Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1823.
Reference Number: 18230115
Reference Number: f18230115-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 15th of JANUARY, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Richard Richards , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Sowley Holroyd, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Burrough , Knt.; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albien Cox , Esq.; and William Venables, Esq.; Alderman of the said City; and Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Hall ,

Thomas Hall ,

John Collins ,

William Barton ,

Joseph Peacock ,

John Sheppard ,

Benjamin Long ,

William Sewell ,

Rodham Smith ,

Robert Morris ,

James Hardy ,

Jonathan Tilley .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Dockrell ,

Thomas Mills ,

Robert Goodburn ,

John Saunders ,

Anthony Horden ,

James Bentley ,

Henry Palmer ,

William Archer ,

William Clark ,

William Taylor ,

George Clements ,

Alexander Smith .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

John Wilson ,

Thomas Mott ,

Benjamin Parnel ,

John Dowling ,

William Carter ,

Thomas Donaldson ,

James Humphries ,

William Whitbread ,

Joseph Vaughn ,

Charles White ,

John Beacham ,

George Barrett .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 15, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

Reference Number: t18230115-1

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards.

172. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , at St. Botolph without, Aldgate, thirteen pieces of silver, value 3 l., the property of our Lord the King , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating it to be the property of Henry William Atkinson , Reuben Fletcher , Richard Franklyn , the Elder, Joseph Nicholl , Jasper Atkinson , Robert Finch , and Richard Franklyn , the Younger.

THIRD COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the property of the keepers of His Majesty's Mints of his Cities of London and Canterbury , and artificers, moneyers, and other officers deputed as to those things, which relate to the offices aforesaid.

MR. HENRY WILLIAM ATKINSON . I am senior moneyer of the Mint . The others are Reuben Fletcher , Richard Franklyn , Sen., Joseph Nicholl , Jasper Atkinson , Robert Finch , and Richard Franklyn , Jun. I had observed several times that there was a deficiency in the bullion, and laid a plan to discover it. We applied to Mr. Parker and Mr. Field, to assist us. On the 10th of December, we were at work upon silver. The prisoner had been employed at the Mint for some years, to do whatever he was desired. On the day in question, he was employed in cutting the silver out into round pieces, which we call blanks, for the purpose of being afterwards stamped. Our practice was to give out a certain quantity in the morning marked with the weight on it, and in the evening after it is coined it is weighed again. On the 10th of December Mr. Franklyn, Jun. informed me of a deficiency - and I stationed Parker and Field to stop the men and boys as they came out on leaving work. I was present and saw Field take hold of the prisoner - a tin box then dropped from him, containing a blank key waxed over for the purpose of taking the impression of the wards of a lock, a few blanks for the manufacture of crown pieces dropped from him at the same time - he was searched, and in all were found thirteen blanks upon him, weighing upwards of eleven ounces, the value of which was full 3 l. The Mint is in the parish of St. Botolph's, Aldgate. All who occupy apartments there, occupy them as the servants of the Crown.

COURT. Q. In delivering it out in the morning, do you ascertain the weight - A. Yes, My Lord; each quantity has a ticket on it denoting the weight.

MR. RICHARD FRANKLYN , JUN. I am one of the moneyers. On the 10th of December, I weighed the silver up at the end of the day; a ticket is always put on it with the weight marked on it - 539 lbs. 10 ozs. were delivered out that day - on weighing it I found it only 538 lbs. 5 ozs., and 10 dwts.; the deficiency being about 1 lb. 4 ozs. I informed Mr. Atkinson.

JOHN FIELD . I have been engaged in business connected with the Mint for some time with my father. Deficiencies had been discovered before, and on the 10th of December I met Mr. Atkinson in the neighbourhood of the Mint, and accompanied him there in consequence of a deficiency being discovered. As the workmen were about to leave, I stopped them at the gate; and took them back into the moneyers hall - the prisoner was among them; I immediately separated him from the rest - his hand was then in his great coat pocket, and as I drew it from the pocket, and there fell on the ground a tin box, which opened in the fall, and a skeleton key and a blank waxed key fell out, the skeleton key has had wax upon it, and is not quite finished. A key being waxed enables a person to take an impression of the wards, and file it to fit them; and some cotton was in the box for the purpose of laying the key on when it has received the impression, that it might not be rubbed out in carrying it. I took both the keys to the strong hold of the Mint, where bullion and other things are deposited - I found the pipes of the same bore at the locks; the one nearly finished would not quite pass the wards. I searched him further, and in taking off his coat three or four round pieces of silver fell on the ground, from his waistcoat pocket I believe, and immediately afterwards a bag containing more pieces fell from him; there were thirteen in all; they were blanks intended for crown pieces. He said he found the keys in his way to the Mint - with respect to the silver blanks, he supposed somebody must have put them into his pockets. I produce the thirteen silver blanks.

MR. WILLIAM PARKER . I was formerly a silversmith. On the 10th of December, I attended the Mint with my son-in-law Mr. Field; whose account is perfectly correct.

MR. CALRS EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. I took down before the Magistrate

the evidence of the witnesses, and after the examinations were read, Mr. Twyford asked the prisoner what he had to say (what he said was not taken down); he said,

" Samuel Marlow gave me the keys" - Mr. Twyford said,

"For what purpose?" he said,

"For the purpose of opening the strong places."

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18230115-2

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

173. MARY MARKBY LOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , two sheets, value 4 s.; a counterpane, value 1 s.; three blankets, value 9 s.; a pillow and case, value 1 s. 6 d.; a window curtain, value 4 s.; a table cover, value 2 s.; a set of fire irons, value 1 s.; a tea-caddy, value 6 d.; a flat iron, value 1 s., and a candlestick, value 1 s., the goods of Robert Turner , in a lodging-room .

ROBERT TURNER . I live at No. 44, Bell-yard, Temple-bar . The prisoner took a second floor of me, about a year ago, and left about four months since, without notice. The articles stated in the indictment were let to her with the lodging. I afterwards forced open her room, and found this property gone. I afterwards assisted Jefferson in apprehending her, and heard her say voluntarily, that she was very sorry it had come to this. She was convicted before the Magistrate under the pawnbroker's act, and sent to prison for three months. This was only for part of the property. She has received no punishment for some of the things. They were all taken at one time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-3

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

174. JOHN BARNES and GEORGE SEABROOK were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , an ass, value 5 s. , the goods of James Deacon Hume , Esq.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE DIX . I am servant to Mr. John Deacon Hume , of Pinner-park, Middlesex. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 28th of November, I saw the ass safe, turned out in Burns Oak-meadow - the gate was locked safe. We had had the ass ever since June; it had three black strokes on its right fore leg, and a sore tail - I missed it next morning, and found it a fortnight after, at the Crown, public-house, Pinner. I was fetched there, and Jeaves shewed it me. Barnes lived at Norwood near Pinner, and was apprehended there.

THOMAS JEAVES . I am a seedsman, I did not know Barnes before this - I knew Seabrook. I live at Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire, about thirty miles from Pinner. The prisoners came together to our house, about eight o'clock one Sunday night; they had two donkies, and said they wanted to speak to me; I asked their business - Seabrook said they had a donkey or two to sell, for they were in distress, as they had been gambling at the Crown, public-house, at Anstead. I went with them to a public-house; they had three more donkies there. I at last gave them 10 s., a quart of ale, and a load of sand for one of them - they delivered it to me; they were both together. Seabrook said it was his own, but Barnes said he should not sell it for 10 s., for he would go without bread first. Seabrook said he should sell it, and Barnes said no more. Seabrook took the money. Both appeared to be dealing with me. Barnes fetched the donkey out of the orchard. I left them and on Monday morning they both came for the load of sand, and carried it away on the donkey which they had - Barnes helped to load. I did not see them again for a week or ten days, when they were taken at Ridley, both in bed at different houses. Barnes hid himself in bed after being dressed. I kept the donkey with my others. Dix afterwards saw it at the public-house - it had a sore tail.

GEORGE DIX . The last witness shewed me the donkey, which I knew to be my master's.

SEABROOK'S Defence. I bought it at Smithfield; but do not know who of.

BARNES'S Defence. I was not close by him when he bought it.

BARNES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SEABROOK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-4

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

175. JOHN DAVIS , JOSEPH FROOM , and GEORGE MALLER , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Montague Levyson , about the hour of six o'clock, in the night of the 2d of January , at St. James, Westminster, with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house, then and there situate, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

MONTAGUE LEVYSON , I am a working jeweller , and live in Pall Mall; in the parish of St. James's . On the 2d of January, about six o'clock in the evening, after dark, I saw the prisoners Davis and Froom, with another person (not in custody), standing at my window - I suspected them. I was in the street coming home, and passed the door. The shop is part of the dwelling-house. About ten yards further I saw another suspicious character, walking to and fro and looking about. I then crossed the street, and saw Maller watching on that side of the way - I again crossed towards my shop, and stood about twenty seconds, and saw Davis push his fingers against the window; the glass fell inside. I seized him; his fingers went inside the glass, which I found had been cut by some sharp instrument. He slipped from me - I pursued, and in the pursuit I saw Maller running; I seized him, and Davis was taken by another person who is not here - I never lost sight of him. On returning towards the house with them two, I saw Froom endeavouring to hide himself against one of the pillars of the Opera colonade, which is opposite my house; I pointed him out and he was secured. I am certain of his person. I gave them in charge. I am certain I saw Davis's fingers go inside through the glass - I saw the tip of his finger through, on the other side of the glass, inside the shop; I could see that through the glass. I am certain his finger was inside the shop.

Prisoner FROOM. Q. There was a wire outside the window - A. Yes, a safe-guard. They could put two fingers through the guard and draw goods out - there were goods small enough within reach.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am conductor of the patrol. I received information, and on going to the prosecutor's shop, I found the prisoners. I had seen Froom and Davis in company together ten minutes before the alarm in Cockspur-street, going towards the prosecutor's house. I found nothing upon Davis; but two duplicates, a dice, three marbles, and some playing cards on Maller. Williams

searched Froom in my presence, and found a handkerchief and a piece of crooked wire in his hat.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . Nicholls's account is correct.

DAVIS'S Defence. I was going to my aunt's in Vere-street. I left home about half-past four o'clock. The gentleman caught hold of me and kicked me.

MALLER'S Defence. I left home at half-past two o'clock, and went into the City - I called in Clare-market, and had a pint of beer. I was to meet my brother between five and six o'clock, and being too soon I walked into Covent-garden, talked a few minutes with a lad who I met, and walked into Leicester-square and through the colonade, to pass away the time, and saw this gentleman cross the road, and catch hold of this boy, and just as I got to the end of the colonade, I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the boy running, and endeavoured to stop him; a gentleman caught him - I went up to see what was the matter, and the gentleman collared me and said,

"This is one I think," but he would not be positive to me; but took me to the shop. The officer who had me was so much intoxicated, I could have got from him if I had been guilty. He was reprimanded for not doing his duty, being drunk.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS re-examined. I reprimanded the officer for not searching him quick enough.

DAVIS - GUILTY. Aged 11.

FROOM - GUILTY - Aged 19.

MALLER - NOT GUILTY .

This case was reserved for the consideration of the Twelve Judges, whether the entry was sufficient to constitute a burglary .

Reference Number: t18230115-5

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

176. NEAL MORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , at St. Anne, Westminster, forty-five yards of carpet, value 3 l., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM CALF . I am shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross - they are linen-drapers, and deal in carpets ; they live in Frith-street, in the parish of St. Anne, Soho . They both live in the house; the shop is part of it. On the evening of the 23d of December, I was standing in the shop, about a quarter past eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner come up and look round as if waiting for somebody in the shop; he went away, then returned, and took a piece of carpet which stood about three yards inside the shop, and ran across the road with it - I am sure it was him. I informed Mr. Cross, who was in the shop - we pursued; I lost sight of him as I turned the corner, and found my master had hold of him; the carpet was then on the ground - I brought it back, it was the same which he took, and is worth 3 l. I gave it to the constable.

THOMAS CROSS . I was in the shop. In consequence of what Calf said, I ran out; I caught sight of the prisoner turning the corner - he was running gently, in a direction from my house, carrying the carpet; he turned the corner. I did not see him put it down, but followed close, and saw him standing about a yard from it, and collared him; I had made no alarm. I took him back - he tried to get from us. It is worth 18 d. per yard; there are forty-five yards. The shop is part of the dwelling-house; we both live there.

Prisoner. Q. Was I the first you laid hold of - A. Yes, the only one.

MARY HAYES . I was in Frith-street on this evening, and saw Mr. Cross running after the prisoner, who met me with the carpet in his arms, and put it down close by me - he then walked away about a yard; Mr. Cross caught him. I am sure of his person. Calf picked it up.

DANIEL BOUGHEY . I am a constable. I took him in charge with the carpet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see my aunt in Frith-street. I turned down Princes-street, and stood by this woman; the carpet stood by her. Mr. Cross laid hold of a young man, and said,

"This is him;" the woman said,

"No, here is the young man," and he then took me; but I am innocent. It is not likely a man of my stature could lift it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18230115-6

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

177. GEORGE MARSHALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James M'Lean , about the hour of six o'clock in the night of the 7th of December , at St. James, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein two frocks, value 6 s. , the goods of Sarah Pashley , spinster.

SARAH PASHLEY . I live in M'Lean's house, in Rupert-street, in the parish of St. James's . On the 7th of December, I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, to Poland-street. Mrs. M'Lean came there to me between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and said somebody had broken into the parlour. I returned home - I unlocked the parlour door where I lodge, and found it bolted inside. A man got in at the window, and unbolted it. I found two child's frocks on the sofa bedstead - I had left them in the drawers a day or two before, and had not moved them. Some of the drawers were partly open; I had left them shut. Nobody but me lodged there. I left the window shut and the blinds also, in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were much alarmed - A. Rather so. I took some things out of the drawers, and mixed them with those on the sofa; but I saw the frocks there before that. The man who got in at the window is not here. The frocks belong to a lady, who I had them from to make others like them.

WILLIAM M'LEAN . Pashley lives at my father's house, whose Christian name is James. On the 7th of December, a little past six o'clock, I was going out, and as I shut the parlour door I observed the window and blinds wide open. I knocked at the door, and then saw the prisoner getting out of the window - I am certain of him; he jumped down from the rails and ran off. There was no light but from the lamps. I could not see his face, but I kept within a yard of him all the way, and never lost sight of him till I caught him about a hundred yards off, at the corner of Archer-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you an opportunity of observing his face - A. No. I knocked at the door and called out mother before I saw him come out; my face was towards the window - nobody was between me and him. He jumped off the window railing and ran off - I

caught hold of him myself. He always said that I was mistaken, that he was not the person; but I am certain of him.

THOMAS DOVE . I received the prisoner in charge from Mr. M'Lean on the 7th of December.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I received the prisoner from Dove. I have the two frocks which I received from Pashley.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was merely coming down the street, heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran the same as many more. A person came and said,

"Is it you they are running after," I said, No. I stood still, and the gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutrix on account of his youth, and believing him in distress .

Reference Number: t18230115-7

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

178. GEORGE CLAY and JOHN SMITH were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Catherine Ball , widow , about seven o'clock in the night of the 7th of December , and stealing three coolers, value 6 s.; a mashing tub, value 2 s.; a washing tray, value 9 d.; sixty yards of hair line, value 1 s.; a tun bowl, value 1 s.; a knife tray, value 6 d., and four forks, value 2 d., her property; and a fixture (i.e.) a copper, value 3 l., her property, and fixed to her dwelling-house .

JOSEPH HOLT . I am servant to Mrs. Catherine Ball , who lives in Acton-place, Kingsland-road . On Friday morning, the 6th of December, about five o'clock I saw the copper safe fixed. I found it next night between six and seven o'clock, at Spitalfields. About half-past seven that morning, as it was just getting day-light I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The copper was worth 3 l. I found it that evening at Spitalfields, in possession of the watchman. I found the rest at Worship-street on the 10th of December.

CHARLES JOHN HORWOOD . On Saturday morning, the 7th of December, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning I received information, and went down the yard leading to my slaughter house, in Wheeler-street, and saw three men there breaking up a copper - they said they were employed by a Mr. Paget of Wheeler-street, to break it up there. I said,

"I should like to see Paget before the copper goes off the premises" - I sent for him, and was left with the three men. I believe both the prisoners to be two of them; but will only swear to Clay; I am certain of him. They took the copper up, put it into a sack, and went out of the yard with it. I went out with them, and said,

"I shall follow you." Paget came up, and said in their presence that he knew nothing about the property or them. Clay was going up Fleur-de-lis-court; Izard followed and took him with the chopper and axe - one of the others had the copper on his back, I think it was Smith; I followed him, he laid it down by the White-heart window - I took it up, and gave it to Hart. Clay was brought back and taken to the watch-house. Smith and the other man got off. I found Smith at Worship-street on the Tuesday.

Prisoner CLAY. Q. Did I mention Paget's name - A. One of them did, I cannot say which.

ROBERT IZARD . About a quarter past eight o'clock in the morning of the 7th of December, I went to the slaughter house for a sheep, and saw Clay and Smith (I am sure of them), and another person breaking up a brewing copper; it appeared nearly new - I went to Spitalfields-market, returned, and saw them still there breaking it up, Horwood desired me to go and ask Paget if he sent them to break it up there; I went, and he said he knew nothing of it - Clay immediately turned round and went up Fleur-de-lis-court with the axe and chopper, and at the top of the court he threw them down - I followed him; he ran up Elder-street and down Blossom-street, where I took him, and brought him back with the axe and chopper. I saw Smith at Worship-street, on the Tuesday after, and pointed him out from among other persons.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a broker, and live in Old-street, St. Lukes. I know both the prisoners. On Friday night, the 6th of December, between seven and nine Clay came to me with a washing tray, a knife tray, a few old forks, three old sacks, and several other small articles - a few minutes afterwards Smith brought three coolers, and another person was with them; they brought other things as well, and left them all with me, and wanted me to buy them, but said they had a copper also, and I was to see that in the morning. I asked Clay where I could see it, and I think he said at No. 14, Curtain-road - I appointed eleven o'clock in the morning; they went away leaving the things with me, and about nine o'clock in the morning Smith and another man came to my house; they said Clay was gone to work - I said I was to go to see the copper at eleven, and they said their mother had moved, and that she had given the copper to Clay. I said they must take the things away, or bring their mother or brother - they went away, and I went to No. 14, Curtain-road, and found Clay had not lived there. I saw

"Acton-place," chalked on the tun bowl, and as I thought No. 1, I went there, but the house was shut up. Smith had agreed to come at two o'clock, so I got an officer ready, who took him when he came. I advanced Clay 8 s. overnight.

RICHARD CONSTABLE . I am an officer of St. Lukes. On the 7th of December, about half-past one o'clock in the afternoon, Bishop came to me - I went to his house, Smith came in, and I secured him.

THOMAS HART . I am watch-house keeper. I went with Adams, and matched the rim of the copper with the brick work; it tallied exactly.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am street keeper. I went with Hart. The copper rim tallied exactly.

JOSEPH HOLT re-examined. I saw every thing safe at five o'clock in the brew-house; it was then day light, and next morning I found them gone. Five tiles were taken off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLAY'S Defence. I was coming down Wheeler-street, at eight o'clock in the morning, and saw two persons breaking this copper up - two persons came and said they would give me 1 s. to help them break it up; I went, and up came this butcher, and asked who authorized us to do it; one of them said it belonged to Paget - a person went to Paget, returned and said it was not so, and seized the man with the copper on his back. I had the chopper in my hand, and finding there was a disturbance, I put it down

and walked away - I made no resistance. As to Bishop saying I brought the tubs, it is false.

SMITH'S Defence. I was coming down Old-street, and saw an article at Bishop's shop, which I thought would suit me - I went to ask the price, and the man seized me and charged me with this.

CLAY - GUILTY. Aged 33.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, and not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-8

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

179. THOMAS MOORE and WILLIAM HURLOCK were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Lambert , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 11th of October (no person being therein), and stealing two coats, value 2 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 15 s.; a pair of breeches, value 5 s.; two waistcoats, value 5 s.; a ring, value 10 s.; a seal, value 10 s.; two silver pins, value 7 s.; a pair of shirt buttons, value 3 s., and a thimble, value 1 s. , his property.

JAMES LAMBERT . I rent a house in Ossulton-street, Sommers Town . On Friday, the 11th of October, I went out about seven o'clock in the morning, leaving only my son at home - I returned about eight or nine o'clock in the evening, but missed nothing till Sunday morning - I then missed two coats; one my son's, who is about seventeen years old - the other was mine. I gave 36 s. for my son's coat and trowsers, which were also gone. The articles stated in the indictment were all gone, which were safe on Thursday in the drawers in the back parlour. About a fortnight after I saw Moore, whom I knew by the name of Wells. A day or two after I saw Hurlock; he told me part of the property was pawned at Lowther's, in Tottenham Court-road; that he was present when they were sent to be pawned, and saw the ticket brought back - he did not say who pawned them.

THOMAS LAMBERT . I live with my father. On the 11th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went out leaving nobody in the house. I locked the door and took the key - I returned about two o'clock, and found the door still fast. I missed nothing until Sunday morning.

ANN SIDNEY . On Friday, the 11th of October, I lodged at No. 26, Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's. I know the prisoners; they came there, and stopped two nights - they did not lodge there; they were there on the morning of the 11th of October, and went out about eleven o'clock together, and returned between two and three, and brought a bundle a piece - they had taken nothing out. Moore went by the name of Wells; he opened his bundle, it contained a coat, two waistcoats, a pair of breeches, and a pair of yellow gloves. He desired me to pledge them at Lowther's, and to ask 2 l. on them - I pledged them for 14 s., in the name of Gibbons, as he desired me, and gave him the money. Hurlock gave his bundle to Sarah Larkins , who went out of the room with it, and returned in about half an hour without it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What way of life are you in - A. I live with my mother.

JOSEPH KING . I am shopman to Mr. Lowther. I beleive Sidney to be the person who pawned these articles at our shop, for 14 s., on the 11th of October, in the name of Gibbons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MOORE'S Defence. I was at Barnet at the time.

MOORE - GUILTY. Aged 16.

HURLOCK - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of Larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-9

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

180. ROBERT HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a ream of paper called bag-cap, value 13 s. , the goods of James Williams and others his partners.

SAMUEL HAYES . I am clerk to Messrs. James Williams , Coopers, and Co., wholesale stationers , of West Smithfield. On the 12th of December, I saw some paper looked out, about four o'clock, and put into the cart, which left the premises - it returned about seven o'clock, and next morning I saw a ream of bag-cap at the Mansion House, which had been put into the cart the preceeding afternoon. I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS CORBY . I am the carman. I put the paper into the cart, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I went to Davis's in the Minories, opposite Rosemary-lane - I got there between five and six o'clock; it was dark. All the paper was right then - I stopped inside the shop about ten minutes, and left nobody in care of the cart. I heard an alarm, ran out, and found the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Brown in Rosemary-lane - the paper laid on the pavement close by the cart on the opposite side of the way. I had not noticed him near the cart.

JOHN BROWN. I am a linen-draper, and live two doors from Mr. Davis's. I saw the prisoner come out of the cart with the paper on his back - suspecting him, I looked into Davis's shop, and saw the carman, told him, and followed the prisoner; he had not got above twenty yards from the cart. I cried Stop thief! and he threw the paper down - I never lost sight of him. I took him two or three hundred yards down Rosemary-lane, and took him back; he denied it.

Prisoner. Q. How far behind me were you when I turned the corner - A. I might be twenty yards; but never lost sight of him all the way.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. I was coming down the Minories, and saw a crowd round Davis's house (the whole of that side is in the City); I went in and found the prisoner in custody - he denied the charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS NEEDHAM . I am an umbrella maker, and live in Sparrow-corner. I met the prisoner running, and putting out my leg I threw him down. Mr. Brown immediately secured him.

GUILTY - Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-10

181. MARY ANN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , half a bushel of coals, value 9 d. , the goods of William Firth , Esq.

WILLIAM FIRTH , ESQ. I live in Sergeant's-inn . The

prisoner was my laundress . I missed a quantity of coals from my cellar, and observed that the last thing the prisoner did of an evening before she left, was to get up a quantity of coals, and the same in the morning, and knowing I could not use them I was resolved to watch her. Last Saturday I saw her bring a very large pile of very large coals. When she had done every thing but opening the shutters, she went outside the door for that purpose, and in that interval of time I got out of bed, took a candle, and went into the attic room, and saw that the coals were there; she immediately returned, and left the room - the moment she shut the door I got out of bed again with my two sons, and the large coals were all gone. It was impossible anybody could have taken them but her; I had seen them not two minutes before. She has only lived with me since Christmas. I should think something less than half a bushel were taken - she returned about eleven o'clock in the day; I told her she had caused me great uneasiness that morning, she trembled - I charged her with it, she denied it. I told her how I had watched her; she still denied it, and said she would send somebody to silence me, and abruptly left the room, and returned with her husband. I had told her she had better throw herself on my compassion than insult me - her husband also insulted and threatened me. I told him it was not suspicion, but ocular proof; he then said his wife was innocent, and if I would not prosecute his wife, he would prosecute me. I gave her in charge.

MASTER HENRY WILLIAM FIRTH . I am ten years old. My father called me out to see the coals - they were piled up high. The prisoner came in; then went away - I went to look and found all the coals gone.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-11

182. THOMAS ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a great coat, value 3 s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Collier .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to belong to John Payne .

FOURTH COUNT, stating it to belong to William Lawrence .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PAYNE . I am quarter master of the 2d battalion of the 1st regiment of the Grenadier gaurds , The prisoner was a private in the same battallion. Regimental great coats are worn three years, and are generally afterwards sold for the benefit of the soldiers. On the 16th of December, five hundred and seventy-five were sold to John Collier - the money was paid to me; it was 90 l. odd. They were to be delivered to him on the 3d of January; they were deposited in the Tower, and in consequence of information they were not delivered, but taken out of the cart; there was then about fifty-six deficient.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am a quarter master. On the 3d of January, I counted the coats - there was then only five hundred and twenty-one; the deficiency was fifty-six.

THOMAS SUTTON . I am a sergeant major. The prisoner did not sleep in the Tower; his company had occupied the room were the clothes were. I was present when he was apprehended near the draw-bridge, on the 7th of January. Burgess pointed him out - he was dressed in a white flannel jacket. The battallion had been drawn up before that, and Burgess pointed him out. I afterwards placed him among others, and he recognized him again; he denied all knowledge of Burgess. I went that day to assist in searching his lodgings at a tobacconist's shop, and found a trap-door in the attick, over his room, and there the officers found a soldier's forage cap, and a bag containing skeleton keys. The prisoner said they were his, and he considered them as lumber, and put them there out of the way. Twenty-three of the coats were traced to Burgess.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What had the room been used for before the coats were there - A. A barrack room, until the coats were put there, which I believe was on the 10th of December; they were moved into another room on the 27th. I cannot say which room they were stolen from. Burgess inspected about four hundred men on parade before he saw the prisoner; he was not among them. After that three or four people were with Burgess; the prisoner was brought - I said he had not seen that man, and then he said,

"That is the man." The prisoner's room was on the first floor - the house is but two stories high. When the keys were opened, he acknowledged that they were his. Two of them opened two doors of the rooms the coats were deposited in.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. On Monday, the 6th of January, I went with a search warrant to Allen's in the Minories, with Sutton, and found some coats there. I went to the prisoners lodging next day; it is a second floor back room. He was not there, but his wife was - I went up into the attick, which is used by all the lodgers, and in the loft found the cap in a bundle, with a quantity of other things used by soldiers, and after the prisoner was pointed out, I asked him how he came to leave his keys and files in the garret; he said he generally used them there, and that he put them in the loft - I then produced them, he claimed the cap, skeleton keys, and other things. I shewed him the keys and asked for what purpose he bought them; he said he did not buy them, but found them in a cupboard where he formerly lodged - I asked if he had altered either of them; he said No, he had done nothing to them since he had had them. One key opens a large room, and another opens two doors, and another small one has fresh marks where it has been filed. He denied all knowledge of Burgess.

Cross-examined. Q. Every thing but the keys are what he used to his gnn - A. Yes.

JAMES BURGESS . I am a dealer in old clothes, and live in Glass House-yard, Rosemary-lane. I have bought about forty soldiers great coats of the prisoner at different times - the first was last Monday four weeks; 3 s. was the average price I gave him. I asked if he was allowed to sell them; he said he was, that they were three years old, and he had bought them of his comrades, and was in the habit of doing so to make a trifle for his family. I sold some of them to Allen - I saw them again last Monday week at Allen's, and afterwards at the Mansion House. I was taken into custody, and afterwards made a witness.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you in custody -

A. From Monday till Wednesday. The officer said Allen bought them of me, and asked if I sold them to him, I said I did. I have dealt with the prisoner about five times; he was dressed in a regimental undress - I never asked what regiment he belonged to. I told the sergeant who I had them from. I was taken down from the Compter next day to identify the man. I deal in rag-fair, and have no shopman. When I bought the first, he said he should have more another day; I gave him 3 s.; 2 s. 9 d., and 2 s. 6 d., for them. I sold some to Allen - 3 s. 6 d. was the average price I got for them. I told them directly that I would find out the man.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I live in the Minories. I bought about twenty-six coats of the witness Burgess; I afterwards gave them to the officer. I gave him 3 s. 6 d. each, which was the full value.

ELIZA HUGHES . I am servant at the Crown and Shears, public-house, in Rosemary-lane. I have seen Burgess and the prisoner three or four times at our house together, dealing for soldier's clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this - A. Last week. They dealt in the tap-room, which is used as a market house.

GEORGE PALMER . I am a salesman. I have seen the prisoner four or five times, and have seen Burgess buy coats of him - the last time was last Friday week, at the Crown and Shears. I am sure of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before - A. No. I am often with Burgess. He was dressed in his regimental jacket. I went to the Tower with Burgess; after he had stopped the prisoner, I said,

"Jem, that is the man;" I said so before I got up to him.

JOHN PAYNE re-examined. The coats were in my custody, and were sold at 3 s. 2 d. each, altogether.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-12

183. NICHOLAS THORP was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a cask, value 3 s., and four gallons and a half of brandy, value 4 l. , the goods of William Hepworth .

THOMAS JENKINS . I am servant to Mr. William Hepworth , who lives in Cooper's-row, Crutched-friars , and is a brandy merchant . The cart with casks of brandy in it, stood opposite my master's door. I saw the prisoner on the wheel of the cart getting down with a four gallon and a half cask of brandy in his hand - I collared him immediately; he was getting down with it, and had removed it quite from the spot where I had placed it. There were two others in his company.

SOPHIA ATKINSON . I live opposite Mr. Hepworth. On the 1st of January, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the cart wheel - he took the cask and put it on the tilt, and Jenkins seized him.

BENJAMIN DICKENS . I am a constable. I took charge of him - he said he was tying his shoe on the wheel.

(Cask produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and put my foot on the wheel to tie my boot lace, and was laid hold of.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-13

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, JANUARY 16.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

184. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a cloak, value 9 s. , the goods of John Augustus Brook .

WILLIAM BRYANT . I am shopman to John Augustus Brook , linen-draper , of Parliament-street . On the 1st of January, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I received information, and missed this cloak from inside the door - I went out and took the prisoner about ten yards off with it, and he immediately dropped it.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a private watchman to Mr. Whitmore. I was going by, and saw the prisoner looking into the shop; I watched him from the opposite side, and saw him step in and take the cloak. I pursued and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-14

Before Mr. Recorder.

185. JOHN SIMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a bullock's tongue, value 6 s. , the goods of George Betty .

GEORGE BETTY . I am an oil-man , and live in Newport-street . This bullock's tongue was inside my door - I saw it safe about ten o'clock at night, on the 24th of December. I went to supper, and in about ten minutes, heard the cry of Stop thief; I ran to the door and missed it.

JAMES JAMES . I am servant to Mr. Betty. I saw the prisoner take a tongue - I ran out, and secured him without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM FOREST . I am a watchman. I stopped him in Cranbourne-street, and saw him throw the tongue away - he struck me and got away, but I took him again.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-15

Before Mr. Recorder.

186. THOMAS CLIFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , a tea-urn, value 50 l.; four cream ewers, value 9 l.; a tea-pot, value 9 l., and a tea-set, value 7 l. , the goods of Montague Levyson .

MONTAGUE LEVYSON . I am a silversmith , and live in Pall Mall. The prisoner was my out door workman . The articles stated in the indictment were delivered him to polish - the tea-set was plated, and all the rest silver. The urn and silver tea-pot were delivered him on Monday, the 12th of August; he was to return them on Friday, the 15th. As he did not come I went after him, but did not see him till the 28th of November. I have not found the property. I searched his house; his tools and every thing portable was taken away.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When he was apprehended how much money was found on him - A. Very little. I delivered him the goods myself; it was all my own except the plated tea service. I was brought up a Jew - my ideas now are solely a belief in a Supreme Being. There are parts in the Old and New Testaments which I do not believe. I entertain doubts of any Revelation

being made by the Supreme Being to man. I believe we shall be punished for our deeds hereafter.

The witness being re-sworn upon the Pentateuch; declared his former evidence to be true.

ROBIN RYDER . I am errand boy to Mr. Levyson. I saw the milk-ewer delivered to the prisoner to polish - they were never brought back.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Magistrate - A. No. I was told to come here about a week ago. I left my master's service soon after, and cannot say whether they were brought back afterwards. I do not recollect telling one Kay that I did not know a word about the matter.

Prisoner's Defence. I am given to understand that Levyson said the urn did not belong to him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-16

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards.

187. THOMAS BESWICK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Walker , about the hour of six, in the night of the 24th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one watch-case, value 5 s., and one watch-hook, value 2 d. , his property.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a watchmaker , and live in Castle-street, East, Oxford-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . On the 24th of December, after six o'clock in the evening, (it was dark) I was in the shop speaking to Mr. Brown, a customer - when a pane of glass was dashed in with great violence; I found a watch case taken out of the glass case - it was taken at that time I am sure, for I saw it safe in the afternoon. Brown ran out, and a cry of Stop thief! was raised. I did not pursue, fearing that if I left the shop, more might be taken; the prisoner was brought back by several people, and the case was given me. He said it was his first offence.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure this was after six o'clock - A. Yes, for I had set a watch just before, and I was at tea when the clock struck six. I could see the watches hanging on the rail. I know this case, for I have the inside which fits it. I rent the house.

WILLIAM ZIETTER . On the 24th of December, I was walking up Well-street, and opposite Margaret-street, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round and saw the prisoner running towards me as hard as he could; I seized him - he had a handkerchief in his hand wrapping something up; I took hold of the handkerchief, and he slipped out of my hand; I took him again; Brown came up, and said he was the man. We took him back to the shop, and I found the watch case in the handkerchief, and gave it to Walker.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the street and saw some boys running, I ran, heard a cry of Stop thief! and picked up the watch case, which I saw one of them throw down - the gentleman took hold of me and took it from me, then let me go. I heard the cry, ran down the street, and some men took hold of me; I said it was the first offence, because he said, if I owned it, he would let me go.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18230115-17

Before Mr. Justice Helroyd.

188. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Pawson , about the hour of four in the night of the 4th of January , at St. Paul, Shadwell, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a pail, value 6 d.; an apron, value 1 d.; four half-crowns, value 10 s.; a sixpence; three hundred penny-pieces, value 25 s.; one thousand seven hundred halfpence, value 3 l. 10 s. 10 d., and one hundred and twenty farthings, value 2 s. 6 d. , his property.

DOROTHY PAWSON . I am the wife of George Pawson , who keeps the Angel, public-house, Back-lane, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . I had seen the prisoner at our house twice before this. On the 3d of January, about half-past 10 o'clock at night, I went into a room which had neither fire or candle in it, to see if the window was safe, it was so. and I found the prisoner laying on the bench with a table rather over him; I asked what he was doing there? he said he was very sleepy; I told him to go out, for we were shutting up - he went out, and I shut the door after him; I fastened the door and windows - I went again and looked all over the house, and left all safe. I was the last person up; I heard nothing in the night. I got up about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, came down stairs and went into the bar, and found all the tills pulled out, and three of them gone, which contained a great quantity of halfpence, and four half-crowns wrapped up in a bit of paper; all this money was gone. The tills and money were safe after I turned him out of the house at night. I examined the house, every thing was safe in front, but in the back parlour I found a lower pane of glass cut clean out, it was quite large enough for a man to get in at - he could then come from the parlour into the bar; he was not in the back parlour the night before; I am certain that window was safe when I went to bed - it is a good height from the ground, but there is a shed he could get on and easily get in. The wash-house joins the parlour, I went in there and found two of the tills laying there empty, and a pail gone, and the wash-house door open, which was bolted and locked the night before - the key of which hung in the bar, and still hung there; I think the lock had been pushed back; I found the other till empty in front of the bar. I was the first person up in the morning.

Prisoner. Q. When I came home from sea, I always drank at your house - A. I only remember seeing him twice.

JOSEPH KENDALL . I am a watchman of St. George in the East. On Saturday the 4th of January, about five o'clock in the morning, before day break, I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Phillip-street, about one hundred and fifty yards from the Angel, coming in a direction from there, and going towards his lodgings - he had a pail on his shoulder, and a flank of beef curled round on the top of it. I asked what he had got, he made no reply - I asked again, and he said,

"Beef," that he belonged to a ship in the London Docks, called the Hope - he went on a few yards, and kicked violently at the door of a butcher's shop; I asked what he wanted, he said,

"Some pork," he said he bought the beef in Ratcliff-highway. I saw two officers over the way, whom I called to my assistance; he wanted me to go to the butcher's where he bought the

beef - they went with him, and I remained with the pail, I found it very weighty, and on lifting up the beef, found a piece of printed cotton, and under that a quantity of penny pieces and halfpence; the officers brought him back, and said he had bought the beef. I then said what I found in the pail; we took him to the Thames Police Office, and I afterwards counted the copper, it amounted to 4 l. 19 s. 6 d.

Prisoner. Q. The pail was not on my shoulder - A. The moment I came up he put it off his shoulder on the ground.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner with Kendall, who called to me, the pail then stood on the step of a butcher's door - we went and enquired about the beef, and returned with him and examined the pail, which contained 4 l. 19 s. 6 d., a cotton apron and some beef; a silver sixpence was among the halfpence, I afterwards searched him, and found in his trowsers pocket three half-crowns, a shilling, and fifteen-pence in copper, all loose in his pocket. I asked how he came by the money in the pail, he said he could not tell, but that in his pocket was his own. Pawson claimed the apron; I found a key on him, which he said belonged to his lodging, but would not tell where that was.

JOHN NEVOD . I am servant to Mr. Barnard, butcher in Ratcliff-highway; the prisoner bought a piece of beef at the shop on Saturday morning, the 4th of January, between four and five o'clock. I saw no pail, he paid me a half-crown and eleven-pence in halfpence, and I gave him one shilling change, for the beef, which came to two shillings and fivepence. I am certain of his person.

DOROTHY PAWSON . The pail and apron are ours - the apron was made out of an old gown, and I have had the pail a long time. I do not know how much copper was taken, but there was as much this.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them how I came by the pail, and the officer said he knew the man, but never looked after him. I have no friends in this country, and have no knowledge of the robbery. As I was on my way to my ship, two men engaged me to carry the pail. I always use this house when I am in this country.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, as he had used no personal violence .

Reference Number: t18230115-18

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

189. WILLIAM JONES alias GIBLETS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Reading , about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 11th of December , ( Maria Simpson and others, being therein,) and stealing, three seals, value 3 l.; two guineas; a half-guinea, and a seven shilling piece, his property, and one watch-key, value 3 s. , the goods of Edward Hanks .

WILLIAM READING . I am a journeyman coach-maker , and live in Riding-house-lane , I had occasion to leave home about five weeks before the 11th of December, and left Edward Hanks , to sleep there, to take care of the house. Maria Simpson , lodged in the parlour; nobody else lived there; I returned on Wednesday the 11th of December, and found the door of the back-room second floor (in which I lived) unlocked; I mentioned it to Hanks who went to the room with me; then returned and looked for the key and it was gone; I missed three gold seals, two guineas and a half, and a seven shilling piece out of a box which was broken open. I found a seal on the following Friday in pawn at Tyes.

EDWARD HANKS . I am a journeyman painter. Reading left me in care of his house. I slept in his room; the prisoner worked with me there for Messrs. Read and Hanks. On the 11th of December, Reading told me his room was open, I went and found his box wrenched open, and my box also open, and a seal and key stolen, but mine had not been locked. I returned to look after the key, which I had put into my waistcoat pocket into the shop, and it was not there; I had locked the room about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I have never found the key; I always kept it locked, he was still at work; there was no other workmen. I left Simpson at home in the morning, she often goes out.

JOHN TYE . I am shopman to Mr. Griffith's, pawnbroker, of Ossulton-street, Sommers-Town. On the 11th of December the prisoner pawned a seal and a key for 6 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BAKER . I am shopman to Mr. Anderson, a pawn-broker, of Brewers-street, Sommers-Town, on the 11th of December, the prisoner pawned a gold seal for 5 s. it was redeemed in the afternoon by somebody - it was a large oval seal, marked M. R. with a red stone, in it; he afterwards pulled a fine gold seal out of his pocket and asked the value, I said 3 l. or 4 l. he wanted me to advance 1 l. on it, I refused because it had a coat of arms on it.

WILLIAM READING . I lost three seals, I had two of the description given by Baker, the three were worth 2 l. or 3 l.

ROBERT WILLAMS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of December, and found 3 s. in his waistcoat pocket and 9 s. in his fob.

Prisoner's Defence. The pawn-brokers swear falsely to me.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing only . - Confined twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-19

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

189. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 3d of December , at St. George, Bloomsbury, a shift, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; an apron, value 6 d.; four sovereigns,; three crown-pieces; three shillings, and a sixpence, the property of John Harrison , in his dwelling-house .

PATIENCE HARRISON . I am the wife of John Harrison , we live in the Colonade, in the parish of St. George's Bloomsbury , the prisoner came to my house on the 13th of November, and told me she was distressed, and I took her in to lodge out of charity, she slept with my children, and continued with me until the 3d. of December, when she had appointed to go with me to a relation of hers to get a box, in which she had clothes, we were to go about three or four o'clock in the afternoon; I had occasion to go out about eleven o'clock in the morning, and left her sitting at the breakfast table; I returned in twenty minutes, and saw she was confused; she said she had been studying and thinking about my brother, who she had told me was her sweetheart, and at dinner time my husband asked why she did not eat as usual; she said nothing. I was getting ready to go with her, and when I

was half naked, she said she wanted a pair of boot-laces, and then a stay-lace; I said; I had plenty of both, she then said she wanted to buy a pair of gloves - I said she had used mine, and could use them again - she said, she had had enough of me, and would borrow no more. I said,

"Ann, I am afraid, there is some scheme in it" - she said,

"No there is not, you know where to find me;" and immediately went out; I expected she was going to Burton-crescent, where we had appointed to go. I got ready and went, but she was not there - I never saw her again. Next morning when I went to breakfast, I found my tea-caddy wrenched open by a fork, and four sovereigns; three crown-pieces; three shillings and sixpence gone, which I had seen safe at eleven o'clock the day before, I missed nothing else that day, being too much confused to look about, on the 5th I missed a petticoat, apron, and a new shift; she left on Tuesday, and on Saturday week, I saw her at Marlborough-street I saw her stripped and my shift found on her back, with my name on it. I claimed it, and said I have been a mother and a friend to you, and why did you distress a poor person like me? I neither threatened or promised her, she cried and said,

"Mrs. Harrison, I am very sorry, but I have done it, and do not know what possessed me to do it;" she said, she opened the tea-caddy with a fork, and that the duplicate of my apron and petticoat, were at the place where the officers took her, she acknowledged taking the money.

SAMUEL WISE . I am an apprentice to John Neat , pawn-broker. A petticoat and an apron were pawned at our house, in the name of Mary Williams , on the 30th of November; I did not take them in. I produce them.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody on Saturday, she was searched in the private room, the woman who searched her, told me in her presence, that she had found the shift on her; when I took her, she cried and said voluntarily, that she took the sovereigns and the silver, and after she was examined, Mrs. Harrison said in her presence, that she had told where the duplicate was to be found, I went to her lodging and found a duplicate of the petticoat and apron in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner to PATIENCE HARRISON . Q. Did you not say you would not appear against me if I confessed where the petticoat and apron were - A. I did not; she said,

"Pray do not hang me;" I said,

"I shall not hang you, pray tell me where my things are," and she told me.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18230115-20

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

191. ELIZABETH STEWARD was indicted for that she, on the 15th of December , being servant to John Silvanus Underwood , did steal three yards of linen, value 4 s.; eleven yards of cotton, value 13 s.; five yards of flannel, value 8 s.; twelve yards of bombazeen, value 20 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; half a yard of muslin, value 18 d.; twenty eight sovereigns; eight crown-pieces; sixteen half-crowns, and sixty shillings, his property, in his dwelling house .

JOHN SILVANUS UNDERWOOD . I live in Bedford-place, Commercial road ; the prisoner came into my service on the 10th December; she stood at my desk that evening, and saw me take out a bag of money, to pay the other servants wages. Next day I went into the City, and on returning about half-past four o'clock, my wife informed me of something, and I missed the bag of money from the desk, containing 7 l. in silver, and twenty sovereigns. On the Saturday morning I missed two silk shawls from my windows, early in the morning, before I got up; and on Sunday, when we went out to chapel, my wife locked the shop door, and on returning we found it had been opened by some means, and found it open again in the afternoon. I immediately questioned the prisoner who had been left in the care of the house; she said no person had been in, and she did not know how it came open. I looked round the shop and found several things misplaced; she persisted that she knew nothing of it. I demanded to search her box, which she willingly acceded to. My wife went up stairs, and brought down a piece of flannel, and a piece of Irish; she said she bought both at Todd's, in Fore-street, and that her mother was with her at the time; she said the flannel measured two yards and a quarter wide, and a thumb over. I found there were two yards and a half; I cannot swear to the Irish, having no mark on it - there is a piece of dirt on one end of the flannel, by which I know it; she persisted that it was not mine. I sent my wife for a piece out of the shop, which had been cut off for a customer; I matched it, it tallied exactly - it must be mine.

ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD . I am the wife of the last witness, in consequence of goods being missed, I accompanied the prisoner up stairs, she opened her box and I found some Irish and flannel, which my husband compared with that in the shop; we have no reason to believe the Irish to be ours.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge; she was examined on the 23d of December, (looks at the examination,) this is the magistrates signature, reads,

"The prisoner confesses having stolen the flannel, but denies stealing either the money or shawls; she also admits taking the property now produced."

ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD . I lost two shawls, but did not miss these articles; but on the 16th her mother brought them to my house - they are worth 2 l. 13 s. together.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the parlour to mend stockings, and my mistress went into the shop, and found the door wide open, and the money missing.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-21

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

192. MARY TICKTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of Edward Bishop , a pocket-book, value 2 s., four sovereigns and one 10 l. Bank-note , the property of Edward William Bishop .

EDWARD WILLIAM BISHOP . On Thursday afternoon the 2d of January, I dressed myself and went to my father's Edward Bishop, who lived in St. Pancras , the prisoner was servant there, before I went my wife brought my pocket book down, I found it contained a 10 l. bank-note and

four sovereigns - I laid it down on the table in the sitting room, and went into another room to put on my under coat. I did not know of my loss until I came home from my father's; I did not then find the pocket book on the table, and missed it. I am sure the money was in it when I laid it on the table. When I got to my father's, I pulled my great coat off, and laid it on the sideboard in the passage, and found it there between twelve and one o'clock at night, when I came away.

MARY BISHOP . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 2d of January, we went together to his father's. Before we went out, I brought the pocket book down stairs and laid it on the table for him to take, and fearing he would forget it, I put it into his great coat pocket while he was in the next room; his great coat laid on the chair ready for him to put on; I did not tell him that I had put it there. I had put a 10 l. note and four sovereigns in it before I brought it down.

THOMAS BLAKEMAN . On Saturday evening, the 4th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and looked out articles to the amount of 2 l. 4 s., and tendered me a 10 l. note - I wrote the address she gave me on it; she said her mother lived at No. 9, Cromer-street, which I put on it. I afterwards found that address to be wrong; she left the note with me, and would not take either goods or change that night, and suspecting she had got it improperly, I followed her home, to Mr. Bishop's, Turnmill-street; she opened the door with a key, and about half-past eleven o'clock that night, I went to Mr. Bishop's, and took her to the watch-house. Here is the note, (producing it;) I wrote Lewis, No, 9, Cromer-street, on it.

JAMES SMITH . I am the watch-house keeper The last witness brought the prisoner to me - my wife searched her, but found nothing on her but an old purse. I told her I thought it a very bad case for a young girl like her to be guilty of; she then said she had the pocket book, but there was only a 10 l. note and one sovereign in it - that she did not take it out of the pocket, but picked it up in the back yard.

MARY BISHOP . Here is

"Mr. Rigg, 20th of November, on it," by which I know it.

EDWARD WILLIAM BISHOP. I took it of Rigg - here is my writing on it.

The prisoner made no Defence, but one witness gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of her youth .

Reference Number: t18230115-22

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

193. MARY MEREDITH was indicted for that she, on the 18th of December , being servant to Thomas Bray , did steal in his dwelling-house, four shirts, value 18 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; two coats, value 12 s.; two blankets, value 10 s.; two table cloths, value 5 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 s.; a quilt, value 5 s.; two tea spoons, value 5 s.; a shawl, value 3 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 2 s.; a towel, value 1 s., and two pin-cloths, value 2 s. , his property.

THOMAS BRAY . I rent a house in James-place, St. Pancras ; the prisoner lived servant with me. On the 18th or 19th of December, in consequence of missing property, I sent for the constable between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - she was then out, she came home soon after, and was searched - a waistcoat was found concealed under her clothes, which is my son's. I provide him with clothes.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a constable. I was fetched. The prisoner came home between eleven and one o'clock - I told her she was suspected of having taken the property, and that she must go up stairs with me; she did so; I asked if she had any property about her; she said, No - I found the waistcoat under her gown, tied up by her petticoat string. She began to cry, and begged her master's forgiveness.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value 1 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-23

194. JANE MOORE was indicted for, that she, being servant to Samuel Roberts , on the 26th of December , did steal in the dwelling house of John Quesnell , a purse, value 6 d.; two sovereigns; fifteen shillings; a book, value 2 s.; two sheets, value 10 s.; a veil value 4 s.; a handkerchief, value 5 s.; a pair of snuffers, value 2 s., and a towel, value 10 d.; the property of Samuel Roberts ; and two shifts, value 4 s.; two pair of shoes, value 9 s; two pair of stockings, value 6 s.; five handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; a half handkerchief, value 6 d.; five pieces of muslin, value 2 s.; a yard of satin, value 4 s.; a frill, value 4 d., and six pieces of ribbon, value 6 d. , the goods of Letitia Roberts .

CAPTAIN SAMUEL ROBERTS . I live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square . The prisoner came into my service on the 14th of December, and left on the 26th. We missed several articles while she was with us, and on the morning she left, I missed so many things that I got a warrant, and went with the officer to No. 12, Cumberland-street, George-street; she was not there, and at night the officer produced several articles of mine.

MISS. LETITIA ROBERTS . I am the prosecutor's sister, and lived with him. I lost several things of my own - I missed one or two of them before she left, and the rest after. I have seen some of them in Clement's possession.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you examine all your things when she came - A. No; but I believe they were all safe.

- SAMPSON. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Greek-street, Soho. I have a shift, a pair of silk stockings, and two pair of shoes, pawned for 8 s., by a woman, I cannot say whom. Clements produced the duplicate of them.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Portland-street. I have a shirt and handkerchief pawned on the 21st of December, in the name of Mary Moore , by a woman whom I do not know. I have no recollection of the prisoner.

THOMAS LEONARD . I went with a search warrant on Thursday, the 26th of December, to No. 12, Cumberland-street, with Westcoat and Captain Roberts . I found the prisoner did not lodge there, but she was likely to call there, to see Mrs. Jones, who lived in the garret. On going to the house again, we found her there, and in her pocket, I found two duplicates, one of Sampson's, and the other, Clark's.

Westcoat found some money and a latch key. I asked her where she lodged, and after some hesitation she said she would shew us; she took us to No. 9, Greek-street - she unlocked the door of the back garret, and in a box there, we found several articles marked L. R. and S. R., and several things wet in a bundle - she said she was turned out of the house by the captain, and brought them away by mistake. I found some snuffers and a book in the box, and some sattins, ribbons, and feathers in another bundle.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . I found two sovereigns and four half-crowns in a piece of paper, which Clements took out of her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner complained of ill-usage from the prosecutor, and that she was turned out of the house without time to pack up her clothes.

CAPTAIN SAMUEL ROBERTS . She wished to leave, and I was as anxious to get rid of her. I owed her 4 s. 6 d., which I paid her at the office.

GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-24

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

195. HENRY WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Thomas Sharpless , from his person .

MR. THOMAS SHARPLESS . I live at Mill-hill, Hendon. On the 31st of October, about a quarter past one o'clock, I was passing through Smithfield, and in St. John-street , an officer informed me my pocket was picked. I found my handkerchief, which I had just before, in his hand, and the prisoner in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Had you seen him near you - A. No. I felt something at my pocket a moment before.

THOMAS EARL . I am porter to Mr. Webb, of Charter-house-lane, I was going into Smithfield, and saw Mr. Sharpless coming towards me, and the prisoner behind him, I saw him take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, I told Mr. Sharpless, and called Stop thief, he was taken near Cloth-fair, and he threw it down.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you first see him - A. At Smithfield-bars, he took it out on this side of Charter-house-lane, which is in the City.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was coming towards the Old Bailey, and saw the prisoner with two more, (one a boy) in his company. I saw the handkerchief come from the pocket, but cannot say who took it, the prisoner run and threw it away; I picked it up and secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see them speak to each other - A. They were close together; I suspected they were in company; I knew him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HARKER . I am an officer. I heard the alarm, and caught the prisoner who was running away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230115-25

196. ELIZA WOOD was indicted for that she, on the 1st of December , being servant to Joseph Slack , did steal two yards and a half of cloth, value 42 s.; and one yard and three quarters of kerseymere, value, 12 s.; and one yard and a quarter of other cloth, value 20 s. ; his property, and THOMAS WARD , was indicted, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOSEPH SLACK . I am a woollen-draper , and live in Smithfield . Wood came into my service on the 26th of November, and on the Sunday evening following, I heard the door shut, and asked her who came in, she said her brother and sister had just gone out; next morning at breakfast my man gave me information, and I missed two yards and a half of ladies cloth, part of a blue kerseymere, and a green pelisse cloth, cut; the ladies cloth was safe on the Saturday night, the kerseymere and pelisse cloths had been cut by small scissars, one yard and a quarter had been cut off the pelisse cloth. Having no other female servant, I charged the prisoner with it, she denied it, I asked where her brother and sister lived, she said,

"No. 9, Charles-street, New Kent Road;" I accompanied an officer there; there were two Nos. 9, but no such name as Wood. The officer fetched her to point out the house, and said in her hearing, that she had confessed the robbery, and that her brother lived in Whitecross-street, she said nothing to it; she afterwards took us to the house in Whitecross-street; she went up stairs, I followed her into a room on the third floor, and there found the prisoner Ward, she said that was her brother, the window of the room was open. I called the officer up, he came up in about five minutes, during which time Ward was going to the door, I caught him by the collar, he tried to throw me down, I had not told him what I came about; when the officer came I gave him in charge, I loosed my hold and he sat down by the window; I saw him put his hand into his pocket, and drop something out of window; I looked out and saw a key rebound to the other side of the street; I called to a gentleman to pick it up, I sent Mr. Picket, down for it, and saw the gentleman deliver it to him, the officer tried to unlock a box in the room with the key, but could not, he was going to break it open, but the prisoner Ward said,

"give me the key and I will open it," which he did, the officer took out two bundles, the second was tied up in a white pocket-handkerchief, it contained a yard and three quarters of blue kerseymere, and a yard and a quarter of pelisse cloth, which I knew to be mine; Ward said that was all belonging to me; I have compared them with other cloth, and they tally where they were cut, and there is a particular mark of white thread in the kerseymere by which I know it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Did Wood go out at all after you heard the door shut - A. Not to my knowledge.

HENRY TURNPENNEY . I am an officer. On the 2d of December, I was at Mr. Slack's house, and heard Wood deny the charge, she said her brother and sister lived in Charles-street, New Kent Road; I accompanied Mr. Slack there, and returned for her, to take her there in the coach; in Blackfriars-Road, I told her it was no use deceiving me, for I was determined to find it out, she bust into tears, and said,

"I cut it off myself," I asked where her brother and sister lived, she said,

"at No. 4, Lower

Whitecross-street," she said she delivered it to Ward; we went to Whitecross-street with her, she went up with Mr. Slack, I stopped below, and soon after Mr. Slack called out of window for me, I went up the wrong staircase, but when I got to the room, I found Ward and Mr. Slack struggling together, I collared Ward and pushed him down into a chair close by the window, I did not see the key go, as my back was turned, but Mr. Slack said.

"He has thrown something out of window," the prisoner said nothing, it was brought up - I tried to open the box with it, but could not, but he said he would open it, and did so, and I found the cloth which Mr. Slack immediately claimed, he described it before he saw it; I found a key on Wood which opens the door of Ward's lodging, and found a similar key upon Ward's wife; Ward said the cloth was given to him to make Wood a pelisse; he said nothing about the kerseymere and other cloth. I took him to Guildhall and left him in charge of my partner, and he run out; but was secured half-way a cross the yard; Wood said she did give him the cloth at Mr. Slack's shop, she said nothing about a pelisse; I believe she said she cut the cloth before he came there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PICKETT . I am Mr. Slack's brother-in-law. I was in the coach at the time Wood made the confession. I told her the crime was a henious one, and if she had been induced by her brother to do it, she should confess. I made her no promise; she said she cut it off by the persuasion of her brother, and had it ready for him by the time he came - that he was in the house about ten minutes, and the bell rang, and he went away - that he took it away in his pockets, and that he sometimes went by the name of Ward. I went with her to Whitecross-street, where she said the cloth was; a key which was found on her, she said, opened her brother's door. A gentleman in the street gave me the key which opened the box; the witness's account is correct.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am shopman to Mr. Slack. I was dressing the window on Monday morning, and missed two yards and a half of ladies cloth, which is new. I know it to be the same. I had seen it on the Saturday.

WOOD. Ward did not know it was stolen.

WARD'S Defence. She told me she bought it, and I did not know but what she had.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-26

197. THOMAS FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a wrapper, value 1 s., and twenty-three counterpanes, value 12 l. , the goods of John Lainson and Henry Lainson .

HENRY LAINSON . I am in partnership with John Lainson . We are Manchester Warehousemen , and live in Bread-street. I can only speak to the property.

CHARLES HURDSFIELD . I am a constable. On Monday, the 16th of December, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing down Watling-street and, saw five or six persons together - I believe the prisoner was one of them; I watched them, and saw them turn up Bread-street, part of them stopped at the corner in Watling-street, the rest went up Star-court , and as I passed the court, I heard some of them say,

"I think this is the knife that will cut" - I went into Mr. Lainson's, at the corner of the court, and saw one of the porters, he and another porter went out, and as we came to the door, a man whom I believe to be the prisoner, had the bale on his back, another man was in his company looking back, I collared him, and said to the porters,

"Lay hold of him," and the man who had the bale, threw it down; I held the companion, and called Stop thief. The prisoner turned the corner, I lost sight of him. I secured the bale, which contained twenty-three counterpanes; it was taken from the lobby of the door; the prisoner was secured in a few minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What became of the other - A. He was discharged, as I could not swear that he was one of them.

THOMAS PEARCE . I am porter to Messrs. Lainson's. I was inside the door when the officers came. I followed him out, and saw the prisoner with the bale on his back at the corner of Watling-street, which is ten or twelve yards from our door; the officer was securing another man. I was close to the prisoner when he dropped the bale - he turned the corner, and I followed him, crying Stop thief! I never lost sight of him, he ran about twenty yards, when somebody knocked him down. I am certain he is the man who dropped the bale - he was given in charge; the bale had been left by the carrier about half an hour before; it was taken from the door in Bread-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Whether it was given him to carry or not, you do not know - A. I know it was safe a minute before; he said nothing about how he got it,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BLUNDELL . I am porter to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner about three yards from the door, with the bale on his back - I went after him, he dropped it about twenty yards off. I did not lose sight of him till he was taken; somebody knocked him down.

Cross-examined. Q. He was very near another man, was he not - A. Several people were passing - he threw it down, and ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! seeing the people running, I turned; somebody struck and knocked me down - but I was never near the house.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-27

198. JOHN BUCKLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Herbert , about the hour of six in the night of the 6th of December , at St. Giles without, Cripplegate, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a coat, value 2 l. 10 s.; a pair of breeches, value 20 s.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; four shirts, value 15 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 16 s.; one sheet, value 3 s., and six yards of linen cloth, value 3 s. , his property.

JOHN HERBERT . I rent a house in Angel-alley, Little Moorfields, in the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate . On the 6th of December, about twenty minutes past five o'clock in the evening, I left home. (I sell sprats ) my room door was locked; I locked the street door - a single woman who lives in the first floor was in the house; it was dark when I left. I returned about seven o'clock, and found

the shutter taken down, and a cut in the window, so that a very stout man could get in. I had left the articles stated in the indictment in my room on the ground floor, they are worth 6 l., they cost me twice as much; they were locked up in a box under my bed, which box I found broken open, and every thing I had was gone - I have not recovered any of it; the prisoner lived in the same court. I did not see him near my door.

WILLIAM FINDLATER . I am near fifteen years old; I live in Bell-alley, Coleman street, and am a shoemaker. On the 6th of December, a little after five o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner close to the prosecutor's house, I saw him go and jump against the door, trying to break it open. I told him not to do it, he made no answer; I knew him before by having lived in the neighbourhood; the watch was not on. I told my father of it the same night, and Mr. Page next morning. I did not lay hold of him, because I knew he would strike me. I left him, but saw him go to the window and take a shutter down.

Q. Why not call Stop thief - A. I did not know what to do. There was another boy with me, but there was two more boys with him. After taking the shutter down, he went to the window and tried to get the lead away to get in, and I told the boy who was with me to come away, or we should get into trouble. I did not call Stop thief! for it is a very dull place, as hardly anybody passes of a night. I told my father directly he came from work. I knew where the constable lived, but do not think he was at home, for there was no light in his room. I did not see the prisoner get into the house. I work with my father.

FRANCIS WARD . I am a shoemaker, and live in Crown-court, Moor-lane. I was with the last witness in Angel-alley; the prisoner called Findlater away. I did not hear what he said to him. I saw the prisoner run to the door to break it down, I persuaded him not to do it, but he would - there were two or three of them - Redwood was one. I saw the prisoner take the shutter down, then I and Findlater ran away - we did not raise an alarm. I told my father and mother of it that night, about ten o'clock; we had been taking a walk. I went to Page the constable, but he was not at home. I did not know where any other constable lived.

WILLIAM FINDLATER re-examined. He called me away, and asked if I would be in it. I said,

"In what," he said he was going to break that man's crib open. I refused to be in it, and advised him not.

HENRY REDWOOD . I live in Moor-lane. I am out of employ. On the 6th of December, I saw Buckley run to the shutter, and take it down. I was standing at my door looking at him; he cut away the glass - there was nobody near to call to. I did not lay hold of him, because he could beat me and two or three together. I saw him get through the glass - he broke the box open, and threw the things out of the window. I could not see what they were - I was not near enough, but I believe they were clothes, I did not help him to take them away. I ran up stairs and told my master, whom I live with, and he went for an officer - he is not here; he got Page next morning. I did not tell him till next morning, for he was out till ten or eleven o'clock that night; and I was in bed when he came home.

Q. When he threw the things out of the window, why not pick them up and take them home? - A. I should have got into trouble. I saw nobody pick them up. I saw him come out. He had two or three companions.

Prisoner. You first moved the shutter, broke the window, and put the glass down the gully-hole, and I gave the clothes out of the window to you. I put them in the soot bag, and you got up the chimney and blew the candle out when your master came home. - Witness I was in bed when my master came home. I never had the shutter in my hand.

WILLIAM BROAD . I live in Pump-court, Moor-lane, with my aunt and uncle. I work at copper-plate printing. I was in Angel-alley, and saw the prisoner run against the door, trying to break it open, but he could not; he then took the shutter down, broke the glass and got in. I saw him throw the clothes out of the window. I ran home directly, and told my aunt and uncle of it, they told me to keep my tongue to myself, or I should get into trouble about it.

Prisoner. Q. You got in with me. - A. I did not; he asked me to get in. I said No, and he wanted Redwood to get in.

THOMAS JONES . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, in Whitecross-street. I told him I was informed he had broken into Herbert's house; he said the sweeps were in it as well as him, and mentioned Redwood, Broad, and another, who was discharged. Broad and Redwood were in custody at that time, and admitted as evidence.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18230115-28

198. CHARLES TOWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 38 lbs. of cheese, value 15 s. , the goods of Samuel Noakes .

SAMUEL NOAKES. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Sun-street . On Wednesday, the 11th of December, this cheese was piled up by the door - I was out.

THOMAS CRAIG . I am shopman to Mr. Noakes. I saw the cheese ten minutes before it was gone. A stranger came in and said a man had taken it. I overtook the prisoner with it, and seized him.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I took charge of him, and found 1 s. 3 d. on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-29

199. ELIZABETH WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , a pair of boots, value 5 s., and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Wagg .

DANIEL WILKS . I am servant to William Wagg , a shoemaker , of Sun-street, Bishopsgate . On the 10th of December, about eleven o'clock in the day, the prisoner came into the shop, and tried some boots on, but bought none - she was in the shop about a quarter of an hour. In about half an hour, I missed a pair of boots and shoes, from the further end of the shop, from the case which was open and within her reach - nobody had been in the shop since her. I saw her ten minutes after she left at the shop at a public-house opposite, looking at some boots - I had not then missed any. When I did miss them, I

went after her, and found her in Union-street, and found them upon her. She dropped one shoe in the street, and the other in the shop.

ROBERT JONES . I live next door to Mr. Wagg. The prisoner came into my shop, and asked to look at a waistcoat-piece; a pair of boots dropped from her which she picked up hastily. I shewed her two or three - they would not suit her. Her conduct excited my suspicion, and I went into Mr. Wagg's and informed him.

SAMUEL FARMER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I took the boots off her feet at the public-house. She denied the charge - a woman was with her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-30

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

201. THOMAS WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a reticule, value 1 s.; a purse, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 6 s., and four shillings, the property of Rebecca Pitman , from her person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-31

202. JOHN THICKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a sovereign, the money of Betty Fowler , from her person .

BETTY FOWLER . I keep the Two Brewers, public-house, Little Tufton-street, Westminster . The prisoner was my pot-boy . I gave him a sovereign on the 10th of December, to get changed - he never returned.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Strutton-ground, on the 24th of December. He said he had spent the sovereign.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother has paid it her at 1 s. a week, and she agreed not to prosecute me.

BETTY FOWLER . I have not received a farthing.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-32

203. ELIZABETH KIMBERLY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , a sovereign; two half-crowns, and two shillings, the monies of John Wilson , from his person .

JOHN WILSON . I am a carpenter , and live at Pimlico. On the 22d of December, about one o'clock in the morning, I was returning from the pay-table, in St. Martin's-lane - I had drank a little. As I came down the lane, the prisoner called to me, and said she wanted to speak to me. I went up a passage with her, and in two or three minutes I missed my money - nobody but her was near me. I lost a sovereign, two half crowns, and a few shillings - I had spent 2 s. I charged her with robbing me, she denied it, and said I had given it to her. which I had not. I gave her in charge. The watchman found a sovereign and 2 s. on her. I went to the pay-table at eight o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. You gave them to me as 2 s. - A. I gave her nothing.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a watchman. I took her in charge; Wilson was holding her hand, she was struggling with him. He accused her of robbing him of a sovereign, two half-crowns, and a shilling or two. He was neither drunk or sober. She said she had only 2 s. from him. I found the sovereign and shillings in her mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me two pieces of coin, which I thought were shillings; he afterwards said, if I did not return it, he would give me in charge. I refused; he dragged me down the court, and called the watchman. I put it in my mouth, to prevent his getting it away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-33

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

204. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moses , about eight o'clock on the night of the 13th of December , at St. Anne, Westminster, with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein being .

WILLIAM MOSES . I rent a house in Prince's-row, in Newport-market, in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster . On Sunday evening, the 15th of December, a little before eight o'clock, I went down stairs for some water, and observed the street-door wide open - I immediately shut it. I came up in two or three minutes, and found it wide open again, (I have several lodgers) I shut it again, and desired my wife to take a candle, and go up stairs, which she did, and called out, that there was a strange man on the stairs. I went up, and found the prisoner on the first-floor stair case, and asked who he came for; he said he came for one Johnson, a gentleman's servant. No such person ever lived in my house. I asked who sent him; he said he came from a coach-maker in Long Acre. I said. I knew every coach-maker there, he could not tell whom it was. I sent for a constable, and went up stairs with him. We found the attic-floor room broken open, the lock was forced open, and the padlock broken off besides. The constable searched him, and found two keys in his pocket, and I saw four more keys found on the staircase between the attic and where I seized him; it had been dark a long time.

Prisoner. Q. Were you present when the keys were found. - A. Yes. Donahoe, who was bound over, is not here; he found them on the stairs. I did not see him pick them up, his father lodges on my second floor - he visits there. I understand he is a carpenter. I do not know him to be a bad character.

MARY MOSES . I am the wife of the last witness. I went up stairs when he found the door open, I took a candle - it was dark. I met the prisoner on the third flight of stairs, he had got on the first stair from the garret passage, coming down - he had no light. I asked him who he wanted, he said one Mr. Johnson - I said, we had no such name in our house. I went down stairs, he followed me down two stories. I called to my husband, who came up and secured him. I heard my husband shut the door the first time. I heard nobody come in between that and when he shut it again. I asked Donahoe to go up stairs, and see if the garret was safe; he was on the second floor looking over the bannisters; he went up, and

came down and informed me the garret was broken open; he brought four keys down - my husband did not go up then; there were beds and boxes in the garret, but nothing disturbed. I afterwards went up myself, the padlock was broken off, and the other lock forced open. I had been up about six o'clock that evening, it was dark then the asp and staple were safe. I locked the door, and brought the keys down with me.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not marks of violence on the padlock. - A. Yes, on the staple. I never knew Donahoe to have any tools in the house. He offered me no violence, nor tried to pass me.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner, about eight o'clock. I searched him, and found two keys on him; four more were produced, one of them unlocked the padlock. Donahoe said in his presence, that he found them on the stairs where the prisoner stood. I went up and found the padlock laying on the floor, and the asp wrenched.

Prisoner. Q. Did you find any thing in my possession that would have done the violence to the asp - A. No. I know nothing of Donahoe.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday evening, previous to this Sunday, I was in conversation at a public-house in the neighbourhood, with a man who I had seen there occasionally; he asked if I was in work, and said he could put a crown in my pocket; that an acquaintance of his was in debt, and wanted to leave his lodgings, but could not carry his box away as he had a bad arm. I asked why he did not do it, he said it was too heavy for one. I said I did not object, and met him accordingly at Moses door, which was wide open; he told me to go in and wait till a person came down stairs. I went into the passage, and in two minutes a young man came down, and gave me two keys, saying,

"These are the keys of the box, and another one; wait till you hear the room door open, then come up, and take the box out; it stands on the right hand." I heard him shut a door, which appeared to be the second floor, I then went up, and at the top heard somebody coming, I stopped, and Mrs. Moses came up, asked what I wanted, and called out. Finding myself charged with a robbery, I instantly made the best excuse I could, and asked for a person I knew nothing of. I followed her down, and on the second floor her husband came up. Donahoe came out; they gave him a light, to go up to the rooms; he came down, and said the door was open, and Moses produced four keys, which he said Donahoe had picked up - these keys correspond with each other. I relied on the appearance of Donahoe, to have made out a complete conspiracy between him, another man, and the officer. The prosecutor's persuasion, or his own conscience has kept him away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18230115-34

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

205. JAMES CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , at St. Mary, Stratford-le-Bow, a gelding, price 3 l. , the property of Robert Simmonds .

ROBERT SIMMONDS . I am a chimney sweeper , and live at Brentwood. On Thursday, the 9th of January, about twelve o'clock, I turned my gelding out in a field about half a mile from Brentwood , and on Saturday morning I went to look for it, and it was gone - the gates of the field were as I had left them. On the Saturday week, I found it at Mr. Kendall's public-house, at Mile End-road. Ellis was there. I knew it very well; I had bought it at Chelmsford fair.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am an officer. On Thursday, the 9th January, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I met the prisoner just by Bow-fair-fields, riding this mare - I stopped him as he had nothing but a halter, and questioned him - he said, he had brought it from Mr. Wick's of Brentwood, to take it to the knackers; but he could not tell who the knackers was. The prosecutor saw it on the Saturday, and claimed it.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18230115-35

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

206. TIMOTHY WHITE was indicted for the wilful murder of Michael Flood .

WILLIAM MURRAY . On the 6th of October, I lived at Old Brentford . I knew Michael Flood , but not the prisoner. I was standing at my door in the morning, and saw a person come up and strike Flood in the face - the blow made him stagger; when he recovered himself and came towards the curb stone, a woman who is in attendance caught the person by the collar, (he was then making another blow at him); she turned him round, and said,

"For God's sake have you killed the man," or

"Will you kill him;" I do not know which. Flood immediately took to his heels, and made a kind of run; the person followed him - the people then came between him, and I could not see what passed; but when I came up they were struggling together, opposite a gateway - I saw Flood down, and the person in a stooping position. Flood bled at the first blow, which was over the left temple; his face was covered with blood. He went himself for a constable - I saw him again about a week afterwards. I saw nothing pass between them before the blow was struck.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in liquor - A. I do not know.

MR. JOHN MORRIS BANNER . I am the house surgeon of St. George's Hospital. The deceased was brought in on the 14th of October; he had a contused wound over the left eye - it was bleeding at the time. He had repeated haemorrhage from the wound; I examined it and found a coagulation of blood - I removed and stopped the bleeding; he went on favourably for two or three days, and then became rather delirious, and had more bleeding from the wound. On the 20th he became still more delirious, and on the 21st he died. I examined the wound minutely after death, and found the bone denuded - I then examined the brain, and found the membrane inflamed, and a little matter under it, just where he received the blow; the inflamation proceeded from the blow. I did not examine any other parts of his body - his vitals were all sound. I think the blow he received was the cause of his death; but if he had had proper medical assistance at first, he might have been saved.

JOHN WALKER . I am a butcher, and live at Old Brentford. On Monday the 6th of October, I was standing in my shop, and saw Flood bleeding from the face, and the prisoner striking him, they were two or three yards from

me, the blood was running from his head. A woman was holding him, trying to prevent his striking him. Flood got away, and ran about twenty yards, the prisoner followed him and threw him down; I afterwards saw the prisoner go after him into a lodging-house; Flood sent for a constable, and he was apprehended; the deceased came into my shop in the course of the day, his face appeared cut in a dreadful manner, I advised him to go home; I saw him again next day walking about; on the Monday morning I accompanied him to the magistrate; the magistrate told the prisoner he must send him to prison, if he could not find bail - he said he could not, the deceased then said,

" Tom I'll make it up with you." Something was said about what he would give him, and he said he had but 3 s. in the world; the magistrate said the expences would amount to more, it was agreed that if he could make up 10 s. he should not go to prison; his wife went out to fetch the 10 s.; the magistrate told me it was settled, and I need not stop, I afterwards saw the prisoner at large; Flood said he never quarreled with him in his life, and the prisoner said, when they were drinking together, he never would pay any thing; they appeared to know each other very well; they were both pensioners; Flood walked about as usual, he never appeared in health, he was always so very thin; the prisoner appeared to me to strike him with his left arm, (the prisoner's left arm is a stump).

ANN WOODWARD . On the 6th of October, I was by Walker's door and saw a man come out of a house with a bag on his back, and going on towards Hounslow; the deceased came up as from Hownslow with a basket in his hand, they both met by the baker's door; I was within two doors of them, I do not know whether any thing was said, but the man struck Flood with his hand, I cannot tell which hand it was, nor where he was struck, for I was flurried. I did not see Flood return the blow, he said nothing, the man struck him again, Flood then called out,

"This fellow is going to kill me," I called out to Walker that somebody was beating old Flood. he went on forwards, the men followed him, but I caught him and stopped him, I gave the man a push, he slipped down by the gutter, I saw no more, till I saw him and Flood laying on the flag-stones, I do not know how they fell.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am constable of Old Brentford; Flood came for me, and I apprehended the prisoner; after the examination, the magistrate talked of sending him to prison; Flood took me aside and wished me to intercede, as he did not wish him to go to prison, but to punish him in some other way, by fining him; I spoke to the magistrate, who levied a fine of 10 s., he could not pay it, the magistrate ordered a commitment to be made out, and authorized me to discharge him if the money was brought; it was brought, and he was discharged, I paid the fees of the court, and 5 s. to Flood out of the money; I afterwards saw Flood at the public-house smoking his pipe. Walker was the only person examined before the magistrate.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a Chelsea pensioner. On the 6th of October, I was at Brentford, and saw the prisoner and deceased by White's window, the prisoner had the deceased down on one knee, I saw him striking him; I do not know with which arm it was, nor where he struck him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him, he said

"Come and have something to drink,

"I said no, he had affronted me once or twice before; he said, I might go to hell, I was in liquor, and dare say I might have struck him; I am sorry to have been the cause of his death.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of Manslaughter only . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-36

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

207. WILLIAM JAMES CUMMINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Fitch , on the King's highway, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a handkerchief, value 2 s.; four penny pieces, and four halfpence , his property.

RICHARD FITCH . I live in London-street, Tottenham-court Road. On the 25th of December , about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was coming from Mile-end, opposite the London Hospital ; I had my child in my arms, my wife was walking close behind me - two women came up, and without speaking, one of them struck me on the breats - I told them to keep off, and put out my arm, and one of them said,

"If that is what you want, d - n your eyes I'll soon fetch somebody who shall settle you." I saw nobody near them, the woman who spoke went to the Lord Nelson, public-house, close by - and in a very short time I received a blow on the back of my head. I was knocked down, and as I rose I saw the prisoner standing close by me; he got my head between his legs as I rose, and some person was beating me on the right side. I felt a hand in my left hand pocket - my hat was knocked off by the blow, and my handkerchief was in it. In a short time I got away from them, and took my hat from one of the women who had struck me - she did not attempt to run away, nor did she conceal my hat; I looked for my handkerchief, and asked her where it was, she said she knew nothing about it. I missed four penny pieces and four halfpence, which were in my left hand pocket; several men came round me the moment it happened to assist me, or I should have been murdered - they got me from the prisoner. I did not hear him say any thing, nor do I know who took my handkerchief or money; he is the man who struck me; he did not run away, but went into the Lord Nelson. We went in after him, he said he would not be taken, and if I was not satisfied he would serve me worse.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He said that in the public-house - A. Yes, publicly. I told the constable of the night the whole - he put it down as an assault, and said they ought to be more civil in that quarter. I do not know that I ever said I should not have come here except for my wife; I might have said so. I did not feel for my money till I left the watch-house - the handkerchief might have fallen out of my hat - I looked for it, but could not find it.

ELIZABETH HAWKINS . I live in Thomas-street, Commercial-road; I was passing at the time, and saw the prosecutor and his wife. Two women came out of a public house, and one of them spoke to him, and the other struck him. I think he made some answer to them. The other said she would bring somebody who should do for him; she went into the public-house, and came out followed by the prisoner; she pointed to Fitch, saying, that was the man, that had struck her; he immediately

struck Fitch, who fell, and as he got up he struck him again, he fell to the ground, he then got his head between the prisoner's heels, and the prisoner stooped over him. I saw his hands close to Fitch's pockets; I heard money drop, it sounded like several pieces; his hat was knocked off - it laid on the ground with the handkerchief in it. The two women went up to his wife, who screamed out

"Murder!" they said,

"D - n you, Ma'am, we will soon stop your screaming." Fitch got his head disengaged in about two minutes, and the prisoner returned into the public-house, and the women followed - the prosecutor also followed. I went into the passage - several people were collected. Fitch took his hat from one of the women.

ELIZA FITCH . I was walking behind my husband; two women came up - one of them struck him, he told them to keep off, and the other fetched a man who struck him, and knocked him down, and as he rose struck him again - and as he rose a third time, he held his head between his legs. I screamed Murder. I cannot exactly say what passed in my fright.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-37

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

208. JANE KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a coat, value 10 s.; two waistcoat pieces, value 3 s.; three gowns, value 1 l.; two petticoats, value 4 s.; seven handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; two window curtains, value 18 d.; seven caps, value 2 s.; an apron, value 4 d.; two pair of stockings, value 18 d,; a fan, value 6 d., and a pair of gloves, value 2 d. , the goods of James Levell .

JAMES LEVELL . I am a labourer , and rent a house in the parish of Heston . On Monday, the 16th of December, about five o'clock in the morning, I went to work, and returned about twenty minutes before five o'clock in the evening. I went into the garden, and in three or four minutes saw the prisoner come up to the garden gate, she asked me to come and unlock the door, for she could not. I went, but could not open it; I then went round to the back door, and found it pulled too, but not fastened. I went up to the bed-room, and found the bolt of the lock of the bed-room door broken, and my chest broken open; I do not know what was in it; the prisoner came in - she lived at one end of the house, and I at the other; we rent it of Mr. Trimmer; my wife's box was also opened; the prisoner pretended that her door was broken open as well. I looked at it, but could see nothing the matter with it; she appeared very much frightened when I examined my boxes. I could not find the property any where. I went to Crawford to my wife. I met Beswick, and told him; I accompanied him to search the prisoner's room - we found nothing; we then went to a room which is not occupied, and found concealed up the fire place, a bag with my coat in it, and all the other property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BESWICK . I am a horse patrol. On the 16th of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I accompanied the prosecutor to the prisoner's room - we found her in bed; I desired her to get up - I found nothing in her room, but in a back room unoccupied, we pulled the bricks down from the chimney, and found a bag containing all these things. The room door was tied with a string; she acknowledged the bag to be her's; she was present when we found it. As we went to the Magistrate's next day, I asked if she had done it; her mother was with us - I told her mother I did not believe but she had somebody to assist her, and she told her mother in my presence voluntarily, that three gipsy women pressed her to commit the robbery.

JANE LEVELL . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I was out washing at this time - I saw the things safe in two boxes the day before; they are worth 35 s.

JAMES BESWICK . What the prisoner said before the Magistrate was taken down - I saw the Magistrate and her sign it.

(read.)

The voluntarily confession of Jane Kemp , who says that on the 16th of December, she did feloniously break open the bed room door of James Levell , of Heston, and did, herself feloniously steal the articles now produced, and further acknowledges that she was urged to commit this robbery by three gipsies, and no threat or promise has been held out to induce her to confess the felony, and that her husband is in no way concerned in it.

JANE KEMP, X her mark.

GUILTY - Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-38

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

209. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of December , a certain order for payment of money , setting it forth, (being an order upon the overseers of St. Pancras, to pay to Thomas Harris , for apprehending two persons convicted as rogues and vagobands,

"nine shillings each," dated the 16th of December, 1822, signed

"F. A. Roe," with intent to defraud William Alston , one of the overseers of the said parish.

Mr. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ALSTON . I am overseer of the parish of St. Pancras. On the 20th of December, the prisoner came to me at the work-house, a paper was delivered to me by the beadle, while I was engaged with a Committee of Directors in an adjoining room, I went out into the passage and saw the prisoner, and asked him if this was his order, he said it was, I pointed out two words in it, viz.

"nine," and

"each," which appeared to me incorrect, I pointed to them with my fingers; I do not recollect that I read them to him, he looked at them, I asked if they were correct, he said the magistrate wrote them, and that he received the order from the magistrate; he said his demand was 10 s.; I then returned into the adjoining room, and sent 10 s. out by William Audley the beadle, his receipt was on the back of it, and was on it at the time it was brought.

WILLIAM AUDLEY . I am beadle of St. Pancras. I received an order from the prisoner at the work-house, and delivered it to Mr. Alston, in the same condition as I received it, he afterwards gave me 10 s., which I gave to the prisoner; I said

"Harris, Mr. Alston has sent you out the 10 s. you demanded on the order," his receipt was on the back of it when he brought it, and there is some writing on the back of my own, respecting some questions I asked him. Mr. Alston desired me to go and ascertain

from him where he apprehended the boys; he said from inside Percy-chapel, on the 15th of December.

FREDERICK ADAM ROWE , ESQ. On the 11th of December, I remember the prisoner bringing two boys before me, charged with having been found in Oxford-street first, and afterwards in Percy-chapel, with intent to commit felony, and from what he stated, I committed them to the House of Correction for a month; Harris brought me the paper to fill up for his reward for taking them; I inserted on the order the word nine, (looking at it;) this is it, the rest of the filling up is written by my clerk, the body is printed, the word

"each" was not on it when I delivered it to him; I am confident that it is not the writing of any of the office clerks.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Has not the word nine been altered. - A. Not in the slightest degree; 1 s. is paid as the office fee, and I thought 4 s. for each sufficient, the letter N. has been written over something which has been written before, I was going to make it ten, but recollecting he would have to pay but one fee, I made it 9 s., and delivered it into his hands; he was a parish constable.

- (Order read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, if I had known there had been the least thing incorrect in the order, I would not have taken it to the work-house. I thought it was 10 s. I was to have, and got a person to write a receipt for 10 s. on the back, as I took it for ten, I knew nothing of the word

"each" being on it; I can write nothing but my name myself.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I wrote the receipt at the back of this order, by the prisoner's desire, as I could write a little better than him, I wrote it for 10 s., I know nothing about the word

"each."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then he can write. - A. I have seen him write his name, that is all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-39

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

210. RICHARD HUMPHREYS and JOHN MATTHEWS , were indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of John Osbern Mosley , about seven o'clock in the night of the 10th of December , and stealing therein a pocket-book,, value 10 d.; a box, value 1 d.; twenty-four cards, value 1 s.; and nine pencils, value 2 s. ; his property.

JAMES PALMER . I am servant to Mr. John Osbern Mosley , who keeps a circulating library in the City-road . On the 10th of December, at three o'clock in the afternoon the shop window was secure; it had been broken, and I had placed a piece of glass against it and some books to keep it close; these things were then safe. The prisoners were brought in in the evening, and I missed them from the window.

SAMUEL BRIDGES . I am constable of St. Luke's. On the 10th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw two boys at the window, I had seen them in Chiswell-street, the same evening, I observed both of them go towards the prosecutor's door, and stoop down by the window, they did something by a pane of glass and then ran off; I could not distinctly see what they did, they run towards Featherstone-street, I went up to the windows and saw a great hole large enough for a man's hand to enter, and a pane of glass broken. I then went after them, but lost sight of them, I met Vann and turned towards Mosley's shop again, and saw the same two boys by the window; I believe there was another boy with them; I tried to take the biggest who was Humphrey's, but he run into the horse-road, and tried to throw his hat off, but I prevented him and secured him; I took him into the shop, and found a small pocket-book in his hat, and a box with cards in it, and four pencils.

GEORGE FRANCIS . On the 10th of December, I was right opposite Mosley's shop, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I had not been there five minutes before I saw Matthews put his hand into the window, and take something out and give it to Humphrey's. I knew them before, I ran across the road to take them, but they both run away, I lost sight of them at the corner of Featherstone-street. I returned and saw Bridges, we went to the shop window and saw them there again; Bridges took Humphrey's.

JOHN VANN . On the 10th of December, I was walking down the City Road, and saw Bridges looking about. I walked by Mosley's shop, and saw two boys looking at the window; I took Matthews, and in his left hand breeches pocket, I found four pencils, and twenty four cards of Scripture biography.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HUMPHREYS'S Defence. We were coming home from the fields, and looking in at the window, Matthews saw these these things tumbling out of the hole, took them, and gave me some.

HUMPHREYS - GUILTY. Aged 13.

MATTHEWS - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Of Larceny only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-40

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

211. CHARLES WARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th December , a wooden cask, value 2 s., and two gallons of brandy, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Browning and William Shipton Browning , his masters and employers; and WILLIAM DALTON was indicted for that he, before the felony aforesaid, was done and committed, (to wit), on the 12th of December , feloniously and maliciously did procure counsel, hire and command the said Charles Warman , the felony aforesaid, to do and commit .

MESSRS. ALLEY and LAW conducted the prosecution.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 15th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner Warman coming in a direction from the prosecutors house, at Smithfield-bars , towards Long-lane, in a direction towards his lodgings - he had a basket. I asked him what he had got, and upon looking, found the basket to contain a two gallon keg, and a bladder of brandy; I asked where he brought it from, he made no answer; I then said,

"Where are you going to take it?" he said,

"To No. 3, Cloth-fair;" I said,

"You have been robbing your master," he said,

"It is only a little drop for myself". I told him I should look him up, he begged for mercy. I took him to the Compter, and found 5 l. 18 s. in his pockets - of which sum I found 3 l. 18 s. belonged to some Society, and which I returned to Messrs. Browning's clerk, (he said he worked for them); he told

me he lived at No. 3. Cloth-fair, but I found it was No. 3, New-court, Cloth-fair. I there found a four gallon keg full of gin, a six gallon cask nearly half-full, two bottles of brandy, three pints of rum, a bottle of red port, two sample bottles of brandy, and a quart wine measure, a funnel, a brass cock, and a bladder, all of which I produce.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am an in-door porter to the prosecutors, who live at Smithfield-bars. Warman was an outdoor porter , and had been there some years. On Sunday, the 15th of December, about seven o'clock in the morning he came to the premises; he had no business there on a Sunday. I got up and let him in, he said he wanted a pair of shoes which he had left behind him, I do not know whether he had left any behind; he had a basket in his hand; he lighted a candle from the lamp, and went down into the cellar; there are two cellers, the spirit cellar is within the other. I finished dressing myself, and went into the privy - and while there, he came up and wished me good bye, and went away. I could not see him go out - he had nothing in his hand when he came up to me. I do not know what he took out.

WILLIAM LIPSCOMBE . I am clerk to Messrs. Thomas and William Shipton Browning, distillers ; Warman was our porter, and has lived there four or five years. I have frequently seen Dalton at the distillery, within the last twelve or fifteen years - he sells pork and butter , and the prosecutors occasionally bought those articles of him. I have compared the brandy found at Warman's lodging with some of the prosecutors stock, and have no doubt of its being theirs - it is the same in quality, strength, flavour, and colour, and is foreign.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Is not Dalton a stage coachman - A. I have heard so; when he came to the distillery, he came on business.

JESSEE BUTLER . I am the daughter of the prisoner Warman. My husband is porter at the Bull and Mouth. My father lived at No. 3, New-court, Cloth-fair; I was at his house the week preceding the Sunday he was taken Dalton was acquainted with my father, and came after him. I saw him there two or three days in that week. On the Monday evening before that Sunday, both him and his son, and my mother, were all there; Dalton asked if there was any thing left out for him, I said,

"No," there was nothing, and the son said it was very strange, for my father knew he wanted it to take with him next morning. I said there was nothing, and they left. I told my father when he came home. The prisoner Dalton came again on the Wednesday evening alone, my father opened the door; we were in the front room; he and my father were in the kitchen, which is on the same floor; my father gave him a glass of gin; they talked a few minutes, and he then left; he came again a few minutes past six o'clock the next evening alone - he walked into the front room, and asked my father if he had anything for him to drink, he gave him a glass of brandy. After that, he said he wanted two gallons of such brandy as that; my father said he had got it for him. Dalton said,

"You must buy a two gallon stone bottle, and I will pay you again;" my father said, he had got it for him; he said,

"You must let me have it by Sunday morning, for John wants it" (meaning his son, who is guard to a coach). My father said, he would rather put it off till Tuesday, as it was against the rules to go to the warehouse on a Sunday. Dalton said,

"Never mind, Joseph will let you in." My father said, he had got it all ready, and he would go and fetch it on Sunday morning; a few minutes before seven o'clock he asked for something more to drink; my father gave him a glass of gin. He then said, there was two gallon stone bottles at John's house that wanted fetching, my father said he would fetch them; he said,

"Why can't Jessee fetch them?" meaning me; he said he should want four gallons of strong gin, two gallons to go on Thursday morning, and two on the Friday afterwards; he said, the gin he had drank was not so good as what my father gave him out of the warehouse - that my father was to take the brandy to John's house on the Sunday, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and John would settle with him. On the Monday after my father was apprehended, I saw Dalton in Old-street Road, and told him my father was taken with the liquor - and he said he knew it, and said,

"If I am taken up, I will take care to have nothing, and I shall know nothing at all about it, and they cannot hurt me, and if you are taken, you know nothing about it;" he accompanied me to John's house, which is in Old-street-road, and there I saw old Mrs. Dalton, and John's wife - the prisoner Dalton walked up and down the room, and seemed very much agitated. Old Mrs. Dalton said, in his presence,

"I thought it would be the case long ago;" (I had not told her of my father's apprehension, but suppose she alluded to that); she also said,

"If there had been no receivers, there would have been no thieves." Dalton said, he did not know what to do - he told me John was out of the way. Nothing more particular passed. He came to my father's house on the Wednesday evening, to find a permit for some gin, which he wanted to shew in case he was taken up - he said he wished to goodness that he could find it; I told him my father had got it. He said he did not know what to do, whether to get out of the way or not, and he would employ a lawyer and counsel, if it cost him 100 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What age are you - A. Nineteen. I have lived at my father's house ever since my marriage. I was at Guildhall on the second examination - I had seen Dalton twice before that. I was examined by the Alderman, and said I knew nothing at all about it. I was not sworn.

Q. Did you say anything about your father having a private still then - A. A few words; I answered what I was asked about conversations between Dalton and my father. I was asked if I ever took parcels to his place; I said Yes. I do not recollect saying that I never heard any conversation between them. I do not rightly know what I said, and cannot venture to swear whether I said so or not. I went to Guildhall twice after my father was committed. Mr. Browing's clerk desired me to go. I saw the solicitor twice before the examination. I went to Guildhall a fortnight all but a day after my father was committed - I then made a statement on oath; I mentioned what had passed on the Thursday, I am quite sure that the conversation took place a few minutes after six o'clock. My father, old Dalton, and myself were the only persons present.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What you have been stating about your evidence before the Magistrate, was before Dalton was in

custody - A. Yes; when he was taken I stated every thing as I have to day.

JAMES BUTLER . I am the husband of the last witness. I have seen the prisoner Dalton at our house, in New-street, Cloth-fair - we lived with Warman. I saw Dalton there about a fortnight before Warman was taken; I then met him coming out of the door - I have seen both the prisoners together eight or nine times.

ANN HALL . I live at No. 2, New-court, directly opposite to Warman's house. I have seen both the prisoners talking together at Warman's door, and one day I saw them walk down to the bottom of the court together, and there part.

MR. WILLIAM SHIPTON BROWNING. The prisoner Dalton was continually at our house, and knew that Warman was our servant. Warman never ordered liquor for customers.

MR. WILLIAM PAYNE . I am clerk to the Magistrate at Guildhall, and attended the examination of Warman, and took down what he stated - no promise or threats were held out to him. Among other things, he stated as follows - (reads.)

"I got a couple of gallons, he" (alluding to a certain person)

"used to take it from me."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time did this take place - A. On Saturday, the 22d, the second examination - he was committed on the third examination. I remember at the time Dalton was committed, somebody said if John Dalton was wanted he would come forward; but a warrant was issued on Saturday, the 4th of January, for old Dalton - he was apprehended that night.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended Dalton, and as I took him to Newgate; he said he had a little liquor, but he understood something about a private still. When I took him, I said I had a warrant against him - he said,

"What is it about Mr. Browning's business," and said, the old man was the d - d'st rogue in all the world; I suppose he meant Warman. He said,

"I have had a little gin of him;" I think he said gin, but will not be certain. He said he had a permit at home, but did not know where he had put it.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did he not say he understood it was from a private still - A. To the best of my knowledge he said so as he was going to Newgate.

(Casks produced and sworn to.)

DALTON'S Defence. I saw this man's daughter the day after he was taken - she came to me for money; I would give her none, as I said I always paid him for the gin I had of him. I saw him in Newgate, and said,

"You have brought me into a pretty place;" he said,

"It is your own fault, if you had only sent me 5 s. the night I was put into Newgate, I would not have said a word about it."

HENRY GARLAND . I keep the Half Moon, public-house, in Duke-street, Smithfield, and have known Dalton about two years - I believe he drives a coach; I knew his son perfectly well. On the Thursday before the 15th of December, when Warman was apprehended, I saw Dalton at my house - he came about four o'clock, or it might be a little after; he came in, and said

"Is John come;" he came to wait for his son, whose coach arrives about that time; he sat in front of the bar on the right hand. His son came in soon after; his father had not gone out of doors; both of them drank tea with us - we drank tea between six and seven o'clock, it might be six or a quarter after. I cannot say how long we were at tea, it sometimes takes three quarters of an hour.

Q. When did old Dalton go away - A. It might be five or six minutes before or after seven; he was not out of the house from the time he first came till then, that I swear. Mr. Gorsuch was there; I think he came in before six o'clock, and stopped till six or after. Dalton took some gin and water with me before tea, and some after - he had three or four glasses with me and his son John.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When did you see John last - A. About three weeks ago; I do not know where he lived; he drove the North Devon coach; it is quite uncertain what time he comes in - I have known him in at three o'clock; he puts up at the Castle and Falcon. I do not know where either of them lived. There might be several customers there. I cannot say how often he had been there that week.

Q. And how can you speak to the day - A. I will explain; on the Thursday fortnight wanting a day, which was on the 12th of December, I ordered a surloin of beef for Christmas day of John Dalton ; I ordered it then that it might have time to hang up.

COURT. Q. Did you know where John lived - A. Somewhere in Old-street-road, but I do not know where. I sometimes bought poultry of him.

Q. Have you a bill and receipt to enable you to know the date - A. No, but I had some goods arrive on the 12th, I know that from my books, which are not here. I know it was the Thursday before Warman was taken.

Q. How soon did you hear that he was taken - A. It might be three quarters of an hour after. Mr. Turnpenny brought the property to my house; but it was mentioned to me before that.

Q. Now did you not tell him that the moment Dalton heard of it, he bolted out of your house - A. No; I did not tell him so, nor anything like it. John Dalton came to my house on the Sunday - I have not seen him since. I was at Guildhall, but not at the first examination.

Q. Did you not tell Mr. Browning that both the Daltons bolted the moment the officer came in - A. No; he asked me about it; I said they stopped above an hour after. My house may be about a hundred and fifty yards from Warman's.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did not Mr. Harmer offer you as a witness at Guildhall - A. Yes. John Dalton is guard to the North Devon coach, and brings poultry and meat from the country.

MARY GARLAND . I am the wife of the last witness. John Dalton generally calls at our house when his coach comes in, which is on Sundays and Thursdays. I heard of Warman's apprehension some time on the Sunday; on the Thursday before that, old Dalton came to our house to meet his son, who usually came from half-past four to five o'clock; when he came, he had gin and water with his father, and I made tea for them myself. I cannot say whether they went out, as I was absent about five minutes; they sat in a little room behind the bar - Mr. Gorsuch and Mr. Charles were there. Dalton went away about seven o'clock, or a little after. I am sure it was seven o'clock, for we seldom have tea till six. I ordered a piece of beef

of young Dalton that day, for Christmas, that it might hang up.

MR. LAW. Q. Were you in court, and within hearing while your husband was examined - A. No, I did not hear a question put to him except the last, I swear that. Dalton was in the house from four o'clock to seven. I served several customers during that time. I think Mr. Gorsuch drank ale, and Mr. Charles a glass of gin. I do not recollect what any other customer had. Gorsuch comes to our house every day - they did not eat anything; we have no sitting-room; they were in a room behind the bar.

Q. Can you tell what they drank on any other day. - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear they could not have gone out for ten minutes, and returned without your knowledge. - A. Not for so long as that; they could not go out without passing me. I was only in court during the last of my husband's examination, I just came in at the door.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where have you been till you came into court. - A. Over at the New Inn, All that I heard my husband say, was concerning the beef. The bar holds about half a dozen people; there is a door between that and the inner room, but it is never shut. A person must come through the bar to go out; they must pass me sideways. They sat down to tea a little before six o'clock. I heard of Warman's being taken; that did not bring the circumstance of Dalton being at my house to my mind, because I am always in the habit of seeing him on Thursday.

COURT. Q. When were you examined about this. - A. Only by Mr. Harmer, that was four or five days ago. I think my husband went to Guildhall on the day after Dalton was taken.

JOHN GORSUCH . I am clerk to Mr. Newman, the City solicitor. I am in the habit of frequenting Garland's house. I make out his accounts, and write his bills out. I heard of Warman's being taken up, on Sunday the 15th. I was at Garland's house on the Thursday before that. I left the office at half-past four o'clock, went home and got to Garland's about twenty minutes, or half-past five o'clock. I might have drank a glass of ale. Garland asked me into the bar, old Dalton was there, and sat on the right-hand side of me in the little bar, and had tea in my presence; he was waiting for his son John, who came and took a cup of tea; his son came in after I got there. I left about a quarter or twenty minutes before seven o'clock, and left the prisoner Dalton there - he had not been out while I was there. The inner bar will not hold above six or seven people; you must pass through the bar where Mrs. Garland serves, to get out. John Dalton was guard to a coach. I have often seen poultry and things brought in. Garland ordered a piece of beef that night for Christmas, and asked me to dine with him.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Was not the last witness in court during the time her husband was examined. - A. Not during the whole time, she was part. I believe she was here the greater part of it. Garland's house is about one hundred and fifty yards from Cloth-fair.

JOSEPH CHARLES . I went to Garland's about half-past five o'clock on this Thursday, and did not stop ten minutes - old Dalton was there.

MR. BROWNING. The witness Garland, told my brother in my hearing, that a man told him, the moment Dalton and his son heard of the apprehension of Warman, they instantly left his house.

HENRY TURNPENNY . Garland told me, that a person had said that the Dalton's were there, heard what had happened, seemed a little alarmed, and went away.

HENRY GARLAND re-examined. Q. Did you say a person told you this. - A. Yes.

Q. Why not state it, when you were repeatedly asked about it. - A. I did, I think.

WARMAN - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

DALTON - GUILTY . Aged 61.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-41

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 18.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Recorder.

212. RICHARD MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a lb. of soap, value 1 s.; eight brushes, value 4 s.; a bottle of capers, value 6 d., and a piece of leather, value 6 d. , the goods of David Parish .

DAVID PARISH . I am an oilman , and live in Great Portland-street. The prisoner came into my service on the 28th September, and in November I gave him notice to quit on the 12th of December, and on that morning, I said he had better leave off work, as he had to go to Uxbridge; he made his wages more than they were; I said.

"Richard, there are 3 lbs. of candles which you stole, I shall stop for," he agreed to it; my boy said he thought I ought to search his box, I got a constable who found a plate leather in his pocket; I had missed ten. Not having room for him at home, I had taken lodgings for him in George-street - we went there, and in his box, which was not locked, I found a picture of my lodgers, four new shoe brushes, with my mark on them, four tooth brushes, a bottle of capers, and a square of soap. He asked for mercy before we went to his lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not promise his father he should be under your eye, and in your house - A. I said, in the course of several weeks, I would take him into the house if I could; he lodged at a coffee-shop; he took it himself.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, he denied taking any thing. I found the leather in his pocket - he said he took it to make finger stalls. I found the rest of the property in his box, which was not locked; four or five persons slept there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-42

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

213. HANNAH FORD and ELIZABETH FORD were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , at St. Mary-le-bone, twenty-one silver forks, value 12 l., and thirteen silver spoons, value 8 l., the goods of Joseph May , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BISHOP . I am under footman to Joseph May,

Esq., who rents a house, No. 20, Lower Montague-street, St. Mary-le-bone . On the 23d of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the pantry, which is below stairs, hearing the plate in the plate closet rattle, and found the two prisoners there; they must have come down the area, the door was on the latch. Elizabeth Ford had some silver spoons and forks tied up in her apron - she dropped them on the floor upon seeing me; they were about two yards from each other, and had no business in the house. I found they had opened the drawer where the plate was kept, but only part of it was gone; the prisoner Hannah asked if I wanted to buy any laces, immediately as Elizabeth let the plate fall. I asked their business, Hannah walked towards the door - I pushed her in and secured them both; they both begged for mercy. I kept them till five o'clock, when the watchman came and took them. I gave the plate to Sellers.

Prisoner ELIZABETH FORD . Q. My sister was only in the passage - A. She was in the pantry.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I received the prisoners in charge at the watch-house. Bishop gave me twelve large, and nine small silver forks; eight table, and five desert spoons; I have kept one of each, and returned the rest; they must be worth above 40 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HANNAH FORD 'S Defence. I was not in the room at all, but stood at the door, and did not know my sister was there. I asked if he wanted any thing, and he pushed me in.

ELIZABETH FORD 'S Defence. My sister did not know I was there, but thought I was gone into the kitchen to ask the cook if she wanted any thing.

HANNAH FORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

ELIZABETH FORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18230115-43

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

214. JEREMIAH JAMES READING was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , two watches, value 90 l. , the goods of James Ogston , Susan Dwerrihouse , John Carter , and James Thomas Bell .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

MR. JAMES OGSTON . I am in partnership with Susan Dwerrihouse , John Carter , and James Thomas Bell . We are watch-makers and live in Davis-street, Berkeley-square. Two or three months before the transaction in question, I sold the prisoner a French gold watch for seven guineas, which he afterwards paid for, and called frequently afterwards to have it regulated. On the 24th of November, 1821, he called and asked for two gold watches, which were to be as good as we could make, and said he was commissioned by a young nobleman, who was then in the country, to send them down. I shewed him several, he asked me to pick out two such as I could recommend; I did so; one was worth forty, and the other forty-five guineas, I said, I hoped he would not consider it unreasonable, if I asked the nobleman's name; he said, it was a case of great delicacy, and I must excuse him, as the young nobleman did not wish his friends to know he was purchasing expensive watches, I let him have them, one was to be kept and paid for within ten days, and the other returned. He took them away, and called as usual to have his watch regulated for a month after, but never mentioned the watches till I pressed him; I think it was not more than fifteen days when I spoke to him about them, (he might have called four times before,) he said the young nobleman had received them, but it was the shooting season and he was not able to send him up the particulars; in a few days I began to be impatient, and asked him for a settlement as the time was exceeded, he said, the young nobleman was subpoenaed on a trial at York. I saw him again in about a month, he then said, the young nobleman was obliged unexpectedly to go out of the country. I saw him several times afterwards, the last time was when I called at his house one Sunday, in Cheyne-walk, Chelsea; he then said it should be settled immediately, that he had got into some difficulty by procuring articles for the young noblemen. I afterwards made an affidavit of the debt, and put a writ against him into the officer's hands, (looking at the affidavit,) this is it, it is dated, May 1822, it was never executed. I have never recovered our watches.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You knew his name, and where he lived - A. Yes, (looking at a paper.) I gave him this, it is merely the particulars and price of the watches, but is not a bill. I never entered them in my books as sold to him; when stock was taken at Christmas, a memorandum was made about them, he promised me an answer in ten days at his own suggestion, I went with Redford the officer to get him arrested several times; I always saw his wife; I do not recollect telling her I had come for the money. I proposed taking a bill in order to get the officer in to arrest him; he did not come to my shop for a considerable time before I issued the writ, I never saw him after it was issued, except on a Sunday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-44

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

215. JAMES NICHOLSON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Moss Benjamin , on the night of the 27th of December , and stealing nine pair of trowsers, value 45 s., and two coats, value 2 l. , his property.

MOSS BENJAMIN. I am a clothes-salesman , and live in Playhouse-yard, St. Luke's . On the 27th of December, my house was all fastened up, and between one and two o'clock in the morning, the watchman alarmed me; I found the front door broken open, and missed a large quantity of wearing apparel off the shelves, I found nine pair of trowsers and two coats at the office. I understand the prisoner is innocent of the crime.

JOHN BROWN . I am a watchman, my box is about two hundred yards from Benjamin's house, in the next street. On the 27th of December, about one o'clock in the morning, I was sitting in my box, and saw six or seven young men come down Gloster-court, into White-cross-street, which communicates with Playhouse-yard, they were going towards Benjamin's house; I saw them returning in about five minutes, each running with clothes thrown loosely over their arms, I knew their faces when I first saw them, by having seen them about; they made a stand for half a minute. I believe the prisoner to be one, I saw him both times, it was a fine moon-light night, and exactly under a strong gass-light; I saw his front face as they went, and on returning I saw his side-face, they were about twenty yards off, and I only saw them for ten yards. To the best of my belief he is one of them, I got

out of my box, made an alarm, and at last one of them dropped his load which I picked up, and followed them into the back allies, but there being so many avenues I lost them; I took the things to the watch-house, then searched about Playhouse-yard, and found Benjamin's door open, and alarmed him. Next evening I went with an officer to a public-house, about a hundred and fifty yards from Benjamin's, and pointed the prisoner out from among fifty others in the tap-room. I truly believe him to be one of them; I came out of the room to the officer, and said I believed him to be one, and went home; I expressed no doubt about him, he is not the man who dropped the things; I should know that man; but he had some.

Prisoner. Q. You saw me two or three times before I was taken - A. That was when I pointed him out at the Admiral Benbow , public-house.

ROBERT LOCK . I am headborough. These goods were delivered to me at one o'clock in the morning. I went with Brown to the Admiral Benbow , and when he came out, he said,

"That little fellow in the black coat, smoking a pipe, I suspect him." I said,

"Can you swear to him before a Magistrate;" he said he could swear it within his own breast. I said it would not do for me to take him, as he did not speak positive. I saw Brown again next night; he asked if I had taken him, I said

"No, are you sure he is one of the men concerned in the robbery;" he said

"Yes, he is one that ran away." I went next night and took him at the same house, and told him he must come with me for a crack, in Playhouse-yard; he said,

"If I am taken for that, I am taken innocently, for I know nothing about it."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-45

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

216. LOUISA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a coat, value 3 l.; a jacket, value 1 l.; a petticoat, value 2 s., and a necklace, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Boyle , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BOYLE . I live in Lower King-street, Commercial-road , the prisoner lodged in my house for three weeks, and left on the 16th or 18th of December. I missed a blue coat early in December, while she was in the house; and after she left the lodging, I missed a jacket from a chest of drawers in the room she occupied. I also missed two petticoats, and some beads; she kept the key. I had spoken to her about the coat, she said she knew nothing of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What was her name. - A. Owen, she has since been married. The drawer the coat was in, was locked. I believe the person who lodged there before her was charged with robbing me, and censured about the coat. I saw it safe about the 25th of November.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. On the 6th of January, I had a warrant to search the prisoner's room, she was married then. I found a string of garnet beads on the sidebord, but nothing else; she said she had had them sevaral years, that they were given to her by a sea captain. I had searched the room before and found nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she present at the first search. - A. Yes, and knew what I searched for. I asked her for the beads then; she said she had none.

THOMAS BOYLE . The beads are rather disfigured now. I know them by the tube of one being fastened to the snap by a piece of thread.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them when I first came to London; they charged the person who lodged there before me with stealing the coat.

GEORGE HARRIS . I am corporal in the first regiment of Grenadier Guards. The prisoner's husband is in that regiment; she has been in town about three months from Wales. I saw some beads like these, round her neck about ten weeks ago, and observed a bit of white thread where the spring is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-46

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

217. STEPHEN WILKS was indicted for bigamy .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am vestry clerk of Hampstead. I produce a copy of the marriage register of St. Mary Magdalen, Oxford, by which it appears, that Stephen Wilks and Ann Adams , were married on the 2d of March, 1802.

(read)

SOLOMON WILKS . I am the prisoner's brother, and was present when he was married to Ann Adams - I saw her here to day.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I have also a copy of the register of St. John's, Hampstead, which states, that Stephen Wilks , widower, was married to Mary Withread , on the 30th of September, 1810 .

MARY WITHREAD . I was married to the prisoner in September, 1810.

The prisoner being called upon for his Defence, gave a detailed account of his first wife's cohabitation with another man, and her refusal to return to him.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-47

Before Lord Chief Baron Richards .

218. WILLIAM BARNETT COLLYER was indicted for that he, on the 7th of January , being servant to James Anthony Molteno , did steal seven prints, framed and glazed, value 4 l.; sixteen prints, value 30 s.; a set of fire irons, value 3 s., and four books, value 4 s., the property of his said master, in his dwelling-house .

JAMES ANTHONY MOLTENO . I am a print-seller , and live in Pall Mall - the prisoner was my servant . One Tuesday in January, I received a message from Mr. Conalghi; I went to him, and saw some of my prints - a man was there, who had offered them for sale. I went with him towards my house to find the person who sent him with them; I thought he was following me, but when I got to my door I found he was not. I immediately ran up to the public-house, and saw the prisoner run from there; I called out,

"Thomas, stop," and the moment he heard my voice, he increased his speed; I called

"Stop thief," and came up to him in Norris-street; somebody having stopped him, and he attempted to fall on his knees - I took him to the watch-house, where he was searched, and twenty-six duplicates found on him, by which I found part of my property in pawn. I missed a great deal of my

property while he was with me, but had not missed these prints, as they were tied up and put in the back kitchen.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I searched, and found twenty-five duplicates on him. I went to Mr. Conalghi's shop, where sixteen prints were given to me. I went to different pawnbrokers, who are here with Mr. Molteno.

MARTIN CONALGHI . These prints were brought to me by a stranger, whose appearance induced me to suspect him.

PHILIP LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 21st of September, two prints were pawned, on the 28th one, on the 24th of August one, and on the 13th of November, a set of fire irons - I believe the prisoner to be the man who pawned them.

WILLIAM ROOKER . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned two prints for 8 s.; he is the man to the best of my recollection. I asked if they were his own - he said, he brought them from Mr. Standley, No. 9, Little Duke-street.

JOHN ARCHBUTT . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of November, the prisoner pawned four books for 3 s.; I knew him before. He redeemed fifteen or sixteen prints on the day he was apprehended; they were similar to some produced, and were pawned in two pledges for ten and four shillings.

MR. MOLTENO re-examined. He had left my service on the 27th of December, in consequence of coming home drunk. The prints are all mine; those pawned at Lawson's are worth two guineas I think.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into St. Alban's coffee-house - a young man asked me to drink with him; he said he was going to redeem some prints, and would pay me if I helped him to carry them - I was waiting in the tap-room for him, and hearing the cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and Mr. Molteno called out

"Thomas." I went straight on to Norris-street, and was stopped. The duplicates were given me by the young man to take care of for him. I never pawned anything belonging to him. The books were given to me by Gray, the shopman.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-48

Before Mr. Justice Holroyd.

219. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , at St. Botolph without, Aldgate , seventeen ounces of gold, value 60 l., the property of our Lord the King , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be the property of Henry William Atkinson , Reuben Fletcher , Richard Franklyn , the elder, Joseph Nicholl , Jasper Atkinson , Robert Finch , and Richard Franklyn , the younger.

FOURTH COUNT, stating it to be the property of the keepers of His Majesty's Mints, of his Cities of London and Canterbury , and artificers, moneyers, and other officers deputed as to those things, which relate to the offices aforesaid.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18230115-49

220. WILLIAM PEARCE was again indicted for a like offence, on the 2d of November , in stealing twelve ounces of gold, value 40 l.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18230115-50

221. ARNOLD HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Hanstead , a watch, value 40 s.; three foreign dollars, value 12 s.; two hundred and twenty sovereigns; three half-sovereigns; the sum of 58 l. 0 s. 2 1/2 d., in monies numbered; a 40 l., a 10 l., and two 5 l. Bank notes, and two 1 l. promissary notes , his property.

THOMAS HANSTEAD . I keep the Porto Bello, public-house, St. Martin's-lane . On the 10th of July, two gentlemen came to my house to dinner - I went up stairs about one o'clock in the afternoon for a table cloth, and found my bed room door ajar; my wife had locked it; it was not forced. I went down and complained to my wife about its being open, and at two o'clock I went up to my box, which stood in the bed room, and found the lid forced open, and the lock hanging to it - I had not noticed the box at one o'clock; but had been to it for money at eleven, every thing was safe then; I locked it again, and locked the door. I missed all my property except a bad shilling. 343 l. 12 s. 2 1/2 d., was stolen - I had counted it the evening before, and entered the amount in my book, which was taken with the money; but I had a memorandum of it on my slate. I had the numbers of two of the notes on the slate, and every thing, but have left them at home. The reason I speak to the money is, because the night before being club night, I was at leisure. It consisted of three Spanish dollars, two hundred and twenty-three sovereigns, which were in one bag, they were my own property; a 40 l., a 10 l., and two 5 l. Bank notes; the 10 l. Bank note belonged to a club which is held at my house, and the 40 l. Bank note belonged to another club; I am responsible for them. The others were my own. I had the numbers of the two 5 l., and the 40 l. notes on my slate; I copied them from the slate at Bow-street. I went to Bow-street immediately, and gave information. The prisoner was apprehended on the 29th of July, and detained for six weeks, and then let out on his own recognizance. I traced a 40 l., two 5 l., and a 10 l. note to him - he stated that he took them of another person, and when that person was taken, we could not find the prisoner - a warrant was issued against him; he heard of it, and surrendered to me.

THOMAS WELLS . I am an Excise officer, and have been so thirty-five years. I have known the prisoner eighteen or twenty years; he used to collect old china for sale. On the 11th or 12th of July, I met him in Castle-street, Leicester-fields, as he was coming to my office - he asked if I could get him change for a 40 l. note, which he gave me, and I got it changed at Mr. Smith's, a publican, at the corner of Earl-street, Seven-dials - I should know it again by my name and address, which I saw him write on it; the prisoner stood outside, I gave him the change - I was well known there. I met him again two or three days afterwards, in Great or Little Newport-street; he asked me to get him change for a 10 l. note; I changed that at Burohell's in Little Newport-street.

Q. Could not he get change as well as you - A. I do not know how that was; he was not so well known as me. I

should know the note again - I did not know where he lived.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I have a 40 l. and a 10 l. note, both of which were paid in on the 20th of July, by banking houses.

WILLIAM BOND . I am an officer. I produce a 5 l. note which Hanstead gave me some time after the robbery.

THOMAS HANSTEAD . I gave this note to Bond - it is one of those stolen. I traced it to a pawnbroker's where the prisoner had redeemed some things, and gave him five sovereigns for it. I know it by the number, and the name of Davis on it, of whom I took it, and made him put his name on it. I know the 40 l. note by the number, which is 2473, and know the 10 l. by endorsements at the back of it.

JOHN DAVIS . I took the prisoner in charge on the 29th of July, at Thomas Ingram 's house, the Rising Sun, Bedford-bury; he said,

"I am done by Mr. Tommy; I am brought into it prettily, by Mr. Tommy". I asked who he meant, he said,

" Tom Ingram ", that he gave him the 40 l. note to change, and he took it to Wells, and after that he took him a 10 l. note, which Ingram gave him - and a few days after that, sent him with a 5 l. note to redeem some things at a pawnbroker's, in Bath-street, City-road. Hanstead traced it from that pawnbroker to another, and got it. Ingram has absconded.

THOMAS HANSTEAD . Ingram lived close by me, and keeps a notorious house. I never saw him or the prisoner at my house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by Ingram, and being in distress, I was glad of the employment; he sent me to change the notes which I gave Wells, and sent me to the pawnbroker's with the other. I was apprehended, and afterwards discharged, but recollect nothing about being told to come again if wanted. I was out one day, and met a man who said two gentlemen wanted me, and in Macclesfield-street, I met Ingram's brother, who said Tom was taken in Sloane-street, and if I came forward, I should hang him; they promised me a pound a week to keep away, and bought me some shoes, and took me from house to house till night, and then lodged me at a baker's in Whitechapel, where I remained eleven days; the woman wished me to leave; he took me to his sister's at Shackelwell - she would have nothing to do with me. I was taken to Backchurch-lane, and remained there till the 5th of January; when he came, and said he had quarrelled with his brother, and I might go where I pleased, and on the Monday I surrendered.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-51

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

222. JOHN READ was indicted for stealing on the 30th of December , two handkerchiefs, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Floyd .

THOMAS STONEHAM . I am shopman to Mr. H. Floyd, hosier , of the Minories . On the 30th of December, about twelve o'clock, I was serving a customer, the prisoner came in with a boy about eighteen years old, who had a pair of skates, and asked for a cravat - he wished to have it out of a particular corner of the window, and while I was getting it, I saw the prisoner helping himself out of the other window. I saw a handkerchief on a line move; the boy did not buy the cravat; the prisoner ran out - I pursued, and took hold of him six doors off, and took a silk and a cotton handkerchief out of his hat; he said his mother gave him one of them. I can swear to one.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. I took him in charge with the handkerchiefs; he said the boy who was with him, gave them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-52

223. HENRY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing on the 19th of December , a bag, value 1 s.; three coats, value 30 s.; two waistcoats, value 15 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s., and forty yards of ribbon, value 10 s. , the goods of William Bellringer .

WILLIAM BELLRINGER . I am porter at the Swan with with Two Necks. On the 19th of December, about one o'clock, I was taking these things in a bag to the Half-Moon, public-house, Gracechurch-street, directed to

"Mr. Seward Lenham, Maidstone." I asked a fruit woman at the corner of George-yard, Lombard-street , to watch the cart, while I delivered a parcel in George-yard. I returned in three minutes, and met the woman in the middle of Lombard-street, with the bag in her hand; she said the cart had been robbed - I put it in again, went up a court, returned, and found the prisoner in custody,

JOHN IMBRIE . I am fourteen years old, and live with Mr. Findley, of Fenchurch-street. I was in Lombard-street, and saw the prisoner drop from the cart with the bag, he ran over to Clement's-lane with it, and dropped it at the corner; on hearing the cry of Stop thief!; I ran after him with others; he fell down a little way up the lane, and I saw him caught.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am a constable. I heard the alarm, ran and found the prisoner in custody. I took him back, and received the bag out of the cart.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-53

224. ABRAHAM VOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , five yards of cotton, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Smith , and others, his partners.

MR. SERGEANT SMITH . I am in partnership with Thomas and Joseph Smith , we are slopsellors , at No. 126, Houndsditch . The prisoner came into our service about July; we did not miss this cotton till it was produced at our house by Garton, on the 13th of December; we then had the prisoner apprehended; he denied stealing it from us - but said, there were others in the house connected with him, who had left it at a certain house for him to sell for them. He had 21 s. or 22 s. a week.

ELIZA GARTON . I live in Aldermanbury, Postern, my my father is a piece-broker. On, or about the 11th of December, about a quarter past six o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop to sell five yards of calico, which I gave him 2 s., for; he had been to the shop before. I am certain of him; suspecting him, I mentioned it to my father after he was gone; he came again next night, and sold a piece of velveteen. I sent a boy to watch where

he went, and from what the boy said, my father took the cotton to Messrs. Smith's.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . I am in Mr. Garton's service. I saw the prisoner bring the cotton, and next evening, by master's desire, I followed him - he went into a wine vaults, at the corner of Fore-street; I waited outside, he came out, and went to a public-house, nearly opposite Mr. Smith's, and then to Mr. Smith's. I told master, and afterwards took the calico there, which Miss Garton bought, they claimed it. I have bought calico of him myself.

JOHN LITTLE . I am a constable. I apprehended him at his master's, and charged him with stealing the calico, and asked how he came by it; he said, a man left it at a public house for him to call for, but he did not know the man or the house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and four children who totally depend upon me for support - I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-54

225. MARGARET JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , two yards of flannel, value 3 s. 6 d., and a pair of gown sleeves, value 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Sewell , to whom she was servant .

SAMUEL SEWELL . I am a painter , and live in Aldersgate-street . The prisoner came into my service on the 1st of January, with an excellent character, from a person in Bunhill-row. On Monday, the 6th, in consequence of suspicions, I tendered her her wages, and told her to quit my service; she refused to go, and I sent for Clinton, who found the articles stated in the indictment, in her box, or bundle. I believe her box was unlocked, her things were packed up, and brought down ready to go, but she refused to go. When they were found, she acknowledged them to be ours, and begged for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was Mrs. Sewell present at the search. - A. Yes. I saw the officer open her box, he did it without a key. I saw her tie the bundle up in her room, and put the things in. She took the flannel from between the sacking of the bed in my sight - it is new; nobody slept with her.

Q. This was while she was wrangling with you about going away - A. Yes, my wife was in the room when she took it from under the bed. I have no other female servant.

MARGARET SEWELL . I am the wife of Samuel Sewell . The prisoner came into our service, on the 1st of January. I received a very good character of her from Mrs. Parry, of Bunhill-row; we discharged her on the 6th. I desired her to pack up all her things, and went into her room with her - she had a small box there; her behaviour was so suspicious, that I turned up her bed, and between it and the sacking, was about two yards of new flannel, I took it up, and she caught it out of my hand, saying it was hers. I desired her to be quick in putting her things up; she tied the flannel up with them, and took them all into the kitchen, then declared she would not go unless I paid for a coach to take her away; she was very abusive, and we sent for Clinton the officer. I did not notice what she put in her bundle; a pair of gown sleeves were found in it, which I kept in a work-closet; they were rather soiled, but not dirty; she had no business with them - we do not wash at home. The flannel is part of a piece of which Clinton has the fellow. I do not know whether I cut it off or not, but am certain it is mine, and was kept in the work-cupboard, in a room into which she was never desired to go.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You desired her to be quick in packing up - A. Yes, she did not make haste, my husband was in the kitchen, while I was in her room; it is close to her room. I think it possible for a person to see into the room from there.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. I was fetched to Mr. Sewell's, and heard a violent noise up one pair of stairs, where the kitchen is. When I entered the room, Mr. and Mrs. Sewell, and the prisoner were there; her master said she had told many falsehoods, and pilfered a little, he wished to get rid of her, and there was her money; she afterwards said, she would not take her things away, unless her master paid a coach to take her away. I said, from her manner, I believed her to be a thief. Mrs. Sewell said,

"Oh! I cannot think she has robbed me, she has only been with me four days." I asked where her things were, Mr. Sewell said, he had kicked them down stairs to get rid of her. I went down, she ran after me, scratched, and struck me. I got them up into the kitchen, and found two yards of new flannel in the bundle. Mrs. Sewell said,

"I should like to look at that again."

"Oh!" said she,

"Ma'am, that is my flannel, I bought it and paid for it;" she attempted to take it out of my hand. I asked, where she bought it, she said, indeed she did not know the person's name, but knew the shop. I said, I would go to the shop with her; in the mean time, Mrs. Sewell fetched a piece of flannel, which upon being compared with the other, she said she had no doubt of its being her's, for there was the mark where it was torn off, the prisoner immediately acknowledged its being her's, and said it was all she had of Mrs. Sewell's. On searching further, I found a pair of muslin sleeves, and several pieces of shirt-frills and new cloth, all of which Mrs. Sewell claimed; she made no answer to it; one sleeve was in her box, and the other in the bundle. Before I got to the bottom of the box she attacked me, and said she would not let me search, for she had got a deal of property in it. I found nothing more of Mrs. Sewell's.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When the flannel was found, tell me the very words she said - A. She said,

"Ma'am, that's all I have got of yours." I saw that the pieces corresponded; there was no lock on her box to the best of my recollection, it was tied round with a silk handkerchief, the things appeared to be put into the bundle with care and not in a hurry, they were folded up. She ran away from me in the street; the flannel is in the same state as I received it.

MRS. SEWELL. I have every reason to believe the flannel is mine, it corresponds in every respect with what remained; the gown-sleeves are mine. I bought the flannel last week in Wood-street, I have no doubt of it being mine, it appears the same in quality and width. She refused to leave, because her character was implicated.

The Jury declared the quality of the flannels to be obviously different.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-55

226. MARGARET JONES was again indicted for stealing, on the the 7th of August , a watch, value 10 l.; a steel watch-hook, value 6 d.; and a piece of ribbon, value 1 s. ; the goods of Elizabeth Service , (since deceased) to whom she was servant .

MRS. ELIZABETH PARKER . I am a widow, and the daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Service , who died on the 17th of November last. I lived in the same house with her, in Finsbury-square . She had a gold watch which she constantly wore, it had a steel-hook fastened to it, suspended by a ribbon. The prisoner was in her service for about a fortnight before the 7th of August, on which day my mother and myself went to dine with my sister, who lives in the same square; my mother was too infirm to get into the carriage without assistance, she had the watch when she was at my sister's; she returned alone about nine o'clock; I returned in about three hours, her watch was then missing - enquiry was made about it; the loss was known to all the servants; I did not see it again till the day before yesterday, when Clinton brought it; the prisoner left the service on the 7th of September. My mother had two male, and two female servants.

RICHARD ROSE . I am servant to Mrs. Parker, I attended Mrs. Service home about nine o'clock on the evening; she lost her watch, she came home in her carriage, I did not observe whether she had it about her; a young gentleman (a relation in the family), and the prisoner, assisted her out of the carriage, as she was very infirm; I held the carriage door while they helped her out; I did not go into the house, but returned with the carriage and attended the rest of the family to Vauxhall, and returned between one and two o'clock I think; I then heard that my mistress had lost her watch, enquiry was made about it; and it was known to every body in the house; I had often seen it at her side. Five guineas reward was offered for it, and hand-bills printed; that was known all through the house; the reward was afterwards increased to ten guineas.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe, whether your mistress wore it on that day - A. No.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. On the 6th of January, I found this watch in the prisoner's box, at Mr. Sewell's, she objected to my searching to the bottom of the box; I asked her if it was her's, she made a snatch at it, and said it was her property; I asked how she came by it, she said,

"Indeed it is my property." I asked again how she came by it, she said her master gave it her, I asked who he was, she said a gentleman at the other end of the town, whom she had lived with, that her mistress had died, and her master gave it her in remembrance of her mistress, by her request; I asked her master's name; she said, indeed she did not know, and that he was gone to France; I asked if any one saw him give it her; she said, her cousin did; she could not tell me the street her master lived in. Mr. Sewell gave her in charge. I took her to the Compter and found a watch-paper in it, which lead me to find Mrs. Parker, who claimed it. The prisoner told me she had had it two years. I found the steel-hook in her box.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know Mr. Sewell, at the time you was fetched - A. I have known them for years as inhabitants. I did not put these questions to her, with a view to give them in evidence. I did not know that the watch was stolen.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-56

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 20.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

227. MARIA RIX was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , three shillings; a sixpence, and two penny-pieces, the monies of Robert Pearman , from his person .

ROBERT PEARMAN . On the night of the 21st of December, I was going through St. Giles's , and stopped by a wall for a necessary purpose. The prisoner came up and put her hand into my pocket, where I had three shillings, a sixpence, and threepence - I felt, and missed it, followed and told her, unless she returned it, I would give her in charge. The watchman secured her.

Prisoner. Q. You gave me a glass of liquor - A. I never spoke to her - she came up and immediately caught me round the waist. I never saw her before.

JOHN KEENE . I am a watchman. I took her in charge, she denied having any money. I took her to the watch-house; he said she had taken 3 s. 9 d. The beadle searched her, and found only twopence on her, but a sixpence fell from some pieces of paper which were in her pocket.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am the beadle. I searched her, and found two penny-pieces, and a sixpence fell from her; she had put some pins in her mouth. I put my hand to her mouth, and felt at least one shilling there - she threw herself back, put her fingers into her mouth, and pulled a pin out - I then saw silver between her teeth. I tried to thrust a key into her mouth, but could not get her jaws open - she then feigned hystericks, and afterwards said,

"You may look now", there was no money then - she must have swallowed it.

GEORGE HEATH . I am the patrol. Wright's account is correct. I held her by the throat - she was quite black in the face - she must have swallowed the money.

Prisoner's Defence. On my word, I never saw his money; he gave me sixpence and twopence.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-57

228. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , two seals. value 2 l., and a necklace, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis Styles .

THOMAS LEWIS STYLES . I am a jeweller , and live in King's-road, Chelsea . On Saturday morning, the 21st of December, about eight o'clock, I left my shop with the glass case about six inches outside the window; the glass

was perfect. I returned about half-past three, and found it broken, and missed two seals and a necklace, worth 50 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WISE . I live opposite to Mr. Styles. On Saturday morning, about ten o'clock I saw the prisoner pass the door - he went up to the glass case, I saw him break the the glass, and then with a wire take out this property. I crossed over, and seized him in the act of taking the last seal, and saw them drop from him into the area.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, and stopped to look at the window, two men stood there. I saw the glass was broken, looked at the one who stood by me, and he went away; this gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-58

229. DENNIS HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , a sovereign, of the monies of George M'Naughton , from his person .

GEORGE BEAUMONT . I am a clothes-salesman. On the 11th of December, I was at the Vine, public-house, Bishopsgate-street . M'Naughton was rather tipsy, and went to sleep in the house; the prosecutor came in with Newman - he ordered a pot of beer, and paid for it; they sat there for half an hour, and the prisoner offered to bet the prosecutor a shilling, that he had no money; the prosecutor then pulled out his pocket-book, and shewed him two sovereigns in a piece of paper, and returned it to his pocket. In a few minutes the prisoner swore he would have something to drink, he took the prosecutor's pocketbook out, and took out a sovereign; the prosecutor struggled to get it from him; he did not know that he had taken anything out; the prisoner gave it him, and went to the bar and got the sovereign changed - I fetched a constable. The landlord was busy and did not know it, he gave no reason for taking the money. I told him it was a shame, and he said I only wanted part of it, and abused me.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say anything about a 5 l. note - A. He told the officer afterwards, that the prosecutor had left a 5 l. note at some house.

Q. Did the landlord give the change to me or M'Naughton - A. He might have laid it on the table, but you took it.

THOMAS PASSMORE . I was fetched to the Vine, and found the prosecutor there, neither drunk or sober. The people said the prisoner had taken a sovereign out of his pocket book - I asked the prisoner if he knew him; he said, Yes, he was an old master of his, the prosecutor said he did not know him. The prisoner said,

"He is my old captain, come and go on board captain;" M'Naughton said he was not a seafaring man. I desired the prisoner to return the sovereign, he said nobody should have it, and that there was a 5 l. note in pledge for 2 s., and he should not have it unless he went with him. He took him out, up the Minories, and into George-street, then said

"This is not the place;" he returned back to Aldgate, and said,

"We will go no further to night, we will go to-morrow." He took 6 d. from his pocket, and said to me, here is 6 d. for you. The prosecutor said he was robbed, and he should not leave him - I then took him in charge, and found 12 s. in his mouth, and 4 s. 6 d. in his pocket.

JOSEPH STONE . I found the silver on the prisoner.

GEORGE M'NAUGHTON. I do not know how I got into the prisoner's company; whether I went in with him or he came in after me, I never saw him before; I was a little in liquor. I lost a 5 l. note - he was an entire stranger to me; I had been to different house. I did not see him till I got to the Vine.

Prisoner's Defence. Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I fell in with him; a parcel of boys were hooting him, as he was in liquor; I drove them away - he said I should have a glass for it. We went to several public-houses, where there was a parcel of girls. He said he would pay me for a day's work if I stopped with him. We went into this house - he was so much in liquor that he could not get a sovereign out of his pocket, so I did it for him.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18230115-59

Before Mr. Recorder.

230. JOHN EDWARDS and JAMES MORRINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 80 lbs. of lead, value 15 s., the goods of our Lord the King , and fixed to a certain building of his, called a barrack .

SECOND COUNT, omitting to state that it was fixed.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I have the care of the Ordnance barrack, at St. John's-wood, Paddington . On the 4th of December, I went my rounds, and found part of the ridge of the roof stripped of the lead - I had seen it all safe on the 2d, about ten o'clock in the morning. I gave information, and found some lead at the office on Friday, the 8th, and upon comparing it, found it fitted with the rest - it was torn off, and the edges corresponded.

JONATHAN HUNT . On the 3d of December, I was on duty near Maida-hill, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and met Morrington at the bottom of the hill - Edwards was two or three paces behind him; they each had a bag on their shoulders. I asked Morrington what he had there; he said he did not know - I said it was pidgeon (meaning lead), and told him to put it down, he threw it down - I asked Edwards to put his lead down, he did so. Morrington was going away; I said

"I must detain you as well as the property" - Harrison who was with me, handcuffed them. We found a hammer and a knife upon Edwards; the rivet was broken, and there was marks of the hammer on the back of the knife. I found a knife on Morrington, which has been used in the same way - we took them to the office. We delivered the lead to Hooker, after marking it. Edwards said he found it in a ditch, and Morrington said he found it in the road; it was a very wet night. The prisoners and the bags were very wet indeed. I took them about half a mile from the barracks. They said they slept in a barn at Red-hill that night, and that was the way they became acquainted.

GEORGE HARRISON . I am an officer, and was with Hunt, whose account is correct. I had seen the prisoners on the Monday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, in the fields, by the barracks. Morrington was looking towards the barracks, and Edwards was lurking about in the fields - I noticed them for full half an hour. I found

a hammer in Edwards's pocket, which appeared to be made for the purpose of receiving it. In our way to the watch-house, Morrington said he did not care a d - n, for they had disfigured the lead, so that it could not be matched.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. I took the lead to the barracks, with Mr. Wilmott - we tried it, and it tallied.

JOHN WILMOTT . I am a plumber. I compared the lead, and am positive it came from there. There are 80 lbs. of it.

EDWARDS'S Defence. I met this man on the road, and in the ditch we found the lead; there were plenty of people about.

MORRINGTON'S Defence. I picked mine up.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 57.

MORRINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-60

231. JOHN STEERS alias MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , a coat, value 50 s., and a pair of shoes, value 6 s., the goods of Alexander Charnley , in the dwelling-house of Edward Deacon .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER CHARNLEY . I live at Mr. George Deacon 's Farm-house, in Stepney ; the prisoner lived in the same room. On Thursday, the 5th of December, a coat, and a pair of shoes were stolen out of a room. I found the coat at the pawnbroker's. I saw it safe at half-past six o'clock on Thursday evening, and missed it at nine o'clock the same night.

JOHN CREED DEXTER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel-road. On the 5th of December, about seven o'clock, the prisoner pawned a coat with me in the name of John Moore , for 1 l. I am certain of his person.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-61

232. ELIZABETH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , a watch, value 35 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d., and a key, value 1 d., the goods of George Liles , from his person .

GEORGE LILES . I am a horse-keeper , at the White Bear, coach-office, Piccadilly . On the 25th of December, between eight and nine o'clock, I was in the stable, waiting for a coach; my watch was in my fob. I knew the prisoner before; she came in the stable to me; I do not know how she came in; I was between asleep and awake, and saw her running away. I missed my watch, and saw it in her hand. I did not feel her take it, or know that she was there, till I saw her running away. I pursued, but could not overtake her. I did not call Stop thief! I knew where to find her, and went after her, but she was not there. She was taken on the Sunday evening; she said she had not seen my watch. I have been at her lodgings three or four times, and she came twice to me at the stable. I have often seen her at the public-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take a lodging for me for a week - A. Yes, and lived with her.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer, and apprehended the prisoner; she denied the charge, but at the watch-house, she told me I should find it at Perryman's.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 27th of December, the watch was pawned by a man for 30 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This man took me to live with him, but he behaved so ill I left him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-62

233. JAMES RIMELL was indicted for embezzling a sovereign, two half crowns; five shillings; ten sixpences, and the sum of 15 s., which he had received on account of John Goodman Lowman , his master .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GOODMAN LOWMAN . I am a grocer , and live in Mary-le-bone. On Sunday morning, the 29th of December, I left town; the prisoner was my principal shopman , and conducted the business in my absence. I directed him to count the money he received, daily, and take it to Mr. Loveridge, who lives next door but one to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long was he in your service - A. Between five and six weeks; there had been a talk about his leaving, I had said nothing to him about it, nor had I mentioned it to Dancer, to the best of my knowledge. I returned home on Tuesday night.

JOHN DANCER . I am shopman to the prosecutor. On the 30th of December, the prisoner, myself, and the boy, were in charge of the shop. About eight o'clock in the evening, I asked the prisoner what money we had taken; he said about 8 l. I knew there was a good deal more, and asked how many sovereigns there were; he said six, I knew there were seven. I had counted the money myself, several times in the course of the day, and know that he knew there were seven; this excited my suspicion. Soon after this, he went to the till, and counted the money, and put it into a paper bag, then into a plumb-drawer - money was not usually kept there; this was an hour before shutting up; he then said he wanted to go out, and borrowed my hat, saying, he did not like his own, because it was a white one. When he was gone, I took the bag out, and counted the money in Holt's presence, and found six sovereigns wrapped up in paper, at the top then, 4 l. 12 s. 6 d. in silver, and a sovereign at the bottom, wrapped up in paper, by itself. I called Holt to notice it. I received one sovereign, and 1 s. after I had counted the money. I took it out of the till, and put the sovereign with the six others in the paper, and 3 s., with the silver; I left the one sovereign seperate as it was, there was then 4 l. 15 s. in silver, seven sovereigns, and one sovereign separate of itself; I replaced the bag in the same drawer, so as not to excite any suspicion; he came in about half an hour after, and said it was time to shut up; I asked him where my hat was, he said he had left it up stairs; I went up for it, leaving him in the shop, and when I came down, which was in about two minutes, he had got the money counted out on the counter, he asked me to count it after him, which I did, and only found 11 l. 0 s. 6 d. which consisted of seven sovereigns, and there was 15 s. deficient in the silver; I said nothing to him, but let him take the money to Mr. Loveridge; I told Holt and the porter what I had observed; and said I would go to Mr. Loveridge's after supper.

Cross-examined. Q. When sovereigns were taken, were they wrapped in separate papers - A. No, there are two tills which have no locks to them; I had not heard of its being likely that he would leave; I know seven sovereigns were taken, as he counted six, and I took one after in his presence.

Q. Where did you come from - A. Buckingham. I was in trouble there, about shooting at the Duke of Buckingham's carriage, to frighten the horses, about three years ago; they made a bungling job of it, and I was acquitted, and lived there for twelve months after, with Mr. Adams, whom I was with before.

MR. LAW. Q. How long after the Queen's acquittal was this firing - A. A week after, it was occasioned by her acquittal. I was charged with a riot.

WILLIAM HOLT . I am shop-boy to Mr. Lowman. On the 29th of December, my master left town. Next day we were in care of the shop. Dancer called me to see the money counted, while the prisoner was out, about eight o'clock; it was in a plumb-drawer; there were six sovereigns in one paper, and one in a paper by itself; the money was on the counter when he called me; I did not see him take it from the plumb-drawer, I afterwards saw him put it into the plumb-drawer, he added a sovereign to the six in the paper; some silver was also taken out of the till and added to it; a sovereign was at the bottom of the bag, the silver on that, and the seven sovereigns at the top. The prisoner soon after returned and ordered us to put the shutters up, and soon after he took the money and went out.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the shop all day - A. No, I was backward and forward; I think I remember seeing the prisoner count the money out of the till. Dancer called me to see him count it; I was in and out afterwards. I did not know that the prisoner was likely to leave, but I thought Dancer would not stop long. I think the prisoner was out about an hour, I did not see him go out; the prisoner was a superior servant to Dancer.

JOHN LOVERIDGE . I live two doors from the prosecutor's, the money taken in his shop while he was absent, was to be brought to me. On the 30th of December, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner paid me 11 l. 0 s. 6 d., it was seven sovereigns, and 4 l. 0 s. 6 d. in silver; Dancer called about a quarter of an hour afterwards, and made a communication to me, and the next morning I wrote to Mr. Lowman to come to town. I produced the money delivered to me, and the account of it, he put down 15 s. in copper which he offered to bring; I said he need not.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Lowman was at your house the next night when the prisoner came - A. Yes, he was apprehended; he brought 12 l. that night, and was not charged with any deficiency in that.

MR. LOWMAN. (Looking at a letter.) This is the prisoner's writing, (read.)

Newgate, January 2d.

SIR - This comes with hopes of forgiveness from you. I am given to understand that it lays with you and Mr. Dancer, whether I have a trial or not, for I understand you can throw out the bill of indictment, when you go to file it. I wish to see you to-morrow, if you will have the goodness to come to me. I never was in Newgate before, and never will be again, if you get me out, which you can. For God's sake forgive me, for the sake of my wife and child.

Your undutiful Servant.

J. RIMELL.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

HENRY STONE . I am a provision dealer, and live in Homer-street; I was at the office, Mr. Lowman and the witnesses stood together; Mr. Lowman said;

"Poor-fellow, he has suffered already, he has been all-night in the watch-house." I said something about stopping the proceedings, provided he would acknowledge it. I went to the prisoner after he was committed, and told him his master would forgive him, if he acknowledged himself guilty.

MR. LAW. Q. You was not authorised to make this communication - A. No, I recommended the prisoner to acknowledge it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-63

234. JAMES RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , a pig, value 3 s. , the goods of William Banks .

WILLIAM BANKS . I am a pork-butcher , and live in Tottenham-court-road ; about ten o'clock on Saturday morning, the 24th of December, I saw the prisoner take this pig off the window-board, I ran and caught him with it; he threw it away and struck me, and got from me, but was taken again in China-street.

THOMAS MALONY . I am a watchman, I saw two men running down China-street, and hearing an alarm I stopped the prisoner, he was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-64

235. BRIDGET CALLAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , six half-crowns; twenty shillings, and ten sixpences , the monies of James Coughlan .

JAMES COUGHLAN . On the 4th of December, I went to lodge in Church-street, St. Giles's; I received six half-crowns; 15 s., and two Spanish dollars, which I kept in a small steel-purse. The prisoner came to me at Chelsea, to enquire about her husband; we were about an hour together at a public-house; she asked me, to go to her lodgings to spend the day with her; another soldier and a woman were with us, we went into a public-house, at Charing-cross , and called for two glasses of liquor; I laid my purse on the table, she took it up and run out with it; I could not follow her, being very ill; I found her in another public-house, in about two hours, but have not found my purse.

JOHN MALTRY . I was in company with the prosecutor and prisoner at Chelsea; I left them at Charing-cross, he had the money in his pocket; I saw her again at night, she was charged with taking the money, and denied it.

JAMES ASHTON . I am a constable. I took charge of her, she was in liquor; I found nothing on her.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a beadle; The prosecutor said, if he could get half his money back, he would forgive her; she said, she would see him d - d first

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted me to stop all night

with him; I said, I never did any such thing; he went out of the public-house, and when he returned, he desired me to go to the watch-house with him.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-65

236. JANE EYNOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a gown, value 18 d. , the goods of William Dean .

JANE DEAN . I am the wife of William Dean ; this gown hung on a line in the garden at Heston ; about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and asked leave to go down my garden, about two o'clock, and I let her, she did not stay above a minute and a half, and in about ten minutes, I missed the gown, I went after her, and told the watchman, and in half an hour, I saw her with it; it was found under her clothes.

WILLIAM ALMOND . I am a watchman of Essex-street, Heston; I found the prisoner about four hundred yards from the house, and asked her what she had under her arm, she said it was her own, and gave it me; Dean claimed it, she turned to go away, but I detained her.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-66

237. MARTHA HEALS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , a gown, value 7 s., and a shawl, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Chuter .

HARRIET CHUTER . I live at Hampstead ; these things were in my drawer in the front parlour, on the 18th of December. The prisoner had nursed my child, but I had not seen her this two years. I found her under the bed; my window was pushed up, and the shutters open; she was searched, and the gown found under her arm, and the shawl in her pocket.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am the watch-house keeper. I was fetched, and took her in charge - the gown had been taken from her, but I found the shawl in her pocket at the watch-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-67

238. BENJAMIN JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December, a jacket, value 6 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 6 s.; a waistcoat, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; the goods of John James Ford ; and a coat, value 5 s., and three shillings , the property of John Gudgeon .

JOHN JAMES Ford . I live at Sheerness. On the 27th of December I was in town, my clothes were on board a vessel in the Regency Canal bason ; the prisoner is a stranger to me. I was asleep in the cabin, and awoke about half-past twelve o'clock at night, and saw somebody, and called out, nobody answered; I got up and missed my clothes - I ran on deck, and saw the prisoner run across the wharf, towards the back of the White Heart, public-house; he was brought back to the pier-head with my clothes - and Gudgeon's coat was found upon him.

JAMES BEACHEY . I am a surveyor of the Thames-police. I saw the prisoner coming from the vessel and stopped him; he ran into the public-house yard, with the bundle under his arm. I took him back to Ford; he threw the things behind the water but.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a constable. Beachey's account is correct; Gudgeon's coat was on his back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the water side, but was turned out of the public-house, and remained in the yard; being in liquor, I went into the stable to sleep, and the gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-68

239. JOHN MANSBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , thirty-nine salt holders, value 35 s. the goods of Josiah Winfield .

JOSIAH WINFIELD . I deal in earthenware , and live at Uxbridge . On the 11th of December, I came home late at night, and found my stable broken open, and some crates opened, and thirty-nine salt holders gone. The prisoner worked in the neighbourhood; I found him on the 14th of December, with a basket, and six of these salt holders in it. I asked if he knew any thing of them, he said he bought them between Hickman and Rislip, from a man travelling about.

JOHN HILL . I was servant to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner on the premises on the 24th of November, about half-past nine o'clock at night; he had climbed over the fence, part of which had been pulled down. I asked what business he had there, he said,

"Never mind, they will not see me."

EDWARD SCEENEY . I am a constable. I took him in charge; he said voluntarily that he took them, and sold all but what was found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-69

240. GEORGE HENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a coat, value 20 s.; four yards of silk, value 30 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Edmund Parfitt .

EDMUND PARFITT . I keep a chandler's shop , in Long-court, Leicester-fields ; the prisoner lived in my first-floor for a month; these things were in the next room to his - they were missed on the 1st of January; he came in as usual, and sat down in the parlour, and the handkerchief was found on his neck.

ISAAC SAWYER . I am an officer. I took him in charge at the prosecutor's house, and found the handkerchief on his neck, the silk in possession of Smith, and the coat in pawn; he denied all knowledge of it.

Cross-examined by MA. LAW. Q. He afterwards told you where to find it - A. Yes.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis. On the 1st of January, the prisoner pawned this coat for 12 s. I am certain of him.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in King-street, Soho. I have known the prisoner a year. The officer came and asked if I had any property that belonged to him. I gave him this silk, which he had left with me about an hour before.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230115-70

241. RICHARD MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , four geese, price 15 s. , the property of Thomas Herbert .

THOMAS HERBERT . I am a farmer , and live at Northolt . I saw my geese safe in my yard on the 27th of December, at ten o'clock at night. I got up at five in the morning, and they were gone; I found them that day, with the prisoner in custody, about six miles off.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am a horse-patrol. I found the prisoner detained with the four geese in a gentleman's stable, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. Herbert afterwards claimed them.

THOMAS HAYNES . I am a farming man. I saw the prisoner getting over into the Harrow-road with four live geese in a basket, at half-past five o'clock in the morning. I stopped him, and asked where he got them, he said he had them from Mr. Page, at Harrow, where he had been working,

GUILTY . Aged 54.

Confined Three Month .

Reference Number: t18230115-71

242. JANE SMITH and ANN RILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a tippet, value 7 s., the goods of Susannah Schneider , privately in her shop .

ANN ARMSTEAD . I am in the service of Mrs. Susannah Schneider , a furrier of Regent-street, Oxford-street . On the 6th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into the shop, and asked to see some feathers - they objected to the price; they were about five minutes in the shop; about a dozen small fur collars were on the counter within their reach - they went out. I had to go to the bottom of the shop for the feathers. I missed nothing; but Clements the officer brought them back to to the shop in about five minutes, and asked if the collar was mine, which he produced. I had but one of that colour, and that was gone.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I was in Regent-street about ten minutes past six o'clock, and saw Smith go up and show something to a boy, whom I suspected. I went up, took hold of her hand, and said,

"What have you got here", the boy immediately ran off. I took it from her, and found it was the fur tippet, with a shop ticket on it I took her to Mrs. Schneider's, and on the way to the office, Riley came up and spoke to her, and I took her,

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I picked it up at the shop door.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-72

243. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , five brushes, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Chater .

HENRY CHATER . I am an oilman , and live in Wellclose-square . I saw these brushes hanging on the door-post, about five minutes before they were stolen; the prisoner was brought back with them.

JOSEPH KAY . I live opposite Chater, and saw the prisoner take the brushes from the door-post, and go into the square. I followed, and secured him with them, and gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-73

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

244. CATHERINE KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , sixteen yards of bombazeen, value 18 s., the goods of William Hart and Henry Hart , privately in their shop .

GEORGE HIBBERT . I am shopman to Messrs. William and Henry Hart , linen-drapers , of Holborn . On the 11th of December, about five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to see some black ribbons, which I shewed her; she then said she wanted coloured ribbons and bought a yard for a penny, she gave me a shilling. I had turned my back several times; I gave her the change. As she was going out I suspected her, and followed her. I found a piece of bombazeen under her left arm, measuring sixteen yards; she begged for mercy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-74

245. HENRY READ and WILLIAM BACON were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , a gun, value 30 s. , the goods of Isaac Blissett .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-75

246. WILLIAM WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Harland , from his person .

JOHN HARLAND . On Friday, the 10th of January, I was in Long-lane . Gould alarmed me, I felt and missed a silk handkerchief, which was safe five minutes before. In consequence of what he said, I turned into Cloth-fair, following the prisoner and two others; he pointed the prisoner out - I collared him, and the other two ran off. I have not found the handkerchief; it was a red, yellow, and black colour.

JOHN GOULD . On the 10th of January, I was in Long-lane, and saw the prisoner take a dark coloured handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to a second man, who gave it to a third, who put it into his hat, which he had off ready to receive it. I informed Harland, and followed them - they were talking to two girls at the end of the court; I pointed the prisoner out, and he took him; the other two ran off. I had a large basket on my shoulder, so that I could not take either of them. I am positive of the prisoner's person - I had watched him for three minutes.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood under the gateway talking to two women, when they came up. I was returning from Tabernacle-walk.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-76

247. FRANCES SOLOMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , four yards and three quarters of ribbon, value 4 s. , the goods of David Simpson .

MARY TUCKETT . I am shopwoman to David Simpson , a haberdasher , of Bishopsgate-street . About five o'clock, the prisoner came in, and asked for black ribbon - I shewed her some, and while she was looking at them, I heard something drop from her, which she stooped to pick up, and while stooping she dropped something else, and as she arose, she put a piece of ribbon on the counter, and

soon after. I saw her put another piece on the counter. I suspected her, pushed her cloak back, and found another piece of ribbon between her arms and side. I told a young man who took her.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. She dropped something which she picked up, and before she could put the third piece on the counter you found the ribbon - A. No; she had plenty of time to put a dozen pieces down. The ribbon drawer laid before her, it was full, and they laid in regular order - they could not have got out by accident. I did not see her pick up her purse.

THOMAS CARROLL . I was fetched to the shop, and found the prisoner there. I asked if she took the ribbon, she neither said Yes or No to me. It was handed to me - she said she was tipsy, and I thought she was a little so.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-77

248. GEORGE REDGRAVE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , five fowls, value 9 s. , the goods of George Porcas .

HENRY PORCAS . I am thirteen years old, and am the son of George Porcas , a poulterer , of Bishopsgate-street , and saw the prisoner come into the shop, and put five fowls into his great coat pocket; nobody was in the shop - I ran down stairs, and hollowed Stop thief! Baxter ran, and brought him back - I said he was the thief; Baxter said he would search him. He then pulled off his great coat, and said he might search him for he had not had them - they were found in his great coat pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-78

249. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , a sheet, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Mays .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Sarah Crook .

SARAH CROOK . I am chamber-maid at the Saracen's Head, kept by Thomas Mays . On the 18th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed a pair of sheets from the room, No. 1 - the officer brought them back that night; they were in my charge. The prisoner is a stranger.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SEPTIMUS SADLER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 18th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought the sheet to pawn - I found it marked

"Mays, Saracen's Head," and detained him. He said he bought it of Mr. Thomas in the Borough, and that he had just redeemed it at another shop - he left my shop, and I sent a man after him; he said he went to fetch the person who gave it him.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I took him in charge at Sadler's - he said he had redeemed it six days before at Salmon's; I took him there, he said he neither knew him or the sheet.

Prisoner. Q. I told you who gave it to me - A. He said next day that a man named York gave it him - he was in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 19th of December, I returned from Gravesend, and met York, whom I knew; we went to a public-house. He got me to pawn the sheet - I did not know but it was his.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-79

250. JOHN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 20 lbs. of mutton, value 7 s. , the goods of John England .

JOHN ENGLAND . I keep an eating house in Wood-street . A haunch of mutton hung inside my door on the 7th of December, it was stolen, and the waiter brought it back. I knew it to be mine.

JAMES MILLS . On the 7th of December, I was in Wood-street, and saw two men cross the road from Addle-street, and reach the haunch of mutton down from England's door, and give it to the prisoner - they went towards Cheapside. I stopped the prisoner with the mutton - he said he did not take it; he gave it to the waiter, and I let him go - the waiter pursued, and took him.

CHARLES DAVEY . I am waiter at Mr. England's. I missed the mutton from the door, and saw Mills taking it from the prisoner - he ran away; I followed and took him without losing sight of him.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-80

251. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM DAWSON . I am a stationer . The prisoner was in my employ, on the 15th of December, and entrusted to receive money for me.

THOMAS JENNINGS FORD. In November last, I was in the service of Mr. Rogers. I paid the prisoner a shilling on Friday, the 15th of November, on account of the prosecutor; for reading the newspaper.

WILLIAM DAWSON . He never paid me this shilling; he used to bring the money when he received it, and I set it down in my book, which it not here. He never accounted to me for it I am certain.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-81

252. JOHN CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , a handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of Patrick Kilgour , from his person .

MR. PATRICK KILGOUR . I am a dry salter . On the 21st of December, between one and two o'clock, I was in Aldersgate-street . I felt in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and saw the prisoner pushing something up his back under his coat. I went aside, let him pass, and seeing a lump between his shoulders, I took hold of him, and found my handkerchief up his back, which was safe just before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running to get to work, four or five boys were before me; one of them turned back, and threw the handkerchief on my shoulder. I was putting it into my pocket when the gentleman laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-82

253. JEREMIAH HARRIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a basket, called a flat, value

2 s. 6 d.; 48 lbs. of butter, value 3 l., and a butter cloth, value 6 d. , the goods of George Bowles .

GEORGE BOWLES . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Rose-street . On the 17th of December, in consequence of information, I went in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him four doors up Rose-court, with my flat of butter in his hands, which was safe ten minutes before.

NICHOLAS ROGERS . I am a butcher, and live in Rose-street. On the 17th of December, a little past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner take the flat of butter from Bowles's door, and go up the market with it. I told Bowles, who took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-83

254. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , a trunk, value 5 s.; a pair of breeches, value 5 s.; five shirts, value 5 s.; a pair of boot-top covers, value 6 d.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s.; two shirt-collars, value 6 d. , the goods John Piesley .

JOHN PIESLEY . I am porter to Ann Nelson . On the 4th of January, I had a box in my cart, to take to the Pewter Platter, Gracechurch-street. I stopped to deliver a parcel in Lime-street-square , and on returning, it was gone. It was directed the same as the one produced.

(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you receive it - A. About four o'clock, and missed it at half-past; the owner is gone to India.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 4th of January, about five o'clock, I was in Leadenhall-street, and saw the prisoner cross into Baker's-gardens, with a trunk. I went round Creechurch-lane, and met him, and said,

" Jack Adams , this is all wrong," I took it from him, and secured him; the trunk contained the articles stated in the indictment.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say it was left in Billiter-lane, and he took it up - A. He said so at the Mansion House.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-84

255. MATTHEW RUSSEL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th January , a wrapper, value 18 d.; eighty-four yards of carpeting, value 4 l. 4 s., and four hearth rugs, value 3 l. , the goods of David Blyth , and James Inglis .

DAVID BLYTH . I am a Scotch factor , in partnership with James Inglis ; the truss in Court containing this property is our's.

JOHN JACKSON . I am an officer. On the 14th of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with three others, in possession of this truss, and followed them to the top of Bread-street; the prisoner was carrying it towards Wood-street; one of them said he had better go down Milk-street; they crossed Honey-lane-market, into Trump-street, then saw me, and three of them ran away. I secured the prisoner with it on his knot, and asked where he was going; he said he did not know. I asked where he got the truss from, he said he did not know. I said,

"Take it back to where you got it;" he said he would not, and threw it down. I collared him; and said,

"I shall take it and you; if you stir, I have that which will deprive you of your existence." I met a person in pursuit of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He was carrying it as a porter would - A. Yes, one man was directing him which way to go. He did not say the others had engaged him to carry it.

JOSEPH BLUNT . I am porter to the prosecutors. I packed up this truss, and put it into a cart, which stood at the door, in Old Fish-street. I went into the warehouse for two minutes, and missed it between half-past six, and a quarter to seven o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman asked if I wanted a job, and gave me a shilling to carry it to Bishopsgate-church.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-85

256. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , a purse, value 9 d.; two half-crowns, and four shillings, the property of Ursella Outrim , from her person .

URSELLA OUTRIM. On the 7th of December, about a quarter-past four o'clock, I was in Fish-street-hill , with a small basket, containing my purse and money, and saw the prisoner's hand coming out of my basket, with the purse in it; he had first tried to trip me up, and nearly knocked the basket out of my hand. I am sure he is the boy. I gave an alarm, a gentleman caught him, and brought him to me - the purse was not found. I lost sight of him for a moment as a cart passed.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a mob of boys running, and run with them - a watchman pulled me into the shop.

PROSECUTRIX, There was no other boy near.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-86

257. EDWARD BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , a goose, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Taylor .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a salesman , and live in Rose-street, Newgate-market . This goose was stolen from my shop-board.

HENRY HONEY . I was in Newgate-market; the prisoner was pointed out. I saw him draw a goose off the shop-board, and run off. I took him in the market, as he was tucking it under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. Two or three people went and pulled the geese, one fell dow, and I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-87

258. GEORGE HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 16 lbs. of pork, value 6 s. , the goods of John Hall Waddel , and Edward Smith Hill .

JOHN HALL WADDEL . I am a salesman , at Newgate-market , in partnership with Edward Smith Hill. On the 15th of January, this pork was left hanging on a hook, in the care of Hoy. I missed it next morning, and found it at Guildhall.

WILLIAM BUSH . I keep the Bell, public-house, in Warwick-lane. On Wednesday night, I saw the prisoner go down my yard, with this side of pork on his arm. I

followed, and took him in Warwick-lane, and gave him in charge. I compared it with the fellow side, at the prosecutors - it fitted, and he said he took it from there.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-88

259. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for a fraud .

Mr. FREDERICK H. PEDDER . I am in partnership with Charles Hackett . On the 19th of December, the prisoner called on us, and demanded payment of Messrs. Watson and Metcalf's account; knowing that he had been in their service, I paid him a cheque for 20 l. 3 s. 9 d. on Messrs. Martin and Co.

MR. JOHN METCALF , JUN. I am in partnership with Joseph Watson . Messrs. Pedder owed us an account. The prisoner left us on the 3d of December, and had no authority to ask payment of any account; we did not send him to demand it.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-89

260. ELEANOR CONNER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JANE PIKE . On the 19th of December, the prisoner came into my father's shop, King-street, Smithfield, for a half-quartern loaf, and gave me a shilling; I thought it was bad, and took it to my father, who asked where she got it; she said, in the market, that she lived in St. Giles's, but could not tell the name of the street, she mentioned two or three places; my father desired me to search her, but she resisted so much, I could not - he then attempted it, and I saw a paper in her hand, which she took from under her arm; I soon after saw the same paper on the ground with another bad shilling in it.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable; the prisoner came into my shop, and offered a counterfeit shilling; my daughter brought it to me in the parlour; I went forward and asked if she had another, she said,

"No," I said, that was bad, and I should not suffer her to go, but should search her; she made a great resistance. I found nothing in her pockets, I wished my daughter to search her bosom; she forced her arm down her bosom, and took a paper from under her arm, she dropped it in the struggle; it contained a bad shilling; I marked them both, and produce them; she gave me two false addresses.

JAMES GILL SEWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint; both these shillings are counterfeits, and of the same die; they have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence I took both in the market. I thought it very wrong for a man to search my bosom, and resisted.

GUILTY .

Confined six Months , and find Sureties for Six Months more .

Reference Number: t18230115-90

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 21.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

261. THOMAS WESTCOAT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , a drawer, value 6 d., and a shilling , the property of Robert Walters .

HEPHZIBAH WALTERS. I am the wife of Robert Walters ; we keep a snuff shop in Foley-street . On the 14th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the parlour, my servant came to me - I went into the shop, and found the till wide open, and a small drawer at the back of it gone; it was safe a few minutes before; there was a shilling in it, but how much more I do not know.

GEORGE LUTZ . I live next door but one to Walters. I stood at my door and saw the prisoner and another looking in at the window; I saw them go into the shop and run out again, I went to Mrs. Walters, who missed her drawer, and then followed the prisoner for half a mile, into Tottenham-court-road, and took him; he said, he did not take the money, but it was the other boy; that there was only one shilling, and the other boy had it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-91

262. MARY HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a lock, value 1 s.; twelve pair of brass nobs, value 5 s., and two pair of rings, value 18 d. the goods of William Crook .

WILLIAM CROOK . I do not consider these to be my property - they belonged to the owner of a house where I was at work. I was not answerable for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-92

263. ANN MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 4 lbs. of bacon, value 18 d. , the goods of John Ballingaler Whyte .

JOHN BALLINGALER WHYTE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in East Smithfield . On Saturday night, the 11th of January, the prisoner came and bought a small piece of pork, and almost immediately after, I missed 4 lbs. of bacon off the window board. I went after her, and found her in a public-house, and brought her back; she denied it. Ghrimes said it was her, and so I gave her in charge.

MARGARET GHRIMES . I was in the shop - and saw the prisoner take up something from the shop window, and put it under her cloak. I could not tell whether it was pork or bacon; I told Whyte the moment she got to the door. I have known her nine years; she bore a good character.

Prisoner's Defence. I put my pork down by the window while I put some halfpence into my pocket. I then took it up again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-93

264. MARK NOBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , forty lbs. of lead, value 4 s. , the goods of James Waddilove ,

JAMES WADDILOVE . I missed this lead about three months since from the roof of a house in Hackney-road . The prisoner was taken on the 21st of December. I have fitted the lead with the roof, and find it corresponds exactly. The prisoner's father was employed to look after the premises.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. On the 21st of December, about a quarter before five o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner in Norton-faldgate. with a basket on his shoulder; I asked what he had there, he hesitated, but at length said,

"Lead." I found four pieces in the basket,

and three in his pocket; they correspond exactly with the prosecutor's premises. I found a hole dug under the foundation of some of the prosecutor's other houses, which lead into the prisoner's father's yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the lead in one of the houses, and was going to take it to the prosecutor.

WILLIAM HALL . He was going towards the prosecutor's.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-94

Before Mr. Recorder.

265. FREDERICK HILDIALG was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM BRICE . I am clerk of the parish of St. Mary, Islington. I produce the register of the marriage of the prisoner to Harriet Weston , on the 18th of April, 1813; it is signed by J. Rose, who was then curate of the parish.

ELEANOR STROMON . I was present at St. Mary, Islington, on the 18th of April, 1813, when the prisoner was married to Harriet Weston , who is alive, I saw her this morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you know who Weston lived with - A. At Mrs. Levy's at Islington. I do not know when they separated.

ITHIEL PRICE. I am the parish clerk of St. Dunstan, Stepney. I produce the register of the 8th of April, 1822 , where I find Frederick Halted was married to Sarah Dudmarsh . I was present and recollect the prisoner; he is the person married to her by that name.

Cross-examined. Q. She did not send this prosecution here - A. I do not think she did. I pointed the prisoner out at Worship-street, the moment I saw him; the marriage was on Easter Monday, and that fixes it on my mind.

The prisoner, through an Interpreter, complained of being illused by his first wife, who had left him, and who lived with another.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-95

266. SAMUEL PRICE and WILLIAM GATES were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a shovel, value 2 s., and a whip, value 1 s. , the goods of John Austin .

JOHN AUSTIN . I am a farmer , and live at Hillingdon . The prisoner Price lived in my neighbourhood. I lost a shovel and a whip from my stable.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES . I am servant to Mr. Austin. On the 23d of December, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the shovel and whip in the stable, and missed them about six o'clock next morning. I saw them again that evening in the constable's possession.

JOHN BLOWER . I am servant to Mr. Rose, of Hillingdon. I bought the whip about ten o'clock, on Tuesday morning, of Gates, for 18 d.; Price was with him.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I bought a shovel of Price, for 1 s. 10 d. - Gates was with him.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners. Price said he had not been near the place.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GATES'S Defence. Price took me to Austin's stable to sleep - he opened the door, and saw some clothes, which were marked; he said they would not do, so he took the shovel and whip.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

GATES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-96

267. JOSEPH NASH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 40 lbs. of beef, value 15 s. , the goods of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT . I keep an eating house in Ratcliff-highway . On the 14th of December, about eight o'clock at night, this beef hung at the door, about ten minutes after I missed it. I found it at the prisoner's house - when it was found, he said,

"Oh! Bennett." I can swear it is my property. He is a coal waggoner.

MARY SAWYER . I was going by Bennett's, and saw an empty coal waggon going by - the prisoner took the beef off the hook, and threw it into the waggon. I followed him home, then returned, and told Bennett.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Had you no ill will against him - A. No. I have had a child by him, and he turned me out. I got into Newgate once - it was through him.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I took him in charge. I found the beef under a cloth. He dropped on his knees, and said,

"Oh! Bennett."

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-97

268. EDMUND LAW and THOMAS WEBB were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , eight geese, price 2 l., and thirteen fowls, price 1 l. ; the property of Isaac Payne .

ISAAC PAYNE. I am a gardener , and live at Barkingside . On the 20th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw my poultry safe in the hen-house, which is fenced in by an hedge, and ditch. Next morning, about seven o'clock, I missed all of them - there were eight geese and thirteen fowls. I found them at Whitechapel Office, on Monday, the 23d, and am positive they are mine. I do not know the prisoners.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am the night beadle of Whitechapel. On Saturday morning, the 21st, about a quarter past six o'clock, I went down Whitechapel-road, and about four hundred yards behind the church, by a bell founder's, I saw a hay cart standing there - Law was walking up and down by it. The cart moved on a few yards at a time. I watched him for half an hour, suspecting he had something in the cart - I waited till he got to the church, and then asked what he had in the cart; he said a sack, but he did not know what was in it - I asked how he came by it; he said he took it up from two men, near the Green Man, public-house, at Laytonstone, who asked him to give them a lift - that one of them wore a smock frock, and the other was a short one. I then told Avis to give me the sack down; I found it contained eight geese, and thirteen fowls, quite warm; they had just been killed. I took Law to the watch-house with them, and sent his hay

to the salesman, and then went into Black Lion-yard, public-house, opposite to where I first saw the cart, and in the tap-room there, I found Webb in bed with a woman - I desired him to dress, and told him I wanted him about some fowls; he denied all knowledge of them. I took him to the watch-house, and placed him with six or eight others - then let Law in, and asked if he saw anybody like the men who gave him the poultry - he pointed Webb out as one, and said he believed another young man was the other, but he could not be certain. Webb denied it. The name of

"Barrell, North Wheel," was on the cart; it would not pass within two miles of Barking side to come to town. The waggon road is more than two miles.

JOHN DANGATE . I am a watchman. I was with Plunkett - his account is correct. I saw Webb with the cart, about a quarter past six o'clock; he came round the horse's head, and went to the cart tail - he then went to a salop woman, and had a bason, and then went up Black Lion-yard. This was before Plunkett came up. I knew Webb before.

WILLIAM AVIS . I am a watchman. I stood on the opposite side of the way, when the cart came up to the bell-founder's, about ten minutes past six o'clock, a man was riding on the hay; Law handed the sack down to a man, but he walked away without it; he then laid it on the cart again, moved on a few yards, then got up and moved the sack.

Cross-examined. Q. The man saw you and walked off - A. I think he did; I am well known there.

LAW'S Defence. As I came along the road, two men asked me to put the sack in my cart. Webb said, they would give me a shilling, and a pot of beer, when I got to town. When I got near the church; he said,

"Stop we will have the parcel down here." I got up to give it him down; he said,

"Stop till my mate comes, he is gone up stairs, I will go and see where he is"; he run away, and never came back; I put the sack on again, got down and walked round the cart to look for him, and after waiting till I was tired, I went on and was stopped.

GEORGE BURRELL . I am a farmer, and live at North wheel. Law lived with me; on the 20th of December, I sent him with a load of hay. Barkingside is twelve or fourteen miles off. He went off between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; and was engaged on my premises till then.

WEBB - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

LAW - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-98

269. JOHN PEDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , a spade, value 18 d. , the goods of John Bolding .

JOHN PALMER . I am servant to Mr. Pounce, of Finchley . John Bolding was his labourer ; his spade was stolen on the 9th of December, from the bottom of the orchard, which is fenced round; I saw it safe at noon, and found it about three weeks after, at the charity school, I knew it to be Bolding's, the prisoner who lives in the neighbourhood was brought to Mr. Pounce's house, by the officer.

JAMES LAWFORD . My mother keeps the charity-school. I bought this spade of the prisoner, on the 15th of December, for 18 d.; Bolding afterwards claimed it; the prisoner said he had had it a good while, and gave 2 s. for it.

JAMES FROST . I am a constable. On the 2d. of January, Palmer came to me; I took the prisoner asleep in a barn; he said he bought the spade.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-99

270. JAMES COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September 1820 , two handkerchiefs, value 4 s., the goods of Richard Outern ; a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Josiah Simroe ; and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Mary Douglas .

The prosecutors and prosecutrix were not present .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-100

271. ANN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , two skirts, value 4 s.; a gown, value 3 s.; a pelisse, value 1 s.; a spencer, value 1 s.; two pockets, value 6 d.; two yards of cotton, value 2 s.; a petticoat, value 1 s.; a pair of earrings, value 2 s., and thirty-six yards of ribbon, value 2 s. , the goods of John Laird , to whom she was servant .

MARGARET LAIRD . I am the wife of John Laird , of Stratford-green ; the prisoner was two or three months in our service; I lost the articles stated in the indictment, and many more. On Thursday night the 12th of January, she went out and did not return till next morning, in consequence of which I discharged her. I sent an officer in search of her afterwards, in consequence of information, and he took her on Sunday, and produced this property, some of them were in a box, which was locked, and some in one which was not locked.

THOMAS LOFFS . I am constable of Stratford. I took the prisoner on Sunday, at No. 4, Stepney-green. I told her, I took her for robbing her master; she made no answer; she was searched, and nothing found on her. On our way to the watch-house, I asked where she had put the things she stole from her mistress; she said, she left the bundle at Mr. Chipps, of Bromley, where I went with her; she went up stairs and delivered me a bundle, containing the property stated in the indictment.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-101

272. WILLIAM JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , two bibles, value 4 s.; two spoons, value 4 s.; a waistcoat, value 6 s.; a flute, value 1 s.; a shirt, value 18 d., two handkerchiefs, value 18 d.; a seal, value 1 l., and a watch-key, value 10 s. , the goods of John Feddon .

JOHN FEDDON . I am a school-master , and live in Brick-lane ; the prisoner lived in my house with his father and mother, who were in my service. I have missed property continually, for the last twelve months; he was apprehended on the 6th of December. The seal was locked up in my desk; I sometimes left it unlocked.

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldersgate-street. I have a waistcoat, tea-spoon, broach, a pair of shoes, and black silk handkerchief pawned at different times. The waistcoat, and I think the shoes and handkerchief were pawned by the prisoner's mother.

SUSAN KIRKWOOD . I am a pawn-broker, and live in Brick-lane, Old-street. I have two bibles, one pawned on the 31st of August, for 18 d., and the other on the 28th of October, for 8 d., by the prisoner, he was in the habit of coming to the shop, I knew his mother; I have a waistcoat and spoon pawned by him, on the 31st of August, for 3 s.; also a pair of stockings for 9 d., on the 19th of October, he also pawned a gold seal and key.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner with his father and mother. I found all the duplicates on the mother. I charged her and him with it. In going to the office, the prisoner said his father and mother were innocent, for it was him that pawned every thing - his parents were discharged.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the seal, and key, but took the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-102

273. MATTHEW WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , twelve yards of cotton, value 9 s., the goods of John Sparrow Benstead , privately in his shop .

FREDERICK CAREY . I am shopman to John Sparrow Bensted, linen-draper , of Little Bath-street, Cold Bath-square . On Monday, the 23d of December, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to look at some shawls - another person was serving in the shop. I shewed her some - she bought none; she was there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I went to the window, to reach her some smaller patterns, as she said they were too large - some cotton lay on the counter. The smaller patterns did not suit her; two females came with her, and they all left the shop together. While I was at the window, I turned round to ask them a question, and from the prisoner's actions, I suspected she was taking something; she had put her hand in her pocket. I went after her, and about four yards from the shop, she pulled the cotton from under her coat, and threw it on the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. One of them went outside to point something out to you - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-103

274. JOSEPH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , three sheets, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas William Kilsby .

ANN KILSBY . I am the wife of Thomas W. Kilsby , of King's-row, Chelsea . These sheets hung in the yard to dry - it is fenced by a railing six feet high. I missed them about eight o'clock on the 30th of December; they were safe five minutes before. I saw them again on the 1st of January, when the prisoner was in custody.

THOMAS BROWN . I was coming from Little Chelsea, with my waggon - I drive for Mr. Beach. I saw the prisoner about half a mile from Kilsby's, he passed me about nine o'clock in the morning of the 1st of January; with a sack on his shoulder; he went into an empty house, and threw the bag down the area. I informed Davis the constable, went with him, and found him there; we secured him. The sheets were in a bag under the stairs, in the lower part of the house; nobody but him was in the house.

JOHN DAVIS . Brown gave me information. I went, and found the prisoner in the house, and the sheets under the stairs; he said he knew nothing of them. I asked him what he had done with the sack, he said he knew nothing of it, that he had been lodging in the house, and taking a nap. I asked who else was in the house; he said nobody, and under the back kitchen stairs, I found a sack containing the sheets.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Parson's-green, and passing the empty house, I saw a handkerchief in the area. I got down, and found the bag there. - I took them up, carried the bag some way, and on looking into it, I found some linen, thought it might bring me into trouble and carried them back, went up stairs to see if I could find any body, and the officer came.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-104

275. GEORGE WATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a cloak, value 12 s. , the goods of William Smith .

JOHN HAINES . On the 17th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner take the cloak from Mr. Smith's door, in Burlington Arcade . I pursued him, and caught him, without losing sight of him. I brought him back with it, and the prosecutor claimed it.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am a constable. I took charge of him with the cloak.

SARAH TURNER . I am shopwoman to William Smith , haberdasher, of Burlington Arcade, this cloak is ours.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-105

276. ROBERT WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , two shawls, value 4 s. ; the goods of William Dean .

WILLIAM DEAN . I keep the Turk's Head, public-house, Turk-street, Globe-fields . On the 9th of January, these shawls were in a cradle in the kitchen, about nine o'clock in the morning. There is a passage leading to the kitchen; the prisoner lodged with me for ten weeks - he was taken that day.

FREDERICK WHITE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned two shawls, with me on the 9th of January, in the afternoon, for 4 s.

ROBERT CRUMPTON . I live in Virginia-row. On the 9th of January, Dean informed me of her loss. I took the prisoner; he said he took them, but meant to bring them back, and that he burnt the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-106

276. JOHN TEULON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , a coat, value 29 s., and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of James Hill .

JAMES HILL . I live in a garret in King-street, Seven-dials . The prisoner lodged in the same room, but slept in a different bed. On the 29th of December, about five o'clock, I left my great coat and shoes in the room; he was then in the room - I returned at seven, and they were gone; he did not return, but was apprehended on the Saturday following, and told me voluntarily that he took them.

DAVID MOSES . I keep a clothes shop in Rosemary-lane. The prisoner came to the shop on Monday evening, the 30th of December, with a pair of shoes, which I saw him self to my brother for 2 s. - I am certain he is the person. He came again next day with a blue great coat, with a single cape, and exchanged it for a pair of black trowsers, and on the Sunday following Hill claimed the shoes, and described the coat; I had sold it. He has got the trowsers on now.

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am a constable. I found the prisoner in St. Martin's work-house - he said he took the gentleman's coat and shoes, and sold them. Moses said he had the trowsers on which he had exchanged for the coat.

JAMES HILL . The shoes are mine, and my coat answers the description.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-107

27. LAMBERT JOHN TITTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. , the goods of William Chandler .

WILLIAM CHANDLER . I am a bootmaker , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the 16th of December, these shoes were on a shew board inside the window. I was sitting in the parlour about half-past six o'clock, and saw the prisoner come into the shop; he took a pair of shoes, and went out - I ran out, and overtook him about sixty yards off with them under his jacket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I took him in charge. I believe he was in distress, for he is the sole support of his family.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-108

278. FREDERICK SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a jar, value 3 s., and 4 ozs. of tobacco, value 1 s. , the goods of John Rhodes .

MARY RHODES . I am the wife of John Rhodes , who deals in tobacco . I was in the parlour, and saw a man going out of the shop, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I missed a jar containing a quarter of a pound of tobacco in it. I ran out and caught him by the flap of his coat - he threw the jar down, and got away, but was secured in five minutes. I cannot swear that it was the prisoner.

JOSEPH ALFREY . I saw the prisoner drop the jar, I followed, and he was taken without my losing sight of him.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner pursued, and took him into custody. I found 4 s. on him.

(Jar produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-109

279. MATILDA SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a purse, value 1 s., and eleven sovereigns, the property of John Pesman , from his person .

JOHN PESMAN . I am a slopseller , and live at Wapping. On the 2d of January, between nine and ten o'clock, I was coming down Tower-street, rather intoxicated, and passing by the prisoner I heard her say that she was in a most deplorable state, and much distressed, and if Captain Rule was in London, she should not be in that wretched state - she was talking to herself, and appeared much distressed. I asked her if she knew Captain Rule, she said Very well, I said so did I, and I would give her something to drink - I took her into a public-house, in Tower-street, and sat down in the same box with her; she had some rum and water. We left there, and she walked with me to the corner of George-street, Minories. I had a purse with eleven sovereigns in it, when I left the public-house. She told me she was quite distressed, and asked me to get her a lodging. When we got to the corner of George-street , she said,

"I have left some things at a certain house, and shall lose them if I don't return for them;" she then left me. The next minute I missed my purse, and about eight days after, I found her at the Police Office. I am certain of her - I have not recovered it. I found her in custody about eight days after, in consequence of an advertisement. She always kept on the side my purse was on.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it me by Aldgate pump - A. I never gave her a farthing. I never knew her before that night.

HAMMOND NELSON . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 2d of January, by Shadwell-church. She had some sovereigns in her hand - I did not count them, but I think there were five or six. She wanted me to go with her to get some clothes from a person; I said No, and took her to the watch-house.

ROBERT SPOONER . I am the night beadle. Nelson brought her to the watch-house - she had eight sovereigns and eleven shillings in her hand, but no purse. I searched her, and found another sovereign in her pocket, and next morning at the office I found another in her hair.

MARY CHEESMAN . My husband is a coal porter. I have known the prisoner three months; she owed me 7 s.; she came down to me at Shadwell, on the 2d of January, at a quarter to one o'clock at night, and pulled out a handful of sovereigns - I said I thought they were not her own, and I would not take the 7 s. She had left some clothes with me. I went to her next morning, and took her a gown - she said she had met an old friend very much in liquor, and took his purse from him, took the money out, and threw the purse away.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-110

280. HENRY STREET was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of December , twenty-four yards of cotton, value 17 s. , the goods of Joseph Hartley .

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Joseph Hartley , a linen-draper , of Ratcliff-highway . On the 13th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was informed some boys were endeavouring to take something from the shop - I ran to the door, and saw the prisoner and another running away. I pursued, and lost sight of them; but overtook them. I found a boy holding the prisoner by the tail of his coat - the boy took this print from him, which had hung inside the door. He must have come in at the door.

WILLIAM SAGE . I am sixteen years old, and live at Mr. Hartley's. A gentleman gave me information; I ran out, and saw two boys running, and the prisoner with the print under his arm, which I missed from the rail. I followed him, came up, and caught him by the coat in Blue Gate-fields with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is false. I had no property; he talked to me full five minutes before the gentleman came up. He picked the print up, and said

"Here it is."

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-111

281. ELIZABETH PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , a watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Thomas Lawrence .

MARGARET LAWRENCE . I am daughter-in-law of Thomas Lawrence , who lives in the Charter-house ; he was confined to his bed, and I attended to him. The prisoner was out of place, and lodged with me; I had known her some time; she was backwards and forwards. I left home between eight and nine o'clock, on the night of the 23d of May; the watch then hung at the fire-place. I missed if next morning; I did not know that she had been into the house that day. On Monday morning, the 16th of December, I by mistake took up her pocket instead of my own, and suspecting her, I examined her purse, and found the duplicate of the watch. I asked her how she came by it; she said she found it. My father was not able to leave the room.

WILLIAM PERDUE . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, pawnbroker, of Houndsditch. I have a watch pawned by a woman, in the name of Ann Price , George-street. The duplicate found on the prisoner, was the one I gave the person. I do not recollect her.

JOHN FORBES. I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my charge; the said she found the duplicate on the stairs. Mrs. Lawrence asked her, why she did not shew it her, as she knew she had lost the watch; she said, that she did not know what it was, being no scholar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-112

282. ELIZABETH PRICE was again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a table cloth, value 3 s., and two pillow cases, value 1 s. , the goods of Margaret Lawrence .

MARGARET LAWRENCE . About the 31st of October, I lost a table cloth and two pillow cases from a drawer in my lodging, in Swan-alley, St. John-street . The prisoner slept with me at the time; she came to live with me on the 5th of September. I told her I missed them; she said, another person in the house must have taken them. I found the duplicate of them in her purse.

GEORGE SHEPPEARD . I am shopman to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, in Baldwins-garden's. On the 31st of October, a table cloth and pillow case were pawned with us; I do not know by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say to it; she took a sovereign out of my pocket when she found the duplicate.

MARGARET LAWRENBE . There were two sovereigns in her purse; the officer has them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-113

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

283. JOHN REYNOLDS and HIRAM M'ADAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 8 lbs. of lead, value 6 s., and a fixture, (i. e.); a brass cock, value 3 s., the goods of Benjamin Chapman , and fixed to his dwelling-house ; and JOHN TUCK was indicted for feloniously receiving the said brass cock, knowing it to be stolen .

BENJAMIN CHAPMAN . I live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea . On the 6th of December, I lost the lead pipes, and a brass cock, which were fixed to my houses, I missed them between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday morning they were wrenched away from the wall in a court which has six houses in it. Next night I went with a constable to Tuck's house, in Dartmouth-street, Westminster, with a search warrant, and found the cock. I understand his name is Turpin.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Can you swear to the cock - A. No; I did not see Tuck in the house; it is a marine store shop.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. On Sunday, the 8th of December, Reynolds's mother sent for me; I found him with her. I neither promised or threatened him, he said,

"I want to tell you who cut the pipes off Mr. Chapman's houses last night, it was me, M'Adams, Hill and Stronick," that they began on Friday evening, first with his mother's pipes. I took him to Chapman, he said they had taken it to M'Adams's sister's, in Duke-lane, and there melted the cocks; that they sold the lead for three shillings, to one Poulter, in Dartmouth-street, and three cocks and a ball, to Turpin, for a shilling. I got a search warrant, but found nothing at Poulter's. I did not search Tuck's myself.

JOHN BOSBURY . On the 30th of November. I put three feet of pipe on Chapman's premises, with a cock and boss, and on the 9th of December, found it broken.

JOHN BANKES . Tuck's house is in Dartmouth-street, he is a dealer in marine stores. I understand that he kept the shop - I often see him buying and selling there. I went there on the 9th of December, and found the brass cock under the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him in the house - A. No; his mother lives there. The cock was concealed and the mother said she did not by any metal.

(Cock produced and sworn to.)

REYNOLD'S Defence. I was out on Friday night, my mother came to me on Friday morning, and asked if I took these things, and said they would give me a new suit of clothes if I told the truth, I at last said, I did; and when before the Magistrate, I was told if I did not say the same, it would be worse for me.

Reynold's confession before the Magistrate was here read.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

M'ADAMS - NOT GUILTY .

TUCK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-114

284. RICHARD PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , an ass, price 5 s. , the property of William Shepherd .

MARY SHEPHERD . I am the wife of William Shepherd . This ass belonged to my son Thomas, he bought it himself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-115

285. ROBERT MADDOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , five live tame pigeons, price 7 s. , the property of James Bass .

JAMES BASS . I had five pigeons in a loft, adjoining my house, in Worship-street . On the night of the 9th of January, I missed them. The next morning, I informed Walton, and about four o'clock in the afternoon, Brown brought the prisoner down, and I found two pigeons, (looks at them) they are mine.

JEREMIAH SINFIELD . I saw the prisoner at a cook-shop, in Wheeler-street; he asked where I was going, and asked where I was going, and asked if I was in a hurry, I said,

"No;" he asked me to accompany him, to sell some pigeons of his own. I went with him to the corner of Club-row; he had a bag, out of which he gave me two pigeons. I sold them to Winsor. I came out of the shop, and took three pigeons in a bag to Sturgess, by his desire.

ELIZABETH STURGESS . I live in Anchor-street. Sinfield brought me three pigeons on the 9th of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I gave him half a crown for them. I put them into a wooden cage, separate from my others, and in the afternoon Brown came and took them away.

WILLIAM BROWN . I received two pigeons from Sturgess. I met the prisoner in the street, and took him. Bass described them before he saw them. The other person had sold the other two.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-116

286. SAMUEL FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 20 lbs. of lead, value 4 s. the goods of a person whose name is unknown.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I and Boston were together, on the 12th of December, in Well 's-street, Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner go into a marine store-shop; he took some lead from his pocket, and put it into the scale, he then undid his waistcoat and took two more pieces out of his pocket. I secured him. He said he found it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-117

287. ANN MANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , four pair of shoe-soles, value 18 d. the goods of Thomas Gardiner .

JONATHAN THWAITES . I am apprentice to Thomas Gardiner , leather-cutter , of Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell . On the 8th of January, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to see some soles; I shewed her some; she took two pair and put them under her shawl, and into her right hand pocket. I went down and told my fellow servant. I returned with Cole, and then she asked to see some more, I put several before her, and saw her take two more pair, and put them into her right-hand pocket. She bought one pair which came to five-pence, and as she was going to pay for them, I asked if she had any more; she said no. Master asked if I was sure, and then sent for a constable.

JOHN COLE . I am servant to Mr. Gardiner. Thwaites fetched me to the prisoner, she put down half a crown, to pay for a pair of soles, we said, she had two pair in her pocket, she denied it; we were going to search her, she said nobody should but a constable, we sent for one, and while he was gone, she produced two pair, and asked to look at some inner soles, we refused to shew them; she afterwards produced two more pair from under her clothes.

WILLIAM THISELTON . I was sent for and took her.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-118

288. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , a pewter-pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of William Edwards .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a publican . and have lost a great many pots.

JOHN BOSTON . I was in company with Colton, on the 19th of December, near Prince's-street, Drury-lane, and saw the prisoner putting his hat on, there was something shining in it, I informed Colton, who went up and took a quart-pot out of his hat, with Edwards's name on it.

WILLIAM COLTON . Boston's account is correct, I believe he was in distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-119

289. THOMAS HAINE was indicted for embezzling .

THOMAS MATTHEW . I am clerk to Messrs. William and John Whitehouse , carriers . The prisoner was employed to drive one of their carts, he was entrusted to receive the carriage for goods, and he ought to bring it to me. On the 10th of August, I gave him a basket to take to Messrs. Welsh and Newall, Knight Rider-street, he was to bring me 1 l. 17 s. 9 d.

MR. JOHN WILSON NEWALL . I am in partnership with Mr. Welch, I paid 1 l. 17 s. 9 d. for carriage on the 6th of September, but cannot swear the prisoner is the person who received it, he gave me a receipt which I produce. The goods came on the 10th of August; I paid it to the person, who brought this note, (looking at it.)

THOMAS MATTHEWS . This is the note I gave the prisoner, on the 10th of August, it is written by me, they do not always receive the money upon delivery; he

was to keep the note till the money was paid; he told me on the first Saturday after the goods was delivered, that it was not paid. He was in our service till a fortnight ago, when he was apprehended; and said he had received this money, and lost five sovereigns out of his pocket coming from Beal's wharf.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-120

290. HENRY GOUGH was indicted, for stealing on the 7th of December , two pewter-pots, value 18 d. the goods of Mary Bevens .

MARY BEVENS . I keep the Bricklayers-Arms, public-house, South Moulton-street , (looking at two pots,) these are my property; I have lost a great many.

JOHN BOSTON . I was in Oxford-road, on Saturday morning, the 7th of December, about seven o'clock with Brooks, and saw the prisoner with a bag under his arm, it rattled; Brooks stopped him, and found six pots on him, two of which had Bevens's name on them.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I was with Boston, I asked the prisoner what was in his bag; he made no answer, but asked to be let go. I found six pots in it. He said, he picked them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the bag at the corner of South Moulton-street.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-121

291. ALEXANDER GORDON was indicted for embezzlement .

PHILLIP REGNART . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money on my account. On the 4th of January, he was sent to Mrs. Long for 6 s., he did not bring it to me - but said she had not paid him any money.

ELEANOR LONG . I deal with the prosecutor. On Saturday, the 4th of January, the prisoner brought four loaves - I paid him 6 s. I generally paid him on the Monday.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I apprehended him; he pleaded distress, and said he bought a pair of shoes with the money.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-122

292. HENRY GRIFFIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a gown, value 5 s., the goods of Ann Elizabeth Brown , from her person .

EVAN JONES . I am a watchman of Old Haggerston. On the 22d of December, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I met the prosecutrix and the prisoner walking together, I bid them good night, turned into my box, and shortly I heard her screaming out, and calling Stop thief! I ran up, and met the prisoner running towards me. I caught at him, and he kicked my light out. I secured him; the girl said,

"You have robbed me;" he denied it. I opened his coat, and found a bundle; he could not tell how he came by it, nor what it was; the girl came up, and said it was her gown; she fainted, and I took her home - they were both sober.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You are sure he was not intoxicated - A. He did not appear so at all.

ANN ELIZABETH BROWN . On Saturday night, the 22d of December, the prisoner came up to me in Finsbury-square; and walked with me to the door of my father's house in Kingsland-road . I desired him to leave me several times; he insisted on seeing me home. I said, he should not, and told him to go about his business. When we got to the door, he snatched the parcel from me. I gave an alarm, and Jones took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say

"You have robbed me" - A. I do not recollect saying so. I walked arm in arm with him part of the way. He offered to take liberties with me. I think he was rather intoxicated. I do not think he intended to steal it, for he behaved very well. He ran twelve yards with it perhaps. He carried the bundle for me once, and I asked him for it, and he gave it me.

WILLIAM LEDGWICK . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the gown. He did not appear inebriated in the least.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out drinking all day. I wanted to go in doors with her; she said I could not - I thought I might. I deny having the bundle in my possession, it was picked up several yards from me; it was handed into her father's house, and given out again.

ELIZABETH BROWN . It was not handed into my father's, till after it was taken. I had left my situation that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-123

293. JOHN FODDERING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a pair of boots, value 10 s. , the goods of John Lanning .

JOHN LANNING . I am a shoemaker , and live at Ratcliff. I gave the prisoner a pair of boots to top; he brought them home on the 9th of January. I desired him to take them back to alter. I sent for them several times, but could not get them. I went to his lodgings about ten o'clock at night. I saw him go in. I followed, and asked him for the boots; he said, they were not done, and I should have them the first thing in the morning, and I said, I would have them done, or undone; he said, I could not. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL TELFER . I am shopman to Mr. Ashley, a pawnbroker at Ratcliff. On the 9th of January, in the evening, the prisoner pawned the boots for 10 s., in the name of John Evans , Broad-street.

Prisoner's Defence. Intending to go out that evening, and having no money, I took the liberty to pawn them, intending to redeem them next day, by pawning part of the clothes which I wanted to put on that night.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-124

294. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a pair of trowsers, value 7 s. , the goods of John Swain .

SUSAN SWAIN . I am the wife of John Swain , of Brick-lane . On the 8th of January, the prisoner came and asked to look at a pair of trowsers. I told him they were not large enough for him; he said,

"Let me look at them;" he took them off the counter, and ran off with them. I called Stop thief! and the officer stopped him.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I heard the alarm, and saw a boy running out of Peartree-street; the prisoner, who was running away was stopped. I took him to the watch-house. I cannot swear it was him. I did not see him come out of the shop. I found the trowsers in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-125

295. JAMES DEWEL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , a fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of Daniel Gunston and William Gunston .

DANIEL GUNSTON . I am in partnership with William Gunston . The fowl was stolen on the 13th of January.

DAVID DAVIS . I am servant to Messrs. Gunston. The prisoner and his companion were going by the shop; he stared me hard in the face - I was behind the counter; he took the fowl off the board outside the window, and walked off with it. I followed, and caught him. The fowl was brought in by a neighbour. When I seized him, his companion told him to strike me, which they both did.

SAMUEL BROMLEY . I picked the fowl up close to the shop, and gave it to a person, who took it into the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. He knocked me down, and I went back to the shop, to ask what he did it for; he said I had stolen a fowl.

GUILTY Aged 14.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-126

296. JAMES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , six shillings, and four sixpences , the monies of John Elsworth .

JOHN ELSWORTH . I am a cheesemonger . Last Thursday week, I sent the prisoner to Mr. Thompson, with a bill and receipt for 12 s., and gave him 8 s., in case he wanted change - he did not return. He was apprehended on Sunday night. I searched, but found nothing on him; he said, he received 12 s. from Thompson, who did not want change, and had spent the money. I told him he had been to Astley's that night - he did not deny it.

SAMUEL DENNIS . I am Mr. Elsworth's servant. I gave the prisoner six shillings, and four sixpences.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-127

297. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , a goose, value 4 s. , the goods of Daniel Gunston and William Gunston .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am servant to Messrs. Gunston. I heard that somebody had run away with a goose. I ran out, and saw two boys running across the road - the prisoner had it in his hand. I took him, and he threw it down. I missed one off the window board.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-128

298. GEORGE BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of January , a wash-hand stand, value 6 s. , the goods of William Bourne .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-129

299. ELIZABETH BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a gown, value 8 s. , the goods of James Henry Williams .

JOHN GANDER . I am shopman to Mr. Williams, pawnbroker , of Brick-lane . On the 23d of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the door, looking at a gown - I was engaged at the counter. I looked round again, and it was gone. I went out immediately, and saw her running with it under her arm; she ran up a court, and threw it over a wall. I secured her, and got a boy to fetch it for me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-130

300. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , a goose, value 4 s. , the goods of Daniel Gunston and William Gunston .

GORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I was coming down St. John-street , and saw the prisoner and another, trying to get a ham from a door; they did not succeed. I followed them to Messrs. Gunston's, and the prisoner held up his apron, and threw the goose off the window-board into it. I secured him.

JOHN BALLARD . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; the goose was claimed by the prosecutors.

MR. GUNSTON. It was ours.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-131

301. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , two pewter pots, value 2 s. , the goods of William Roxbourgh .

WILLIAM ROXBOURGH . I keep the Wilmington Arms, public-house, Spafields . I have lost six dozen pots within last three months. These two are mine.

JOHN BOSTON . I saw the prisoner in Turnmill-street, on the 24th of December, and watched him into one Dedman's, a dealer in Marine stores, with these pots in a bag, and secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-132

302. WILLIAM BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , a pelisse, value 40 s. , the goods of William Simons ,

WILLIAM JOHNS . I am in the employ of Mr. Simons, of Leicester-square , On the 27th of December, I missed a cloth pelisse, which was safe five minutes before. I followed the prisoner who was running away in Newport-street. He dropped it in Lisle-street, and was secured; he did not deny taking it, but pleaded distress.

HAMMOND WEBB . I received him in charge with the pelisse; he appeared distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-133

303. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , nine pair of boots, value 1 l. 4 s. , the goods of John Richards .

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a shoemaker , and live in

Golden-lane . The prisoner lodged in my back room for seven weeks. On the 26th of December, I went out with him - we were together for two hours, he then left me. I went home soon after, and missed nine pair of boys boots. Next morning I went to look for him - he did not return to his lodging, and on Monday I found six pair at Vincent's - they were in the shop window; the shop was locked, and I had the key, but when I came home I found a window broken.

JOHN VINCENT . I am a shoemaker, and live in Hatton-wall. On the 26th of December, between six and seven o'clock at night, the prisoner brought two pair of boots to sell, saying he had four pair more, that his wife was at the door with them, and that he made them himself out of old boots, and lived a few miles off. I gave him 2 s. per pair for them. Richard's afterwards claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met Wm. Mitchell in Sun-street, with a woman in his company - he asked if I could tell him where to sell six pair of boys boots; I went with him to Mutton-hill, and sold them. I gave the money to the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-134

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

304. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a shoulder of mutton, value 7 s. , the goods of Humphrey Thompkins .

HUMPHREY THOMPKINS . I live in Drury-lane , and am a butcher . On the 11th of January, at twelve o'clock at night, I was outside the shop, and the prisoner cheapened several joints; I desired him to go about his business, and while I was busy an alarm was given. I ran and took him with a shoulder of mutton under his coat.

JOHN THOMPKINS . I am in my brother's service - directly his back was turned; I saw the prisoner take the mutton off the hook, and told my brother.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-135

305. SARAH GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , a brooch, value 5 s. , the goods of Joseph Crabtree .

JANE CRABTREE . I am the wife of Joseph Crabtree . On the 15th of December, between eleven and one o'clock, the prisoner came into my room, and offered to sell a silver thimble - I laid a brooch and ring on the table, and turned round to the shelf to find my own thimble, I turned back in half a minute, and missed the brooch; she said she had not got it, and hoped I did not accuse her; I said no more, but let her go; she returned in three quarters of an hour, and desired me to look at her duplicates, I did so - there was none for a brooch; she came again at five o'clock - my husband was at home then, and gave her in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not turn my pockets inside out - A. No, she only took her bonnet off - she said I might search her, but I did not.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and found nothing on her; but after she was committed, she said she threw the brooch away in the kennel, as she was accused of it, and that it stuck to her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it - I said I let a thimble fall into the kennel.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-136

306. CHARLES CLAWS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a watch, value 30 s.; three sovereigns, a guinea, and three shillings, the property of John Scarlett , from his person .

JOHN SCARLETT . I am a hostler at the Black Horse, in the Haymarket . On the 6th of August, about ten o'clock, I went to bed, but am not certain that my watch was there - it generally hung by the fire place. I got up at five o'clock, and at half-past five missed my money from my pocket, which was safe overnight. The prisoner did not sleep there, but had access to the room.

WILLIAM MARTIN . On or about the 8th of August, I bought the duplicate of the watch of the prisoner, for 10 s., and redeemed it; it was pawned for 1 l.

JOHN SCARLETT . This is my watch. He had left the yard ten days, but came to the room on Monday.

WILLIAM GILES . I am a patrol. On the 11th of January, I and Dingley went to a public-house, in Hyde Park, and apprehended the prisoner - he said he meant to return the prosecutor the money, he had robbed him of, as soon as he could, and that he had sent him a sovereign on Saturday night. We mentioned the watch to him; he said he would make it up to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicate - my friends recommended me to make it up to preserve my character.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18230115-137

Before Mr. Recorder.

307. PATRICK CRAWLEY and JAMES CARR were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 30 lbs. of rope, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Phillips .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a lighterman . About the 10th of December, I found a headfast belonging to my lighter, which laid in the City-canal .

JOHN HERBERT . I am a watchman on the City-canal. On the 9th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard a whispering under a dead wall, and asked who was there, and found the prisoners together; they said they had nothing, but I found a quantity of rope under each of their smock frocks, tied round their bodies.

JAMES BEACHEY . I am a surveyor of the Thames Police. The prisoners were given into my charge. I examined Phillips's lighter, and the headfast was gone. They said they found it at the bottom of the canal. I found two knives on Crawley, which had been recently cutting rope.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Phillips. I saw

the lighter safe on Saturday, lashed to a ship, and on Tuesday I found it aground, and the headfast gone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARR'S Defence. I found it on the grass.

CRAWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18230115-138

308. JAMES MARKWICK and CHARLES TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , two canvas wrappers, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Cutten .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Butler .

CHARLES CUTTEN . I am a messenger to the Commissioners of Bankrupts . These wrappers were in the house of Mr. John Butler , of Milk-street . I put Taylor into possession of the premises six weeks ago.

JOHN UPTON . I am a conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 7th of December, I stopped Markwick in St. John-street, Clerkenwell, with this wrapper, and asked where he got it; he said he bought it of some servants in Bunhill-row - I asked if the master authorised his servants to sell it, he then said he bought it of the gentleman; I said I should take him to the gentleman, and when we got into Bath-street, he said he bought it of one Taylor, at a public-house. I left him in charge, and went to the Northumberland Arm's, City-road, found Taylor there, and asked if he had sold or given any wrapper to any man within ten minutes - he said not. I took Markwick there, who said he was the man; Taylor denied it - Markwick then said he bought it of a stranger in the street. I went to Markwick's house, and found a quantity of wrappers in boxes and drawers.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was he carrying it publicly - A. Yes.

HUGH CLARK . I am an officer, and was with Upton; his account is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not apprehend Taylor - A. No. We said if he was wanted he must come, and he did come.

JOSEPH EARL . I was warehouseman to Mr. Butler. Taylor was in possession there - Mr. Butler was abroad at the time. There were a quantity of wrappers in the cellar - these two are marked J. B. in the way ours are.

Cross-examined. Q. When you sell a bale you send wrapper and all - A. Yes; they are not sent to the retail dealers in wrappers. Markwick was porter to Mr. Butler. The commission was opened on the 25th of November; this was a week after that.

CHARLES CUTTEN re-examined. I did not live in the house. Taylor was in possession under me, under the warrant; but the effects were assigned over to Mr. Helps, the provisional assignee. My authority was gone when the assignment was made. Mr. Helps never took possession except through me. I consider myself under his control, and the property in his care.

MR. HELPS. I was provisional assignee. I consider that Cutten had possession for me. I had not directed him remain in possession for me.

MARKWICK - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-139

309. NATHANIEL WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , a box, value 6 d.; four shillings, and two six-pences, the property of William Richards , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-140

310. ISAAC BATEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , a gown-piece, value 7 s., four handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; a shirt value 5 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a jacket, value 5 s.; a cap, value 18 d.; a pair of shoes, value 3 s.; two brushes, value 9 d., and a pair of spurs, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Bramley .

JOSEPH BRAMLEY . On the 22d of December, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I got on the Isleworth coach, at Kensington; I had a bundle containing this property. I was quite sober; the prisoner was on the coach-top; he had no bundle on the coach-top, but one in the boot; the coach stopped on Turnham-green , I got down, leaving my bundle there, and on returning he and it were gone, and his own left behind. He was stopped by the patrol in a quarter of an hour. The coachman said he knew him very well, and thought he had taken it in mistake.

JAMES BESWICK . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner on Turnham-green, in the way to Isleworth, with the bundle under his arm, I asked how he came to take it off the coach, he said, a soldier had given it him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did he appear intoxicated - A. Yes, he staggered a good deal, he was behind the coach; it must have passed him, he had left a band-box in the boot; he was let go, and afterwards taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated and did not know what I was doing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-141

311. THOMAS BRUCE , JOSEPH WATERS , and THOMAS HALFPENNY were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , a sack, value 2 s., two knives, value 1 s., and a bottle, value 1 d. , the goods of William Swain .

WILLIAM SWAIN . I live at Limehouse, these things were in a barge, on the Regent's-canal, near the Jews-harp, public-house . I found the prisoner's in the cabin; at three o'clock in the afternoon and missed these things.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The barge laid in the ice - A. Yes, they had lighted a fire in the cabin, and ran out the moment they saw me.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I was in the Park, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw Waters and Bruce, jumping over the rails; I followed and took Bruce, and found a phial in his pocket which Swain claimed.

WILLIAM COUSINS. I am a constable. I found the prisoner's at the watch-house - nothing was found on them.

WILLIAM SWAIN . I lost a phial like this, there was oil in it for a sprained hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-142

312. JOHN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , a blanket, value 2 s., and a shirt, value 6 d. , the goods of Sarah Stout .

SARAH STOUT . I am a widow , and live at Shadwell ,

I let the prisoner a bed, on the 31st of December, at 6 d. a night - he went to bed at nine o'clock; the sheet was an old one, and the blanket was on another bed in the same room, I went up at eleven o'clock in the morning, it was there then, he went away at one o'clock; and in about an hour, I missed them; two men slept in the room, but they left early in the morning.

JOHN SPENCER. I am a headborough. On the 6th of January, the prisoner came and asked me where he could get a lodging, and Stout's daughter came up and charged him with stealing a sheet and blanket, he said

"You are wrong; I am not the man, for I do not know you." I let him go aside for a necessary purpose, and then he ran off. I followed, took him, and found the sheet on him; he said, he sold the blanket for 18 d.

(Sheet produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-143

313. PATRICK COLLINS and DENNIS DONOVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , a handkerchief, value 18 d. the goods of John Buttfield , from his person .

JOHN BUTTFIELD . I am collector to a Dispensary , and live in Newman-street. On Sunday evening the 12th of January, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in High-street, St. Giles's , with a lady; a person gave me information; I then felt, and missed my handkerchief from my pocket; the prisoners were taken, I had not seen them near me; the officer brought me my handkerchief next morning.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Islington. I was with Jordan and Bradbury, and saw the prisoner's in company, and following different gentlemen, which induced me to watch them; I saw the prosecutor walking with a lady, they went up to him, and I saw Collins draw the handkerchief out of the pocket, and give it to Donovan, and both got away, through some courts; I stopped the prosecutor and took his address, we then went into St. Giles's, and saw them among about ten others, it was not safe to take them, they were holding the handkerchief up and looking at it; we watched them till they came out from the rest; I then took Donovan, and found the handkerchief in his hat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners, and watched them for two hours. I was just half across the road, and saw one of them take the handkerchief, but could not see which; they ran up the yard, we took them in about five minutes; I saw Donovan shewing it to Collins. They would have been rescued, if we had not had assistance.

COLLINS'S Defence. I saw it on the ground, picked it up and gave it to Donovan.

DONOVAN'S Defence. He picked it up and said, his hat was too tight, and told me to put it into mine for him.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

DONOVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18230115-144

314. CHARLES BOSHER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , a cheese, value 10 s. , the goods, of James Mogg .

WILLIAM BARLOW . I am shopman to James Mogg , cheesemonger , of Long-acre . I heard a noise at the window, and missed the cheese, which was safe three minutes before, I went out and found the prisoner in Mercer-street, with it under his arm, he dropped it, but I secured him without loosing sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-145

315. JAMES DARBY and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , a watch, value 10 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Rice .

ELIZABETH RICE . I live in Whitecross-street , this watch was in the kitchen window. Darby came with a boy to sweep the chimney, on Saturday, the 7th of December, and as soon as they were gone, I missed it, and on Tuesday I found it at Worship-street. Williams was not in the house.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am ten years old. I went with Darby to sweep Mrs. Rice's, chimney. Williams stopped in the street waiting for us; I was up the chimney about ten minutes, and did not see the watch till I got to Worship-street.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a headborough. I apprehended Darby on Saturday night. Brown told me I should find the duplicate of the watch down an area, which I did. I took him first, he denied it, and run away, he said,

"I do not know what they took, but Darby took something, for he went into a pawnbroker's."

JOSEPH BROWN re-examined. I saw Darby with a duplicate in a box on Saturday, about eight o'clock; we left the house about seven; he tore it up near Hatton-garden, and I told the constable.

HENRY IVES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 7th of December, about a quarter after eight o'clock in the morning, Darby pawned the watch in the name of Jones.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

DARBY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-146

316. SARAH FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , a shawl, value 5 s.; three bed curtains, value 2 s.; a table cloth, value 1 s., and three blankets, value 7 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Stott , widow .

ELIZABETH STOTT . I keep the Six Bells, public-house, Dove-court, Lombard-street . The prisoner lived servant with me for three years; she left me some months ago, but returned, and was in my service nine weeks; three or four weeks after that, I missed a shawl, and got a warrant, and accompanied the officer to Williams's, and in the front kitchen I found all this property; she was in the House of Correction at the time.

ROBERT COOMBS . I am a constable. I went with a search warrant to No. 7, William-street, Mile-end. We found this property, which was claimed by the prosecutrix.

JANE TRIP . I lodge in the first floor of No. 7, William-street. The prisoner occupied the front kitchen. I have been there three months, and she was there before I came;

she was apprehended on another charge, and gave me the key of her room; I gave it to Coombs, and saw him find the curtains and blanket on the bed, and the shawl in her box.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the curtains and blankets, and found the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-147

317. RICHARD HAWKINS and JOHN KEELEY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , three saws, value 7 s. , the goods of George Davis .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-148

318. WILLIAM HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th December , three deal boards, value 1 s. 6 d., and eight pieces of oak scantlings, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Spratley .

THOMAS SPRATLEY . I was building some houses in Arbour-square, Commercial-road. The prisoner was a sawyer ; these boards were at the back of my house. On Saturday evening, the 14th of December, I went outside and saw him taking them away; his mate was with him; each of them had wood, he said his mate induced him to take them - his mate threw his down and got away. I think it was the mate's fault. I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It is usual to take wood to light our fire with. I have a wife and six children.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-149

319. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , an iron bar, value 10 s. , the goods of John Koops .

JOHN KOOPS . I keep the Old Rose, public-house, Ratcliffe-highway . This bar stood with the shutters in the passage. On the 7th of January, I shut up at eleven o'clock at night, and missed it; it was safe in the afternoon. The patrol came about half-past twelve o'clock; I went to the watch-house and found the prisoner with it, in custody.

RICHARD SKYRING . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, about half-past ten o'clock at night with the bar; he said it was his own, and that he lived in Rosemary-lane; I found he did not live there - he then said he lived in Moorfields.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-150

320. EDWARD MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of George West .

GEORGE WEST . I am a shoemaker , and live on Saffron-hill ; these shoes were on the ledge of my window. I saw the prisoner take one, and pursued him, and saw two in his hand, he threw them away; I took him at the corner of Mutton-hill.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES MORLEY . I took charge of him

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18230115-151

321. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , a pair of breeches, value 12 s. , the goods of Lawrence Kennedy .

JOHN ROLFE . I am servant to L. Kennedy, a pawnbroker , and live at Shadwell . These breeches hung on a horse inside the door - a man took them and ran off; I followed and took the prisoner; I found them laying within a yard of the Dove. I know him to be the person by his dress; he said, I did not see him take them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-152

322. WILLIAM M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a pair of wooden steps, value 2 s. , the goods of a certain person, whose name is unknown.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-153

323. JOHN PRIBBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , two planes, value 2 s.; nine pieces of veneer, value 5 s.; two yards of trimming, value 2 d.; two pieces of cotton, value 2 d.; a pillar and claw, value 1 s.; the goods of John Edwin Robinson ; and a plane, value 18 d. , the goods of Samuel Bearne .

JOHN EDWIN ROBINSON . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Ship-alley, Wellclose-square; the prisoner was in my service, about six months as journeyman . I missed some veneers, and some time after, in consequence of information, he was apprehended about the 22d of December. I lost this property, and found it at his lodging; he went with us to search.

SAMUEL BEARNE . I am in the service of Robinson. I missed a plane about the end of November, and found it at the prisoner's lodging.

BENJAMIN BLABEY . I am a constable. I went with the prisoner to his lodgings, and found these things; he said he brought them out unknown to his master.

(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-154

324. PATRICK RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , a fowl, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Foxhall .

RICHARD FOXHALL . I am the son of Charles Foxhall , a poulterer of Cannon-street, St. George's . I saw the prisoner take the fowl from the window; I pursued, he threw it down, my father took him to the watch-house; there were two older boys who ran away.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I received him in charge. I find his mother is a destitute woman, and that he has been entrapped by bad boys.

GUILTY . Aged 8.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-155

325 JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , a hammer, value 3 s.; a pair of pincers, value 3 s.; a pair of scissors, value 3 s.; five needles, value 2 d.; a screw driver, value 1 s.; a punch, value 3 d.; an awl, value 8 d.; a regulator, value 6 d., and a bag, value 6 d. , the goods of James Jones .

JAMES JONES . I am an upholsterer , and live in Garden-wall,

Shoreditch. I was going to work at Mr. Hubbard's, in Long-alley , on the 10th of December, I took these thing there, about one o'clock; about an hour after, I missed them from outside the door. The prisoner was working with them for me. I found him on the 12th of December in bed; he had sold three of them.

THOMAS BRAGNELL . I am a smith, and live in Whitecross-street. The prisoner came to me on the 10th of December, between one and two o'clock, with a pair of pincers, a hammer, and scissors, which I bought of him; he said his father was dead, and had left him more tools than he wanted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEONARD M'NALLY. I apprehended him on the 12th of December.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him for 2 s. 6 d., which he owed me; he told me to go and get some money on the tools.

JAMES JONES . I owed him nothing, and never said so.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-156

326. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , a trunk, value 16 s. , the goods of James Wyer .

ROBERT WYER . I am brother to James Wyer , trunk-maker , who lives in Oxford-street . On the 14th of January, just before one o'clock, I was informed this trunk was stolen from outside the door; I went out and took the prisoner at the corner of Wardour-street with it; he refused to go with me without an officer.

SAMUEL JONES . I am a footman. I saw the prisoner take the trunk; I followed him, and picked it up - he had thrown it down.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all right. I was very hungry, and thought it no harm to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-157

327. JOHN SABERI was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , being servant to James Moyes , sixteen books, value 5 l.; 76 lbs. of printing types, value 8 l.; forty quires of paper, value 3 l.; 78 lbs. of paper, value 10 s.; two ink cans, value 2 s. and half a peck of coals, value 3 d. his property.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BAKER . I am apprentice to James Moyes , printer , in Greville-street, Hatton-garden ; the prisoner was his pressman , and earned from 36 s. to 2 l. a week. On the 4th of January, he was followed out of the house; I saw him brought back, and some coals found on him; he lodged at No. 1, Dove-court; Leather-lane.

RICHARD MOTT . I am in the service of the prosecutor. I went to the prisoner's lodging with Limbrick, No. 1, Dove-court, and found the articles stated in the indictment there, except the coals.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I have the property found at his lodging.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES MOYES . These things are mine; the books are Blair's Lectures, and the Life of Howard; only two copies had been sent out, one to the author, and one to the publisher.

Prisoner's Defence. The ink cans were given to me last April, by Creswell, the foreman. My father who was a letter-press printer, died, and I had about 50 lbs. of his type and materials. About the end of last March, one of the prosecutor's men went to Birmingham; I bought some type and paper of him. The sheets or books are what I worked myself, and saved them, and some were given me by the men to complete my set.

MR. MOYES. The workmen have no right to take sheets; it is too frequently done, but I should not suffer it if I knew it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-158

328. CHARLES WHITWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , twenty-four yards of floor cloth, value 4 l. , the goods of William Pitt .

WILLIAM PITT . I keep a floor cloth warehouse , in Northumberland-place, Commercial-road . On the 20th of December, this floor cloth was on the threshold of the door - I saw it safe ten minutes before it was missed. Ellis brought it to me with the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a constable. I was in the Commercial-road, and saw the prisoner lurking about; I watched him - I crossed over into a shop; he then went to the prosecutor's door, put the oil cloth on his shoulder, and ran off. I took him with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-159

329. THOMAS WILLIAM HENRY DOBBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , a coat, value 30 s., and a waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of John Hinde .

JOHN HINDE . I am a solicitor , and live in Essex-street, Strand . On the 29th of December, I missed a coat and waistcoat, which were safe the night before, from my room on the second floor. I found it in pawn on Monday morning, in Ratcliff-highway. I heard the prisoner was in the house, and went to the East India Company's barracks, and took him. I saw a duplicate of the coat found upon him.

JOHN CORDEROY . My father is a pawnbroker, and lives in Ratcliff-highway. I was present when the prisoner pawned this coat and waistcoat for 30 s., on Saturday night, the 28th of December. I am certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SUSAN COOK . My mother keeps the house where Mr. Hinde lodges. The prisoner came several times to see Mr. Hinde - he came on the Saturday, and went into Mr. Hinde's room, who was not at home. I heard him go out afterwards.

JAMES COOK . I am servant to Mr. Hinde. I have often seen the prisoner in the room. I put the coat into a trunk on Saturday morning, and in the evening it was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-160

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

330. RICHARD WARNER was indicted for stealing,

on the 29th of December , a pair of sheets, value 4 s.; four shirts, value 7 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; four aprons, value 2 s.; three napkins, value 16 s., and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. , the goods of James Renshaw .

JAMES RENSHAW . I lodge in White-horse-court, Whitecross-street . On Sunday, the 29th of December, about twelve o'clock, I went out with my wife. I bolted the back door, and locked my room door.

MARY RENSHAW . I went out with my husband - these things were on a chair in the room; we returned at nine o'clock, and they were all gone. I have found only one sheet.

ANN JONES . I live in the same house. On the day stated, my boy came up; I went down, and found Renshaw's door half open - I called my child to bring a light, and it looked all in confusion.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I live with my father, a pawnbroker, of Whitecross-street. On the 30th of December, the prisoner pawned the sheet for 2 s.; he came again on Wednesday, and I detained him. The prosecutrix declared in my shop that it was not her property, and when before the Magistrate she swore to it.

ROBERT LOCK . I apprehended the prisoner. He said his mother sent him to pawn the sheet - I took him to his mother, she said she did not; he then said he found it in Piccadilly.

MARY RENSHAW . I have always said that it was mine; I did not make it myself - it is not marked.

MARY KELLY . I know the sheet to belong to a Mrs. Elliot, for I was in the house when she made it; it is not the prosecutrix's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-161

331. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing on the 13th of January , a bushel of oats, beans, and chaff, mixed together, value 15 d. , the goods of Thomas Rhodes and William Rhodes ; and JOHN CLAY , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a dustman. Clay and I were were driving the dust-cart - Cook was with us. Clay asked Cook to give him some corn. Clay said,

"Come with me, and I'll give you some;" he took us to the prosecutor's premises, at Newington, and gave him the corn out of a nose bag. Cook gave him 6 d. for it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. This was for the horse you drove - A. Yes, I thought no harm of it.

Prisoner COOK. Q. You are the one who took it. - Witness. I did not. Cook drives for Mr. Rhodes; he emptied it out of a nose bag. I cannot say it belonged to Mr. Rhodes.

HENRY ISHMAIL . I am a patrol. I was on duty at Newington, and saw Clay near Hackney church, with a sack on his back, coming as from Mr. Rhodes's stable. I asked what he had got, he said, Corn, which he had bought at a corn-chandler's, at Newington. I told him I should go with him, to see if his account was true; he then said, he bought it of the hostler at the White Hart, public-house, Kingsland-road. I took him there, but the hostler denied it.

WILLIAM TEES . I am clerk to Messrs. Rhodes. I know nothing of this corn; it is of the same description as ours - we have missed none.

THOMAS BEST . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw Ishmail stop Clay, and crossed over to him. I opened the bag, and he said he bought it at the White Hart, public-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-162

332. JAMES BEAUMONT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , two sash windows, value 30 s., the goods of William Dempsey , and fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM DEMPSEY . I have a house in Jubilee-place , which was uninhabited; these sashes were glazed, but the glass is now taken out - they were fixed and hung.

FLORENCE DRISCOLL . I am a labourer in Mr. Dempsey's service. The house was finished, and the windows glazed. I had been at work there that day, and about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise like whispering, and something crack like glass. I called the watchman, who went up stairs - he called me up. I found the prisoner in his custody. We found the squares of glass in the same room against the wall; they had been taken out of the sashes; three out of eighteen were broken; they were all right at four o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You did not see him doing any thing to them - A. No, he gave no reason for being there, but begged to be let go.

RICHARD FOSTER . I am a watchman of Mile-end. Driscol called me in - he got over the wall to let me in. I found the prisoner up stairs; he opened the window, and got out on the leads. I told him, unless he returned, I would fire at him - he came back. I delivered him to Driscoll; he said there was one more with him, I searched, but found nobody. The lines of the sashes were cut, and the glass cut out. I heard glass break as Driscoll got over the wall.

JAMES STONE . I am a constable. I examined the premises, and found a glazier's tool there; the prisoner said he was a glazier, and that another young man took him there, and that the flail which I found on the premises belonged to that young man.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18230115-163

333. MARY WOOTEN was indicted for bigamy .

The indictment stated, that the prisoner was first married to John Wooten . The first witness stated that the prisoner's husband name was John Hope Wooten .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-164

334. ELIZABETH BRYANT and MARY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , a purse, value 2 d.; a sovereign, and a half-crown , the property of John Dallige .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18230115-165

335. JOSEPH GRINDLEY and ANTHONY CAIRN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 19 lbs. of lead, value 3 s., the goods of George Flamston , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

EDWARD TILBURY . I live in High-street, Bloomsbury . On the 17th of December, the prisoner was at work on my premises, and something being wrong on the adjoining roof, I sent them to repair it. In the evening the officer

brought me some lead, which I compared with the roof and it corresponded with what was missing there. The house belonged to my mother-in-law, Isabella Guson. George Flamston lives in it.

JOHN LINCOLN . On the evening of the 17th of December, about six o'clock, I was in Gee's-court, and saw the prisoners - I heard Cairn say to Grindley,

"This is the shop;" he was just by a dealer in marine stores - they walked in; I followed, and heard the man in the shop, say,

"I don't buy." I asked what they had got, and found a piece of lead concealed under Grindley's coat, and a piece on Cairn - it corresponded exactly with the roof. I secured them.

GRINDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

CAIRN - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-166

336. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , a tea-kettel, value 12 s., and a phosphorus box, value 2 s. , the goods of Dyer Lennan .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Weston .

DYER LENNAN I live in Holborn . On the 26th of December, between five and six o'clock, I missed these things, they were safe at four o'clock, on the back of the shop counter; next morning they were produced by the officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM COLTON . On the evening of the 26th of December, between six and seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner running down Holborn, with the kettle in his hand, I followed him, he was secured without my loosing sight of him, but he threw it away.

JOHN BOSTON . I saw the kettle thrown into the road. I picked it up and gave it to Colton, the phosphorus box was inside it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-167

337. WILLIAM LLOYD was indicted for embezzling, a five shilling-piece and threepence, which he had received on account of Samuel Summers his master .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a butcher , and live at Sommers-town, the prisoner was my servant , and entrusted to receive money on my account, which he ought to pay my wife, when he came hone. Mrs. Joyce dealt with me.

MRS. JOYCE. I paid the prisoner, four shillings and eight-pence halfpenny for his master. I cannot say in what coin I paid him in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-168

338. WILLIAM LLOYD was again indicted for embezzling, two half crowns .

SAMUEL SUMMERS . My evidence in the last case is true. Mrs. Wilkinson dealt with me, the prisoner never paid me a farthing on her account.

ELIZA WILKINSON . I live at Camden-town. On the 26th of December, the prisoner brought me a leg of mutton, which came to five shillings; I paid him two half crowns.

Prisoner. I understood it was for a Christmas-box - Witness. After paying him for the mutton, he asked me for a Christmas-box, and I gave him a shilling. I might have put all the money into his hand at once, but I told him the shilling was for him.

MRS. SUMMERS. The prisoner never came home after taking this mutton; he was apprehended next day.

Prisoner. My master owes me a fortnight's wages - Witness. I wanted to pay him his money, he said he wished me to keep it till Sunday. His wages were ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. Written. I am charged with this, in consequence of master forgetting to cross the books, but I am totally innocent. I went out, and was asked to drink by several customers, and did not return till ten o'clock at night, and being told master was going to send me to prison I left.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-169

339. LOUISA DAVIS was indicted for stealing on the 6th of January , a sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Richard Billingsby , let to the prisoner, with a furnished lodging .

JANE BILLINGSBY . We let a lodging to the prisoner's husband, not to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18230115-170

340. LOUISA DAVIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , a gown, value 3 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; two stockings, value 1 s., and a ring, value 4 s. , the goods of Mary Noakes , widow .

MARY NOAKES . I live in Duke's-court, Castle-street. The prisoner came from the same country as me, and lodged with me in Brown's-buildings, St. Mary Axe . I went out after a situation one day, about two o'clock; these things were then safe, and she was in the room. I returned about six o'clock, and she was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. This was about the beginning of October, was it not - A. We came from Wales in October, together, I think it was about thirteen weeks ago.

JOSEPH HALL . I am servant to Messrs. Murray, and Co. pawnbrokers, of East Smithfield. On the 6th of January, the prisoner pawned a gown, a shift, and a pair of shoes. I saw her before the Magistrate, and am certain of her.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a constable. On the 6th of January, I went with a warrant to the prisoner's room, in Flemish-street, and got a duplicate of this property from her husband; she said she had pawned them, and begged of me to say nothing about it, and after that, she said it was her own gown, that she had brought it from the country. I found a ring on her finger, which the prosecutrix claims.

MARY NOAKES . I cannot swear to the ring; the gown is mine, I know it by the pattern. I never saw another of this pattern. I cannot swear to any thing else.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-171

341. ANNE PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , thirty-six yards of galloon, value 2 s. 10 d., and eighteen yards of tape, value 4 d. , the goods of James Shoolbread , and John Ferguson .

DUNCAN CUMMING . I am shopman to Messrs. James Shoolbread and John Ferguson , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 16th of December, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner came and bought tape, and things, which came to 4 s. 10 d. While I was serving her, I saw her take a piece of tape, and put it under her shawl, and apparently into her right-hand pocket. I shewed her some galloon, and a piece which I left on the counter, was gone, and I saw her rustling under her shawl as before. I told Mr. Shoolbread, who came up as she was going out; she was taken up stairs, and denied having any thing; the shopwoman searched her, and found the galloon and tape, which are my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. She dealt at your shop, did not she - A. I never saw her before.

MARY MULCOCK . I searched her, and found a piece of galloon, tape, and ribbon in her pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-172

342. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN KEMP . I am a carman , the prisoner was my servant . On the 2d of December, I sent him with the waggon, to deliver four crates to Mr. Tyne, of Kensington, and entrusted him to receive the carriage, which was 4 l. 9 s. He set off about ten o'clock, and at half-past four, the waggon came into the yard without any driver, and the whip tied to the side of it. On the 28th, I saw him at Rotherithe, charged him with it; he said he had lost the money - he never paid it to me. He was about a month with me. I had given him no warning.

JOHN FELLOWS . I am porter, at Wakeman's-wharf, Paddington. I delivered the crates to the prisoner, and gave him this bill, (looking at it) with them. He was to bring back, 4 l. 9 s. I did not see him again till he was apprehended.

THOMAS TYNE . The prisoner brought me four crates, I paid him 4 l. 9 s., for the carriage.

JOSEPH WAKEMAN . I am an agent at Paddington-wharf. I wrote the bill for the prisoner, but have not received the money.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-173

343. SAMUEL ANSON and WILLIAM ASH were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of David Evans .

DAVID EVAN. On the 12th of December, in the morning, I was at work in my master's garden at Highbury-grove - my coat hung on the garden fence; my fellow servant alarmed me, and I missed it, went in pursuit, and found the prisoner's walking by the river side; as soon as they saw me, Ash threw my coat out of their basket; Evans picked it up - we followed and secured them without losing sight of them. I first saw them about a mile from the garden.

JOSEPH EVANS . I went in pursuit, and first saw them about a mile and a half off, carrying the basket. When I got within thirty yards of them, they turned and saw me - Ash threw the coat out of the basket, and both immediately ran off, and climbed over a large wooden fence. I came up with them after crossing a few fields; then returned and fetched the coat.

JOHN CARNELL . The prisoners were given into my charge. I asked Anson why he ran if he did not take the coat, he said,

"It is true, I don't know what I ran for;" Ash said,

"Don't lay it to me" - Anson then said,

"We are both in it."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANSON'S Defence. I saw several people running, and ran the same as another. I have been twenty-seven years in the Navy.

ASH'S Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and pursued over an hedge. A man stopped me.

ANSON - GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Three Months .

ASH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-174

344. SUSANNAH CUBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , two pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Richard Weston .

THOMAS FISH . I am servant to Thomas Richard Weston , at the Hope, public-house, Marylebone. On the 16th of January, I received information, went out, and saw the prisoner going towards Marylebone-church with a basket - I asked what was in it, she said two pint pots. I saw they were my master's, and took her back. I had left them at a house in New-street , the night before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18230115-175

345. GEORGE CHEESLEY was indicted for stealing, on 13th of January , a coat, value 2 l. 10 s. . the goods of James Ely .

JAMES ELY, I am a coal dealer , and live in Norton-street . On the 13th of January, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my house with my brother's card - and said my brother would be obliged if I would lend him my great coat. I gave it him,

JOHN ELY . The prisoner was in my service; I sent him to Hampstead, and told him to call and borrow my brother's great coat for me; he never came near me all day, so I went to my brother's, and at night met him in Holborn, with half a dozen girls, and asked what he had done with it; he said he had not had, nor seen it. I said, he had had it at half-past eleven o'clock; he said,

"Well, a boy came running after me in Oxford-street, (who I believe to be your brother's boy) and asked me for it." I said my brother had not got a boy.

Prisoner's Defence. A man ran after me in Oxford-street, and said he wanted Mr. Ely's coat.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18230115-176

346. SARAH INNWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , nine handkerchiefs, value 15 s.; a cloak, value 1 s.; a pair of shoes, value 2 s.; a shawl, value 6 d., and an apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Walsingham .

MARY WALSINGHAM. I lodge in Greyhound-yard,

Holborn , the prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 25th of December, I went out, and desired her to take care of the property in the room. I returned at half past-nine o'clock the next night, found the door locked, and her gone; I had it opened and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

THOMAS RAVENSCROFT . I am servant to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, of Holborn. On the 26th December, the prisoner pawned four handkerchiefs.

DAVID KNOWLES . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner in charge, and found the duplicate on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly did pawn the handkerchiefs, but nothing else.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18230115-177

347. JOHN RIDDELL was indicted for stealing, on he 15th of January , a pair of boots, value 7 s. , the goods of Charles Casey .

CHARLES CASEY . I am a shoemaker , and live in Brick-lane . On the 15th of January, these boots hung at the door; I heard the string move, ran out, and saw the prisoner running up Mitchell-street, with the boots under his arm, followed, and overtook him about one hundred yards off; he resisted a good deal, and threw them down.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Four Months .


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