Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th February 1823.
Reference Number: 18230219
Reference Number: f18230219-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Dyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 19th of FEBRUARY, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and George Bridges , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and William Brown , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; and Thomas Denman, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justice of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Peter Duncan ,

John Thwaites ,

James Gray ,

Thomas Davis ,

Jethero Barrow ,

John Gilbert ,

William Rudge ,

Samuel Buckingham ,

James Hilton ,

Joseph Branch ,

Thomas Glover ,

Cornelius Rich .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Edward Smith ,

Daniel Fencock ,

Joshua Gordon ,

Samuel Crowsher ,

Robert Hart ,

James Bigg ,

Joseph Jones ,

Edward Beasley ,

John Eastwood ,

Robert Allen ,

Francis Place ,

Thomas King .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Michael Bath ,

John Hunt ,

Joseph Green ,

George Charlton ,

James Haward ,

Thomas Parker ,

John Berril ,

William Bell ,

William Goddard ,

Nathaniel Beale ,

William Wingfield ,

James Dobson .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 19, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18230219-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Park.

348. JOHN STRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , in the dwelling-house of William Donovan , twenty guineas; one hundred sovereigns; one hundred half sovereigns; ten seven shilling pieces; three hundred crown pieces; one 100 l.; one 30 l.; three 10 l., and three 5 l. Bank notes, and a Bank post bill for payment of, and value 80 l. , his property.

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DONOVAN . I am a fishmonger , and live in Oxford-street . About three years ago the prisoner Strong was in my employ - I also employed him as journeyman for about two months last summer; he might know where I kept part of my money. On Sunday evening, the 22d of December, about half-past five o'clock, I left my house in the care of Kenaley, who was my errand boy, and had been a year and a half in my service. I desired him to make himself a comfortable fire in the parlour behind the shop, and gave him some books to read. Thomas Griffiths , who had the care of my horse was with him. I went out for the purpose of attending chapel, but called at my brother's - I was sent for about nine o'clock, and found my daughter Elizabeth in tears. I found the inner door of the second parlour open; the lock was picked. I went to the drawers where I kept part of my money, and missed upwards of twenty sovereigns, some silver, and Bank notes - there was a 5 l. and a 10 l., and others, and two cheques, one for 30 l., and the other 18 l. There were marks of two chisels on the drawer, and in the other part of the drawer, I found the key of my iron chest, which I took to the chest, and found it locked. Some clothes which I had left on the top of it were thrown into the middle of the room, and upon opening it, I found there was not a farthing left. I lost above a hundred sovereigns, a 100 l. Bank note, a 80 l. Bank post bill, and from one to two hundred crown pieces. My suspicions fell on Kenaley. I had a very sharp dog in the house - no stranger could enter without his barking; the same dog was with me when Strong lived there, and if it was here it would run at him now I have no doubt.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Kenaley was accused himself - A. Yes. I have lodgers; the same people lodge with me now. I kept the keys of the iron chest in the drawer - I do not think Kenaley knew that; he had no access to that parlour. I have recovered none of my notes.

ELIZABETH DONOVAN . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I had been out all day, and returned about twenty minutes past eight o'clock. I discovered the robbery, and sent for my father.

CHARLES KENALEY . In December last I lived with the prosecutor - I had been in his service nearly two years before, and came back to him the Monday before the robbery. In that week, I met the prisoner at the Lamb and Flag, public-house, kept by Mr. Evenden, in James-street, Manchester-square; it was on the Friday evening - he asked if I had gone back; I said I had; he said that was all right, and if he came on Sunday would I let him in - I said I did not know whether it would be my turn to stop at home on the Sunday or not; he said I could stop if I liked, and if I did would I let him in; I refused and went away. I saw him again on the Saturday night, at the same place - he said if he and Bob came the next night, would I let them in, (I had seen Bob in his company before, but did not know his name); I said there would be no way for them to come in - he said Chandler would watch the man out of the stable, meaning Griffiths my fellow servant, who took care of the horse. I agreed to do it - Bob was present at both the conversations on Friday and Saturday. Strong said he thought my master had a great deal of money in the house, and that fishmongering was a good trade. I went home to tea, and afterwards returned to the public-house, but saw no more of them. Chandler was not present at these conversations. I saw them again about five o'clock on Sunday evening, at the Lamb and Flag. On the Saturday evening, Strong also said Chandler would watch my master out to chapel - he always went on Sunday nights, and did so when Strong was there. When I went on the Sunday, they asked me if I was going home to tea, I said I was, and would return - I returned in about an hour, and found Strong there alone; he asked if I was going back to the shop, I said, Yes - we then came out, and he asked if my master was at the shop, I said he was not. He said Chandler and Bob were in James-street. He told me to tell the man to go and clean the horse directly, I said I would. It was

agreed that when the man was gone, I was to stop at the door, and should see him at the corner opposite, I said I would. He said when the man was gone they would come in. I went to the shop; Griffiths was there - he said he would go and do his horse up, and then go home; I said, very well - he went, and I went to the door, and saw them at the opposite corner; Strong and Bob came over - I did not see Chandler; they had some keys; I do not know what they did with them. I remained at the door while they went in. They had a chisel, which would not do - Bob went and got another; they were in the house about ten minutes. I was not at the door all the time - I went into the room and saw them opening the drawer; they said they would go and fetch another chisel - they did not make much noise. I had not seen the dog after returning from tea. As they went out, I asked them how much they had got; they said about 300 l., and said I must know nothing about it. No appointment was made for me to meet them about it. I never learnt from the prisoner what became of it. Griffiths came back from the stable in about half an hour - I was sitting in the outer parlour; he came in and did not stop two minutes, and then left, but before he went, I left him in the house while I took some oysters into Manchester-square - I was gone about twenty minutes, and on returning found a girl talking to him at the door, and when she went away, he asked me who she was, I told him; he said she had been standing there for five minutes. I said I knew her by seeing her walk by the shop. He went away in about five minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. The prosecutor took you out of a charity school I believe - A. Yes. I was examined twice before I charged the prisoner with the robbery. I said at the first examination that I had been out with oysters, and did not know whether the robbery was done during that time or not. I have been in the House of Correction ever since.

Q. Have you never said that you was sorry you had accused the prisoner for he had no hand in it, but Bob was the person who broke the place open - A. No. I do not know one Barry. I was in the room when they said they must fetch another chisel. I told the Magistrate about another chisel being sent for.

ELIZABETH DONOVAN re-examined. When I came home the dog was in the front parlour - he was usually about the shop and parlour.

WILLIAM DONOVAN . I cannot recollect where the dog was when I went out. While Strong and Kenaley lived with me; it was my constant habit to go to chapel on Sunday evenings, and they knew it.

JANE EVENDEN . I am the wife of Thomas Evenden , who keeps the Lamb and Flag, James-street. I know Strong, and have seen Kenaley two or three times. I heard of this robbery on the Monday - I remember Strong was at my house the whole of Saturday evening, he was waiting there to be paid. I did not see Kenaley that evening - there were twenty or thirty people there. I know the prisoner well; he is a slater, and worked for Mr. West, and was regularly paid at our house. I saw him there again about six o'clock on Sunday evening, and Kenaley was there too, warming his hands in the same room, but I did not see them talking together - I only went into the room once, and cannot say whether they went out together; I think Kenaley was only there a few minutes. I do not know Bob by name; but on Saturday evening there were men there, who worked with Strong. I have seen Chandler there several times; his master serves us with bread - he was not there on Sunday evening.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am in Mr. Donovan's service, and take care of his horses. I was left at home with Kenaley - he came in after he had had tea. I told him I was going to the stable to do up the horses; he said, very well - I went, leaving him in the shop, and returned in about half an hour; he was then opening some oysters, which he said were to go to Latonches's, in Manchester-square. He took them, and I waited till he came back - I sat down by the fire, and heard a knock at the door, I went to look, but saw nobody; the knock was repeated, I went and saw a young woman standing at the corner, about two yards from me, but not talking to me. I asked Kenaley when he came if he knew her, he said he had seen her several times walking up and down. I waited a few minutes, and then went home.

Cross-examined. Q. You had no conversation with the girl - A. No.

THOMAS COOK . I am a carpenter, and have examined the drawers - there are the marks of two different chisels on it. I found part of a key in the lock of the second parlour door, which I produce.

Prisoner. I am entirely innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-2

Before Mr. Baron Graham ,

349. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , at St. Marylebone, a gelding, price 50 l.; a chaise, value 20 l., and a set of chaise harness, value 3 l. , the property of Joseph Hetherington .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HETHERINGTON . I am the son of Joseph Hetherington, of Connaught-terrace, Edgware-road, a livery stable keeper . On the 4th of January, the prisoner applied at the stables for a horse and chaise to hire, for twenty-eight days - he was to pay ten guineas for that time; he said he was the son of Mr. Hale, of Grosvenor-place. I knew there was such a person, a gentleman of property. He said he would have given me a reference to Martin's banking-house in Bond-street, but not being on good terms with his father, he did not like to give too many references at the banker's - that he lived at Hyde Cottage, near Edgware. He also referred me to Mr. Smith's, North Audley-street; I called upon him, but he was not within. The prisoner came again, I told him I had not seen Mr. Smith; he then said he would have referred me to Martin's, as I said before; on his representations, I was induced to let him have the horse and chaise on those terms, and gave him the stamp office ticket for the month. In about ten days or a fortnight, I began to make enquiry about my horse and chaise, and after the month had expired, I found the chaise and harness at Stone's livery stables, Marylebone-street, and the horse at Mr. Parker's of Southall; they were the same that I let the prisoner. I had found the prisoner at the Mitre, public-house, Connaught-terrace, on the Thursday after the twenty-eight days had expired, and asked where

the horse and chaise were, he said at Hampstead, and not being satisfied, I took him into custody, and found them in consequence of information; it was a brown gelding - they are now in my father's possession.

Prisoner. Q. When I first applied your foreman stated the terms much higher; but they were lowered in considation of my taking it for three months - Witness. I recollect nothing being mentioned about three months - it was let for one month.

THOMAS PARKER . I am a farmer, and live at Southall. On the 27th of January, the prisoner came to me in Berner-street, where I live when in town, and said he had got a horse and chaise to dispose of (I did not know him before, but my servant had seen him); he brought the horse and chaise to the door. I sent my servant with him to Mr. Stone's, in Marylebone-street, to enquire his opinion of the value; his hostler said, 20 l. I asked the prisoner where he got the horse and chaise, and how long he had had them - he said about three months, but did not say where he got it. I asked what he was, he said an officer in the army; I asked him if any one recommended him to me; he said, Yes, Mr. Kemp of Pimlico - I had known Mr. Kemp, of Pimlico, upwards of thirty years. He asked 23 l. or 24 l. for it altogether; I said I was informed 20 l. was the value, and would give no more - he agreed to take it, and gave me this receipt for the money (looking at it); my servant wrote the body of it, and he signed it in my presence; it is signed William Ward , Chumley Cottage, Richmond. I had asked where he lived, and if he kept a house; he said at Richmond. Sometime after the prosecutor claimed it; he described the horse and chaise accurately, and I gave them up.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not apply to you two days before on the subject - Witness. I understood so from my servant, but I did not see him.

Q. Did I not see you two days before, and talk with you for twenty minutes - A. Not that I recollect. I know nothing of his asking me to take it as a pledge.

Q. Did I not say Kemp recommended me to you as a person who lent money on different property - A. Nothing of the kind. He did not ask me to take it as a pledge.

Q. Did not you make an express stipulation to take it as a pledge for one month, at a certain interest, allowing a month's keep - A. Never. I said I should sell it again. I said I would have nothing to do with it but buying it.

Q. Did I not ask you to write the terms agreed to, at the back of the receipt - A. Nothing of the kind.

Receipt read: - Received on the 27th of January, 1823, of Thomas Parker, twenty pounds, for a horse, chaise, and harness, complete; William Ward , Chumley Cottage, Richmond, near the bridge, water side.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired the horse and gig under the belief that if I paid regularly for the first month, I was to have it for three months, and before the expiration of the first month, I was unfortunately embarrased, and wanted to pledge it, hoping I should be able to redeem it before the time expired. I applied to Kemp, a pawnbroker, of Pimlico, who said it was not in his way, but that Parker took pledges of that kind, and I went, and saw him in the presence of his clerk - he said, No, it would eat more than its value in the year, but if I chose to make a sale of it he would insure me the return in a month, and if I called on Monday, he would look at it, which I did; he came down, and looked at it. I had said I only wanted 20 l., but on Monday asked for 25 l. - he said,

"You said 20 l. at first, and 20 l. you shall have." He asked where I lived, I gave him the address; he asked if I would let his clerk drive it into the City to get a bill cashed, and if I called in an hour I should have the money; he agreed to keep it for a month. I returned in an hour, and when his clerk returned he laid the money on the table. I repeated the stipulations before his clerk. I asked him to write the agreement at the back of the receipt; he said he often had dealings of this kind, and never had his credit called into question, and it was not customary to write the stipulations. I gave him the receipt, he engaging to keep it for a month, and said if it was a day over the month, and the interest and keep not paid, he should not keep it. He asked what interest I gave, I said 3 l. would be sufficient; he said 3 l. would be too much, he would say 2 l.; and at the time I pledged it, I had every idea of being able to redeem it before the month expired, and had no idea of making away with it.

THOMAS PARKER re-examined. I have a clerk who merely receives my rents, and books debts. I have about two hundred acres of land. I was formerly a silversmith and pawnbroker, but have left that business.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18230219-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

350. THOMAS GUNTRIP was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , seven coats, value 3 l.; three pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; a pair of breeches, value 10 s., and a pair of boots, value 10 s., the goods of Tristram Radcliff , to whom he was servant , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE SMALLBONE . I am shopman to Mr. Hall, a pawnbroker, of Marylebone. On Thursday, the 30th of January, the prisoner came and offered a great coat, a close body coat, and two pair of trowsers, in pawn for 2 l., which I gave him; he said they were his master's, and he was authorized to pawn them - that his master's name was Mr. Radcliff, No. 22, Upper Dorset-street, and that his own name was Guntrip. He came again on the Thursday following, with a great coat, a pair of trowsers, and a pair of breeches, and said he pledged them for his master, a plumber, named Hall, of George-street - I asked if I had not taken something of him before, he said, Yes; I asked if his name was Guntrip, he said, Yes, and that he thought he had redeemed the coat he pawned before - I said that was not the case, and detained him.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am shopman to Messrs. Neat and Son, pawnbrokers, in Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 3d of February, the prisoner pawned three frock coats for 17 s., in the name of John Portman , No. 24, Davis-street.

MR. TRISTRAM RADCLIFF . I rent a furnished house by the week, in Welbeck-street, Marylebone . The prisoner was in my service for eight months, I missed nothing till I received information from Mr. Hall, the pawnbroker

who produced the clothes to me. They were in wear at the time. I never authorized him to pawn them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to ask my friends for money to redeem them.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-4

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

351. JAMES FAIRER and WILLIAM HARDING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Humphries , about the hour of nine in the night of the 13th of February , at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein four pair of shoes, value 10 s. , his property.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am a shoemaker , and live in James-street, Manchester-square, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On the 13th of February, about half-past nine o'clock, I was in the parlour - a girl came into the shop, and gave me information. I ran out, and saw two young men standing at the door - I found a pane of glass broken, and missed some shoes, I cannot tell how many. The pane was not quite out; it was a piece cut out at the corner; they had then put a hand through and opened the casement, which was fastened with a wire. I found the window about two inches open; a person could put his hand in, and take the shoes. I had seen it about half an hour before; I did not examine the pane then; I could see that the window was not unfastened then. I asked the two young men if they had seen anybody near, for somebody had been robbing me - they said they saw two boys; they went away on saying so, but one of them returned in about a minute, and said there were some very suspicious boys round the corner - I ran over towards the boys, One of the young men said,

"That is him, catch him." The two prisoners were then together, I went to take Fairer, he ran off as hard as he could, I secured him, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS EVANS . On the 13th of February, I was going up Henrietta-street, and saw the prisoner Harding, and Penford talking to him. I stopped about half a minute; there was a cry of Stop thief! I saw Harding run across the road, and throw something down an area; he was secured. I went to the house, and the landlady brought me up a pair shoes, out of the area - I gave them to the constable of the night at the watch-house. I am positive that Harding ran by the area, and threw something down, but what I do not know.

JOHN HUMPHRIES re-examined. Upon examination I missed a pair and two odd shoes; the odd ones were found next morning, and brought to me. I was at the watch-house when Evans brought the pair in, and gave them to the constable of the night. I claimed them - he gave them up to me next morning. I had seen them in the window that afternoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES PENFORD . On the 13th of February, I was in James-street, going with a friend, who called on an acquaintance of his, at the prosecutor's house, about half-past nine o'clock; I stood at the door waiting for him, and the prosecutor came out, and said he had been robbed, and asked if I had seen anybody passing; I said, No. It was a very dark night. My friend came out, we went on, and as we turned into Henrietta-street, at the corner of the street and Bird-street, we observed the two prisoner's as if looking for something; we passed them about five yards - Harding ran after us, and asked if we had picked up a shoe; we said, No. It immediately struck me they were the theives - I sent my friend to the prosecutor's house, and while he was gone they kept looking for the shoe. Fairer said they had bought a pair of shoes, and shewed me one, saying it was the fellow to that they lost. The prosecutor came up - I said,

"That is he, mark him," pointing to Fairer; he immediately took to his heels, and Harding walked leisurely across the road, turned round, and seeing me following him, he unbuttoned his coat, threw something down the area, and then ran off - I followed and took him at the corner of James-street, and gave him to the watchman. I went to the prosecutor's, and went with Evans to the area, which was searched, and the woman brought the shoes up.

Prisoner FAIRER. Q. Was I not twenty yards off when the cry of Stop thief! was raised - A. He was close to Harding.

Prisoner FAIRER. I am innocent.

One witness gave Fairer a good Character.

FAIRER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy on account of a good Character .

HARDING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18230219-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

352. MARY DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , a gown, value 30 s.; a coat, value 10 s.; a waistcoat, value 5 s.; a pair of pantaloons, value 8 s.; three pair of stockings, value 12 s.; two silver spoons, value 10 s.; a purse, value 10 s., and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of John Jarvis , to whom she was servant . in his dwelling-house .

JOHN JARVIS . I am a surgeon , and rent a house in New Compton-street . The prisoner came into my service on the 2d of January, and remained twelve days. In consequence of missing property on the night of the 14th of of January, we called the watchman in, and charged her with taking a coat, a waistcoat and other things; she denied it most positively. I saw a pair of silk and a pair of worsted stockings taken off her legs - she was recommended to me by Mary Murray, a servant, in Covent Garden, who had lived three years with us.

SUSANNAH JARVIS . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I saw these stockings taken off her legs. I found some tea and a glass cloth in her trunk, with the marks cut off. She represented herself as a single woman, but I understand she is married.

JOHN BURKE . I am a watchman. I received her in charge.

JAMES DRY . I am servant to Mr. Bartram, a pawnbroker, of Princes-street, Soho. On the 4th of January, about nine o'clock at night, the prisoner pawned a tea and a salt spoon, for 3 s. 6 d. with me, in the name of Mary Murray , No. 21, Bedford-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner to MRS. JARVIS. Q. Was I out on the 4th - A. She went out in the evening under the pretence of getting wood.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-6

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

353. HENRY COX and ISAAC DAVIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Hone , on the King's-highway, on the 8th of February , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l.; a seal, value 1 l.; two watch keys, value 1 l.; a hat, value 5 s., and a steel chain, value 4 s. , his property.

EDWARD HONE . I am a gunsmith . On the 8th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was proceeding home through Whitechapel - the lamps were just being lighted. At the corner of Goulston-street , I saw a window broken, there was a crowd round; I stopped to see what was the matter, and was surrounded by four or five men; the prisoners were among them - they all hustled me up, pinioned my arms back, and nearly pushed me against the window. I looked over my shoulder, and said,

"Don't shove me against the window;" and at that time I had a sight of the prisoners - Cox had hold of my arm, and Davis was very busy about my person, at my right side - I am certain of them both. I was released immediately I told them not to push me against the window - it struck me immediately that I was robbed; I clapped my hand on my fob, and missed my watch and chain; I said,

"I've lost my watch," still keeping my eye on the prisoners, who were going away. A man said,

"There they go;" I said, Yes, I know it, and immediately followed them, and caught Davis by the collar, and said,

"Young man, where is my watch?" he immediately up with his clenched fist, and struck me on the mouth. I called out,

"For God's sake help;" Cox then came up, and I immediately received a violent blow on the face; I am not sure he struck it. I still kept Davis, and grasped at Cox with my left hand - I held them both, and was down on my left knee crying for help, still holding them both, and while down I received several kicks or blows about my body. Two patrols came up, and I gave the prisoners in their charge. My watch was not found.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How long had you seen your watch before you put your head through the window - A. I did not put my head through the window; I only looked in. I had put my watch into my fob two minutes before - I had just left the shop. I did not pull it out in the street; nobody could take it before I got into the crowd. I did not feel it taken. Davis did not strike till I collared him - four or five persons were about me, but my eye was on the prisoners.

COURT. Q. Did Davis touch your person - A. Yes; I felt his hand down at my trowsers.

Prisoner Cox. Q. You said nothing to the Magistrate about my holding your arms or striking you - A. I did not mention every thing to the Magistrate, for I was so irritated, and all in a gore of blood. I said my arms were pinioned, and I think I said Cox was one who pinioned them; but I was confused, and on recovering I recollected every thing. I am certain of both of them.

RICHARD SAWARD . On the night of the 8th of February, I saw the mob about the shop. I saw Cox had hold of Hone's arms, holding them back - he said he had lost his watch; I said,

"There goes the man," pointing to Cox. I did not notice Davis.

RICHARD BRUSH SKILLERN . I am an officer. On the 8th of February, about a quarter before six o'clock, Hall and I were coming along Whitechapel; there was a mob at the corner of Goulston-street, we ran across, and were told a gentleman had lost his watch. I immediately ran, and just before I got to Petticoat-lane, I found the prosecutor holding Davis - he complained of losing his watch. I secured Davis, and Hall took Cox, who was standing by. Davis said he was innocent. I pushed them into a baker's shop, and searched them, but found nothing on them.

WILLIAM HALL . I followed the last witness, and at the corner of Petticoat-lane, which is about twenty yards from Goulston-street, I saw Skillern holding Davis. Cox was striking at Hone, who was partly down - I secured him; he made a great resistance. When I got him out of the mob, he put his hands up, and said,

"I have got nothing." I searched him, but found nothing on him.

Prisoner Cox. Q. Did I resist - A. Yes. When I first went up, he was striking the prosecutor, and when I laid hold of him, he made all the resistance possible.

Cox's Defence. I was passing by, and heard the prosecutor call for assistance - I went up, several people came round. I was shoved about, and received a blow from somebody - I do not know whether it was the prosecutor or Davis; but I returned the blow, and was taken.

DAVIS'S Defence. I was passing; the prosecutor said he had lost his watch. I stood in the crowd, and if I had known anything of it, he could have taken me in the crowd; but I walked away to Petticoat-lane, when he knocked my hat off, and I struck him.

COX - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

DAVIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18230219-7

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

354. JANE DAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a ring, value 11 s., the goods of John Read , from the person of Sarah, his wife .

SARAH READ . I am the wife of John Read , a bottle-merchant , of Petticoat-lane. On the 6th of November, about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, I went into a wine vaults, in Elliston-street, Petticoat-lane . I saw Martin, the officer there - he fetched the prisoner in; I was there till a quarter to nine o'clock, as Martin said, if I dared to come out, he would take me into custody. I sent for Forrester, but he did not come. I drank nothing, but went into the bar, and had tea with the landlady - I left there about five minutes past nine o'clock; two officers saw me home. When I went into the wine vaults, I had two rings on my finger. The prisoner called me by the most in famous names, and spit upon me eight or nine times; I never spoke to her before that. I had indicted Martin, who she lived with, for a conspiracy - she said,

"If that

won't suit you Madam," and then threw off her shawl and bonnet, and began to beat me; I protected my face with my hands, and she took my ring off, and after breaking my thumb, and knocking out one of my teeth, she went out. I then missed the ring, and took a candle, but could not find it. I felt her pull my ring off; she then returned, and tore my cap and gown off. I went before the Lord Mayor about it, but she was bailed, and Martin went to indict me for it - I went out of the way, to avoid their taking my life.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did not you apply for a summons - A. I went for a summons for the man, for teaching her to take my ring, but never mentioned her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-8

355. ELIZABETH BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a counterpane, value 20 s. , the goods of Charles Lowe .

CHARLES LOWE . I am a brewer , and live on Garlick-hill . The prisoner used to wash for my lodgers. On the 27th of January, she came for some things, and said she had a relation who scoured counterpanes, and I saw my wife give her one to get done; it has not been returned. I found her two or three days after, and had her secured - she had left her lodging. I told her I suspected she had made away with the counterpane; she then gave me the duplicate.

PETER PIGE . I am servant to Mr. Bailey, of Aldersgate-street. The prisoner has pawned several things with us. On the 27th of January, the prisoner pawned a counterpane for 10 s., in the name of Turtle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The lodger came down and gave it me to pawn, and said she would give me the money to redeem it on Monday - I often pawn things for her; her name is Turtle. Lowe keeps a house of ill-fame.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-9

356. MARY FLARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a gown, value 5 s., and a child's coat, value 2 s. , the goods of Stephen Whitaker .

CHARLES SAMLER . I am servant to Stephen Whitaker , a pawnbroker , of Long-lane . Last Monday evening, this gown and coat hung inside the door; they were pinned together. The prisoner came and offered an article in pawn, but would not take what I offered, and left. In half a minute I missed the gown and coat, which she must have passed to go out. I looked up the court, and saw her turning the corner - I secured her; but before I got up to her, I thought she threw something from her lap; she returned to the shop with me willingly. I left her in Mr. Whitaker's charge, while I went to look for the goods - there was nobody else in the court. I found them on the very spot where I thought I saw her drop them. She said she was going to the other end of the town; but there was no thoroughfare in the court - she at first said she was going to call on somebody in the court, but nobody knew her.

Prisoner. Q. Could I not have gone away with case if I liked - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to pawn an article for 6 s., he offered 4 s. I turned down the court, and finding it no thoroughfare, I returned, and met him - he asked me to walk back, which I did; he examined my parcel, and then begged my pardon. Two women in the shop said, they saw it taken, but could not say it was me; he desired me to go about my business, and I was angry at being accused. The young man brought the things in, and said he would detain me for my impudence.

CHARLES SAMLER . One of the women in the shop said she thought it was a woman in a light gown - the prisoner's gown was not a dark one.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-10

357. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , two rings, value 25 s. , the goods of Thomas Hopkins .

MARY ANN HOPKINS . I am the daughter of Thomas Hopkins, a haberdasher and jeweller , of Long-lane . On Saturday evening, the 18th of January, a little after five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and pointed to two gold rings, which he wanted to see - I shewed them to him; I stood by him all the time - my mother was in the shop. The price, 12 s. 6 d. was marked on them each. He offered 10 s. for one; my mother refused to take it, and after asking for other things, he put one on his finger, and had the other in his hand, and then went out of the shop; I pursued, calling Stop thief! and only lost sight of him for a moment, while he turned the corner into the pig-market - my father was crossing the market, and stopped him. They have not been found. I am certain he had them.

THOMAS HOPKINS . I was crossing the market, and heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running; I tried to stop him, but he gave a sudden twist, and got away. He was knocked down, and I secured him. My daughter came up and said he was the man; my wife also declared it - he could easily throw them away.

JAMES MASON . I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running - I knocked him down, and he was secured - the girl said he was the man.

JOHN HARPER . I am an officer. I saw him running, and he was secured.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop, and a man ran out - there was a cry of Stop thief! I ran after him, and was knocked down.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-11

358. CHARLES YOUD , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Richard Woodward , from his person .

MR. RICHARD WOODWARD . I am a packer , and live in Great St. Thomas Apostle. On the 1st of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in Cannon-street , and felt a catch at my right hand pocket, and immediately felt a touch at my right elbow - I had noticed two boys just before. I felt, and missed my handkerchief - I turned round, and saw the prisoner, and said,

"You have taken my handkerchief, where is it?" he said,

"Oh No, it was the other boy," pointing to the other, who was going on. I was not satisfied, and lifted up his apron, and there

found it - he then said the other boy gave it him; and as I took him to the Mansion House, he said he picked it up.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge at the Mansion House.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-12

359. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a box, value 1 s., and 50 lbs. of raisins, value 39 s. , the goods of William Henry Budd .

THOMAS DAFFEY . I am a porter at a waggon warehouse, in the Old Change , kept by William Henry Budd . On the 10th of January, about ten minutes before six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come into the warehouse, and put his hand on a box of raisins, which was directed to

" James Boss , Hertfordshire" - I suspected him, and kept still without speaking to him; he went out, and walked about the street without saying anything - he returned in a few minutes, and came into the middle of the warehouse, and looked round. I cannot say whether he saw me; he went out again, then returned, and put the box upon his shoulder. I laid hold of him in the street, about three or four yards from the gate with it; his jacket gave way - he let the box drop, and ran away; I called Stop thief! and he was taken before I lost sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SHUREY . I am a constable of Bread-street, and live opposite the warehouse. I heard the alarm, and saw a man running, and the box laying opposite my window.

JOSEPH SANDAL . I am a dyer, and live in the Old Change. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running - I followed, and when I came up, he was in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-13

360. MORGAN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , two knives, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Williams .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a cutler , and live in the Borough. I have stall in Newgate-market . On Thursday last, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was informed the prisoner had stolen some knives - I found my neighbour had secured him. The prisoner himself, delivered up two knives to me, and begged forgiveness. He was then three or four feet from my stall - I missed them off my stall board.

JAMES ATKINSON . I am a poultry salesman, in Newgate-market. I saw the prisoner make a snatch on the stall - I watched, and saw him make a second snatch; I went out, and caught him, and told Williams; he produced the knives himself.

JAMES KEMP . I am a constable. I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 8.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230219-14

361. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , three handkerchiefs, value 7 s., the goods of William Bradley , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I am a linendraper , and live in Newgate-market . On the 25th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went into my shop - the prisoner was then looking at some handkerchiefs. In about five minutes my shopman came round the counter, and accused him of having stolen something; he searched him, and found three silk handkerchiefs in his trowsers pocket.

JOHN MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Bradley. The prisoner came to the counter, and asked to see some cotton - I shewed him a great quantity, and none suited. I suspected and watched him - I had to turn my back to get a particular pattern, which he wanted to see - the silk handkerchiefs were in the window, within his reach. When I shewed him what he wanted, he said it would not suit him. I saw him putting some handkerchiefs into his pocket, and charged him with it - he was secured, and I found them upon him.

HENRY HONEY . I received the handkerchiefs from Mr. Bradley. I found no money on the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY Aged 14.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-15

362. SARAH WIGLEY and ELIZABETH GILES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , forty yards of ribbon, value 11 s., the goods of John Blackhall , privately in his shop .

HANNAH BLACKHALL . I am the wife of John Blackhall , of Little Distaff-lane. I sell ribbons - Wigley came into my shop on Friday last, about one o'clock; I was in the shop alone; she asked for some narrow ribbons - I cut one yard off for her, which came to a penny. The other ribbons were in the window, but not within her reach, unless she undrew a curtain - she had a child with her, and tied the child's shoe with the ribbon, and while she was doing so, Giles came in, but did not speak to her - she asked for some satin ribbon to trim her bonnet; I went round the counter, and shewed her the ribbons, which hung in the window, but took none out. She hesitated about them - Wigley then asked if I had any black ribbon to trim her bonnet; I said I had purple which would do as well, she would not have it, and asked the price of some caps on the counter, and tried one on - I turned my head from Giles now and then, but did not leave her. Giles offered 1 s. 9 d. for three yards of ribbon, which I could not take - she kept hesitating, and then I found Wigley was going; I looked to see if the caps were all safe; by that time she had got close to Giles, and stood with her back to her - she appeared pulling down her own shawl; I saw her countenance change, which induced me to watch her; she immediately left the shop - Giles kept holding the ribbon. At that moment my husband came in, and before he entered the door, he asked me where the ribbons were, which had hung in the window - I then missed a piece, and asked Giles if she had got it, she said, No. My husband went for an officer, who came; I told him another woman had been there, and described her - we went after her; she was found in half an hour

after. Giles was searched in my presence, and five or six halfpence found upon her - she had not got 1 s. 9 d. We let her go, not finding the property on her. I missed the purple ribbon, which I had offered her - nobody but them had been in the shop. Giles denied all knowledge of Wigley while she was in the shop. They were both apprehended together in a gin shop; she then said Wigley was her sister-in-law. Wigley had then changed her bonnet and shawl.

JOHN BLACKHALL . When I came home, I found Giles in the shop, with a ribbon in her hand, looking at it. I said to my wife,

"Have not you lost a ribbon;" she said, No, but on looking round, she found she had. I ran for an officer, who went in search of Wigley. We let Giles go and she left her address, and in half an hour, we found them together, in a gin-shop in Shoemaker-row - she had told me she lived opposite the gin-shop. She denied all knowledge of Wigley in the shop, but afterwards said she was her sister-in-law. Wigley said nothing - she did not hear Giles say this. They were given in charge.

NATHANIEL MINES . I was sent for, and took the prisoners. I knew them before - they were acquainted together.

WIGLEYS'S Defence. My mother-in-law sells fish in Shoemaker-row - she left me in care of it. My sister-in-law lives in the same house; she came and told me she had been charged with stealing ribbons - we went in and had some beer. Mines and the gentleman came in and took us - I told them they might go up and search my place. I had 2 s. in my hand. A woman searched me at the Compter.

GILES'S Defence. Two women came into the shop while I was putting the strings into my child's shoes; the women could not agree about the price of the caps, and went out. I offered 1 s. 9 d. for the ribbon - she could not take it. A gentleman came and shut the door - I was searched, and nothing found upon me. I have lived in the parish many years. I gave them my name and address. I went and told my sister-in-law, and we went to have a pint of beer. Mines came in and took us.

WIGLEY - GUILTY . Aged 28.

GILES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-16

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

363. ELIZABETH ROWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 15 s. , the goods of William Harris .

SARAH BUTLER . I am in the service of Mr. William Harris , a haberdasher , of Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 28th of January, about one o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for figured ribbons - she said there was none that suited her. I took out another drawer, and had occasion to turn my back to get it, and while doing so, I saw her put her hands down very quick, and pull her shawl together. In her hurry, she rather lifted up her shawl - I saw her put a piece of ribbon, eighteen yards long under her arm. I immediately took it from her, and called Mr. Harris. A constable was fetched.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not comparing the ribbons - A. She took up a piece, and said if it was not black, it would do; but she put another piece under her arm.

JOSEPH BREECH . I am an officer. I took charge of her; she said she was only comparing the ribbons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was comparing two pieces, and she took one out of my hand, and said I was going to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-17

Before Mr. Recorder.

364. MARY LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , two spoons, value 5 s., the goods of Richard Hodson , to whom she was servant .

CHARLES COUSINS . I am the watch-house keeper. I received the prisoner from Reece, on the 30th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, and found four duplicates in a pocket book, which Reece produced.

JOHN REECE . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner on the night in question, and took her to the watch-house - she took a pocket book from her pocket, opened it, and said she had some duplicates in it. She threw pocketbook and all in the fire - she was in liquor; I returned it to her but she threw it in again.

GEORGE RANCE . I am servant to Mr. Richard Hodson , who keeps the Piazza Coffee-house, Covent Garden . The prisoner has left his service about five months. We missed some spoons while she was there, and when she was apprehended, I accompanied Cousins to the pawnbrokers, and found two table spoons, marked H. G., which are my master's.

JOHN NEALE. I am servant to Mr. Philmer, a pawnbroker, of Union-street, Borough. I have a dessert spoon pawned on the 20th of September, for 4 s., by a female, in the name of Ann Leonard . I cannot say who she was.

WILLIAM EDWARD GODWIN . I am servant to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, of the Borough. I have two spoons, pawned on the 11th of July, and part of one on the 27th of September, in the name of Mary Leonard , Fishmongers-alley. I cannot say by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman, who said she had a duplicate of four spoons, to sell, and asked me to buy it - I gave her 5 s. 6 d. for it; they were pawned for 15 s. I redeemed them, and pawned them again to buy clothes to go into Mr. Hodson's service.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230219-18

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

365. BENJAMIN MOORE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas William Kerr , with a certain offensive weapon, to wit, an umbrella, with intent his goods and monies feloniously to take and carry away .

GENERAL THOMAS WILLIAM KERR . On the 7th of February last, I dined at the Service-club, in Regent-street, and left the house shortly after eight o'clock. I had a severe cold, and abstained from drinking - I was quite sober. I returned home through St. James's-square, by the house of the late Lord Londonderry, and up King-street - I had walked by the bottom of Duke-street, about twelve yards. I was dressed in a Portuguese cloak, which confined my arms a good deal; it was open in front, and my chain and seals were exposed. I do not recollect meeting anybody in King-street - I heard no footsteps, but suddenly received a blow at the back of my head, which in a great degree stunned and parlalyzed me - I felt unable to resist, and cried out for assistance as articulately as I was able. I half turned round to see who it was, and in turning I fell against the rails. I saw a man standing close behind me, with both hands lifted up, in an attitude ready to strike - I imagined that he had an enormous stick; but I do not think it could have been so, because if it had it must have fractured my scull. I called loudly for help, and cannot say that the second blow fell upon me; I held up my umbrella, but I rather think the man did not strike, but ran away. At that moment I saw two men on the other side of the way. There were three gas lights; the most distant of which was not many yards off - one of those two men pursued the one who struck me, and the other crossed to my help. In a few minutes the prisoner was brought up to me, by Roper and Donovan, who were the persons I saw pursuing him. He appeared very much agitated, and said to me,

"Are you the man I shoved against just now?" I believe I answered,

"I don't know what you call shoving, but I am the man whom some cowardly villian has most cruelly assaulted behind my back;" I think he said,

"I beg your pardon, I took you for another man." I desired he might be carried to St. James's watch-house - I followed as well as I could with assistance. I felt myself much hurt, and could not speak plain, my tongue was parlalyzed. When I got to the watch-house, I felt sick and faint - I did not then see the prisoner; I told the constable it was a man of the same stature as that (meaning Donovan, who stood before me); I did not mean to accuse him as being the person. I was much agitated, and did not know who the person was. Upon getting home, I had fomentations applied to my head, which was exceedingly swollen, but not cut. When the prisoner was brought up to me, a cotton umbrella was produced, saturated with wet, as if from rain - it did not rain then, but I think it must have rained before. The soldier who had it, said the prisoner had struck him. He was dressed much meaner than he is now, and was much agitated at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When you described the person at the watch-house, the prisoner was not in your view - A. No. Being much agitated, I cannot be certain what passed. I cannot say whether the man had passed me, but if he had not he could not have seen my seals. He was near fainting at the watch-house - I cannot say whether any words passed after I received the blow, nothing was said before. I held up a silk umbrella instantly.

Q. When he was brought to you, he said he mistook you for another person - A. To the best of my recollection he did.

MICHAEL DONOVAN . On the night of the 7th of February, I was in King-street, and heard a cry of

"Help, for God's sake help," accompanied with the sound of a blow or blows. I and Osborne were standing together; we turned round, and saw two persons on the opposite side - one of whom was struggling, and the other running. I pursued him, and in St. James's-square he dodged me round the posts, and got into Pall Mall, where a soldier stopped him, on which he rose his umbrella to make a blow at the soldier, and then dropped it - the soldier picked it up, and gave it to me - we brought it with the prisoner into King-street, to General Kerr , who was talking to the witness - he said,

"This is not the gentleman I shoved against;" the prosecutor said,

"I don't know what you call shoving, but I am the man who was struck just now." The General desired me to take him to the watch-house, and he would give charge of him - as we went along he begged very hard to be let go.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. I go on messages, and live in Angel-court, King-street. Osborne lives at Mr. Newton's, St. James-square - he was talking to me about giving me a job; we did not go into a public-house, as he had been insulted there.

Q. The General said at the watch-house that it was a man about your stature - A. Yes.

JOSEPH OSBORNE . I was standing with Donovan by Willis's rooms, and heard the sound of a blow or blows, with a cry for assistance - we saw two men on the opposite side. I ran across to the General, and Donovan went after the other man, who ran away. The General appeared much hurt and agitated - I remained with him till the prisoner was brought back, which was in a very short time. I saw nobody in the street but the man and the General - I looked over the moment I heard the cry. When the man saw us approach he ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came up the person ran away - A. Yes. I was telling Donovan I should want him next day to bottle wines. I generally call on him if I do not see him about. I do not use the public-house at the corner, as they offended me some time ago.

THOMAS ROPER . I am a private in the Coldstreams. I was in Pall Mall, and saw the prisoner run across from St. James's-square - there was a cry of Stop thief! I stopped him; he made a blow at me with his umbrella, and dropped it; I picked it up. We took him back.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am day watch-house keeper, and was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in. Donovan had the umbrella; I saw him put it into the cupboard - I afterwards took it out of that cupboard; it was very wet and heavy when it was put in. I asked him where he lived, he gave me a correct direction - it had rained very hard that night.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to come from Pimlico, where I live, to Poland-street - I crossed the Park, and finding it very cold, I ran or trotted across the Park into Pall Mall, up Kings-place, into King-street, and was met by a man, who made a heavy thrust at my stomach with a stick or umbrella, which irritated me - I turned round, ran a few paces after him, and thrust at him with my umbrella, and struck him. I saw one or two persons

whom I thought belonged to him, and ran to prevent my being ill-used.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-19

Before Mr. Justice Park.

366. JOHN WALKER , JAMES ALDRIDGE , and THOMAS GIBSON alias WILLIAM BLACKETT , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Andrew James Stimpson , about the hour of ten in the night of the 4th of January , at St. Paul, Shadwell, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a glass mug, value 3 s.; a sheet, value 3 s.; a table cloth, value 1 s.; a pillow case, value 6 d., and a handkerchief, value 6 d , his property.

ELIZABETH STIMPSON . I am the wife of Andrew James Stimpson , we live in Juniper-row, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell ; he rents the house. On Saturday, the 4th of January, he and I went out about seven o'clock in the morning - it was not light; we left nobody in the house - I fastened the door after me, and tried it before I left; I took the key with me. The windows were fastened inside. My sister, Mary Dodd lives next door; I desired her to take care of the house; she could get in the back way - nobody could get in that way except from her house, unless they got over the pailing. I got home about eleven o'clock at night; my husband got home just before me - he is not here. I found the house stripped. The door was then shut. The articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above 10 l., and a quantity of other things. The house was stripped.

MARY DODD . I am the sister of the last witness. On the 4th of January, she went out, and asked me to take care of the house; I could get in from the back of my house. I went into it last between nine and ten o'clock at night; I shut the door when I came out, and left it on the latch - it was all safe then. Her husband came home about ten o'clock; he came through my house, and I went into the house with him - we found the street door open, and the property gone, which was safe at nine o'clock that night.

THOMAS ALLEN . I live next door to the prosecutor. I know Walker and Aldridge - I saw them first about eight o'clock on Saturday night, the 4th of January, walking backwards and forwards by the prosecutor's door; from eight o'clock till five minutes past nine - I did not know them before. I stood at my door sometime watching them, as I suspected them. Walker hit against me, and looked very hard in my face; I asked if he should know me again, he made no answer - this was about half-past eight o'clock; he then went towards the prosecutor's door, and I did not see him again, but I saw Aldridge walking about by the door till five minutes past nine o'clock.

Prisoner WALKER. Q. Did you say at the Office that we hit you - A. Yes. They touched me on the shoulder.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I went to No. 6, Vine-court, on the 14th of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, with Freeman, and found the door fast. Freeman went to one door, and I to the other - I asked for admittance, and somebody inside used a bad expression, and refused to admit us. I then broke the door open, and saw Walker; he jumped out of bed, (the door opened into that room) he had his trowsers on. Aldridge sat in a chair, with a child in his arms, and Gibson rushed out at the front door, Freeman stopped him. I searched the place, and found a glass jug on a side-board, in a corner by the fire place, and behind the back of the stove, I found a two crow bars, a box with phosphorus matches, four keys in an unfinished state, but in preparation for cutting to make picklock keys, and some wax, with the impression of a key on it. The rope ladder was under the bed; it would reach to a third floor room. There was a false back made to the table drawer, and the keys were in there.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I produce the things. I have had them ever since. Brown's account is correct.

MRS. STIMPSON. I know the jug by a speck, which has been on it ever since I had it, which is eight years.

WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

ALDRIDGE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

GIBSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-20

Before Mr. Justice Park.

367. JOHN WALKER , JAMES ALDRIDGE , and THOMAS GIBSON alias WILLIAM BLACKETT , were again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of James Armstrong , about the hour of five in the night, of the 7th of January , at St. George, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a hat, value 10 s.; a tea pot, value 5 s., and a pair of scissars, value 6 d. , his property.

JAMES ARMSTRONG . I rent a house in Princes-square, St. George's in the East . In the night of the 7th of January, my house was broken into. My sister only lives there besides myself; we went to bed between ten and eleven - I saw that the doors and windows were fastened. I got up about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the morning; it was scarcely light - I was the first up; I found the street door and the parlour window open, it has an outside shutter, and the bolt of the shutter was wrenched off. We missed some linen, a hat, a tea-pot, and a pair of scissars.

JANE CASE . I occupy a room in the house in Vine-court, where the prisoners were. There are but two rooms; mine is the upper one. A young women named Lipps lived in the lower one, Walker lived there with her, and the other prisoners used to come backwards and forwards; they came there for six weeks before they were taken.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I went with the officer on the 14th of January - we found the prisoners at the house; Gibson was endeavouring to escape, and Walker attempted to come out half dressed, he had his trowsers on. I found a hat on Gibson's head, which the prosecutor claimed. The tea-pot was on the mantle piece - I saw the implements found, and applied the crow-bars to Armstrong's window shutter; they had used both ends of one of them, and some marks agreed with the other one.

JOHN BROWN . I examined Armstrong's premises, and found a hat left behind, with the name of Barber, hatter, in it, also a candle, which appeared to have been recently lighted.

JAMES ARMSTRONG . I know the tea-pot by a dent on it. I cannot swear to the scissars, but know the hat; I

worn it every day - the maker's name has been torn out since. A strange hat was left behind.

GIBSON'S Defence. I bought that hat of a man who sells clothes, for 16 s., and gave him 12 s. for the coat and waistcoat I have on now. I was going down to the brig Alliance, Captain Bell , at Gravesend, to go to the East Indies. I bought the hat on the 7th; I cannot rightly say the month. I was sent to this house in Vine-court, with a letter, by Mrs. Wilkinson, of Limehouse, to Mrs. Hutchinson, and as I came out of the door, Freeman stopped me. Hutchinson keeps the house in Vine-court.

JANE CASE . No such person lives in the house.

MR. ARMSTRONG. I gave twenty-eight shillings for the hat, and have had it three months. I should not think it worth sixteen shillings.

WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

ALDRIDGE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

GIBSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18230219-21

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

368. ANN OLDFIELD was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Warner , on the King's-highway, on the 14th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bag, value 1 d., and a shilling , his property.

JOHN WARNER . On the 14th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I left my work, at an iron foundry, and was going home, and in Golden-lane, near Old-street-road , I passed the prisoner; she hit me on my left side, and knocked my hat off - several people were passing. I stooped down to pick it up, and she thrust her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took out a little canvass bag with a shilling in it; I immediately seized her - she fastened her teeth into my hand. I called the watchman, who forced the bag out of her hand with the shilling in it.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not tipsy - A. I had two pints of beer that day, and was perfectly sober. I drank nothing with her, nor took any liberties with her.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a watchman. I saw Warner as I was calling twelve o'clock; he was quite sober. There was a great noise - I saw his hat off, he said, this women has robbed me - he was trying to get the bag out of her hand; he took it out, and gave it me. When I saw her I said,

"It is you Miss Oldfield is it, you must come with me." She was very impudent, and in liquor.

THOMAS BACON . I am a watchman. Williamson's account is correct.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him about eleven o'clock, very tipsy; he would kiss, me, and in so doing his hat fell off. We went into the Queen's Head, public-house, and had a glass each; he began to be very sick, and said he would go home with me all night - I said he should not, he said if I did not give him a lodging, he would give me one. The watchman came up, and he had the purse in his hand all the while.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230219-22

Before Mr. Justice Park.

369. CHARLES BLOOMFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , four books, value 43 s., and twenty sheets of printed music, value 5 s., the goods of John Wilton , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD JACKSON . I am a watchman of St. George the Martyr, Bloomsbury. The prosecutor lives in Gray's Inn-passage ; and is a bookseller . On the 7th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was going down Red Lion-street, and as I came to Gray's Inn-passage, I saw four persons whom I suspected; I watched them for about half an hour. I came down Gray's Inn-passage, and saw all four standing against Wilson's window; I went round Bedford-street way, looked round the passage, and saw one of them come out with this bundle of books under his arm - as soon as he came to the end of the passage, the prisoner received them from him, and then went down Red Lion-street. I pursued him till he came to the corner of Bedford-street, and then collared him; he dropped them, and resisted. I held up my umbrella, and said I would knock him down - I picked them up, and took him to the watch-house with them.

JOHN WILTON . I am a bookseller, and rent a house in Gray's Inn-passage. These books are mine; and are worth 47 s. - here are two copies of Parkhursts Greek Lexicon; the rest are unbound. I had seen them about quarter of an hour before they were taken, on a stool inside the shop, the door was open. They could not be taken without coming into the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and stood at the end of the passage to hear a woman singing, and as I was moving away, a young man came and said,

"Have the goodness to lay hold of this for a moment;" I said, Yes. A person came up and laid hold of me - I turned round, and they fell - he said I had stolen the books, I said it was false, there is the person who gave them to me, why not take him - he said, No, I have got you, that is enough.

RICHARD JACKSON . He did point a man out, but I could not take him. The prisoner I am certain was one of the four persons.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-23

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

370. HENRY DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn, a seal, value 5 s.; a thimble, value 6 d., and eighteen sovereigns, the property of Harriet Hatton , spinster , in the dwelling-house of William Stevens .

HARRIET HATTON . In January last, I was in the service of Mr. William Stevens , who lives in Lambs Conduit-street, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn - the house was under repair. The prisoner's father was one of the workmen. I had some money and other things in my care belonging to my fellow servant, Robert Beeson, who was in the hospital. There were four 10 l. notes and a 5 l., and twenty four sovereigns, a gold seal, and a thimble of my own - I kept it in a box, which was not locked, in an upper bed room - I did not sleep in that room as it was not finished. The prisoner was backwards and forwards

fetching water for the men. I saw him in the morning of the 28th of January, between eleven and twelve o'clock, near some of the other bed room doors - I saw my box safe about half-past ten o'clock that morning; I opened it and every thing was safe. Some of the sovereigns were in one part of the box, and some in another, loose in a little box. I missed the property about half-past six o'clock in the evening - there had been but one workmen employed in that room, and he was a carpenter - he only put a lock on the door; that was before one o'clock. I think the door was not locked at all. I missed all the property together. I went to the box for the thimble, and missed all this property. I went and told my master of it - he had not slept there at all. I and the housemaid first slept there on Monday the 27th. We expected our master would come to sleep there in a day or two - there was but one bed in the house, and that was on the first floor. The prisoner was apprehended next morning, and my thimble produced. I got back nine sovereigns, eight shillings, and a gold seal a few days afterwards.

ROBERT BEESON . I was fellow servant with Hatton. While I was in the hospital, and gave her 69 l. in notes and sovereigns, and a gold seal to take care of.

ANN GUTHRIE . I know the prisoner. On the 28th of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, he shewed me a silver thimble, which he said he had found - I told him to take it to his mother, he said she had two or three, and my mother gave him 1 d. for it, and gave it to me. It was claimed next day by Hatton.

JAMES HULL . I am servant to David Jones , a salesman, who lives in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. The prisoner came to the shop, on the 28th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, with another boy, to buy a pair of pistols, which he gave 35 s. for - he paid me two sovereigns, and I gave him 5 s.; he produced a gold seal from his pocket - I asked were he got it; he said it was given him. The other boy also bought a brace of pistols.

JAMES SADLER . I am an officer. On the 28th, about eight o'clock at night, I was informed of this robbery. I went to the house at nine o'clock next morning, and examined a side drawer in the box, and there found four 10 l. notes, a 5 l., and six sovereigns. The prisoner's father was at work there at the time - the father said he lodged in Queen-street, Seven-dials. I went there, and found a box locked; I asked the father if he had the key, his wife said the prisoner had it - the father forced it open, and I found in it a brace of pistols and a bullet mould. At that moment the prisoner came into the room - I asked how he came by them; he said he found them. I searched him, and found a silver watch in his pocket; he said he found that also. I asked what he had done with the remainder of the money, and said I could hold out no hopes to him - he said,

"If you won't hurt me, I will take you round the corner and tell you where the money is;" I told him not to say anything - he seemed alarmed; he went round into Great St. Andrew-street, and into a Jew's clothes shop, and said to the Jew,

"Give me the money I gave you last night" - the Jew said he gave him no money, but paid him 12 s. for a jacket - the prisoner said he had left between seven and eight sovereigns with him; the Jew denied it. I then asked the prisoner what he had done with the rest, he said he had bought a brace of pistols, and gave three sovereigns to another boy, whom he met in the street - I asked what he had done with the seal and thimble; he said he had pawned his coat, and if I would go to a pawnbroker's, which he directed me to, I should find the seal in the jacket, which I did, and have kept it ever since. He directed me to where the watch was bought; I went and returned it, and got back 5 l. 2 s. from the watchmaker, and the money for the pistols from Jones. I got back 9 l. 10 s. in all. I produce the seal and thimble.

ROBERT BEESON . I know the seal by its being bent on one side.

HARRIET HATTON . I know the thimble by the rim round it.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done, and leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Earnestly Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18230219-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

371. JOHN ROWAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , three sheets, value 12 s., the goods of Thomas Hughes , in a lodging-room .

MARY HUGHES . I am the wife of Thomas Hughes , a publican , of Church-lane, St. Martin's . On the 20th of January, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner asked to have a bed for a week. I said it was our rule to have a shilling for the first night, and nine-pence for every night after - he said he wanted a bed to himself which I let him; there was another bed in the room, in which a countryman and a friend slept. The countryman had slept there for a week. I told him there was another bed in the room, but do not know whether I said any one would sleep in it.

The Court ruled that this was not a contract within the meaning of the Act; the lodging being let to different tenants at one time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-25

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

372. WILLIAM SOAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Edward Sieck , from his person .

MR. EDWARD SIECK . I am a merchant , of Langbourn-chambers, Fenchurch-street. On the 1st of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Newgate-street , going home. I had a silk handkerchief in my coat pocket - a person called out to me that the prisoner had picked my pocket; I turned round, and saw him twenty or thirty yards from me. I felt, and missed my handkerchief. I gave him in charge. I have not recovered it.

JOHN WOODWARD . I am servant to Sir John Lubbock , at the banking house. I was in Newgate-street, between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 1st of February, and saw the prisoner noticing people's pockets as they passed - I watched him. I noticed Mr. Sieck; the prisoner got up to him, put his hand in his pocket, and drew the handkerchief out - I was not two yards from him

at the time. A woman was walking with him - I said to him,

"You have robbed that gentleman." I made a catch at the handkerchief, and caught him by the cuff of his coat; he put himself in an attitude to strike me - I then let go of his hand which had the handkerchief in it, and in the mean time the woman came up, and caught me by the collar, and said,

"Go along, what have you to do with that man" - she let go of me, took the handkerchief from the prisoner, and went off with it. Mr. Sieck came up, and said he had lost his handkerchief - the prisoner was secured before he was out of my sight. I knew his person before, and am certain of him.

HENRY HONEY . I am a constable. On the 1st of February, I was on the opposite side of the way, and I saw people collected, and found the witness accusing the prisoner of having stolen the handkerchief - I took him. I found nothing but a few halfpence and an old clothes brush on him.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your Lordship and Gentlemen, I stand charged with stealing a handkerchief, which I deny - though it is of little use, for you are bound to give a verdict according to the evidence, and it is my misfortune to be in custody at a time when I am too poor to employ counsel. I understand two persons can prove my innocence, but have nobody to send for them. I was convicted here at a former period, and soon liberated having His Majesty's Most Gracious pardon. All I can say is that in this, as in the former case, I have been pursued by bad men, who seek my destruction.

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230219-26

373. ROBERT HATCHMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Samuel Marsden , on the 21st of January , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon; at Allhallows, London-wall. (Wilhelmina his wife and other persons being therein) and stealing therein three watches, value 18 l. , his property.

SAMUEL MARSDEN . I am a watch-maker , and live at No. 4, Leathersellers-buildings, London-wall, in the parish of St. Allhallows . On the 21st of January, about a quarter past ten o'clock in the morning, I went to Cornhill, the watches were then all safe. I returned in about an hour, and missed three off the board, which was near the window, they were worth about 18 l. I went round to the different pawnbrokers, and found the prisoner at Sowerby's, in Chiswell-street, where he had been detained; he asked me to be as merciful as I could. I said, I would on account of his wife and family. I did not know him before.

WILHELMINA MARSDEN . I am the wife of the prosecutor. When he went out, I went down stairs into the kitchen, which is under the shop, and had been there but a few minutes, when I heard a foot-step across the shop, which I had locked before I went down; I sent a little girl up, she called out; I ran up and found the middle door forced open - the box of the lock was forced off; it was safe just before, that door leads from the shop to the bed-room, that and the bed-room door were open. I went into the shop, and missed some watches, but could not tell how many, till my husband came home. The lodgers were up stairs, and my children were in the house.

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am shopman to Mr. Sowerby, pawnbroker, of Chiswell-street. On the 21st of January, a few minutes after eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our shop, and offered to pawn a silver watch. I asked his name, he said John Williams , of No. 25, Bunhill-row; I asked if it was his own, and what it cost; he said it was, and cost four guineas. It was worth much more, which excited my suspicion, and I detained him. I went to No. 25, Bunhill-row, but could find no such person. I returned and told him, I would not be trifled with; he then said he had it from his mother, who lived in the Hackney-road, and if I went there I should be satisfied. I went and found her, but had no reason (from what I heard there), to believe his account was correct. I returned and gave him in charge. I had locked him in the parlour, while I went, and the other two watches were found just where he sat, among a bundle of clothes, we knew nothing of them, he was not present when they were found. Marsden came in and claimed the one offered in pawn. We had not then found the others, but when he saw them, he claimed them. I produce the one he offered me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Worship-street. I found the other two watches among the clothes in the parlour; he told me I should find them there.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy on account of my wife and family.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and the prosecutor, he having a wife and two infant children .

Reference Number: t18230219-27

374. MARY ANN SLOAT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , at St. Dunstan in the East, in the dwelling-house of Henry Paul Kemp , there situate; three 10 l., and one 5 l. Bank notes his property .

HENRY PAUL KEMP . I rent a house in Harp-lane, Tower-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East . On the 5th of February, these notes were in my desk, which was in the kitchen; I had seen them safe two or three days before, they were in a leather case and put into the desk, which was locked; I missed them between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, a piece was broken off the front of the desk, and the lid forced open; I had no more notes there, than what I missed. The prisoner used to call occasionaly at the house. I had not seen her there that day, and did not know where she lived. I have seen a 5 l. note since, which I believe to be mine, and I have seen the three 10 l. notes, which I can swear to. The officer produced them. She was apprehended on the 5th.

JOHN DUNMILL . I live at Mr. Kemp's. On the 4th of February, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning; I was coming down stairs to go out; and on opening the street door I saw the prisoner, she went in and shut the door after her; I went away and did not see her afterwards; I returned after eleven o'clock, and heard of the robbery about twelve o'clock next morning, and I told this to Mr. Kemp.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. On the 5th of February, I was informed of the robbery. About four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to No. 8, Hooper-street, Lambeth,

and asked for Mary Ann , I was told there was no such person there; I saw Jane Parrott , who appeared mistress of the house; she told me to come at nine o'clock in the evening, which I did, and saw the prisoner standing at the door; she went in very quick upon seeing me, and tried to shun me. I went in and found her behind the door; I told her she was charged with stealing 35 l. from her uncle, (Mr. Kemp.) she denied knowing any thing about it. I took her up stairs to an apartment, which she shewed me as her own, and searched her in Wayling's presence. I found no notes upon her; I said,

"You have robbed your uncle before." She said, she never did it before; I neither promised or threatend her, she was much in liquor. I told Wayling to take her to the watch-house, and I searched the house. Parrott was out at that time. I put Eagleston at the door to take her if she came in, and bring her up to me. I remained up stairs with a girl who was in the house, and in about an hour Eagleston brought Parrott up to me. I searched her but found nothing. I told her (Parrott) I was still certain she had the money. She sat down on the bed and called God to witness she had never seen it. I was going to take her to the watch-house; she wanted to go down stairs to a young girl who was laying in - she wished me to leave the room; I refused, and she then asked the girl to give her the notes, she had given her to take care of; she handed them over to her; I caught hold of them; there were three 10 l. notes, which the prosecutor claimed. We took them to Bow-street, and went from thence in a coach to the Mansion-house, and as we went, the prisoner said to Parrott.

"I never should have robbed my uncle if it had not been for you." (Parrott is between fifty and sixty years old.) She said, Parrott had said she owed her a little money, and she must get it somewhere or other, and that she told her afterwards, that she had robbed her uncle of the money; that Parrott had a son in Whitecross-street prison, and the notes were to be taken there to be put off, and that Parrott was to have one 10 l. note herself out of it, and that she had nearly the whole of the change of the 5 l. note.

HENRY PAUL KEMP. I have endorsed two of the notes, and recollect the other by the number; I had it from Messrs. Hoares and Barnett, bankers, and I am certain they are three of the notes I lost. The prisoner lived with us about a year and a half ago. I do not exactly know where she has been lately.

JAMES WAYLING . I apprehended Parrott, and saw the young woman deliver the notes over to her. I was in the coach going to the Mansion-house, and heard what passed. Smith's account is correct; she said, she told Parrott she had robbed her uncle of them.

The prisoners made no Defence, but three witnesses gave her a good character, but stated they had not seen her lately.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her youth, character, and believing her to have been seduced by Parrott .

Reference Number: t18230219-28

375. CHARLES GOULD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a coat, value 1 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; two waistcoats, value 8 s.; a shirt, value 18 d., and a neckerchief, value 6 d., the goods of James Lewis ; and a picture, value 8 s., the goods of William Jones , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES LEWIS . I live at Mr. Jones's, Wood-street, Cheapside . I occupy the garret. The prisoner slept with me five or six nights, and two more men slept in another bed - he told me he was a biscuit baker , out of place. The two pair of trowsers and two waistcoats were tied up in a handkerchief together; my coat laid in the window - I saw them safe on the 17th of January, about eleven o'clock, when I went to bed. The prisoner was then in the room, but not undressed - he slept with me that night, and got up at half-past five o'clock, having told the watchman to call him - I got up at nine, and missed all my clothes; he never returned. I found him in custody on the 21st. The other two men still live there. He had given no notice of leaving - I had had my clothes in wear sometime.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This lodging was at a public-house - A. Yes; at the Bull's Head. He left his own clothes behind him.

WILLIAM JONES . Gould lodged at my house with Lewis - he went out early in the morning; he had not said he should leave, and did not pay me; he left his own clothes behind. I lost a picture from the parlour, which was safe overnight.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a watchman. I called the prisoner at a quarter before five o'clock, by his desire. I saw him go out of the house with a picture under his arm. I saw no bundle.

HENRY SHARP . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the Old Fish, public-house, in Baldwin's-garden. I told him it was about another charge, and about this also - he said I ought to be the last person to take him, and denied it. He had lodged in the same house as me once.

Prisoner's Defence. I took away the clothes I had on, and nothing else. I left none behind.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-29

376. GEORGE ALVEY and JOHN MORING were indicted for stealing on the 7th of February , two pair of laced half boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Russell .

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a shoemaker , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 7th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at work behind my counter - the two prisoners with another person came in; the third person asked for laced half boots - I shewed him four or five pair, one of which he said would fit him, and he paid 3 s. 6 d. for them; he told me to drive some nails into them, which I did, and while I was about it Alvey left the shop; Moring staid till Alvey returned, and when the boots were finished they all three left together - I immediately missed two pair of half boots, which were within their reach; I followed them, and from their conversation in the shop, I understood they had been drinking in Long-lane, I went there, but could not find them. In returning I met Alvey alone, with a pair of half boots in his hand - I seized him, he dropped the boots in my hand, scuffled, and got off - I cried Stop thief! and followed; he was taken in about an hour after; I am certain of him. The boots are mine. My

son went with me to look after them, and in crossing Smithfield we met the two prisoners together. I called the patrol and secured them. We found the other pair of boots at their feet.

JOHN RUSSELL , JUN. I know the prisoners to be the men who came with another - when they were gone I missed two pair of boots. I went with my father after them, and in crossing Smithfield we met the two prisoners, and gave them in charge. I saw Alvey drop the boots at his feet; he ran, but was stopped. Moring bought a pair of old boots off the other man's feet, because they were too small for him; but the boots Alvey dropped were the stolen ones.

JOHN POWELL . I am the patrol. I saw the two prisoners together - Russell called me. I saw Alvey throw down a pair of boots, and run off. I secured him in Long-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to).

ALVEY'S Defence. I took them, but the other men knew nothing about it.

ALVEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

MORING - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-30

377. MATTHEW JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of William Martin , from his person .

WILLIAM MARTIN . I live in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. On the 8th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming up Holborn-hill - my handkerchief was safe when I was at the Tower, in my coat pocket. I was informed it was gone, I felt, and missed it. It was produced to me the next night. I did not see the prisoner. I left my address at the watch-house.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 8th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on Holborn-hill, on the opposite side to Mr. Martin, and saw the prisoner in company with two more running after the prosecutor. I watched them and saw, Jordan take the handkerchief out; they all ran up Union-court - I sent a man to stop the gentleman. I followed, and lost sight of them - I knew them before. I went towards Field-lane, and met Wilden, who accompanied me, and in West-street, I took Jordan; he was standing at the corner of a court in company with several more. I had taken the other two before that. I found the handkerchief in his hat with another; he said he bought them of a sailor. Mr. Martin claimed it, and produced the fellow one.

WILLIAM GEORGE THISLETON , I am a pawnbroker, and live in Charlotte-street, Battle-bridge. I was on Holborn-hill with Colton, and saw them following Mr. Martin - the prisoner took something from Mr. Martin's pocket, but I could not see what; he and one of the others run up Union-court. I went with Colton, and took the prisoner afterwards in West-street - he was with seven or eight more.

THOMAS WILDEN . I am a constable of Holborn. I met Colton, and went with him, and took Jordan, who stood with seven or eight more, and found two handkerchiefs in his hat - he said he bought them of a sailor half an hour before. The bill was thrown out against the other two.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was waiting in a public-house, and a sailor came in, who appeared distressed - he asked me to buy the two handkerchiefs for 8 s.; I gave him 6 s. for them. I put them into my hat, went out, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230219-31

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

378. ANN LOWTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a sheet, value 7 s.; a flat iron, value 1 s., and three books, value 1 s., the goods of Eliza Deverell , in a lodging-room .

ELIZA DEVERILL . I live in Union-street . I let the prisoner half of my bed, and slept with her - the furniture in the room was mine.

COURT. Then this should be an indictment at Common Law.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-32

379. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two blankets, value 4 s. , the goods of John Walker James .

JOHN WALKER JAMES . I keep a carpet warehouse in Oxford-street . On the night of the 6th of February, about quarter past seven o'clock, these blankets, hung outside the door. I heard an alarm, ran out, and saw the prisoner running with them, he dropped them - I pursued crying Stop thief. He was stopped without my losing sight of him.

PETER MARTIN . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner over the way, and Mr. James following him - he dropped the blankets, and I stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Oxford-street, and found them.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-33

380. ALEXANDER PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , a bottle, value 3 s., and a basket, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Barker .

THOMAS BARKER . I keep an errand cart . On the 30th of January, I was in Whitechapel , this basket was tied on the tail of the cart - between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was on the pavement by the side of the cart, which was going on. A young man gave me information, and I missed it, and found the prisoner about thirty yards off with it - he said he found it; it could not have dropped.

WILLIAM COOPER . I am servant to a sugar baker. I was passing at the time, and saw the prisoner and another young man before me, whom I suspected; they were looking

round. The prisoner went into the road, and took the bottle and basket from the cart's tail - he ran on the pavement, and I asked him where he got it; he said he found it - I said I saw him take it.

JOHN MARRYATT . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in distress, and thought it would fetch 6 d.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-34

Before Mr. Justice Park.

381. HENRY SEATON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of Lawson Holmes , about the hour of seven in the night of the 26th of January , at St. Paul Shadwell, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, two watches, value 1 l.; one pair of sleeve buttons, value 1 s.; forty pieces of old silver coin, value 30 s., and thirteen sovereigns , the property of Catherine Dale , widow .

SECOND COUNT, the same only, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Catherine Dale .

THOMAS CLARK . I am porter to Lawson Holmes , No. 66, Ratcliff-highway . On Sunday evening the 26th of January, I went out about a quarter before six o'clock, leaving only Mrs. Dale, who lodges on the first floor at home, it was dark. I returned about seven o'clock, and saw a light shining on the wall of the stair-case; I immediately went back, and saw White and Anderson. I got a light, and we all went up stairs, and found the prisoner trying to get out of the first floor window; Dale occupies that room. He ran to the landing, and struck me on the side of my head, and then knocked the other man down, and ran into the second floor back room. A third man collared him; and I laid hold of him, and brought him down, and took him outside the door, and laid him on the snow, and took him to the watch-house. I returned to the house, and went into the first floor rooms, and found the linen laying about the floor, and in the back room the trunks were on the bed. My master picked up a crow-bar, soon after in a chair, in the front room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he ever get away - A. No. I first saw him in the front room. Holmes never slept in the house, but I do, and his other servants do. I saw the prisoner's face distinctly.

LAWSON HOLMES . I rent the house; three servants slept there, also Vaughan and my son-in-law also. Dale lodges with me. I was fetched to the house, about five minutes after this happened. Dale was at church. I found a crow bar and dark lantern, which I gave to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not the firm of the house Bourne and Holmes - A. Yes, but Bourne has been dead for years. I have no partner. The house is in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell.

CATHERINE DALE . I lodge in Mr. Holmes's house. I went to church, about five minutes past six o'clock, I left my rooms safe, and double locked the street-door. I returned about eight o'clock, and found every thing in confusion; the drawers were all open, and the linen laying about on the ground. I missed thirteen sovereigns and some old silver coin out of a trunk; two watches and a pair of silver sleeve buttons. I had left every thing safe; the watches and money were entirely gone.

EDWARD WHITE . I was called in to assist the porter.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the man you found in the house escape - A. No; it was the prisoner.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a constable of Shadwell. I was sent for and took charge of the prisoner, about half past seven o'clock. It was quite dark. I searched him and found two matches in his waistcoat pocket, and his left hand coat pocket was turned inside out. Next morning, Bowcott, who keeps a shop next door to Holmes, brought me a small piece of candle and two matches wrapped up in a paper; and on the Monday evening, Sedger brought a watch to the watch-house.

THOMAS BOWCOTT . I live next door to Mr. Holmes. On the morning of the robbery, I heard a cry for assistance, and immediately went. I found the prisoner and the witness on the snow; I assisted in securing him. As we got to Smellie's door, the prisoner was struggling and fell on one knee; and after he was put into the watch-house. I went back to the spot, and found a green-bag on the snow, near the curb; it contained seven skeleton and one picklock key, which I gave to the officer. When we took him to the watch-house, he laid down at the door on the right hand side of the steps, and on that spot I found next morning, a piece of wax candle and two matches, which I also gave to the officer.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a patrol. On the night in question I was opposite Shadwell-church with Avery, and opposite the prosecutor's door, I saw Avery pick up a watch, a skeleton key, and a sleeve-button; I found another sleeve-button in the snow, and in the room I found a dark lantern, and a piece of candle in it on the table - I compared the candle found by Bowcott with that in the lantern, they corresponded. The crow-bar was given to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How did the candles correspond - A. They were of one size.

JOHN AVERY . I went to Holmes's house - no force was used to the doors, they must have been entered by false keys. I picked up a skeleton key which unlocked the door. I also found a silver watch and sleeve button. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, and asked where he lived. He said in North-street, City-road, but afterwards he said in Great Gardner-street. I asked what he was, he said a chair-maker. I asked who he worked for, he hesitated. I then asked where he worked last, and who for. He said he had sold half a dozen chairs in Moorfields, but could not tell me the name or number. Bowcott gave me eight skeleton keys, and one picklock key. Another picklock key was given me by a young woman who picked it up.

ROBERT SEDGER . I am a shipwright. On Monday morning, about eleven o'clock, I was opposite Shadwell watch-house, and saw the ribbon of a watch laying on the snow. I picked it up. A small key and a silver watch were hanging to it. I gave it to Spooner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say, is that I went

skaiting, and passing by this house, I saw two young men reeling in the snow; one went away, and the other laid hold of me as I stood there, and said I was the man.

THOMAS CLARK . I am positive he is the man. I never let him go.

EDWARD WHITE . I swear the same.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good Character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18230219-35

382. JOHN BURK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, a coat, value 10 s.; two waistcoats, value 1 l; a pair of shoes, value 8 s.; three shirts, value 1 l.; a neckerchief, value 1 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; eight sovereigns; six half crowns, and five shillings, the property of Walter Burk ; and a watch, value 4 l.; a seal, value 3 l.; two watch keys, value 10 s.; a snuff-box, value 2 l.; a hat, value 15 s.; three pair of gloves, value 3 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 2 l.; two pair of stockings, value 4 s.; two sovereigns. and six half crowns, the property of Luke John Burk ; and a waistcoat, value 10 s.; an ink-stand, value 1 s.; a piece of old coin, value 1 d., and ten shillings, the property of William Walter Burk ; and a scent box, value 1 l., the goods of Catharine Thresa Burk , in the dwelling-house of the said Walter Burk .

LUKE JOHN BURK . I am the son of Walter Burk , who is clerk to a solicitor , and lives in Worship-street, Finsbury-square , and rents the house. I do not know whether the prisoner is a relation of ours or not - he calls himself one, my father took him into his family; he first applied to us about nine months ago; he has lived in the house about two months; he slept there, and was employed a little I believe; he left suddenly on the morning of the 6th of January, and did not return until he was brought back two or three weeks after. When he left, I missed my silver hunting watch, with a seal and two keys, and a silver snuff-box off my bed-room table; my trowsers which I had placed on a chair by my bed side, and 2 l. 15 s., which was in the pocket; also my hat and gloves from down stairs, a pair of nankeen trowsers from my drawers, and two silk and one white handkerchief out of the same drawers, and two pair of stockings; my watch, snuff-box, and two handkerchiefs were afterwards produced at Worship-street.

WALTER BURK . I am the father of the last witness. I took the prisoner under my protection; he left the house suddenly on the morning of the 6th of January; he was in the house at four; and at eight o'clock I went to call him, and he was gone; we examined in a few minutes, and missed the property stated in the indictment. I found my coat at Worship-street.

WILLIAM WALTER BURK . I live with my father. When the prisoner went, I missed a pair of gloves, a white waistcoat, 10 s. in silver, an ink-stand, and a piece of old coin.

WILLIAM BATEMAN . I am a constable of Coventry. On the morning of the 7th of January, about eight o'clock, as I came out of a private lodging-house, at Coventry. I met the prisoner coming in enquiring for a lodging - the coach comes in early in the morning - he had no bundle. I saw he was rather intoxicated, and advised the lodging-house keeper to let him have a bed. I stopped with him a few minutes; he was telling the lodging-house keeper that he had paid 17 s. for a chaise from London to Barnett, to take the coach. I took no notice, but thought his statement not correct. In the evening, I went to the house again - he was then in the kitchen. I said I would go with him to the coach-office, which I did, with the landlady. I asked the clerk if he knew him; he said he believed him to be the person who came down by the coach that morning, that the coach had gone to Liverpool without him, for he was so intoxicated, and they had had much trouble with him on the road. I asked what money he had about him, as he was going to Liverpool; he said as much as would take him there. I took him to the watch-house, searched him, and found a purse in his pocket containing eight sovereigns, seven half crowns, five shillings, two sixpences, and an old coin, and in his waistcoat pocket was another half crown. In his coat pocket I found a silver snuff-box, and in his breeches pocket a small silver hunting-watch, and in his great coatpocket, two pair of stockings, two white pocket handkerchiefs, a coloured handkerchief, and a night cap. The hat he had on was claimed by Burk. I have had them ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, except that my uncle gave me the things.

One witness gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing him to be in distress, and to have got into bad company .

Reference Number: t18230219-36

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

383. WILLIAM BINGLEY was indicted for the wilful murder of George Durham .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Thomason, who keeps the George, in George-yard, Whitechapel. I knew George Durham very well. I saw him at the house, on Sunday, the 26th of January, at half past one o'clock in the day; he spoke disrespectful things of the prisoner there. I saw the prisoner a few minutes after Durham left the house, and I told him what Durham had said; he said he was a good for nothing man, and had he been there he would have given him a good hiding; but if he did, he would take the law of him, and therefore it was better to leave him alone. I saw him and Durham in the street, opposite the house that night, about a quarter past eleven o'clock. It was a very light night and frosty, and there were lumps of hard snow on the ground. I could hear distinctly what they said. The prisoner said, to the deceased,

"What have you been saying disrespectful of me;" Deceased said,

"What I like;" he repeated this several times. The prisoner said,

"I would give you a good hiding, but you would take the law of me." The deceased answered no, I would not, and immediately took off his hat, and laid it on a lump of snow, and put himself in a fighting attitude; they began to fight together. I think Durham hit the first blow in the prisoner's face; the prisoner then struck him - Durham fell on the stones on the opposite side, where the snow was swept; he got up, took his hat and hurried away towards his father's. He was not so stout as the prisoner, but about his height.

THOMAS DOWLING . I was in George-yard , about ten minutes before eleven o'clock; I saw Durham and the

prisoner there. The prisoner said,

"George what have you to say against me, that you go backbiting me behind my back, if you had any thing to say, why not say it to my face;" The deceased answered, he would say what he liked, and added

"You had better hit me." The prisoner said,

"If I do you'll take the law of me;" he said, I'll take no law whatever, he took off his hat, and put himself in a fighting attitude. The prisoner buttoned his great coat, and they fell too fighting, they came to a close and Bingley threw Durham a cross-buttock, with his head on the pavement. The stones were all pebbles, and very sharp; he was thrown on the pavement with violence; he was quite thrown up, his feet were a yard and a quarter off the ground, when his head touched the pavement; he rose his head from the pavement, and I saw the blood trickle down from the wound; he got up and put himself again in a fighting attitude; they set too and he received a blow; he then took up his hat and walked off towards his father's, saying he would fight no more. Bingley went towards home.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long after this did the man die - A. Several days. I often seen him about the streets afterwards, smoking his pipe and drinking.

JOHN DURHAM . I am the father of the deceased - he came home on Sunday, between half past ten and eleven o'clock; his head was injured. I went with him to the hospital; he walked, and on Tuesday, I took him again in a coach; he returned and went again, on Thursday in a coach. He died in the hospital. He told me on the evening he received the blow, that Bingley had given him his death blow, and said there was no chance of his life; and that he had received his death blow. I considered him at that time in a dying state; there was not the least hopes of him from the first moment I saw him. He asked me to go with him to see if the man could be apprehended. He walked to the hospital two or three times.

RICHARD PULLEN . I am a pupil at the London-hospital. I first saw Durham about one o'clock in the night the accident happened. I examined his head, and found a severe contusion, but it was not cut. I suppose it to be caused by a fall. I had no apprehension of immediate death, nor was he under apprehension of immediate death; he wished me to sign a certificate of his danger, in order to apprehend the man.

LEWIS EVANS . I am a pupil at the hospital. On Thursday, the 30th of January, I saw the deceased and attended him till his death, which took place on Tuesday, the 4th of February. He came to the hospital to remain, on Sunday evening, the 2d of February. I examined his head after his death; there was a contused wound which might have been done by a blunt instrument, or by falling against some hard substance - there was apparently inflammation of the brain, which I suppose to have been caused by the wound, which produced his death.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of Manslaughter only . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230219-37

Before Mr. Justice Park.

384. SUSAN STUBBINGS was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with the wilful murder of a certain new-born infant .

ELIZABETH HACKETT . I am a married woman, and live in Adlow-street, Burton-crescent. The prisoner lived servant with me for three months; she is about sixteen years old - I spoke to her several times soon after she came to me, and asked her if she was in the family way, she said she was not; I sent for Mr. Wakefield to examine her, about a month before this affair happened, he told her he suspected she was in the family way, she said she was not. On the 29th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I went into the parlour, and she was laying on the sofa-bedstead, and said she had a pain in her chest; I said, I thought she was in labour, she denied it; I sent for her aunt, who came, she went to get a room for her, and sent her cousin to fetch her to the room - we got a coach for her. Her cousin went behind her to put on her things, and heard the child cry, she was delivered of it between the time her aunt came, and our getting the coach; nobody was with her at the time. Richardson the nurse, and George Wakefield the doctor were fetched, I saw the child; it kept bleeding from the shoulders, there appeared scratches on the shoulder, it bled at the mouth and nose continually. I found some clothes for it - it was a very fine boy, its nails were grown, we tried to feed it, but could get nothing whatever down it. I told the nurse it would not live from the first, that was my opinion; it died at two o'clock next morning. She never had it in bed with her, or touched it after the nurse came, which was about half an hour after it was born.

SARAH STUBBINGS . I am the prisoner's aunt - she had called on me on the Saturday before. I had spoken to her about her condition, and told her she had better go home to her father's; she said her father had a large family, and had trouble enough, and she wished to get another situation. I was sent for, and went to her; she complained of a pain in her chest - I went to get her a lodging, and sent my daughter for her, she did not come, and I went back, and saw marks on the child's neck after it was washed. I thought she had done it in her agony in labour, and said nothing to her about it.

MR. GEORGE WAKEFIELD , surgeon, after describing some particulars, which are unnecessary to relate; stated that upon examining the child after death, he observed the neck to be black and larcerated in several places, which might have happened by the prisoner's delivering herself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-38

385. ELIZABETH SAUNDERS was charged on the Coroners Inquisition, only, with the wilful murder of her new-born child .

DAVID ELLIS . I live in John-street, Oxford-street. The prisoner came into my service on Thursday, the 2d of January, I did not suspect her being pregnant. On the 4th of February , my wife gave me information - I went into the kitchen between seven and eight o'clock at night; Mr. Ellis pointed out something to me on the floor, in consequence of which I fetched Mr. Kerr, and stated my suspicions, and Mr. Ellis spoke to him - he went up to see the prisoner in her bed room. When he came down he stated his apprehensions, and having seen some blood on the stairs leading to the yard, he asked for a candle - I

went with him to the privy, and found an infant laying on its back, with the head and part of the neck in the soil; I sent for a person who came in half an hour, and took it up - it was put into a box unwashed. I could see no marks of violence on it in the state it was then in. The constable nailed the box down, and put it in the front vault of my house, and nailed up the door. This was late on Saturday evening - it remained there till Monday morning, when Howell took it away.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Watson took the child from the privy - A. Yes. Mr. Kerr was present - the soil only covered it as far as the chest.

MR. JAMES KERR . I am an apothecary. On the 4th of January, Mr. Ellis sent for me about eight o'clock in the evening. I first went to the privy, and on throwing down a piece of lighted paper, I saw the child laying on its back, and the head depressed on the soil. The chest and face were visible, but sunk a little in the soil; Mr. Ellis sent for Watson to take it up; I did not observe any thing about its neck - I went up stairs to the prisoner with Mrs. Ellis, who introduced me as a medical man, and left me with her; I asked if she wished for my assistance, she said No, that she had been poorly, but was better - this was all that passed.

Q. Then you had no reason to suppose from what passed, that she had been recently brought to bed - A. Not the least; the child appeared not to have come to maturity by a month or two - I am induced to think it was born alive by its general healthy appearance, but cannot say it was so. A feeling similar to an inclination to stool, is very common in pregnancy. I opened the body and found the lungs inflated, and from that I think it had breathed, but that is not conclusive - it might have imbibed sufficient air, even in parturition so as to have inflated the lungs.

Q. You cannot say it was born alive - A. Certainly not.

BENJAMIN WATSON . I am a night-man. I went to the privy with a light, and saw the child laying on the surface of the soil on its back, with its head in the soil; one of my men got it up and put it into a box, it was quite naked; I observed nothing about its body.

GEORGE HOWELL . I summoned the Coroner's Inquest, and was sent for the body of the child on the 7th, to take it before the Inquest - I went to Mr. Ellis's vault; the servant unnailed the door in my presence, and gave me the box, I took it to St. Marylebone workhouse, and unnailed it, and left it for two hours with the nurses to be washed - I then called for it, and found it laying on a clean table, and a piece of a silk handkerchief laying by its side, which the nurse tied round the neck - I myself had not seen it on the neck before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-39

Before Mr. Justice Park.

386. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Bays on the King's-highway, on the 16th of February , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a medal, value 10 s.; a pair of spectacles, value 1 s.; four sovereigns, and a half crown , his property.

JOHN BAYS . I am a bricklayer , and live in Petticoat-lane. On Saturday night last, about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, I was going home through Whitechapel , and in stepping over the kennel I fell down, my legs being bad. I had drank 6 d. of gin and water, and half a pint of half and half, two hours before that. When I fell down, four persons came up - the prisoner was one, but I cannot recognize the others. I am confident he was one; they lifted me up, and led me by the arms about three yards; the prisoner had my left arm, and another my right. One of the other two put his hand into my pockets, and turned them inside out. I could not hinder him, as they held both my arms; they took four sovereigns, and four or five shillings out, a pair of spectacles, and a silver medal belonging to my volunteer corps. I do not know that the fourth man touched me at all. I am sure the prisoner was not the fourth man. When they had robbed me, three sovereigns, a half, and some halfpence fell on the pavement; they all ran off except the prisoner; he pretended to come up as a friend, and assisted me into the house, and then asked for some cold water to wipe my face; my wife gave him some warm water out of the kettle; he washed the mud off my face. I saw three sovereigns laying on the table - my wife put them there; they were three of those I was robbed of.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you lived at this house - A. Nearly thirty years. I dare say the prisoner knew me very well; I did not know him before. I was neither drunk nor sober. I did not apply for drink at the watch-house - I might ask for beer, for I was knocked all to pieces by the dreadful fall I had, and a blow which one of them gave me. The man who robbed me had a white rough coat on - there was nothing to prevent the prisoner's running away.

Q. Did he not say,

"Mr. Bays, I am sorry to see you in this distress, and will help you into your house" - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Were you not very drunk - A. I was not my Lord.

SUSAN BAYS . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I heard his voice, and went to the door. I found him close to the door, with four men round him; one had old of each arm, another was in front, and another behind. There was one with a white coat, whom I pushed with my hands, and made the money fall out of his hands on the pavement; he ran across the street, with the medal in his hand - I pursued him. When I got up to him, he knocked me down, and ran off, and dropped the medal - the watchman picked it up, and gave it to me; the other two men ran off. The prisoner remained, and still had hold of my husband's arm. I came back, and picked up three sovereigns. a half crown, and some halfpence, close to the door. The prisoner wished my husband to go into the house; he said he could go in without his assistance, but the prisoner forced him in, and sat him down in a chair, and asked me for some cold water. I had gone in before the prisoner, and laid the three sovereigns down on the table. My son came down stairs naked, hearing his father call, but went out of the room directly, to dress himself. I saw the sovereigns on the table after he left the room. The prisoner washed my husband's face. I turned round to get him a towel, and on turning again, I missed a sovereign off the table - they were there when I put the bason down. I said I missed the sovereigns; he seemed agitated, and said he would show me what money he had, and produced

three half crowns, and a sovereign. I said the sovereign belonged to me, and he had better deliver it up and go about his business - he refused. I heard him call my husband Mr. Bois. I never saw him before. There was nobody else in the room when the sovereign was missed - we gave charge of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not your son been in and out of the room - A. No, my son saw me pick the sovereigns up, and put them on the table, and left the place immediately; he did not come in again till it was lost.

Q. Had there not been a debate, whether there was not a farthing on the table instead of a third sovereign - A. No, I said nothing about a farthing; my son gave me one after I picked the sovereigns up.

JOHN BAYS , JUN. I looked out of window, and saw my father laying in the kennel - I ran down stairs naked, and helped him up. The prisoner was there then, and the other man was gone. My father had complained of weak legs - he had been drinking, but was not so intoxicated as not to know what he was about. I and the prisoner put him up against the door, and took him into the house. I saw my mother lay down three sovereigns, half a crown, and some halfpence, but do not know how many. I picked up a farthing afterwards in the street - I thought it was a sovereign till she brought out a light.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not go into the parlour to assist your father - A. I went into the house - the prisoner was wiping my father's face; my mother asked how many soveriegns I saw her put down - I said three, and if one was missing it must be the prisoner.

Q. Why not go in to assist your father - A. The prisoner would force himself in - my father kept saying he did not want him, and I was looking for the other sovereign. I live next door to my father.

Q. Did you leave your father's house unknown to him sometime ago - A. No. I do not know Valentine. My father never charged me with stealing any truck wheels; I had lent a pair to one Viner. I never ran away. My father was told that Valentine had stolen them. I did not keep out of the way while he was examined.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I am beadle of Whitechapel. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found a sovereign and three half crown upon him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prosecutor very drunk - A. I considered him so; he said,

"Let us have some beer;" I said, I thought he had had enough, and had better go home.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. It is only through inhumanity that I am brought here.

HEZIAH LEALTER . I live in Middlesex-street, near the prosecutor's. About a quarter past twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery, I saw him laying on the stones near his own door - he was intoxicated; only I and his wife were near him. I called the watch; two watchmen came up from about two hundred yards off; one of them had found the medal. I and Bays's son picked him up - some silver, gold, and halfpence were found on the ground. There was nobody else near - I wished Bays good night, and told his wife she had better take him in doors - I went to my own door, and then the prisoner came up, and asked what was the matter; I said a neighbour of mine was knocked down - he asked if he had been robbed, I said, I thought he had lost nothing, for his wife had picked up the money, which had fallen out of his pocket. When I was with Bays, he said he had lost his medal, and nothing else.

COURT. Q. Then the first thing you saw was the prosecutor laying in the gutter, and his wife by him - A. Not in the gutter - he laid along the pavement; there was not a soulinear him. I went out upon hearing her call out

"Stop the two men with white coats." I never saw the prisoner go up to him - the prisoner deals in glass. When he left me I went in doors, and he went up the street. I never spoke to the watchmen.

LEWIS JACOBS . I live in Petticoat-lane, or Middlesex-street, nearly opposite Bays's. I came home from the West end of the town. I saw two men pass me in white coats, as I was ringing the bell, and in three or four minutes I heard an alarm opposite Middlesex-street; I went over, and Mr. Bays appeared very intoxicated - he stood against the wall - the prisoner came along on the opposite side of the way, and crossed over to Bays, and said,

"How are you." He appeared to me so much intoxicated, he could hardly speak - Bays shook hands with him. The prisoner said,

"Shall I help you in doors;" Bays said,

"You may if you like," and he walked in doors with him. The door was shut, and I went home.

LAZARUS LAZARUS . I know the prisoner. I paid him two sovereigns on Friday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-40

London Cases,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

387. RICHARD LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , two pieces of bombazeen, value 13 l. 1 s. , the goods of John Lea and Thomas Simcox Lea .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FOX . I am in the service of Messrs. John and Thomas Simcox Lea, carpet and bombazeen manufacturers , Newgate-street . On the 1st of July, about half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the warehouse, and asked to see bombazeens - he said he wanted no credit, and we must do them on the lowest terms. He selected three pieces, and said he must have them sent immediately - he put the coarsest piece aside, and said,

"I'll have the other two first." He came into the counting-house, and gave the name of

"Bolton and Co., No. 16, Nicholas-lane;" I followed him there with the goods - I found him standing at the door, and seeing Bolton and Co. on the door, I gave them to him; he took them up stairs telling me to wait. I heard him speak to somebody; he then ran down, and said

"The gentleman wants the other piece, run back as fast as you can for it, and I will pay for all three." I ran back, and on returning found it was an empty house. I did not see him again till he was apprehended. I gave information at the Mansion-house. I met him in the Old Change last Wednesday, and gave him in charge. I have never found the property.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say

"Send them to Nicholas-lane, and you will see Bolton on the door" - A. He wrote down

Bolton and Co., as the persons buying the good. I found he was a judge of bombazeens.

DANIEL LOCKIER . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I have the address the prisoner wrote, it is

"J. Bolton and Co., No. 16, Nicholas-lane;" I went there, and found the house empty.

SAMUEL FOGG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked him what he had done with the bombazeens; he said he had pawned them over the water, and he would settle with Mr. Lea for them, if he would allow him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in good circumstances, but through unforseen misfortunes have fallen into distress. When I bought the goods I expected to receive money to pay for them, but was disappointed. About six weeks ago, I obtained a respectable situation at Mr. Ferguson's, in the Old Change, and meant to pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-41

388. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , a wooden till, value 1 s., the goods of Garton Crucifix ; fifty-three penny-pieces; twenty-nine halfpence, and fifty farthings , his property.

GARTON CRUCIFIX. I am a tobaconist , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 20th of January, in the evening, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, and saw a hat rise above the window - I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner stepping out of the shop with my till; I took him five or six doors off with it - there was 6 s. 8 d. in copper in it, and fifty-three penny-pieces.

JOHN SERGEANT . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the till.

(Till produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-42

389. JOHN HOLYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , four seals, value 11 l. 11 s.; two watch-chains, value 10 l. 3 s., and two gold pins, value 7 s. 3 d. , the goods of John Brogden .

JOHN BROGDEN . I live in Bridgewater-square. On the 4th of January, at six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my counting-house, and said,

"You know me Mr. Brogden," I said,

"Yes, I have known you twenty years - I think you served your apprenticeship with Mr. Mayfield;" he said,

"You are perfectly right, I have never left him; I continue with him to the present moment, I am no starter, nor is it likely I shall leave him; I have occasion for a seal and chain for my brother, who is a man of property, and can pay for it. Let me have a few to shew him, and what he does not choose, I will return you." I let him have them, and desired they might he entered in our return book, not considering them as sold - and a paper was delivered him with the seals, expressly stating they were upon approbation for his brother to choose one, and return the others. I gave him several chains, and several seals, he said he would return in an hour, and pay me for that which might be selected, and return the others. As he left, I desired him not to be longer than the hour, he said, certainly not, I might depend upon his returning in an hour; but I did not see him for a month after, when he was taken into custody.

THOMAS WARBOYS . I am clerk to Mr. Brogden. The prisoner came to the counting-house on the 4th of January, for a chain and seals to shew his brother, he took several with him, and did not return. About a fortnight, or month after, I was fetched, and found him in custody.

THOMAS MAYFIELD . The prisoner was in my service once. I never sent him to make any purchase of Mr. Brogden - I had not seen him for five or six years.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-43

390. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , five pieces of calico, value 3 l. 16 s., and one wrapper, value 1 s. , the goods of Charles Nettleship .

THOMAS BROOKS . I am book-keeper to Mr. Charles Nettleship , of the Three Tuns public-house, Aldgate . On the 8th of February, between four and five o'clock, a truss was brought in, directed to Jaques, of Hicksworth. I took it into our warehouse across the yard. We did not miss it till next day.

JOSEPH WHITTER . I took the truss from Swan and Co., to the Three Tons, it contained calico.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 8th of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner between the Three Tuns, and the Bell, Aldgate, with a truss on his back. I looked after him to see where he was going - he crossed the road, I followed him, and when he got near Jewry-street, I stopped him, and said,

"Where are you going with that?" He said,

"What is that to you." I said,

"It is directed, where are you going to take it?" He said, he did not know, nor where he brought it from. I took him, he said he was a seafaring man, and knew a great many smugglers, and met them in Whitechapel; and they said they had some tea and coffee to get rid of, that he was waiting to take it, and that they gave him the truss. I found it contained calico, and the invoice in it led me to the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men whom I knew to be smugglers, they said they had some tea if I could find a customer for it; I said, I dare say I could, and they gave it me.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-44

391. GEORGE ROBERTS and JOHN GRANDY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , twelve sets of drawing instruments, value 36 s. , the goods of Thomas Blunt and Edward Blunt .

HENRY KEMBELL . I am shopman to Thomas and Edward Blunt . On the 18th January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning the prisoner's came into the shop, Grandy asked for a black lead pencil - I shewed him some at 6 d., he offered 4 d. for one; Roberts touched him on the shoulder, and said two or three times,

"Make haste, give him 6 d.," he (Roberts) immediatelyran out of the shop. The errand-boy pursued, and a young gentleman brought in twelve sets of instruments which had been on our counter a quarter of an hour before; Grandy remained in the shop, and was detained, and Roberts secured.

JOSEPH GREENWOOD . I am servant to the prosecutor. I went after Roberts, because I saw him take the instruments off the counter, and put them under his great coat. I followed, he dropped them on the pavement - I did not see them picked up - they were taken into the shop while I was pursuing them.

THOMAS THOROUGHGOOD . I received them in charge.

ROBERTS - GUILTY - Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRUNDY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-45

392. BENJAMIN BARNES and THOMAS MARSTON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , a box-coat, value 12 s. , the goods of William Rolfe .

MR. WILLIAM ROLFE . I am a musical-instrument maker , and live in Cheapside . Last Monday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, a great coat was taken off a caravan at the door. It is what we give to our driver; I saw it there when he came to the door, but missed it in a short time.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. On the 17th of February, I was going down Cheapside, and saw the prisoner's standing together. Marston left Barnes, and stood over by Bow-church; Barnes went up to the caravan and took something, and went with it through Bow-church-yard; Marston kept looking over to see if any one came out - he then followed Barnes into Bow-lane, they come there both together, and Barnes then had the coat on his back wearing it. I heard Marston call out

"Tom," as he went after him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. BARNES. I know nothing of Marston.

BARNES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

MARSTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-46

393. JEREMIAH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , ten pair of stockings, value 35 s. , the goods of John Moyle .

JOHN GOODBURN . I am servant to John Moyle , of Threadneedle-street , the prisoner came into the shop with another boy, and asked to see some black silk handkerchiefs, I said we had none lower than 7 s.; he said let us see them - I shewed them some, and said that was too high a price for them, he said

"Yes, I should like one about 4 s." I said we had none lower. The otherboy said,

"I should think a cotton one would do" I said

"We dont keep them," a gentleman came in who I attended to, and I thought the boys were gone, instead of which they were at the other end of the shop, a lady came down and said,

"What have you got there" I looked and saw Wood with the stockings under his arm, going towards the door he dropped them, and both ran off, I took the prisoner immediately without losing sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did no such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-47

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

394. TIMOTHY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , a watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Joseph Higgins .

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I keep a potatoe-shop , in St. Dunstan's-place . My watch hung over the mantle-piece, in the parlour; I went into the cellar, leaving a little girl there - I heard a foot-step in the shop and my girl called out; I came up opened the back door and took the prisoner coming out of the parlour, and said what have you got; he said nothing, I missed the watch; he denied having it, but I heard it fall from him on the mat, at the parlour door.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Can you undertake to swear, that it was not on the mat when you came up - A. Yes. He said at the office that he came for 1 d. of apples. My girl is not six years old.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ROGERS . I took him in charge, and found 24 s. on him, he resisted my searching him.

Prisoner's Defence. The girl said there were only two apples for a penny; I wanted three and she called her father.

GUILTY Aged 18.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-48

Before Mr. Baron Graham ,

395. CHARLES CLIFT was indicted, for that he, on the 10th of January , at St James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 11006, 5 l., dated the 20th of August, 1821, signed J. Robinson,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument, a promissory note, for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same as the two former, only stating his intent to be to defraud William Chapman .

The prisoner was strongly urged by the Court, to take his trial, but persisted in pleading

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18230219-49

396. CHARLES CLIFT was again indicted, for that he, on the 18th of January , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did dispose of and put away, a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note, (setting it forth, No. 11041, dated the 20th of August, 1821, 5 l., signed J. Robinson,) with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only calling the forged instrument, a promissory note, for payment of money, instead of a Bank note.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner's intent to be to defraud Charles Green .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18230219-50

Before Mr. Justice Park.

397. JOHN BALDOCK , JOHN MARDELL , and ELIZABETH MARTIN , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , twenty yards of trimming, value 20 d.; ten pieces of cord, value 10 d.; ten yards of ribbon, value 2 s.; a quarter of a yard of sattin, value 4 d.; a pocket book, value 6 d.; four habit shirts, value 4 s.; two yards of calico, value 2 s.; seven caps, value 6 d.; three shifts, value 7 s.; nine collars, value 12 s. 6 d.; two work bags, value 3 s.; fifteen handkerchiefs, value 22 s.; three aprons, value 2 s.; one hundred and sixteen yards of bombazeen, value 11 l. 12 s.; three drawings, value 5 s.; a cruet frame, value 40 s.; twelve yards of braiding, value 3 s.; two gown bodies, value 3 s.; a scarf, value 6 d.; a gown, value 12 s.; a spencer, value 2 s.; two petticoats, value 2 s.; one hundred and twenty bobbins, value 8 s.; a dress, value 6 d.; a slip. value 1 s.; a pair of stays, value 1 s., and a box, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Thomas Atterbury .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Frederick Brunton .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK BRUNTON . At Christmas last, I lived at Milton, in Barking, and was going to move to Barnet, and sent by the Woburn waggon, ten boxes, and a small cask of wine, on the 13th of January, and on Thursday morning, the 16th, I went to the Bull, public-house, at Whetstone, in consequence of what I had heard, and found one box missing it contained wearing apparel; they were numbered from No. 1, to 11. I missed No. 5 - Jarvis shewed me some pieces of things cut up at Whetstone, which I believe to be part of my goods. I got a warrant in consequence of this, and searched Mardell's house at Whetstone, and found eight of my neck handkerchiefs, with the marks at the corner cut off, and the corner rounded at the end, but not hemmed, and found other articles of mine there.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did not you tell him, he might as well tell where he got them - A. No. We went there about a fortnight after the 16th of January.

COURT. Q. What size was the box - A. Three feet long - one person could carry it; but the others were too large.

HENRY THOMAS ATTERBURY . I am the Woburn carrier; I received the packages from Mr. Brunton, to take to Barnet - I received them at Whetstone, they were put up in the waggon.

JAMES PURCEL . I am the waggoner. I had the eleven packages, and took them too far on to Whetstone, and left them at the Bull, with the hostler, between one and two o'clock on Wednesday morning. I put them all in the stable myself, and I am sure they were all there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you leave the waggon any where before you took them out - A. No. I saw them locked up. Challis kept the key.

WILLIAM CHALLIS . I am the hostler at the Bull. On the 15th of January, Purcel, left ten boxes and one barrel with me - I locked them up in the stable myself, and kept the key - I am sure they were all there then. I took them in on Wednesday morning, between one and two o'clock - I went to the stable about five that morning, to get a horse out, and I saw nothing the matter with the stable door, but did not notice the packages there. Mr. Brunton came about them at seven o'clock; I then examined the stable door, and found the staple of the lock had been drawn, and a package taken. I gave the key to Baker when I went to bed.

ISAAC BAKER . Challis delivered me the key, about ten o'clock in the morning - I went into the stable at that time; I locked the door when I came out; I found nothing amiss. I kept the key until Mr. Brunton came.

Cross-examined. Q. You took no notice of the boxes - A. No. It was dark.

JOHN CONWAY . I am a constable of St. Pancras. On Wednesday, the 29th of January, I went with a search warrant to Mardell's, with Mr. Brunton - he lodged on the first floor, and was at dinner with his wife. I found some fancy trimming, and in an unfurnished room below, which was locked up, I found eight handkerchiefs with the corners cut off. Mardell's wife gave me the key of the room; I found nothing else there. Mardell denied all knowledge of it, or how they got into his possession. I neither held out threat or promise - I said I thought he might save me a great deal of trouble if he would say where the rest of the property was; he still insisted he knew nothing of it - I asked him for the key of his stable, knowing he was an hostler; he said that was of no consequence. I said unless he gave it to me, I should break the door open, and search it - he then said he would go, and fetch the remaining part of the property; he left the room - I followed him very close; he unlocked the stable door, and went up a ladder into a loft, I followed. He got into a large corn bin, about three quarters full of corn, and handed me out a large bundle, consisting of some bombazeens, a plated cruet frame, and several articles of wearing apparel. I asked if that was all, he said, Yes - I searched myself, and found a smaller bundle. I took him into custody, and asked where he got the things; he made no reply then, but afterwards said he had them from Louse Jack, (meaning Baldock.) I then went and apprehended Challis, the hostler, and then to a cottage at Barnet, rented by Elizabeth Martin , and apprehended Baldock and her, sitting together there, but being in another County, I did not search the house, but went there next day with Morrison, and saw him take a small parcel from between the bed and mattress, containing a pair of stays, a remnant of black bombazeen, and a silk handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you part with the key of the house - A. No.

JOHN MORRISON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to Martin's house, with Conway, and found the things he stated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CONWAY re-examined. I was before the Magistrate when Baldock was examined - what he said was taken down; (looking at the examination,) this is it - (reads.)

"The bundle I found about a week ago, at the back of Mr. Moulton's house, in a field - I took it to *** to take care of for me, till I could hear something about it. I did not open it, nor give him anything out of it; I never saw it after I left it with him, and did not know where he put it. I heard of Brunton's having lost property before I found the bundle: - John Baldock desires to add that when he found the bundle, something dropped out of it, which he

took to ***, and put them between the bed and mattress."

BALDOCK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

MARDELL - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARTIN - NOT - GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-51

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

398. MARTHA DOWLING and ANN SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , three hearth rugs, value 30 s., and ten yards of flannel, value 5 s., the goods of William Baldey and John William Marriott , privately in their shop .

JOHN FOSTER . I am shopman to Messrs. William Baldey and John William Marriott , linendrapers , of Great Russell-street, Covent-garden . On the 25th January, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop together - no other customers were there; I was the only person serving. They bought some Irish and flannel, and a blanket which were to be put up for them. I knew Sullivan before, but not Dowling - she came to recommend Dowling, who bought the goods. They were half an hour in the shop; there were other goods on the counter. I missed nothing, but the officer came in in about twenty minutes, while I was putting away the blankets, which I had shewn them. I accompanied him to the office without looking if anything was gone, and found the prisoners there in custody. I saw the articles there in a basket. I found three hearth rugs in one basket, and some flannel in the other - they were my master's property. I returned to the shop, and missed them; they had laid at the side of the shop, about two yards from the counter, against the wainscoat. Dowling sat on a stool close to the counter, and Sullivan stood at her side, and each had a basket - Dowling had a cloak on, and I think Sullivan a coat. I went behind a partition at the back of the shop for ten minutes, for the blankets, and I could not then see into the front.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is your master's name William John or John William - A. I do not know which is the first name. Sullivan has five children, and bore an excellent character. Dowling gave her name and address. The goods were to be paid for by weekly instalments.

COURT. Q. Is there any other William John or John William in the house. - A. No; my master has no children.

THOMAS ANSDEN . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 25th of January, I was on duty at Charing-cross; with Ball, and saw the two prisoners coming towards the Horse Gaurds, in a direction from Cockspur-street. As we passed them Dowling slipped down by accident, and I saw this roll of flannel under her cloak, with the shop ticket on it - Sullivan lifted her up; they walked on about twenty yards together, and Dowling staggered in the road - Ball caught hold of her arm, and brought her on the pavement - Sullivan had then left Dowling, and was crossing the road; I fetched her back to where Dowling stood, and as I took the flannel from under Dowling's arm, two had shillings fell out of her hand, as she was trying to snatch the ticket off the flannel - she shut her hand again; I forced it open, and took three bad shillings from it, tied in a piece of rag. I gave her to Ball, and took Sullivan into custody; I found two hearth rugs, and a bill of the prosecutor's, and 20 s. in silver in her basket.

Cross-examined. Q. Sullivan had the basket - A. Yes. Ball took another basket from Dowling.

WILLIAM BALL . I found a rug in Dowling's basket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Sullivan put in a written Defence, stating that Dowling had desired her to accompany her to the shop, to be answerable for the goods, and upon coming out of the shop she put the stolen property in her basket.

DOWLING - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-52

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

399. JOSEPH LEE was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Alexander Carse , in the night of the 17th of January , and stealing one plait of hair, value 15 s. , the goods of Henry Holmes .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230219-53

Before Mr. Justice Park.

400. WILLIAM ENEAS GIFFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Grisewood , about ten o'clock in the morning, on the 5th of February ( Sarah Budd being therein), and stealing a coat, value 20 s. , his property.

SARAH BUDD . I am servant to Mr. Howell, who lodges at Mr. Grisewood's livery-stables, Finsbury-place, Finsbury-square . On the morning of the 5th of February, at a quarter past ten o'clock, I was on the drawing-room stairs, and heard somebody in the passage; I looked back, and saw the prisoner. The door had been shut - I cannot swear that the latch had caught. I had seen the outer door not a moment before, but did not examine it. The persons coming into Mr. Grisewood's office, came through there; Mr. Grisewood pays the taxes, and keeps an office in the house. I saw the prisoner go into the office, and take down a great coat, and put it in his basket; I came down to him, and he asked if I wanted to buy any pens - I said No, but he had a great coat in his basket; he denied it. I went outside, shut the door, and called the hostler, who took him; he had thrown the coat up on the nail again. I am sure I saw him take it off the nail, and put it into his basket.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any more coats hanging up - A. Not on that side.

WILLIAM ROSE . I am the hostler. Budd called me. I found the prisoner in the passage, and secured him - he said he had pens to sell. I charged him with having removed the coat, he denied it. It hung up then in a careless manner. I believe the coat belonged to Mr. Grisewood - we have lost coats before.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to sell pens.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing only - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-54

Before Mr. Justice Park.

401. BENJAMIN JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Gill .

ROBERT GILL. I am pot-boy at the Queen's-head, public-house, Litchfield-street . On the 7th of February, about a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, I was coming out of the parlour, and met the prisoner in the passage; he was coming from the yard with something under his arm. I went into the kitchen, and missed my great coat off the dresser. I then followed, and caught him fifty yards off, and said,

"That is my coat" - he said, it was not, and offered me 1 s., I refused it; saying, I would have the coat - he then gave it to me, and struck me across the head with his stick (which broke into three pieces) and ran off. I called to a young man who secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy came into the yard to me, and said I should have the coat for 3 s. When the prosecutor came up, and said it was his, I said

"Take it then, here is 1 s. for you;" but he pulled at me, and I gave him a rap with my stick.

GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230219-55

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

402. MARY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , a pewter pot, value 1 s., the goods of James Carpenter ; and a pewter pot, value 1 s., the goods of Henry Mason ; and a pewter pot, value 1 s. , the goods of William Dew .

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am the son of James Carpenter , who keeps the Queen's-head, public-house, High-street, Marylebone . On the 5th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and had half a pint of beer in a pint pot; I watched her till near nine o'clock, when she went out. I followed, and stopped her, and felt that she had some pots on each side; took her into the Prince of Wales, public-house, and gave her to Morris.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I searched her, and in a side pocket, I found a pot claimed by Carpenter; and in a pocket in front of her person, was one claimed by Dew; another dropped from her with Mason's name. She was in liquor.

WILLIAM DEW . I keep a public-house in James-street, one of these pots are mine. I have lost upwards of four hundred within the last year.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I recollect nothing of it till I found myself in the watch-house in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230219-56

Before Mr. Justice Park.

403. JOSEPH WESTBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th February , thirty-six printed books, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Fiske .

MR. ROBERT FISKE. I am a bookseller , and live at the corner of Marylebone-lane, and Wigmore-street; and rent a warehouse at Mr. Gaunt's livery-stables next door, where I have seven or eight thousand volumes - the prisoner was gatesman of the stables ; I also have presses in another room there. I found the padlock of the presses loose, and missed books several times. I observed the prisoner one morning with a large bag on his back, which appeared to have books in it - I watched him into a house in Barrett's-court, Wigmore-street; I returned, and enquired at the stable, and found he was leaving the situation of gatesman. On the 12th of February, I was coming up Barrett's-court, and saw three odd volumes of Blackstone's Commentaries in the window, and knew them to be mine; I went in and found about twelve volumes of mine.

JOHN TEW . I live at No. 21, Barrett's-court. I bought the books of a woman, whom I since know to be the prisoner's wife; I never bought any of him, I bought them all within a fortnight or three weeks, and gave 12 s. or 14 s. for the whole. I gave 4 d. and 6 d. each for some of them.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I produce the books which I found at Tew's, here is

"Clark's Homer" complete, and

"Elvesias on Man."

MR. FISKE. They are mine, and worth about 6 l. if complete.

Prisoner. I am very sorry that I took them away.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-57

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

404. GEORGE ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Jeremiah Lewis .

HENRY GEORGE FRAAS . I live at Shadwell , with Jeremiah Lewis , a pawnbroker . On the 30th of February, about four o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing by the door, and go away in about a minute; I went out and missed nothing, but saw this waistcoat hanging in its place. He came to the door again in about half an hour, looked in, and went away - he came again in less than a minute; I was in the other shop; I saw his arms move, as if he was reaching in at the door, he then went away. I went to the door, and missed the waistcoat, which was about a quarter of a yard within the door; I followed and brought him back, felt in his breast, but could not find it. I sent for an officer, who searched him at the bottom of the shop - he asked for a light, and as I turned round to reach one, I saw the prisoner putting on his hat, and the waistcoat on the floor about a yard from him, and five yards from where it had hung - he denied throwing it down.

RICHARD VAUGHAN . I am an officer. I was fetched. Fraas said that he had a waistcoat about him; I took him back to search him, and while I turned for the light, he took his hat off, and the moment the light came, I found the waistcoat by his side.

Prisoner. Q. Was not my hat in my hand when you took me - A. No, he had it on.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along, he ran out and took me - my hat laid on the floor when the officer came, and a young woman picked up the waistcoat behind a screen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-58

Before Mr. Justice Park.

405. JAMES MILES was indicted for stealing, on the

25th of January , two half-crowns, and a sixpence, the monies of William Phillips , from his person .

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a carpenter . I slept in the same bed as the prisoner for eight nights, in David-court, Marylebone , and on the 26th of January, about three o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody in the room, jumped up, and saw him standing by the chair where my clothes were - I heard money jingle, and said

"What are you at" - he pretended to be taken ill, and got into bed - got up, and went out about seven o'clock; I got up at eight, and found two half-crowns and three pence at the edge of my pocket, and missed two half-crowns and sixpence - he did not return again, and on the 28th January, I met him in Baker-street, and charged him with it, he pretended not to know me - then he said he was going to receive some money, and would meet me in the evening, and satisfy me, and pay me for the time I had lost in looking after him - he took me to several places, but I gave him in charge.

GEORGE PERFITT . I am a butcher. Phillips brought the prisoner to me, he said, if he went to Westminster with him, he would pay him the money; but he left him with me while he got an officer - he offered to leave his jacket and waistcoat with me while he fetched the money.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-59

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

406. THOMAS WILLIAMS and JOHN CRAFT were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Richard Hunter , about four o'clock in the night of the 30th of January , and stealing a great coat, value 4 s., the goods of William Blakesley , a shawl, value 2 s.; an apron, value 6 d., and a pair of laced boots, value 5 s. , the goods of Jane Stevens .

RICHARD HUNTER . I keep the Hole in the Wall public-house, St. Dunstan's-court, Fleet-street . On the 30th of January, I went to bed at twelve o'clock; all the doors and windows were fast. The kitchen is divided from the house by a narrow court, and does not communicate with the dwelling-house, but is part of another house. I was alarmed about four o'clock in the morning, and found the lock of the kitchen door broken to pieces, and my boy's ( William Blakesley ) great coat spread open on the kitchen floor, and Steven's property laid by the side of it - the drawers were all open. I found the prisoners at the watch-house, with a crow-bar, which fitted the impressions made on the kitchen door, and some marks which were made on the wine-cellar flap.

JANE STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Hunter. I locked the kitchen up, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, and put the keys in the bar; my boots and apron were then in the drawer, and the shawl hung on a nail by Blakesley's coat.

JOHN WARD . I am a watchman. On the 30th of January, at four o'clock in the morning, I was going round my beat, and saw the prisoners coming out of St. Dunstan's-court - they made a stand at the end of the court, to see which way I was coming. I went up towards the court, and they walked on, still looking back, and when I came to the court, I pushed Hunter's kitchen door, and found it open - I shut it, and followed them towards Fetter-lane, and by Crane-court, I met Davis - they had just turned down Fetter-lane. I sent him down the lane, and I went up Fleur-de-lis-court to meet them, and caught Craft as he was running - Davis laid hold of Williams. I am certain of their persons - we took them to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Are you certain of them - A. I am, I took particular notice of them.

WILLIAM DAVIS . Ward gave me information. I went up Fetter-lane, and Williams seeing me following them made a stoop as if to do something to his shoe. I crossed towards him, and he ran down Fleur-de-lis-court - I secured him, and Ward took Craft at the same time; nobody else was near - they were searched at the watch-house, and a bundle of bladders found on Williams.

Cross-examined. Q. Bladders are used to carry spirits in - A. Yes.

RICHARD HANNINGTON . I am watch-house keeper, and received them in charge. I found a crow-bar upon Craft, and some bladders; a phosphorus box and matches on Williams. I took the crow-bar to Hunter's - it fitted the impressions made on the door, and the marks on the cellar flap.

WILLIAM'S Defence. I work at Covent Garden. I was coming from Ratcliff, and found the bladders by Fleet-market. I stopped in this court for a necessary purpose, then went up Fetter-lane, and the watchman came and took me. I went up the lane, because I thought the watchman would take me for running against a girl.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY. Aged 19.

CRAFT - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-60

407. JOHN ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a pocket-book, value 1 s.; a purse, value 2 d.; two crowns; ten shillings, and two shillings, the property of Mary Ann Artis , from her person .

MARY ANN ARTIS . I live in Greenfield-street, Whitechapel. On the 10th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was by the church at the corner of Hounsditch , and had a purse containing this money, in a basket. I perceived the lid of my basket move up, turned round, and saw the prisoner by my side. I asked if he had got anything of mine, he said,

"No." I said,

"I am sure you have," took hold of him, and found my pocket-book, with my purse and money in it under his jacket, in his hand. Brown came up and took him.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I was crossing Hounsditch, and heard the cry of Stop him! I pursued the prisoner, who fell down, and I took him in the Minories.

(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and ran my arm against the lady's basket, which was broken - the pocket-book rolled out; she asked what I had of her's, I said,

"Nothing," and walked on, heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230219-61

408. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for that he, on

the 17th of January , being servant to Thomas Flint , did steal four fans, value 2 s.; two silk handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d., and two pair of gloves, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Flint , his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. GEORGE HANDEL SHARP . I am father-in-law to Mr. Flint, a haberdasher , who carries on business on Fish-street-hill; the prisoner has been his porter since September, and slept on the landing-place, between the shop and passage; his brother Richard was porter there before him. On Friday morning, the 17th of January, about eleven o'clock, when Mrs. Flint came from Wandsworth, in consequence of information, I called all the servants together. Mrs. Flint asked the shopwomen for the keys of their boxes, and I asked the shopmen and porter for theirs, and said that two Cypress dresses, and a length of plaid sarsnett were missing, and they must all be searched; the prisoner gave me four keys, saying, that three of them were of no use, and that the other belonged to his locked-up box, and said,

"In searching my box, take care of my money;" the place he slept in was parted off from the shop by two doors, which I lock up every night, and until I open them in the morning nobody can get into the shop; there is a large sky-light at the back of the shop, which opens, and a person can easily get into the shop that way from where the prisoner slept. Mr. Dumeford and I went to the prisoner's room first; I looked in and saw his room in great confusion; his bed-clothes all turned about, and several boxes. I said, it would take us a long while, and we would go to the young men's room first. I locked the door with a key which had been in my possession ever since his brother left; he was in the shop when I locked the door, but could not see me do it - he had no key himself. I went and searched eight or nine of the young men's boxes, which were in a room at a great distance from the prisoner's, and was an hour and a half about it. I then returned to the prisoner's room, and found it forced open; a piece was forced off the door-post, the lock was wrenched from its place, and there was fresh blood on the door-post; we sent for a constable - the prisoner at that time was gone out with a parcel; we took his locked-up box marked (T. C.) into the drawing-room, came down and examined the room, and between the bed and sacking, I found a pair of new worsted stockings. I found a phosphorus box, and two pair of ladies' gloves in a little box on the shelf; also a new silk handkerchief, and two pair of ladies' gloves on the shelf, with three or four handkerchiefs which were not new. I then went to the box in the drawing-room, and found the hasp of the lock completely forced off, and immediately it was opened, I found a clean neckcloth with a mark of fresh blood on it, four fans which had never been sold, and two new black silk handkerchiefs. The prisoner had just come in as I opened the box - I fetched him, and said,

"Thomas, here is the constable to search your box, but before we do that, if you are the person I suspect of breaking open the door, you have a wound on your hand;" he said,

"Broke open the door, my door was never locked." I said,

"Let me look at your hand;" he gave me his left hand - I asked to see the other; he then gave me the right, and there was a cut across the knuckle of the first finger, which was bleeding then; he said he did it in opening the shutters that morning - this was half-past two o'clock - we open at half-past seven; he then saw us search his box, and find the property; he said,

"These fans I took out of the warehouse, and meant to have spoken to Mr. Dumeford about them," and that he bought all the other things in Whitechapel. I asked where there, but he could not tell; he said, he knew nothing about the ladies' gloves. There being no money in the box, I asked where it was; he said, he had none. I said, he had desired me to take care of the money; he said,

"My clothes are my money, I have no opportunity of saving money in this service;" the constable searched him, and found five sovereigns and fifteen shillings in his left-hand pocket, and twenty-seven shillings in the other, which he had received of a customer. I sent him to the watch-house, and in the evening went with Mr. Flint to him. Mr. Flint asked if he knew anything of his brother; he said,

"I have not seen my brother for this month," and that, he did not know where he or his sister lived, but that his mother lived in some court which he mentioned. I asked if he had not a relation who lived at No. 33, 63, or 23, Curtain-road; he said he had no relation in Curtain-road.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You are not concerned in the business - A. Not at all. Mr. Flint has no partner. The prisoner sat within five yards of the door, when I locked it; he was sent out about one o'clock. We have about eighteen persons employed in the shop; I can swear to the fans; he could have had the other things from his master at the wholesale price; it is not likely he would have given the retail price to another person.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can people in the shop see his bed room door - A. No. They must open a door on the fourth stair, to see his room; he asked what I was going to search for, I told him the Cypress dresses.

ROBERT DUMEFORD . I am warehouseman to Mr. Flint. Mr. Sharpe's account is correct; I knew nothing of the prisoner's having the fans, but the day before the search, I went with him into the cellar, to look for some wrapper, and there found fifty or sixty of these Dutch fans, in a very dirty state, which had been there for years - I told him to take them into the shop to be cleaned, and am certain these four were among them.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a mark on them - A. No; but I could pick these out from the other fifty; he acknowledges taking them.

EDWARD ROGERS . I am a constable, and assisted in the search. Mr. Sharp's account is correct; the prisoner's hand, had quite fresh blood on it; I shewed him the blood on the handkerchiefs; he said,

"Oh, you may say anything."

MR. THOMAS FLINT . In consequence of information, I came to town; my father-in-law's account is correct. I went to No. 63, Curtain-road, and found the prisoner's brother Richard, there, with his mother and sister, they lodged in the house, (looking at a letter;) I have seen the prisoner write several times, I believe this to be his writing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I found this letter in Richard Clark 's pocket.

(Reads.)

December, 1822.

Please Richard call down this evening, when I am shutting

up. I have got a very heavy parcel to take very far - as soon as you can, and you will much oblige, J. Clark, Richard Clark , No. 53, Curtain-road; 14th of January.

The post-mark was,

"Fish-street-hill."

Prisoner's Defence. I was out at the time, the door and box were broken open. Different things which have been said are wrong. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-62

409. JOHN STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 48 lbs. of lead, value 2 s. , the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

HENRY SMITH EVANS . I am clerk to Messrs. Russell and Co, carriers of Friday-street. On the 11th of February, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come down the ladder of the adjoining premises, in Watling-street , (which have been lately burnt down,) with a load on his shoulder; I asked him to stop, he then run up the ladder to escape, but was secured, and under some bricks in the hod, I found 48 lbs. of lead. He fell on his knees and begged, forgiveness. He said he took it from the ruins; it was partly melted as if it had come from the ruins. Four houses were burnt.

JOHN JACKSON . I took him in charge. I could not find which house the lead was taken from - he appeared in a distressed and starving state. He was employed there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work for a bricklayer, who is employed by the Sun-fire-office. He was not there that morning, so I begun clearing away the rubbish, and was bringing the lead round to where the firemen threw it, and was stopped, but did not intend to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-63

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

410. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , sixty yards of flannel, value 20 s. , the goods of Samuel Bannister .

SAMUEL BANNISTER . I am a hosier , and live in Holborn . On the 6th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, when I went out, the flannel stood two feet within the shop, and was fastened by a handkerchief; when I came home, the prisoner was in custody in the watch-house.

MARY SARTIN . I am servant to a gentleman, in James-street, Bedford-row. On the 6th of February, about half-past seven o'clock, I was going into a linendraper's shop, next door to the prosecutors, and saw a young man take a roll of flannel from the prosecutor's door, I went in and told them, and in about five minutes the prisoner was brought back with it.

HENRY STOCKPORT . I am a sadler. I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner run across the road with the flannel: he turned down Gray's Inn-lane, where I took him with it on his back - he said nothing.

Prisoner. Q. Was any body with me - A. Yes, you called out to him,

"Come along Dick," and he escaped.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I received him in charge; he began to cry, and said he did it through distress. I found 7 s., on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had sold some beads in Air-street-hill, for 7 s.; a young man came up, and asked me to carry the flannel.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-64

Before Mr. Justice Park.

411. JOHN BAKER and WILLIAM THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , forty guineas; one 10 l., forty-seven 5 l.; and eight 1 l., promissory notes; forty 5 l., and three hundred and twentyeight 1 l., Bank notes , the property of Thomas Sparkes , and others his partners,

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Augustus Robert Hankey and others his partners.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am clerk in the banking-house, of Messrs. Thomas Sparkes and Co's. of Exeter. On the 5th of December, I enclosed the notes stated in the indictment, in a parcel for the Exeter subscription coach, of which Baker was the guard, and had carried parcels for us for many years, containing money to a large amount; he received 6 s. 8 d. a parcel, for himself, besides the carriage - he knew that it contained money; we had no regular time to send them, he was always to carry them sown up in his pocket, and to deliver it to Messrs. Hankey, or their resident clerk, I sealed the inside cover and directed it to Messrs. Hankey's, No. 7, Fenchurch-street, and the outside one, to the guard of the Exeter subscription coach, and sowed it up in his left hand outside coat pocket; his coat was on at the time. I have since seen five of the 5 l. country notes, at the Mansion House.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The parcel in question, I believe was to have been sent by the five o'clock coach, but the guard who went that time, being a stranger, you sent it by Baker - A. Yes. I took the numbers of the country notes. His coach left Exeter, at six o'clock in the evening. I sewed the parcel in his coat, about twenty-five minutes before six o'clock; I saw him the next time he came to Exeter, which was on the following Monday; we had not sent a parcel by him, for more than four months before.

COURT. Q. Where, were the five notes you saw at the Mansion-house, made payable - A. At Messrs. Hanbury's. We sent parcels much oftener by the morning coaches, than by Baker, as he was evening guard, (looking at a parcel,) this represents the size and appearance of it, and is about the same weight.

JOHN CORK . I am resident clerk at Messrs. Augustus Robert Hankey and Co's. banking-house, and know Baker perfectly well. On Friday night, the 6th of December, about half past ten o'clock, he came to the banking-house, and said, he had bad news to communicate to me, that he had lost the parcel, I said how could that be; he said

he found it cumbersome, and took it out of his pocket, and put it in the coach seat. I detained him until eleven o'clock, when Mr. Hankey came home, he was then suffered to go, upon promising to come next morning, which he punctually did. Nothing was said to him in my hearing, he was permitted to go away. He seldom brought parcels from the Exeter bank, but when he did, they were always sown up in his pocket, and which is the way all the guards bring them, and we unstitch them at the banking-house - I never recollect a guard bringing a parcel in any other way, but once.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long had you been in the habit of receiving parcels from Exeter - A. I have been there five or six years, and generally receive them myself. He said, he had lost it at the White Horse-cellar he believed, and accounted for his calling so late, by saying he had been after two female passengers; he usually came between seven and eight o'clock - he said he missed it first at the Bull and Mouth, but had seen it safe at the White Horse-cellar, and had returned there, and told them he had lost it. That he took the address of the female passengers, which he gave me, they were Holman and Masters. We had received no advice of the notes, or we could have stopped them - he gave me all the information in his power, and was permitted to go on his journey on Saturday night.

MARY HOLLOWAY HOLMAN . I came from Exeter by the subscription coach - we left about six o'clock in the evening, on the 5th of December. Baker was guard - we stopped at the White Horse-cellar next evening, about six o'clock, (after dark), Baker appeared then to have a white coat on, the same as when we left Exeter. At the White Horse-cellar, Mr. Barnett came and looked over all the parcels on each side of the coach - I did not observe him take any out. I told him there was one he had not seen, he then looked at it, but did not take it out; it appeared to be a white parcel, like the one produced. I did not see Baker at this time. Barnett shut the door after him, there was a woman in the coach with me. Soon after Barnett left, Baker came into the coach on the same side as Barnett with a lantern, and looked at the parcels in the seat - and while he was looking, I heard a voice on the other side of the coach, the window was down, but the door shut - Baker only looked into the front sent where the white parcel was. I could not distinguish what the voice said, but Baker said something, which I supposed to be answering the voice, and almost immediately left the coach. I did not observe him take it away - he shut the door, and after that, I heard a voice on the road side, saying,

"Hand me that parcel," I turned round to the woman in the coach, and said,

"That parcel is wanted." I lifted up the seat, and gave the white parcel to the man who spoke.

Q. What induced you to give that parcel - A. It was the first I laid my hand upon, and thought of course if it was not right, he would have returned it. I had not seen it before Barnett came. I did not see the face of the man I gave it to, so as to know him again - we drove to the Bull and Mouth, and soon after arriving there, Baker asked me if any one had come into the coach to look for parcels - I said,

"No one has been in the coach, but the person you was speaking to asked me for that parcel, and I gave it to him," he made no answer, but turned round, and said to the people who stood near,

"I must go back to Piccadilly." I heard him say,

"It is that fellow Bob there;" I saw no more of him. The other woman went to the Bull and Mouth with me - I got out first.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Baker applied to you for your address - A. Yes. There was no other passenger but the woman and her child. I believe Barnett keeps the booking office at the White Horse-cellar. I believe there were outside passengers.

Q. When you told Barnett that one parcel had escaped his attention, did he not say,

"Oh, that is the guard's parcel" - A. He might have said so, but I have no recollection of anything of the kind.

COURT. Q. When the guard came to look, I suppose you moved to let him open the seat - A. No; he only looked at the front side - he might have taken anything away without my seeing it. Barnett looked at both sides. The woman came outside part of the way; but being very wet, she came in in the morning.

SUSANNAH MARTIN . I was a passenger by the Exeter coach. I got inside about seven o'clock in the morning, as it rained hard - we got to the White Horse-cellar about seven o'clock in the evening. A gentleman came with a lantern, and searched both sides of the coach, but took no parcel out. Baker came soon after, and looked in at the coach seat, but took nothing out. I forget whether he had a light; I did not hear any voice - I had a child. Mrs. Holman and I sat on the same side, with our backs to the horses - we stopped on the left hand side of the road; Mrs. Holman was next to the road, and I next the pavement. After Baker went away, a man came and asked for the parcel, it was a man of Thomas's appearance, but I am not certain of him - he opened the door, and said,

"Will you have the goodness to give me that white parcel;" Mrs. Holman rose, and lifted up the side where I was sitting (I had moved my seat after Barnett came) and gave him out the white parcel, which was like the one produced; we then went on to the Bull and Mouth. Baker asked for the parcel, and said he did not know what he should do - he must go back to the White Horse-cellar about it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He took your address, I believe - A. Yes; Mrs. Holman told Barnett there was a parcel he had not seen - he returned and looked at it - he said nothing about it being the guard's; he merely touched it, but did not take it up.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time did you come to town - A. About seven o'clock; it was dark - the person who demanded the parcel, opened the door on the right side.

THOMAS DENNIS . On the 6th December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I and my brother Phillip were going up Holborn, to Mr. Hemmings, a hardwareman, of Broad-street, St. Giles; with some Waterloo crackers, which we make - and in our way, saw the prisoner Thomas in company with three others, at the Bell and Crown, Holborn; about the inn gateway. I had seen him before, and stopped to notice him - we went and stood at Furnival's Inn-gate; I saw Thomas and his companions talking together, and whipping about the inn. The old Salisbury coach came out, and drove

towards Oxford-road - one of the three men had a great coat over his arm; they all ran with Thomas to the first coach-stand, beyond Middle-row - and there he and two others got into the first chariot. I saw no more of the fourth man. We followed the chariot up Holborn, down Little and Great Queen-street, Lisle-street, and in Piccadilly it stopped; at the corner of Arlington-street, all three got out; two of them ran round the hind part of the coach, and just as they got out, the old Salisbury coach came up - we had then got into the road to see who came out of the coach; Thomas was then on the pavement - the other two crossed over to the old Salisbury coach; we then went and stood by the Gloucester coffee-house door, one of the two men put on his great coat, and appeared as if he was going off by the coach; but seeing the old Salisbury coach full inside, they went to another coach which stood on the opposite side, on the Arlington-street, side, the horses heads being towards the City. They crossed behind the coach; we went round the horses heads, I walked by the coach door, and the two who were in great coats appeared to be assisting a lady out, and Thomas stood behind them, with his face towards the coach door. I then went by, and the guard stood against the hind-wheel with a light in his hand, looking over some boxes; I do not know who the guard was. I then crossed the way to the corner of Berkley-street, and stood looking over a post, and saw Thomas come round the hind part of the coach, and go up to the road-side of the coach, which was nearest to me. I did not see him doing any thing, but he came away stooping, with his hands on his knees, and appeared to be looking under the coach - he went up a second time towards the coach door, but I could not see what passed; he then came back holding his hands in front, and when he went to the corner, I saw he had something white, which appeared to me to be a parcel - the other two who had been at the door joined his company; I crossed the way, and went up Berkley-street; they passed close to me. I walked over to the coach, and saw Exeter on it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What are you - A. A fire-work maker. Mr. Hemmings's son has a toy business, and I was going to him with the crackers - my brother had the crackers. I generally go with him to see what they fetch - we had done work, and I went with him; we trotted all the way to the White Horse-cellar. The old Salisbury coach went another road; we got to Piccadilly before it.

Q. When did you mention all this - A. Directly I saw the bill up in Long-lane.

Q. Offering 500 l. reward - A. Yes. I thought there was something wrong, but I would not get myself into trouble till I was sure of it. I went to Mr. Brown, the City marshal, according to the direction on the bill, and he sent for Forrester - this was about a fortnight before Christmas. My brother said,

"Let us go over, and ask the guard if he has lost anything;" I said we had better not get ourselves into trouble, because we were not rightly certain, and if anything was lost it would be advertised. I hardly knew whether to go and ask the guard or not.

Q. Did you ever come into this Court, at the same door as the prisoners have - A. Yes, but my innocence was proved. I was told I should be asked about that, and offered money to keep away. I have been tried here twice, but it was when I was a boy, and might be among bad company. My innocence was proved both times.

Q. When did you first hear the guard was in custody - A. When I saw the bill. I knew nothing about Baker being committed till Martin told me he stood for trial on the following morning, which was the day after I gave the information - that is the first I heard of his being taken up, to the best of my knowledge - I will not swear it, as I might have heard it. I never read it in the newspaper. I was tried here about the year 1810; I cannot recollect the time, for I have been at work ever since, and do not wish to remember it - it was thirteen or fourteen years ago; I am thirty years old. I was only tried twice. The reward offered is 500 l. upon conviction and recovery of the property, and 200 l. upon conviction, whether it is recovered or not. I believe the guard to be innocent.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You watched them from the first, and never saw the guard do anything - A. I did not.

COURT. Q. How did you manage to keep up with the coach - A. We ran all the way. The horses were bad, or we could not have kept up with it. I had seen Thomas before in bad company, which was my reason for watching him.

PHILIP DENNIS . I am a fire-work maker. On the night of the 6th of December, I was in Holborn, with my brother, and saw four men - Thomas was one of them; I did not know them before, but I took particular notice of him. He walked up and down by the gateway, and kept looking up, and in about ten minutes, the old Salisbury coach drove out of the Bell and Crown; they all ran after it to the first coach stand by Middle-row, then Thomas and two of them got in. We followed the coach down Little and Great Queen-street, Long-acre, and Lisle-street - it stopped on the left hand of Piccadilly; they got out. The Salisbury coach came up, and two of them ran up, leaving Thomas on the pavement - one of them took hold of the dickey of the Salisbury coach, and gave a swing; they then went on the pavement, and one put on his coat; they stood at the coffee-house door. Thomas was on the other side of the way. The two then crossed the road to the pavement, by the Exeter coach, (I cannot read, but my brother read the name;) they went round the back part of the coach; we crossed and went round the horses' heads. I stood by the hind horse, and my brother walked by them, as they stood at the coach door. I saw Thomas go round the hind part of the coach, and leave the coach door - the other two stood on the pavement at the coach door. Thomas came away in about a minute, with his hands before him, and the other two men one on each side of him, looking at his bosom. I was behind and could not see what they were looking at. They went away.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Where were you going - A. To take some Waterloo crackers to Mr. Hemmings. I had them tied in a handkerchief. I asked my brother to go with me - he had half the profits; he generally goes with me. I did not see them do anything to the Salisbury coach. I mentioned this matter at the wine vaults in Fleet-market; they told me the guard was taken up, and I ought to mention it - I went to my brother directly, and said,

"If you don't give information, I will;" I

told him the guard was taken up. He said he would go and let them know of it. I heard of the reward along while afterwards. I do not know when my brother gave information.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What made you stop in Holborn - A. To see what these men were about. I knew nothing of the Salisbury coach being in the yard, till it came out.

THOMAS ROWE . I am a freeman and porter of the City. On Saturday morning, the 7th of December, about ten o'clock, I was at my stand in Angel-court, Throgmorton-street. The prisoner Thomas came and gave me five 5 l. notes, and said,

"Go to Lloyd's, and get me sovereigns for these" - Messrs. Jones and Lloyd, live in Lothbury, but as I was going along, I observed that he was mistaken, and that they were payable at Messrs. Hanbury and Lloyd's, of Lombard-street; I went there, received sovereigns for them, and brought them to him. I had asked where he would be, he said,

"Up in these chambers," pointing to the first door in Angel-court - but on returning I met him at the end of the court; I think I walked on to the door, and gave him the sovereigns in the door way - he then took out six more 5 l. notes, and said,

"You may as well go and get me these done," they were payable at Messrs. Hoares and Barnett's, and were Tavistock Bank notes - I got sovereigns for them. He met me about half way down Angel-court, where I delivered them to him - he put them into his pocket, without counting them, and gave me 2 s.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You have not always expressed yourself so certain of his person - A. I did not swear to him at the Mansion House; I swore that I believed he was the man - I felt as confident of him as I do now. When I was shewn into the room at the Mansion House, I said,

"That is the man who employed me." I am not a ticket porter - I was one for three years, one of my bondsman died - I provided another, who was not accepted. I have a badge; it is merely my name, and stating that I am a freeman; I produce it. I thought this a singular circumstance when I saw him put the money into his pocket without counting it. I then thought he might be a servant who had robbed his master, and went and gave information at the banking-houses, as soon as I saw it in the papers, which was on the Tuesday or Wednesday. I never had the least doubt of his being the man.

MARY CREEDON . I sell fruit in Angel-court. I know Rowe; he stands opposite the Auction-mart. I saw him give a handful of sovereigns into Thomas's hand; he was waiting at the post close by me. I am certain he is the man - he did not count the sovereigns. I saw him for upwards of ten minutes.

THOMAS GOULD . I am clerk at Messrs. Hanbury's and Co., and produce five 5 l. notes paid on the morning of the 7th of December.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How do you know that you paid them that morning - A. By the numbers - I was applied to about them on Monday, and found we had paid them on Saturday. They are Weymouth and Dorsetshire notes,

THOMAS RICHARDS . These are five of the notes I enclosed in the parcel. I know them by a red ink number on the back.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. In consequence of information from Thomas Dennis , I apprehended Thomas on the night of the 15th of January, about ten o'clock, at a public-house in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane, sitting in the parlour with a woman. I called him by name, and said I wanted to speak to him; he came out into the court. I said, I did not know whether he knew me, but that I knew him very well, and he must go with me, on suspicion of robbing the Exeter subscription coach; he said he new nothing about it, and would not go. I collared him, and called Thomas and Phillip Dennis , who were in the court; he then said he would go quietly with us. I got him near the top of Gray's Inn-lane; he there tried to wrench himself from my grasp, and said, he would go no further, that he was in the country, and I should not take him out of it. (I am a City officer.) I forced him into a coach, and took him to the Compter, and found eleven sovereigns on him in a purse, three gold seals, a ribbon, and two keys; he refused his name or address - he knew I was a city officer.

The prisoner Baker put in a long written defence, stating, that he did not miss the parcel till he arrived at the Bull and Mouth, when he used every exertion to recover it, and went to the banking-house to inform Mr. Cork, supposing they had received advice of the parcel, in which case, they could stop the notes before they could be presented for payment, that it was the common practice of the guards, to take their parcels out of their pockets, on account of their being so cumbersome, and that he had no idea of his having to convey the parcel till within half an hour of the time the coach started.

ROBERT OXENHAM . I am guard to the Exeter subscription coach. There are two coaches, the one Baker is guard to, leaves at six o'clock in the evening, and arrives in town about seven o'clock next night - it is one hundred and eighty miles from town; he would have to get up and down between thirty and forty times in the journey. I have had banker's parcels sown up in my pockets when I left Exeter, but in consequence of the inconvenience, have frequently taken them out. He has been guard for eight or nine years.

JOHN BESFORD . I was coachman. On the night the parcel was lost, Baker told me at the Bull and Mouth, that the parcel was missing; he immediately went off to the White Horse-cellar, and was very anxious about it.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a clerk at the booking-office, White Horse-cellar. Baker came back on the evening the parcel was lost, to see if it was mislaid, and appeared very anxious about it.

MRS. HOLLMAN re-examined. There were two ladies got out before we got to the White Horse-cellar.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

BAKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-65

412. JOHN MANCE and WILLIAM PALLISIER were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , three live tame ducks, price 9 s. , the property of Henry Attwell .

HENRY ATTWELL . I am a milkman and live at Hackney . On the 10th of February, I lost two ducks and a drake.

WILLIAM DREWETT . I am a school-master, and live in Grove-street, Hackney. On the 10th of February, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, in consequence of an alarm, I went to the door, and saw the prisoners together, passing the field in which my house is. Mance had a bag on his back - I followed them, and sent for an officer, who joined me in Shore-place; we followed them to Cambridge-heath, and as they approached the road, I lost them. I ran round to meet them, but did not. I saw Beal in possession of a bag containing three ducks. I am sure they are the men.

JOSEPH BEAL . I am a chimney-sweep. I saw the prisoners by the side of the canal, near Cambridge-heath-bridge. I saw one of them drop the bag, which I immediately picked up - it contained two ducks and a drake. I cannot swear to them.

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners going from Shore-place. Mance had the bag on his shoulder. I could not see their faces, but from their appearance, they are the men. I saw them both run into some unfinished building, and found Pallisier between the joists, under the flooring; he begged to be let go, saying, he had had nothing to eat all day, and it was the first time he had done any thing of the kind.

GEORGE HOLDING . I am a carpenter. I was working at the new buildings. Pallisier came and asked me to let him get under the floor, saying, he had not had a bit of victuals all day. I asked why he wanted to get there; he said,

"God bless you let me get under, for the officer's are after me," and that he had stolen something. I sent to tell my master.

THOMAS MAY . I was at work at the building, and after Goodwin gave up the search, I crossed over the building, and saw the prisoner Mance, concealed between the coal-cellars; he tried to get away, saying, he was no thief, and would not go with me.

Prisoner MANCE. Q. Did I not enquire for a person - A. When I found him concealed, he asked for Ayres, a carpenter - no such person was there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MANCE'S Defence. I went to ask for Ayres.

MANCE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

PALISIER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-66

413. JOSEPH JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 64 lbs. of iron, value 18 d. , the goods of Robert Woodcock and James Woodcock .

GEORGE TOMLINSON . I am servant to Mr. Meacham, who lives near Mr. Woodcock. On the 3d of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was crossing Mr. Woodcock's ground, and met the prisoner - he had nothing then. I returned in ten minutes, and saw him with this iron on his shoulder; he laid it down while he got over a fence, and then took it away. I told my master, who went after him.

JOHN MEACHAM . Tomlinson told me. I overtook the prisoner with the iron on his shoulder.

ROBERT WOODCOCK . I am in partnership with my brother James - we are builders. The iron is ours.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-67

414. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , a brass cock, value 1 s. 2 d. , the goods of Phillip Whittle Wood .

PHILLIP WHITTLE WOOD. I am a clerk in the East India House, and live in Robert-street, Hoxton . On the 5th of February. I missed a cock out of my water-butt. My yard is fenced and walled round.

SAMUEL RUSHTON . I live near Wood. On the 5th of February, I found a shoe on my wall, and close by it, I found the cock, in a place which Matthews pointed out. The prisoner claimed the shoe at the watch-house.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I live two doors from Wood. About four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in my garden, which is enclosed by a wall four feet high; he got over into Rushton's ground. I followed and took him before he had got twenty yards; he said,

"I have dropped my shoe," and at that moment, I saw him drop something at his right side. I took him to the watch-house, and shewed Rushton where he dropped the thing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-68

415. JOHN DAVIS and JAMES STONE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , forty yards of linen, value 50 s., the goods of Richard Stratton , privately in his shop .

JOHN WILSON . I am shopman to Richard Strafton . linendraper , Coventry-street, St. James's . On the 30th of January, I found the prisoners in custody, with this linen, which was stolen from behind our counter. I do not know when I had seen it last; it must have been taken at shutting-up time, when only one person is in care of the shop.

HENRY GATES . I belong to the Thames Police. On the 28th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw Stone going down from the County Fire Office into Piccadilly; he called a coach off the stand, and followed it down to the corner of Queen-street; he there opened the door and jumped in, and I saw Davis throw a bundle out of his arms into the coach - he then got in. I called Bidgood to assist me. I got in, took the bundle and them - it was linen. I asked them where they got it, they said, they picked it up at a gentleman's door in Marylebone-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

STONE'S Defence. This boy asked me to call a coach for him, and as soon as the coach stopped, he threw the bundle in, and the officer collared me.

DAVIS'S Defence. I saw it against a door in Marylebone-street, and picked it up. I asked this person to get a coach.

STONE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-69

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

416. RICHARD CLARK was indicted for that he, on the 30th of August , being servant to Thomas Flint , did steal four shawls, value 7 l.; nine yards of lace, value 40 s.; twenty yards of sarsnet, value 6 l.; nine silk handkerchief, value 3 l.; two scarfs, value 3 l.; a veil, value 13 s.; ninety yards of ribbon, value 3 l.; four pair of gloves, value 7 s.; ten

ounces of cotton, value 4 s.; fifty yards of Irish linen, value 6 l.; four yards of velvet, value 40 s.; two yards and a half of Persian, value 4 s.; a feather, value 3 s.; a stock, value 3 s.; one dozen of silk trimming, value 1 s. 6 d.; a fan, value 4 s., and a yard of satin, value 5 s., his property, in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS FLINT . I am a haberdasher , and live on Fish-street-hill. The prisoner was in my service last year as porter ; he left in September, having lived two years and a half with me. While he was there, I frequently missed property; after he left, he was succeeded by his brother Thomas, and about the 18th of January, in consequence of what passed about his brother, I went with Turnpenny and Bestow, to No. 63, Curtain-road, Turnpenny went in there - and after he returned to me, I went with him to the same house, and saw the prisoner there; I told him they had got his brother in custody, and to clear his character, if he was an honest man, he could have no objection to my searching his premises - he said he had none. I searched in the parlour and bedroom which he said were his - he said, he had no other rooms. I found a great deal of property in the rooms; different kinds of silk goods and lace, cottons, Irish, and other things which I deal in, and were mine. Some of them had my mark on them, and those which were not marked, I knew to have been part of my stock. There was a particular shawl found in his sitting-room, with no mark on it, but which I well knew; it cost me 2 l. 2 s. (his rooms were on the first floor). I found three yards of lace, and a piece of figured sarsnet, measuring twelve yards and three quarters, which I also knew, it was worth about 4 l. Turnpenny tried the bedroom door and found it locked - he said

"Richard, we must have the key of the bed-room" - he said it was lost, that the child had lost it, and he could not find it. I said,

"Richard, if you are an honest man, you will not object to my searching;" he gave me a chisel, with which I opened it - (I think there was a child in the bedroom) there were several boxes in the bed-room, one of them locked, and several made-up dresses in the drawers; he was asked for the key of the locked box, he said, that was lost, but I believe it was afterwards produced. I was much agitated at the time; he objected to our opening the box, saying it belonged to his sister, and not to himself. On opening it, I found twelve yards and three quarters of sarsnet, and many other articles - and 92 l. in gold - I asked how he came by the money, I think he said his mother had two farms in Ireland, which she had sold, and that was the produce; I particularly well recollect the shawl being missed; we took stock on the 31st July, and some day in the first week in August it was missing.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You do not serve in the shop - A. I do not; I have several servants.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever sell him, or give him any of the property - A. Certainly not; it is a rule with me not to suffer any servant to have goods without their being entered in the book - his brother could not have stolen the shawl, sarsnet, or lace, as he was not in my service at the time. I found fifty yards of linen at his house - he said he bought that of a Jew.

WILLIAM BESTOW . I searched the premises with Mr. Flint. I am a silk manufacturer, and live in Wood-street. I saw Turnpenny go into the house, he afterwards came out, and I think I saw a woman and boy come out at the door at the same time, looking after Turnpenny. Soon after Mr. Flint, Turnpenny, and I, returned and saw the prisoner; we went to the first floor where search was made; I stood at the door to prevent any one going out - Mr. Flint told Clark his brother was taken for robbing him, but he believed he was an honest man, and he wished to know his brother's connections; he said, he was sorry for it - Mr. Flint asked when he saw him - he said, on Sunday. A great many things were found in the front room. On opening the drawers, Mr. Flint asked whose these goods were, he said, they were his sister's, who was a milliner. I noticed Mr. Flint's marks on some cotton balls, and on a fan. A shawl was found in the drawers, Mr. Flint said,

"This is I believe my property" - the prisoner said he could not tell, his sister might buy it at the shop. Mr. Flint said, he had no doubt of it being his, for it was missed immediately after taking stock. In the drawers we found a great deal of property, and a great deal of lace on dresses partly made up, which Mr. Flint knew. The officer asked for the key of the other room, Clark's mother said in his hearing, that it was lost - we got into the room, there was only one bed there, and a child on it; there were several boxes containing different goods, one was locked - the officer said, the key must be found, or it must be broken open; he found it at last; some Irish linen, several pieces of lace, and ninety-two sovereigns were found in it; he said, he had saved part of the money, and the rest was the produce of some land in Ireland, which his mother had sold.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Mr. Flint's mark - A. I do. The name of Clark was on the door, and I think,

"dress-maker," and something else; The prisoner brought the things away himself, by Mr. Flint's desire, to Fish-street-hill.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I went with Mr. Flint and the the last witness to the Curtain-road, on the 18th of January, I went first to the house alone - I saw a little girl, who called Miss Clark, and the prisoner came down; I asked him if Miss Clark was at home, he said, No. I asked if he lived there, he said, he did - I said, in what part of the house; he said, the first floor. I said, by way of excuse, that I wanted one Clark, a little man, who used to live at Westminster; he said,

"I am not a little man - I have a brother about my size;" I wished him good evening. Mr. Flint, and the other gentleman with him was standing up the street - I went and told him what had passed, we returned to the house - I went up stairs. The prisoner sat by the fire, and got up - I made search - and found a great deal of property, which Mr. Flint claimed. I asked for the key of the bed-room, and was told by somebody that it was lost. I went to the door, opened it, and found a child in bed, there were several boxes there; we found things which Mr. Flint claimed - there was a large box locked; I asked for the key, somebody said it could not be found; I said, I should break it open, and I believe the prisoner immediately fetched a hammer and a chisel; Mr. Flint opened

it; several things were found, and 92 l. in sovereigns in a bag, in a tin box; he said, he had sold some land in Ireland for it, and it was his property. I did not hear his mother's name mentioned; I put the things into a box, and took them to Mr. Flint's, to see if the shop-people would know them, and then took him to the Compter. I searched him in Mr. Flint's dining-room, and found six sovereigns, twenty shillings in silver, an ear-ring, a broach, a watch, three seals, and a key. I searched him again at the Compter, and found two new silk handkerchiefs loose in his pocket, a watch-ribbon, and a pair of gloves, all new. I have returned him 20 l. of the money.

Cross-examined. Q. His sister carried on business there as a dress-maker - A. Her name was on a brass-plate upon the door.

COURT. Q. Whom did the child belong to - A. He said it was his sister's. It was not said in what part of the house his mother and sister lived - he said the first floor belonged to him; there was a turn-up bedstead in the sitting room, and a bed in the other. All the property was on the first floor.

ELIZABETH SOUTHEY . I was in Mr. Flint's employment in July, August, and September, last year. I remember a particular shawl being missed in the early part of August; enquiry was made about it by the young people, and Mr. Flint knew it - I cannot say whether the porter knew it was lost; (looking at one,) this is it - I am positive of it, and the shop mark is on most of the other property.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Does Mr. Flint sell goods with his mark on them - A. Not this description of goods; trifling things are sold with the mark. I know this shawl as well as I should know my own apparel, and can say with confidence that it is the very shawl which was lost. I was called into the shop twice to see shawls of a similar pattern, but which I could tell was not the one. We never had but one of this kind in the shop - I should know it if I accidently saw it upon a person's back.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I have lived four years with Mr. Flint. I assisted in taking stock in July. I know this shawl - we had but one of the pattern; it was missed a few days after taking stock; it was known through the shop. I firmly believe it to be the same, by the pattern and general appearance.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. If you had seen it among six of the same pattern, could you have picked it out - A. I think I could - it had been in the shop some months. (The witness looked at the rest of the property, most of which he identified.)

MR. FLINT. I can swear to most of the property. The shawl, scarf, and twelve yards and three quarters of sarsnet, were all missed before the prisoner left.

ROBERT DUMEFORD . I am warehouseman to Mr. Flint, and assisted in taking the stock in July, and remember the shawl being missed. I can swear to it; it was missed between the 1st and 20th of August. I cannot say when the other goods were missed.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is there any mark on the shawl - A. No. I think I could select it from a dozen others of the same pattern. I never saw another of this quality.

MR. ALLEY contended that the counsel for the prosecution was bound to elect upon which article he should proceed; it being evident they were stolen at different times. The Court concurred on the objection, and Mr. Adolphus elected to proceed upon the shawl.

MR. FLINT. The shawl I bought for two guineas nett cash.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-70

417. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN AYLWIN . I was at the foot of Lambeth-hill , and felt a smartish tugg at my coat pocket, turned round, and discovered that my handkerchief was three parts out of my pocket, and found the prisoner in custody.

ROBERT COCKHEAD . I am a carpenter. I was on Lambeth-hill, and saw Mr. Aylwin pass, and the prisoner following him. I saw him lay hold of the handkerchief, and give it a tug - he still followed, and turned up Lambeth-hill. I seized him, and said he had attempted to pick the gentleman's pocket; he said,

"I have not done it" - I said No, but he had tried to do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not touch his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-71

418. JOHN SMITH was indicted for a like offence .

JAMES BANBURY . I am a weaver . On the 19th of February, I was in Aldermanbury ; the prisoner came in front of me, and thrust his hand into my side pocket, where my pocket-book was; I seized his hand and kept it in my pocket. I called the watch, and gave him in charge. I was a little in liquor.

THOMAS MORTIMER . I am apprentice to Mr. Banbury, and was walking with him. I saw the prisoner rush up against him, and put his hand in his side pocket; my master held is hand, and he was secured.

I am constable of the night. Mr. Banbury, brought the prisoner to the watch-house. Mr. Banbury, was perfectly sensible.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! stood still, and the watchman stopped me. I was never near him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-72

419. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for a like offence .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a stationer , and live in Holborn. On the 8th of February, I was in Cow-lane , between six and seven o'clock in the evening, with a handkerchief in my coat pocket, I felt a hand at my pocket, it was drawn out, I caught the prisoner with my left hand. A boy named Jordan was with him. I am quite sure his hand was in my pocket, I took him into the road, and sent for an officer.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. He was brought to the watch-house, by the patrol.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-73

SIXTH DAY.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

420. JOSEPH BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , a watch, value 30s.; two keys, value 2d., and a piece of ribbon, value 1d., the goods of Emanuel Dias Santos , from his person .

REV. EMANUEL DIAS SANTOS . I am a Roman catholic clergyman . On the 30th of January, I was waiting to go in at the pit door of Drury-lane theatre , there was a considerable crowd, The prisoner was next to me, and close to the wall; I felt my guard chain round my neck break, and immediately perceived my watch was gone. The prisoner turned round and attempted to get away. I called Stop thief! And he was stopped - I lost sight of him for a little time, but saw him again, in five minutes after, I can swear he is the person who stood next to me. My watch was found.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS Q. Did you not tell the magistrate, that you could not tell how it went - A. No. I said, I did not see it taken, but saw him turn from me immediately it was done.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am a constable. I was at the pit door. There was a cry, and I stopped the prisoner; the prosecutor charged him stealing his watch, and gave charge of him. As I took him across Great Russell-street, he slipped from me, and ran under the coaches, down different streets, to the Olympic theatre, where he was taken. I lost sight of him for three minutes, but have no doubt of him. On the Thursday afterwards, the watch was brought to me by a person belonging to the theatre.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-74

421. SAMUEL DUTCHER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOSHUA BUTLER BACON . I am in the employ of Joel Perkins , Charles Theodosius Heath , and George Thomas Heath , of Fleet-street. The prisoner had been in their employ ever since May 1818, as confidential servant ; his duty was to receive money and account for it at the time. On the 31st of January, I sent him with a cheque upon Messrs. Cox, Biddulph and Co, for 208l. 6s. 8d., (looks at a check,) this is it. He was gone an hour and a half, or two hours, he had to call at the stamp-office for some stamps; when he returned, he said he had lost 205l. of the money, that he had put in his trowsers pocket, leaving the 3l. in his waistcoat pocket. I asked why he had put it there, he said, he put it all into his waistcoat pocket, but at the stamp-office, he took the 205l. out of his pocket and put it into his trowsers pocket, that he had a hole in his trowsers pocket, which was the reason he did not put the change there, that he had gone to the bankers. and got the number of the notes, which he gave me. On the Monday, I had some conversation with him about it, he was very impudent, and said his character and mine were on a par. He was discharged, and a week after (which was Monday the 10th.) I received information from the Bank.

WILLIAM HARE . I am clerk to Messrs. Cox and Co. I paid this cheque with the following notes. No. 8462, dated 4th January, 1823, for 200l. No. 10,944, dated 6th January, for 5l., and the rest in money - I paid it to the prisoner; on the 31st of January, he returned much agitated, to ask if I could give him the particulars of the notes, for he had lost them. I gave them to him.

THOMAS WRAGG . I am clerk in the Bank. I have a 200l. note, No. 8462, dated, 4th January, 1823, and a 5l. No., 10,944, dated 6th January, 1823. The 200l. was paid into the Bank by Mr. Thomas, of Cornhill, on the 10th of February, we stopped it, but paid it on the 12th.

THOMAS RANCE . I am in the service of Mr. Thomas, a silversmith. This note was paid us on the 8th of February, by a person who gave his name and address as ' Reynolds 217, High-street, Shadwell; ' he bought some Spanish dollars of us. I took it to the Bank on the 10th.

ABRAHAM REYNOLDS . I paid this note to Mr. Thomas. I cannot swear to it. I only paid him one - I saw him write my name on it. I took it of the prisoner, who gave me the name of Thompson; he obtained Spanish dollars, two gold watches, and some chains for it, from me. I gave him about 20l. in English money.

JOSHUA BUTLER BACON re-examined. In consequence of information, I went to Liverpool - I got in on Tuesday night, the 11th inst. and early on Wednesday morning, I applied to the police, and the prisoner was taken in three quarters of an hour; he denied taking the property, and said it was his own money he had laid out, that he had only saved two hundred Spanish dollars - we found five hundred dollars at his lodgings there. On shewing them to him, I asked if he knew Mr. Thomas, and Mr. Reynolds; he said, he found I knew more than he suspected, and was willing to confess that he took the money, and gave the 200l. note to Mr. Reynolds. He bore a good character before this.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor brought me from my home, promising to send me home at any time. I requested him several times to send me home; he appeared vexed with me, and said, I should go about my business, and I took this opportunity of returning to my native country.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230219-75

Before Mr. Recorder.

422. ANN CONNER and ELIZABETH WILLMOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , a shawl, value 10s. , the goods of John Graham , and William Nixon .

JAMES HAWTHORN . I am shopman to John Graham and William Nixon, linen-drapers , of High Holborn . On Tuesday, the 4th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came to our shop - it was dark; another young man served them; they wanted some prints to the pattern of the gowns they wore; he shewed them a great many - none would suit. They then asked to see some stuffs - the counter was much loaded with the goods they had seen. They then brought three quarters of a yard of Persian, which came to 1s. 6d., and asked to see some shawls. I began to suspect them - they were shewn some, and fixed on a red one, the price was

10 s. 6 d. - they offered 6 s. for it, but we refused. Conner pressed us very much to take 6 s., saying, she had no more money. While dealing for the shawl, I saw Willmott take one off the counter, and put it under her gown. I informed Mr. Graham. Conner wanted to leave 1 s. deposit on the red shawl; we took it to try them. She gave 2 s. 6 d., being 1 s. 6 d. for the Persian, and 1 s. for the shawl; they then went towards the door - I stopped them. Mr. Graham took Willmott into the counting-house, and found the shawl on her; they said it was the first time, and did not appear to be concerned.

EDWARD WHITE . I received the prisoners in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CONNER'S Defence. I met Willmott in Holborn, and asked her to go with me to buy a bonnet-lining, but I knew nothing of her stealing the shawl.

WILLMOTT'S Defence. She did not know that I had it - it was through distress.

WILLMOTT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

CONNER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-76

423. WILLIAM BURGESS , WILLIAM TOBIN , and MICHAEL THOMAS , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , two gowns, value 4 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 10 d.; a shawl, value 1 s.; four yards of ribbon, value 4 d.; a pocket-book, value 1 d.; fifty cards, value 1 d., and twelve shillings, the property of Mary Murphy ; and four coats, value 1 l.; three waistcoats, value 7 s.; a pair of breeches, value 4 s., and a pair of braces, value 2 d. , the goods of Thomas Fitzmaurice .

MARY MURPHY . I am a milk-woman , and live with Fitzmaurice, in the kitchen of a house in Tower-street, Seven-dials . I know Tobin. Last Thursday fortnight, I left my room about half-past one o'clock, leaving a child eleven years old in the room - I came home at four o'clock, and every thing I had was gone out of my box. I lost the articles stated in the indictment. I saw my gown and shawl at Bow-street, on Monday.

THOMAS FITZMAURICE . I live with Murphy. I went out a little before eleven o'clock, and returned about half-past four. I missed my things. We found the prisoners at Bow-street.

HENRY WILD . I am apprentice to Mr. Holland, pawnbroker, of Museum-street, I have a gown, and two waistcoats pawned on the 6th of February, by Tobin, about five o'clock in the evening.

JEREMIAH JOHN CONDEL . I am an officer. I apprehended Tobin on Sunday morning, in bed, in King-street, Seven-dials. I told him the charge - he said nothing. As we went to the watch-house, he burst out crying. I went to him there at eleven o'clock, and received information, and took the prisoners in bed together, in Church-street, St. Giles's. I said I wanted them for felony. I found in the room, a shawl, three odd braces, fifty cards, and a skeleton key. There was a crow-bar in the prosecutor's room, the door of which was broken open, and the hasp forced off - part of the door was cut away with a knife, and then wrenched. They did not account how they came by the property.

Prisoner BURGESS. Q. Did I not say that Tobin brought the things to my place for me to buy them - A. He said so at the watch-house. Thomas said he was innocent, and if he could go home, he would return all the things back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BURGESS'S Defence. He could not swear to the coat at Bow-street.

TOBIN'S Defence. I have lived fourteen weeks in the prosecutor's house, and was never out after six o'clock.

THOMAS'S Defence. Tobin told the officer I was innocent. I was locked out that night, and went to sleep with him.

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

TOBIN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-77

424. GEORGE BEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , six yards of stuff, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Hodge and Henry Lowman .

THOMAS HOLT . I am shopman to Richard Hodge and Henry Lowman , linendrapers , of Argyle House, Regent-street . On the evening of the 6th of February, about six o'clock, I was standing in the shop, about three yards from the door, and saw a piece of worsted stuff drawn off a pile, which stood within three feet of the door. I run to the door, and saw the prisoner running with something under his arm. I pursued about a hundred yards - he dropped it, and I secured him without losing sight of him. The stuff was picked up and returned to me.

THOMAS GOODLUCK . I am a waiter at the Castle Tavern. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running, and Holt following him. I ran and stopped him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-78

425. WILLIAM CHATFIELD and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a pillow, value 18 d. , the goods of Benjamin Lamb .

BENJAMIN LAMB . I am a broker , and live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's . On the 12th of February, I lost a pillow, my wife sent for me; I went in pursuit round Old-street, and caught Allen with it in his apron - and as I returned from Worship-street, I took Chatfield. Cox spoke to them both.

HARRIET COX . I am ten years old, and live next door to Lamb, in Brick-lane, Old-street. I was going for some milk, between six and seven o'clock in the afternoon, it was nearly dark. I saw Chatfield get on a step, and take the pillow - Allen stood waiting at the corner of Mitchell-street, two doors off; they both went down there together. I told Mrs. Lamb of it, and at night Mr. Lamb took one of them. I saw them at Worship-street next morning, and am sure of them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHATFIELD - GUILTY .

Whipped and Discharged.

ALLEN - GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-79

426. DAVID WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the

23d of January , five yards of floor cloth, value 10 s. , the goods of Mark Albinas Pelham .

MARY PELHAM . I am the wife of Mark Albinas Pelham ; we live in great Hermitage-street . On the 22d of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I fastened the door. The floor-cloth was safe on the passage floor; I missed it next morning, about eight o'clock. The door had been opened in the morning. I found the prisoner in custody that afternoon with it - it must have been drawn under the door.

JOSEPH WHITNEY . I am a patrol in Upper East Smithfield. I stopped the prisoner on the 23d of January, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, near the watch-house, with a bundle. I asked what it was, he refused to tell me, and I took him, and found it was the floorcloth, and about eleven o'clock, he said he bought it of a sailor in Nightingale-lane, for 1 s. 3 d.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am the watch-house keeper. I found a screw driver, and a large pair of tweezers on him, which could be put under the door to draw the cloth under.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a sailor in Nightingale-lane, who put down the roll of cloth and other things - he said he had come from his lodgings, and had wandered about all night, and would I buy them - he asked 3 s. for the cloth, I offered him a shilling; he said, if I gave him 1 s. 3 d. he would give me some joiner's tools, which he did.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230219-80

427. HENRY GLOVER , WILLIAM HEAGREN , DANIEL SWEENEY , and RICHARD ANDERSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , three pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of John Lewis .

JOHN LEWIS . I am a hosier , and live in Tottenham Court-road . On the 29th of January, at three o'clock in the afternoon - I pinned four pair of stockings against the door, and there was one pair there before. They were inside the shop - I went out, and on returning about six o'clock, I found them gone, and the prisoners in custody.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a constable. On Wednesday evening, about half-past six o'clock, I saw Glover and Heagren at the shop-door, and the other two prisoners were waiting at the corner of the street for them, about four doors off. I had seen all four in company together about six o'clock, and watched them, and saw Glover unpin the stockings - he did not go into the shop to do it; he took two pair, they were close together. I sent a person over to the shop, to enquire if it was stolen, they ran down China-street, all four together, and in about five minutes, I took them all together. I found one pair on Glover.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GLOVER - GUILTY . Aged 12.

HEAGREN - GUILTY . Aged 12.

SWEENEY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-81

428. ANN KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , an umbrella, value 2 s. , the goods of William Slater .

WILLIAM SLATER . I live in Rose-street, Covent-garden . On the 4th of February, I lost an umbrella from the back-kitchen, about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, I went out, and found the prisoner in Church-lane with it, concealed under her cloak - she had been at the house to beg for bread.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230219-82

429. ELIZABETH LEVITT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a gown, value 3 s.; a shift, value 5 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; three caps, value 1 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Robert Bray .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

FRANCES BRAY . I am the wife of Robert Bray . I was in St. Martin's workhouse , the prisoner slept in the same room as myself. On the 19th of January, when I went out in the morning, I left my bundle, containing the articles stated in the indictment under my pillow. I returned about half-past seven o'clock, and missed every thing. A general search was made.

MARY CLEMSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. Martin's-lane. I received a shift from the prisoner for 1 s. 3 d.

MARY HUNT . I live in Monmouth-street. On Sunday morning, I bought this gown of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them; though I sold them.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230219-83

430. SAMUEL MASON and GEORGE KEPPIE were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , a gown, value 1 s.; a shawl, value 2 s.; a cloak, value, 4 s., and a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of Jane Murray ; and a watch, value 1 l., and two seals, value 10 s. , the goods of George Thompson .

GEORGE THOMPSON . I am a steward of the Leith Smack, which laid at the Leith wharf . I lost a watch and three seals, which hung by my bed-side - the prisoners are strangers. On the 2d of February, between two and four o'clock in the morning, while I was in bed, there was a noise, the mate got up, but found nobody - and about half-past four o'clock, we missed the watch. Murray had been a passenger, and left her clothes in my care, they were stolen at the same time. I found my watch at the Thames Police on the Monday, a seal was then added to it.

JANE MURRAY . I am a widow. My clothes were on board the Smack. I left them in Thompson's care, and found them at the office.

JAMES SIMMONS . I am a patrol, of Aldgate. On Monday morning, the 2d of February, about half-past four o'clock, I saw the prisoners in company in Butcher-row, East Smithfield - Witney was with me. I stopped Mason, who had a bundle, and asked what he had there - he said, a jacket and waistcoat. I asked if any thing else was in it - he said, Yes; a gown. I found no jacket

or waistcoat in it, but a shawl, a cloak, and a handkerchief. Keppie ran off, but I took him three hours after in Nightingale-lane, and found the watch and handkerchief on him. Thompson came and claimed the things about six o'clock.

JOSEPH WITNEY . I am a patrol. Simmon's account is correct. Mason said, he had been with an unfortunate girl, and lost two sovereigns, and took the bundle instead.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am watch-house keeper. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MASON'S Defence. My clothes were on board the Rochester - this young man and I had been drinking all night, and as we were going to the ship, a man came and threw this bundle down - I picked it up.

KEPPIE'S Defence. He found the bundle, took the watch out, and gave it to me.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

KEPPIE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-84

431. CATHERINE MAXWELL and ANN BENNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Vincent .

ANN VINCENT . I am the wife of Thomas Vincent , a shoe-maker , of Vine-street, Hatton-wall . On the 10th of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came and asked for a pair of women's shoes; I shewed her a pair; they said it was not the kind of shoe they wanted. Maxwell ran out of the shop very fast up Mutton-hill, the other walked slowly out. I missed these shoes from the window, and called my son. Bennett then run, they were pursued - another man brought Maxwell back without the shoes, she threw two pair at him, which were not mine. I am not quite certain of Bennett's person.

CHARLES VINCENT . My mother called me down, and said the shoes were stolen. I ran out some distance, and on my return, I saw Bennett with a pair of shoes under her shawl, which were my father's - she was running along. I passed her two or three times - she threw the shoes down, and on my stooping to take them up, she threw two more pair at me, and ran away; and next day I saw her at the corner of Castle-street, I know her again, and had her secured; her features are exactly the same - I strongly believe she is the person. I found Maxwell in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAXWELL'S Defence. This woman was not with me, it was Martha Burk ; I met her in Holborn, and she asked me to go with her to buy a pair of shoes. Seeing her put the shoes under her arm, I began to tremble, and went out.

BENNETT'S Defence. I am not the person. I was at work from eight o'clock in the morning, till eight o'clock at night.

MARY ANN CRUCHENDEN . I live in Pearless-row, Bath-street; Bennett works with me at shoe-binding. On the Monday before she was taken, she was not out of my presence till eight o'clock at night.

MAXWELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BENNETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-85

432. CATHERINE MAXWELL and ANN BENNETT were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , two pair of shoes, value 8 s. , the goods of William Kilsby .

ANN KILSBY . I am the wife of William Kilsby , a shoemaker , of Great Saffron-hill . On the 10th of February, Maxwell came into the shop, between twelve and one o'clock, with another woman about the size of Bennett, and asked for a pair of strong shoes; I shewed them several; but they did not approve of them - they left the shop, and in about ten minutes I missed two pair. I found them in the possession of the constable next day. I am certain of Maxwell.

THOMAS FLEETWOOD . I am a constable. I took charge of Maxwell. The two pair of shoes were delivered to me at Vincent's. Kilsby claimed two pair.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAXWELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

BENNET - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-86

433. JOHN NELSON COBB was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN NEVILLE . I am clerk to Mr. Charles Lewis , a dyer . The prisoner was his porter ; he was afterwards made collecting clerk. Mr. Phillips owed us 30 s. - the prisoner never paid us that money. (Looks at a receipt,) this is his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was it not the custom for him to sign the receipt, and you to receive the money - A. No. We refused to advance his salary till he left off drinking.

BENJAMIN ALLEN . I am butler to Mr. Phillips. I paid the prisoner a sovereign and a half, on the 14th of January, and took his receipt. I paid him at Mr. Lewis's house. I did not see him write the receipt. He brought it down stairs to me ready written.

Prisoner's Defence. I was five years in Mr. Lewis's service as porter - he then placed me in this situation, which was rather a dangerous one, without advancing my salary, and being told I must move my lodgings, and make myself more respectable. I was told if I gave and account of what I had received it would be better for me. I delivered one, but it has proved contrary to my expectations.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-87

434. THOMAS MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of John Pemberton .

JOHN PEMBERTON . I am a linendraper , and live in St. John-street . On the 12th of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon, this shawl was pinned inside the door, and was missed about six o'clock. The shop was very crowded - I did not see it taken. The prisoner was stopped three or four yards off with it.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner and two others trying every shop they came to. One of them who got away pulled at the shawl, and then walked away. The prisoner stood a little distance off,

went up, and pulled it down - he put it in his breast. I pursued him, and secured him; he dropped it at my feet. The other two tried to rescue him from me.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-88

435. SAMUEL RAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , ten deals, value 20 s. , the goods of Jonathan Turner .

EDWARD ALDRED . I am in the service of Jonathan Turner , a timber merchant , of Millbank-row . The prisoner was employed as a sawyer in the yard for ten days. I missed ten deals on taking stock. The prisoner had no authority to take them.

RICHARD RODLEY . I am servant to Mr. Jones, a coal merchant, of Princes-street, Westminster. On Wednesday the 22d of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, my master sent me to Turner's yard - I saw two sawyers at work; the prisoner was not one of them. I told them I wanted ten deals; they directed me to the Ship, public-house, where I found the prisoner - I asked if he worked at Mr. Turner's, he said, Yes; I said I wanted ten deals - he came out, and fetched them off the pile in the yard. I put them into the cart, and gave him a sovereign, and drove them home.

GEORGE JONES . I had bought deals of the prosecutor before, and sent my man on this morning for ten, which he brought.

THOMAS CRITTENDEN . I am a timber tower. I went to Jones's, and found seven of the deals; they corresponded with those on the pile. Ray ran away from the yard - I found him at Rotherhithe; he said he had spent the sovereign.

JOHN WHEELER . I am an officer. I received him in charge - he said he sold the deals, and got tipsy with the money; but meant to restore it as soon as he could.

WILLIAM CLARK . I was authorized to sell the deals. When I came in the morning, the prisoner told me he had let ten deals go. I said he had no business in the yard, as the gates were locked, and asked him for the money; he said,

"Is it a likely story I should be able to give you the money, when I did not know the price."

Prisoner's Defence. I delivered them to the man as Clark was not in the way.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-89

436. JAMES TROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Tyeer .

MARY TYEER . I am the wife of John Tyeer ; we live in Whitechapel. I sent my son with his father's tea, about five o'clock in the evening, he had a coat on, and was brought home a little after seven o'clock without it.

DANIEL SPINK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat pawned on the 12th of February, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, by Ingram, she came again three days afterwards, to redeem it. I stopped her.

SARAH INGRAM . I sell water cresses, in Kingsland-road. I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, and the prisoner came and said it was very cold; I said it was, he said,

"I have been at work all day, and my master has given me a coat, I would have sold it but it is late," and presently he asked if I knew of a pawnbrokers, and said if I could pawn it, he would give me something to drink; I pawned it for 2 s., and gave him the money and ticket, he gave me the ticket for myself; I went to redeem it and was stopped. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES COCK . I am a headborough, I was informed of the robbery, and I met the prisoner and charged him with stealing the coat, he said, there was no man in London knew him," that he had just come from on board an Indiaman, and was going back again; I sent for the boy, who pointed him out from amongst others, he said

"That is the man who stole my coat" - the prisoner then said, he certainly did do it, and was guilty

ANN EARLY . The prisoner brought me the boy, and left him at my stall, he had no coat on then; the prisoner said the child was his own, that he was going to get half a chest of oranges, and asked me to take care of him the while, he never returned, the child began to cry, and I found out his parents.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said the child belonged to me.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-90

437. JAMES CRUNKHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a quart pot, value 2 s. , the goods of James Peters .

EDWARD HUNT . I am servant to James Peters , of the Grand Junction Arms, public-house, Paddington . I washed the pots in the afternoon, and put them on a horse, and went into the kitchen; I heard a noise, I went out and found a quart pot in the coal hole, and told my fellow servant to watch it, she came to me and said it was stolen; I went after the prisoner, and stopped him fifty yards off, and found the quart pot under his coat, on his left side, under his arm; he said, he was going to fetch a pot of beer in it; he had jammed it together; he was rather stupefied with liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite tipsey.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-91

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

438. MILES BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one hundred and forty glass bottles, value 35 s., and two baskets, value 4 s., the goods of John Maxwell , to whom he was servant .

JOHN MAXWELL . I am a bottle merchant , and live in Upper Thames-street. The prisoner has been in my service, twelve months; I had a good opinion of him; he has been on and off in my service for five or six years.

JOHN HARRIE . I am warehouseman to Mr. Alderman Thompson. Maxwell has a warehouse opposite my parlour window. On Sunday last, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner go into the warehouse,

and move some empty bottles, which stood at the door; he then took two bottles and went into the warehouse, and in about twenty minutes, he went out with one of them, a basket will hold six dozen - he brought out another soon after and fastened the door up as before. I threw up the window and heard two voices, and saw a man assisting him out of the gateway with them; I went round and was up to them in a moment, and said,

"Where are you going with those; bottles" the other man said, he knew nothing about it, and that he only helped him out with them; I told the prisoner I must detain him, he said,

"Oh! No, look over this, it is nothing, I am in your hands." I took him to the watch-house, and then made the other man assist me, in taking the bottles back to the premises. He seemed rather fresh with liquor, and said he had been to an Irish raffle - he fell on his knees, and begged me to look over it, and said, he was going to make a few shillings of them, he would not tell me where he was going to take them.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230219-92

439. THOMAS COUSINS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a tea tray, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Binyon .

SAMUEL EDWARD FREEMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Binyon , of Fenchurch-street . On Friday last, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner pass the shop twice, and then take a tea-tray down from the door; I ran out and secured him, he threw it down.

JOHN JUDD . I am an officer. I received him in charge. and found a knife concealed under his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm, ran over and was seized.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230219-93

440. WILLIAM COSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , two seals, value 20 s.; a key value 3 s. and a ring value 4 s., the goods of Robert May , from his person .

ROBERT MAY . Last Monday evening, I was near Lamb-alley, Gracechurch-street , the prisoner rushed up, and put one arm before me, and made a snatch with the other at my seals, and got them, he run through the passage, and then to the right through Angel-alley; I jumped down the steps, and three or four others bustled up against me, I followed him above one hundred yards, and secured him without loosing sight of him; he looked behind to see if he was pursued, and as soon as I collared him, he said,

"Oh! pray sir, forgive me."

SARAH WHEELER . I was walking with Mr. May, and saw the prisoner come from the court, I saw him take the seals, he ran away directly. I am certain of his person.

JOHN HINES . I am an officer. May gave the prisoner into my charge. I found nothing upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor unfortunate lad, my father-in-law and I, had some words, I came out, and heard an alarm, and crossed over, thinking I might be suspected, and saw a youth throw something away, but did not know what.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-94

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

441. JOHN WILSON was indicted for embezzelement .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a baker . The prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money for me. On the 1st. of January, I sent him to Taylor for 1 l. 9 s., and told him to ask for the money. I did not see him again for five weeks. He never brought the money.

JOHN TAYLOR . I deal with Turner, and live in Essex-street, Whitechapel. The prisoner brought me the bill, I paid him 1 l. on account. It was thirty-eight shillings in sixpences, and a shilling.

JOSHUA GALLOWAY . I am an officer. On the 2d of February, I apprehended him, he said he had lost the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I got intoxicated, went to a public-house with a man, fell asleep, and lost the money,

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-95

442. JOSHUA WILKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a sash philaster, value 14 s., the goods of William Edwards ; and a saw, value 11 s. , the goods of Lewis Jones .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a carpenter . I was working at a building in Moorfields ; on the 4th of January, I lost a sash philaster, on Monday morning, which was safe on Saturday night.

LEWIS JONES . I was working at the same house, and left my saw there in my chest it was gone on Monday.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham Court-road. On the 6th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned the philaster and saw with me - he came on the Monday following to pawn more tools, which he said were his own. I said I must detain him, he immediately ran out, I followed and gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Fleet-market.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-96

443. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , three tea caddies, value 15 s. , the goods of Samuel Morris .

SAMUEL MORRIS . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Old-street-road, On the 11th of November, the prisoner bought a tea caddy for 5 s., which he paid for, and ordered six more to be made by next morning, when he came for them, and I only had three ready; he said they would do, and asked me to let my daughter take them home with him to Bunhill-row, and he would send the money back by her; she returned between four and five o'clock without the money.

MARIA MORRIS . I am the daughter of the last witness. I went with the prisoner and the tea caddies - he said, I was to take them to Bunhill-row; he then said, I must go further than that, or I could not have the money; he then took me to a hair-dressers, in Long-lane, and asked me for them, to shew one, and to wait at the door until he came out, which he did, and then took me to a public-house, in Smithfield, and then to a public-house in Holborn,

to shew them there; I stood at the door till he came out and gave them to me, and then took me to Fetter-lane, and asked me for them, and said he would bring me out the money, I did so, and he ran up a court. I saw him no more until last Thursday fortnight, when I saw him in the City-road, with a female, and knew him well, I watched him into a public-house at Islington, and fetched an officer.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I apprehended him at the public-house - he said they could only make a debt of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I was going to send two into the country; I did not get the money till nine o'clock, then I went to the public-house for the girl, and she was gone; I had left her in the tap-room.

MARIA MORRIS . I went to no public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-97

444. THOMAS MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of John Sowerby .

JOHN JACKSON . I am shopman to John Sowerby , of Brick-lane . This handkerchief hung inside the door, and was taken about three o'clock in the afternoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LITTLEMORE . I am a painter and glazier, and live in Smithfield. On the 17th of January, I heard a cry of Stop thief! in Brick-lane, and saw the prisoner running very fast. I put out my arm, and caught hold of him; he struggled, but I held him, and gave him in charge. It was found in his bosom.

WILLIAM GRANNER . I live opposite the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner unpin the handkerchief. The witness stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm; a man threw the handkerchief down, and I picked it up and put it in my bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230219-98

445. JEREMIAH RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 36 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., belonging to Andrew James Smith , and fixed to a building of his .

JAMES RAGRAM . I work for Mr. Cooper, who was building a house in Peter-lane, Cow-cross . On the 25th of January, I left at six o'clock in the evening; the pipe was in the cellar, fixed to the building. I went on the Monday morning, and fifteen feet of it was gone. The house belongs to Andrew James Smith .

(Property produced and sworn to).

LOUISA BARTLETT . On Sunday, the 26th of January, between one and two o'clock, I was at my window, and saw the prisoner inside the pailing - I live behind these premises; he had a hook in his hand, and went down under the rafters of the house with it.

HENRY BARTLETT . I was with my wife, and saw the prisoner come out of the premises with two pieces of pipe. I informed the officer who was with me, and when he came out the officer took him.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am an officer. I went up the court, and stood till the prisoner came out. I asked what business he had there; he said, it was nothing to me. I said,

"What have you got in your pocket;" he said,

"Nothing." I found the two pieces of pipes in his pockets, and another piece in the cellar, with the hook. I compared the pipe, and it matched exactly with what was left, and there was ice in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had had this pipe three months, and having no money, was going to sell it.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-99

446. JEREMIAH RILEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , two tubs, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Handley .

THOMAS HANDLEY . On the 18th of September, these tubs were full of water in my yard, opposite the building where the pipe was stolen, and next morning they were gone - the yard door was forced open, and on searching the prisoner's premises when he was apprehended, I found them there.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. Upon searching the prisoner's premises, I found the tubs there. He he said had had them seven months.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-100

447. WILLIAM DYBALL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a copper can, value 10 s. , the goods Robert Burnett and others, his partners.

JAMES BUHALL . I am servant to Robert Burnett and Co. distillers , Vauxhall. On the 29th of January, I was sent with some spirits in the cart - I went to Hounsditch. When I got into the cart, to drive away, I missed a copper can.

GEORGE FURLONG . I am a Bow-street, patrol. On the 29th of January, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in George-yard, Whitechapel , with this can in his hand; he said he picked it up in Petticoat-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it in Petticoat-lane, and picked it up. I said I was going to ask my father whether I had better advertise it.

GEORGE FURLONG . He said no such words. His father does live in George-yard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-101

448. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Thomas Hatton .

MARY ANN EDWARDS . I am servant to Mr. Barber, of Chancery-lane . On the 8th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was cleaning the front office. I went down to fetch some water, and on returning, I found the street-door partly open - I had pushed it too. I saw footsteps on the ground in the office. I stopped a moment at the end of the stairs, and saw the prisoner and another man come out with coats under their arms. I had noticed them before, two doors off; the prisoner went out first, and the other followed, and pulled the door rather too. I called out, and saw them cross the road into Lincoln's Inn. The prisoner was brought back in about three minutes. Three coats were stolen.

CHARLES FOLO . I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's door. Edwards followed, calling Stop thief! he ran through Lincoln's Inn-gate, and dropped

the coats in the passage. I followed and stopped him, and on bringing him back only one was found.

SAMUEL FURNISH . I live in Lincoln's Inn. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running on with some clothes under his arm. I stopped till he was brought back; I then heard he had dropped the coats. I ran and picked one up.

THOMAS HATTON . The coat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230219-102

449. THOMAS FLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , a handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of John Stevenson .

JOHN ASTON . I am servant to John Stevenson . On the 21st of January, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop, and pulled down a silk handkerchief, which was hanging up; I sent M'Lawrence after him - I am certain of him. I saw him at the office about a quarter of an hour after.

FREDERICK M'LAWRENCE . Aston sent me after the man. I saw the prisoner, and secured him - he threw the handkerchief out of his coat-pocket; I followed, and saw the boy pick it up, and gave it to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-103

450. THOMAS JOHNSON and WILLIAM CURRY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , a bell, value 8 s. , the goods of William Butterfield .

JOHN SMITH . I am a dustman, and live in Kingsland-road. On the 14th of December, I was taking the dust out of Mr. Birch's, in Cornhill , about seven o'clock in the morning, and left my bell on the threshold of the door. I was in the house about a quarter of an hour, and missed it - it belonged to William Butterfield .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TURPIN . In the morning of the 14th December, Johnson came into my mother's shop, Dartmouth-street, Westminster, to sell the bell. I asked who it belonged to - he said to his father, who lived in Orchard-street; he went away, but returned in a quarter of an hour, and brought the other prisoner, who said it belonged to his father, who lived in Parker's-rents, and then in Jeffrey's buildings. I sent for an officer.

JOSEPH COOPER . I was fetched to Turpin's, and found the two prisoners in custody. I found a leather strap upon Curry, which came off the bell handle. I went to to Orchard-street, and found the address was false, and Curry then said, he went by his mother's maiden name - we could find no owner for the bell, and they were discharged. I took them again on the 21st of January, Curry said, he found it on a dung-heap, in Bridges-street, Westminster, at seven o'clock in the morning.

JOHNSON'S Defence. Curry asked me to sell it for him.

CURRY'S Defence. I brought it into my master's shop, and asked him to sell it.

JOHN SMITH. The leather was tied to the bell handle.

CURRY - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Fourteen Days .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-104

451. MARGARET M'QUIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two blankets, value 8 s.; two sheets, value 4 s.; a bolster, value 8 s., and a pair of bellows, value 1 s., the goods of William Kennedy , in a lodging-room, let to her and her husband .

WILLIAM KENNEDY . I live in Little St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials . On the 25th or 26th of December, the prisoner took a lodging, my wife let the room; these things were in it; it was let to her and not to her husband. She did not say she was married - but after she had been there a fortnight, her husband came.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-105

452. JACOB ADAM was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , two sheets, value 10 s.; two blankets, value 10 s.; a bolster, value 5 s., and a flat-iron, value 6 d., the goods of John Richards , in a lodging-room .

MARY RICHARDS . I am the wife of John Richards , of Phillip-street, St. George's in the East . I let the prisoner a furnished room - these things were let with it; he came on the 1st of December, and left on the 28th of January; he came again on the Saturday following, and I charged them with taking them - he said, he had sent me the duplicates. I had missed them ten days before he left - and he said he had pawned them, and would get them for me.

SOLOMON LEVY . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Park-lane; the prisoner brought me six duplicates. I bought them of him - he wanted me to lend money on them. I refused; he said, if I would buy them, and keep them until to-morrow night, when he was to come and buy them of me; he did not come, and I sent my son with five of the duplicates to redeem the goods.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left the lodging; but being distressed, I pawned the things, and promised her I would redeem them. I received a parcel from the country, at their house; she sent for me to come, and upon opening it, I found there was 12 s.; she said if they were sovereigns, it would be all right. I offered her 7 s. of it - and said, I would redeem the things with the other 5 s.; but she gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-106

453. JACOB ADAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , two blankets, value 8 s.; a sheet, value 4 s., and a pillow case, value 1 s., the goods of Joseph Allen , in a lodging-room .

MARIA ALLEN . I am the wife of Joseph Allen ; we live in Cross-street, St. George's . The prisoner took a lodging at my house in October. I missed the property on the 26th of November - he left on the Monday following. The woman who lives with him, told me they were pawned; I begged of him to get them out - he said he would, and said he would alter his name into mine on the tickets, and give me the money to redeem them. He gave me three duplicates.

Prisoner. Q. You said I had better let them be in pawn till the distress was out of your house - A. No; I said I should not redeem them till then. I called on him after he left, about them.

SOLOMON LEVY . He sold me the ticket of a blanket; I

redeemed it - he said they were his own, that distress had driven him to pawn them, and begged of me to keep them for him.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road. I have a shirt pawned with me, by the prisoner I believe, but will not swear it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was mere distress.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-107

454. ANN AYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a whittle, value 4 s. , the goods of James Henry Williamson .

JOHN GARDNER . I am shopman to James Henry Williamson, a pawnbroker , of Brick-lane . On the 1st of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was in the shop. I cast my eye on a looking glass, which we have to detect thefts, and I saw her looking at a whittle, soon after I saw her un-pin it and go out - I followed and caught her with it in her lap. She appeared in a starving state.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-108

455. JAMES BLUNDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a candle frame and moulds, value 30 s., and twelve candles, value 1 s. , the goods of Moses Israel .

MOSES ISRAEL . I am a tallow chandler , and live in Bevis-marks . On the 28th of January, between six and seven o'clock, this mould frame was at the door, under the window - I missed it while I was speaking to a person, and found it at the office next day.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. On Tuesday evening, the 28th of January, I stopped the prisoner in Wentworth-street, with this mould on his shoulder; he said he took it from a door in Petticoat-lane; but at the office he said it was in Duke-street, and that he was distressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230219-109

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

456. HENRY KINDER was indicted for that he, on the 18th of January , being servant to Paul Storr and John Mortimer , did steal a silver spoon, value 10 s., and a knife, value 10 s. , their property; and SARAH CHERRY was indicted for that she, well knowing him to have committed the said felony, did feloniously receive, harbour, and maintain him .

SECOND COUNT, charging her with feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen.

THIRD COUNT, charging the said Henry Kinder with embezzling four mustard ladles, value 10 s.; two pepper ladles, value 5 s., and two sugar ladles, value 5 s., their property; and SARAH CHERRY was indicted with harbouring and maintaining him, knowing him to have committed the said felony.

ANOTHER COUNT, charging her with receiving the said last mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

The Court ruled that the learned counsel must elect upon which Counts he would proceed; the indictment containing two separate charges. Mr. Alley elected to proceed upon the two first Counts.

THOMAS CONNELLY . I am shopman to Messrs. Paul Storr and John Mortimer , who are silversmiths and jewellers , and live in New Bond-street - the prisoner was their porter . We do business with Messrs. Eley and Co., working silversmiths, of Paternoster-row. On Wednesday, the 15th of January, we sent the prisoner there with some plate, which he delivered safe; he was to have brought a table spoon and knife back from them, among other things - he did not return. I saw him in custody on the following Monday with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. I believe you had a very high opinion of him - A. Yes, very. The spoon was worth 12 s. or 14 s., and the knife 18 s.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a Bow-street officer. On Sunday, the 19th of January, about ten o'clock at night, in consequence of information, I went to the prisoner Cherry's house, at No. 8, Almonry, Westminster - she was in the front parlour; I asked if she had not got some one concealed in the back parlour; she said No, there was no one - she took the candle up, and went into the back parlour with us; we saw nobody there, but I saw a cupboard with a padlock on it, and asked what she had got there - she said there was nobody there, nor anything belonging to any one. She immediately blew the candle out, and went into the front parlour. I said I insisted upon seeing what was in it, the candle was lighted, and she unlocked it, pulled a bag out, and tried to conceal it in front of her. I caught hold of it, and asked if she knew what it contained; she made no answer - I opened it, and found a silver tea spoon, a knife with a silver handle, and other articles of plate. After that she said it belonged to a man who was up stairs. I went up and found Kinder laying on a bed with his coat off, and two women in the room, (there were two men down stairs.) I asked Kinder if he had got anything below; he made no answer, but said afterwards that what was there was his own. He gave me his name, but refused to say where he lived, and said it was hard to detain him as it was his own property. I took them to Bow-street, and found a bill of parcels in the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. She tried to conceal the bag - A. She put it between her knees. There was nothing else in the cupboard but old rags.

JOHN CONDE . I am an officer, and accompanied Snowsell. There was a bed in the back parlour, and only one person could get between it and the cupboard. Cherry went to the cupboard, dragged the bag out, and put it between her legs; it was concealed under some old rags. Cherry had put the candle out.

MR. WILLIAM ELEY . I am a working jeweller, and do business for the prosecutors. On the 15th of January, Kinder brought some plate, and took some back - I believe I myself delivered him the knife, but I am not certain. I looked it out for him to take; I know it to be the same by a mark upon it. We sent it to the prosecutors on sale or return. The bag contains other plate delivered to him.

THOMAS CONNELLY re-examined. I know the spoon to be the prosecutors's - it was sent to Messrs. Eley and Co. to be repaired. The bag is the one he took out that morning.

KINDER'S Defence. My Lord and Gentleman of the Jury, however imprudently I may have acted, I feel concious of no intention to defraud my employers - I have indeed been guilty of great excesses, but is it possible to suppose I should let the plate remain in the bag till Sunday. The woman was ignorant of my conduct.

CHERRY'S Defence. I gave him the key to look into the cupboard, and did not conceal the bag, but gave it him out of the cupboard, and said I did not know what it contained. The prisoner gave it me to take care of, and I gave him the key to lock it up himself. I gave the officer two candles, and insisted on his looking all over the house.

KINDER - GUILTY . Aged 38.

CHERRY - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-110

457. HENRY KINDER was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a watch, value 10 l. , the goods of Paul Storr and John Mortimer .

THOMAS CONNELLY . I gave the prisoner on the same day a gold watch, worth forty guineas, to take to Northampton-square, to have my masters' names engraved upon it. He never returned - he was sent to a variety of places.

JOHN CONDE . I found a duplicate of this watch upon him.

ROBERT BIRCH . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this watch with me for 6 l. 10 s., on the 18th of January.

Cross-examined. Q. If he had asked for 10 l. would you have advanced it - A. Yes.

The prisoner in his defence stated that he could not find Northampton-square, and pawned the watch in a state of intoxication.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-111

458. HENRY PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously receiving a seal-skin, value 12 s., and four cat-skins, value 5 s. 6 d., part of a parcel of goods, of which John Sinfield was at the Quarter sessions, for the County of Surry, convicted of stealing; he well knowing them to be stolen .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

JAMES M'MICHAEL , solicitor, produced an office copy of the record of the conviction of Sinfield, which was read.

JOHN ROWBOTHAM . I live in Long-lane, Southwark. Sinfield was convicted at Horsemonger-lane, of stealing these skins; and in consequence of what he told me, I went to the prisoner's house, Middlesex-street, Whitechapel, on the 3d of September, with an officer, and Anthony my man - we found him at home. I told him I had been robbed, and was informed he had part of the property, which I described; he keeps a furrier's shop, and deals in hats. I had lost them on the 29th of August; he appeared confused, and said, he had bought no skins of any description for three weeks, and knew nothing at all of them. I said, we must search the premises - he immediately pulled about twenty skins of various sorts, principally cat and fitch, and said,

"If any of these are your's, you may see them." Anthony identified four Dutch cat-skins, three of which had his mark - two of them were in a finished, and in a saleable state - and the other two in a half manufactured state. I said, if he had those, he must have some others; he took a seal-skin from under the counter, and asked if that was mine, it was mine; I had given it out to my man to finish some time before - it was nearly finished, and cost me 12 s.; the finished cat-skins are worth 18 d., and the others 1 s. 3 d. each; they are part of those Sinfield was convicted of stealing - he was taken to Union-hall, and said, he bought them of a man named Hart for 10 s. 6 d.; they are worth 17 s. 6 d. Foreign skins are never hawked about, but bought of merchants. No respectable person would buy them in this state.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were these skins produced on Sinfield's trial, and given in evidence - A. They were, the magistrate did not reject these - it was one others; I lost about 1 l. worth. I might not have seen these for a fortnight, before the 29th of August.

JAMES GLANNON . I am an officer, and went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's house - he produced some skins. I have those which were claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you attend Sinfield's trial - A. Yes, I believe something was said about some not being received in evidence, but I believe they were all shown to the Jury.

RICHARD ANTHONY . I am in the prosecutor's service, and went with him to the prisoner's house; he said he had bought no skins for the last three weeks - when my master said he would search for the property; he said he would give him leave, and threw about twenty skins behind the counter; I knew four of the cat-skins (looking at them) I dressed them myself; three have my mark on them - one has the mark cut off. I think I had seen them in my master's possession three days before the search; two of them are unsaleable.

WILLIAM FLYNN . I work for the prosecutor, and had worked upon this seal-skin - it is not finished. I had seen it at home, about a week before it was found.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to speak to a day - A. No; I saw it shortly before. I should know it from among a hundred; it is not properly dressed; I had seen it just a week before it was found.

JAMES REEVES . I am clerk at Union-hall. I found by my book that this charge was made against Sinfield on the 2d of September, and Phillips on the 3d; bail was taken for his appearance on the Monday following. He said, he bought the skins of a man whom he had dealt with before, but he did not know his name, nor where he lived.

On the 28th, he brought one H. Hart to the office, in custody of an officer - and said, he was the man of whom he bought the skins; the magistrate discharged Hart.

JOHN ROWBOTHAM . The prisoner sent me no notice of Hart being at Union-hall. I live near the office.

MR. M'MICHAEL. I appeared as solicitor. Phillips sent me no notice of having found Hart.

The prisoner made no defence - but his Counsel called

HENRY HART . I deal in clothes and hare-skins; the prisoner took me to Union-hall, and I was told to go about my business. I sold some skins very much like these to the prisoner. I was coming down the Minories, and a man asked if I would buy some; I said, I did not understand the value of them; he said he was a furrier, and if I would go with him to sell them, he would pay me for my trouble - I went with him, and when we got to the market, he said, he would give me 2 s. to sell them,

Q. Where is the market - A. Petticoat-lane, he waited outside, while I went in and sold them to Phillips - he told me to ask 12 s. for them, but I asked 14 s. Phillips offered 9 s.; I at last took 10 s. 6 d., came out, and gave the owner the money, and he gave me 2 s.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago was this - A. About five or six months. I live in Phillip-street, Commercial-road; he did not ask where I got them, for he knew my face. I had sold him two or three hare-skins before - he called me Hart; I think he does not remember that he did. I have told him where I lodged once - I never spoke to him much - I did not hear of his being taken up till I was taken myself. I sold them to him above a month before I was taken I dare say. I only know him by dealing with him two or three times.

JAMES RENSHAW . I am a skinner and furrier, and live in Hunt-street, Mile-end. I have sold many a better skin than this seal one for 5 s.; the market price for the others, is 8 d. or 9 d. each.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you been a furrier - A. Eighteen or nineteen years; I cannot say whether they are British or Foreign cat-skins. I do not know so much about them as the seal-skin; it is finished as well as it can be - if more is done to it, it would be worse than it is - there are several holes in it now.

WILLIAM MASHMAN . I am a journeyman skin-manufacturer, and work in Palmer-street, Tenter-ground. I would not have this seal-skin at any price, it is good for nothing. I think if a man tried to do more to it, there would be none of it left; it is finished as well as it can be.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-112

459. THOMAS JONES , JOHN JONES , THOMAS CAMPBELL , and ROBERT BERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 16 lbs. of beef, value 5 s. , the goods of John Adams .

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. On Friday, the 31st of January, I went to watch Mr. Adam's premises, in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital. I got there about five o'clock in the morning, and concealed myself in a door-way opposite. I saw a man whom I believe to be Campbell stand directly opposite; he went off into Rebecca-court, which is two doors off. I returned to my post, and saw John Jones standing at the corner of Union, and Well-street, for three or four minutes; he then went down Rebecca-court. I saw no more till Mr. Adams came round with his cart, and went away with a boy in it, as if to go to market. At that time, John Jones was at the shop door - it was a very dark morning. Mr. Adams returned to me privately, in about five minutes, and took me opposite his house, and in a few minutes I saw John Jones come out, and go down the East side of Well-street, and look in at a coffee shop window; he then returned into Rebecca-court, where I lost him. I went into the coffee-shop, and found nobody there. I returned, and joined Mr. Adams, and just before seven o'clock, John Jones and Bury came to the shop; Jones went in, Berry stood at the door, Jones returned and spoke to him; in about a minute a whistle was given, and Campbell immediately crossed over from Well-street - Thomas Jones was in the shop, all four prisoners were then together; the shop shutters were not open, but the lamp was burning. Campbell was outside, looking into the shop, and Berry by his side; the two Jones's went into the shop, and the door was shut, and in about a minute, John Jones brought out something in a bag, and gave it to Berry, who immediately crossed through Rebecca-court. I pursued, leaving the others at the door, took him, and asked what was in the bag; he said,

"For God's sake don't ask me any questions;" at that moment, I heard Mr. Adams calling Stop thief! John Jones came running into the court; I secured and took them both to the shop. Thomas Jones was there, and Mr. Adams brought Campbell in. I opened the bag, and found 16 lbs. of salt beef, in two pieces. Berry expressed his sorrow several times. I found a sovereign on John Jones , which he said he received from Berry for the beef. I found 10 s. 6 d. on Berry, who refused to give his name till he got before the magistrate. Thomas Jones said he was not concerned.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He never left the shop - A. No.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a butcher. John and Thomas Jones were in my service. I set Schofield to watch, and pretended to go to market, but returned, and about ten minutes after six o'clock, John Jones came out; the officer followed him, and about seven o'clock, John came back with Berry - my shop was shut up, but the door ajar. John went in, and Berry stood outside. John Jones came out and beckoned Campbell over, and whistled. Campbell and Berry remained outside. John Jones came, brought out a bag, and gave it to Berry, and said something to Campbell. Schofield ran after Berry, and John Jones followed. I followed Campbell as fast as I could, being a cripple; he ran into a man's hands, and I collared him; he said,

"For God's sake Mr. Adams, let me go, I have got no hand in it." I brought him back; they all begged for mercy. I told Thomas Jones , he was as guilty as the the rest, for seeing the property go away; he made no answer, and at the watch-house, John Jones said the meat weighed 13 lbs., and Thomas said he saw it weighed, and it was going to be paid for. I found it weighed 16 lbs. It was kept in a salt tub, and requires two people to pull it out; my shop was never open till day-light, and I do not allow any thing to be sold at that time.

BERRY'S Defence. I am a shoemaker. I went, there early. I had made a pair of boots for Jones, and

went to take them home; he weighed me 13 lbs. of beef, which I paid 4 s. 1 1/2 d. for.

CAMPBELL'S Defence. Thomas Jones had given me a coat to scower. I went to take it home, and gave it him at the door. I was going away when I was taken.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . There was no coat found there.

THOMAS JONES - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

JOHN JONES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BERRY - GUILTY . Aged 25.

CAMPBELL - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-113

460. JOSEPH MACKIE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , a pair of diamond ear-ring drops, value 31 l., the goods of William Haydon , to whom he was servant .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAYDON . I am a jeweller , and live in Compton-street. My shop is in Lisle-street, Leicester-square; the prisoner was in my service. I had a pair of diamond ear-ring drops which were delivered to Miss Roe, at Mr. Pearman's, Gower-street; the price was 87 l., but they were rather too large for her. I agreed to make her a smaller pair, and she was to wear these, until I could make the others. The prisoner knew all this; he told me afterwards that he had seen her, and she liked them very well and would keep them till about Christmas, by that time, I was to make a smaller pair; he afterwards told me she would keep them, but towards Christmas, I received a letter from Mrs. Ross, the friend of Miss Roe, to wait on her; I told the prisoner the conversation I had with her. Miss Ross said,

"Have you done the ear-rings," I said, I understood Miss Roe, liked the large ones, so much that she will keep them, she said,

"I understand you have had them back sometime; I said,

"Oh! No, that cannot be, and as a proof of it, I will bring you my clerk;" I took him to Mrs. Ross, he told her, that Miss Roe, had told him that she meant to keep the large ear-rings, having a friend who would buy them. I afterwards received a letter from Miss Roe, which I shewed the prisoner, he looked it over, and immediately said,

"I am sorry to say, I have them, circumstances have obliged me to make away with them for 25 l.;" he shewed me a card with Mr. Dobrees name on it, saying that he should have some money in a few days, and would get them; he left, and I saw him in Hart-street, Covent-garden, on the 24th of December; he then said, he was very sorry, but he should have 300 l. or 400 l in a few days, and they should be forthcoming. I received a letter from him, on the 28th of December, and had him apprehended on the Sunday following, and after that received another letter from him. I never empowered him to receive the diamonds from Miss Roe.

Prisoner. Q. I believe in July you met me, and requested me to make up your books - A. Yes; he appeared distressed and I took him into my service; my circumstances became involved, in consequence of being robbed of 1600 l., and I desired him to make up my books. I agreed to give him 1 l. a week, till I could get him a better situation, I interested myself for him, and had got him one, at one hundred and thirty guineas a year, just as I discovered this robbery; I said to him repeatedly that it was odd, I did not hear about the ear-rings, and he always said,

"She will keep them, or if she does not, she knowes a lady who will buy them."

The following letters alluded to in the evidence were read, one dated,

"Cheltenham, the 10th of December," from Miss Roe, expressing her surprise at hearing from Mrs. Ross, respecting her being possessed of the drops, and stating that she had returned them to the prosecutor's man, also the two following from the prisoner to the prosecutor.

"My good Sir, From the same principal which operates on the mind of any man, who may have transgressed on the rules of propriety, has rendered me heart broken. I hope in a few days to see a friend, who will be productive of a mutual adjustment of our differences. In the mean time, I hope you will excuse my attending upon you.

28th of December.

J. MACKIE.

"Sir, From the manner in which you are proceeding against me, it will be requisite in my defence to have recourse to such observations as will produce very unpleasent consequences, which you will not have me to blame for, I can only say it might have been otherwise, without any prejudice to either."

J. MACKIE.

EDWARD PRICE . I am a friend of the prosecutor's. I was present in Hart-street when the prisoner and the prosecutor were together - his account is correct.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree. I have a pair of diamond drops, which I received from the prisoner, on the 23d of October, as security for 25 l.; he redeemed some diamonds at the time.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not frequently pawned diamonds with you - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was placed in a very critical situation by the prosecutors trusting the business to my care - he found my services useful to him in his embarrasments. He has frequently desired me to do the best I could to carry on the business in his absence, and I have pawned goods to pay the workmen on Saturdays, and when the ear-rings were pawned part of the money was appropriated to his use. There was an account between us, and if the ear-rings were brought into the account there would be little difference between us. There was no intention ultimately to injure him.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-114

461. GEORGE KEEBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a saddle, value 2 l., the goods of Stephen Frehern ; and a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of William Neighbour .

WILLIAM NEIGHBOUR . I am a post boy at the White Horse, public-house at Uxbridge . On the 26th of January, my saddle and coat were in the stable, they were safe at ten o'clock at night, and at two o'clock next day I missed it. The prisoner was a stranger. I found the saddle on the 31st at the office, where he was in custody; it belonged to Stephen Frehern , my master.

HANNAH. PETTIFORD . I live in the Harrow-road, Paddington. On the 27th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock, a man came to my shop for half a pound of bacon, and some bread, and asked to leave a saddle there, and he would call for it directly - I let him leave it. I do not think the prisoner is the man - I did not see who called forit.

JOHN MIMMS . I am a foot patrol. I saw the prisoner

come out of a sadler's shop at Paddington, at half-past five o'clock in the afternoon of the 27th. The sadler told me something - I followed him, and asked where he brought the saddle from; he said from Stratford - I asked where he was going with it; he said that was not my business - I said,

"You have been into that shop and offered to sell it for 17 s.;" he said he had. I took him into custody with it on his shoulder.

HENRY STOELL . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge. I found he had a light drab great coat with a cape to it, on under his jacket; but at his second examination he had made away with it.

WILLIAM NEIGHBOUR . Mine was a coat of that description.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-115

462. WILLIAM BROMLEY was indicted for stealing on the 22d of January , a watch, value 30 s., and two spoons, value 6 s. , the goods of Stephen Butler .

STEPHEN BUTLER . I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials . On the 22d of January, my wife missed these things.

SARAH BUTLER . I am the wife of the prosecutor. the watch hung under the mantle piece, and the spoons on the mantle piece, in the two pair front room. About fifteen minutes before seven o'clock, I was sitting at work, and two very loud knocks came at the door, I went down with a candle, nobody was there; I came up again, and found the door shut as I had left it, but saw two feet under the bed, I was much alarmed, and ran down stairs for assistance, two men came up with me; they went into the room, and as I was going in a man passed me without a hat, I searched and missed the property; a hat was found under the bed. The prisoner was apprehended two days after. I am certain he is the person who passed me, he had drank tea with me the evening before.

GEORGE SHEPPARD . I am servant to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, of Baldwins-gardens. On the 23d of January, towards the evening, a watch was pawned for 20 s., by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS KENDRICK . Butler gave him in my charge. His sister said in his hearing, that the hat left behind was his; he said, another boy pawned the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-116

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

463. THOMAS ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , a tea-caddy, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Henings , the elder.

THOMAS HENINGS. On the 23d of January, I left my tea-caddy, on a stand in my shop in Broad-street, St. Giles . I went up stairs about ten minutes before six o'clock, leaving my son in the shop; I came down stairs about a quarter past six o'clock, and the apprentice brought it in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HENINGS , JUN. My father left me in the shop, and when he came down, he missed the caddy; I did not see it taken. A lady had been in the shop to buy some spoons.

PHILIP RILEY . I am the patrol. I was at the corner of George-street, St. Giles, about a quarter past six o'clock; the prisoner passed me with the tea-caddy, partly concealed under his coat. I asked him what he had got, he said nothing; I took it from him; he said, his mother bought it at Westminster, and that his name was Clancey.

Prisoner. I wish you would transport me, for my life is a burthen to me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-117

464. FREDERICK BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , seven pieces of foreign gold coin, value 7 l. 6 s. , the property of William Cobb .

WILLIAM COBB . I am master of the brig Traverse , I had some gold coin on board, at the Cape of Good Hope, it was sealed up in a canvas bag, which I locked in my drawer. I arrived at Gravesend , on the 13th of February; I then took the bag out of the drawer, and put it in a glass-case, in the cabin, and left it there-when the vessel arrived in the docks, I went on board, on the 15th, and put the bag in my pocket, and on Tuesday week, I took it to a merchant, to whom it was directed; there should have been eighty-eight pieces of gold, he opened it in my presence, and found only eighty-one, there was a hole in the canvas, the bag was perfect, and sealed up at the Cape. The prisoner was an apprentice on board; I went on board on the Monday, and searched his trowsers pocket, and found a 5 l. note, a sovereign, a crown piece, and two half crowns; I asked how he came by them, he made no answer; he had no way of getting money, the coins were thicker than sovereigns. I dont know their value, there were three different kinds.

GEORGE LEE . I am shopman to Mr. Lewis, silversmith, and bullion dealer, in Brydges-street, Covent-garden. On Tuesday the 18th of January, the prisoner brought seven pieces of Indian gold, which he said he brought from the Cape, in the ship Traverse, I gave him 6 l. 17 s. 6 d. for them, it was in a 5 l. note; and a sovereign; and the 5 l. note, produced is the one, it has my employer's name on it.

JOHN BLYTHE . I am a Thames Police officer. Last Wednesday, I went to Mr. Lewis, with the prisoner. Lee gave me seven gold coins, which he said he bought of the prisoner; I have them - the 5 l. note is what the captain of the ship gave me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-118

465. ELIZABETH HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , twelve plates, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Mary Maria Brumfitt .

MARY MARIA BRUMFITT . I keep a china shop , in Jerusalem-court, St. John's-square . These plates were outside the shop, before the windows. I saw them ten minutes before they were missed.

SARAH RUSH . I live next door but one to the prosecutrix;

about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take the plates from under the windows and walk away. I informed the prosecutrix.

JAMES SLEIGH . I was in Jerusalem-court. I saw the prisoner stooping down under the window of the prosecutrix's shop, and take the plates in her hand; I thought she belonged to the shop; but Rush called out Stop her. I ran and brought her back with them.

JOHN WIGGINS . I took her in charge, She said she was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-119

466. EDWARD MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , a shirt, value 10 d. , the goods of Robert Wainwright .

WILLIAM WATLING . The prisoner came into my eating-house, in Grub-street , on Saturday week at eleven o'clock at night, and had two basons of soup - I went into the back parlour, and saw him get up and look over the counter, then turn back to the further settle, to a sideboard, and take the shirt and some calico. I fetched him out of the settle and there they laid.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-120

467. ELIZABETH PRICHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , a watch, value 30 s.; two seals, value 1 l.; a shirt-pin, value 8 s., and an ear-ring, value 3 s., the goods of George Skinner , from his person .

GEORGE SKINNER . I am waiter at the Gloucester coffee-house. On the 31st of January, early in the morning, I saw the prisoner between George-street, and Museum-street, Holborn; I accompanied her to a house in George-street , and slept there. I had a watch, three seals, a ring, and a pin; I lost them there. I found her at Holmes's, Museum-street, with another woman, trying on a pair of new shoes; the ring and pin were produced. I had been drinking, but knew what I was about.

HENRY WILD . I am shopman to Mr. Holme. The prisoner pawned a ring and pin at our house - and Skinner came in before she left.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WALTER CAMPBELL . I took her in charge.

The prisoner in her defence stated, that the prosecutor was intoxicated, and gave her the property to pawn instead of money.

GEORGE SKINNER re-examined. I gave her 3 s. 6 d. I did not give her them to pawn.

WALTER CAMPBELL . She said nothing of this kind when I took her.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230219-121

468. JOHN RAMSDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , two quart pots, value 3 s. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a publican . Lewis brought the prisoner to me last Saturday week, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, with two quart pots, which are mine.

ROBERT LEWIS . On the 15th of February, I was going into Chafer's-place, Burton-street, and saw the prisoner with two quart pots under his apron - he went down the steps, took his apron off, and wrapped them up in it; I took him - he said he was going to take them home; he threw them down, and said, that was were he had them from. I secured him - he said, that he heard a man crying pots, and was going to see if they were his.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to give them to the pot-boy.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-122

469. ANN CLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , (being servant to Thomas Rowley ), a fork, value 8 s.; a napkin, value 1 s., and three towels value 6 d. , his property.

FRANCES ROWLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Rowley , who is abroad. I live in King-street, Edgware-road ; the prisoner came into my service about the 1st of February, I parted with her a week afterwards. On Saturday night I sent her to the watch-house for disorderly conduct, and getting tipsy; she wanted to take a bundle with her, but I refused to let her - it was detained in my parlour till the Tuesday following, locked up in the parlour; I kept the key in the drawing-room. The constable opened the room on Tuesday in my presence, and found the parcel, she had come to demand her clothes - she had made up the bundle on Saturday night. When my servant opened the door to her, she rushed on her, and began beating her. I ran down stairs, hearing the screams, and saw her beating her. I sent for an officer, who opened the bundle in the presence of the prisoner and myself, and found two napkins belonging to me in it; she then asked for her trunk, which was brought down. I said I would have that searched also - she ran away when she was asked for the key, one of the constables fetched her back, and threatened to break it open - she then gave up the key, and a silver fork was found in it.

Cross-examined by MR. BERNARD. Q. I believe you had her with a character - A. She referred me to a person, who did not satisfy me; but being ill, I took her for a week on trial. I went to the watch-house on Sunday to sign my name, two gentlemen went with me; neither of them called himself Mr. Rowley - she was discharged on bail. I had charged her with threatening to take my life; she had held me down on the stairs at half-past twelve o'clock at night, and pulled off all my clothes. I have four silver forks constantly in use, they were kept in the drawing-room cupboard; her box was locked.

Q. When her trunk was opened, did not she look at you, and say,

"Oh! you wicked woman" - A. She did several times, and I nearly fainted; she said it before the box was brought down. I do not know what she said when it was opened, for I was near fainting at the time the fork was found.

Q. At what church were you married - A. I was married in a private house. I cannot say when, for I took no notice of the time; it was in the period of St. Mary's, Dublin. The Rev. - Harris was the clergyman; I think it is nearly six years ago. I have not seen Mr.

Rowley since the year I married him. I have always gone by his name.

THOMAS FRANCIS . I was fetched to Mrs. Rowley's, on the 12th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I saw a servant crying, Mrs. Rowley was in the parlour; she said the prisoner wanted to take her bundle and trunk without being searched, and that she had lost a silver fork. The parcel laid in the corner of the parlour tied up at two corners, and the other two untied - she claimed three dusters and a napkin, which were in it; the trunk was brought down - I asked the prisoner for the key, which she refused two or three times; I said I should break it open; she then delivered it. I unlocked it, and Mrs. Rowley took out the fork.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say she would not give up the key till she had a witness present - A. I do not recollect it; I will not swear that she did not. When the fork was found, she said,

"Oh! you wicked woman." Some of the linen in the bundle was wet, as if it had been laying in a tub.

THOMAS WHITING . I went with the officers to the house. I saw the trunk opened, but when it was to be fetched down, the prisoner said,

"I have stopped long enough," and ran to the door - I fetched her back, and saw the trunk opened, and the fork found; she made a second attempt to get to the door, but I had the key in my hand.

MRS. ROWLEY. The fork is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. You went before the magistrate on the Monday, did you say a word about the fork - A. No; I had not missed it. I suppose the watchman must have opened the bundle on Saturday, in pulling it from her, some things came out at the time. I pushed them in with my feet, and locked it up. She told the magistrate that I put the fork there, but positively I did not.

- I am servant to the prosecutrix.

I do not know how the fork got in the box; I heard my mistress say it was missing. When the prisoner came to the door, she said she wanted to speak to me, that she had come for her things - she then knocked me down. When her trunk was opened, she told Mrs. Rowley she put the fork there; we generally have four silver forks in use. Mrs. Rowley appeared rather agitated, when the prisoner said she put the fork there.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the door for my things. I found the servant had been warned against my calling. I gave the door a push, and walked in - she screamed out - her mistress came down, and a constable was fetched. I was shewn into the parlour, where the bundle was. Mrs. Rowley requested the constable to turn me out of the room, which he did, and I could not see my things examined. I did not like to give up the key of my box, as I was not allowed to see my things, so I ran to the door to tell the neighbours. The moment the box was opened, Mrs. Rowley fell back, and pretended to go into a fit. I looked at her instead of the box. I turned round, saw the fork, and said,

"Oh! you wicked woman."

MARGARET WRIGHT . I live in Brown-street, Bryanston-square. I have known the prosecutrix between four and five years, but never knew her by the name of Bowley till now; she went by the name of Miss Hadeen first, and then Mrs. Rainsford, and the name of Crawford.

ELIZA COX . I have been servant to the prosecutrix, and left her a month ago. I was there five days only; she cleaned the silver forks herself. I never knew more than two in use.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-123

470. SAMUEL COTTRELL , HENRY SELF , and SARAH JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , at St. Marylebone, ten fixtures, viz. five window sashes, value 5 l., the goods of James Kent , and fixed to a dwelling-house .

The prosecutor stated, the house in question, to be in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and this being a local charge, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18230219-124

471. THOMAS ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 6 lbs. of soap, value 3 s. , the goods of Francis Morrish .

FRANCIS MORRISH . I am a tallow-chandler . On the 6th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was down stairs, and heard a rustling in the shop - the servant called me up. I found the prisoner there; he was charged with stealing 5 or 6 lbs. of soap, which I found missing.

GEORGE HENRY BRAINE . I live opposite the prosecutor's. On the evening of the 6th of February, I was at my parlour window, and saw the prisoner and another walking up and down the door. The prisoner went in and took up two or three bars of soap, and ran towards Baker-street - the other followed. I ran out, and saw them both returning without the soap; they passed the shop again two or three times, and the prisoner was going in again. I ran over and secured him. The soap was not found. I am sure of his person; there was a strong light in the shop - he said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. Why did he not take me with it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-125

472. JOHN BARLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , a set of china, value 14 s., and a basket, value 6 d. , the goods of Moses Lockett .

MOSES LOCKETT . I employed the prisoner to hawk china about for me; he was to bring the goods or money to me every night; he never returned. I found him at Westminster; he said he had sold it - I cannot say he did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-126

473. THOMAS GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 6 lbs. of pork, value 2 s. , the goods of John Ballingall Whyte .

JOHN BALLINGALL WHYTE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Upper East Smithfield . On the 18th of February, this pork laid inside the shop. On the 19th, the officer brought it. I had seen it safe the afternoon before, but did not miss it. The prisoner was at the shop about six o'clock that evening. I am sure it was mine.

JOHN LITTLE . On the 18th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Wapping, with 6 lbs. of pork concealed inside his jacket; he said a gentleman gave it him at Billingsgate - he tried to escape. Whyte claimed it next day.

Prisoner's Defence. I had my supper off it, and therefore how can he swear to it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230219-127

474. FRANCIS PEACOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , a pair of trowsers, value 1 s.; a a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., and a yard of baize, value 6 s., the goods of Hugh Campbell ; and two sofa covers, value 6 d.; four bolsters, value 2 s., and 6 lbs. of sugar, value 3 s. , the goods of George Kilgour .

HUGH CAMPBELL . I am master of the brig , Venus, which laid in Shadwell Dock . The articles stated in the indictment were in the vessel; mine were in my trunk, and the other things belong to the master of the vessel, George Kilgour , and were in the locker. I saw them safe on the Monday afternoon, at half-past five o'clock, when I locked the cabin door with a padlock, and on Monday morning, I found the staple wrenched off, and laying on the deck; the door was open, and these things all gone. I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police officer. On Monday last, I stopped the prisoner in Cannon-street, about six o'clock in the morning, with a bundle, which he said was clothes. The bundle contained the property in question.

JAMES FIGG . I searched the prisoner, and found a silk handkerchief, and the sofa covers were round his body. I found a pair of pinchers and a knife in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them laying on some timber, at the wharf.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-128

475. EDWARD SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a pewter pot, value 18 d. , the goods of James Fancey .

JAMES FANCEY . I keep the Blue Anchor, public-house, Catherine-street . On the night of the 31st of January, I sent a pot of beer to Mr. Stanbury, of Richard-street. The prisoner was brought to me next morning with the pot.

EDWARD DOWTON . I live in Richard-street, Limehouse . On the 1st of February, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was down in my father's kitchen, looking through the window - the pot was on the step of Stanbury's house; the prisoner snatched it up and ran off with it. I ran up, and overtook him with it under his apron.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230219-129

476. EDWARD WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , one hundred and sixty pieces of cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Welsh .

CHARLOTTE WELSH . I am the wife of Edward Welsh, of Playhouse-yard. I keep a clothes shop. On the 21st of January, I had seven bundles of cloth in the shop, outside the door. I saw them safe at three o'clock, but missed them at five - they were too much for one boy to carry. The officer produced them to me next evening.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable of St. Luke's. On Tuesday night, the 21st of January, I saw three or four boys in George-yard, Golden-lane. scuffling together - Bradford was with me. I went up, and the prisoner ran off with the other boys, dropping these pieces of cloth all the way. The prisoner dropped some of them, and ran into a privy, and hid himself. I forced the door open, and he said,

"I have done nothing, I did not steal them, it was the boy with one arm," and another boy whom he named.

THOMAS BRADFORD . The witness's account is correct.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230219-130

477. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , a fixture (i.e.) a copper, value 10 s., belonging to Joseph Stroud , and fixed to certain building .

JOSEPH STROUD . I was employed by Mr. Davis, to repair a house in King-street, Soho . I bought a copper, and set it in the back kitchen about five o'clock, on the 21st of February, I fixed it in the brick work. Next day, about twelve o'clock, I was looking out of a three story window, and saw the prisoner bringing the copper out. I called out to him, and he threw it down and ran off. I am certain he is the person.

JOHN MITCHELL . I was at the window, and saw the prisoner with the copper; he looked, and seeing us, ran off. I am certain of him - he was stopped in about three minutes.

WILLIAM STROUD . I saw him with the copper in his hand. I understand he bears a good character, but is out of employ.

JOSEPH GILLON . I heard the cry, and stopped him in Dean-street - Stroud was pursuing him.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230219-131

478. HANNAH BUCKELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , two pair of gaiters, value 5 s., and two waistcoat pieces, value 6 s., the goods of Richard Scott , her master and employer .

RICHARD SCOTT . I am a tailor . The prisoner was in my service. On the 18th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, in consequence of suspicions, I followed her out of the house into Tothill-street, and saw her go into a house there, and offer these gaiters for sale; I went in and claimed them; she said, she was sorry she had taken them. I had an excellent character with her, and gave her ten guineas a year.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230219-132

479. ALEXANDER MITCHELL and ROBERT DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , one hundred and ninety squares of glass, value 5 l. , the goods of John Readwin .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to belong to James Bruce and John Readwin .

JOHN READWIN . I left this glass in two houses, belonging to Mr. Turner in Wardour-street , James Bruce has been in partnership with me; I contract for the building. I left all safe on Thursday night, and next morning found one hundred and ninety squares cut out of the sashes.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am captain of the watch of St. James's. On the 20th of February, about two o'clock in the morning. I heard a noise in this house like glass breaking - the watchman came to me; we got assistance, went in, and found the two prisoners there, and secured them.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a watchman. I went into the house about half-past two o'clock in the morning, and when we got to the foot of the stairs, we heard people running up stairs - we went to the first floor back room, and found the sashes with all the glass taken out. We found the prisoners in the atris - they said they came to sleep there. We searched them at the watch-house, and found a knife on Mitchell covered with putty, and both of them had putty stickings on their hands.

JOSHUA IVERY . I have heard the last witness's account, it is correct. I found a knife in Mitchell's has with putty on it.

WILLIAM NEVILL . I was at work at the house, and left about six o'clock; all was then safe - the sashes were not fastened, they stood in the room. The door was nailed up, but not locked.

MITCHELL's Defence. I never saw the sashes. I was passing, and saw two people come out - I asked if they would let us lay there out of the night air; they said, Yes, if we would make no noise. I found the knife on the stairs.

MITCHELL - GUILTY . Aged 23.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230219-133

480. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , a time-piece, value 30 s. , the goods of William King .

ESTHER SANDEL . I have the care of an unfurnished house in Queen's Arms-street , belonging to William King . On this day week, I was there, and the bell rang; I went to the door, and the prisoner said he came to look at the water pipes. I shewed him down stairs into the back kitchen - he looked at the cistern, and I went up to the door, as the bell rang again; I found a boy, who asked for some name which I did not know, and as I turned to go down again, I found him coming up; he went out - I went into the kitchen, and missed a time piece, which had hung up. I went to the door directly, and met Mr. Willis's son, and told him, and he brought him back again. The time piece was found on him.

FREDERICK WILLIS . Sandel pointed the prisoner out to me - I followed, and secured him. He said,

"I have got a time piece," and produced it from his pocket. I know it belongs to Mr. King - I have often seen it at his house.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-134

481. ELIZABETH KENNEDY and JOHN BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Richards .

JOHN MARCHANT . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Field-lane. Last Thursday night I was in Golden-lane , at the house of John Richards , and saw the prisoner in the shop. After I left the house, I was passing, and saw Bryan go in and out of the shop two or three times - and soon after Kennedy came out with something under her apron; she let the shoes drop; Bryan picked them up, and said,

"I have got them." I followed them into a shop in Portpool-lane, where he offered them for sale; I went in and secured him.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a shoe-maker . The prisoners lived in my house at the time - the boots are mine, and were in my shop that day. Kennedy has been entrusted with all my property; I never missed any thing. Bryan worked for me; they lived in different rooms.

WILLIAM ALLESON . I live in Portpool-lane, Bryan offered them for sale, Richards came in and claimed them.

JOSEPH WILLIAMSON . I am the watchman. I took the woman in charge; she bears a good character.

KENNEDY'S Defence. I saw Bryan in the street, he wished me to walk with him. I was not aware of what he had got.

KENNEDY - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Month .

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230219-135

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

482. JOHN SIDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , a saw, value 6 s.; a chisel, value 9 d.; a stick, value 5 s., and seven bitts, value 1 s. , the goods of William Annett .

WILLIAM ANNETT. I am a carpenter , and live at Sunbury. In September, I had been working at Mrs. Clarks's, at Staines ; I left my tools there locked up in a box. I sent Wells for the box last week, and upon opening it, I missed the tools stated in the indictment, the box was still locked; the prisoner had worked for me at Clarks's; he lives at Staines; the constable and I took a search warrant, and found them at his house - and he said he had stolen them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He did not use the word stolen - A. He did; he said,

"I stole them." I have borrowed my workmen's tools when they lay on the bench.

THOMAS SEXTON . I am a constable. I went with Annett, and found the tools at the prisoner's house - he acknowledged taking them, and said there was another chisel which he would send home. I do not remember his saying that he stole them. I believe he was a hard working man.

Prisoner's Defence. On looking for my own tools behind the prosecutor's chest, I found these tools, and took them home to return them to him when I saw him; but as we lived five miles apart, I could not take them directly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-136

483. JAMES LARKIN , WILLIAM SMITH , and JOHN FOSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , three counterpanes, value 20 s.; nine sheets, value 15 s.; three night-gowns, value 3 s.; six table-cloths, value 12 s.; ten shifts, value 10 s.; twenty petticoats, value 20 s.; twenty-five napkins, value 20 s.; two pair of stays, value 2 s., and a bag, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Phillips , and EDWARD BUREAU , and SARAH HIS WIFE , were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

HANNAH BRETT . I am servant to Mr. Richard Phillips , who lives in Fenchurch-buildings . Last Monday week, the prisoner Larkin came to the house for the linen, and said, he was going to take it to the cart, which stood in Fenchurch-street; I did not know him before. I gave him a bag of linen, which was made up ready for the carrier. I followed him, and found him in about ten minutes, in Fenchurch-street; and asked where he was going to take the linen - he said, to the cart; I was not satisfied, and he stopped Wickers, another carrier - who said, he was Larkin's son, who is our carrier; he threw the linen into Wicker's cart, and I went home. He is Larkin's son.

STEPHEN BELL . I am a hackney-man. I was on the stand in Mark-lane, about three o'clock; Smith came up, and asked the fare to Westminster. I asked if there was any thing to carry - he said, a bundle; I said 4 s., and he told me to follow him; he overtook Larkin with a bundle, which was put into my coach; they got in with it, and just by Westminster-abbey, they told me to go to the public-house over by Dean's-yard, and have something to drink; they both got out, leaving the bundle in the coach. I went into the public-house with them, and had a pot of beer - Smith went out, Foster joined them, and soon after Smith returned, and paid me. Foster carried the bundle from the coach.

SMITH. Q. Did I not go away before the bundle was taken - A. I think not; he paid me my fair.

MATTHEW FARMER . I am watchman of the Abbey. On Monday, I was at the Coach and Horses, public-house, about half-past three o'clock, and saw Larkin and Foster with Bell the coachman, having a pot of beer. I went out, and took the number of the coach, then went to lock up the Abbey; and on returning, saw Larkin, Smith, and Foster together.

GEORGE POPLE . I am an officer. On Monday afternoon, the 17th February, I went with Larkin's father to Bureau's house, in the Almonry - he and his wife sat there at tea. I said,

"Where is the bundle of linen which was brought in this afternoon - he said,

"There has been none brought in here at all;" both declared that none had been brought in. I said, a person saw it brought in - he said, I was welcome to look round the room. I asked where his bed-room was - he said, that was it; I said,

"There is no bed here." I went to the back-room, on the ground-floor, where I knew that he slept; I pulled the curtains back, and saw linen strewed all over the bed; I called for a light, he muttered something, and seemed unwilling to give me one, my brother got par. Bureau said,

"Mr. Popls, I will tell you where it is." I said, I had found it; he followed me into the room, and the linen laid there - the woman went out of the house, I asked the man how he got it, he said, it was left there for him to purchase, and that he opened the bundle to uncertain the value. I sent him to the office, and afterwards apprehended his wife. Next day, I apprehended the other prisoners, and found the duplicate of two shirts upon Smith.

Cross-examined by MR. PARNDERGAST. Q. Is the person here who saw the bundle taken in - A. No; I only heard that it was seen. I think he said, he did not know who left it; he keeps a sort of eating-house - the bedroom is only divided from the shop by curtains; he positively denied having it three different times - he did not ask his wife any questions about it; she said at the office, that a tall man with sandy hair brought it.

RICHARD POPLE . I was with my brother. Bureau and his wife denied all knowledge of the property. I took him to the Hoop and Grapes public-house - he said there, that a short man in a light jacket and trowsers, brought the linen, that he came to him at a public-house; and asked if he would buy them - that he told him to take them to his house, and if he liked them, he might call at seven o'clock, and he would pay him.

SARAH BUNN . I live in Dukes-court, Westminster, two doors from Bureau. On Monday afternoon, about half-past four o'clock, I saw a man go down towards his house, with a large white bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to).

LARKIN'S Defence. I went for the linen for my father. I met Smith, and asked him to get me a coach to take it to Chelsea, as I had missed the cart. I took him to the Coach and Horses, public-house to drink, and asked him to lend me the money to pay for the coach. I borrowed 5 s. of a young man, and being obliged to make up the money, I took the bundle to Bureau, and asked him to let me leave it for half an hour, then took out two shirts and pawned them to get the money for the coachman - intending to make them good the following week. I was going to fetch it, but hearing that Bureau was apprehended, I was afraid.

SMITH'S Defence. I have the same to say - he said, if I called him a coach, he would give me a ride to Westminster. I met him on Tuesday, and he gave me the duplicate of two shirts.

EDWARD BUREAU 'S Defence. I did not deny having the property, but as soon as he came, I gave him a candle, and said, I believed somebody had left a bundle,

LARKIN - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

EDWARD BUREAU - GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

FOSTER - NOT GUILTY .

SARAH BUREAU - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230219-137

Before Mr. Recorder.

484. DANIEL GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously receivng on the 20th of November , a 100 l. Bank note, stolen by Mary Smith , from the person of Thomas M'Kinnon , he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

THOMAS M'KINNON. I am a colour manufacturer , and live in King Edward-street, Wapping. On the 20th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was going towards home, and was rather the worse, for liquor; I had dined with a friend, at the King's head, public-house, in the

Poultry, and had received a 100 l., a 20 l., and a 5 l. Bank note, and put them in my breeches pocket - we then went to an inn in John-street, the Minories; I had three bottles of wine; one or two gentlemen who came in took part of it, and I suppose each of the three persons had a pint each; I had drank nothing at the King's Head; I parted with my friend at the door, and about the end of the Minories, in Whitechapel, I met a woman, and went with her to a house in Chapman-street, Commercial-road, and soon after I got there, she robbed me and ran out of the house like a dart; I felt in my pocket, and my money was gone; I had been with no other woman. I had entered the number of the notes in my memorandum book, the 100 l. was No. 19,834, dated the 11th of October, 1822; I stopped them at the Bank, and in about a month, I was sent for and found the 100 l. note.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I keep a public-house, in Chapel-street, Commercial-road. On the 20th of November, about half past eight o'clock, in the evening, the prisoner came to my house, and asked for a young man, with a round jacket on, who came out and spoke to him, the prisoner said

"Come Jack it is all right," a girl, who went by the name of Mary Smith , stood behind the prisoner outside the door, she lived three doors from my house. I knew the prisoner before by sight. I did not hear of the robbery at this time - I have seen the prisoner go in and out of the house, where Smith lived. I have seen her and the prisoner drinking together at my house. The prosecutor came to me about three weeks after, and described the woman to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know who inhabited the house Smith lived in - A. No. It is a house of ill fame. I cannot say, whether the prisoner lived there, but I have seen him go in there; when he came to my house if he had not asked for the man, I should not have particularly noticed him.

COURT. Q. Did Smith, the prisoner, and the man he called all go away in the same direction - A. They appeared to do so, but it was dark. The woman was always called Mary Smith .

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Whitechapel, and know the prisoner. On the 20th of November, about nine o'clock at night, he and a girl who I never saw before, came to my house; he pulled an 100 l. note out of his waistcoat pocket, presented it to me upside down, and asked me what amount it was; I turned it round, and told him it was an 100 l. Bank note - he said,

"Oh! is it;" I turned it round on the blank side; there was an endorsement on the back of it, hardly legible - I could not make out what it was. He put it into his pocket, and then pulled out a 20 l. note, and asked what it was; I told him; that was quite new, and had no endorsement; he then pulled out a new 5 l. note - I told him what that was - he said he would lay out the 5 l. note if I would change the others for him; I refused, and he left the shop. (My house is half or three quarters of a mile from Chapel-street,) I had known him for about four week before, and when he left the shop, suspecting all was not right, I followed him and the girl seven or eight hundred yards off into Rosemary-lane, and lost sight of them all at once. I then went to Whitechapel watch-house, and stated what had happened. Plankett Parteridge, and I went round together after them for three or four hours without success.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is your's an open shop - A. Yes. There are clothes hanging outside the same as at other shops. I had seen the prisoner about the neighbourhood frequently, and had seen him seven or eight times; he was dressed in a short fustian jacket; I do not know where he lived. I never saw the woman before; she looked like a girl of the town; she had a red whittle on. I had no power to stop him if I had chosen - he could have overcome me. I was tried here some years ago, for fetching three spoons out of pawn, and was acquitted. I have been in the House of Correction, and in Clerkenwell, about a stolen 10 l. note, which I took in my business - I was detained for a fortnight, and then discharged. I was also in prison about a quantity of palms, which I had sold to a slopseller, and when the business of the 10 l. note happened, a person came forward and owned four of the palms, and I was held to bail, tried at Hick's Hall, and was acquitted. I never said that it was another man who brought me the 100 l. note, or that I offered 50 l. for the notes.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am night beadle of Whitechapel. On the 20th of November, Lewis came to me and Parteridge, at the Horse and Groom, public-house, which is opposite the watch-house, about a quarter past nine o'clock, and said, a man and a girl had been to his house with a 100 l., a 20 l., and a 5 l. note; he described their persons, and said, the man wanted to lay out the 5 l. note, if he would change the others, we went with him in search of them for above an hour, and from the description he gave me, I said who I thought they were, I saw the prosecutor next day, and he shewed me the house where he was robbed.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know who inhabits the house - A. No. Lewis said he followed them to Rosemary-lane. I was looking for the prisoner, but never saw him after this, till he was apprehended. I have known him seven years, I never knew him in custody but once, that was about a robbery at the Dundee Arms. Lewis said the woman had a red whittle on.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank, and produce a 100 l. note, No. 19,834, dated the 11th of October, 1820, it is endorsed,

"R. Williams," but is a good deal blotted.

HOWARD LEWIS . The note was blotted in this manner. I can swear to it, by the name of Hoares on the front.

THOMAS M'KINNON. This is my 100 l. Bank note.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you not very drunk - A. Not very. I should know the woman again, there was another woman in the house, but she did not come near me. I gave her no money, for she run away; I went to Lewis about three weeks after, he said, he had seen this man before, and had given information to the officers.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner from Plunkett's information, on the 10th of January, and told him it was for a robbery, that he was concerned with a woman, who went by the name of

"Stiff Poll," who stole 129 l.; he said he knew nothing about it; I know that he lived with that woman. The prosecutor's description of the woman, answers her description.

Prisoner's Defence. At the first examination, Lewis said he did not know the number of the notes, nor on what night it happened, till he was taken to the Bank, and then he saw the note.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: o18230219-1

REX V JOSEPH FROOM and JOHN DAVIS .

MR. JUSTICE PARK delivered the decision of the Twelve Judges, upon this case tried January Session, vide Second Session, page 68, and reserved for their consideration. Their Lordships' unanimous opinion was, that the prisoners were properly convicted, and that it was clearly a Burglary, it having been proved that the tip of one of the prisoner's fingers were inside the shop window, out of which property might have been takes.


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