go for a constable," and ran off. I dragged Goldsmith to the door, and called Stop thief.

Prisoner ALLEN. Q. Did I speak to this boy - A. I do not know; he came in with him. I am positive they were both together.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I heard the alarm, and stopped Allen who was running very fast; he threw something over the Queen's garden wall.

JAMES DINGLEY . I took them in charge with the property.

GOLDSMITH'S Defence. This boy knows nothing of me.

GOLDSMITH - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Six Months .

ALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-159

653. JOHN BETTY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a jacket, value 2 s. , the goods of John Youlden .

JAMES SLATER . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 24th of February, about half-past three o'clock, I was on the brandy quay, in the London Docks, and took the prisoner in custody with a jacket on; John Youlden swore to it before the Magistrate - he is gone to sea. The prisoner said it was his own. The letter Y was inside it; he said something afterwards about buying it.

ROBERT FRANKLIN . I was at work on the London Docks, upon the brandy quay. On the 24th of February, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go on board the Lavinia, to the stern, and take this jacket off, and brought it near the hold, stooped down while Youlden went below, and then he put it on, and came ashore.

Prisoner's Defence. (Through an Interpreter.) I bought and paid for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-160

654. THOMAS WELCH and THOMAS KING were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 18 lbs. of soap, value 10 s. , the goods of John Bishop .

JOHN BISHOP . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Old-street . On the 27th of February, about ten minutes to six o'clock in the evening, I missed 18 or 19 lbs. of soap, from about a yard within the street door. It was in a white deal box,

HENRY PRINCE . I was by Bishop's shop, and saw the two prisoners, and another man, stopping opposite his window, for about five minutes. They went about forty yards past the house, and then turned back. Welch left the other two standing opposite the window, and stood at the corner of Golden-lane. I saw King put his hand in his pocket, and give something to the other - he went over into the shop, and came out with a white deal box on his arm; King lifted it on the man's shoulder, who ran off down Golden-lane; I followed; they turned back, and asked where I was going - I said, home - Murphy was with me. King took Murphy's hand, and pretended to be drunk. Murphy said,

"Let me go home." He said

"No, do not be in such a hurry; come and have something to drink." During this time the man was going off with the box. King fell down, and Welch hit me on my neck, and I fell. I said,

"I know you, and will have you." He ran down the lane, and in a short time Bishop came up; and at half past ten o'clock, I saw them all in Whitecross-street; and then I think they were in liquor. I sent for the officer, and got Welch secured that night. I knew him before. I did not want to take them, but my father said, they ought to be made an example of.

JOHN MURPHY . I was with Prince, and saw the prisoners at Bishop's window with another. They went about forty yards, and then turned back; Welsh stood at the end of Golden-lane, and the other two kept looking in at the window. Welsh gave the other man something from his waistcoat pocket - he then went into the shop and brought out a deal box; King helped it on his shoulder, and went down Golden-lane with him. We followed them - King pretended to be drunk, and shoved me, and asked where I was going in such a hurry; I said home. He did not appear to be drunk before. Welsh said,

"Come

let us have something to drink;" I refused. King wanted me to go and drink.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. On the 27th of February, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners go into the Goat, public-house, about fifty-yards from the prosecutor's. Welch was coming out. I said,

"Tom, I want you, and that is the other," pointing to King, who Fordham took. Welsh said,

"Let me go, and I will walk with you." I did so, and he rushed out. I followed and took him.

KING'S Defence. If I was the person, is it likely I should be let go I was intoxicated, and met Prince that night in a shop, and why not take me then.

WELCH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

KING - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-161

655. JOSEPH WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a basket, value 2 d., and 40 lbs. of raisins, value 12 s. , the goods of Alexander Braden .

ALEXANDER BRADEN . I am a grocer , and live in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 24th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I missed a basket of raisins. I heard an alarm, went to the door, and found the prisoner in custody with them.

HENRY MORGAN . I am the patrol. On the 24th of February I saw the prisoner leaning on a post at the corner of Elm-street, another person was with him. The prisoner was looking in at Braden's window; he then went and spoke to another person, then returned, looked at the window again, and took up a basket of raisins, and came over towards me; I stopped him, and he threw it down.

WILLIAM MEADOWS . I am porter to Mr. Braden. I heard the alarm, and went across the road, and found the basket of raisins, and the prisoner in custody. There were nine baskets at the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw three people before me; I came up, and the patrol seized me. A woman said, she had seen four men lurking about, but I was neither of them.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-162

656. JAMES WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two shirts, value 7 s. , the goods of Mary Jones , widow .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Francis Stringer .

MARY JONES . The prisoner lodged at my house, in the Harrow-road . I missed a shirt marked F.S. for F. Stringer, whom I washed for, it was taken from my kitchen. I charged the prisoner with it; he denied it, and I gave him in charge.

DAVID FRAIL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Lisson-grove. I received a shirt in pawn of the prisoner, on the 13th of February, in his own name.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Bryant, pawnbroker St. John-street. The prisoner pawned a shirt at our house, in the name of Read.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-163

657. JAMES TUKE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , a coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Thomas Dallman .

JOHN NORRIS . I am a patrol. I went to Hedges's the pawnbroker, and found a coat. I apprehended the prisoner next day and found the duplicate. I apprehended him at a gentlemans house; he said we had better go up in the drawing-room; he ran up before me, and pulled the tickets out; he threw them down and was kicking them underneath the sofa. He was handcuffed.

WILLIAM EDGHILL . I am foreman to Mr. Dallman, tailor , of Bond-street . The prisoner had the care of the property; he was discharged in the early part of June. I missed a black coat, about the middle of December, and questioned him about it; he said he knew nothing of it, and looked over the warehouse with me, two or three times. I found it at the pawnbrokers; I knew it to be the same.

THOMAS HORTON . I am shopman to Mr. Hedges. The coat was pawned on the 18th of June, in the name of Smith. I do not know by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-164

658. WILLIAM NOBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two sheets, value 3 s.; a bolster, value 1 s., and a ring value 6 d., the goods of Frances Conner , widow , in a lodging-room .

FRANCES CONNER . I am a widow, and live in Peter-court, Rosemary-lane . I let the prisoner a furnished room, a week before the third of March. On Monday morning he went out early, and fell down on the stairs and alarmed us; I called out

"Who is there," he said

"it is me." An officer brought him to me. - I then went up stairs and missed a sheet off his bed, and another sheet and blanket off another bed.

RICHARD DADY . I am an officer. On the 3d of March, I stopped the prisoner with this property - he said it was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230409-165

659. GEORGE WIGGINS and MARY CROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , a watch, value 3 l., and four half crowns, value 10 s., the property of Joseph Dornan , from his person .

JOSEPH DORNAN . I am a stone-mason , and live at St. George's in the East . On the 16th of March I went to the Bell, Ratcliffe-highway. I have known Cross a long time; she was there; I gave her some beer - Wiggins came in and she asked him to drink with her, which he did; she asked me to give her some dinner, I agreed, she was to go home with me - they both walked with me; she took my arm, and Wiggins walked by her side. When we got near my lodging, she said,

"I hope Joseph you won't deceive me," I said,

"I will not, you shall both have some dinner - I have no money in my pocket, but I have some half crowns in the table drawer, we will get something with that;" when I came to the door, I took out the key from my pocket, they both shoved against me, and said they would unlock it for me - I opened it myself, and both came

in; Wiggins said,

"Go on, I'll be with you in a moment" - Cross and I went up stairs; I got the box to strike a light, to make a fire - the tinder-box was in the drawer with the money, which was safe when I took the box out. I was striking a light, and Cross pulled the drawer out, took something out and turned round, saying she wanted to go into the back-yard - I directed her to the yard; she said I had better lay down and have a sleep; I was rather fresh; she said she would be up in a moment, and as soon as she was out of the room, I felt and found my watch gone from my fob, and the money from the drawer. I went down, and they were both gone, and the door shut. I found them in custody afterwards.

WIGGINS Defence. He came to the public-house and asked us to drink, and tossed for five half quarterns of gin; he got very much in liquor - I thought I would see him home, but did not go up stairs.

JOSEPH DORNAN . I felt my watch safe within twelve yards of the door.

CROSS'S Defence. He missed his money the moment he entered the room - before he got the box out.

WILLIAM FORSTER . On the 26th of March, I apprehended Wiggins, and told him it was for the watch - he said

"Oh! it is for that, is it."

CROSS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing the Monies only . Confined Fourteen Days .

WIGGINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-166

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 19.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

660. SARAH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a towel, value 2 s. , the goods of William Dingley .

WILLIAM DINGLEY . I keep a public-house in Cromer-street . On Sunday the 2d of March, the prisoner came into the house just after church-time - she went out, and I sent my boy after her; I saw him take the towel out of her bosom - she had taken it out of the kitchen-drawer.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . My master sent me after her, and I asked her if she had been in the house - she said, No; I found the towel in her bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-167

661. WILLIAM MUNRO was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two sheets, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Annis , in a lodging-room .

SARAH ANNIS . I am the wife of Thomas Annis , and live at Wapping . The prisoner lodged a fortnight with me - I was told something, and I went up and forced myself into his room, and missed the sheets off his bed - he told me to say nothing about it; I gave him in charge, and the duplicate was found on him.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I live with Mr. Murray, pawnbroker. On the 3d or 4th of March, the prisoner pawned the sheets in his name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Being in want of a few shillings, I took the liberty to pawn them - meaning to get them out next day.

GUILTY - Aged 67.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230409-168

662. JANE REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a shawl, value 7 s., the goods of William Corlett , from the person of Mary Stiles , spinster .

MARY CORLETT . I live in Graham's-buildings; Mary Stiles is my grand-daughter. On Thursday the 6th of March, I sent her out with a shawl round her neck, which I afterwards found at the pawnbroker's; she came home in three-quarters of an hour without it; she is seven years old.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mr. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. The prisoner pawned the shawl; I have known her some years.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-169

663. JOSEPH HILLEBRAND was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , three shirts; value 5 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of John Scringer .

JOHN KOOPS . I keep the Old Rose, public-house, in Ratcliff-highway . The prisoner slept at my house on Friday, the 28th of February, and was to return next night, but did not. I missed two pair of trowsers, and a handkerchief.

JOHN SCRINGER . I live at the Old Rose, and sleep in the back-room. The prisoner slept in the front. On the 1st of March, I missed three shirts, and a handkerchief from my drawer.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a constable. On the 4th of March I apprehended the prisoner, and found a shirt on him, and two duplicates; he said he sold the other shirt for 1 s., to a man in Dock-street - I went there, and found a shirt and two pair of trowsers.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am servant to Mr. Cowling, pawnbroker, Ratcliff-highway. On the 1st of March the prisoner pawned a pair of trowsers with me.

WILLIAM TOWNLY . I am a pawnbroker, of Cable-street. On the 3d of March the prisoner pawned a handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - Aged 21.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-170

664. RICHARD HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a shawl, value 5 s., the goods of John Robinson Nicholls , from the person of Elizabeth , his wife .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-171

665. JOHN REAS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Robert Wroots , from his person .

ROBERT WROOTS . On the 30th of March, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was in Regent-street . I felt my handkerchief go from my pocket, and turning round I saw the prisoner with it in his hand. I pursued and took it from him, and gave it to the watchman.

JOHN FOLEY . I am the watchman. I was in Regent-street,

and heard the cry of

"Watch;" I took the prisoner from the prosecutor's hands with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to).

ROBERT CHAPMAN . I searched him and found the handkerchief on him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-172

666. THOMAS BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , four fixtures, (i.e.) four window sashes, value 3 l., the goods of George Bilborough , and fixed to a certain building belonging to John Bilborough .

SECOND COUNT, not stating them to be fixtures.

THOMAS VANN . On Friday morning, the 28th of February, about seven o'clock, Lock brought the prisoner in charge to my door, I found these window sashes on the ground by him. I asked where he got them; he said that was an unfair question - he afterwards said he bought them.

ROBERT LOCK . I saw the prisoner in Pump-alley, leading into Chequer-alley, with these sashes; I asked where he got them - he said from Old-street, and was going to take them to Chequer-square. I said I would follow him; he was going to throw them down, and I detained him.

GEORGE BILBOROUGH . I am a carpenter ; I missed these sashes from a house in Wellington-street, Goswell-street-road . I went to the house on Saturday the 1st of March, and found the street door broken open, the lines cut, and the sashes gone. I was there three days before, but did not notice him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I deal in sashes and buy them from old buildings. I bought them some time ago.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-173

Before Mr. Recorder.

667. GEORGE HUGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 5 lbs. of pepper, value 3 s. , the goods of the East India Company .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HARLLEY . I am an Excise officer. On Tuesday afternoon, the 25th of February, about ten minutes after three o'clock, I was in the East India Company's warehouse, Blackwall . I found three bags of pepper concealed under some planks in the Company's yard - next morning I concealed myself in a watch-box, about ten yards from where they were concealed, and about a quarter before eight o'clock, the prisoner came to the planks and took the bags; he put one in his hat and one in each pocket - they weighed 5 lbs. together; he left two empty bags and a pocket handkerchief in the place where the pepper was; I ran out and took him to the warehouse-keeper's room - the warehouse is not open till eight o'clock; he would not be searched if he went out before eight - the prisoner worked in the same warehouse, but not on the same floor as the pepper was kept.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How came you to find them there - A. I was told some had been there before - eight o'clock was the time to come to work; I have seen labourers go in and out without being searched - I have seen the prisoner go out without being searched. He did not say he was going to the counting-house.

GEORGE BURROWS . I am a constable at the Blackwall gate of the Company's warehouse. The prisoner was given in my charge for stealing pepper. I searched him in Mr. Brown's presence, and found three bags of pepper on him - he escaped from us as I was taking him to the office; I caught him two hours afterwards on Bow Common.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it your duty to search persons going out - A. Yes, it is the custom at all the gates.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Do not persons often pass without being searched - A. It might be so; if he left before eight o'clock he would not be searched.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am an elder in the Company's service; the prisoner has been seven years in the service, and had 20 s. a week, and worked from eight till three o'clock.

Q. He is a married man - A. Yes; he carried on the business of a brazier besides his regular employ.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-174

668. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , certain fixtures, (i. e.), a copper, value 1 l.; three gas consumers, value 9 s.; four gas burners, value 8 s.; part of a copper cover, value 2 s., and three bell-handles, value 2 s. the goods of Joseph Bottrill , and fixed to a certain building of his .

JOSEPH BOTTRILL . I live in Brydges-street, Covent-garden . I have a house, No. 15, in the same street, which was unoccupied - I was there on the Saturday, and on Tuesday morning the 11th of March, in consequence of information, I went there and found the gas fittings of the shop torn away from the shop first-floor, and a copper from the kitchen, which was fitted in brick-work. I found the prisoner in custody with them on the Tuesday; the door must have been opened with a false key.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Mr. Kay had taken the lease of this house - A. Not till after this happened; I partly let it him on the 5th of March - I received part of the purchase-money, but did not transfer it to him till Tuesday night.

THOMAS DENYER . I am servant to Mr. Bottrill; I went to the premises about twelve o'clock on the Monday afternoon, and left between three and four, all was then safe; I locked the door, and went there again about a quarter past eight o'clock on Tuesday morning, and found the door still locked, and missed the copper from the brickwork in the kitchen, and the gas-fittings from the shop and the first-floor. I saw them again about a week afterwards, and knew them.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was proprietor of the premises - A. My master; one Scott had been in possession of them.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner on the 11th of March, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning, in Russel-court, Drury-lane, with a copper on his head, tied up in a green baize; it appeared fresh from the brick-work. I asked where he got it, - he said, he was going to take it to Shoe-lane. I said,

"That is no answer to my question" - He then said, a man

gave it him to carry in Covent-garden-market. I detained him, and found the rest of the property in the copper. He said, he did not know what was in it. I found two keys and a brass cock upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I do jobs about; and in Covent-garden, a man asked me to carry this to Shoe-lane. This man stopped me - I thought he asked me where I was going, instead of where I came from.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-175

670. WILLIAM GUY was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution

DAVID ABSOLAM . I am parish clerk of Great Yarmouth, and was so in 1815. I have known the prisoner almost from his childhood, and was present when he married Elizabeth Thompson Capon , on December 25, 1825 , by banns, she was single . I knew them both well. I have a copy of the register which I extracted myself. (read.)

PRISONER. Q. Are you confident she was alive, when I married my last wife - A. I saw her in June or September last. I think there were five marriages that morning. Mr. Humphries was the clergyman, the attesting witnesses are all her relations. I am certain of him as I knew him well before. I am elected by the corporation, and was never suspended. The Church plate is kept at my house now, and was never moved from it.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What is the prisoner - A. A tailor.

JULIA HEALEY . I was married to the prisoner at Shoreditch, on the 14th of November, 1819. I have one child by him, and am now in the family way. He lived about two years at first with me; then left me in distress without a penny to buy bread; he returned to me about seven months ago, and left me in the family way again, after saying he had a comfortable home for me. He went by the name of William H. Guy when he married me; I heard he was married before, and told him of it; he said she was only a kept woman, this was some time after I married him. I was acquainted with him for three months before I married him. I had no fortune, I believed him to be single; my uncle was foreman in Bishopsgate-street, were he worked as a tailor; he pawned the ring off my finger and my clothes, and then deserted me.

CLIFFORD ELISHA . I am the parish clerk of Shoreditch. I produce a certificate of this marriage which I extracted from the books. I do not remember the parties, (read) the prisoner was described as a batchelor in this certificate.)

The prisoner in a long address to the Court, contended that the first marriage was not proved, as the clerk must have forgotten his person, and that the attesting witnesses and clergyman should be called.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-176

671. THOMAS DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 100 lbs. weight of lead value 10 s. the goods of Thomas Atkinson , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

THOMAS ATKINSON . I live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea . This lead was stolen from my front parapet. It was all safe on Sunday morning, the 23d of March, about eleven o'clock; and next morning, about seven o'clock, I missed it. There was about 1 cwt. It has never been found. I sent for a constable. The prisoner was taken between eleven and twelve o'clock that morning.

FRANCIS GALE . I am a coachman, and live in Lower Sloane-street, about three minutes walk from Atkinson's. I put my coach up in the yard, three or four doors from Atkinson's house. A little after twelve o'clock at night, as I passed the shop, I kicked against against a roll of lead. I looked up, and saw two men on the leads of the shop, which are about twenty feet high. It was rather a dark night. I called the watchman two or three times. They laid down on the leads to hide themselves. I could find no watchman, and did not know what to do. As I stood there, the prisoner came down from the leads; (I had known him six months - he lived near the place.) I asked him what he was doing. He said, he was doing wrong. I said, I was sorry for it, and went home - there were three of them. I told my mistress of it at eleven o'clock, and she told Atkinson.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at the Nell Gwynn , public-house. He denied the charge. I found only 1 d. on them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-177

672. SARAH GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a spoon, value 3 s; a shirt, value 3 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; and a sheet, value 4 s., the goods of David Romaine . to whom she was servant .

REBECCA ROMAINE . I am the wife of David Romaine , of Hill-street, Finsbury . The prisoner lived servant with us eight weeks. I had a good character with her. I missed these articles in March, and mentioned it to her three or four days before she was taken; she denied all knowledge of it. She was taken up on Easter Sunday. I found a duplicate of the property in her pocket. She had only 1 1/2 d. I gave her 2 s. a week.

JOHN LLOYD . I am servant to Mr. Folkard, pawnbroker. I have a tea spoon, pawned on the 21st of March for 2 s. 6 d. by the prisoner, in the name of Emma Wyatt , Paul-street. I never saw her before, but am certain of her person.

WILLIAM FENNER . I am shopman to Mr. Walker, pawnbroker, Tabernacle-walk. A shirt was pawned with me for 2 s. in the name of Ann Wyatt .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am shopman to Mr. Jones, of Holywell-street. On the 12th of March a shift was pawned with me. I do not know who by.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am a servant to Mr. Folkard. On the 29th of March a sheet was pawned, I cannot say who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HANDLEY . I received her in charge. She said she wished to redeem the things.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-178

673. HENRY NIGHTINGALE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a table top, value 7 s. the goods of John Maddams , his master .

JOHN MADDAMS . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Vincent-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner was employed by me. The officer brought the prisoner in with the table top which I had not missed. He worked with me two years and three quarters.

JOHN STOCKWELL . I am a watchman. About half past twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Kings-land-road, with the table top not covered over. I asked him how he came by it. He said at first it was his own; but afterwards, that it was his master's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The apprentice was ordered to bring eight tops down, but he brought nine, and asked me to take one home for him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-179

674. JOHN OXFORD was indicted for stealing, on the first of April , a coral, value 4 s.; a frock, value 6 d.; and a pair of gloves, value 2 d. the goods of Francis Hamlyn , his master .

JANE HAMLYN . I am the wife of Francis Hamlyn , butcher . The prisoner was in our service above twelve months. On the 2d of April, I missed the coral from the parlour cupboard, behind the shop. I saw it there the day before. He asked leave to go out for an hour or two, and I let him. Next day Tatten came to me, and I found the property at the office.

JOSEPH TATTEN . I was passing through Holboran, and saw the prisoner and another boy together. He gave the boy a frock to pawn; I stopped him going into the pawnbrokers. He said, his mother gave him the frock to pawn, and that his mother's name was Smith, of Hackney. I I took him to Hatton-garden. I found out the prosecutor, and informed him.

JOHN LIMBRICK . He was given into my charge, with the frock - I found the coral and gloves in his pocket - he said he picked them up in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-180

675. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two coats, value 15 s.; two waistcoats, value 8 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 20 s., the goods of Mary Hughes , from the person of Edward Hughes .

MARY HUGHES . I am a widow , and live in Lucas-street, St. George's. - Edward Hughes is my son. On Saturday the 1st of March, I sent him to Smellie's, in Ratcliff-highway, to redeem these clothes. I saw them at Lambeth-street, on the Monday following - the prisoner was in custody.

EDWARD HUGHES . My mother sent me to get these things out of pawn, from Mr. Smellie's, Ratcliff-highway. I had not got far before the prisoner came after me, and said I had got the wrong bundle; and said,

"Come back." Before I got back, he said,

"Let me feel the weight of them." I gave them to him, and he said, I might have known by the weight they were not my property. We went together as far as the door; I pulled open the door, and he ran off with the bundle; I followed, and cried Stop thief! and never lost sight of him till he was stopped. He dropped them in the road - I picked them up - they were the right things - he was secured.

WILLIAM INCH . I am the patrol. The prisoner was stopped just before I got up. The boy had the bundle, and charged him with stealing it; he denied it.

JOSEPH JACKSON . I took him in charge. He said he had left a bundle at the pawnbroker's - I found that was false.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230409-181

676. ROBERT MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , three mould frames, value 5 l., and thirty-six candles, value 2 s. , the goods of William Huxtable , and JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

WILLIAM HUXTABLE . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in King-street, Holborn. On the 20th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, my men went to tea leaving only one in the shop; one of my men came and gave me information. I went directly to the manufactory in Theobalds-road , and missed three mould-frames and thirty-six candles, which weighed 12 lbs. I have seen some since, which I have every reason to believe to be the same; they correspond in number and appearance. I went next morning about eleven o'clock to John Martin 's house, in Crown-street, and found them in a bag in a store-room there; he was not at home; I saw Robert there. I compared them with my moulds, and believe them to be the same, from appearance and smell. I have been many years in the trade. The name of John Martin is over the door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. - Q. These candles were three to the pound - A. Yes; it is a common size; the smell of tallow depends on the age.

Q. Are there not thousands of pounds of the same size - A. There are.

RICHARD GILBERT . I am a carpenter, and live in Norfolk-street, Middlesex-hospital; on the 20th of February, about a quarter past six o'clock, I was at the corner of Harper-street, Theobald's-road, fifteen or twenty yards from the prosecutor's manufactory, and saw two men with two mould frames on their shoulders; it was just dark, I followed to the end of Harper-street, where another man overtook them with another frame and joined them. I suspected and followed them - I have no doubt that Robert Martin was one of the two first, each had a frame; I followed them to the corner of Queen-street into Southampton-row, Great Russel-street, down Charlotte-street, Plumbtree-street, across Holborn, into Monmouth-street, to No. 26, Crown-street, which house had the name of Robert Martin over the door; they all three went in, one of them came out again, and said to those that were in -

"Damn your eyes look sharp;" I looked him hard in the face, and should know him again, it was neither of the prisoners. I watched him so as to know him again; then went home to tea - I suspected Mr. Huxtable had been robbed of them. I went and told him, and we went to Bow-street; there were candles in the moulds. I went to the house next morning with the officers, Ford and Diggins, saw Robert Martin and a woman - the candles were found, I found some bits of wood there, which appear to me to have been part of a mould; here is one piece with the mark of tallow on it. There was tallow all about the place, as if it had been broken up there - I seized Robert immediately, and charged him with it - he could make no answer; I said I had no doubt but he was the man I had seen the night before. I did not say I saw him with the property.

Cross-examined. Q. It was rather dusky - A. Yes; but I could see as far as a hundred yards. It was exactly ten or fifteen minutes after six - it was only dusk, for it was a very light afternoon. I was about ten yards from them, their backs were towards me; I got before them and faced them all in Southampton-row.

Q. Did you never say he was the third man and not one of the first - A. Not to my knowledge; he was the last of the two. I never said he was the one who joined them.

Q. Did you mention any particular mark by which you knew him - A. It appeared to me as if he had a coat, and laced half boots - I said I knew him by a dirty apron, and laced boots; he was the shortest of the three, and I swear to his face - they were all three young. I found him at the house next morning, in the same dress as he wore the night before - I said he was the man, I had no doubt; we found some lead melted up at the house - I am sure the wood is part of the frame, as there is one piece that comes out between the holes of the mould; I was near enough to touch them at times - I faced them at the corner of Queen-square; it was dark when I got to Crown-street.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I went with Gilbert and Huxtable, to No. 26, Crown-street, Soho. I searched the front shop, and the cellar, and left my brother officer with Robert Martin , who was in the shop - Mrs. Martin was in the cellar with me; she said her husband was out, and she would shew me any part of the house - she went up stairs before me in haste, I followed immediately into the back store-house, where metal and things were deposited. There was a ladle with pewter or lead in a molten state, and while I was looking at it, I saw thirty-six candles hanging up in a bag, and on the step of the door I found some small chips of wood, with tallow on them. There were fragments of more having been chopped up on the threshold of the door; and the threshold bore the marks of the chopper. I found Robert Martin in the back-kitchen, behind the shop - Gilbert saw him, and as soon as he came out of the room, he said

"That is one of them, I know" - I took him into custody; I asked if he knew any thing of it - he said No. He had a dirty white apron on; I went and apprehended the father that day, at Hicks's-Hall; I never saw him in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You found some pewter - A. Yes; I have it here; I brought away all that appeared to be melted - here are twelve pieces; there was a quantity of old rags covered over the pewter. Mrs. Martin shewed me every place but that, and then she ran quickly up stairs to that place. Gilbert said he had every reason to believe Robert to be the same person.

SAMUEL DICKINS . I am an officer, and was with the last witness. I searched the shop, but found no candles there. I kept Robert in charge; he tried to get out at the street door, but I stopped him, and said he should not go - I left him in care of two persons, and went to the kitchen. Mrs. Martin ran up stairs, but we followed, and found the candles - Mr. Huxtable said he believed them to be his. I found a piece of wood on the cill of the door of the back place; there were bits of wood all about, and marks of the chopper - the pieces of wood had tallow on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the wood more greasy than now - A. It was; we brought away all we could pick up.

RICHARD SEAKINS . I am a candle mould frame maker. I saw this wood at Martin's house when it was found; there was a little bit with half a circular hole in it, and another piece appears to be part of the bottom; there were pieces of tallow on it. I saw the candles found - I had made a new frame for the prosecutor, and they appeared moulded from that frame. Twelve of the thirty-six had marks which are in the head of the frame I made.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not that wood answer for a hundred different purposes besides candle moulds - A. No doubt of it. I made the new frame about a year ago; the tops are made of beech, and the tops of the mould were of a spiral form.

WILLIAM EAST . I am an Excise officer. The prosecutor was under my survey. I saw the candles at Bow-street, and took four of the prosecutor's candles, and compared them, and have no doubt of them being part of his stock. I have been in that department twenty years. Particular melted tallow would have a particular appearance, smell, and colour.

Cross-examined. Q. When they have been made a long time, they get the same colour - A. Yes; but I am certain they are not old candles, not three days old - they were not cold when they were found. They corresponded in smell, size, and age.

JURY to MR. HUXTABLE. Q. Had you some new moulds from Seakins - A. He made up one new frame; I lost three frames; they were made by different manufacturers - he had made one of the frames; the maker of the others is dead. Each frame contained twelve candles; they were on the stones cooling.

The prisoners made no Defence, but the following witnesses were called on their behalf.

EDWARD THOMPSON . I live at No. 17, Long-acre; I lodge on the second floor, and am a clerk - I am out of employ. I came from Liverpool about eighteen months ago, and have not had any regular employment since. Hollingsworth is landlord of the house. On the 20th of February, last, about two minutes before six o'clock, I was coming down Crown-street, Soho, and a gentleman accosted me, and asked if I had any commands to Liverpool he would take them - I told him No; I did not know his name. He was going to Ireland that way; I had seen him once or twice, only, at two or three inns in London. We stood in conversation in the street, opposite Mr. Martin's door; our conservation lasted upwards of twelve or fourteen minutes, as near as I can recollect, during which time I saw Robert Martin twice or thrice, at the door, and inside the shop. I had known him for about fourteen months - I had sold him things belonging to a lady, whose husband was dead, and she is gone to Scotland; it was Mrs. Johnson of Broad-street, at the bottom of Poland-street. Immediately after the gentleman and I separated it struck a quarter past six o'clock, and I have nothing further to say.

COURT. Q. Can you tell me the name of any person for whom you have acted as clerk during the eighteen months - A. I have written several letters, bills, and memorandums for a cousin of mine, and bought books at various sales, and sold them. I have been a good deal

supported by a sister of mine, who lives at Manchester, and my brother.

Q. I want to know for whom you have acted as clerk for the last eighteen months - A. Previous to that time I was six years and three quarters a clerk.

Q. How have you got your living for the last eighteen months - A. I have a great deal of support from Manchester and Liverpool, and from my aunt, Margaret Kay , who lives in Ryder's-court, Leicester-square, she lodges there in the garret - she has contributed to my support, in conjunction with my cousin; she has only one room; I have had meals with her. I have lodged in Long-acre six or seven months.

Q. You went over to ask Robert Martin how he did I suppose - A. No; I was standing in conversation. I cannot tell the name of the person, who was in conversation with me; he was going to Ireland by way of Liverpool.

A. When your friend left you, why not go over and ask how he did - A. It was of no material consequence; it was on a Thursday. I had sold him a few brushes and various kitchen utensils, and a pan or two belonging to the lady, they amounted to about 10 s. in all. He always paid ready money. I sold them within four months. He was never at my lodgings. I told him where I lived, when I lived in Rose-street, Long-acre.

Q. Did you tell him at any other time - A. Yes; nine months ago or more, I lived in Rose-street about eight months ago. I have been seven months where I now am, and previous to that I was there. I did not keep company with Robert Martin . I told him where I lived because Mr. Martin said, he would not buy any thing of a stranger without he knew where he lived.

Q. All the articles you have dealt in, only amounted to 10 s. - A. It might be 1 s. more, they did not ask where I lived, after I had told them once; I lived in Rose-street, then, I do not recollect his asking where I lived afterwards.

Q. How came you to swear, you told him you lived in Long-acre - A. I think I told Mrs. Martin so, because she was mostly in the shop. I will swear, I told her I lived in Long-acre. I told Mr. Martin where I lived in Rose-street, and think I told Mrs. Martin, I lived in Long-acre.

Q. When were you applied to, to be a witness - A. Last Friday, Mrs. Martin applied to me. I was going by the house, on the 21st of February, and saw Mrs. Martin, at the door and asked her how she was; she said she was in a little trouble about her son and Mr. Martin; then she related the circumstance to me; this was about noon.

Q. Noon is twelve o'clock in the day - A. Yes; she told me then, that her son and Mr. Martin were taken up; about noon. I swear that positively; she did not say who had taken them. She said they were taken at her house, at least her son was. I believe Mr. Martin was not taken there.

Q. She told you at noon, that they were both taken up - A. At noon the following day.

Q. She told you this on the 21st of February, at noon, that Mr. Martin and his son were both taken up, do you swear that positively - A. I do - she said her son; was taken there, and her husband at Clerkenwell, she told me so at noon; Clerkenwell, is half a mile from her house; she said they were taken to Bow-street. I said nothing more to her, but wished her good morning.

Q. Did you then tell her, you saw her son the day before, at the time he was charged with this offence - A. Yes; I forgot that; I immediately replied

"I was by here last night and saw your son Robert." I told her the very time I had seen him.

Q. How did you know that the time was material - A. I said I was by a few minutes before six o'clock, talking to a gentleman, and saw him last night; she asked me what time I had seen him - I told her it struck six o'clock just as the gentleman accosted me, and we were twelve or fourteen minutes together. She said they were taken up for some candles I believe; nothing else; she did not mention about candle moulds. I did not go to see Martin.

Q. When was it you told Mrs. Martin where you lived - A. Nine months ago. I told her I lived in Rose-street.

Q. How then could they find you out in Long-acre - A. I believe I told her that four or five months ago. I called in and told her, I believe.

Q. Will you positively swear you told her you lived at No. 17, Long-acre - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear she said Martin sen. was in custody, as early as noon that day - A. Yes.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What house were you employed in six years before you went to Liverpool - A. The house of John Braddock .

THOMAS FORD . John Martin was not taken till four o'clock in the afternoon.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 19th, 20th, and 21st of February, John Martin was at Hicks's Hall with me, waiting to go before the Grand Jury. He was there all day on the 20th till night, and went part of the way home with me; he lives about a mile and a half from Clerkenwell - we staid till nearly half-past five o'clock, and went home together. I live at Knights-bridge; we went together as far as Newport-street, Newport-market - it was six o'clock when he left. It was nearly dark then - he was then nearly half a mile from home.

COURT. Q. Newport-street would be in his way home - A. No; he should have gone up Holborn. I was present on the 21st when he was taken up; I did not particularly notice the time, but think it might be about one in the afternoon.

Q. Then this man could not have heard that he was in custody and at Bow-street at twelve o'clock at noon - A. No; he lives in Crown-street, St. Giles's, and is a dealer in marine stores, which is written over his house - I left at six o'clock.

JURY. Q. What particular circumstance enables you to say what time of the night it was - A. I am out every night; there had been a little rain that day - it was cloudy. There is no particular circumstance to make me say it was dark.

ROBERT MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-182

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

677. JOHN LAYTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a watch, value 20 s.; three seals, value 2 s., and a key, value 1 s., the goods of Robert Lawson , from his person .

ROBERT LAWSON . On the 12th of March, about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, I was going down towards the New-road ; my watch was then safe - I missed it next morning at a quarter past five. I went home to Regent-park barracks , and went to bed - the prisoner was discharged from our regiment about four months ago. I had been with him and Wallis from eleven o'clock, and he came as far as the barracks with me. I slept in a room alone all night, with my door locked; I do not always carry it about with me, and therefore did not think of it when I went to bed. I had drank very little.

SAMUEL B. DALTON . The prosecutor informed me he had lost his watch. I took the prisoner in custody on Monday evening and found the watch in pawn.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. The watch, seals, and key, were pawned with me on the 11th of March, in the name of Latham, I do not know who by, but it is in the prisoner's name.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I went with the officer to look for the prisoner; we were at the Marquis of Granby - he came in, was taken, and denied the charge. The duplicate was handed over to me before the Magistrate.

ROBERT LAWSON re-examined. It is my watch, seal, and key. After the prisoner's apprehension, he sent for me to the watch-house; he wished me not to appear against him, and he would give me the duplicate, and a sovereign; I said I must appear. At the public-house opposite the office, I heard him ask two people to go to his room, and in the bedding they would find the duplicate, and to go to his wife for the sovereign; they were brought, and he asked me to take it - I said

"I will if you choose, but I must appear before the magistrate."

GEORGE WILLIS . I am a carpenter. I was with the prosecutor and prisoner, and walked all the way to the barracks with them, arm in arm together; Lawson was in the mid dle - we had drank a glass or two of gin together.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You fought with him - A. No; we only sparred for about five minutes, after drinking the gin - he appeared to be a little tipsy.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he would make the matter up if I gave him the duplicate; he was so intoxicated we were obliged to carry him in our arms.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-183

678. RICHARD WILTSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , two pillows, value 6 s.; a quilt, value 14 s., and a mahogany glass, value 10 s., the goods of John Mitchell , in a lodging-room .

JOHN MITCHELL . I live in Upper North-place, Grays-inn-lane . The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 3d of September, and on the 3d of April when I came in the evening I missed these things from his room; he came in about an hour after, I asked him about them, he said he knew nothing about them - I wished him to go into the room and shew me whether the goods were there; he afterwards said the glass was broken, and that he had sent the frame to have a new glass - my wife asked for the quilt and pillows, he said he knew nothing about them - he was going out, I stopped him. In about half an hour his wife came, I asked her about them, she said they had disposed of them - I asked how he could act so; I received severe abuse from him, and gave him in charge; the officer searched him in my presence; the duplicates were found on his wife.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer. The prisoner resisted being searched - his wife said she had the duplicates, and I found them upon her; they are for two pillows, a quilt, and looking-glass.

EDWARD FAIRCLOUGH , I am a pawnbroker. I have two pillows pawned by the prisoner, on the 17th of March - a quilt, and looking-glass by his wife.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-184

679. THOMAS BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , two fowls, value 4 s. , the goods of Richard Moss .

RICHARD MOSS . On the 6th of March, I lost two fowls from my shop at Knightsbridge ; they were on the shelves about four feet from the window - I saw them safe about three o'clock - they were brought to me about ten minutes afterwards.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I saw the prisoner and three others opposite the prosecutor's shop; one of the others took the fowls - the prisoner and the other were watching, one on each side. As soon as they were taken they walked away together - I followed, and laid hold of them, but was knocked down, and the fowls were thrown down into a shop, next door but one to the prosecutor's. I caught the prisoner - they were all three together, and ran off together after knocking me down.

Prisoner. Q. Did I run - A. I did not give him time to run - he went off quick.

WILLIAM HILL . I accompanied Griffiths in pursuit; the prisoner was whistling when we came up - he said he would go with us where we liked; we took him to the prosecutor - he said he knew nothing of the men; Griffiths said he saw him with them before he took the fowls; he made no reply.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-185

680. PETER WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a jacket, value 8 s.; a waistcoat, value 3 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s., and a hat, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Cooper .

THOMAS COOPER . I belong to the brig Planter , which lay off Horsley-Down . On the 18th of March, I slept in the forecastle, and left the things in my chest, and next morning missed my clothes. The stocking was a purple one, I have the fellow to it.

FRANCIS BRIDE . I was carpenter of the Planter. I was in a public-house on the night of the 18th of March; the prisoner came and said he had lost his way - that he belonged to an East India ship from Bengal, and that he had been eleven months on his passage, and had come ashore at Deptford, for some clothes of the captain's; he offered to give any body three or four dollars to shew him the ship

- we pitied him from this account, and I took him aboard our ship for a night's lodging; he was to sleep in the forecastle; I gave him the jacket to lay on. When I got up next morning he was gone - two ship-mates missed their clothes.

NATHANIEL GORMAN . I apprehended him on the 18th of March - I took off his back, a hat, a pair of trowsers, and a blue stocking; he said he bought the hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I stole the things I should not wear them - a man came on deck and asked me to buy them; and at four o'clock in the morning, a man came and sent me ashore.

GUILTY - Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-186

681. ELIZABETH WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of William Chandler .

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Ratcliffe-highway . On the 24th of February, in consequence of information I went into a tobacconist's shop, next door to mine, and found the prisoner standing at the counter with the shoes in her hand; I took them from her, they were mine, and had been taken of a nail by the door post.

THOMAS GRENVILLE . I was servant to a gentleman who lived opposite Chandler's. I was sent over to the prosecutor to tell him of two women who were at the door, one with the shoes in her hand; she went into the tobacconists with them; I heard her ask the tobacconist's man if they were his.

Q. Why did you not tell this at the time - A. I told the Magistrate I saw her break them off the rails. I did not tell him she asked the tobacconist if they were his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-187

682. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Carter .

THOMAS CARTER . I live in Charles-street, Middlesex-Hospital. About half past eight o'clock, on the 27th of March, I missed a pot from No. 3, Nassau-street - Read brought it to me that day - my house is quarter of a mile from Mr. Cobham's.

JOHN TICKNER . I am shopman to Mr. Cobham, who lives at the corner of Chapel-street, Portman-placr. On the 27th of March, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and asked if we wanted a man to carry out parcels; I said No; he went away, and I found he had left a quart pot on the mat where he stood - it was not there a minute before.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. On the 27th of March, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a basket, which appeared heavy, he saw me and went into this shop, stooped down to the mat, and when he came out he ran, I pursued and took him - he said,

"I was only there begging, Read, don't take me." At the watch-house he said he went to ask what name was on the pot, as he had found it.

Prisoner's Defence. Read has spoken false. I did not run - I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 22,

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-188

683. WILLIAM POPE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a candlestick, value 30 s. , the goods of Joseph Cholmondley .

WILLIAM WEST . I am servant to Mr. Joseph Cholmondley , a surgeon , who lives in Hatton-garden . On the 18th of February before seven o'clock in the evening there was a knock at the door; I opened it and found the prisoner there - he gave me a note; I understood him to say it was for Mr. Evans, and required an answer, I shut the door, and said,

"Will you walk in the front room;" he said,

"No, I'll wait in the hall." I took the note up stairs, and waited while my mistress read it, (my master was not at home), I came down in about five minutes, he was gone and also the candlestick, which was there when he came in, I did not miss it till five minutes after.

CATHERINE HANSARD . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the evening of the 18th of February, about seven o'clock, the candlestick was in the hall; West brought a note up - I went down and saw the prisoner standing in the hall. The candlestick was not there then; he stood with his hat in his hand. I believe he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was it dark - Yes; I am certain he is the person. I never saw him before.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking too much, and knocked at a gentleman's door in Gloster-street, and was taken to the office for it - when this person came and looked at me with others, she said the man was not there, but when I was pointed out she said I was the person.

WILLIAM WEST . I looked round and said I did not see him; he was then behind another man; when I saw him I said he was the person.

JOHN POPE . I am servant to a gentleman in Guildford-street. On the 18th of February, the prisoner, who is my son, came to me at twenty-five minutes past six o'clock, with a bundle of dirty linen for his brother George. I live in Great Ormand-yard (looking at the letter) this is not my son's writing.

GEORGE POPE . I am servant to a gentleman in Burton-crescent. On the Tuesday before my brother was taken, he came to me at twenty-five minutes before seven o'clock for my linen, and left me nearly at nine; he was not out of master's house till then.

COURT. Q. How do you know it was the 18th. - A. He always fetches my linen on Tuesdays - I attended before the Magistrate to give evidence.

SARAH POPE . I am the prisoner's mother; he brought my son's linen for me to wash about nine o'clock.

ANN DAGLISH . I am cook where the prisoner's brother lives; he was there on the Tuesday night before he was taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-189

684. JOHN WILLIAMS and EDWARD JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , seven yards of cotton, value 8 s. , the goods of Francis Hillier .

FRANCIS HILLIER . I am a linen-draper , and live at Tottenham . On Tuesday, the 11th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner came into the shop - the cotton was then safe. Williams asked to see some handkerchiefs but bought none; Johnson went out in a short time, and soon after Williams went

out after him; he had said to Johnson,

"Go out and get something for dinner, and I'll come to you." After they were gone I missed this cotton, and pursued, but could not find them. In returning I found them in custody; the officer produced the cotton - nobody but them had been in the shop.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I found the cotton in the prisoner Williams's hat; he was stopped by another person - they were given in my charge at ten o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to).

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I went into this shop to buy a handkerchief, and fixed upon one at 1 s. 6 d., I only had 1 s. 3 d., and as I came out I kicked against something at the door, picked it up, and put it in my hat, thinking it was some poor woman's apron.

JOHNSONS'S Defence. I was coming from Northall. I got into conversation with Williams; I went to buy some victuals and he ran after me, saying I have found a parcel.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-190

685. JOHN WILLIAMS and EDWARD JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a gross of buttons, value 4 s. 6 d. the goods of Joseph Selman .

JOSEPH SELMAN . On Thursday, the 11th of March, both the prisoners came into my shop; Williams asked me what I would make him a fustian jacket for, I said 7 s. I looked at them very hard - he turned to Johnson and said

"I only gave 3 s. for this" (which he had on) they went out leaving the door open. I shut the door - I saw Williams take off his hat and talk to Johnson. I missed the buttons from the window, and went in pursuit; I found them in about an hour - they ran off. I called Stop thief! Williams threw off his hat, and was brought to me with the buttons; I charged him with taking them - they said nothing.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I found Johnson in the prosecutor's custody. The buttons were found in a ditch.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-191

686. THOMAS LIPSCOMBE was indicted for that he, about the hour of one, in the night of the 19th of March , at St. Margaret, Westminster, in a certain nursery ground belonging to James Gray , and William Gray , feloniously did pluck up and carry away, eighteen hundred plants, value 30 s., their property, then and there growing, standing, and being .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner in laying the charge.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am a nurseryman , in partnership with my father, James Gray . We have grounds at Kensington-gore, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . We had planted several crab stock plants on the 19th of March; I left the ground in the afternoon; the men usually leave at six o'clock - it is dark before seven. Next morning, between nine and ten, I went to the grounds, and found that about eighteen hundred had been stolen; the ground was trodden down - it had been a wet night - I did not see the ground when it was finished at night, but plants were left standing in different places. I afterwards saw six or seven of them - our clerk brought them from Vauxhall; they appeared to be a part of those stolen, as far as I could judge. I had not assisted in planting them, but was present part of the day. We always trim them in planting them. If they are intended for sale they are not trimmed. I do not know the prisoner. After his committal he came up to me, and said,

"I am guilty," and begged I would not prosecute, on account of his family.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Nothing had been said to him - A. No; he said this voluntarily, - he asked to speak to me, and said so. I understand he is a market gardener. There were more than than three hundred plants gone, certainly, - the value of the whole is between 30 s. and 40 s.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I was with the men planting the trees. They left work on the evening of the 19th - it was not dark then. I returned to the ground soon after six o'clock next morning, the sun had risen about ten minutes. I found a number of rows, and about eighteen hundred plants pulled up and gone. We had left the ground pretty level. The land is rather of a yellowish hue, and a stiff soil. I did not observe any earth on the parts of the plants that were above the ground. I assisted in pruning them - they were done for planting, and not for sale; we could not have exposed such for sale. There was the print of men's feet on the ground. Some rows were taken entirely; and sometimes one left here and there, as if done in a hurry, and in the dark. In consequence of information from Phillip, I went to his grounds at Vauxhall, and saw about two thousand plants, being near the number we lost; they were not planted, but the roots merely covered with earth. I have seven of them here, and am positive they are part of those stolen from our ground. I had pruned them myself, and cut the roots much closer than if they were intended for sale - we always cut them closer for planting; and the leaders of some were on, and others were not; and in cutting them. I frequently left a small piece of bark, which I observe on these. I will swear that at least fifteen hundred of them are ours - our soil is a yellow loom colour, and these were covered with mud at the top, above the roots, which would not have been the case, if they had not been taken from the ground in a hurry, laid on the wet ground and walked over; they have the same sort of soil on them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Are they now in the state you found them - A. There was a little more earth about them than now.

Q. Will the earth that is now on them weigh twelve grains - A. I think not. I speak from the quality and nature of the soil which was on them at the time.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When you saw them they were fresh - A. Yes. I positively swear they are ours. I received them from Phillips on the Saturday following.

CHARLES SWADDLING . I am foreman to the prosecutor. I recollect the planting these trees, - we missed them in the morning - I believe those produced to be the same; have every appearance of it.

LEONARD PHILLIPS , sen. I have a nursery ground at Vauxhall. About a week previous to the 22d of March, the prisoner called on me, and produced a sample of crab

and pear stocks, I agreed for two thousand of each. About ten o'clock on Saturday morning, the 22d of March, he brought two thousand of each. I covered the roots with earth to keep the air from them. I saw they were much injured in the bark, and in a state improper to be sold. They appeared to have been trampled on in the dark. He accounted for the injury, by saying, they were damaged by rubbing against the sides of the cart. I shewed him that the interior of the bundles were the same. He could give no satisfactory answer to that. The stems were very muddy - I refused to pay for them, as I had suspicions, and wrote to the prosecutors immediately. The clerk came over, and I shewed him the same; he took a few away as a sample - they were cut in an unusual manner for sale. He observed, in reply to that, that he had been so kind as to do that for me, as they were prepared for planting; and that he would not charge me any thing for it, though they were worth 7 s. 6 d. for it. He delivered them on the 22d. I left my ground on the Saturday evening, and on the Monday morning found them all stolen, except seven, which had escaped notice. The pear stocks were not taken; they were not the prosecutors', nor were they in the same state.

Cross-examined. Q. You have bought of him before - A. Yes, at different times; I had ordered these a week previous. I wrote to him on the 13th of March to bring me a sample. I was never at his grounds.

JAMES COX . I am a cow keeper, and have a field adjoining Mr. Gray's. I heard of the robbery on the 28th of March - I had been on my grounds until nine o'clock the previous night, and saw nobody in the prosecutor's premises. I went to the field next morning about half-past five o'clock, and saw nobody there.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you watching the trees - A. No; but if anybody had been there I must have seen them.

WILLIAM MARKHAM . I am a nurseryman. When plants are to be sold, they are cut different to when they are intended for planting. Those in question are cut for planting only.

Cross-examined. Q. But if sold for planting they would be cut that way - A. Never; the small fibres are never cut off when they are sold, or they would spoil; they should be cut off at the moment of planting. They are not sold after being planted and pruned; they never take them up. No nursery man would sell them in that state; the expence of planting is too great to sell them afterwards.

COURT. Q. Every person has his own way of trimming - A. Yes. I should certainly have declined buying them in this state; I should have suspected they had been stolen after planting.

LEONARD PHILLIPS . It was quite obvious that they were obtained improperly - they were pruned in an unusual manner.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to call.

HENRY HAWKINS . I am a gardener, and live at Fulham. The prisoner has a bit of ground there, and plants crab and pear trees. I let him the ground - I have known him a year and a half; he bore an honest character. There are some such trees as these now in his ground; six or seven roods of them.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have given him a good character - do not you know he has been tried in this Court, and transported - A. I never heard it. There is nothing particular in these plants.

HENRY LIPSCOMBE . I am the prisoner's son. On the 13th of March, he received a note from Mr. Phillips, and on the 21st, he said he wanted to complete the order, and I helped him take up the trees from his stock, and there are some on the ground now, which were missed in taking up; they were all taken from our ground.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Where did you spend the night of the 19th of March - A. Most likely at home. I have not seen the trees since they were sold, except the seven produced.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230409-192

ELEVENTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 21.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

687. ELIZABETH COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , a blanket, value 1 s., and sheet, value 18 d., the goods of George Sheen , in a lodging-room .

HANNAH SHEEN . I am the wife of George Sheen ; we live in Mercer's-row, Shadwell . Early in February, I let the prisoner a furnished lodging, for six weeks. When she left I missed a blanket, and a sheet.

Prisoner. Q. Did I leave the lodging - A. I heard her go out; she had left me some things a week before to keep till she paid her rent.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I took the prisoner into custody on the 15th of March. I found a duplicate of the property upon her.

ROBERT WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Moriat, pawnbroker, Gravel-lane. I have a sheet pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Mary Collins .

HENRY HAWKINS . I am servant to Mr. Reynolds. On the 24th of February, a blanket was pawned, in the name of Ann Collins .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never meant to leave the place. I told her the things were pawned, and gave her things to keep instead of them.

HANNAH SHEEN . I did not know they were pawned.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-193

688. MARY PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a watch, value 2 l.; a seal, value 10 s., and a key, value 3 s., the goods of Robert Dargue , from his person .

MARY HEARN . I am the wife of William Hearn ; we live at Wapping. On the 23d of February, the prisoner came to my house for some things, which I had belonging to her, and left a blue cotton handkerchief there. An officer came in a few minutes, and said in her presence, he had come for a watch, which she had taken from a young man - she said she had none. She came and stood by me, and wanted to slip the watch into my hand - I would not, and it dropped down. Dargue picked it up.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. I found the prisoner at Hearn's - the prosecutor was with me. I said I wanted her for stealing his watch; she denied it. I saw something pass towards Hearn; I had another girl in my charge, and on turning round I saw the watch in the prosecutor's hand; he claimed it. The prisoner was flurried, and said nothing, The man had been intoxicated, and could not say whether she was the girl or not. He is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-194

689. NICHOLAS BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , twenty-three yards of calico, value 16 s. , the goods of John Cubley .

JOHN CUBLEY . I am a linendraper , and live at Bow . About eight o'clock on the night of the 10th of April, there were a number of pieces of calico, piled up two yards within the door; I heard one of them slide down - I called Stop thief! and the prisoner was secured, and the calico was brought in in about five minutes.

CHARLES BRISTOW . I heard a cry of Stop thief, and saw the prisoner running with something white under his arm - I secured him; he threw the property into the church-yard. It was picked up, and returned to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-195

690. ISRAEL DENNING was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , one set of fire irons, value 3 s. , the goods of John Herbert .

JANE WAGER . I am servant to Mr. John Herbert , who keeps the Globe, public-house . On the 22d of February, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I missed the fire irons, and found them at Worship-street on the Tuesday following.

JAMES DAVEY . I am a brick maker, and live at Hackney. I heard the cry of Stop thief! in the Hackney-road , on the 22d of February, about a half past eight o'clock in the morning, and ran in pursuit of the prisoner, and took him behind the engine house concealed, and gave him in charge to the officer. I only lost sight of him in turning the corner of a wall.

HENRY WHITEHAND . I am servant at the Royal Oak, Hackney and I saw the prisoner come through the Globe, public-house, with something under his coat. I saw three nobbs above his coat. He ran as hard as he could. I told Mr. Herbart.

THOMAS GOODWIN . On Saturday the 22d of February, I was in Margaret-street, Hackney, and saw the prisoner running very fast with something under his coat. I saw the top of the fire irons projecting out; he ran up by the side of the canal. I lost sight of him several times; but I am certain of him. When he found me near him, he dropped the irons. Davey took him; he said a man gave them to him by the Globe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-196

691. JOHN FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a jacket, value 4 s. the goods of Edward Hall .

EDWARD HALL . I work at Osborne's livery stables, King's-mews . On the 11th of April, I saw the prisoner riding some horses in the yard, and about an hour after. I missed my jacket. I found him in Bedford-street, with it on; he said a boy gave it him. I had left it hanging in the stables.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to appear decent in, as I wanted to get a place, and should have returned it in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-197

692. MARY LEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , seven yards of lace, value 10 s. , the goods of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Chiswell-street . In the evening of the 10th of March, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to see some lace, she was shewn some, it got strewed over the box. I saw her leaning over the counter with her whittle; she had a piece of lace in her hand, and sent the young man to the window to fetch some more, and while he was gone the prisoner put it quite under her whittle; she then offered a low price for the lace, and was going away without buying any thing. I stopped her at the door; she shook her whittle and this lace fell at her feet, it was two yards from the counter.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it, it might have fallen from the counter.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230409-198

693 JAMES STARLING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one bridle, value 8 s.; one roller, value 4 s., and one head-stall, value 1 s. , the goods of John Anderson .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230409-199

Before Mr. Recoder.

694. ELIZABETH YATMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , two pewter pots, value 18 d., the goods of Peter Speedy , one pewter pot, value 18 d. the goods of John Simpson , and one pewter pot, value 1 s. , the goods of George Baldock .

PETER SPEEDY . I keep the Boot, public-house , in Cromer-street, Judd-street. I lost two pots. I served the people of the house in which the prisoner lived. Since Christmas I have lost pots to the value of 7 l.

JOHN SIMPSON . I keep the Dolphin, public-house , Tunbridge-street, New-road. One of the pots are mine.

GEORGE BALDOCK . I keep the Nightingale, public-house , Alpha-cottage, nearly three miles from the other houses. This other pot is my property.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I went with a search warrant to the prisoner's room, No. 19, Wood-street, Cromer-street, to look for other articles. She lodged in the front parlour. I found a chest of drawers; one drawer was locked. I insisted on its being opened. she hesitated, and at last opened it with a key, and put herself down to try to conceal something, she took hold of a pint pot trying to conceal it. I found another quart pot and two pints, each wrapped in separate cloths; they had the names and signs of the houses, all on them. There was wearing apparel in the drawers.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I have two lodgers. I went out to wash for three days, and in the evening they came home dreadfully in liquor. I knew nothing of the pots being there. The partition to the drawers does not meet half way, so that they could put any thing there.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-200

695. JAMES BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , a snuff box, value 5 l. the goods of Augustus Delisle , from his person .

AUGUSTUS DELISLE , ESQ. I live in Chapel-street, Grosvenor-square. I was at the Opera-house on Saturday the 5th of April. I had a silver snuff box in my coat pocket. As I was coming out of the pit, about twelve o'clock, I felt for it, and missed it at the entrance door. I saw the prisoner about two yards off, I suspected him from his appearance, and laid hold of him. I found the snuff box in his breeches pocket, and gave him in charge - it cost me five guineas.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He said he picked it up, did not he - A. I do not recollect it. I declined at first to prosecute him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. I was attending at the Opera-house, and received the prisoner in charge for picking pockets - several gentlemen were round; he said he knew nothing about it. Mr. Delisle said, he had taken his snuff box out of his coat pocket - he made no answer. I asked him how he came to go into the pit, being only a journeyman carpenter. He said he went to see the performance, and paid 10 s. 6 d.; that he saw a man drop a box, he picked it up and put it into his pocket. The prosecutor did not attend at the office, and he was discharged.

WILLIAM WOOTTEN . I was coming along with the prisoner to the office, and at the Mews gate, three or four men stood together - the prisoner hung back; and about three yards from these men I saw a man I knew, and demanded his aid; he collared him, and I was immediately tripped up, he fell upon me, made a struggle, and got his hands out of a handkerchief, which they were tied with, and struck me a blow over my head as soon as I got up; we were up and down three or four times; and while I was on my back I received a blow on the cheek-bone, which deprived me of my senses; but I did not let go of him, till the man who I called to my assistance pretended to assist. I said,

"hold him tight;" and at that moment he let him go - he ran down Charing-cross, but was secured.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230409-201

696. THOMAS WOOD and EDWARD BARTHOLOMEW were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 2 1/2 lbs. mutton, value 14 d. , the goods of William Souter .

WILLIAM SOUTER . I am a butcher , and live in Greenhill's-rents. On the 9th of April, about a quarter to two o'clock, I left my shop without any one in it. The door was locked, but the window open.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a lighterman. About two o'clock in the afternoon, I was going by the shop, and saw the prisoner Wood throw himself across the shop-board, and reach the meat from inside the shop, and put it on the board in front; they then began to talk together. I passed them twice, and on looking round, saw Bartholomew running with it on his back - he threw a blue handkerchief over it. I followed, and as I passed the Sessions House, I ran in for an officer - followed them to Coppicerow, and they were stopped; Wood dropped the mutton.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you not tell the magistrate you did not see him take it - A. No. I said I did not see him take it the second time; as a coach drew up between us at the time.

JOHN CONDE . I am a constable. Williams fetched me, and at corner of Coppice-row the prisoners stopped; they saw us coming, and one says to the other

"Cut it." They immediately ran up a street. I followed, and took Bartholomew, and Williams took Wood. I saw something fall from him. I found 2 s. 7 d. on Bartholomew, and 5 s. 7 d. on Wood. A loin of mutton was picked up.

DAVID MAGSON . I followed the prisoners, and saw Wood running with a blue handkerchief, and found the mutton at his feet when I came up.

WOOD'S Defence. Williams said before the Magistrate that he did not see us take it. We had been in a public-house five minutes before he caught sight of us again.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

BARTHOLOMEW - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18230409-202

697. FREDERICK JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , one penny-weight and ten grains of gold, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles Mainstone .

CHARLES MAINSTONE . I am a working jeweller , and live in Seabright-place, in Hackney-road. The prisoner has been my apprentice for five years. On Thursday week, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I had occasion to melt a small quantity of gold. I weighed 21 dwts., and put it in a crucible, on the work board, where he was at work alone. Having lost gold and pearls at times, I thought I would fix the crucible, so that I should know if it had been disturbed - he had no occasion to move it at all. I returned in three or four minutes, and found it had been removed a few inches from where I placed it; it then weighed 19 dwts. 13 grains - he seemed confused, and went up stairs, and shortly afterwards returned, and was shuffling among some old boxes. I sent him on an errand, and found the gold wrapped up in paper, in an old box, among some old iron - I replaced it there, and sent for an officer, and when he came in, I asked him to produce the gold he had taken from the crucible; he denied having taken any. The officer spoke sharp to him, and he put his hand up the flue, and produced it. I had left it in the box - he must have moved it from there.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I believe you gave him leave to use a little gold to make a pin for himself - A. I had been robbed before by the apprentices; I then said, if they wanted a broach, to ask my leave, and they should have it; but the first who robbed me I would prosecute.

THOMAS EAGLES . I was sent for, and took charge

of him. I saw him produce the gold from a flue. He said he was going to make a broach of it for himself.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-203

698. WILLIAM GLEED was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , two candlesticks, value 10 s. , the goods of William Wilkins .

WILLIAM WILKINS . I am a Smith , and live in Grosvenor-place, Chelsea. On the 12th of April, about twenty minutes past five o'clock, these candlesticks stood under the stall. I heard a rustling while I was in the work shop, and coming out I saw the prisoner with them under his apron; I followed him about a hundred yards, and secured him with them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-204

699. JANE FENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , three bed gowns, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 1 s. 6 d.,; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two frocks, value 4 s.; an iron footman, value 1 s.; a flat iron, value 6 d., and five napkins, value 2 s. the goods of Lazarus Jacobs .

CATHERINE JACOBS . I am the wife of Lazarus Jacobs, who is a clothes salesman , and live in Church-lane . The prisoner was in my service for six weeks, I gave her 2 s. per week. I left her in care of my place on the 23d of February about nine o'clock in the morning, and went out, I returned at ten at night, and found her at home. These things were in a box in my bed-room not locked - I went to the box and missed some children's things; I called her up, and she said they were in the other room - I went, but they were not there. She then said they were at the mangler's. I had her fetched, and she said she had brought them home on Friday - the prisoner then said she would give them to me in the morning - but we gave her in charge. I found them in pawn.

GEORGE GILES . I am shopman to Mr. Law, pawnbroker, Commercial-road; I have a night-gown pawned on the 18th of February, and a table cloth on the 17th, a footman, petticoat, and stockings, two flat irons and two towels.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; I found some duplicates in her possession, which led me to Sowerby's, who delivered me a bed gown, frock, and napkin.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of pawning for them.

CATHERINE JACOBS. I never gave her authority to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-205

700. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a child's dress, value 12 s. , the goods of Phillip Marks .

PHILLIP MARKS . I am a salesman , and live in Mary-le-bone-lane . On the 6th of March this dress hung across a line in the shop. I missed it about eight in the evening - I had seen it ten minutes before - my little brother gave an alarm. I ran out, crying Stop thief! and I saw the prisoner about twenty yards off; I lost sight of him for five minutes, and will not swear to him.

GEORGE TURNER . I live with my father, nearly opposite Marks's; I saw the prisoner take the clothes off the line and run off - Marks followed, and I lost sight of him. I never saw him before; I am certain he is the man - he threw it into a butcher's shop. I picked it up, and another boy snatched it out of my hand, and gave it to Marks.

WILLIAM JONES . I am watchman of Mary-le-bone, I heard the cry of Stop thief! a man came running up very fast, and when within a yard of me, he stepped aside and crossed the street, I followed but lost sight of him for ten minutes.

HUMPHREY ROBERTS . I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry; the prosecutor came up and said he thought it was me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230409-206

701. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a tool, called a bright stake, value 10 s. , the goods of Edward Freeman .

EDWARD FREEMAN . I am a smith , and live in Aylesbury-street . On the 13th of March, this bright stake lay in the shop. The prisoner was walking up and down before the door, but I did not suspect him; in about ten minutes I was sent for to do a job opposite, and left my wife in the shop. On coming out of the door, I saw him running from my door with something under his waistcoat - I went after him, and asked what he had got; he said nothing. I took it from him. He pleaded distress.

THOMAS BURRIDGE . I am a constable, I received him in charge and found 6 d. on him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230409-207

702. ANN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a silver ornament, representing a sheep, value 24 s. , the goods of Allen Hampden Pye , Esq.

GENERAL ALLEN HAMPDEN PYE . I lodge in the first floor of a house in Southampton-street, Covent-garden , kept by Mr. Corbyn, the prisoner was servant at the house; I had a silver ornament, representing a sheep, which I brought from South America - it was kept in a small band-box in a trunk which was frequently open. On Thursday the 18th of April, I returned from a walk, and found the prisoner in charge, and on looking into my trunk I missed the ornament. The officer produced it.

JOSEPH CORBYN . I am a taylor; the prisoner was my only servant - her box was searched and this ornament found in it. She had lived three weeks with me.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer; I found it in the prisoner's box, she was present and said she met an acquaintance in Oxford-street, who gave it her - that he had since gone to Ireland; she afterwards said she found it on the carpet in the room, and took it up stairs to look at.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it up stairs to look at.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230409-208

703. ANN LLOYD was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a table cloth, value 2 s.; two pieces of lace, value 2 s.; a brooch, value 2 d., and a brooch case, value 1 d. , the goods of John Crucifix .

ANN CRUCIFIX . I am the wife of John Crucifix , blacking maker . The prisoner lived six weeks with me - I gave her a character when she went. I did not miss the property till the officers brought it me.

GEORGE AVIS . I found it in her box.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-209

704. CATHERINE DUNKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a spoon, value 12 s.; two bottles, value 6 d.; two quarts of wine, value 10 s.; 6 lbs. of bread, value 1 s.; half an ounce of tea, value 3 d.; one ounce of cocoa, value 2 d.; three pair of gloves, value 2 s.; seven plates, value 3 s., and four ounces of mutton, value 2 d. , the goods of William Croft Fish ; and CATHERINE RILEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM CROFT FISH . I live in John-street, Pentonville . The prisoner was five weeks in my service, and was my only female servant - having suspicion that I was plundered from time to time, I determined to watch; and on Sunday I found concealed between her bed and the sacking, a whity-brown paper parcel; containing coffee, sugar, cocoa, sweetmeats, gloves, and a small child's stocking, containing duplicates; one of which was for a silver spoon, pawned on the 27th of March. I replaced the things, as she had asked to go out that evening - I examined the plate, and found a spoon missing. I got up early next morning, and watched at the bed-room window, which commanded a view of the street, and in about twenty minutes I saw Riley come opposite the house, and look down the kitchen - she went backwards and forwards six or seven times, she then stopped; she had a small white handkerchief, which appeared to be empty, she opened the gate and appeared to come in at the street-door; this was about six o'clock. Riley left the house endeavouring to conceal a bundle under her cloak; I then ran down and before she turned the corner of the street, I came up with her, and asked what she had under her cloak; she said some broken victuals, which had been given her by a person close by - I asked her where; she pointed towards the chapel, which is in a contrary direction to my house - I told her to return with me; she did - I placed her in the in the front parlour, where the other prisoner was. I had her bundle put on the table; she made a motion which I thought to be curtsying, but I found she had dropped a bottle of port wine; I made her sit down. and would suffer no communication between the two; close by the door where she sat, was another bottle of sherry, which I have compared with my stock. I sent for a constable, who examined the bundle - it was the same I had found under the bed, but two plates were added to it. I found a letter with a direction in it, in the parcel which gave me the residence of the prisoner Riley. I went there and found five plates, of the same pattern as the other two; and about four yards of ribbon, which I knew to be mine, as it was on the card of a friend of mine, and I had seen it on my wife's bonnet; five pair of gloves were in the bundle, and some of which have my name on them. Riley said she had found the wine that morning, in a field behind the House of Correction, wrapped in a napkin. Dunkin said she did not care what I did with her, provided I let the other go. She called her aunt - I found the spoon at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The gloves are dirty - A. Certainly; they were perhaps left in my hat, or put in a drawer to be cleaned - the ribbon cost 16 d., a yard. I can swear to the plates, by their shape, size, and pattern, and by a deficiency in the set.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge, how many plates you had - A. I do; for we had had a party the night before; and the prisoner was very anxious to have the key to put them out. I know they were not broken - we allow our servants 10 s. 6 d. a year, in addition to their wages for accidents; and if they were broken, we should know it. I knew the wine by the taste, and colour.

ELIZABETH ASHEN . I am servant to Mr. Neale, who lives opposite Mr. Fish. I saw Riley walking up and down the street, before Mr. Fish's door, a little after six o'clock in the morning; and noticed her looking down the kitchen window. Then the servant let her in - she had no bundle then, only a white handkerchief; she came out in about five minutes, with a bundle under her arm - I went away from the window directly; Mr. Fish came over, and I told him what I had seen.

HONORA O'CONNELL +. I live in John-street, one door from Mr. Fish. I went to his door for a light, the prisoner Riley then stood there with a bundle - she left the house as I came away. I did not suspect any thing.

JAMES PHILLIPS . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to Riley's house. and found five plates, and the ribbon there.

DUNKIN. I am quite innocent.

RILEY'S Defence. I found the bottles of wine at the back of the House of Correction; and brought the two plates to the other prisoner to replace two she had broken. As I came along, I met a woman who gave me this broken victuals.

DUNKIN - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months .

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-210

705. ELIZABETH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a bag, value 1 d.; three sovereigns; a crown piece; four half crowns; nine shillings, and two sixpences, the property of John Levett , from his person .

JOHN LEVETT . I live in North-green, Finsbury, and am a labourer . On the 11th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I received five sovereigns and eleven shillings at Chelsea Hospital. I spent some of it in drink, and was rather fresh. I was going home, and lost it between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I do not remember meeting any woman - I was going to look for a woman, whom I had promised to go home with, but could not find her. I either fell down or was knocked down, and the officer picked me up. I cannot say whether I had been in company with any woman or not.

WILLIAM SANDERSON . I am a tailor, and live at Pimlico.

I was passing Buckingham-gate, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prosecutor coming out of a public-house, very drunk, and coming down the steps he fell, and cut his head very much - the prisoner followed him out of the house, and endeavoured to raise him up. I asked if she knew any thing of him; she said, No, and seeing him in that state I proposed to search his pockets to see if we could find where he belonged to, which I did, and his pockets were empty. A person who came out of the public-house, said they had seen him with sovereigns; I then suspected the prisoner must have robbed him, searched her, and found a bag concealed under her arm, containing three sovereigns, a crown, and four half crown pieces. I delivered it to the landlord, gave her in charge, and sent the prosecutor to the Infirmary. The bag and money was delivered to me.

JOHN LEVETT . The bag is mine - I have had it twelve months.

Prisoner's Defence. He laid in the street drunk, put his hand into his pocket, and asked me to take care of it.

WILLIAM SANDERSON . That could not have happened without my observing it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-211

706. JOHN TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two frocks, value 9 d.; a bed gown, value 6 d.; a pin-cloth, value 3 d.; an apron, value 6 d., and three handkerchiefs, value 3 d. , the goods of Edward Sheen .

EDWARD SHEEN . I live in Broad-street . On the 6th of April, I lost these things from my bed-room drawers. I found the prisoner in custody with them about five o'clock in the afternoon; he took me to Old Gravel-lane, went into a house there, and brought part of the property out. He had breakfasted with my lodger the day before.

MARIA WOOD . I am the prosecutor's mother-in-law. Between four and five o'clock, I found the prisoner in the bed-room - he begged my pardon, and said he was in the wrong room, and ran up into the front garret. My son laid hold of him afterwards, and the things were produced.

ELIZABETH GOGAN . I live in Old Gravel-lane, and sell fruit. I was talking with a woman, and the prisoner came up, and produced some frocks and handkerchiefs from his bosom, and asked us to buy them; another woman came down the court; he sold them for 6 d., and was going to throw away an old handkerchief. I said

"give that to me;" he did so, and I gave it to the officer.

ADAM HYDE . I took him in charge with the clothes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-212

707. EDWARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a trunk, value 8 s. , the goods of Jane Wedderburn , widow , Dowager Countess of Selkirk .

HUGH COLTHORPE . I am in the service of the Dowager Countess of Selkirk; her town house is in Lower Grosvenor-street. Her ladyship was going on a visit to Lady Douglas, at Barnes - we went by Queen's-elms. The trunk was behind the carriage - it contained her son (Lord Selkirk's) property. I saw it safe when we called at No. 47, Hertford-street - I strapped it on the carriage, and missed it when we got to the Old George, public-house, Fulham-road ; I saw the prisoner running from behind the carriage with it in his hands. I jumped off the dickey, and went after him - he threw it down, and was stopped. I am certain of his person.

CHARLES GEORGE BOLTON . I live at Little Chelsea. I saw the prisoner running behind the carriage, and the strap dragging on the ground. I saw him pull the strap down, and take the trunk, and go off with it - I ran out to stop him; he offered to fight me, and took a knife out, drew it, and brandished it at me. The strap had been cut - he was secured before I lost sight of him. I saw him throw it away.

JOHN PARSONS . I am a constable. I saw a mob round the carriage, and met the prisoner making his escape. Lady Selkirk wished him to be secured - I went after him, and took him at Hyde Park-corner.

HENRY COTTON . I saw the prisoner going from the carriage with the trunk in his hands - he threw it down and ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took it, but did not cut the strap. I could get no work, owing to my last master refusing to give me a character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-213

708. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , a cap, value 4 s. , the goods of John Lackey .

JOHN ATTWOOD . I am servant John Lackey - he has a partner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-214

709. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of James Guest .

MARTHA GUEST . I am the wife of James Guest , Allock-lane, Shoreditch . This handkerchief was in a basket in the kitchen, and must have been taken between Monday evening or Tuesday morning, the 1st of April - I missed it on the Wednesday, and found it in pawn. I employed the prisoner to turn a silk machine.

WILLIAM PARR . I am apprenticed to Mr. Cotton, pawnbroker, Shoreditch. I have a handkerchief pawned by the prisoner, in his own name, on the 1st of April, for 3 s. 6 d.

GEORGE DAY . I received him in charge - he said he had destroyed the duplicate, but told me where to find the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-215

710. ELIZABETH ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing on the 29th of March , a gown, value 2 s.; a sheet, value 4 s.; a shift, value 18 d.; an apron, value 1 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and an iron, value 6 d., the goods of George Harrison ; and a handkerchief, value 6 d., and a pail, value 1 s. , the goods of Christian Lanterburg .

MARY HARRISON . I am the wife of George Harrison, and live in the Back-road, St. George's in the East . The prisoner lodged on the second floor of the same house; she followed no business. I missed these things on the 29th of March, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning; I employed her to wash for me, and told her to hang these these things up on the landing place - she left the house, and was found on the 4th of April - she had my gown on.

JOHN LAPPAGE . I am a pawnbroker. I have flat-iron, pawned on the 27th of March, by a woman in the name of Ann Robertson , and on the 24th of March, a handkerchief was pawned.

CHRISTIAN LANTERBURG. I keep the house. I lost a pail and handkerchief, which were safe the evening before she left. I have found the handkerchief which was stolen from the shop. She left without notice.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge. I found the gown on her back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-216

711. SARAH ANN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one ring, value 20 s. , the goods of Richard Wall .

AGATHA WALL . Late in the evening of the 27th of March, I missed my gold ring, from my wash-hand stand drawer. The prisoner was my servant , and had been three weeks with me. I have not found it.

JOHN WYLLIE . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge for stealing the ring. I asked her some questions about it, and said she had better confess it. She took me to Kingston, in May's-buildings. I asked him in her presence if he recollected buying a ring of her; he said he did, but that he had parted with it.

RICHARD KINGSTON . I keep a jeweller's shop, the prisoner sold me a ring on the 11th of March for 4 s., it was topaz set in gold; she said she found it. I sold it for 7 s.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230409-217

712. ROBERT PRESTIGE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , four pewter pots, value 2 s. , the goods of William Renninson .

WILLIAM RENNINSON . I keep the Plaisterer's-arms, public-house, Seymour-street, Euston-square . I have lost a number of pots. I think these were taken from my customers doors; they have my name and sign on them.

THOMAS MAY . I am the patrol. I stopped the prisoner in the afternoon of the 21st of March, in Clarendon-street, Somer's-town, with four pint pots in a bag, which was covered with his apron. I asked him what he had got; he said nothing. The prosecutor claimed them.

PETER WHITEHAIRE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the pots; he said distress drove him to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-218

713. SAMUEL WILLIAM MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a watch, value 20 s.; a a seal, value 6 d.; a chain, value 1 s.; a key, value 1 d. , the goods of Edgar George Papworth .

EDGAR GEORGE PAPWORTH. I live with my parents, in Grosvenor-street, Camden-town . I left my watch on the chimney-piece in the bed-room; we took the prisoner in out of charity! he went to school with me; he slept with me; we went to bed about eleven o'clock, and when I awoke about eight next morning, he was gone. I missed my watch, and afterwards found it in pawn; he was taken on the 7th of March; he said if I would go to Piccadilly with him. he would give me the money; I went as far as Fulham he then gave me the duplicate.

HENRY BARR . I am servant to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker. On the 15th of January, about half past eight o'clock in the morning; I took this watch in pawn of the prisoner for 17 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made a ship in miniature, and sold it to the prosecutor for 25 s., he paid me 5 s. I wanted to go into the country, and I asked the prosecutor for the rest; he would not give it me; his sister suggested that I should pawn his watch; I did so, and gave him the duplicate; he returned it to me, saying it was useless to him. He walked with me as far as Hammersmith, I returned in three days and drank tea with him; he said nothing. I was apprehended about a week after, and the prosecutor desired the the officer to let me go; he did so, and I visited him for a month after.

E. G. PAPWORTH. He came to the house two or three times after the watch was taken. He gave me the duplicate when my sister was with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230409-219

714. THOMAS HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two sheets, value 10 s.; two shifts value 4 s.; two bed-gowns, value 5 s.; one cravat, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; a table cloth, value 2 s. 6 d.; a shirt value 1 s.; and a pillow case, value 6 d. the goods of Samuel Elliott .

SARAH ELLIOTT . I am the wife of Samuel Elliott , we live in Wenlock-cottage. City-road . On the 26th of March, these things hung in the back garden, which is inclosed all round. I saw them safe about half past seven o'clock at my house, and missed them ten minutes after. I found the articles mentioned in the indictment at a pawnbrokers; at Hoxton, next morning. I lost several others.

SARAH LAW . My husband is a pawnbroker, and lives at Hoxton. On the 27th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, we took a shirt, shift, and cravat in pawn of the prisoner; he said his mother sent him, and that he lived at No. 28, Essex-street, Hoxton.

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Mr. Law's shop; I took these things from him there, and produce them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Essex-street, who asked me to pawn them for 7 s., and he would give me a few halfpence. I returned to him, and he sent me with more.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230409-220

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

715. JOHN WATTS was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS LANE . I am in partnership with Allen Billing , we live in Coventry-street. The prisoner was our foreman , and entrusted to receive money for us. Mr. Buckmaster owed us 9 l.; the prisoner never accounted to me for this money.

WILLIAM BUCKMASTER . I paid the prisoner 9 l., on account of the prosecutors on the 26th of June.

ALLEN BILLING . He never accounted to me for it.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-221

716. SAMUEL SHEPPARD was indicted for bigamy .

JOHN HARE . The prisoner was married to my daughter in 1812, she is now alive. I was present at the marriage.

MARY RUMBLE . I was married to the prisoner on the 20th of March, 1815 ; he said he was married before, but he had writings drawn up of separation, and gave me a letter, which he said was his wife's hand-writing.

This letter was here read, it was dated the 26th of February, 1815, and signed Mary Hare , stating, that if the prisoner would send her a divorcement she would sign it.

JOHN HARE . I do not believe this to be my daughter's writing.

The prisoner, in a written defence, complained of his first wife's leaving him and cohabiting with the lieutenant of his regiment, and that she finally married again, and that his ignorance of the law led him to suppose he might do the same.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230409-222

717. JAMES SHEAN