Old Bailey Proceedings, 23rd October 1822.
Reference Number: 18221023
Reference Number: f18221023-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 23d of OCTOBER, 1822, and following Days;

Being the Eighth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; and Christopher Smith , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and Robert Waithman , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; and Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Cath ,

Rodham Smith ,

William Veres ,

Thomas Gain ,

Thomas Atkinson ,

Stephen Crouch ,

James Carwell ,

Richard Sharp ,

William Bruce ,

James Bouper ,

Thomas Wocester ,

John Hobson .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Charles Fletcher ,

Thompson Raine ,

Samuel Morton ,

George Reynolds ,

Charles Norton ,

John Bairn ,

William Catchpoole ,

John Dixon ,

James Smith ,

John Harrison ,

William Brazier ,

Joseph Heeney .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

William Pinnock ,

Robert Pedley ,

Samuel Wood ,

William Sheppard ,

Zachariah Sweet ,

William Glendening ,

William Thomas Watson ,

Thomas Craddock ,

James Trotter ,

William Smith ,

George Harlow ,

Thomas Fabey .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 23, 1822.

MAGNAY, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18221023-1

1488. JOHN BENJAMIN BROOKES was indicted for feloniously forging a certain false, forged, and counterfeit endorsement, upon a certain cheque , upon Messrs. Hodsoll's, the words, figures, and names following,

"Seager's bill, Cash 5 l. 10 s., cheque 10 l. - 15 l. 10 s., William Clarke ," with intent to defraud.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same, knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ALLEY, CURWOOD, and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. RICHARD BEMBRIDGE , clerk of the judgments of the Court of Common Pleas, produced the nisi prius record of a cause,

" William Clarke against John Brookes ," for goods sold and delivered. The Plea was the general issue, and verdict for the plaintift 13 l. 5 s. Attorney for the defendant Mr. John Slee Isaacson .

SIR ROBERT BIRNIE , KNT. I produce a letter which was delivered to me in the Office, by a stranger, on the prisoner's second or third examination. I sent for Clarke and asked him if it was his hand-writing; he said, No, but the signature was his.

RICHARD HILL . I am an attorney, and live in Chancery-lane, and was attorney in this cause, and attended the trial. I have a notice of set off, which was produced in the cause - there is a set off, for a bill of Beckenham's; the document was left at my office by a person whom I did not see; it was acted upon on the trial of the cause - the prisoner was present on the trial, also Mr. Isaacson, his attorney. I have the Judge's order. dated the 10th of May, 1822, for the defendant to deliver to the attorney - for the plaintiff's particulars of the set off, within four days - (read.) In pursuance of this order particulars were delivered to me, and the set off brought in in the usual manner, and the writing is the hand-writing of Isaacson's clerk. (The set off was here read.) The prisoner attended the trial himself. I demanded 16 l. 4 s. 6 d., for the plaintiff, and gave evidence of that demand, and the defendant gave evidence of his demand in the set off, and produced a cheque in Court endorsed, to shew that Beckenham's bill -

MR. SERGEANT PELL, (for the prisoner.) Q. Who produced it - A. You did Sir; at the time the counsel was opening his defence on the ground of that cheque - he turned round to Brookes and Isaacson, who sat behind him, and the prisoner delivered the cheque into Mr. Sergeant Pell 's hands.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was any bill of Seager's given in evidence by the defendant - A. I rather think we produced Seager's bill - it was produced to prove that it was given in discharge of Beckenham's bill of 17 l. 9 s. in discharge of the set off. Brookes produced the cheque to shew that Seager's bill was not given in discharge of Beckenham's bill; but that he had discounted it, and the endorsement at the back of it was to shew the manner in which he had discounted the bill. At that time a cause was pending in the King's Bench, between the same parties. I have the writ, declaration, and issue here. The cause of action stated in the declaration is that it was for a bill drawn by Beckenham, on the 22d of October, 1821, accepted by Thomas Griftiths , at two months, for 17 l. 9 s. 6 d. Mr. Isaacson was attorney in this cause also. This appears to be the bill included in the set off in the Common Pleas. The cause in the Common Pleas had been tried on the 12th of January, and two days after I took out a summons before Mr. Justice Best, for the plaintiff to attend next day at two o'clock, to shew cause why the cheque proved on the trial should not he deposited with the clerk of the nisi prius for the defendant and his witnesses to inspect the same. (Summons read.) Isaacson and I attended the return of the summons. I am not certain whether Brookes was there. The cheque was not produced, and his Lordship made an order that the cheque be delivered to Mr. Isaacson, the plaintift's attorney, and that I should be at liberty to take a copy of it, and that Isaacson should produce it at chambers at twenty-four hours notice, to such persons as I wished to inspect it. Isaacson undertook to produce it on the trial of the cause. In pursuance of that order I received at my

house a copy of the cheque, with a letter at the bottom, in the hand-writing of Turner, Isaacson's clerk - it is the same hand-writing as the proceedings in the cause. After this I took out two other summonses; one dated the 26th of June, for Isaacson to attend chambers at eleven o'clock on Friday, to shew cause why he should not produce the cheque mentioned in the order of the 15th - nobody attended that order, and I took out further summonses for Isaacson and the plaintiff to attend, for the same purpose on the 29th; this was a peremptory summons. There was no Judge till the 3d of July, when Isaacson attended before Mr. Justice Best, who heard us both, and then ordered that on Friday next the cheque should be produced to me at chambers. On the Friday following, Isaacson, Brookes, myself, my clerk, and my brother attended. I told his Lordship in their presence that I had received the copy of the cheque in pursuance of his Lordship's former order; but had not been able to see the original - that I had given the names of four persons to attend chambers, to inspect it. Brookes was in hearing all the time. The Judge turned round to Isaacson, and said,

"Where is the original cheque;" Isaacson stated that it was before counsel - the Judge immediately said,

"Well, then you can fetch it in a few minutes;" he hesitated, and then stated to the Judge, that he had delivered it back to Brookes - the Judge turned to Brookes with the copy of the cheque in his hand, and said,

"Is this a copy of the cheque;" Brookes replied

"It is." The Judge said,

"Where is the original;" he paused a moment. The Judge repeated his question - he then said he either was or felt himself in a very serious situation - that he had taken very able advice, and had been advised to destroy the cheque, and had destroyed it. The Judge said, no honourable man could have given such advice, and we left the Judge.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. You have been an attorney many years - A. Thirty years.

Q. Have you ever had any words with Mr. Brookes - A. Never, till on this occasion. I never had anything to do with him till this came into my office.

Q. Since that has there not been circumstances under which you thought Mr. Brookes had used words which irritated you; you thinking you did not deserve them - A. Yes. I have expressed a determination to bring him to public trial. I was examined as a witness for Clarke, against Brookes in the Common Pleas.

Q. Do not you know that Brookes considered your evidence as not true - A. I do not know. I have been threatened, and stopped in the street, and had mobs raised about me. I have been intimidated in all manner of ways. On the 14th I commenced proceedings to get the cheque, and then he charged me with perjury, conspiracy, fraud, and every thing. He threatened me in the public street, to charge me with perjury.

Q. You have stated that Brookes handed over the cheque to his counsel in Court - did you mean to state positively that you saw him deliver it into my hand - A. I am positive, it was handed up to the Judge, and afterwards came into the hands of Clarke's counsel - Clarke saw it; we both saw it. It was afterwards handed to somebody. I never saw the original cheque after I left the Court. No application was made to the Judge to direct it to be impounded.

Q. Is not the action brought by Brookes against Clarke, on the bill of Griffiths still pending - A. It is. I should state that he told the Judge he meant to decline that action. The record has been withdrawn.

Q. Do you remember immediately after the trial, which was on the 12th of June, which party served the other with a summons - A. I did. The first summons was on the 14th.

Q. Look at this summons, which is ours - A. This is dated the 13th. I do not believe it was served. I believe the first summons served on me, was on the 17th, 18th, and 19th. They were in the cause in the King's Bench. I only speak from the papers, and I have but three summonses here - (looking at a paper) - this is my clerk's writing, signed in my name, and by my authority. I believe no summons was served on me before the 17th. The paper which I say is my clerk's writing is dated the 15th of June. I was attending the Judge on the subject of the summons, and this was mentioned.

Q. Is not the paper dated the 15th, which came out of your office, entitled

"Brookes against Clarke" - A. Yes. It is the names of the three clerks referred to in my evidence on the cause. He has previously desired this to be done.

Q. On your oath, before this paper was delivered by you at the Judge's chambers, had not Brookes asked for the names of these very persons, and had you not declined to give them - A. I had. I think this was about the 14th or 15th, after I had taken out the summons to produce the cheque. The request was made to me immediately after the trial. He sent a letter to me for the names - I did not answer the letter. Some conversation took place before Mr. Justice Best, that he had not got the names; I said,

"Here they are."

Q. I ask you whether at the Judge's chambers, you did not decline giving the names - A. I did not. I think it was on the 14th. I did not deny having said Brookes had made admissions before three of my clerks, or anything like it. He asked for my clerks' names, and I gave them to him, and the Judge commended me for it. This was on the 14th or 15th, when I was before the Judge, in consequence of an order in the other cause. I think the summons was taken out on the 14th, and I attended on the 15th, and then this declaration about the clerks took place.

Q. Who was called on the trial to prove Clarke's handwriting - A. Turner. (Looking at a letter) I believe this is the copy of the letter sent me, for the names of the three persons. I have the copy of an affidavit made by Brookes - I think it was sent to me on the 14th or 15th. The draft of an affidavit was delivered to me before I gave him the name - one of the names is my clerk and son. I cannot say whether he was present at the trial - I think he was not.

Q. Was he not examined to prove some notice - A.(Looks at a brief.) I think he was examined to prove the service of a notice - he was not examined to prove the acknowledgement. When we were before the Judge about the cheque, the Judge said he should order it into the hands of Isaacson, and if he did not produce it from time to time, the Court would know how to deal with him.

Q. What may be the amount of your costs in the causes

in which Clarke and Brookes have been engaged - A. I should think upwards of 100 l. up to the middle of June; but my bill is not made out. 50 l. was paid in by Bicknell, on the 17th of June, and afterwards 90 l. I should think I have a claim for 100 l. now.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Have you the money in Court ready to deliver up if the Court order it - A. I have. It came to me from my client, and I thought it my duty to have it here.

Q. You gave evidence of a conversation you had with the prisoner on the trial - A. I did, this account was produced as coming from his office - it is a debtor and creditor's account between him and Clarke. I produced it on the part of Clarke; (read.) It appears by this account that Brookes makes himself a debtor of 13 l. 5 s. 6 d., and that was the verdict. I stated in my evidence that the conversation I had with Brookes was in the presence of three of my clerks. I was not served with the summons dated the 13th. I was attending the Judge on the 15th, and on that occasion the names of my clerks were verbally requested.

WILLIAM DONALD . I am an agent. I sell goods by commission. I was acquainted with Salmon, a Bow-street officer, and recollect his having purchased a horse of me in December, 1821 - he paid me part in money, and a 15 l. bill. I knew Clarke, and applied to him to get it discounted. I accompanied him to the prisoner's office, in Board-court, Bow-street - I stood outside, and gave Clarke the bill to take to him to get discounted. (A bill was here shewn the witness.) This is the bill; it is drawn by me on Salmon, at two months date, dated the 16th of December. He came out to me - the bill was at last discounted. Clarke handed over to me the proceeds of the bill that instant, at his own house. I never left him till he gave me a cheque for 10 l. on Hodsoll's, also three sovereigns, and 15 s. - 25 s. was allowed for discount. During the time I was with him, he had no opportunity of writing anything on the cheque. I cannot say whether, when the cheque was given to me, there were any figures or name at the back of it. He lives in Bow-street, three or four hundred yards from Brookes's house. He had no opportunity while I was with him of making any writing on it. I do not know whether there was any writing on it. The cheque was paid by Messrs. Hodsoll.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long was Clarke in the office with Brookes - A. It might be a quarter of an hour. It was in December. I do not know the date.

GEORGE WARD . I am a hatter, and live in Clare-street, Clare-market. The prisoner called on me, and produced a cheque, on the day before I was to appear at Mr. Justice Best's chambers. He put the cheque into my hands, and asked me if the endorsement on the back was Clarke's hand-writing - I was acquainted with Clarke's writing. There were some figures, and William Clarke , written under them. I told him it was nothing like Clarke's handwriting; that was my opinion on it, and said I would call my wife, who had seen Clarke's hand-writing, to take her opinion on it - she came and said in his presence it was nothing like Clarke's hand-writing, from what she had seen of it. I went several times to Mr. Justice Best's chambers, but did not see the cheque there, or at all after he produced it at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When you took it in your hand you said you thought it was not the handwriting of Clarke - A. The cheque was not; it was drawn by Brookes, on Messrs. Hodsoll's, for 10 l.; the endorsement was very different to Clarke's writing. I said I was satisfied it was not his writing, but would call my wife to hear her opinion.

Q. What opportunities have you of seeing Clarke's writing - A. I had several clubs at his house when he lived in Stanhope-street. I always found his writing a loose straggling hand. He seldom wrote his Christian name at full length - he generally wrote it Wm. I have seen him write William in full on bills. His hand was a very bad one. The endorsement I saw was William at full length under the figures.

Q. Look at this paper, what is your belief as to that - A. This has a great resemblance to Clarke's writing - it is at full length. I should take it to be Clarke's writing; I think it something like it. (Looking at another paper,) This is quite the contrary - I should not take it to be anything like his writing.

Q. I believe Clarke has some defect in his arm - A. He was thrown out of a gig three or four years ago; whether he has recovered I do not know.

THOMAS GOLDSMID . I was examined as a witness in the case of Clarke and Brookes, in the Common Pleas. I was afterwards arrested on the 7th of August for debt, and on the 8th of August I saw the prisoner in Cold Bath-fields prison, (the sheriff's officer had taken my word.) After being in conversation about five minutes, Brookes came down to me from the Governor's house, in company with Clarke. I walked to the end of the garden with him, and he said,

"My life is at stake," or

"My life is in danger; will you swear that is Clarke's hand at the back of the cheque?" I said I had never seen the cheque, and it was impossible for me to say whether it was, I only saw it as it was handed by the counsel to the Judge, at the trial of the cause - he said

"Of course Clarke has told you what I have directed him." I told him I understood from the papers that the cheque had been destroyed, that I had seen Clarke's writing repeatedly, but if I had seen it, and knew it to be his hand writing, I should have said so. About this time Isaacson and one Bates came in, and Mr. Brookes and Isaacson went up to the other side of the Governor's garden, and stopped about five or ten minutes; Brookes then came back to me, and said,

"Any communication you will make to Mr. Isaacson will be the same as making it to me, for really my mind is so agitated I do not know what I am talking of;" (this was between the first and second examination.) I said I wished to do him no injury, and should not have attended if he had not sent for me. I went outside, and soon after Isaacson came.

GRIFFITH HENRY TOOD . I am a cashier at Messrs. Hodsoll, Sterling, and Co's. In December last, the prisoner kept an account at our house. Upon looking at our book, I find on the 18th of December we paid a cheque of his, for 10 l. - the entry in the book is made by Jones, from the cheque itself. The first entry was made in the waste book by Mr. Hodsoll himself.

JOSEPH BICKNALL . I am a clerk at Stretton's brew-house.

Clarke dealt at our house - I have known him four or five years. I accompanied him to Cold Bath-fields one day, where the prisoner was confined. It was in the summer time, after the prisoner's examinations - I saw him in the garden. I neither held out any promise or threat to him - the conversation was not addressed to me. I heard it from beginning to end. Clarke was requested by the prisoner not to attend at Bow-street - Clarke said he would not, provided money was deposited to pay his expences; Brookes agreed to this. I did not hear Brookes say anything particular before this.

Q. Begin the conversation; what first passed - A. Clarke said,

"This is Mr. Bicknall from Stretton's," and that he wished me to come with them for the purpose they had been talking about the last time they met. Brookes said the expences should be paid. Brookes then gave me a 100 l. Bank note, 25 l. more in Bank notes, and a bill for 25 l. at a short date - it was paid into my hands, and an undertaking was given. I paid 50 l. of the money back to Mr. Hills's brother, and the 100 l. I gave Clarke himself - I gave up the undertaking also. This was ten days or a fortnight ago.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. One hundred and fifty pounds was paid over - A. Yes. I paid 50 l. of it to Mr. Hill, brother to the attorney.

RICHARD HILL . (Looking at a letter,) This is the prisoner's writing.

This letter was read: - It was signed J. B., and addressed to Clarke, entreating his assistance on the prisoner's behalf, and to have no communication with Hill.

Another letter, the body of which Mr. Hill deposed to be the prisoner's writing, was read: - It was signed by Clarke, and addressed to Sir Robert Birnie, stating that from circumstances which had come to his knowledge, since the examination, he regretted having gone so far, and begged to be allowed to decline proceeding further.

THOMAS JONES . I am clerk to Messrs. Hodsoll and Sterling. I have the book in which I find a cheque entered - drawn by Brookes, in the name of Clarke, on the 18th of December, 1821, for 10 l. - the entry is my writing. I find no other entry of another 10 l. cheque.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. Is the entry made from the cheque itself, or from any other book - A. From the cheque.

GEORGE HILL . On the 16th of October, I left a copy of this notice at Mr. Hanson's office; he is Mr. Brookes's solicitor. On the 17th, I served a copy on the prisoner in Newgate. I was present at the last attendance on the summons. Mr. Justice Best asked for the cheque, the prisoner hesitated a little while, and said he had not got the cheque; but had taken legal advice, and destroyed it.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Isaacson was present, and had the same opportunity of hearing this as you had - A. Yes.

The notice was here read, for the production of the original cheque.

The copy of the cheque was here put in, and read.

The prisoner, in an exceeding long Defence, stated he had discounted various bills for the prosecutor, Clarke, several of which were dishonoured, and among others he discounted Griffith's; and about a fortnight before that became due, Clarke called with Seager's bill, for 15 l. 10 s., and being told by Turner, the clerk, that the prosecutor was engaged, sent the bill up with a note, desiring 3 l., and stating that the rest would do on the 14th. The prisoner sent down four sovereigns, and on the 17th the prosecutor called and stated that Griffith's bill would not be paid, and asked him to take another, for which the prisoner agreed to do if he approved of it, and between four and five o'clock on the same day Clarke called, and in the back office gave him Salmon's bill, for Griffith's, and then asked for the residue of Seager's bill, and the prisoner gave him 15 s.; he charged 15 s. discount, which with the four sovereigns made cash, 5 l. 10 s., and a cheque for 10 l., and in coming into the front office, the prisoner drew the cheque, endorsed the particulars on it, and handed it to Clarke to sign, which he immediately did; and it was done to show which bill was paid for Griffith's. - The prisoner then made several severe comments on the character of Mr. Hill; stating that he had been advised to do anything to get out of his hands, which was the reason he proposed to compromise the matter, and that he would rather forfeit every farthing he had, than stand at the bar of this Court. - He then stated the case he had to prove, which will appear from the following evidence.

JOHN SLEE ISAACSON . I have known the prisoner two or three years. I have been intimate with him during that time. I have known him I suppose seven years. I was attorney in the case of Clarke against Brookes, and am also his attorney in the case against Clarke, who is now in the King's Bench, for trial. My offices were at his house in Broad-court. He occasionally discounts bills for persons. I know Clarke. I was present at Brookes's trial. I recollect a cheque produced, drawn by Brookes, on his bankers, with the endorsement in question on it. I think it was Turner, who swore to the hand-writing of the name of Clarke - Turner is a clerk to me, as well as Brookes. Clarke was present at the trial. I do not think any questions were put to any witness tending to prove the name William Clarke was a forgery; it formed part of Brookes's case. If any such questions had been put to any witness, I believe I must have heard it. The cheque was handed publicly about the Court - I think after it was done with, it was handed at the end of the trial by Mr. Hill to Brookes. I believe Hill made no objection to the cheque. (Looks at the summons dated the 13th of June,) This was obtained by Brookes - I did not serve it, or attend any Judge on this summons. I attended the summons on the 15th, at the time Hill produced this paper. Hill attended in consequence of a summons, and produced the paper with the witnesses's names. I understood from him, that he attended in consequence of the summons. I believe Turner had taken the draft of an affidavit to Hill before that. I attended Mr. Justice Best's chambers on one or two occasions, and was there when application was made to Mr. Brookes to produce the cheque. I stood close to the Judge's table, and heard all that passed - Hill applied for the cheque, and it was produced, and the Judge ordered a copy of it to be delivered to Hill, and that he should have an opportunity of inspecting the original. Mr. Hill afterwards took out a summons for it to be produced before three or four persons - we did not attend the first summons for some days, and then Mr. Hill made an appointment, and we attended. Brookes then refused to produce the

cheque; he said he was advised not to produce it, and that he did not intend to go on with the action, and should not produce it - if anything more had been said, I must have heard it. I do not recollect that he said anything else. I do not recollect that he said he had destroyed it. Since the prisoner's committal I have had frequent conversations with Clarke on this business. I am acquainted with Brookes's writing. (Looking at the letter written to Sir Robert Birnie .) He is one of my clerks. This letter is not his writing. I always found him a very honest character.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are an attorney - A. Yes. My office was in Broad-court, in Brookes's house. He has been my clerk since the 10th of October, 1821. I live in Holborn, and have an office there now. I have lived there since October, 1821. My name is now off Brookes's door; it was put on last April or May; I carried on business till then without any name. I took my name off a fortnight ago. There was no motion pending in Court about me and Brookes when the name was put on the door. He and Turner, his brother-in-law, were my clerks at the time. I swear they were my clerks. I did some business for Clarke, the prosecutor, in the case of Sutherland; I never saw Clarke on the business, it was done by Brookes, my managing clerk. I was present at the trial in the Common Pleas; an account was produced, (looking at it,) it is in Turner's writing. I was not present when it was made; it was produced in evidence, on behalf of the plaintiff. One Astley was called as a witness, and one Mann - I do not recollect that they proved admissions on the part of Brookes - I will not swear they did not, but I do not recollect it. (Looking at a letter,) This is Turner's writing. I dare say it was sent from my office; it is done by my authority, in consequence of the Judge's order. (The letter inclosing a copy of the cheque, was here read.) I was a witness on the trial. After the trial was over, the cheque remained in Brookes's possession - he produced it before the Judge; he did not deliver it to me afterwards. Mr. Justice Best directed it to be delivered into my hands, to be produced at the trial of the cause in the King's Bench, and at chambers. I requested Brookes to deliver it to me; he refused. I do not know whether it is really destroyed or not. I do not recollect hearing Mr. Justice Best say he believed no honourable man would advise the destruction of the cheque. I did not hear Brookes say he felt himself in difficulty. I took out a summons on the 12th, for Mr. Hill to give up the names of the three clerks. There is no endorsement of service at the back of the summons.

MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. You are under recognizance to attend here - A. Yes. Brookes was my managing clerk - I did not live in the house, and it was necessary for him to transact business with many clients, whom I did not see.

JAMES TURNER . In December, 1821, I was one of Mr. Isaacson's clerks, and Brooks was also his clerk, and had the principal management of the business. I know William Clarke . Sometime in December, in an afternoon, Clarke came to Mr. Isaacson's office, and brought a bill. I do not recollect rightly what bill it was, but I think I should know it if I saw it - (looking at Seager's bill,) I think this is the bill, which was given me by Mr. Clarke, to be discounted by Mr. Brookes. He was up stairs when Clarke brought it - I took it up to him, and a note written by Clarke.

Q. How came he to write a note - A. He called and asked if Mr. Brookes was at home; I said he was engaged with company up stairs - he then said,

"Ask him if he can let me have 3 l. or 4 l. on this bill," and that the remainder would do in the course of a week or two. I then took up a note from Clarke to Mr. Brookes; (looking at one,) this is the paper I took the bill up in.

(read.)

Sir, I should be much obliged to you if you will have the goodness to let me have 3 l., on account of the inclosed; the other part will do for me on the 14th of this month. I am, &c.,

W. CLARKE.

JAMES TURNER re-examined. I took up this paper, with the bill inclosed in it, to Mr. Brookes; he sent down four sovereigns, which I gave to Clarke, and he went away. I saw him again at Mr. Brookes's on the 17th of December - Brookes was up stairs when he came. I do not recollect Clarke's bringing anything then. I went up to Mr. Brookes, and he came down; Clarke was then in the front office; they then went into the back office; I did not follow them; they returned into the front office again. I know Arthur; he came down stairs into the front office, while they were in the back office. When they returned into the front office, they found Arthur there - he kept his bonds in the iron-chest, with Mr. Brookes's permission; he is a broker. I do not exactly recollect what passed when they met in the front office, but Mr. Brookes said something about paying the 1 l. 10 s. I cannot exactly recollect the particulars. Brookes came to his desk, took out his cheque book, and wrote a cheque for 10 l. - I saw the cheque. He gave the cheque to Clarke, and said,

"Clarke, you had better endorse this cheque;" (looking at the duplicate of the cheque,) that is the hand-writing of Mr. Brookes. I saw him tear the cheque off to give to Clarke - I saw him also write something in the margin of the cheque at the time. I do not know whether this was before he tore off the cheque, but it was at the time.

Q. Are you certain he said,

"Clarke, you had better endorse the cheque" - A. I am; I have not the least doubt of it, and he did endorse it - Arthur was present during the whole transaction, and after it was over, said something to him about brandy. Clarke went away with the cheque. I know that Griffith's bill was dishonoured.

Q. Look at this account, do you know whose writing it is - A. Yes; I wrote it. (This was the account produced on the part of the prosecution.) Clarke came to me with one Mann, for a settlement of the account, between him and Brookes, it was in February last, and at Clarke's desire. I wrote this account by his dictation - Brookes said it was not correct when I took it up stairs to him. I returned with it to Clarke, and told him Brookes said it was not correct, but if he would look in in two or three days he would make a settlement with him. I laid the paper on the desk, and Clarke took it away with him. I think it was the day after the trial that I took a letter from Brookes to Mr. Hill - (looks at it,) this is it, (read.) (This letter was dated the 13th of June, requesting the names of the three clerks, as before stated.) Mr. Hill did not give the names up in consequence of this letter; in consequence of

which, I took out a summons the same afternoon, and served a copy of the summons myself that evening. I believe it was to attend next day, but I did not attend the summons myself. A copy of an affidavit was served on Hill that day or the day after. He attended the summons. (Looking at the letter addressed to Sir Robert Birnie ,) The body of this letter is certainly not in Brookes's writing. (Looking at two letters,) I have no doubt but these are both Clarke's writing.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You have been employed by the prisoner, in what capacity - A. I am clerk to Isaacson. Mr. Brookes managed the business. I never knew that the prisoner was an attorney, nor ever heard that he passed as one. Clarke has employed him repeatedly since I have been in the office; but whether he employed him as an attorney or not, I do not know. I have lived there two years. Isaacson has an office in Holborn now, but had not in December last. The account produced is in my hand-writing; but I wrote it by Clarke's desire.

Q. Did you not bring it down stairs, and deliver it yourself as a settled account to Mann - A. I did not. I was examined at Westminster Hall; the original cheque was produced there. I think I swore that I believed it was Clarke's writing.

Q. You have swore to day you saw Clarke write the endorsement - A. Yes, I did. I was not asked at Westminster Hall, if I saw him write it. I attended the first and third examinations at Bow-street - I was not summoned to attend the second, and did not go, as there was nobody to attend to the business. If I had been wanted I could have been fetched in a moment. I was in and out most all day.

Q. Did you keep out of the way - A. No. The copy of the cheque was produced at the first examination. I said I had no recollection of making the copy; but it was very similar to my hand-writing. I at first said I did not know whose writing it was, and that I did not recollect writing it. The examination was between six and seven o'clock in the evening. I did not know where Brookes was - I wanted to see him particularly. The servant said he was gone with Salmon to Bow-street. I went into the office and found him in custody, and was so completely astonished I scarcely know what I said, for I had not been in the place above ten minutes before I was examined.

MR. SERGEANT PELL. Q. You were taken under circumstances of great surprise at Bow-street - A. Yes. I had not the slightest reason to expect I should find him in custody, and it agitated me.

COURT. Q. By whom were you paid your wages - A. Sometimes by Brookes, and sometimes by Isaacson. I was paid weekly, and Brookes was paid weekly.

HENRY ARTHUR. I am a broker of the City. On the 17th of December, I lived at Mr. Brookes's house, in Broad-court. I had lived there about four years. I had the privelege of all the house, and slept in the top room, and had the use of the iron-chest in the front office. I have seen Clarke. I saw him in Brookes's house, some days before Christmas day, it was about five o'clock in the evening. Mr. Turner was sitting in the front office. I was putting some Spanish bonds in the iron-case, and Brookes came from the back office, followed by Clarke. The desk is divided by a railing - the iron-chest is outside the rail. Turner sat opposite Mr. Brookes, within the rail. Brookes sat down within the rail, on a stool - Clarke stood at the corner of a desk by Brookes, within the rail, and about the length of the desk, which came about a yard from him. Brookes was writing - I could not see what he was writing. While he was writing, I heard him tell Clarke to sign the back of the cheque; Clarke leant over as if he was signing - I did not see a pen in his hand, as his back was turned to me. As he was going away, I told him to let me have a gallon of brandy as good as that he had let Mr. Brookes have - he said he could not warrant what he had, but he expected some from Sir Robert Bennett 's, a wine-merchant, at Vauxhall, and when it came he would send it. He sent some afterwards. I have known Brookes about eight years, and always found him honest.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You saw Clarke and Brookes come out of the front office - A. I did. I saw no cheque-book. I am certain Brookes told Clarke to sign the back of the cheque, not the back of the bill. I attended at Westminster Hall to prove this.

MARTIN NOWLAND BATES . (Looking at the letter written to Sir Robert Biruie ,) The body of this letter was written by me. I have been intimate with Brookes for five or six years - he is a respectable man.

MR. ALLEY. Q. What way of life are you in - A. An artist; employed by people. Mr. Bish employs me now. I have not done much lately, as my health is bad. I live in Upper John-street, Fitzroy-square. I have occasionally lived at a house kept by the prisoner's mother, in Lower Newman-street. I never received anything from her for any service. The last work I carried home was to Mr. Power, a music-seller, in the Strand.

MR. HOWARD. I am an attorney. (Looking at the two signatures, W. Clarke, referred to in Ward's evidence.) I have frequently seen Clarke write, and believe both these to be his writing, certainly. He has been a client of mine.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You believe them both to be his writing - A. I do.

Q. Look at the back of this bill - A. I believe that to be his writing. I think I should take that bill as his endorsement. (This was the bill for which the cheque was given.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-2

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24.

1489. ROBEN BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , three live fowls, price 4 s. , the property of James Gough .

BENJAMIN GOUGH . I am the brother of James Gough , a timber-merchant , who lives in Shoreditch . Manley, the watchman, brought three live fowls to the house, before six o'clock in the morning of the 4th of August. The prisoner was in custody. They were kept in a hen-house - I had seen them safe the evening before, about dusk, as they were going to roost. There were six of them; they used

to go out into the street - they were all safe then. William-street is parallel with the timber-yard.

MICHAEL MANLEY . I am a watchman. On Sunday morning, about five minutes before five o'clock, I heard watch called; I went up, and saw the prisoner running with this bag in his hand - I pursued, and overtook him. and asked what he had in it; he said fowls, and I found three live fowls in it. He said a boy gave them to him; he did not know who he was, or where he lived. I took him to the watch-house.

RICHARD SPRINGER . I am a bed-post carver, and live in John-street, Curtain-road, nearly opposite Gough's. I was looking out of the window a little before five o'clock in the morning and saw the prisoner and another man driving the fowls from William-street, into Le Blanc-buildings, which is no thoroughfare. The prisoner went down the buildings to lay hold of them, and the other stood at the entrance to prevent them from getting out; the prisoner had a bag; when he went out of the buildings I saw he had got them in the bag. They came by my house, and I charged them with stealing the fowls; they denied it. I called watch, and they ran off. The watchman took the prisoner; the other escaped. I was undressed, and could not follow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-3

1490. MARY MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on 3d of August , two tea-caddies, value 4 s.; four cruets, value 1 s., and one blanket, value 5 s., the goods of William Robinson , in a lodging-room let to her and Susan Medway , and one shawl, value 3 s. , his property.

SARAH ROBINSON . I am the wife of William Robinson , and live in School House-lane, Stepney . On the 27th of July, the prisoner and another young woman, named Susan Medway , came and took a lodging together, at 5 s. per week; they continued in the lodging until the Saturday following, and then both left together, without notice. The tea-caddy was in the room, but was not let with the lodging. When I went into the room, I missed this property - I had lent the other woman the shawl. I did not see the prisoner again till to day. I am sure she is the woman. They did not pay for the lodging except 3 s. earnest.

LUCY PLOWMAN . I am a broker, and live in High-street, Shadwell. I bought two tea-caddies and four small cruets of the prisoner. I have known her all her life - it was about half-past five o'clock on Saturday afternoon, the 3d of August. Robinson came in and claimed them in half an hour.

JOHN MURRANT . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the Thames Police Office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-4

1491. MARY MORRIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , three silver spoons, value 7 s.; one sheet, value 3 s.; one blanket, value 2 s., and one towel, value 6 d., the goods of Thomas Dawson , in a lodging let to her and Susan Medway .

MARY DAWSON . I am the wife of Thomas Dawson , who rents a house at Wapping . On the 3d of August, the prisoner and Medway came to lodge with us - I let them the bed-room, dining-room, and the use of a kitchen, at 10 s. 6 d. a week. The prisoner was to pay the rent, but the lodging was for their joint use. They left on the Monday morning, without notice - they went out very fast, which made me suspect them. I ran up, and found the door locked and the key gone - I got another key, and found the cupboard door locked; I opened it, and missed a table spoon and two tea spoons, and from the bed-room, I missed the other things. They were let with the lodging. I have recovered none of them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-5

1492. WILLIAM FRY and PHILIP WARD were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Paterson , about eight o'clock in the night of the 4th of October , and stealing one pair of boots, value 3 s. , the goods of William Paterson .

WILLIAM PATERSON . I am a boot and shoe maker , and live in the Broadway, Westminster . On the 4th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in my kitchen, which joins the shop, and hearing a noise, I went to the door, and somebody exclaimed,

"They are robbing your shop." There was a mob at the door. I went round to the window outside - (a pane of glass had been cracked, and mended with putty,) a piece of it had been moved on one side. I missed a pair of lady's boots, which had been near the pane - I had seen them there a little before three o'clock. The prisoner Fry was brought to me in two minutes by Hill; he was accused by Ryan, of putting his hand through my windows, and denied it, and said he had just come up Tothill-street, which is at the corner of my house.

JOSEPH HILL . I am a constable. I came up to the prosecutor's shop almost immediately after this happened. Paterson said he had been robbed - Ryan pointed out Fry, who was mixing in the crowd. I took him, but found nothing on him. I did not see Ward there; I took him on the Sunday, in the Almonry.

SAMUEL RYAN . I was eleven years old in September last. On the night of the 4th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, I was running by the shop, and heard the noise of the glass breaking. I saw Ward with his hand in the window, and he had the glass in his hand. Fry and Ward were both standing together, and then they went to a post and stopped - Fry then went to the window, put his hand in, and took something out, and put it under his coat; he went over the way. I could not see what it was. I was just by the curb when I heard the glass break. Fry went over to the baker's shop, and gave the things from under his coat to another boy, (not Ward) - he came back, put his hand in the window again, and took something out; I could not tell what, and then went over and gave it to the same boy. I saw the window was quite close, and puttied the day before. There was a candle in the window.

I did not know them before. I am sure they are the boys.

WILLIAM HATTON . I am eleven years old. I was by Mr. Paterson's shop on this night, going on an errand. I saw Ward put his hand into the window; he then went into the middle of the road, and called another boy to him, who is not here. Fry followed him over to a tobacco shop - they stopped there; then both the prisoners came back to the window, and stood there. I saw no more. I did not see them take anything out. I did not see Fry's hand in the window. I was there all the time they were.

Q. Have not you said you saw Ward put his hand into the window, and take something out, but what you could not say - A. Yes. I did not see him take anything out.

FRY'S Defence. I had just come from my master's on an errand, when the gentleman caught hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-6

1493. DAVID JENKINS and THOMAS PROUD were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , at St. John's, Westminster, seven gowns, value 4 l.; two petticoats, value 8 s.; one scarf, value 10 s., and three pieces of patchwork, value 5 s., the goods of Louisa Owen , in the dwelling-house of Margaret Mounsell , widow.

LOUISA OWEN . I live in St. Ann's-lane, Westminster . I live servant with my aunt, Margaret Mounsell , who is a widow, and rents the house. On Thursday, the 3d of October, I lost a hair trunk out of the second floor room, containing the articles stated in the indictment. I saw the trunk about five o'clock. I went to bed about nine o'clock, and it was gone. Proud was at the house about four o'clock that day, and Jenkins about three - I did not see them after four o'clock. I have found none of my property. Some little things were found in Jenkins's cellar the same night, about a quarter before ten o'clock; I was present when they were found - it consisted of patchwork, which had been in my trunk; they are here. I produce part of them - here is a piece, which I had a gown of myself. Jenkins was at the watch-house when it was found; I had caused him to be apprehended at the Castle, public-house, Broadway. Jenkins's mother keeps the house the pieces were found in, and he cuts wood in the cellar with Proud; the things were worth 10 l. I I was at home from five till nine o'clock, and heard nobody come in or go out; a rope was found at the top of the house, to which they must have slung the box, and let it down.

MARGARET MOUNSELL . I am a widow, and keep the house; it is in the parish of St. John, Westminster, I believe - I pay taxes to St. John's and St. Margaret's.

WILLIAM GOUGH . I am patrol. I locked up Jenkins on the night of the 3d of October, and then went to a cellar where he and Proud chopped wood, at No. 37, Orchard-street, and found these bits of patchwork, which I have kept ever since.

THOMAS PACE . I belong to Queen's-square. I was with Jenkins at Turpin's, in Dartmouth-street, a little after six o'clock in the morning, in company with Greenhill the watch-house keeper. Jenkins took us there, to shew us where the property was, but we found none of it; he pointed out the person, to whom he said he sold it. I examined the premises; and on the front garret parapet were marks of boy's feet, and marks on the wall where the box had been let down - the prisoner's feet are about the same size.

LOUISA OWEN re-examined. I saw the marks on the parapet of my window; I swear to this patchwork.

JENKINS'S Defence. Proud was not in my company all the evening.

PROUD'S Defence. We happened to be in the public-house; but I was not in his company.

JENKINS - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing only . - Confined One Year .

PROUD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18221023-7

1494. SARAH PERRY was indicted for that she being servant to Edward Byers , did steal on the 17th of October , three gowns, value 30 s.; six caps, value 48 s., and one pelisse, value 20 s., his property, in the dwelling-house of William Odell .

EDWARD BYERS . I lodge in Trevess-square, Westminster ; the house is William Odell 's. Prisoner was servant of all work to me for about three weeks; she slept in the front kitchen, which is below stairs; there is an area in front, secured by iron pallisades. On Thursday, the 17th of this month, about half past four o'clock in the morning, my family were disturbed by the prisoner (I and my wife slept in the first floor back room); she said there was a thief in the house, who had been up to her beside, on the side adjoining the kitchen door. I went down with my wife and Mr. and Mrs. Odell, and found the door closed as it was the night before; the kitchen window, which opens downwards, was partly open. I found nobody in the house. There was a table near the window, which was white deal - had any one come in with dirty feet, there must have been impressions on it, but there were none, nor any marks on the cill, either inside or outside. On going into the kitchen, the clothes which had been washed the preceding day hung on the horse; and on enquiring of her what was stolen, she said she had ironed three dresses of my wife's, three lace caps, and two or three night caps, and hung them on the horse last night; and that the thief must have taken them. I immediately went to the watchman, who was calling half-past four o'clock; he came in, and stated in her presence, that at four o'clock, on going his rounds, he observed the kitchen shutters open, a candle burning, and the clothes horse covered with clothes. I examined the doors, and finding them all secure, I suspected her, and gave her in charge; she was taken to the watch-house; she was undressed when she came to my room. My wife and myself and Mr. Odell's servant made search, and on examining the prisoner's bed, between the bed and sacking, we found the identical articles stated in the indictment (which she had stated to be stolen), put up in a bundle - the caps were lace. My wife found a pelisse in another part of the bed. When the prisoner was given in charge, she was sitting on the bed, on the spot under which the bundle was found, and expressed great reluctance to quit that place.

MRS. BYERS. I am the wife of the last witness. This property is ours. When my husband went to the watch-house with the prisoner, I remained in the kitchen some

time, and then we all went up stairs; we did not put the bundle in the bed. I had missed the pelisse two or three days before from the drawer, and told her; but upon her expressing a doubt of having even seen it, I thought I might have put it in a trunk up stairs. I had worn the other things while she lived with us, but had not seen the pelisse. The property is worth about 30 s. second hand.

SOPHIA OAKLEY . I was servant to Mr. Odell at the time. I searched the place with the prosecutor, and saw the things found - I never put them there; they were all rolled up in a bundle, except the pelisse. I used to go into the kitchen now and then. On the night before the robbery, she asked me to sleep with her, and said something came over her that the house would be robbed that night - I declined; but said I would tell the watchman to watch the house - she said,

"No, nonsense." I told her to bar the window up; she said, Oh! no, how was she to get up in the morning.

Prisoner. Q. Did I never ask you to sleep with me before - A. Yes. I went to her bed one night, because my own was hard, and I could not sleep. I had nothing to do with the wash.

HENRY RANCE . I am a watchman. The house is in my beat. Byers called me at half-past four o'clock - I went into the house. I had been in my proper place all night - my box is near the house. I saw no attack made on the house; I should have heard it if any had been made. I observed before four o'clock, that the window was open, and a light burning and the clothes on the horse, before the fire. When I went into the house, the prisoner said there had been a thief there - she said she saw him, and that she supposed he came in by the window; that he was a stout jolly lad, and that he came close to her bed-side; that she did not see him go away, for she was alarmed, and ran up stairs to call her master. She mentioned what was missing. It was a dirty night, and nobody could have come in without making a dirt there - on the cill and table there was none. I took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you had been to Brompton-row - A. That is in my beat, and is not twenty yards off. I was calling half-past four.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-8

1495. WILLIAM CROUCHER and CHARLES HENNINGTON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Smith , about the hour of seven in the forenoon, of the 2d of October , at St. Martin in the fields, (no person being therein,) and stealing therein one coat, value 50 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 30 s.; one pin, value 5 s.; one shawl, value 5 s.; eight spoons, value 30 s.; one crown; three half-crowns; twelve shillings, and seven sixpences , the property of Daniel O'Brien .

SUSANNAH O'BRIEN. I am the wife of Daniel O'Brien; we live in Blue-cross-street, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields ; we rent the kitchen; William Smith is the landlord, and lives in the house. On Wednesday, the 2d of October, I went out about a quarter after seven o'clock in the morning; I left my daughter Mary Ann Isaacs in the house; I returned about half-past eight; Isaacs was not there - she returned in quarter of an hour; I then got in, as she had the key. I found my husband's large chest broken open, and a large drab great coat and the rest of the property stated in the indictment gone. There were three half-crowns and one crown among the silver. I have found nothing since. I found a milk kettle left on the table in the kitchen, which was not there before. When I went out that morning, I saw the two prisoners standing in the street against a post opposite, at the corner, four or five doors from each other. Hennington stood at the post, with the same sort of kettle in his hand as that I found in the kitchen. I had seen them waiting about there three mornings before, on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday; they were dressed like milkmen; Croucher had a blue apron, the other had a dark blue coat, and a smart orange-coloured handkerchief on; I took particular notice of him being so smart. My daughter called my attention to them on the Monday morning, and as I was going round with my milk on Wednesday, about a quarter of an hour after I left home (about half-past seven o'clock) I saw Hennington running down Hemming's-row, with a light great coat on, like the one missed. I did not see Croucher then.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Croucher had a blue apron on, that is all that made him look like a milkman - A. Yes; we called them the dandy milkmen. Hennington was dressed genteelly, and stood about twelve yards off, with a kettle in his hand, of the same size as that I found in the room; there are many kettles of that size. I afterwards saw him running with the coat on, and am sure of his person, for I particularly noticed him; it was a large drab old-fashioned coat, and too big for him; I saw his face, and also saw that he had the same orange-coloured handkerchief on, and knew him again. The kitchen has a door leading into the passage, communicating with the rest of the house; Mrs. Smith and her two children were in the house at the time.

COURT. Q. What is the value of the coat? A. My husband gave three guineas and a half for it; it is worth 2 l. - he had worn it very little. The other things are worth 65 s.

MARY ANN ISAACS . I am the daughter-in-law of Mrs. O'Brien. I went out on Wednesday morning, about a quarter past seven o'clock, about two minutes after my mother; I locked the back door twice, and left the key inside; the front door was latched - I left it fast; I returned about half-past seven o'clock; I looked down the cellar, to see if there was any customer - I saw two men open the street door of the house and come out; I looked very hard at them - the prisoners are the men. Croucher had a black waistcoat, black silk handkerchief, and dark blue coat and blue trowsers; Hennington had a darkish brown old fashioned great coat on. They said nothing to me. I watched them up the street, and went down into the kitchen directly, and found the back door wide open, and a strange milk can on the table. My father-in-law's chest was broken open. I immediately missed his coat, also my own shawl out of my box. I went and met my mother and told her. I did not suspect the men then. The great coat one had on was like my father-in-law's. I have seen the prisoners several times before - I saw Croucher on the Monday morning before the robbery with a milk kettle in his hand - I

saw him several times in the course of Monday, and many times on the Tuesday. I saw Hennington also on the Tuesday; he had a coloured silk handkerchief on. I saw them together several times on the Monday and Tuesday - I did not know where they lived, or their names.

Cross-examined. Q. It was an old great coat - A. No, an old fashioned one - he never wore it since I have been with him, which is two years. I saw Croucher on Monday, going along with the milk can in his hand, and Hennington following him - I do not say they were together then. The back door leads to the kitchen stairs.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 3d of October. in consequence of information, I apprehended both the prisoners about three o'clock in the afternoon, in Vine-street, Chandos-street, in the street; they were in company with a third person; both had black silk handkerchiefs. I searched them, and on Hennington I found an orange-coloured silk handkerchief. I got the milk can from the premises. I was fetched directly, and saw it found.

SUSANNAH O'BRIEN . That is the colour of the handkerchief Hennington had on.

FRANCES SMITH . My husband rents the house in Blue-cross-street. On the morning before the robbery (Tuesday) I saw two men come up the back way from the kitchen; I looked at them - they were respectably dressed, and not knowing but they belonged to the people in the kitchen, I took no further notice; they appeared to be exactly like the prisoners. Next morning I went to the shop door to look after my son, who was gone on an errand, and saw the same two men going down the front way into the kitchen down the cellar stairs, and about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after I heard of the robbery. I cannot swear positively to the prisoners - they were very much like them; neither had a great coat on; I did not notice their dresses particularly, only they appeared well dressed.

Cross-examined. Q. You thought them well dressed - A. Yes. The prisoners appear very much like them.

RICHARD DAWKINS . I am a milkman, and live at Plumtree-street, Bloomsbury. On the 2d of October, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock in the morning I was in Hemming's-row, St. Martin's-lane; it is near Bluecross-street; I saw two men, one had a blue coat and trowsers, and the other a large drab great coat on. I heard a great rattling in their pockets as they passed me, which appeared like silver or money of some sort. I will not swear it was the prisoners.

THOMAS EVANS . I am a milkman. The milk kettle produced is mine. I have known Croucher five years. I cannot say he had the kettle, but I lodged at his father's house at one time, and sometimes I lent him a can like this. I cannot say whether he always returned it. I have lost ten or twenty cans in the course of the year.

Cross-examined. Q. He was apprenticed to his uncle - A. I understand so. I left his father's house three years ago; I was a milkman then, and am so now. I sold some of my old cans to a Mrs. Lizard, but not this, as none that I sold her had my name on.

CROUCHER'S Defence. I was in a different place at the time.

HENNINGTON'S Defence. I was not in that part of the town.

GEORGE CROUCHER . I am the prisoner's father. He was apprenticed to his uncle, who is a glazier to the Corporation of London. He was with him nearly seven years - they separated four or five months ago, having some altercation; he has chiefly lived me since. On Wednesday morning, the 2d of October, he came home about half-past six o'clock - he had not slept at home. I sat in his company from that time till twenty minutes before seven o'clock. I live in Castle-court, Strand. He then went out, and returned about ten minutes before eight o'clock. He was dressed in a blue coat and round hat. I have seen Hennington before, but never knew my son to be acquainted with him. My son sometimes worked with me, and at times had jobs of his own. I am a mangler and porter. He was with me on Tuesday, till twelve or one o'clock, all the morning. He did not get up till eight, and was at home on Monday till twelve o'clock. He slept at home on Sunday and Monday nights.

JAMES PRESCOD . I am a butcher, and live in Croucher's house. I remember something about the day this robbery took place. I believe it was on a Wednesday. I saw Croucher in the passage with his father, about a quarter before seven o'clock. He bore an honest industrious character. I did not see him after a quarter to seven o'clock; we walked together from the house at that time, to near where I work; I got there about ten minutes to seven o'clock. I work at Collinson's, Holborn, near the Turnstile. I then left him, and cannot say which way he went.

Another witness gave Croucher a good character.

FRANCES SMITH re-examined. It was between seven and eight o'clock on Tuesday morning that I saw two men come out of the kitchen. I live a very little way from Castle-court, Strand.

CROUCHER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

HENNINGTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18221023-9

1496. WILLIAM HOLLAND and JOHN BARNETT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Clayton , about the hour of seven in the night of the 20th of September , at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES CLAYTON . I keep the Old George, public-house, in Oxford-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On Friday, the 20th of September, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, (I am certain about the time,) I was standing at my bar with the servant at my side, in the usual course of my business - two persons came in; my lamps were alight in all part of the house, and the street lamps also.

Q. Suppose you had gone out and seen your wife or son twenty yards off, should you have known them - A. No, not by the daylight. Two persons came into my house to the front bar - the front door is in Oxford-street; I have also a side entrance in Old George-yard, the entrance to Mr. Bushnell's coach-yard. Customers come in at the front door, but some come in at the side, as well as the lodgers,

I never recollect seeing either of the two men before. Barnett was one of them. My servant was in the room last before the alarm. My bedroom is the first floor back room; I have a contrivance by which if any one enters that room a bell rings violently in my bar. Nobody but my family have a right to go into the room - the key hangs in the bar. While the two men were drinking in the bar the bell rang, and in consequence of what my servant said I ran immediately up stairs to my bed-room, and met Holland four or five yards from the door, on the third step of the stairs. I did not know him before; I could not see his face; I demanded to know who he was; I believe he said,

"Who are you?" or

"What is it to you?" Upon which I said,

"Somebody has entered my room, and you are the first man I met, and I will secure you." On my seizing him, he caught hold of my collar and a struggle ensued; we came a few steps down, and I called for a light; my servant immediately left the bar, and brought me a candle, and while I was struggling, the other two men, whom I had left at the bar, passed my servant, and I was collared by some person behind, who pulled me and Holland down the stairs together; we fell down together, and the third man knocked the candle out of the servant's hand just before we fell. Holland immediately got on his feet, and made out at the side door; I started the very moment after him. I was on my feet as soon as him, and was never above half a yard from him; he turned out into Oxford-street, then to the left hand, ran against a person, and I caught him, and he was secured. I took him back into my parlour, and said I suspected I had been robbed. Upon going up into my bed-room with a candle, I found the door open - nothing was gone. I returned down stairs, and fastened my side door, and left two persons to guard it. I then went to the bar with a large stick, and was bolting the front door in Oxford-street. I heard a scuffle behind me in the bar, and saw Barnett struggling with two or three men - he had a stick in his hand - he was secured. I did not see him searched.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you sure you never lost sight of Holland - A. Never. I have six or seven lodgers; the side-door is for their use, and persons coming to them. A bookbinder lodged with me - he died six weeks before; his name was taken off the door two days before the transaction. Holland said he had been up stairs after the bookbinder, but did not know his name: his room was on the same floor as my bed-room. I have but one staircase.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long were Barnett and the other man at the bar before the bell rang - A. Three or four minutes; my servant had given them a glass of rum and water - the other man asked me to drink. I cannot say who the persons were who came behind when I was struggling with Holland.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How far is the bookbinder's door from yours - A. Nearly opposite; his widow remained there, and was at home at the time; she has moved now. Some implements of housebreaking were brought to me from the parlour afterwards.

COURT. Q. Suppose the door had been left open half an inch, if any person gave it a shove, would the bell ring - A. Yes, my Lord. I do not think it could have been left ajar; I had not been up there after eleven o'clock. The bell does not ring when the door shuts; there were no marks of violence on the door, but by some means the bolt was put back.

MARY HERSLOPE . I am in Mr. Clayton's service as barmaid. On the 20th of September I was in my master's bed-room, at six o'clock in the evening; I put the bell spring on the door when I came out, locked the door after me, and took the key down, and hung it up in the bar - I am sure I locked it. I was in the bar when the bell rang; I had been out of the bar for a few minutes before that, but when the bell rang, the key was still where I had hung it. I did not see the two persons come in to drink. When the bell rang, my master went up stairs - he called for a light - I went towards the stairs with a candle. At that time Barnett and another man stood at the bar - they both passed me in the passage, and the other man, who has escaped, knocked the light out of my hand; and before that, Barnett ran on the stairs, and took my master by the collar, and pulled him down, and then the candle was knocked out. I saw no more - I went to the bar. Barnett came and paid me for the rum and water - I took the money. I saw Holland brought back; Barnett stood at the bar then, and did not offer to run away.

COURT. Q. The front door was open all that time - A. It was not fastened. Barnett remained at the bar four or five minutes before Holland was brought back. My master went to the door to fasten it; Barnett went and held up a stick to strike him, but was prevented by somebody who was by - he was taken into the parlour.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. He paid for his rum and water and was going away, and your master stopped him - A. Yes; he held his stick up; he did not attempt to do any thing before my master endeavoured to stop him. I told the Magistrate about Barnett's collaring my master on the stairs; they did not say they had come to help him. I should think the stairs are about a yard wide. I stood at the foot of the stairs (not on them) when the man passed me, and knocked the light out - it was not done by accident. I know it was dark at the time; for I had been at the front door just before, and it was quite pitch dark.

Q. Then inside the house, with the candle put out, how could you see - A. There was a light from the bar. I left the room about six o'clock - the alarm was above an hour after.

COURT. Q. Did not you say, when you were examined before, that you had not been out of the bar from the time you locked the door, till it happened - A. Not that I know of. My master's back was towards Barnett when he raised the stick to strike him; also when he went up stairs to pull him down.

JOSEPH DOWNES ALLEN . I am a Clerk in the Bank of England. On the 20th of September, a little past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Oxford-street, coming from the city; I went into Clayton's house; it was dark in the street - I should think it was a quarter or twenty minutes past seven o'clock; there was not sufficient light for one man to know the countenance of another in the street; it had been dusk for forty minutes before I went in. My attention was attracted by a crowd round the prosecutor's house; and on going in, there was a great confusion inside. I saw Holland in the parlour, sitting near the window, with

his right hand towards the window; and while he sat there he took a letter out of his pocket, which he was going to tear up; some persons prevented him, and in the mean time I heard something drop from him. I said to the persons about me,

"Take care of your pockets;" and a short time after that, Barnett was in the room, and I saw him take something off the table, as I thought. I tapped the landlord on the shoulder, and in consequence of what I said to him he (the landlord) immediately went out of the bar towards the front door - Barnett went out rather behind him - he went and bolted the front door. Barnett lifted up a stick which he had in his hand, and was going to level it at the landlord's head - I prevented him - he immediately turned round, and swore he would knock me down, if I prevented his going out, saying he had particular business, and would go. The landlord had bolted the door. Barnett walked to the bar - I observed him put something into the left side of his coat; I saw him afterwards throw a dark lantern down in the parlour; I picked it up, and accused him of throwing it down - he denied it - I gave it to the landlord. A phosphorus bottle and picklock key were found in the grate immediately behind Barnett. Nobody was so near the grate as him - nobody but him had an opportunity of putting them there - he sat with his back to the fire-place. We attempted to secure him; he struck me with his stick several times.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. He said he would strike you or any person who prevented his going out, as he had particular business - A. Yes. There might be ten persons in the parlour where the grate was. I did not see the phosphorus bottle found. It is a good-sized room.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you passed any church, to know the time - A. St. Giles's clock struck seven as I was in Broad-street, a little beyond Drury-lane, but not so far as Middle-row. Clayton's is nearly opposite Dean-street, which is ten minutes walk. I had called at a snuff-shop for about ten minutes, in the way. I got to Clayton's a quarter or twenty minutes after seven o'clock, and saw a crowd round the house before I arrived. It was dark when I heard the clock strike; I could not then discern a man's countenance. The alarm had taken place before I got to Clayton's.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did the persons in the parlour come in before or after you - A. Some before and some after.

COURT. Q. Did you pick up more than one picklock key - A. I did not pick it up; I saw but one found - that was in the grate or on the hearth.

Q. Have you always said it was near to where Barnett was sitting - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. Have you not said it was picked up off the ground where Holland sat - A. They both sat in the same situation.

CHARLES PARRINGTON . I was at the prosecutor's on this night, before the alarm. I was in the parlour when I heard the first noise; eight or ten people were then in the parlour - I went out of the house on being called away. I was standing at the bar, and saw Barnett attempt to strike Clayton as he was fastening the door - he went away then to the other, and said if he could not get out at one door he would at the other. I held the door, and said he should not. A scuffle ensued between us, and I took the stick from him, and gave it to Clayton.

WILLIAM WOOL . I am a coachmaker, and live next door to Clayton. I saw Holland being pursued towards St. Giles's. I think he came out of Clayton's front door. It was quite dark then.

JOHN GUINT . I was in Perry's-place, opposite Clayton's house on the 21st of September, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, and found four skeleton keys, about ten yards from the door, in Oxford-street, behind a stone in Perry's-yard - they appeared to have been laid there.

CHARLES CLAYTON re-examined. The prisoners were taken out of my house by the constable, at the front door, near this spot - they would not have to pass the place where the keys were found. My parlour is particularly light; it is all a glass front. I should suppose that Holland was taken not above three minutes after the two persons came in - it could not have exceeded five. A phosphorus box, a picklock key, and a dark lantern were given me by the witness, and somebody brought me some matches. None of them are mine.

ROBERT MOSS . I am a constable. Clayton gave the prisoners in charge, with the dark lantern and other things.

JAMES SEYMOUR . I saw Holland running outside Clayton's house - he was secured, and taken in; I went in, and in the parlour where he was, I picked up a few matches; some of them were under where he sat, and some by the seat by the fire. Barnett was not sitting by the matches at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many other persons were in the room - A. A number of others; but none so near the matches as Holland. I gave them to some man in the room.

JAMES TOWERS . I am a constable. I took Barnett into custody, and found a large knife on him at the watch-house. As I was taking him along, he made several faint attempts to escape, by endeavouring to snatch his hand from under my arm, and to trip me up two or three times.

HOLLAND'S Defence. I came out of the country, and was in town about twelve days. I wanted to get some books bound, and was recommended to a binder at Clayton's - I went there about seven o'clock, knocked at the door on the right hand side up stairs, several times; nobody answered - I turned to the other door to knock, and it instantly flew open. I heard the prosecutor cry out that he was robbed, and came down to get out, thinking he might suspect me to be implicated.

BARNETT'S Defence. I went in to have some rum and water - there was a piece of work on the stairs. I went there with other people. Clayton was coming down with two or three people - I was rather in liquor, and he nearly pushed me down. I went back to the bar, and finished my glass.

Three witnesses gave Barnett a good character.

HOLLAND - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

BARNETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-10

1497. WILLIAM BUSH was indicted for stealing, on

the 29th of July , one watch, value 5 l.; two keys, value 10 s.; one seal, value 7 s., and two rings, value 10 s., the goods of James Berwick , in his dwelling-house .

JANE BERWICK . I am the wife of James Berwick , who is a hatter - we live in Bishopsgate-street . The watch was on our mantle-piece in the parlour, at the end of the shop - it was silver gilt, and had a gold seal, and two keys to it; one metal and the other gold; they are worth 5 l. together. On the 29th of July, I saw it safe at half-past twelve o'clock, and about one the prisoner came in to enquire about a first floor we had to let; he had been twice before, on the same business. I am quite sure of his person. I shewed him the apartments, of which he approved; he was sometime talking in the parlour. He said he took them for two friends of his in the Bank, and requested me to fetch him pen, ink, and paper, as he had no card in his pocket. I went into the counting-house, (which joins the parlour) for it; I left him alone - I was absent about a minute, and as I returned, he met me, and took the pen and ink from me, saying he would not give me the trouble to come into the parlour, and wrote on the card on the end of the counter,

"Dupree, Nelson-square, Blackfriars-road," and went away. I missed the watch immediately he was gone - nobody but him could have taken it. I am quite sure it was in the parlour when I went for the pen and ink. He was taken into custody on the Monday following.

Prisoner. Q. Did you leave me in the parlour while you went to see if the rooms were ready for my seeing them - A. That was the first time he came.

Q. Did you ask any clerk in the Bank to get you any lodgers - A. Mr. Berwick most likely did. I told him Mr. Berwick would require a respectable reference, and that he knew a Mr. Smith in the Bank.

RICHARD MYERS . I am shopman to Mr. Berwick. I recollect the prisoner coming after the lodging. I did not know where the watch was. I was informed it was stolen. I went out to look for the man, but could not find him. On the Sunday after, I saw the prisoner in Long-lane, and charged him with stealing the watch - he said I was mistaken in the person; that he had never been in Bishopsgate-street about any apartments. I am certain he is the man. He said he was going to meet a friend in St. John-street, and would satisfy me he was not the person. I walked up that way with him - he then said he would take me to his lodging. He ran away from me, but I took him without losing sight of him. The metal watch key was taken from his person at Giltspur-street, by Taylor. I saw him come to the house the day the watch was stolen, and on one day before.

Prisoner. Q. You saw me the first day I called - A. Yes. I saw you pass through the shop. I was examined before Mr. Alderman Waithman, and did not say I was not at home on the day it was stolen. I was asked why I took such particular notice of him, and said I noticed his shabby hat and boots. When I saw him in Long-lane, he turned into a hair dresser's shop, and disguised himself as I understand. I stopped, and met him coming out. I cannot say whether he saw me, and when we got nearly to the corner of Long-lane, he turned back and ran away on seeing Taylor. I followed, and caught him by Carthusian-street.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. On Sunday, the 4th of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I was meeting the prisoner - two men were following him; Myers told me to take him into custody; I asked for what; he said he was a thief. I looked behind, and he was running off as hard as he could. I ran to Charterhouse-lane to meet him, and found him in the hands of Myers, and found the watch key on him at the Compter.

(Key produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was apprehended early in the last vacation, and my time was postponed last Session, for the prosecutrix's convenience, which has deprived me of the important evidence of Dupree and Lawrence, who employed me to take the lodgings. They are now returned to their native country. They would have convinced the Court, I did not introduce myself into Berwick's house to accomplish a premeditated theft; but was employed by them to take the lodging.

JANE BERWICK . After the watch was stolen, neither Dupree or any one else called.

RICHARD MYERS . I went to Nelson-square, and found no such person as Dupree lived there.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-11

1498. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one jacket, value 7 s.; one watch, value 3 l.; one seal, value 1 s.; one key, value 1 d.; three sovereigns, and one half-crown, the property of John Ingram ; one pair of trowsers, value 3 s.; one hat, value 7 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; and two promissory notes for the payment of 1 l. each ; the property of Thomas Ingram .

JOHN INGRAM . I belong to the Prince Regent fishing vessel , which lay off Billingsgate . On the 3d of this month, I left the vessel about ten o'clock in the morning, and returned about twelve. I left my property in the vessel; there were three sovereigns and a half in my jacket pocket, which was in my box, not locked up; the prisoner was a stranger. When I returned, I missed my watch immediately, which hung in the bed cabin; I afterwards missed the other things. I took the prisoner next day at the head of Billingsgate market with the jacket on. I have found nothing else. I told him he was the man I was looking for - he made no answer, but pretended to be in liquor, and I think he was. I gave him in charge.

THOMAS INGRAM . I belong to the vessel, and left it about the same time as my brother. My clothes were safe. I had a pair of trowsers, a hat, a shirt, and two Chelmsford one-pound notes in my pocket-book, in my box - the trowsers were on the bed. I returned about one o'clock, and missed them. I saw the prisoner when he was taken; he had my brother's jacket, and my trowsers, shirt, and hat on him. I found the prisoner's old clothes in the cabin.

JOHN RYDER . I work at Billingsgate market. I know the prisoner by having seen him come ashore with the clothes on. I had seen him on that morning before; he then had no shoes, stockings, or hat on, and an old jacket. When he came ashore he had shoes and stockings, and a blue coat and trowsers, and a new beaver hat. About an hour afterwards, I heard the vessel was robbed, and mentioned this.

WILLIAM MACKEY . I received him in charge. I had

seen him the morning before with the clothes on which were found in the vessel. He told me he committed the robbery.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I must have been led astray; and did not know what I was about at the time, if I did do it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-12

1499. WILLIAM RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Low , from his person .

WILLIAM LOW. I am a bookseller , and lodge in Bull and Mouth-street. On Saturday, the 12th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Cateaton-street , going to my lodging, and felt something push against me; I turned round, and missed my silk handkerchief, which I had used five minutes before. On my turning round, the prisoner walked out from behind me; there were several others near me; I followed and stopped him in King-street - he had crossed over. My suspicion was increased by his walking fast. I took him, and found my handkerchief in his pocket; he had another blue one, which he said was his own, and that he found mine. Smith took him in custody.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I found a blue handkerchief marked C. G. on him, which he claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. In Cateaton-street I saw two lads walking behind Mr. Low; I happened to turn my head and saw them cross into the road; I saw the handkerchief dropped, picked it up, and put it in my pocket; I did not know whom it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-13

1500. GOODMAN SOLOMON and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , part of a crimping engine, value 15 s. , the goods of Augustin Finch .

AUGUSTIN FINCH . I am an ironmonger , and live in Bishopsgate-street Without . On the 11th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I just left the shop to breakfast in the back room; the two prisoners came in and asked for a penny Jew's harp; I said I had none; they went away and returned in about a minute, and asked if I could tell where to buy one; I said,

"Go about your business." In consequence of something my wife said, I got up, and missed part of a crimping engine off the counter, which was there ten minutes before. I went after them, but lost sight of them, and returned for my hat. I then went to an old iron shop in Widegate-alley, and found them in about five minutes, in the act of selling it. Fuller keeps the shop. I went in and laid hold of them - I had great difficulty in holding them - Solomon got away, but was stopped.

MARTHA FULLER . I keep an iron shop in Widegate-alley. Two boys came into my shop, but I cannot say who they were - they were much such boys as the prisoners.

Q. Are they the two, or cannot you be certain of them - A. I cannot exactly say; they had not time to offer any thing. They asked if I bought old metal; I said, No; and no sooner had I said so, than the gentleman came in, and laid hold of one of them; the other ran out.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in charge with the property. Fuller knew the boys at the Mansion-house.

MR. FINCH. I cannot say whether the property was in Fuller's hands or on the counter.

MARTHA FULLER re-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear they had not time to offer it - A. Yes. I never saw it till the gentleman had it. It was not on my counter.

AUGUSTIN FINCH . It is mine. She could not avoid seeing it. One of the boys ran behind her counter. I insisted on having him out.

SOLOMON'S Defence. I was going down Bishopsgate-street, and this little boy asked me to go with him to buy the harp. The gentleman had none, and we came out - he said

"Let us go and ask where we can buy one;" the gentleman said,

"Go out you rascals," and in the street the boy said,

"Look what I have found, let us go into the shop, and sell it;" we went in, and the woman said,

"Stop a moment."

BAILEY'S Defence. He went with me to buy the harp, and as we came out this piece of brass laid on the step - I picked it up and shewed it him; and said

"Let us go to an iron shop and see if they will buy it."

SOLOMON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-14

1501. THOMAS DOBNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , one watch, value 2 l. 10 s.; one seal, value 1 l. 2 s.; one key, value 6 s., and one handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of William Daniels , in the dwelling-house of James Innes .

WILLIAM DANIELS . I am a waiter at the Queen's Arm, tavern, in Cheapside . James Innes rents the house. This watch was a silver one, and was in my bed-room, and is worth 2 l. 10 s.; there was a gold seal, worth 1 l., and a gold key, worth 6 s. I saw it safe at ten o'clock in the morning of the 30th of September - the prisoner had been painting the house. He came to fetch his tools away on that day; he was only painting the lower part of the house. I sleep in the garret. I went to my bed-room again at eleven o'clock that night, and missed my watch; it had hung up against the bed. I saw it again on the Friday following, (this was on Monday,) the seal and key were gone. On the Thursday after the robbery, I had applied to an officer, and the prisoner was taken. He at first denied it; but before he was examined, he voluntarily said he had given the duplicate to Herbert, in whose possession I found the watch.

ROBERT HERBERT . I am a painter. I worked in the same house with the prisoner. I only know him by doing this job. I left eight days before the robbery. I only did the graining - there was more painting to be done when I left. On Monday the 30th of September, two men brought the prisoner home in a violent fit. I was in bed, and was called down to him. He recovered in about an hour, and

gave me the duplicate of a watch, saying he was going into the country, and it was not in his power to get it out. I took it out, and shewed it him next day; it was pawned for 15 s. It had a gold seal and key to it, which were afterwards pledged by my direction. On the Sunday night his master came to me; I told him the prisoner had given me the ticket, and I got the watch out. Daniels claimed it. I had not asked how he came by it. He lodged at the same house with me.

JAMES PATTEN . I am a shopman to Mr. Morritt, a pawnbroker, of Longacre. I have the seal and key, pawned with me for 8 s.

ROBERT HERBERT . It is the seal and key I got my brother to pawn.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of October - he denied the charge; I said,

"It is no use denying it, for I have found the seal and key in pawn." He said,

"Well then, I will tell you the truth, I took the watch and handkerchief, and nothing else."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner begged for Mercy, and received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-15

1502. LUCY PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two yards and a half of flannel, value 1 s., and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of William Spriggs .

WILLIAM SPRIGGS . I am a hosier , and live in Fleet-market . The prisoner came to my house on the 1st of September, as nurse - I missed some flannel. I afterwards found out where she lived, and went to her room, with the officer; she was in custody at the time, and referred us to that place, when we engaged her. We found two yards and a half of flannel and a remnant besides, two pair of stockings were found in a bundle, in the possession of a man named Stokes, who was at the watch-house. The prisoner said Stokes was her nephew. The flannel was produced before the Magistrate, in the prisoner's presence. She was not taken up about the flannel. I know it by its matching the piece it was cut from, which I produce. I missed exactly that quantity. There was no mark on it.

THOMAS WILDING . I am a constable. I went to her lodgings, and found the flannel. I do not say she lodged there.

Upon comparing the pieces of flannel, the Jury found they were not of the same width.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-16

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25.

1503. WILLIAM ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 3 lbs. of tin, value 2 s. 3 d., and twelve iron hinges, value 11 d. , the goods of Joseph Reynolds

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I am an ironmonger , and live in Frith-street, Soho . The prisoner was in my service six weeks, as a porter . On the 27th of September I was out, and returned about six o'clock in the evening, and found him in custody, in the counting-house. I told him he had robbed me; he said,

"It is too true, Sir." I found this property concealed about his person. I have known him from a boy, and took him out of the street through charity.

THOMAS HAYWARD . I am thirteen years old. On Friday evening, the 27th of September, the prisoner came in about six o'clock. One of the men told me to go below into the warehouse - I went in among some shovels, and the prisoner came down with a light - he looked round the warehouse twice; then set the light at a distance from him, and took a handful of bar tin from a cask - he then went aside and concealed it about him; then took another handful, and went to the end of the warehouse. I went up stairs and told one of the men - the clerk called him into the counting-house, and detained him till my master came home.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-17

1504. THOMAS POWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , forty yards of fearnaught, value 4 l. , the goods of Daniel Deacon and Daniel Deacon the younger.

DANIEL DEACON , JUN. I am in partnership with my father, Daniel Deacon - we are carriers at the White Horse, Cripplegate. This property was in our possession.

JOHN HINCKLIFF . I am porter to the prosecutors; I had the waggon. I had thirty-one pieces of fearnaught; they came from the country. I was going to unload them at Sparrow-corner, and was stopping at a house out of the rain, when a person came and said a piece was taken from the waggon. I ran out and saw the prisoner about sixty yards from the waggon, with a piece on his shoulder. I came up to him in Queen-street, Rosemary-lane - he was not running; I stopped him there with it. It measured fifty yards. I said,

"You rogue, you have robbed me" - he said,

"I have not," and threw it down; and struck me in the mouth. I kept hold of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did it happen in Sparrow-corner - A. They call it so. It was at Mr. Clarke's back door.

HENRY HALES . I am a constable. I took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BISSETT . I am a constable of Tower Ward. I was passing by the Hoop and Horse Shoe, public-house, at the bottom of Queen-street, and observed the prisoner drop the property from his shoulder, and strike the waggoner, who held him. I assisted in securing him.

MR. WONTNER. The back part of Mr. Clarke's house is in Middlesex, to the best of my belief. Queen-street is in the County.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman on Tower-hill asked

me to carry it to Rosemary-lane for 1 s. This man claimed it. I saw he was not the person who delivered it, so I struck him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-18

1505. WILLIAM FACEY was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Bannister , on the 5th of October , and stealing two boxes, value 6 d.; three rings, value 1 l.; six models, value 9 s.; three watch keys, value 6 s.; eight pennyweights of gold, value 20 s.; twelve pearls, value 8 s.; four topazes, value 2 s.; four garnets, value 2 s.; one pair of ear-rings, value 5 s., and one cannister, value 2 d. , his property.

WILLIAM BANNISTER . I am a working jeweller , and live at Twickenham . On Saturday, the 5th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I took this property into my workshop, which is in my dwelling-house. I left the shop at four o'clock in the afternoon, and shut up the workshop. I only latched it, not locked it - it was all safe then; I did not go there again till three o'clock in the afternoon of Sunday. I found the door which is in my garden open, and the property gone. I traced footsteps of a full grown man over some loose mould and sand, from the place over the wall, where I supposed the person had escaped. I could not judge whether they were the steps of more than one person. I went to the prisoner's mother's house last Monday, which was a fortnight after the robbery. I found there a copper box, which I had lost, and which contained the gold; a tea cannister was also there. I found a pair of gold ear-rings at the prisoner's lodging; he was a stranger to me. I was at home from four o'clock on Saturday, till three on Sunday. I am certain I had latched the door.

MARY ANN BANNISTER . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I saw the property safe at ten o'clock on Saturday morning, and at ten o'clock on Sunday morning I saw the shop door open - I thought my husband was in there, and did not say anything. Between three and four o'clock the robbery was discovered. I think the person had entered by the gate. I had heard footsteps on Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock, coming up the yard, which leads to the shop; I supposed it to be the doctor coming to the house, as there was a person ill. There was no appearance of marks on the door, it had only been latched.

MARY SMITH . I live at Twickenham. Last Monday fortnight in the afternoon, the prisoner gave me the earrings; he lived at my mother's house three or four months. I put them in my ears - he did not say where he got them. Bannister claimed them; and I gave them to him.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's mother's house, which is next door to Smith's; he boards at his mother's, and sleeps at Smith's. I found a tea cannister in a closet at his mother's, and a copper box in the room at Smith's, where he lodges; he had been committed some days before that. When he was apprehended I found a small wooden box in his jacket pocket, containing a gold ring, and part of a seal; he said he found the ring three months before on Chase Bridge. I apprehended him on the 15th.

WILLIAM STILWELL . I was with Webb when he apprehended the prisoner; he said he found the box with the rings three months ago on Chase Bridge.

WILLIAM BANNISTER . This cannister and the box were taken that night, and had my gold in it. The ear-rings are mine, and here is part of a seal. The property lost was worth between 3 l. and 4 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a young man here, who knows I was at my lodgings from ten o'clock at night till six in the morning.

CHARLES SMITH . I live at Twickenham, and am a working gardener, and am Mary Smith 's brother. I live in the same house that the prisoner sleeps in - he sleeps in the same bed as me. On the night the prosecutor says he was robbed, I will take my oath he was in bed and fast asleep at the time - it was a fortnight ago last Saturday - he was not out all day; he was very ill indeed, and went to bed at ten o'clock. I got up between six and seven o'clock and left him in bed, and staid at home with him till ten or eleven o'clock, and then went to the water-side; I returned in half an hour, and was at home all the afternoon - we went to bed together between ten and eleven o'clock. I got up at six o'clock. I came home to breakfast, and never asked whether he was in bed or not. He had a violent pain in his inside. He went to the doctor for medicine on Saturday morning. I recollect it because it was the only day I was at home. I could not sleep sound, for he was so ill.

MARY SMITH re-examined. The prisoner was at home all day on Saturday, very ill, and slept at home that night - he could not have gone out without passing my mother's door.

Q. He might have crept down - A. My mother is of a very weak constitution, and sleeps very little at night. I saw the box in my mother's cupboard two or three days before Webb came. He gave me the ear-rings on Monday; I put them in my ears on Thursday; he saw them there, and did not object to it. Bannister lives about quarter of a mile off.

Prisoner. I had a dog to sell, and sold it to William Tubs . I went to him on Monday, and picked these things up - I wore the ring on my finger three or four days, and offered it for sale. I did not keep it private.

CHARLES SMITH . He offered the ring to me for sale the week before he was taken, and said he found it. He wore it in the street, and shewed it about to the neighbours.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18221023-19

1506. WILLIAM FACEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , sixteen half-crowns; forty shillings, and forty sixpences, the monies of Philip Humphreys , in his dwelling-house .

PHILIP HUMPHREYS . I am a pawnbroker , and live at Isleworth . On the 15th of October, I had some silver in my shop, about ten o'clock that morning; I had brought it from down stairs. There was 5 l. or 6 l. or more - I cannot tell the exact amount; there were half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences. In about half an hour I went to the till, and found the whole of it gone - it was in a small box. I had not seen the prisoner in the shop. I am certain there was above four half-crowns. There was no lid to the box.

JOHN FISHER . On the 15th of October; Humphreys came to me - about half an hour before that, (about ten o'clock) I had seen the prisoner come out of the shop with something in his hand - I cannot tell what it was; he was carrying it openly. It seemed to be covered with something white. I knew him before.

THOMAS LAMBERT . I live at Brentford. On the 15th of October, the prisoner came into my brother's shop, at Brentford, about twelve o'clock, and bought a pair of shoes - he paid 11 s. 6 d. for them in silver, and had more silver in his hand, counting it; there was not 1 l. worth.

WILLIAM BRABY . I live at Brentford. On the 15th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a pair of breeches, which he paid me 13 s. for - he went out, and returned in about twenty minutes, and bought a blue jacket, some pearl buttons, and stockings, which came to 2 l. 2 s. 4 d.; he paid my mistress all in silver - there were two half-crowns, and the rest in shillings and sixpences. Her shop is a mile and a half from Humphreys'.

ROBERT BALMAINE . I live at Twickenham. On the morning of the 15th of October, I was near Humphreys' house a little after ten o'clock, and saw the prisoner come out of his shop with something in his hands, covered up. I was about ten yards behind him, and said nothing to him. He went towards Brentford.

CHRISTOPHER CAMPBELL . I live at Isleworth. On the 15th of October, about a quarter past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner there passing my shop near the fields; he walked by very quick; I saw nobody with him. Mr. Humphreys' daughter came to me in about an hour, and in consequence of what she said, I went after him, and took him at Brentford between twelve and one o'clock, with the clothes under his arm. I said,

"Have you been through Isleworth?" He said,

"Yes." I asked if he called at Mr. Humphreys'; he said,

"No." I took him.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a constable. I have the clothes; I found only 1 s. on him.

THOMAS WISE . I live at Twickenham. I was going to Brentford with the prisoner; and in going through Isleworth, he went into Humphreys', and said he was going in there to pawn a pair of stockings, to get a pot of beer, and asked me to wait for him, which I did, about twenty yards from the door. I did not see him come out, but after he came out I saw him with a pair of white stockings in his hands; I cannot say whether he had any thing under them; he walked on about twenty yards, then told me to walk on and he would overtake me, which I did, and he overtook me in Zion-fields, where I met a friend, and there we separated. I overtook him again at Brentford Bridge. I saw no money with him.

MARY WESTON . I live at Isleworth. I was going to Brentford market with a woman; the prisoner passed me; the woman said, that was one of the Twickenham swells; he turned round and spoke to her, and said he was going to a badger baiting. He was taken between the prosecutor's house and Brentford; when he got a little farther, I saw four small pieces of wood in his hand, of a pale brown colour, rather longer than his hand.

SOPHIA WHITE . I live at Isleworth. I found the box in Mr. Stanbury's barn, just by Isleworth church, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 15th of October. Webb has it.

THOMAS WEBB . I produce the box; it is broken in four pieces.

MARY WESTON . It is of the same colour and size as the pieces of wood he had when I saw him near the church-yard.

PHILIP HUMPHREYS . This is the wood which formed the box. I did not see the prisoner in the shop; it had been left a short time without any body in it. I cannot recollect how many of each coin there was.

Prisoner's Defence. I had saved up 3 l. 9 s. to buy clothes, and swore I would not spend a halfpenny of it except for clothes. I wanted to pawn the stockings, to make up 3 l. 10 s. I called out in the shop - nobody answered, and I came out. Most of my money was in half-crowns.

THOMAS WEBB . He told me he sold a bull-dog to one Smith of Richmond, for 16 s., by which he got the silver; and that Kirby of Brentford paid him 1 l. I found he had sold a dog in the Spring.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18221023-20

1507. GEORGE WINSTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Ann White on the King's highway, on the 17th of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 20 s. the goods of Thomas White .

MARY ANN WHITE . I am the wife of Thomas White . On the 17th of October, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was going down to the public-house in Nightingale-lane, East Smithfield , to look for my husband; and as I went along, two young men stood together - the prisoner was one of them. I went into the public-house and found my husband was not there. As I came out, they still stood there, and just as I turned back, one of them ran after me - I looked back, and saw he had a blue coat on - he knocked me down - that was not the prisoner. When I was down, the prisoner ran up and took my shawl. I caught hold of him by the tail of his coat, and he handed the shawl to another man. I still held his coat, and tore it in the back - I called out Stop thief! and the patrol came up, and I gave him in charge directly. He was never out of my sight.

PRISONER. Q. Did you not receive 1 l. from Mrs. Agnue to compound the felony - A. No. Two other men were taken whom I could not swear to.

JOHN HAGUE . I am patrol of Aldgate. On the 17th of October, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went towards the corner, and saw the prosecutrix all over mud, and the prisoner standing by her, who she said had taken her shawl; she had not hold of him, but stood up close by him; he did not attempt to run away, and said he did not take it himself, but that he saw another take it. His coat was torn. There were a great many people round.

MARY ANN WHITE re-examined. I put my fingers into a hole in his coat, and tore it down. He could not run away, as several people were round.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am the watch-house keeper; the prisoner was brought in; White was all over mud, and said in his presence that another man knocked her down, and

the prisoner snatched her shawl off. He denied it, and said he was standing opposite Mr. Thom's shop, waiting for a friend. The street is very light, there are three gas lamps in it, and there are three public-houses.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with a young man to have a pint of beer - he went into the chandler's shop - I was waiting for him. This woman came out with two men, turned up an alley, and when she got about half-way up, the young man in a fustian jacket took her shawl off. She passed me three or four times in the street for half an hour, and then took me. My coat was torn three days before.

CHARLES STAPLES . I am a constable, and live in Bell-alley. I had information that two young men were concerned in this robbery; I apprehended them, and took them to the Mansion House. White said she could not positively swear to them - their names were Agnue and Switcher. She got hold of Agnue's mother, who said,

"For God's sake, do not swear to my son." She said,

"Well, I don't care, so as I get the value of my shawl - that is all I want, and shall not appear." I took these prisoners to the Thames Police, and when she got there, she said she could not swear to either of them. The Magistrate committed them as vagrants, and as she came out, the mother of one of them said,

"You d - d ***, see what a sovereign will do." White then came to me and said,

"I fear I have done wrong - I have taken a sovereign of Mrs. Agnue." I said she had done very wrong.

SARAH TRUEMAN . I heard Mrs. White say at the Thames Police that she did not wish to hurt any one, if her shawl was made good; Mr. Agnue, the father of one of the prisoners, said he would pay her; she valued it at 1 l., and I had it from her own lips afterwards, that she had received 1 l. from Mr. Agnue. She was very drunk that night, and on coming home said, if Mrs. Winston would pay her for her shawl, she would not swear to her son. I said she had already sworn to him - she said she was not obliged to appear.

MARY ANN WHITE . It is quite wrong; no such thing happened. I never told Mr. Agnue I would not appear if I got the value of my shawl. I left Mrs. Agnue in the office. I never received a sovereign from Mr. or Mrs. Agnue, nor ever spoke to either of the witnesses. I saw Trueman at the office, and said, I did not wish to hurt any one, if my shawl was made good; Agnue's father said he would pay what I valued it at - he said to me,

"Mrs. White, here is 1 l. for yourself," and threw it on the taproom table - I did not take it up. I never told Trueman I had received 1 l. from Agnue.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-21

1508. JOHN SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Finer and Thomas Nowland , about the hour of ten in the morning of the 11th of October , at St. Andrew, Holborn (the said Thomas Nowland and others being therein), and stealing one watch-chain, value 3 l. , their property.

THOMAS NOWLAND . I am a watchmaker , in partnership with Thomas Finer . We rent a house in High Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew ; we both live there, and pay the rent jointly. On Friday, the 11th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was in the back part of the shop; the door was shut; I saw my partner's son come suddenly from behind the counter, open the door, and run out; I observed a pane of glass was cut, which was whole before. Some gold curb watch chains lay in the window, near the pane. Mr. Finer, junior, brought the prisoner back.

HORATIO FINER . I am the son of Thomas Finer . I was in the shop, about two yards from the window, and saw the prisoner and another boy at the window. I heard the glass crack, and then they walked away; I looked and saw it was broken, and a piece pushed in; I ran after the prisoner, and took him opposite Mr. Stanley's shop, but found nothing on him. He was very much frightened, and the moment I collared him said he had not broken the window, before I charged him with it. When I brought him back he said a boy pushed him against it.

EDWARD STANLEY . I live four doors from the prosecutors'. Between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw eight or ten people gathered round my window. I went out to see what they were doing, and saw a watch-chain in a woman's hand - this was about a quarter of an hour after the prisoner was secured. I asked her for the chain - she said it was hers. I took it from her, saying, I thought it belonged to my neighbour, and she might come with me. I took it to the prosecutors', but she went away. He claimed it. The prisoner was there at the time. It was found down my area. The woman said she was going by, and a little girl who was with her dropped the chain. One of my areas is very shallow, but the chain could not be reached without a stick. The woman herself had no stick, but a boy who stood there had one.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They said they missed nothing.

MR. FINER. I did not say nothing was missing. I took him within a foot of Mr. Stanley's area.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-22

1509. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two pictures, value 50 s. the goods of John Roberts , in his dwelling-house .

MARIA HARDMAN . I am servant to a gentleman who lodges in Mr. Roberts's house. On the 15th of October, about five minutes past seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise and went up stairs. Some little time after, I saw the prisoner with a light in his hand - he had two large prints in his hand - he put the light on a seat in the passage, then opened the door, and took the prints out. I followed him to the top of the street, and then gave an alarm. I did not lose sight of him. He was taken in a few minutes. I am certain of his person; I saw him again in a few minutes. The prints were taken from Mr. Roberts's rooms, one from the back, and the other from the front parlour.

THOMAS PIPER . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner walking across the road, with two framed and glazed prints. I pursued, and only lost sight of him while a coach passed. When I came on the opposite side, I picked up one of the prints, and delivered it to an officer; I did not see him drop it. I believe he is the man who carried them, but cannot be certain.

SAMUEL PHILLIPS . I heard an alarm; the prisoner ran

by me very fast; he had nothing with him. He ran towards my shop. I endeavoured to secure him; he struck me violently, and got away. I saw a gentleman stop him. I did not lose sight of him, and am certain he is the person.

WILLIAM DELY . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner on the south side of the Strand, walking. I went after him, and just as I got up to him, he looked round, and as I was going to collar him, he dropped the two prints. He then turned down a court into Holywell-street; he fell down in the court, and I fell on him; he was secured.

WILLIAM WOOTTON . I am an officer. The prints were brought to the office with the prisoner.

MR. JOHN ROBERTS . I live at Norfolk-street . The prints are mine. My rooms were being painted, and I do not know which room they were in. The subscription price for the print is 5 l. 5 s. - it is the Royal Academicians - I have had it twenty years, and I value it at 20 s.

Prisoner's Defence. A man ran by me. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran into Holywell-street - was knocked down, and charged with the theft.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18221023-23

1510. JOHN CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , three candlesticks, value 50 s.; two pair of salt cellars, value 3 l.; and one snuffer tray, value, 50 s., the goods of Henry Walker , Samuel Yongue , Charles Yongue , and George Kitchen , in their dwelling-house .

HENRY WALKER . I am in partnership with Samuel Yongue , Charles Yongue , and George Kitchen ; we are silversmiths ; the firm rents a house in Beaufort Buildings , but I only live in it. The prisoner had been our servant more than two years, as warehouseman and porter . Mr. Tate, who is a silversmith, came to me on Thursday, the 17th of October, and said, in the presence of the prisoner, that he had seen two snuffer trays of our manufacture at Balfour's the pawnbroker's, in Chandos-street. When I went out of the warehouse to go there, the prisoner went out also, and his father brought a note from him - I know it to be the prisoner's hand-writing - (read).

"Mr. Walker, I have been driven by the most distressing circumstances to make use of your property, and before I could replace it, you have discovered it, and I am rained. Pray walk with my father, and I will give you every satisfaction, and endeavour to make all good. In mercy to me do not bring an officer, till you have heard what I have to say; and then, if you are not convinced that what I have done is through distress, I will give myself up, as with the loss of my character, I am for ever ruined. J. CAMPBELL."

I told his father he must come to me, or I should send an officer for him; he came and delivered me a number of duplicates, which the officer has got. I went to Balfour's, and found two snuffer trays; and at Cameron's in the Strand I found a silver snuffer tray; at Levy's, in London-street, a pair of silver salts, and two plated candlesticks; also other property at different places - I do not know when they were taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a character with him - A. Yes. He had 20 s. a-week. His parents were in great distress - I cannot say whether he supported them or not.

WILLIAM LACK . I am servant to Isaac Levy , pawnbroker in London-street. On the 13th of September, the prisoner pawned a pair of plated candlesticks for 20 s., and two salts were pawned in July for 25 s.; and afterwards I advanced 10 s. more, and on the 31st of August, 10 s. more, making 2 l. 5 s. I never saw him till he pawned the salts. When he brought the candlesticks, he said he was a manufacturer - he gave the name of John Wittingham , Fitzroy-place.

JOHN HAWKES . I am shopman to Mr. Cameron, pawnbroker, in the Strand. I have a silver candlestick pawned on the 9th of September for 25 s. in the name of John Wittingham , St. Martin's-lane, by the prisoner; also a pair of plated salts, pawned for 10 s. on the 3d of August, in the same name, and on the 23d of August, a silver snuffer tray, for 2 l. 10 s. When he brought the candlestick, I asked whose it was, he said his own, and that he had pawned it once or twice before, which the apprentice said was true. I had only lived there two days, and only took in the candlesticks.

MR. WALKER. The property is all ours. There is no single article worth 40 s. except the snuffer tray.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-24

1511. GEORGE HARRIS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Robert Dobson , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 27th of September , and stealing four eggs, value 3 d. his property.

ROBERT DOBSON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Great Wild-street . On the 27th of September, about ten o'clock at night, I fastened up my shop; between twelve and one, I was alarmed, and got up and found the shutter bar broken, and a shutter taken down, and a square of glass broken. The prisoner was in custody. I cannot say that any thing was gone. A parcel of eggs stood just by the glass, which was whole the day before. I believe one of the prisoner's hands was bloody - there was blood on the window. The bar had been wrenched off one end, then twisted round and broken off.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You do not know how the blood came - A. I suppose from the prisoner's hand.

JOHN HOWARD . I am a patrol. On the 27th of September I was on duty in Wild-street, between twelve and one o'clock, and saw a loose shutter standing against the next house to Dobson's. The prisoner stood with his back against No. 3, from where the shutter was taken down. I asked what he was after; he said he lived there, and that he had called his sister, and she was coming down. He moved a little from the window, and I noticed the pane of glass broken, and some blood on the glass. I instantly collared him, and said,

"You villain, you are breaking into this house." He made a little resistance. I called the watch, who came up while I was wrestling with him. We took him to the watch-house, and there I noticed one finger of his right hand had been recently cut; and there

were marks of blood on his clothes. A basket of eggs stood close by the window.

Cross-examined. Q. Before you came up, did you not see somebody striking him - A. No; he appeared to have had a little to drink. I did not notice that his eye was cut.

Q. Did not you say at the office that the cut in his eye was inflicted by your fist, and not with any weapon - A. No; he said he was waiting for his sister, not for assistance.

NICHOLAS MANNING . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of watch, and about five minutes before that, I heard glass break; I thought it was in Prince's-street, and went there. On hearing the cry, I went to Wild-street, and found the prisoner in custody of Howard, who was struggling with him. The shutter was down, and the bar broken, and a quantity of glass out. He was trying to get from Howard. He threw away two or three eggs - all of them broke except one, which I took to Marlborough-street, and it broke in my pocket. There was blood on the egg, and on the shells - his finger was cut and bleeding.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came up, which way was his face - A. Towards the house; he threw the eggs out of his hand behind him.

Q. Was not the crush against the window such as might be made by falling against it - A. Yes. I saw nobody go down the street. I think there was a scratch on his temple, but no blood on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Ben Johnson intoxicated, and hearing a noise, I ran over the way, and was pushed against the glass, which broke, and I called for assistance, and was knocking for the people of the house, when the patrol came up; I said I was waiting for assistance, which he mistook for sister, and said,

"Your sister does not live here." He cut me in the eye, which bled profusely; the cut in the hand has been there six months.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18221023-25

1512. JOHN COWDEROY was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Atkins , on the King's highway, on the 20th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one handkerchief, value 2 s. , his property.

JAMES ATKINS . I am mate of a brig which lay in the London Docks. I lived in Crown-court, East Smithfield. On Sunday last I was returning home about half-past twelve o'clock at night, and in East Smithfield the prisoner came up and passed by me, and seized my handkerchief out of my pocket - he had not touched me till then. I seized him with it in his hand. He threw it into the street, and struck me on the nose. I held him till Summers came - he was never out of my custody.

SAMUEL DAMON . I am in the Excise, and live at Butler's Buildings, East Smithfield. Last Sunday night, I was going home about half-past twelve o'clock, and heard the cry of Watch! three times. I went up, and found the prosecutor with the prisoner in custody. I saw the prisoner throw something from him. I helped to secure him.

JAMES SUMMONS . I am a patrol. I heard the alarm, and found the two witnesses securing the prisoner. I saw nothing thrown away. Atkins was bleeding at the nose, and said the prisoner had done it - he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing over Tower-hill, and as I passed the prosecutor, he laid hold of me, and said,

"You have taken my handkerchief." Two or three more people were round him. I never saw his handkerchief.

JAMES ATKINS re-examined. Two more men were taken to the watch-house, but they were not near me. Nobody but the prisoner was near me.

GUILTY.

Of stealing from the person only . - Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-26

1513. OWEN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , thirty-five yards of cloth, value 18 s. , the goods of George Ridges .

GEORGE RIDGES . I am a porter , and live in Carter-lane, Doctors' Commons. On the 1st of October, about six in the evening, I had this cloth in a cart, among other things. I was going to take it to the Borough; it was safe in Gracechurch-street when I left the cart, to deliver a parcel. I returned in three minutes, and found the prisoner on the shafts of the cart, with it in his arms. I caught him by the jacket, and he dropped it, and was secured. It lay in the body of the cart, and measured thirty-five yards.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. It was in the middle of the cart - A. Yes; he had got it on the shaft; he had moved the whole of it from the body of the cart - I am positive of it.

JOHN CROWTHER . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge, and have a remnant of the cloth.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-27

1514. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Robinson , from his person .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Tottenham-court-road. On Sunday, the 13th of October, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Cow-lane, West Smithfield , going home, and heard a disturbance in the street, a little before me. I came up and spoke to my brother, who was with me at the time, and while speaking, I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket. I turned round and collared the prisoner, who was near, and accused him of the theft, and gave him in charge. The handkerchief was picked up; he said he knew nothing of it.

WILLIAM ROWE . I live in Fox and Knott-court, Cow-lane. I was standing at my door between seven and eight o'clock on Sunday evening, the 13th of October, and heard an altercation at the top of the court. I went up, and had not been there more than two or three minutes, when the prosecutor came up, and at that moment the prisoner and another made a sudden dart in among the people. I kept my eye on the prisoner, and while the prosecutor was speaking, I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief from his (the prosecutor's) pocket, and throw it to the person who rushed in with him. While the prosecutor

was securing him, I picked it up. His companion was trying to shuffle it under his feet, to conceal it. He ran off as hard as he could. I gave the handkerchief to the officer.

SAMUEL HUNT . I am the patrol. The prisoner was given into my charge.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am the beadle. I found the prisoner at the watch-house; the handkerchief was given in my charge. I found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the lane, and saw a dozen people together; a gentleman who was with the prosecutor was charged with taking indecent liberties with two women, which caused the mob.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-28

1515. JAMES PARR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two loaves of bread, value 1 s. 3 d. , the goods of John Beale .

JOHN BEALE . I am journeyman to Mr. Fry, baker, of Bow-lane. On the 9th of October, about twelve o'clock, my basket stood in Lawrence-lane . I went into a house, and when I came out, the prisoner was in custody, with the two loaves, which are my master's. I missed them from the basket; I had marked them with a pencil at the bottom, having lost some before.

JAMES SING . I am a baker out of employ. I was in Lawrence-lane, and saw the prisoner go up to the basket, and take two loaves out. I was about twenty yards off - I went up and took him; I told him I had been watching for him several mornings. He said he never stole any before. Beale had made two pencil marks on them, and claimed them.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Month .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-29

1516. ELIZABETH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one shawl, value 36 s., the goods of Joseph Morris , privately in his shop .

EDWARD HANDLEY . I am shopman to Joseph Morris , a linen draper , of Fleet-market , in the parish of St. Bride. On the 8th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop alone, and asked to see some shawls. I shewed her twenty or thirty, but she bought none. I left seven on the counter - she stood looking at them while I went to the other end of the shop, and on returning I found there was only six. Nobody else was at the counter. I was absent about a minute. On my return, she said she would mention the price to a person, and would call again - she was going out as I was counting the shawls, and missing one, I followed her immediately, and overtook her about ten yards off; I brought her back, and she dropped it at the door, inside the shop. I did not see it fall from her - she had a large cloak on. Nobody could have dropped it but her; she denied touching it. She had only 11 1/2 d. on her.

DANIEL TURNER . I am a constable. I found 11 1/2 d. on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-30

1517. THOMAS KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , three yards of sheeting, value 3 s., and four yards of diaper, value 7 s. , the goods of Stephen Maberly .

WILLIAM MAYBARY . I am agent to Stephen Maberly of Paul's Wharf . The prisoner was a porter in the warehouse. We take stock every three months. On the 29th of September last we missed several pieces of linen and other things, amounting in value to 100 l. We took stock more minutely on the 5th of October, and found the goods still missing. On the 12th of October, I had some officers at the wharf, and determined to examine all the servants - the prisoner was the first that was called. Brand asked if he knew of any linen which had been taken - he said he did not, that he lodged at the corner of Knight Rider-court, on the first floor. We went to his lodging; he remained at the wharf - his wife was not at home, and we returned without searching. When we got back to the wharf, his wife came down almost directly, and we accompanied her back to the lodging, and on opening one of the drawers, Brand found forty or fifty duplicates, one of which led us to Mr. Chaffers's, of Queen-street; there were several remnants there of Mr. Maberly's sheeting, and one of diaper, which was a table cloth made up. There was only one article I could compare with what he had by us, that was a diaper table cloth. We had four pieces of that diaper in the warehouse, one of which had been cut on the 16th of May, 1820, six yards and a half, and sold to John Nelson . A piece measures forty yards. On taking stock we missed eight yards from one piece, and thirteen and a half from another; it was a very particular pattern and width. Mr. Maberly had manufactured it at Aberdeen, and only four pieces of it had been made. I found a remnant of dark sheeting in his drawers, of which we have the counterpart in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When you went to the lodgings did you leave word who you were, and from where you came - A. I believe not. Brand spoke, we returned, and his wife came within five minutes to speak to him, saying she I understood some gentleman had been to the house. I think she opened the drawer where the duplicates were. I do not know whether it was locked. We have five people in our warehouse. I believe his wife said the duplicates belonged to a friend, who was out of town. It is thirty-four inches wide, which is a particular width. He has lived above thirteen years with us.

DAVID NICHOLLS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Maberly. Brand brought a piece of linen sheeting to the warehouse. I compared it with a piece there, and it corresponded. We occasionally cut a piece for a friend. The piece was matched with what Brand had - it had never been cut by us. I did not know that it was cut before this; it had been in the warehouse more than a year. It was not cut strait, and the piece matched exactly. The whole piece should be eight yards and a half; Brand produced about four. The quality

is the same - the edge corresponds. He brought it after the prisoner was committed.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see it for a week after he was apprehended - A. Less than that; I think it might be five days. I have brought the piece it was cut from. This piece was one hundred and twenty-six yards when it came from the manufactory. It makes eight and a half. I had not seen the remnant within a year before.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalsman. I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found his wife there. The second time I went I found the piece of sheeting in one of the drawers. I took it to the warehouse some days after, and produced it in the same state as when I found it. I found a duplicate, which led me to Mr. Chaffers's; I got a piece of diaper from there. I saw the sheeting compared with a piece in the warehouse - it formed part of the same in my judgment. I have both here.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner was left in the counting-house while you went to his lodging - A. Yes. I only asked if anybody was at home. I was dressed in my common clothes. I found the duplicate and sheeting in the same drawer. It was not locked.

JAMES YOUNG . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers. The diaper table cloth was pawned with us on the 16th of February last, by a woman, in the name of Ann Watson . The duplicate produced is the one I gave her.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not seen many table cloths of the same pattern and fabric - A. Many. There is nothing particular in this. I could not swear to it if it was stolen from me.

Prisoner's Defence. Every two or three months they are cutting patterns - they used to mark every piece they cut, but lately they have not done so.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-31

1518. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Richard Parker .

RICHARD PARKER . I am a helper at Dixon's Repository, Barbican . My coat was in a room near the stable; it was safe in the afternoon of the 1st of October, in a box on the ground floor. About nine o'clock at night I missed it. I found it in pawn on the 4th, in Fore-street. The prisoner occasionally worked in the yard. I had not seen him there that day.

HENRY SMITH . I am a labourer at Mr. Dixon's. On the 1st of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the yard, he had no particular business there - he could easily slip into the room where the coat was. I saw him go down the yard about half-past five o'clock with Parker's coat on his back - I knew it to be his by seeing him wear it. I thought he had borrowed it of Parker, and said nothing to him. Next morning I heard it was stolen, and told Parker what I had seen. I saw him next night talking to Parker at the public-house; I do not know what passed. I saw the coat at the pawnbroker's afterwards, and know it is the one I saw on the prisoner's back.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was not the prisoner generally there on sale days - A. Yes. The room the coat was in was open to anybody in the yard. I never heard of the workmen playing tricks with each others' coats. The 1st of October was a sale day, but it was after the sale that I saw him go out.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am street-keeper of Cripplegate. I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of October, in George-yard, Grub-street. I told him it was about the coat - he confessed that he stole it, and said he would get it out if he would not prosecute him. I took him to Russell's, where it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not take him to the pawnbroker's, to swear the duplicate was lost - A. He requested himself to make the affidavit. He told me he had pawned it to treat some girls, and would show me the pawnbroker's.

JAMES LATTER . I am servant to Mr. Russell, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the coat in my presence.

RICHARD PARKER . It is mine.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you remember Mr. Dixon asking if you had found your coat - A. Yes; he said,

"Why don't you find out who has got your coat;" I said,

"I shall Sir, as quick as I can," he said,

"Mind you do, and if you don't, you shan't work in my yard any longer." I found out where it was next day, and went to the prisoner - he said I should have it again if I said nothing of it. I did not tell Mr. Dixon I was satisfied he did not mean to steal it. I have worked eleven months there, and never knew the men lark with each others' clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-32

1519. THOMAS NAPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Charles Jackson .

JOHN STAPLES . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Jackson , who lives in Long-lane . On the 5th of October, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was behind the counter serving a customer, when a gentleman passing by gave me information. I ran by the gentleman's direction, and overtook the prisoner about fifty yards off, with the hat under his apron. I am sure it is my master's.

WILLIAM STRATTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-33

1520. FRANCIS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Christopher Read , from his person .

MR. CHRISTOPHER READ . I am a student , and live in the Temple. On Saturday evening last, about twenty minutes before seven o'clock, I was near Temple-bar . A gentleman told me my handkerchief was taken - I felt and missed it. I found the prisoner in custody of a constable. My handkerchief, which was safe not two minutes before, has not been found.

JOHN CARLILE . I am one of the night patrol. I was in Fleet-street, near Temple-bar, and saw the prisoner in company with another - I watched them for five minutes; they followed a gentleman, and attempted his pocket, then they followed Mr. Read. I saw the prisoner take Mr.

Read's pocket in his right hand, and lift it up; and just by Chancery-lane, he lifted it up again - put his hand in and pulled the handkerchief a little way out; his companion, who was close to him, covered him, and by Bell-yard he got the handkerchief out entirely, and gave it to his companion. I caught him, but his companion escaped. I sent my wife, who was with me, to tell Mr. Read.

MARY CARLILE . I was walking with my husband, and saw the prisoner and another in company together - they followed two other gentleman. I saw one of them take the handkerchief from Mr. Read's pocket, and give it to the other; but I do not know which took it. The prisoner was stopped. I went after Mr. Read.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer dragged me into the shop - but I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-34

1521. JAMES FENNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , two waistcoats, value 3 s.; two shirts, value 5 s., and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of James Palmer .

JAMES PALMER . I live in Norfolk. On the 13th of September, I left the Gravesend boat, about one o'clock in the morning, and took my trunk to a public-house in Darkhouse-lane , and left it there. I returned about eight o'clock that morning, and it was safe. I did not open it till an hour after - I had lost the key. The prisoner came up with me as an acquaintance, and advised me to go and look for a lodging. I broke the trunk open, put a rope round it, and went with him; he left me at a house. I returned about four o'clock, and missed the articles stated in the indictment; he came to the house drunk that night, and was turned out; I followed and charged him with it; he was secured, and part of the things found on him at the watch-house.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a patrol. On the 13th of September I apprehended the prisoner on Palmer's charge. I searched him at the watch-house, and found concealed in his hat a waistcoat and a parcel of tracts, and a pair of stockings in his coat pocket. Palmer claimed them. The prisoner was intoxicated, and said the prosecutor let him have them to sell.

GEORGE WHITAKER . I am a watchman. I was at the watch-house, and saw the property found on him, and next day I found a shirt and waistcoat, at the Hercules, public-house, Leadenhall-street, which the prosecutor claimed.

DANIEL BOGGIS . I am a constable. I took charge of the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me three shirts and two handkerchiefs to pawn or sell. I sold two handkerchiefs and one shirt at a public-house, and we drank with the money together. He gave me some things to wear myself.

JAMES PALMER . It is false; I drank but one pot of beer with him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-35

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26.

1522. SARAH JOHNSON and ANN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one pocket book, value 5 s. and one one-pound promissory note, the property of Philip Jay , from his person .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP JAY . I am a worsted manufacturer , and live at Cavendish in Suffolk. On the 11th of October I was in town, and about eleven o'clock at night was returning home to my lodgings, at the Green Dragon, inn, Bishopsgate-street. I went into a public-house, at the corner of Dean-street, Holborn, and saw the prisoners there; they were impertinent to me; I told them not to interfere with me. I left the house and they followed. I told them to keep their distance. Opposite Chancery-lane, in Holborn , I called a coach in the middle of the street, and as I was getting in, I was hustled by them; they came round me, and asked me to go with them. I missed my pocketbook directly from my left-hand inside coat-pocket; it contained memorandums and a one-pound Suffolk note.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How were they impudent to you - A. They used improper language: I was neither drunk nor sober, but capable of knowing what passed.

ROBERT ROSS . I am a linen draper, and live in High-Holborn. I was coming through Great Turnstile, and saw the prosecutor and the two prisoners on the opposite side of Holborn, and from the conduct of the prisoners, I was induced to follow them. I saw Mr. Jay leave them near Brownlow-street - they followed him very closely - I saw him call a coach. He was then on the pavement; the coach drew up to the pavement - he was off the curb stone. As he got in, the prisoners went one on each side of him. Johnston took something from under his coat - she then said to Brown,

"Come along." I saw her put whatever it was under her pelisse. I went up and laid hold of her. She put her fingers up to her mouth, and said,

"Hush." I called the watch - she threw the pocket book from her, and was taken. Brown ran off, but was stopped by the watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Brown some distance off - A. No, she was at Mr. Jay's side.

SIRAS JAY . I am not related to the prosecutor. I saw Johnson throw the pocket book down in the middle of the street - I picked it up and gave it to the watchman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSTON'S Defence. I met this young woman - we went into the public-house for a glass of porter; the prosecutor sat in a box; there were five or six girls and men; he said he thought there was something superior in my appearance and behaviour, and he would give me whatever I liked to drink. I had brandy and water, and two glasses of gin, which he paid for, and we went away together, and by his desire I left him by Chancery-lane. We were going the same way as him; my attention was called by seeing several people round a coach - I went up and saw the pocket book; I picked it up; the gentleman came, and I said, if it belonged to him, to take it.

BROWN'S Defence. He asked us to drink with him, and

by his desire we left him. I left my friend to go home, and was crossing when the gentleman took me.

JOHNSTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-36

1523. WILLIAM TOWNSEND alias POCOCK was indicted for feloniously assaulting Aaron Crossley Seymour , on the King's highway, on the 13th of September , at St. Marylebone, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two sovereigns and one ten-pound bank-note his property.

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

MR. AARON CROSSLEY SEYMOUR. I live at Dublin, and am not in any business. In September last, I was in England, and lodged in Upper Bryanston-street; I am married. Mrs. Seymour was in England with me; on the evening of the 6th of September, we had drank tea with a friend in Lower Bryanston-street, which lies between Portman-square and Oxford-road, and is, I should think, not fifty yards from Oxford-road; I set out from there to go to see a friend next door to the Middlesex Hospital; I meant to take a coach. I met the prisoner at the corner of Bryanston-street, in Portman-street.

Q. Did you meet, or did he overtake you - A. We came to the corner together - he asked what o'clock it was - it was quite dark, and was between eight and nine o'clock; I told him the time as near as I could, without taking out my watch; he remarked that it was a fine night, and walked by me; no further conversation passed; he continued to walk by my side, and when I got into Oxford-street, I stood on the pavement searching for my eye glass, to see if there was a coachman on a coach-box, and while searching for my glass he asked if I wanted a coach - I said I did - he then said he believed I was a stranger in London, and he would get one for me.

Q. Were you a stranger in town - A. Yes; I had only been here two days - I was here some years ago.

Q. A good many years ago - A. Yes; he asked what direction I was going in - I said towards Middlesex Hospital; he said he was going in the same direction, and begged I would allow him to take part of the coach, and he would pay his share; I said I would pay for the coach, and if any accommodation to him, he was at liberty to go as far as convenient - I thought it would be ungenerous to refuse just at that moment. He pointed out a coach on the stand, which happened to be the first - we walked towards it, and before we said any thing, the door was opened; I cannot tell who by, but it was not the waterman usually on the stand; I stepped in first - the prisoner delayed in coming in, and said something to the man who opened the door, which I did not hear, and immediately stepped into the coach, which was shut up in a moment - the door was shut so very quick, I had not a moment to direct where to drive, and the man did not apply, as they usually do, for money. The prisoner placed himself between me and the door, and immediately gave the direction towards Marylebone Church; not knowing immediately where Marylebone Church was, I said,

"Is that in my direction?" - he said it was; the coach drove up Portman-street, which I had come down, into Portman-square; if it had turned to the right in the square, it would take me to Middlesex hospital - I knew that from the map - but I saw it go up to the west side of the square, and immediately objected, and said it was taking me out of my way; he said it was not - at this time the coach was going on rapidly; he said he only wanted to go to the street a little above the square, and then the coach would go on with me; I said I was in a hurry to go to Berner's-street, and he must either leave the coach, or I would, and get another; he said there was no necessity for my leaving the coach, as he meant to drive to Marylebone New Church, and then to the watch-house; I asked what business he could have at the watch-house; he said he meant to commit me for malepractices; I immediately put my head out of the window and called to the coachman to stop - and then saw a man on the box with the coachman; the prisoner begged I would not make a noise, as we could get out quietly at Marylebone Church; I was alarmed at what he had said, and having seen two men on the coach box, I said I would not stay another moment - I again called the coachman; he did not hear me, I suppose; the prisoner put his head out on the other side, and said something, what I could not hear - he spoke to one of the men on the box - the coach was at this time just passing the garden of Montague House, I opened the door and jumped out, being much alarmed, and ran down the west side of the square, and saw no more of him that night; I turned to the south side of the square, and along Edward-street, to Middlesex hospital. And on the 12th or 13th, (I don't know the day of the week), I saw him again about four o'clock, in the afternoon, at my own door in Upper Bryanston-street, just as I was knocking; he said he had now found out where I lived - expressed himself dissatisfied at my having treated him so shabbily about the coach; I told him my leaving the coach was unavoidable, as I expected either to be robbed or murdered - that he had imposed on me as I was a stranger; the door was at that moment opened by my servant - I said I would be in, in a few minutes; I was unwilling to bring him into the house, and we walked up to the top of Bryanston-street. He told me he was a hard-working man, and that I was a gentleman - and said,

"Now, you shall pay me well, or I will expose you to the world;" I asked him how - he said he knew himself, and that he was an ironmonger living in Adam-street, (there is Adam-street close by Edgware-road) - that his name was William Townsend , and he was well known in the neighbourhood; I remonstrated with him on the impropriety of his accusation and demand.

Q. What demand had he made - A. He had said he would be paid well or he would expose me - he said he must have 50 l., or he would expose me to the world. I reasoned with him - and told him he could neither have principle, honour, nor humanity, to extort money from me, and he must be conscious that he was extorting it; he said he did not want to talk about things of that sort, he must have the money - he became very loud in his demands, and threatened to expose me to the first person he met in the street.

Q. Did he ever say what he would expose you about - A. Nothing more than malepractices; he was loud in his demands - I became very much alarmed and thrown off

my guard - I said I had not such a sum of money, and could not afford to give it him; he said he would take 20 l.; I said I could not give him that neither; he said he must have it; I replied I could not give it - he then asked what I could give him; I said I had 10 l. in my pocket; he swore with an oath, he would not take that; I do not recollect what the oath was; he said immediately after that he would take that, if I would give him something more, but he would not take 10 l. alone as he had sworn it; I said I could get him a couple of sovereigns perhaps, and begged him to wait in the street. I returned home, went up stairs, dinner was on the table - I told Mrs. Seymour I should be back in a minute; I got two sovereigns out of my desk, went down and gave them to him - (I had given him the 10 l. note.) He went away, swearing in a very solemn manner, that I should never hear of him, or see him any more.

Q. About how long were you in the coach with him on the 6th of September - A. I think not five minutes, we did not go more than four hundred yards; I certainly did not take any indecent liberties with him - nor was I guilty of any malepractices towards him. I parted with my money from very great alarm and apprehension of his exposing both my person to danger, and my character to injury.

Cross-examined by ADOLPHUS. Q. You were in town only two or three days before this happened - A. I came to town on Wednesday, and this happened on Friday - it is nearly four years since I was in town before.

Q. Had you not been in London at all during that interval of four years - A. For two days I had - that was about a month before this transaction - I then came from Cheltenham. I only came to see my brother who was in a bad state of health; I lived in Dublin.

Q. Have you lived much in England, during the four years, though not in London - A. I have, at Brighton, Bath, Cheltenham, and Tunbridge - I lived at those places for the first two years of the four - but for the last two years I have been out of England, except the times I have mentioned.

Q. How long were you living in London four years ago - A. I was about eight months in the neighbourhood of Bedford-square - I lived in China Mews, Tottenham Court-road. I was never in any business; I knew very well how to call a coach for myself - but was not at all acquainted with the streets in the neighbourhood of Marylebone; I was once in Regent's-park, four years ago. The person I wanted to call on by the Middlesex Hospital, was Mrs. Ward, No. 39, Berner's-street. I had no acquaintance with the prisoner till he spoke to me. Oxford-road was not my nearest way - but I went there for the purpose of getting a coach. I did not take the number - and did not see a creature passing to call to for assistance; there might be people passing, but I did not see them. I mentioned this circumstance to nobody between the 6th and 12th. Montague House is at the North West corner of Portman-square - I had never been by there before, but have walked there since.

Q. On the 12th or 13th, did he say any thing more than that he would expose you - A. For malepractices, he said nothing more. There was not a man-servant in the house. I did not attempt to secure him, or desire help.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Was the coach stand the nearest to Lower Bryanston-street - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did you ever go to Adam-street to look for an ironmonger named Townsend - A. Never.

Q. What was your reason for not calling for assistance on the 13th in the street, it being day-light - A. I felt very much alarmed, and saw a man pass by in Bryanston-street, while I was talking to the prisoner, and the prisoner nodded very familiarly to him, and laughed - and he passed twice again while we were talking. When we were in Bryanston-street, he said his mother had left him an estate in Ireland, which he expected to get when he was of age - that it amounted to 3,000 l., and he wished to go over to get payment of it, and had not the means, and threw himself on me to enable him so to do - and after that he threatened if I did not give him the money he would expose me. I have been married nearly five years.

Q. How soon after the 12th or 13th, did you communicate to any one about what passed - A. I cannot exactly say - my wife spoke to me about it about the 2d of October.

JURY. Q. How was the prisoner dressed, when you took him into the coach - A. Entirely in black, but being night I could not distinguish whether it was good black - he appeared to me well dressed. I am sure it was on Friday, and not on Sunday night.

MARY KENDALL . I keep the house, No. 28, Upper Bryanston-street. On the 5th of September last, Mr. and Mrs. Seymour came to lodge with me. The prisoner came to the house several times - the first time was the 2d of October, about eight o'clock in the morning; I let him in; nobody was with him; he requested to see Mr. Seymour; I said he was not at home - he said he had better not deny himself, for he had been twice denied before, and if Mr. Seymour would not see him, he would fetch an officer; he went away for about five minutes, and brought a young fellow with him, and said that was an officer, and that he was one himself; the young man said nothing; I requested them to come in and speak to Mrs. Seymour - (Mr. Seymour was out); he was very turbulent, and I requested Mrs. Seymour to come down to see him. He said he wanted 28 l. from Mr. Seymour, that he had received 12 l. at one time, and 10 l. at another. Mrs. Seymour came down - I was present, and shewed her into the front parlour; I stood in the passage; the prisoner took out a short stick, and said he was an officer - (the other man did not come in at all.) I could hear what passed, as the door was open; he said his business was secret; he could not tell Mrs. Seymour what it was on any account, and said he would be there at 12 o'clock next day; this was on Thursday, the 2d of October; I believe it was 11 o'clock before he left. Mrs. Seymour saw him twice after that in my presence. He was taken up in the passage of my house, on the Tuesday after; he had called several times in the course of that time. He told me on the Monday before he was taken, that he was a watchmaker, named Townsend, living in Adam-street, that he was a very respectable young man, and very well known; he came several times. On the Saturday I saw him, and spoke to him - he said he understood Mr. Seymour was a man of fortune, and bore a very good character, and married a rich heiress, and he was surprised he could not pay him the money he had promised him; he said he would inform Mrs. Seymour if he did not pay him - and desired to speak to her; I called her down - she came to the door, and desired to know what he wanted; he said he could not inform her, it

would make her miserable for life, and blast Mr. Seymour's character - he said nothing more, but went away. On the Monday after, I met him in Oxford-street, between eight and nine o'clock at night - he spoke to me; I said I could not stop to speak to him in the street; he said he wished me to inform Mr. Seymour he should call on him in the morning; I desired him not to call to annoy Mrs. Seymour any more, for it was very unpleasant to me and her; he said he was in great want of his money; he was going to Ireland; that his grandmother was dead, and he could not go without the money - that Mr. Seymour was guilty of crimes not worthy of a man; I asked how he became acquainted him - if it occurred in Ireland or since he came to England; he said in England; I asked how he knew it; he said he called a coach in Oxford-street; I asked if Mr. Seymour had insulted the coachman; he said No; he called a coach, and took a person in it with him.

Q. He said a person, not himself - A. No, a person; nothing more passed till next morning at eight o'clock, when he knocked at the door; I saw him in a minute, and showed him into the front parlour, requesting he would not see Mrs. Seymour any more, as it would be very serious and he would be taken up.

Cross-examined. Q. They came to you on the 5th - A. Yes; from the Park-hotel, where they had been only one night; they came from Cheltenham; they went to drink tea every evening at a relation's in Lower Bryanston-street; I think the lady's name is Rogers.

Q. He said his business was money, and it was a secret affair - A. Yes; he did not object to my being present. Mrs. Seymour requested me to go in.

Q. You told him he would be taken up if he came, and yet he did come - A. Yes.

MRS. ANN SEYMOUR . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Wednesday, the 2d of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, (I think), Mrs. Kendall called me down. I saw the prisoner; he said my husband owed him 50 l., I said it must be a mistake, he said it was not; I asked what it was for, he said it was a great secret; I said I knew nothing about it, but if it was the case, if he would call next day at twelve o'clock, if the money was owing, Mr. Seymour would settle it; he went away. I requested information might be given at the police-office; and about four o'clock that day, the officers came, but the prisoner did not come. I did not see him again till about seven o'clock on Saturday evening; I was in the parlour, and went out to him and asked his business, he said he wanted 28 l. of Mr. Seymour, and if he did not get it he would injure Mr. Seymour's character for ever; I replied, that his character did not depend on him; and he said he would ruin my happiness for ever by the disclosure, and that he would write me a letter by the next morning, stating the whole particulars; I received no letter. I did not see him again till the Tuesday morning following, which was the 8th of October; when he came, I went into the parlour and called Mrs. Kendall in and my own servant; the prisoner said,

"Now Ma'am I will tell you all. Mr. Seymour is guilty of crimes unworthy of man; I have two coachmen to prove it; they say they will prosecute me, as I know where he lives, if I don't prosecute him, and I have given them 20 l. each, and I am a ruined man if I don't get 28 l." I offered him 10 l. if he would sign a paper never to molest Mr. Seymour more, (Mr. Seymour came into the parlour while I was making the offer, I think,) he said he would not sign the paper as he should get himself into a scrape, and said he would not take the money except he had a witness of his own; Mr. Seymour offered him 10 l.; he said, at last, he would take the money of Mrs. Kendall at the hall-door. We had two officers ready looking out for him. Mrs. Kendall had the money ready to give him at the hall-door, when Clement's, the officer, came and took him.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner in the passage of No. 28, Bryanston-street, on Tuesday, the 8th of October. I had attended on Wednesday, the 2d of October, Thursday, the 3d, and Monday the 7th, for the purpose of taking him, by the prosecutor's desire. As I took him to the office, he began to speak to me of his own accord; he said,

"Oh, he is a bad one." I asked in what respect; he then said,

"About five weeks ago, I was walking in Seymour-street, about half drunk; and the prosecutor came up to me, took hold of my arm, and asked if I would go and have something to drink; I refused, saying I had been drinking before" - that they walked together until they came to a coach-stand in Oxford-street, when the prosecutor called a coach, and they got in and drove up Portman-street, across Portman-square, and when they got into Gloster-street, the gentleman put one hand across his neck, and the other into his breeches - that he directly called to the coachman to stop, with intent to take the man who was on the box with the coachman, inside, and then drive to Marylebone watch-house; but before the coachman could stop, he jumped out and ran away; that he never saw him after for a fortnight, and then he was drinking at Buckland's public-house, Bryanston-street, and saw the prosecutor go up to the next door; that he ran up to him, and collared him, and said,

"Now I have found you, I'll go and fetch my father, and you shall be exposed for what you did to me in the coach the other night, and left me to pay for the coach" - that the prosecutor begged of him to be quiet, and he would give him anything to be quiet, and say no more about it; that he then went in, and brought out a 10 l. note and two sovereigns, and gave him - that he at first refused to take it, and threw it down on the stones, but afterwards took it and went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he repeat the same before the Justice - A. Part of it. I believe it was not written down. One Kelly was sent for, who made a demand on the prisoner. I believe it was not taken down. I was present all the time.

COURT. Q. You searched the prisoner's apartments - A. Yes. He told me he lived in Cutler-street, Oxford-road - I went and searched his lodgings there, and found a pocket book in a chest of drawers, containing a quantity of pawnbroker's duplicates. Some things which I found were afterwards delivered up to him.

MR. WALFORD. Q. How much did Kelly demand of the prisoner - A. I cannot say whether it was 3 l. 10 s. or 4 l. The prisoner said,

"I do not owe you a halfpenny," and repeated it several times - Kelly persisted in it, and it drew tears from the prisoner, and at last the prisoner said,

"You want to extort money from me, the same as I have from this gentleman," pointing to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. He directed you to his lodgings; how long he lived there you do not say - A. Only from what I heard. I am sure he did not say, you want to extort money, the same as I am charged. I rather think he told me he had lived in Adam-street, but am not certain. He did not say what he was.

Prisoner's Defence. I have to say that when I accosted Mr. Seymour in the street, he pushed his hands away from him, and said,

"For God's sake don't expose me. I will give you any sum you want." He walked across into Paddington-fields, where it is private. I told him I did not want money, for if my father knew it he would sacrifice me and him too. He insisted on my having money, and said that money was more object to me than my character - I took it up, and went away with it. Besides that, he says it was on Friday night when he first met me - it was half-past ten o'clock on Sunday evening. He accosted me, and asked me what it was o'clock - (I had a watch which Clements has.) He walked with me to the corner of Adam-street. I did not know he was going to state it was Friday, or I could have brought a man who saw him speak to me on Sunday night, at half-past ten o'clock.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I have a watch of his.

MR. SEYMOUR. Q. You walked to the top of the street with him, were you in any field with him - A. Certainly not. I was not out of Bryanston-street - he had not threatened me with anything about his father.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-37

1524. JAMES GOODWIN was indicted for stealing on the 22d of October , one pelisse, value 15 l.; six yards of linen, value 10 s.; two table cloths, value 1 l., and one petticoat, value 5 s., the goods of William Ward , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WARD . I am a baker , and rent a house in Whitehorse-street, Whitehorse-terrace, Stepney . On the 22d of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise in the shop, I was down stairs, and sent the boy up; I went up after him in a few minutes, and saw the prisoner at the entrance of the parlour-door, behind the counter; he said he wanted a penny-loaf. I looked into the parlour and saw both the drawers open; I found the pelisse lying behind the door, about a yard from the drawers, and two table-cloths on a chair, two shirts and a pocket were on the floor; they were all taken out of the drawers. I had been across the room at four o'clock that morning, they were not there then. There was nobody in the shop; I heard him open the parlour-door. I had not seen the things, in the drawers, for two or three days before. My wife was not up till just before eight o'clock, and had not been in the parlour till he was taken.

WILLIAM HARRE . I am shop-boy to Mr. Ward. I ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner come out of the parlour; he had nothing; I was in the parlour at four o'clock, not after, I had not seen my mistress up that morning, till after the prisoner was taken; he was close to the door when I ran up. I saw one George Courtney looking in at the window; he nodded to the prisoner to come out as I ran up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. While the gentleman was gone for the officer, the prosecutor took the things out of the drawer and laid them about the place.

WILLIAM WARD . It is not true. The property is worth 32 s.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 32 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-38

1525. GEORGE VELLUM was indicted for making an assault upon William Blake , and stabbing him on his left side, with intent to kill and murder him, or do him some grevious bodily harm .

JOHN EMBLETON . I live in Hart-street, Covent-garden. On the 30th of September , I was at Chelsea , looking at a race which was going on by some women for a shift. I saw the prisoner in the crowd; he struck a boy named Blake, on the left breast, with his right hand; I saw nothing in his hand when he hit Blake; it was a front blow. I heard a cry that he had stabbed him; the prisoner ran off; I overtook him about one hundred yards off, and took hold of his right hand, in which I found a pen-knife, I put it into my pocket without noticing whether it was bloody. I said,

"You rascal what has become of the knife?" he opened his hand and gave it to me. I told him he had stabbed a boy; he made no answer. I took him back to the place, and found he had stabbed two boys. A surgeon was sent for, who said Blake's wound was dangerous; the prisoner was detained; he said he would never carry a knife again, and then he could not use it; that the boys had beset him, and he had said he would strike them with it if they did not leave him alone; that they had been following him, and beating him.

HENRY BLAKE . I am about twelve years old. I was in the crowd; a good many boys were fighting with the prisoner - I was one of them; he said,

"If you don't keep away I will run the knife into you;" we did not keep away. He had the knife in his hand at the time he stabbed the other boy, then walked away, and we followed him.

COURT. Under these circumstances, if death had occurred, it would be man-slaughter and not murder.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-39

1526. GEORGE VELLUM was again indicted for the like offence upon William Mosley .

No evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18221023-40

1527. WILLIAM RUTHERFORD was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Mary Tuffnell , about eleven o'clock at night, of the 22d of October , and stealing one gown, value 3 s.; one towel, value 1 d.; one petticoat, value 3 d.; three waiters, value 3 d., and two mugs, value 6 d., her property; and one gown, value 18 d.; one shift, value 6 d., and one pair of stockings, value 1 d. , the goods of Hannah Simpson .

MARY TUFFNELL . I am a single woman, and keep a house in Union-street, Shadwell . The prisoner lodged eight months with me; he went away last Friday week, and said he was going into Greenwich-Hospital. Last Tuesday night I went out a little before eight

o'clock, and returned a little past eleven o'clock, I missed my things; I had fastened the front door, the back door was just shut.

HANNAH SIMPSON . I went out with Tuffnell. The things hung on the line, some of them were mine; when I returned they were gone.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman of Shadwell. About eleven o'clock last Tuesday night, I stopped the prisoner on my beat, with a bundle under his arm, coming in a direction from the prosecutrix's house; he said they were his clean things, that he was going on board his ship; he had two goblets under his jacket, which made me suspect him. He struggled, but I secured him, and in the watch-house he said he got them from the prosecutrixes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They took all my money, and promised to keep me till I got a ship; she kicked me out of doors. I did not intend to make away with the things.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Of stealing only . - Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-41

1528. JOHN BURROWS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Johanna, the wife of Thomas Mahon , on the King's highway, on the 22d of October , at Christchurch, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of the said Thomas Mahon .

JOHANNA MAHON . I am the wife of Thomas Mahon , we live on the Commercial-road. On the 22d of October, I was passing from Whitechapel to Flower and Dean-street, about five minutes past eleven o'clock at night, going to fetch one of my children. I saw the prisoner in George's-street , and asked him if that was my way to Flower and Dean-street; he said

"Yes," and walked on my left side till we got about the middle of the street, and then knocked me down in the mud and took off my shawl; he got me down by going behind me, putting both his hands on my shoulders, and pushing me forward, and took my shawl; he took it at the same moment as he shoved me. He ran back immediately the way we came. It was a dark night, but there were lamps in the street. I am sure he is the man, from his size and dress.

MICHAEL HUGHES . I am a watchman. I was standing at the corner of George's-street; the prisoner went by just before eleven o'clock, and about five minutes after I saw the prosecutrix standing up all covered with mud. In consequence of what she said, I went in pursuit, and about a quarter before twelve o'clock, Pate and I were together, and the prisoner was coming down Winfield-street; I stopped him and asked what he had done with the shawl he took from the woman, (she had not described him - I took him from seeing him go by about the time;) he said

"What woman?" I said the woman who was knocked down and had the shawl taken from her in George's-street; he strongly denied it. I took him with the assistance of my partner, to her house; he still denied it. Pate took off his hat and the shawl was in it. I saw nobody else in the street when he went down.

WILLIAM PATE . I have heard the last witnesses's account, it is true; I found the shawl in the prisoner's hat; he had denied it.

THOMAS HART . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the shawl about twelve o'clock at night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards home, and at the corner of the street I picked up this shawl; I asked several people if it belonged to them; nobody owned it. I put it in my hat, and had it for half an hour.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutrix, believing it to be his first offence.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-42

1529. EDWARD EDRIDGE was indicted for a rape .

GUILTY - DEATH .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-43

1530. GEORGE MASSEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting, on the 30th of October , James Lockwood , putting him in fear, and demanding money of him, with intent to rob him .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

The prisoner had attacked the prosecutor in the street, and in a most scandalous manner charged him with an unnatural crime, the particulars of which are too indelicate for publication.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-44

1531. JOHN LACEY and JOHN WALTERS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , four casks, value 3 l. , the goods of George Hale , and others his partners; and JAMES TURNER was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. HALL LYNN. I am a partner in the firm of George Hale and Co., brewers ; there are three partners - George Hale is the first. Lacey and Walters were in our service, and in consequence of information, I got the officers to watch them; they are our draymen ; they have their orders every morning from the storehouse clerk, and all the casks are put into the dray, and they have to bring back the empty ones from the customers, whatever they return. We have lost casks within the last year to the amount of 1200 l.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many servants have you - A. A great many. We have bought upwards of 300 new casks within the last year. I have ten draymen.

Q. Is it not the practice, when they are overloaded, to leave casks at any place, and call for them in the morning - A. I never knew ale casks deposited in that way; I have known small casks pitched. If the dray is full, they should leave them in the publican's cellar.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever know men go out of their way to leave casks - A. Never. A dray will carry twenty-four full barrels, and perhaps thirty empty. I never knew casks pitched in the City.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. I was employed to watch the prisoners. On Saturday, the 28th of September, about seven or eight o'clock in the morning, the first

thing I observed was the dray coming from the brow-house in Redcross-street - Lacey and Walters attended it. They first stopped at the Bull's Head, public-house, Jewin-crescent, and delivered two casks, and received two empty ones in return, and put them in the dray. They then went and delivered two casks at the Nagg's Head, Aldersgate-street, and received one empty one. They then went to the corner of Butcherhall-lane, and delivered four full casks, and received five empty; then to Bowman's, in St. Paul's church-yard, left two casks, and received four empty ones; then to the Weaver's Arms, London Wall, and left five full, and received five empty ones; then to the Flying Horse in Grub-street, and livered one, and received one. This house is about two hundred yards from the brew-house; and if they wanted to dispose of the empty casks, they could go and deliver them; but they turned back, and went down to the bottom of Fore-street, towards Moorfields - and there Walters left his companion, and went across Moorfields, and Lacey went towards London Wall, into Bishopsgate-street, and stood opposite Bishopsgate Church. In about five minutes Walters returned, and came up to the dray, and they went with the dray to the London workhouse - they stopped there and took out four large empty casks, and rolled them on the heads, (each having two), into the yard of the London workhouse. Turner was the porter at the gate - he received the casks from them, and put them up by the side of the wall, inside the gates - and as he received them one at the time, he took hold of some hamper leads and baskets, and covered them over one at a time, so as to conceal them; and the moment the fourth was delivered, Lacey turned his horses' heads round, and drove off at a very fair pace. Walters and Turner stopped a minute or two, and tossed up a halfpenny, and as soon as he picked up his halfpenny, both came out of the workhouse gate. I went in, and went to the casks, lifted up the covering, and saw

"Hale, Redcross-street," very deeply burnt on the cask; and instead of finding four casks, I found five; only four were delivered at that time. They were all five marked the same. I then took the opportunity of taking a knife out, and marking them. I continued to watch them day and night, till Monday night, to see how they were disposed of. I left on Wednesday - they were on the premises then; I went again on Friday, in the afternoon, and missed them; but before that, between the Saturday and Friday, I had seen the prisoners there in conversation with Turner twice; they both went together both times. I apprehended Turner at the workhouse gate, on the Friday; the casks were then gone. Turner came in at the gate about two o'clock. I asked him what had become of the casks left by Hale's draymen, the other day; he said,

"Go and ask those who took them away." I said I was an officer, and would not be trifled with - I repeated my question, to which he returned the same answer. He was very resolute; I handcuffed him, and brought him to the Compter. I had taken the other prisoners at the brewhouse before. They laughed at it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. It was done in open day light - A. Yes; the dray left as soon as they were delivered. I made a memorandum of the circumstance - they received eighteen empty casks in all, and delivered sixteen full ones.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Would the dray have held more casks - A. Yes, it was a large four-wheeled dray, with three horses.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am an officer - and accompanied Clinton. Every word of his evidence is true. I was not with him when the prisoners were apprehended. I saw the casks in the workhouse yard, covered with hampers; Turner covered them over. I watched them from Saturday till Monday.

Cross-examined. Q. How many days did you see the casks in the yard - A. From Saturday till Monday. The names could not be seen, without the hamper covers being taken off.

MR. LYNN. Our brewery has nothing to do with the London workhouse. The casks cost us 23 s. each.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your storehouse clerk here - A. No, he only orders what beer to take out.

WALTERS' Defence. A great deal he has sworn is false.

TURNER'S Defence. These men have frequently come and said they were heavily loaded, and left casks, and fetched them sometimes the same day, and sometimes in a day or two. They left five on Saturday; I moved some baskets for them to go against the wall, and then threw them up, to make way for the trucks to come in. The master of the workhouse once gave them leave to put casks there.

HENRY GARDNER . I have been master of the workhouse nineteen months - Turner was porter there. One day, about twelve months ago, the prisoners came to me when I was in the yard, and asked permission to leave some casks - I gave them leave. I have observed none there since.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had not been there long, when the request was made - A. No, they did not ask my leave, till they saw me coming. The workhouse cellars are hired by a wine merchant - and casks are being brought there all day. There are baskets and hampers about.

LACEY - GUILTY . WALTERS - GUILTY .

See sixth day.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 58.

Turner Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-45

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, OCTOBER 28.

1532. FREDERICK STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of George Warner , from his person .

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ANDREWS . I live in Trinity-court. On the 2d of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Princes-street, Piccadilly , and saw the prisoner go behind Mr. Warner, and take a handkerchief out of his pocket; (he was smartly dressed.) He ran off; I pursued calling Stop thief, and as he turned out of the street he dropped the handkerchief - I picked it up, and secured him.

GEORGE WARNER . I am a clerk in the War Office, and live at Kensington. I was walking down Princes-street,

and was informed my pocket was picked - I felt and missed my handkerchief, which was safe just before, and pursued the prisoner down Lisle-street, and found him in custody with it. He was respectably dressed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-46

1533. SARAH HEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Samuel Vincent .

SAMUEL VINCENT . I live in Wych-street . The prisoner lodged with me for two months. On the 12th of October last, about ten o'clock at night, I missed the watch from my back parlour - it hung over the turn-up bedstead. The prisoner lived in the two pair back room, with her husband. I found it on the Thursday following at a pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. In what room was your bedstead - A. In the back parlour. Her husband might be in the house at that time.

JOSEPH CAMPAIGN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday evening, and found four duplicates in her room, but none were for the watch. She denied it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say her husband took it - A. No. I believe they were in distress.

JOHN LESTER . I am shopman to Mr. Aldus, a pawnbroker. I took the watch in from the prisoner, on Saturday, the 12th of October, at night, for 22 s. I knew her before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The real fact is, my husband stole it, and I pawned it - we were in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Fourteen Days .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-47

1234. HENRY DAY was indicted for that he, on the 2d of March , in the 2d year of His Majesty's reign, at St. Mary-le-Strand , feloniously did sell certain silver plate, made and wrought in Great Britian, (to wit,) four silver gravy spoons, each of them at the time of sale having thereon the impression of a forged mark, forged and counterfeited to resemble a mark used (in pursuance of the 55th of George the 3d) for the purpose of marking such silver plate; he knowing the said impressions to be the impressions of such forged and counterfeited mark as aforesaid, with intent to defraud our Lord the King , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same only for exposing to sale, instead of selling, and substituting the word stamp for mark.

THIRTEEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL and MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN JONES . I am a silversmith, and live at No. 338, in the Strand. I have lived there nine years. The prisoner is a working silversmith - I have known him as one for six or seven years. He worked for his father before he went into business for himself, and was well acquainted with the trade. In the beginning of the year 1821, I gave him a general order for goods, which he brought in at four different times. I produce the bill of parcels of the goods delivered by him; it is in his hand-writing.

This bill was here read - it contained various items, among which were the four gravy spoons stated in the indictment. There was a charge of 4 l. 15 s. 1 d., for duty on the whole weight of the goods.

He found the silver himself. His charge on the bill is merely the fashion, the weight of the silver is at the bottom, and the price not charged.

Q. Do you understand from this he meant to state he had paid for duty 4 l. 15 s. 1 d. - A. Exactly so. I paid him that sum including the duty. He delivered the gravy spoons on the 2d of March - I produce them. When I ordered them of him I had no other gravy spoons in my stock, nor have I had any since. I am sure they are the same he delivered me on the 2d of March. I afterwards delivered them to Mr. Miles, the inspector of stamps. This was a fortnight or three week ago. I marked them first.

Q. Have you any other article now in your possession included in the bill of parcels, besides the gravy spoons - A. Yes; here is a soup ladle. I bought two. Sometime after I received them, he came to me, and wanted to borrow one for an order he had in a hurry, and I lent him one - about a week afterwards he returned it; I cannot say it is the same I lent, but both came from him. The weight was cast up, and I paid him part in cash and part in a bill at two months - the total sum of the whole order, which was in four deliveries, was 41 l. 8 s. 1 d., the amount of fashion, and duty is 8 l. 10 s. of the first bill. The amount of the whole silver was 73 l. 18 s. 7 d. I had a transaction with him in February, and have a bill of parcels of it. It contains six French dessert spoons - I paid him for duty on the whole delivery 3 l. - it was included in the total amount. I produce the six dessert spoons; the other things are sold. At the time I had these dessert spoons from him, I had no others of that description in my stock, nor have I had since.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You have been speaking of transactions eighteen months ago - A. Yes, my business is not very large - I only employ one working silversmith, besides him. I dealt with his father, their business is not very large, I believe. I believe the prisoner delivered me the goods himself - part of them I can speak positively to. I never entered the goods I bought of him in any book, because I always paid him money when he brought them in. I am perfectly certain that these goods came from his hand. He has a brother or two, and his father used to come sometimes. I might have received some goods from his apprentice; workmen and apprentices have brought goods in some cases. These goods have been in my possession ever since; I am sure he brought them himself. I have one young man who has the care of my stock, he has been with me three years - he and my wife are the only persons having access to my stock; the shop is locked up at night. We weigh them, and put a private mark on them, but no mark to distinguish from whom they come; I trust to the maker's initials, which are punched on the stamp. Until within the last three weeks, I had no reason to direct my attention to

them. I have no other goods of the kind in my possession. I never lend plate out. I have not dismissed any servant since March, 1821. I believe the bill of parcels is in the prisoner's hand-writing - the back of it is, but I cannot speak to the body of it, because I did not see him write it.

COURT. Q. Judging of his hand-writing, do you believe it to be his; suppose you saw a Bill of exchange drawn in that hand, as by him, should you have accepted it - A. Yes, I should.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Is the back of the bill, which is the particulars of the whole transaction, his writing - A. It is, I saw him write it, and gave him the money; my private mark is on the spoons to denote the weight - I put that on perhaps a day or two after; they are the identical spoons.

COURT. Q. You said you had one other person employed to manufacture for you, what are his initials - A. I have some from Wintle, I don't know his Christian name.

Q. You said you never entered the prisoner's work, because you paid him money, now one of the bills of parcels amounts to 8 l. 10 s. 1 d. which relates to various articles, and on the back of it is different duty and amounts, you did not pay that till the 2d of March - A. I added the bills altogether, knowing he would bring them in, in a few days.

DAVID JONES . I am a silversmith - and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's. I have had dealings with the prisoner; about the latter end of November, or beginning of December, 1820, I ordered some tea-spoons of him, which he supplied me with. I produce his bill of parcels - (read, dated, the 16th of December, 1820, amount 1 l. 12 s. 7 d.) - The spoons were delivered on the 9th of December. I produce them - 12 s. 6 d. is charged in the bill, as the duty on 80 z. 7 dwts. - I paid him the account on the 16th of December - when he brought me the bill, dated the 16th, which was for other articles, among which is one tea-spoon to match some others - 9 d. was charged for duty on that spoon; I paid that - but I have not got the spoon now. I paid him for the whole of the two jobs on that day, (the 16th of December, 1820.) I paid him cash, 1 l. 12 s. 7 d. for manufacture and duty; I gave him silver for the weight. I produce the 12 spoons which I received on the 9th, and am sure they are the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This occurrence was two years ago - A. About that time. I cannot say whether he delivered them, or whether it was his father, or brother; his brother was a workman, but the father had given the business up to the prisoner - but resided with him, and assisted him a little. The apprentice might have delivered them; but I received them from the prisoner's house. I have an apprentice. I think I received the goods myself, because I gave back work - but am not certain. I had two apprentices at that time; they are both with me still. I may have lent plate to accommodate a friend - but never lent tea-spoons on any occasion in my life. The bills and pattern of the spoons, enables me to speak to the circumstance - but I have a recollection of the circumstance. I am obliged to keep the pattern, but it is not often enquired for. I dare say every shop has that pattern. I have not turned any apprentice away. I have one whom I have a suspicion about - but that does not relate to duty, it is quite unconnected with it.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Are those the spoons described in that bill - A. They are; I am certain of it; they have my private mark on them, which corresponds with the weight in the invoice - which enables me to say they are the same described in the bill. The prisoner himself received the money, the duty being part of it. He put his initials to the bill at the time I paid him.

JURY. Q. Of course the duty charged in the bill, refers to the goods in those bills - A. It does; the duty charged never relates to goods not charged in the particular invoice.

JOHN WHITE DENNINC . I am journeyman to Mr. William Kirkham , a pawnbroker, who lives in Blackfriar's-road. I produce from our house, two silver skewers, which I had delivered to Mr. Miles; they formed a part of Mr. Kirkham's sale stock.

WILLIAM KIRKHAM . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Blackfriar's-road. I sometimes buy goods. I succeeded Joseph Phillips , of Burdett-place, Kent-road; at this house, I bought the whole of his stock of him - among which were three skewers; one we sold, and the other two were taken away on Saturday, by Mr. Miles; the last witness delivered them to him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS, JUNIOR. Q. From whom did you receive them - A. I found them in the house. I took the stock in February last.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS . I carried on business as pawnbroker, in Blackfriar's-road. Mr. Kirkham succeeded me, and took all the stock; the prisoner worked for me as silversmith, from about May, 1819, until September, 1821. He made three skewers for me, which I parted with to Mr. Kirkham - (looking at two) - my firm belief is they are the same that the prisoner made for me; but I cannot positively say, they have been so long out of my possession. I have no private mark on them; I believe them to be the same, from the make and shape; he never made me any before; his initials are on the stamp; I noticed that, when he brought them to my house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long ago is it, that he made them - A.(Looking at a memorandum), January the 18th, 1821; they were in my possession till the 11th of February, 1822; I have not seen them since; my full belief is, that they are the same.

Q. Look at that skewer, there is no initial on that - A. I remember once remarking to the prisoner, that the initial was not quite legible - and he said it was owing to the stamping.

Q. Have you had plate manufactured, or that came through the hands of Wintle - A. Not for many years - I think I had none within the last two years. I have had some from Weston, but not from him, for the last three years. I think there might be some of Wintle's make in my stock, when Mr. Kirkham took it. I do not know what has become of him or Weston.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had you any skewers from Wintle or Weston - A. None from any body but the prisoner. When I asked him about the faint mark - he said it was owing to the stamping; he did not say they were not his mark.

JAMES GEORGE STEVENS . I am a silversmith and pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. I dealt with the prisoner. Early in December, 1820, I ordered some butter ladles of him; he brought them home on the 8th or 9th, with a bill of parcels, which I produce - (read, charging the butter

ladles and several other articles, weight in all 12 oz. 2 dwts., duty 18 s. 2 d.) - the duty is charged 18 s. 2 d., which I paid him in the general account. I have two of the butter ladles - and produce them; the other pair is sold. I am sure they are the same; I never had any other of this description.

COURT. Q. Suppose I put these into your hands, not knowing whom it came from, should you say the initials were H. D. - A. To the best of my knowledge I should.

MR. WALFORD. Q. At the time the butter ladles were brought, was any fish slice brought - A. Yes; the prisoner brought them himself. I have the fish slice also. I bought it of him - and produce it - it is charged at the back of the bill; the charge includes the duty.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there a running account between you - A. Yes; the duty on different articles is specified in the bills. A variety of persons come to my shop; I have an apprentice and a young man; I am absent occasionally. I have a young boy in my service; I cannot say whether the shop was ever left to him; he is sixteen or seventeen years of age. I never pledged any of my stock; the goods were never out of my shop since I received them.

Q. Did you ever state that you received four salt spoons from the prisoner, and afterwards found you were mistaken - A. No; I swear that positively.

Q. Did you ever, on any occasion, within these two years back, make an offer to the prisoner that he should have back any goods he had left in your shop, if he had a doubt as to their correctness - A. No.

GEORGE MILES . I am an inspector of silver plate stamps, and have been so about thirteen years. The prisoner has been for some years a working silversmith. The plate is brought to Goldsmith's Hall, with the initials of the maker impressed on it; it is then assayed to try the quality of silver, and if correct, the Goldsmith's mark is impressed on it; also the mark denoting that the duty is paid. The Goldsmith's marks are to certify it is correct in quality, that is the lion and the leopard's head; and the King's mark is the King's head. I have the punch here; there is a letter impressed, which varies on the 29th of May every year; wrought plate is never delivered from the hall until the initials of the manufacturer's are stamped - (looking at the skewers) - I should not have stamped plate marked as these are. On the 26th of September, I was present when the prisoner's premises were searched; I found a steel punch on his premises, with his initials, which I have here - it is the regular punch which he should have as a working silversmith. The initials are H. D. (Looking at two gravy spoons the subject of this indictment,) we should not have suffered these to pass with the initials in the state these are now in. I have seen them before. The stamp of the King's head is forged on each spoon - the lion and leopards' heads are also forged. I have compared the prisoner's punch with the marks on the spoons; the initials on them correspond with the punch; the letter D. corresponds. The punch could have punched that letter. It appears by the gravy spoons that the punch has been first applied one way, and then in the reverse direction, and is completely confused. I have made some impressions with his punch, which I produce. (Looking at twelve tea spoons sold to David Jones ,) These marks are forged on all of them, and there is the same imperfections in most of the initials. We should not have stamped them with such initials. (Looking at six dessert spoons sold to J. Jones,) They are forged in all respects, also the stamp on the soup ladle. The initials on this are struck double, and on the skewers; we should not have passed them. (Looking at the butter ladle and fish knife,) The stamps are forged on both, and the initials on both are struck double - this makes it more difficult to discover the real initials. The variable letter on all but the butter ladle is E, which letter came into use on the 28th of May, 1820, and ceased on the 27th of May, 1821. The letter on the butter ladle is D, which was in use the year before. We should not have struck that letter in 1820.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you any thing to do with stamping the plate - A. At times I do, but very seldom; I have not ceased to be a stamper. There are ten persons in the office, only four of them are stampers. I never heard of a stamper being dismissed for misconduct; nobody in the office has been discharged, or complained of for irregularities; mistakes have happened at times.

Q. Genuine stamps have been mistaken for forged - A. Never in any instance that I ever heard of in my life.

Q. Did you ever hear of an instance as it regarded Mr. Carteledge - A. Yes; that was no mistake, it is said to have taken place, but did not. After plate is stamped, it has to undergo a polishing; it is always sent in as forward a state as possible, that they should pay the less duty. The finishing does not make the stamp the less perfect than when it is done at the hall, if it is done with skill. I have seen marks as perfect as when it came out of the hall, and have seen some less perfect, but never so as to render it at all difficult to say whether the stamp is genuine or not.

Q. Has there been presented to you pieces of plate, which at first, with common observation, you have hesitated about - A. I have hesitated certainly; if it is much obliterated I pause of course before I give my opinion. I know of no instance of a genuine mark being mistaken at our office for forged. I only know two manufacturers whose initials are H. D. We take an impression from the manufacturer's punch, and send it back to him; so that we see whether the punch mark corresponds with the impression we have; it comes to us with the manufacturer's mark punched on it; we do not enter in any book, who brings it; it is accompanied by two tickets, to denote from whom it comes; we take a receipt from the master or servant to whom it is delivered back.

Q. A manufacturer may be imposed on by the bearer of the plate, by substituting other plate - A. Yes. Our office is confined to the London district; but if plate came from any part of the kingdom, we take it. How many there are in the kingdom whose initials are H. D. I cannot say.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. Do you receive any plate from any person who has not a punch mark registered at your office - A. No; it is sent to the hall in as forward a state as possible, because the duty is according to weight, and polishing lessens the weight.

Q. Have you ever seen any plate immediately after polishing, in which you could have any difficulty in knowing the mark - A. No, after it has been worn and got into use, it may become more obliterated; the letters on the other persons punch, whose initials are H. D. are a different size; this plate corresponds with the prisoner's punch mark, and not with the other. None of the plate produced, has been stamped at Goldsmith's Hall.

COURT. Q. The plate comes to you unstamped - A. Yes, we send it out stamped.

MR. JOHN SMITH . I am engraver to the Goldsmith's Company, and the Stamp Office. I engrave the punch mark - (looking at the four gravy spoons) - the King's head on these is forged - (looking at the whole of the articles produced) - the marks on all these are forged.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish merely to state, most solemnly before my God, that I am innocent of the charge laid against me; if forgery is committed in any way, it is without my knowledge.

CHARLES DAY . I am the prisoner's brother. I have worked with him about three years and a half.

Q. Do you recollect, about the latter part of 1820, and some time after that, what state of health he was in - A. I recollect he was ill, and confined during that month.

Q. What month - A. During the latter part of February.

Q. What year are you speaking of - A.1820. I mean when it -

Q. Attend - give a correct account; your brother was ill when - A. In December, 1821; he was exceedingly ill before that, and his life despaired of for four months before. I do not mean that he was ill for four months, but four months before, he was labouring under a stricture, and in December and January following he had a relapse. He was not able at times to go out. I transacted his business for him. He was ill about three weeks after that, and went to Herefordshire for his health, and staid there seven or eight days. His business was then done for him by other persons.

- CARTELEDGE. I am a silver spoon maker. I had a transaction with the Goldsmith's Company when a mistake occurred - it was last August twelvemonth. Mr. Miles and two marshalsmen came to arrest me, and take me to the Mansion House, on the ground of stamped plate being forged; and when I got there, the mistake was found out. They had seized the plate as forged - it was given up - I have witnesses to prove it. It was not returned to me - it belonged to a box of Mr. Garfield's - it was not my property. I cannot say whether it was sent to its proper owner; I was not brought into trouble about it, but did all I could to bring the parties to justice.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. Was the plate returned by the Company - A. I have never had it returned - it was detained because it was among others that were forged - it was not mine. I do not know whether my employer ever had it back.

Q. The evidence against you was not sufficient, and you were discharged - A. Yes. I can swear, and prove that the mark was not forged. Garfield was not taken up with me - the plate was not in a box belonging to him - I know nothing about him. He was not in my business, nor was he at the Mansion House.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was the plate marked with a genuine stamp - A. It was.

WILLIAM MILES re-examined. I have an impression of the original stamp - the original is destroyed. There was no mistake in Carteledge's business. The plate was detained at the King's warehouse, as seized by his Majesty.

Q. Was the King's head on it forged - A. It was.

JURY. Q. Does the plate come to you sealed up - A. It does not - the initial punch is kept by the manufacturer, and he only can use it.

Fifteen witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-48

1535. THEODORE CONSTANTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , at St. George's, Hanover-square, one watch, value 5 l.; one chain, value 2 l., and four rings, value 20 s., the goods of William Jarrin , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM JARRIN . I am a confectioner , and live in New Bond-street, in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square . On Friday, the 27th of September, I saw the prisoner in my shop - he bought same cakes for two children he had with him. I knew him before, and went out, leaving him in the shop. I missed a gold watch, gold watch chain, and four rings, a small fish and key. I had seen them the night before on the table, in my bed-room, which is the second floor back room - the front room on that floor is where I make my confectionary ornaments. I did not miss the property till I heard the prisoner was in custody, which was the day after he came. He was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards, but was never in the bed-room. I allowed him a guinea a week on his father's account, as he was not on good terms with his father. The property is worth 8 l. I rent the house myself, and have no lodgers. He was in the habit of going to the workshop.

JOHN FRANCIS . I am apprentice to Mr. Jarrin. The prisoner came to the shop on Friday; he remained there, and about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw him going up stairs; he did not say what he was going up for. He remained up stairs about half an hour. I said nothing to him, as he had been accustomed to go up to the workshop. There are other men up there. When he came down, he desired me to get him a hackney-coach, which I did, and he went away.

JAMES HOWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Bartrum, of Prince's-street, Leicester-square. On Friday, the 27th of September, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pawned a watch, a chain, a seal, a fish suspended to it, and four rings, for 4 l., in the name of John Smith , No. 42, Soho-square, he said they were his sister's property. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN MAWDITT . I am in the service of Mr. Jarrin. I was at his workshop on this Friday, and remember the prisoner coming there; he did not stop above five minutes; and after leaving the room I heard him in master's bedroom; I did not go out to him; he was there about five minutes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I took him in custody about twelve o'clock at night, on another charge. I found a duplicate of the watch on him, among others.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day I was taken by the constable he found the duplicate of the watch on me. I had dined in Leicester-square, and met a young Frenchman there, who shewed them to me; I gave him 3 l. for them; he said he bought them for 1 l.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-49

1536. REUBEN JOSEPH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , one teapot, value 3 l.; one cream jug, value 15 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s.; two dessert forks, value 6 s.; one dessert spoon, value 3 s.; two egg spoons, value 3 s., and fifteen tea spoons, value 2 l. the goods of Sir William Duff Gordon , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FARQUHAR . I am butler to Sir William Duff Gordon, who lives in Lower Brook-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . The articles stated in the indictment were in my care; I missed them in the morning of the 16th of July - I had seen them safe a few days before in a small cupboard in the servants' hall. I have seen some of them since at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. There was an excellent cream ewer lost with them - A. Yes, and a crest on it; it was beaten up when I found it.

SAMUEL SUTTON . I saw Sir William Gordon 's plate safe in the servants' cupboard on Monday morning, the 15th of July. I am his footman. The articles stated in the indictment were among it; they were missed the next morning about ten o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw the prisoner in the house - A. Never.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. In consequence of information, on Tuesday, the 23d of July, I went to the house of Guest, between one and two o'clock, and found him at home - it is a private house. I told him what I wanted; he unlocked a small trunk in the first floor back room, and produced a cream jug. He made no objection to my searching, but assisted me. The trunk was not concealed at all. In consequence of what he said, I called at Joseph's with a search warrant - I did not see him; he was afterwards summoned to attend the office, and came on the 24th, and was confronted with Guest. Guest was committed on the 24th, and discharged on the 27th, when the case was gone through and the prisoner was committed, I produced the cream jug - it was doubled up rather more than it is now.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did you produce your warrant - A. Yes. He knew I was an officer; I should have opened the box if he had not. He lives in Crown-court, Soho. The box was on the first floor; there was a bed there, but it was not under it. I searched the prisoner's house, and found nothing suspicious. He was a witness against Guest at first, and denied having sold them to him; he was afterwards bailed, and has surrendered to-day.

JOSEPH GUEST . At the time of the robbery I lived in Crown-court, Little Pulteney-street. I have known the prisoner about a year and a half, he was a salesman and dealer in wearing apparel and plate, and lived in Chandos-street, Oxford-street; and keeps a shop. The officer searched my house; I gave him the cream jug; I bought it with the other property of the prisoner. He came to me on Monday, the 15th of July, between seven and a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening; I live up stairs; the street door is always open, but there is a centre door. My wife and daughter were present when he came. John Bouser worked for me at the time, he has absconded now; I have done all I could to find him out, but cannot. I was called down from my workshop, by my wife or daughter, to the prisoner, in the room on the first floor; he had a bundle with him, and said he had some second-hand plate that would suit me - he produced it - it consisted of a teapot, cream ewer, seventeen tea spoons, two egg spoons, a dessert spoon, two dessert forks, and one pair of sugar tongs, weighing together 44 oz. all but 2 dwts.; I considered I had no occasion to ask how he came by it. I agreed to give him 5 s. 6 d. per ounce, which amounted to 12 l. 1 s.; I gave him twelve sovereigns and one shilling; my wife was present when I paid him, but I am not positive whether my daughter was. I only had the milk pot when the officer came, having sold the rest; I had not sold the ewer because there was a crack in the handle, which I did not perceive previous to erasing the crest, and it was unfashionable; I could not mend it without, and being unsaleable I put it there to be melted.

COURT. Q. Did you erase the crest - A. Yes; I beat it up in that shape. I erased it, to polish it up, to sell the better - and afterwards perceived the crack.

Cross-examined by ALLEY. Q. He came to you, on the 15th of July, was that the day your house was searched - A. No.

Q. Were not some of the spoons gilt, when you got them - A. No; it was towards the evening when I bought them - and I polished them that night. I saw no gilt on them. I did it between light and dark, and polishing might rub it off. I filed the crests off of course, as I do thousands in the year.

Q. Was not your reason for breaking up the ewer, because the crest was so deep that in filing it out, you broke a hole in it - A. No; but beating it up to make it small for the pot, might make a hole.

Q. If you did not intend it for sale, why file out the crest - A. I always file out crests and cyphers.

Q. On your oath, did you say who you sold the spoons and other things to, till after the teapot was found - A. I had no occasion - I think the teapot was found on the Tuesday following. I gave 5 s. 6 d. an ounce for it - it was bruised, and all over dirt. I sold it all at 7 s. an ounce. I was in custody two days and a half. Bouser coloured the teapot up next morning; he has absconded. I was at Bow-street two years and a half ago, about some linen.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. What was that - A. I was deceived by a young man, who was a shopman in New-street, Covent-garden. I was charged with buying linen of him; I was discharged.

COURT. Q. The prisoner came to your house with them, between seven and eight o'clock - A. At half past seven - Bouser was up in the workshop with me; he saw Josephs on the first floor, as he came down stairs to leave work.

Q. When you found the milk pot not worth selling, could you not as well have left it in the state it was - A. I

knocked it up to make it small for the melting pot. I did not knock it up for a week after.

Q. When you shewed that milk pot to Clements, on your oath did you mention to him the teapot, spoons, or other things - A. Yes; and told him where I had sold them.

ANN GUEST . I am the wife of Joseph Guest . On the 15th of July, my husband lived at No. 4, Crown-court. Mr. Joseph came that evening into the front room, on the first floor, which is the sitting room - he brought some plate. I called to one of my sons to tell my husband to come from the shop, which is at the top of the house. The prisoner was not many minutes in the room, till he came down - he opened the plate which he had in his bundle. I heard all that passed. He said he had brought forty-four ounces of plate, and my husband bought it for 5 s. 6 d. an ounce; it came to 12 l. 2 s.; 4 s. was taken off for the dirt on it - he gave Joseph twelve sovereigns and 1 s.; nobody else was in the room. My little girl was in the passage with the children - he went away, as soon as he got the money. Bouser, the workman, came down to leave work, while he was in the room, and saw him. I do not know what has become of him. The plate was taken up stairs into the shop the same night and finished off. I think my husband went to work again after the prisoner was gone. I heard him say he had sold the teapot to Jupp.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When did you first appear at Marlborough-street - A. On the Saturday. My husband had then been in custody four days. I called to my son Joseph to call his father down - he is not here. Bouser left work about seven o'clock. I do not know that I saw the things after Joseph brought them.

JOSEPH GUEST re-examined. I cannot be positive whether there was a crest or cypher on the cream jug. I have so many crests to take out, I cannot say.

SARAH GUEST . I am daughter of Joseph Guest . I remember the prisoner coming to my father's house in July, in a coach - he knocked at the passage door; I opened it; he asked if my father was at home, and went up to the first floor. He had a bundle tied in a blue silk handkerchief. I called my father down.

Q. You called him with your own voice - A. Yes, and told him he was wanted. I went into the next room, and did not hear what passed. He told me to go and tell the coachman to stop, and he would be down in a few minutes, which I did. I saw him go out - he was quarter of an hour or twenty minutes in the house. Bouser left work soon after he came in - I cannot say whether he saw him.

MR. ALLEY. Q. You, and not your brother called your father - A. No. My younger brother went up stairs. My brother did not call my father, it was me.

JOHN FARQUHAR . The cream jug had a crest and two words written round it.

MR. LAW. Q. It was in very good condition - A. Certainly. It was equally as good as the sugar bason, which I produce - it corresponded in pattern with it. Ten of the spoons were gilt inside, and seven plain - they had a motto strongly marked on them.

COURT to GUEST. Q. Look at this sugar bason, and say on your oath had not the ewer and spoons the same crest and letters on them - A. It is possible they might, but I am so in the habit of erasing crests, I cannot say. I did not read the motto. I believe part of the spoons were gilt, but very much worn.

MR. RICHARD THOMAS . I am a silversmith, and live in the Strand. On the 15th of July the value of silver to melt was 5 s. an ounce.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18221023-50

1537. JOSEPH RANKIN was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of William Robson and Alfred Brooks , on the 12th of October , and stealing two fowls, value 5 s., and a loaf of bread, value 6 d. , the property of William Robson .

WILLIAM ROBSON . I live on St. Dunstan's-hill . Alfred Brooks is my partner; we rent the house between us. On Saturday night, the 11th of October, I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock; the house was properly secured; I was not disturbed in the night; I got up about eight o'clock in the morning; I went to a place of worship in the morning, and on returning Mrs. Robson said the house had been entered in the night. I examined the counting-house, the door of which opens into the private passage leading into Tower-street - I found the door leading from the warehouse into the counting-house open - it was closed overnight. I went to the iron safe which was in the warehouse, and where we kept our stamps; the the cash box used to be kept there about a month ago, when the prisoner lived with us as errand boy. I found the iron safe door open, but nothing gone. I went into the dining room, where the keys of the premises were kept, and the brass chain they were kept on was broken, and the keys of the iron safe and warehouse taken from it and returned again; there were no marks of violence about the warehouse. I suspect the entrance was made through the area which leads to the coal cellar, as the grating had been left unfastened. A person getting in there would get into the cellar, and then by lifting up a trap door could get into the passage. Two fowls and a quartern loaf were stolen. On the Monday, I was in a shop enquiring the prisoner's residence, and he came in; the moment he saw me, he made off, but was secured. I asked where he had been on the Saturday night; he said he went home at seven o'clock, and went to bed about eight. He lived about four months with me.

WILLIAM MONS . I am apprentice to Mr. Robson. I did not sleep in the house. On Monday morning I was asked if I had left the iron safe open. I had locked it on the Saturday night, also the counting-house door.

WILLIAM JOSEPH NEWMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Robson. About half-past six o'clock on the Monday morning the servant came down and informed me she had found the street door open; I got up, went down stairs, and found the door leading from the counting-house to the warehouse open, as also the door leading from the passage to the counting-house. The iron safe was open. I went up stairs and found the keys lying in the parlour window, and one of the links of the chain broken, and the iron safe key lying loose on the chain.

JOSEPH DOUGLAS . I saw the prisoner by the prosecutor's premises about eight o'clock on Saturday night,

standing against the door. I did not know where he lived. I knew he was discharged from their service.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 12th of October, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, in Lombard-street. I took him to the prosecutors' house, and told him the house had been entered on the Saturday night, and that he was suspected, and he had to clear his character, and say where he was that night; he said he lodged with his mother in Red-lion-court, Minories; that he was at home on Saturday night, in bed at eight o'clock; that he was taken ill about three o'clock in the morning, and did not get up till twelve o'clock on Sunday. I examined the premises; I believe the person must have entered by getting down the area grating where the coals are let down. I found a staple about three feet down there, so that any person going down must have torn their clothes with it. On searching the room the prisoner lodged in, I found a coat which appeared very dirty all round, as if the person had slid down the place; some of it appeared to be coal dust, but I cannot be certain of it. I asked him how his coat became torn (it had a slit in the back); he said he was not aware that it was torn, that it was a coat he did his dirty work in, and had it on on Saturday. I told him he had been seen in the street at the time; he said if any person had seen him it must have been at the Royalty, for he recollected he had been there, and was not in bed as he said at first; that he went in at the stage door of the theatre, and from there to what they call the fly.

HENRY SLOWRAN . I am patrol of Tower Ward. As I was on my morning duty, about twenty minutes past six o'clock, I found the prosecutors' door open. I knocked three times, and rung the bell two or three times; at last the servant came down. I found no marks of violence there.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-51

1538. JOHN BROWN and JOHN FRANKS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Arthur Wiggan , from his person .

MR. ARTHUR WIGGAN. I live on Dowgate-hill. On the 5th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I was looking in at a print shop, in Sweeting's-alley - I stood there scarcely a moment, and did not perceive any thing; I used my handkerchief while I stood there - a gentleman came up and asked if I had lost it; I felt and missed it. I had seen the prisoners standing close to me at the shop - they were about three yards from me when the gentleman gave me the information - I laid hold of Franks and charged him with it - he denied it - I left him, as there were people to take care of him, and laid hold of Brown - he denied it; my handkerchief was picked up immediately after, close to the spot - the person who found it was about two yards from me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was in a public part of the street - A. It is a very crowded place; several people were looking at the shop.

MR. B. W. PIKE. I am a dry salter, and live in Miles's-lane. I was in Sweeting's-alley, and saw the prisoners acting in such a manner as to draw my attention, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw them immediately behind Mr. Wiggan, who was looking at the prints - one stood against each pocket. Brown had both his hands engaged, twisting a piece of paper round his thumb - Franks had his hands before him, close to Mr. Wiggan's pocket. Immediately on their quitting Mr. Wiggan, I went and asked him to feel in his pocket, and he missed his handkerchief. The prisoners were accosted about three yards from the spot, and at the end of the alley Franks ran away; I pursued him to the end of Bartholomew-lane - I had lost sight of him for a moment - I ran back, and at the end of Sweeting's-alley I saw him walking; I immediately touched him and said,

"This is the man," and in a moment an officer came up and took him. The handkerchief was picked up five or six yards from the shop - it was utterly impossible for any persons to have done it but the prisoners. I placed myself behind the corner of the windows, and had a perfect view of their proceedings.

Prisoner FRANKS. Q. Did you see me run, when in Sweeting's Alley - A. Yes; within three or four yards of the end of the alley.

Q. You cannot swear positively who took the handkerchief - A. No, because they covered each other's operations. I did not see it taken or dropped. Three or four persons were round the shop, I will not swear there was not six, there was not seven; they were respectable persons. Brown did not take it.

JOHN BRADEY . I am street-keeper. I was on duty at the North Gate; heard a cry of stop him - turned towards Sweeting's Alley, and saw Brown running; he was stopped in Threadneedle-street, before I could get up to him. Franks was brought to me, and one Samuel delivered me the handkerchief. The prisoners were much agitated, and begged hard to be let go. Brown was stopped between the corner of Bartholomew-lane, and the Cock, tavern.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. WIGGAN. Q. Did you not say you seized Brown a short distance from the window - A. Yes, the witness is mistaken, it was Franks that run, not Brown. I took Franks, but left him, and took Brown; then went again after Franks; he might have run, while I was away.

JOHN BRADEY . I am sure Brown was running, when I turned round.

MR. PIKE. I saw Franks running, but did not see Brown run; I had my eye on him for five minutes. I did not see him get from the persons round him, for I was engaged running after Franks; he might have run during that time.

BROWN'S Defence. I walked away about six yards from the shop. Mr. Pike came up and said,

"You are one of them." I said,

"What do you mean?" Mr. Wiggan said I had got the handkerchief; he laid hold of me, and I was taken down to Bartholomew-lane - and about the middle of the lane, Bradey came up. I never run, for I was not let go.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-52

1539. ANN PARKINS was indicted for unlawfully receiving, on the 5th of October , three shirts, value 2 l. 10 s.; one dress, value 6 l.; one frock, value 30 s.; one

pelisse, value 1 l.; two petticoats, value 1 l.; two nightgowns, value 16 s.; one cap, value 25 s.; two pinafores value 4 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 16 s.; one pair of stays, value 2 s.; nine handkerchiefs, value 26 s.; two sheets, value 3 l.; two pillow-cases, value 6 s.; one shift, value 12 s.; two night-caps, value 2 s., and one waistcoat, value 30 s., the goods of James Cowie , well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. JAMES COWIE . I am a wine merchant - and live in Sherborne-lane. Our linen is sent into the country to be washed. On the 5th of October, the carrier's boy brought the clean linen - and said he would call in half an hour for the dirty; it was put into a box, which in about half an hour another person called for, and took away. We supposed that he came from the carrier; this was about four o'clock - and about six o'clock the boy came, and we found the trick out.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable. On Sunday, afternoon, the 6th of October, about half-past two o'clock, in consequence of information, I went to a chandler's shop, No. 6, Petticoat-lane, and found the prisoner in the passage, with two large bundles by the side of her, containing the articles stated in the indictment; which Mrs. Cowie afterwards claimed. I asked how she came by them; she said she had a bundle from a gentleman at Temple-bar, to sell for 15 s. for him - and the other was linen she had to wash; but all the things had Mrs. Cowie's initials on them. I understood her to say, she brought it from Mrs. Hall, of Camomile-street. I took her into custody. I turned her handkerchief aside, and saw she had a clean shift on, marked J. C. or C. C. She endeavoured to make her escape - and while I left her in charge of Morris, she bit the mark out of the shift.

MRS. CATHERINE COWIE . I am the wife of James Cowie . The prisoner is a perfect stranger. I have seen all the property - it is ours, and worth 20 l. I saw the clean linen brought back, and put the articles stated in the indictment, in the box myself, and saw them again at the Mansion House, on Monday.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a constable. Sapwell left the prisoner in my charge. I took her into a public house, and while I was attending to the mob, I looked round, and she was biting the linen at her breast; I caught hold of her - she kept pulling at the shift with her teeth, and bit part of it out. I asked why she did that? she said it was nothing to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had to take linen to Camomile-street, and Whitechapel. A person gave me a bundle of linen to wash, and said he would send for or fetch it. He left me in Petticoat-lane, for three-quarters of an hour - then brought the small bundle, and said he wanted 15 s. for it; a Jewess stood at the door, and asked if I had any thing to sell - I shewed it her. I was stopped, and a constable sent for.

THOMAS SAPWELL . The small bundle contained four handkerchiefs, a lady's dress, a waistcoat, and two shirts.

MRS. CATHERINE COWIE . The dress alone, is worth 6 l.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-53

1540. NIEL DOUGLAS was indicted for a fraud . MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CURTIS . In the Summer of 1819, I lodged in Blewitt's-buildings; the prisoner lodged in the same house. I was in search of employment - I had frequent conversation with him on the subject. He stated, that he had an uncle, Colonel Miller, who resided at Bethnal-green, but with whom he was then at variance - but it was his own fault, for he would not stoop to ask his uncle's pardon, or he would have forgiveness; he represented that Colonel Miller had been a late Director and proprietor in the India House - and that he could make great interest to obtain a situation in that house, and asked if I should object to one. I said I should be very glad of one. Soon after that, one morning (in May, or the beginning of June, I think,) he asked if I was particularly engaged that day, and if I had any writing paper - and if I would put some in my pocket, we could take a walk together in the afternoon. I did so, and we took a walk up Church-street, towards Bethnal-green - went into a public-house, which he said a friend of his kept. We went into the parlour, where we were alone; he asked for my paper, and wrote out four or five memorials; before that he had said that he could get me a situation, as messenger - and asked if I should object to wear livery. I said not. He then drew out some memorials, and wished me to make a fair copy of them; he had said, as we walked along, that he had had some conversation with his uncle, who thought from my hand-writing, and the situation I had held, (I had been in the Custom House), that the place would be too low for me, and he would use his influence to get me a situation as clerk. He drafted out four memorials, (looking at them), these are the drafts of them.

These memorials were here read; they were addressed to four Directors, soliciting their interest on behalf of the prosecutor.

Q. Were these memorials copied - A. I copied them, and gave to him to take to his uncle, who was to sign them, and distribute them to the different gentlemen. I saw him almost every evening; he represented to me, that his uncle had sent them to the Directors, and the business was going on in the regular channel. On the 29th of July, 1819. I met him by appointment, (with Holcroft, a friend of mine,) at the Crown and Thistle, public-house, Billiter-street, about four o'clock, and asked him my business was going on at the East-India House; he said every thing was done that was needful, and nothing wanting but the payment of the fees. I said if he would let me know the amount, I dare say I should be able to pay them; he said he did not know what they were, but if I and Holcroft waited there he would go to the India House and make enquiry. He left us and returned in about half an hour, and brought a slip of paper with the amount of fees - (looking at it) - this is it - (read, memorials written, 2 l. 8 s. 6 d.; fresh memorial for deputy chairmain, 10 s. 6 d.; five new ones, 1 l. 1 s. 3 d.; copy for records, 19 s.: - 4 l. 19 s. 3 d.) - I said it might as well be paid first as last, and I would go to my lodgings and fetch the money; he said

"Well, if you do fetch it, don't fetch it in ones, but fetch a five-pound note, as it will look more respectable." I went to my lodgings, and got five 1 l. notes, changed them for a 5 l. note, and brought it to

him - he said a complimentary letter ought to be written to Mr. Hudson, the clerk at the India House; he drafted one out. I went up to a private room, and copied it, came down, and shewed it him. He said it would do very well. I gave him the 5 l. note to convince him it was one - he returned it me; I folded it up in the letter, in the presence of him and Holcroft, sealed, and directed it to

"H. Hudson, Esq., East India House," by his direction, and he had told me to fold the note in it. He said he did not wish to be seen further in it, but as my friend Holcroft was with me, he had better take the letter to the India House, and that would be proof that it did go, and he would go as far as the India House with him - they went out together for that purpose, and returned in about ten minutes; he said he was going to meet a party at his uncle's, and left. On the 4th of October, when I got to my lodgings, Mrs. Dowling, the landlady, gave me this letter, (looking at it, No. 1;) it is in a diguised hand; but I believe it to be the prisoner's writing - I told him I had received it. One evening Mrs. Dowling gave me another letter, this is it, (looking at it, No. 2,) I believe it to be his writing, but the hand is disguised. In consequence of this letter I went into the country to see my friends, but before I went he told me that on a clerk being appointed it was customary on the appointment being delivered to give a dinner to the other clerks - I said I had not the least objection to it if it was customary. He mentioned the dinner once or twice. I went to Lewes to see my friends, and while there I received this letter - (looking at it, No. 3) - it is his writing, and a day or two afterward I received another (No. 4), in consequence of which I went to the Bank at Lewes, paid in 14 l., and got this bill - (looking at it) - which I inclosed in a letter to the prisoner; the receipt at the back of it is in his handwriting. After this he came into the country on a visit to my friends. I saw him there frequently; he said every thing was finally arranged and settled, and that the dinner was at the Ship Tavern. Leadenhall-street. (A cheque upon Sir John Esdaile and Co, drawn by the Lewes Old Bank for 14 l., the receipt signed by the prisoner, was here read) - While I was in the country, I received another letter - it is in a disguised hand, but is the prisoner's writing - (looking at the letter, No. 6) - this is his writing. I afterwards discovered that it was entirely false, and that I had no appointment whatever.

Q. How came you not to enquire at the India House sooner - A. I trusted entirely to him; and he always wanted me to avoid making enquiry, he said every thing was perfectly right. From the time he left Lewes till the 27th of September last, I never saw him; I took every pains to find him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What age are you - A. Thirty-seven. I have had a situation in the Customs nine years, I did not get it by purchase; I first became acquainted with him at Blewitt's-buildings; our business was mostly conducted at public-houses. I might not be quite sober sometimes when I was with him. I have a perfect recollection of all our meetings.

Q. As you have lost two sums of money, be so good as to tell us what false pretence obtained the 5 l. - A. To pay fees for the situation he said he had obtained for me. None of the letters came till after that. I believed Mr. Miller to be a Director, and that he was a Colonel, and expected it was by his interest only I was to obtain it.

Q. When did he first tell you not to go to the India-House to make enquiries - A. In June, 1819; he told me so repeatedly, it never occurred to me that the letters were fabricated; but after the deception was discovered I compared one with the other, and find they are his writing. I took out a warrant to apprehend him, on the 27th of September, 1819, but could never find him. The letter dated the 21st of August obtained the 14 l. from me. I found the prisoner in Robinhood-court, Shoe-lane, on the 20th of September, 1822; I took an officer with me and he was apprehended. I am not to pay the expense of the prosecution.

MR. WALFORD. Q. You presented a memorial to the India Company, and they took up the business - A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did he lodge in Blewitt's-buildings at the time he came to visit your friends in the country - A. Yes. I could not find him there after I discovered the deception.

The letters referred to in the evidence were as follows: - No. 1, signed H. Hudson, dated, East-India-House, 4th of August, 1819; informing the prosecutor he was appointed an extra clerk, the appointment to commence on the 25th of September, and desiring him to appear before the Directors on the 22d to receive his instructions; and till then his appearance would be dispensed with, and desiring the payment of the fees of office.

No. 2, dated the 11th August, signed H. Hudson, informing the prosecutor that every thing was settled; that he would be entitled to his seniority from this date, and acknowledging the payment of fees.

No. 3, dated the 18th of August, from the prisoner to the prosecutor at Lewes, stating that the dinner was to take place next day, and desiring an answer by return of post, saying in what manner the bill was to be discharged, and proposing that a bill should be drawn for it.

No. 4, dated the 20th of August; from the prisoner to Curtis, informing him that the dinner had taken place last night; and out of sixteen invited, thirteen sat down to dinner; some of whom were the most respectable in the house. That it was understood to be Colonel Miller's entertainment; that the bill was 12 l. 16 s. 4 d., and with 1 l. to be given to the waiters made 13 l. 16 s. 4 d.; and desiring the prosecutor to go to the Bank, pay 14 l. in, and forward an order for the cash.

No. 5, addressed to prosecutor, dated East-India-House, 7th of September, signed H. Hudson; informing him that as a special ballot was appointed for twenty-two, the Court of Directors had postponed his attendance from the 22d to the 29th; when he must not fail to attend.

No. 6, dated Bethnal-green, 14th August, addressed to J.D. Stone, Esq. Comptroller of Customs, signed Miller Douglas, of Stone and Webberly-park, congratulating him upon the appointment of the prosecutor.

JAMES HOLCROFT . I live in Alfred-terrace, Stepney. I have known Mr. Curtis since 1814; I and he met the prisoner at the Crown and Thistle, public-house, Billeter-lane, several times, and recollect meeting there when he asked the prisoner how his business went on at the India House. I had met him before, when the subject was respecting the appointment of a clerk's situation in the India House; the prisoner said every thing was settled, except the fees of office being paid. Curtis asked him the amount of them; he went out to ascertain

and returned in fifteen or twenty minutes with a slip of paper, with the fees on it, amounting to nearly 5 l. Curtis went home to fetch them; Douglas wished him to bring one note instead of small ones. Curtis fetched a five-pound note, and asked how he was to convey it to Mr. Hudson, whose name had been mentioned before in the conversation; the prisoner said,

"You had better send Mr. Hudson a complimentary note;" a form for which he drafted out. Curtis retired and copied it, enclosed the five-pound note, and sealed the letter, addressed it to H. Hudson, Esq. East-India House. The prisoner said I had better take it, and he would walk with me, which he did to the corner of Lime-street; and as we went along I said I was a stranger in the India House, and did not know where to deliver it; he said I was to deliver it to the messenger in the lobby, at the left hand entrance - which I did - and joined him at the corner of Lime-street. We returned to Curtis, and in about twenty minutes lie apologized for leaving us, saying, he was going to a party at his uncle's, Colonel Miller's, at Bethnal-green, and left. Curtis went into the country about the middle of August, and while he was there, I saw the prisoner at the Crown and Thistle, public-house; he said the gentleman at the India House had had the dinner the day before, (he had told me nothing about the dinner before,) he said they were the principal clerks in the house; he said the dinner was at the Ship, public-house, in Leadenhall-street; that the bill amounted to 14 l. altogether, and he was anxious that it should be paid. I said, I made no doubt, if he wrote to Mr. Curtis he would send the money by return of post. He wrote in my presence, and said he had left room for me to write what I chose; I said I had nothing to say - but wrote this postscript (looks at the letter).

Cross-examined. Q. Were you present when the prisoner told him not to go to the India House - A. Yes; several times. I do not know what reason he assigned, as I paid very little attention to him. I have seen Curtis in liquor two or three times, but not often. He was not particularly addicted to liquor.

Q. Did you hear Curtis swear at the Mansion House, that he wrote the paper with the amount of fees - A. I believe he did, but he wrote it from a copy, which Douglas shewed him. It does not appear to me to be his writing. The prisoner did not ask for the 5 l.; Curtis said it might as well be paid at once. He was not drunk when this business was transacted.

HENRY DYMOND . I am a messenger at the India House. In the summer of 1819, the prisoner was a good deal about the India House, he came frequently after one of the messengers - I have seen him in the passage of one of the lobbies. I recollect Baird asking me to take a letter for him, and in the course of that day the prisoner asked me to deliver a letter to Curtis, at his lodgings. It was directed to Mr. J. Curtis, Blewitt's-buildings, Holborn - I gave it to the landlady. The prisoner had access to the passages and lobbies. Letters brought for the clerks were left in the left hand lobby, but since this matter has been discovered, an alteration has been made. I never saw the prisoner in that lobby - but any of the messenger's friends could go there without suspicion.

EDWARD DENCH . I am a messenger in the Company's service, and was so in the summer of 1819. The prisoner was intimate with Baird a messenger. He had no appointment under the Company - he asked me to take a letter to Curtis, his fellow lodger, at Blewitt's-buildings, to meet him in the City. I gave it to Mrs. Dowling; (looking at it,) this is it. If a letter was brought for a clerk three years ago, it would be received by a messenger, and laid in the lobby window, or put into an open box. Anybody who knew the messengers, or a stranger at the lobby might take them.

MARY DOWLING . I keep the house in Blewitt's-buildings. The prisoner and prosecutor lodged with me. In September, 1819, two East India Company's messengers brought two letters at different times, which I delivered to Curtis. The prisoner left my lodgings to go into the country - I expected him to return, but he did not - he had not settled with me exactly. I believe Curtis to be a sober man.

JOHN COOKE . I am a messenger in the East India Company's service. In the summer of 1819, the prisoner was in the habit of coming to the house. I remember his coming one evening in the summer, about five o'clock, when I was at the front door; it was after office hours - he enquired for Mr. Baird; I said I believed he was gone; he said I should go with him to the George, public-house, St. Mary-axe, and have some drink - I refused, but he said I should, and I went. He asked what I chose to drink, I chose porter - he paid the reckoning, which was 15 d. or 18 d.; he gave the landlord a 5 l. note in payment, and received the change. I do not know whether it was a Bank note.

HENRY THOMAS ADAMS . I keep the Ship, public-house, opposite the India House. In September, 1819, there was no dinner of the India House clerks at my house, nor in August - nor any dinner at which the prisoner and Mr. Hudson were present. I do not know the prisoner. No bill of 13 l. odd was paid me for a dinner.

JOHN CONNYERS HUDSON . I am clerk to the Committee of College, at the East India House. (Looking at the three letters,) Neither of these are my writing. I knew nothing of the subject till this charge was made. I never received a 5 l. note as payment of fees, for any appointment. There are two other clerks of my name in the house.

CHARLES HUDSON . I am clerk of the Treasury in the East India House. Neither of the letters are my writing. I know nothing of it. I knew nothing of the affair till this investigation took place. I never received a letter with a 5 l. note from Curtis, to pay fees of admission.

ROBERT HUDSON . I am clerk in the Home Audit Office, in the India House. The letters are not written by me. I knew nothing of the matter till the investigation took place, and have received no 5 l. note to pay fees.

MR. WILLIAM MILLER . I live at Bethnal-green - the defendant is my nephew by half blood. He never made any interest with me to get Curtis a situation. I have no interest at all in the house, and do not know the four Directors alluded to, except by name. He did not live with me. I knew nothing of this negotiation, and never saw Curtis.

THOMAS LOWES . I am clerk to Sir James Esdaile . This bill was paid in 1819, by me. The person receiving it wrote his name on it - I suppose as I paid it then.

MR. ANDREWS, addressed the Jury on behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-54

SIXTH DAY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29.

1541. NICODEMUS DUNN , CHARLES DUNN , JOSEPH DUNN , MICHAEL LEARY , and GEORGE MOSS , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , four live tame geese, price 12 s. , the property of Alexander Fletcher .

JOHN ROGERS . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Fletcher , of Homerton . On the morning of Michaelmas day, about ten o'clock, I went to open a gate, about four miles from my master's house, and saw all the prisoners except Leary, playing at pitch in the hole - they were in my master's field; I ordered them out - they refused to go because my master would not give them a job. I left them, and in about an hour heard a great noise among the geese, which were let out in the field - I went and missed four; I had seen them all safe about nine o'clock. I and my master went and found three of them lying dead - one had its head cut off, and the others were cut in the head - they were in the field. One of them was thrown over the hedge. We took them home, and went to look for the other, and at the end of the path we saw the five prisoners sitting on a gate - they walked round the field; we went on, and the constable took them.

JAMES MORTON . I am a basket maker, and live at Homerton. On Michaelmas day, I was going along the field, and saw two bricklayers before me, and a young man behind me. The path is a thoroughfare, two geese were lying on the right side of the path, and one on the left - I jumped over the fence, and threw them into the footpath. We took them to Mr. Fletcher's house. I saw Rogers in the field; we went to look for the other one - and saw the five prisoners sitting on a white gate, about a quarter of a mile from where the geese were. They walked away; we went back - but the officers called us, and we went after them; I saw them sitting by the side of the river Lea; they walked over the locked gate - we pursued them, and they walked through a branch of the river; it was about up to their knees.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable. I went after the prisoners, and saw them cross the river. I went through after them. Moss was secured, and brought to us. I knew him before, and am sure he is one of them. There was blood on his coat, and I found a knife on him - he said the blood was with liver, which he went to get for his mother, and put it under his coat.

NICODEMUS DUNN . Q. Did not Moss tell you, Charles Dunn cut off the goose's head - A. No.

COURT. Q. Look at this deposition, is your signature to it - A. Yes.

Q. It says here,

"Moss confessed it, and said that Charles Dunn cut off the heads" - A. Yes, but I understood the prisoner to ask me if I did not tell Moss to say so - he did say Charles Dunn cut the head off.

JOSHUA POTTER . I am a constable. I apprehended all the prisoners but Moss, about a quarter past six o'clock, on the 29th of September. Nicodemus Dunn had a fowl; I found a bloody knife on him, and a box of dominos.

ROBERT PRESCOTT . I was in company with Garva - as we went along, Moss said that Charles Dunn cut the head off one of the geese, and he was frightened, and ran off; that Nicodemus Dunn took the other geese over into the next field.

NICODEMUS DUNN 's Defence. I ran away, because I thought the officers were after me for pitching in the hole, on Sunday.

CHARLES DUNN's Defence. We saw them coming after us, and I walked through the old river, and went to Walthamstow, and picked this fowl up in the forest ready trussed.

NICODEMUS DUNN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

CHARLES DUNN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

JOSEPH DUNN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined One Year .

LEARY - GUILTY . Aged 12.

MOSS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-55

1542. WILLIAM DODGE , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , four hundred and forty pounds of hay, value 10 s. the goods of John Amer .

JOHN AMER . I am a farmer , and live at Perry Dale. On the 19th of October I lost eight trusses of hay out of a cart-house of a farm, two miles from my house. It is worth about 18 s. or 20 s. I was out in the evening, and found the prisoner had been taken and liberated.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you first see him - A. On Sunday morning, when I took him. He said he had bought the hay, and could prove it.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I am servant to Mr. Amer. On Friday afternoon, I tied up two dozen trusses in the cart-house; I left it safe about six o'clock in the evening, and about six is the morning, I went and missed eight trusses, which was too much for one man to carry; the cart-house is close against the road; the prisoner was a stranger to me. I told my master, and on Sunday I went with him and found the prisoner in his own house at Isleworth, three or four miles off, close to the Brentford-road. We found the hay on his premises; some of it was shaken about - there were five trusses and a quantity loose lying there. I put my hand into the truss, and found a shell which I had put in the middle of them. I am sure it is the hay I bound.

RICHARD KIRBY . I am bailiff to Mr. Johnson, whose farm is about a mile and a half from Amer's. On Saturday morning, the 19th of October, about half-past five o'clock, I was in Mr. Johnson's field, and heard a cart stop opposite a cabbage field; I listened and heard the cabbages crack, and thought somebody was stealing. I went over, and found the prisoner with four cabbages in his hand, and the horse and cart stood there with about eight trusses of hay in it. I secured him for taking the cabbages. He was discharged, being fined 10 s. He said he wanted to go to Kingston market, and so I sent a man with him, to deliver up his cart of hay, and then bring him back to me.

MOSES RYDER . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge on Sunday morning, for stealing the hay; he did not account for how he got it.

JOHN GOODWIN . I am a labourer, and work for Mr. Johnson. Last Saturday week, as I was going to work about a quarter past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing by his horse in the road, by the cabbage field. When I got up to the cart, Kirby asked if I knew him - I said I had seen him before. Some trusses of hay were in the cart - I did not count them. He expressed his sorrow for taking the cabbages. I knew nothing of the hay then; he was then about a mile from his own house, and about two miles from where the hay was taken.

WILLIAM DENNISON . I am a constable. I was ordered by the High Constable to take the prisoner in charge on the Sunday morning. He said he bought the hay and paid for it, and could bring proof; he did not say where he bought it. I kept one of the hay bands.

WILLIAM WILKINSON . That is part of the hay band - it is coarse stuff which had grown by the water side.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday morning early, I was hired by Sarah Peet to go to the Feathers, public-house, at Ealing, for some goods which were coming by the Birmingham waggon; they did not come. I turned away from the public-house, and at a short distance a man came up with a one-horse load of hay, and a straw cart behind; he asked if I wanted to buy any hay; I said No, I had not got money enough to buy a load; he said he would sell a small quantity, and asked 2 s. 3 d. a truss. I said I could buy it at 2 s. at home, and agreed for six trusses; and while he was putting them from his cart into mine, a man whom I had been acquainted with for a number of years came up. I said,

"Robert, can you lend me 6 s.?" He said, No, for he was going to pay some money; but he lent me half a crown, which I bought two more trusses with.

WILLIAM DENNISON . He said he bought it by the Feathers.

RICHARD KIRBY . The Feathers is nearly a mile from the cabbage field.

SARAH PEET . I live at Smallborn-green. I know the prisoner. Last Saturday week I employed him to fetch a bed and a few other things, that came from my mother's at Birmingham; he came to me between the Old Hat and Feathers, public-house, at ten minutes after five o'clock. I accompanied him to the Feathers to meet the waggon; it did not come; I walked by the side of the cart. A man came up with some hay in a one-horse cart, near the Feathers trough; he had a straw cart and another hay cart also. The man said,

"Do you want to buy a truss or two of hay?" he said

"Perhaps you sell it too dear for me, I can buy it cheap at home." He bought six trusses, and was to give 2 s. a truss, and then bought two more, as a man came up who knew him and lent him 2 s. 6 d.; the man unloaded it, and he put it up in his cart. I went down to the other public-house to look if my goods had been left there. I left the prisoner; (he wanted to go home in a hurry), to go to Kingston market, and was to come for my things if they arrived.

COURT. Q. What public-houses did you go to enquire at - A. To the Two Hats and Green Man; they are about one hundred yards from the Feathers. I was to go to the Blackhorse, public-house, Shepherd's-bush, if they were not there, and so I did not require him to wait, as he was in a hurry to go to Kingston market. I called at his house as I went along, between one and two o'clock in the morning; I went to meet the waggon, as my sister was coming with the goods; she is not come yet, as my mother is ill and cannot spare her. Robert Young lent him the 2 s. 6 d.; he called him Bob. I have since heard him say his name is Robert Young ; the prisoner's son fetched him, and told him of it at the prisoner's house on Sunday.

Q. How came you there - A. I went there - I told the Magistrate this story.

Q. Did you not think it odd he should buy hay on the road when he could get it as cheap at home - A. No. I had applied to him overnight for his horse and cart; he said he would come. I called again in the morning, as I wanted him to go with me; his wife answered me out of the window.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a labourer, and live at Twickenham - and have known the prisoner ten years - he works with a horse and cart. Last Saturday week, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I saw him stand with his cart, and a load of hay on another cart. I was going to Covent-garden market, after apples.

Q.What brought you to the Feathers - A. I had business that way. I lent him 2 s. 6 d. - I cannot say what for, but believe it was to buy hay. I came away directly. The Feathers is six miles from Twickenham. I had to call on one Rook, at Ealing, whom I buy apples for; his house is about two hundred yards beyond the Feathers. The hay cart might have a load of hay on it. I did not see the trusses taken out. I was close to the prisoner's cart - there was no hay in that, when I lent him the 2 s. 6 d. I think there was a woman there, but am not certain. I went away as soon as I gave him the half-crown; he did not say what he wanted it for, that I recollect.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-56

1543. EDWARD M'WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Skelton , about the hour of one in the night of the 10th of September , at St. George's, Bloomsbury, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one teapot, value 10 l.; sixty brooches, value 20 l.; thirty-five watch-keys, value 15 l.; fifty-five seals, value 60 l.; one hundred and fifty-two rings, value 47 l.; seventy-three pair of ear-rings, value 73 l.; thirty-six gold pins, value 11 l.; thirty-three silver pencil-cases; value 9 l.; one silver snuff-box, value 30 s.; four silver boxes, value 3 l.; seventeen silver spoons, value 6 l.; three pair of silver sugar tougs, value 30 s.; three watches, value 10 l., and twelve black lead pencils, value 2 s. his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL SKELTON . I am a jeweller , and rent a house in Upper King-street, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . On the night of Tuesday, the 10th of September, I was the last person in the shop, but not the last person up; I barred and bolted the shop, and locked the back parlour door, and took the key up stairs with me. All the windows

and doors were safe. I went to bed about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and did not get up till seven o'clock in the morning. I went to the parlour door (nobody had been there before me that morning); I found the door bolted inside, and could not get in. I went out at the private door, and found the shop door ajar - it opens into the street. I had secured it with a bar across the middle, and two bolts; it had been opened from inside; the entrance had been made by the parlour door - how they got there I cannot say - they must have entered by a false key. I found the inside window sash drawn aside, and missed the articles stated in the indictment; there were not above forty seals, worth 45 l.; the black lead pencils were in the pencil cases; the total value of the property was about 200 l. I found a punch ladle handle on the floor - the silver bowl had been broken off and taken away. I should know some of the ear-rings again - some of them were quite a new pattern, which I had only bought five days before. I always write my private mark on the pencils, with the price, on a place which I cut for the purpose. Some pencils have been found, which have the marks all cut off from the place I usually cut them; it is not usual to cut them, to put a mark on. I went directly to Bow-street; and in consequence of information, I went with the officers on the 11th of October, to a place we were directed to, and as we were at the back of Pancras New Church, we met the prisoner with a woman; the officer said,

"Ned, I want you, and Charlotte, I want you." They asked what he wanted them for; he said, to go to their lodging; one of them said,

"We don't lodge here, we lodge at Marylebone." The prisoner began to be restive, and he was obliged to be handcuffed. We took them to Draper's-place, Burton-crescent; the officer then said to the woman,

"Which house is it?" She looked round, and said,

"I don't know this place, I never was here in my life," (the prisoner was close to her, and said nothing); the officer told me to knock at No. 27, which I did, and said to the landlady,

"Do you know this lady and gentleman?" She said,

"Yes, they lodge here;" they did not contradict her - the officers went up stairs and searched. The prisoner went into the first floor with them, and the woman into the second. A pair of ear drops were produced, which I knew, the tops of these drops were found in the woman's ears, and taken out before the Magistrate and compared. I knew them to be the same which I bought on the 5th of September. I saw the officer take twenty-two pencils from the prisoner's pocket - they were cut as I cut them to put into pencil cases; I knew them in a moment, and have not the least doubt in the world of their being part of the property stolen that night. I found a handkerchief in a chair by the shop window, and a dark lantern on a table in my parlour, and a piece of silk on it. I was present when the officers found some skeleton keys, crow Bars, and phosphorous boxes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you never seen pencils put ready into cases - A. They are always so, I always cut a flat place to put the mark on. There is one pencil among them, which I can swear I had one exactly like; it is black with rubbing up and down; I had had it a long time by me; it went very stiff in the case. The ear-rings are brought to me by persons who get them from the wholesale shops. I was with the prisoner till Bond had done searching the room. I did not see him take the pencils from any where, and put them into his pocket, it was a month after the robbery. When I saw the bottoms of the ear-rings, I doubted about them - but when I saw the bottoms and tops together, I had no doubt, I had sold none of that pattern.

WILLIAM BOND . I am a Bow-street officer. I went with the prosecutor on the 10th of October, in search of this property - Davis accompanied us. Just at the back of the New Pancras Church, I met the prisoner with a female on his arm; Davis said

"Here they come." I took one, and he the other. I did not know the prisoner by name. I did not hear Davis address him; I took the prisoner, and he the woman. I asked him where he lived; he said in Marylebone. I said I was not satisfied about that. Davis said,

"I know where you live." I don't recollect whether he made any answer. He resisted, and we handcuffed him, and took him to the house; I was not the first who got there. Davis or Skelton knocked. A woman came to the door; Davis asked if they did not lodge there; she said Yes. I took the prisoner up one pair of stairs; the prosecutor was with us. I did not know then but that was the room he lived in. I searched him, and found a box key, which he said belonged to his chest or box. I found two more, one a latch, and the other a fall key; I asked how he came by them - he said

"What of that?" On searching his coat pockets, I found a small bundle of pencils, and a small screw-driver - he had a pair of pincers in his hand, when we took him. At the top of the cupboard I found two latch keys, a file, a broken key, five skeleton keys, and a large drop key, they were wrapped up in a piece of green moreen, and then in brown paper. Mr. Skelton found some duplicates, which do not relate to the charge. I asked if the keys belonged to him - he said No, and that he knew nothing about them. During this time, Davis was up stairs with the woman; he brought a bag of keys down, which we took to the office. I went to a place at the back of Newcastle-street, Oxford-street, with the key which he said belonged to his chest; Mr. Skelton directed me then, and in a box there, I found a bunch of large keys, and a bunch of small ones - three of which I take to be skeleton keys. The woman stood at the bar, before the Magistrate, with him. I then took from her ears, a pair of ear-rings, without drops. Davis produced a pair of drops, which were matched with the tops; the prosecutor was then quite positive that they were his. I think what the woman said was taken in writing.

Cross-examined. Q. When Davis and you met them, were you near each other - A. As near as we could be - but the prisoner made so much noise. I could not hear what Davis said; I had a bad cold in my head, and could not hear well. I understood they lodged on the second floor. I found the keys on the first.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who took you into that room - A. The door was open. He claimed nothing in that room.

MR. SKELTON. I sent Bond to Castle-street, in consequence of information.

JOHN DAVIS . I accompanied the prosecutor and Bond; and near the end of Draper's place, by Pancras Church, I saw the prisoner and his wife - she lives with him. I knew them before; I said

" Ned I want you, and Charlotte I want you." The prisoner said

"What do you want

of me, where is your warrant?" I said

"We don't want a warrant." He was very obstreperous - Bond handcuffed him. I said we must go to their lodging; he said they did not lodge there, they lodged in Marylebone; I said I knew better, and desired him to come to Draper's place. I went first with the women, and Bond followed close with the prisoner. I desired the woman to go to her lodging; she said she did not lodge there - the prisoner was close to her, and must have heard her. I then knocked at No. 27 - the landlady opened the door. I asked her if they lodged there; she said

"Oh yes, they do." They made no answer. We went up stairs to the front room, first floor. I first tried the back room door, and could not open it for some time; then we went into the front room. Bond searched, and found what he has produced. The landlady saw us go into the first floor - neither she nor the prisoner said it was not their room. I took the woman up to the second floor, and began searching the front room there - and in a cupboard, (which was open), by the side of the fire-place, I found a quantity of duplicates, and among them, one relating to a ring, which led me to Baxter's, in Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. I have kept the duplicate ever since; it is dated the 21st of September, 1822. I saw a little box in the room, but could not find the key; after looking in both rooms, the woman found the key at the foot of the bed, in the back room. I found nothing in the box, and proceeded to search further about the closets, and on the top of the closet by the fireside, I found a small crow bar; it has been used, and is broken. I went into the back room, (the bed-room), the woman gave me the keys - and in a box in the room, the key of which was on a ring with others she gave me, I found a pair of gold drops of ear-rings, wrapped in cotton. I heard her say something about them, before the Magistrate, but it was not taken down in writing I am quite certain; the prisoner stood by her at the time; the clerk was not writing. She said her brother had brought them fifteen or eighteen months ago. The prisoner said nothing to it. I continued the search and found twenty-four skeleton keys, in a bag, in a closet, at the top of two pair of stairs - and in the same bag were four Bramah's keys, and one key which would open a French lock; five of the keys which were in the bag, were in a small bag by themselves, within the large one - they appeared to be more used than the others. And in a closet in the bed-room, I found three phosphorus boxes, and some matches with them. The prisoner was committed, and the woman discharged as his wife.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know O'Hare - A. I have known a man of that name. I do not know whether he ever lodged there. The prisoner's lodging is on the second floor.

MR. SKELTON. I believe the ear-rings to be part of the property stolen - A. I had some precisely of that pattern. The pencils are all cut in the place where I cut them, to mark them, except one - here is one which I observed with black marks, from moving up and down in the case; it is a particularly small size, which I could not sell; it is cut where I cut mine - here is one cut through to the lead to cut the mark off.

Cross-examined. Q. All you know is that they have cuts at the bottom - A. No; There were two or three which were left on sale or return, and them I did not cut or mark - the cases of them are a new pattern. One of those pencils are here. I found no cases. Customers generally move the pencils in and out when they look at them. Here is one not marked at all - that is cut, but not by me. I have no mark on the ear-rings. Here are twenty-one pencils in all; one has been cut for the purpose of writing.

JOSEPH SADDINGTON . I am foreman to a working jeweller. (Looking at the ear drops,) I think these are my manufacture. I have the punch I made them from - I have no doubt that the drops and tops have been manufactured by this punch. It was invented by myself six months ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you sold any - A. Some dozens to different tradespeople.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You sold none eighteen months ago - A. No; the pattern was not in existence then.

JOHN CORDY CROUCH . I am shopman to Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, of Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital. The duplicate produced belongs to our shop. I have the article corresponding with it - it was pawned by a woman whom I do not know. I have not seen her at Bow-street. It is for a chased ring, pawned on the 21st of September, in the name of Wilson.

SAMUEL SKELTON . I cannot swear to it.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

WILLIAM BAILEY . I am a bedstead maker, and live in Marylebone-passage, Well-street, Oxford-street. The prisoner worked for me at making press bedsteads. On the night of the 10th of September, I was at the White Horse, public-house, Castle-street, Oxford-market, where there is a club held, and was in the prisoner's company there from ten o'clock till half-past ten. He was very much intoxicated at half-past ten, in such a state that he could hardly walk out of the parlour. I observed at the time that Teddy had got his whack.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know his wife - A. Only by her coming backward and forward to the shop. I don't belong to the club. I don't know where he lives, as he had moved once or twice. He earned 23 s. or 24 s. a week.

COURT. Q. Did he work at home, or at your warehouse - A. Yes; I have frequented this house for four years.

Q. What makes you remember the 10th of September, from any other night - A. He had had some beer at my shop in the morning, and through that he got drunk, and in the evening he went to the White Horse; he was formerly clerk to the club, and was so drunk he could not manage the books. It was on Tuesday night; the club is held every Tuesday night.

Q. What makes you remember the 10th of September, from any other Tuesday night - A. He had a bedstead to make for himself, and was at work at it; the turner was to bring the feet of it home on Saturday, and did not till Monday. He was taken up a month or three weeks after. I know it was on the night of the robbery.

Q. How do you know that - A. Why, the turner mentioned in our shop, that he had passed the house at the time the robbery was committed. I saw in the newspaper, a week after, that the robbery was in King-street - and that it was committed on the 12th. I have known him drunk before; he was not given to drink.

Q. What makes you certain of the date - A. I referred

to the club-books a fortnight ago, and reckoned that was the night he was drunk, because another man signed the book instead of him, as he was drunk; the book of that night is not his writing.

JOSEPH ATTWOOD . I have known the prisoner two years, and am master of the club; he acted as secretary on club nights, which are Tuesdays. I produce the club-book which he keeps, and find that on the third Tuesday in the month he did not act, as the book is not in his writing; he has only signed the book on one Tuesday in the month, that is, the 24th. On the 3d and 10th Mr. Cantlin signed it, because the prisoner was drunk; he was not there on the 17th; he was rather drunk on the 3d, to the best of my recollection; the names of those present are not entered. Bailey was in the room on the night of the 10th, as a visitor. I remember Coleman (one of the members) asking if the prisoner was not liable to a fine, as he was not able to sign the book. The club broke up about ten or half-past ten o'clock; the prisoner was very drunk, and just able to walk out of the room.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What club is this - A. A shoe-club. Here is his writing on the 24th, it is only the words

"in hand;"

"J. Hopkins" is not his writing. I will swear they are not both written by the same hand; the landlord always signs the book; he paid his fees that night - a member only pays once.

Q. Then he was never at the club till then - A. Yes; but had not paid; he was there on the first and second Tuesday in the month.

WILLIAM CANTLIN . I know the prisoner. I don't belong to the club, but was at it on the night of the 10th, when he was there very tipsy; I was at another table with a person; the prisoner was very tipsy, and the clerk asked the favour of me to settle the book for him, being secretary to a tailor's club, which meets at that house, and I did; I settled the book once before - (looking at it) - here is my writing in it on the 10th.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long before had you settled it - A. On the 3d; he was absent that night. I cannot say what hour he went away, it might be ten or half-past ten o'clock.

COURT. Q. Are you sure he was not there on the 3d - A. Yes; positive. It was his place to settle the book every night, if he was there.

Q. Was he drunk on the 3d - A. I cannot say whether he was there or not.

Q. You have said he was not - A. I may be mistaken; but recollect very well his being there on the 10th, and Bailey remarking,

"Teddy has got his whack tonight."

CHARLOTTE LESLIE . I live with the prisoner, but am not his wife. On the 10th of September I fetched him home from the White-Horse, Castle-street; he was very tipsy indeed. We lived at that time in Little Barlow-street, High-street, Marylebone; he slept with me that night, and did not not go out till between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, when he went to work.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time in the evening did you go to the club for him - A. The watchman went half-past ten o'clock as I went into Cavendish-square. I went into the passage and sent the servant into the club-room for him; I saw Mr. Beech there, and Mr. Bailey came out of the door at the same time and spoke to me; while I was waiting there he said something; as he passed I said,

"How do you do Mr. Bailey?" he nodded to me and went in again; he said nothing about the prisoner's situation. I waited there about a quarter of an hour. We did not live in Draper's-buildings then, but have since.

Q. How long before the 10th of October, had you lived there - A. Four days; we moved every thing from our last lodging, which was in Little Brownlow-street, where we went to live on the 1st of August. We had the second floor in Draper's-buildings, and had slept there the night before the officers stopped us in the street; the prisoner was going to work then; he had stopped at home to hang a window. I have lived with him between nine and ten years, some people call me by his name; I told the Magistrate I was not his wife. He was taken up three years ago, but discharged by Mr. Birnie immediately; that only happened once to my knowledge. I was taken up the same night, and was brought here as a witness then against a relation of mine.

Q. What particular reason have you for remembering this was on the 10th of September - A. Because Bartholomew Fair ended on the Friday before.

COURT. Q. When the officer took you, you lodged in Draper's Buildings - A. Yes; I said I did not live there, as I did not wish then to create a piece of work in the neighbourhood - Q. How long have you had the skeleton keys - A. Ten months, I had them of a brother of mine; they were in a bag, and he told me where they were, and he said he did not like them to be there, and I fetched them.

Q. Where from - A. From a place where he had hid them.

Q. Where was that - A. In a field, if you must know, at Paddington - they were hid under a hedge, with the crow. I hung them in a bag in the cupboard, at the top of the stairs; there was no bolt or any thing on the door. He told me to fetch them from the field - I have had them ever since. I lodged at that time in Margaret-court, and moved from there to Suffolk Mews.

Q. Did you carry the picklock keys and crow-bar with you - A. Yes; I put them in a dust pail - I did not like to leave them behind, as I knew they were not right things - they were not kept for use. I did not like them to be exposed, or I should have sold them.

Q. Did you not think, if they were found in your possession, you would get into trouble - A. I thought if any honest person had them there was no harm. I did not clean them - some of them were wrapped up - I never opened them. I advised my brother to let them be where they were, but he said they might be found, and some mischief come of them. I have had them at four different lodgings. Two of the phosphorus boxes belonged to my brother and were in the bag; they were of no service - I could never get a light with them. - (Upon being tried in Court, the phosphorus produced a light instantly.) - I do not know who lodged on the first floor. The White Horse is a mile and a half or two miles from Barlow-street. He did not come home to tea that afternoon, which made me think he might be drunk - he was very drunk;

he held by my arm. I am certain I spoke to Bailey there; he came out into the passage; I went and stood talking to some women at the door, and saw the prisoner come out. I did not see Bailey return to the room.

GUILTY - DEATH .

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-57

1544. JOHN LAMB was indicted for that he, on the 15th of July , being servant to William Leighton , John Paley , William Petty , and Lawrence Harrison , did steal from them one 100 l., two 50 l. and three 30 l. Bank post bills , their property.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

HARSKY GISBORNE . I live at Manchester. On Saturnoon afternoon, the 13th of July, I paid Samuel Stanway , on account of the prosecutors, one 100 l., two of 50 l., and three of 30 l. Bank post bills.

SAMUEL STANWAY . I am in the employ of the prosecutors, at Manchester. I received from Mr. Gisborne, at the warehouse, one 100 l., two 50 l., and three 30 l. Bank post bills. I took particular notice of the 100 l. bill, as I had never seen such a large one before. I am fifteen years old. Cole and Co. was written on the back of it; and Cunliffe and Co. was on the back of the two 50 l. notes. The prisoner was a porter at the warehouse, and was at the counting-house door at the time the money was paid. Mr. Hall did not come to the warehouse that night, and so I did not pay him the money. When I received it, the prisoner advised me to put it into my own drawer in the counting-house, which I did, and locked it; and as Mr. Hall did not come, I put the money in the waste-book, and put that into the iron chest, and locked it up. He did not see me put it there. The key of the chest was on the bunch of keys which it was his duty to take to Mr. Hall every night after he locked up the warehouse; he lodged at Mr. Hall's house; the warehouse was shut up at eight o'clock, and before that the prisoner asked where I had put the money; I said into a safe place. On the Monday morning, I saw him at the warehouse door - it was his duty to open it at half past eight o'clock. I went there at that time, and waited till nine; when I saw him, he said Mr. Hall would not trust him with the keys, because he thought he had had them in his coat pocket on the Sunday; but that he had left them in his other coat pocket, at the house; and that Mr. Hall desired I should come for them. I went for them, and the servant gave them to me. I returned to the warehouse, and gave them to him. He opened the front door, and took the books out of the iron safe as usual, and put them on the desk; he remained in the warehouse a few minutes. He usually goes to the Post Office for the letters - I asked if he wanted any money to pay for the letters; he said he had some. He went out as if to go to the Post Office, and never returned.

GEORGE HALL . I conduct the business for Messrs. William Leighton , John Paley , William Petty , and Lawrence Harrison . I live in Bedford-street, about a mile from the warehouse. It was the prisoner's duty to bring me home the keys nightly, if I was not there, and take them in the morning. I do not know whether he brought them on Saturday, the 13th of July. I did not miss them till the Monday morning about half-past eight o'clock, as he did not come into my room for them; I found he had been out, and on looking for the keys, I found they were not there. Almost immediately after, he came into the room; he had not slept at home that night; he came into my bedroom with the keys; I asked him where they had been; he said he left them in his old coat pocket on Saturday night; I blamed him for it, and said I would not trust him with them again, and told him to put them down and send the boy for them. Shortly after Stanway came for the keys, and about an hour afterwards I heard the prisoner had absconded - he had lived about eight months with us. I heard of him again in the middle of September, and came to town; I found him in custody; he denied the charge.

JOHN HART . I am a salesman, and live in Holywell-street, Strand. The prisoner came to my house to buy some clothes the day before I changed that 100 l. Bank post bill. He asked for a travelling cloak, saying he was going to Paris - he bought articles to the amount of 10 l. and tendered me a 50 l. Bank post bill. I went out to see if it was good, and found it was. I returned to him, and found that during my absence, my boy had sold him goods to the whole amount of the bill - he made another purchase to the amount of 45 l., besides the 50 l.; it was a gold watch, seals, pencil, and clothes, and tendered a 100 l. Bank post bill for that. I found it was good, and agreed to take it. I gave him thirty-five sovereigns; rode with him to the Black Horse, inn, with part of the goods, to see if he lodged there; he told the waiter I would not give him his change; I gave him 10 l. more, as the waiter said he knew him - the waiter went home with me, and I gave him the rest. He bought a box with the goods, and had a brass plate put on it, with the name I. H. Holmes on it. Next morning he called in a coach, for the rest of the goods, and asked me if it was all right. I said Yes. He had told me he had a pension in the army of 200 l. per annum, and that he got this money at the death of his mother. He called again on his return from Paris about three weeks after, and wanted to sell me part of the things I had sold him, but I refused. I received the 100 l. Bank bill at the Bank myself. I have since seen it.

JURY. Q. You seemed to want change, why not offer him the 50 l. bill back - A. He said he was going to Paris, and wanted change.

SOLOMON GOODMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Hart. His account is correct. I saw the prisoner give him both the bills.

SAMUEL FARQUHAR . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce the 50 l. and the 100 l. Bank post bills.

JOHN HART . These are what he paid me; his name is on them.

SAMUEL STANWAY . These are two of the bills I received.

MR. CUNLIFFE. This 50 l. bill is endorsed by one of our partners.

GUILTY , Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-58

1545. JOHN LACEY and JOHN WALTERS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , four casks, value 3 l. , the goods of George Hale and others, his employers.

WALL LYNN. I am a partner in the firm of George Hale and Co., there are other partners. We are brewers , carrying on business in Redcross-street; the prisoner is one of our draymen . Within the last twelve months we have lost casks in value amounting to 1200 l., each cask being worth 23 s.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. I was employed by the prosecutors to watch the prisoners, on the 3d of October, from the brew-house in Redcross-street, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning. The prisoners attended the dray. It at first had about eight casks of beer on it. They went over Blackfriar's-bridge, turned up Beer-lane, Southwark, and left two full barrels at a workhouse there, and received three empty ones; and at a public-house, in Churlotte-street, they left two full ones, and received one empty one. They then went round into Westminster-road, Walters left the other. The next delivery was at the White-hart, public-house, Walworth-road; one cask was left there, and none returned; they next went to the Duke's Head, public-house, Borough, where they left one and received two empty ones; then they went to a court in Gracechurch-street, to a public-house, and received four empty casks, but delivered none. They then went on different cads to York-street, Bethnal-green, and stopped under a gateway, at the end of a brewery, with Richard Clark and Co. written in front. Walters had joined the other, and was with him at this time. They both left the dray, and went into Clark's brewery. I saw them in conversation with Clark; they then both came out of the brewery, round the corner of the dray - took four of the barrels out of the dray, pitched three on the ground, and put the fourth on the top of them. They left them at the corner of the brewery, and returned into the brewery. I immediately went and looked at all four casks, they had

"Hale, Red Cross-street," burnt very deeply on the head of all of them. The prisoners came out of the brew-house - each took one into Clark's brew-house, returned and fetched the other two - and as they brought them into the yard, Clark took them from them, and put them into the back part of the premises. They all three smiled together, Clark took his jacket, and all three came out together. Next day I went to Clark's brewery with Knight, and watched for Clark - he did not come until eight o'clock in the evening - and at that time was driving a horse with a little dray, with six or seven empty casks on (the dray the prisoners drove it would not hold a great many casks;) four of Mr. Hale's casks were on Clark's dray. As he was backing his dray into the yard, I went up to him, and asked if his name was Clark - he said No, it was Wright. I laid hold of him - he struggled most powerfully. I believe I broke his wrist, and my partner cut his head; his little boy who was with him, called out,

"Mother, mother," which the people mistook for a cry of murder - a mob collected; a dog was let loose on us, and Clark escaped. We found nineteen casks on the premises with the names taken out.

LACEY - GUILTY . Aged 38.

WALTERS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

See Page 584.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-59

1546. ELIZABETH COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , one thimble, value 1 s.; one sovereign, and 3 s. the property of William Baker .

BARBARA HAGAN . I live at Mr. Green's, Carnaby-street . Baker lodged there. On the 24th of September, about one o'clock, the prisoner came and said, she had come for Mrs. Baker's work-box; I said I did not know where it was; she said,

"I know where it is," and took it up herself from the foot of the bed. The bed is in a parlour behind the shop. I cannot say whether the box was locked.

ANN BAKER . I am the wife of William Baker . I lodge at Green's. I have known the prisoner two years. On Tuesday, the 24th of September, about eleven o'clock, I went out; the prisoner had called on me that morning. I told her I was going out for the day. I left my box locked under the bed. I had opened it in her presence that morning - it contained a sovereign and 3 s. and some duplicates, and a thimble; she saw what was in it; I never sent her for it. She lived in Lancaster-court, close by - she went out with me - and I left her at the corner of the street.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-60

1547. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing on the 21st of September , four caps, value 4 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of James Fisher .

JAMES FISHER . On Tuesday the 24th of September, between two and three o'clock, I took a trunk and band box to the Spread Eagle inn, Piccadilly , and gave them to Fearns the porter; the bandbox was tied with a strong cord and handkerchief; it contained a bonnet and some caps and a handkerchief. I saw the prisoner about there. I saw Fearns put the trunk into the front boot, and the bandbox into the coach; the prisoner was sitting in the coach at the time. I went towards home to meet my wife, and returned with her to the coach; and on the door being opened for her to get in, I saw the string of the bandbox off, and the handkerchief partly untied. I said to the prisoner,

"You are the only person in the coach, and was here when the box was put in; I must know who took the string off?" he said, he knew nothing about it. My wife opened the box and missed the caps. He attempted to get out at the other door, but the porter prevented him, and in the scuffle his hat fell off, and I picked it up; it contained four caps and a handkerchief, which were taken out of the band box. My wife claimed them. I asked him for the string of the box, and he pulled it out of his pocket - he was dressed in livery. There was no time to secure him, as the coach would not wait. I went as far as the Elephant and Castle, inn. I saw the prisoner again on the 9th of October, and am certain of him - he was not in livery then.

GEORGE FEARN . I am a porter at the Spread Eagle. I received the band box, and put it inside the coach, on the front seat - the prisoner was the only person in the coach; I am certain of him. After he was charged with taking the caps, he tried to get out at the other door, but I prevented him. Mr. Fisher agreed to go on in the coach, and he went on to Brighton, to his master, Mr. Barber Beaumont. I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Brighton to the family I lived with. I was certainly much in liquor, and

hardly knew what I was about. He says I wanted to make my escape; of course I should not escape after paying 10 s. for the fare, for the value of 4 s., which they say is the value of the caps. I was at Brighton a fortnight - my master came to town, and I understand the prosecutor went and reported this to him - but my master kept me in his service a week after, which I should think he would not have done if I was dishonest.

JAMES FISHER . He appeared a little in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-61

1548. JOHN STONEHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Isaac Brook .

ISAAC BROOK . I live in Cranbourne-passage, Leicester-square . On the 11th of October, about nine o'clock at night, I was standing in my shop, and heard a pair of shoes snatched from my window, and the string which secured them crack - I looked and missed them off the shew board; they were there a minute before. I ran to the top of the passage, and saw the prisoner running up Porter-street - I called Stop thief! he was stopped in Princes-court. I only lost sight of him for half a minute, while he turned up the court. I cannot swear to him, as I did not see his face until he was stopped. My window was open, and the shoes lay on the board.

ELIZABETH WEBB . A few minutes past nine o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief. I live in Prince's-court. I went to the door, and saw a man run by, and several people pursuing him. A pair of shoes was thrown among the crowd, which I picked up, and afterwards gave them to Mr. Brook.

SOLOMON GIBBS . I live within a door of Prince's-court. About a quarter past nine o'clock at night, I heard the cry, and saw the prisoner running up the court, very fast - shortly after some people turned the corner after him - he was alone. I stopped him; he had passed Webb's door. The prosecutor came up, and he was taken to the watch-house.

DANIEL BOVEY . The prisoner was given into my charge. Mr. Brooks gave me the shoes. He said he hoped it would be forgiven, for it was his first offence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-62

1549. JOHN DAVIS and MARIA DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one sovereign, twelve shillings, and one sixpence, the monies of John Lennon , from his person .

JOHN LENNON . I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 7th of October, I received my pension, consisting of four sovereigns, and 6 s. 6 d. in silver. I know the female prisoner, and am slightly acquainted with the man. I met them just as I came out of the College-gate, and took them to a house, and treated them, and then took them to my own room in Marlborough-place, Chelsea, where I gave them a dinner. I went to Portman-square, and on returning called on them in Ann-street, Westminster . I then had a sovereign and 16 s. 6 d., in silver - I gave the man 1 s. for beer, and while he was gone for it I fell sick, and laid down by the side of their bed. I awoke in a quarter of an hour, and they were fighting - I put my hand in my left hand pocket, and found I had only 8 1/2 d. left. I said they had behaved very ill to me in robbing me, and they had better give up my money. The man searched his wife, and found 2 s. 6 d. on her, and offered it to me to go away. I took the woman to the watch-house; he followed me there. I gave him in charge. He denied having any money - 17 s. was found on him. I lost a sovereign and 12 s. 6 d.

Prisoner JOHN DAVIS . Q. When you got home your wife asked you for your money, and you gave her three sovereigns and 16 s. - A. Yes - she returned it to me again. I went home with a boy to King-street, Portman-square, and then returned to the prisoners'; but went to no public-houses after I left Chelsea. I was rather ill in my stomach. I had only drank two pots of beer, and very little gin.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-63

1550. THOMAS BALLINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one copper, value 10 s. , the goods of William Morgan .

CHARLES DUNN . I am a watchman. On the 9th of October, about six o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Edward-street, and saw the prisoner with this copper on his head - Fry, another watchman, asked where he got it; he said,

"Not from far." Fry said," You must take it back then" - he said he would. We followed him to the top of Union-place - he was then crossing a meadow, and said he was going to the house over the bridge, where his father lived - Fry brought him back with the copper to the top of Edward-street. I went up, and he immediately left the copper, and ran away. I secured him.

GEORGE FRY . I am a watchman. I was on duty. Dunn's account is correct. The prisoner said he was going home with the copper - I said he could not move things at that time; he said he would return with it. He pointed to a house in Maiden-lane, and said Smith lived there. I knew it was Camplin's house, and took him back - he said he should not carry the copper about in that way - I said,

"Then I will." I laid hold of one end, and as soon as I called Dunn he ran off, but was secured.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I live in St. Pancras . On the 9th of October, about seven o'clock, I came down and missed the copper from the wash-house. The one produced has been fitted to the hole, and matches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD COOPER . The watchmen brought the prisoner and copper to my house about six o'clock in the morning. I compared it at the prosecutor's house; it fitted exactly.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a man gave him the copper on the bridge in Maiden-lane, to carry to the Colonade in Russell-square.

GEORGE DUNN . He said nothing of this sort to me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-64

1551. THOMAS SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , two gowns, value 14 s.; one gown-body, value 1 s., and one scarf, value 4 s., the goods of Margaret Wigstead ; and two pair of trowsers, value 20 s., and one shirt, value 6 s. , the goods of John Rogers .

MARGARET WIGSTEAD . I was servant to Mr. John Rogers , of Hoxton . On Monday, the 9th of October, I got up about one o'clock in the morning, to wash, and hung the articles stated in the indictment in the garden to dry, about half-past five o'clock. I went into the garden exactly at six, and missed them with others.

HENRY LARA . I am a watchman. On the 9th of October, at half-past six o'clock, I was on duty with Jones, and met the prisoner and another man about a mile and a half from Mr. Rogers's - each had a bundle under his arm; they passed us. I followed them - the prisoner went up a passage by the Rising Sun, public-house, in the Hackney-road. I asked what he had there; he said, Nothing. I felt and found it was wet linen. I took him into custody. He said he found it - I asked him what had become of the handkerchief off his neck; he said that was it, which the bundle was in.

EVAN JONES . Lara's account is correct. The other boy got away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work at six o'clock in the morning, and in a brick field, I found these things covered with grass, and took my handkerchief off, tied them up, and thought I would take them to the watch-house, and met the watchman, and told him they were things I had found.

HENRY LARA . He was coming towards the watch-house; but he turned away from it, and struggled to get away.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-65

1552. SUSAN TALBOT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , one silver watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Mathias Marshall .

MATHIAS MARSHALL . On the 2d of October, about half past eight o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Oxford-street; she asked if I would give her any thing to drink, and I asked her; another woman was with her, who went away. I went home with her and had half a pint of beer; the other woman came into the room; I took out 2 s. 6 d. and gave it to her; she said I should not stop there unless I gave her 1 s. more; I told her I did not come to stop, but would have something to drink; she went out to get some supper, and left the other woman with me; she wanted to get me out, I refused to go, expecting the prisoner would return. I waited nearly two hours, and when she came into the room, she told me I had better go to bed; I consented; I put my watch in my handkerchief, and laid my coat under the pillow; I turned round and felt somebody touch me; I saw her hand come out of my hat. I said,

"What are you doing?" She said,

"Nothing," and went down stairs, saying she would be back in a minute. I went after her, and could not find her. I returned with the watchman - I found every room in the house locked. I went to the watch-house, returned again, and saw the prisoner in the room with two others. I gave her in charge, but have not found my watch.

Prisoner. Q. You first said you lost an umbrella - A. I did lose it before I lost my watch.

EDWARD HARRINGTON . I am a watchman, the prosecutor came to me and complained of losing his watch. I went with him up to the room at No. 6, Bainbridge-street , and found the door padlocked outside; he was not quite sober, but understood what he was about; we returned in about two hours to the same room, and found the prisoner lying on the bed. She denied the charge, but did not deny having been with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw his watch or umbrella. He went down stairs, and I went down, and returned in an hour - he came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-66

1553. ESTHER WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one scarf, value 20 s., and two shirts, value 10 s. , the goods of John Hunt .

MARY HUNT . I am wife of John Hunt , and live in Little Windmill-street, Golden-square . Last Saturday three weeks, the prisoner came to lodge in our house. On the Wednesday following she was alone, and I asked her to bring her work and sit with me, which she did, and drank tea with me. We were talking about dress. I took out my scarf and shewed it her; I folded it up in my handkerchief and put it into my box with my bonnet over it, and put my box under the bed, covered over with a handkerchief; and on Sunday morning I went to the box, and saw the handkerchief the scarf was in lying by the side, folded up in a different manner, and the scarf gone. I knocked at the prisoner's door, and she came into my my room; I said I had lost my scarf. She said,

"You had better be certain." I said,

"I am certain, and nobody has been in my place but my husband and you, and if you know of it, tell me." She said she should think it a sin to rob me, who worked so hard, and

"as to Mary Ann ." she said,

"I know nothing about her," - (this is the other lodger). She said she would get it out of Mary Ann if she could; she went into her room; I called to her and said,

"Do tell me if you think Mary Ann has taken it;" she said she did not know, but she would get it out of her if she had or had not, before my husband came home; and to-morrow, she would go round to the pawnbrokers. The prisoner went out, and never came back all night. In the course of the evening, I went to my drawers, and missed two of my husband's shirts. I suspected her, and in the morning, in consequence of information, we went to Oxford-street, and found her there, in the street, by the Pantheon. Evans, who was with me, kept her eye on her, while I fetched the patrol, and just by the Pantheon I met her and said,

"Oh, Esther, you wicked girl." She said," I know I have robbed you." I asked what she had done with my husband's shirts; she said she took them also and pawned them, but had destroyed the duplicates.

Prisoner. Q. You promised faithfully to forgive me - A. Yes I did, after she said she had pawned them, but I was bound over.

JAMES LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. On Saturday, the 12th of October, the prisoner pawned the scarf in the name of Mary Willis .

JOHN HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis, of Great Portland-street. On the 10th of October a shawl was pawned by a female whom I did not know, in the name of Mary Willis .

GEORGE PICKETT . I am shopman to Neat and Son, Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 10th of October a female pawned a shawl in the name of Willis.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-67

1554. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , four pewter pots, value 3 s., the goods of Richard Gardner ; two pewter pots, value 1 s., the goods of Mark Calleyford ; and one pint pot, value 6 d. , the goods of John Henry Watchorn .

RICHARD GARDNER . I keep the Manchester Arms , Adam-street, Marylebone. On the 7th of October, in consequence of information, I went into Baker-street, and stopped the prisoner, and found two pint and two quart pots of mine on him, and others of other people's; he had them in an apron and two in a bag; he begged forgiveness.

MARK CALLEYFORD . Two of the pots are mine.

JOHN HENRY WATCHORN . One of them is mine.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. He was given into my charge; he refused to say where he lived. I went to a room in Lisson-grove; (a key was found on him which opened the door); I found a spoon there with solder and melted pewter in it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 74.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-68

1555. NORAH CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one sheet, value 1 s.; one bed tick, value 2 s.; one shift, value 1 s.; one clothes horse, value 3 s. , the goods of Ellenor Cochlan .

ELLENOR COCHLAN. I live in St. George's in the East ; the prisoner lived in the same house with me; I missed these things. I was in the workhouse a fortnight ill, and when I came back they were gone. The prisoner was still there. My husband died three or four months ago. She owned she pawned them, and promised to redeem them when she had money. When I went to the workhouse I told my little boy to take the things to the workhouse with me, but she said she would take care of them.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you leave me your children to support, and I told you I would pawn these things to pay the rent - A. No. She is landlady of the house. I lived there 5 or 6 weeks; her husband was a friend of mine, and he would take no rent. She paid nothing for my children; the neighbours brought them victuals. I never paid her rent; when she asked for a shilling, I gave it her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-69

1556. WILLIAM FLINT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , one plane, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Robert Compton .

ROBERT COMPTON . I am a carpenter . I saw my plane safe on Tuesday morning; it is three weeks ago to-day - it was on the ground floor of a building at Ball's Pond , where I was at work - my tools were in my basket. I went away about eight o'clock in the morning, and returned about half-past nine, and it was gone. I found it at Worship-street on Wednesday week after. The prisoner worked on the premises that morning.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of October, in the evening, the prisoner pawned the plane in the name of John Smith .

GEORGE GOODLUCK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge for stealing the tools; he said he knew nothing of them.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-70

1557. THOMAS INCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one shawl, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Birt .

CHARLES BIRT . I am a linen draper , and live in Ratcliffe-highway ; the prisoner came into the shop with two others, on the 9th of October, he asked for two yards of ferrett. I was in the back parlour and heard him; I was afterwards called into the shop; I asked the prisoner what he had been doing, he said nothing; I lifted up his apron. and found the shawl under it; the other ran out. I had seen it a quarter of an hour before. He begged of me to let him go.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other two put it under my apron; I was frightened and did not like to say I had it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sargent.

Reference Number: t18221023-71

1558. MARGARET MURPHY and JOSEPH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , four shillings and two sixpences, the monies of John Curry , from his person .

JOHN CURRY . I live at Mr. White's, in Nightingale-lane. On Saturday night, the 19th of October, I saw Murphy at the Bull's-head, Ratcliffe-highway; I gave her some beer, and went home with her to Shadwell ; I agreed to give her two shillings; I had four shillings and two sixpences in my pocket. Soon after I got to bed, I heard a scratching at the door - I said there is some body at the door - she said No, it is at the next house; she got up, I laid hold of her, and asked where she was going; she lifted the window up, and a man came in, and said,

"What are you doing with my wife? you scoundrel, I have a good mind to take your life;" he caught hold of me, tore my shirt, and ill used me; he knocked me down; I said

"Spare my life, I'll go away without my clothes." He said,

"No, put on your clothes." I did so; and Murphy said, if I would send for some gin, it would be all made up; I gave her sixpence; she sent for the gin, which was drank; she then said, I had better make the best of my way off as fast as I could, and the moment I got out I missed my money. I went to the watchman, and told him of it; he got two more watchmen; we

went to the house, but could not get in for some time. The watchman took Smith to the watch-house; a button was found on him, which I can swear to, (looking at it,) this button was in my pocket with the money - the money was found, I could not swear to that, but the amount is right.

Prisoner SMITH. Q. Did I come in at the window, or was the door opened to me - A. At the window. I sat and drank with him because I could not get out. I did not threaten the woman with a knife; there was no cry of murder; she was not screaming for help.

BENJAMIN PATTERSON . I am the patrol. About four o'clock this morning, Curry came to me, and said he was robbed. I went with him to the house, and found the prisoners in bed. They got up and came to the door half dressed; both denied the charge, and soon after some person said,

"Why did not you brush?" he said

"So I would if I had the keys." As I was taking him to the watch-house, Smith offered me what money he had to let him go, or speak in his favour. The woman said the prosecutor had pinched and ill treated her before Smith came, but said nothing about a knife.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am the watch-house keeper; between four and five o'clock, the prisoners were brought to the watch-house. On Murphy I found four shillings and two sixpences, and a button; she said the prosecutor had behaved very ill to her, and pinched her, but there were no marks of violence on her arm. Nothing was said about the knife till the patrol said Smith had offered him all the money he had. He then said he had threatened the woman with a knife; Smith did not deny offering the money.

MURPHY'S Defence. I had three shillings besides what he gave me, having pawned my shawl that night; as to the button it belongs to a young man in the East Indies; I have three or four of them. He behaved so ill to me I could not stop with him; he said he would knife me, or any one who came to my assistance; I called for help, unfastened the door, and this young man came in, and said,

"You cannot be a man to take a knife to a woman." On the Monday he went to a relation of mine, and said he had lost 5 s. and if she gave him 7 s. he would not appear; she gave him 5 s.

SMITH'S Defence. I heard the alarm, and was let in at the door by the woman, who was calling murder.

WILLIAM SUMMERS re-examined. He said Smith came in at the window, and a sailor said in Smith's presence, that he saw him go in at the window, and that he had been robbed the same way in the house that night.

ELIZA WILMOTT . I live in this house, and between eleven and twelve o'clock, I heard the prosecutor say he had but two shillings, and would give it to the girl; that he had no more money, and when he got paid, he would satisfy her. I live over head. The prosecutor was about an hour in the house; I fell asleep and was awoke by a great noise, of his saying he would stick the girl with a knife, if she did not consent; there was a cry of murder; he said he would stick any person who came in. Smith went in directly the cry was made about the knife.

Q. Did you say any thing about the knife before the magistrate - A. I was not asked; they would not let me speak; the noise was about half past twelve o'clock; as near as I can guess.

ELLENOR MURPHY . On Saturday week, about eleven o'clock, the prosecutor came to me and asked if I was not the prisoner's sister; he said if he got his money, he wished no more. I said it was hard for me to pay it, but sooner than she should stop in trouble I would; I sent a person out to pawn something, and paid him; he said if he did not have 7 s. it would not do; he went to the top of the street, returned, and took the 5 s.; I told Summers who took it from him, and returned to me.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . The prosecutor informed me a woman had been after him, and gave him 5 s. I said he had done wrong, and made him return it. I heard Wilmott examined before the Magistrate; she said nothing about the knife. Smith interrupted her and said it was all lies she was saying, and she was turned out.

MURPHY - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-72

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30.

1559. ELIZA MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , one shift, value 2 s. the goods of Edward Thomas .

MARY ANN THOMAS . I am the wife of Edward Thomas . On the 28th of September, my shift hung in the yard to dry - I missed it next morning. The prisoner was my servant , and had the care of it, as I was ill. On the 6th of October, I found it on her person, made into a petticoat - I know it by the gores which I cut. I charged her with stealing it; she said I had better swear it.

MARY ANN BATE . I made this shift, and am certain the petticoat is part of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is mine. I never took her shift - I bought it myself.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-73

1560. JOHN SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one cart load of sand, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Want and James Richardson ; and JOSEPH HILL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN WANT . I am a bricklayer. Shepherd is my carman .

SARAH GODLICUT . My husband works for the prosecutor. On the 11th of October, early in the morning, I saw Shepherd shoot a load of sand opposite two gates in the New-way, Westminster. It was in the prosecutor's cart.

WILLIAM SLATER . I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 11th October, I measured out forty-nine yards of sand from the barge. Shepherd was one of the carmen, who was to take it to Pimlico. I met Godlicut next day, and from what she said, I went to the gates on the New-way - that is not Hill's premises. I saw marks of sand on the outside of the gate, and brought a sample away, and

got one from the bulk, which I produce. Hill lives close by the premises. I saw the marks of sand on his steps; it was shot close to the steps, where it had been been carried into the house. I saw Hill, and asked where he had the sand from the day before; he made no answer; I said I was afraid he had been doing wrong, and that the prosecutor had lost sand. He turned pale and gave me no answer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is he not a plasterer - A. Yes, and uses sand. I dare say a great deal of sand passes his door every day. I do not swear the samples are alike.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I took Shepherd on the night of the 14th. Mr. Want asked how he could be guilty of robbing him of the sand; he said he had done it, but would pay for it, but his wages had been stopped, and he took this in lieu of them, and shot it out in Broadway. I took Hill; Mr. Want charged him with receiving it; he said two loads of sand had been left there, but he knew nothing of it.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he knew nothing of the sand you applied about - A. I believe he did.

MR. WANT. I do not remember charging Hill with it.

GEORGE POPLE . I was at the public-house by the office when Pace brought Shepherd there; Want asked how many loads he had taken; he said he took two on Friday, and one on Saturday, to Hill's, in New-way; but had made no agreement with Hill, what he was to have for it. At the examination, the Magistrate asked how it was taken into Hill's premises; Want said it was wheeled in; Hill said,

"Don't tell lies, it was basketed in."

SHEPHERD'S Defence. I know nothing of it, but my wages were stopped. Mr. Want desired me to make away.

MR. WANT. He was paid on the 5th, but was not paid on Saturday the 12th. I kept his wages back to settle on Monday.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-74

1561. GEORGE BRINDLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Shaw , about seven o'clock in the night of the 19th of October , at St. James's, Clerkenwell, with intent to steal, and stealing, four bonnets, value 3 l. , his property.

JOHN SHAW . I rent a house No. 12, White Conduit-street, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell , and am a straw bonnet maker ; I was out when this occurred.

ANN SHAW . I am wife of John Shaw ; there is a great number of bonnets in the parlour; there is a railing before the window, but the gate is not kept locked. I had been working in the parlour a quarter of an hour before this happened, and am certain I left the sash entirely closed; nobody went there after me. About half-past seven o'clock, I returned into the parlour without hearing any alarm, and found the window quite up, and one Leghorn and three straw bonnets gone, they cost me 3 l. 6 s. 6 d. Nobody was there; the prisoner is a stranger. On Monday evening, the officer brought two of them to me; and on Wednesday I saw the prisoner at Worship-street. I am sure they are two of the bonnets stolen from our room.

JOHN SHAW . I saw two of the bonnets on Monday, and knew them; I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN TURADY . I am constable of St. Luke's. On Saturday evening, the 19th of October, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming along Golden-lane about a mile and a half from Mr. Shaw's house; he turned from me; I went over, took him, and asked what he had got - he said,

"Two bonnets." I found it was so - he had them in a handkerchief. I asked how he came by them; he said he brought them from his sister's. A mob collected. I sent him to the watch-house, and there he said he brought them from a man named Roberts, of New Compton-street, St. Giles's, and was going to take them to his sister's to sell, who kept a bonnet shop in play-house yard, Golden-lane. Compton-street is near an hour's walk from Golden-lane. I asked if his sister knew he was gone for the bonnets - he said she did, and she had sent him for them. I found his sister where he said. I made enquiry, and Mr. and Mrs. Shaw claimed the bonnets - they described them before they saw them.

JOHN FELLS . I am a constable, and was with Tweedy; his account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man stopped me and said he would give me 1 s. to sell them; I said I thought my sister would buy them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-75

1562. THOMAS FEARBY , WILLIAM WHITTON , WILLIAM LEICESTER , JOHN CURRY , and SAMUEL RAVEN , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , at Heston, in the dwelling-house of James Curtis , nine spoons, value 7 l.; one punch ladle, value 2 l.; two snuff-boxes, value 5 l.; three watches, value 9 l.; one neck chain, value 1 l.; one watch key, value 5 s.; seven rings, value 10 l.; nine brooches, value 5 l.; one gold pin, value 6 s.; two pair of ear-rings, value 15 s.; one tortoiseshell, value 10 s.; one pocket-book, value 6 d.; one locket and chain, value 2 l.; sixteen sovereigns, value 16 l.; one half guinea, value 10 s. 6 d.; one seven-shilling piece, value 7 s.; three Bank notes for payment of, and value 5 l. each, and one promissory note, for payment of, and value 5 l. , the property of the said James Curtis .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and STIRLING conducted the prosecution.

JAMES CURTIS . I keep the White Bear, public-house, at Hounslow; in the parish of Heston . On the 18th of September (the day of Egham races), about half-past one o'clock, Fearby and Whitton came in a horse and gig, and dined at my house - they had often been there before, and had slept there once; they asked what time the races began, I told them half-past two o'clock - they went away about half-past three, and returned in the same gig, about half-past eight; it was dark then. The other three prisoners came in directly after, and there was a sixth man in their company (who gave the name of White at Kensington); there were ten in company altogether - they all appeared in company, one with the other, and went into the same room, and all appeared acquainted; they sat in the same room. Leicester came in a gig with White. When Fearby returned in the evening, I stood at the door - he told me to move his horse in the same position as a gentleman's, who was going away at the time, that it might not be exposed to the draft. The horses were kept outside in the gigs all the time they were there. The whole ten

were in the parlour on the ground floor - it is quite separate from the bar and tap room; nobody could see what passed in the parlour - the parlour door was open most all the time, for one of them observed that it was warm, and desired me to leave it ajar. There is a passage four or five feet wide, between the bar and parlour. I was in the parlour twice to wait on them, and was in and out of the bar and tap-room. They sat at the tables - there are two or three tables in the room, but no one large enough for them all to sit at. I could not see what they were about. Some of them had tea, some grog, and some pipes. I, my wife, and servant all went into the room occasionally, to wait on them. Some of them went out at times; Fearby was out once when I went into the room. The staircase comes into the passage, which the parlour door opens into; it fronts the street door, and that passage leads into the garden. One of the men who came in the fourth gig, and who is not here, while he stood in street asked me to shew him the way to the water-closet, which I did - it is in the garden; I unlocked the door for him. They talked as if they were all in one general company, and sang two songs. They staid about an hour - the horses and gigs staid outside all the time, close to each other; away from the principal entrance, towards the tap. I missed nothing before they left.

Q. In what manner did they leave - A. After singing two songs, they all joined in the last chorus together. I stood in the tap-room, hearing it; I cannot say whether they were all in the tap-room at that time, for I was not in the room for a quarter of an hour before; but as soon as the song was sung, they were all off as quick as a shot out of a gun - they were out in a moment, and all into their gigs in a moment. Fearby and Whitton were the last who got into their gig. I advised them to stop a little, as there was danger from a waggon which was in the way. Whitton dropped 3 d. into my hand for the hostler, as he got into the gig, without waiting to have his horse reined up, as he usually did; he and Fearby got into the same gig - they came first and went last. Several of them went out of the room, while they were there. Fearby in particular walked up and down the passage, with his great coat and whip in his hand. In the course of ten minutes after they were gone, my wife alarmed me; I went up and found the bed-room door open - the lock had been picked - it was locked before. I found five or six boxes and the bureau all broken open, and marks of violence on them. I found a small bit of a polished steel instrument, which had been broken in the room. My papers were all on the bed, where one of my children was asleep. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The handle of the punch ladle was broken off, and only the silver part taken. The value of the goods stolen was nearly 100 l., besides which three 5 l. Bank-notes, one 5 l. Abingdon note, sixteen sovereigns, a half-guinea and a 7 s. piece were taken. I sent my wife for an officer, who came. I and my hostler set off in my gig; the officer and his son and another went in his cart. We told the patrols on the road of the robbery, and when I came to Kensington, I found the five prisoners in custody, three of them in one house together, at the Marquis of Granby, that was Leicester, Fearby, Whitton, and White the two others were near the gateway of the palace, about thirty yards off, in a gig. There were four gigs in all came to my house, three persons were in one gig, and one on horseback - all four gigs set off towards London - I only came up with three gigs. At the time they were at my house, no persons were taking refreshment on the side of the house where they were, and where the stair-case is. I have found the three 5 l. Bank-notes at the Bank. White has escaped.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long was White in custody - A. I do not know; I left him in custody. I was there an hour; they went away in a great hurry. My house is on this side of the racecourse; it is nine miles from town; there are cross roads between me and town. The bar is between the passage and tap-room.

Q. Cannot persons come into your passage out of the taproom - A. Certainly; the passage communicates with the staircase; but they must go through two kitchens to get to the passage from the taproom; but from the parlour they can get to the staircase. The passage runs right through the house, and there is another passage which leads into the bar and into the tap-room; but the general passage is where the staircase is; but it cannot be got to from the taproom, without going through the kitchens. No guests sit in the kitchens. The passage dividing the taproom from the bar, does not lead to the passage communicating with the staircase, except by going through the kitchens. There were plenty of people travelling up and down the road. The prisoners were in the room; we put the best company in; they sat at three tables, and kept us all in full employ. They called frequently for the attendants; and left a pint of ale unpaid, which was served to them when they first went in; they were off so quick I had no opportunity of mentioning it; neither of the prisoners called for the ale. When the parlour door is open I can see into it from the bar, the door was a-jar. There is no other staircase.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You have one common passage to your house - A. I have; one passage leads to the taproom, the principal passage leads to the staircase; at one end of that passage is the door leading to the street, any person standing at the door can see the bottom of the staircase, it is four or five yards from the staircase; any person can come from the street to the stairs, without going through any room. The parties arrived in four gigs; it was dark, I think they could not have got the property without a light. The bed-room is the back room, first floor, and looks into the stable yard; it has only one window, and the window cannot be seen in all parts of the yard; a candle in the room would not throw a light over all the yard, for the window is hid by a wall; the light would fall on the yard, except in one direction. Some of the prisoners came out and paid for what they had; I had only served two of them. White ordered the first glass of rum and water himself; it was not paid for; the man who came on horseback ordered ale - he is not here. Three men were in the last gig.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were much engaged with their orders - A. Yes; I did not go into the passage much myself, I was principally at the door to see if the horses were taken care of; I was in and out at the door, in the bar and tap-room, While I was at the door no person went in, so as to go up stairs. When the parlour door is

open, they could see into the bar; the bar door is right opposite the parlour door. Fearby and Whitton are the only persons I remember seeing before.

COURT. Q. Does the passage which divides the taproom from the bar, communicate with the stable yard - A. No; they desired the gigs to be moved from the passage leading to the staircase, on account of the draft. There was three or four candles in the parlour; I did not miss any candle at any time.

MARY CURTIS . I am wife of the last witness. On the evening in question, I remember all the prisoners being in the house. I was in the bed-room five minutes before they came into the house, my child was in bed there; I went to the box which contained some of the property, and took another box off it, every thing was then perfectly safe; I locked the door when I came out, tried it, and put the key in my pocket, and kept it till I went up and discovered the robbery; the articles stated in the indictment were in the room; the prisoners came in five minutes after I came down. Fearby came into the house by himself, and asked me for a glass of brandy and water, and a pipe - (He and Whitton had dined there) - I knew them both before; I did not see the others come in. I made the brandy and water, and took it into the parlour; Fearby and Leicester were then in there, and some more were coming in at the door, I did not notice them; I went into the parlour again in about ten minutes, with bread and butter; there were seven or eight there then; I can only swear to Leicester and Fearby, I did not observe Whitton at that time. I went into the room again, in about twenty minutes, some were drinking, some smoking, and others at tea then - it is common for people to call for different things if they are of one party; they gave orders at different times; the parlour door was open most of the time, I was to and fro in the parlour, and crossed the passage to go there. I was generally in the bar while they were there; nobody could come in at the front door and go up stairs, without passing the bar.

Q. If any person went from the parlour door to the stairs, must you also see them - A. Yes, I cannot see the stair-case from the bar-door; I could see them come from the parlour-door, but could not see whether they went up stairs, as it is five or six yards from the bar. As I stand in the bar, my face is towards the street door, my right side towards the parlour, and my back towards the staircase. I remained down stairs till they all went away. No guests were in the house except the ten in the parlour. There were people in the tap-room, most of whom were there when we made the discovery; they could not come from the tap-room and pass the bar to the stairs without my seeing them. I saw three men go from the tap-room into the passage, and go up to bed while the prisoners were there; they were waggoners, whose waggons stood at our house - one of them had slept there for fifteen years. While the prisoners were there they kept walking about, and Fearby walked up and down the passage with his whip in his hand, and he brought me his glass to fill with brandy and water; he left the glass with me and went out of doors; my husband was in the bar at that time; my face is turned the same way when I mix liquors as at other times. I sent the servant up with the three men when they went to bed; that was half an hour before the party went away; they sleep on the second floor. I was present when the party went away; one did not pay. Whitton came to the bar to pay; that was the first time I had seen him; and Leicester came to the bar for a pipe. They went away all in a moment. I went to tell the gentleman on horseback that he had not paid his reckoning, and they were gone before I could get to the door - they were all moving off - I just saw the chaises. I went up to the bed-room in about five minutes; nobody had been in the house in the mean time. I found the lock of the bed-room door open, without any appearance of violence - it was half open. I had the key in my pocket. I found a mahogany box which had contained the property on the bed; the lock was broken off, and papers strewed about; another trunk and the bureau were broken open; my husband sent me for a constable, and set out in pursuit.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not state at Bow-street that it was ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after they left that you went up - A. I said about ten minutes, but never mentioned a quarter of an hour; I cannot tell the exact time. We have lived a year and a quarter in the house. There is an inner door in the passage, between the bar and street doors - it is two or perhaps three yards from the bar; the stairs are about five yards from the bar; there is no window in the bar opposite the parlour; I can see through the bar door, but if I am mixing liquors I am away from it. I serve at the bar door.

Q. Fearby first came into the bar - A. No. I met him in the passage at the inner door - he ordered a glass of liquor, and took it into the parlour to him in about five minutes; only he and Leicester were there then - they had not taken their seats. I met the others coming into the parlour as I came out. I went into the parlour again in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour with bread and butter. There was then seven or eight people there - I saw Curry and Raven drinking brandy and water at the same table as those who had tea. There might be six persons in the tap-room - none of them had come from the races. I was not in the tap-room while the prisoners were there, but was just before; there was then about six persons there, three of whom were the men who went up to bed. The passage leading to the tap is on one side of the bar, and is very narrow, and the passage to the parlour on the other side. A person coming through the taproom must go through two kitchens, to get to the parlour. They could get to the stairs without going through the bar, but not without our seeing them.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How many times did you go into the parlour - A. Three; a quarter of an hour might elapse between the first and second time, and in twenty minutes I went again, and then saw Raven and Curry - they sat drinking together and another person by their side - I do not know whether he was drinking with them. Raven came to the bar to ask for change for his 5 s. piece, just as he was going. We never put two parties into the parlour together, without asking if it would be agreeable. The tables are not used by different parties - we have seldom occasion for them. These races make very little difference to us. We have three or four rooms, and seldom put two parties into one, as they are

never all full at once. Some gentlemen had left the parlour just before they came in. I mixed liquors for nobody else while the party were in the parlour - I might mix a glass for the tap-room. The waggoners knew the house very well - they did not go to bed at the same time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. When the property was missed, were the waggoners applied to - A. I went up stairs, they were all in bed - I did not examine their rooms - they staid till morning, and one came back in the evening. I believe two of them went away about three o'clock - I had not been to bed then. The gentlemen who were in the parlour before they came were there when I went up stairs - I went to fetch some Banbury cakes for them; they were not out of my sight afterward till they left. I only speak of time and distance by guess.

JAMES HAMPTON . I am hostler at the house, and have been so nearly four years. I recollect all the five prisoners being at master's house on the 18th - I am sure of all their persons. Fearby and Whitton came in the morning, and came again in the evening with the others, and five more, about half-past eight o'clock; they all came within three minutes. Fearby and Whitton were in one gig; two more gigs had two in each, and another had three - one was on horseback - that was neither of the prisoners - they got out of their gigs, and walked in; I stood outside all the time taking care of the gigs and horses; they walked into the parlour - Fearby kept walking in and out several times, and he looked in at the bar window - he spoke to me - some of the others came in and out - I could see the passage from where I stood - nobody except that party went into that passage while they were there - Fearby and Whitton frequented the house - they went away about half-past nine in their gigs all together as quick as possibly they could - they appeared sober. I heard of the robbery soon after, and immediately went off with my master in a gig after them, and at Kensigton we found Fearby and Whitton in the Marquise of Granby, and some were in the next house - the prisoners and White were all stopped at Kensington - I found them in custody of the patrol when we came up.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was it not a very busy day - A. No. I think it was between three and four minutes after Fearby and Whitton came up that the rest came - it was not five minutes - the other three gigs came up as quick as they could, one after the other, at a pretty good pace - a man can drive half-a-mile in four minutes. Fearby came up and spoke to me about his horse - he had given directions about it when he first came. I had the hay in a crib at the door, and did not leave the door at all. I was in the tap-room when Fearby arrived and was called out - the gig had just pulled up - I did not see it come up. I left about half-a-dozen persons in the tap-room.

Q. How do they get from the yard to the taproom - A. Out at the yard-gate. I can go into the tap-room from the street. I went into the tap-room after they were all gone - there were several persons there then - there were not so many as nine.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. I suppose while the gigs stood there many others drove by towards London - A. Yes; Curry and Raven were in the third gig. I did not move their gigs - if more had called at the house I should - Fearby's stood nearest to the door - they were all drawn up with their heads facing the bar-window, which is in front of the house - they were aside of each other - the crib was just by the tap-room window. I stood facing the passage, with my side to the bar-window. I am sure nobody went into the passage while they were there, or I must have seen them go in - there is a back way to the house through the yard. When I got to Kensington they had been stopped. Raven and Curry were not in the same house as Fearby and Whitton.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you hear any other gig come up when Fearby and Whitton's came - A. No; the other three came up close one after the other. I asked Fearby, If I should take his horse out of the gig? he said No. I made the same offer to all the others, and they said No. It was a darkish windy night, it did not rain; I could see the door of the house, all the time they were there nobody went in at the street door to the passage. Egham races makes very little difference to our business. The window of the parlour where they sat looks into the street; I did not see it open.

MRS. CURTIS re-examined. There is only one window to the parlour that was closed.

MARY SIMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Curtis, and remember the company coming into the parlour on the night of the robbery. I waited on them, there were ten of them, they were all in the parlour when I began to wait on them. Fearby and Whitton had brandy and water, they sat at a table with another man, who is not here, he was drinking something else; the other seven all had something. I was frequently in the room, and heard them all talking to one another; they sang while I was in the room, two of them sang, I do not recollect whether the rest did. Whitton came to the bar and paid the mistress as they were going away; and one, who is absent, gave me some money, which he wanted to change. Curry gave me 1 s. for two glasses of rum and water. Raven gave me a crown-piece for change which I gave mistress. Three waggoners slept in the garret that night, all in one room; I show-them up to bed all at one time, and left a candle with them. I went up to their room after the robbery was discovered - they were there then, and appeared to be asleep - their candle was put out. I did not notice my master's bed-room door when I lit them up. The ten men went away about half an hour after.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. If different parties came you would shew them into that room - A. Yes. If two or three parties came respectably dressed, I should shew them into that room. I went up with the waggoners all at once - (I think it was half an hour before the party went). If my master's bed-room door had been open then, I think I must have observed it - if there had been a light in the room I must. I went up to the waggoners' room about quarter of an hour after the men went away, I do not think it was more - I went up alone, to see if the men were in bed; nobody sent me up. My mistress went up before me.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Curry and Raven drank together, nobody drank with them - A. They were not talking to the people at the other tables, but with themselves. I have seen two or three different parties in that room together.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you lived at the house - A. Three years. There are three rooms for company. We never put two parties into one room, unless the other rooms are occupied - there was nobody in the other rooms. I did not awake the waggoners - they went away in the morning at the regular time of their business.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable. I went in pursuit with my son and a young man on this night. Mr. Curtis and his hostler followed. I first saw Curry and Raven opposite the Goat, public house, opposite the palace gates. The patrol had turned their gig round - he brought them to me - I took them out of the gig into the Goat, public-house, and assisted in searching them; but found none of the property. I left them in custody, and went to the Marquis of Granby, where two gigs stood, and there found Fearby, Leicester, Whitton, and one, who has escaped, (he gave the name of White); they were in the same room together, and the only persons in the room. I took them all into custody - one of them was coming towards the door; I insisted that none of them should go till they were searched. Fearby asked what authority I had; I said I was an officer, that there had been a robbery at a public-house, at Hounslow, and a hue and cry raised; they appeared rather to dispute my searching them. I found none of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw two gigs at the door and the persons inside were drinking liquor there - A. Yes. I saw the gigs there as I went to the Goat, and on returning from the Goat, I found them in the road - I was going into the Marquis of Granby at first, but Staines said,

"Here is one going on," and then I went and took Curry and Raven, and made all the haste I possibly could back to the Marquis of Granby, fearing the party should have heard what had passed. I saw nobody in the two gigs. I believe the hostler stood there. I was an hour and a half there, and left White and all in safe custody. I searched them all minutely.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Curry and Raven were going towards London - A. Yes. I searched the gigs.

MR. ADOLPHUS, Q. How long were you searching the two men before you went to the Marquis of Granby - A. Not five minutes. Curry's chaise had passed the other two before Staines turned it round. The heads of the other two horses were turned towards town. I was present when a watch was brought in.

COURT. Q. You pursued as soon as you got information - A. Yes. I only caught sight of three gigs. I am deaf, and only understood Curtis that there were three - but he says he told me four.

ISAAC STAINES . I am horse patrol at Hounslow. I went on horseback with Cook - and when I came to Kensington, saw three gigs standing at the Marquis of Granby, public-house; before I could get up, one separated from the other two - Curry and Raven were in that gig. I ran we took them to the Three Tuns, public house - searched up, stopped the gig, took them into custody - called Cook; them, but found nothing. I went back to the Marquis of Granby, in about five minutes - the two gigs still stood there. I followed Cook through the bar into the parlour, and found Fearby, Leicester, Whitton, and White, there. I did not know any of them before - we secured and searched them, but found nothing. Cook told them, we took them for robbing the White Lion, public-house, at Hounslow, where they had been before. Fearby said, he considered we were officers, and was very willing to be searched. We went back from there to the other prisoners, at the Three Tuns, and there a gentleman gave me a watch. Curtis does not claim it.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far beyond the Marquis of Granby did you get, before you turned the gig back - A. About one hundred yards. I hollowed out to Cook, who was nearly opposite the Marquis of Granby; he came to me. He is deaf - but he had others with him.

Q. Any person on the watch could have given the alarm - A. Yes, but the prisoners were in the parlour, at the back of the bar, and at the back of the house.

FEARBY'S Defence. The road between Hounslow and Kensington, is so interspersed with cross-roads, that nothing would be more natural for me, (if I had committed the robbery), than to have gone out of the regular road, much less would it be likely for me to have stopped half an hour, with my horse and gig, at the Marquis of Granby. I was minutely searched; the bar-room I was in, and my gig were also searched. I was not kept in confinement, but kept that night in the public-house. After four hours, the officer said one man had escaped; the door was open, and I might have gone out as well. I dined at the house that day - and when we left, two persons were in the parlour, and had been for half an hour. In the evening, I went out to see if my horse and gig were safe, and ordered a glass of rum and water. We had some conversation respecting the races. Mrs. Curtis asked, if there were many people there; I said Yes. She said she thought so, as so many people had come to her house. Several more people came in, and a song was sung, and many joined in the chorus - it is said there were ten people in the room, but I think there were many more. He says one of the three men has slept at the house, fifteen years; how can he be so positive, when he has only been there a year and a half? It is plain they do not know when the robbery was done, or they would not have searched the waggoners. The house is exposed to every passenger, situated directly on the main road to the West of England - and particularly on that day when there was a prize fight, as well as the races. How easily might any person in the tap room have gone into the parlour, without the knowledge of any of the witnesses? the parlour door was wide open.

The other prisoners made no defence.

FEARBY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

WHITTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

LEICESTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

CURRY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

RAVEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-76

1563. HENRY CASE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , three hearth rugs, value 2 l., and seven yards of floor cloth, value 1 l.; the goods of John Goode , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN GOODE . I am a broker , and live on Clerkenwell-green . On the 20th of August, early in the morning, I went to Oatlands for three days; I had seen these things the day before.

HARRIET GOODE . I am wife of John Goode . On Monday night, the 19th of August, I put the rugs and floor cloth on a chest of drawers in the shop; they were safe when I shut up. I missed them between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning. It is an open shop.

MARY HYATT . I live servant to Mr. Miller, of Clerkenwell-green. On the 20th of August, I was at the door, and saw the prisoner take what appeared to be a rug from the shop, it was rolled up; whether there was more than one, I don't know. I had frequently seen him passing, and am sure of him; I did not see him again for six or seven weeks, and then showed him to Mr. Goode as he passed. He was secured. I did not suspect he was stealing it. The shop is three doors off on the same side of the way.

MRS. GOODE. They were not rolled together.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-77

1564. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , three gross of buttons, value 4 s. 6 d., the goods of Robert Bryan and Henry Price , his masters, to whom he was servant .

ROBERT BRYAN . I am in partnership with Henry Price , we live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster; and are army accoutrement makers . The prisoner was in our service; he made our brass ornaments. On the 7th of October, in consequence of information from Atkins, I and an officer watched the prisoner about quarter past one o'clock, from Atkins's house, in Cecil-court, into Hawkes, Mosley, and Co's., Piccadilly, army accoutrement makers. I went in about five minutes, and found him offering three gross of buttons for sale, which were ours. I asked what he did there? he said, he only came with Atkins. I said,

"I suspect you have been robbing me of buttons - these are mine;" he said,

"They were Atkins's." Atkins (who was with him) said,

"They are not, you want to get me transported as well as yourself;" he then said he had bought the metal and made them, and that Mr. Mosley had ordered twelve gross. Mr. Mosley came down and said, he had never seen him in his life; and had ordered none. I gave him in charge. We took stock a week ago, and found we were five gross deficient. They came out of our die, and are our metal; and it is impossible he could make them from his own metal.

WILLIAM ATKINS . I was a burnisher, in the prosecutor's employment, four or five months ago. The prisoner came to me five or six weeks ago, and said he had an order from Hawkes, Mosley, and Co. for twelve gross of buttons, and wanted me to burnish them for him. He came to me on the morning of the 7th of October, about half-past eight o'clock, and left five gross to burnish, and said if I would do them by two o'clock we could go and sell them, for I knew the shop better than he did; I suspected him, and informed Mr. Bryan, as I knew his die. Mr. Bryan told me to burnish as many as I could by the time, and I did three gross. The prisoner called, and I set him to count them while I went out and told Mr. Bryan he was come. I returned - he said,

"Here, you take them; I'll have no more to do with them." I said, I would have nothing to do with them; they were tied up, and we went to Hawkes's, and at the door he said,

"You go in with them;" I said,

"No; I'll go in with you." He went in and offered them for sale to the clerk, at 3 s. a gross; he had told me he would take 2 s. Bryan came in and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM RAY . I am clerk to Messrs. Hawkes and Co.; the prisoner came and produced three gross of buttons, at 3 s.; and said he came from Birmingham, and could make them as cheap as any body.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I am a native of Birmingham; I borrowed 16 s. of my landlady, being short of work, and bought a little metal, and made these for myself with my master's die.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-78

1565. JOHN LEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , one spoon, value 18 s. , the goods of Thomas Davis .

JOHN RICE . I am a milkman, and live in Fleur-de-lis-court, Spitalfields. On the 12th of September, I was in the Kingsland-road , and heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw people pursuing the prisoner. I followed, and tried to stop him - but he got from me. I followed and seized him by Kingsland-road, about seven houses from where I first saw him. Just as I took him he put his hand into his pocket, and whipped the spoon out over a wall, and said,

"What are you taking hold of me for, I have got nothing" - I said,

"No, you have thrown it out of your pocket." He said he did not take the spoon, but another boy had; I took him to Davis's, the King's Head, public-house, and left him there.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you mean to say he mentioned the word

"spoon" - A. He said another boy took the spoon. I stopped him about two hundred yards from the public-house. I told Cox where he had thrown it.

SOPHIA DAVIS . I am the wife of Thomas Davis - we keep a public-house in the Kingsland-road. The prisoner was in the tap-room about quarter past one o'clock, with others - they staid about ten minutes, and in consequence of what was said, I looked, and missed a spoon of the table - I ran in pursuit of the prisoner, who had left the house just before. I saw him running, and pursued him calling Stop thief!

Cross-examined. Q. How many were in the house - A. I cannot say. Some were much older than him. I think one went out with him. The alarm was given the moment he went out.

THOMAS HEALEY . I am a cordwainer. On the 22d of September, I was in the Kingsland-road, between one and two o'clock, and saw Mrs. Davis pursuing the prisoner. Somebody said something was thrown over the wall; Cox rang at the bell - I went in with him, and he found the spoon.

WILLIAM COX . I am a brewer, and live at Hoxton. I heard the alarm. I saw something thrown over the wall which shone like a spoon - I went into the garden, and found the spoon, which I gave to Davis, who claimed it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-79

1567. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 39 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. , the goods of a certain person or persons unknown.

RICHARD DEYKIN . I superintend the watch of Kentish Town. On the 8th of October, in the morning, I saw the prisoner in Union-street, coming from towards the fields, dressed in a smock frock. I stopped him and found 39 lbs. of lead on him. I found some tools on him, with marks of lead on the pincers. He said the lead belonged to him, and then said he found it in Copenhagen-fields, and afterwards said it was by the Belvidere. I have not found where it came from.

ALEXANDER WARREN . I assisted in taking the lead from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went mushrooming, and found it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-80

1568. MARY STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , (being servant to Thomas Wilkinson Harland ) one brooch, value 4 s.; three rings, value 3 s.; two pair of ear-rings, value 4 s., and one chain, value 6 s. , his property.

ANN HARLAND . I am wife of Thomas Wilkinson Harland . We live in Thornhaugh street . The prisoner was one week in our service, and left on the 1st of October. I asked her to allow me to look into her box - she said not without a constable. I said I did not wish a piece of work, and if she was honest she would let me. She turned round and struck me in the face, and tore my gown. I gave her in charge for an assault - and next night she came for her boxes. I sent for Summers, who found these things in her box.

Prisoner. Q. Does not your sister live in the house - A. Yes.

JOHN SUMMERS . I was sent for, and found the property in her box, which was corded, but not locked.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Her sister came into my bed-room; she sleeps with me; she put these things on the looking-glass-drawer, and the rest in my trunk.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-81

1569. SARAH WILKS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , one gown, value 8 s.; four shirts, value 13 s.; two shifts, value 2 s.; three aprons, value 2 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 8 s. , the goods of Thomas Chown .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to James Bullock .

JAMES BULLOCK , JUN. I live with my father in Philip-street, Kingsland-road . On the 17th of August, about one o'clock, Rebecca Chown brought these things to be mangled; and in about ten minutes the prisoner came and said Mrs. Chown had brought a bundle to be mangled; and if my mother could not get them done soon enough, I was to give them to her, and Mrs. Chown would iron them - the bundle lay on a chair, and she took it away. I never saw her before, but am sure she is the person.

REBECCA CHOWN . I am daughter of Thomas Chown . I left the bundle with James Bullock . I don't know the prisoner.

ANN CHOWN . I sent my daughter to Bullock's with the articles stated in the indictment. I never sent the prisoner for them. (Looking at the shirt, apron, and trowsers,) these are mine.

WILLIAM THIMBLELY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old Street; the prisoner pawned the articles produced between two and three o'clock. I cannot say she is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the property; it is all false.

JAMES BULLOCK re-examined - I am confident she is the woman; I saw her full in the face; I saw her again on the 1st of October.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-82

1570. THOMAS BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , one coat, value 10 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 7 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of John Norton ; and one gown, value 10 s. , the goods of Timothy Healey .

CATHERINE NORTON . I am wife of John Norton , and live on Saffron-hill . On the 10th of October, while at breakfast, I heard footsteps going down stairs; I went into the back-room, and missed these things; the gown belonged to my sister-in-law, who is the wife of Timothy Healey ; they were safe ten minutes before. I went down, and saw a man going out with a bundle; Routh went after him, and brought the prisoner back with them.

THOMAS ROUTH . Norton sent me after the prisoner. I overtook him in about six minutes, with a bundle under his arm; took him back, and gave him to Barnaby.

JOHN BARNABY . I took him in charge with the property. I asked how he came by them; he said he was distressed, and out of work.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man called me to the door, told me to wait - he came down, and gave me the bundle to carry to Red Lion-street.

THOMAS ROUTH . He said nothing of the kind to me; he was running with them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-83

1571. DAVID CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 28 lbs. of sugar, value 12 s.; 1 lb. of raisins, value 6 d.; 8 oz. of currants, value 6 d.; 4 oz. of tea, value 1 s. 9 d. and one bag, value 6 d. the goods of John March .

JOHN MARCH . I bring hay to St. James's market . On Saturday, the 24th of August, I came to town. I bought this grocery, at Jones's, Oxford-road, and put them into the nose bag, in front of the cart. Three cakes of soap, and 5 s. in copper, were in the cart. I stopped the horse in Park-street ; the nose bag was safe then. I left the cart for two minutes - and on returning, it was gone.

JOHN LINCOLN . On the 24th of August, about half-past four o'clock, I was at the top of Hill-street, and saw the prisoner running along South Audley-street, with his coat under his arm; he appeared to have something heavy - and when he came near, I saw the bag under his coat; he went down Dean-street, and kept looking behind, which made me

suspect. I stopped him in Park-lane, and told him I was a constable, and asked what he had; he said it was nothing to me. I got him as far as Smith-street, with great difficulty, and there he caught hold of the rails; a gentleman passed, who sent Clark to my assistance, who took the property, and I the prisoner. I called at Jones's in Oxford-street, to weigh the things, as I knew him.

JOSEPH GLOVER . I am shopman to Mr. Jones. I sold these goods to March - they have my writing on them.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-84

1571. JAMES GOSNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , two sheets, value 2 s.; one blanket, value 1 s., and one quilt, value 1 s. the goods of Moses John Hickman .

THOMAS BOYCE . I am a watchman of Shadwell. On the 13th of October, at a quarter past twelve o'clock, at night, I stopped the prisoner with a bundle; he said it was an old sheet and blanket, and he was going to Poplar. He refused to tell where he brought them from. I said he must go to the watch-house; he then threw them down, and tried to escape, but I secured him.

MOSES JOHN HICKMAN . These things are mine. I live in Church-road, St. George's in the East. They were in a room of mine in Twine-court, Shadwell , which I let to Mary Lee , a week before.

ANN LONG . I lodge in one of Mr. Hickman's houses. On Saturday, the 12th of October, about half past eight o'clock, I went out, locked the door, but the shutter was not fastened. I returned about half past two, found the door open, and missed these things. The lock appeared to be slipped back.

Prisoner's Defence. I received my wages, got in liquor, and went home with a girl, and gave her half a crown to fetch liquor - she went off with the money, and so I took these things.

MARY LEE . I know the prisoner by sight - but he never went home with me. I never saw him after Friday night, when I went to my mother, who was ill. I gave the key to Long.

ANN LONG . I never saw him, except in custody.

THOMAS BOYCE . He told the Magistrate, he knew neither of the girls.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-85

1573. CHRISTOPHER HARLOW was indicted for stealing on the 21st of October , three deal boards, value 5 s.; and thirteen feet of deal, value 2 s. the goods of John Chittock .

DANIEL LEVERAGE . I am a costermonger, and live in Old Pye-street. I employed the prisoner to build a shed in my yard, last month - I left town, and on returning, it was built, and some loose deal was in the yard. He found the wood.

Prisoner. Q. Since I have been in prison, I understand you have bought the wood - A. I paid Chittock 30 s. for it, I have the receipt.

JOHN CHITTOCK . I am a corn-dealer . I missed three boards, and a rafter from my yard, and found them a verages. They are worth 7 s.

THOMAS DOGNELL . Chittock applied to me. I found the deal, and took Leverage, and afterwards took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-86

1574. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , one apron, value 2 d., the goods of Jabez Belleston , and 14 lbs. of leaden pipe, value 2 s. the goods of William Rodman , and fixed to a dwelling house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

JABEZ BELLESTON . On the 18th of October, I was at work at No. 1, Short's-gardens, Drury-lane - and went to tea at five o'clock; returned in twenty minutes. I had hung my apron on the pipe, which was fixed. I found the pipe cut into two pieces, ready to be taken away. I found the shop door open, and called to Bennett, who rents the shop; and the prisoner said,

"I want Bennet;" (he was a stranger.) I said,

"What do you want? leave your business, and I will tell him." He said he wanted to see him, himself. I lit a candle, and Parteridge said the pipe was cut. I seized the prisoner as he was going out - he asked me to let him go. The pipe was cut down, and laid in the shop; and while I was lighting the candle, I saw him drop my apron from under his own. I asked how he came to cut the lead; he made no answer.

ISAIAH PARTERIDGE . I went to the shop with Belleston. The door being open, he called to Bennett; the prisoner was in the shop, and said,

"I want Bennett." Belleston struck a light - and I said he has got the pipe; he rushed out, but Belleston ran and secured him. The property belongs to William Rodman .

WALTER CAMPBELL . I got the pipe from Belleston - it fits the rest of the pipe.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop, knowing it was a smith's - and did not see the lead, till they found it.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Four Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-87

1575. CATHERINE MOORHEAD was indicted for stealing on the 26th of September , one waistcoat, value 2 s.; two pencil cases, value 2 s.; one sovereign, two half crowns, nine shillings, and two sixpences , the property of John Thurston .

JOHN THURSTON . On the 26th of September, at eight o'clock in the morning, I went to the Coopers' Arms, public-house, and waited there till twenty minutes past four in the afternoon. Several soldiers and women were there. A soldier made a dispute about a pot of beer, and while they were talking about it, somebody knocked me down; the prisoner was in the room. I was insensible; I do not know that she did any thing.

Q. She did not attack you - A. Not that I know of. I never told the Magistrate that she attacked me; my deposition was read over to me before I signed it. I lost my property out of my waistcoat pocket. I was taken to the Castle, public-house, and found the prisoner there; they said she was the person who robbed me. I saw nothing fall out of her bosom; I saw the pencil case, but did not

see it fall, and never told the Magistrate I saw it fall from her bosom. I lost 1 l. 15 s. 6 d. from my waistcoat pocket.

GEORGE SPREADBURY . I am a private in the Cold-stream Regiment. On Thursday evening, the 26th of September, I was coming along Broadway, Westminster, and saw a piece of work; the prosecutor was using the prisoner very ill. I said,

"Don't beat the woman - if you have lost any thing, take her to Queen-square." He said she had robbed him. I took her from him. He took hold of her gown, and out fell the pencil case, and other things. I picked them up - he claimed them, and said she had robbed him of them. I assisted in taking her to Queen-square.

ANN DAVIDSON . On the 26th of September I found a waistcoat in my yard, which is behind the Castle, public-house; the prisoner said she dropped it there, through a hole in the privy.

JAMES GILLMORE . On the 26th of September, I was coming through Great Chapel-street, and saw the prisoner in custody of some soldiers; the prosecutor was very much intoxicated, and charged her with robbing him. The soldier gave me two pencil cases, which he said he took from her bosom.

The Prisoner in her defence called,

AMELIA ROBSON . I was at the public-house, the prosecutor was tossing with the soldiers for beer; he lost, and was not willing to pay - words occurred between them, and they got fighting and went out. I afterwards saw him beating the prisoner in a most cruel manner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-88

1575. GEORGE ORIEL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one sack, value 1 d., and four loaves of bread, value 1 s. , the goods of William Worts .

WILLIAM WORTS . I am a baker , and live at Poplar; the prisoner was in my service one week. On Saturday, the 12th of October, I gave him leave to go out, and told him to return by bed time; and next morning I was fetched to Lambeth-street, where I found this bread in a sack, which I suspect to be mine, but cannot swear it.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Saturday, the 12th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in the Commercial-road, with the sack and four loaves in it; he said he brought them from Worts his master, and was taking them to Curtis, Whitechapel-road. I asked why he did not take them in a basket; he said his master said the sack was more handy. I sent a man to Curtis with him, and afterwards saw him in the watch-house. I said he had told me a story, and I must detain him; he said he was very sorry, for he should loose his place.

WILLIAM WORTS . I sent him with no bread to Curtis - I have no such customer.

JOHN ESHELBY . I was present when Goodey stopped the prisoner; he said at the watch-house that what he had told Goodey was not true; that they were dead men, which he told the Magistrate means overplus bread, charged to people who keep no account.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the sack on Thursday before, and put the bread in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-89

1576. ELIZABETH PETTIT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th December , one shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of John Sabey .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Charles Resdol .

ANN SABEY . I am wife of John Sabey . On the 19th of October, when I went to bed, I left eight shirts on the first floor landing to dry, and missed one about ten minutes to eight next morning; I had it to wash from Charles Resdol ; I found it in pawn, and redeemed it. I never saw the prisoner before.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. Sabey redeemed a shirt on Monday; and on Tuesday the prisoner came with the duplicate; I detained her, as she had pawned it in the name of Sarah Williams .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home with work on Saturday morning; and in Grafton street the person who stole the shirt (as I suppose) ran after me and asked me to pawn it at Blackburn's; I have dealt at the house ever since he has been there; I objected, but she said she had money to make up, or she should lose all her goods and her children were waiting breakfast; she said her name was Sarah Williams ; she waited till I came out. I put the 5 s. into her hand; she said,

"Keep the ticket," and away she ran.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I apprehended the prisoner; she gave this account at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

After the verdict was returned, the prosecutrix stated that Willimas had access to the property, and bore a bad character.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-90

1577. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one boat, value 8 l. , the goods of Richard Nell .

EDWARD FOX . I am master of the Amity, which lay at St. Catherine's wharf ; I saw the boat attached to her at nine o'clock on Sunday night; and at two o'clock in the morning, the officer brought it to me. Richard Nell is the owner.

NATHANIEL GORMAN . I am a constable of the Thames Police. I stopped the prisoner going towards the shore at Stone Stairs at one o'clock on Monday morning, sculling this boat; he was a mile from St. Catherine's down the stream; the tide was ebbing; he said he was going ashore for an old shipmate - that he belonged to the Amity, Edward Fox master. I asked what he had in the boat; he said it was a bundle his shipmate brought, and it contained clothes; that his shipmate was gone to Gould's-hill; I waited half-an-hour; he called out

"George" once or twice; he could not tell the man's sirname. I asked him a second time if he belonged to the ship; he said

"No." I took him to the office.

EDWARD FOX. The prisoner did not belong to the ship; the boat was fastened by a rope.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a public-house, in St. Catherine's-lane, George Alders was there, and said he had got a ship, and wanted somebody to go to Stone Stairs to help him to take his things. I went; I don't know where he got the boat.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-91

1578. WILLIAM HARRIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , one jacket, value 2 s.; one waistcoat, value 1 s.; one pair of trowsers, value 2 s.; two stockings, value 6 d.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 s.; one snuff-box, value 1 l.; and three sovereigns , the property of William Cook .

WILLIAM COOK . I am master of the brig Waterhouse . I lost this property; it was safe at nine o'clock, on last Sunday night, in the cabin-chair, when I went to bed; the sovereign and box were in my pocket; the other things were the clothes I had pulled off. I turned out of bed at half-past six o'clock, and they were gone. I found all but the sovereigns and box at the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NATHANIEL GORMAN . When I asked the prisoner where he was going, he said, ashore, to wait for George, who was gone to Gould's-hill, which is a quarter of a mile off. This bundle was in the boat; I asked what it contained; he said, a jacket, waistcoat, trowsers, and handkerchief. On searching him at the office, I found two handkerchiefs in his hat, one of which was the prosecutor's; he said they were his property. In the evening I learnt that a snuff-box and the sovereigns were gone. I went to search him again, and he pulled out a sovereign and 1 s. 10 d.; he said a friend had been to see him and gave it him.

EDWARD FOX . The Waterhouse lay a mile lower down the river than the Amity.

The prisoner put in a written defence; stating that Alders brought the things to the boat, and he was keeping it while he fetched more; that he gave him the handkerchief for to take care of.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-92

1579. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , one coat. value 5 s. ; the goods of Ezra Spark .

EZRA SPARK . I am a cow-keeper , and live in Oxford-street . On the 4th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, my coat hung on the cow-house door. I went into my yard, and saw the prisoner taking something up by the door; he came out of the cow-house; I followed and stopped him with a sack under his arm, and asked what he had there; he said nothing but what was his own. I found my coat in it. He said, he was sent for a Mr. Smith's coat. I sent to one Smith who lives near; he had nothing to do with the cow-house.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me, and said Smith sent him to fetch his coat from the cow-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Hertfordshire that evening, and as I came down the street, Smith said he would give me a job, as I am a painter; he told me to wait a bit; and said,

"Fetch my coat, and I will take you to my master; it is only a few doors higher up, where I have been at work; it hangs across the door." I went in and took this, and the gentleman collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-93

1580. JANE TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one gown, value 20 s., and one blanket, value 6 s. , the goods of Elizabeth Brown .

ELIZABETH BROWN . The prisoner lodged in the same house with me, in Whitecross-street . On the 1st of August I went out, and on returning missed a silk gown - I missed a blanket before; she had an opportunity of going into my room.

JOHN STORR . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of July, a woman pawned a gown-skirt for 5 s., in the name of Mary Brown . Old-street; on the 10th of August, she had another shilling on it; and afterwards pawned the body. The prisoner is the woman to the best of my belief. I I gave the person the duplicate produced.

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . On the 20th of July, a blanket was pawned, in the name of Anne Taylor . I know the prisoner, and believe she pawned it; but have not a distinct recollection of it. The duplicate found is that I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LONGWORTH . I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of September, and found duplicates of the gown and blanket on her, with several others.

Prisoner's Defence. She occupied part of my room for eight weeks; I found her in coals and candles. I pawned the gown to support her child; she partook of what I got on the things. She gave the officer the tickets.

JOHN LONGWORTH . I found the tickets on the prisoner.

ELIZABETH BROWN . It is not true; she did not give me the tickets. On my oath I did not know of her pawning them.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeannt.

Reference Number: t18221023-94

1581. CHARLES WOODFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , eight live tame rabbits, value 8 s. , the property of James Woodford .

JAMES WOODFORD . The prisoner is my son. On the 16th of October. he came home rather in a drunken state, and soon after went into the back yard, and killed eight rabbits, and went out. I was out at the time, and knew nothing about it.

MARY WOODFORD . I am the prosecutor's niece. I saw the prisoner go towards the rabbits, and in quarter of an hour saw them dead. He did not take them away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-95

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31.

1582. JOHN HIBBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , two silver spoons, value 4 s. , the goods of Jane Duff , his mistress, and employer.

JANE DUFF . I am a widow . The prisoner was six weeks in my service - he used to clean boots and shoes. I missed a tea spoon and dessert spoon. The officer brought me the dessert spoon next morning.

EDWARD READ . Mr. Ramsay, a pawnbroker, gave the

prisoner and Valour into my charge, with the dessert spoon. The prisoner said it belonged to his mother, and then that he took it from a lady where he had been cleaning knives, and intended to take it back. I went to his lodging, and found a duplicate of a spoon, pawned at Oldsworth's.

WILLIAM OLDSWORTH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of October, Valour pawned the spoon.

GEORGE VALOUR . The prisoner employed me to pawn it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-96

1583. JOHN KING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , nine sheets, value 3 s.; three pictures, value 4 s.; two tea-pots, value 3 s.; one milk-pot, value 3 d., and one bason, value 4 d. , the goods of Mary Sculley .

MARY SCULLEY . I am an unfortunute girl. I have known the prisoner about five years - he was in my room with another man; we had been to the Paviours' Arms, public-house, and all three came home together, and were intoxicated. I missed the things stated in the indictment.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman of Shadwell. On the 16th of October, early in the morning, I saw the prisoner down New Gravel-lane. I searched him, and found three large shells in his pocket, and the pictures were close to him on the ground. It is about ten minutes walk from the prosecutrix's house. The mustard-pot fell out of his pocket. He said he brought them from on board a ship. I found some duplicates in the shells, which led me to the pawnbroker's.

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the things on the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-97

1584. FANNY KENYON was indicted for that she, on the 21st of October , being servant to Joseph Glaskin , did steal fifteen purses, value 30 s. , his property.

JOSEPH GLASKIN . I live in Michael-street, Hackney. The prisoner was in my service five weeks - she was going to leave me on the 21st of October; I asked to see her box; she said she could not find the key - I found a key which opened it, and in it were these purses, which are mine. I am the manufacturer. She begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-98

1585. WILLIAM CAMBDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one pint pot, value 8 d., the goods of James Clark ; and one pint pot, value 8 d. , the goods of John James .

JAMES CLARK . I am a publican . The prisoner was brought into my house with two pint pots on his arm, one of which is mine.

JOHN JAMES . I am a publican. A pot was found on the prisoner, which is mine. Clark brought it to me.

MARY COCHRAN . I put a pot out at my door, belonging to Clark, and saw the prisoner take it - I gave an alarm, and called after him, and asked what he was going to do with it; he denied having it. I followed him, and met my husband, who took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-99

1586. RICHARD FARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , one petticoat, value 2 s., and one apron, value 1 s. , the goods of William Bowser .

ANN BOWSER . I am the wife of William Bowser ; we live in Upper-street, Islington . On the 3d of October, I lost a petticoat and an apron, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I was at dinner at a public-house, about ten yards from Bowser's, and saw a person running after the prisoner, and crying Stop thief! I followed, and found him in custody, and the things taken from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-100

1587. JAMES PARDON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one shawl, value 3 s. , the goods of James Payne and George Henry Bassington .

GEORGE MEBLE . I am shopman to James Payne , and George Henry Bassington , pawnbrokers , who live in Whitechapel . On the 1st of October, I placed a shawl at my door for sale, and saw the prisoner take it between three and four o'clock that afternoon. I brought him back, and took it from him. He pleaded distress.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I took him in charge with the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-101

1588. MARY LONG and MARY JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , three sovereigns, four half-crowns, six shillings, and three sixpences, the monies of Emanuel Jackey , from his person .

EMANUEL JACKEY. I am a seaman . On the 19th of October, I saw the prisoners in Bluegate-fields , about half-past five o'clock at night - they pulled me into their room - and both of them took the money stated in the indictment, out of my pocket. I was a little in liquor - my money was safe just before. They ran away out of the house; I followed and saw them go into another house in the court. I am sure of their persons.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am an officer. The prosecutor complained to me on the Saturday, and on Monday night he was watching the house they ran into. We went in and found they had escaped. I found them in ten minutes after, concealed in two separate houses. Long said,

"Am I one of the girls?" the prosecutor said,

"Yes, you are."

Jones at first denied living at the house the robbery was committed at, but afterwards acknowledged it.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-102

1589. MARY ANN PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , one handkerchief, value 10 s., and one frill, value 10 s. , the goods of Ann Massey , widow .

The prosecutrix's name being Mercer, and not Massey, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-103

1590. MARY ANN RANKLING was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , one gown, value 10 s.; one cloak, value 10 s., and one whittle, value 10 s. , the goods of John Roberts .

JANE ROBERTS . I am the wife of John Roberts ; we live in Caroline-court, Spafields . The prisoner lodged on the second-floor. On the 13th of October, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I went out to work, and returned at half-past three o'clock - I had left the door locked; these things were in my trunk. On returning I found the door open, and the property gone.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN . I am a pawnbroker. Between twelve and one o'clock, on the 12th of October, the prisoner pawned this property with me, in the name of Mary Ann Brooks ; another woman was with her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM JORDAN . I apprehended her on Monday the 14th. I asked her for the duplicate of the property; she said it was of no use to produce it to me; she was in fits for an hour. She came to me on Saturday to surrender, but the property was not then found.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out before her, and did not return till after her.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-104

1591. CONRAD STEIGER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , nine gallons of ale, value 12 s., and nine gallons of table beer, value 4 s. , the goods of Samuel Pratt , his master.

GEORGE PURNELL . I am a collector of rents, and live in Cumberland-street, Curtain-road. I bought a cask of ale and a cask of beer of the prisoner in June last. I intended to brew, and saw him at Mr. Pratt's, a sugar refiner , where he is foreman. I asked him to give me instructions to brew - he did - but said he was going to brew himself next week, and if I would send him hops and malt he would brew for me. I said

"It will be useless my sending hops and malt; if you'll buy them for me when you buy your own, I will pay you for them." He always told me he was a partner in the house, and it was generally believed in the neighbourhood. I sent a message to him, and received a cask of beer and ale from him, and paid him 16 s., which he said was for two bushels of malt and two pounds of hops.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. He offered to brew if you sent the malt and hops - A. Yes.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a bricklayer. I was employed to carry the cask of ale from the prisoner to the last witness in June last; the prisoner delivered it to me at Mr. Pratt's.

SAMUEL PRATT . I am a sugar refiner; the prisoner was my foreman - I never authorised him to sell any ale or beer.

Cross-examined. Q. He was two years in your service - A. Yes; he was to have a per centage on the profits of the business, if it netted any; I paid him 2 l. a week wages. The ale was not his. I ordered him to brew three barrels of strong ale, and not more. I went down and found it put into two new barrels; he said it was for the men's beer.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the malt and hops for it and did not injure Mr. Pratt.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18221023-105

1592. ANGELICA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , one silver fork, value 15 s. , the property of Marie Jean de Chardounay .

No witnesses being able to prove the prosecutor's name, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-106

1593. WILLIAM BYRON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 33 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. the goods of John Sutton , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL SHACKELL . I am foreman to Mr. John Sutton ; he rents the City Farm-house . The prisoner was a pauper there, and allowed to go on errands. In consequence of the rain coming through the roof, on the 24th of October, I went on the roof the house, the prisoner followed me up of his own accord; I found the lead cut from all round the building - it measured an hundred and thirty-five feet; three quarters of it had been taken away, and the rest rolled up ready for being carried away; the lead which covered the trap-door appeared to have been removed for some time. On returning with the prisoner, I said it was most surprising how it could be cut without his knowing something of it; he said he cut some of it to mend other parts, and that I told him to do it, which was false. About eight o'clock in the evening I went up with a dark lantern, and found some sheet lead folded and laid on the rafters; that was done since I had been there; and in the morning I found the prisoner's basket with a quantity of lead folded up on it.

Prisoner. Q. Was not that place free of access to every body - A. There are two separate parts of the building, and the porter at the gate is ordered to admit no one. It is impossible for any body to get on the roof; a female pauper was found there six months ago, when a ladder had been left there. Three pieces of the lead were in his basket.

ELIZABETH THATCHER . I am a pauper in the house. On the 24th of October, the rain came in at the roof. I lifted up the window, and called out,

"Bill, what makes

the wet come in?" I did not see him, or have any answer. When I went down to dinner, I said,

"Bill, what have you been at at the top of the house, to make the water come in on us?" He said,

"Hush." A little time after, he came up into the ward; I pointed to where the rain came in, and said,

"How did you make this wet come in?" He said, Mr. Shakell had paid him beforehand for the job, and he went up to finish it.

ELIZABETH BISHOP . I am a pauper in the house; I have frequently seen the prisoner on the roof.

MARGARET READ . I have seen the prisoner come in at the loft door.

JOHN SUTTON . I am the proprietor of the house - I never ordered the prisoner to cut the lead.

ROBERT BROWN . I apprehended the prisoner. He said he was employed to repair the trap-door, and cut the frame to do it.

Prisoner's Defence. Shackell has hired these witness to come forward; he employed me on the roof, and paid me for it; the women have access to it, and two men have been seen there.

PRISONER to THATCHER. Q. Did not Shackell say you was liable to six month's imprisonment for not speaking against me - A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-107

1594. THOMAS BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , two pair of sheets, value 1 l.; two pair of pillowcases, value 10 s.; one tablecloth, value 12 s., and twenty-four silver spoons, value 14 l. , the goods of James Weale , Joseph Carlton , and Charles Ward .

GEORGE CALFORD . I am employed by James Weale , Joseph Carlton , and Charles Ward , to take care of a warehouse where furniture is let out, at No. 11, Edward-street, Portman-square. I live in Upper Brook-street, Grosvenor-square. On one Sunday I called at the warehouse, and, in consequence of what passed, I went to No. 2, Park-street, Grosvenor-square, and inquired for Thomas Berry ; I did not see him; it was a very good house, fit for a gentleman. I saw a person there, who represented himself as his housekeeper; and, in consequence of what passed between her and myself, I was perfectly satisfied, and sent the goods stated in the indictment to the house, with an inventory of them, and the terms of hire per week, which was 10 s. 6 d.; they were delivered on the 8th October, 1821; I had not then seen Mr. Berry; on the following Monday the week expired, and the housekeeper brought back a pair of sheets and pillowcases, and paid 10 s. 6 d. for the week's hire. In the afternoon an order was sent for six more tablespoons for one night's use, which I sent without a list; and about three days after I sent the porter for the spoons; he did not bring them, nor have I seen them since. Five or six weeks after, not having received any more money, and hearing something, I applied for the arrears, and saw a person who I understood to be Mrs. Berry; I got neither goods or money from her. A few days after I called again, and saw the servant. I went several times until the 21st of December, when I was determined not to leave till I got satisfied. I was in the house about an hour and a-half, and while there, the prisoner came in, the servant said to him,

"I am glad you are come, Sir, for this man has been very insolent, and refuses to leave the house;" he walked up into the drawing-room with me. I said, Mr. Berry, I have come for the goods which you have belonging to my master; and out of the house I cannot go without the goods or the hire." I told him where I came from, and shewed him the list of the goods; he said his wife was in the country - she had the property locked up, and that on Saturday on her return they should be given up, and the hire paid. I left very dissatisfied, and said I would not quit the house; he then took out his pocket-book, and shewed ten or twelve bills of exchange to the amount of about 2000 l. He picked out one for 150 l., which he said was the smallest, and I was to hold it as security until the following Saturday, when he would return the goods, and I left (the bill was here produced, dated 1st November, 1821, upon John May , Trinity-square, Aldersgate-street, by Thomas Cates , accepted, due the 4th of September, 1822, and endorsed by the drawer.) There was pen and ink there; but I said he should not endorse it, as I should not put it into circulation. On the Saturday I called several times, but could not see him. I never saw him again till 3d October, 1822, when he was in custody; I never afterwards found any body at the house but one maid-servant; I saw his wife afterwards in Clerkenwell prison. When the bill became due, I presented it at No. 6, Trinity-court; there is no Trinity-square, there was no number on the bill; I found a John May lodged in a garret at No. 6, Trinity-court; I did not see him, but his wife; I was not paid; I could find no other John May ; I found the prisoner, in October, at a furnished-house, No. 42, Edgware-road, of which he appeared master; I got an officer, and took him; he denied having seen me before, and repeated that before the Magistrate; I at last produced the bill; he then faultered, and said he believed he had seen me once before, but persisted that he had never received the goods. He did not ask me for the 150 l. bill; I saw him searched; 4 1/2 d. was found on him, and an old gilt chain without a watch. I have recovered none of the goods.

Prisoner. Q. When you called, did I not say I knew nothing of the goods. A. No; he said his wife had them locked up.

DAVID VERNON . I was porter at the warehouse in October, 1821. I delivered the goods at No. 2, Park-street, with a bill of them. I went on the Monday following, with six tablespoons - I took no account with them; they were never returned to me. I went for them once. I never saw the prisoner.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended him by Calford's direction; he said he never saw Calford - that he heard of the name - but knew nothing of the business; he sneered at it

ANN SAWYER . I am proprietor of the furnished house, No. 2, Park-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 3d of October, I let it to Mr. and Mrs. Berry, for the year, at 190 l. The prisoner said they came from Worcester, and they could only give reference to two houses in the city; they referred me to Bull and Brooksbank, No. 5, Adam's-court, at the back of the Bank - who the prisoner said were their agents, and said he was a gentleman coming to reside in town with his aunt. I went to Bull and Co., who gave

him a very excellent character. I never got a quarter's rent, and could hear no more of Bull and Co. Calford applied to me; I gave him information. They went from my house, a little before the quarter was due, all but the maid-servant. On my coming in, she said she had received a letter from Mrs. Berry, to meet her in Portman-square. I sent a person with her to meet her mistress, but she ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the goods, or saw them - and Mrs. Berry says she never ordered them, nor ever paid any thing for the hire of any thing in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-108

1595. CHARLES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , one coat, value 6 s., and one waistcoat, value 4 s. the goods of Cornelius Charlotte .

CORNELIUS CHARLOTTE . I keep an eating-house at Charing-cross . On the 26th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, the prisoner came in; I did not see him; I was sitting behind the counter. My coat and waistcoat hung nearly at the back of the counter; he was brought back with it directly.

WILLIAM HAWKINS . I am a servant to Charlotte. I saw the prisoner come into the house, between eleven and twelve o'clock; he went behind the counter, where my master was dosing - I saw him go out. I ran out, caught him with the coat and waistcoat under his jacket, about six yards off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-109

1596. JOHN SMITH and ELIZABETH DOWLING were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , five sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Boyer , from his person .

THOMAS BOYER . I am a mariner . On Sunday morning, the 29th of September, about church-time, I saw Dowling in Shadwell. I had known her seven years before. I went into a chandler's shop with her, got some bread and butter, and went to her house, No. 38, Spring-street . I had come ashore the day before, and received 10 l. 18 s. 4 d. for wages, it was in five sovereigns, and a 5 l. note. I changed the note; I had five sovereigns, and some silver in my waistcoat pocket. I sat on the foot of the bed, while she lit the fire; we were on the ground-floor. I had been up all night and fell asleep; only herself and I were in the room. Smith awoke me just about dusk. I did not know him before; it was dark - and I do not know whether Dowling was there. Then Smith asked what business I had there? and who brought me there? I felt in my waistcoat pocket, when he awoke me - and I told him a girl brought me there, and that I should not go till an officer came, for I had been robbed. Another man came in with a light, and gave me some beer. I drank with them, because I was very thirsty. Then the prisoner and the man took me by the arm, and turned me out of the room. I stood outside the door, till the watch was set. I told him, and he told me to fetch an officer. I got Spooner, who went in, and found the prisoners in bed together.

ANN GARBATT . I keep a public-house in Fox-lane, Shadwell. Dowling came to me between one and two o'clock, on the 29th of September, for a pot of beer, and asked me to change a sovereign - which I did. She lived at No. 38, Spring-street; she took the beer away. I had seen Boyer following her, about half past twelve o'clock, that morning - he was very drunk then. When she came to me, she said a friend who had come from sea, and whom she had known seven or eight years, had given her some money to buy a bonnet and some other things. She left four sovereigns with me, besides the one she changed. She wished me to keep it for her, as she thought she might lose it. She afterwards came for silver for one of the sovereigns, saying, she wanted to pay her landlord, and that she had been paying other debts about the neighbourhood. I sent for Spooner at night, and gave him the money. Smith lives at the house; he is a hard-working man.

EDWARD ALLEN . I am a watchman. Boyer came to me about nine o'clock at night; he seemed sober; he stood at the door of No. 38, and said he had been robbed of five or six sovereigns; I told him to wait while I fetched an officer; I went up to the ground-floor, and found the prisoners fast asleep on the bed; Smith asked what was the matter; he said he was innocent; they both said they knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM SPOONER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoners, who were very much intoxicated; Garbatt gave me three sovereigns, which Bowyer could not identify; he gave Smith in charge for the assault. Dowling said she never had his money.

DOWLING'S Defence. I met him; he took me to a public-house, and asked me where there was a bonnet-shop, where he could buy me some clothes; he gave the money into my hands to take care of till Monday.

WILLIAM HOGDEN . The prisoner Smith was with me from nine o'clock in the morning till half-past two on Sunday.

DOWLING - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-110

1597. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE HARROW . I am the son of David Harrow , a packing-case maker ; he lives in Brydges-street, Covent Garden; the prisoner was in his service as errand-boy for two months; my father sent him to Mr. Jupp, Bond-street, for 5 l., about the 31st of August, 1821; he never returned. I am certain of his person.

DAVID HARROW . I sent the prisoner to Mr. Jupp's with some boxes, and to receive 5 l. I gave him a ticket for Mr. Jupp to sign, on having received the boxes; he never returned either with the bill or money. I sent for him to his father's house several times, but could not find him.

MR. GEORGE JUPP . My father owed Mr. Harrow 5 l. I cannot say whether the prisoner was the person who came; but about the 31st of August the money was applied for, and I paid five sovereigns. I do not recollect whether he brought any boxes or books. Mr. Harrow called about it three or four hours after.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-111

1598. WILLIAM SYKES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , one counterpane, value 2 s., and one shirt, value 2 s. , the property of Richard Godber .

MARY GODBER . I am the wife of Richard Godber , we live in Exeter-street, Sloane-street . I took the prisoner in as a lodger, on the 7th of October, he had the counterpane to use; the shirt belonged to a gentleman I wash for, and it was hanging in the next room to his to dry. I lost it on Friday, and on Monday I asked him for the rent; he said he would pay me when the fortnight was up. I asked if he knew any thing of the shirt; he said, No; I said, I did not suspect him. I found it at a pawnbroker's that day week. When the fortnight expired, I went to him for the rent, he did not pay it; he went out; he came back, and I locked the door to prevent his going in till he paid me, and gave him in charge.

GEORGE PARKER . I am shopman to Neat and Son, Duke-street, Manchester-square. I took a shirt in pawn of the prisoner, on the 12th of October; the counterpane was pawned two days after in the same name, but I did not take it in; the prosecutrix described the shirt before she saw it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SNOWSELL . I apprehended him, and found the duplicate on him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-112

1599. SAMUEL TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , one saw, value 9 s., and one plane, value 3 s. , the goods of Benjamin Matthewson .

BENJAMIN MATTHEWSON . I am a journeyman carpenter ; the prisoner worked on the same premises, in Whitmore-row, Hoxton . I left work for half an hour, on Saturday, the 12th of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning. He had been discharged a month before that, and had no business there. I returned about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw him walking very fast in a direction from the building, within a yard of the door. I ran after him, seeing something under his coat, and caught him about a hundred and fifty yards off, in the middle of a field, with the saw under his arm, and the plane under the other.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-113

1600. SARAH WHITEHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , three sheets, value 6 s.; three towels, value 1 s.; two pillow cases, value 2 s.; one flat-iron, value 6 d.; one blanket, value 1 s.; one knife, value 1 d.; and one fork, value 1 d. , the goods of Sarah Gale .

SARAH GALE . I live in Arundel-street, Strand; the prisoner lived servant with me twice; the last time was for about a month or five weeks. I let lodgings. I missed the articles stated in the indictment all at once. I have two houses - one in Carlisle street - the lodgers had men-servants; the prisoner was servant in the house in Carlisle-street , where my daughter lives. About a week after she left I found the property, part at her lodging and part in pawn. She married from my house - her husband is in Yorkshire. I found a knife and fork and a pair of sheets, with my initials taken out, at her room. I made the sheets myself, I work left handed, and know them to be my work. All the property is mine; they were stolen in July and August.

JAMES ROSS . I have a blanket pawned at my shop, Paddington-street, for 3 s. 6 d. in the name of Ann Daniels . I did not take it in. An iron was also pawned - the person who took it in has left me.

JOHN M'LACHLAN. I am servant to Mr. Jones, South-street, Manchester-square. I have a sheet, tablecloth, four towels, and two pillow-cases, pawned on the 28th of September, in the name of Ann Whitehead , by a woman whom I don't know.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GRACE DANIELS . My husband is a soldier. I live in Rochester-row. I washed for Mrs. Gale. I know one sheet by a particular mark in the middle of it; that sheet is not here. I lodged with the prisoner; she told me the blanket was Mrs. Gale's. I saw her take it out to pawn. Her husband was in the Life Guards barracks at the time.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. She came into the lodging, and told me that Daniels had pawned some of the things as well as herself. Mrs. Gale at first claimed two sheets; but afterwards only one.

Prisoner's Defence. Daniels gave me the things, and I pawned them in my own name.

GRACE DANIELS . I never gave them to her.

SARAH ALEXANDER . I live in Little York-place, New-road. The prisoner lodged with me. The two sheets the prosecutrix swears to are mine - here is a mark in one with brown worsted. She brought the officer and took them away. They belong to the landlord of the house, and I am his housekeeper. They have been three years in my possession.

MICHAEL MORRIS . This woman claimed them at the time we found them.

MRS. GALE. The officer is quite mistaken.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-114

1601. JOHN MUSGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , seven sovereigns, value 7 l. , the monies of Margaret Stokes .

MARGARET STOKES . I am a widow , and live near the Yorkshire Stingo, in the kitchen. I entrusted the prisoner to pay 7 l. for a stocking frame for me, on the 9th of October. I knew him before. I gave the sovereigns into his hands about eleven o'clock; he never returned. I have got none of my money. On the Sunday following, I found him at the Tower, and asked him for the money; he said he would go, and pay for the frame on Monday - but he never came. I had him taken on the Monday following. He was paying his addresses to me.

ROBERT WILSON . The prosecutrix ordered the frame of me, and was to give 7 l. for it. The prisoner came to look at it, three weeks or a month before this happened. He never brought the money at all.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. I apprehended him; he said he understood it was given him, to spend it.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the money, till we were married. The officer of the regiment would not let me marry her, as her character was bad.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-115

1602. JOHN FOTHERGILL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , one waistcoat, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas Pinchin .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-116

1603. FREDERICK HOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , one waistcoat, value 4 s. the goods of Joseph Martin .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-117

1604. MARY ANN HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , two silver spoons, value 4 s., and three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. , the goods of Phineas Johnson .

PHINEAS JOHNSON . I am clerk to Mr. Isaacs, an attorney, and live in Bunhill-row . The prisoner was nine days in my service. I missed two tea spoons, and a handkerchief. I dismissed her on the 16th of October. I afterwards found them in pawn.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. I took two tea-spoons, and three handkerchiefs in pawn, of the prisoner, on the 7th of October.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended her at her father's, in John's-row, St. Luke's; she denied the charge at first, but afterwards admitted it - and took me to the pawnbrokers, where she pawned the property.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-118

1605. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , one cloak, value 6 s.; four petticoats, value 5 s., and one frock, value 8 d. , the goods of Samuel Smith .

ELIZA SMITH . I am the wife of Samuel Smith ; we live in Laystall-street ; these things were in my box on the 2d floor, where the prisoner lodged. I found the box broken open on the 20th of October, and missed them. I saw the box about eight o'clock in the morning; he left the house next morning, and returned between eleven and twelve. I had him secured, and found the property in pawn.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am servant to Mr. Nicholls a pawnbroker of Grays-inn-lane. On the 19th of October, the prisoner pawned the petticoats with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM READ . I took him in charge. On the second examination he told me where he had pawned the property. I found a silk cloak in pawn from that information.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18221023-119

1606. CHARLOTTE RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , six umbrellas, value 6 s. , the property of Lawrence Kennedy .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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