Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1822.
Reference Number: 18221204
Reference Number: f18221204-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 4th of DECEMBER, 1822, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; George Scholey , Esq.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Christopher Smith , Esq.; and George Bridges , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; John Garratt , Esq.; and Anthony Brown , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julian Arabin ; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Richard Lamb ,

Thomas Day ,

Thomas Hope ,

William Thomas Huggins ,

William Green ,

William Henry Sinclair ,

Thomas Kingham ,

Robert Simpson ,

William Long ,

Richard Tucker ,

James Russell ,

Thomas Allen .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Butcher ,

Henry Stevens ,

Silvester Sapsford ,

Joseph Wells ,

George Smith ,

William Tribe ,

Samuel Walledge ,

Charles White ,

John Bailey ,

John Ellsmore ,

John Herbert ,

John Parnell .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

John Payne ,

William Abercrombie ,

William Thisleton ,

George Calton ,

Thomas Rawlings ,

Thomas Jones ,

Giles Waller ,

Edward Dyer ,

James Craig ,

William Wilson ,

John Sowerby ,

John Templeman .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 4, 1822.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Reference Number: t18221204-1

Before Mr. Recorder.

1. PATRICK GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November, 1821 , at St. Mary-le-bone , a watch, value 30 s.; three shirts, value 6 s.; two waistcoats, value 4 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three pair of stockings, value 3 s.; two coats, value 20 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s., the goods, of Edmund Carroll , in his dwelling-house .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18221204-2

2. JORGAN JORGENSON was indicted for that he on the 28th of September , at St Luke , feloniously and without lawful excuse, was at large before the expiration the term of seven years, for which he was at the delivery the gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 12th of April in the 1st year of his present majesty's reign, ordered to be transported, against the statute.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Reference Number: t18221204-3

Before Mr. Recorder.

3. ALEXANDER ROBERTSON was indicted for that he on the 19th of October , at St. Andrew, Holborn , feloniously did utter certain materials, to wit, one sugar bason, the bottom and cover of which were made of silver, and the other part of base metal silvered over, and resembling plate of silver; the said sugar bason having thereon at the time it was uttered the impression of a forged and counterfeited mark, forged and counterfeited to resemble a certain mark issued in pursuance of the 55th of George the 3d) denoting the payment of a certain duty, under the care and management of the Commissioners of Stamps on silver plate, with intent to defraud our Lord the King .

TEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18221204-4

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

4. JOSEPH HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , one chaise cart, value 10 l. , the goods of Spaul Thurlow .

SPAUL THURLOW . I am a stable keeper , and live in Hill-street, Upper Clapton. On the 25th of August, my man lent a chaise cart to somebody; he is not here - it was never brought back. I saw the prisoner three weeks after at Enfield, and told him I wished to have my cart brought home, and was determined to have it - he promised it should be brought home in a few days. About a fortnight after I got a warrant Five or six weeks after it was hired, the prisoner brought it home without the lamps or cushions. I believe he was not there when it was hired.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-5

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

5. WILLIAM TUCKER was indicted for that he, on the 17th of July , with a certain gun loaded with gunpowder and small stones, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did shoot at William Beckett , with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him or do him some grevious bodily harm.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BECKETT (being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath.) I am eleven years old, and live at Heston, with Mr. Bell. About two or three months ago, in the harvest time. I met the prisoner at Windmill-bridge - he wanted me to let him shoot at my hat; I refused; he took it off my head, and threw it up in the air - it lodged in a hedge, and he shot two holes in it, and after that he went to the other side of the road and picked up some pebbles-stones, and said,

"I'll be d - d if I don't have a shoot at you;" I said, " Oh! Ah!" and when he picked up the stones and crossed the road, he said,

"Do you think I should hit you there?" I said, Oh! Ah! He put the gun up to his shoulder, and put his fingers to the trigger - I put my hands to my face, and he fired off directly; I saw the flash - it hit me is the hands, arms, and face, and in my eye, in consequence of

which, I have lost the sight of it. Some of the stones were as big as peas. There was not room for more then two carts to pass between us when he fired. I had no quarrell with him. I never saw him before. When he saw I was wounded, he went and told Mr. Coleman that his gun had gone off, and he had shot this little boy in the face. Mr. Coleman said,

"Take him down to the canal, and wipe his face," which he did, and rubbed it with brown paper, and took me through the field towards home. He then asked which was my way home - I pointed to it, and he left me to go home; I walked back towards the bridge, and saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long had you been in his company - A. About half an hour. He was put there to keep the birds off the barley. I had been talking to him. There were some boats near us with people in them when he fired - they were at the lock below the bridge.

COURT. Q. Had he fired his gun before he fired at your hat - A. I did not see him fire before - it was loaded before he shot at my hat. His powder was in a bag in his pocket I - saw him pick up pebbles and put into the gun, and ram ti down after the pebbles were put in. I said Oh! Ah! thinking he was only in fun - I did not think he was going to shoot me. I could have ran away or stooped down if I liked. I did not go before the Justice till about three weeks ago.

PRESS BELL. The prosecutor lived with me. On the 17th after the accident, he came to my house. I saw him about half-past ten o'clock that night; he was in a dreadful state, and was under the doctor's care ten weeks. I went to a Magistrate about it next day.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you go to Bow-street - A. About the 16th of November. I know Mr. Haydon - I told him if the prisoner discharged the doctor's bill, and paid the expences my wife had been at, I should not trouble him further. The boy was entirely under my care.

MR. FROGLEY. I am a surgeon, and attended the prosecutor nine or ten weeks. I saw him the morning after the accident, and found him much wounded from the effects of it. I took several stones from his face, and some from under the skin of his hand. I expected he would have lost both eyes, but he has the sight of one. Some of the stones were very small; the largest was not bigger then a pea. He was unable to leave the house for six weeks. There was danger from the number of the wounds - he was out of danger after six weeks.

Prisoner's Defence. It was an accident. I had the gun in my hand, and was going away from the boy, and getting over a stile - the but-end of the gun knocked against it and it went off. He called out; I ran and picked him up. I saw Coleman and told him of the accident, and went and washed him and wiped it with some paper, having no handkerchief.

- TRUMPER. I am a farmer. The prisoner was in my service - I set him to keep the crows of the wheat. It was an old gun, and went off very easy at full cock - it was pretty strong at half-cock. I gave him one charge of shot in the morning in a hurry. He was not to shoot the birds, only to make a noise to frighten them away. He was a humane boy, and particularly fond of children.

WILLIAM COLEMAN , JUN. I work on the canal, and was about fifteen yards from Beckett, in a boat, rather under the bridge when the gun went off - I could not see him; he hollowed,

"Oh, my eye." I got out of the boat and met him on the bridge. The prisoner was about five yards from me. Beckett said,

"Take me home, or this boy will kill me." I went away and did not see him washed.

THOMAS COLEMAN . I was on the tow path of the canal, about fifty feet from the boys. I heard the gun go off, and immediately heard the boy cry. I sent my son on the bridge and went myself. The prisoner brought Beckett towards me, and said his gun had gone off unawares, and he had hurt the boy's face - he lifted him up to shew me his face. I lifted him over, and he washed him very carefully, and neither of us having a handkerchief, he poured the water on his face with his hands. He was very attentive to him, and appeared sorry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-6

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

6. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for that he, on the 30th of October , at St. Georges, Hanover-square, being servant to James Florence DeBurgh , Esq , did steal one ring, value 50 l.; one purse, value 2 s.; one 100 l.; one 50 l., and ten 1 l. Bank notes, the property of his said master and employer, in his dwelling-house , against the statute.

COLONEL JAMES FLORENCE DEBURGH , I live in Chapel-street, Grosvenor-place, in the parish of St. Georges, Hanover-square . The prisoner was a private in my regiment, and lived in my house, as my backman or servant. On the 30th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went out and left him at home - I returned between one and two; he was not then at home. I did not see him again till I saw him at Leeds on the 13th of November - I had no expectation of his leaving; I had missed my keys after going out that morning, and immediately on my returning I went to my scrutoire and found the key in it, and the scrutoire shut. I missed from a drawer in it where I kept my money, a green purse, which I know contained a 100 l. a 50 l. and ten 10 l. Bank notes, of which I had the numbers, and several other notes and sovereigns; also a diamond ring. On receiving information of his being apprehended, on Sunday fortnight I arrived at Leeds, and next day saw my ring in possession of the constable.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I am captain of the watch at Leeds. I produce the ring. The prisoner was in custody on the 11th of November last. I found the ring on him; also a 10 l. Bank note, a black purse, 35 s. in silver, and a green purse.

COLONEL DEBURGH. The ring is mine, and has been in my possession many years, and also the purse. A quantity of sovereigns were shewn to me at Leeds.

SAMUEL HARDING . I am a jeweller, and live in Oxford-street. On the 30th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock, or perhaps twelve in the day, the prisoner came to my shop, and bought a silver watch and gold key for 5 l. 13 s., and paid me a 10 l. Bank note - I wrote a name on it which he gave me,

" John Harris , No. 23, Chapel-street,

Grosvenor-place - (Looking at a 10 l. note dated the 27th of September, 1822, No. 684), this is it.

COLONEL DEBURGH. This note is one of mine. I stopped payment of it at the Bank. I had a list of the notes, which I made at the time I received them. No. 684, dated the 27th of September, 1822, is one of them. I gave the list to the printer for some hand-bills, and find this number and date in the printed bills.

JAMES INGHAM . I am street-keeper of Leeds. I went to the house of John Haliday , a hair-dresser, where the prisoner had lodged, and got ninety-three sovereigns and a half, in consequence of hand-bills being distributed. The prisoner was in custody then. They were in Haliday's possession, with a watch and some clothes. I only speak from information when I say he lodged there.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18221204-7

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

7. GEORGE McHENRY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kennedy , on the 8th of November , at St. Martin in the Fields, and stealing therein one boot, value 6 d.; two frocks, value 6 d.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; two pinafores, value 6 d.; one coat, value 2 s.; five shirts, value 5 s.; five sheets, value 10 s.; five shifts, value 5 s.; four gowns, value 10 s.; three bed-gowns, value 1 s. 6 d.; one pair of drawers, value 1 s.; five table-cloths, value 5 s.; two pillow-cases, value 1 s.; four aprons, value 1 s., and one umbrella, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Gough , widow .

ANN GOUGH . I am a widow, and by trade a laundress . I live in White Hart-court, Castle-street, Leicester-square . On Thursday night, the 7th of November, about one o'clock, I went to bed, and left every thing secure My linen was in my room. I was not disturbed in the night. I arose between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and found two baskets of linen empty, and the shutter of my room open. I am sure the window was down, and the shutters put too at night. I found some of the property that evening.

FRANCIS JOHN GATES . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. On Friday, the 8th of November, about ten minutes past five o'clock, in the morning, I was in George-street, St. Giles's, and saw the prisoner coming up from St. Giles's, towards Russell-street, with a white bundle. I asked what it was, he said nothing belonging to me - I said,

"What is it;" he said sheets, and that he got them from a man in George-street. I called assistance, and took him to the watch-house - he said there that he found them at Hoxton. I searched him, and found a shirt in his great coat pocket, and on the other side another, and a sheet under his waistcoat. Other articles were found on him. He had the umbrella in his hand. Mrs. Gough claimed all the property.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a patrol. I assisted in searching the prisoner. I found a sheet under his waistcoat, and one in each pocket. He said he found them at Hoxton. I found a small candlestick, a candle and matches on him, and a spike. They were concealed in an under jacket he had on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18221204-8

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

8. SAMUEL HILLIARD was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Pearson , at eight o'clock at night, on the 10th of November , and stealing two beds, value 30 s.; two mattresses, value 30 s.; one looking-glass, value 14 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; two blankets, value 10 s., and three quilts, value 5 s. ; his property.

ELIZABETH PEARSON . I am the daughter of William Pearson , who rents a house in Old-street. I sleep at a room in James-street , where this property was. On Sunday, the 10th of November, at half-past six o'clock at night, I went out leaving nobody at home. I locked and padlocked the door, and took the key with me. I returned about ten o'clock, and found the door open, but nobody in the house except the lodgers. The room was hired by my father, who is a broker, to put things into. I missed two new mattresses, a new feather bed, and the bed I slept on, two sheets, two bundles, some quilts, and other articles. I made the new bed myself - it is worth 2 l. 10 s. The mattresses are worth 3 l.; they cost us 30 s.

GEORGE GARNETT . I am the watchman. On Monday morning, the 11th of November, about a quarter past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a truck in Featherstone-court - he put a mattress on the truck; there was one on it before. I sent my brother watchman off with information, and when he returned I saw the prisoner put a bed on the truck. I took him in charge, and delivered the property to Walker. He was about two hundred yards from Featherstons-court.

HENRY MARTIN . I lodge in the same house with the prisoner, at No. 9, James-court, Featherstone-street, I was at home from seven o'clock till ten on Sunday night. I was standing at the door about ten minutes, and saw a man come into the court with a bed on his back - he put it down on the stairs, and the prisoner came out of his room and helped him with it into the prisoner's room - a woman lit them up. I saw nothing else broght in. I suspected they were only cheating the landlord, and went away directly. I do not know whether the prisoner had been out. I had been at home all the evening. I was not further out than the end of the court. I think I must have known if he had gone out at all between six and seven o'clock.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging, which is about sixty yards from this room, on the 11th of November, in the evening, and found a bed looking-glass, three quilts, and a sheet.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MARTIN re-examined. I live in the garret over the prisoner's room. I had been at the door about ten minutes when the bed was brought in. I had come from my own room, where I had been all the afternoon. After the bed came in I went to Whitecross-street. The prisoner was in his room at the time I went down - he could not go out without passing me at the door; his door was shut. I had not heard him move about in his room. The prisoner came down to the man of his own accord - he carried it up three or four stairs before the prisoner came and helped him. The prisoner lives up one pair. The man did not call him - I must have heard if he had called.

The prisoner in a long Defence, stated that a man had called on him two days before, and asked if he might move his goods to his room, as he was fearful of their being seized for rent, and that when they came, he found them

too bulky, and desired him to remove them, and they agreed to pay him to move them in the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-9

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

9. WILLIAM FRY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Myler , about eight o'clock in the night of the 30th of October , at St. Margaret, Westminster, and stealing therein six shoes, value 5 s. , his property.

RICHARD MYLER . I rent a house in York-street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . On the 30th of October, I lost some shoes from my window; I saw them about eight o'clock in the evening. A pane of glass had been mended with putty three weeks before, but was quite secure. I shut up at nine o'clock in the evening, and observed nothing. My lamp had been lighted two hours - it was quite dark. I went to bed at half-past nine o'clock, and in the morning about seven opened my shutters, and found the glass pushed in, and missed the shoes. In about half an hour Timbrell's daughter brought me some shoes, which were mine, and at the watch-house two odd shoes were produced.

RICHARD BRAND . I am a watchman of the Almonry. On the 30th of October, I was calling ten o'clock - the prisoner stood about three or four yards from my box, with a small bundle under his arm. I asked what it was; he said a pair of shoes, I found there was more than one pair, and took him to the watch-house. I found he had four shoes in a handkerchief, which I afterwards delivered to Timbrell.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELI . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house - the prisoner was brought in with two pair of shoes in a handkerchief; he said he bought them of a jew in the Borough, for 3 s. 6 d. It was a wet night. I examined his shoes, and found them very dry - I took them off, and found they were two odd ones. Myler claimed them. I sent my daughter with the two pair of shoes to Myler, she returned me the same I gave her.

RICHARD MYLER . The two pair and two odd shoes are mine, and were in the window at eight o'clock. They are second-hand - I know them by my punch mark. The two found on his feet are also mine, and appeared to have been worn about an hour. I only rent the shop and parlour - the house is let out in tenements, the landlord does not live in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18221204-10

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

10. MARTIN BELL and WILLIAM PARKINS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, of William Parry , about seven o'clock at night, on the 26th of November , at St. Mary-le-bone, with intent to steal, and stealing a coat, value 5 l., his property; and seven coats, value 3 l.; four pair of breeches, value 12 s., and four waistcoats, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Wasson .

ROBERT WASSON . I am coachman to Mr. Parry, who lives in St. Mary-le-bone parish. The coach-house is in Gloster-mews West , in the same parish. I sleep there without paying any rent. On the 26th of November, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, I went out and left nobody in the stable - I locked the doors. On returning I found the stable door unlocked, and bolted inside. There is a stair-case leading from the stable to my room, which is over the coach-house. I drew back and stood quiet. A man gently opened the door, and locked out - I ran up, locked him in, held the door and called the watchmen; we burst the door open, and found the two prisoners there, who were strangers. My box coat was moved off the coach box, and put on the splinter-bar; it was my master's, and worth 5 l. Four coats were taken out of a box in my bed-room; also two pair of breeches, and four waistcoats, and all put in a heap ready to be tied up, and carried away. A phosphorus box was found, which was not there when I went out.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Does not your master allow you less wages on account of your sleeping there - A. No. There is a passage leading from the stable to the house. I am sure I locked the door. The box coat was a new one. The property is not here.

CHRISTOPHER VINCENT . I am butler to Mr. Parry. I locked the back door leading from the house to the stable - that door was not broken open.

HUMPHREY ROBERTS . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. On the evening of the 26th, I was on duty at the watch-house. I searched the prisoners, and on Bell found a latch and a door key, and on Parkins I found two keys and a knife. I tried the keys to the stable door, but they would not unlock it.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am superintendant of the watch. Wasson alarmed me. We found the prisoners concealed on or about the body of the carriage.

JOHN SLOUGH . I am the coachman. I was at the stable, and went up stairs, and as I came down picked up a phosphorus box and matches.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I searched the prisoners's lodgings, but found nothing. One key belongs to Parkin's door.

The prisoners made no Defence, but Bell received a good character from seven witnesses.

BELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth and character.

PARKINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18221204-11

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

11. ANN WOOD and SOPHIA TRAVERS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Siggs , on the King's highway, on the 26th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bag, value 6 d.; twenty-seven sovereigns, and ten shillings , his property.

ROBERT SIGGS . I am a carrier , and live at Averill in Suffolk. On the 26th of November, I was in town, in Whitechapel, between five and six o'clock in the evening, and got in company with Ann Wood - she invited me home; she pressed me, and I went. The other prisoner went into the room with us. I gave them 6 d. each, and Travers said they would have 1 s. more before I went out; I said, I would if she would let me out. I took my purse out to give her 1 s., and Wood knocked my purse out of my hand - the other woman held me behind. I tried to seize Wood, but the other prisoner let her out - I struggled with her for five minutes before she got out, and tore her gown - the room was on the ground floor. I ran into the street, where several people were standing, and asked for

help nobody would assist me. Some man knocked me down. I seized Wood, but another man pulled me back, and she got from me. I lost sight of her for half an hour - I saw her again in the street, and she was secured. A waistcoat was taken from her, which she said belonged to a gentleman in her room - we went to the room; it was not the room I was in. I saw Travers in custody next morning. There was a candle in the room. I never saw them before; but am certain of them. I lost twenty-seven sovereigns and a cheque for 15 l. 10 s.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Who did the money belong to - A. Different people who I had received it for. I was quite sober, and did not like the place when I got there.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 26th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prosecutor in Winfield-street. He crossed the way, and seized Wood, saying she had robbed him - he appeared sober, but distressed at losing his money. In taking Wood to the watch-house, I found a silk waistcoat under her arm, which she said she was going to pawn for a man in her room. Upon going to the house I found a genteel man there without a waistcoat. I searched Wood soon after. The prosecutor said he had torn her gown at her bosom; she undid her gown, it was not torn. I took Travers next morning. The prosecutor saw her at the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You met her in Wentworth-street - A. Yes. If she had the sovereigns about her, I must have found them.

WOOD'S Defence. I was with the gentleman who gave me the waistcoat an hour and a half.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-12

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

12. MARGARET GIBBONS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one watch, value 6 l.; one chain, value 30 s.; two seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 1 s., the goods of George Findlay , from his person .

GEORGE FINDLAY . I am a seaman . On the 3d of November, I met the prisoner about eleven o'clock at night. I went to a house with her, but do not know where - we went to bed. I awoke at four o'clock in the morning, she was gone, and my watch and appendages. I had left it in my pocket - I slept in my clothes. My brother and cousin were with me, and came to the door to awake me. I found a pocket and some duplicates in the room, by which means I found her in bed, alone. I said I would give her two sovereigns to produce my watch - she said she knew nothing about it. My brother found it in the bed without the cases. She was quite intoxicated. I said if she would say where the cases were I would give her a sovereign - she would not and I called the officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. The prosecutor gave me the watch. She claimed the duplicates found in the room. I delivered them to her I believe, by order of the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him with two young men and another woman, and went with them. He only had enough to pay for the room, and gave me his watch instead of money. I gave him my direction, Brown Bear-alley.

GEORGE FINDLAY . I only had 5 s. I gave her no money, and had not agreed to give her anything. I gave half-a-crown for the bed, and found half-a-crown in my pocket in the morning. I was rather in liquor. I did not give it her to pledge. I am sure I did not entrust her with it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-13

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

13. ELIZA WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , three yards of linen, value 7 s.; three caps, value 3 s.; two yards of calico, value 2 s.; two yards of lace, value 2 s.; one yard of silk, value 2 s., and two yards of ribbon, value 1 s. , the goods of Sarah Crawford .

SARAH CRAWFORD . I lodge in Brownlow-street - the prisoner lodged in the same house for two days. I went out in the morning leaving my property locked up in two boxes - I returned at five o'clock in the evening; she had then taken a room higher up in the house as a lodging - she brought me the key of my room; I went in, and between ten and eleven o'clock next morning, I missed my property. I went with an officer to her room, and found two lace caps and other things, which I had not missed until I saw them on her bed. An apron was found in her box, which was mine. The whole of the property is mine - she had no authority to take it.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I went to the prosecutrix's room, and then to the prisoner's room on the second floor, and found her there. The property on the bed was claimed by the prosecutrix, and other things found in the box. The prisoner said they were her property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not like to live with her, (as she gets her living very indifferently,) and moved up stairs. The things were intermixed with mine - but I never intended to steal them. I never looked at them till the officer found them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-14

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

14. HAGAN ALDESTERN WALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , four shirts, value 8 s. , the goods of Simon Simpson .

SIMON SIMPSON . I live in Three Colt-court, Limehouse . On the 2d of November, at nine o'clock, when I went to bed, four shirts were on my table, and when I came down in the morning I missed them. The prisoner is a shipmate of mine, and lodged at my house for three months. He was taken on the 10th, for breaking my windows, and one of the shirts was found on his person. I told him of the loss of the shirts on the 3d - he said, I should be cautious how I accused him of it, if I could not prove my words.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Was there not a dispute between you about some debt, and he paid you a smaller sum - A. He paid me part of the debt. I kept him for five months. My wife never pawned his property. He had his meals in our room, and my wife washed for

him. There was no quarrel between us. He owed me 15 l. 9 s. I never gave him a receipt.

ANN SIMPSON . I am the wife of the prosecutor. Three of the shirts were cotton, and one linen. My husband had only worn two of them. I was obliged to pledge almost every thing we had to maintain the prisoner. The house had not been broken into. They were missed on the morning of the 3d of November. Another man besides him lodged in the house - he was not absent. My husband charged him with it directly; but he denied it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you make the prisoner's shirts - A. No; I washed them. His were a different stripe and colour to my husbands - he slept three nights in the house after the robbery, and went before the Magistrate to complain of our detaining his things for what he owed us.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN. I am a watchman. On the 10th of November, I was called, and took the prisoner for breaking the windows, and on examining him Mrs. Simpson claimed the shirt on his back. He said he could prove he had had it made at Cumberland-gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not afterwards say he must have taken it by mistake for his own - A. I do not recollect it.

The prisoner in his Defence; stated that he took the shirt by mistake, for one of his own, which laid on the same table - that his things were detained, and he only owed them 16 s.

ANN SIMPSON . He owes us 3 l. now - he has only paid 10 l. 10 s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-15

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

15. CATHERINE McCABE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , three blankets, value 12 s.; one sheet, value 2 s., and one counterpane, value 2 s. , the goods of William Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a livery-stable keeper , and live in Coleman-street . On the 25th of November, about six o'clock, the servant alarmed me. I sent Hunt, the post boy up stairs - I followed him soon after, and found he had hold of the prisoner. My door leading from the house to the stable is generally open. I found some things on the floor, and two blankets on the bed. She said she was going by the gateway, and asked the post boy the way to Knight Rider-street; that he said he would shew her the way, and took her up into the room - but finding her an old woman would have nothing to say to her.

JOHN HUNT . I am a post boy to Mr. Thompson, I was with my master in the counting-house, and the servant said she heard somebody up stairs. I went up to my master's bed-room on the first floor, and found the prisoner there. I never saw her before. The bed clothes were off the bed, and she was tying them up, she had the blanket, sheet, and counterpane. I held her till my master came up. I took a light up with me, which she put out.

ELIZABETH ALLCOCK . I am servant to Mr. Thompson. I was in the kitchen, and heard footsteps overhead - I informed my master, and went up with Hunt, and found the prisoner in the act of taking the things. I had made the bed, and turned it down an hour before, but found the things on the floor.

WILLIAM LILLEY . I am a constable. I took her in charge with the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing belonging to Mr. Thompson. The boy came up, and told me to go up, and he would shew me where I could get a lodging. I was much intoxicated. He thought I was young; but found I was not.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-16

16. JAMES COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one waistcoat, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Yates , and one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Philip Lee .

PHILIP LEE . I am a clerk to Mr. Drake, of Love-lane, Eastcheap . On the 7th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I lost a coat out of a closet on the first floor. The street door is generally open. The prisoner was brought into the counting-house with my coat hanging on his arm. I saw it safe an hour before. He was a stranger.

THOMAS YATES . I am a clerk to Mr. Drake. On the 7th of November, I lost a waistcoat, from the same closet. I did not see the prisoner till he was brought into the counting-house. My waistcoat was in his hat - he said he was going to take the coat to his master. He had a paper in his hand with a name on it.

MR. JOHN ABRAHAM DRAKE . I am a merchant, and live in Love-lane. I saw the prisoner standing on the staircase, which is close to the door. He was quite a stranger - he said he came to enquire for Mr. Carter; I knew no such person, and desired him to go into the counting-house. He had a coat on his arm, which Mr. Lee claimed. The waistoat was found in his hat.

WILLIAM HENRY BUXTON . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner. I found the waistcoat in his hat, and two duplicates in his pocket. He resisted, and got away, but was secured in a few minutes - I am certain of his person.

ABRAHAM STERLING . I saw the prisoner running away in Love-lane; I caught him and held him till the constable came up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman in Billiter-square gave me a note to find out Mr. Walker - he sent me up stairs to see if he was there, and as I came down the things lay on the stairs.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-17

17. WILLIAM PRICE WALL was indicted for stealing, on 25th of October , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of John Greensill , from his person .

JOHN GREENSILL . I am a clerk in the Ordnance Office, and live at Islington. On the 25th of October, between one and two o'clock, I was in Ball-alley , walking towards the Bank. I had a silk handkerchief in my pocket - I felt a twitch at it, and upon turning round saw the prisoner putting something into his pocket. Nobody but him was

near enough to take my handkerchief; I felt and missed it - he ran past me into George-yard, and turned into Lombard-street. I kept calling Stop thief! he was stopped. I merely lost sight of him while turning the corner. I am certain he is the man. The handkerchief was produced - he appeared alone.

WILLIAM HENDERSON . I am shopman to Mr. Carter of Lombard-street. As I came to George-yard, the prisoner rushed by me, and crossed to go up Three King-court, running in a direction from the cry. I pursued, and he was stopped a few yards up the court. I found the handkerchief in his hand, which I gave to the constable with him. He said he had picked nobody's pocket, before any questions were put to him.

JOHN WATSON . I heard the cry of Stop thief, and saw the prisoner running up Three King-court. I was in the court, and stopped till he came up - he said,

"Don't stop me;" I seized him, and saw the handkerchief in his hand. Henderson took it from him.

HENRY TAYLOR . I took the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-18

18. MARIA EVANS and JANE McDONALD were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , six shillings, the monies of John Nash , from his person .

JOHN NASH . I am a hair-dresser , and live in Holywell-street, Strand. On the 29th of October, between twelve and one o'clock at night, I was by Honey-lane, Cheapside , returning from my father-in-law's. I was quite sober. I saw Evans; she asked me to go home with her - I refused. She put one hand on my thigh, and the other on my neck, and pressed me up against a shop front. McDonald came up, and thrust her hand into my trowsers pocket, and took out some money (I had 9 s. 6 d. there); I seized her hand while it was in my pocket, and saw some money pass from her to Evans, who returned some to her again. On my calling for assistance, McDonald gave me a shilling, and said that was all she had taken, and she got away. I gave Evans in charge of the watchman - she said, she knew nothing of the other woman. McDonald was not taken till next night. Evans was never out of my sight. I did not see McDonald myself for two mornings after. I am certain of her - she was pock-marked. I missed 5 s. from my pocket, besides the shilling returned me. It was a moonlight night - and I held McDonald by the gas light for three minutes.

JAMES EVANS . I am a constable. Evans was brought into my custody.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I apprehended McDonald on the night following, she denied the charge. I found no money on her.

McDONALD'S Defence. I was at home at a quarter to nine o'clock on the 28th, and next night as I was taking some work home, Taylor took me. I was not in Evan's company.

THOMAS VANN . I live at No. 1, Crown-court, Golden-lane, and am in the employ of Messrs. Evans and Son, booksellers, of Long-lane. McDonald lodged with me for upwards of six months. On Monday, the 28th of October, she came home between nine and ten o'clock at night; she lives on the 2d floor - I live down stairs, and let her in, and was up till near one o'clock. I double locked the door, and it is impossible she could go out - she had no key. She did not leave the house till between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

McDONALD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-19

19. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one ham, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Moores .

WILLIAM WELLER . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Moores , a cheesemonger , of Fleet-market . This ham hung about five feet inside the shop. I saw the prisoner standing behind the door post, looking into the shop - I watched him, and saw him come in, and take the ham. I overtook him within a yard of the door. I think he had been drinking.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-20

20. THOMAS WALLER was indicted for stealing on the 29th of November , four shillings, the monies of Thomas Toll , from his person .

THOMAS TOLL . I am a labourer , and live at Wilsden. On the 29th of November I came to town to look for a situation, and between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner by Smithfield , he was quite a stranger - he came up and asked if I wanted a place, I said Yes; at his desire I accompanied him to a public-house, for him to put my name down, he said he would call for a pen but did not; he asked me how much money I had about me, and told me to pull my purse out - I had 15 s. in my purse when I went in, I spent nothing then, I pulled out my purse and took out seven shillings and a sixpence, I had it in my hand. Two or three minutes after we got in, a man came and joined the prisoners company, and wanted me to play at some game, I said I had no money to play games - the prisoner then took 4 s. out of my hand, and the other man took 3 s. 6 d. I told them they should not have my money, they started out of the house immediately without saying why they took it - they took different directions. I followed the prisoner a little way calling out that he had robbed me. Taylor, the officer, met him and stopped him, without my losing sight of him; he had called for a pint of beer at the house, which he paid for on delivery, and offered me some of it, this was before he took my money. I described the house to Taylor, it is about twenty yards from where he was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not game there - A. No, he returned me the 4 s. just as Taylor came up - Taylor was dressed in blue, turned up with red.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable, and apprehended the prisoner in Little Britain; the prosecutor was following him and accusing him of robbing him; the prisoner saw me, he knew me before, he immediately put 4 s. out of his hand into the prosecutors hand, and said

"Here is your money," the prosecutor said,

"This is not all, I want 3 s. 6 d.

more;" the prisoner made no reply. The prosecutor pointed out the public-house to me, it is the White Horse, in Little Britain - I found three duplicates and three bankers cheques on him, not folded up; the prosecutor described the other man.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has foresworn himself, he tossed up for 1 s. and a pint of porter, I held the 4 s., he said he could not afford to lose it, I said I got nothing by it, and gave him his 4 s. back.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-21

21. PHILIP WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 27th of November , 17 lbs. of mutton, value 5 s. , the goods of James Daniels .

JAMES DANIELS . I am a butcher of Leadenhall Market. I saw the prisoner take the saddle of mutton off the hook, and put it under his arm, between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 27th of November, I went after him and took him with it six yards off.

JOHN FORSTER . I took him into custody with the mutton.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18221204-22

22. WILLIAM ANGEL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Henry Pelerim Dutton .

HENRY PELERIM DUTTON . I live on Tower Hill. - This coat was stolen from Mr. Cohen's counting-house, Swithen's-lane . I left it there between six and eight o'clock in the evening, and on returning about nine in the morning, I found it was stolen; I saw it at the Mansion-house that morning with the prisoner in custody - the counting-house door was open when I left.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 30th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was crossing from the end of Cornhill to the Mansion-house, and saw the prisoner coming down Lombard-street, with something in a handkerchief under his arm, he passed me, and turned down Charlotte-row; I went up and felt the bundle, and asked what he had got, he said a blue coat, which he was going to take to Crown-court, Fleet-street, that he brought it from Mr. White's, No. 15, Fenchurch-street. I found it did contain a blue coat, I said,

"Don't tell me a lie, and send me to Fenchurch-street to no purpose;" he said," I will tell you the truth, a man, at the corner of Lombard-street, gave me the coat to carry to Mr. Smith's, in Crown-court." I went to No. 15, Fenchurch-street, but could find no Mr. White there; I then went to Crown-court, and found that one Smith had lived at No. 9, some time back, but nobody at No. 3. I returned, and Mr. Dutton claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave it to me to take to Smith, a tailor, No. 3, Crown-court.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-23

23. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 2 lbs. of feathers, value 6 s. the goods of Mary Fullbrook , in a lodging-room .

MARY FULLBROOK . I am a widow , and live in Bird court, Phillip-lane , the prisoner took a lodging at my house - he stopped six weeks before this happened. I let him a room on the second floor, with another young man, he was to pay 2 s. a week for half the bed. On the 30th of October, he was going away, he owed me 5 s., he came down with a bundle, I asked what was in it, he said some dirty things; I said I wished to see them, he refused, and went up stairs, I followed him, and saw feathers scattered about the ticking which had been ripped open, and feathers taken out. I sent for a constable, we found 2 lbs. of feathers in the bundle - he was gone away then, and had put the bundle into Wood's box, and was taken four day's after; they were taken from the bed in which he slept.

JOHN WOOD . I am servant to Mr. Hardcastle, and slept with the prisoner; when I got up I left him in bed, the bed was not disturbed then, I found his bundle in my box afterwards.

JOHN ASHBURN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the back of the Rosemary Branch public-house, Hoxton. I told him the charge, he said, he had done it and it could not be helped.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking across Islington Fields one morning early, and picked up an old pillow case with the feathers in it; I took them home, and next morning was taking them out when I was stopped.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18221204-24

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

24. JAMES SPEAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 60 lbs. of lead, value 5 s., belonging to Francis Platamone Count St. Antonio , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his, and one copper, value 5 s. , his property.

SECOND COUNT, stating the lead to be fixed to a building.

THIRD COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the same person and Sophia his wife.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JAMES ABBOT . I am an auctioneer, and live in Castle-street, Strand. On the 28th of September I took charge of a house in Duke-street , for Francis Platamone Count St. Antonio, a copper was fixed in the wash-house which I had caused to be unfixed, and put into the house, the service pipe of the cistern was fixed to the premises. I saw it safe within a fortnight of the time the prisoner was apprehended; I kept the key of the house.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. On Monday morning, the 4th of November, about seven o'clock, I met the prisoner in Jeremy-street, with the copper in a bag, on his back; Foxhall and I went up and questioned him, he said he brought it from Duke-street, and was taking it to his master. in Fleet-Market. We followed him, and saw him near an old iron shop in Blue Cross-street, and then stopped him; he resisted a good deal, but Foxhall took him, and I took the copper; he slipped off his coat and ran off - we followed and overtook him - we found a crow-bar and basket in the bag, he was stopped in Regent-street

without my losing sight of him. As he was brought back to the top of White Horse-street, I saw a quantity of lead and a knot, wrapped up in a black cloth - it was in the direction he went. I compared the crow-bar with the marks on the house in Duke-street, where the lead was wrenched, it fitted, and the pipe matched with the rest - the edges were quite fresh cut.

THOMAS FOXHALL . I was with Bidgood.

BENJAMIN BRUTON . I am servant to Mr. Abbot. I know the copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Jeremy-street, about a quarter past seven o'clock, and a man gave me the copper to carry to Fleet-Market.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-25

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

25. EDWARD POWELL was indicted for stealing. on the 19th of November , two sash cills, value 8 s. , the goods of John Viney , and CHARLES EYRES was indicted for receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN VINEY . I am a carpenter , and live in Crouch-End . I had a pair of sash cills cut in the last week of October, and laid them in the timber-yard. On the 19th of November, I received information, and missed them, I found them at Grinder's, Hornsey-road. In consequence of what he said, I went to the prisoner Eyres's house, and as the officers entered the door, I saw Powell escape by the back window, and run across the field; we stopped him. Eyres was taken on suspicion.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you call them cills - A. They are cut in the rough for cills, we call them cills, they are 11 feet long.

EDMUND GRINDER . I am a wheelwright, and live in the Hornsey-road. Powell asked me to make him a cart, and he would find the timber; and on Saturday evening, the 16th of November, he sent two pieces of oak, and said they were to make the shafts with. He came to me and said he had laid them in my yard, and asked me to put them into my shop, and on Monday morning I found they were sash cills, and immediately suspected they were stolen. He was at my shop on Monday and Tuesday mornings - I told him they would not do for the shafts - he told me to cut them up and make the body of the cart with them; the cills laid before us all the time. I went for Mr. Viney, who took them away that evening.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there no other wood laying about - A. Yes, but it was all mine. I had hold of these cills at the time we were talking about them.

JOSEPH PRESTON . I am a sawyer, and work for Mr. Viney. I know this to be the timber I cut out, by an accident I had in sawing them - the yard is open all night - Powell lives about a mile off and had no business there - I saw them on the premises the beginning of November, they were about three feet within the gate.

JOHN VINEY . I have no reason to suspect Eyres.

POWELL'S Defence. I found them and took them to Grinder's, as I could find no owner, and intended to pay the owner if I found him.

POWELL - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

EYRES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-26

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

26. ELIZABETH PILLAR and MARGARET SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , from the person of Nathaniel Fowler , a bag, value 1 d., five half-crowns, twenty-five shillings, three sixpences, and a 1 l. Bank note , his property.

NATHANIEL FOWLER . I am a hawker , and live in Berkshire. On the 22d of November, about eight o'clock at night, I was in Ratcliff-highway - I met the prisoner Pillar, and went home with her, I found Smith in the room, we had a pot of porter, which we all drank, I paid for it. In about half an hour Pillar and I went up Ratcliff-highway, leaving Smith in the room - we were out about two hours; we sat some time in a public-house, where we had a pot of beer. I was not much in liquor when I first met her - we returned to the room and found Smith there, and had another pot of beer, and some meat cooked for supper, after that I laid on the bed, and so did Pillar, for three-quarters of an hour, and while there I felt her feeling about my breast under my waistcoat. I said,

"What are you doing," she said

"Nothing at all" - she got up - she was to go and find a room where we could be for the rest of the night, and Smith was to bring me to her - my money was in an inside pocket at my breast - Smith told me to come with her to find Pillar, and when I got out of the street door she shut me out, I then missed my property, I called the watchman who accompanied me to the house, we found both the prisoners there, and the bag my money was in laying on the bed empty. I picked it up - they both denied having seen me. Pillar opened the window and threw something out - the watchman said it was a note. She made no answer; the watchman afterwards brought me a Warminster note, which had been in my bag with 39 s. in silver. I had more silver in my breeches pocket.

JAMES CONNELLY . I am a watchman of Shadwell. Between one and two o'clock in the morning of the 22d of November, the prosecutor came and told me he had been robbed by two women, and that he should know them; we went to the house and knocked - Pillar looked out of the window. I said,

"Do you know this man"; she said she thought she did, and that he had been there that night - she came down to open the door in her shift. I went with him up stairs. She denied the charge. Fowler took a bag off the bed and said,

"Here is the bag which contained my swag, but there is none in it now;" Smith denied any knowledge of it. I said I must search; Pillar then weat and threw something out of the window. I asked what it was - she said nothing. I said I saw her throw something, she said it was only a piece of paper, and that the watchman had got it. Roberts brought the note in, and Fowler claimed it; 11 s. 6 d. was found in the room - they were both undressed.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman of Ratcliff-highway. I remained outside of the house. I was going to fetch an officer to burst the door open, but they opened it. I was coming back, and just as I got to the house, I saw Pillar open the window and throw the note out. I picked it up.

NATHANIEL FOWLER . The bag is mine, and the note is a Warminster one which I lost. I cannot read.

PILLAR'S Defence. He asked to go home with me. I took him to Smith's room - he asked me to go down to Berkshire and live with him, and took me out, bought me

a bonnet and ribbons. When we returned, he shook his money out of his bag, and said,

"Don't think I have got no money;" I told him to pick it up. I went out to get something to drink, and on coming back he was gone - he gave me the note at supper time to redeem some clothes, as I was going with him to Berkshire.

NATHANIEL FOWLER . I did buy her a bonnet. I did not throw her any money down, or give her the 1 l. note. Her account is false.

The Court being of opinion that there was no case against Smith, she was acquitted, and called by Pillar on her behalf.

MARGARET SMITH . What the prisoner at the bar says is very right indeed; the prosecutor came to my place and gave her this note, in my presence, to go and redeem her clothes. She said she could not get change, he said, never mind, as he could get it in the morning from the waggoners. She put it in her bosom. She had no place to sleep, and I let her sleep with me. The watchman found 11 s. 6 d. in my husband's chest, which belonged to two men who were at sea. Fowler was very much in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-27

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

27. CATHERINE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two sovereigns, two shillings, and a pen-knife, value 6 d., the property of Thomas Davis , from his person .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am an excavator , and live in Chandos-street. On Saturday, the 16th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Spur-street, Leicester-square . She asked me for some gin, I said I had no money to part with; she kept following me, and asked for a few halfpence - I gave her 2 d. or 3 d.; she then came close to me - I found I had lost two sovereigns and a penknife. I stopped and accused her of it - she had kept pushing up close to me till I missed the money - nobody else came near me. I had it safe when she first came up, for I had my hand in my pocket at the time. I had her taken to the watch-house - my pen-knife was found on her but no money. I was sober, I had been paying my men at Pimlico, and was going home. I had come with another man who was going into Regent-street.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me some bread and cheese out of your pocket - A. No, I had none; my knife was in the same pocket as the sovereigns.

RICHARD STRICKLAND . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found a pen-knife on her, but no money - she did not say how she got it, or that the prosecutor gave it her, or took liberties with her.

THOMAS FREELAND . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave an alarm - I went up, and found him holding the prisoner, and charging her with robbing him of two sovereigns and two shillings. She said nothing about his giving her anything.

(Knife produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the knife to cut the bread and cheese.

THOMAS DAVIS . A hackney coachman came up, and looked her full in the face; she could have given it to him.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Of stealing the Knife value 6 d. only .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-28

Before Mr. Baron Garrow

28. THOMAS BENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , five shirts, value 25 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Barnett ; and one pair of shoes, value 2 s., the goods of Sarah Spencer , from her person .

SARAH SPENCER . I live with my mother, in Vinegar-lane, Commercial-road - she is a laundress. Thomas Barnet is my father-in-law. On the 30th of October, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was in Gravel-lane with a bundle of linen, into which I put a pair of shoes which I had bought there. As I came out of the shop, I saw three men standing there - one of them snatched my bundle, and was gone in a moment; one of the others ran after him. The prisoner held me fast while the others got away - he held me full two or three minutes; it was moon-light, and the lamps were lit; I screamed out for assistance, and he ran towards the others, but was stopped before I lost sight of him - I am certain of him. My bundle was produced in a few minutes; it had been picked up in the direction they ran.

JOHN AVERY . I am a Bow-street patrol. I heard a young woman scream out, and ran to her - she said,

"They have got my bundle, there he goes, that is him." The other two ran up Chigwell-hill, and the prisoner ran up by the dock wall, and took to the left. I secured him; she immediately said he was the man who held her. I went to Chigwell-hill, and picked up the bundle. The linen belonged to a Captain, and was given up to him. I asked how he came there, he said he went on an errand from his master, Mr. Ward, French-alley, Goswell-street, and afterwards said he went on his own pleasure.

(Shoes produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to the Black Horse, public-house, Gravel-lane, to see a man. The prosecutrix screamed out, and said she was robbed - I went up and asked who by; she said a man, and pointed towards the wall-several people ran, and I was taken.

SARAH SPENCER . He did not come and ask who robbed me. I am certain of him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-29

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

29. ELIZA CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , two stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Jeremiah Lewis .

HENRY GEORGE TRAYER . I live with Mr. Jeremiah Lewis , a pawnbroker , at Shadwell . The prisoner came into the shop on the 8th of November, between three and four o'clock, and asked for two affidavits for three shells, which were in pledge, and as I was writing them, I saw her handling the stocking, which hung up in the shop near the counter, and before I had finished them, I saw her putting her hand into her pocket - I looked and saw the stockings were gone. I went round, and charged her with taking them - she asked how I could think of such a thing. While I was calling somebody to fetch an officer, I saw her shifting something about - I went round again, and found them on the floor. I am certain they were not there the first time I went round. When the constable came she begged for mercy. She had pawned some shawls at our shop

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched them.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-30

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

30. MANUEL SILVA was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one watch, value 50 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; a case of surgical instruments, value 20 s., and a pair of shoes, value 6 d. , the goods of Frederick Cappers .

FREDERICK CAPPERS . I belong to St. Thomas's Hospital . The prisoner was a patient there, and after being convalescent, he was employed to assist me in the surgery. On the 29th of November, about one o'clock, I went out leaving him there - this property was in my bed-room up three pair of stairs. I locked my boxes and the door, and put the keys in the surgery as usual. I returned home, at half-past one o'clock, expecting to find him there, but he was gone and did not return. When I went to bed at night I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment. I found him that night, at the Star, public-house, opposite the East London Theatre, and all my things were found on him.

THOMAS TURNER . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house about eleven o'clock, at night with a bundle in his hand. All the property was found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to pawn them to pay my expences to Portugal, and meant to send him the tickets from Portugal,

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-31

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

31. ELIZABETH WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , two coats, value 5 s.; a pair of breeches, value 3 s.; two candlesticks, value 2 s.; a tea-tray, value 1 s., and a cloak, value 6 d. , the goods of John Mitchell .

JOHN MITCHELL . I live in Red Lion-court, Wapping . The prisoner lodged in the same house with her father. I missed this property on the 17th of November - she was not to be found after that. They were in a drawer, which was not locked.

EDWARD NEWBURY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Anchor and Hoop-alley, St. George's. On the 31st of October, the prisoner pawned a silk cloak for 6 d. in her own name. She said she had borrowed it.

(Cloak produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman gave it to me to pawn.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 6 d. only .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-32

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

32. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of John Cave .

JOHN CAVE . I am a cheesemonger . and live at Cambridge-Heath. On the 9th of November, I was at Newgate Market , and left my horse and cart in care of a person - my great coat was in it. I was not gone above four minutes, and on returning I missed it.

GEORGE RAINER . I took care of the cart and saw two baskets in it, but nothing else.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am a constable. On Saturday, the 9th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner on Saffron-hill, with the coat under his arm - I followed him to a shop in Chick-lane, he came out, and just by Turnstile I stopped him and questioned him; he said it was a great coat, and that he bought it of a man in Smithfield, for 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a Jew and bought it for 10 s.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-33

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

33. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , three sovereigns and a seven-shilling piece, the monies of Nathaniel Shackle , from his person .

NATHANIEL SHACKLE . I am a clothier , and live at Nailsworth, in Gloucestershire. I was in London on the 26th of November, and was taken to a house near the Tower, by a relation of mine on the 27th, and there I saw the prisoner; it was late in the evening - I slept there all night with her - I am certain of her - I lost three sovereigns and a seven-shilling piece. I know they were safe at twelve o'clock, and the next morning, about day-light, she awoke me, by opening the door to go out. I instantly looked for my clothes, which were under the pillow, and missed them from my watch pocket - I got up and wrote a note to the landlady, requesting her to detain the prisoner if she returned, and that I would call at seven o'clock at night, which I did, and found her in custody of an officer. She said she had spent 1 l. 12 s., in Field-lane, and had 35 s. of my property left, which she threw on the table in the bag, it was in when I pinned it in my fob.

LEWIS BARNETT . I am an officer. I took her into custody, she acknowledged it, and produced 1 l. 15 s., saying she had spent 1 l. 12 s.

GUILTY. Aged 19

Of stealing, but not from his person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-34

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

34. FANNY ROUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , two blankets, value 4 s.; a glass, value 6 d.; two pillow-cases, value 6 d.; two sheets, value 5 s.; and a quilt, value 1 s. the goods of William Booth , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM BOOTH . I live in Great Barlow-street. My wife let the prisoner a furnished room, with a man who passed as her husband - she took it for her and her husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-35

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

35. JOHN SOUTHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a basket, value 6 d., and a dead hare, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Parker .

Mr. LAW conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS TURNER . I am the guard of the Regent Stamford Coach. On the 8th of November, on our way to town, at Hornsey, we stopped to take up a passenger, and saw the prisoner behind, in the act of handing the parcels from the hind boot. I hollowed out,

"Stop thief;" Lee pursued him - he was taken fifty yards off. I brought him to town on the coach - I missed a basket containing a hare, among others, directed to Mr. Parker.

JOSEPH LEE . I am a groom. On the 8th of November, I stopped the Stamford Coach; between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the boot door open, and the prisoner step off the steps behind and run away. I raised an alarm - I took him, and heard something drop from him - I got a lamp and found this piece of iron on the spot. Next morning I went to the spot where I took him, and found two keys.

THOMAS WILLEY . On the 9th of November, I was in the Hornsey-road, and looking over a hedge on the spot the guard mentioned, I found two baskets, on containing a pheasant and a hare - I don't know what was in the other. I got a gentleman to read the direction, and I delivered one parcel to Mr. Parker, Newgate-street.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am book-keeper to the Stamford Coach, at St. Neots. On the 8th of November, I received a basket, directed to Mr. Parker, Newgate-street, which I put into the hind boot myself. I produce the weigh bill.

THOMAS TURNER re-examined. I only came from Graveley. I delivered no parcel on the road. When we arrived in town, on calling over the weigh-bill, this was missing among others; I saw it in the boot, at Graveley.

- THOMPSON. Mr. Auger is proprietor of the coach. He has no partners.

MR. JOSEPH PARKER . On the 9th of November, this parcel, containing a hare and pheasant, were delivered at my house.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-36

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

36. HANNAH POMROY and ELIZABETH CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a gown, value 5 s., and a waistcoat, value 4 s. , the goods of William Abel .

ELIZABETH ABEL . I am the wife of William Abel , we live in Rosemary-lane . I was confined to my bed five weeks, and after that I missed a gown and waistcoat, about four months and a fortnight ago; they were taken out of a box which stood outside my bed-room door unlocked - the prisoners both lodged at my house. On the 7th of November, I saw Clark pass my door, with my gown on, and had her taken, next day I took Pomroy, and found the waistcoat in pawn, at the Minories, on the 9th of November. I cannot say whether they were taken at the same time, I missed them before Pomroy left, which was four months and a fortnight ago.

Prisoner POMROY. Q. When did you take the possession of the shop - A. Ten months ago. I had not seen the things for twelve months. I did not mention the loss, thinking she would move if I did, and I wished to find it out. Pomroy lodged there before we took possession, which was before Lady-day.

THOMAS OBORN . I apprehended Clark with the gown. She said Pomroy sold her the duplicate of it. On the 8th, I apprehended Pomroy, and found a duplicate of the waistcoat on her.

WILLIAM BUDD . I am shopman to Mr. Harris. I took the waistcoat in pawn of a woman - the duplicate is that I gave her. Pomroy might have pawned it - I have seen her at the shop.

POMROY's Defence. My husband bought the waistcoat the day after Christmas-day, in Whitechapel, for 8 s., and before he went to sea I pawned it. He bought it of Mr. Morley, Whitechapel, who has it down in his book.

CLARK'S Defence. Pomroy gave me the duplicate, saying, the gown was too small for her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-37

37. SAMUEL CORNEY was indicted for that he, on the 17th of June , having in his possession a bill of exchange, (setting it forth dated June 17, 1822, at two months, for 37 l. 16 s., drawn by S. Corney, upon Mr. Mead, No. 2, Pope's Head-alley, Cornhill;) on the same day did forge an acceptance of the said bill , which is as follows -

"Accept W. Mead," with an intent to defraud J. Walker .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

HENRY WALKER . I am a farmer , and live at Enfield. I sold the prisoner some wheat, he ground it at Waltham Abbey. He owed me 28 l. 3 s. 2 d. I received a bill of exchange on the 17th of June - it came sealed up in a letter which I produced. My wife gave it me. I have frequently seen the prisoner write, and know his handwriting - the signature to the bill is his - I don't know who wrote the body of it. It was not endorsed when I received it, but there was an acceptance on it. It was addressed to William Mead , No. 2, Pope's Head-alley. About a week after I received it the prisoner called for the balance; I refused to pay it until I enquired who the acceptor was; he said he was a very good man, that he was a flour factor, in Mark-lane. I saw him about a week after at Waltham Abbey; he said he was distressed for cash, and wanted the balance of the bill. I said it was not endorsed; he said it was - I told him it was not, and shewed it to him; he said,

"How could I be so foolish as to send you this bill without its being endorsed;" he went into the White-horse, and there took a pen and endorsed it in my presence. I said I should not give him the balance, for I had made enquiry, and could find no such man as he mentioned. I enquired in Mark-lane, and Pope's Head-alley, and could find no such person. I kept the bill till it was nearly due, and then gave it to my son-in-law, William Palmer , to present. I have not the letter which enclosed it - I don't know what was done with it - it stated he had sent me a good bill, and would call in a few days for the balance. I believe the letter was in his hand-writing, but I don't recollect. He repeatedly called for the balance, but never after it became due. He was taken up more than two months after, as he frequently promised he would find the money, and said first that Mead lived at one place and then at another.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The acceptance is not his writing - A. I don't know that; the bill has been in my son's possession for a week, or perhaps more, and

was one night at my solicitors. I have no mark on it - every time that I saw the prisoner, he said Mead lived in a different place. I went to him a week after it was due, and told him it was not paid, and I could not find Mead; he always said it was on a good man, and would be paid. I was told that no such person lived in Pope's Head-alley. I don't know whether the upper part of the house is let out.

WILLIAM PALMER . I live on Ludgate-hill, and am a hosier. I received this bill from Mr. Walker, my father-in-law, and presented it, on its becoming due, at No. 2, Pope's Head-alley, at the bottom part of the house, and received for an answer, that Mr. Mead was not known at all - it is a notaries. There is a stair-case with names on the side - none of them were Mead. I did not go up.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you make the enquiry - A. The day it became due.

JOHN ADAMS ELLEN. I am clerk to Mr. Guillonneau and have been so seven years, at No. 2, Pope's Head-alley. The whole house belongs to him - his business is carried on on the ground floor - there is a stair-case leading to the rooms above - no person named Mead lived there in June last. I remember Mr. Palmer coming with the bill - I handed it to Mr. Guillonneau. Palmer said he would have it noted, and Mr. Guillonneau then in a formal manner asked the housekeeper if any such person lived up-stairs, though he knew there was no such person.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Guillonneau does not live in the house - A. No, the housekeeper has to let the offices - we are furnished with the names.

Q. Suppose one person takes a set of chambers, and two live in them, you don't enquire about that - A. Certainly not; I know every person in the house - I receive the rents from them.

MARY WALKER . I received the letter sealed and directed to my husband.

CATHERINE WYBEY . I saw the prisoner write a letter, seal it, and give it to my housekeeper to deliver. I did not see the bill. He lived in Essex. Bill put in and read.

Mr. Adolphus called

WILLIAM MOORE , I am a stationer, and live in Bishopsgate-street; the body of this bill is my writing. I have drawn several for the prisoner, but don't recollect this particular circumstance, there were sometimes two persons present, and at times only one. Some of those I drew for him have been accepted in my presence, but whether this was or not I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-38

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

38. WILLIAM BITTON and RICHARD CLARK were indicted for stealing, on 28th of October , one yard of muslin, value 7 d.; a quarter of a yard of other muslin, value 10 d.; two pieces of cord containing twelve yards each, value 18 d.; six dozen of wire buttons, value 1 s. 4 d., and four balls of cotton, value 1 d., the goods of Matilda Walford from his person .

MATILDA WALFORD . I live in Clifton-street, Finsbury-market. On the 28th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the corner of Houndsditch - my reticule hung on my arm; I felt a pull at it, and Forrester immediately came up, and asked if I had lost anything; I then found a parcel containing these things had been drawn out of my reticule. The prisoners were taken soon after. I do not recollect having seen them. Forrester produced my property immediately.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 28th of October, between five and six o'clock, when I came near Duke-street, Houndsditch, I observed three persons behind a female, going towards Houndsditch - I followed them, and when she came to the corner of Houndsditch, I observed a bustle - I did not see them take anything: but she turned round, and looked rather confused, I asked if she had lost anything - she said

"Yes, a parcel." Bitton was then going towards Aldgate-church, and Clark crossed to the opposite side - I could not see the other. I looked for half a minute, then crossed over, and laid hold of Clark, opened his coat, put my hand between his legs, and took the parcel from there - it contained the articles stated in the indictment. Bitton was at that time crossing towards Clark - I said to somebody who was near,

"Lay hold of him;" he immediately ran down the Minories a short space, then turned back and walked; somebody laid hold of him, and delivered him to me - he said he knew nothing of it. When I took Clark, he said,

"I picked this parcel up at the corner of the posts." Several persons besides them were round Miss Walford, as there was a stoppage with a coach. I did not see either of them stoop; they might without my seeing them. My eye was fixed on them. I cannot say whether the pavement was clean or dirty. I think it was a dry night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BITTON'S Defence. I was returning from Gracechurch-street, and as I crossed a gentleman laid hold of me.

CLARK's Defence. I was coming home, and by the corner of Houndsditch, I kicked this parcel with my feet, took it up, and held it in my hand ten minutes to see if anybody owned it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-39

39. BENJAMIN VALENTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 3 lbs. weight of pewter, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Phillips , his master, to whom he was servant .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a pewterer , and live in Smithfield . The prisoner was a labourer in my service. I had information from my journeyman, and set him and my son to watch, and on the 2d of December, about eight o'clock at night, when I came home, I saw about 3 lbs. of pewter, taken from the prisoner - he said it was the first time. He has worked for me for three years off and on.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am the prosecutor's son. In consequence of suspicion, I made a hole in the wainscot through which I could see all over the workshop, and about five minutes to eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner go to the fire to toast a small piece of cheese with his right hand, and with his left he took two pieces of pewter out of the put, and put them into his left hand breeches pocket - I acquainted my father, who sent for an officer. My father stopped him as he was going out of the shop door. I saw it found in his pocket - he said it was the first offence, and begged forgiveness.

THOMAS PIKE . I was fetched, and took the pewter out

of his pocket - he wished to take it out himself. Both pieces have Phillips's initials on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-40

40. HENRY HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one trunk, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; two shirts, value 10 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 d.; two neckerchiefs, value 3 s.; a flannel belt, value 1 s.; a shaving-box, value 5 s., and two razors, value 1 s. , the goods of George Telfor .

GEORGE TELFOR . I live at Stroud, Rochester, and am master of a vessel , which laid in Billingsgate Dock . I left the vessel at four o'clock on the 5th of November - my trunk containing the articles stated in the indictment was then in my bed place - there were papers in it to the amount of 1800 l. - I have never found it. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM BROWNHILL . I am a constable of Billingsgate. On the 7th of November, about eight o'clock at night, I and Mackey having information, went in pursuit of a man - the prisoner was stopped by somebody and given into our charge; we took him to a public-house, and found a coat on him. We sent for Mr. Telfor, who claimed the shirt on his back; also a handkerchief, and flannel bandage, which he had on. He said his mother gave him the shirt, that she had made it, and he had the fellow at home - I asked if it had any mark; he said, No; we found it marked G.T. He said there was a blue mark on the flannel bandage, and Mr. Telfor also claimed it by that mark - he denied knowing anything of the papers or trunk for two or three days, but afterwards said voluntarily that there was another man in the robbery - that he gave him the things which he had, out of the trunk, and the cannister containing the ship's papers, and finding them of no use to him, he threw them into the Tower-ditch. He took us to the spot; but we cannot find them.

WILLIAM MACKEY . I took the shirt off his back - Mr. Telfor described it before he saw it. We found a pension ticket on him for 9 l. a year.

(Shirt produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the Mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-41

41. JOHN GOULDING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , seven copper rivets, value 2 s. 6 d., and 5 lbs. of copper, value 4 s., the goods of William Pontifex and others his partners, to whom he was servant .

JAMES WOOD . I am in partnership with William Pontifex and others, coppersmiths of Shoe-lane. The prisoner was in our service as day-labourer . On the 28th of October, Mr. Cummings brought several pieces of brass and copper to me, which I immediately identified as ours, and ordered the prisoner to be taken into custody. He was in the workshop - he declared his innocence - nothing was found on him. His wife never came to the manufactory - they never buy goods of us, and these were quite new.

WILLIAM CUMMINGS . I am an iron-monger and brazier, and live in Beech-street, Barbican. On the 26th of October, about eight o'clock at night, a woman came to my shop to buy a kettle, and produced this copper to be taken in exchange. I afterwards shewed it to Mr. Wood, who claimed it. There were seven or eight pounds of it.

JACOB FRUIN . I am beadle of Holborn. On the 28th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Mr. Wood came to me; I went and took the prisoner at his factory; brought him into the counting-house, and told him he was charged with stealing copper - he said he knew nothing of it. I went with Mr. Wood to Cummings, and we all went to No. 5, John's-court, Golden-lane, and saw a woman who called herself Mrs. Goulding. I afterwards saw her with the prisoner, who acknowledged her as his wife. We found nothing at the house but two small pieces of solder in a box.

MR. CUMMINGS. This was the woman who brought the copper to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them. The people who gave them to my wife will prove where they got them.

RANDAL M'DONALD . I live in John's-place, Golden-lane, in the same house as the prisoner, on the first floor. I am a plasterer, and work for Mr. Trott. I was working at a sadler's in Goswell-street. About two months before the prisoner was taken up, I was going for a pail of whitewash, I found a bit of old rag, with some rivets tied in it, as I crossed from the pawn-broker's shop to the Pitt's-head, public-house - they were copper, and new, I believe, but did not take much notice, as I was in a hurry to get my breakfast. They looked fresh; there were 10 or 12 rivets, to the best of my belief. I took them home, and gave them to an old woman who lived in the house named Pettit. I have not seen them since, and should not know them again. There was no piece of copper with them; they were about the same size as those produced. This was two months before the prisoner was taken.

Mr. WOOD. I am certain of the rivets being of our manufacture; I am certain they had not been made a week before he was taken; any one in the trade would say the same.

SARAH PETTIT . I lodged in the same house as the prisoner did. M'Donald was coming home one Saturday night, and found these rivets, about two months before the prisoner was taken up. When he came home he threw them down, apron and all, and said he had found them. I did not open it, but gave it to Mrs. Goulding - I might open it.

Q. Did you open it or not - A. To be sure I did; it contained little nails of copper. I gave them to Mrs. Goulding, saying they might be of some use to her.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-42

42. THOMAS ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a bag, value 1 s.; a coat, value 30 s.; three pair of trowsers, value 24 s.; three waistcoats, value 14 s.; four shirts, value 16 s.; three neckerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d.; a razor-case, value 6 d.; two razors, value 3 s. 6 d.; a razor-strop, valu 2 s. 6 d.; two brushes, value 1 s.; four pair stockings, value 4 s.; three night-caps, value 1 s. 6 d.; one pair drawers, value 2 s.; one pair shoes, value 5 s.;

four books, value 12 s.; a watch, value 34 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; and one seal, value 5 d. , the goods of Robert Allen Mitchell .

ROBERT ALLEN MITCHELL . I lodge in the King's Arms yard, Coleman-street. I put the articles stated in the indictment into a bag, and sent them by coach to the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street, to be left till called for. I walked to town. The watch was in my pocket - I met the prisoner in my way to town. I arrived on the 1st November, and stopped at the Cherry-tree, Kingsland-road, for him, as I had given him my watch to sell for me, and he had gone away with the money. When I got to the Spread Eagle, the bag was gone - the prisoner was taken next day. I had told him I had sent my property there.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am book-keeper at the Spread Eagle; this bag came by the Lincoln coach, directed to Robert Mitchell , to be left till called for, about the 28th of November. On the 1st of November, just as the Lincoln coach came in, the prisoner came and asked for a bag directed to Robert Mitchell , to be left till called for. he paid 2 s. 8 d. for the carriage, and it was delivered to him. Mitchell came for it about ten minutes before ten o'clock that night; I told him it was delivered. I saw the prisoner at the office next morning, and am certain he is the person.

Q. Did you, or another person, deliver me the bag - A. I did myself, and took the 2 s. 8 d.

HENRY MAGNAS . I am an officer. On the 2d of November, about ten o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street; the porter of the inn was with me; I told him I took him for stealing some clothes from the Spread Eagle; he denied the charge. I took him up the yard, and Penny identified him as the person who received the property. I found a waistcoat on his person, with Mitchell's name at full length on it, also a pair of stockings, neck and pocket handkerchiefs, with his initials, and 14 s. 6 d. in cash He denied having any property when I searched him. I have found nothing else.

WALTER BARWELL . I am porter at the Spread Eagle; I did not see the prisoner there, but apprehended him on Saturday morning, in consequence of information, and saw the clothes taken from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made a long defence, and stated that he was discharged from the 33d regiment, and fell in company with the prosecutor about six miles from Peterborough, who persuaded him to accompany him to town, instead of going to Cambridge, which he intended, and promised to pay his expenses; but the prosecutor not being able to walk so well, he (the prisoner) told him where to find him in town, and came on; the prosecutor having lent him the waistcoat, shirt, stockings and handkerchief to appear decent when he got to town.

ROBERT ALLEN MITCHELL . I never gave him leave to wear the things, they were in my bag.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-43

43. ELIZA BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Eliza Thornton , in a lodging-room let by contract to her .

ELIZA THORNTON . I live in Philip-lane, in the parish of St. Sepulchre , and rent the whole house; the prisoner took my front attic furnished at 5 s. a week, and staid about three months. I gave her warning, as she owed me 25 s. rent. She said she took it for her husband and herself - he came home every night.

COURT. The lodging was taken by her and a man - the indictment is bad.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-44

44. HENRY STRUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , two children's dresses, value 40 s. , the goods of Edward Smith and his partners.

EDWARD SMITH JUN. I am in partnership with my father and brother, and live in Houndsditch . On Saturday morning, the 2d of November, these dresses were inside the shop door, on a string. I did not see them taken, or see the prisoner near the shop. I was informed they were gone - went out, and saw the prisoner about five hundred yards off, in a back street, towards Duke's-place; he was secured, and denied the charge, the property was not found - it was worth 40 s.

JAMES WILKES . I am a scale-maker, and live in Golden-lane. On the 2d of November, I was at work for Mr. Shurey, of Hounsditch, nearly opposite Smith's, and saw the prisoner and two young men talking together, at the corner of Castle-street, within two or three yards of the shop. I was working at the door, and watched them with my master - the prisoner left their company and looked into a pastry-cook-shop, within two doors of Mr. Smith's, then one of the others went in and came out, then he joined company again. I saw the prisoner leave them and look in at the pastry cook's window again - the other two went up to Smith's door and took the clothes; the prisoner immediately followed them, and went off with them. His face was towards them when they took the dresses - he must have seen them. I saw him beckon to them, and they directly went up and took them; and he followed them up Castle-street. I went and told Mr. Smith, and when I came out I saw them again, but when they came to another corner I missed them - he turned the same corner and was laid hold of; he said he lived at a cheese-monger's in Mile End-road, and denied it.

Prisoner. Q. I said I lived at a broker's - A. He said a cheesemonger.

WILLIAM TRIPP . I am a constable. He was delivered over to me - I found nothing upon him - he said he lived with a broker, I went to the broker and found he knew him.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with the broker five months ago, I was coming up Houndsditch and saw two lads by this shop - they came up to me - one of them asked the way to James-street; I said I did not know, he left me, and I saw him standing by the shop door - whether he took any thing or not I don't know, but there was a cry of

"Stop thief," and I ran after them directly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-45

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

45. RICHARD RUSSELL and JOHN LEE were indicted

for stealing, on the 24th of October , twelve box scales and sectors, value 20 s., the goods of John Bleuler privately in his shop .

MR. JOHN BLEULER . I am an optician , and live on Ludgate-street . On the 24th of October, twelve box scales, and twelve sectors were on my compter, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, wrapped up in paper. Lee came in about five and asked the price of a magic lantern, he looked at some slides - I had occasion to turn my back to get them - he stood alone at the compter, and went away without buying any thing. I did not see Russell that I know of; there was a person waiting outside, looking in at the shop. I cannot tell who it was. In the afternoon of the next day, the officer called. I did not miss them till he shewed them me - they were in the same paper as when they laid on my compter. I had not sold them. I saw the prisoners at Bow-street, two or three days after, and am certain of Lee.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners in company together, going into the gallery entrance of the Adelphi theatre, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, on the 24th of October. I went in after them, and brought them out. I found the scales and sectors on Russell, tied in brown paper, and wrapped up in a handkerchief - he said he bought them of a Jew for four shillings, but did not say where. I found Mr. Bleuler's name on them, and he claimed them.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I saw the things found on Russell, he said he gave a Jew 4 s. for them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LEE's Defence. I had been on business for my father, was returning, and on Ludgate-hill, seeing a magic lantern in the window, I went to ask the price. I was going to the theatre to keep a place for my father, and met Russell in the Strand, who went with me.

RUSSELL'S Defence. I do not know where the shop is, we had not been in company above ten minutes when we were taken. On the 23d of October, the day before I was taken, I had been to my master's to enquire about a situation, having lost it through illness, and in the Borough I saw a Jew boy, who said he would sell me some rules, which I bought for four shillings, for a glazier, who I knew wanted some. I was waiting to meet the glazier at the corner of Richardson-street - I saw Lee and went with him.

LEE - GUILTY. Aged 18.

RUSSELL - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-46

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

46. CATHERINE BAYLIES and SUSAN WELSBY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a table cloth value 2 s.; three gowns, value 10 s.; six petticoats, value 6 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; two veils, value 20 s.; a parasol, value 2 s.; a book, value 2 s.; a comb, value 2 s.; a tippet, value 2 s.; and two shawls, value 5 s., the goods of Harriet Johnston ; and three coats, value 2 l.; three pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; four shirts, value 10 s.; three cravats, value 2 s.; and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of Henry Coe ; and MARY MUMFORD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

HARRIET JOHNSTON . I live in Berkeley-street, Lambeth . The prisoners Baylies and Welsby lodged with me, they came on the 30th of October, and stopped three weeks and four days, until the 24th of November, when they left during my absence, without notice. I went out about half-past one o'clock, and returned at six, and they were gone. I missed the articles stated in the indictment - Mr. Coe lodged in the house - my things were in two separate bedrooms. I found most of them at Bow-street next morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH WORMALD . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Monday morning, about nine o'clock, I was coming up the Strand, and at the end of Hewitt's-court, I saw several people - I saw Coe standing by the side of Mumford. I found his property in the front garret of No. 3. New Round-court, Strand. Baylies and Welsby were in bed there together. Coe asked Baylies for his property, and she produced a great deal of it from under the pillow. They acknowledged that they brought them away - Baylies said they came there the night before.

HENRY COE . I lodged at Johnston's. Baylies and Welsby also lodged there. I went out to dinner on the 24th, and returned at half-past eight o'clock at night and missed my things. A coachman gave me information, and next morning I went to Hewitt's-court, Strand, to Acker-man's, a pawnbroker, and gave information there. I remained in the court, and in half an hour the pawnbroker came out of the shop with Mumford and my coat, when I gave her in charge. I asked her no questions - I then went to No. 3, New-round-court, and found Baylies and Welsby there in bed. Wormald came almost directly after, and I found the property produced in the room.

JOHN BUGG . I am shopman to Mr. Ackerman, pawnbroker. A friend of Coe's gave me information about a quarter to eight o'clock, and in about half an hour Mumford offered a coat in pawn for 1 l. I asked whose it was, she said she brought it from a gentleman. I sent for Coe who claimed it and took her.

JOSEPH WORMALD re-examined. Mumford took me to her lodging of her own accord, No. 3, New Round-court. I asked her no questions.

WELSBY's Defence. I did not take the things. Baylies took them.

MUMFORD'S Defence. They came about ten o'clock at night with two bundles - they said they had left their lodgings and were going out of town in the morning. I let them remain in my place - they asked me to pawn the coat, saying, it belonged to a gentleman of theirs.

BAYLIES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WELSBY - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Welsby recommended to Mercy, and to the Penitentiary .

MUMFORD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-47

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

47. JAMES TRAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a pair of trowsers, value 4 s.; a razor, value 18 d., and a shirt, value 18 d. , the goods of Thomas Banner ; and JOHN RILEY was indicted for receiving the razor and shirt, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS BANNER . I have been in the first regiment of

Dragoons, but am now discharged. On the 28th of October, I was quartered at the Coach and Horses, public-house, Jew's-row, Chelsea . Trayner slept in the same room with me for two nights. On the 30th of October, about ten o'clock, I went out, and left a shirt a pair of trowsers, and a razor, in a bundle in the room - he was not in the room then. I returned about half-past three o'clock, and did not go into my room till I went to bed; I then found my handkerchief opened, and the things taken out. I saw the prisoner next morning at the Three Crowns, public-house - he denied it. My trowsers were produced to me at the Coach and Horses, public-house. I afterwards went to Riley's.

WILLIAM DRAPER . I am a shoemaker, and live at Chelsea. I saw Trayner at a public-house at Chelsea, one Wednesday night, about ten o'clock; I met him in the passage, and he asked if I wanted to buy a pair of shoes - I said No; I examined them, and should know them again. I met him in the street next morning, and asked him if he had sold them; he said he had, but he would get me a better bargain in the course of the day. I took Banner to the Three Crowns, where Trayner was; I said he was the man who offered me the trowsers - he was given in charge. (Trowsers produced) - these are them. I saw No. 12 on the waistband when he offered them - it was about ten o'clock at night.

ROBERT CHAMPION . I am a constable. On the 31st of October, about eight o'clock in the morning. I was fetched in the Three Crowns, and found Trayner, Draper, and Banner there. Banner said he had been robbed of this property, and gave charge of Trayner. In the way to the watch-house, he said of his own accord that he took the things and sold them, being distressed. About an hour and a half after, I went to Riley and asked if had not in the course of Saturday bought a shirt and a razor, and described Trayner to him; he said,

"No, I did not" - I said I am told you did. As I was coming away, I saw the razor laying on the board in front of his shop, where he puts his goods; he said he bought it yesterday for 2 1/2 d. - I told him not to part with it till I found whether it was Banner's, and said

"I think you must have the shirt;" he said,

"I have none but one which hangs there," which was a calico one, without a frill. I fetched Banner, who claimed the razor - I then said he must have the shirt - he said I

"have not." I said he must go to Queen-square, to say where he got the razor; he said,

"Well shall I get into trouble about the shirt;" I said I could not say - he said,

"Well I have it," and fetched it; it was not the one which hung up. Banner said it was his, but the frill was gone. He said he bought it of Trayner - he is a dealer in marine stores. He went out willingly with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

TRAYNER pleaded distress.

RILEY's Defence. He came to me, and said he had nothing to eat for a week, and asked me to buy the shirt - I gave him 18 d. for it, and next morning found it was stolen. I told Champion I had not got the shirt, as I had sold it, and while he was gone I got it back.

TRAYNER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

RILEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-48

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

48. SAMUEL PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , twenty-six yards of linen, value 35 s. , the goods of William Dawsett .

WILLIAM DAWSETT . I am a weaver , and live in Wilmot-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner was my apprentice - he lived five years with me; he left me, and returned again, and on Sunday, the 17th of November, he went out and did not return. I missed a shawl, and then a piece of Irish linen, worth 39 s., which we bought the day before. On the Sunday following (the 24th,) I met him - he said,

"Master, I am very sorry for what I have done, if you will let me, I will come home and work it out, and pay for the cloth I have taken away" - I had said nothing to him. I told him it was the second time he had robbed me, and he should never come into my house again. I had him apprehended on the 26th. I had seen the Irish cloth on the 17th.

Prisoner. Q. I said I was sorry for being absent from work, and would make good what time I had lost - A. It is false.

BARNARD GLEED . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th, at his master's shop. I told him I took him for stealing the cloth - he said he thought his master would not have sent for me, when he was to pay him 5 s. per week.

WILLIAM DAWSETT re-examined. I let him come home on the evening of the 26th. I took no notice, but let the officer know. I never agreed to take 5 s. a week. He was in the shop, but I did not tell him to go to work.

Prisoner's Defence. He sent to say I might come home.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-49

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

49. THOMAS MOODY was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM PARKES . I am a horse-hair manufacturer , and live in Worship-street. The prisoner was in my service about twelve months - he was employed to receive money from my customer's; his duty was to bring it to me immediately upon receiving it. On the 14th of October, I sent him to Mr. Atkinson's with a bill, which had been returned, to receive the amount - he did not return; but gave himself up about a month after.

MR ATKINSON. I paid this bill to the prosecutor - it was dishonoured, and a boy brought it to me, and I gave a cheque on Messrs. Ransom, for 6 l. 5 s. I cannot swear to the prisoner.

PHILIP EDWARDS . I am a cashier to Messrs. Ransom, and Co. I paid this cheque, but cannot say to whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-50

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

50. ELIZABETH KIRBEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , twelve plates, value 4 s. , the goods of William Carter .

THOMAS ALLEY , I am servant to Mr. Carter, who keeps a china-shop in Rosemary-lane . We had a stand of things outside by the window. On the 30th of October, I was at the door, and received information, and laid hold of

the prisoner with some plates under her cloak - she knelt down and put them on the curb stone. Phillips took them up, and I took her. I know them by the pattern.

BARNARD PHILLIPS . I have a stand by Mr. Carter's On the 30th of October, I saw the prisoner take some plates of the bottom of the shop window; she crossed over, and was going down Princes-street. I told Alley, and saw him stop her. She put them on the ground about twenty yards off.

Prisoner's Defence. It was mere distress. I had a child dead at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-51

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

54. JOHN JANES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a hat, value 3 s., and an apron, value 1 s. , the goods of David Donold .

DAVID DONALD . I am servant at the Carpenters' Arms, public-house, Adam-street, Westminster . The prisoner was in the tap-room on the 18th of November - he asked for a lodging, and was told he could not have one. He called for half a pint of beer - I saw him take up my hat, which was on the seat, and wrapt it up in a cloth. I stopped him, and asked what he wanted with it - he said he was not going to take it away. I had put my apron on the bench, and the landlady told me to feel in his pockets, and I found my apron there. I turned him out, and the watchman soon after brought him back.

EDWARD BARKSHAW . I am a watchman. The prisoner was turned out of the house. I followed him down the mews, and found him behind a dung heap, took him back, and Donald gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-52

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

52. THOMAS INGS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 800 lbs. of lead, value 7 l., the goods of Francis Darcy Bacon , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his ; and JOHN DRUCE was indicted, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT stating it to have been fixed to a building.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a carpenter. I was employed by Major Francis Darcy Bacon to repair some buildings on Finchley Common : the gutters of his three houses were leaded. On Monday morning, the 24th of November, I missed about 7 cwt., which I had seen safe about ten o'clock on Saturday morning. I traced footsteps of two persons from the house, and also four resting places. I traced them towards Druce's house, and sat up all night watching, and on Friday morning I saw his cart, which Barnes stopped. I afterwards took Ings and one Jordan. I saw some lead in possession of Atkins, and found the rest buried in Drnce's garden. There were between 3 and 4 cwt of lead, it fitted with the top of the building; the whole was stripped off. I have no doubt it came from this building.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a carpenter. On Tuesday, I stopped Druce with his cart. I was with Chapman on the 24th; we traced footsteps 200 yards from his house, until we came to the turnpike road. When I saw Druce with his cart, I told him I was directed to stop him; he asked me for what, I said on suspicion of the lead in his cart; he said he had some lead, but he did not know where it came from, that Jordan and Ings were to meet him at the Maidenhead, Battle-bridge, to take the lead from him. I secured him. The lead was in two sacks in the cart; he also had some empty fish-baskets and a coat in the cart. We proceeded to the Maidenhead, but found nobody there. In the evening I apprehended Ings. I saw the lead compared with the building, it fitted. I had seen the two prisoners and Jordan together on the Saturday night about eight o'clock, at the Swan with two Necks public-house, Finchley Common. Ings had his coat tails tucked up into his pockets, somebody said to him,

"Why don't you put your tails down?" he said

"That is just fit for my business." They live about one hundred and fifty yards from the public-house. I saw Ings and Jordan at the same house on Friday night, about nine o'clock, talking very low, I heard one of them say,

"It won't do." Druce keeps an ass and cart, and goes about the country. He made no resistance.

THOMAS ATKINS . I am an officer. Dunce was brought to me by Barns. I matched the lead, and found it corresponded with the building.

ISAAC ROBINSON . I am bailiff to Major Bacon . Chapman came to me on Tuesday, and I went with him to where Jordan worked, and took him, and next day I took Ings. The houses are called Coldarbour.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a gardener. I had been working for Mr. Mathews. On the Saturday night I saw Ings and Druce at the Swan with two Necks on Finchley Common. Ings had been talking about the house at Coldar-bour about a week before. We had no conversation about it on the Saturday night. Ings had said there was some lead in the gutters which might be got at; I said very well - he said, but we must have a ladder to get at it, and that he had been round the premises, and seen one laying there. He said nothing about it to Druce, but said to us on the Saturday night, that I must give him a good load of something before Christmas. Ings and I went to the house that night between eleven and twelve; Druce did not go. We took all the lead off the three gutters; it was about 7 cwt. We carried part at a time down in the meadow field which leads down to Druce's house; we then carried it on further, resting at times, and took it to Druce's house; he was at home; Ings went round to his windows, where he slept, and knocked; I saw him give out the shovel to dig a hole to bury it in the garden. I did not hear him say any thing. We buried it all in the garden. Ings went home, and I slept with Druce. (I lodge at the Swan.) I told Druce where we got it from, and what we had done with it. Ings and I met that day at Druce's house, and it was agreed that Druce should take it home on Monday morning, and we was to assist him in loading it; but we overslept ourselves, and did not go to Druce's on Monday, so it was not taken away. I was at the Swan on Sunday night; Druce was not there. On Tuesday morning I went to Druce's house between four and five o'clock - Ings did not come - Druce was up, and had a fire; and after having some tea, he said, " the harness is on the donkey, you can get

some of the lead out of the garden." He gave me the shovel; I went to the garden and dug up two pieces, and brought them into the house; he assisted me in putting them into two sacks, and then he helped me with them into the cart. I then left him; he said he should take them to London. I had not agreed to meet him any where.

BARNES re-examined. The lead had a little dirt on it; it has been brushed off outside - there were two pieces in each sack, and some clay on it. I could only trace the footsteps of two people; some were about the size of Ings's, the toe was very round. I did not see the prisoner at the Swan after eight o'clock on Saturday night.

ISSAC ROBINSON. Ings had round toed shoes on when I took him.

DRUCE's Defence. I was not with them five minutes on Saturday night.

INGS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

DRUCE - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-53

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

53. JAMES HALLIWELL was indicted for that he, being servant to Thomas Thwaites , did steal, on the 24th of October , two boys dresses, value 25 s., and a pair of trowsers, value 12 s. , his property.

THOMAS THWAITES . I am a tailor , and live in Black-more-street; the prisoner was my foreman. In consequence of information I went to his room on the 27th of October; I found him about nine o'clock the next morning - he lodged at my house - I told him he had taken something of mine. The officer wished me to leave the room, which I did. I found two duplicates in the fob of his old trowsers, which were in a box, that did not belong to him - I never knew him to use it. Next morning I went to the pawnbroker's, and found a child's dress and a pair of black trowsers, which were mine, and had been in my shop; and at Benton's I found another dress; I don't know when they were taken - I had bought one only a month before. He worked at piece-work - I occasionally left him in care of the shop; he was then paid 4 d. an hour. I at times sent him out with garments, for which I paid him.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. - Q. Had you missed the clothes - A. No, they hung in the shop for sale. I knew the trowsers were his, having seen him wear them. He acted as my head man; I placed great confidence in him. He was going to be married, he said, he intended to redeem them after his marriage, and return them.

THOMAS RAVENSCROFT . I am apprentice to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker of Holborn. On the 19th of October the prisoner, pawned a dress and trowsers for 15 s. in the name of Wilson; one of the duplicates is what I gave him.

JAMES BENTON . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, of Holborn. On the 24th of October this dress was pawned in the name of W. Wilson by the prisoner. I am certain of his person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-54

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

54. JAMES HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , a hat, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Richard Salt .

THOMAS RICHARD SALT . On the 15th of November, about nine o'clock at night, and saw a hat snatched from the door. I ran out, and saw the prisoner running along Whitechapel with it in his hand; I pursued him up a court, and secured him, but he had by that time made away with it; I have not found it since; it was tied by a string, which he cut.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother sent me to the court for some dirty linen; the gentleman looked at me, went away for a minute, then returned and took me.

MR. SALT. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-55

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

55. JOHN GILMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one hundred and four printed books, value 30 s. , the goods of John Bysh .

The printed sheets of a work were delivered to the prisoner to bind, and he afterwards pawned them. The Court ruled that he did not steal books, but sheets of paper.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18221204-56

Before Mr. Baron Garrow ,

56. JOHN GYNAR was indicted for bigamy .

SARAH SCOTCHMAN . I live in Berkley-square, and was present at Mary-le-bone church, in May 1814, when the prisoner married my sister Lydia, who was single; she went out as nurse, and he went to service. She had four children by him. I don't know when he left her; she is now in Court.

PHOEBE LANNING . On the 16th of October, 1818 , I was married to the prisoner at St James's Westminster ; he lived with me ten or fourteen months.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me on the 23d of November. I have a copy of the register of the marriage at St. James's; I compared it with the original (read). I have the other certificate, but did not compare that.

Prisoner. I throw myself upon your Lordship's mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-57

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

57. JOHN EDWARD OGDENIS ALLCOCK was indicted for that he, being servant to Mr. Fountain, did steal two silver butter-boats, value 4 l. 10 s., a sovereign and four half crowns , his property.

WILLIAM FOUNTAIN . I live in Arthur-place, New Haggerston, the prisoner was employed by me as journeyman, and went on errands; he was not in my constant employ, business being bad. On Monday morning, the 28th of October, I sent him to Goldsmith's-hall with two silver butter-boats to be stamped, and gave him a sovereign and four half crowns to pay the duty; he was to leave it at the hall, and return in an hour. He did not return at all, and on the Wednesday evening, when I came home, I found he had come to my house drunk, and was asleep. He said he was very sorry he had spent the money, but that was robbed of the boats; they weighed twenty-three ounces.

WILLIAM FOUNTAIN . I am the prosecutor's son. I went to Goldsmith's-hall in the afternoon, and could not find the boats.

WILLIAM LEE . I keep the Black's-head public-house. On the evening of the robbery, he came with three or four more, and called for a pint of beer, which I refused without the money. They said they had plenty of money, and ordered half a pint of rum, and a pipe; the prisoner gave me a sovereign; soon after his companions went out, and he told me he had been robbed of two sovereigns and the change I had given him; a woman had been with him, who, he said, was his wife. I asked him if she took the money; he said yes. I said, perhaps she knew best how to take care of it. He came again next morning, and said he was robbed. I said,

"Why, you said your wife took the money;" he said he had no wife. He asked me if Ironmonger was with him, I said yes; he fetched him, and said I said he had robbed him.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I took him in charge, and asked what he had done with the property; he said he had been robbed; that the people tore the lining out of his hat and pocket; I examined his pocket, but it had not been torn.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged in Almstrong's rents, and was to go to my master at eight o'clock in the morning, I got a man on the first floor to call me. I got the boats from my master, and went into a public-house and got 2 d. worth of rum, then went home, and tossed with the lodger for two glasses of gin; he came out with me, and took me to a house by Baker's-row. I found it was too late to go to the Hall, as I must be there by nine o'clock, so I got some breakfast, and the man went with me to a public house in Church-street. He asked me what I had in my bag, I said china; he wanted me to leave it there, and sent me out for eggs, but I took the bag with me. I returned to the public-house, and drank there till twelve o'clock; the liquor made me drowsy, and where I went to I have no recollection, but was at the Turk's Head just after three o'clock, and remember that after that I got robbed; for they put my hat over my face, and extended my arms. while they emptied my pockets and tore away my fob. Next day I went to ask the landlord if I had a bag with me, as I was told I had been in the privy at the Feathers asleep. A witness was at the Turk's Head, who saw the whole transaction.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-58

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

58. JAMES CHAPEL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , a saw, value 6 s. , the goods of Elias Fry .

ELIAS FRY . I live in Park-street, New-road; on the night of the 19th November, a saw was stolen from an unfinished building of mine. The prisoner is a stranger.

EDWARD BULWORTHY . I am shopman to Mr. Wadmore, pawnbroker, Tottenham Court-road. On the 19th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought this saw to pawn; I asked whose it was; he said, Mr. Hunt's, his master; I told him to fetch Hunt, instead of which he brought a woman, who said she was Mrs. Hunt. She said she knew nothing of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a lad in Tottenham Court-road, who asked me to pawn it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-59

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

59. THOMAS BULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , seventy-nine yards of canvas, value 3 l. , the goods of Samuel Moates

JOHN NEWTON . I am servant to Samuel Moates , ship-chandler , Lower Shadwell . The prisoner came and said he belonged to the ship Morley, Captain Jackson, and had come for the canvas. I delivered it to him, believing his account.

HENRY TRACE . I am servant to Mr. Lewis, a pawnbroker; on the 18th of November the prisoner pawned the canvas for 1 l.; he said it was his own, and he was going to take it to the East Indies.

JOHN ROLFE . On the 19th of November, the prisoner pawned some canvass with me for 18 s.

Captain Jackson was not present to prove he did not send the prisoner for the goods.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-60

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

60. HENRY JAMES BAXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , a shirt, value 3 s., and two handkerchiefs value 2 s. , the goods of William Arthur .

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I am a labourer , and live in James's-street, Commercial-road. On the 26th of October, I was at the King's Head public-house, with these things in a bundle. I hadg one there with the prisoner, whom I knew before. I went out for a necessary purpose, and on returning met him coming out, and wished him good night; I went in and missed the bundle - the company told me something - I immediately went out. I saw him at different times, I desired him to produce my property, and on Saturday I had him apprehended. He always said he had not taken them.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a cooper; I was at the King's Head; Arthur went out, and while he was out Baxter went out - they were both very much in liquor - they had been drinking together for an hour, and neither of them knew what they were about. I think the prisoner took the bundle out with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, and went into a public-house with him; he asked me to mind his property while he went out for oysters, and when he returned it was still there. I did not think myself any more in charge of it, and never had it in my possession.

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I invited him to the house. We had three pints of beer between us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-61

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

61. SAMUEL CORNEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , seventy sacks, value 5 l. , the goods of Joseph Parker .

JOSEPH PARKER . I am a corn-dealer , and live in Houndsditch, the prisoner is a miller , and lives at Waltham Abbey. On the 9th of November, he came to a person's house where I deal, and in my presence offered to sell him two hundred sacks of flour, and to deliver seventy-three sacks

by water at my warehouse. I agreed to supply the sacks, he accompanied me to my warehouse, and went in my cart with me to the Basing-house, where the sacks were put into a cart in our presence, to be taken to Waltham Abbey, and to be returned on the Wednesday following full. I saw him on Monday, he said the sacks were filling, and would be in the barge in due time. Nicholls and I said we should come down to Waltham market on Tuesday; he told us not to come, but we went and could not find him. We went to the mill and found the sacks were not there. I saw him that afternoon and charged him with deceiving me, and asked where the sacks were; he said, at the mill; I said they were not - he persisted that they were, but I said I should get an officer unless he told me where they were - he was taken to Edmonton, and said they were at Crouch's, and there we found them. I was told in his presence that he had obtained one pound on them, having sold them, as his own before I had delivered them - he admitted that he had done wrong.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You found them at Edmonton, which is in the road to Waltham Abbey - A. It is; we were in his company at the Red Lion public-house, Waltham Abbey, we sat down and took a meal together as good friends. I made no offer to drop the matter for 5 l. 15 s., nor was any offer made in my presence.

NATHANIEL NICHOLLS . I have heard Parker's account, it is true. I believe it was not his intention to make away with the sacks. I have known him for years - he bore an honest character.

JOHN CROUCH . I live at Edmonton, and am a miller. Three bundles of sacks were brought to my house. I never counted or opened them. I contracted for fifty or sixty of the prisoner's old sacks, the price was to be settled after they were examined - the business was first mentioned five weeks ago last Tuesday; he said he had some sacks which he should like me to buy. I was not at home when they were brought. I advanced him 1 l. on them, on Saturday evening, the 9th of November, and on Sunday morning called him over, and said,

"Corney these are not your sacks," he said, they were not, but his would be down in a day or two. I consider by that that he meant to exchange them.

Cross-examined. Q. They were left in pledge, till he supplied those you were to buy - A. I rather think it was so.

COURT. Q. In the course of your business do different people's sacks get intermixed - A. They do.

JOHN MILLER . I live at Waltham Abbey, where the prisoner ground. Parker came to look for the sacks - they were never brought there.

RICHARD BATES . I am a constable. I apprehended him, the sacks were brought to Worship-street, but are not here.

JOSEPH PARKER . I saw them at Worship-street. Two bundles were marked

"J. S." for James Stedman, who was owner; the others

"W. T." they came to me from persons who had flour from those parties - the flour was to come up on Wednesday. I found the sacks the day before that.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-62

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

62. JOSEPH KNIPE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , two shirts, value 8 s.; a cravat, value 2 s.; and a coat, value 12 s., the goods of William George Prescott , Esq. ; and a shirt, value 4 s., the goods of William Willowby Prescott , Esq. ; and a shirt, value 4 s. the goods of Henry Prescott , Esq.

Mr. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM LANGLEY . I am porter to Messrs. Prescott's, bankers , Threadneedle-street . On the 6th of November, about half-past two o'clock, I saw the prisoner, (who is a stranger,) come down from the first floor - I saw him just within the private door of the house - stopped him - brought him in and Plowman searched him.

WILLIAM PLOWMAN . I am an officer. I searched him and found three shirts on him, in separate pockets, and a shirt and cravat in his bosom, he had been detained when I got there.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not appear overwhelmed with trouble - A. He appeared distressed and had no money - he told me he was a dead man.

WILLIAM SCHOFIELD . I am a turnkey of the Compter. The prisoner was brought there - he came to the gate, and said,

"Schofield, I have got a coat, and should like to pawn it" - I was called away, but he came to me again, and said,

"These coats belong to my prosecutor, and I wish to get rid of them." I found he had three coats on his back, wearing them.

ELIZA RUSSELL . I am servant to Messrs. Prescott's. The shirts belong to them, and are marked. Two of them belong to Mr. William George Prescott , one to Mr. William Willoughby Prescott , and another to Henry Prescott - I had the care of them; they were in the dressing room. I know one of the coats to belong to Mr. William George Prescott . The private door is sometimes left open.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress, and stating that Schofield's evidence appeared almost incredible.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-63

63. JAMES WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of James Hawkins Codner , from his person .

MR. JAMES HAWKINS CODNER . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Love-lane, Eastcheap. Last Wednesday evening, about seven o'clock at night, I was walking with a friend in Lombard-street , going home, and near Grace-church-street , I suddenly missed my handkerchief, which was safe at the Post-office - I turned round and saw the prisoner passing quickly; he was alone. There was a person near me, but I think not near enough to have taken it. I seized the prisoner on the spot, and charged him with it, looked down, and saw it at his feet - I told my cousin that was the person who took it. I think nobody but him could have dropped it - I picked it up, and took him to the Mansion-house.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not another young man behind you - A. I saw no one; a person was by my side rather beyond me - he could not have taken it.

JAMES HEARSEY . I am an orange-merchant, and was with Mr. Codner, On missing his handkerchief he put his hand down to see if it was really gone, and at that moment

I turned round, and saw it drop from the prisoner's hand. I had not observed him before. There was nobody within twenty yards behind us.

JOHN BROWN. I am a constable. The handkerchief was delivered to me. I found three knives in the prisoner's pocket, and two duplicates, one for a handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I sell knives and garters for my living in the markets . I did not pick the gentleman's pocket - it was another young man who I know very well - he came to me at the Mansion-house, and told me not to tell that I saw him commit the act.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-64

64. JOHN BARTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , a handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of Robert Gelder , from his person .

ROBERT GELDER . I live in Northampton-place, Kent-road. On the 22d of November, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the South side of London Bridge, going home - my handkerchief was safe in my outside pocket on Fish-street-hill. I did not miss it till I saw it in the possession of Forrester, who held the prisoner by the collar. He said he did not take it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. I saw Mr. Gelder on London Bridge . The prisoner and another person were following him - I watched them for five or ten minutes. Mr. Gelder stopped once or twice on the bridge, and they stopped also at a little distance from him, and when he came near the Surry side, where it was being repaired - there was a railing up and the passage is narrow. I was on the opposite side, and saw the flap of Mr. Gelder's coat drop - I could not observe whether it was the prisoner or the other who took the handkerchief, as a carraige passed. A small piece of the handkerchief was out before - seeing it was gone, I crossed and saw the prisoner tucking something into his trowsers, (I have seen him about before) - I took hold of him; he was attempting to get it out of his trowsers, but I seized him, and took him to Mr. Gelder, and took the handkerchief out of his trowsers.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going over the the bridge after a situation, and just where it is being repaired, I saw the handkerchief on the bridge, picked it up, and put it in my pocket. Two or three men were walking on before me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-65

65. WILLIAM TUCKER was indicted for that he, being servant to John Lewis and Joseph Collyer , did steal on the 12th of November , one pound and a half of I alian liquorice, value 2 s. , their property.

MR. JOHN LEWIS . I am in partnership with Mr. Joseph Collyer ; we are merchants , and reside in Mincing-lane. The prisoner was in our service as porter , for eight or nine months. I suspected him, and desired the clerk to watch, and on the 12th of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, as he left work, he was stopped - I saw him searched in the yard, and a pound and a half of liquorice was found in a bag in his small clothes, which was taken from a chest in the warehouse - it could be got at without being forced open. He said it was the first time.

FRANCIS SIMPKIN . I am clerk to Mr. Lewis - he stopped the prisoner. I searched him, and saw the Italian liquorice found in his breeches.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the liquorice in his breeches. He said it was the first time he had done anything of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I took two or three sticks to carry home to my children, being in distress. I thought it no harm.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-66

66. JOHN NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , a coat, value 30 s., and a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of Edmund Fleming .

EDWARD CALVER . I am shopman to Edmund Fleming . This coat and waistcoat hung inside the shop. Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner loitering about the window alone, then saw him come into the door-way, and handle them as a customer would - he went away, returned in about ten minutes, and looked through the shop window, I went out over the way to watch, and saw him go to the door way, and come out again, and about a quarter past four o'clock, he went to the door, cut the string, and took the coat and waistcoat - I ran over immediately, and secured him. They cost 32 s.

THOMAS WALLIS . I was on the opposite side with Calver, and saw him take the coat and waistcoat, and assisted in taking him. I am clerk to Mr. Hemming, a relation of the prosecutors.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I received him in charge with the property. He only had 5 s. about him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly never took them away - I was at the door with it when they took hold of me. I did not cut the string.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-67

67. JAMES DAILY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two sheets, value 4 s.; a counterpane, value 2 s. 6 d.; a gown, value 5 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; two bed gowns, value 18 d.; two aprons, value 18 d.; a pinafore, value 1 s.; a blanket, value 1 s.; and a handkerchief, value 6 d. , the goods of William Mealings .

MARY MEALINGS . I am wife of William Mealings , we lodge in Hartshorn-alley, Leadenhall-street , on the second floor; the articles stated in the indictment were in a box, in our room. I had a letter for the lying-in charity, and left home about a quarter past nine o'clock, returned in an hour - went to my box to put the letter into it, and this property was gone. I do not think I had locked the room door - my children were at school. I found the sheets and a quilt in about an hour and a half, at Price's, but have found nothing else. I saw the prisoner in custody next day - he is a stranger.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am shopman to Mr. Wodmore,

pawnbroker, Wentworth-street. On the 29th October, about half an hour before the prosecutrix came, I took the sheets and counterpane in pawn, for 7 s., from a young man, named John M'Carthy, who I had seen before - he cannot be found.

MICHAEL HUGHES . I am a watchman. The prisoner was given into my charge about half-past ten o'clock, on the 27th of October. The prosecutrix and her husband came to me about half-past nine o'clock, and said they were robbed by a young man in a seaman's dress. I went to look for him - the prisoner came along Winfield-street, and seeing me coming towards him, he crossed over and ran away, I called to my partner, who stopped him. Mealings said,

"Oh, you rogue you have ruined me, you have robbed me;" he said he knew I wanted him for a robbery - he knew me.

JESSEE PAYNE . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. I was at the corner of Winfield-street, and heard the cry of

"Stop him;" I immediately looked up and caught the prisoner in my arms, took him to the watch-house, but found no duplicate on him; he said he knew what I searched him for, I wanted the duplicates. Mealings gave charge of him.

Prisoner. I said,

"I have got no money, I suppose that is what you want" - Witness. He said, I wanted to find the main articles - I wanted the duplicates.

MARY ANN FARRIER . I live next door to Mealings. About ten o'clock in the morning as I was going on an errand, I stood by the house, and am certain the prisoner is the man whom I saw come out of the door with a bundle under his arm. I returned in about half an hour, and heard her enquire if any one had been seen to go out with a bundle; I said, I had seen a sailor go out - I went to Lambeth-street next day and saw him with several more, and pointed him out.

Prisoner. Q. All you know is that I live in the same house as Mealings - A. His mother does - I think the bundle would have held all the property, it was tied in a white handkerchief, and pretty large.

MARY MEALINGS . I had seen him at the house three or four days before - his mother lives there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been about a fortnight from sea, and came once or twice a week to see my mother.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-68

68. RICHARD THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Abraham Van Over , from his person .

MR. ABRAHAM VAN OVER. I live at Nine Elms, Batter-sea. On the 31st of October, between three and four o'clock, I was standing on 'Change, talking to some gentlemen near the centre - my handkerchief was safe a few minutes before. I did not see the prisoner until a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder - he had hold of the prisoner's hand with the handkerchief in it.

LIPMAN WOOLF DRACH , I live in Castle-street, St. Mary Axe. I was on 'Change, and saw the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Van Over's pocket and take the handkerchief out. I laid hold of his hand with it in it, and told the prosecutor. We took him to the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. There was a crowd there - A. Yes, it was a busy day. I was close to him and am sure he took it.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I received him in charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Drach has not sworn exactly right.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One year .

Reference Number: t18221204-69

69. JOHN LIVERMORE was indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of John Chapman , and stealing two petticoats, value 2 s.; a pinafore, value 1 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s. 4 d.; six towels, value 2 s. 6 d.; and seventy-two pieces of copper money, value 6 s. , his property.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I rent a house in Middle-street, Cloth-fair . On the 15th of November , I went to bed about eleven o'clock at night. The shop door was locked, and the house all secure. I think my lodger was out. He has a key. I am a fish-monger and green-grocer . I was awoke by hearing the brewer's drayman next door. My lodger alarmed me at half past six o'clock in the morning. It was then dark, being very wet. On coming down I found the cellar grating taken up, and laid on the stones, and three stones moved off it, which were there at night; this would enable them to get into the cellar; there is a door on the cellar stairs which was only latched. The shop door, which was double locked over night, was open; no violence was used to it. The lock was forced off the till, and about 6 s. worth of copper taken; two drawers in the same room were opened, and this property taken. The prisoner lives directly opposite; and when I came down in the morning, I saw him at his bed-room window looking out, talking to the drayman. He was taken that evening.

LOTT STOCKLEY . I am drayman to Messrs. Combe and Company. On the 16th of November I was in Middle-street with my dray, next door to Chapman's. I got there ten minutes after five o'clock, and saw the cellar grating laying across the pavement. I gave no alarm; I thought the house had been robbed. I told the landlord next door of it. I saw a short person standing in a door-way opposite. I do not know who it was. I soon after heard of the robbery. It was dark and wet.

Cross-examined by Mr. ANDREWS. Q. Was the short person a man or a woman - A. I cannot say, it was so dark; a boy could lift the grating.

JOHN CHRISTMAS . I lodge at Chapman's; and came home at half-past ten o'clock. I have a key of the street door; I found it latched; I opened it and made all fast. I did not observe the grating. I went to bed, got up at half-past six o'clock to go to work, and found the door still fastened, but the grating removed, and the cellar and shop doors open, which were closed when I went to bed. I called Chapman. My father came home just before me.

Cross-examined. Q. How is the cellar door fastened - A. I saw it was latched that night. The iron grating was not fastened inside. It weighs about 1/2 a cwt.

BENJAMIN COGWELL . I am a pawn-broker, and live in Aldersgate-street. I have two children's petticoats,

a pinafore, and handkerchief, which the prisoner offered in pledge on Saturday evening, the 16th of November, between seven and eight o'clock. I asked who he brought them from - he said from his brother, and afterwards that he found them. I detained him, as Chapman had given me information.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew him, did not you - A. No, I did not know where he lived. I do not live three minutes walk from Chapman's.

SARAH CHAPMAN . I went to bed at the same time as my husband, and in the morning I missed the linen off the drawers, except the petticoats, which were in the drawers, and were rough dried. I saw them at Cogwells in the evening.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see them at night before you went to bed - I saw every thing that night. Every one was at home when I went to bed except Christmas and his father. The cellar grating falls into a wooden frame; the stairs are the foot of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL SKELMAN . I am a watchman. At half-past five o'clock on the morning of the 16th I called Christmas up; all was safe then, and the grating in its proper place, and so it was about ten minutes to six, when I was calling six o'clock.

JOHN HARKER . I am an officer. I was fetched to the pawnbrokers, where Cogwell is shopman, and took the prisoner, and found 8 s. in silver, and 11 1/2 d. on him; he said he found the things in Cloth-fair.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-70

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

70. MARY PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , a saucepan, value 2 s., and a basket, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Humphreys ; and a basket, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Whitmore .

MARY ANN HUMPHREYS . I am the wife of Thomas Humphreys , an iron-founder ; we live in Little-Britain . On the 28th of November, between two and three o'clock, a boy called me - I went, and laid hold of the prisoner at the door; two baskets and a saucepan were found on her, which were taken from the front cellar. She must have come into the house to take them. One basket belonged to Joseph Whitmore , who lives in the house. She fell on her knees and begged for mercy.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I live at Humphreys's house. I was going out for some water, and saw the prisoner in the privy, in the yard - she came out with two baskets, and a saucepan. I called my uncle down; she ran out, and was stopped. She pretended to go into a fit.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took her in charge.

THOMAS WHITMORE . I took her with the basket in her possession. She begged forgivness.

Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-71

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

71. JOHN WAIT was indicted for that he, on the 17th of September , at St. Mary-le-bow, feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited deed , the tenor of which is as follows: -

Setting forth the usual form of a power of Attorney, made in the joint names of John Wait , of Gloucestershire, gentleman, and John Cox , of Wrington, Somersetshire, attorney: appointing John Underhill , of the Stock Exchange, gentleman, to sell and transfer 2189 l. 17 s. 1 d., 3 per Cent. annuities, dated the 22d of October, 1821, signed John Wait , and John Cox , and attested as under.

Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of us, by the above-named John Wait and John Cox ,

William Sheppard , stationer, Corn-street, Bristol,

Thomas Davis , auctioneer, Corn-street, Bristol.

with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England - he at the time of so uttering and publishing the same as true, well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away instead of uttering and publishing as true.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same only stating his intent to be to defraud John Cox .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS FIELD . I am a clerk at the Bank of England. I produce the Bank ledger, by which I find that on the 5th of July, 1818, 2189 l. 17 s. 1 d., 3 per cent. annuities, standing in the joint names of John Wait and John Cox - it still stands in their names.

JOHN UNDERHILL . I am a stock jobber. In September, 1821, I received a letter by post, from a person, and signed

" John Wait ;" (looking at No. 1) - this is it; it is dated the 23d of September. I received it in the regular course, and applied for a power of attorney, which I obtained from the Bank. I think I made the application on the day I received the letter. This is the power of attorney, (looking at it). This is it. I had it filled up all but the signature, attestations, and date, and sent it down by post.

JOHN ISAAC JEFFREY . I am a clerk to Messrs. Kay, Freshfield, and Kay. On the 22d of November, 1822, I served the prisoner personally with a notice, of which this is a copy - (read) - (This was a notice to the prisoner to produce a letter written by Mr. Underhill, and copies of all letters written and sent by him to the said Mr. Underhill, and particularly one sent on or about the 24th of December, accompanying the power of attorney, for the sale of the stock in question).

MR. UNDERHILL (re-examined). I sent the power of Attorney by post, to Mr. John Wait , of No. 5, Wilson-street, Bristol. I think I sent it in a fly-leaf. I received a letter, a considerable time afterwards; this is it, (looking at it, No. 2). It is dated the 16th of September, 1822, and enclosed the same power of attorney as I sent down, as far as I recollect, (looking at the power of attorney,) this is what it contained. I wrote on it a request to act on this power that day. I went to the Bank that day, and carried the power, but was not permitted to act upon it, and in consequence of what passed at the Bank, I wrote this letter, (looking at it, No. 3,) it is dated September 17, addressed John Wait , Esq. No. 5, Wilson-street, Bristol, it is my writing.

Cross-examined by Mr. SERGEANT PELL. Q. Have you any distinct recollection of all the facts to which you have spoken to, or are you speaking under some degree of uncertainty - A. I speak from the letters; I recollect the application to the Bank for the power and so on. It is by looking at the letters that I speak with positiveness. I transact a good deal of business, but am not employed to obtain many powers of attorney; I supply the broker with what he wants to buy or sell; I recollect obtaining the power from the Bank, which I sent to Bristol, whether the one I sent was returned to me I cannot swear. I sent it by post, most likely I did not put the letter into the post myself. Mr. Wait is a stranger to me, I am certain the power of Attorney produced is that I received from Bristol, for my writing is at the back of it. I cannot swear that I received it on the 17th of September, as I might misdate it. I applied at the Bank, to act upon it myself.

Mr. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. When you applied to obtain it in 1821, what did you do at the Bank - A. I wrote instructions for it on paper, which I put on the box, which is in the usual mode, (looking at a paper,) these are the instructions I delivered at the Bank, on the 24th of September 1821, and in consequence of which I got the power and forwarded it to Bristol.

FRANCIS FIELD re-examined. (Looking at the instructions and power,) I filled up this power of attorney from this ticket of instruction, on the 24th of September 1821. There is a memorandum on the power, which enables me to speak to the date. I have no recollection of filling up any other of the same sort on that day. I know the power by the figures on it; a folio of the account from which it is taken is put on the instructions; and if I had made out two from the same account, they would have that folio. We make a memorandum on the account of having made a power. If a second application was made to me for a power to sell the same stock, I should object to it, if I recollected it. It would entirely depend upon my recollection.

MR. UNDERHILL re-examined. I do not recollect that I received instructions for more than one power of attorney for this stock.

WILLIAM DRURY . I live at Birmingham; I went into Mr. Wait's service on the 26th of June 1818, and left him the latter end of May, 1819. He was a grocer. I was in the habit of seeing him write. (Looks at a letter, dated 16th September, 1822.) I believe this to correspond with his writing - I believe it to be his writing. (Looking at another, dated 23d September, 1821.) I believe this to be his, but I cannot say so much for this as the first.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT PELL. Q. You are carrying on business on your own account new? - A. No; I am assistant at a grocer and cheese-factor's. I was never in Bristol. I became acquainted with Mr. Wait at Birmingham; he left some time after I left him. The last I knew of him was in May 1819, he carried on business at Birmingham as grocer; my business was to serve behind the counter: he had two assistants besides me, and a porter. Robert Sherlock was one. I do not recollect the other; he was also employed behind the counter. I did not keep the books; I have written in them occasionally; he kept the books himself. I can speak with greater certainty to one letter than the other.

Q. Do you believe the whole of both the letters to be the hand-writing of Mr. Wait - A. Yes. I look to the signatures. I believe the body of both to be his writing.

Q. Are not the characters of the two very unlike each other - A. Not very. My belief is formed more upon the signatures. There is a likeness in the bodies.

Q. What occasioned you to leave Mr. Wait - I don't exactly know. I don't recollect any dispute with him, it is so long ago. He dismissed me - I inquired the reason, he would not give me a satisfactory one. I cannot exactly recollect what reason he assigned; I have no recollection that he gave any reason.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. While you were with him, how many opportunities had you of seeing him write - A. I was in the habit of seeing him write most days; he has made out invoices to the customers.

Q. In the body of one of the letters his name is set out, what is your belief as to that - A. I believe it to be his writing.

ROBERT SHERLOCK . I live at Birmingham. I was in Mr. Wait's service eight or nine months; I left before Drury. I had opportunities of learning the character of his hand-writing (looking at the letters;) they appear to correspond with Mr. Wait's hand-writing; but that dated 16th September, 1822, corresponds more than the other.

Cross-examined by MR. CAMPBELL. Q. You do not think the signatures of both to be so much like his - A. The signatures of both correspond more than the body; the signature of that dated 1821, corresponds more than the body. I think the whole of both are his writing, but one is more like it than the other.

Q. Does it appear disguised at all - A. It does not correspond so much. I was principally behind the counter, and went out collecting a little.

Q. How came you to leave him - A. I gave him notice; I had no dispute in particular.

Q. On your solemn oath, had you any dispute with him before you left - A. I never had any particular dispute. He was rather afflicted at times.

Q. Was any charge made against you of any thing that happened during his illness - I do not recollect any thing particular; I cannot recollect when it was, but I was behind the counter, and had taken a note, and Mr. Wait said he had looked into the drawer at night, and it was not there; but it was on the following morning, I do not recollect how long it was before I left. When I left him, I went to live with Mr. Bishop. Mr. Wait wished me to continue if I chose, and offered to get me a situation at Worcester, but I preferred going to Mr. Bishop. I have since been in business as a tobacconist at Birmingham, for two or three months, and then came to live in London.

Q. You ran away from Birmingham - A. I had an error with the Excise, and left in consequence of that, but returned again, and settled the fine with the Excise.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. What was this transaction of the note - A. It was a local note payable some distance from Birmingham. I took it of a customer, Mr. Wait recollected my taking it and looked into the till at night, and said it was not there, and on the following morning he went to look and said he had found it there, this was cleared up and he wanted me to continue with him if I

choose; he had said nothing to me about the note till he found it in the till, and after that he wished me to continue and gave me a character to Mr. Bishop.

COURT. Q. How soon after you took the note did you put it into the till - A. Immediately that I took it, that I swear, he said nothing to me about it till morning, I had no quarrel with him except about this.

Mr. JOHN HALL . I am a glass-merchant at Bristol, and have known Mr. Wait, forty or fifty years. In the the spring of 1821, he called on me to ask the name of my broker, it was about a year and three quarters ago; to the best of my recollection, he said he had twelve or fourteen hundred pounds of stock to sell; I understood him to say, it stood in the joint names of himself and another person whom he named. I don't recollect the name, but am certain it was not Cox, I recommended Mr. Underhill, to him. Mr. Wait lived in Bristol, but I don't exactly know where.

Cross-examined. Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. What character has he born during the whole of his life - A. Very good, I never heard any thing amiss of him.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am a stationer, and live in Corn-street, Bristol. I know the prisoner, he has lived in Bristol during the last year, in two or three different streets. I never called on him, in Wilson-street, but understand he lived there. At the latter end of the year 1821 he came to me about witnessing his name to a power of Attorney, (looking at it,) this is it; he came into the shop, and asked me to witness his name to the power of Attorney, and having my pen in my hand, he asked me to fill up the blanks left for the date in the deed. I wrote

"22d. October" He requested I would write in the attestation; he dictated to me what to write.

"The above named John Wait ." (The words signed, sealed, and delivered were printed.) I don't recollect writing any more; I saw him sign the deed, no body else signed it. I don't know John Cox . Only myself and Mr. Davis, who lives opposite me were present. Mr. Davis was either in the shop or was sent for, he witnessed it as well as me, and it was returned to Mr. Wait, who took it away. I did not see it again till I saw it before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT PELL. Q. I see it says

"signed, sealed, and delivered, & c. in the presence of us, by the above named John Wait , and John Cox " - A. I remember writing

" John Wait ," but have no recollection whatever of writing John Cox .

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say positively you did not write John Cox (in the attestation) as well as John Wait - A. I do not think I could, I do not believe I did, I have no recollection of it. I believe Mr. Davis was there all the time; he and the prisoner both left the shop together. There may be a relation of the prisoner's at Bristol named John Wait . I am not acquainted with him. I have heard of a John Waite ten years ago at Bristol, but not since. I believe he lived at Kingsdown.

Q. Did you not state before the magistrate that you believed the words John Cox were your writing, though you had no recollection of writing them - A. I do not think I could. I do not believe I did. I do not recollect writing it at all.

Mr. BOLLAND. Q. You do not recollect writing the words at that time, did you ever see the deed afterwards to write them - A. Never till I saw it before the magistrate.

COURT. Q. Do you believe

" John Cox " to be your hand writing - A. It is very like it, but I do not believe it to be mine. I never saw any John Cox execute the deed, nor did I ever see Cox till he was pointed out to me before the magistrate.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am an auctioneer, and live in Corn-street, Bristol, opposite Mr. Sheppard (looking at the attestation to the deed), here is my writing. I attested this instrument in Sheppard's shop; the prisoner was there. I saw Mr. Wait execute it; no John Cox was there. I know nobody of that name. I never saw any one of that name respecting this instrument.

Q. Look at the attestation, can you say in what state it was at the time you signed your name to it - A.

"The above named John Wait and John Cox " is now written under it, but to the best of my belief only the whole of the line was there, or that the name of John Cox was not there, because I believe it impossible I could have written my name without seeing the writing, and if I had seen it in its present state, I should have known it to be wrong, the name John Cox was certainly not there at the time I signed it. After the instrument was executed, it was delivered to the prisoner. I never saw it again till I was examined about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. CAMPBELL. Q. If I understand you, you now speak reasoning from probability, and not from any distinct recollection of the fact - A. I do, I reason from the instrument. The transaction never came across my mind afterwards.

COURT. Q. Have you any recollection whether the name of John Cox opposite the seal was on it at the time - A. It could not be, or I should not have signed my name, I suppose for the same reason that neither of the names John Cox were there.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I saw the prisoner sign his name opposite the seal. I have a distinct recollection that the name

" John Cox " opposite the seal was not written at that time.

Mr. JOHN COX . I am a solicitor, and live at Wrington in Somersetshire, about twelve miles from Bristol: there is no other solicitor of my name there. I produce the prohat of the will of John Fitcho , who bequeaths 2000 l. in trust to his widow, the interest was to go to the widow, and at her decease to me and my brother. Mr. Wait and Mr. Nash were appointed trustees: Nash never acted, and this was communicated to Mr. Wait, and in consequence of which I and him went in October 1815, to the Castle Bank, Bristol, to invest the stock. I mentioned in Mr. Wait's presence to Mr. Courtney the banker that Mr. Wait wished to invest this sum in the three per cent. consols, there being a deficiency of assets, the money did not amount to 2000 l. I told Mr. Courtney that Nash declined to act. that Mrs. Fitcho was likely to live many years, and as the money came ultimately to my brother and myself, and as Mr. Wait was the only gentleman named, we might all die before the old lady, and as the money might come to my brother's children, there should be another trustee. Mr. Courtney suggested to me to put my name in the stock, I said if Wait had no objection I would; and the stock was purchased in our joint names, no other stock was bought in our joint names (looking at the power of attorney). I never gave any body authority to obtain a power of attorney for the sale of

the sock. The name John Cox is not my writing. I gave he bank notice to that effect (looking at the notice), this is my hand writing.

Cross-examined by SERJEANT PELL. Q. Have you been much acquainted with Mr. Wait - A. I cannot say I have, except as being trustee to the will. I always understood him to be a very respectable man indeed. I saw the power of attorney at Wrington, on the 25th of September of this year. Mr. Day, the magistrate's clerk produced it to me there.

Q. Have you a distinct recollection as to the state it was then in - A. I have.

Q. Look at the signature John Cox to the execution, and tell me whether the word

"Cox" is in the same state now as when you saw it at Wrington - A. No, it is not, the letter C was then of a different character to what it is now, it was the same shape as a small c is usually made, with a dot, it has now a loop added to it. The dot is still visible, and the bottom of the C passed immediately into the o without a turn to it, but now there is a complete turn.

Q. Is not your usual mode of writing your name with a C of a similar description to what this now is - A. Yes, Mr. Day gave the instrument into my hands, it was with me an hour. I had it repeatedly in my hands during that time, when I returned it; the C was in the same state as at first. I stated to several people that it was no imitation of my hand-writing, as the C was of a different character, and it was very remarkable that the C in the attestation and in the execution was of the same character. It is clear that the fine stroke in the C has been written since, for there is the appearance of two strokes where it joins the dot; there has been an attempt to make it, and the first stroke did not meet the dot in the regular form, and so a second is made.

COURT. Q. Have you ever received a dividend on the stock yourself - A. Never. I very seldom receive dividends on any stocks. I have executed powers.

WILLIAM COX . I live at Penley near Bristol, and am in the pilot service. In the beginning of October a person hired my boat to go to Clovelly, about eighteen miles from Bristol, on the coast of Devon, to bring a gentleman, and put him on board the brig Aurora. I got to Clovelly on Friday evening, the 4th of October. I found the prisoner there; he came on board. I had no conversation with him. I was only in the boat two days. The person who hired us told us he was going on board the Aurora, which I knew was bound for Philadelphia. We ran up the Canif on the Welch coast out of the bad weather to wait till the brig came down. I asked him no questions, nor did any body in my hearing. I came away on Sunday night, leaving him on board the vessel.

THOMAS EVANS . I am a police officer; in consequence of information, I went down the river on the nights of the 8th and 9th of October; and in the Roads I found the gentleman at the bar in a small skiff down below, a man and a boy were on deck. I told him I had a warrant against him; he said how did I know he was there. I did not shew him the warrant, or tell him what it was for. I have known him twenty years; he lived in Wilson-street, I believe. I never saw him there, but I went to No. 5 Wilson-street, and saw his wife and family there.

Cross-examined by MR. CAMPBELL. Q. Did you know- any other person of the name of Wait, at Bristol - A. Several, I know no John Wait , I do not know their Christian names.

JAMES BRINDLE . I am in the service of the Post-office, at Bristol, and deliver letters in Wilson-street. The prisoner lived at No. 5, in September last, he has not lived there above two years (looking at the letter from Mr. Undrill to Mr. Wait) this has the regular London post mark on it. I have no recollection of this particular letter going through my hands.

The several documents referred to were here read as under:

5, Wilson-street, Bristol, 23d Sept. 1822.

No. I. - SIR, I am recommended by Mr. John Hall, of this city, glazier, to employ you to buy and sell stock for me, as occasion may require. I wish you to send me a power of attorney for the sale of 2189 l. 17 s. 1 d. standing in the names of John Wait and John Cox , of Wrington, Somersetshire, attorney.

Yours, &c. JOHN WAIT .

To Mr. J. Underhill, broker, Stock Exchange, London.

No. 2. - SIR, Enclosed you have the power executed, it was signed as far back as October, which I suppose makes no difference. We did not want the money then, therefore have let it remain till now. Please to sell out, and if possible, let me have it by return of post. - Yours, &c.

JOHN WAIT .

5, Wilson-street, Bristol, 16th Sept. 1822.

No. 3. - SIR, In consequence of the very great difference in the signature of Mr. Cox, the Bank will not allow the power to pass, consequently, you will request Mr. Cox to address a letter, directed to the Accountant General, of the Bank of England, stating that he does not always sign in the same way, and authorizing the sale of the stock.

In your letter you do not state in what way I shall send the proceeds. Our usual method is, by a Bank post bill.

Yours, & c. J. UNDERHILL.

Stock Exchange, Sept. 17, 1822.

JOHN WAIT , ESQ. No. 5, Wilson-street, Bristol.

A notice from Mr. Cox to the Bank of England, of the deed not being genuine, and the deed was also read.

The prisoner made no defence, but his counsel called

MR. CHARLES JONES . I am a wine and brandy merchant, and live in Mark-lane. I was in partnership with Mr. Wait from September 1811, to September 1816, and had frequent opportunities of seeing him write; for the last three years of that time I saw his writing three or four times a week. (looks at the letter dated September 1822.) I have seen this before, somebody on the part of the Bank produced it, and asked if I thought it was Mr. Wait's hand writing, or whether I knew it was his. I have been subpoened here on the part of the Bank.

Q. (Looking at the letter) Tell me whether you believe it to be his hand-writing or not - A. The two letters

"it" at the end of the name, I think resemble it in a small degree, but every other part of it I think very unlike Mr. Wait's writing; at least very unlike any of his writing that I ever saw. I stated this to the gentleman who applied to me, and that I did not believe it to be his writing.

Q. After having intimated that, had you any message from the Bank - A. I had a letter on the 3d of December, stating, that it would not be necessary for me to attend the prosecution. I have known Mr. Wait, eleven years; every

transaction of his with me was of the most honourable kind, his general character was an upright honourable man.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did you not when applied to on the part of the Bank, desire you might not be called, because it would be unpleasant - A. I did.

Q. And did you not at the same time state that there were many other persons much more able to speak to his writing than you, because you had not seen it lately. - A. Exactly so, and the gentleman said it was probable they should have sufficient evidence. It is six years since I saw him write, I said the

"it" at the end of the name bore a resemblance.

MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. Was it after you said it would be painful for you to be called as a witness, and that you did not think it to be his writing, that you were subpoened - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. You applied to the Bank that you might not be called upon - A. I requested I might not at the moment I saw the writing. I had seen it at the time I wished to be excused from attending, but upon reflection, I considered it my duty to appear after forming my opinion on it.

MR. MOORE. I am a wholesale wine and brandy merchant, of Bristol. I was in partnership with Mr. Wait, about five years, at Bristol, and had an opportunity of frequently seeing him write; he did not take an active part in the business (looks at the letter dated September, 1822.) I believe I have seen this before - the magistrate's clerk at Bristol shewed it to me. I was subpoened on the part of the Bank, and afterwards had notice that I need not attend. I had not expressed any opinion on the letter - I told them I did not conceive myself called upon to give an opinion, and I should decline it.

Q. Now, do you believe that to be Mr. Wait's handwriting - A. From the opportunities I had of seeing his writing, (which was certainly very frequently) this is certainly very different indeed from what I recollect of the character of his writing. I always considered him a gentleman of the highest propriety, and that was his general character.

COURT. Q. When did your partnership with him cease - A. I think six years ago, but I have seen his writing since.

Q. If you received a letter in that hand-writing what would be the impression on your mind - A. I should have doubted its authenticity. Mr. Jones was in partnership with us.

James George , Esq., Mayor of Bristol; John Cave , Esq., Sheriff of Bristol; Sir Richard Ball , Alderman of Bristol; Richard Henry Davis , Esq., M. P. for Bristol; Edward Brotheroe , Esq, late Member for Bristol; the Reverend - Biddulph, Minister of St. James's, Bristol; the Reverend - Roberts, Dissenting Minister; - Bruce, Esq.; Samuel Broad , Esq.; Joseph Piney , Esq.; Messrs. Stanton, Lemon, and Harris, all of Bristol; Messrs. Edward Drayton , Thomas Ventom , William Reynolds , and William Chandler ; all gave the prisoner a most unexceptionable and highly respectable character for the last twenty years.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 52.

Most Strongly Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury, on account of his previous good character.

Reference Number: t18221204-72

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

72. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , four shirts, value 16 s.; a sheet, value 5 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; a napkin, value 1 s.; six gowns, value 3 l.; a coat, value 3 l.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; a shirt, value 10 s., and a hat, value 10 s., the goods of Ann Bevan , in her dwelling-house .

ANN BEVAN . I am a widow , and live in West-street, Limehouse . The prisoner came to lodge with me on a Thursday, in April, and said he was chief mate of a ship, and on Monday, about half-past nine o'clock, he sent me to redeem a sextant for him - I left him alone sitting in the kitchen. I locked up all the other rooms, and returned about half-past eleven o'clock; I found the parlour door broken open, and every thing taken out of the drawers. I lost the articles stated in the indictment - the prisoner was gone; I did not see him again till he was in custody. I had the waistcoat to make from a slopseller.

JOHN MURPHY . I am shopman to Joseph Delaney , of Church-street, Rotherhithe. I have four shirts, a sheet, a gown, and a handkerchief, which I took in pawn on the 22d of April, from the prisoner, in the name of William King . I have no doubt of his person.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I had the prisoner detained on this charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I admit taking the lodging, but deny taking any of the property, or pawning any part of it. I sent her to redeem a sextant and other things worth 8 l., which she has applied to her own use. Other persons were in the house at the time. The pawnbroker at first said he had no knowledge of me - he was told he must be positive, and then said I was the man.

GUILTY. Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-73

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

73. JAMES GILCHRIST was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Phoebe Morris , spinster , about six o'clock in the night of the 29th of November , at St. George, Hanover-square, with intent to steal, and stealing therein three reams of paper, value 49 s. , her property.

PHOERE MORRIS. I am single, and keep a circulating library and stationer's shop in South Audley-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 29th of November, about a quarter to six o'clock in the evening, I was writing in the parlour, behind the shop - my candle had been lighted above an hour; nobody was in the shop. I heard an unusual noise, rose up, opened the parlour door, and found the shop door wide open - it had been shut, and has a bell to it to give notice if it is opened. I cast my eye on the counter, and missed three reams of paper, which I had received two hours before - I ran to the door, saw nobody, and thought no more of it; but next day some was produced to me, which corresponds in quality and quantity. I had bought it of Messrs. Wilson. I had been out of the shop about a quarter of an hour, and left

the door on the latch, in the usual way. If it had not been opened with great caution the bell must have rang.

BENJAMIN WM. VALENTINE . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 29th of November, a little after six o'clock at night, I was with Westcoatt; we turned into George-street, and saw the prisoner standing with something in his arms; he was seven or eight minutes walk from Miss Morris's. We passed him a few yards, turned back, and by that time he had got inside the door of one Joseph's house. I looked in, and asked him if he lodged there, he said he did; I asked if there were any other lodgers - Westcoatt came in and seized him. I took this paper from him. I found Miss Morris out next day.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I was with Valentine; his account is correct. I asked the prisoner how he came by the parcel, he said he had just bought it; I asked where, he made no answer; I said,

"Then I shall take you;" he then said he picked it up in Duke-street, on a step, and afterwards that he found it in Tom's-court. Next day I got information, and took it to Miss Morris's.

DANIEL TOMALIN . I am porter to Mr. Wilson, a wholesale stationer. On the 29th of November, I delivered this paper to Miss Morris; the same wrapper is now on it.

REUBEN JOSEPH . I live in George-street, Grosvenor-square, and keep a sale-shop. On the 29th of November I heard some person in the passage. I went up stairs, and before I could ask the prisoner a question, the officer came in and questioned him; he said he lodged there. They took him away. I did not know him before. I saw Westcoatt take the bundle from him.

THOMAS HAMMOND . I am servant to Mr. Wilson, and know the paper to be what I sent Miss Morris. My writing is on two of the reams.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Mr. Hill's of Monmouth-street, and in Duke-street, on the right-hand side of Tom's-court, I found a paper parcel by the wall, and coming by; two men shoved me into this gentleman's passage, and asked what I had. I said I did not know.

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . It is false.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18221204-74

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

74. THOMAS LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a cloak, value 10 s. the goods of Samuel Williams and John Williams .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I am a linen-draper , in partnership with my brother John; we live in St. John-street . On the 16th of November this cloak hung inside of the door. I saw it safe at five o'clock, and found it at the watch-house at half-past six.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH BAILEY . I am a patrole, A little after six o'clock, in consequence of what Wadland told me, I saw the prisoner running in St. John's-street, in a direction from Williams's shop. I pursued him, and saw him drop the cloak, which I picked up. Hayford brought him back. I am sure he is the man, for I knew him before by sight.

ELIZA WADLAND . I live opposite Mr. Williams's. On the 16th of November I saw a man take something from the inside of Mr. Williams's door, and told Bailey, who pursued the same man. I cannot speak to the prisoner.

JOHN HAYFORD . I was following the prisoner with O'Kell. I took a circuitous round, and came up as O'Kell stopped him; I commenced the pursuit from my own door, which is about a hundred yards from the shop; he was going in a direction from there. I handcuffed him, and took him to the watch-house. Bailey saw him, and said that is the man. I did not see him with any thing.

THOMAS O'Kell . I was at Hayford's house, and run after the prisoner, hearing a cry, and stopped him in Great Arthur-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up St. John's-street, and heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately ran, and somebody took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-75

75. HANNAH POMROY , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , a shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Markham .

ELIZABETH HINTON . I live in a court in Rosemary-lane . On the 1st of October I employed the prisoner to clean my room, and while she was there, I put a shirt between the bed and sacking; I had it to wash for H. Markham. I went out, leaving her alone in the room; returned in a quarter of an hour, and missed it. I told her of it; she said she had not seen it; I said it was there when I went out, and asked if any one had been there in my absence; she said no. I told her she had got it; she said she had not. I said if she had, and would give it to me, or if she had pawned it I would redeem it, she said she had not seen it. I found it in pawn on the 8th of November.

Prisoner. Q. Did not we pawn it together, and did not you have part of the money - A. It is false.

THOMAS OBORN . I am headborough. I took the prisoner on the 8th of November, on another charge, and found twelve duplicates on her, one of which was for the shirt, the prosecutrix redeemed it unknown to me.

JAMES LOVE . I am shopman to Mr. Williams, Cable-street. On the 1st of October a smock-frock was pawned with me, I call it a smock-frock, because it has an extra collar. I have no recollection of the prisoner.

Q. Do you swear that - A. I do. I have seen her in the shop before, three or four times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I brought that woman from on board a ship, she has run me into every kind of danger, she brought a man to my room and robbed him of a sovereign. I said I would not have that done in my room, she sent me word yesterday that if she could not transport me, she would get another person that would. I have pawned my things to give her bread, as for the shirt she knew of it as well as I did, she does it entirely out of spite.

ELIZABETH HINTON . On my oath it is false.

ELIZA CLARK . I live in Rosemary-lane, Hinton, the prisoner and myself, all lived in a house together, and when we had no money we pledged our clothes one for the other, as far as it would go, and after that she left us

and lived opposite, and brought a duck-frock for Pomroy to pawn for her and her man to buy a breakfast, I did not notice it; it was lined with blue; I believe, she delivered it in my presence.

Q. There was no secret at all about it - A. No, they were good friends. Hinton brought a man in one night, and robbed him. Pomroy found it out and did not like such goings on, and gave her leave to quit the room, this was about three weeks before the frock was brought to pledge; she brought Hinton the money. I think it was 15 d. I believe Pomroy kept the duplicate - See page, 14.

ELIZABETH HINTON . It is false, my Lord. It is made up between the parties. I never delivered her the money. I was not without money; it is all a false report about my bringing a man home; she did not quarrel with me about any man. Clark is an unfortunate woman, I believe.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-76

London Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

76. THOMAS WELLMAN and JAMES BEVAN were indicted for stealing on the 11th of November a handkerchief, value 6 d., the goods of William John Davy , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-77

77. DAVID CULVER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November a coat, value 20 s. the goods of James Mumford .

JAMES MUMFORD . I live at Attfield, Broadoak. On the 29th of November I came to town, and about half-past five o'clock in the morning, my cart stood in Bell-yard, Warwick-lane . My coat was on the horse. I saw it safe five minutes before it was taken, and the prisoner in the yard; he was employed to carry meat about the market. I was unpacking my goods in the yard, and missed it; and on Wednesday last I went with the officer and took the prisoner in his master's yard, in Chick-lane, and told him it was for stealing a coat, he said he had nothing on his arm but a cloth.

JOHN PLAYER . I am salesman to Messrs. Challis and Company, Newgate Market, and have known the prisoner some time. Yesterday week, between five and six o'clock, I met him in Stationer's-court with a rough great-coat on his arm; I spoke to him and went on. I am sure he had a coat. As soon as I went to work, I met Mr. Mumford enquiring after his coat, I told him I had met a person with one, and afterwards told him who it was, and described the coat to him. I saw it after the prisoner was taken; it appeared like the one I saw him with; he is a slaughterman, and was in his working dress at the time.

BENJAMIN PRATT . I am collector of the City tolls. On Friday morning, the 29th of November, between five and six o'clock, I stood at the bottom of Paternoster-row, and saw a man with a coat on his arm coming from the market. I looked at him, and suspected him; he stood still looking about in Warwick-lane, near Amen-corner. I had seen him two or three times before, and am certain he is the man. I left him, and went on Ludgate-hill. Jackson afterwards asked me about it, and at first I denied having seen him, not wishing to be in trouble about it, but afterwards said he was the man.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a beadle. I went down Chick-lane, with Mumford, and apprehended the prisoner, and afterwards found the coat at a house in Black Boy-alley, Chick-lane. A young woman who is not here gave it me. I believe the prisoner did not live there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. - I am as innocent as you are who sit there, but I had it in my possession; it was given to me in the market to take down into the yard.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-78

78. THOMAS GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November two pieces of printed parchment, called writ pieces, with stamps thereon, denoting the payment of certain duties, value 5 s. , the goods of James Wren .

JAMES WREN . I am servant to Mr. Salt, a cornchandler. I wanted to issue two writs, and bought the stamps for that purpose; and last Monday I called at the City Arms for Thompson, a law writer, who fills up writs; he was not there, and the prisoner offered to do it. I said if he would do it properly I would give him half-a-crown, and put the stamps down before him; he set to writing.

Q. You never expected to receive the paper in the state you delivered it to him - A. He was to fill them up; he sat down and began writing. I went to another part of the room for the newspaper, and he went out at the other door with the stamps and papers; there was two papers not written on; I laid them down with the two affidavit stamps for him to fill up, and also make the affidavits. The papers were stamped with a 5 s. stamp. I was not alarmed at missing them, but sat a few minutes, and then began to wonder where he was, and from what I heard, I went to Mr. Hildyard where I bought them, and found he had been there and sold them; he was to fill all the papers up. He heard me inquiring for Thompson, and said he could do it, and shewed me an affidavit to convince me of it. I found him the same evening at the City Arms, and took him. I told him he had treated me very ill. I had written

"17 s. 6 d." in figures on the stamps before I delivered them to him.

PRISONER. Q. Did you not ask me to fetch the stamps - A. Yes, I called there before I bought them.

Q. Did I not say to you,

"have the goodness to wait, and I will return" - A. No.

J. B. HILDYARD. My father is a law-stationer, and lives in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street. The prisoner came with these two stamps, and asked me to return the money. I asked if he himself had bought them, he said No, he had sent a tall gentleman in black for them, but it was for a job of his own. I returned him 10 s., which was paid for them, and in about half an hour the prosecutor

called about them. I produced them. I know them to be the same, as they are folded, and all the rest I had were not. I am almost certain of it, but cannot swear these are the two, as some others might be folded.

THOMAS SMITH . I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him I was not positive as to the return of the writ, and would go and get a friend to fill it up properly, and told him to wait till I returned.

The Court ruled, the charge could not be sustained. The stamps were delivered for the purpose of being filled up, and would then be of no value except to the particular person, and not the subject of felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-79

79. JAMES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October a curtain, value 1 s. the goods of Joseph Valler , in a lodging-room in the dwelling-house of Alice Lathan .

JOSEPH VALLER . I live in the dwelling-house of Alice Lathan , Green Arbour-court, Old Bailey, St. Sepulchre , the property in three of the rooms belonged to me.

JOANNAH VALLER . I am the wife of Joseph Valler . I let the prisoner the first floor, front room for Mrs. Latham, at the end of August for 3 s. a week, for him and his wife. The furniture in the room was ours; we allowed her to let it with the room; he left about the 28th October, and owed 6 s. 6 d. He said when he came that he should leave about the 6th of November; he took the key away, and on Tuesday I opened the door with another key and missed a curtain, which I afterwards saw at Guildhall.

WILLIAM WAUGH . I am a pawnbroker. I have a curtain which the prisoner pawned for 1 s. on the 3d of October. He pawned another next day. I am certain of his person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS THOMPSON . I apprehended him. He sent somebody for the duplicate and gave it to me.

The prisoner pleaded the greatest distress.

GUILTY . Aged

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-80

80. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing on the 1st of November one chest, value 2 s. and 82 lbs of tea, value 22 l. the goods of Richard Snell and John Robins .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Samuel Ogle .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT JONES . I am warehouse-man to Mr. Hillhouse of Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On the 1st of November I sent two chests of tea to Messrs. Snell and Robins by Parker, one weighed 80 and the other 82 lbs, and had the mark of the ship on them.

RICHARD PARKER . I took the chests to Messrs. Snell and Company's warehouse, London Wall, and delivered them to Atkinson, between six and seven in the evening, and saw them put by the scales.

CHARLES ATKINSON . I am porter to Richard Snell and John Robins . Parker brought two chests, and put them in the warehouse just by the scales, twelve yards from the door. It was then dark. I saw

"S. Ogle, Leeds," marked on them. In about half an hour I saw a man lay hold of one of them, pitch it on an end, and put it on his shoulder, and go towards the gate. I came up with him outside the gate, and said,

"My good fellow what are you going to do with that chest;" he mentioned some name. I collared him, he gave a hollow like an owl, and the prisoner came from over the way, struck me on the mouth, and cut my lip without saying any thing; I had hold of the man at the time, and he threw the chest down; it struck me on the toe. He got away leaving it behind. I laid hold of the prisoner; he dragged me six or eight yards through the mud, but I held him. Hodge came up, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You cannot say whether he was present at the time of the robbery. A. No. There was five or six people round me inside the gate after the scuffle, but at the time he came over I saw nobody else near; some people were a few yards off; it was five minutes before I could get assistance. I am sure he is the man who struck me, for I never lost sight or let go of him.

THOMAS HODGE . I am waggoner to the prosecutors. I saw the prisoner cross the road and strike Atkinson. I ran out, saw him strike him, collared and brought him into the ware-house. The man who stole the chest got away.

Cross-examined. Q. The last witness had not hold of the prisoner - A. Yes, he had, till I got hold of him. I did not go out at first, thinking the man had brought the chest by mistake, and was going to take it away.

JOHN SALTER . I am an officer, and was sent for, and found the prisoner in custody; he resisted being searched. I put my hand into his left hand pocket; he swore he would not have his money taken from him by any man. He went quietly with me towards the Compter till we got to Wood-street, where four or five men attempted to rescue him. I was struck in the mouth, and my hat knocked off; he made every effort himself to get away. I found 6 l. 9 s. 6 d. on him, which was returned him.

Prisoner's Defence. Atkinson says I came up and struck him, and nobody was near; and this man says he saw me come over and strike him. I was coming by, very groggy, and as another stranger might, I stood looking on. I was struck and collared, and asked what I had done. I should not have struck him if I was not in liquor.

All the witnesses declared the prisoner to be perfectly sober.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-81

81 JAMES HONEYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , from the person of William Prentice , a pocket-book, value 1 s. eight 10 l. and one 20 l. Bank notes , his property.

Mr. WILLIAM PRENTICE . I live at Richmond, on the the 11th of November, about one o'clock, I received a

dividend of 40 l. at the Bank, and had 60 l. before in my pocket-book, which was in my outside coat-pocket. I was going to dine in Serle-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, there was no coach at the Bank, and I went to the Mansion house, public-house, and had a pint of porter with my friend Brownley, who came out of the Bank with me. I had no conversation with any one at the public-house, we came out, and at the end of the court leading into the street, I saw some persons and one of them gave a spring forward, I turned round to my friend and said,

"Let us get a coach, for we are in bad company," I saw the person who sprung forward sufficiently to know him, it was the prisoner; I saw him again ten days after, but was not very positive of him, when I first saw him, I thought him very like the man, but he was differently dressed. When I came out of the public-house door, I buttoned my coat and perceived my pocket-book there, I walked along the passage, the man sprang forward and in two mintutes, I felt and missed it and have not since seen it. There were five or six people about me, they continued where they were on the man's springing forward, I got aside of them and got away; I got into a coach at the end of the Old Jewry, and found my pocket cut through when I got to Mr. Ross's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were you when you first missed your pocket-book - A. At Mr. Ross's, twenty minutes or half an hour after I left the public-house, I came out of the public-house near two o'clock, it was the day Hunt came to town, but before he came, there were a great many people all along the street.

Q. Who first pointed the prisoner out to you - A. I saw him at the Mansion-house sitting down, I called an officer and said

"That is the man who jumped out, but I cannot swear he robbed me."

THOMAS BROWNLEY . I am acquainted with Mr. Prentice. I came out of the Bank with him, and came towards the Mansion-house public-house. A man who appeared like a coachman, stood at the back of my chair, in the public-house, and when I got up to come away he walked out before us, we came into the passage and I believe the man who jumped out from the wall was the same who was in the house. Just as we came out Mr. Prentice said he thought we were in bad company, we went on to the Old Jury, called a coach which he got into, and I left. I saw the prisoner in custody at the Mansion-house last Thursday week, I could not exactly say that he is the man, but very strongly suspected that he was, and I am almost sure of it. I am possitive of it now.

Q. What makes you more positive now than at the Mansion-house - A. I have considered it more and am more convinced that he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. ALLEY - Q. What are you - A. A baker. I will swear the prisoner is the man I saw; when he was at the Mansion-house, he was in a different garb, he was the same stature, and I believe the same countenance.

Q, Do you mean to swear you are positive, or that you only believe he is the man - A. I believe it.

EDWARD STAMMERS . I am a clerk in the Bank. On the 11th of November, I paid the dividend warrant in four 10 l. notes - Nos. 19,928 to 19,931, dated the 19th of October, 1822. I have the entry here in my own writing.

JOSEPH BAKER . I am shopman to Messrs. Forrest and Co., pawnbrokers, Warwick-row, Blackfriars-road. On the 12th of November, I received a 10 l. note from a person who gave the name of James Gilbert - I gave the same note to the officer; (Looking at No. 19,928) - this is it, it has my writing on it,

" James Gilbert , for Mr. Honeyman, Fleece, Little Knight Rider-street, Paul's-chain." I have not seen Gilbert since.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am one of the day patrol. On the 27th of November, I went with Mr. Prentice, to the Fleece, public-house - I sent him into the parlour, and told him to take no notice of me. I went in afterwards and Gilbert was not there. The prisoner was in the bar, and said Gilbert lodged there, and would be in between eight and nine o'clock. I said I came respecting a 10 l. note, which had been paid by Gilbert to the pawnbroker, and which was a stolen one; he said he had sent a 10 l. note by Gilbert, to redeem a pledge. Gilbert did not come in, and I told the prisoner he must go with me to the Mansion House - this was a little after seven o'clock; he put on his hat and walked with me. I left Mr. Prentice to wait the arrival of Gilbert. I then asked the prisoner how he became possessed of this 10 l. note; he stated that on the afternoon of the 11th, the landlord and landlady were out, and he was minding the bar all the afternoon, and between five and six o'clock a person came in, and had some brandy and water, and asked for change for a 10 l. note - that he gave him change out of his own pocket. I asked what address the person gave; he said he thought he had sufficient knowledge of a good note from a bad one, and did not ask him, and that he could not write and could not put the address on if he had heard it. In about three quarters of an hour the prosecutor and his friends brought Gilbert. We sat in the porter's lodge, where there is a good gas light - I think only me, the porter, and the prisoner were there. The prosecutor called me out in a few minutes, and stated that he was confident, and would swear the person who was there was the person who sprang before him at the time he came out of the public-house. After we went in again, the prisoner said,

"I have not yet seen the note, and wish to see it." This note and two others which had gone into the Bank, laid on the table, and he picked out this one as that he sent by Gilbert. I said then if he could not write he could read writing; he said

"I can write a little, I did not mean to say I could not write at all - there is my writing on the top of the note," and he thought he wrote it for the name of Day; but on looking at it, it was Mr. Davis, King-street, Cheapside, written in a very bad hand. He was taken on Wednesday, and detained till Thursday, and taken to the Mansion House, and we were sent to Guildhall. The prisoner told me he wore a white coat and a cap on the day of Hunt's entry, and went out to see Hunt, but went no farther than St. Paul's Church-yard.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you were talking with him at the public-house was the prosecutor there - A. No; he was in the parlour, and the door shut. I think he saw me taking the prisoner away; he could not see his face - the bar is very dark. He might go into the parlour without seeing him.

Gilbert being called did not appear.

Prisoner's Defence. I was assisting a friend who keeps the public-house in Little Knight Rider-street, and on the

11th of November, about a quarter or twenty minutes past one o'clock, some persons came in, and said Hunt was coming - two young men ran out, and I followed them. I went opposite the South door of St. Paul's, till Hunt passed, then returned, and in Sermon-lane, met Peer, and told him he was too late, for Hunt was gone by. I was not absent more than ten minutes, Mrs. Christie asked if I had seen Hunt - I said, Yes. She went up to dress, and went to meet her husband about three o'clock, and left me in charge of the house. Three persons came in about five o'clock, and had brandy and water - one of them came and asked for change for a 10 l. note; I refused - he said he could not pay me, I sent the servant girl to get change, she could not, and having money in my pocket, I gave change; I asked his address, he said,

"Davis, King-street, Cheapside;" a few days after, I sent Gilbert, who had lived servant with me before, to redeem some articles, and he gave the note. The prosecutor saw me attending to the business of the house sometime, and said nothing about me. Directly I was asked about it, I said, I sent Gilbert with the note, and explained every thing.

SUSAN CHRISTIE . My husband keeps the Fleece, public-house, Knight Rider-street. I remember the day Hunt made his entry - he passed about half-past one o'clock; I was in the parlour, and my husband was at Vauxhall. The prisoner lived in the house - I told him from the noise I heard that Hunt was going by; he went out, and returned in five minutes, and was about the house all day while I was at home. I went out at half-past three o'clock and am certain he never went out during that time. I left him in care of the house.

COURT. Q. What makes you speak particular as to the time he was absent - A. I particularly requested him not to stay, as I wished to go out; but some gentlemen came in after he had been out, and detained me.

JAMES SMITH . I am a baker. I was at the Fleece public-house, about five o'clock on the day Hunt arrived, the prisoner was then in the bar serving. I was at the bar and heard a gentleman ask him to change a 10 l. note, he gave his name Davis, or Jarvis.

RICHARD SAMUELS . I am a shoemaker. I was by St. Paul's when Hunt passed, and saw the prisoner at the end of Black Swan-alley, facing the Fleece, between half-past one and two o'clock.

THOMAS BELL . I work at a callenderer's. I went to the Fleece at one o'clock on the day Hunt came, and stopped about twenty minutes, then went to St. Paul's Church-yard, hearing Hunt was coming, the prisoner was in the house all the time I was there. I saw Hunt pass and returned to the house about twenty minutes or a quarter before two, he was there then - I dined there - I had ordered a steak before I went out.

JAMES BOARD . I am a callenderer. I was at the Fleece at one o'clock, and went out to see Hunt, the prisoner was in the house then, I remained until two, but did not see him after a quarter before two.

ROBERT PEER . I drive the Southampton coach. I went to the Fleece at one o'clock, on the day of Hunt's procession, the prisoner was there, and served me with a pot of half and half. I went out before the procession came, returned, and had more to drink, he was there then, and between half-past one and half-past two I went up Sermon-lane, and met him with two little children returning to the Fleece he said I was too late.

SAMUEL HAWKINS . I am employed in the Perogative-office, Doctor's Commons, and dine at the Fleece. I have known the prisoner eight or nine years. I saw him at the Fleece the day Hunt arrived, cooking chops, which I ordered at half-past one. I saw the procession, returned to dinner, and staid there till near three o'clock, he was in the house all that time serving and assisting in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-82

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, DECEMBER 9.

Middlsex Cases, before Mr. Recorder.

82. MARK HERD , WILLIAM WATTS , JAMES BROWN , and THOMAS FULLER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Alexander De Riemer , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 13th of November , at St. Pancras, with intent to steal, and stealing fourteen silver spoons, value 9 l.; a pen-knife, value 1 s.; a wine funnel, value 1 l.; a snuff-box, value 10 s.; and a phleme, value 1 s.; his property, and an umbrella, value 1 s. ; the goods of Martha Hurst , spinster ; and CHARLOTTE BANFIELD was indicted for, that she, after the said felony and burglary, was committed, to wit, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did receive, harbour, and maintain the said prisoners, well knowing them to have done and committed the said felony and burglary .

JAMES ALEXANDER DE RIEMER . I rent a house in Euston-place, in the parish of St. Pancras, Middlesex . In the night between the 13th and 14th of November, my house was broken open. I was the last person up - there was no alarm in the night, the front fastenings of the house were all safe when I went to bed - I did not examine the back. Charlotte Burge got up first in the morning and alarmed me about seven o'clock, I came down, it was light then. I found the back kitchen window up, and the mark of an instrument between the cill of the window and the bottom sash; there was a large hole in one of the shutters of that window which are inside, the mark on the cill had been made by raising the window, the catch of the window was broken off by the force of raising the sash; there is a yard behind the house which is enclosed by a wall, ten feet hight, there were marks on that wall of two persons having got down - there is a row of houses on the other side of the wall; the property was stolen from the parlour. When they got into the kitchen the door was bolted outside, and a pannel was taken out of the door, which was safe overnight. We missed fourteen spoons from the parlour, worth about 9 l. at least, a pen-knife, from the cheffoneer drawer, a plated wire funnel, worth 1 l., a snuff-box, worth 10 s., it was a tortoiseshell, mounted with gold, and a phleme, worth 1 s.; the robbery was on Sunday night, and on Monday following, I went to the office and found all the property.

CHARLOTTE BURGE . I am cook to Mr. De Riemer. On the night of the robbery, I went to bed at ten o'clock, the kitchen was safe then, the shutter was barred and entire, and the window sash also. I heard no noise in the night.

I bolted the back kitchen door, the bolts are outside - there was then no hole in it. I got up about seven o'clock in the morning, it was just day-light, I found the front kitchen door open; and the back kitchen door open, a piece cut out of it, and a piece out of the shutter, and the window up as high as it could be. I first called my fellow-servant and then my master - the spoons were safe on the evening before, in the back parlour sideboard drawer. I missed the articles stated in the indictment - an umbrella, belonging to Martha Hurst , my fellow servant, hung up near the back kitchen door, it was gone - I found it at the office with the other property.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the morning of the 14th November, about six o'clock (it was not day-light), I called on Pople and Handley. We went to No. 13, Castle-street, Seven Dials, the street-door was open; the house is full half an hour's walk from the prosecutor's. We went up stairs; I being first, went to the top of the attic-stairs, and found an umbrella very wet, the wet running from it; this was claimed by Charlotte Burge , as belonging to her fellow servant. I listened at the door, and heard the voice of two or three men speaking in a low tone. I burst the door open, and saw silver articles on a deal table. Watts, Fuller, and Brown were sitting round the fire; the table was between Watts and Fuller. I knew Watts, ran to him with a cutlass held it to his breast, and told him if he moved I would run him through. Handley then was holding a pistol to Herd's head, who was in bed with Banfield. Cooper secured the property - there were fourteen silver spoons, and a wine-funnel on the table. I handcuffed Fuller and Brown - while doing so, I saw a snuff-box (which I now produce) drop from either Watts or Fuller, but which I cannot say. Handley handcuffed Watts. We then ordered Herd to get out of bed, which he did; he dressed himself all but his coat, and then said,

"Let me go to the other side of the room for my coat, which hangs on a chair." I followed him, and when he had his coat in his hand, and was going to put it on, this knife dropped from the pocket. We ordered Banfield to get up and dress herself. Cooper asked the prisoners who the plate belonged to; neither of them made any reply, that I recollect. When Cooper had searched the room, I said I would have a search, and by the right-hand side of the fire-place, I found a board loose in the floor, which I took up; there was a hollow space under it, and some way from the hole, as far as I could reach my hand, I found five skeleton keys, and one other key, tied together, a hook, a chisel, a screw-driver, a stock for a centre-bit, an iron crow-bar, and dark lanthorn; and on the back of the chair where Fuller sat, was this old blue coat, very wet; and on the side of the bed where Herd lay, I found a pair of old worsted stockings, very wet and very dirty. We took all the prisoner's to the watch-house, and from there to the office. The coat Fuller had on was dry, and had feathers on it, as if he had been on a bed. Brown's hat, coat, waistcoat and pantaloons were very wet indeed, and all their shoes were dirty with fresh dirt; they appeared to have been dried by the fire. They did not say where they had been. On the Monday following, I and Cooper went to the prosecutor's house, with all the implements, also the knife and snuff-box, and on examination I found the sash had been forced up, and the chisel and screwdriver exactly fitted the marks on the cill and and bottom of the sash; the window-catch was forced off and a hole bored through the shutter. We found in the front kitchen a cupboard forced open by the side of the fire-place, and the same two instruments fitted the marks on that door. In the middle door of the back kitchen were marks of centre-bits; at each corner of the pannel which was taken out (I produce it), the beading which confined the pannel was cut away with a knife, so that it came out. We examined the wall and the vault door, it appeared that they had climbed up on the door, and then on the wall. It would take a full half hour to make an an entrance with these instruments; the robbery altogether would occupy above three quarters of an hour. The prosecutor claimed the knife and snuff-box immediately on seeing them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did you get to Castle-street - A. About seven o'clock - it was day light then and did not rain. I got up between five and six o'clock; it rained hard then, and I went to bed. I arose again about a quarter to six, it was then a gentle mizzling rain, and did not rain heavy afterwards; it left off about six o'clock. It rained hard in the middle of the night - I do not know whether the previous evening was wet. I was never in the house before. I did not then know who belonged to it. I only saw one bed in the room.

Q. Five people don't usually sleep in one bed - A. I have seen as many. There was a good fire there. Brown sat in a chair on the left of the fire - the bed was in a recess. I think the room is not twenty feet square. The moment the door was opened, Brown looked over his shoulder - he had his shoes and hat on; his coat was very wet; it was a blue one. I did not ask to see his shoes; they appeared wet, and it was fresh wet as if he had been out that morning. He was very wet altogether - his clothes and shoes satisfied me that he had been out that morning. They were all sitting round a good fire. Euston-place is on the same side of the way as Pancras New Church.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Watts and Fuller were fully dressed - A. Yes; their clothes were dampish. Fuller's coat appeared to have been taken off the bed. He denied that the coat at the back of the chair was his.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Herd was in bed quite undressed - A. Yes - so was Banfield; she said she was very ill, and I beleive she was; she had a black eye and bruises about her. There were nobody besides the prisoners in the room. I looked at the stockings by the bed before Herd got up; I wrapped them up, and brought them away - he put on a clean pair of white ones, his coat was on the left hand side of the bed - I found nothing on him, but saw him drop the knife, his coat was dryish, it did not hang by the fire; his breeches were not exactly dry, they were not in the state they would be if he had been out in a heavy rain. I believe his waistcoat was dry, but did not notice it - his hat and shoes appeared to have been out in a heavy rain; he might have dried his clothes - his hat appeared to have been dried by the fire; I can tell that because I am a hatter by trade. Herd asked me before the Magistrate if the stockings were not in the pocket of the

coat - I said No, I picked them up by the bed side, and then put them myself into the coat pocket. The snuff-box, implements, and pen-knife have been in my possession ever since.

MR. DE REIMER. I think the pen-knife is mine; it appears the same as was taken that night. I had it three or four months - I have no mark on it. I am certain of the snuff-box, it is marked with my initials.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It is a common pen-knife - A. Yes; if I saw it in a person's possession I should not claim it by any mark.

JOSEPH COOPER . I went with Pace to Castle-street. We got there about seven o'clock. Pace had called on me a little after six; it had been a very wet night, but did not rain when I came out. We went up stairs, broke the door open. Fuller, Brown, and Watts, sat by the fire. Herd and Banfield were in bed together. We told them we came to take them into custody, and on the table we found a wine funnel, and fourteen silver spoons in a blue rag, which was very wet, A tortoiseshell box was dropped, which Pace picked up. Herd was dressing at the time. Pace found a hole at the corner of the room, and pulled from under the floor the house-breaking implements. We did not find the centre bit belonging to the stock. I took from the mantle-piece a gardner's pruning knife; and after Herd and Banfield had got up, I found a silver box in the bed, with thirty silver counters in it; we found the owner for that. I found a wet blue coat hanging on the back of a chair in which I believe Fuller sat. By the side of the bed was a pair of worsted stocking with the feet wet. When Herd got up he put on a pair of clean while stockings. Two pair of their shoes out of the four were wet; one pair which Herd put on were soaking wet through. I think Brown had on a wet pair too; and the other two pair which appeared more dry, looked as if they had been dried by the fire. In a box claimed by Banfield I found a red pocket-book of this year, with a silver lock to it, with several cuts of a knife in it. After taking them away. Handley and I went back, and made a second search in the same room; this was between eleven and twelve. Handley found a letter and a file. We then went to Russell's, White Lion-Court, Seven Dials, to the first floor, back room, and found a woman's reticule basket, with seven picklock keys, and one latch key; and in the table drawer we found a googe bit, which would drill a hole. We also found a hat and coat there, which Fuller claimed; there was a bed in that room; we found nobody there. An umbrella was found on the landing-place in Castle-street. The prosecutor's cook claimed it as her fellow servant's property. The wet had ran from it; it must have been there some time, for the wet from it had soaked into the floor. We went to the office, and the prisoner's were put to the bar for examination; and Fuller claimed the hat and coat which I brought from Russell's. On the Monday following, we went to the prosecutors; the chisel and screw-driver fitted the marks in the window. I have no doubt those instruments had been used there. and also at the kitchen and cupboard doors.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The spoons were concealed in a blue rag - A. Yes, I did not see them till I undid them. I found what they were, and asked them all round if they were theirs; nobody claimed them. I did not take them out of the rag; the funnel was not covered over.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Herd and Ban-field were undressed and in bed - A. Yes, I believe Herd's coat was damp, but not so wet as the others. I did not examine his waistcoat; his shoes were wet; his hat was very wet; it did not appear to have been dried by the fire; the streets were wet and damp. Banfield appeared very ill.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was not the night before very rainy - A. I went home about eleven o'clock, and it had not rained all the evening then.

MR. DE RIEMER. The fourteen spoons are mine and have my initials on them. I believe the funnel to be mine from its size and appearance.

CHARLOTTE BURGE . The umbrella belongs to my fellow servant Martha Hurst ; she has had it during the five years I have been there; neither of us were out the evening before; it was not wetted by us.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am officer of Queen-square. I accompained Cooper and Pace to Castle-street. We broke the room door open, and found the five prisoners there. Herd and the woman were in bed; the other three sat round the fire; there was a table standing between Fuller and Watts; the spoons and funnel were on it, and I took off a phleme. I saw the impliments of house-breaking found under the floor. Herd's shoes were very wet, and some of their clothes. I went to a lodging at Russell's, White Lion-street, which I suspected to be Fuller's, and he claimed a coat and hat which was brought from there; they were dry.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You examined Herd's things attentively - A. I examined his shoes, coat, and hat. I did not examine his waitcoat or breeches; his coat appeared dry, but his shoes very wet and dirty.

MR. DE RIENER. I lost a phleme from the parlour, but cannot swear to this one.

HERD'S Defence. I was in bed from twelve o'clock till I was apprehended, and I let these men in when they came in the morning.

WATT'S Defence. On the night previous to my apprehension, I was with Fuller at a public-house, in St. James's. I told him I was going down to Richmond next day, and asked him to accompany me, which he agreed to, and appointed me to to call on him before six o'clock in the morning to breakfast. I called at his lodgings at the appointed time; he got up and dressed. His wife (who is Herd's sister) had words with him about going; he said he would go to his brothers and get breakfast, and we went there to breakfast. I knocked at the door. Banfield asked who was there and said, if we stopped while she unlocked the door and got into bed she would let us in, and did so. We asked for Herd; she said he was out, but she expected him in every moment, and asked us to sit down. We sat by the fire; and in about quarter of an hour Herd came in alone; and about ten minutes after Brown came up, and then Herd went to bed; the room was so dark I could discover nothing on the table till I pulled the curtain aside, I saw the funnel, but know no more.

BROWN'S Defence. I called up there as I passed, but know nothing of the robbery.

BANFIELD'S Defence. I went to bed about eleven o'clock. Herd came home between twelve and one, and never got out of bed till three men knocked at the door. I awoke him; he got out and let them in; two very decent men saw Herd home in liquor.

HERD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

WATTS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

FULLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, as no violence was offered to any one in the house, and no locks picked .

BANFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-83

83. ELIZABETH PHYSWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , at St. Mary-le-bone, in the dwelling-house of Thomas William Baker , a tin box, value 1 s., a guinea, seven sovereigns, a half sovereign, and two 5 l. bank-notes, the property of the said Thomas William Baker , to whom she was servant, against the statute ; and SOPHIA STEPHENSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, one of the said notes, knowing it to have been stolen, against the statute .

THOMAS WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Foley-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone . On Sunday the 27th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw my tin cash-box safe in my bed-room, on one corner of my drawers. I had omitted to put it away in its usual place, as my mother-in-law was then in a dying state. Physwick had at that time lived not quite a week in my service, she left about seven o'clock that evening. I had a character with her, she gave me no notice of her going, nor did she wait for her wages. At the time she left we were at tea, and she was desired to take the tea up stairs to my mother-in-law, she came down, she was sent to feed the bird in the shop and we did not see her after that. In taking the tea up she must pass the room-door, where the cash-box was, she left the street-door on a jar. I apprehended her on the following Saturday the 1st of November, at Chatham. I have found the box with the writings that were in it, but all the money was gone. I have got one of the 5 l. notes from the Bank, and am sure it is one of those which were in my box. At the time it was stolen it contained two 5 l. notes, seven or eight sovereigns, a crooked guinea, one or three half sovereigns, a seven shilling piece, and about 5 l. in silver, with other things. I found the box at Mary-le-bone office. I don't know Stephenson; when I took Phywsick, I told her she had stolen my cash-box and money, she acknowledged taking it, I neither threatened or promised her. I found nothing on her.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am servant to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, of Tothill-street. I have a crooked guinea, which Stephenson brought into our shop and asked its value, I said it was light and gave her twenty shillings for it, which was the full value.

MR. BAKER. That is the guinea which was in my box.

THOMAS ROBERT HADLEY . I am servant to Mr. Price, linen-draper, of Tothill-street, Westminster, the prisoner Stephenson and a female named Smith, came into my master's shop, on Monday afternoon the 28th of October, and bought several articles. Smith tendered me a 5 l. note. I put on it,

"Mrs. Smith, No. 1, Wright's-passage, Tothill-street," by which I know the note produced to be the same, it has my writing on it, they laid out about nineteen shillings in change.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I live at No. 1, Wright's-passage, Tothill-street Stephenson came to me and asked me to go and see if this note was passable, I had washed for her before, I went alone first, to Wright's, the pawn-brokers, to ask if it was good. and they said it was good, but could not change it, she did not say how she came by it. I brought it back to her, she said

"Go and change it, and buy something for yourself." I said I did not like to go, she then said she would go too, we went to Mr. Price's, Hadley served us, we bought some black stuff for petticoats, a pair of black stockings for eighteen-pence, a black and red shawl, and some flannel, which came to eighteen shillings and sixpence, I gave him the note she had given me, I did not suspect any thing. I gave her the change, I was to have a pair of black stockings, a flannel, and a black petticoat. I said I did not wish any thing, the stuff bought, would make two flannel, and two black petticoats, she told me to take the things home and make them; this was on a Monday morning. and on Tuesday she came to me and said a young woman had robbed her master, and she was afraid she herself would get into prison, and the young woman too. She went away telling me to make her gown as soon as I could, and to take care of the things. I told this to the constable, when I was before the magistrate, the week after, I saw Physwick on Tuesday morning, she came with Stephenson, but was not by when she mentioned about the note.

GILES CHAPMAN . I keep the Cooper's-arms, Strutton-ground. Stephenson came into my house and called for a pint of beer, on Monday evening the 28th of October between six and seven o'clock, and asked me to keep three sovereigns for her until the morning; when she would call for them, I had information, and when she called in the morning I detained them, and she went away, she was a little in liquor when she gave them to me; I have brought three with me, but they were mixed with others.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Tuesday morning I and Pace took Stephenson. I told her she was concerned in a robbery which Physwick had committed. She denied any knowledge of it or of Physwick. We kept her in custody, and some time after she sent for me, and said she would tell all she knew about it, and said voluntarily that this young woman, some time ago, had robbed her of a pair of shoes, and owed her a few shillings besides; and that on Sunday Physwick came and said she was come to make amends; that they went out on Monday morning and bought some things which we found at Smith's house, she denied all knowledge of any notes. I went with Mr. Baker to Chatham, and took Physwick, who confessed to me voluntarily that she had taken the box out of her master's bed-room, and took it to a court in Islington, which she did not know the name of, where she opened the box and took out what she could, and left the box against a wall there; that she afterwards came to Westminster, and went to Stephenson's,

with the two notes in her hand, but she only saw what amount one of them was, and that was a five. That Stephenson took both notes out of her hand, and said she would get change for them; that she returned in an hour or two, and gave her four sovereigns, telling her she should have the remainder another time. When she was at the office, I shewed her the box, which somebody had taken to Mary-le-bone office, she said it was the same. Stephenson denied all knowledge of the notes.

THOMAS PACE . I searched Stephenson on Monday night, and found about 10 s. on her; she was quite drunk. She keeps a house of ill-fame. I asked her where the sovereigns were, she said she had none, and knew nothing about them. In consequence of information I went to Chapman, who said he had three sovereigns, and described Stephenson to me. I found the property at Smith's, which had been bought at the linen-drapers. Some of it was under the stairs, and some in a back pace.

PHYSWICK'S Defence. Stephenson is innocent of the robbery.

STEPHENSON'S Defence. I knew nothing of the robbery. I had not seen this young woman for eighteen months; she came up and said her grandmother was dead, and had left her the money, and asked me to go with her to buy some things.

PHYSWICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of her youth, and believing her to be seduced by Stephenson .

STEPHENSON - GUILTY . - Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-84

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

84. GEORGE CRIPPS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT RANES . I am a grocer , and live in Leather-lane - Mr. Holsten dealt with me - the prisoner was my porter and entrusted to receive money; in October last, I applied to Mr. Holsten, for a balance of 8 l. 3 s. 1 1/2 d. due to me. I had asked the prisoner about it, he said Mr. Holsten had promised to pay it on the 6th of October, when he was to receive money from Germany.

Prisoner. Q. Will you produce your small daily cash book - A. I have no such book now, I have not used it since April.

ROBERT RODDINGTON . I am clerk to Mr. Ranes. On the first of April, I find by the day-book, that the prisoner paid me 30 s. on account of Mr. Holstein, I recollect the circumstance very well, he said he had only received that sum.

JACOB HOLSTEIN . I live in Gray Eagle-street, Spital-fields. On the first of April, I paid the prisoner 3 l. 10 s. on Mr. Rane's account. I saw him write the receipt which I produce. I gave him two sovereigns, and the rest in silver. He told me on the 19th of August, that Mr. Rane had left off the wholesale trade, and could not serve me.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-85

85. GEORGE HEDLAM , and EDWARD CLEAR , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 150 lbs. of potatoes, value 6 d. , the goods of Richard Gibson .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD GIBSON . I am a tea-dealer , and have a farm in Essex; I live in town; the prisoners were in my service. On the 12th of November I sent them with 4 ton 2 cwt. of potatoes; 3 ton were to be delivered to Mr. Rhodes, 1 ton to Mr. Thompson, Cottage-lane, Commercial-road, and the remainder to Mr. Rhodes's clerk. Hedlam had only been in my service two days.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Did you see them loaded - A. I saw them in the waggon, and the rest in a cart.

ELIZA PARDY . I am nearly twelve years old. I saw the prisoners and another man in Cottage-lane, with a waggon and a cart; I saw them go into Jane Rodding 's house, in Cottage-lane, and told my aunt of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen them before - A. No. It was four weeks ago.

JANE RODDING . I live in Cottage-lane. On the 12th of November, about two o'clock in the day, the prisoners called on me, and asked if I was in the habit of buying potatoes; I said Yes, but it did not suit me then, as I only had sixpence; they said they had almost done, but they had a few left, and as I was a poor woman they would sell them worth my money; I said I thanked them, but I had none. One of them went to the waggon, and brought three or four in his hand, and said,

"See, they are good ones;" I said they might be, but they did not suit me; they said they dare say I could raise money to buy what few they had left, they brought in about 1 1/2 cwt. in a bag. I said, what do you want for them; they said they wanted to empty the waggon, to take home some dung, and would I give 4 s. 6 d. I offered them 3 s. 6 d.; there were three men; one said

"She is a poor woman, let her have them." I borrowed the money, and paid them. I believe the prisoners are two of the men. I saw them at the police-office three days after, and had no doubt of them. I really believe them to be the men.

HEADLAM - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Six Months .

CLEAR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18221204-86

86. GEORGE ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , twenty-seven panes of glass, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Peters .

WILLIAM WOODURY . I am an officer. On the 21st of November I was in Edgware-road, and saw the prisoner with a basket in his hand, about five o'clock in the evening. I stopped till he passed us, and asked what he had, he said glass, that he brought from Mr. Smith's to do some work at Chapel-street, Paddington, that he brought it at night to save the trouble of going for it in the morning. We were near Chapel-street; he said he could not tell the house he was to go to, and afterwards said Mr. Peters's foreman of Park-street, gave it him, saying it was glass out of old coach sashes. He had twenty-seven pieces of glass.

JOHN WITH. I am foreman at Messrs. Smith and Maberly's, builders. They were employed at Mr. Peters's manufactory. In November last the prisoner was working there. I saw the glass at the office; I cannot swear to it positively. I ordered two men to cut glass out of old

sashes, and place it in a room in the house, of which the prisoner kept the key. I missed some, and this is of the same description. I never gave him leave to take any. He bore a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18221204-87

Before Mr. Recorder.

86. FREDERICK MIDDLESEX was indicted for feloniously putting off to Joseph Simpson Eyles , a counterfeit half crown, and twelve counterfeit sixpences, at and for a lower rate than the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for, (i.e.) for 3 s.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH SIMPSON EYLES . I am a smith , and live in Jane-street, Commercial-road. I have known the prisoner a year and a half; I used to see him at the Globe coffee-shop, Beech-street, and at the St. John's, Cowcross-street. In August last he made an application to me, which I communicated to the police, and by their instructions I met him at the Globe coffee-shop on Monday evening, the 9th of October. I met him on several other occasions, and always with the knowledge of the police. On Friday afternoon, the 18th of October, about two o'clock, I met him at the St. John's, Cowcross-street, to receive the remainder of some money I had received the day before, two counterfeit half crowns and a shilling. I was to pay 10 d. for the half crowns, and 4 d. for the shilling. I met him on Friday to receive a half crown and a shilling more. I had given him 3 s. 6 d. on the Tuesday, to supply me with as much as that would produce at the rate I mentioned; three half crowns and two shillings were to be given me for 3 s. He then owed me 4 d. I had met him on Thursday and Friday to receive counterfeit money for the 3 s. 6 d. which I gave him on Tuesday. It was marked money, given to me by Armstrong. I gave the counterfeit money I received of him to Attfield, but what I received on the 18th I gave to Armstrong. He did not give me the 4 d., as he had not got it, and said the next purchase I made he should want 3 d. for the stuff to do the money over with.

Cross-examined by MR. STIRLING. Q. You was not present when he was searched - A. No. I am a smith by trade, and now work for one Burt. The prisoner asked me to buy counterfeit money. I occasionally get jobs for myself. I never informed against people. I got money from the officers to buy the counterfeit money. I believe I have had about 22 s. from them besides, for loss of time. This is the only transaction I had with the police. My reason for informing of him was, because he asked me to go out with him several times, and afterwards asked me to buy money.

MR. LAW. Q. Being out of employ, he asked you to pass had money with him - A. Yes. I refused, and thought it my duty to inform.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I have heard Eyles's account, it is correct. He first gave me information on the 8th or 9th of October. I informed the solicitor of the Mint, and supplied him with money from time to time to purchase counterfeit coin. On the 10th of October I supplied him with 3 s. 6 d. to purchase, and 2 s. 6 d. for himself to spend. I marked the 3 s. 6 d. so as to know it again. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23 d. Eyles had given three half crowns, and 2 s., on the 18th of October, all counterfeit. I gave him two marked shillings on the 23d of October, at night, (about two hours before I took the prisoner). I told Vann to go to St John's Coffee-shop to watch, and after waiting some time, I saw the prisoner and Eyles, and another man, come out together. I followed them up a court; Eyles and the prisoner were talking together. I followed them to the Queen's Head public-house, where I had stationed Attfield. I secured the prisoner, and took him into that house. Vann junior was with me. I said I must take him for uttering bad money to the carroly man who had just left him, he denied it, saying, he never sold any in all his life, that he had all good money about him. In his right-hand breeches pocket I found a purse, containing five or six shillings of good money - it was not the silver I had marked. In the same pocket, I found two loose shillings, which he said he had had some time, I found that it was the money I had marked and given that night to Eyles. I said that very money had been in my possession not an hour ago, and he said,

"Lord bless me! the man who was walking with me must have put it into my pocket." I have kept the 2 s. ever since, I gave Attfield the counterfeit money I received from Eyles on the 18th; I could not take him on the 18 h, as it was very rainy, and I did not see him come out of the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say how the two marked shillings got into his pocket - A. No.

MR. LAW. Q. Did he say he had but five shillings and not seven shillings - A. No. The purse and the two shillings were in sight when I asked how long he had it; he could not avoid seeing them; he was much agitated at the time.

JOHN VANN . My father is an officer. On the 23d of October, Armstrong gave me information, and I went to St. John's coffee-shop, in Cow Cross-street, and saw the prisoner standing in the coffee-room. Eyles was sitting down, and I sat directly opposite him, about four yards from the prisoner, who was talking with Eyles for about ten minutes, and they appeared well acquainted. I heard the prisoner say he could not get them without - but I could not hear the rest of the sentence. Eyles gave him a paper over the settle; he took it and put it into his pocket. In about five minutes I came out and went to the Queen's Head, at the corner of St. John's-lane, where I saw Attfield, and I told him the prisoner had received a paper from Eyles. At that moment the prisoner came by, and Armstrong was behind him. Another man besides Eyles was with him. Armstrong then took him into the Queen's Head. I held his hand while Armstrong searched him; his account is correct. I saw Armstrong give Eyles the two shillings about an hour before he went to the house.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I have heard the witness's account; it is correct as far as I was present. I received counterfeit money from Armstrong on the 18th.

MARIA JORDAN . I am servant to William Taylor , who keeps the Globe Coffee-shop in Beech-street. In August last I frequently saw the prisoner and Eyles in company together there. I am certain of their persons.

Cross-examined. Q. You know Eyles - A. Yes, by his

frequenting the place. I cautioned the prisoner to have nothing to do with him.

Mr. LAW. Q. Had any thing occurred to make you caution him - A. I had heard he was a bad character, I did not know the prisoner's character at that time. I saw them in company after that as often as ever.

MARY ANN BARNS . I am servant at the St. John's Coffee-shop. I have frequently seen Eyles and the prisoner talking together. Eyles came one day, and told me to tell the prisoner to meet him at seven o'clock that evening. I told him, he said he could not, but would meet him at eleven o'clock next day; this was on the Wednesday before he was apprehended.

JOSEPH ALLEN . I have frequently seen the prisoner and Eyles at the coffee-shop in private conversation.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint, and have been so thirty-two years. The three half-crowns are counterfeit, and of the same die; the two shillings are also counterfeit, and from the same die; they are merely washed, and have not been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. The charge is totally false. I never had any dealing with the witness, and only know him by seeing him at the coffee-shop, where I went to look at the advertisements for a situation. The man came and sat down by me; he had been drinking, and said some friends had been treating him, which I suppose was the officers. I came out in a quarter of an hour, and was followed by him. I was seized and taken into a house. The officers asked what money I had, and took out my purse, containing 8 s. 6 d., and at the same time he had 2 s. in his hand. I said the money and papers belonged to me, and I did not know I had more than was in my purse, and if it was in my pocket it must have been put in. I received this man in the light of a friend at first, but find him a villain. Under all the circumstances, what credit can you attach to such a man.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-88

London Cases, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

87. MARY ANN JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FRANCES STARLING . I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Great East-cheap . The prisoner came to my shop on the 4th of October between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, and asked for two pounds of curd soap, which came to 1 s. 10 d. She laid down a sovereign, which I took up, and found it a good one. I had laid her down the change, 18 s. 2 d., she then hesitated, and said it was not for herself, and the person she bought it for would think it too dear. (I had told her the price as soon as she laid the sovereign down,) and she thought she should not take it. I took the change off the counter, and pushed the sovereign back to her, she took it up; she then said she would take it. I tendered her the change again; she put a sovereign across the counter. I never suspected it, concluding it was the same; and she went away with the change and soap. I discovered it was a bad one when I went to put it into my purse. I produce it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When she put the sovereign down you told her the price - A. I cannot speak to that. I did not tell her the price till she offered to pay. The counter was between us, She took the sovereign up and held it, as I thought, between her fingers and thumb. I discovered it was bad before I put it into my purse, and did not put it in. I had put it into my pocket first; there was no other sovereign there; it has not been in my possession ever since, but it was marked about a fortnight afterwards, and I can swear to it; it was in my pocket all that time, except when I produced it at Guildhall. I shewed it to several people myself, but never lost sight of it.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Is this the sovereign - A. It is. I put it into a paper, and put it into my pocket.

MR. SEWELL. I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. This sovereign is counterfeit.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not officers of the Mint who know the coin - A. Yes. They are only examined in capital prosecutions. I have been clerk to the solicitor of the mint for thirty years, and attend particularly to business of this description.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months ,

And to find Sureties for her good behaviour .

Reference Number: t18221204-89

88. THOMAS CHARLES REDFEARN was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences .

JAMES HARRIS . I am clerk to Messrs. Edward Fran and George M. Davidson . On the 14th of September, the prisoner brought to our warehouse a written order, signed Weatherhall and Co. (who deal with us), which I produce - it is for four dozen of common and four dozen of best crown mixed pins. I told him we had no common pins; he said he would take the best - I delivered four dozen to him, and he took them away; he had been to the house before. In the course of the day he came, and said he would have four dozen more of the best, which I delivered him with the invoice. The goods were delivered on the faith of this order.

MR. RICHARD BAGALLY . I am one of the firm of Weatherhall and Co. The order was not written by any one in our employ. The prisoner never had our authority to get these things. We never saw him till his apprehension.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-90

89. THOMAS CHARLES REDFEARN was again indicted for a like offence .

JOHN HARRIS . On the 12th of October, the prisoner brought an order signed as before. I delivered him four dozen of common and four dozen of the best mixed pins.

MR. BAGALLY. This order is not from our house.

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-91

90. THOMAS CHARLES REDFEARN was again indicted for a like offence .

HENRY LAWLER . I am in the service of Messrs. Francis and Co. On the 5th of October, the prisoner presented in order for these things, and said he would take them - I

looked out the goods, and gave them to him; they were a gross of coronation bodkins, and six dozen of pins, value 1 l.

MR. BAGALLY. This order is also forged.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-92

91. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for a fraud .

WILLIAM JURY. I am a warehouseman to Messrs. Ingleby, Jones, and Co. On the 30th of October, the prisoner presented this order at our house, (read, Messrs. Ingleby and Co. please to deliver to the bearer a dozen of black twilled silk handkerchiefs, at 5 s. 6 d. for John Stedman ) - Mr. Stedman is a customer of ours. I gave the order to Mr. Jones, who delivered the prisoner the handkerchiefs in my presence. I never saw him before.

ROBERT CROFT JONES. I am a warehouseman to the prosecutor. Jury gave me this order - I looked out twelve silk handkerchiefs, and delivered them to the prisoner, who went away with them. He said his name was John Williams . I am certain of his person.

FRANCIS WALKER . I saw the prisoner deliver this order to Jury, and saw the goods delivered to him.

JOHN STEADMAN . I live in Beech-street, Barbican. there is no other there of my name. I never sent the prisoner with this order - it is not written by me.

MR. JOHN JONES . I am in partnership with Messrs. Russel and Ingleby; we are silk-dealers.

WILLIAM MARKHAM . I am an officer. I found upon the prisoner a duplicate of a black silk handkerchief, pawned for 2 s. 6 d.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-93

92. DANIEL MONTGOMERY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-94

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before W. Arabin, Esq.

92. CHARLES HOWSE and JAMES BULL were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , from the person of William Puddiford , a 20 l. a 10 l. and six 5 l. Bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM PUDDIFORD . I am a cow-keeper and hay-salesman . On the 29th of November, about three o'clock, I was at the Welch Harp, Edgware-road - it is five miles from Tyburn turnpike - my son, who is twenty-two years old, sat at the bar at tea with me, the prisoners came into the parlour afterwards, and while they were there, I looked at my notes. I had 60 l. I folded them up, and put them into my right-hand breeches pocket loose. I knew Howse before by sight; Bull was quite a stranger, we came away all three together in a gig, as Howse asked me to ride. I sat on the near side, Bull sat next to me, and Howse drove. I rode as far as Lisson Grove , then got out, and put my hand into my pocket (which was buttoned when I got into the gig) and missed my money - I said

"I have lost my money and one of you must have got it," they had not got out of the gig - Howse said,

"Mr. Puddiford, I hope you do not think I have got it;" I said, one of them must have got it; one of them then said,

"There lies your note behind you," I then took up a 20 l. note, about two yards from the gig - I said,

"This is not all by a great deal, you have got 40 l. more;" the watchman stood by and said,

"What is that you say, have they got your money" - I said

"Yes, and I give you charge of them." Howse immediately whipped his horse and galloped away - we went after them - the watchman sprang his rattle, and hollowed,

"Stop the gig;" they drove on nearly half a mile, till they came to Baker-street, then Howse was thrown out and secured; he said,

"Puddiford, I hope you are not going to leave me locked up." I found a 10 l. and two 5 l. notes, about three hundred and fifty yards from Lisson Grove, between that and Baker-street. I went home, returned, and found in the same road nearer to town, some notes, but as I cannot read, I cannot tell what they are; they were trod upon and torn all to pieces. I had drank two pints of ale with another person - I was sober.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is not your name Pettiford - A. I don't know how it is spelt, some spell it

"Ped" and some

"Pud." I had a box coat on, which was buttoned up over my clothes. I sat in the corner of the gig, Bull sat nearly on my thigh - we left the house just before four o'clock. I only had two pints of ale. I do not think that the landlord refused to give me more liquor. While I was in the gig I asked them twice to stop and drink, they refused - they pulled up for me to get out.

Q. Did not you charge one of the patrole with stealing your money - A. No; as I came out of Mary-le-bone office, I saw the dog which followed the gig, and said, that was the dog." I did not complain of any officers not taking a patrol into custody. I cannot swear the rattle did not frighten the horse.

COURT. Q. You said he whipped the horse - A. Yes, I generally feel for my money when I leave company, the note laid about two yards behind me - it was not a windy night. I did not go in the track the notes were found - they were found on the left side of the road, fifteen yards from the path.

WILLIAM SUTHERLAND . I am a watchman. I came up just after the prisoner got out of the gig, he was speaking to the two men, I asked how he came to loose his money, they at that moment drove off, but not very quick, for about twelve paces then turned round and came back, and said

"What do you mean Puddiford, to say we have got your money," he said he had lost it and had been no where but with them in the gig, he persisted in saying they must have it, and said,

"take charge of them." they immediately turned the gig, whipped the horse, and made off as fast as they could, a man had hold of the reins, they snatched them from him, I pursued calling

"Stop-thief," they drove by all the watchmen, I came up with Howse who was dirty, and asking for his hat, I think he had been thrown out. I saw Puddiford pick up the 20 l. note; the road is very wide.

JOHN PIZZY . I am sergeant of the watch, I was going my rounds after five o'clock, and about three quarters of a mile from Baker-street, I met the prisoner in the gig, I tried

to stop it. Howse struck me with the whip and went on at full gallop. I sprang my rattle, called out

"Stop thief, stop the gig," they got out of my sight, I am sure they are the same men. I afterwards took Howse, between Baker-street and Boston-street, his coat and face were very dirty, he resisted going to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by Mr. BRODRICK. Q. Was he not enquiring about his hat - A. Yes, he was not standing still.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer, I took Bull about nine o'clock at night, on the 29th of November. Howse had told me where to find him, he said he was innocent. I have a 10 l.; a 20 l.; and part of a 10 l; and 5 l. Bank notes.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Howse's friend took you to Bull by his desire - A. He did.

WILLIAM PUDDIFORD . I know the 10 l. note by a tear in it.

- SMITH. The prosecutor gave me twenty sovereigns for this note, it has my writing on it.

HENRY BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of St. Mary-le-bone; about a quarter before eight o'clock, I had information of this robbery. Puddiford had a dog which he said belonged to one of the party who robbed him, that he met that party in Mary-le-bone-lane, and the officer refused to take charge of him; one Harrison said I should know more about it to-morrow

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He charged an officer with being the thief - A. Yes, he said as he came from the watch-house, that he met three men in Mary-le-bone-lane, that the dog he had was following the men, one of them was the party who robbed him, I understood him to say the man who robbed him was an officer, and that the watchman refused to take charge of him, he said the dog belonged to the men, all three were police-officers he believed, but he gave them in charge to the watchman, who refused to take them, and the man who be charged with the robbery ran away,

WILLIAM PUDDIFORD . There was a dog with the gig, I was in Mary-le-bone-lane; three men were before me and a dog. I said that was the dog. and perhaps the man might be there.

HOWSE Defence. He asked if I would give him a ride, I said, I had no objection, the landlord said he should have no more to drink, as he had had enough, we got into the gig and had a cloth over our knees, we ran the gig over a heap of stones, I stepped out but having hold of the reins, got in again and asked for the whip which was lost, we left the prosecutor in the gig while we went back to look for it, and when we returned he was standing out of the gig, and said he had lost 60 l. then said 45 l. that it was a 10 l. note and four fives, I said that was only 30 l. he then said, he had lost none at all, he would go no further, and we drove on thirty yards, turned back and asked if he thought we had his money, the watchman said it should be settled, I said I would stop there for nobody; he sprang his rattle - ; the horse took fright, and by Baker-street, Bull got out.

BULL'S Defence was precisely to the same effect.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. A brother officer was returning with me and met a friend; we were all three in Mary-le-bone lane; the prosecutor ran up, and laid hold of my friend. The watchman came and said,

"This man says you are one of the persons who robbed him." My friend stood in the crowd afterwards, and the prosecutor did not know him; and at the office he told the people an officer was in the gig with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-95

Before Mr. Recorder.

93. HENRY OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , a clock, value 10 l. , the goods of William Stewart .

WILLIAM STEWART . I am a farmer , and live at Eastham ; the prisoner worked for me; I discharged him on the 19th of November, and found him in custody shortly after, with the clock, which he had taken from my outhouse.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On the 19th of November I was fetched to the shop of Levy, a watchmaker of Whitechapel. The prisoner and another man were there, and the clock. I said,

"Whose clock is this?" the prisoner said,

"It is mine." I asked him where he got it, he said he bought it of Mr. Stewart of Eastham, for 4 l.; and the other man said he hired him to carry it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Twelve Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-96

94. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for that he, on the 18th of November , unlawfully, maliciously, and wilfully did, by menaces, demand the money of Henry Goldsmid , of and from him, by threatening to accuse him of having committed an unnatural crime, with a felonious intent to rob him and his monies from his person, and against his will, violently and feloniously to steal .

FOUR other COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY GOLDSMITH , Esq. I reside on my estate at Crickoel, South Wales. I came to town on the 9th of November, and lodged at the Hummums; but on Monday, the 18th, when this happened, I was lodging in Norfolk-street, I was out walking with two ladies, and returned with them to Norfolk-street, Strand, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. I went in, and we were sitting down to lunch, and all at once a person, whom I should know again, knocked at the door, and said a man in Howard-street wanted to speak to me. I went round the corner, and saw the prisoner - I am certain of him. He said to me,

"Sir, do you recollect being in the coach with me on Saturday week?" I said,

"Me! in a coach with you! I was 160 miles from London." Upon which he said,

"Then I will accuse you of an unnatural crime, if you will not give me 10 l.; and you cannot get off, for I saw you go into the Hummums on Wednesday night, and I will therefore accuse you of it on that night." Upon which I said,

"You filthy beast!" and endeavoured to seize him. I did not then see the person who brought the message. Before I endeavoured to seize him, he said,

"If you do not give me the 10 l., you shall have plenty of our sort after you." I endeavoured to seize him, and he ran away as hard as he could down Surrey-street. I followed, calling stop thief, but nobody would assist me, till I at last gave the people to understand, as well as I could, that he had charged me

with an unnatural crime; then plenty followed him. He ran down the steps into the river, jumped into the mud. I saw him secured. He was almost covered with mud up to his breast. I then said to him,

"You have accused me with an unnatural crime, and I shall take you to Bow-street." He turned round in the presence of the people, and said,

"I have no charge to make against you whatever, Sir, except that you met me in the street, and told me that you was a pawnbroker's clerk, and promised to get me a situation, and desired me to call at No. 8, Norfolk-street;" - which is all false, for I never saw him before in my life. He was taken to Bow-street and committed. He appeared to have a slight impediment in his speech, but not much.

Prisoner. Q. Can you positively swear that I said I would charge you with an unnatural crime - A. On my oath he did.

GEORGE HEATH , JUN. I am a waterman, and stood at the bottom of Surrey-street. I saw the prisoner running, and Mr. Goldsmid pursuing him. There was a cry of Stop thief. On seeing me he ran into the mud - if I had not been in the way, he could have run into Strand-lane. Mr. Goldsmid came down and told me what was the matter, and ran round to intercept him. I ran into the mud, and secured him. I asked what made him run away - he said he had done nothing; he was no thief. I brought him to Mr. Goldsmid; he then said Mr. Goldsmid had promised to get him a place; Mr. Goldsmid denied having any knowledge of him before, and said he had charged him with an unnatural crime. The prisoner said it was all false. He spoke very well at first, but afterwards stuttered a good deal.

JOHN HUGGINS . I live in Howard-street. I heard a dreadful cry of Stop thief; ran up stairs; came out and saw a mob running down Surrey-street; the prisoner was brought out of the mud; his clothes were muddy up to his arms. Mr. Goldsmid said he had charged him with an unnatural crime; he said he had made no such charge.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 13th of November I met a gentleman, who asked the way to Covent Garden-market. I shewed him the way; he asked what I was - I said I wanted a situation; he said if I came to the Hummums he would get me one. I went in after him, and asked the waiter his name - He said Goldsmid. I went on Monday; the waiter said he was gone to live at No. 8 Norfolk-street. I had a friend with me, and sent him to ask him to speak for me, as I was not able. The gentleman came out; I asked if he had heard of a situation - He said

"You do not know me." I said he had promised to get me one; I was leaving him, and there was a cry of Stop thief. I went down by the water to see what was the matter, slipped into the mud, and somebody collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-97

95. JOHN BOLTON was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of George Boys about ten o'clock at night on the 2d of November , and stealing therein nine live tame pigeons , his property.

GEORGE BOYS . I live in Great St. Ann's-street, Westminster , and keep tame pigeons in my garret. I had between forty and fifty. I saw them safe between eight and nine o'clock on Saturday night, and next morning found the prisoner offering one for sale; he said a lad gave it him. I cannot say they were all safe the night before. I missed eight or nine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-98

96. JOHN LLOYD alias BROWN was indicted for feloniously falsely and making and forging a certain order for payment of 6 l. 9 s., with intent to defraud Joseph Birt .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true with the like intention.

JOSEPH BIRT . I am a linen-draper and hosier , and live in Shoreditch. The prisoner came to my shop on the 20th September for some hosiery to shew to a customer in Church-street; if they did not suit he was to return them; they came to 22 s. 1 d. I said I had not sufficient knowledge of him to let him have them without security, and he produced this cheque on Sir John Lubbock , and left it with me, and returned in about an hour, saying he had not seen his customer, and wished to keep them till next morning, and the next day, or the day after, he asked to keep them longer. I consented, and saw no more of him. On the 24th I had a bill to take up at Sir John Lubbock 's, and paid this in part; it was taken in payment. I did not see him till November, when he was brought to my shop, and said

"You will not do any thing with me, Mr. Birt you will get your money."

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. He did not offer to give you the cheque till you requested security - A. No, he merely left it in my possession, and never gave me authority to present it. I have not received the goods back.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am clerk to Sir John Lubbock (looking at the cheque), here is my writing, by which I know I received this cheque from Birt, in part payment of a bill for 58 l., it is drawn on our house by James Brown . I find from inquiry that no such person keeps cash there; the usual method is to pass the cheque to another clerk, who cancels it if it is good; it was objected to the same evening, and returned in the morning.

Q. Can you positively say no such person keeps cash at your house - A. I only speak from inquiry which I have made of the senior clerks.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer. On the 7th of November I was fetched to Birt's shop; the prisoner was there. Birt shewed me the cheque. I asked the prisoner if the name at the bottom of it was his - he said no, and that he did not know the person he took it of.

SARAH GROVE . My husband is houseman at Shoreditch watch-house. I went to clean the watch-house when the prisoner was there, and behind a large door I found a cheque book.

SAMUEL ANDREWS . I am shopman to Mr. Birt. On the 7th of November I met the prisoner, and asked if he did not remember leaving a cheque in Shoreditch - he said no. I asked him to go with me; he said he would, but must go to Aldgate first, and would call as he returned. I said very well, and went on; but looked

back and saw him running. I called Stop thief! and he stopped.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-99

97. ALDERMAN AUSTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November four saws, value 20 s.; a plough, value 5 s.; a plane, value 1 s.; two squares, value 2 s., the goods of David Scott ; and a plough, value 5 s. , the goods of Adam Lloyd .

DAVID SCOTT . I am a journeyman carpenter . On Saturday the 16th of November, I was at work in Upper Park-street, Dorset-square , and left my tools safe in the building about six o'clock at night. I fastened the house up by boards behind, and locked the front. I went on Sunday morning about seven o'clock, and missed these tools; the board had been pulled down and replaced. The prisoner worked at a building on the opposite side of the street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many men were at work there - A. Five or six. I was the only one who had a key.

ADAM LLOYD . I lost a plough from the house.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a servant to Messrs. Stone and Company, pawnbrokers, of Oxford-street. The prisoner came to the shop on Saturday night between seven and nine o'clock. I think it was eight. I never saw him before, but am certain he is the man. He pawned two saws and a plough, in the name of John Lloyd , James-street, and I believe redeemed some clothes at the same time. Next morning the prosecutors claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure of his person - A. I am, he came into one of the boxes, which are more private than the shop. I was about five minutes attending to him, and noticed him, as I suspected him, as he redeemed something pawned in a different name. I saw him at the office on Monday, and was positive to him.

Q. Had he a swollen face - A. He had no flannel on it; his lip appeared rather thick, nothing more.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 16th, about nine o'clock at night, a man pawned two saws, two squares, a plough, and plane, in the name of William Knight , Monmouth-street. I rather think he was shorter than the prisoner, and differently dressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and took him on Monday to the building, where the opening had been made, and fitted his shoes to the foot marks on the ground; there were three impressions particularly deep, and all of the same size. I told him to put his foot into them, and it fitted exactly. There were no nails in the shoe.

Cross-examined. Q. Why not take his shoe off and compare it - A. I thought it fairer for him to put his foot in, as he might say I disturbed the mark. He did not object to it. They were right and left marks, and of a common size. I said it was very odd your shoes fit this mark exactly. He made no reply. It was a stiff clay soil.

Prisoner's Defence. I left work about six o'clock as usual, and took the keys to my master's house, and staid there till twenty minutes past eight; then went and had a glass of gin, and went to Little Coram-street; remained there till half-past eleven. I had a swollen face, and a handkerchief over it. I then went to the Marquis of Cornwallis public-house, and then to bed; and on Monday morning about eleven, when I was at work, a man came, and said Scott and the officer had been after me. I went over to Scott, but he was not there. I returned to work, and between two and three o'clock the officer came. He took me to the building, and put my feet into the marks; they did not fit by half an inch at the toe, but he said they were a good fit. I said they did not by half an inch.

JOHN STAPLES . He said nothing about his feet not fitting then, but told the magistrate they did not by half an inch.

WILLIAM KING . I live in Park-street, and am a carpenter. The prisoner is my apprentice. On the night of the 16th of November, he was in my house from six to twenty minutes or a quarter to eight o'clock, sitting by the fire very ill; he had a tremendous swollen face, it was quite out of form, and so altered I should not have known him myself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-100

98. JOHN DIXON was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-101

99. MARY HAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , thirteen yards of lawn, value 15 s. the goods of John Sparrow Benstead .

JOHN SPARROW BENSTEAD . I am a linen-draper , and live in Little Bath-street, St. Luke's . On the 29th of October, on coming home, my young man gave me some information, and about two or three o'clock the prisoner came in; the young man was serving her, I sent him away, and attended to her myself. She was looking at cloaks; no other customer was there. I took a piece of lawn, and laid it on the counter, turned away for a moment, and on turning again the lawn was gone, and from her actions I suspected she had it. She bargained for the cloak, and paid 2 s. 6 d. on it in part of 11 s., and had it put away for her; she went out; I followed and took her about fifty yards off, brought her back, and when she got into the shop, I saw her put her hand into her pocket. I said,

"Do not take it out, you need not throw it down, I know what you have got," I thought I heard something fall behind the counter, and as I took her into the back room, I found the lawn, which was not there when I went after her. I gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR ANDREWS. Q. Was she in liquor - A. I think not.

FREDERICK CARY . I am shopman to Mr. Benstead. While he served the prisoner, I attended to another customer five or six yards from her. I saw the lawn on the counter. I stooped to pick up some paper, and as I rose, my master was gone up the shop, and I saw the prisoner take something off the counter, and put it into her pocket. I could not distinguish what it was. I walked up the shop, missed the lawn, and told my master; and on reaching the 2 s. 6 d. to pay for the cloak, she dropped something, stooped, and picked it up. I could not see

what it was; she went out; my master followed her and brought her back; the lawn was not then on the floor, for I had just passed the place. My master took her into the parlour, and left her with me while he fetched an officer; she begged hard of me to let her go, saying, it was her first offence, and liquor had got into her head; she did not appear intoxicated. I have heard she is a widow, and has a large family.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I took her in charge, and found 9 s. 4 d. on her, and the duplicate of a watch pawned that day; she appeared in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18221204-102

100. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Johannah Hart , spinster , on the King's highway on the 21st of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a reticule, value 1 s. 6 d. a shilling, and a sixpence , her property.

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-103

101. GEORGE LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a scarf, value 2 l.; two gowns, value 50 s.; two petticoats, value 10 s.; three shifts, value 15 s.; a brooch, value 1 l.; a smelling bottle, value 2 s.; a handkerchief, value 3 s.; and a shirt, value 3 s.; the goods of Jane Tilley Ward , in the dwelling-house of George Hubbard .

JANE TILLEY WARD. I am single , and live at Mr. Hubbard's, Crown-street, Westminster , in the back room, first floor. I believe his name is George; these things were put away in a box; I had not seen some of them for a fortnight before; the prisoner kept company with me, and was frequently at my room; he never came without my knowledge. I always locked the door when I went out; he is a private soldier ; I went from home with him on the 9th of November, to the west end of the town, and in the Park I gave him the key of the door; he said he was going to Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, and I was to call for him, which I did, but he was not there; and when I got home I found the key placed over the door, I went in, and missed the silk handkerchief, and next day missed the other things.

ANN RIDLEY . I keep the Nag's Head public-house, Tothill-street. On the 9th of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, the prisoner left a bundle of regimentals at my house; he supped there, and after supper came and left a scarf, and borrowed six shillings on it; he slept at my house, and remained there till twelve o'clock in the morning. Ward came on Monday, saying she had been robbed, and I shewed her the scarf. He surrendered himself up on the Saturday.

(Scarf produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only took the scarf, and that was at her request.

JANE TILLY WARD. I knew nothing of his taking it.

GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18221204-104

102. PHILIP MARKS and JOHN RYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , a watch, value 30 s.; a chain, value 5 s.; and two seals, value 5 s.; the goods of George Cotton , from his person .

MR. GEORGE COTTON . I live in John-street, Berkley-square. On Monday, the 11th of November, when Hunt came to town, I was in Pall Mall , about half-past twelve o'clock, there was a great crowd - my watch was in my fob; the outside case was gold. I stood on the step of a public-house at the corner of John-street, and in four or five minutes a man (who had hold of Marks came up.) and asked if I had lost anything; I felt and missed my watch - there were a great many people about the door. It was sent to me on the Friday following in a brown paper parcel; I do not know who from.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am a constable of St. Pancras. I was in Pall Mall, and saw the prisoners in company together, at the door of the Goat, public-house. I watched them, and in a minute I saw Mr. Cotton; they were on each side of him - he stood between them at the door. I saw Marks draw a watch from somebody, and give it to Ryan. I pushed Marks into the public-house, and secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you been an officer - A. Not quite a year. There might be seven or eight persons about him.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I was in Pall Mall, and saw the prisoners there - I had seen Marks before, but not in company with the other; he and Ryan stood on the steps. Mr. Cotton appeared to be hustled, and in a very little time Hunt's coach came up; I tried to get into the passage of the house, and three or four who stood in front said there was no room. I forced myself in, and asked Mr. Cotton if he had lost anything; I had seen nothing taken, I only suspected - he said his watch was gone. Marks stood next to him I assisted in securing him. Ryan went away. I found a watch on Marks, which was his own. He cried and said he was innocent.

WILLIAM ALLENSBY . I am a private watchman to Mr. Whitmore. I was in Pall Mall with Taylor, and saw the prisoners, and followed them to the Goat - I saw Marks on one side of Mr. Cotton and Ryan on the other. I kept my eye on them, and saw them very busy doing something, what I could not tell. Taylor caught hold of Marks, and he was secured. I saw Ryan at Worship-street, about twenty minutes past three o'clock that day, and identified him as having been in Marks's company.

MARKS'S Defence. I was only standing at the door, and am as innocent as my five babies at home.

DAVID WARD . I am a wine cooper. I was in Pall Mall, in the Goat, and saw Marks there; but saw him take no watch - I must have seen him if he had. I was behind him, and think he could not take it without my seeing him. There was great confusion - I did not see Ryan.

COURT. Q. Did you hear of a watch being taken - A. Taylor asked the gentleman if he had lost anything - I did not hear his answer. I could not see his hands. I can swear I never saw him take anything; he might take it without my seeing him - I was about a yard from him, behind. I do not think any body was between us; I dare say there was. I said nothing to the officers, but gave Marks my card in Pall Mall; I got it written down. I told

him I would speak for him; but did not tell him what I could prove. I live in Blucher-buildings, Dorsetshire-place.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I recollect seeing this witness there. When I took Marks into the room, he said,

"You may depend upon it you have got the wrong man" - I told him to mind his own business; he said he stood behind and was certain he saw him do nothing, and it was a pity a man should be lugged away in that manner. He did stand behind him.

BARNARD GLEED . I apprehended Ryan in the City-road, between three and four o'clock that day. I had not heard of this charge then. Harris swore to him at the office.

MARKS - GUILTY . Aged 37.

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18221204-105

103. JAMES BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , three deal boards, value 18 d. , the goods of William Lawrence and John Cover .

LYDIA CHURCH . I live in Princess-place, Burton-road, Bethnal-green. Last Saturday three weeks the prisoner brought three deal boards to me, and said he brought them to make a deal table with. I was to have been married to him in a fortnight.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am in partnership with John Cover - we keep a timber-yard at Hoxton . The boards were taken from our yard; we do not miss any.

JOHN BRITTELL . I am in the prosecutors' employ at the shop and timber-yard. I saw the deals at Worship-street, and know them to be my masters'; the prisoner was in his service. I am certain they had not been sold for I had plained them over, and marked them

"Kitchen," intending to use them on the kitchen stairs. The prisoner was in my masters' service for two months. I saw them nine days before he was apprehended. He bore a good character.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me - I went to Church's mother's, and found the boards. The word kitchen is written on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was working for the prosecutors - I went to the shop one night, and asked Brittell if the cart was coming down with stuff; his brother who is foreman delivered these boards to me on Friday night, and on Saturday morning I was to take them down to the building. I bought four short boards two years ago, and exchanged them for these three long ones, and used mine at the building.

JOHN BRITTELL . I believe my brother delivered them to him - he is not here. I have no knowledge of his bringing short ones instead of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-106

First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

104. BENJAMIN JOHNSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , four coats, value 3 l., and a hat, value 8 s., the goods of William Meek , from his person .

WILLIAM MEEK . I live in Splittsfields, St. George's in the East . The prisoner lived in the same house, and slept in the garret with my father and brother; I sleep below. On the 10th of October my brother went up to bed a few minutes after the prisoner, and about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning I heard somebody coming down stairs and go into the kitchen. (I had seen the hat on the kitchen shelf after they went to bed.) I heard a person come from the kitchen, and unfasten the street door. I jumped out of bed, went into the passage, and saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm; he pulled the door in my face, and went off. I partly dressed and followed him in six or seven minutes, but could not find him. I returned, and missed a blue and a black coat from the garret, which I had left there at ten o'clock at night; one was under his bed, and I had seen him put the other in the cupboard.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Every thing was in the room except what you missed - A. Yes. I never saw any clothes of his, except what he wore. Only one man worked there besides him at that time, and he went home at eight. Three persons besides the prisoner slept there.

JOHN MEEK. I am the last witness's brother. The prisoner slept with me. I saw one coat which the prisoner had been at work upon that night; it was my brother William's. I went out in the morning after the prisoner, without knowing of the robbery, and did not see him again till the 30th of November, when I accidentally saw the prisoner at a public-house at dinner; he got up and wished me to go out and speak with him; I went out; he first asked me if we had not received a letter from him about the articles; I said No. He said he had written to my brother to meet him to make it up; that he had pawned the articles, and left the duplicates with a friend at Hoxton. We returned to the public-house; he said he would go with me to where the duplicates were, but he gave me the slip and ran out.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not articles in the room of his - A. Nothing, to my knowledge; he was three weeks there.

WILLIAM MEEK re-examined. He left his old hat behind.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the coats finished which he took - A. He was at work at one all day, which was not quite finished, but it was a perfect coat.

Prisoner. Defence. I left a man at work there on the previous evening, with my two shirts, which I told Meek's wife to wash. He employs women and men at work, all on the same floor. I left the coat in the room. I had seen a person who had been at work in the morning right opposite the house. I always arose before the rest of the work people, and generally went into the back kitchen to wash. I went to look for better work, and engaged with one Ragnull. I met a person a fortnight after, who told me of the robbery.

JURY to MEEK. Q. Had you paid him for making the coat - A. It was not finished. I paid him something in advance. I expected him to go on with the work.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-107

105. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , a shirt, value 6 s., a waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of John Bradden .

JOHN BRADDEN . On Tuesday, the 1st of October, the prisoner brought a shirt, waistcoat, two old silk handkerchiefs, and a pair of stockings, to be washed; my wife takes in washing; she washed them, and I saw them safe on Sunday, the 6th, at two o'clock, when I was at home. My wife and daughter were out; I fell asleep by the fire; the back-door was bolted, but there is a door leading from the shop to the bed-room. When I awoke, this linen, which I had seen on the bed was gone. I did not see the prisoner for ten days after; he then called, and said he was come for his things; my wife told him she had looked all over the house, and could not find them; he said he was very sorry, and if he had been in place, instead of out, he should not care about it; she said she must make it good; he said he wished to have it made up adequate to what was lost. The cloth was bought to make him a shirt, but he had that day a pair of stockings, a waistcoat, and white handkerchief of mine, and one of my shirts till they could make him one.

Prisoner. Q. I sent the shirt back, three or four days after - A. Yes, that was the shirt my wife lent him.

MARY ANN BRADDEN . My mother washed for the prisoner. On the 1st of October, he left these things to be washed by the following Saturday. They were pinned up ready for him on the bed, but he did not call. On the 6th, I went out; I saw the bundle safe on the bed, between two and three o'clock. I returned at nine, but did not think to look for it. On the Monday after the 6th, he came and desired to have them made good.

THOMAS ATKINS . I apprehended him about the 12th of November, and found a duplicate of Maslin's shop upon him.

WILLIAM MASLIN . I am a pawnbroker, and have a shirt and waitcoat pawned on the 7th of October, in the evening, I do not know who by.

MARY ANN BRADDEN . The shirt is marked W. R. No. 2, this, and No. 1, are the only two he ever brought. I know the waistcoat to be the same as he brought on the 1st of October, by the pattern.

Prisoner. Q. When I came for my things, you asked which waistcoat it was that I lost - A. He only had this and a dark black striped one. He lodged the next door to us.

JURY. Q. Are you sure No. 2, was the shirt he brought that day - A. Yes; he had No. 1 away the day before. My mother asked which waistcoat he had lost, as she did not exactly know; I did not recollect it at first, he only had two washing ones, and he had the black one away the day before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-108

106. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , two pieces of wood, value 4 s. the goods of John Webb .

DANIEL EDRIDGE . I am a carpenter. In August I was working for John Webb , at a house in Regent-street ; an alarm was given that somebody had stolen some timber, I went out and saw the prisoner with it on his back, and told him to put it down, which he did. I asked why he took it, he said he did not know that he had done any harm, he had carried it a few paces, it had been left by the side of the building.

JOHN WILD . I was working by Burlington-street, and saw him take up the boards, (it was about the middle of the day). I went after him and asked where he was going with them, he said, he did not know, but he would put them down if he had done wrong. I let him go - he was afterwards taken.

Prisoner's Defence. Four or five of us were working at a cesspool - we wanted two short pieces of timber to lie our planks on; I thought they belonged to Mr. Burton, who had given us leave to take some from his building on a former occasion. I worked at the place for six days after, and the prosecutor came backward and forward and never mentioned it to me.

JOHN WILD . He was working somewhere near - it was only fit for fire wood.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-109

107. BENJAMIN WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, on the first of December , being servant to Thomas Stable , did steal three pair of shoes, value 10 s., and a pair of heel pieces, value 6 d. , his property.

THOMAS STABLE . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Hatton-garden, the prisoner was in my service; and on the first of December, about half-past nine o'clock, I saw him go out, and suspecting he had something, I stopped him, and took him to Barnley, who found three pair of shoes on him, in my presence - they are mine, and were in the shop the night before.

JOHN BARNLEY . I searched and found the property upon him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-110

108. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , a fowl, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of George Alwright .

WILLIAM THOMAS NORRIS . I am errand boy to Mr. George Alwright , a poulterer , who lives at the corner of Hatton-garden . On the 16th of November, I saw the prisoner take a fowl up, look at it, and then look round, put it under her shawl; she was going away - I called to my master and saw Hetherington take her; she had passed the door about a step, her back was to the door.

THOMAS WILDON . I am an officer. I was sent for between seven and eight o'clock, and took her. I searched her at Hatton-garden, and found another fowl in her pocket. Alwright's fowl was taken from her before - she offered to leave her shawl for the value of it. I found 6 s. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I took up two fowls to look at, the boy was particularly engaged, I put my hand into my pocket, and was going into the shop when he cried out that I was stealing the fowl, I offered to pay for it as they made a noise. I bought the other at Newgate-market.

THOMAS WILDON . She said nothing about looking at it for the purpose of buying it.

- DOBEL. I am a book-binder. The prisoner is a stranger to me, but being in the gallery I heard this boy's evidence. I was coming by at the time and consider that she was taking it off the shelf to take it in to see what she was to give for it, the boy is set as a spy to look out, and it might appear as if she was thieving. I saw it taken out of her hand, but I did not interpose or go before a magistrate.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-111

109. SAMUEL ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , ten books, value 14 s. the goods of William Hughes , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a bookseller , and live at Islington . On the 29th of November, in the morning, I was in my back parlour, and saw the prisoner turn out of the shop very quick, I followed and secured him three hundred yards off, but before that I saw him drop the books, which were picked up and brought in by a neighbour, who is absent - they had been taken off a shelf, where they stood altogether. I saw him close to them and never lost sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-112

110. MARY WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Carr , from his person .

WILLIAM CARR . On the 6th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I was crossing Bagnigge-wells-fields, towards Grays-inn-lane , and saw the prisoner by the wall of the burying-ground in company with a man and woman, she came and took hold of my arm and asked me to treat her. I said I had no money - she swore she would have the silk handkerchief which was round my neck if I did not, I said I would not, and she took it from me by force, I kept hold of her for some time; a short man then came out from the wall with a stick, and asked if I wanted to strangle her. I said No, he told me to let her go, and shook me violently. I let her go, and she crossed the fields and said she would go and get some gin. I found her that night at a public-house close by, with my handkerchief in her bosom - the man searched my pockets after she was gone and found I had no money.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I was passing the public-house. I searched the prisoner and found the handkerchief concealed under her arm-pit, under her clothes, she then said he gave her a bad shilling, I found a bad one in her mouth, and two bad ones in her pocket. Carr gave the same account he has now.

Prisoner's Defence. He came and asked me to walk with him, we went across the fields, and he gave me a bad shilling. I told him it was bad and he gave me his handkerchief.

WILLIAM CARR . It is wholly false - I had nothing to do with her.

GUILTY - Aged 37.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-113

111. HENRY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Andrew Hair , from his person .

GEORGE SMITH . On the 9th of November, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner on the Middlesex side of Westminster-bridge , a boy who was with him attempted to pick a gentleman's pocket. I watched some time, and then saw the prisoner take the handkerchief and put it into his trowsers, they ran different ways, I ran and took the prisoner and found the handkerchief in his pocket. I called the gentleman who claimed it, and called himself Andrew Hair before the magistrate. The prisoner appeared distressed.

Prisoner. I was out of employ and driven to it from mere distress.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-114

112. CHARLES YOUD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a tin-box, 1 d. and part of the works of a watch, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Bowles , from the person of Ann Bowles .

FRANCIS WILEMAN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Prichard, watch-spring-maker, of Wynatt-street. On the 14th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was by Clerkenwell-church, and heard a cry of Stop him, and saw the prisoner running with a bag in his hand, I followed and dodged him, he then threw it behind him, and behind me, I pursued and caught him, went back immediately, and took the bag up and gave it to Ann Bowles , who was crying and claimed it.

JOSEPH BOWLES . I sent my daughter Ann to the gilders in Attfield-street, for these watch-works; three gentlemen brought the prisoner and her to me, she then had the bag in her hand, the gentlemen said, in the prisoner's presence,

"We have brought the thief that stole the watch," he did not deny it. I gave him in charge, he acknowledged taking it, but said he did not mean to keep it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-115

113. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a shilling, four sixpences, and two penny-pieces , the monies, of Jacob Wilson .

JACOB WILSON . I am a tobacconist , and live at Wapping . On the 13th of October, about twenty minutes before six o'clock, I left my wife in the shop; I returned in five minutes; she was then in the parlour with a friend, I found the prisoner behind the counter with the till open, and his hand in it, I missed three shillings from it, I asked what he did there, he immediately threw the money out into the street; I picked up a shilling, and a penny, a boy brought in a sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in for a halfpenny's-worth of tobacco, the gentleman came and charged me with robbing the till.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-116

114. JOHN YOUNG was indicted, for stealing on the 12th of November , fifteen pounds of cheese, value 8 s. twelve pounds of bread, value 18 d. a sovereign and 15 s. the goods of Richard Adlam , from his person .

RICHARD ADLAM . I am an excavator . On the 12th of November, I lodged at the Sun and Sportsman, Paddington , the prisoner worked for me. On the evening of the 12th of November, I was in the parlour having some writing done, he was in the kitchen with his wife and an Irishwoman, I had three quartern loaves in a four bushel sack, under my seat, and a sovereign and nineteen shillings in my pocket; about ten o'clock I pretended to be asleep, because I wanted my men to go home, but I fee asleep in a quarter of an hour, and when I awoke my

money was gone from my pocket, and the victuals from the sack, and the handkerchief off my neck, next morning I went to the prisoner's house, with two officers and found the cheese and handkerchief. I saw nobody when I awoke but his wife, and she wanted me to set by her, I was quite sober, I only had two glasses of rum and water, there was beer drank on the works; I find all the men in provisions.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. On the 13th of November, I was with the prosecutor and took the prisoner at work, and charged him with this robbery, he said he knew nothing about it. I went to his lodgings in Fitzroy-place, and found two cheeses, two loaves of bread, and a kettle, my brother officer found the bag the cheese was in; we waited till the prisoner's wife came home, and on searching her she begged hard to go backward; I let her go, and after that I went and found the handkerchief down the privy, which I had searched before she came in, and it was not there then; I found seventeen shillings on her.

RICHARD ADLAM . I know the cheese and believe the bag to be mine, the handkerchief is the one which was taken off my neck.

Prisoners Defence. I have had the bag above a year and a half, I was as drunk as him and know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18221204-117

115. JOHN MILBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a shawl value 5 s. the goods of Joseph Halliday . from the person of Sarah Halliday .

SARAH HALLIDAY . I am daughter of Joseph Halliday . On Sunday the 1st of December, I went to fetch some beer for supper, and on returning, as I opened the street-door, there was a great many people bustling about, as a stage had broken down, the prisoner took hold of my whittle; I did not see him until then, I ran a little way down the passage and he followed me, having still hold of it, I put down the beer and recovered the shawl again, he took it off my shoulder about half a yard, two young men came into the passage, I ran and called my father; my mother brought a light and they got out, my mother shut the door and somebody kicked against it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When he took your shawl, did he get it entirely from your person - A. Yes. I took the shawl from him, he seemed tipsy.

Q. Have you the least doubt but it was a frolic - A. I don't know, he did not speak to me, he appeared tipsy, they could have escaped if they liked.

CHARLES BOLTON . I am an officer, I saw the prisoner standing outside the door, kicking violently against it, he was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-118

116. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a trunk, value 2 s.; three gowns, value, 3 l. and a shawl, value, 5 l. the goods of Elizabeth Hobbs .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-119

117. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a coat, value 15 s. and a pair of compasses, value 15 d. , the goods of Richard Rolt .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-120

118. FRANCIS RIX was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a time-piece, value 20 s. the goods of Ann Arnold , and four handkerchiefs, value 2 s., two aprons, value 6 d. a waistcoat, value 6 d., two pair of stockings, value 1 s., a shirt value 6 d., a shaving-box, value 2 d. and a brush value 1 d. the property of Thomas Cautlin .

ANN ARNOLD . I am a widow and live at Hackneywick , the prisoner lodged seven weeks with me, and slept with Cantlin. On the 14th of November, about half past five o'clock, I missed a time-piece off my bed-room drawers, with Cantlin's bundle which was safe half an hour before,

WILLIAM EARLY . I am a patrole of Wapping, I have four small articles which I found on the prisoner, at seven o'clock at night, of the 14th of November, when I searched him.

CATHARINE ELLIS . I am the wife of Alexander Ellis , a clothes salesman, who lives in Rosemary-lane. On the 14th of November, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and asked me to buy a timepiece and shirt. I said I was no judge of any thing of the kind, and asked how a sailor came by a time-piece; he said the shirt was his mother's, but he brought the time-piece from Hamburgh; he left the shop, and returned about a quarter past seven, with a bundle much smaller than what he had before; he still had the timepiece, and asked me to buy the things. I said I did not think he came by them justly; he pressed me to buy them; a man came to the door, and said,

"Halloo, I want to speak to you;" and when he got to the door, I caught up the bundle, and said,

"Take your bundle with you, but he ran off without it." I was alarmed, and threw it out of doors; I sent for Barry the patrole, who took it away. The time-piece was in the bundle; it broke in falling; Mrs. Arnold came up in about half an hour; she claimed the time-piece before the magistrate. Barry is not here.

MRS. ARNOLD. I saw the time-piece at the office next day, and claimed it in the prisoner's presence; he said he knew he had taken it.

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY - Aged 20.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18221204-121

119. ELIZABETH PETTY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , a pelisse, value 5 s. the goods of Moses Davis .

SARAH DAVIS . I am wife of Moses Davis , who lives Gray's Inn-lane , and is a salesman . Last Friday three weeks, about half-past 7 o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner; she came into the shop, and looked at some articles; I came out of the parlour, and asked if she wanted any thing; she took up a pelisse, and ran out with it. I followed, and saw her throw it down; she was stopped and brought back.

GEORGE PERRY . I received her in charge about half-past seven o'clock with the pelisse; she said she found it within a few yards of the house.

The prisoner, in her defence, stated the prosecutrix used most shocking oaths, and that she found the pelisse at the corner of Baldwin's gardens.

SARAH DAVIS , re-examined. I saw her person distinctly in the shop, and I am sure she is the woman. I saw her take it, and followed her, calling Stop thief! I never lost sight of her; she begged my pardon, and said she would do so no more.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-122

120. GEORGE JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , seventy-two broom heads, value 6 l.; twelve brushes, value 15 s.; six sheepskins, value 6 s; and two quarts of blacking, value 1 s. , the goods of William Braccy , Kent.

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-123

121. JOHN BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , a shirt, value 2 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of James Dingley .

JAMES DINGLEY . I am a dismounted patrole . On the 26th of October I was in my stable at the end of Green's yard . Green called to me, and said, I was being robbed. I looked round, and saw the prisoner running across the Five-fields with something in his hand. We both followed him. I saw him throw the bundle away. Green picked it up, and gave it to me; it contained the articles stated in the indictment, which are mine, and had hung on the lines in the drying ground. Welch stopped him without my losing sight of him; another boy came up and tried to rescue him.

GEORGE GREEN . I saw the prisoner in my father's yard, and saw him go up and take the clothes off the line. I gave an alarm; he ran and dropped them. I picked them up, and still followed, and never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. He said at Queen-square he lost sight of me for ten minutes - Witness, I did not.

WILLIAM WELCH . I was coming from work, and saw Green pursuing the prisoner. I collared him. He said,

"For God's sake do not stop me, I have done nothing." I said,

"No harm will come to you if you have done nothing." He said,

"What shall I do." I took him to Green.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along to dinner, and getting over a ditch, heard a cry of Stop thief! I stopped a little behind, and this man took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-124

122. MARY BEYNON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a pair of sheets, value 3 s., and a rug, value 2 s., the goods of Mary Murphy , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARY MURPHY. The prisoner took a furnished room in my house; these things were let with it; she left on the 11th of November, while I was at market, without notice. I sat up till twelve o'clock for her. Next morning I unlocked her door; missed them, and found the duplicates in the room.

Prisoner. Q. You told me I could come in at any time before one - A. Yes, She lodged five months with me, I missed nothing before,

WILLIAM BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of November the sheet was pawned by the prisoner; the rug was pawned on the 26th of July, but the man who took it in is not here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She came into the room, and missed them before I left. I said I would get them out as soon as I could.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-125

123. THOMAS PRICE and MARY PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a bed, value 20 s.; a blanket, value 6 s.; a sheet, value 2 s.; a bolster, value 5 s.; a pillow, value 2 s.; and a pair of bellows, value 2 s., the goods of John Redfern , in a lodging-room .

MARY REDFERN . I am wife of George Redfern , we keep the Old Rum Puncheon public-house in Shoreditch ; the prisoners lodged nearly five months with us; they owed 20 s. rent. On the 25th of November, I went into their room, and wished to see the things; the man said his wife was in bed, and I could not. I said if I did not see them that day I should bring an officer up in the afternoon, and in the afternoon I found the door locked, and they were gone; I missed the articles stated in the indictment; the woman came in at night with the officers. I asked what she had done with the duplicates - she said they were up stairs, and I found them in the room. I never gave her leave to pawn them.

JOHN KNOWLES . I am shopman to Mr. Flemming, pawnbroker, Fleet-market. On the 29th of October a bed was pawned in the name of Ann Price . I cannot say who by.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS PRICE 's Defence. We did not leave the lodging, but two officers took my wife as she was coming home. I had been out of work a long time, and pawned them to pay my rent.

THOMAS PRICE - GUILTY. Aged 58.

Recommended to Mercy .

Confined 14 days .

MARY PRICE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-126

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

124. CATHERINE MOORHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , six yards of diaper, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Dew , privately in his shop .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-127

125. JOHN GILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of John Burn , from his person .

JOHN BURN . I am a grocer , and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 11th of November, about a quarter before three o'clock, I was in a crowd in the City-road ; the officer spoke to me, I felt and missed my handkerchief.

JOHN BOSTON . I am an officer. I was by the turnpike in the City-road, and saw the prisoner take a handerchief from the prosecutor's right-hand pocket, and pat it into the flap of his coat. I seized him, and took it from him, before he could get his hand from his breast.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I saw the prisoner at the gentleman's pocket, but did not see the handkerchief taken out. I saw it found on him.

WILLIAM ALLENRY . I saw the prisoner at the gentleman's pocket; he took the handkerchief out, and put it in his breast.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I just went into the crowd; the handkerchief was between me and the gentleman.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-128

126. MICHAEL SILVERTHORN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , four half crowns and two shillings, the monies of Lewis Murray , from his person .

LEWIS MURRAY. On the night of the 30th of November I was at the Two Brewers, George-street , drinking with the prisoner. I had met him at another public-house, and drank with him at both, and was about half an hour with him. I had been to four public-houses. He went away, and when I was going to pay, I missed four half crowns and two shillings from my breeches pocket, which were safe ten minutes before. He had sat close by me - it was safe ten minutes before - I had been with him from eleven o'clock in the morning.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am waiter at the Two Brewers. I saw Murray and the prisoner there about four o'clock, for about quarter of an hour. They had a pot of beer, and sat close to each other. The prisoner put his hand into Murray's pocket, and pulled out some silver, and put it into his own pocket. He was talking to Murray all the time. They were sitting in a corner; there were about a dozen people in the house; he went away, and Murray could not pay for the beer.

Q Why not mention it before - A. Murray was in liquor, and I thought he took it to take care of for him. He went out while I was telling my brother.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I apprehended him on the 30th of November, and found three half crowns on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 11 s., of my own when I met him - we drank all day - I got into liquor, and left him, but never robbed him.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-129

127. MARY BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , a coat, value 1 l., and a waistcoat, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Wilson .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-130

Before Mr. Recorder.

128. JOHN WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a coat, value 50 s., the goods of George Higgins , in his dwelling-house .

MR. GEORGE HIGGINS . I live in Somersetshire. I was stopping at Needham's hotel, Westminster-bridge . I lost a coat from there. The prisoner was a stranger. I saw it last on the 21st of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, in my bed-room. The street-door is generally open. I left my room, and returned about half-past eight, and it was gone. I found it in pawn about a month after. I had had it six or seven months.

JAMES PRICE . I live at Needham's hotel. On Sunday afternoon, the 20th of October, the prisoner came into the coffee-room for refreshment, and on the 21st, at about seven o'clock in the morning, while Mr. Higgins was out, I met him in the passage leading to the coffee-room, he said

"Good morning," and went away. He had slept in the house that night, and was going away. I did not see him with the coat. His bed-room was near Mr. Higgins's.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am shopman to Mr. Chaffers, pawnbroker of Watling-street. I have a coat pawned on the 21st of October, in the afternoon, by the prisoner, for 14 s. I had seen him three or four times before, and am certain of him. Mr. Higgins afterwards claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WAYLING . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of November, and found several duplicates on him. I left him in the room and found more duplicates on the bed.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Reference Number: t18221204-131

129. JOHN WILLIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , at St. Ann's, a tea-pot, value 3 l.; a cruet stand, value 30 s.; and five cruets, value 10 s. the goods of William Matthew Catterton , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MATTHEW CATTERTON . I keep the Phoenix tavern, at Ratcliff Cross, in the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse . A man, whom I believe to be the prisoner, came to my house on the 21st November, and had dinner in the little parlour, and went away, and said he was going to spend the evening in the neighbourhood, and asked if he could have a bed at night; he returned and slept there, and went away about nine o'clock in the morning. About eleven, the servant missed the sheets off the bed, and about four in the afternoon, I missed the articles stated in the indictment from my bed-room - he slept in the back-room, second floor, opposite to my bed-room. I had seen them all in my bed-room the morning before he slept there, (Wednesday the 20th), but not after. The tea-pot and cruet-stand were silver - the cruets were glass, silver mounted. My bed-room was not kept locked, nor the cupboard in which they were; the stair-case is a good distance from the room where he dined, and there is a door at the bottom of the stairs, which is always shut, but not locked. I found the property on the Saturday week following, at Turner's, in Brydges-street. They are family plate - I am certain they are mine, they have my father and mother's initials on them.

EDWARD LEONARD . I was waiter at Mr. Catterton's. The prisoner is the person who dined and slept at the house one Thursday - I was not at home when he left in the morning. I waited on him at dinner, and shewed him up to bed. I am certain of his person.

THOMAS WEBB . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, of Brydges-street. This property was pawned at our shop - all on the same day, but at seperate times, by the prisoner, on the 22d of November, in the name of Strand - I am certain of his person. I advanced 2 l. 15 s. on the silver tea-pot, it is worth 3 l. I advanced two guineas on the cruets and stand, they are worth two guineas and a half as old silver. Mr. Catterton saw them and claimed them.

JAMES WAYLING . I apprehended the prisoner, and found the duplicates of the property either on his person, or in the room where I apprehended him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I stand here overwhelmed with shame. I have not been in this country above twelve months from the West Indies, where I had been eleven years. When I came to town I had 1100 l., the hard earnings of a toilsome life, both on sea and shore. In a few weeks I accidently met with a person who I knew in Jamaica - he introduced me into one of the houses in St. James's, which have been the destruction of many besides myself. He deprived me of 300 l., and in the course of three weeks, I was deprived of 1500 l. more. I was an alien, and had no where to resort, and God only knows the feelings I experienced before I could bring myself to this. I never was the companion of loose or abandoned characters. I must throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18221204-132

130. ELEANOR FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , a shirt, value 6 d.; a pair of stockings, value 2 d., and a night cap, value 2 d. , the goods of William Pearson .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-133

131. JOHN HICKENS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , two shirts, value 2 s., the goods of William Craig ; and a pair of stockings, value 6 d., and a shirt, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Craig .

REBECCA SMITH . I am a laundress, and live in Dorset-street, Spitalfields . I wash for William and Thomas Craig - the prisoner had been once to my place for a shirt and stockings, which I had washed for him, and on the 26th of October, about one o'clock, he knocked at the door, and said he had come for Mr. Craig's things - I said it was a wrong time for him to send for them, they were not ironed, and he must call in an hour; he said he would rather wait, and waited till I did them. I gave him two shirts of William Craig 's, and a pair of stockings of Thomas Craig 's, and on Saturday night I found it was a trick.

THOMAS CRAIG . I am the brother of William Craig , we never sent the prisoner for the clothes. I found mine at the Two Brewers, public-house.

GEORGE FREAKES . I am apprenticed to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a shirt and flannel waistcoat for 1 s. on Saturday the 26th of October.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-134

132. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , four stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Brodie .

KEZZIAH BRODIE . I am the wife of Robert Brodie ; we live in Limehouse-causeway . On the 22d of November, I hung four stockings at the bottom of the court to dry, about half-past three o'clock, and missed them in about an hour. I found them next day with the prisoner in custody.

JOHN DICKEE , I am a pawnbroker, and live at Limehouse. On the 22d of November, a little past four o'clock, the prisoner offered the four stockings in pawn, and being wet, I detained them, and gave him in charge.

JOHN LINES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge - he said he bought them for 4 s.

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-135

133. EDWARD PITFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a gown, value 5 s., the goods of James Sheppard ; and a gown, value 3 s. , the goods of Norah Sullivan .

JAMES SHEPPARD . I keep the Half Moon, public-house, Portpool-lane - Sullivan lives in my house. On the 3d of October, my wife's gown was left in the kitchen to be washed. The prisoner frequently called at the house. When I came home at night, I found him in custody with the gowns.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did he not appear intoxicated - A. No.

NORAH SULLIVAN . I am servant to Mr. Sheppard. On the 30th of October, I was washing, and saw the prisoner in the kitchen about seven o'clock in the evening. My mistress called me away once or twice - he came to the kitchen door, and said,

"You are washing, will you drink some beer;" he brought me a pint of beer, and then went backwards - soon after I looked for the gowns, and they were gone. A lodger of ours went after him, and brought him back. I found the gowns at Hatton-garden in three quarters of an hour.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am servant to Mr. Nichols, of Gray's Inn-lane. I took two gowns in pawn of the prisoner for 3 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM THISLETON . I took the prisoner at the prosecutor's house. I found the duplicate on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-136

134. JAMES SHEEN and GEORGE JAMES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a pair of clasps, value 18 d.; two pair of ear-rings, value 1 s., and three knives, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Gould .

RICHARD GOULD . I am a hardware-man , and live in South Moulton-street . On Thursday, the 14th of November, these things were in a shew glass outside the window - they were safe about six o'clock in the evening, and at seven I missed them. I found the prisoners at the office on the Monday following I think. A young man afterwards came into the shop, and gave two ear-rings and a clasp into my hand, and went out immediately; I do not know who it was.

BENJAMIN BRANDER . I am a hair-dresser, and live in

Gees-court. Sheen lives in the same house with his mother, who sells fruit in the street. On the 14th of November, I went out on business, and on returning home about half-past seven o'clock, I found Sheen in the shop; (my master rents the house) he had a brooch, a pair of slippers, and two pair of ear-rings in his hand, which appeared new - he asked me to buy the brooch; a young man said they were stolen, and took them from him. He said he found them at the corner of Somerset-street. I do not know James.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners on the Monday. I took Sheen at the corner of Gray-street, Oxford-street. I took him over to James's lodging, and found him at home. I asked what they had done with the things, which they took from Mr. Gould - James said

"I had nothing but a knife, and that I sold a woman who sells eels in the street." Sheen said, Ned Stockman took them from him, and lost them two or three nights before at a fight. The prosecutor produced the property a few days after.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SHEEN - GUILTY. Aged 9.

JAMES - GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18221204-137

135. HENRY CASE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , eighteen yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. , the goods of William Shepherd Love , and Reece Davis .

WILLIAM SHEPPARD LOVE . I am a linen-draper , in partnership with Reece Davis , and live in St. John-street . This cotton was inside the door-way; I saw it safe at six o'clock in the evening; I missed it soon after. Thompson, the officer brought it to me about half-past six o'clock with the prisoner.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a constable. On the evening of the 7th of November, I was in St. John-street, and saw the prisoner go up to the door, put his hand in, and take something - he crossed over, and dropped it. I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-138

136. THOMAS SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a hat, value 2 s. , the goods of John Broadhurst .

JOHN BROADHURST . I am a hawker of earthenware , and live at Battle-bridge . I was opening a crate of goods; my hat was on the shop board, and was stolen. I did not see it taken. The prisoner was brought back with it on his head.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable, and live four doors from Broadhurst. I was passing by, and saw the prisoner looking in at a shop; he had his own hat on. When Broadhurst stooped down, he snatched the hat and ran off with it - I followed, and took him with it on his head. He had put his own under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked it before me, and picked it up. I was rather in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-139

137. GEORGE CHURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a coat, value 5 s , the goods of Samuel Willows .

SAMUEL WILLOWS . I am a fishmonger , and live at Maida-hill. My coat was in my pony chaise - I saw it safe in Foley-place. I was going home at the rate of eight miles an hour; it might have fell out - I have never seen it since.

WILLIAM KENRICK . I saw Mr. Mills drive by, and saw the prisoner follow the gig, which went very fast, he drew the coat off gently from the gig by degrees, he then ran off - I called the hostler, and asked where he was going with it, he made no answer. I sent the hostler to ask the gentleman if he had lost it - he said he had. I followed and saw it on his arm, but when I caught him it was gone. I did not see him throw it away, he said he did it through distress, and did not know where it was.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was it - A. Between six and seven - I lost sight of him for about a minute, I am certain of him

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a hostler. My master called me, I saw the prisoner running behind the gig, and just as it turned the corner he drew the coat from it, he came back close by us, I am certain of his person.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. Four or five minutes, it was moonlight, his back was towards me. I did not see him stopped.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I took him in charge, and at the office he acknowledged taking it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was surrounded and charged with this, but I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-140

138. CHARLES ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , a coat, value 30 s. the goods of Richard Sammarez .

JAMES TEMPLE . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, of St. James's-place. On the 25th of November, about ten minutes past five o'clock, the gig stood at a door in Greek-street, Soho , and the coat on it. As I stood at the horse's head I heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked round and saw a number of persons looking towards the square, the prisoner was brought back. I saw a man pick up the coat which I found to be my master's.

JOHN WETHERALL . I am a bricklayer. I was going through Greek-street, and saw the gig at the door - I saw the prisoner take the coat from the gig and run towards the square. I pursued, calling Stop thief! he dropped it at the corner of Soho-square. I did not loose sight of him only while I stopped to take it up - he was secured; he asked me to forgive him, and said the coat was given to him.

GEORGE BRYAN . I am a painter. About a quarter past five o'clock I saw the prisoner pull the coat from the gig. I did not see Temple - I called Stop thief! and pursued, I saw him drop it, and took him without losing sight of him, he asked what we wanted with him, he said it was not him, and then that a man gave it to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months and publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-141

139. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on

the 20th of November , three gallons of mushrooms, value 3 s., and a basket, value 1 s. , the goods of Job Hitchcock .

JOB HITCHCOCK. I live at Richmond. I have a stand in Covent Garden-market. On the 28th of November, I had some mushrooms on a cart, with other things, opposite the piazzas. I saw them about nine o'clock at night, and missed them the next morning, and I found the prisoner in custody with them about eleven o'clock.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am a watchman of St. Martin's-lane. I saw the prisoner on the 28th of November about one o'clock in the morning, with a basket under his arm, full of mushrooms; he said he came from Harrow with his mushrooms to market, and that he was going to No. 5, behind the Abbey, to Mr. Noble's; he could not tell the name of the street.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Week and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-142

140. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a jacket, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Gunnis .

WILLIAM GUNNIS . I am a sailor , and live in Upper Chapel-street, St. George's . On Friday evening, the 6th of December, I pulled my coat off, and put it on the bedpost; the prisoner lodged in the same room, but was not not at home; he is a sailor. I left about half-past one o'clock, and returned about half-past five; it was gone, he did not return. I found him that evening in Knightingale-lane, and charged him with it; he denied having it.

JAMES COLE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and took us to Ellis.

ALEXANDER ELLIS . I am a salesman. I bought the jacket of the prisoner for seven shillings about four o'clock; he had it on his back.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18221204-143

141. ELIZA CARELESS and MARY ANN WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , eleven yards of poplin, value 20 s., the goods of William White , from his person .

WILLIAM WHITE . I am a hair-dresser , and live in Goswell-street. On the 15th of November I had eleven yards of poplin in a handkerchief, going to Hoxton with it. About half-past five o'clock in the evening I called at Careless's house in Radnor-street, St. Luke's ; she keeps a house of ill fame . I have known her some years. I called there to see a person who resides there in the one pair. I stopped about ten minutes. Careless said she was out, but would be in in a moment. I stopped in Careless's room; Wood was with her; I was not there two minutes before she asked for something to drink; I went out and got some gin, asking Careless to take care of the bundle, telling her there was property in it. When I returned the bundle remained; they drank the liquor. I took up my bundle and left. There were three quantities of poplin in it, of eleven yards each. When I got out I found the bundle very loose, and upon examining it one dress out of the three was gone. I went back and charged them with it; they denied it. I fetched a constable, who found it in a room up stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are a hairdresser - A. I served my time to one. I deal in various articles. We had a quartern and a half of gin. I do not think I had seen Wood three times before. She did not tell me she had taken it. I had been there a short time before; I went to see Miss Roberts. I seldom went but I saw Wood. She did not say I owed her any money. Roberts came in just as I went out. I knew it was a brothel. There was a man at dinner there when I brought the constable.

THOMAS JAMES CARTER . I am a constable. The prosecutor applied to me. I went to the house about six o'clock in the evening; he was quite sober, and said he had lost eleven yards of poplin. I found it between the bed and sacking in a back room on the first floor. Careless was down stairs in a back room. I saw no other woman there; the prisoners denied ever having seen him. Wood was there undressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARELESS'S Defence. I have a witness to prove Wood offered it to him for 5 s., which he owed her.

- SMITHERS. I was dining at this house with two women; Wood and the prosecutor were in the front parlour. Wood said she had the property; that he owed her 20 s., and she would not return it till he paid her; he made no answer. She said he had owed it her fourteen days; he did not contradict her. She afterwards said he should have it for 5 s. I am a packer, and live at No. 29, Bell-alley, Coleman-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-144

142. SAMUEL DOWSETT was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN JONATHAN BUTTRESS . I am a silk-manufacturer , and live in Howard-street, Spitalfields. I employ four hundred men; the prisoner was my foreman , entrusted to pay and receive money for me; he was nearly four years in my service; I gave him 100 l. per annum, and certain other privileges, which brought him in 4 l. per week more.

THOMAS ESCREET . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I supplied the prisoner with money to pay the men; I generally gave it into his hands. I have a book which he kept in his own hand-writing, (producing it) here is an entry on the 28th of September of 2 l., being paid to Abraham Stanfield in the prisoner's hand-writing. I have given him credit in the ledger for that sum, as if he had paid it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. You generally give him money to pay the men - A. Yes, I cannot say I myself delivered him money on the 28th.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-145

143. SAMUEL DOWSETT was again indicted for embezzling, on the 19th of June , two half-crowns, and 5 s.

MR. BUTTRESS. The prisoner was in my service, and received money for me.

JOSHUA RAWLINGS. I am in the prosecutor's employ as

weaver. I bought a piece of silk of my master, and was to pay him by instalments of 10 s. out of every piece of work that I took home; it came to 6 l. 13 s. 8 d. I took work home on the 19th of June, and the money I was to receive was laid down on the counter. I had had an advance before; the prisoner put down 2 l. 13 s. 4 d. on the counter; I said you will take the 10 s., meaning for the silk, I owed nothing else, and he took up 10 s. I can swear there was one half-crown among it.

Cross-examined. Q. You said take the 10 s. - A. Yes. I have a memorandum of the payments, which he made at the back of the bill. Here is an entry on the 19th of June of 10 s.

THOMAS ESCREET . The prisoner never accounted to me for this 10 s. I have the accounts in his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there an account of any 10 s. being paid - A. Yes, on the 28th of August, which is the first sum. When he was discharged, he was requested to make out his balance; he made out a balance of 68 l.; there then appeared a deficiency of 13 l., which he acknowledged he had applied to his own use; he was discharged on the 25th of October. The amount of his deficiences is 800 l.

JOSHUA RAWLINS re-examined. The piece I was paid for on the 19th came to 7 l. 13 s. 4 d. I had received 5 l. in advance.

Prisoner. Q. What had you drawn on the work you were on at the time I left - A. two pounds, that is not the piece in question. I always came for advances on Saturday. The 19th was Wednesday.

Prisoner's Defence. If Rawlings's account, in folio 136, is examined, it will be found that no deficiency whatever occurs, though it may not appear in the amount of 10 s., it appears as 20 s.; he acknowledges receiving 2 l. on the work he was on when I left, and 3 l. is entered, and the extra 1 l. is designed to cover what is stated in the bill; it was not entered at the time through the great pressure of business.

THOMAS ESCREET . He has not accounted for the 10 s. I entered this 1 l. in the account myself to balance it. I am certain he never brought this 10 s. to account.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-146

144. WILLIAM DOWSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , a gown, value 3 s. the goods of Mary Blake .

MARY BLAKE . I live at Mr. Edwards's, Three Colt-lane, Bethnal-green . Last Wednesday I lost a gown out of a garden (which is walled round), where it hung to dry. I saw it safe between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and missed it between five and six.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a publican; Blake was my servant . On the 4th December, a little past five o'clock, the prisoner came into the tap-room; he had been in the house a quarter of an hour, then went along the passage into the yard, and could then easily get into the garden; he returned; I did not notice that he had any thing; he went again about five minutes after; and again returned. He was the only person who went into the yard. About five or six minutes after the gown was missed, I sent after him; the servant brought him over, with three or four persons who were with him. He denied taking it, I sent for a constable. The gown was produced, and he begged for mercy.

THOMAS THWAITES . I am servant at the house. I went after the prisoner about a quarter of a mile, and brought him back across the fields, having found him in a house in Bath-street. He denied all knowledge of it, and came with me and two more who were with him, and on turning the corner. I picked up the gown on the step of a door. We had passed close by these steps, I went that way, and must have seen it, had it lain there then. Nobody was near the house but himself and the two men. I gave the gown to my mistress, and told her where I found it. He said he hoped my master would forgive him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ESSEX . I was sent for and took charge of him. The gown was produced, and he was asked if he knew any thing of it; he said,

"I beg your pardon, Mr. Edwards, I hope you will forgive me."

Defence. If I had the gown, I had plenty of time to get rid of it before the young man came for it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-147

Second Jury.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

145. MATTHEW HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , a plane, value 4 s., the goods of James Coleby , and plane, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Willis .

WILLIAM TARRANT . I am a journeyman carpenter, and live at Hoxton. On Sunday afternoon, the 1st of December, I saw the prisoner going in a direction from where I had left my tools on the Saturday afternoon about three o'clock. He had a basket of tools; he said they were his own. I found a mallet and gauge of mine, which I had left in an unfinished house the night before, with two planes and some chisels, which Coleby and Willis claimed.

JAMES COLEBY . I am a carpenter , and was at work at a house at Hoxton Old Town , by the Haberdashers' Arms, on Saturday, the 1st of December, I left a plane there worth 4 s.

RICHARD WILLIS . I was work with Coleby. I left a plane, which I afterwards found at Worship-street. I left it on Friday morning.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I was passing at the time the prisoner was stopped by Tarrant. I took the basket of tools from him. He wished to give them up, saying he had made a bad job of it, but supposed he should not be hung.

(Property poduced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It rained very hard on Sunday afternoon. I went into a house for shelter; the door was open, and I took some of the tools up to carry them somewhere to secure them, being a carpenter myself. I found the rest by the side of a house.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-148

146. HENRY JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on

the 5th of December , 4 lbs. of pork, value 1 s., and 6 lbs. of beef, value 1 s. , the goods of Joseph Janes .

JOSEPH JANES . I keep a cook-shop on Saffron-hill . On the 5th of December, about a quarter past seven o'clock, in the morning, this meat was in my shop; it weighed ten pounds. I found it afterwards in the officer's possession, and knew it. It was two hands of pork and a leg of beef.

JOHN TWEEDY . On the night of the 5th of December, about eight o'clock, I met the prisoner in Golden-lane, with something in his apron; he said it was ham; I found it was two hands of pork, and a piece of beef. He said the boys who were with him gave it him. He told the magistrate that the boys went into the shop, telling him they were going to take the beef; that they brought it out and gave it him to sell, and he was to have fourpence for his trouble. It was claimed by Janes.

Prisoner's Defence. I met three boys on Saffron-hill, they said they were going into the shop to buy a bit of beef, and if I would carry it to Playhouse-yard they would give me fourpence.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-149

147. SARAH LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , a pig, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Baker .

GEORGE DARBY . I am servant to Charles Baker , butcher of Tottenham Court-road. One Saturday evening in October, my master desired me to watch the prisoner, who was walking up and down before the shop. I saw her take a pig up from the window, put it under her cloak, and cross the road. I followed and took it from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not across the road.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18221204-150

148. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , three frocks, value 3 s., and a petticoat, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Wood .

ANN WOOD . I live in James-court, Featherstone-street . On Saturday, the 16th of November, I went on an errand, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, leaving the door a-jar; I returned in five minutes, and found it more open than I left it, and the prisoner coming out with these things under his arm. I missed them off the line, and pursued him. I called for Patrick who lives close by; he stopped him in about five minutes, in my presence, with them under his arm. They consisted of three frocks and a petticoat.

WILLIAM PATRICK . I am a constable of St. Luke's, Wood called me - I took the prisoner, and found the property under his arm.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoners Defence. I was going home rather intoxicated, having been drinking with a friend, and in Old-street two women stood at the corner of James-street, and took me with them into a room in James's-court; she took two shillings from me, and bolted off; the other came up, and turned me out, and I foolishly took these things off the line to make them return the money.

WILLIAM PATRICK , He appeared to have been drinking. It is a house of ill fame. He said the prosecutrix was not the girl he went with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-151

149. THOMAS MOUNTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Eliza Pitt , from her person .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-152

150. MICHAEL M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , an umbrella, value 18 d.; a basket, value 6 s.; a purse, value 1 d., and a piece of crape, value 3 d., the goods of Parthenia Guest , from her person .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

PARTHENIA GUEST . I live in Market-street, Fitzroy-market. On the evening of the 23d of November, I was going from home towards Tottenham Court-road; it was a dirty night, and I struck my foot against a post at the corner of Grafton-mews , and to save myself from falling I let go of my basket and umbrella; the basket contained a purse and a piece of crape; some duplicates and a 6 d., were in the purse, and some loose halfpence in the basket. The prisoner was the watchman ; it was half-past eight o'clock: he came up with his watchman's coat on, with No. 20 marked on it. He took up the basket, turned round, and took the purse and crape out of the basket, and took the umbrella from me. I told him he had taken it; he denied having taken any thing of the kind, and said,

"Mind, this is my number, 20; appear against me, if you dare." I went home, and, in consequence of my landlord's advice, I went to the watch-house again at twelve o'clock. I described him to Howard, and by his advice sat in his chair; and when the prisoner came in I said

"That is the man." Howard immediately asked if he knew me; he said Yes, he saw me fall; he asked him if he had any thing belonging to me, he said

"No, I have not." He was making towards the door, Howard prevented his going out, and when he was brought back the purse with its contents were found upon him; the umbrella was under his arm, and a piece of mutton wrapped in my piece of crape. They were all taken from his person in my presence. I immediately knew them.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say the basket fell out of your hand, and then swear I snatched it from you. - A. To save myself from falling, I let them fall; the umbrella dropped; he did not snatch it out of my hand. I was in Howard's chair when he came into the watch-house.

COURT. Q. You signed your deposition before the magistrate, did not you - A. Yes, it was read over to me; (looking at it) - this is it.

The deposition was here read, in which the witness stated that the prisoner had snatched the basket and umbrella out her hand, and that she was rather intoxicated.

Q. How came you to say, then, that he snatched it out of your hand - A. He took the basket from me, and threw it at me afterwards; he snatched it from me. I let the umbrella fall to save myself from falling; he picked it up, I asked him for it; he said he had nothing of the kind.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the watch-house-keeper at Cleveland-mews, the prosecutor came to me between nine and ten o'clock at night, on the 23d of November, and said that the watchman No. 20, had robbed her of her purse and

umbrella, in Grafton-street, that he took it from her little basket; she had the basket with her at the time, she was not quite sober. I advised her to come about twelve o'clock which she did, she then appeared nearly sober, at twelve o'clock the prisoner came in, it was his time to go off, the girl came just before him and was sitting in my chair, I asked him, if he knew any thing of that woman's purse, she got up, he said

"No, what woman," I pointed to her, he said,

"Here let us look at you;" he then said,

"Oh! I gave you your basket," she said

"Yes, but you took my purse out first, and the umbrella," she said she was sure it was him; I told him I should search him, he then shifted out of the watch-house with his umbrella in his hand and a little bundle; before I could stop him, he put the umbrella and bundle just down, outside the watch-house door, I caught his hand and pulled him in, and took up this umbrella and bundle, the girl immediately said that is my umbrella, and that the gauze in which he had wrapped some meat was her's. he said it was veal, I opened it and found it was mutton, he said he gave 6 d. a pound for it, I began to search him, he pulled off his watch-coat, his own coat and waistcoat and threw them down; Shepherd picked up the coat, the purse dropped out of it; I produced the umbrella

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I am serjeant of the early watch, I was there when Guest came, she was placed behind Howard's chair, when the prisoner came in she said,

"That is the man who took my purse," he denied any knowledge of the purse, but said he had seen her and picked her up, but had none of her property, when he found he was going to be searched, he shifted out at the door with the umbrella and bundle, Howard pulled him in with them, and when he put the umbrella on the table, she said,

"That is mine and the crape round the bundle is mine," he then threw off his watch-coat, his own coat and waistcoat, all at once, and as I turned the waistcoat up, 3 1/2 d. and a purse fell out, there was several duplicates in the purse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crying nine o'clock and met this woman, she stumbled against me, I lifted her up she said,

"I am very tipsy," she said she had lost her basket, I saw it, picked it up and gave it her, she said I had her purse and umbrella, and the contents of the basket, I said I knew nothing of it, she went away, I turned round and found the umbrella by the mews, and in about five minutes found the purse; a person came and asked if I had seen the woman, I said I had seen a tipsy woman, I had found her purse and umbrella, and if she came to me next morning she should have it. When I went to the watch-house, Howard said

"Strip directly," I came to lay the meat outside the door, he came out, ordered me to take my clothes off and so I did, as to the six-pence I never saw it.

ELIZA MORTIMER . I live in the same house as the prosecutrix; I was coming down stairs last Friday week, she came up and said she had lost her purse, and that the watchman had it, I went out and met M'Cabe, I went round into Warren-street, heard a watchman say to the other

"What have you done with her," the prisoner said " I sent her home about her business," he said

"I have her tickets, and if you come round with me, I'll shew them to you," I saw him put the tickets into the purse, one by one, and saw the crape, I went home and told the prosecutrix and told her to go to the watch-house at twelve o'clock, or to Howard-street, at four.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you say all this to Guest - A. Yes, I did not go to the watch-house with her, for I was not at home till dinner-time next day - Q. What are you - A. The same as Mrs. Guest - unfortunate, I believe she is the same.

ROBERT REDGATE . The prisoner sent for me to Newgate, and told me to find the woman whom he had told he had the property, I went and found her and the prosecutrix at No. 22, Fitzroy-market, she said she did not wish to prosecute, and would rather make it up with his friends, I agreed to meet her next evening, she came and agreed to take three pounds not to prosecute, the prisoner's wife and I were to raise it, I promised to bring her the money next day, at ten o'clock I went and gave her five shillings in part, and on Thursday next I was to make the rest good, but when I went she said she must prosecute, or she should not get the property, but she would take good care to throw a flaw before the grand jury.

JURY to HOWARD. Q. Have the watchmen any instructions if they find any thing on their beats - A. They are not to be discharged if they do not bring it to the watch-house.

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Of stealing but not from the person .

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-153

151. JAMES AYLWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a book, value 2 s.; an opera-glass, value 2 s.; and a lamp, value 1 s. ; the goods of William Henry Debney .

WILLIAM HENRY DEBNEY . I live at Chelsea. On Monday the 8th of November, my father missed a carpet, and went up to a room where the prisoner's mother lodges; and on the Tuesday after that I missed these things, which I had not seen for some months previous.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I took him into custody on another charge, and found some duplicates on him of these things.

JOHN STUBBING . I am servant to Mr. Kemble, pawnbroker at Knightsbridge. I took a book in pawn of the prisoner on the 6th of August, in the name of Fuller. I have known him three years.

CHARLES PADDON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker at Pimlico. On the 5th of August, the prisoner pawned an opera-glass in the name of William Fuller . I knew him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 41.

Of stealing the opera-glass only .

Reference Number: t18221204-154

152. JAMES AYLWARD was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , two handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; and a pair of boots, value 2 s. , the goods of Phillip Humphrey .

PHILLIP HUMPHREY . I am servant to William Tullet, and live near Fulham-bridge . I came there on the 18th of November, and missed two handkerchiefs and a

pair of boots about twelve o'clock next day; they were safe at six o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE PICKETT . I live in Duke-street, Manchester-square, and am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of November, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I took in two silk handkerchiefs in pawn of the prisoner for 5 s. 6 d.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I took the prisoner into custody. I found on him a duplicate of this property.

WILLIAM BLAKE . I am shopman to Mr. Aldus of Berwick-street. I have a pair of boots pawned on the 20th of November, in the name of Fuller. I do not know who by.

ANN COLLET . I keep the Fulham-bridge public-house at Brompton. The prisoner slept at the house for five weeks. On the 15th of November I had occasion to go to the adjoining room to his, and found a cupboard forced open, and a bottle jack gone; he lodged in the house on the 19th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-155

153. PHILLIP REDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , two yards of cloth, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Edwards .

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am a willow-cutter , and live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. On the 16th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I was going home with two aprons made of Russia duck; the prisoner stopped me in Whitechapel , saying,

"Halloo my boy, where are you going" - I said home. He asked what I had got - I said nothing but my own; he said,

"Let me look at it." I shewed it to him; he took it from me, and said he would take care of it till the morning. I said I would rather keep it myself. I was in liquor a little, but capable of knowing what I was about. I asked for it again; he insisted on seeing me home, and saw me to the end of the street, and said,

"Now where do you live." I was pointing to the house, and he ran off with the bundle into a Mr. Cuff's gateway, where he is watchman, but before I could get to the gate he shut it; a witness came up, and knocked for eight or ten minutes; he at last came out, and was taken to the watch-house.

SELAH FRANCIS . I live in Newcastle-street. On the 16th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner running from Edwards into the gateway; he shut the wicket after him. I saw nothing in his hand. I stood about a quarter of an hour while Edwards knocked at the gate; he poked his head out, and said he had nothing belonging to him. He is a private watchman.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I say I was taking care of it till the morning - A. No, he denied having any thing.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with the robbery, and denied all knowledge of it; he said he saw Edwards at the corner of Castle-street, but knew nothing of the cloth; but after he was locked up, he called me, and said he had put the cloth in a little back warehouse. I went to search, but could not find it. Next morning he called me, and said he threw it up into a loop-hole at Mr. Baker's warehouse. Mr. Baker's man found it there.

EDWARD FARMER . I assisted Edwards to take the prisoner; he said the man in the gate-way robbed him. I knocked for a quarter of an hour. The prisoner then came and denied having the cloth. I took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM NORTH . I am servant to Mr. Baker. On the morning of the 17th of November, I found the cloth up in the first floor loft, which communicates with Mr. Cuff's yard; I gave it to Plunkett.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I told them at the watch-house I had thrown it there directly I went in, and if they would stand on a tub they could get it. I put it there ready for him if he called in the morning.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-156

154. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , a coal scuttle, value 13 s. , the goods of William Shaw .

WILLIAM SHAW . I live in Castle-street, Long-acre . My coal-scuttle had a particular mark on it; it stood in front of my shop. On the 19th of November, I saw it safe about five o'clock in the afternoon, and missed it five minutes after. I found in about ten minutes; the officer brought it.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I was in Castle-street between five and six o'clock on the 19th of November, and saw the prisoner running very fast in a direction from Shaw's house up Mercer-street. I pursued; he turned into Leg-alley, and saw me behind him, and threw the scuttle down; he stumbled, and I secured him.

THOMAS PEARCE . I was passing and saw a young man stoop down and pick up the scuttle from Shaw's shop, and another took a boiler. I crossed over into Leg-alley, and found the prisoner secured; he is dressed the same as the man, but I cannot swear to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, and saw it about twenty yards from the door I stood by, saw no owner, took it up, and walked leisurely away into Leg-alley; a man came after me; sung out Stop thief; and I put it down.

THOMAS PEARCE . I saw him take it from inside the shop door.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-157

155. SAMUEL SLAUGHTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , a watch, value 30 s.; a ribbon, value 1 d.; and two keys, value 1 d. ; the goods of David Cox .

DAVID COX . I live at Islington . The prisoner came to my house on Sunday the 10th of November, I asked him to dine with me; he cooked the dinner, and I fell asleep the while; he left after dinner, and soon after I missed my watch from my fob.

Prisoner. Q. You offered me the watch to see when the fowl would be done - I was dead asleep, and do not recollect it.

JOHN HARRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday afternoon, between three and four

o'clock, and found the duplicate of the watch on him. I told him what Cox charged him with; he confessed it, saying he met a young woman, and having nothing to treat her with, he pawned the watch, and that he had it to see when the fowl would be done.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a pawn-broker. The prisoner pawned the watch with me for 1 l. in the name of John Slaughter .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS LISTER . I am twelve years old. I was at Cox's; he was rather sleepy; the prisoner asked the time; Cox pulled out his watch; gave it him. He looked at it; laid it on the table. I saw him put it into his fob while Cox was asleep. Cox lent it him to see when the fowl should be done.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-158

156. WILLIAM STEPHENS and HENRY CORKER were indicted, for stealing on the 29th of November , twenty-two brooms, value 4 s. , the goods of David Raw .

DAVID RAW . On the night of the 29th of November, I had a dozen and ten brooms outside my shop door, in Richard-street, Islington . I missed them five minutes after.

GEORGE TAYLOR . On the night of the 29th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner's in Rodney-street, Pentonville. Corker put the bundle of brooms under a shop window, I saw them in his hand; he then came towards me. I held him, and said,

"Now you will go back, and take what you left there." I took him back. Raw claimed them. I took him into custody. Stephens was taken next morning. I knew them both before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CORKER'S Defence. Stephens was not in my company.

STEPHENS - NOT GUILTY .

CORKER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-159

157. ELEANOR SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , a sovereign , the money of James Tizzard .

JAMES TIZZARD . On the 5th of December I saw the prisoner in St. Giles's. I gave her a sovereign to get change, and she run off.

COURT. This is no felony,

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-160

158. EDWARD GEE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , a crown piece, two shillings, and a sixpence, the monies of Charles Cheesman from his person .

CHARLES CHEESMAN . On the 11th of November, I was by the Eagle Tavern, City Road ; it was the day Hunt came there. While he was getting out of the carriage I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket. I seized him by the collar. He drew his hand out of my pocket, and I heard the money fall to the ground. There was a crown, and two shillings, I endeavoured to pick it up, but other people did that. I only got two-pence.

Prisoner. Q. Was any body near you except me - A. Not on that side. I was wedged up till the carriage moved on, and at that instant he put his hand into my pocket. He said if I would let him go, he would go quietly - I let him go; he up with his fist, and knocked me backwards; but I got hold of him, and the gang pushed me about, but I kept my hold.

BENJAMIN BOGGIS . I was in the crowd, and saw the prisoner at the right elbow of the prosecutor - he drew his hand out of his pocket, and the money fell from him the moment the prosecutor collared him.

Prisoner. Q. Which side was you - A. Behind you both. He let the money fall - I did not see the money.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was coming out of Bunhill-row, and on returning saw a mob in Bath-street - there was a cry of

"rescue." I collared the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not go quietly - A. Yes; when I laid hold of him, he said he was quite tired of being pulled about. and would go quietly.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-161

159. JOHN KERBY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , a hat, value 10 s., the goods of Alexander Marshall , from his person .

ALEXANDER MARSHALL . On the 14th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Queen-street, Soho - a man came up behind me, took off my hat, and ran off with it; I gave an alarm. I did not see who it was. He was followed and secured, but not in my sight.

WILLIAM HALFPENNY . I was in Queen-street, heard the cry, and met the prisoner running with the hat in his hand at the corner of Frith-street - I collared him; he struggled, and got from me, turned the corner, and in Soho-square I saw him stopped again.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I heard the cry; the prisoner ran up Frith-street very hard, and had something which he flung away. I stopped him; he said he was innocent. The last witness came up, and assisted in taking him back. A gentleman brought back the hat.

HAMMOND WEBB . I took him in charge with the hat, which I wrote my name on, and returned it to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This was not the gentleman who gave the prosecutor the hat.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-162

160. MARY PROCTOR was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , five sovereigns , the monies of Peter Dafe .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-163

161. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , three shillings, and five sixpences, the monies of Lawrence Nettle , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Reference Number: t18221204-164

162. SAMUEL WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a watch, value 1 l. 15 s., a watch-chain, value 1 s.; two keys, value 1 s., and one seal, value 6 d., the goods of William Callow , from his person .

WILLIAM CALLOW . I lodge at the Falstaff, public-house, Old-street - the prisoner lodged in the same room. On the 17th of November, I laid my watch on the bed about two o'clock in the afternoon - I went out, and returned between nine and ten o'clock; it was then gone -

the prisoner was at home. Next morning I followed him to a pawnbroker's in St. John-street, and when he came out I went in, and found it there.

WILLIAM HOLROYD . I sleep in the same room as the prisoner and witness. I went up stairs in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner lying across the bed intoxicated; he awoke, undressed, and got into bed. I went down and left him there.

JAMES WOOD . I am a shopman to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, in St. John-street. The prisoner pawned the watch in the name of G. Walker, about nine o'clock in the morning. Callow came in about it directly after.

JOHN TWEEDY . On the 18th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was sent for - I asked the prisoner for the duplicate of the watch - he pretended to look for it, and said he lost it in Holborn. I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-165

163. JOHN LUCAS WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 70 lbs. of lead, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Smith .

RICHARD SMITH . I am a plumber , and live in Little Guilford-street, Bloomsbury; the prisoner was in my employ. I was with him at work in Bloomsbury-square , on the 23d of October, until eight o'clock, when I left him. I returned from breakfast at ten o'clock, he was not then there. I missed some lead off the flat where he should have been at work, it was the property of William Hewitt , who contracted for it; some of the same sort was afterwards found on him but we could not exactly match it.

JOHN DAVIS . On the 23d of October, I was on duty in Holborn. I saw the prisoner coming towards Drury-lane, with something under his jacket. I watched him into a house in Charles-street - I waited outside - he came out with this lead on his shoulder - I followed him to White-Lion-street, Seven Dials, into a plumber's, he came out without the lead. I took him and asked what had become of the lead, he said he had none. I took him back and found two pieces of lead which were what he brought in, he denied it but afterwards said he did bring it in, and that it was Mr. Brooks's. Brooks said it was his, and then said he knew nothing of it, and referred me to his man.

HENRY PARDOE . I live at Mr. Brooks's - the prisoner once worked there. On the 27th of October, about nine o'clock, he brought the lead there - two officers brought him back in a few minutes.

RICHARD SMITH . I believe it to be the lead I was putting down and which was there when I left the premises. I could not match it because the new lead was put down.

GUILTY . - Aged 28.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-166

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

164. ELIZABETH SIMMONS was indicted for stealing on the 4th of December , six table cloths, value 50 s., and one shift, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Speak .

ELIZABETH SPEAK . I am the wife of Samuel Speak , of St. John's, Wool-lane . I am a laundress - the prisoner was employed by me. I discharged her last Tuesday week, and on Wednesday evening she came to know if I would give her a character. I gave her no answer - she went through into the ironing room by the wash-house, where these things were, except the shift, which was stolen before. Mrs. King gave me information and on Thursday morning I went to Mr. Trails, the pawnbroker's, and found three table cloths and a shift, belonging to a person I washed for, which had been in my place while she was with me. I found a table cloth at Briant's - the pawnbrokers are not here.

ELEANOR KING . I work for Mrs. Speake, and was in the wash-house when the prisoner came. I had put the linen there half an hour after she was gone; I missed a table cloth.

SARAH ALLINGHAM . I saw her come into the wash-house and missed a table cloth half an hour after.

HENRY BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. I found duplicates of the property at her lodging pawned in her name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-167

165. ELIZABETH SIMMONS was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , four blankets, value 10 s. a pair of bellows, value 1 s., and a flat iron, value 6 d., the goods of William Bowman , in a lodging-room .

JANE BOWMAN . I am the wife of William Bowman ; we live in Duke-street ; the prisoner lodged with me three weeks. Buckeridge came to search her lodgings, and I missed these articles.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I found duplicates of the property in an old blanket, at the top of the bed head they were dated the 16th of November, 30th of November and the 2d and 5th of December.

JOHN WHITAKER . I am servant to Mr. Gideon, a pawnbroker of Stafford-street; the articles stated in the indictment were pawned at our house by the prisoner, in her own name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had pawned them before, and always fetched them out.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-168

166. JOSEPH KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 35 s. and a seal, value 1 s. the property of John Dixon ; and JOHN SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN DIXON . I am a weaver , and live at Bethnal-green , Kemp was in my employ. On the 15th of November, between four and five o'clock, he went down stairs to get his tea, and I went down also; two watches hung in the shop by the loom, he went up to the shop before me, and came down and went out. I went up immediately and missed them.

JOHN DIXON . I am the son of the last witness, and live four doors from him, in Newcastle-street. I was looking out of a one pair of stairs window, and saw Kemp, between four and five o'clock with another taller person running towards

the end of the street. I saw Kemp give something to the other person.

THOMAS WILLIAM ROBINS . I am shopman to Mr. Maslin, pawnbroker, Kingsland-road. On the 15th of November, Sheppard came and pawned a watch. I am certain of his person.

THOMAS PEARSON . I am shopman to Mr. Attenbow, pawnbroker in Shoreditch. On the 15th of November Sheppard' offered the watch in pawn; he said it was his own. I detained him till Vann came.

THOMAS VANN . Kemp was apprehended on the 15th. I was fetched and found Sheppard at the pawnbroker's; the seal was in his pocket. He said he bought it of a Jew for 24 s. At four o'clock that afternoon I found 1 l. 1 s. 4 d. in his pocket, being the sum he pawned the watch for.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

KEMP - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SHEPPARD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18221204-169

Before Mr. Recorder.

167. THOMAS GIBBONS was indicted for bigamy .

MARY DUNKLEY . I am a servant at Daventry. I was first cousin to Eliza Morgan , the prisoner was married to her in 1817. I was present. She had lived with her friends, who were flax-dressers. She was single. They lived together at Daventry about a year and a half. The prisoner is a shoemaker ; they had no children. I saw her alive last night; she lives with her friends in Northampton. I saw the ceremony performed, and put my mark to the register.

Prisoner. Q. Did not she leave me and go to live with another man - A. Not to my knowledge.

WILLIAM PARSONS . I saw this copy taken from the register at Daventry. I am the father of the second wife. I saw Mr. Williams, the minister copy it from the book.

(Read.)

MARY ANN PARSONS . I live in New Peter-street, Westminster. I was married to the prisoner on the 19th of May last, at St. Margaret's, Westminster . We were acuainted from July last year. I did not know he had been married before. I lived with my father at the time, I worked at the book binding. I had no property. I found out in November, that he was married before. I saw his first wife. He lived with me till I discovered it.

WILLIAM PARSONS . The prosecutrix is my daughter. I objected to the marriage, having heard that he was married before, and told him so, he denied it. They went to church without my knowledge. He always denied being married. I had no positive evidence of it till November.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of November. I told him the charge; he asked if both his wives were there. He was locking a box, and I asked him for the key. He said he knew what I wanted, and gave me the certificate of the second marriage out of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a faint knowledge that I was married to Morgan, and on the 26th of March she went to live with another man. I wrote to her repeatedly to return, but she refused.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18221204-170

168. SARAH BUNGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , a table-cloth, value 18 d.; two napkins, value 18 d,; a night-gown, value 6 d., and a pair of stocking, value 6 d. , the goods of John Beauchamp .

JOHN BEAUCHAMP . I live at Highgate-hill; and am a silversmith . The prisoner was in my service three or four months. On Friday morning last, in consequence of something which occurred, I sent for a constable; I charged her with robbing me. I went up stairs with her; she brought down her two boxes, and gave the keys to the constable, who opened them in her presence, and found the articles stated in the indictment.

MRS. ANN BEAUCHAMP . I am the wife of the prosecutor; I had a good character of the prisoner. I saw her boxes opened, and the property found, which I knew to be ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot tell how they came into my box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221204-171

169. DANIEL HENNINGTON and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , a leg of pork, value 2 s. , the goods of Robert Gunston .

ROBERT GUNSTON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in the Commercial-road . This leg of pork hung at my doorpost. I missed it about half-past one o'clock on the 7th of December, and afterwards found the prisoners in custody with it. I had seen them both in the shop together two minutes before.

ARTHUR TANNER . I am a constable. About half-past one o'clock I stopped the prisoners about a hundred yards from Gunston's shop. Hennington had the pork under his jacket, and said Smith gave it him. Smith went away, I followed him; and he said he knew nothing of it. Mr. Gunston claimed it, and Hennington offered to pay for it.

HENNINGTON'S Defence. I said I would pay for it rather than go to prison.

SMITH'S Defence. I went into the shop to buy pork, came out and overtook Hennington.

HENNINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY - Aged 20.

Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18221204-172

170. JOHN MARSHALL was indicted for stealing on the 20th of November , a square, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Elias Fry ; six planes value 16 s., a filaster, value 5 s., a gauge, value 2 s., and a plow, value 10 d. the goods of Elias Fry , sen.

ELIAS FRY , JUN. I am a carpenter and joiner , my square was in an unfinished house, in Park-street, Dorset-square , my father was at work there, I saw it safe on Saturday at half-past five o'clock, when I left, I left some workmen on the first floor, I went again on Monday morning and found the bricks which were put in the window rather out, and our tools gone, the prisoner was a stranger, I found him at the office on Tuesday, with the tools there, and six planes of my father's, the whole are worth five pounds.

WILLIAM HOUSE . I am a pawn-broker, and live in High-street, St. Giles's, a square was brought to my shop by Joseph Aldridge , I stopped him with it having had information, he said he brought it from a carpenter up the gateway, I told him to send the mrn, he went out.

Fry came in immediately after, and claimed it, Aldridge returned with another man, who he said was the owner, that was not the prisoner.

JOSEPH ALDRIDGE . I sell hearth-stones and live in Church-street, St. Giles's, I dont know the prisoner, I took the square to pawn, my sister brought it to me to pawn when I was in bed; he told me to fetch the owner, I was going for my sister and met a young fellow, told him, and he said he would go with me to get it.

SARAH ALDRIDGE . I gave my brother the square to pawn, the prisoner gave it me that morning and told me to pawn it, he left it in my room and left a great basket full of tools, and said they were his own, one Covey, a wheel wright was with me, and called my brother up and and sent him to pawn it, the prisoner was to wait in my room for the money, he stopped, and as he did not return he went away with the tools, and said I was to keep the money for him, and he would call for it, another man came with him; when I found my brother was taken, and that it was stolen, I went to the watch-house and told of it, he never called for the money, but was taken up three or four days after.

CORNELIUS BROWN . I am a beadle. House met me, and gave Aldridge to me, he gave the account he has now.

(Square produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, on Tuesday the 3 d. of December, on suspicion of this, I told him the charge, he said he supposed it was all right, I saw Sarah Aldridge , at Marlborough-street. she said he was the person.

JOHN STAPLES . I took him from the watch-house to the office, and on the way he said

"You might have let me gone out of the country in my own way, I suppose it is of no use now, if I was to return all the tools," I said he might do as he liked, about giving up the property, I could make no promises, he said,

"Why it is useless to deny it any longer," I asked if he choose to say where the property was, he said he should take time to consider.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny saying any thing of the kind, I had entered into the East-India service, and said they might let me leave the country in my own way.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Years , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18221204-173

171. JOHN ARCHER and ANN BRADSHAW , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , a seal, value 4 l., a key, value 10 s. and a chain, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas M'Kanon , from his person .

THOMAS M'KANON. I live in King-Edward-street, Wapping, and am an oilman . On the 20th of November, about eight, in the evening, I was in a house in Chapel-street, Commercial-road , I was perfectly sober, I was going in company with two young men in pursuit of a woman who had robbed me, Archer, met one of the two men, I spoke to him and told him who we were looking for, he joined us to assist, and after going a short way he asked me to treat him with some porter, and on coming to this house he said

"My sister lives hear, will you go in and have it." - it was a private house, one of the men and I went into the ground floor room, they sent for the porter, I had no money, Archer said,

"Will you put your watch in that tea-caddy, and we will find porter." Bradshaw and another woman were in the room, I refused and then he drew near to me, and made a snatch at my watch, my fob was twisted, the chain which was steel broke, it had a gold seal and key to it, which cost me 4 l. 10 s., he rushed out of the room directly, I pursued but he got off with it, Bradshaw said nothing, I gave information at Lambeth-street, and he was apprehended, I have not recovered my property, I am certain the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were you perfectly sober - A. Yes, when he robbed me, I might have been intoxicated three-quarters of an hour before, only one link on my chain was left, I had been drinking with a friend in George-street, Minories, about four o'clock that afternoon, we had three bottles of wine between us. I left there between six and seven o'clock.

COURT. Q. Were you going the nearest way home - A. I had been robbed that evening of 129 l. at a house about thirty yards from the house he took me to, and was looking for the woman. I got sober after being robbed.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street, On the 21st of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prosecutor who complained of being robbed, he pointed out the house in Chapel-street, I found Bradshaw there, he described the man to me, I took Bradshaw to a public-house, and as I came out I saw Archer pass, I called to Plunkett and the moment he saw me he ran off, I pursued, he got away, Plunkett took him, I knew him before, we took him into the public-house where the prosecutor was, he said that was the man who snatched his chain and seals. I found nothing on him.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I am an officer, the prosecutor described the prisoner to me, I followed and took the prisoner, he ran a full half-mile, we had said nothing to him.

Prisoner's Defence. He swore to me because I wore a round frock, I was at my brother's from six o'clock at night till ten in the morning.

WILLIAM FOSTER . He described him as a bricklayer , dressed in fustian, he was so dressed when I took him.

ARCHER - GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

BRADSHAW - NOT GUILTY .


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