Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th April 1822.
Reference Number: 18220417
Reference Number: f18220417-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 17th of APRIL, 1822, and following Days;

Being the Fourth Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq.; LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; George Scholey , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; and Christopher Smith , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq.; Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; and William St . Julien Arabin, Esq.; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Ashley ,

Robert Gotely ,

James Mears ,

Isaac Johnson ,

John Wood ,

John Search Taylor,

William Robinson ,

Thomas Hughes ,

Thomas West ,

Samuel Clowe ,

Joseph Richardson ,

William Simpkin ,

1st Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Harrison ,

George Camp ,

David Smith ,

William Green ,

Thomas Shint ,

John Atkins ,

Edward Wilkinson ,

William Abbott ,

James Plumer Windus ,

Thomas Daffer ,

Joseph Hale Miller ,

John Williams.

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Charles Ashmead ,

Richard Buck ,

John Hall ,

William Sweet ,

Robert Green ,

Francis Cole ,

George Prior ,

Joseph Turner ,

Philip White ,

David Deer ,

Stephen Radburn ,

Samuel Betteley .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 17, 1822.

MAGNAY, MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18220417-1

535. GEORGE READ was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Rees , from the person of Margaret Rees , spinster .

MARY REES . I am eleven years old, and live in Old Cock-lane, Shoreditch. One Sunday evening, in January, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I was going home from school with my sister Margaret, who is younger than I; we were looking in at the pastry-cook's-shop window, she screamed and said a boy had taken a handkerchief off her neck, and I saw it under the prisoner's arm, he was about two yards from me - Mr. Gaylor took hold of him, and sent me for a light; he denied having it. I saw a gentleman take the handkerchief from him. I am sure he is the boy.

WILLIAM GAYLOR . I am a pastry-cook. I was returning home on this evening, between seven and eight o'clock, and saw three boys looking in at my window; I watched, and saw the prisoner attempt to take the handkerchief off the girl's neck; she screamed out - I saw it was gone from her neck, and collared him, he denied having it. While the girl was gone for a light I saw him drop it from under his arm - I picked it up, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am a constable. I received him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Bishopsgate-church, and by this window, I saw a parcel of boys. I picked up the handkerchief, and put it under my arm.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-2

536. MICHEAL BATEMAN was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-3

537. JOHN YATES and MICHAEL DONAHOW were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hemmings , about eight o'clock in the night of the 27th of March , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one counterpane, value 4 s.; two sheets, value 8 s.; two shirts, value 4 s.; one apron, value 1 s.; and one gown, value 2 s. ; the goods of Sarah Bishop , widow .

SARAH BISHOP . I am a widow, and lodge in John Hemmings 's house, No. 35, Tufton-street, St. John the Evangelist, Westminster . He lives in the house himself - I occupy the parlour; my window is very high from the street, there are five or six steps leading up to the house. On this day three weeks, I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, and returned about eight o'clock at night; it was then dark - I had locked my door, and left the key with Mr. Hemmings, when I went out the window was shut close down, and I found it still shut. I missed a counterpane, a pair of sheets, two shirts, an apron, and a dark cotton gown, which I am sure were there when I left in the morning.

JANE STEWART . (This witness being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath). I am ten years old, and lived at No. 6, Carpenter-street, near Tufton-street, at this time; I was going on an errand, about eight o'clock at night, and saw Mrs. Bishop's parlour window open; it was moon-light - I saw things thrown out of the window into the street, and then saw a tallish man jump out of the window. He took up some of the things, left the rest, and ran up the street. I saw a shorter man jump out - I was just crossing the road, and called out Stop thief! three times, nobody answered me. I saw Mr. Matthews knock at the door; the first man who jumped out, had a dark waistcoat on, and no coat - the shorter man had light round clothes on. I only saw two men, that (pointing to Donahow) is the tall one, I am quite sure of it. I cannot speak to the other by his features, but by his clothes, his coat and trowsers were light.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a cordwainer, and live five doors from Tufton-street. On this evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I was at my own house, three men went by, I was eight or nine feet from them in height, looking from my window, I can speak positive to both the prisoners; a third person was with them. When they came between my shop and the next, one of them turned round, and said.

"This is the shop," pointing to the next door; this drew my attention. They went on to the corner

of Tufton-street. Soon after, in consequence of what somebody said, I went to the house, and alarmed the people; a great crowd collected in a short time, and in the crowd, I saw the two prisoners; there were sixty or seventy people - I am sure they are two of the three I saw go by my house. I told a boy to go for a constable - they stood near me, and might have heard me; they ran off directly I had spoken.

THOMAS WARDLE . I work in Marsham-street, and am an apprentice. I was going along Tufton-street, on the night in question, and passed this house, about eight o'clock, and saw three young men standing there; two of them were lifting the other one up to the window, but directly they saw me, they dropped him down - I went on three or four doors, and told a lady who stood at a door. I was afraid they would ill-treat me if I alarmed the people. I can swear to Yates, being the one who was lifted up to the window.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I am an officer. I apprehended Yates in Strutton-ground, the day after the robbery. I saw him in Artillery-place, I called out,

"Yates, I want to speak to you," (he knew me before); he looked at me, then kicked his shoes off his feet, and ran off as fast as he could - I afterwards apprehended him - he said he knew what I wanted him for, it was a robbery, but he was not the person; he did not say what robbery.

YATES'S Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn. I ran because my father was after me.

DONAHOW'S Defence. I was only walking by.

YATES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

DONAHOW - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-4

538. JOSHUA READ was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Read , about twelve o'clock in the morning of the 14th of April , (no person being therein), and stealing 34 l., in monies numbered , his property.

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL PEARKES . I am a labourer, and live at Hampstead. I know Mr. Read's house, the prisoner is his son. I met him on Sunday last, about half-past twelve o'clock, in Flask-walk; he asked if I wanted any money, I said Yes; he asked if I would have a sovereign, I said No, I would much rather have 1 s., for I should be better able to pay him; he gave me a crown piece, and after that shewed me a great quantity of sovereigns, which he took out of his breeches pocket, and a great quantity of silver, which he took from his coat pocket, tied up in a white cloth; I asked how he got it. He said he got into his father's house in their absence, and had broken the till, and had taken the money from it - I persuaded him to go and deliver the money up to his father, he refused to do it, and said he would take a coach, and go to London; I said I certainly would go and tell Mrs. Read; he said I might if I chose. I went to her, I took a cart, and overtook him at Pancras-church, on the roof of a coach. He got off, I delivered him to Batten, who took the money from him, and took him to the watch-house. I have known him about ten years. I think he was much intoxicated - he lived with his father, and worked for him. I never knew him to be weak in his mind.

WILLIAM BATTEN . I am patrol of Somers'-town. I received the prisoner in charge from Pearkes, and too from his person twenty-three sovereigns, one guinea, and one seven shilling-piece in gold, and eight pounds in silver, and Pearkes gave me a crown-piece; he gave me no account of it.

THOMAS READ . I am the father of the prisoner. I am a bricklayer , and live at Hampstead . I generally keep money in my house; I had received money for rent on Saturday. I went to church on Sunday, and on returning missed all my cash; there were twenty-five sovereigns, two guineas, and one seven shilling-piece in gold, about seven 5 l. notes, and 7 l. 10 s., in silver; it was taken between ten and one o'clock in the day; the prisoner had been out all night; he lived with me. I have a wife, two daughters, and a servant, but they were all at church, and the house was empty - I returned home about twenty minutes past one o'clock. I did not see him that day. He was given to liquor.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing only, and not in a dwelling-house .

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-5

539. RICHARD PAYNE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Hopper , on the King's highway, on the 21st of March , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one basket, value 1 s., her property; and one pair of breeches, value 11 s. , the goods of Henry Lewin .

JANE HOPPER . I am single. I was in Perkin's-rents, Peter-street, Westminster , on Thursday night, the 28th of March, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, going to my lodging - I had a basket, and a pair of breeches in them, which belonged to Henry Lewin , who was walking with me, and had a pot of porter in his hands; he was rather before me; the prisoner was dressed in a soldier's white jacket - he said to Lewin,

"Comrade, will you let me drink," Lewin has been a soldier, but they did not appear to know each other; he said,

"Coldstream will you let me drink;" I said he was no Coldstream; he did not let him drink. He jumped across the road, knocked me down, and then wrung the basket out of my hand, and ran off with it. I fell from his blow; I pursued him, crying Stop thief! he was taken in Peter-street. Lewin has lived with me for two months. He hit me on the side, which knocked me down.

HENRY LEWIN . I have been a soldier. I was about twenty yards before Hopper. The prisoner came to me first, and asked me to let him drink, I would not. He then went over the way to her, and they were walking together; I heard her hollow, but did not see her on the ground; I overtook them at the watch-house. I had given her a pair of breeches to carry in her basket.

THOMAS SPEED . I am a watchman. About a quarter before eleven o'clock, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran down Pear-street, and met the prisoner crossing the corner, running with a basket. Hopper came up, and we took him to the watch-house - I took the basket out of his hand. He said,

"A dozen of you shall not take me." He was tipsy, but not much.

ROBERT GRADY . I am the watch-house keeper. The

prisoner was delivered into my charge, with the basket and breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have known this girl some time, and had met her in Duck-lane a month before, and gave her 3 s. to go with me; I got drunk, and she ran off. When I saw her on this night, I asked her for my 3 s., and she said she had never seen me. I said I would keep her basket till she returned my money.

JANE HOPPER re-examined. I am an unfortunate girl, but never saw him before - he said nothing about 3 s. I felt a blow on my side which knocked me down.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-6

540. JOHN FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one set of cruets and stands, value 10 s.; one musical box, value 5 l.; four spoons, value 10 s., and one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s., the goods of George Mott , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ELTHAM . I am servant to Mr. George Mott of Essex-street, Strand . On Monday, the 1st of April, about ten minutes past nine o'clock, I went out of the house, leaving the door ajar; I was returning in five minutes, and saw the prisoner come from the door - he went down to the bottom of the street. I followed him; he had something wrapped up in a handkerchief; he ran up Milford-lane; I overtook him at the top of the lane, and saw the shape of a cruet under his handkerchief; I said,

"You have got my master's property." He said,

"I have nothing of yours," and then threw it at me, handkerchief and all - I collared him, but he got away. I picked up the things, and then followed him, crying Stop thief! he was taken in about two minutes by Ross's. The glass of the cruet was broken - I produce it, I do not know the value of it. They are my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you lose sight of him - A. In turning the corner. I am certain of him.

JOHN ROSS . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and took the prisoner, who was running along Little Essex-street; the last witness came up in about a minute, with the stand in his hand.

GUILTY. Aged 48.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-7

541. FRANCIS MEADDOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , at St. Andrew, Holborn, one table-clock, value 5 l., the goods of Catharine Sharpe spinster , in her dwelling-house .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE WALKER . I am footman to Miss Catharine Sharpe who lives in New Ormond-street in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn . On the 14th of March, about twenty minutes after seven o'clock at night, the prisoner came to the house, and said he had brought a letter which required an answer. I said the family was not home. He said he would call the next night with it; he would not leave it. He brought it again next night, and requested an answer. I told him to come into the passage. - I took the letter of him, and shut the door; he stood on the mat. I laid the letter down on the sideboard, and went down stairs for my coat; when I came up he still stood where I had left him. I took the letter to Miss Sharpe in the drawing-room, but as I suspected something, I returned to the stair-case, and looked over the bannisters - I saw him take the clock off the bracket in the hall, and saw it in his hand; I ran down, calling Stop thief! He opened the door with one hand, having the clock in the other, and dropped it on the threshold of the door, and ran off. I pursued, and took him in Lamb's Conduit-street, without losing sight of him. I am sure he is the man. It is Miss Sharpe's dwelling-house.

Prisoner. Q. Is there no turning in the street - A. Yes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES CROPLEY . I am a clock-maker. This clock is now worth between 8 l. and 9 l. I had repaired it lately.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am an officer. I heard an alarm, but the prisoner was secured before I got up. I produce the letter.

(read).

MADAM. - I have taken the liberty of addressing you respecting the will of Mr. James Browning , lately deceased, and who when living resided in Bernard-street, Russell-square. The motive of my application is to find one of the attesting witnesses to the will, it being about to be proved. The will is attested by a Mr. William Gordon , a Mr. John Brown, and a Miss Eliza or Elizabeth Sharp , and having been apprised of your residing in New Ormond-street, Queen-square, I have ventured to address you, and should feel obliged by your informing me, per bearer, if you ever had any acquaintance with the deceased, or any knowledge of the above Will.

I am, Madam, your obedient Servant,

J. JESSOP, Gray's Inn.

March 14th, 1822.

WILLIAM SHARPE . I am brother to the prosecutrix. She knew nothing of the business mentioned in the letter.

Prisoner's Defence. I consider it a hard case, that a man should speak so positively to me. I have only been three months in town, and have nobody to give me a character. On this evening, I was in Lamb's Conduit-street, two gentlemen happened to stop me; he came up, and swore I was the person who took the clock. A lady who came to the door cannot recognize me, and had a better view of the person than him.

SARAH SMITH . I live in New Ormond-street. I was passing the house, and saw a man in the hall with the clock; he looked at me, made towards the door, and I screamed Murder! He dropped it at my feet - I collared him, but he got from me. The footman pursued him quite close; it is impossible he could lose sight of him. The prisoner is of the same stature and dress as the man, but I will not swear to him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-8

542. HENRY JOHN NAYLOR , GEORGE ADAMS , EDWARD WARD , and JOHN ANSON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Condell , about the hour of two o'clock, in the night of the 18th of February , at Greenford, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, one clock, value 10 l.; forty-nine knives, value 2 l.; forty-nine forks, value 2 l.; one castor-stand, value 2 l.; one liquor frame, value 1 l.; three

bottles, value 10 s.; one table-cloth, value 5 s.; one table-cover, value 10 s.; one cruet stand, value 1 l.; two pair of nut-crackers, value 3 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s.; four rests for knives, value 8 s.; one snuff box, value 5 s., and one nutmeg-grater, value 3 s. , the goods of the said William Condell .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS, conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE EDMUND PLATT . Mr. William Condell is a linen-draper , of Bond-street, and has a country house at Greenford, Middlesex . I am an inmate of his house - he was not at Greenford on the night in question, Tuesday the 18th of February; I was there, and went to bed about half-past ten o'clock. I saw all the windows and doors fast, and secure. I was disturbed a little before two o'clock, by the barking of a little dog, and by a noise of knocking of the inner doors, and hearing footsteps in different parts of the house, I got up and went down stairs undressed, with a double barrelled gun; I opened my door as cautiously as I could, and immediately heard footsteps going down stairs, and when I had got down about six steps, a light went across the hall, and I observed two or three figures pass; I fired one of my barrels, and pursued them into the dining-room - there is a window which opens on to the lawn, and as they went through there I pulled the trigger of the other barrel, but it missed fire. I followed them through the window on the lawn, and pulled the trigger again, and it missed fire again - I then saw two men together, and one seperate; two of the men followed the gravel walk, the other went through a clump; I immediately lost sight of him. I drove the two towards a quickset hedge, which they dashed through, it was six feet high on the inner side, and eight on the other. I heard some one going over the pailing, and as I returned to the house, I stumbled over a pair of shoes and a hat, which I took up, and carried to my bed-room - I then got a light, dressed myself, and sent the servant to alarm Hughes the gardener; I got him, King the constable, and Hunt the carter; I sent King and Hughes in one direction - I mounted my horse and went another way. I found a crow bar in the study, under my bed-room, also a dark lanthorn.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You are not in partnership with Mr. Condell - A. No. I have retired from the army.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am gardener to Mr. Condell. I was called up, and went with King into the Uxbridge-road, and about a mile from my master's house, I took Naylor, he was walking on the foot-path, in company with Adams, whom King secured; the constable searched Naylor in my presence, and found three silver forks and two cruet tops on him. I did not see Adams searched; I saw him strike the constable.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What time was this - A. About three o'clock in the morning, it was a dark night. I can swear to Adams; I had a good opportunity of seeing him - his face was close to mine when King collared him, I noticed his features, and person most particularly; he was without his shoes; King held him a minute or two, he then gave him a violent blow on the head, and got from him - he was taken the same morning.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am carter to Mr. Condell. Mr. Platt called me up, I did not go in pursuit. On the morning after the robbery, I searched all round the premises, and traced where they went through the edge, it was broken quite down, and in the same trace down the meadow, nearly two hundred yards from the edge, I found a table cloth spread, and a clock, some silver candlestands, cruet-frames, and between four and five dozen of knives and forks, all covered over with a baize table-cover - I looked round and three or four flint stones laid at the corner, close to the house, and a glass decanter, half full of brandy; and just in the centre of the house, were three or four more flints, a bottle of gin, and the iron bar of the window; it was about twenty yards from the window. I was going to town that morning with a load of hay, and when I came into Kensington, I saw Bowles, (Mr. Epley's carter). I walked with him, and told him of the robbery, and in consequence of what he said, I looked and saw the prisoner Adams in his cart, and noticed some small pips on his hat, as if from a hedge, and his coat was torn on his left shoulder, there was also a green mark on his shoulder; he had neither shoes or stockings on. I got Pugh who was going to town, to secure him, we got in the cart, and handed him down.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you search him - A. Yes; and found a loaded pistol in his left hand trowsers pocket.

WILLIAM KING . I live at Greenford. I went with Hughes, and met Adams and Naylor, I believe it to be Adams, but cannot positively swear to his features. Hughes took Naylor, whom I afterwards searched. When I came up, I said,

"Good morning gentlemen," they said, "Good morning;" I said,

"Where do you come from," they said,

"What odds is it to you," I said,

"A great deal," and by this time, I saw that the man, whom I believe to be Adams, had neither stockings or shoes on - he resisted greatly when I seized him; he thrust his hand into his right hand pocket, I ordered him to take it out, which he did, and I threw him on the path - he begged me not to ill-use him, I said,

"Then be civil," he said,

"I will," he resisted again, and put his hand into his left-hand breeches pocket - I felt and found what appeared to me a pistol, I held it fast, he resisted, and we struggled till we got from one side of the road to the other, and then he pulled some weapon from his right hand pocket, and gave me a blow on the head, which caused me to lose my hold of the pistol, and he got away. I staggered but did not fall down - my head had a cut between two and three inches long. I then went to assist Hughes. I observed Adams coat was torn on his left shoulder before I seized him. I searched Naylor at the cage, and found the property mentioned in his pocket. I then went to the Green Man, public-house, Ealing, and saw Thompson the landlord, and in consequence of what he told me I went after a cart towards town, and met Platt at Shepherds Bush, and about half way down Notting-hill, I found a cart, which I searched, and found Ward and Anson; it was an open hay cart; they were under the cloth which covers the hay - I found nothing on them. I have 3 forks and 2 cruet-tops which I found on Naylor.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How far is Notting-hill from London - A. About two miles. I overtook the cart, between six and seven o'clock; it was getting light. I was on the Tyburn Road.

MARY AYRES . On this Tuesday morning, I was going to work at my sister's at Southall, about a quarter before six o'clock, and I picked up two knives and a fork, which I delivered to Lovick; they were in the turnpike road

by a lane, between Hadley and Southall, and in the afternoon as I returned from work, about forty yards from the same place, I saw a boy pick up a cruet-stand.

RICHARD FORDER . I am beadle of St. Margaret, Westminster. Pugh applied to me on Tuesday morning, to take Adams into custody, near Knightsbridge. I searched him, and found a pistol in his left-hand breeches pocket, this knife, a latch key, and 6 1/4. His left-hand pocket was torn. The pistol was loaded with two balls.

JOHN LOVICK . I am a constable. Ayres gave me two knives and a fork.

WILLIAM PLUMRIDGE . On the Monday before the house was robbed, I and Wm. Harris were going towards London, with five hundred bricks, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw four men together on the road, it was the four prisoners; they were going down the road towards Greenford, near the Black Lion, public-house; they were playing with oranges, one of the oranges came against the foot of my horse; I kept it and eat it, and this made me observe them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. In whose employ are you - A. Mr. Hitchcock's. They were on the Bayswater-road. I cannot say whether they were a mile or more from town. I should not particularly have noticed them if the orange had not been thrown at my horse; there was nobody else near - I saw them for four or five minutes. I stopped rather behind my horses - I know them by their features and dress. I told the Magistrate that I knew them most by their dress.

WILLAM HARRIS. I am carter to Mr. Benson, of Brook Green. On the afternoon of the 18th, I was with Plumridge at Bayswater, and saw four men playing with oranges - Auson is one of them, I am sure; I did not take so much notice of the other three, as they kept on.

THOMAS RAWLINSON . I am the driver of the Birmingham coach. On the 18th I was between the 4th and 5th mile stone, between eight and nine o'clock, and saw four men together, and two at a distance behind them - two of the four were smoking, they were about two yards from each other; Anson and Ward were smoking. I have not the least doubt of the four prisoners; I was going very slow, as I had a heavy load. I had lights to my coach.

Cross-examined by MR ANDREWS. Q. It was a dark night, and you only saw them by your lights - A. I saw them plainly, I met them; I was coming to town, and noticed them particularly.

Q. Did you not hesitate about them before the Magistrate - A. I said I would not positively swear to them, but I looked at them, and felt more positive, and had no doubt of them - they had changed their clothes then. I said I would not swear positively, but believed them to be the men.

COURT. Q. Your lamps reflect forward, did they reflect on their countenances - A. Yes. The darker the night is the better my light shews. I looked particularly at them, and cautioned the guard to take care of the hind boot, as we had been repeatedly robbed.

JOHN SPURGEAR . I am a hostler. I received a load of hay from Birch, on the 19th of February. I examined the trusses minutely, and found a centre-bit in one of them, I gave it to Plank. It was without a stock.

JOHN BUGBOURN . I am a labourer. I was at Notting-hill on a Tuesday in February last, and found the stock of a centre-bit, about forty yards from the turnpike, in the high road; at half-past seven o'clock.

DANIEL BIRCH . I am servant to Mr. Joseph Scrafs , of Enfield. I had a load of hay from Uxbridge, and delivered it to Spurgear. I bound the hay myself; there was nothing in it - As I came to town I took up Ward and Anson, by the seven mile stone, and at Notting-hill turnpike. King took them out of my cart.

JOHN LOVICK re-examined. The centre-bit was given to me, I took it to the house, and compared it with the holes; it appeared that they were were made by it.

JOHN HARVEY . I am horse-keeper at the Old Hatts, on the Uxbridge-road. About four o'clock on the morning of this robbery, I met Anson and Ward at the Old Hatts, where I change my horses; they asked their way to London, and said they had come from Twickenham, and lost their way - I told them to go straight on, and went with them, to the Green Man, and got them some hot, and two pipes of tobacco; they went away in Birch's hay cart. I noticed that they had handkerchiefs tied over their mouths, and their hats over their eyes, and they would not walk into the house to warm themselves, but drank the hot at the door.

JAMES BOWLES . I am carter to Mr. Epley. On Tuesday the 19th of February, I saw the prisoner Adams at Brentford, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning; he asked me to let him ride to town, and said he would give me a pot of beer; he had no shoes on. He said he had been tipsy overnight, and had lost his shoes; he had none on. He was taken into custody at Knightsbridge.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. Early on the morning of the 19th Feb. I went down and examined the house. Naylor was delivered into my custody at Hanwell, and at Mr. Condell's house, Mr. Platt gave me a pair of shoes, a hat, a dark lanthorn, a crow bar, and a glove. I examined Naylor's person, and found several scratches on his hands, which appeared recently inflicted, as there was a discharge from them - he would not tell me how they came so. I then asked him how he came by the plated articles found in his pocket? he said he had come from Uxbridge early that morning, and about half a mile of the other side of Hanwell, he came up with a man without shoes, and that man asked him to carry those articles for him, which he did, and shortly after, near a cross road, two men came up, and took them both into custody; that he surrendered, but the other man without shoes knocked down the man who took him, and got off. He was very dirty, his knees were muddy both before and behind. I took him to the office, and soon after Adams was given into my charge; he had no shoes or stockings on, his trowsers were very muddy, and his left-hand trowsers pocket nearly torn off; his coat was torn in the left arm. Upon taking his coat off I found several small holes like shot holes had passed through the tall; the shoes which Mr. Platt delivered me were tried on his feet, they fitted him. I took him to the back of the office where Naylor was confined, and asked Naylor if he knew him, and at the same time told him I should give his answer in evidence; he said,

"That is the man who gave me the plated articles, which were found in my pocket, and the same who struck the person who took him, and made his escape." Adams denied it, and said he did not know him at all, and had never seen him in his

life. Naylor said he was the man - a pistol was produced before the Magistrate; I found it was loaded with two balls, and primed - I unloaded it. I received Anson and Ward in charge at Mary-le-bone watch-house, and examined their persons; and found their hands scratched in the same way as Naylors, and a little bloody, and their clothes very muddy. I took Adams into their presence; he said he knew neither of them, and they said they had never seen each other in their lives. Ward and Anson said they had been tumbling about, which made them so muddy. I produce Adam's coat, also a dark lanthorn, a crow, and a hat, which was tried on, but fitted neither of them well.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Naylor always gave the same account - A. Yes. The place he says he met Adams at, is about a mile from the house. The shoes would have fitted Adams if his stockings were on.

MR. PLATT re-examined. My gun was loaded with small shot. I conceive, from the appearence of the premises, that there were five or six persons - I only saw three, but on the lawn in front, there were foot-marks and flint-stones, and a bottle of spirits, in two different places on the lawn, and the foot-marks were in two or three different places.

ANN DAVIS . I lived servant to the prosecutor. Only I and my sister were at the house on this night. I produce the liquor and cruet-stand, which was brought in off the meadow; it is my masters, and was safe in the house that night. The rest of the property produced is also my master's.

JOHN LOVICK re-examined. I cut a piece of the shutter out, which I produce with the centre-bit found in the hay. The holes in it appear to be made with this instrument.

NAYLOR. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

ADAM'S Defence. I went to Staines to paint; I finished my job, got drunk, and laid down in the road; somebody stole my shoes and money - when I got up, I picked up the pistol, and put it in my pocket.

WARD'S Defence. I am thoroughly innocent.

ANSON'S Defence. I am innocent.

Seven witnesses gave Naylor, and Two gave Anson a good character.

NAYLOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

ADAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

WARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

ANSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-9

543. THOMAS WINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , two pair of shoes, value 11 s., the goods of Lewis Hunt . Also stealing, on the 17th of March, fifty-seven pair of shoes, 15 l. 13 s. 6 d.; fourteen pair of half boots, value 2 l. 16 s., and ten pair of other shoes, value 25 s. , his property.

To both of which indictments the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.

The prosecutor stated his loss to be 170 pairs of shoes.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-10

544. WILLIAM BARTHOLEMEW and JOHN CLOSE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Gardner , about the hour of two o'clock in the night of the 5th of April , at St. Sepulchre, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein two-table spoons, value 20 s.; five tea-spoons, value 5 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s.; one milk pot, value 1 l. 10 s.; one ladle, value 5 s.; two salt spoons, value 2 s.; six other tea spoons, value 1 s.; two table-cloths, value 10 s.; one wooden till, value 1 s., and the sum of 2 l. 10 s., in monies numbered, the property of the said George Gardner ; and two shirts, value 5 s., and four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. , the goods of Benjamin Booth .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE GARDNER . I keep the Fortune of War, public-house, Giltspur-street, West Smithfield, in the parish of St. Sepulchre . On the night of the 5th of April, I was the last person up, and saw the house completely fastened. I went to bed about twelve o'clock. Under the window which fronts the street, there is a door, which opens for the drovers to put their ropes in; it was fastened by a lock. I was called up at three o'clock by the watchman, and found this door forced, and the lock off; there is a door inside, opening into this place, and that was also forced open, I am sure it was safe overnight - the inner door had not been opened for five years; it leads into the bar, and on examining the bar, I found an empty drawer standing on the counter, which had been robbed of between 5 s. and 10 s. worth of copper; it was in its proper place over night. I then found another till taken away, with about 45 s. in copper in it; the lock of a door in the bar was picked, which was locked when I went to bed, and the bar parlour had been entered, and from a cupboard there, was taken two table and six teaspoons, a pair of sugar tongs, a cream pot, a pair of salt-spoons, and a punch ladle, all silver; and 6 plated spoons, two table cloths; and a bundle was taken from a dresser, which did not belong to me. The value of the whole is about 7 l. with the money. The watchman took me to a court within two doors of my house, and in that court was a privy; the floor of which was taken up, and the whole of the articles and money stated in the indictment where found down there, but only part of the copper. Newman brought me a small crow-bar and chisel two hours after.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The privy does not belong to your house - A. No. The court leads to two private houses, and the privy belongs to them; I do not know whether it is always left open. The tills were in their proper places at night - the outer door of this place door was locked; one drover, named Nicholls, has a key; it was not a night on which he would have occasion to come there. I tried the door on this night, and found it safe - if that had been open, they would have to force the inner door.

ROGER HOGAN . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre. On the night in question I was near Cock-court; was walking by my box, which is opposite Cock-lane, and the Fortune of War, - the court is two doors below, down Cock-lane. At half-past two o'clock, Bartho-lemew came over to me; he appeared to come out of the side door of the Fortune of War, in Cock-lane; he said,

"Watchman it is a cold morning," I said,

"We cannot complain for the time of year;" he said,

"I am locked out, I live down at the bottom of the lane," I said,

"Can't you make them

hear," he said, he did not like to disturb them - we talked for near half an hour; he kept his eye on the Fortune of War - I went down Cock-lane, at three o'clock to cry the hour; he remained by my box. I came out of the lane into Giltspur-street, and down a court to cry the hour; I took off my hat, having suspicion of him, and looked out of the court, and saw him cross over to the Fortune of War. I went into Cock-lane, and could see nothing of him; presently I heard a gingle, which seemed to proceed from the court, where the two houses are; then Close came out of the court - I crossed over and asked what he was doing there; he said he lived there; I said I thought he did not, he persisted that he did, and wanted me to go in and see that he did; I took him by the collar, and said I would take him to the watch-house, and have him examined, but as he persisted that he lived there, I let him go, and he went up the court, which is no thoroughfare; I remained at the end. Cook (a watchman) came up; I placed him there to prevent any one coming out while I went to the watch-house for a reinforcement - I brought Godfrey, and found Cook at his post; we went up the court, looked about, and could see nobody; presently Cook put his stick through a hole in the privy door, and said there were persons there; we demanded entrance, but could not obtain it, then we heard a noise inside like breaking of wood; we broke in at the door, and found the prisoners there; we secured and took them to the watch-house; then returned to the privy to see if we could find any thing; I looked about the yard, found nothing, and put my lantern down the privy, and discovered linen, plate, and broken wood, down in the soil. We went to the Fortune of War, and found the side door open - I had examined that door before one o'clock, and found it safe. We alarmed Mr. Gardner; he got up, and looked over his house; we took him to the privy, I got a chisel and hammer, pulled up the floor, and found the property stated in the indictment there, and gave them to Godfrey.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. At what time did you first see Bartholemew - A. At half-past two o'clock - he appeared quite sober; he did not ask leave to sit in my box, or where he could get a night's lodging; he was alone then. He asked if we allowed people to sit in the watch-house, I said

"No, provided we found you drunk or at housebreaking, we would give you a night's lodging." I knew there was a privy in this court; any one might get to it, it has only one seat, I believe.

COURT. Q. Had you observed any body go up the court from the time you first saw Bartholemew, till you heard the gingle - A. No, my Lord.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am the inspector of the watch. Hogan fetched me to the court in Cock-lane. I found Cook standing as a sentry; we all three went up, and all was silent; we looked about and found nobody in the court or in the inner yard where the privy is; it is in an inner yard, which is enclosed by a door - it might have been left open. We found the privy door shut - Cook put his stick through; we forced it open, and found the prisoners there; Bartholemew came out first, and desired we would not use him ill; I laid hold of him; the other came out, and said the same and surrendered; we had not charged them with any thing. Before the door was open, we heard a great noise like the breaking of timber. We found the property; and some implements of housebreaking in a green bag in the privy. Previous to searching the privy, we took the prisoners to the watch-house. Both gave their names - Bartholemew gave his residence No. 30, Onslow-street, Saffron-hill, as a baker; I asked what he did in the privy; he said he went for a necessary purpose. Close said he had no residence in London; that he was a shoemaker, and had come from Devonshire that day. They were taken to the Compter. We then went and found Gardner's house broken open. We searched the privy immediately after taking the prisoners to the watch-house, and found the articles stated in the indictment; also a broken till, a green bag, containing 3 s. in silver, and seventeen picklock keys, 16 s. 4 3/4 d. in copper, and a chisel were picked up, a small box, and a bottle - and in the yard we found 8 d. in copper loose on the pavement. The property was given to Pike. On entering Gardner's house, by the door, we found a small dark lantern, and a large door key; a gimblet was stuck in the outer door under the window, with a string tied to it, which would enable them to keep the door close after they had got in; we found the lock of this door wrenched off, and the inner door open; there are two holes to the privy.

THOMAS PIKE . I produce the property.

MR. GARDNER. The property is all mine, and the till - I saw it all safe when I went to bed.

BARTHOLEMEW'S Defence. I am totally innocent. I had been over the water with some friends, stopped late, and on coming home, about two o'clock, I was intoxicated - I found the street door locked, did not wish to disturb the other lodgers, and meant to walk about till morning. As I crossed Smithfield, this watchman stood with a man in his box, I asked if I might sit in the watch-house; he said the officers would not allow it - we talked a few minutes; I then went up the court into the privy, and to the best of my recollection fell asleep there. I never saw this person before, and to the best of my knowledge was never in Gardner's house in my life.

Close made no Defence.

GEORGE GODFREY re-examined. He appeared perfectly sober.

THOMAS PIKE . When I saw him he appeared perfectly sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not the watchman's duty to go round and see if idle persons are in this privy - A. I believe it is, there are no directions given for it - it is the watchman's duty to search places where doors are open. There are privies at the watering houses for drovers to use. I know of no privies being left open.

ROBERT COOK . I am the watchman who was left sentry at the court. The privy is only for the use of the two houses - no person could tell there was one there. I never saw a drover go there in my life; if a person was going along, and enquired for such a place, he might be informed there was one there; it is not a place a man is likely to find out at night.

ELIZA HEMMINGS . My husband is a sawyer, and lives in St. George's-fields. I was told of this robbery on the Saturday. Bartholemew came to our house on Good Friday, he had a bad foot; I asked him to sit down till my husband came in, which he did till about eight o'clock - I asked if he was not hungry, and gave him some pork and

a pint of porter. He stopped till half-past one o'clock - I believe he was rather intoxicated; he and my husband had three pots and a pint of beer between them; I had some of it - we were drinking from about nine to half-past one o'clock; he fell asleep part of the time in the arm chair, and I awoke him. I thought him intoxicated - he smoked three pipes; I asked him to stop, but he said he would go home to his wife and child. I have known him five or six years; he was an honest steady man. He lived some where about here, but where I do not know.

One witness gave Bartholemew a good character.

BARTHOLEMEW - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

CLOSE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-11

545. WILLIAM ODEL was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE LEE . I am a salesman , and live in Newgate-market. The prisoner has been my collecting-clerk about four years. Mr. Pocklington was indebted to me 16 l. 13 s. 5 d.; the prisoner had to collect it. Tuesday is our collecting-day in the City, and on the Wednesday he went out to collect as usual, and while he was out something occured which induced me to suspect him; and on Thursday I went to Mr. Pocklington - the prisoner was apprehended on the Wednesday; I did not then know of this deficiency. He had not brought Mr. Pocklington's money to account.

ROBERT POCKLINGTON . On Tuesday, the 19th of February, the prisoner called on me for 16 l. 13 s. 5 d., due to his master. I saw him write a receipt in my book; I gave him sixteen sovereigns, half a sovereign, and 3 s. 6 d. in silver - I produce my book. I told Mr. Lee I had paid the money to his man.

(receipt read).

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you made other payments that day - A. Several. I paid every thing that day in sovereigns.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am a constable, and took charge of the prisoner on the 20th of February. I went to his lodging, and found some memorandums and a book there.

MR. ANDREWS to MR. LEE. Q. When ought he to account to you - A. Every day; when he comes home he makes up his books - he had 18 s. a week.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

The prosecutor stated his total loss to be 380 l.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-12

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 18.

546. RICHARD PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 30 lbs. of rope, value 20 s.; 20 lbs. of spun yarn, value 18 d., and eight pieces of wood, value 16 s. , the goods of Richard Campbell Bazett .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Richard Frederick Doveton .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN JOSEPH FIELD . I am chief officer of the ship Locus. On the 11th of April she lay in the City Canal ; there was a stage composed of spun-yarn and timber, made to comunicate with the land. The ship belonged to Mr. Richard Campbell Bassett , and I had the charge of it; we were going off, and the stage was dropped into the water - the prisoner had been one of the crew, and was discharged on the Saturday before. After he was in custody, he said he had been assisting another in removing the things, but did not know what had become of them - that he had not sold them.

CHARLES WHITE . On the 11th of April I went to take charge of the stage, and found it dropped into the water; the prisoner came down by the side of the bank in a boat, and lent me a hand to launch the spars off the bank - I thought he was one of the crew; I had to go to the ship Providence, and while I was gone he took them away; they were to be delivered to Mr. Hillman, of Poplar - I thought he was going to take them there, believing him to be one of the crew. He rowed away behind the ship.

JOHN GILLMAN . I am a Thames Police surveyor. He was given into my charge on Friday - I asked why he took the things, who was with him, and what he had done with them; he would not tell - he said he had not sold them - he said he was very sorry for what he had done. It has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a boat with a lad, whose name I do not know; he was coming by the City Canal, and saw me by the spars.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined for Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-13

547. JOHN CREWYS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 100 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., belonging to Robert Elford , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

ROBERT ELFORD . I am a farrier , and live in Exeter-street, Sloane-street. On the 20th of March Webb came to me, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and gave me information - I went on the roof of a house of mine, No. 2, Middle-row, Knightsbridge , and found the gutters stripped of their lead; Webb produced some which fitted the place. The prisoner was in custody; I have known him eighteen years; he bore a good character - he lodged on the premises. I let the house to a school-master. About 3 cwt. was stolen.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a watchman of St. James, Westminster. On the 19th March, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner in Piccadilly, with an apron on his left shoulder - I stopped him, and asked what he had there; he said his own property - I took him to the watch-house, and found it contained 36 lbs. of lead; he said he found it in Kensington-road; he was coming in a direction from Knightsbridge. I went to Elford, and we compared the lead with the gutter, it fitted exactly with part of it - the prisoner said he lodged at the house over the shop. I examined his room, and found 65 lbs. more rolled up in his bed, in a sheep's-skin - this also fitted the gutter; a great deal more was taken away. When he saw Mr. Elford,

he said he did take it, but hoped he would not hurt him.

GEORGE SPENCER . I produce the lead - it has been compared with the gutter, and fitted exactly. I have known the prisoner seventeen years; he is a carver and gilder. I had not seen him for two months.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday night I found a piece of lead in Kensington-road, and left it at a coffee-shop - I was fetching it from there. I had not occupied the room for some time.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-14

548. JOHN WALKER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Alexander Gazeley , about eight o'clock in the night of the 19th of March , with intent to steal .

RICHARD LESTER . On the 19th of March I lived shop-man with George Alexander Gazeley , of No. 11, Great Newport-street . About five o'clock a boy came and asked for Mr. Gaseley; I said he was not at home; he returned in a short time, and asked me to go to the corner; I went, but did not see the prisoner then. About eight o'clock I was going out at the private door, and saw it open - the prisoner was standing at it, on the threshold; his feet were not within the door, nor any part of his body. I said,

"What do you want;" he said he came to measure the shopman for shoes - I said I was the shopman; he said I was not the person, but it was some cabinet-maker, a short thin man; but he did not know his name. The door had been opened before by a key I suppose; it was shut ten minutes before.

GEORGE ALEXANDER GASELEY . I was called down; the prisoner was in the passage with my servant; he said he was a shoemaker, that he had been to the Yorkshire Grey, public-house, Woodstock-street, and met a man there, who said if he came to my house, he would find a job to make and mend a pair of shoes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-15

549. WILLIAM TILLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , at Teddington, one mare, price 10 l. , the property of John Mullins .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to the Reverend Charles Gower Boyles , clerk.

JOHN MULLINS . I live at Teddington, Middlesex . On the 6th or 7th of November; I bought this mare, it was in my stable there; I saw it safe at six o'clock on the night of the 6th of March; I cannot say whether the door was locked. The patrol called me up about a quarter-past four o'clock next morning, and informed me my gates were open - I missed my mare, and traced her out of the yard to a lane leading to Kingston; a patrol and I immediately went towards Kingston; and the patrol overtook the prisoner within an hour after, on the mare's back, going towards Wimbledon Common. When I came up, I found him with the prisoner and the mare - it was mine, but it appears to have been stolen before I had her; I bought her of one Hall.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How far from your house was it found - A. About a mile and a half. I had not secured the gate myself. I think I have seen the prisoner once at my house - I am a publican.

COURT. Q. Is the stable within your yard - A. Yes. The yard gates were locked at night, and the lock found broken off.

RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE . I am a patrol. I went with the prosecutor - I waited at the King's Arms, public-house, and met the prisoner coming up on the mare. Mullins came up in five minutes. I presented a pistol at the prisoner, and told him to stop, for he had stolen the mare; he said, There he was, and there was the mare. When I brought him to Teddington, he acknowledged taking the mare out of the stable by himself. The prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. How did he acknowledge it - A. He said he broke the stable open, and took her himself. She has been returned to the Reverend Charles Gower Boyles , whom it appears to have been stolen from before.

The prisoner made no defence, but three witnesses gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-16

550. GEORGE ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , one watch, value 4 l.; one key, value 2 s., and one ring, value 2 s., the goods of John Spencer , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN SPENCER . I keep the George and Vulture, public-house, Hoxton . On the 26th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, some person came into my house, and asked if he could have a bed; he was told that he could, and paid for it then; I did not see him at that time - I saw him afterwards, and gave him a candle to go to bed; I believe it to be the prisoner, but I cannot swear positively to him. The pot-boy lit him up; he went up and came down in five minutes - I saw him then also, and have no doubt of his being the person, but am not certain.

Q. If you have no doubt, why cannot you be certain - A. I did not take notice enough to swear to him; he is the same stature and appearance. He came down stairs, said he had left his pocket-book behind him, and would return in five minutes, but never did. Next morning I missed a watch from a room opposite his, which was there an hour before he came. On the 6th of April, in consequence of what I saw in the newspaper, I went to Guildhall, and saw my watch; I described him to the officer as well as I could. He was then in custody on another charge.

ROBERT FIELDING . I am an officer. I found this watch in the prisoner's pocket - I apprehended him on the 4th of April, and asked him where he got it from; he said it was his father's, who was dead - he said the glass was broken, and he should send the watch-maker to me to repair it, and desired me to keep it going as it was a good one. The watch-maker never came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a public-house, and gave a man my father's watch and 1 l. for this - I put my chain and seal on it, and took it to be valued; they said it was worth three guineas and a half. The man came from

Coventry - I have written to him several times; but had no answer. There is a bruise in it, which I did in getting over a wall.

- . I am the prosecutor's cousin - he had lent me the watch; I put it in my hat about ten o'clock. I slept in the house.

GUILTY Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-17

551. HENRY LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , at St. Giles in the fields, thirty-three silver spoons, value 8 l. and thirty-two sovereigns, the property of William Slade , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SLADE . I rent a house in the parish of St. Giles in the fields . On Sunday morning, the 24th of February, between nine and ten o'clock, I missed thirty-two sovereigns and thirty-three silver spoons, from a strong closet - I think there were forty-five or fifty sovereigns; but I had not counted them for some days. I found the closet open; I do not know whether I had locked it at night, but I generally do. I thought the key was in my pocket, but I have sometimes left it in the door by chance. My wife discovered it before me; I saw the gold there about seven o'clock at night, but did not see the plate that night; it consisted of eleven table, eleven tea, nine desert, and two gravy spoons. There was 45 l. by the side of the gold, which was not taken.

THOMAS STEVENS . The prisoner came into Mr. Notts, the Green Man, public-house, Finchley Common, on the 24th of February, and asked for bread, cheese, and beer; I fetched it for him - he gave me a sovereign to change; I returned to him, and saw two long silver spoons in his bosom. We sent for Frost, an officer, and secured him.

JAMES FROST . I am an officer. I was fetched and searched the prisoner, and found thirty-spoons, and thirty-one sovereigns, besides one which Stevens had changed; this was about noon; he was drunk. He said his wife lived in St. Giles's parish, and that the property was her's. I detained him. I produce the property.

MR. SLADE. The property is mine. The prisoner was one of my workmen; he jobbed about the house, and was there that day cleaning my clothes.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor, believing him to be a young offender.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-18

552. JOB EDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one watch, value 3 l., the goods of George Tomlinson ; and one pin, value 10 s., the goods of George Flack , in the dwelling-house of George Flack .

GEORGE FLACK . I am the secretary to the Russell Institution , No. 55, Great Coram-street , where I reside; the Institution pay the rent and taxes - my salary is lower on account of living rent free - none but my family live there; there are four reading rooms open for subscribers; who may come at all hours in the day - I have no right to hinder them from coming from half-past eight o'clock in the morning until ten at night. The prisoner's father was employed on the premises as an upholdster - the prisoner came on the 20th of March to assist him; G. Tomlinson, my brother-in-law, was on a visit at my house; I missed a gold pin from his room.

GEORGE TOMLINSON . I was at Mr. Flack's house. I left my watch on the table on the morning of the 20th of March - I went into my room at night, but did not think to look for it, and I did not miss it till Thursday night the 21st.

WILLIAM FRANCIS HARDING . I am servant to Mr. Dunball, a pawnbroker, of Skinner-street, Somers Town. I have a watch which was pawned by a young man on the 20th of March, about the middle of the day. I believe the prisoner to be the person - he gave me the name of Emmett.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LAWLER . I have known the prisoner about six weeks, by working with him. I am a plasterer's labourer. On the 20th of March he asked me to sell a gold pin for him; I sold it to Mr. Scott of Barbican, a refiner, for 2 s. 9 d., and gave him the money - he gave me 3 d. for my trouble. After sometime he asked me to pledge this watch, I refused, and told him I did not think he came honestly by it; he said he did not, and that he got it from a house in Great Coram-street, where he was at work.

THOMAS SCOTT . I bought a pin of Lawler, for 2 s. 9 d., on the 20th of March - there were beads in it, which I took out.

MR. FLACK. I believe it to be mine. The members of the Institution have a right to go into my private rooms, but never do. I am allowed coals and candles.

CHARLES BELL . I have known the prisoner about two months. On the 21st of March, about six o'clock, I met at the end of the colonade in Guilford-street, and bought a duplicate of a watch of him for 4 s.

FRANCIS HARDING . It is the same duplicate I gave him.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of Stealing only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-19

553. JOHN HAYDON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Bartholemew Carroll , about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 24th of March , (no person being therein), and stealing two coats, value 2 l.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; two pair of pantaloons, value 15 s.; one shirt, value 10 s.; two table cloths, value 15 s.; three decanters, value 2 l.; one decauter-stand, value 5 s.; eight spoons, value 3 l.; one scarf, value 2 l.; one pelisse, value 1 l.; one time-piece, value 1 l.; one ring, value 6 s.; eighteen yards of linen, value 30 s.; one gown, value 5 s., and one cruet, value 5 s. ; his property.

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-20

554. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously assaulting Elias Duke , and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut him in and on his left side, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

ELIAS DUKE . On the 28th of March I was playing at skittels with Chandler, Johnson, and the prisoner, at the at the Two Brewers, public-house, Vine-street, Hatton-wall ; the prisoner was my partner; we lost a pot of beer - then he and I played to see who should pay for the beer, and I beat him; the beer was brought, and I paid or it before the game was lost. When I won I asked him for the money; he refused to pay; I took off his hat, and struck him twice, and said I would keep it till he did - I do not recollect whether he returned the blow. I knocked him down each time that I struck him; he got up, and was angry with me. Chandler said he would be answerable for the beer, if I would not hit him again - three of us sat down, and we all drank the beer; he drank some. This lasted ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and after I got up he hit me under the chin - I do not know whether it was with his fist or not. I went to strike him again, but whether I did or not I do not know; I followed him in before this; he had asked me to pay his fine. He asked me to fight him, I said I would not because he was less than myself; then he struck me under the chin, without saying any thing more; I tried to hit him again, but do not know whether I did or not, and then he cut me on the thigh; I saw nothing in his hand - then he cut me on the hip; we were struggling all this time; I had gone up to him to follow him in, and tried to strike him; I saw nothing in his hand - we had been quarrelling all the while. My hip and thigh bled; we were talking angrily together from the first - I gave him the first blow.

ROBERT CHANDLER . I was present, and saw the prosecutor knock him down twice - they continued quarrelling till this happened.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-21

555. HENRY RICHARDS and JOHN FRANCIS ROBERTS were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , five planes, value 12 s.; one saw, value 2 s., one stock and seven bits, value 7 s.; six chisels, value 3 s.; two gauges, value 6 d.; one hammer, value 6 d.; one spoke shave, value 3 d., and one pair of pinchers, value 6 d., the goods of John Sims ; and four planes, value 8 s.; two saws, value 3 s.; one axe, value 2 s.; one square, value 2 s.; one oil stone, value 6 d.; one mallet, value 4 d.; five chisels, value 18 d.; one hammer, value 10 d., and two guages, value 8 d., the goods of William Curphey ; and eight planes, value 16 s.; two saws, value 10 s.; three chisels, value 1 s.; one mallet, value 3 d.; one hammer, value 6 d.; one pair of pinchers, value 9 d., and two screw drivers, value 1 s. , the goods of Isaac Darby .

JOHN SIMS . I am a carpenter , and work for Isaac Darby , of Little Charlotte-street, Pimlico . On Wednesday, the 3d of April, I left the workshop at six o'clock in the evening - I left tools of various descriptions in a basket there; I went again at six o'clock in the morning, and found the door open - the bolt of the lock was broken; it appeared to have been done either by a crow-bar or chisel, and I missed all the tools.

ANN LUDGROVE . I live in Dartmouth-street, near Pimilco, at Mrs. Turpin's. I was sitting on the step of the shop door, about half-past eight o'clock, on the night of the 3d of April, and saw the prisoners pass me, each had a basket of tools on his back - they went into Mrs. Turpin's shop, and put their baskets on the ground; one of them went out for half an hour - the baskets were not touched till he returned - then John Turpin said to me,

"You had better go into the parlour to my mother, for I do not like any one to hear what I have to say;" I went in, the parlour door is half glass - John Turpin shut the door; I could see what they did. The prisoners opened the baskets, and took out the tools; as they were looking them over, the officers came in and took them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Are you servant to Turpin - A. No. I lodge there with my father - there were oil lamps burning in the shop. There were three baskets and three men, but one went away immediately as he sat the tools down. Young Turpin was taken and bailed next day.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. On the 3d of April, in consequence of information, I and Pople went to Turpin's house, about ten o'clock at night, and found the prisoners handling the tools in the shop. Young Turpin was behind the counter - I saw Ludgrove there. While I was handcuffing the prisoners Pople asked the prisoners where they got them; they gave no answer. Some were strewed about, and the rest were in the baskets.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear Ludgrove examined before the Magistrate - A. I did; she spoke of a third man. I found them sorting the tools.

ISAAC DARBY . I live at Pimlico. I was in my shop till half-past seven o'clock, and locked the door - every thing was safe. I was there first in the morning, and found it broken open, and the tools gone. I have seen Roberts about the neighbourhood.

(Property produced and sworn to).

RICHARDS'S Defence. We went into this shop to buy something, when the man came in and took us.

ROBERTS'S Defence. I met this man in Tothill-street. I went in to buy an awl and was taken.

RICHARDS - GUILTY Aged 23.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-22

556. MARY OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , 8 lbs. of pork, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Pilkington .

BENJAMIN LOVELL . I live opposite Mr. Pilkington, in Chandos-street . On the 23d of February I saw the prisoner put her arm into the shop, and take a leg of pork off a hook; she put it under her shawl, and walked off - I stopped her, and took her back.

ROBERT PILKINGTON . The pork is mine - she had not bought it or asked the price.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in and asked the price, it fell down. This man ran in and seized me.

ROBERT PILKINGTON . She was never in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-23

557. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , one carpet, value 35 s. , the goods of Edward Herod .

JAMES MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Edward Herod , a broker , who lives at No. 6 and 7, Castle-street, Long-acre . On the 8th of March I was pulling down the shutters, and missed a carpet off a table in the shop. I saw the prisoner in the street with it in his arms; he was walking towards Drury-lane. I took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-24

558. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Wood , from his person .

JOSEPH WOOD . I live at Eton, and am a cutler . On the 6th of April I came to town, and was at Westminster ; I met the prisoner in some street there, and went with her to a public-house. She took me to a house - I went out and got change for a sovereign; we had some eggs and bacon - several girls were in the room drunk. We went out together, and I bought her a bonnet and things which came to about 6 s.; she took me back to the house, and in less than ten minutes she went away - I jumped up and felt my pockets, and said,

"Stop her, she has stolen two sovereigns from my waistcoat pocket" - I know they were safe when I entered the room; we then were alone; I missed them the moment she left. I went to the watch-house, and the constable went to look for her, and sent for me - I found her at the watch-house. I gave her no money at all.

HENRY BETTS . I am a constable. I apprehended her at the end of King's-road, Grosvenor-place - I found 2 s. 1 d., tied up in one corner of her handkerchief, and 7 s. 6 d., in another corner, and a new whittle on her back; she said she had been with him, but knew nothing of the sovereigns.

ANN WRIGHT . The prisoner came to where I live, with this man, about four o'clock in the afternoon; he wanted change for a sovereign; I could not change it; they went out, returned, and had eggs and bacon. They again went out about six o'clock, and at night they returned together.

SARAH MOTT . I sold them the bonnet, lining, and trimming. The prosecutor had some sovereigns in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. He was very drunk, and broke a window in the bonnet shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-25

559. THOMAS MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , one watch, value 2 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d., and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Stephen Pasqueer , from his person .

STEPHEN PASQUEER . On the 26th of March, about nine o'clock, I was passing through Broad-court , towards Drury-lane, and heard somebody near me - a man sprung towards me, and snatched my watch from my pocket, and ran off to the corner; I cannot speak to him - somebody asked what was the matter; I said I was robbed of my watch, and in a moment I heard the watch works fall on the pavement; I picked them up, and somebody else picked up the case.

WILLIAM SHIRES . I am a patrol. I was coming from Bow-street, and in Broad-court, a man ran by me very fast in a dark coat. I saw the prisoner hold the prosecutor's arm, stooping down, and asking him what was the matter - I looked in his face, and said,

"Tom, I shall take you for being an accessary," and did so, but found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-26

560. JOHN BIGLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 8 lbs. of copper, value 4 s. , the goods of James Cadwalider Parker .

JAMES CADWALIDER PARKER. On Saturday, the 16th of February, I discovered I had lost about 1 1/4 cwt. of copper from a room in my warehouse, where the prisoner worked - I took no notice as I did not know whom to suspect. The constable afterwards gave me information. He worked one year and a half for me. Five other men have access to the place.

THOMAS HOWARD . I am a constable. Hearing the prosecutor had been robbed, I traced part of the property on the 16th of February to Mr. Wilks, a copper founder, living in York-street, Westminster.

SARAH WILKS . I am the wife of Thomas Wilks , a copper founder I bought 8 lbs of copper of the prisoner's wife, three or four months ago; for 4 s. 8 d. I never saw the prisoner about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-27

561. JAMES LORYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one half-crown, and one shilling , the monies of Thomas Yarron .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS YARRON . I am in the employ of Mr. Geldard, a currier of Little Moor's-yard, St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner's father is landlord of the premisses. I frequently went out leaving my clothes in the warehouse, and in consequence of suspicion, I left some money in my waistcoat pocket, having marked it all. I secreted myself in the shop, under the table at the usual time for going to dinner, and covered myself with a sack - I saw the prisoner come into the shop, go towards my clothes, and take something out of my waistcoat pocket; returned in about five minutes, took something else out, and went away. I kept under the table till Mr. Geldard came in, then searched my pocket, and missed a marked half-crown and a shilling. I got an officer, and when I returned the prisoner was in the shop with Mr. Geldard. The officer searched him, and found them in one of his boots under his feet. I knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM GELDARD . I am a currier. I marked a half-crown of the prosecutor's money, and saw the half-crown and a shilling found in the prisoner's boot.

WILLIAM WOOTTEN . I searched the prisoner; I asked what he had about him, and what he had been doing, he said nothing - I found the money in his boot. He said he intended to give it to his father when he came home.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the half-crown and a shilling in the shop; picked it up and put it in my box. Soon after Yarron came; I said I had found some money he said

"Let us look at it, it is mine;" I said he ought to give me 6 d. for finding it. He then went to Bow-street.

THOMAS YARRON . It is all false.

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Confined Three Months and Twice Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-28

562. THOMAS CANE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , seven brass hinges, value 20 s. , the goods of John Harbon and Samuel Harbon .

BENJAMIN HEMMING . I am a porter to Messrs. Harbons. On the 27th of March the prisoner came in for a pair of hinges - I was coming into the shop and saw him put a parcel containing seven brass hinges into his pocket - I told him to lay the parcel down; he said he had nothing belonging to me - he was standing where the hinges were. My master took hold of him, and in the scuffle I saw him drop them. I picked them up.

SAMUEL HARBON . I am in partnership with John Harbon . The prisoner came in while another person was serving at the counter, and went to the further end of the shop were the hinges are kept, and pulled a pair out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw them.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-29

563. JAMES CLARK and WILLIAM MEGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one spoon, value 20 s. , the goods of John Holme Purvis .

JOHN LILLEY . I am butler to Mr. John Holme Purvis, of Berkley-square . On the 13th of March, about three o'clock, I missed a table spoon, and in consequence of information, I went with Walker through David-street, and overtook the prisoner Clark, and gave him in charge. Walker pointed to his trowsers pocket - I then saw the end of the spoon, and took it out. He denied having it when he was charged with it, but afterwards said he picked it up in the street.

CHARLES WALKER . I was crossing Berkley-square, and saw Megan come up Mr. Purvis's area steps with two flower pots. Clark was waiting for him at the top of the steps. Megan gave him a spoon. I informed Lilley.

MARGARET WALKER . I am cook to Mr. Purvis. Megan came down into the kitchen to sell some flowers; I would not buy them - there was some spoons near to where he stood. He could not seen have them without coming in.

SAMUEL PLANK . Clark was brought to the office and asked to speak to me, and told me he did not steal the spoon, but received it from Bill Megan . I took Megan that evening near the office, and brought him into Clark's presence. He said,

"That is him who gave me the spoon in Berkley-square." Megan said he had been down the area to sell some flowers, but never saw the spoon.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 27.

MEGAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-30

564. JAMES BUCKLEY and GOTHEB MARCUS LEVI were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , one hundred and eighty seal skins, value 90 l. 18 s. , the good of Henry Wells .

HENRY WELLS . I am a general merchant , and live in Cable-street, Whitechapel. The prisoner Buckley came with James Wilson , (who is included in the indictment,) on 14th March, to look at some fur seal skins at my house; I shewed him about six. Buckley said he came with Wilson from Boxer and Co., and appointed the following morning for me to see him at Boxer and Co's office, No. 1, Pinner's Court, Broad-street. I attended there, and found Wilson sitting in a chair; it had the appearance of a merchant's counting-house. Wilson asked if I would give a little credit for the skins - he had said he should be a large buyer if we could agree. I said, if I sold them, I must have cash, and could give no credit; he appointed to meet me at two o'clock that day, at my house. Buckley was writing at the desk as a clerk, and within hearing. Wilson came to my house at two o'clock, and looked out 180 skins, which came to 90 l. 18 s. I asked when they were to be delivered; he looked at his watch, and said

"You can deliver them, I suppose, in an hour." I said I could. I got a porter with a truck to take them, and sent my son with them. He brought the skins back in one hour and a half, directing me to be their the next morning before half-past ten o'clock. I got to Pinner's Court, about twenty minutes before ten with them. Buckley was sitting at the desk writing, and an elderly man was there. I asked if Mr. Wilson had been there. They said,

"No." I said,

"Do you suppose he will be long." Buckley said,

"No, Mr. Wilsonseldom exceeds ten o'clock." I waited a few minutes; said I will go to the end of the court to the porter, and perhaps I might see Mr. Wilson come up the street. I stood talking to the porter, and saw Mr. Wilson coming; he came up to me, and said

"Good morning." I said

"I have brought the skins according to order." He said

"Let the porter deliver them, and I will pay you for them." The porter put them down in the office. There were sixteen others, a little damaged besides, which I had in a bag to see if I could sell them, as he seemed anxious for skins. Buckley was there when they were delivered. I told Wilson there was a mistake of 3 s. in the invoice; he was to pay the portage; he took the invoice, and looked at it, and said

"Very well, 3 s. is of no consequence." I said

"Will you look at these sixteen skins." He did, and said

"I will not purchase them now; we will leave them for the present till I have paid for the others." I waited a few minutes for my money, and he said he had two heavy bills, and must wait till the office was open to get them cashed, which would be in the course of an hour. I said

"I thought you would have been prepared with the money, my business is urgent, and I cannot leave home long together." He said he was sorry to detain me, but the office would be open in an hour, and then he could get the cash. I said

"I will wait then till you have the money." The skins were still in the office. He left the office to get the money as I thought; Buckley still remained there. I waited some little time, and then walked to the end of the court, and returned; the skins were still in the office. Buckley said,

"Take a seat, for Mr. Wilson will not be long." While I stood at the end of the court

the elderly man passed me, and on my return Buckley was alone in the office. I said

"I suppose you know Mr. Wilson, don't you." He said

"Yes." I said,

"Is he a respectable man." He said,

"A very respectable man, and in an extensive way of business near Manchester." I said,

"Not in Manchester." He said,

"No." I asked what place. I understood him to say Salford, about six miles from Manchester. In a few minutes the prisoner Levi came into the office, and bent his head over the railing of the desk, and said in plain English,

"Have the goodness to tell Mr. Wilson he can have 200 l. at five o'clock." This was near eleven o'clock. I took notice of him, he left the office. In a few minutes Wilson came in, and apologized for detaining me. I said I was sorry too, for my business was urgent at home, and I expected the money, and said,

"It will not be long now before you get it." I never intended to give up the goods without the money. He said he was sorry to detain me. I said,

"If one of the two bills you have is not too heavy, and a good one, I will take my amount out of it, and give you the difference." He said,

"You are very polite, but I have left the bills at the banking-house, and should not like to take them away." He took out his pocket-book, and said,

"I have got a bill here, you see, but it is not of very large amount." I leant my head over, and saw it was a bill. He said he could not get the money before three o'clock. I said

"I thought that was very strange, that he ought to be prepared with the money. He proposed paying me at three o'clock. I said,

"Then you cannot get the money." He said,

"No, not till three o'clock." I took the sixteen skins, and put them in a brown holland bag, and put it on the rest of the skins, and said to Buckley,

"Sir, these skins will be safe here till I return, or send my son?" He said,

"Yes," as I was to send for the money, if I could not come myself. I then hastened home.

Q. Did you give them credit till three o'clock, or leave them on their assurance, that they would be safe till you had the money - A. It was about half-past eleven. I hastened home and instantly sent my son to the place to retain possession of the goods. It would take about quarter of an hour to go there. I told him to stay near the door till three, and then go in if I did not come - and if he could not get the cash to bring away the goods. He came home after three, and said we were robbed. I went to Pinner's Court, and found the clerks, the skins, and all the books gone, and nothing but a few wafers left. I made enquiry, and on Sunday Hewksley gave me information. I found 174 of the skins at Rose and Crown Court next morning, on the first floor. The sixteen skins were left behind in the counting-house. The prisoners were taken on Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You have recovered all but six - A. I dealt with Wilson; he was recommended by Buckley. I am a woollen-draper and shipowner, and various businesses. Wilson is not to be found. I never saw Levi till he came, and said Wilson might have 200 l. at five o'clock.

HENRY A. WELLS . I am the son of the last witness. I went to Pinner's Court in the afternoon, and saw Buckley. I had the skins on a truck, in care of a porter. Buckley asked for an invoice, which I gave him. He then said Mr. Wilson was gone to drink tea with a gentleman (it was then a quarter-past four o'clock) and had left word for my father to come next morning at half-past nine with the skins. I came back, and next morning, about a quarter-past twelve, I went to the counting-house, and waited outside till three o'clock, and was to go in then if my father did not come. He did not, and I went in at three o'clock, and found nobody there, nor any skins, except the sixteen damaged ones. Books and every thing were gone. Nothing was taken out while I was waiting; they must have been gone before I get there. I returned and told my father. I was not above a quarter of an hour going from my father's to the counting-house.

JAMES SELLING HEWKLEY . I am a ticket-porter, and live in Little Moorfields - my stand is at St. Lawrence Church. A person came to me at twelve o'clock, and said if I would go to No. 2, Pinner's Court, there was a job for me. I went, and when I got into the counting-house, the skins were delivered into my sheet by Buckley. I could get no answer where I was to take them to, but Levi went with me, having a few in a bag, when I got opposite Old Bethlem, I asked if he was going through the gates. He said

"No; to Rose and Crown court." He spoke very good English. My load was too bulky to get through the gate. He took me to a private house, No. 12, Rose and Crown Court. I untied them below; they were carried up to the first floor. He asked me what the job was. I said 1 s. 6 d. He gave me 1 s. 2 d. I saw some bills stuck up afterwards, which led me to Wells. I shewed him where I took the goods, and they were recovered. I am sure of the prisoner person.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I apprehended Buckley in Rose and Crown Court, on Monday the 18th of March. I took him to the Mansion House; then went and took Levi in the same court.

"I told him he must go with me." He asked for what.

"I told him," and the lady of the house said,

"I advise you not to go without a coach. He said, he would not, and went in a coach, saying, he would not be dragged through the streets like a dog. He spoke very good English.

BUCKLEY'S Defence. I had been servant to Boxer and Co.'s a very short time, and merely acted according to the instructions of the principal clerk, and Mr. Wilson, who was a friend of Boxer's. I have been made a dupe of.

Levi, representing that he could not understand English, had the evidence interpreted to him.

BUCKLEY - GUILTY . Aged 27.

LEVY - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-31

565. JOHN TRUEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , fourteen yards of satin, value 30 s. the goods of William Leaf , William Leaf the younger, and James Cole .

WILLIAM LEAL , JUN. I am in partnership with my father, William Leaf and James Coles . We are warehouse-men , and live in Old Change . The prisoner was our porter for four years.

RICHARD SMEATON . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. On the 1st of March, at seven in the morning, I observed Trueman appeared bulky. He was cleaning out

the warehouse. I allowed him to leave the warehouse at eight o'clock, for breakfast. He passed out of the warehouse into the cellar of the private house; and when he had been there about ten minutes I called him back; he still appeared bulky. I said, he had something about him. He denied it. I told him he must satisfy me what he had got in the paper, which I saw under his coat. - He answered nothing. I took this satin, fourteen yards, from him; it has our private mark on it; he seemed confused. I told him to follow me up into the warehouse. He said he would tell me all about it. I told him to say nothing to me; he said something which I paid no attention to, but told him to return to the cellar till Mr. Leaf came to town. He was taken in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did not his duty lead him to where the satin was kept - A. He swept part of the warehouse, but not where the satin was; the paper was not visible till after I spoke to him. He said he found it on the staircase under suspicious circumstances, and meant to tell his employers.

Prisoner's Defence. (written). After eight weeks imprisonment, I am brought here for an offence I never committed, but did what I considered my duty. In sweeping the warehouse I frequently found goods where they ought not to be, and determined to acquaint Mr. Leaf of it, and in March I found these goods on the stairs and put it carefully in my pocket; it was visible to every one; the end of the paper hanging out. Is this the conduct of a theif; would any man in his senses place stolen goods in such a situation.

RICHARD SMEETON . I never observed goods out of their proper places; I went up the stairs the night before this, after every one had left, and there was nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-32

566. JAMES DODD and JOHN GREEN were indicted for stealing on the 26th of March , seven table-spoons, value 5 l. 5 s.; six desert spoons, value 3 l. 9 s.; seven tea spoons, value 2 l. 18 s.; four salt spoons, value 1 l. 1 s.; two pair of tongs, value 55 s.; nine shirts, value 9 l.; four pair of stockings, value 6 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; nine yards of cambric, value 5 l. 8 s.; one gown, value 6 s.; three shifts, value 18 s.; four yards of silk, value 16 s., and nine bound books, value 3 l. , the goods of Thomas Gill .

THOMAS GILL . I live in the North Riding, Yorkshire. The property stated in the indictment was deposited in a strong room in Bridewell . I saw them last on the 23rd of August. I had the key of the box they were in; I saw some of it in the officer's possession on the 6th of April.

JOHN HARPER . I am turnkey of Bridewell; the two prisoners were both prisoners there. Mr. Gill applied to me in August, and left a trunk in my care. I deposited it in the strong-room in the prison; the prisoners had no access to it. Early in February I was taken ill, and remained so till the 24th of March, when I returned to my duty, and on the 26th I found the door of the room had been opened, and the box broken open. I had not seen it since February; they were both prisoners there then. I watched and saw Green deliver a shirt and handkerchief to a woman, to get washed for him. Mr. Gill afterwards claimed them; an officer searched Dodd and on him found a shirt, marked T. G. which Mr. Gill claimed, and the stockings on his feet. I then searched Dodd's cell, and found two pair of sugar tongs; nobody but him was confined in that cell. I also found two pieces of silk, and two pair of stockings, in his cell, all claimed by Mr. Gill. I found nothing in Green's cell. I charged Dodd with it; he said he was very sorry any body was blamed besides himself; that he committed the robbery, but nobody but himself knew any thing of it. Green said he had the things of Dodd; he might go to the room unobserved in the day time. The locks must have been picked. Dodd was committed for two years from Guildhall Sessions, and made a wardsman in the prison.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GREEN'S Defence. Dodd gave me the shirt to get washed for him. I bought the handkerchief of him.

DODD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

GREEN - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-33

567. GEORGE MELLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Buckland , from his person .

MR. HENRY BUCKLAND . I live in Gutter Lane. On the 11th of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Cornhill , going home. I was tapped on the shoulder and told my handkerchief was taken. I found the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Mann, and my handkerchief on the ground; he was close behind me; he said he hoped I would not bring him into trouble, and denied it.

HENRY MANN . I am a Wine Merchant, and live in Southampton Street, Bloomsbury. I was in Cornhill, and saw Mr. Buckland. I also saw the prisoner with a companion; they were well dressed. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Buckland's pocket, and either drop it or put it to his companion. I seized him and the other whom I let go to tap the gentleman on the shoulder; his companion got off with the handkerchief kicking under his feet.

JOHN BRADY . I am street-keeper, he was given in my charge with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am wholly ignorant of the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-34

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 19.

568. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-35

569. GEORGE BENNETT was indicted for the wilful murder of John Edgcock .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES HALL . I am a labourer. I live at Hounslow; I knew John Edgcock . On the 18th of March I was at my chamber window, looking out, and saw the Gosport Coach stop on this side of the Marquis of Granby; the prisoner was on the box driving. Robert Mayers 's waggon came by, driven by the deceased, while the coach stood there; the waggon passed the Gosport Coach, and then the Malborough Coach came by; the waggoner's right hand was near the horses; the Malborough Coach was on the right hand side of the road; the Marquis of Granby is on the left, coming to London; the Malborough Coach passed on the right hand side, the deceased was passing on the left side of his horses, close against the body horse; the waggon was about three yards from the foot path; when the Malborough Coach drove by, the prisoner started directly on the left side, between the waggon and the left side, and as his coach passed the waggon, the box of the coach's hind wheel and the box of the waggon, came in contact together. The coach was going on faster than it ought; it got by the waggon somehow, and then the waggon horses set off full trot. The waggoner caught hold of his own trace harness, to prevent the coach going over him, and then the horses set off at full trot. The waggoner fell down, and his fore and hind wheels went over him.

COURT. Q. You say there was only three yards between the waggon and the foot-path, did the coach go on the foot-path - A. No, it went very near it. I did not see the coach or horses strike against the deceased. The coach passed by my window, just as the boxes touched, I hollowed out very loud,

"Coachman you must stop, or you will run over the man." I ran down and stopped the waggoner's horses. He laid at the White Bear ten or twelve days and then died.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The waggon had to pass the Gosport Coach on its way to town - A. Yes, the road is wide enough for four or five to go abreast; the waggon was far enough out in the road. My window is about seventeen yards from the Granby; the left hand is the near side; the waggon had quite cleared the Gosport Coach before the coach started; the accident was about thirty-eight yards form the Granby; the coachman had passed the body of the waggon when the man fell, but not the horses. I did not see the waggon leader make a sudden start to the near side. I looked more to the waggon than the horses; I know the waggon leader is rather skittish.

COURT. Q. The deceased caught hold of his trace harness - A. Yes, my Lord; he was pulled down. I saw him fall just as the coach passed him; I think the coach would have touched him, if he had not got close to his horses; he stepped half a yard out of the way; his own waggon ran over him, not the coach.

SARAH ROE . I keep a Grocer's Shop at Hounslow. I stood at my door, which is seven houses from the Marquis of Granby, in the town, on the same side of the way. I saw the Gosport Coach at the Marquis of Granby; the driver was taking up a lady and gentleman. I saw the waggon come up to my door, and the Malborough Coach passed it very clear on the other side. I did not observe that it made the horses turn out of the way. At the time it passed the Granby, the driver of the Gosport Coach got on his box, and drove very fast indeed, on the left side, between the waggon; and as the waggoner was bearing very near towards our side, the coachman persisted in passing; and when they came opposite our door, the kennel being very low, I thought the coach would be over, as the waggon was so very near, there was scarce room for the coach to pass; the coach wheel went into the gutter, and made the coach leau over much towards my house; the waggoner got a little from my house, and how the accident happened I did not see. The body of the coach did not entirely pass the body of the waggon till it had passed my house; the coach being then between me and the waggoner, I could not see him. I afterwards saw him lay nine yards off. The waggon had then gone over him. There was room enough for him to have driven straight, and then it would not have happened.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you not say the coach was so near the side, you were afraid it would be over - A. Yes.

JEFFREY SIMPKIN . I am hostler at the Marquis of Granby. I was at my lodgings, and saw the Gosport Coach at the Granby; the prisoner drove it. I went and stood by the horses, on the public house side of the way. I saw the rein of the Gosport Coach under the near leader's tail, and attemped to take it away, but the coachman started so quick before I could take it; he hit the wheel horse, and started at a goodish pace, not much faster then he ought to go, but coaches do go at a good pace. The waggon seemed to be over right the leaders head, but being afraid at seeing the rein under the horses tail, I did not take notice, fearing the leader would kick, and cannot say whether it could pass the waggon without danger, but it could not without the coach wheel going into the gutter. As it passed the waggoner, he went up scrambling to his horses traces to save himself, to get out of the way of the coach; then his horses took fright, and two of them turned right across the road, towards the Malborough Coach; this was before he fell; I cannot say whether the coach touched him or not; I saw him thrown down. The Malborough Coach being on the right side, I suppose turned the horses back again nearly straight; I think if the prisoner had gone on steady it would not have happened; or if he had gone on his right side of the road.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you see the prisoner off the box - A. No, the waggon had not quite cleared the coach when it was about to start; the waggoner was bearing on his left side, to let him pass on the right; he fell at the time the Malborough Coach passed; he laid hold of the traces, and I suppose was pulled down by the horses pulling on; the body of the coach was about ten yards from him; when he fell his left leg was behind his right, and he fell under his middle horse.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When his legs were entangled, was he falling - A. He was holding by his traces; the prisoner started with the leading reins in his hand, but they could not be strained so as to have a full command of his horses. He could not be off seeing the waggoner.

MR. HENRY MONTAGUE GROVER . I am a solicitor. I was on the Hounslow Road, on horseback, passing on my own near side, which was the off side of the waggon; and as I approached the hind part of the waggon the prisoner appeared to have his horses in confusion. I don't know

whether he was on the point of starting or not. He had drawn his horses up. He appeared to me to be intending to turn to his own side, which he ought to have done, being behind the waggon; but he turned his horses between the waggon and the curb on the left. I saw nothing afterwards, till I saw the man on the ground. His thigh was broken. He was taken away on a shutter. It gave me the impression that he was knocked down by the head of his horse.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was not the whole road open to the waggoner when he passed the Marquis of Granby - A. I did not see him pass. He was in his right place, and there was room for the prisoner to pass on his right side.

HARRISON WILKINSON . I am a surgeon at Hounslow. I was called in immediately after the accident, and attended the deceased till his death. His right thigh was fractured. There was a severe contusion in the left thigh, and a deep wound in his leg. I have no doubt but that produced the fever which occasion his death. He died on the eleven or twelfth day.

JOHN EDGCOCK . I am the son of the deceased. His name was John. He was 63 years old.

Prisoner's Defence. I took up two passengers at the Marquis of Granby, and just as I started the waggon came on my off side. I immediately went on, and never touched him or his horses; but my reins getting under the leader's tail it sprung off faster than I wished, being a high blood spirited mare. I did not know the man had fallen till I got to the end of the town.

ELIZA LANE . I live at Hounslow, and was examined before the Coroner. I was at Mrs. Ogleby's, and saw the coach pass close to the path. I saw the waggon fore-wheel knock the man down. The Gosport Coach had then passed about two lengths from the waggon before he fell.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did the coach pass the waggon - A. The Gosport Coach had passed two lengths before I looked. He fell with his feet under the waggon. He was hitting the coach horses. Q. I thought the coach had passed before you looked. How could you see him hit the horses - A. The coach was more by the side of him at first. There was room for two persons to pass between the coach and waggon, at the time he was striking the horses. He was walking very slow when the wheel knocked him down; and his horses went slow.

MARY DAVIS . My husband keeps the Marquis of Granby. The Gosport Coach just passed to take up a gentleman and lady. I stood to see the lady into the coach. The coachman was getting on his box, and the moment the passengers were in, the coach started. I saw the waggon on the other side of the coach. There was room for four to go abreast. The bodies of the coach and waggon were very near together. When it started there was room for the waggon to go further from the coach. I saw the coach pass the waggon about two yards off, and saw the waggoner catching at the chains of his waggon; and his horses began a trot. This was after the coach passed - I saw him fall. I think his foot slipped as he caught at the chain apparently to stop the horses. His leader had turned towards the coach as it was going by.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say when the coach started the body of the two were abreast - A. I think they must. There were three horses to the waggon, and only two abreast to the coach; I think I saw Simpkins there. I think the reins had caught. The waggon had not passed the body of the coach then. The accident happened forty or fifty yards off. Q. Then it is not true that the waggon horses were walking slowly, and the waggon knocked him down - A. No, it was trotting. The wheels knocked him down. There was room for the coach to pass; for it did pass. There was no danger - the coach went slowly at first - it neither galloped or trotted.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. It started slow. How far did it go before it got into its usual pace - A. About twenty yards.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am horsekeeper at the Marquis of Granby. The coach stood there about half a yard from the footpath. The waggon came along very near it; there was plenty of room - three or four carriages might pass. The first horse of the waggon was before the coach when it started; the waggoner was walking on the near side of his horses, and the waggon body was opposite the coach fore-wheel. The coach set off very slow, at a shuffling trot; and after it passed the waggoner he laid hold of his chain - crossed his legs, and fell down. There was about a yard and a half, between the coach and waggon, when it passed. I should think there was four or five yards between the waggon and the curb.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see Simpkin - A. Not till after it was over. The coach went about ten yards at the shuffling trot. The accident happened forty or fifty yards off. The Gosport Coach was ten or fifteen yards beyond the waggon when it happened. The waggon was bearing on the coach, and I suppose the coachman hollowed out to him, and then he turned his horses out again. I was standing behind the coach.

FRANCIS THOMAS . I am an ironmonger, and live at Maidenhead. I was a passenger on the Malborough Coach. Just as we got opposite the Marquis of Granby the Gosport Coach set off. The waggon was by the side of it. The bodies were nearly abreast, and I saw the deceased either strike, or attempt to strike the Gosport coachman with his long whip, and in consequence of the smack of the whip, as I suppose, the waggon horses went on a trot. I saw the deceased attempting to hold the traces of his waggon; he fell and both the waggon wheels went over his legs. The Gosport Coach was then several yards before the waggon. Our coach was beyond the waggon, and the Gosport Coach was before ours.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you sit - A. Outside, in front, on the near side, with my face towards the horses' heads. The coach started just as we got opposite it. There was no racing. I am positive the waggoner attempted to strike the coachman. Just as it was setting off he was near his hind horse. I have seen coaches pass well in less space, and without danger.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. There was room enough to pass without danger. Quite sufficient - if he had been an active man he could have got out of the way.

ROBERT MILLER . I came up just after the accident, and helped to take the man to the White Bear. He said he must die, and he believed his own horse knocked him down.

ISAAC CARTER . I was standing at the door of the Marquis of Granby when the coach started. The waggon

was then a little behind the coach. There was something the matter with the reins, which detained the coachman a few seconds; and in that time the waggon drew up, and rather drew on him. The coachman was deprived of the reins of the near side. Somebody extricated them. He was then in the kennel, by the footpath - the waggon having drawn nearer on him. He said,

"Daddy or father, hold off a bit." He held off, and then the coachman pulled his horses out of the kennel further into the road; and just as he got past the waggon horse, the waggon leader horse shyed towards the side of the Marlborough Coach. I believe the horses got right of themselves, and went away in a smartish trot. It shyed at something on the off side. I saw the man with his legs crossed; he appeared feeble. I said,

"that man will be under the wheel" - I saw him catching at the chains; and it had such an affect on me, I closed my eyes for a few seconds, and then saw him fall on his left side. I don't attribute the accident to the prisoner's coach. I ran to the man's assistance, and assisted the medical gentleman as well as I could. When he was collected, I asked how he came by the accident. He said, his daughter told him, before he left home, he should die; that he knew his death was come; that he was knocked down by his own horse, and run over by his own wheels; that it was an accident, and could not be helped.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you tell the Coroner all this - A. I was not suffered to speak, or any one else, scarcely.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-36

570. ELIJAH GOUGH was indicted for the wilful murder of Barnard Downs .

GEORGE PEPPITT . I am waterman at the coach-stand in Oxford-road , at the corner of Bond-street , On the 25th of February, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come along going towards Tyburn in a little cart, with nothing in it; he drove with reins, and only one horse, going at a fastish trot. He came very near me; I said,

"Where are you going, are you going to run over us" - he went a little further down, turned back, and came towards me; but not so fast; he stood and went back again towards Tyburn, at a fastish trot up the road. He came back in about an hour and a half fall gallop, whipping his horse all the way; I said,

"For God's sake don't go so fast, you'll run over somebody," he did not answer, but kept whipping his horse - I was below Bond-street. I knew the deceased very well, his name was Barnard Downs ; he was an old man, and had swept the crossing between Bond-street and Vine-street, for thirteen years. He had a stooping gait. I saw him shoved down by the prisoner's horse and cart; he never stopped at all, but went on out of my sight. Downs was taken into a doctor's shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Did the man usually stand out in the road - A. Yes.

JOHN HOLLEY . I am a Hackney coachman. I saw the prisoner go up the road, and afterwards return up Oxford-street towards St. Giles's, driving as fast as the horse could gallop; it was about one o'clock. He was continually whipping his horse under the belly. I was on my box, and hollowed out,

"For God's don't go so fast, you will do mischief." Mine was the first coach on the stand. Downs was crossing from the middle to the side to get out of the way. Several people hollowed to him, but he took no notice. The cart came so quick on Downs that he turned himself sideways, and the shaft and the horse's shoulder caught him, and struck him about the head and shoulder, shoved him forward about a yard and a half, and then the off wheel went over him - the prisoner continued whipping his horses more and more to get out of the way; he was followed but got out of my sight.

Cross-examined. Q. Did his wheels make a great noise - A. They made a rattling. It was not a covered cart.

WILLIAM THURSTON . I am a coachman. I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner in a cart galloping; I never heard him call to the man to get out of the way - the horse knocked him down, and cut his head open. I saw him whip his horse twice after he went over the deceased. He certainly must have seen and known that he had ran over him. I took him to a chymist's shop, then to a surgeon's, and then to the Middlesex Hospital.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off were you when you first saw him A. Not six yards; I was on the north side, and the deceased was on my side, between two and three yards off the curb.

ROBERT PILWORTH . I am a carpenter. I was coming up Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner in Princes-street, a number of people were round the cart; a man was holding the reins, and the prisoner flogging the horse to get away. I seized both reins and stopped him - he was very violent. The horse appeared in a very bad state; he was as wet as if he had been drawn through a pond.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he sober - A. He was tipsy certainly, and was remanded to get sober.

JOHN SWEETMAN . I am a surgeon to the Middlesex Hospital. The deceased was brought there about half-past one o'clock; he had his right thigh broken, and a severe blow on the head. He was insensible - he was a very old man; the accident described caused his death. He died on the Saturday. I opened him, and found a contusion of the brain.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of Manslaughter only .

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-37

571. WILLIAM CROCKSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Marchant , about nine o'clock, on the 11th of March , and stealing two rings, value 3 s., and one gold pin, value 15 s. , his property.

WILLIAM JONES . I am shopman to Robert Marchant , a silversmith , of Montague-street . On the 11th of March, about half past eight o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner looking in at the window - he then walked away for about a quarter of an hour; I turned my head, and saw him at the window again watching the boy who was cleaning the brass plate at the door - I saw him moving his arm he was against the window. I saw some cards move in the window, and directly I got off my seat, I saw a knife move in the window - he had the knife through the hole driving the card out; his hand was not inside; I did not see him take any thing. I told Mr. Marchant; he ran to

the street door. There was a gold pin in the card he was moving. He did not get that.

ROBERT MARCHANT . Jones informed me. I went to the private door, and the prisoner was at the window; I tried to catch hold of him but he got away - I followed and stopped him in Riding House-lane, without losing sight of him. I missed two wedding rings; he had not got the pin out. The cards the rings were on, were left behind. I have not seen the rings since.

WILLIAM BARTLETT . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner and brought him back to Mr. Marchant. I found a hook knife on him.

WILLIAM JONES . This is the card I saw him dragging out - it has one pin on it. The other cards were moved nearer to the window. The hole was not large enough for his hand to enter.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man very much like me stood by the window - one could easily be taken for the other. He was fumbling about the window. Mr. Marchant took me.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 5 s. only .

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-38

572. WILLIAM BACKBUTTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Newsam , in a certain passage in the King's highway, on the 30th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one tin box, value 1 s., and one sovereign , the property of William Newsam .

REBECCA NEWSAM . I am the wife of William Newsam , my son's name is James; he is eleven years old. On Saturday night, about nine o'clock, the 30th of March, I gave him a sovereign in a box, and sent him on an errand.

JAMES NEWSAM . My mother gave me a sovereign in a tin box to pay to Mrs. Powell, of Long-alley, Shoreditch - as I went along I met Powell's son - I knew the prisoner before, he lived in the neighbourhood, I did not see the prisoner near me then. I told Powell what I was going to do; he asked where I was going and I heard him say to the prisoner,

"I shall run up Angel-alley" - he went away and then the prisoner came and punched me first on the back with his fist, and then put his hand in my pocket and took the sovereign and box out - he took the money first, pushed me, and ran up Angel-alley. I used to call him Billy Button . I had seen him talking to Powell, but did not hear what they said - I heard him tell him I was going to pay his mother 5 s. I am sure he is the boy.

JAMES BROWN . I apprehended him four days after this.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not there all that night.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Of stealing from the person only .

Confined One Year , and Twice Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-39

573. SAMUEL TAYLOR and THOMAS LEACH were indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Warren , on the King's highway, on the 23d of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, the sum of 5 s. , his property.

SAMUEL WARREN . On Saturday, the 23d of March, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I received six shillings from Mr. Webb. The prisoner Leach was present. Mr. Green who was present, said he would see me out the back way, for fear I should be robbed; and Leach said he would see me frighted; so I went out with him in front. I was going home to Phillip Street, Curtain Road; Taylor, was outside the door; we all three went together to the Swan. He (Leach), asked Taylor to have some beer. We went in and had two pots of beer; we all three went in, and two or three doors off Taylor threw an old coat over me; Leach was a few yards before, and threw me down, and took the money out of my left-hand. I had 5 s. I had lent him 1 s. as we came along, as he asked me. I got up directly and cried Stop theif! I saw Leach before me but could not see Taylor; I told him I had lost my money; he said

"If you run round the corner, you can catch him." Leach went on; I picked up the coat and walked on, and saw Leach at the corner of Essex-street, Kingsland Road; he said I shall stop here. I went home and told my father. I am sure Taylor robbed me. I knew him before. They were taken on Monday morning.

Prisoner TAYLOR. Q. Did you not give me the money. A. No, I did not see the coat till he put it over me.

GEORGE RUTHERFORD . I took the prisoners in charge. The boy gave me the coat.

TAYLOR'S Defence. It is all false.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-40

574. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 14th of April , half a pig's head, value 18 d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I am a butcher . I have known the prisoner some years; she came in and took half a pig's head, and went away with it. I stopped her; she said she had paid my wife; she was a customer; my wife is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-41

575. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 6th of April , twelve pounds of lead, value 4 s., belonging to John Fitzgerald , and fixed to a dwelling house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

LUKE FRANKLIN . On the 6th of April I was at work in an empty house in Gloster-street . The prisoner knocked at the door, and said he was sent by the gentleman, to examine the water pipes; I said I knew nothing of it, and showed him up stairs to the plumber, and left him with him.

JOHN PERRING . I was at work in the house which belongs to John Fitzgerald . The prisoner came up to me, and said he was to meet a gentleman there at eleven o'clock, to examine the pipes in the kitchen, as he was going to have tin pipes put instead of leaden ones. He stopped a few minutes, and then went down. I followed him to light him out, but he turned back at the bottom of the stairs, and pulling a piece of cord out, said he would take the dimensions of the pipes, and give the gentleman an answer when he called; I let him go into the kitchen alone. Franklin called to me in about five minutes, to know if I had let the man out; I said No. I went down to the kitchen and

found he had pulled the leaden pipe out of the sink, and laid it on the window, and had a small piece of it in his hand; he said

"This is what I want, for I must have something to make the tin pipe the same size, and must take it and the brass top to fit it." He went away with the pipe. He had pulled it away from the sink. I thought it not right to let him go without orders, and I asked him who authorized him to come and take it away. He said

"The gentleman who has taken the house." I said

"No gentleman has taken the house." He said

"If you don't want me to have it, here it is for you." I said

"I think we will have you along with it," and seized him. He threw himself on his knees, and begged for mercy, and said he was distressed, and had not eaten for two or three days. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-42

576. JAMES M'BRIDE was indicted for stealing on the 4th of March , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of John Pape .

JOHN PAPE . I am a tailor . I had a great coat to repair for Mr. Carr. The prisoner slept that night at my house out of charity, at my son's desire in the shop. I left the coat with him and my son, on the 4th of March, about eight o'clock. I returned in two hours, and he was gone with it.

GEORGE PAPE . I was with the prisoner. He put the coat on, walked up and down the room, and said what a swell he was; then went down, saying he would go to see if my brother knew him, but never returned. I met him on the 6th instant, at Chairing-Cross, and had him secured.

JOHN LEWIS BATHGATE . I am constable. I took him in charge. He said he was very sorry, and hoped the magistrate would forgive him; and he would enlist in the East India Service.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-43

577. ANN MAHON was indicted for stealing on the 26th of February , 12 lbs. of beef, value 3 s. , the goods of Joseph Longford .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-44

578. SAMUEL LITTLE and EDWARD DAWSON were indicted for stealing on the 27th of February , one coat, value 20 s. , the goods of John Hewson .

WILLIAM LOVETT . I am a carman to Mr. Wood, and live nearly opposite Hewson's. On Wednesday the 27th of February, I saw Little walking to and fro. I saw Dawson with him half an hour before, a quarter of a mile off. I saw Little walk into the house, and Dawson on the opposite side; Little came out with something under a cloth; they both ran off together towards Bromley. I alarmed the house. I saw them together, pursued, and seized Little in a privy at Bromley. He had nothing then.

EDWARD JOHNSON . I work at Mr. Foster's. I went in pursuite and found the coat concealed in a blanket, on the top of a water trunk, and took it to a public house. I found Dawson under the water trunk, two or three yards from where the coat was.

SARAH BYAN . I keep a public house. Johnson gave me the coat. I gave it to the constable.

JOHN HEWSON . I am a mariner. I live at Poplar. The coat is mine. I had left it hanging in the passage at ten o'clock.

LITTLE - GUILTY Aged 25.

DAWSON - GUILTY Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-45

579. THOMAS LEONARD was indicted for stealing on the 28th of February , 50 lbs. of lead, value 6 s. belonging to Thomas Keeton , and fixed to a building of his .

THOMAS KEETON . I live in Short's-gardens, Drury Lane. On the 28th of February, this lead was taken. I had spoken to the watchman the day before; I compared this with the building, it fitted.

CHARLES MAYHEW . I am a watchman. On the 28th of February, about half past two o'clock in the morning, I saw a person going up Short's-gardens, and in two minutes after I heard some dogs bark; a rattle sprang. I run up Keeton's premises, and on a kind of gallery on the first floor, I heard something drop. I got on the parapet, and found the prisoner laying in the gutter, and about 50 lbs. of lead close to him, which I compared with the gutter; it fitted. A knife was found just by him.

DANIEL KNOWLES . I found the knife in the gutter, it appeared to have been recently used.

EDWARD HUTCHINSON . I was watching the premises, and saw two men on the roof bending something, and gave an alarm.

Prisoner's Defence. I was locked out of my lodgings, and got on the roof seeing some one there.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-46

580. GEORGE HAMILTON was indicted for stealing on the 22nd of March , one pair of trowsers, value 18 s.; one pair of braces, value 1 s., and two gowns, value 10 s. , the goods of Josiah Hardsman .

ESTHER HARDSMAN . I am the wife of Josiah Hardsman , and live in Little York-street, Bethnel-Green . The prisoner had been twice at our house before. On the 22d of March, about eight in the morning, I saw this property safe in my bed-room, on the first floor. The prisoner came about half-past ten o'clock that morning into the two-pair room, and brought some hair, which I had given him to make a front of. He is a barber - he went down stairs; I missed the things between twelve and one o'clock. He must have passed my bed-room when he came. I understand he is greatly distressed, and has a wife and eleven children.

WILLIAM WELLS . I am a butcher. I called at Hards-man's for orders - saw the bed-room door was open, and saw the prisoner coming down stairs with a bundle under his arm, wrapped in a red spotted handkerchief. He was creeping down on his toes.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Foulkard, a pawn-broker, of Providence Row, Finsbury Square. -

The prisoner came to me on the 24th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, and pawned two black gowns, and a pair of trowers, for 18 s. in the name of John Bradshaw . - He said it was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM STREDWICK . I searched him and found 26 s. and four duplicates on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The money did not belong to me.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-47

581. ANN DARTER was indicted for stealing on the 27th of February , at St. Sepulchre, two shawls, value 1 l. 5 s.; two pelisses, value 5 l. 10 s.; one pair of stays, value 5 s.; one table-cloth, value 2 s.; four napkins, value 2 s.; one fish-knife, value 1 l.; one butter-knife, value 10 s.; one silver skewer, value 7 s.; one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10 s.; six table spoons, value 2 l. 4 s.; eight tea spoons, value 1 l.; four salt spoons, value 14 s.; three desert spoons, value 16 s.; one gold thimble, value 15 s.; one silver thimble, value 4 s.; one silver ladle, value 2 l.; one silver pint pot, value 7 l., and one strainer, value 1 l., the goods of Cornelius Boyle ; and one thimble and one pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one pelisse, value 1 l.; three spencers, value 12 s.; one petticoat, value 5 s.; one scarf, value 10 s.; one shawl, value 1 l. 10 s.; one gown, value 5 s., and one necklace, value 5 s., the goods of Mary Eden , in the dwelling-house of the said Cornelius Boyle .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

MR. CORNELIUS BOYLE . I am a partner in the Firm of Messrs. Williams and Co., and live at 85, West Smithfield, in the parish of St. Sepulchre . I occupy the whole of the house. The prisoner came into my service as cook , on the 2nd of November.

Mrs. SUSANNAH BOYLE. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 2nd of November last the prisoner came into our service, at 14 l. per annum wages. Up to the 27th of February she conducted herself to my satisfaction. She asked permission to leave the house on the 25th, for medical advice. On Wednesday, the 27th of February, about half-past ten in the morning, I left the house with my nursery-maid and the children - leaving Eden, (the house-maid) and prisoner in the house. I returned ten minutes before twelve - found the closet locked - on unlocking it I looked for a tea-spoon, but could find none, and called for Eden, the house-maid. The prisoner was not in the house; and I saw no more of her. She had given me no intimation of her leaving. The table-spoons were also gone from the closet. I went up stairs to a drawer, where part of the plate was kept, and found the lock disorded and a key broken in it. In the after-part of the day I missed the two pelisses, a shawl, a scarf, a pair of stays, and the other articles stated in the indictment. They are worth 25 l. I had some things at the mangle, and sent orders that they should not be delivered to her if she called.

MARY EDEN . I am house-maid to Mr. Boyle. The prisoner was also servant there. I occasionally fetched water from St. John-street. On the 27th of February, about a half-past ten or nearer eleven o'clock, she asked me if I was going for water - only she and I were in the house. She wished me to fetch the water, and get her a watch ribbon. I asked what sort - she said she would leave it to me choice. I washed up the tea things and she assisted me to put them in a closet in the dining-room, which is close to the kitchen. The plate in common use was kept in that closet - there were table and tea spoons, a silver mug, wine strainer, fish knife, a butter knife, four salt spoons, and desert spoons, there at that time. She went down and cleaned her boots and put them on, saying, that her feet ached with the shoes she had on. She only spoke once about my getting the water, I should have gone at that time if she had not spoken. She folded the clothes for me to take to the mangle - and told me to take them, and tell the women to do them directly; and that I would call for them.

Q. Did she say any thing about her work - A. She intended cleaning her kitchen, and the bed-room. I went out about eleven o'clock, and had not the least idea of her leaving. The key was in the cupboard door, and every thing safe when I went out. I returned in about twenty-five minutes - she was gone and never returned. - Mistress came home in about ten minutes, and asked me for a tea spoon. I said they were all in the closet, and on looking, all the plate was gone. I went up into my own room, and missed the property stated in the indictment as mine (enumerating them), which were all safe when I left the house. The prisoner's box was also gone. I saw my things again last Tuesday - they have been brought back.

Prisoner. Q. When you went for water were you not going to buy some for fur yourself - and I asked you to buy me a watch ribbon - A. Yes, I was to buy her ribbon at the same time.

ANN JONES . I live in West-street, Smithfield. On the 27th of February, about eleven or a quarter past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my house; she knocked at my mother's door, and asked for a person named Jones; my mother went to her; I afterwards saw her; she begged the favour to leave a box which she had with her; I gave her leave. She asked if it would be safe; I said

"If you do not think it safe, do not leave it." She said she had had words with her mistress, and had left her place, and was going back to settle with her; that she could not go out in that condition, and pulled out of her box a black gown and spencer, and put them on, and went away. She went out first without changing her dress, and then changed it, and my husband took away the box with her. She gave me a red whittle and an old cap instead of money, saying that her mistress had not paid her in small change. Next morning I went with these things to Mr. Boyle, and stated what I knew.

RICHARD JONES . I have heard what my wife has stated; it is correct. I took the prisoner's box to the coach-stand by Hatton Garden; she got in with it; the box produced is the one.

JAMES LAWSON . I am foreman to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker of Chairing Cross. On the 27th of February I took four table spoons and two dessert spoons in pawn about twelve o'clock for 2 l.; they are worth about 45 s. They were pawned by a female very genteelly dressed, in the name of Mary Bennett . I have no recollection of her features.

RICHARD STEPHENS . I am turnkey of Giltspur-street Compter. In the night of the 24th of March, about one o'clock, the prisoner knocked at the Compter door. I admitted her. She asked if I knew her; I hesitated, and he said she came to give herself up to justice. I asked her a few questions, and put her to bed with two other women. She said she should say nothing till she had seen Mr. Williams or Mr. Boyle, and intimated a wish to see them. I knew of this matter from hand-bills which had been left with me. She was genteelly dressed, and had this pelisse and shawl on. I brought Mr. Boyle to her next morning.

MRS. BOYLE. The pelisse is mine, and was in the house on the 27th of February, in a large drawer in the bedroom unlocked. - It is worth 5 l. It has not been much worn.

MARY EDEN . The shawl is mine; I gave 45 s. for it, and only wore it once.

MR. BOYLE. The spoons are mine, and have my initials on them.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, in consequence of her previous good character while with him.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-48

582. ABRAHAM HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , two pair of half-boots, value 9 s., and three pair of shoes, value 8 s. , the goods of Robert Clarkson .

ROBERT CLARKSON . I am a shoemaker , and live in Barbican. The prisoner worked for me occasionally. I missed shoes on the 20th of March, and suspecting him, I went to a pawnbroker, and found some duplicates in possession of Martha Levy , and found these boots and shoes at Sowerby's. I had provided him with samples to sell boots and shoes for me, but he had no authority to sell these.

MARTHA LEVY . I live in Francis-place, Westminster-road. My husband keeps a clothes shop; the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood. The prisoner came to my house, and asked me to buy eighteen duplicates. I said I did not know whether they would do, as my husband was out. He left them with me, and I advanced him 5 s. My husband advised me to return them, but he did not call again for them. I gave them up to Clinton.

JOB WATKINS. I am an apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, in Chiswell-street. I took a pair of half boots and shoes in of the prisoner, on the 15th of March, for 3 s., in the name of Searle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN CLINTON. I apprehended him on the 20th of March. He said he had sold twelve duplicates to Levy.

Prisoner's Defence. He employed me to sell goods - but put them at such a price, I could not sell any. I was at great expense in travelling to sell them. I only mention this in pallitation of the offence.

ROBERT CLARKSON . These were stolen off my shelves.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-49

583. ABRAHAM HOWARD was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one pair of shoes, value 6 s., and one other pair of shoes, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Clarkson .

FREDERICK EDWARDS . I am shopman to Mrs. Fothergill of Aldersgate-street. On the 20th of March the prisoner pawned two pair of shoes in the name of Edwards, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and Clarkson claimed them about three.

ROBERT CLARSON . They are mine. I left the prisoner in care of my shop on the 20th of March, about twelve o'clock, and returned in an hour, being informed that he had been out. I went to Fothergill's and found these goods.

JOHN CLINTON . I found a duplicate of a pair of shoes on him.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-50

584. JONATHAN NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , one pair of shoes, value 3 s., the goods of William Worster ; one gown, value 7 s.; one shift, value 3 s.; one scarf, value 7 s.; one neck handkerchief, value 3 s.; one lace frill, value 4 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and 15 s. in monies numbered , the property of Sarah Page .

WILLIAM WORSTER . I keep the Three Crowns, public-house, Dowgate-hill . On the 26th of February the prisoner came to lodge at my house for one night, and paid 1 s. before. About one o'clock in the morning I shewed him up. The shoes were in the servant's room on the same floor as he slept, in an old trunk not locked - he did not come down stairs till three o'clock in the afternoon; the girl went up in the evening and complained she had lost some things. He was apprehended on the 14th of March with my shoes on his feet, and the key of the servant's box in his pocket.

SARAH PAGE . I am servant to Mr. Worster. I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and got up about seven o'clock in the morning - I went into my room about six o'clock in the evening, and missed the property stated in the indictment from my box, which was not locked. I have found nothing but the key of the box; it was in a drawer in the room - every thing was safe when I got up in the morning; nobody but a young man lodged in the house, and he left before I got up.

ROBERT DADY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 14th of March, in Upper Thames-street. He denied being at the house; but when I took him there, he recollected the house. I took the shoes off his feet, and three keys from his pocket - Page claimed one which unlocked her box.

(Shoes and Key produced and sworn to).

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-51

585. MARY SCHOFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one blanket, value 5 s., and one counterpane, value 5 s., the goods of Phoebe Reeves , in a lodging-room let to her .

PHOEBE REEVES. I live in White Rose-alley, Whitecross-street . The prisoner and her husband lodged with me since Christmas. On the 4th of April I was informed the prisoner had gone out with a bundle - I went into the room when her husband came home, and missed this property. The duplicates were found on her.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 4th of April the prisoner pawned a sheet and counterpane for 4 s. 6 d.,

FREDERICK ALDERS . I took a blanket in pawn of her for 3 s.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-52

586. SUSAN JAMESON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , two shillings, six penny pieces, and four farthings, the monies of Henry Hancock , from his person .

HENRY HANCOCK . I am a window blind-maker , and live in White-street, Moorfields. On the 3d of April, about midnight, I was coming from Tottenham Court-road, and in Little Moorfields the prisoner accosted me, and immediately put her hand into my pocket and took this money out - I had no conversation with her at all; she did it instantaniously - it was two shillings, six penny pieces, and four farthings. I gave her in charge.

VINCENT WING . I am a watchman of Little Moorfields. I heard a cry of Watch! and found them standing together - he gave charge of her, for robbing him; she denied it; she was searched at the watch-house, and 3 s. 10 d., and four farthings were found on her. One farthing was bright, which Hancock stated before he saw it.

MATTHEW POLLOCK . I am a constable. She produced the money from her bosom upon my searching her - she said nothing about the man giving it her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me 3 d. and the farthings with it. He pulled me about, and then called Watch!

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-53

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 20.

587. WILLIAM PARKS was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM EDWARD KING . I am a silk mercer , and live in Pall Mall. The prisoner had been my clerk nearly twelve years. I have examined my books; Miss Pearce's account of 9 l. 15 s., was never paid me - she was indebted to me that sum in January. I have never received it from the prisoner; he accounted to me weekly.

MISS MARY PEARCE . I live in John-street, Oxford-road. I was indebted to Mr. King, 9 l. 15 s., and paid the prisoner that sum for him on the 29th of January; he gave me this receipt - I saw him write it; (read). I paid him ten sovereigns, and he gave me 5 s.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I apprehended him, and he admitted receiving this money.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

The prosecutor stated his loss to be 700 l.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-54

588. AMOS ALMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , one coat, value 4 l., the goods of Joseph Holden Strutt , Esq. , privately in his coach-house .

RICHARD WALL . I am coachman to Mr. Joseph Holden Strutt . This coat was at No. 2, North Cumberland-mews ; I saw it at seven o'clock of the 27th of March, on the box of the carriage, in the coach-house - I slept in the house; it was always kept on the box. I went there about nine o'clock at night, and it was gone - I had left the door fastened. The prisoner used to come backwards and forwards to assist at the mews; I saw him in custody with it about four o'clock the next afternoon. It is my master's property.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a constable. On the 28th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the corner of Compton-street, Soho, with a bundle - he passed me; I looked after him, and he looked back at me, and went into Broad-street passed a large clothes shop, then returned, and offered the coat for sale; I saw Thompson, went in, and asked how he came by it; he said he had had it twelve months, and had lent it to Colonel Strutt 's coachman.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said it belonged to the coachman.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-55

589. MICHAEL TWOOMEY was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-56

590. BENJAMIN COX was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Craft , about eleven o'clock at night, of the 4th of March , and stealing therein one pillow, value 2 s. 6 d., and two pillow-cases, value 1 s. , his property.

WILLIAM CRAFT . I rent a house in Little York-street . On Monday night the 4th of March, about nine o'clock, I and my wife went out, leaving two lodgers in the house; I double locked the inside door, and the outside one was on the spring lock - we returned about a quarter before eleven o'clock, and found both the doors wide open; neither of them were injured. We missed these things - we found the lodgers at home, neither of them are here; they could not get through the inside door, for I had the key in my pocket. There is a passage between the two doors; nobody could get into the passage unless the lodgers let them in.

WILLIAM IRONS . On the 4th of March, about twelve o'clock, I was in Holywell-street, Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner with two others. I searched him and found a

pillow under his coat, and two pillow-cases in his hat, and in his right hand coat pocket a dark lantern - he said he had them from a friend, and at last he said from Mr. Abrahams, of Wheeler-street; I went there and enquired, they had not seen him for six months; they are Jews. On enquiry I took the things to Crafts.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to take me to Abrahams - A. Yes, but it was late and I locked him up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of Abrahams for 2 s. 6 d., and as for the lantern I used it to look after my master's horse at night.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of Stealing only .

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-57

591. WILLIAM HEMMINGS was indicted for stealing on the 6th of April , 5 lbs. of mutton, value 1 s. 8 d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . I live in Skinner-street, Somers Town . The prisoner came into my shop, and asked for a breast of mutton, which I shewed him. I turned my back to speak to a customer, and found he had gone out with it. I pursued him; he said he thought I had weighed it, and he would pay me for it if I liked; he appeared rather drunk, and as if he had fallen down.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR . I am a constable. I took him in charge and found 7 s. 6 d. on him; he said he was willing to pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-58

592. RICHARD GRAYSTOCK was indicted for stealing on the 25th of March , 30 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., the goods of Cornelius Metcalf , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, for cutting with intent to steal.

MARY ANN METCALF . I am the wife of Cornelius Metcalf , we live at Bethnal Green . On the 25th of March, about twenty minutes to eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner on our penthouse; I called Hancock; he told him to come down; he was laying by the side of a bundle of lead. I gave him in charge.

THOMAS HANCOCK . Mrs. Metcalf called me. I caught the prisoner as he came off the pent-house.

JOSEPH PULLIN . I am an officer. I was sent for. I went on the pent-house with a light, and found this lead cut and rolled up; I compared it with the rest, it matched; it was cut with the same instrument. I could find no knife.

Prisoner's Defence. My father died on Saturday morning.

GUILTY Aged 15.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-59

593. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 20th of March , at St. Pancras, one mare, price 25 l. the property of William Woolnough .

WILLIAM WOOLNOUGH . I am agent to the Canal Company , and live at Croydon. I have known the prisoner three or four years; I took him into my service last month, as a helper in my stables. On the 20th of March, I sent him with two horses from Croydon , (a mare of mine, and a gelding of Mr. Charles Oakes 's) and desired him to take them to the Boar's Head, livery stables in the Borough. He had lived three weeks with me; he went away with them about seven o'clock in the morning, and never returned. I found him at Hatton Garden on the Monday following. My mare was in the possession of an officer at the White Hart Livery Stables, Gray's-Inn-Lane. It is worth 25 l. I had given him no authority to part with it.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am a constable of St. Pancras. On the 20th of March, between three and four o'clock, I was in the New road, and saw the prisoner driving at a most furious rate, with two more in a chaise; near Battle Bridge, he ran against a gentlemans' horse, and cut him. I stopped him for the assault. I detained the mare which was in the chaise, and sent her to the WhiteHart; he told me that he had brought her and a grey poney which he had sold, from Cokefield, and that they belonged to his brother; that he was going to Harford with the mare, and then to Ware, to a Mr. Godfrey, who was to give him 25 l. for it. He at first said he had sold it; and drove it in the chaise to see if he could warrant it to go quiet in harness, he was very drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I got very drunk on the road, and did not know was I was at when I sold the poney.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-60

594. JOHN BUDDS was indicted for stealing on the 3d of March , 9 lbs. of mutton, value 4 s. 6 d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

JAMES ALLEN . I am servant to Samuel Somers , butcher . On Sunday the 3d of March, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a loin of mutton, and took one up. I knew him before by his buying meat of us; I told him to go to the scales and have it weighed; he had it jointed, and was going out with it. Mr. Somers stopped him at the door, and asked if he had paid for it; he said Yes, he had paid Mrs. Somers. I said he had not; and took him to her, and she said he had not. I am positive it was never weighed.

SAMUEL SOMERS . I was in the shop. The prisoner never paid for the meat; my wife was by the scales; I was at the end of the shop with Allen.

Q. Might he not have paid your wife, and you not see him - A. Not well. It was possible; 9 s. 8 d. were found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy the meat, and before I could make any answer Somers turned round, and called me a thief.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-61

595. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for stealing on the 11th of April , 3 lbs. of mutton, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS . On the 11th of April, this prisoner came in. I saw him take half a shoulder of mutton, and go away with it. I knew him before; he was very drunk; he stood at the scales some time to have it weighed. He went off.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-62

596. SARAH BYRNE was indicted for stealing on the 6th of April , two pewter pots, value 2 s.; the goods of Leonard Wapshot ; one pewter pot, value 1 s.; the goods of

John Henry Watchorn ; one pewter pot, value 1 s.; the goods of James Phillips ; and one pewter pot, value 1 s. , the goods of Richard Keen .

RICHARD GARDNER . I keep the Manchester Arms, Manchester Square. In consequence of information, I went out on the 6th of April, about noon, and found the prisoner about one hundred and seventy yards from my house, with two pint pots in her apron. I gave her in charge. She said her child picked them up, and that she lived at No. 4, Thornton-place, York-street. I went there, and found three pint pots, with the name of Wright engraved on them.

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I found two pots in her lodgings with a frying pan, one marked J. Watchorn, and one J. Phillips; some solder fell from the frying pan when I took it out of the cupboard, and I found a key in her pocket with solder stuck in it.

LEONARD WAPSHOT . Two of the pots are mine.

JOHN HENRY WATCHORN . There are two of mine; our customers put them out at their doors.

Prisoner's Defence. I have three children and beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-63

597. JOHN HICKEY was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM DAY . I produce a copy of the marriage register at Gurnsey; there is nobody to prove that it is a true copy.

RACHAEL Le PAYE . (Through an interpreter) I live at Gurnsey. I have seen the prisoner there with Sophia De Garis . I was present when he was married to her, at the church of De Castro, Gurnsey, by Mr. Dobree the clergyman; after their marriage, they lived together in the same house, and had a child; this was seven years ago. She is now in court.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure he is the man. - A. I am. It was on the 13th of July. He lived at Gurnsey two years afterwards.

MARTHA SHEPHARD . On the 19th of June I was married to the prisoner at Paddington. He represented himself as a single man; and eight or nine months after, I found he was married before; I lived with him after my marriage.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you get acquainted with him. - A. About eighteen months ago, at Melksham; my father wished to prevent our marriage, and said he heard he had a wife, but I placed confidence in him; he always denied having a wife.

WILLIAM DAY . I have a copy of the register of the marriage at Paddington. It is a true copy.

The Register was here read; the prisoner being described as a bachelor.

ELIZA RUTT . I live at Gurnsey. The prisoner was a gardener to Mr. Le Marchant there. Sophia De Garis and he lived as man and wife, and had a child.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-64

598. SOLLY ISAACS and SAMUEL LAZARUS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , one gown value 3 s.; one shawl, value 1 s.; one bed gown, value 6 d., and one shift, value 6 d. , the goods of Eliza Storey .

ELIZA STOREY . I live in Little Burr-street, and keep a shop there. On the 5th of March, two little boys came in at dusk, for a halfpenny worth of cakes; they went away, and in the morning I missed this property, which hung on a chair - they might have taken them while I turned to get the cakes. I found them at the office.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police surveyor. On the 5th of March, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I saw Isaacs with something in his hand in East Smithfield, within two hundred yards of the prosecutrix's; there were three of them together - I caught Isaacs, and before I took him he dropped the things. I found the shift in his hat - he said he bought them of a sailor for 2 s.

ROBERT CARTER . I was with Shields, and took Lazarus, who was with Isaacs. I took a gown from under his arm - he said Hall gave 2 s. for it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ISAACS'S Defence. I gave 2 s. for them.

ISAACS - GUILTY Aged 14.

LAZARUS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Six Months , and Wipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-65

599. JOHN FRANCISCO was indicted for stealing on the 19th of March , one frock, value 9 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s., and three candlesticks, value 3 s. , the goods of Henry Stratton .

HARRIET GEAR . I am servant to Henry Stratton , of Shoreditch . On the 19th of March I heard a noise in the back kitchen - I went down, and the prisoner came up with something in his hand; he threw down three candlesticks and a handkerchief, and endeavoured to pass me; I called James, and at the top of the stairs we secured him.

JAMES TIMMS . The last witness called me. I found the prisoner making his way out; he said I had no business to detain him - he got into the front passage, and struck me in the face. His jacket tore, and out fell the handkerchief and stockings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-66

600. DAVID DELANEY was indicted for stealing on the 17th of March , one pair of overalls, value 5 s., the goods of William Deacon ; and one shirt, value 5 s.; one jacket, value 3 s., and 1 s. 2 d., in money, the property of William Edwards ; and one shirt, value 5 s., the goods of John Fishlock ; and one handkerchief, value 1 s.; one towell, value 1 s.; one coat, value 4 s., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of John Fitzhenry .

WILLIAM DEACON . I am a private in the Light Dragoons . I was quartered at Honslow barracks; I had a pair of overalls in my room on the 17th of March; Fishlock and Fitzhenry's things were there also - I saw them safe at two o'clock in the afternoon, when we went out. The prisoner had been in our room for four days, he came to see a countryman of his, and slept in the room - we left him alone in the room. I returned at a quarter before seven o'clock, he was still there - I went out again, returned at eight o'clock, and he was gone. We missed all these things. I went on the Bath-road, and found him at the White Hart, public-house, Longford, in bed with this property.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I slept in the room and missed my things.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-67

601. MARY DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one sheet, value 5 s. , the goods of John Windsor .

SARAH WINDSOR . I am the daughter of John Windsor , who lives in Portland-street ; on the 5th of April, about one o'clock, the prisoner came out of the passage with something under her cloak, I told Morgan, who followed her.

WM. MORGAN, I went after her, and overtook her about half a mile off, she looked me in the face, and dropped a sheet, and resisted.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He used me very ill.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-68

602. ELLEN CANE was indicted for stealing on the 13th of April , one coat, value 12 s., and a waistcoat, value 4 s. , the goods of Terrence Riley .

TERRENCE RILEY . I live in Charlotte-street . On the 13th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I went out and left my door unlocked, and my coat and waistcoat in the bed-room; I returned about noon, and it was gone; the prisoner lodged on the second floor.

RICHARD LAWRENCE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane, the prisoner pawned this coat and waistcoat, on the 13th of April, between three and five o'clock, in her own name, for nine shillings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The door was never locked.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Four Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-69

603. WILLIAM BRYANT , was indicted for stealing on the 21st of March , one till, value 1 s., and 30 s. in monies numbered , the property of Eliza Dyke , Martha Close , and Ann Weldon .

ELIZA DYKE . I am in partnership with Martha Close , widow , and Ann Weldon ; we keep the Duke of York public-house, Hoxton ; on the 21st of March, at night, I was standing at the bar, the prisoner opened the lobby door, and asked the way to Hoxton; I said he was in Hoxton; he shut the door, and went out; I went into the tap-room, which is immediately opposite, to tell the boy to shut up, and while I was speaking to him, I felt the wind blow in at the door; I went to the bar door, looked over, and missed the till from the counter; I caught the prisoner coming out of the lobby, and pulled him into the tap-room; Close came in at the time, and searched him, he found no money on him; I returned to the lobby, and found the till on the floor; just where I had seen him; there were 27 s. in it. The lobby is part of the bar.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-70

604. JOHN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , one coat, value 10 s., and a pair of pantaloons, value 18 s. , the goods of Leonard De Arriaga .

LEONARD DE ARRIAGA (Though an Interpreter). I am Captain of the ship Truro. On the 5th of April, at night, I saw my things in my chest, in the cabin; the ship lay off Wapping ; next morning at seven o'clock I missed my clothes; I know nothing of the prisoner.

PETER LEON . I belong to the ship, I went in pursuit of the thief, and found the prisoner beyond the London Docks, about eight in the morning, with the pantaloons on, and a coat tied in a handkerchief. I gave him in charge.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I was applied to and took him in charge, with the coat tied in a handkerchief. The captain described his things to me, and the prisoner acknowledged taking them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-71

605. WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for stealing on the 12th of July , two coats, value 30 s. , the goods of John Gillart .

RACHAEL GILLART . I am the wife of John Gillart of Little St. Andrews-street . On the 12th of July, about noon, I saw the prisoner close to our door, lurking about. I lost above 30 l. worth of goods that day; consisting of silks and apparel. I lost two coats from inside the shop door. I had frequently seen him about, and saw him about a minute before the things were stolen. He was apprehended on the 13th of February.

DENNIS CATHER . I apprehended him on the 13th of February, in Monmouth-street. I found a coat in the shop then - he had sold it them. The prosecutrix and another woman were there. He said he sold a green coat there at the same time, but the woman would not produce it.

RACHAEL GILLART re-examined. Mrs. M'Carthy fetched me to this shop in Monmouth-street. I found the prisoner there. Norberry produced a black coat, and prisoner confessed that he had sold it to her, with a green one. She denied ever seeing him before. He said

"Yes, for you bought the green coat that I served her of." The black coat is mine.

HARRIET NORBERRY . I bought a black coat of the prisoner about six months before this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said they were given me to sell, not that I served her of them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-72

606. HENRY SANDERS was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM ERROLD . I live in the Harrow-road, and know the prisoner. He lodged at my house six weeks before the 20th of March, 1821. I was present at his marriage to Ann Wakeman , at Paddington. He left my house on the day he was married. I saw his wife on the 21st of March last, alive, at her lodgings in the Hampstead-road.

GEORGE WATT . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's marriage at Paddington, on 20th of March, 1821. I compared it with the register.

(read).

BRIDGET GRAYDON . I know the prisoner. He married me at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, on the 10th of October last. He represented himself as a single man.

GEORGE WATT . I am Grayden's brother-in-law. I have a copy of the register of her marriage to the prisoner, at St. John the Evangelist. (read). The prisoner described himself as a bachelor.

ELIZABETH TALBOTT . I was present at this marriage.

Prisoner's Defence. I married my first wife by the parish, and lived unhappy. On proof of her infidelity, we parted by mutual consent. I got acquainted with my second wife - she was in the family way by me, and urged me to marry, and threatened to swear the child to me; and being alarmed, I married her - not knowing I was doing wrong.

BRIDGET GRAYDON . I was never in the family way till I married him; nor did I threaten to swear a child to him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-73

607. HUGH WORTHAM and JAMES BURNHAM were indicted for stealing on the 4th April , one leaden pump, value 2 l. and 100 lbs. lead, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel Simons , and fixed in a court-yard, of a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it be fixed a in an outlet.

SAMUEL SIMONS . I am a builder , and live at Chelsea. In April last I was building a house. All the materials were my property. On the 5th of April I missed a pump from the yard; it was fixed and cased with wood; it was safe the day before, fixed against the garden wall, which runs up to the house.

JAMES HARDY . I am a plumber. I put up two pumps for Simons. I have seen part of it, and know it by the joints.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners, and one Squires. I went to the yard the pump was stolen from; I compared their shoes with the footmarks; they must have been made with their shoes; I tried them in several places, and all six shoes agreed with the marks.

GEORGE SQUIRES . I know the prisoners. I went with them, on the 4th April, to Simons's premises in the evening, we went down Park Grove, Burnham got over the wall, and let us in at the front door; we went to the pumps, pulled the wood-work away, got them down, and broke up the pipes, and took the two pumps, and hid them under some mould in a field, with part of the pipe - then took them to Dartmouth-street, and sold the pumps first for 6 s. 7 d. Burnham had the money, and as we came down York-street we had some beer; then fetched some of the pipe, and sold it in Dartmouth-street for 6 s. 6 d.; and I had my share of the money.

Prisoner BURNHAM. Q. Did you see me get over the wall - A. No, he let us in in front.

WORTHAM'S Defence. I met him in Jew's Row; he was waiting at the Bun House, as next day was Good Friday, and there is always some diversion there.

BURNHAM'S Defence. I worked at the building, which occasioned my footmarks being there.

SAMUEL SIMONS . That was a week before.

WORTHAM - GUILTY . Aged 21.

BURNHAM - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-74

608. JOHN WEBB was indicted for stealing on the 25th of February , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Francis Conrad Jorgans .

FRANCIS CONRAD JORGANS . I live in Queen-street, Ratcliff , and am a baker . On the 25th of February, at eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop while I was in the bake-house. When I came up, he came out of the parlour with my coat into the shop, and asked for a bun; I said

"Where have you been, you have got my coat." He still asked for a bun. I took him into the parlour, and he asked my pardon; I had lost another coat from the parlour in the morning; he said a boy out-side had offered him 1 s. to go in and get it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-75

609. JOHN WOODWARD , JOSEPH KIGHT and TIMS KIGHT , were indicted for stealing on the 25th of March , two hundred pictures, value 30 s. , the goods of William Hornegold .

CATHERINE HORNEGOLD . I am the wife of William Hornegold , a stationer , we live in Cross-street, Carnaby Market . On the night of the 23d of March, Joseph Kight came to buy a half-penny worth of silk. Woodward stood at the door; I did not see the other. Next morning I missed about two hundred theatrical characters.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You knew them before - A. They are neighbours children.

CHARLES SMITH . On Monday evening, the 25th of April, I was coming down Marlborough-street, and met Roberts, and went with him into Cross-street, and saw Joseph Kight in Hornegold's shop, buying some silk. I looked through the window, and while her back was turned, I saw him take some pictures off the counter, and give them to Woodward, who was in the passage just by the shop door; he took them down to the bottom of the court to Tims Kight, who laughed and said,

"What have you been buying all these pictures," and he and Kight went down Carnaby street with them. When they were all together in the court, I said they had been taking the pictures. Tims Kight said,

"If you tell we will split your bl - y head open." Joseph Kight went into the shop again. I knew them before by seeing them about.

Q. What are you - A. An artificial flower maker. I was afraid to go and tell the prosecutor then, as they were about, but I went next morning. They stood there till we went away.

EDWARD ROBERTS . I was with Smith, and saw the prisoners by the shop; Joseph Kight was in the shop; I saw him take the pictures off the counter and give them to Woodward. He brought them to the end of the court to Joseph Kight . Tims said if we told he would split our bl - y heads open. I went next morning and told.

TIMS KIGHT'S Defence. Smith offered to buy them of me.

WOODWARD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOSEPH KIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 13.

TIMS KIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18220417-76

610. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , three thousand four hundred needles, value 10 s. , the goods of Robert Kirby , George Beard , and William Toovey .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. GEORGE BEARD . I am in partnership with Messrs. Robert Kirby and William Toovey , wholesale pin and needle makers , Cannon-street . The prisoner had been our porter nearly twelve months, and in consequence of suspicion on the 12th of April, I concealed myself in the shop in the morning; he came between six and seven o'clock, and proceeded round the counter to undo the fastening of the shutters - there are drawers behind the counter where the needles are kept. As soon as he unscrewed the shutters he looked round, then pulled out one of the drawers, and I saw him put the drawer too - I considered he had taken what he thought proper; he walked round the counter and took some of the shutters down - I walked forward when he was at the back of the warehouse, ordered the doors to be closed, and as he advanced I said, " William, you are robbing us," he denied it - I said

"It is of no use denying it, walk into the counting-house;" he pulled out two or three needles, I said,

"You have more, produce all you have;" and reluctantly he pulled out some packages of needles. We searched him and found in the whole three thousand four hundred on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-77

611. WILLIAM CLARK was again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 40 lbs. of pins, value 50 s.; one leather case, 18 d.; six hundred needles, value 3 s., and three quires of paper, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Kirby , George Beard , and William Toovey .

MR. BEARD. When the prisoner was searched I found this memorandum in his pocket,

" I. O. U. 7 l. April, the 1st, 1822; J. Williams, April the 8th, 3 l. making 10 l.," I believe the bottom part,

"April 8th, 3 l. making 10 l," to be the prisoner's hand writing. We went with the prisoner to William's, Great Arthur-street, Golden-lane, he took us there; but we had great difficulty to get him to take us there; it is a chandler's shop - we found Williams there; the prisoner was asked,

"Is that the man you have taken the pins and needles to," he said Yes. Williams was asked if he knew him, he said,

"Yes," Drinkwater searched. Before this I saw nearly a quire of paper on the counter, which I recognised as our property, from its particular manufacture. I saw a needle case found on the premises, and under the bed two brown paper parcels; one containing 14 lbs. of pins, and the other 24 lbs. in papers as we pack them; the prisoner stated that he took them there, and we found a memorandum which led us there.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I searched the premises, and produce the property. I found the parcel of pins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-78

612. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 3 lbs. of thread, value 3 s.; 1 1/2 lbs. of sewing silk, value 40 s.; one hundred yards of ribbon, value 20 s.; thirty yards of Persain, value 5 s.; six pair of gloves, value 5 s.; twelve silk laces, value 2 s. 6 d.; 1 lb. of cotton, value 4 s.; two pieces of ferret, value 10 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 20 s.; twelve gross of buttons, value 30 s.; 2 ozs. of silk twist, value 4 s.; one dozen of socks, value 5 s.; thirty-six yards of galloon, value 3 s.; two scarfs, value 36 s., and ten yards of silk, value 30 s. , the goods of John Lewthwaite .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . The prisoner lives at No. 15, Great Arthur-street, Golden-lane. On the 12th of June, I went and searched the ground floor there, and in the room where he and his wife slept, I found the articles stated in the indictment, and twenty-seven duplicates in his bureau for silk. I found him at home then.

MR. JOHN LEWTHWAITE. I am a wholesale haberdasher , and live at No. 2, Lad-lane. The prisoner was in my service about two years and a half, and left in June last - he had access to my warehouse. The property produced is all mine. He had twenty-two guineas a year.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am servant to Mr. Guest of Fleet-market. I have ten yards of silk and a scarf; the duplicate produced corresponds with it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-79

613. JOHN EDWARD HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , two sovereigns, and the sum of 10 s. in monies numbered , the monies of John Mattingly .

JOHN MATTINGLY . I am a bedstead maker , and live at No. 4, Glass House-yard, Blackfriars. On the 12th of February the prisoner came to me in the cellar, and asked the price of a tent bedstead; I told him 32 s. - he asked if the wood was seasoned as it was to go to the West Indies, he should want five of them, I must take less, and they must be matted and taken down to the London Docks; I said if he would send the matting I would take off 2 s. which we agreed to. He said,

"You will want some money," I said Yes; he said it was too late them, but he would call next morning and say when I should see the merchant - he came next day at noon, and asked if I had made out the bill, I said, No, because I was waiting to see him; he desired me to make it out; I made it out and gave it him; he said,

"Have you any cards," I said No. He said,

"Write down your address and business on the bill;" I did so. He told me to meet him at the Jamacia Coffee-house, Cornhill - I agreed to meet him on change, at half-past three o'clock, and bring the difference of a 10 l.

note, which would be 50 s. I went and waited till four o'clock, when he came with some papers and a pen in his hand, and said he was sorry to keep me so long, and asked if I had got the change, I said Yes; he asked for the bill, I said he had that. I shewed him a stamped receipt; he said that would do very well, and I must follow him to Lloyd's, and at the top of the stairs he told me to wait and he would be with me directly; I waited a few minutes - he came, and said,

"Have you got the change ready, give me the change, and sign this paper;" I endeavoured all I could to sign it, but the pen he gave would not write - there was grease at the end of it; he had got the change; he said,

"I will get a fresh pen," and went into the Coffee-house again, as I thought for that purpose, but he never returned; I did not see him till he was taken up eight days after. I never saw the merchant. I gave him two sovereigns and 10 s.

JOHN BRADY . I am a beadle. I apprehended the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had moved in a respectable station, and had a large family.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-80

614. JOHN SABEY and GEORGE HAYCRAFT were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Perfect Richards , from his person .

WILLIAM PERFECT RICHARDS . I am a clerk to Messrs. Curtis and Co. On the 20th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was opposite St. Andrew's Church, Holborn , and felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the hands of the prisoner Sabey; the prisoners were both together - I charged him with it, he threw it down and denied it. I gave him in charge. Haycraft ran off down Shoe-lane - I cannot be certain of him, but believe him to be the person.

Prisoner. SABEY. Q. Was there not a crowd - A. Not till afterwards.

THOMAS WILDEN . I am a constable of Holborn. I was coming down Holborn-hill, and saw the two prisoners in company together; I followed them and saw Haycraft put his hand into Mr. Richard's pocket, take out something, and give it to Sabey - I knew them both before. Mr. Richards took Sabey, who dropped it. I seized both, but Haycraft got from me and ran down Shoe-lane. I took him two days afterward in St. James's Park.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE CORBY . I was with Wilden, and am certain of both the prisoners.

SABEY'S Defence. I was coming along, the gentleman turned round and said I had his handkerchief. I had my hands in my pocket at the time.

SABEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HAYCRAFT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-81

615. RICHARD PRESCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 11 lbs. of beef, value 6 s., and 8 lbs. of pork, value 6 s. , the goods of Henry Woodley .

HENRY WOODLEY . I am a butcher , and live at Aldgate , the prisoner was employed by my landlord, and had access to my premises. On the evening of the 19th of March I was fetched, and found him at the watch-house with the meat which I knew to be mine by the cut - it was safe at seven o'clock.

ROBERT EVERETT . I live with Mr. Jepson, butcher, Aldgate; I saw the prisoner come into our back premises, which communicate with Mr. Woodley's shop, at a quarter past nine o'clock; I was concealed in the slaughter-house; I saw him go through to Woodley's shop, and come out again with something under his arm tied up in a cloth; I seized him, and he dropped the beef and pork.

TOBIAS LOVE . I am a watch-house keeper, and took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. - I had been about the place all the afternoon - I only moved the meat.

GUILTY .

Whipped and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-82

616. WILLIAM PRICE WALL was indicted for stealing on the 3d of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Stephen Curtis , from his person .

STEPHEN CURTIS . I am a leather-cutter , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate. On the 3d of April I was in Redcross-street , and felt something at my pocket; I missed my handkerchief, and upon turning round saw the prisoner and another lad close behind, and the handkerchief at his heels; he must have dropped it, it could have fallen from no other person; it was rather exposed - he appeared distressed.

JAMES TUCKER . I was coming along between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and saw Curtis seize the prisoner, and saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. - I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-83

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, APRIL 22, 1822.

617. JANE SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing on the 12th of April , six pecks of coals, value 1. the goods of John Finlayson , Samuel Ellis , and Robert High .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL ELLIS . I am in partnership with John Finlayson and Robert Pugh ; we are coal-merchants ; our wharf is near Salisbury-street; we have barges of coals there. On the 12th of April, about one o'clock, Shields came to me; I went to the Caroline barge, and found about a sack of coals had been taken from it; when the tide went down I found nearly a sack in the mud.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. On the 12th of April, I was on the river with Short, about one o'clock in the day, and saw the prisoner standing in the mud by the side

of the Caroline barge, taking large coals from it and treading them down into the mud with her feet; I watched her till she had got ten large coals, and then told Short to go and stop her when she came ashore; she was taken, and an apron full of coals found on her; I went down to the mud; and found upwards of a bushel, but the tide rose so quick, that I could not get the rest.

Prisoner's Defence. I went at what we call

"mud-larking," and found the coals in the mud - plenty of other women do it besides me.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-84

618. JOHN ABSOLAM was indicted for stealing on the 8th of April , one scarf, value 8 s. , the goods of Daniel William Saunders .

DANIEL WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I am a fish-monger , and live in Tottenham Court-road ; this scarf was in my bed-room. On Monday the 8th of April, at five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and had three pennyworth of oysters, and asked the price of some salmon, and said he would have it, he went up to the oyster-room, which was next to the bed-room, to eat it; my girl gave me information; I went up and found him in the bed-room with the scarf in his pocket; the bed-room door was shut, but not locked.

ANN CARRICK . I am servant to Mr. Saunder's; I heard footsteps in the bed-room - ran up and saw the prisoner there - I informed my master.

HANNAH MOTE . I lodge in the house; I was alarmed about five o'clock by the servants screaming; I immediately ran down stairs and saw Mr. Saunders and the prisoner in the bed-room, struggling together.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable; I was fetched to the prisoner; he said he did not care for any officer; I searched him, and found a sovereign and 10 s. 9 d. on him, and a wax taper; he resisted all he could; I found every drawer in the room had been opened, and a handkerchief on the bed which he claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief is not mine - I was never in the room.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-85

619. JOHN DIGNUM was indicted for a rape .

The prosecutrix did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-86

620. WILLIAM PIESSE was indicted for that he, on the 27th of March feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows: -

"Messrs. Klaister and Horsley, No. 11, Leadenhall-street. Please to pay Mr. G. Glover, or bearer, the sum of 30 l., on account of your obedient servant, Alexander Wur . London, March 27th, 1822." With intent to defraud George Glover , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

GEORGE GLOVER . I am a grocer , and live in Aldgate High-street. On the 27th of March the prisoner came to my shop, and said that he was Capt. Wur, of the ship Juno, which laid in the docks, and gave a verbal order for grocery, amounting to 29 l. 4 s. 6 d., to be sent on board the Juno, for the ships company's use; I did not pack them up; he asked if I could give him change for a draft for 30 l.; I said we were obliged to act with caution, and I would decline it; but if he would leave the draft I should have an opportunity of receiving it, and seeing if it was correct, and if so, I would send the goods down with the balance; he wrote a draft on my counter; I saw him write and sign it; I gave him pen, ink, and paper - I produce it - (read, see the Indictment.)

MR. JOSEPH HORSLEY . I am in partnership with David Klaister ; we are ship-brokers and commercial agents, at No. 11, Leadenhall-street; Captains often correspond with us; I do not know a person named Alexander Wur ; we have no such customer - no such person has a right to draw on us.

The Court ruled, that it was necessary to prove that the prisoner was not Capt. Wur, of the ship Juno; the prosecutors ought to have sent to the docks to enquire if there was such a vessel there.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-87

621. WILLIAM PIESSE was again indicted for that he, on the 25th of March , at St. Botolph Without, Bishopsgate, feloniously did, falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows -

"Messrs. Macauly, Babington, and Co. No. 16, George-street, Mansion-house - Please to pay Mr. T. B. Hopgood, or bearer, the sum of 30 l. on account of your obliged servant. W. H. Pasioe. London, March 25th, 1822." With intent to defraud Thomas Burn Hopgood , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged order, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

MR. THOS. BURN HOPGOOD. I am a silversmith and jeweller , and live in Bishopsgate-street Without. On Monday, the 25th of March, the prisoner came to my shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock. I never saw him before; he looked out a number of goods, amounting to 28 l. 13 s. I made out an invoice in the name of Captain Pascoe, by his desire. He represented himself as the Captain of the Lively from New York. I was to send the goods down to the dock on the following morning. He wrote a cheque in my presence; for which I gave him 1 l. 7 s. in change - (I produce it), he went away immediately; I directly sent my son with the cheque. It was not paid.

HENRY STEWART . I am in the counting-house of Messrs. M'Auley and Babington, No. 16, George-street, Mansion-House. I have been there five years, and am perfectly well acquainted with their customers, and all their correspondents. No ship of the name of Lively was consigned to us. I know no Pascoe. No such person has a right to draw on our house. I knew nothing of the prisoner before this charge.

Mr. HOPGOOD re-examined. He bought the goods as Captain of the Lively, for the use of the crew. They were spoons, forks, and other things. He said he would be at the dock to receive them the following morning, and I was not to send later than eleven, or a half-past eleven o'clock, or he should not be there. My son went down to the docks, but he was not there.

MR. GEORGE GLOVER . I know the prisoner; he called on me on 27th of March, I saw him write this paper and sign the name of Wur to it. He told me he was Captain of the ship Juno, laying in the London Docks, and wanted the grocery for the cabin's use.

(Cheque read as in the Indictment.)

JAMES MARSH . I live at No. 53, Tower-street, and know the prisoner; his name is H. C. Piesse. I have known him about eight months, by being in company with him and his brother. I have been in his company about three times. He has been a clerk. His brother goes by that name.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy, by Mr. Glover.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-88

622. SOLOMON MYERS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of May , feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did strike, cut, and stab George Myers , with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or do him some grievous bodily harm.

GEORGE MYERS . I live in London Terrace, Commercial-road . The prisoner is my uncle; we were formerly partners in selling pens and quills - the partnership ceased three years ago. I had a dispute about his wife's business some time ago, before the Magistrate, but none with him. She, him, my wife, and I, were at Lambeth-street Office together in March; his wife made a charge against mine, which was dismissed. On the following afternoon, about five o'clock, I was in my kitchen, the prisoner knocked eight or nine times; I knew his voice; he called me a b **** and a thief, and threatened me with my life to come up; I went up and opened the door - my child was not with me. I opened the door and as I trod off the wooden step on the stone step of the door, I received a stab on my right side, and as I came off the step I received another in my hand. I had said nothing at all to him; I saw nothing in his hand at any time. After he had stabbed me, my wife picked up the knife - I never saw it in his hand - I struck him with a broom stick which I had in my hand before he stabbed me - it was by the threshold of my door where he stabbed me. I struck him with the broom stick on the head; I was on the ground. I was pulled down, I cannot say by whom, there was so many there - the people came up seeing the scuffle. I do not know how I came on the ground. I went to my father and shewed him how I was stabbed, and then returned home.

Q. How did you get away from where you lay down - A. Three or four people lifted me up, I do not know them. I believe the prisoner ran away. I did not strike him before he stabbed me.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. After you struck him did you not both pull off your clothes, and fight for a quarter of an hour - A. No, we did not fight at all, that I swear. We live next door but one to each other.

Q. On your oath did not you give your wife the knife - A. She picked it off the ground. I never said I would hang my uncle.

COURT. Q. Have you never said that when your uncle struck you and you were going to strike him, that you saw a knife under his coat sleeve - A. I do not know that I ever did. I believe he kicked me when I was on the ground, but I was insensible. I said that a young man who is gone to Brighton parted us.

Q. Why not call out that you were stabbed immediately - A. I was afraid, because my wife was in the family way.

SARAH WOLLAND . I was standing at my door on the 6th of March, (I live next door to Myers the prosecutor), I saw the prisoner come up; Myers's door was shut; I heard the prisoner call him a b - y b - r, and knocked at the door repeatedly. I saw him put his left hand into his left coat pocket, and making use of very bad expressions all the time - he took out a knife, opened it with his right hand, and put it up his left sleeve - he said he would have his b - y life. The knife fell from his sleeve, he picked it up and replaced it; George Myers came up in ten or fifteen minutes, and opened the door; the moment he got off the wooden step on the pavement, he pulled his knife from his sleeve and stabbed him; I saw this quite plain. His knocking at the door had brought a great number of people about the door. It is a private house. I am inclined to think he was in liquor, but not so far gone as not to know what he was doing.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not your name Cook - A. I have gone by that name; it is my mother's maiden name. I have not seen my husband for twelve months. I get my living as I can. I let a room to three females.

Q. Did the uncle and nephew fight long - A. I did not stay to see, for when the blood came from his hand I went in doors. I went out again in a quarter of an hour and saw him come out in his shirt and say,

"Look here how I am stabbed."

Q. Do you let out a room for unlawful purposes to men and woman - A. I let the room to the women, they do as they please. I saw no broom stick in the prosecutor's hand - a little boy picked up the knife, and gave it to his wife, as she says, but I did not see it. I did not see the prosecutor strike him.

GEORGE MYERS re-examined. I went to my father's house, and shewed him how I was stabbed. I produce the shirt and waistcoat which I wore; they are cut, and the shirt is bloody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you shew your father the shirt - A. Yes. He did not say that my shirt was not cut. I had leeches put to my side; I wore this shirt then. I went to my father before I went home; my wife had not given me the knife then.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am an officer. On the 6th of March, in consequence of information, I was within two hundred yards of this place, and met the prisoner, and took him.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I produce the knife which I took

out of the prosecutor's waistcoat pocket - there was wet blood marks on it. He was in bed.

GEORGE THOMAS DALE . I am dresser to the London Hospital; I was called in to see the prosecutor a quarter of an hour after, he had received a wound in his right breast; I probed it, it was about three inches deep, and in a slanting direction; I should suppose it was given by such an instrument as the knife produced, it was a serious wound, I ordered leeches to it, the shirt was bloody before they were ordered.

Cross-examined. Q. It was not very deep. - A. It had struck against one of the breast bones and glanced off; if it had not been for the bone it would have penetrated the lungs; the cut in the waistcoat corresponds with the place the wound is in.

Prisoner's Defence. - I have witnesses to call.

JOHN M'KENZIE . I am a porter; I was on London Terrace, Commercial Road; I saw this man rather in a rage talking about somebody, and all of a sudden a door opened, the prosecutor came out with a broom stick in his hand, and struck the prisoner as hard as he could; the prisoner did nothing to him before the man struck him; he was without his coat and his shirt sleeves turned up; then the prisoner pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and a scuffle ensued for three or four minutes, or rather better, the prosecutor got him against a back wall and pummel led him well, so that he could not see out of his eye, and his face was all over a gore of blood; the prosecutor went in doors and I left. I saw the prosecutor go into his house; they were both quarrelling and fighting.

COURT. Q. You are quite sure the prisoner's face was all in a gore of blood - A. Quite, and his eye was quite swollen, he had scratches and pinches on his face; they were quite plain, so that every body might see them.

PHILIP HALL . I was going along the Terrace, a row commenced between the prisoner and prosecutor, I stopped a little, and the prosecutor came out with a stick and hit him as hard as he could, and knocked him against the rails; then the prisoner pulled his coat off, and they got fighting for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, and after that the prisoner was taken to his own door by some women; I am sure the prosecutor hit him first.

COURT. Q. Then the prisoner never struck at all - A. Yes, they got fighting, he had two black eyes, and was all over blood; the prosecutor went in doors as well.

MARY BROWN . I was in London Terrace, and saw the prisoner very shockingly, and dreadfully ill-used; his nephew took hold of the broom stick and knocked it about his head as hard as he could, and then hit him against the wall with his fist, against the brick wall, and wrung his nose; after this the prosecutor's wife came out and tore the prisoner's shirt right down, and said,

"Take him and kill him at once;" the prisoner went in doors bleeding; his face was covered with blood, and he had a shocking black eye.

MICHAEL MYERS . I am the prosecutor's brother; I was at my door, which is two doors from my brother's; my uncle came down the Terrace rather in liquor, and instead of knocking at his own door he knocked at my brother's with his fist, not with the knocker; my brother came out with a broom stick and knocked him right against the pailing; that is the first thing which was done; he then threw the broom stick down, and fought with him; my brother was taken into his house, and my uncle taken into our house. I parted them; my uncle was much knocked about on the temple; my brother came to my father's door about a quarter of an hour after the row was over, and said,

"Father, see I am stabbed." I never saw any knife, except in my brother's wife's hands, which was after the row was over.

COURT. Q. Your uncle used no bad language - A. None at all, he was not in the least passion, his face and temples were scratched and bleeding.

ABRAHAM MYERS . I am the prisoner's brother. I was at home - my sister-in-law was in the kitchen. I heard my brother's voice; I called her up to the door; he was speaking loud; I went up and saw my son George open his street door, he lives two doors from me; he opened his door with a broom stick in hand and struck his uncle over his head; he staggered, then he threw the stick down and struck him with his fist till he fell; then my brother pulled his coat off - my son had none on, and they fought for a quarter of an hour. When my son came out he struck him instantly with the stick, and the blood gushed out of his temples. After fighting my brother was taken into his own house and then into mine; he was very bloody. In about a quarter of an hour my son came to my door, and said, he was stabbed; this was the first I heard of it. I said,

"Why not say you was stabbed before you fought;" he opened his breast and shewed it me, and I did not see a drop of blood, it looked like a wound. My son has said, he would go twenty miles to hang his uncle at any time; and my son hung himself once, about twelve years ago.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say that when he presented his side to you, there was no appearance of a wound or blood - A. None; I saw a wound but no blood. I cannot tell whether it appeared a fresh wound, there was blood on his shirt, on his back and trowsers; I saw none on the side of his shirt, nor on his breast. I saw no knife.

PHOEBE MYERS . I am the prosecutor's sister. I came down the terrace, and saw the prisoner come along; he knocked at my nephew's door by mistake as it appeared; then he looked and went to his own door momentarily, and before he could get rightly to it, George came out with a stick, and gave him a blow at the side of his neck.

COURT. Q. Not on the head - A. No. He kept himself up as well as he could, but a hard blow came the second time, and he fell; he got up, pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and they fought away ten or fifteen minutes. I was close to them, and saw no knife; after fighting, the prisoner fell, and George fell on him; somebody took them up. George Myers 's wife came out; I went into the house with her, and he followed. His wife fainted, and he sat on the bed by her, and while I was getting her out of the faint, he got off the chair by the bed side, and said

"Aunt, I am stabbed." He went to his father's in ten minutes. I saw no knife produced.

COURT. Q. What led you into the street - A. I was going to my brother-in-law's.

Q. You were not in your brother-in-law's kitchen - A. No. I am Abraham Myers 's sister-in-law. I live in Bulmer street, Commercial Road. I had not gone into Abraham's house when it happened. I did not hear the prisoner call

out at all. I saw him give a single knock at the door with the knocker. I called my brother Abraham out after he was knocked down by the second blow; George Myers always said the prisoner was never a good friend of his, and if he could do him any animosity he would.

JOHN M'KENZIE re-examined. When we went before the magistrate, I went into an ale-house in Church-lane. The prosecutor said to the prisoner,

"I shall hang you yet." When I saw the prisoner, he was going along the terrace in a rage and passion.

WILLIAM FREEMAN re-examined. When I met the prisoner, he had apparently received a blow, his cheek-bone was a little swollen, and his frill was torn; he was neither scratched nor bleeding. I took him a quarter of an hour after it happened.

WILLIAM DALE . I saw the prosecutor at five o'clock, his wound was a fresh one.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-89

623. ELEANOR SHRIEVES was indicted for that she, on the 10th of March , at St. Pancras, feloniously, unlawfully, wilfully and maliciously did set fire to a certain house belonging to John Revett , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the house to belong to John Brooks .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELEANOR REVETT . I am the wife of John Revett ; we live at No. 13, Deer's-place, Somers Town , in the parish of St. Pancras; he rents the house; the prisoner was employed by us, but not as a regular servant; she had been about three months with us; the fire happened on Sunday. On the day before I received a letter from Mr. Abbott, I opened it in the prisoner's presence, it contained a 20 l. note; she was sitting by my side at needle-work; the note fell down by the side of the fire, and she picked it up; and gave it me; I said

"Mary there is a 20 l. note, pick it up;" this was about half-past twelve; I gave the note to Mr. Revett, when he came home after candle-light, I gave it him in the letter; he went out to get it changed but could not; he then put it in the cash-box, and locked it; he took the box up stairs, when we went to bed, and put it on the drawers in our bedroom. On Sunday about half-past one, I went to the cash-box; my husband was not at home; I had taken the key out of his pocket in the morning, and placed it in the looking-glass drawer which was locked; this was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; I opened it about half-past one, and took out 6 s. in silver; I did not then see the 20 l. note; I did not look for it; I only went to the silver drawer; I immediately locked the cash-box, and placed it between the bed and the mattress; I am confident that I locked the box; I carried it by the handle, and if it had not been locked it would have opened in my hand; I was very particular in locking it; I left home a few minutes after this, and went to where my husband was; I came home with him in a coach about nine o'clock; we were not sent for; I found several people round the fore garden gate, and there was an alarm of fire; I found several people up stairs; but my conversation was directed to the prisoner, whom I found sitting in the parlour, by the door; Mr. Balls was up stairs; I asked the prisoner how the fire came, she said, she did not know; I repeatedly asked her, and received the same answer; she did not move from her seat, but appeared quite unconcerned; Mr. Revett went up stairs; I saw the bed-room before he came down, and I saw the bed-hangings were burnt, and the bed was on fire then; I had given the prisoner leave to go to chapel that evening; I went to Mrs. Ball's house, which is five minutes walk, and returned shortly; Mr. Revett then produced the cash-box, and the 20 l. note was missing, he said,

"Mary, you know something of this," she denied it; he said,

"There should be a 20 l. note in this cash-box," I had replaced the key in the dressing-glass drawer, it was not produced at this time; Mr. Revett said, it would be better to have every person in the place searched before they left, which was done by the parish constable; the prisoner was still sitting in the same place all the time; till the officer desired her to go into the other room to be searched. The note was not found, she fainted away, and was afterwards searched; the outside of the box was burnt, a sovereign which I had left in it, and some silver was still there; the prisoner had frequently seen me take money out of the box - I am sure I did not leave it in the state it was found.

JOHN REVETT . I came home with Mrs. Revett; I had put the 20 l. note in this cash-box, (producing it) under this bill of exchange, and placed the inner box, containing the silver and gold over it; when I came home at night I went up stairs, and perceived, on approaching the bedroom, that the curtains were on fire and nearly consumed, and immediately on my reaching the top of the stairs, Balls handed the cash-box to me; the bolt of the lock was shot, but the asp was not in it; the bed was partly burnt; the straw pallias appeared to have been set fire to in four places; the bed furniture was entirely consumed; the posts of the bedstead were partly burnt; but the sacking particularly, over a place where it appeared to me a fire had been kindled on the floor; a place in the floor and wainscoat were burnt; also the paper of the room, and the bed-board; that was all the damage. When I missed the 20 l. note I saw the prisoner sitting in the parlour, I said,

"Mary, you know something of this," she said,

"Indeed, Sir, I do not;" I then ordered a general search; I directed Williams to go to Ball, and search his lodging, as he had been at my house; he is a relation by marriage; I went with him; the note has not been found. When the prisoner was going to be searched she appeared agitated and fainted - immediately after the search she was taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you got the pieces of the floor here - A. Yes; the wainscoat and paper were also burnt; it appeared that the object was to conceal the note being stolen - John Brooks is my landlord.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were there any ashes under the bill of exchange - A. No. Sarah Brown our constant servant, came home in the coach with us.

ELEANOR BALLS . I went to Mr. Revett's house on this day; I got there at half-past four o'clock, before my husband; I found the prisoner alone; I went to enquire if her mistress was out, (I am Mr. Revett's aunt) and if she wished to go to chapel I was to keep house for her; she said, her mistress had given her leave to go out; Mr. Revett had asked us to come in the evening, and let her

go to chapel; I returned home to tea, and came back to the house a little before six; the right hand parlour shutters were shut up, and one of the kitchens; she went to chapel as she said, and returned at a quarter-past eight o'clock. I was in the house the whole time, and in the left hand parlour the principal part of the time. When I first entered the house after she was gone I searched every room, it was about six o'clock, being alone I thought it proper; I saw nothing in disorder at all; I searched the bed-room, and looked under the bedstead, there was no sign of fire or any thing to occasion it; the bed curtains were neatly folded and laid upon the pillow; the bed was not turned down; I had no candle, it was not dark enough; when I came down, as the kitchen was shut up, and the cellar dark, I lighted a candle which was left on a table in the parlour, I lighted it at the parlour fire; I looked round in the cellar, kitchen, and closet, under the stairs, then returned to the parlour and put the candle out; I did not go into the bed-room with the candle; I saw nothing of the cash-box; there was no fire in the bed-room grate, nor in any room but one parlour and one kitchen; the prisoner returned at a quarter-past eight o'clock, I had lighted the candle then, and she took it from the parlour to go into the kitchen to light her kitchen candle, and pull off her things; she came up with my candle, I asked her if she had been to chapel, and if she was in time; she said Yes; I asked who preached, and what was the text; she said, she did not recollect it; Mr. Balls came at half-past eight, and sat with me; I then told the prisoner we would take some bread and cheese and porter for supper, and return, observing that I supposed Mr. Revett would not be offended; she said,

"Oh, no!" and brought up the tray, and fetched some porter. We then thought it would be best for one of us to stop till Mr. Revett came home, and I left Mr. Balls there.

Cross-examined. Q. She did not hurry you out of the house - A. No.

AMBROSE BALLS . I came in and had bread and cheese; my wife went home; the prisoner came into the parlour, took a candle and went out of the parlour, and shut the door, she staid out nearly ten minutes, and came again into the parlour, and set the candle on the side board; I do not know whether it was lighted; when she came in she sat down on a chair by the door; I never knew her do so before; I had not asked her to sit down; I said,

"Mary, you had better come nearer the fire," and moved to let her; we talked for ten or fifteen minutes about Eagle-street chapel; I then smelt fire, and said,

"Molly, I smell fire;" she said,

"I have a time or two."

Q. Once or twice you mean - A. Yes, I took the candle off the table and went up stairs; the smell increased, and when I got to the chamber-door, I saw the smoke coming from between the door and door post. I called out and said,

"Mary, the bed is on fire," she was still sitting in the parlour. I came down to her, went to the front door and gave the alarm of fire; she still sat there and did not stir to give any alarm; she was crying and did not speak to me. I went over the way to Messrs. Brooks to give the alarm, and returned immediately; I took a candle and went down to get water; the fire was extinguished; Mr. Brooks, Ellen and Williams came into the house and assisted. The prisoner remained sitting in the parlour till Mr. Revett came home; Williams found the cash box and handed it to me; I gave it Mr. Revett in the same state as I received it, it was very hot; I went down with him; his account is true.

Cross-examined. Q. When you came down, having discovered the fire, you at once went to the door and gave an alarm - A. I did, I was gone a very short time leaving her alone in the house; she could have escaped if she choose, or while I was up stairs. She fainted when the constable ordered her into another room to be searched; it was not proposed for a woman to search her - the road is open to the house in front; there is a brick wall behind, seven feet high, a back door leads to the garden.

COURT. Q. After your wife left did any body come in - A. Nobody. I should think the place could not have been set fire to a quarter of an hour before I discovered it. I cannot say whether the bed was turned down or not, the back door was bolted; I saw the watchman open it to get at the water-butt.

MRS. BALLS. I was alone in the house about two hours.

Q. Suppose that after you examined the room, if any body had set fire to the bed directly after, must you not have discovered it - A. Yes. The back door leading to the garden was bolted and barred, and the shutters also.

JOHN REVETT re-examined. After I got home the back door was open for the people to get to the water-butt. My house was not insured. I went to chapel in the Borough-road, and attended three services without coming home. My wife joined me in the afternoon.

SARAH BROWN . I am Mr. Revett's servant. On the Saturday I had bought nine bundles of fire wood - I used a bundle and a half on Sunday morning, and left half a bundle in the dresser drawer, and put seven in the cupboard under the stairs, the prisoner was in the kitchen and knew this. After the alarm, next morning, I looked in the closet and found only three bundles; but next morning I found two more in a foul clothes basket, which stood in the same closet - I might have put them there myself; only two bundles were then missing. I know that the prisoner had a cambric muslin slip, which is a sort of petticoat with a body and short sleeves - I saw it on the floor of the bed-room, were we both slept, on Sunday morning; she had worn it on the Saturday - it was old but serviceable. On the Monday I saw part of it between the bed and mattress in our bed-room, and the other part I did not find. When I came home with my master and mistress, the prisoner was in the parlour; I asked her where the fire was, she said she did not know - I asked her three times, she said she did not know whether there had been any fire in the house or not. I asked why she did not get a light for the men who were going down stairs getting the water; she said nothing. After she was searched I asked her if she went any where besides to chapel; she said not in the evening, but she went in the morning to No. 11, Saffron-hill; I asked her again in the morning about the text, she said she could not remember the chapter or verse, but the words were,

"Seek and ye shall find, knock, and the door of mercy shall be opened."

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a constable. I was passing, went into the house, and extinguished the fire. The bed

things were taken off, and under the wool mattrass I saw the tin cash-box; it was open ajar and very hot, I could scarcely hold it. I called for the master of the house; Mr. Balls represented himself as such, and I gave it him in the same state.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her Youth.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18220417-90

214. GEORGE BIGGS and RICHARD BIGGS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , one 300 l.; one 200 l.; one 100 l.; two 20 l., and one 5 l., Bank notes, the property of Henry Sterry , in his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT. Stating them to be the property of Joseph Richardson .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH RICHARDSON . I am a woollen draper , and live on Ludgate-street. George Biggs was my servant for four years, up to the time of this offence. On the 5th of March, I sent him to Mr. Sterry's for 645 l. He was to take up a bill with it at Holts, in Broad-street. It was a bill I had accepted for Mr. Sterry, for goods sold me by him, and I was not provided to take it up. I sent the prisoner to Mr. Sterry a little before three o'clock; he had been informed in the morning, that he would have to go. I was sent for to Mr. Sterry's a little after four, and found the prisoner George Biggs there crying, and holding a handkerchief up to his mouth, Mr. Elton, the clerk, told me in his presence, that he, (George), had been to take up the bill, and had been knocked down and robbed of the money. I said I could not believe any thing of the kind, and said

"What have you done with the other money;" meaning 15 l. I had given him to take up another bill. He said that was in his waistcoat pocket safe, and gave it me. He persisted in his account. He said he was robbed in Austin Friar's. I cannot say whether that would be in his way. I knew he had a brother, but did not know his person.

WILLIAM ELTON . I am clerk to Mr. Sterry, of Basinghall-street . On the 5th of March, about a quarter to four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, George Biggs , came to our warehouse. I saw the notes delivered to him, there was a 300 l. dated the 18th of February, No. 9319 - one 200 l. dated the 16th of February, No. 3876 - one 100 l. dated the 19th of February, No. 13817 - two of 20 l. each dated 5th of February, Nos. 17205 and 17593 - one 5 l. dated the 31st January, No. 16544 - all dated 1822. I saw them delivered into his hands to pay a bill, which Mr. Richardson could not pay. George Biggs delivered that message to us, and said he was going to Broad-street to pay it, (Looks at the 100 l. a 20 l. and a 5 l. note) these were among the notes delivered to him. He went away, and in twenty minutes returned crying, and said he had been knocked down in Austin Friars, by three people and robbed of the money, that he had taken it out of his pocket, with the notice to see where he was to go to; that as they met him, one of them struck him in the eye, mouth, and stomach, and knocked him down, and took the money from him; that they lifted him up, and put him on a step of a door, and left him. I sent for Mr. Richardson, and kept him there till he came, he gave the same account again. Austin Friars is not in the direct way to Broad-street; he should have gone down London Wall, Winchester-street, it could not make a minutes difference.

Prisoner GEORGE BIGGS . Q. How long was I at Mr. Sterry's - A. About fifteen minutes.

Prisoner RICHARD BIGGS . Q. Did you ever see me in company with my brother - A. Never that I know.

ESTHER WESTON . My husband is a hair-dresser, we live in Holyday-yard, Creed Lane. I know the prisoner George, and now know Richard. On Tuesday, the 5th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw them together in St. Martin's Court, Ludgate Hill. A girl of the town, (in appearance), was with them; they seemed in deep conversation together. I have since learnt they are brothers. I am quite sure of their persons, and that it was between three and four o'clock.

JOHN HOPPER . I am a waterman at St. Catherine's. I know Richard Biggs , but not George. I saw Richard in St. Catherine's-lane on the 5th of March. I drank with him at the Black Boy, public-house there, at seven o'clock in the evening, he shewed me a 5 l. Bank note, and wanted me to get change. I went to Mr. Austin's, the Ship; Mrs. Austin gave me change for it. I gave her the same note I received from him. He said nothing about how he got it. I am quite sure of his person.

RICHARD BIGGS. Q. Are you sure whether it was Tuesday or Wednesday - A. No, it was one of those days. Q. Did you not go to my father's last week. - A. Yes, I was informed his father was dying and wanted to see me. I did not ask him to be answerable for any money if I staid away.

JOHN AUSTIN . I keep the Ship. My wife gave me the note changed for Hopper, and I marked the name of Hopper on the note. I don't know what day it was.

Prisoner RICHARD BIGGS . Q. How long was it in your possession before you marked it - A. I think three days, but I had no other note in the house of any kind.

RUTH AUSTIN , (looks at the 5 l. note). I know this to be the note I changed for Hopper on Tuesday, the 5th March. I knew him before; I put the note in a bag, there was no other there; I gave it to Mr. Austin about nine in the evening, when he came home. It was in nobody's hands in the mean time.

JAMES HAYES . I had seen Richard Biggs twice before the Wednesday; I knew him by the name of John Brown; he lodged at No. 4, Joiner-street, Toolley-street, Borough, with Jane Somerfield , who is a loose girl. On Sunday morning, the 6th of March, I was passing through Joiner-street to work, and Jane and her sister called me up. Richard was not there; I did not see him that day - I saw him on Thursday morning at his lodgings. I whistled as I went by, and was let in by Jane's sister. I went up and saw the prisoner and Jane in the bed. Richard asked if I would have any thing to drink; he sent Harriet for gin and peppermint, and after it was drank Richard gave the bolster to Harriet, and asked her to give me the notes out of it. She was a long time getting them out. She emptied all the feathers out, and at last found them. He looked at them, and said

"It is all right; give me the bolster - put the feathers in, and I will put them where I can place my hand on them." He put them in again, and she sewed the bolster up; and after breakfast, at eleven o'clock, Richard, I, and Mason, went out together

to go to Covent Garden. Richard gave Mason some sovereigns. I told him to walk on one side of the way, and we two would walk on the other, to avoid suspicion. We went to Govent Garden; and just as we got near the market, he met a young man named Bill Watts . We went into the wine vaults to have something to drink, and after drinking the liquor, Richard gave Watts something to drink.

Q. Did he at last give you any money? - A. On the Saturday morning I went up stairs - he gave me what he said was 500 l., and twenty sovereigns, to take care of for him, I said I would. It was in two bank notes, one was a 200 l. I saw him again on Sunday; and he told me that his brother went to borrow some money for his master to take up a bill; and when he had got the money he gave it to him, and said he had been knocked down and robbed of it. When Richard gave me the money, he said,

"They cannot hurt you, and besides you can get a good character, for you are at work."

COURT. Q. You seem about as bad as him, if this is true - A. It is all true. I live at No. 9, Union-row, Snow's Fields, Bermondsey, and am a colourer.

Prisoner RICHARD BIGGS . Q. Did I know where you lived at the time I gave you the money - A. No, he sent Jane with me to see that I took it home. She only went as far as Western-street; but no further, as she met a young man.

Q. What became of the money - A. I did not come home on Thursday, but on Friday morning, my parents did not know I had it; and I concealed it in the ceiling of the privy, and three men came and took it away. I only know this by what my sister told me.

Q. Do you mean to swear you do not know what became of it - A. I do not. I opened it, but did not see what the other note was.

Q. Were you in the habit of seeing me after you had the money - A. Yes, on Monday, at the Feathers, Waterloo Road. I never told him I lost it. It was not taken till the Friday following. He told me to take a pound or two when I wanted it, but not to take the notes. He put some rag over the notes, and then wrapped the sovereigns up in it.

HENRY TURNPENNY . On the 5th of March I was sent for - I and Mr. Richardson, the prisoner George, and Mr. Sterry went to Austin Friars, where he said he was robbed; he pointed out the spot where he was robbed; we could find nobody there that knew any thing of it. He said it happened about four o'clock. Next day I went after Richard, and found him at last, at Ingram's, the Sun, in Bedfordbury. I had very hard work to get him away. I was surrounded immediately I seized him, and unless I I had produced my fire arms, I should not have secured him. He made very great resistance. I was forced out of the skittle-ground into the tap-room. I found 24 s. 6 d. on him.

JOHN SMITH . I am a dealer in coins, and live in Cornhill. On the 6th April I took the 100 l. bank note, numbered 13,817, produced. It was paid me by an elderly man, who brought one hundred and twenty Napoleons for it. I sent it to the Bank, and then it was stopped.

ALICE EWBANKS . I live in Austin Friars, about five yards from the spot where the robbery was said to have been committed. I heard of no robbery on that day, until the gentleman came at night to enquire. I was in doors at four o'clock, cleaning the kitchen, with the kitchen windows open, and must have heard if there had been any alarm. I was there from two till five. I am house-keeper to a Mr. Robinson.

MR. ELTON. (Looking at the 100 l. and 5 l. notes) These are two of the notes paid him.

GEORGE BIGGS 'S, Defence. I have nothing to state only the manner I was robbed of the money. When the bill was presented to Mr. Richardson, I was not aware I was going to take it up. The direction was left, and about eleven or twelve o'clock, I took it to Mr. Sterry's, and told him the bill was due. He called afterwards, and said,

"Send somebody between three and four o'clock for the money." I was not aware I was going to take it up, till I was sent. Mr. Richardson sometimes took them up himself. I left Mr. Richardson's at half-past three in the afternoon; previous to that, about ten minutes before, I had to go to Thomas-street. I had met my brother in the morning, and went with him to have something to drink, at the Cock. He had a young woman with him, and said he was going to the Cock. The last time I saw him, was twenty minutes after three, and then I did not know I was going to take up the bill. When I returned, I was ordered to go to Mr. Sterry's I stopped there ten minutes before I received the money, which was given me from a parcel of notes. I went out of Mr. Sterry's front door, and along London Wall, up Winchester-street, to Austin Friars, and in the notes I had the direction of the bill. Not being sure of the number, I unfortunately pulled the notes out of my pocket, and looked at the direction; at the moment three very genteel persons passed me, and the moment I put the money in my pocket. I received a blow on the back of my neck; at the same moment one in my mouth, and one on the chest which knocked me down, and completely deprived me of speech; two of the persons lifted me up by the arms, and placed me on the step, and run towards Broad-street; the contrary way to that they were going when they met me. I was not able to call after them through the blow, but run as well as I was able, the way they went; but never saw them after they crossed the corner of Austin Friars. I run as fast as I could up Threadneedle-street, but could not see them; I returned the same way as I came to Mr. Sterry's, and several people asked me what was the matter. I said I had been robbed. I make no doubt but they would have gone with me if I had asked them. I then thought it most advisable to make the best of my way back to Mr. Sterry's, and endeavour, if possible, to stop the number of the notes. I stated to them the manner in which I had lost it, they asked me if I should know the persons again, if I saw them. I said I was certain I should know two of them; Mr. Sterry said I must come to the Mansion House. I went before the Lord Mayor, and stated the manner I had lost the money. Mr. Richardson and Mr. Sterry were sometime together with the Lord Mayor. We then went back to Mr. Sterry's, and staid there till near eleven o'clock; they then said they did not believe what I had said. Mr. Richardson, I believe, objected to my being taken into custody that night, and I was taken to his house, where I remained all night, and next morning proceeded to business as usual, and opened the shop, swept the door, and brushed the windows, and

about nine o'clock Mr. Richardson went out, and did not return till about eleven. He had told me previous to going out that I must go before the Lord Mayor, and undergo an examination. I said I was willing, and about eleven o'clock I went. I was not in custody, I had abundant opportunity to escape, if I had been guilty, but I knew I was innocent.

RICHARD BIGGS 'S Defence. I recollect being in company with my brother on the day in question, as I was in the habit of seeing him three or four times a week; the first time I met him was about half-past twelve o'clock, on Ludgate-hill, I was in company with a young woman, he said he was going to Holborn; I said, I was going to have something to drink at the Cock, and would wait there for him; he came there and went home; I waited there after he had left me, till about a quarter past three, and just as I was coming away he came there a second time. I asked him to sit down, and if he could stop; he said he was going to Thames-street and could not wait. We all came out together from the Cock, and stood a few minutes talking at the door; I went towards Temple-bar with the woman. I wish to make a few observations as to Hayes. He acknowledges I did not know where he lived; I leave it to you to consider whether it is likely that I should leave so much money in care of a person to whom I was a stranger. If I had counsel it would be plainer to your Lordship. On the first examination he swore it was a 300 l. and 200 l. - On the second, he said it was a 200 l. note, and the other might be a song for what he knew. He mentions likewise in his statement a third person named Harriet, who, if she was brought forward, could perhaps greatly corroborate his testimony. These witnesses, I submit, are kept away, because if they were questioned as to Hayes's character (for I know for many years it has been no good) he has been an utterer of forged notes. As to Hopper, the first I knew of him was his being procured as an hired bail for me at Lambeth-street, for which he received 10 s.; he went to my father and offered not to come against me for 20 l., and he sent into the gaol to say if I sent him out 2 l. he would not appear.

HENRY TURNPENNY . Harriet Somerville is in Brixton gaol I understand. I went to enquire for her to bring her as a witness here.

WILLIAM MASON . I live in Green Church-yard, St. Catherine,'s, and am apprenticed to a waterman; the prisoner's father lives in Little Macclesfield-street; I was there one night when Hopper came and offered to go out of the way for the sum of 20 l. His father said it was not in his power to give it him.

Q. Were you not taken up on this charge - A. Yes, but I knew nothing of it. I rowed them up to Waterloo-bridge, and he paid me the fare, the same as any other person. I don't know Bill Watts . I have seen Harriet and Jane, but don't know where they are.

MR. ELTON re-examined. When the prisoner came back and gave this account his lips were swollen, and he had blood on his handkerchief.

GEORGE BIGGS - GUILTY Aged 18.

RICHARD BIGGS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-91

625. JOHN M'CARTHY was indicted for manslaughter .

ISAAC SQUINCE . I was a prisoner in Newgate on the 30th of March , and Francis Dempsey and M'Carthy were prisoners there. We were all in the same yard; I saw Dempsey throwing some sopped bread at the prisoner out of the yard, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, just after breakfast; the bread hit him on the shoulder; the prisoner took no notice of it, but went down stairs; Dempsey followed him, threw more pieces of bread at him, which hit him on the back. As he was going down stairs the prisoner said, if he did not be easy he would hit him on the top knot; then the prisoner went up stairs again and the deceased threw more bread at him; then the prisoner kicked at him, but missed him; they then both got together and struggled, and both fell; he did not strike him, but threw him in the struggle; the prisoner was uppermost, they got up again - had another scuffle - I saw no blows, the deceased fell again, and the prisoner at the top. Dempsey seemed hurt and said, he would not fight any more, and leant his head on the table. He died in the afternoon. He laid hold of the prisoner's foot and began the wrestling.

EDWARD MARTIN . I was a prisoner in Newgate; the first I saw was M'Carthy entering the ward; the deceased threw a bit of sopped bread at him, only once that I saw; I did not see them till the second fall; the deceased was hurt; there were no blows, only wrestling.

EDWARD MURPHY . I was a prisoner in the same ward, and saw the deceased following the prisoner, throwing a piece of sopped bread at him, the prisoner said he would give him a kick on the top knot, the deceased still provoked him, they wrestled and fell, the prisoner was taken from him, and wrestled again, and had another fall, the deceased was undermost - a little while after he laid on the table and seemed very bad.

WILLIAM BOX , ESQ. I am surgeon of Newgate; I saw Dempsey between twelve and one o'clock, he was then dying very fast, and died in three minutes; I opened his body, the internal appearances were perfectly healthy, and completely free from the appearance of violence, there was no appearance of scratch or bruise; I examined his head particularly, there was a rupture of one of the principle arteries, and six ounces of blood were taken out, that caused his death - it is impossible to say it was in consequence of the fall.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-92

626. ABRAHAM HOWARD was indicted for embezzling four sovereigns, which he received on account of Benjamin Smith , his employer .

MR. ADOLPHUS, conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I am a flour factor , and live in London Wall; I have a brewery in Surrey. The latter end of last year, the prisoner was my collecting clerk , it was his duty to receive money for me, he was to account to me every night, and was to enter daily in this book the sums he received; I have his entry of the 26th of January; there is no entry of the 4 l. received from Joseph Temple , on that day, or any other time; Temple owed me 4 l. - I parted with the prisoner a day or two after.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not send a gentleman to meet me - A. Yes, that was about a week after; he gave him a list of the debts he was deficient in, which amounted to 30 l., and said, if I would not prosecute him, when he got a situation he would repay me, I sent him word that as he bore a good character before, I should not promise not to prosecute him, but if he behaved well where he was going I would not. (looking at a receipt) this is his writing, I did not take him up but found him in custody.

JOSEPH TEMPLE . I was indebted to Mr. Smith 4 l.; the prisoner called for it several times, and at last I paid him four sovereigns, and produce the receipt he wrote me for it.

(read).

Prisoner's Defence. I always wished to settle by instalments.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-93

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, APRIL 23. 1822.

627. CALEB SALTER and MICHAEL JENNINGS were indicted for stealing on the 4th of March , two quarts of rum, value 10 s. , the goods of Henry Blanchard , John Blanchard , Thomas Wilson , Edward George Barnard , Thomas Shipton , and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Thomas Edwards .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to be the goods of certain persons unknown.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM FINCH . I am a tide-waiter at the Customs, and had charge of the lug boat Frederick, on the 4th of March, in the basin of the West India Dock, eleven puncheons of rum were in it; Salter was an Excise waterman , and had charge of the Joseph, which laid about twenty yards from the Frederick; Jennings had charge of the Maunder, about thirty feet off, they could easily get from these boats to the Frederick; I was on guard near the Frederick, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I went on board her, and got under the tarpauling for my great coat, and smelt a strong smell of rum, as I got into the lug boat, I spoke to Salter, who was on board a lug boat next to the Frederick, I found the tarpauling had been removed, I lifted it up and found a syphon put into the rum cask, with a long bladder to it, it was nearly full, I took the syphon off the skin, and called two officers to help me to get it out. Salter walked across to the Maunder as soon as he saw me going aft; Jennings was walking on the Maunder, Salter said something to him, and when I called the officers to my assistance, they both went into the Maunder's cabin, I saw them both come out together and lean over, and one of them threw something over into the water, it floated, and then something was thrown in which sunk; I said to Salter you have made a pretty thing of it; he said, I had a d - d sight to say about it; nobody was near the Maunder but Salter, he was within eight feet of it; Culverhouse picked up the thing which floated, it was two large bladders; we took them into custody; Roebuck searched the Maunder and found a bladder smaller than the one which was full of rum.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You never saw Jennings out of his boat - A. He has got the palsy in one arm; the rum was running when I discovered it; Salter got over two or three lug boats into the Maunder - it was moon-light.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. How many vessels were there in the bason - A. I do not know, the Joseph laid a-head of the Maunder - I was walking on the quay to keep myself warm.

Q. Are not these men in the habit of passing from one vessel to the other to keep themselves warm - A. They walk on their own vessels, but not from one to another; I have seen them do it - I had been walking about for a quarter of an hour on the quay.

EDWARD CULVERHOUSE . I am an Excise tide-water; I had the care of the Frederick from eight o'clock in the morning till six; she was Thomas Edward 's boat, and had eleven puncheons of rum on board; I joined Finch to walk on the quay between seven and eight o'clock, and in five minutes Finch called me, I saw Salter in the lug boat adjoining the Frederick; I stepped into the boat and found a syphon in one of the puncheons; Finch had the bladder in his hand; Salter went over into the Maunder, Finch followed him. I afterwards went into the Maunder, Roebuck came out of the cabin with the skin in his hand, I pulled two bladders out of the water just a-stern of the Maunder. I heard Finch say to Salter that he had made a pretty thing of it; he said he had a d - d sight to say about it. I found the tarpauling lifted up; I had left it over the puncheon, it must have been done in the few moments I was ashore.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK, Q. You walked on the quay in sight of the barges all the time - A. Yes, I had been walking half an hour - the tarpauling was not fastened down; I had left the boat three-quarters of an hour, there was an empty boat by the side of her.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. - Q. There were many other boats in the bason - A. A great many, most of them touched each other; there were four excise watchmen in charge of different boats, including the prisoner's, no other vessels had a cargo.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Were you not at times a long way from the Quay - A. Thirty yards - our backs were turned at times.

JOHN ROEBUCK . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 4th of March, I was on duty at the entrance gate, and heard Finch cry out to the Police officers to come; I went down and saw Salter and Jennings in the Maunder standing in the body of the barge. I heard Finch accuse them of plundering his barge - I found these skins laying on the cabin floor of the lighter. Jennings has the palsy on one side.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were the skins dry - A. Yes. I found nothing in the Joseph.

ROBERT TAYLORS . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 5th of March, I was on duty, and heard somebody call for the Police; I ran to the basin and crossed four or five craft to the Maunder, and found the prisoners there; they stood on the larboard side leaning over the water's edge - Finch cried out,

"They are throwing the implements

overboard - they came into the barge; he said,

"You have been doing it nicely; why not bleed your own charge and not mine;" Salter said,

"I think you have a d - d deal to say about it." Jennings wanted to go into the cabin for his great coat; we would not let any one go in till we got a light; we then went in, and Roebuck found the skin. I saw Culverhouse pick up two bladders - the water has no current.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was the tide flowing or ebbing - A. The water does not come through the gates.

MR. THOMAS EDWARDS . The boat called the Frederick is mine. I had eleven puncheons of rum on board.

SALTER'S Defence. There was only one boat between the Maunder and the Frederick. I know nothing of the charge.

JENNING'S Defence. I was not out of my craft.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-94

627. ELIZABETH GILSON and MARGARET MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one gown, value 1 l.; one pelisse, value 2 l.; one scarf, value 1 l.; four aprons, value, 4 s.; three caps, value 4 s.; three frills, value 4 s.; three pair of ruffles, value 2 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 8 s.; two pair of stockings, value 3 s., the goods of William Perkins , in the dwelling of John Day .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH PERKINS . I am the wife of William Perkins , tailor , Litchfield-street, Oxford-Road. In February I took a lodging at Mr. John Day 's, at Enfield , on account of ill-health. I had a one pair back room. I sat with Mrs. Day. Gilson lodged in the house. I never saw Marsh there. I went there on the 14th, and on the 16th, I lost the articles stated in the indictment. They were worth above 5 l. altogether. I left the silk gown in a box unlocked in a closet in my room. The pelisse hung in the same closet, and the rest of the things were in a large hat-box in the room. I left them there safe about five in the afternoon of the 16th. Gilson went out on the 6th. I cannot say whether she carried any thing out with her. She went out again in about a quarter of an hour; it was then a little after seven o'clock. She said to me,

"If a young man should call tell him," I shall return in a few minutes, and I will leave my candle burning" - she did not return at all. A candle was left burning in the back kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS Q. These things would make a large bundle - A. Yes.

SARAH DAY . I am the wife of John Day . The prisoners came to lodge at my house on the 28th of January - represented themselves to be sisters, and said they lived by needle-work. Marsh continued her lodging till the 7th of February, and then left without notice. Both lodged in one room - I did not see her again till she was in custody. Mrs. Perkins came to lodge with me on the 14th. On the 16th I was out.

JOHN DAY . I keep the house at Enfield. I remember the night Gilson went away - she asked me to lend her a coal-bag to fetch coals, between six and seven in the evening. I said, I did not know where it was, - she found it in the cupboard, and took it up stairs with her. - I saw her go out afterwards, but did not notice that she had any thing. Mrs. Perkins's is a back-room - her's was in front, on the same floor as Mrs. Perkins. Anything thrown out would fall into the street. As Gilson left, she said,

"I will leave the candle burning; and if a young man calls, tell him I shall be in a few minutes." When she left, the coal-bag was missing.

JAMES DRAPER . I am a tin-plate-worker, and live at Enfield. On the 16th of February, I met Marsh coming down the town towards Day's house, within about fifty yards of it, at seven o'clock in the evening. I heard of the robbery next morning.

WILLIAM BLAKE . I am driver of the Edmonton Coach. Edmonton is in the way from Enfield to London. I took the prisoners as passengers on my coach, on the 16th of February, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock, at Tottenham High Cross; they had a white bag, which would hold about a peck. I sat them down at the end of Old-street. The bag appeared clean.

GILSON'S Defence. Q. Did I not tell you to mind the tea-caddy in the bag - A. Yes, there appeared something like a caddy in it.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am an officer at Edmonton. Day gave me information. I found Marsh on Saturday, the 23nd, at No. 12, Portpool-lane, in the one pair front room. I found some frills, false hair, and a quantity of duplicates on her. On Sunday the 24th I took Gilson in the same room. I found nothing on her but duplicates, and a dredging-box. I went to the pawnbroker's. Marsh said the frills were her's. I found a dark lantern, fifteen skeleton, and two picklock keys, and a phosphorous box in a portmanteau, at the lodging, and found the coal-bag in the room on Sunday.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see a man there - A. No, I found both the prisoners lodged there. There was one bed, and a small couch in a closet.

JOHN TITMARSH . I was with Gibson. His account is correct. I forced the door open.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DAY . This is the coal-bag I lent Gilson.

WILLIAM CREE . I am pawnbroker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 19th of February a petticoat was pawned for 9 d. The duplicate found on Marsh is what I gave the person.

ROBERT KENDREW . I am servant to Mr. Nicholls, pawnbroker, Gray's Inn-lane. I produce two caps, and two ruffles, which I took in pawn for 2 s. 6 d. of a person in the name of Ann Johnson . I did not take it in.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I have the duplicates corresponding with these, they were in a chest of drawers in their room.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Marsh say the duplicates were given her to take care of - A. She said the box containing the picklock keys, was left by a gentleman when she was out.

ROBERT KENDREW . These duplicates correspond with the things.

CHARLES ARMSTRONG . I live in Baldwins's Gardens. I have a remnant of linen, and an apron, pawned for 1 s.; also an apron and pinafore pawned on the 21st of February. The duplicates of them are among those produced.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARSH'S Defence. I met my sister at Edmonton - we had a few words about a tea-caddy, and parted. She overtook me by Tottenham, and said there was my tea-caddy. She got on the stage with me, and we parted by the Hospital.

GILSON'S Defence. My sister is perfectly innocent.

GILSON - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

MARSH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-95

628. JANE CLARK was indicted for stealing on the 26th of February , one pocket, value 6 d.; one shawl, value 8 s.; two caps, value 20 s.; one shift, value 5 s.; one pair of stockings, value 2 s.; one gown, value 3 s.; one handkerchief, value 4 s.; one piece of lace, value 3 s., and four sovereigns, the property of Sarah Harmer , in the dwelling house of Atwood Henry Kelsey .

SARAH HARMER . I live with Mr. Kelsey, in Bloomsbury-square , the prisoner lived fellow servant with me. On the 26th of February this property was in my box in my bed-room, I lost it all; I am a single woman, they were all locked up; the prisoner slept in the same bed with me for a night or two, I had only been there a week; she was house-maid, and had been there seven weeks; I missed them on the 26th of February, about ten minutes after she left the house; she had not given warning, but said, she must leave directly, and would pay a months wages, which she did and went, I found my trunk still locked, but the property gone; I had left the key in a little basket; I had not looked into it for a week.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Her boxes were searched before she left the house - A. Yes.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the 27th of February I went to No. 11, Little Guildford-street, where the prisoner lodged, I found a pocket book with two sovereigns in it, and about 20 s. in silver - I found the rest of the things stated in the indictment in her box.

(Property produced and sworn to).

MR. ATWOOD H. KELSEY. The prisoner lived seven weeks with me; her boxes were searched before she left - I thought well of her.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, believing it her first offence.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-96

629. JEREMIAH PETHERS was indicted for stealing on the 22d of February , one blanket, value 8 s. , the goods of George Mitchell .

MISS SARAH MITCHELL . I live with my father, George Mitchell , auctioneer , in White Hart Lane, Tottenham . On the 22d of February, the blanket was in a room on the ground floor, the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood. On the 19th of February I had seen him loitering about the house - two blankets were missed that day.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am an officer. On the 22d of February, about ten o'clock in the evening, I apprehended the prisoner in Mr. Mitchell's hay-loft, I found the door fastened inside with a rope, and found him either asleep or pretending to be so, I asked him where the blanket was, he came down stairs, and when he saw Miss Mitchell he fell on his knees, and said he hoped she would forgive him, and that he took the blanket.

MARY PRICE . I am a servant to Mr. Mitchell, I saw the prisoner take the blanket away about twelve o'clock, and run into the stable with it, he had no business at the house, I told Miss Mitchell; we went to the stable, and he was gone, but he was afterwards found there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work there.

MISS MITCHELL. He was never employed there.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-97

630. OWEN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing on the 18th of March , one necklace, value 3 s. the goods of William Shearman , from the person of Eliza Shearman .

ELIZA BARTHOLEMEW . I am servant to Mr. Shearman. I had the care of his daughter Eliza on the 10th of March, about five o'clock in the evening, I was in Church-street, Shoreditch ; the child had a coral necklace on; there was a crowd standing looking at a show; I saw the prisoner take the necklace off the child's neck, it was done in a minute; he almost strangled her. I seized him, shook his hands, and he dropped it, and ran away. I told Gibbs who was there, and described him to him; he found him in about ten minutes. I am sure he is the boy.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you see him do it - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am an officer. I was in Church-street, the girl described the prisoner to me; I found him. He said,

"I took the beads of the child's neck, but Lockwood told me to do it." I took Lockwood, but the girl could not speak to him, she spoke to the prisoner immediately.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-98

631. SAMUEL WESTLEY , GEORGE DENHAM and JOHN CLARK , were indicted for stealing on the 4th of March , two petticoats, value 4 s. the goods of Henry Miller .

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am an officer. On the 4th of March, I was at home in Tyson-street, Brick Lane, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw Clark running, he was a quarter of a mile from Miller's house, and secured him in Air-street.

JOHN SHORT . I saw Miller's girl running, and went with her, and overtook the three prisoners by Friar's Mount, walking together in a direction from the house. When they saw us, they run up a street. I saw Clark drop two petticoats from behind his jacket, the girl picked them up, and said Denham who bit her, had got away. I saw him the next day, and am sure of them.

CHARLES BONE . I was with Short, and saw the prisoners all together. Short's account is correct.

MARY CHARLOTTE MILLER . I am daughter of Henry Miller . About five o'clock on the afternoon in question,

some-body informed me, the petticoats were stolen. I immediately went out up an alley, three doors off into Club Row, and saw the three prisoners all together running down an alley, which was no thoroughfare. They turned back towards Kemp's Gardens, and saw me. Clark dropped the petticoats from under his jacket, and they walked a little away. I caught Denham, and he bit my fingers. He said he would not let go of it, till I let him go. He said it was not him but Clark. I picked the petticoats up; they were taken off a nail out side the door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN MERCER . I live next door to Miller's, and saw the prisoners lurking about; they rushed by very quick.

WESTLEY'S Defence. All she has said is false.

WESTLEY - GUILTY . Aged. 14.

CLARKE - GUILTY Aged 14.

DENHAM - GUILTY Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-99

632. FREDERICK PRIEST was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , four sets of reins, value 40 s. , the goods of Joseph Waterhouse .

WILLIAM DOVER . I am servant to Joseph Waterhouse , of South Mims , Coach proprietor . On the 17th of March, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I lost four sets of reins; they were safe at three o'clock the day before; I saw them again the same morning, in the officer's possession.

THOMAS DOMER . I am horse-keeper to Mr. Mountain and live at Whetstone, six miles from South Mims; I saw a cart going by at half-past six in the morning, loaded with hay, and a bag on the top, which I thought contained reins. Having lost some myself, I followed the cart; William Chappell drove it, the prisoner was walking by the side; I followed it nearly a quarter of a mile; he kept by its side all the time, and when I looked after him, he always looked away, and while I was going for an officer somebody took the bag out of the cart; the prisoner threw it across his shoulder, and was going up the lane with it. I went to him, he threw it down and ran off; I took him immediately; he said,

"Pray forgive me this time; what shall I do?"

THOMAS HOLMES . I am a patrole at Whetstone. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DOVER . They belong to Mr. Waterhouse; he has partners, but not in the concern at South Mims, they are used for the Liverpool mail.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-100

633. ELIZA OLIVER , widow , and ELIZA OLIVER , spinster , were indicted for stealing one looking-glass, value 10 s.; one feather bed, value 30 s.; one blanket, value 3 s.; two sheets, value 3 s.; one coverlet, value 2 s.; one set of bed-furniture, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 4 s.; one bolster, value 2 s.; one tea-kettle, value 2 s., the goods of John Burland , in a lodging-room, let to the said Eliza Oliver , widow .

JOHN BURLAND . I live in Tabernacle-walk, in the parish of St. Luke's . I let a lodging to Eliza Oliver , widow, a front room, at 6 s. a week; she paid some rent; and on the 9th of March I went up into the room, and missed all the things stated in the indictment, and which was let with the lodging; they were both present, I asked them how they got the bed away; they gave no answer, and I fetched an officer.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You let the lodging to the mother - A. Yes, they both had the use of the furniture, and were nearly eight weeks with me.

THOMAS DALE . I am a constable. I was sent for and found the prisoner there. Mrs. Burland gave me some duplicates, and said to me in their presence, that the room was robbed; I asked the mother where the bed was, she said it was divided into four and pawned - she wished me not to take the daughter, saying she (the daughter) had pawned them by her direction.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say she did it from distress, and meant to redeem them - A. She said she would get the money, if the prosecutor would wait. There were duplicates of nearly all the property.

WILLIAIM BROOK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a quantity of things pawned in the name of Brown, by Oliver, the younger.

JAMES BOWSON . I have a quantity of things pawned by both the prisoners. They have pawned things before and redeemed them.

ROBERT CASSELL . I have a tea kettel, pawned by the daughter.

JOHN ELDERKIN . I have a bed pawned by the daughter.

ELIZA - OLIVER - Widow - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

ELIZA - OLIVER - Younger - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-101

674. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , two loaves of bread, value 15 d. , the goods of Charles Hull .

CHARLES HULL . I keep a chandler's shop in Peter-street, Bethnal Green . I put two loaves in the window, and in about five minutes an alarm was given - I ran and found the prisoner in custody.

JOHN PITT . I saw the prisoner about half-past seven in the morning, with two others, standing about three feet from the prosecutor's house; I saw the prisoner go over, look in at the window, then return to his companions, and in a short time they went towards the shop; the prisoner opened the door and went in - I ran over, he came out with the loaves; I followed and secured him.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE . I stopped him with the bread in his arms.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-102

675. WILLIAM SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , one coat, value 3 s. , the goods of Stephen Wood .

STEPHEN WOOD . I am a jobber . On the 1st of April, I was coming by Stepney Church , about ten o'clock, with a great coat in my cart - somebody said it was stolen; it

was brought to me with the prisoner in custody, he said,

"Pray forgive me I will never do so any more."

TIMOTHY LEAPER . I am a carpenter. I saw the prisoner looking into Wood's cart; he got on the tail board and pulled the coat from the front, and put it against the tail board, went a few yards further, and then pulled it quite out, and ran off twisting it round his arm; I pursued, he ran as hard as he could and dropped it. I saw him taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-103

676. JAMES QUANTOCK was indicted for stealing on the 4th of February , two saws, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Nudd .

CHARLES NUDD . I am a carpenter , and worked for the prisoner's father. I was at work in the shop in Wheatsheaf-yard; White Lion-street , I left two saws there with my other tools on Saturday night, the 2d of February, and missed them on Monday morning. About three weeks ago I met the prisoner in the street, and asked how he came to rob me of my saws, he denied it - I told him to be off from the neighbourhood; he said he would not - he did not leave the neighbourhood. I said I would certainly charge an officer with him; he dared me to do it; I took him towards the watch-house; he went willingly, but when he found me in earnest, he resisted and ran off; I cried Stop thief! and he was taken. He did not live at home.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. One Evans sent me to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-104

637. EDWARD MURPHY was indicted for stealing on the 14th of March , one saw, value 8 s., and one chisel, value 1 s. , the good of William Bonython .

WILLIAM BURFORD . I am a carpenter. On the 14th of March I was at work in Regency-street . I had a saw and chisel there between nine and ten o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner go out of the building; he was charged with stealing the tools, and detained. They were on the second floor. I left them safe at a quarter before nine o'clock, and at a half-past nine they were gone.

JAMES BENDFORD . I was at work on the premises. I saw the prisoner come across the parlour floor, about nine o'clock; he had no business there. I saw Down pursue him; he returned and gave an alarm. The prisoner ran away; I pursued him to his lodging; he was concealed there, and denied to me; I went and got Down, and then secured him in Hanover Square; he made great resistance, and said he had nothing; at last he took me to a building, where we found them.

WILLIAM DOWN . I was employed on the building, and saw the prisoner go up stairs. As he came down I saw the saws under his arm. I followed him, but fell down and hurt myself. I sent Burford after him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the buildings to get a job, and as I crossed the square, I was taken. They said I should pay for all.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-105

638. EDWARD MARTIN , CHARLES KING , and RICHARD HILL , were indicted for stealing on the 28th of February , one pint of brandy, value 1 s.; one pint of Geneva, value 1 s.; twenty dollars, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Douglas .

ROBERT SMITH . I belong to the brig Blucher, which laid in the London Docks . Captain Robert Douglas was ashore. The prisoner was cabin boy. Martin belonged to the big Aimwell; he and Hill were in the Blucher. Hill gave me a bottle of wine out of the cabin; I drank a drop, we took it on board the Aimwell - Francis was with us; we played at cards, and Martin and Hill went and fetched a bottle of gin from the cabin of the Blucher, and while they were gone Francis and I watched them, and saw them go to the cabin - they got down the sky light. The gin was drank among us, and just as we had done King came in; we had some raisins and things eating; we went to sleep, and when I awoke Hill was in bed - he and Martin were talking together; they were tipsy - I told the mate of it.

ABRAHAM FRANCIS . I belong to the Aimwell. Martin and Hill went and got the gin out of the Blucher cabin; King came in afterwards. Before I went to sleep I heard Martin and King talking; Martin said,

"Shall I go now;" and King said,

"Yes." Martin said,

"Not yet; not till day light, the watchman will hear us," there was one on the quay. In the morning Martin called me on deck and said, he had put a bottle of sweet liquor, and a dollar in my chest, and he gave me a dollar, and told me not to tell the captain that he was going away; but they were taken up in a short time, as I went and told the watchman.

JOHN SLATER . I am a constable in the London Docks; the watchman sent me to take the prisoners. I saw King coming from the Aimwell with his bed and bedding, as if he was leaving the vessel. I saw Martin soon after, and asked him what he did on board the Blucher; he said nothing. I found eight dollars and a half in his waistcoat pocket; he said he took them of a Spanish captain. I found a few raisins on Martin, and a bottle of gin and brandy. I went on board the Blucher cabin with the mate and found the locker forced open.

ROBERT DOUGLAS . I am master of the Blucher. I left the locker all fast, and found it broken open, and six or seven bottles of brandy and Hollands gone; I missed twenty or twenty-five dollars. Francis told me this story. I have no mark to the dollars.

MARTIN'S Defence. I earned the dollars at Cuba.

KING'S Defence. They were drinking gin, and asked me to drink.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

KING - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-106

639. HENRY WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one apron, value 2 s. , the goods of Frederick Heinkey .

FREDERICK HEINKEY . I am a ironmonger , and live in Great Portland-place . On the 18th of March, my wife's apron laid on the stove in the shop, near the door; I saw the prisoner come in and take something - I pursued and overtook him next door, with the apron in his hand.

RICHARD COATES . I am a constable, and took him in charge. The prosecutor's wife gave me the apron, and claimed it as her's. I believe this is his first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-107

640. HENRY BLAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one spade, value 3 s., the goods of William Elphinstone M'Lagan , one hoe, value 1 s., and eight ounces of flower seeds, value 4 s. , the goods of John Varecannon .

WILLIAM ELPHINSTONE M'LAGAN. This spade was in my garden at the end of Upper Cumming-street, Pentonville . On the 14th of March, I found my summer house broken open, and all my garden tools taken away - I informed the constable, and found the prisoner in custody afterwards. I traced footsteps from my garden into the adjoining one, where I had frequently seen him.

JOHN VARECANNON . I am a gardener to the prosecutor. On the 12th I locked my tools up in his summer house, and on the 14th they were missed, with my flower seeds, I saw them again when the prisoner was taken.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am a constable. I apprehended him on another charge, on the 26th of March. I went to Field-lane, and found a spade and hoe, which M'Lagan claimed.

ELIZA SHEPPARD . I keep an iron shop in Field-lane. I bought these things of the prisoner on the 12th or 14th of March - I bought two hoes, a rake, fork, and two spades. I cannot swear that the spade produced is what I bought of him; but the hoe is, as I had no other like it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to sell them.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was with Taylor. The prisoner said one Jones went with him, and waited outside while he broke the place open.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-108

641. JAMES CARR , JOHN DRISCOLL , and EDWARD HURLEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , 20 lbs. of rope, value 5 s. , the goods of Sir Robert Wigram , Bart., and others his partners.

JOHN EVANS . I am a wharfinger, in the employ of Sir Robert Wigram , Bart. On Saturday, the 23d of February, I was sitting in the counting-house on the wharf, and on turning my head, saw Driscoll climbing the fence; I did not suspect anything - five minutes after I saw him pulling the pailling down, and pulling some old rope through - I told the watchman to take them, they ran off, but he secured the prisoner. I cannot swear to the rope.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-109

642. SARAH CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , thirty yards of ribbon, value 18 s. , the goods of George Lowe .

GEORGE MEEKE . I am shopman to Mr. Geo. Low , who lives in the City-road . The prisoner came in as a customer, and while the boy was shewing her ribbons, I saw her take a piece and put it in her pocket - I charged her with it, and she produced three pieces from her pocket. She did not say she had bought them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-110

643. GEORGE HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , one book, value 18 d. , the goods of Joseph Coxhead .

JOSEPH COXHEAD . I am a bookseller , and live in High Holborn . My window is open. An officer brought the prisoner in with a book, which he had taken - he begged for mercy; he said he was distressed, which I believe is correct. I found his character was good.

FRANCIS KEYS . I saw him take the book, and secured him; he appeared distressed, he had no money.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-111

644. SARAH HAYES was indicted for stealing on the 8th of March , one watch, value 7 l., the goods of John Newton Goodhall , from his person .

JOHN NEWTON GOODHALL . I am of no trade now; I was brought up to the law. On the 7th of March I had been dining with some friends, the party broke up late, I was induced to go about three o'clock in the morning with some women to the Constitution, Bedford-street , I was knocked about there, and robbed of my watch chain, I left there, and had not got many yards, I believe I was exclaiming loudly about being robbed, the prisoner and another came up, and asked me several questions, and proposed taking me home with her, and asked me particularly about the watch; it being without the chain, I had put it in my breeches pocket; I went with her and the other women to a house in Vine-street, near St. Martin's lane; the prisoner opened the door, it was between five and six o'clock; then she went down stairs to get a light, the other women went up stairs, I had laid down on the bed, and fell into a doze, I awoke, and called out, the prisoner said,

"You need not be alarmed, all is right," and placed herself by my side, and she asked me a great many questions, and occasionally smacking my pocket which had the watch in, I thought I felt her hand in my pocket, she made a spring from me, I missed my watch, she ran down stairs and got into a

room on the left side of the passage, and fastened herself in; I ran up stairs and broke the windows, in order to procure assistance; the landlord called the watchman, two watchmen came up, and after some time they got her, and went to the watch-house; some altercation took place between me and the landlord, and in the mean time the watchmen and the prisoner disappeared; I went to Bow-street and described her, the watchmen are not here; I believe they would rather give evidence in her favour; she was taken again between seven and eight o'clock; I was merry, but had my recollection about me; I might have been drunk when I went to the Constitution; I might be under the influence of liquor when I went with her, but was not deprived of my recollection.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not bite me - A. She struck me in the mouth, and I believe I bit her.

Prisoner's Defence. He missed his watch while I was down stairs - they refused to take me in charge at the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-112

645. JAMES IRELAND was indicted for stealing on the 8th of April , one silver spoon, value 10 s. the goods of James George Hodgson .

JAMES FURZMAN . I am an officer; there was a fire at the Rum Puncheon, Cross-lane. I went there with the engine, the prisoner was with his son, who was cleaning the chimney, and as he stood looking up the chimney, I saw the handle of a spoon out of his breeches pocket, I said,

"You have some wedge there Jemmy," he asked, what was that to me, I went out, and told my brother, and in the mean time he shifted it out of his pocket, and put it in his breeches; my brother searched and found it there.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I am an officer; I asked the prisoner what he had about him; he took the spoon out of his breeches pocket, and put it inside them, I found the word,

"Piazza Coffee-house." on it - he said he had been sweeping the chimney there and found it.

GEORGE RANCE . I live at the Piazza Coffee-house, kept by James George Hodgson - the spoon is his.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in sifting the ashes at home, and intended to carry it home, but this fire broke out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-113

646. BENJAMIN KEMP was indicted for stealing on the 20th of March , three hundred yards of cotton, value 15 l. the goods of James Millner .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Lawrence , Chas. Jollands , Isaac Lawrence , and Thos. Lightfoot .

CHARLES DRUMMOND . I am in the house of James Millner , calenderer and packer ; the prisoner was in their service, and had been so for six or seven years; I delivered him eleven parcels of printed cottons, which had been sent from Lawrence and Co. to be glazed - he never returned, but was taken up on the 17th of April.

WILLIAM FOY . I am in the house of Mess. Lawrence and Jollands, eleven pieces of printed cotton were sent to Millner to be glazed - they never came back.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of April, in Wentworth-street, for using threatening language to me, when I was taking another prisoner, he said, he should go where he should learn a good business, and it would be better for him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-114

647. JOHN M'CARTHY was indicted for stealing on the 21st of March , one pair of boot backs, value 4 s. the goods of George Hale .

GEORGE HALE . I keep a boot shop in the Strand ; the prisoner worked for me for about two years. On the 21st of March, at two o'clock in the afternoon, he came for work, I desired him to call in the evening, and he went away, and about five o'clock I missed a pair of Hessian backs from the back shop; he had been in the back shop, he came again about seven o'clock; I had received information, and asked if he had taken a pair, he said; No, I asked if he had offered a pair to Mr. Redaway; he said, No; he had not been into his shop that day; I asked him to go with me to Redaway; he went with me; they said that he was the man who offered the backs for sale; and he said they were liars; I gave him in charge - I went to Westcoats and found them.

WILLIAM REDAWAY . I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in the Strand, the prisoner came to my shop and pulled out a pair of Hessian backs to sell me; I refused, he immediately went out; I am positive he is the man - when he was brought in the evening he denied having been there.

JOHN TREICE . I am servant to Mr. Wescoat, of Hewitt's Court, Strand; he is a boot and shoe-maker; the prisoner came between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and asked us to buy a pair of boots; Wescoat said they did not suit him; he said we should have them for 2 s., he said he had been on the sprey, and would leave them for 1 s. 6 d. and call the next day for them; he left them, I gave them to Mr. Hale afterwards; he said his name was Butler, and that he lived in Tun-court, Strand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had them two months - I bought them myself.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Arabin.

Reference Number: t18220417-115

648. JOHN MARRIOTT and JOSEPH THOMPSON were indicted for stealing on the 29th of March , one handkerchief, value 5 s. , the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown.

THOMAS GLASBORO . I am a patrol. On the 29th of March, about half-past three o'clock, I was in Coventry-street, and saw the prisoners in company, they made some observations, and I passed, and crossed to the other side of the way, and turned down Oxendon-street, along Panton-street, into the Haymarket, crossed the Colonade, into Cockspur-street , and just by a picture shop there, I saw Marriott pull a handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket. Thompson was close to him, the gentleman crossed over to the Mews, and by that Marriott pulled it further out of the pocket, and when they came to the Northumberland

Coffee-house he pulled it quite out and dropped it on the ground, and stopped to pick it up; Thompson was close to him, and just as he was rising with it, I secured them both, Thompson struggled and got away; I told the gentleman he was robbed, and begged him to go to the watch-house; he refused his name and address, saying he was going out of town that night; Thompson was taken ten days after.

THOMAS GOOK . I took Thompson, he said, he was distressed at the time he did it.

MARRIOTT'S Defence. I met Thompson, and at Charing-cross, we stopped for some waggons to pass - I saw the gentleman's handkerchief fall from his pocket, I picked it up to give him, when I was secured.

MARRIOTT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-116

649. ALEXANDER RANN was indicted for stealing on the 27th of March , two coats, value 30 s. , the goods of Joseph Samuel Lescher .

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 27th of March, I was at my door in Church Row, St. Pancras, talking to Croker. The prisoner went by with a basket, with a handkerchief over it; he looked hard at me. I told Croker to follow him. He turned round and saw me coming, and threw down the basket, pushed Croker aside, and ran off. I pursued him and took him at last.

HENRY CROKER . I was with Limbrick, and saw the prisoner pass with a basket. I went after him, and asked if he had any fowls; he said

"No." I said some had been stolen. He said,

"I have got my master's clothes." I said

"Who is your master - where does he live." He said at Pentonville, and immediately threw the basket at my feet. I picked it up; Limbrick pursued and took him. It contained two coats, and two lemons.

MR. JOSEPH LESCHER . I live at West End, Hampstead . The coats are both my son's, whose name is Joseph Samuel Lescher, and were in the hall about nine o'clock, when I went out in the morning. I returned at five, but did not miss them till next morning, and on Tuesday the officer brought them.

JOHN CORBETT . I live at West End. On the 27th of March I saw the prisoner with another about three o'clock, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's house, with the basket. I noticed them particularly, and saw a brown great coat outside the basket. The other carried the basket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-117

SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24. 1822.

650. WILLIAM BURGESS and MICHAEL DRISCOLL were indicted for stealing on the 1st of March , one chaise seat, value 3 s. the goods of Richard Smith Bramwell .

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. On the 1st of March, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was in Greek-street , and saw Mr. Bramwell's chaise there. Burgess tried to take something out of it; Driscoll stood close to him, he made one or two attempts, and then took the chaise seat out, put it under his coat, and both crossed the way together. I followed, and took Burgess, and he threw it down an area.

THOMAS FOXHALL . I was with Bidgood, and saw Burgess take the seat. I secured Driscoll; they were together.

CHARLES FIELD . I am servant to Richard Smith Bramwell . I left the chaise at the door, returned and found the prisoners in custody with the chaise seat, which is his.

BURGESS'S Defence. I kicked against it, and picked it up, the man collared me, and it fell out of my hand.

DRISCOLL'S Defence. I was going along, and the man took me.

BURGESS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

DRISCOLL - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-118

651. BRIDGES RODWELL was indicted for stealing on the 3d of April , one shift, value 5 s.; one napkin, value 1 s.; two shifts, value 8 s.; eleven table cloth, value 10 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 4 s., and a silver spoon, value 18 d. the goods of James Judd .

MARY JUDD . I am a laundress, and live in West-street. My husband's name is James. The prisoner was employed to wash for me. I missed this property.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR . I am a constable of St Pancras. On the 3d of April, I took the prisoner in custody. I found two duplicates of a shirt and handkerchief on him.

GEORGE TIGHE . I am servant to Mr. Griffiths, pawnbroker, Somers Town. The prisoner pawned a table cloth for 8 s., a spoon for 2 s., a handkerchief for 9 d. and two handkerchiefs for 2 s.

ROBERT PIKE . I am servant to Mr. Anderson, of Brewer street. I have a shirt, napkin, and handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner.

HENRY M'DONALD. I have a shift pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM BOND. I have a shift, which the prisoner pawned on the 20th of March.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-119

652. HANNAH AUSTIN , was indicted for stealing on 14th of March , 6 lbs. of beef, value 2 s. , the property of William Barnard .

THOMAS SPINDLER . I am servant to Mr. Haynes. Barnard lives opposite to us, in Ratcliff Highway . On the 14th of March I saw the prisoner take two pieces of beef, and go away with them. She was taken in Gravel-lane with it.

JAMES HOLBERT . I am servant to William Barnard . I received information, and took the prisoner five hundred yards off, running away; she said she had nothing - I found the beef laying by her, in a passage she ran into.

CHALES TICKELL . I am an officer, and took her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman passed me in the passage, and dropped it. The witness has sworn false.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-120

653. RICHARD BROAD was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of William Anderton , and one waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Cording .

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Cannon-street Road . On the 2d of March, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner looking in at the door; I turned my head and made a snatch - I immediately missed a handkerchief, which had hung at the door. I went round the corner and saw the prisoner and another boy running up the street, I followed and brought him back; he had a bundle under his arm - I asked what it was, he said his father's waistcoat - I asked for my handkerchief; he said he knew nothing about it. I sent him to the watch-house, and found it tied round the lower part of his body, under his shirt.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am servant to Mr. Cording, pawnbroker, No. 163, Ratcliff Highway, a waistcoat was found on the prisoner, which was stolen from our door on the 2nd of March.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy threw the waistcoat and handkerchief down - I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-121

654. JOHN MACKIAH COLLINS was indicted for bigamy .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BROOMFIELD . I am a tailor, and live in Bartholemew Terrace, City Road. I know the prisoner; his proper name his John Mackiah Collins. I was present on the 22nd of December, 1818, at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green, when he married Elizabeth Mason . I had known her for six months previous. She was single - I saw her in Court to day - she had 500 l. or 600 l. They had one child, which is now about eighteen months old. My signature is to the register.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure she was single before - A. She passed as such.

ELIZA CARTER . I am sextoness of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I have the care of the register, as the sexton is dead. I produce the register of the prisoner's marriage on the 22nd of December, 1818, to Elizabeth Mason (read). The prisoner is described as a bachelor.

JANE BLANKS . I was married to the prisoner on the 14th of June, 1821 , at Little Baddow Church, Essex , by licence. He represented himself to me as a widower, of property; he said he had married a black woman, and she died in his arms. My father is a blacksmith, at Little Baddow. I was acquainted with him about three months.

Cross-examined. Q. Before your marriage had you any conversation with him about Mason - A. No.

LAZARUS BLANKS. I live at Baddow. I produce the register of the prisoner's marriage to my daughter, which I received from the Minister of the parish (read). I saw the ceremony performed. I am clerk of the church.

JOHN WALTER . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge in Willow Walk, Middlesex.

Prisoner's Defence. Blank's father knew I was not a widower; he was acquainted with me in Chelmsford prison, where I was a debtor; he knew Mason had absconded from me, and cohabited with other people in London - Blanks herself saw her, and spoke to her, in the Fleet prison.

LAZARUS BLANKS. He said his wife had absconded, and he was divorced from her, and that he had 17,000 l.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a prisoner, and yet you believed him worth 17,000 l. - A. Yes; I made all the enquiry I could about Mason, and sent my son to town with him to enquire, and how he blinded my son's eyes I do not know.

SARAH BLANKS . He never told me he was divorced, but that his wife was dead; I told my father this before our marriage - he made himself very bad, and made his will, all to deceive me.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

There were two other indictments of a similar nature against the prisoner.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-122

655. JOHN WARREN was indicted for stealing on the 25th of February , one sable collar, value 8 s., one piece of muslin, value 4 s., twelve yards of silk ferret, value 1 s., eighty-one skeins of silk, value 6 s., five dozen buttons, value 6 d. and four pounds of sugar, value 2 s. , the goods of Edmund Cocken , John Morley , and John Usher , Executors, of George Swan , deceased, and William Edgar .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Edmund Cocken , John Morley , John Usher , and W. Edgar.

THIRD COUNT, stating them to belong to W. Edgar, and others, his partners.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ROBINSON . I live with Mr. Edgar; the prisoner was their porter , and lived in the house. On the 25th of February Mr. Edgar was going to turn him away, and asked if I suspected his honesty; I said, No; but there would be no impropriety in searching his trunks; he said, very well, and immediately brought one forward, and pulled out a key, and in that trunk I found about one hundred different parcels of paper, each containing small quantities of sugar, also the articles stated in the indictment, which are quite new and clean; he said, he saved the sugar at different times out of his breakfast allowance, and found the other things in the dust-hole.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Had you dismissed any other servants about this time - A. No, he was five years with us.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer; I took the prisoner and property in charge.

MR. WILLIAM EDGAR . I was in partnership with the late George Swan , who died in November, his executors

are Edmund Cocken , John Morley , and John Usher - I never gave the prisoner authority to take these things.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-123

656. WILLIAM RUDLAND was indicted for embezzling the sum of 1 l. 16 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, which he had received on account of Thomas and Charles Lewis , his employers .

MR. PHILLIPS, conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES LEWIS . I am in partnership with my father, Thomas Lewis , we are silk-dyers , and live in Oxendon-street, Haymarket. The prisoner has been our shopman five years, he had the care of the till, and was entrusted with all monies received in the shop; Messrs. Barbers, of Pall-mall, were our customers, and in January owed us 1 l. 16 s. 6 d., it was his duty to enter all sums received in the cash-book, which I have here, it is all in his handwriting, there is no account of this money - he ought to hand the cash over every night.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He has a wife and four children - A. Yes. The money he paid me at night always agreed with the book.

JOHN BARNES . I am in the service of Messrs. Barbers. On the 5th of January I went to Mr. Lewis's shop, and told the prisoner I came to pay Mr. Baker's account, which was 1 l. 16 s. 6 d., I cannot say exactly how I paid him, but am sure I gave him a sovereign and silver, or two sovereigns and received change - I produce the bill, with the receipt to it, which he gave me.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Subject to the decision of the Twelve Judges whether it is necessary to prove the specific money embezzled .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-124

657. JEREMIAH M'CARTY was indicted for stealing on the 22d of March , thirty-one pounds of lead, value 5 s. , the goods of Isaac and William Darby .

WILLIAM DARBY . I am in partnership with my father, Isaac Darby ; we are builders ; the prisoner was our servant , and was employed to bring this lead from St. John-street to Pimlico.

JAMES PARKER . I am a plumber, and delivered the lead to the prisoner between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, in St. John-street; I delivered him ten pieces of old, and two of new lead, which weighed about three hundred weight - I found thirty-one pounds of old at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You only saw one piece - A. Yes; it was of the same sort - it was in his cart with some rubbish.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a constable. On the 22d of March I saw the prisoner in York-street, Westminster, with something very heavy in a basket; he had no cart then; I followed him into Orchard-street; he turned into a marine store-shop, and put the basket into a scale; the master was behind the counter; I asked the prisoner what was in the basket; he hesitated, and said, it was a bit of lead which he had brought from Five-fields, Pimlico; I asked where there, and he said,

"I may as well tell you the truth, it is a piece I brought from my masters building, in St. John-street."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DARBY . It is old gutter lead - I had told him to bring it away.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-125

658. MATTHEW VERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , at St. James, Westminster, one mare, price 3 l. 10 s. , the property of Joseph Warner .

JOSEPH WARNER . I live at No. 8, Legg-alley, Long-acre. I had a mare, which I kept in New-yard, Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On the 24th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, and said he knew of a customer for her; I took him to the stable, and went with him and the pony to shew to the customer - I asked who it was, he said if I went with him he would shew me; he took me to New-street, Carnaby-market; we went into a public-house, and had a pint of beer, then went to another public-house - he went in, and I stood at the door with the mare; he came out, and said the man was at the Ship, public-house, in Wardour-street - I went to Wardour-street, with him and the mare; he went into a public-house there, and gave the halter to a foot soldier, who stood at the door, to hold. I was standing by, and a man named Balls came up, and pretended to look at it - the prisoner was in the public-house at this time; I went in and asked him if Balls was the man who was to be the customer - he came out, and said,

"Oh! Mr. Balls you are the man I was looking for, this is the thing that will just suit you;" I had hold of the halter then. Balls said,

"I think it is rather stiff behind." The prisoner took the halter out of my hand, and said,

"No it ayn't, you shall see;" he jumped on her back, and rode away with her - I thought he was coming back, and went up the street, returned in about ten minutes, and Balls was gone also. I knew the prisoner before. I went to Ball's house, as I knew he lived just by, and asked if he had seen him; he said,

"Oh! no I have not seen him since," and he did not want to have any thing to do with it. I have never found it. I saw the prisoner a fortnight or three weeks after, about nine or ten o'clock at night in bed - I did not know I had a right to take him, and while I went down to tell the watchman; he left his bed, and could not be found. On the Thursday following I saw him in the Haymarket, took hold of him, and told him I wanted him to come with me; he said if I would go home with him, he would - I went part of the way, and met Wright the beadle, and gave him in charge; I charged him with stealing my mare - he said he had sold it to one Large. I have not seen it since. He never represented that he meant to purchase it. I have known him twelve months by sight, but did not know where he lived. I had refused 3 l. 10 s. for it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Large pay you for it - A. No. The prisoner came to me about nine o'clock. I believe the soldier stood by when the prisoner took the mare. I did not know Balls before - I did not entrust it with the prisoner to go and sell for me.

Q. Have you not been after him, and said to his friends

that the money was all you wanted - A. That was after he was taken. I never said I gave him authority to sell her, or that I knew the money was all I ought to have - I said I heard he was drunk.

Q. Was the horse fit for any thing but slaughter - A. Yes.

THOMAS LARGE . I am a carman, and live in Edward-street, Soho. I bought the mare of the prisoner; I cannot tell on what day it was - I had her nine days, and sold her again before he was taken. I bought her in the evening at dusk; he rode into my yard, and was very drunk indeed - I asked what he was going to do with it; he said to sell it, and wanted 3 l. for it, I said I would buy it for 2 l., I gave him 1 s., and said I would pay him in the morning if it was sound; he came next morning, and seemed sober - I ordered him to take it away for I would not have it, it was such a dog horse thing, and had a broken back; he was taking her out of the yard, and a man said give him 30 s., I did so, and kept it nine days, it got no better, and I sold it for 2 l.; I swapped it for hay.

Q. Did you ask him whose it was - A. He said it was his, and had been given him for a chop in Long-acre, for a black horse - he gave this account in the evening, and in the morning also when he was sober. I do not know where the person lives who bought her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him - A. I have known him for years. I do not know that he was acquainted with Warner. The prisoner deals about Smithfield in horses. I never knew any harm of him, only when he gets drunk, he is like a madman. I believe 30 s. is more than it is worth.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a constable of St. Giles's. I was sent for on Thursday the 11th of April. Warner gave the prisoner in charge for stealing the horse. I said he must go to Marlborough-street, he said if we would not take him before a Magistrate he would endeavour to get the horse back again.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the pony to sell for him, as he had two, and did not know what to do with them.

JOSEPH WARNER . I know that he frequented Smithfield.

RICHARD BALLS . I was taken to Marlborough-street by the prosecutor, as a witness; the prisoner's father brought me here to-day. I knew the prisoner about Wardour-street, and Berwick-street, as a workman for Mr. Large. I saw him and Warner together. I am a porter, and do chair-work; and lodge at No. 4, Meard's-court, Dean-street, Soho, on the first floor; and have lived there fourteen years. I saw them at the corner of Peter-street; Warner had hold of the pony in a halter. I went over, and took no notice of what passed; Verney came out to me, and said -

"Do you want to buy a poney;" - I said, No; he had not spoken to me about one before I said I did not want one; then Warner turned the halter out of his hands into Verney's, and said,

"Verney, take the poney; and see how it goes." Verney got on it; and it had like to have fallen all on one side; then he went up the street, and I saw him no more. I went home, and came to the corner of Meard's-court; Warner came, and asked if I had seen his poney; I said I had not seen it or him.

RICHARD FRIEND . I am messenger to the Eagle Insurance Office; and have known the prisoner many years. He has been twice in St. Luke's, and his father has had two keepers for him. I believe he is wrong in his head, in consequence of a fall; when he gets in liquor he is quite incapable of knowing what he is about. I never heard any thing against his character when he was sober.

JOHN VERNEY . I am the prisoner's father. Warner came to me on a Sunday before my son was taken, and said it was a bad job that the prisoner and him went out together to sell the horse. I understood that my son had bought it for him at Smithfield, and was to have it to sell when he wanted to part with it; and that one morning they both went out to sell it.

Q. Did he accuse your son of stealing it - No; he said he wanted the money or the horse. He asked where my son was; I could not tell him, I had no reason to know that he had run away. He afterwards said he wanted 5 l. for it. I enquired among the neighbours; they said 2 l. was enough. I said I was poor enough, but would give him 3 l.; he would not take it. He said he would go into Court, and do his best to punish him.

Q. Is your son wrong in the head - A. Yes; I got him into St. Luke's, eight months at one time, and ten at another. When he gets in liquor he is wild.

COURT Q. You would give 3 l. to prevent his punishing your son - A. Yes.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-126

659. WILLIAM DAY and CHARLES WALTON were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , one fixture, (i.e.) one copper, value 5 s., the goods of John Lay , and fixed to a dwelling-house of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to a certain building of his.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LAY . I am servant to Rev. Mr. Lewis, but live in a house of my own, at Twickenham . This copper was fixed in a wash-house in the yard. I missed it on the 25th of March; I found it at Kingston, in Frankton's warehouse, broken to pieces; it was hammered out, and fitted the place.

ELIZA WEST . I live in the same yard, and saw the copper safe about a week before.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Every body in the yard used it - A. No; I used it as a neighbour, but it belonged to Lay, and was fixed in his wash-house.

JOHN FARRER . I am a labourer, and live at Ham; I worked at Hounslow. On the 25th of March, before dinner time, I was at the Horse and Groom at Kingston, and saw Day there. He asked two men who were there, if they had seen Dummey. I have heard Walton called by that name, and answer to it. They said No, they expected him, and in he (Walton) came; three or four of them called him Dummey. He asked if the ragman was come. A man came in afterwards from Kingston, who answered to the name of Ragman. Then Walton went out, and brought in the copper in a bag; the ragman weighed it in the taproom, and said it was eleven pounds and a-half, and put the money on the table. Day sat on the same bench, and took it up, which Walton did not object to.

The ragman took the copper away directly. The prisoners remained and drank together, and drank with me. Walton said he had like to have lost the copper, for some boys were bird-nesting in a ditch.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose he meant the boys might have found it before him - A. No.

JOSEPH FRANKTON . I bought the copper of the ragman, whose name is James Shaw , on the 25th of March; he collects rags and metal. It weighed eleven pounds and a half; and was claimed the same day.

Cross-examined. Q. You mixed it with other metal, I suppose - A. Yes; but I gave the constable the same as Shaw sold me. It was about six o'clock in the evening. I asked if it was safe. He said Yes; he has run away now.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a constable, and took the prisoners on the 28th of March. I showed them the copper; told them it came from Frankton's; and that Shaw, who bought it of them, had taken me there, and showed it to me. Shaw was present then, and said he had given them 7 d. a lb. for it. They said he only gave them 4 s. 6 d.; and Walton said he had had it ever since Mr. Lucas's sale (which I know to be three or four years ago); and that he went over to Kingston for Day, to procure him a man to buy it. I measured the copper round, and believe it was taken from the place.

SAMUEL EAST. I went with Webb, and apprehended the prisoners; his account is correct.

WILLIAM WEST . I live at Twickenham. I saw Walton go by my door on the 25th March, about five o'clock in the afternoon; he said to Taylor, who got out of the way,

"What is the use of getting out of the way - he saw you," he got behind a shutter. Walton had a smallish bag or bundle; I only saw the hind part of it; it was about the size of the bag produced.

SAMUEL EAST. I produced the bag and copper, which I got from Frankton's.

JOHN LAY . I fitted the rim to the copper-hole; it corresponded, and I knew it by a mark of solder.

WALTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

DAY - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-127

660. WILLIAM PALMER & JOSEPH WHITBREAD , were indicted for stealing on the 18th of April , one sack, value 6 d., and three bushels of coals, value 4 s. , the goods of William Tyler .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM TYLER . I am a coal-merchant , and live at Pondersend. Palmer was in my service. On 18th April, he had to deliver a load of coals to Mr. Nash, at Edmonton; the first waggon contained 33 sacks. I went next day to Mr. Rogers and saw a sack of coals of the same description.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. They were not measured - A. No, they were bought as a room; four sacks out of the second waggon were to be delivered to Mr. Ives. I know nothing of Whitbread.

ROBERT SANDERSON . I am a coal-meter. I delivered Palmer thirty-three sacks of coals, between half-past six and seven o'clock.

CATHARINE BATES . I live in South-street, Pondersend. On 18th April, about seven o'clock, I saw a waggon draw up to Rogers' gate, next door to me; the prisoners were with it. Whitbread put a sack off the waggon, on Palmer's shoulder, and while he shot them Whitbread fastened the chain, and both went off with the waggon. I don't know what became of the sack.

HARRIET BELCHER . I am servant to Mr. Nash. The prisoners brought the first waggon of coals about ten minutes before eight o'clock; and when they were going, Palmer was pulling the sacks into the waggon. I said,

"Don't you count them" He said it did not signify, he was coming again, and he would not do it. Whitbread opened the gate and they drove off. He said it did not matter to me. Another waggon came in the afternoon.

JOSEPH SARJENT . I live at Lower Edmonton. On 18th April, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, Palmer came to me with a waggon of coals, and asked if I wanted to buy a sack of coals. I said No. He then asked if he might put it down till he came back. I made no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. A smith. I neither consented nor refused, for I was busy.

PALMER - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

WHITBREAD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Arabain.

Reference Number: t18220417-128

661. RACHAEL LINGARD and ANN LYONS were indicted for stealing on the 11th of March , one shawl, value 1 s., the goods of James Morton , from the person of Ann his wife .

ANN MORTON . I am the wife of James Morton . On the 11th of March, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in Back Church-lane , and had a shawl on, the prisoners were arm in arm, with a man between them; they met me, I could not get off the pavement to make way for them, and Lingard hit me in the face, and knocked me down with her fist; I got up, and she struck me again, and took hold of me, and pulled the shawl off my neck; I held her fast by her cloak; the other stood by and assisted her, and all three struck me; she bit my arm and thumb, but I held her, and kept hold of my shawl after she pulled it off, but Lyons pulled it from me, and took Lingard's bonnet, and went off with it - I held her till the watchman came.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was with you - A. My child; I went before the Justice next day, and charged them with a robbery, and assault; I was not bound over to prosecute them; I never sent to say I would have 20 l. to make it up.

MARGARET JOHNSON . The prosecutrix and her daughter had been to visit me; soon after they left the daughter returned and fetched me, I went, and saw Lingard take the shawl; I saw Lyons strike her; three of them attacked her together - she was bit in the finger and arm.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your husband - A. A farrier. The Justice said it was an assault.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . I am a watchman; I was on duty; a gentleman said I was wanted in Back Church-lane; I found Lingard in charge of another watchman - the prosecutrix said she had struck her, and robbed her of her shawl.

MARY ANN MORTON . I am the prosecutrix's daughter,

and was with her, the prisoners and a man between them, were walking together, we did not get off the pavement in time, Lingard hit her, and knocked her down, she got up, and they knocked her down again and hit her. I fetched Mrs. Johnson, and she found them still beating her; Lyons took her shawl off, she first pulled it off my mother's shoulder, and she and the man took it away; I went to lay hold of it, and Lyons knocked me down, and bit me - the watchman came and took her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did your mother fight - A. She tried to keep their blows off - the shawl was not taken till I returned with Mrs. Johnson.

LINGARD'S Defence. She pushed against me; I was rather intoxicated; she called me a prostitute, and took my cap off, and held me till the watchman came.

LYON'S Defence. I went away with the bonnet.

LINGARD - GUILTY Aged 27.

LYONS - GUILTY Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-129

162. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 1st of April , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Tennant , from his person .

Mr. HENRY TENNANT . I am a barrister . On the 1st of April I was walking in High-Holborn , between twelve and one o'clock, and felt a hand at my coat pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner putting something in his breast; he ran off; I pursued, and he was taken, and my handkerchief found on him.

CORNELIUS BOWEN . I heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner behind a cart - I saw the handkerchief found on him.

JOHN BOWEN . I took him in charge, and took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-130

663. WILLIAM RENSLEY was indicted for stealing on the 7th of February , one pin, value 1 l.; one watch, value 2 l., and fourteen sovereigns, the property of John Rooke , in the dwelling-house of Francis Taylor .

JOHN ROOKE . I live with Francis Taylor , in Little Bell-Alley, Coleman-street . The prisoner lodged in the opposite room to mine; I have been a clerk in the Bank, and live on my pension; I lost the property stated in the indictment, at different times, from my box; I missed seven sovereigns and the watch on the 7th of March, it was an old silver one made for my father, and not worth much - I had not examined my box for months.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am an officer. On the 8th of March I was informed of this robbery, and took the prisoner at his lodgings, and told him Mr. Rooke had been robbed, and suspected him, he denied it; I took the keys of his box and opened it in his presence, and found seven duplicates, between the leaves of a book, one of which was for the pin, pawned for 5 s. on the 7th of February; next morning I told him the watch was found, and asked what he had done with the duplicate; he said, he had lost it out of his pocket; that he had six sovereigns, and bought a new pair of boots for two guineas, and paid 1 l. at a coffee-shop in Coleman-street, and had spent the rest.

JOHN HUGHES . I am servant to Mr. Baylis, pawnbroker, Great Portland-street. On the 7th of February, the prisoner pawned the pin in the name of Grangely, and on the 5th of March the watch for 10 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-131

664. CHARLES GRAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Dart , about the hour of one o'clock in the night of the 4th of April , at St. Andrew Undershaft, with intent to steal .

MESSRS. BOLLAND AND WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE TYE . I am servant to Mr. Dart, who lives next door to the East India House. On Thursday night, the 4th of April, I went to bed about eleven o'clock, and slept down stairs; after I had been asleep, I heard a noise at the area window opposite my bed, it was shut close down when I went to bed; I first heard the noise about half-past twelve, and rose up in bed, but could see nothing, and thought it must be the cats, and about one o'clock I heard a noise again; I rose up again and saw a man on his hands and knees getting in at the window, which was pushed up, the window ledge is two feet two inches broad; he was in all but his feet; I called out Haloo! what is the matter; his answer was,

"I will let you know what is the matter;" I jumped out of bed, and he retreated; I ran up stairs and alarmed the house, master came down, the man was then gone. The window is about five feet from the bottom of the area. We got two men to assist us, and searched the inside of the house, but could find nobody. We immediately searched the area, looked in the coal cellar, at the left hand was the prisoner standing up with his face close against the wall. We asked how he came there; he said he had no business. I asked how he came in; he said he let himself down at the corner of the area. I am sure it was the same voice as answered me, and said

"I'll let you know."

JOSEPH DART , ESQ. My house is in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft. In consequence of the alarm, I searched the house, the prisoner was found in the coal cellar. A person must drop fifteen feet from the top of the rails, or about ten feet from the surface.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-132

665. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for burgariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Amess , about four o'clock in the night of the 18th of March , with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing 80 lbs. of lead, value 10 s. belonging to Joseph May and Samuel Amess , and fixed to a certain out-house, used and occupied with their respective dwelling-house.

THIRD COUNT, calling it a leaden sink.

SAMUEL AMESS . I live in Little Swan Alley, London Wall . On 18th March, I went to bed between ten and eleven; and at four o'clock in the morning, I heard a kind of crack. I got up and found an outside shutter open, which was fastened when I went to bed. Three squares of glass were taken out, and a flower-pot which stood inside, was taken out into the yard. They had put their arms through the window, and undone the fastening of the casement, and opened it. I went into the yard, to an out-house which is used by me and my partner, Joseph May , who lives next door, and found a desk and some bottles taken from there and set in the yard, and a leaden sink unfixed and carried away; it was safe the day before. An apron was left in the yard, which don't belong to us. I found the sink at the watch-house, and can swear to it, as it fitted the place.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you left the yard gate open - A. It is always bolted, and there were foot marks where they had got over the gate.

WILLIAM JONES . I am watchman at the London Institution, Moorfields. I was calling five o'clock, and saw the prisoner standing at the back of the Riding School, and lifting up something heavy. I went towards him; he saw me, and went away, leaving it there. It was a leaden sink. He turned round about thirty yards off to see if I was coming. I went to the watch-house for assistance, and when I came out, he had got very near it again, and on seeing me, went away. He came round towards it again, and we took him. Mr. Amess claimed it.

WILLIAM MARKWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner about thirty yards from the lead, strolling about the field, with his hands behind him; they were all over black and lime. He said he was going to the East India Docks, and lived in the Borough. I found 11 s. 6 d., two keys and a knife on him. I saw the lead fitted to the out-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Billingsgate. The officer came and took me.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing the lead only .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-133

666. RICHARD MANLEY , was indicted for stealing on the 19th of March , one watch, value 1 l.; one seal, value 2 s. 6 d.; two keys, value 2 d.; one slide, value 1 d., and one ring, value 1 d., the goods of William Kimber , from his person .

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am a grocer , and live in Bury-street Clerkenwell. On the 19th of March, about one o'clock in the day, I was in the Minories , near the Three Lords, public house, a man came up by me at Aldgate Church, and walked by my side as I was driving my horse and cart, till I came to the Three Lords, then the prisoner passed, and dropped a pin case, which the man picked up and opened it and found needles in it. He took them out, and put in two pins, and said

"I'll do this, and if he comes back, I will lay him a pot of beer that there is not two needles in it." The prisoner returned, and accused me of picking up the pin case. I said the other man had picked it up; then the other man returned it to him. He shook it, and wanted to lay me 5 s. that there were two needles in it. I said No; there was two pins. The other man then asked what time it was. I pulled out my watch, and he wanted me to lay him the 5 s. I said I had not got 5 s.; and put the watch into the man's hand, holding the seals in my own. The man put the pin case into his pocket, and pulled out another with two needles in it. Then the prisoner said,

"I'll have the watch," and took it and ran off with it. I followed crying, Stop thief! and he was stopped with it in Whitechapel, half a mile off. The other man got off.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. What countryman are you - A. Gloucestershire. I put the watch into his hand by way of bet.

Q. You lost the bet - A. By an exchange. I told him there were pins in it. I put my watch against his 5 s. He asked me to let him look at it;

"Then" said I,

"The watch shall be for the 5 s." I can swear he changed the cases, for one was larger than the other.

JOHN PLANT . I am a labourer, and live in Jones's-rents. I was in the Minories, and saw Kimber driving his cart, and a man with him; then up came the prisoner; they talked together. I saw the watch in the hands of Kimber, and the other man; the prisoner made a snatch at it, and away he ran; the other man ran the other way. I minded the cart while Kimber pursued. I know that the spot is the city.

JAMES JEFFREY . I belong to the Thames Police. I was in Whitechapel; heard the alarm, and stopped the prisoner, who was running, and saw Kimber putting his watch into his fob. I found two cases on the prisoner, one contained two pins, and the other two needles.

WILLIAM KIMBER . A gentleman brought him to me, and he said,

"Here is your watch. I beg your pardon. I did not intend to steal it."

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-134

667. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for a fraud .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BUNTENSHAW . I am servant to Mr. John Pickersgill , a Manchester warehouseman, of Lawrence-lane. On the 15th of April, the prisoner brought an order for two woollen cords, and said he wanted to match as near as possible to two patterns, which were on the order - I asked what price, he said he did not know, but Messrs. Edenborough wanted to send them out at 6 s., I sent him with three patterns to know which would suit; he returned in eight or nine minutes with two of those patterns attached to the order. I said I would send them over, he said he must take them himself - it rained very hard, and I said they would get wet as he had nothing to cover them; he said Mr. Edenborough desired him to bring them, and would be very angry if he did not - I asked his name, he said William Gilbert , which I put in the book, and delivered him the goods, and invoice; they amount to 11 l. 3 s. I sent Meclenburgh to follow him.

Order read: - Messrs. Hebden, Brothers, and Co. Please to send per bearer, one piece of cord, the nearest you have to each of the above patterns.

EDENBOROUGH, CHITTENDEN, and BARTLETT.

81, Queen Street.

15th of April, 1822.

JOHN MECLENBURGH . I was told to follow the prisoner, and sent Fothergill after him.

JOHN FOTHERGILL . I am porter to Mr. Pickersgill. I followed the prisoner across Cheapside, down Queen-street, by Mr. Edenborough's, and into Budge-row; he then returned up Queen-street, into the Old Jewry, and Basinghall-street, where I saw an officer, and we took him. We asked where he was going with the goods; he said,

"What is that to you;" and then said he would let us know, and went into Mr. Brittens, and delivered them in Messrs. Edenborough and Co's. name. He said he was their porter, and we accompanied him there. Mr. Edenborough disowned him, and we took him to Mr. Pickersgill, who gave him in charge.

WILLIAM OWEN . Fothergill came to me in Basinghall-street. I asked the prisoner where he was going with the goods, he said

"D - n you, what is it to you?" he went on, and rested his goods a little while - I told him to come on, he said he was not afraid. and went into Mr. Britten's and pulled out the invoice; Mr. Britten asked the numbers of the cords; he pulled out a pencil and wrote them down. I desired Mr. Britten to deliver them to nobody. I took him to Mr. Edenborough's - he tried to escape.

MR. JOHN PICKERSGILL . I am a Manchester warehouseman. I have no partners now. My house is known by the name Hebden, Brothers, and Co., which was once my firm.

MR. THOMAS CHITTENDEN . I am in partnership with John Edenborough and Thomas Bartlett , of Queen-street. I do not know the prisoner, but understand he was a servant in the house, some years before I was in the firm. The order is not written by any one in our house. We wanted no such goods.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-135

668. JUDITH DONAVAN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

CHARLOTTE MITCHELL . On the 16th April the prisoner came into our wine vaults, in Newgate-street, and had a quartern of gin, which came to 3 1/2 d., and gave me a bad shilling; I gave it to my master, who returned it her. She then gave me a bad sixpence, which I gave him, and he sent for Nixon.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not drunk - A. Rather so; but sensible. Another woman was with her.

WM. GILES. I keep the wine vaults; Mitchell's account is correct. I took the sixpence into the back room, found it bad, and sent for an officer. I produce it.

HENRY NIXON . I am ward beadle. I apprehended her, and found a sixpence in her mouth; she had other money there which she swallowed in my presence.

JOSIAH SEWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors for the Mint; both sixpences are counterfeit, and from the same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk - I had changed a five shilling piece - I met a woman who took me to drink, and I don't know what took place.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-136

EIGHTH DAY. THURSDAY, APRIL 25. 1822.

669. HENRY THOMAS PARKES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , two traces, value 10 s. , the goods of Richard Moorley .

RICHARD MOORLEY . I live in St. Anns-street, Soho ; the prisoner was my groom , and left me on the 9th of March, and had no business on the premises after that. On the 13th, between nine and ten o'clock at night, in consequence of information, I went to my stable, and found the harness pulled about, and two traces gone; and the prisoner concealed under some boards in the hay loft. I saw another man run from the stable door, and leave one of the traces at the door.

JOHN NASH . I am a collar maker, and live opposite the stable. About half past nine o'clock I saw a man standing by my door, with a bag under his arm; he looked about there. I went to the stable door, and heard a voice inside say -

"I am coming over now - gently;" I said,

"Aye," and the voice said again,

"I am coming;" I said,

"Which way?" I suppose he took me for his companion. I rang the bell, and alarmed Mr. Moorley. We unlocked the door, and found the prisoner in the loft; the other man ran away.

ROBERT HOWE . I accompanied them to the stable, and found the harness knocked about. I had left all safe at eight o'clock - there is an outer door, which a person could get over. I picked up a trace outside the door, which was safe at eight o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty of being in the stable, but not with intent to steal.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-137

670. JAMES FLOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one coat, value 15 s. , the goods of Benjamin Nicholls .

BENJAMIN NICHOLLS. I am a gardener , and attend Covent-garden Market . On the 13th of April, about half-past seven o'clock, my coat was on my stand - I left the stand for two minutes - King alarmed me, and I missed it. I have not found it. It was a drab coat.

WILLIAM KING . I saw a drab coat on Nicholls's stand. I saw the prisoner take it, wrap it up, and put it under his coat, and run away; I followed, but he got off. I am sure he is the man; he was taken in half an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where were you - A. I stood on my waggon. It did not appear a trick.

ANTHONY THOMPSON . I am an officer. About half-past eight o'clock on this morning I heard a cry of Stop

thief! and took the prisoner in Hart-street - he was running, and had another coat, which Orberry claimed.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-138

671. JAMES FLOOD was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Thomas Orberry .

THOMAS ORBERRY . I am a carrier . On the 13th April, about eight o'clock, I was in the market, and saw the prisoner take the coat off my caravan. I called him, and he jumped down, and ran away. He dropped it in Russell-street, and was taken in Hart-street.

THOMAS ORBERRY . I saw him take my father's coat, and am sure he is the man.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-139

672. EDWARD DESMOND and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Russell , about the hour of three in the night of the 21st of April , at St. Clement Dane, with intent to steal, and stealing therein one tea pot, value 4 l.; seventeen silver spoons, value 5 l.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s.; one pepper box, value 1 l., and one watch, value 1 l., his property; one coat value 4 l., and 10 l. 15 s., in monies numbered, the property of Charlotte Latty , spinster ; and one coat, value 15 s., the goods of Richard Harrington ; one watch, value 10 l.; one watch-chain, value 1 l.; three seals, value 1 l.; one handkerchief, value 1 s., and one pair of spectacles, value 10 s., the goods of the Reverend George Stokes , clerk ; and two 5 l. Bank notes , the property of the said Charlotte Latty , against the statute.

JAMES RUSSELL . I live at No. 17, Carey-street, in the parish of St. Clement's Danes , and rent the whole house. On the 21st of April I went to bed about eleven o'clock - the family had not then all come home; I sleep in the attick. I was disturbed between two and three o'clock by hearing a scuffling on the stairs. My young men who slept on the same floor awoke me. Mr. Stokes, who lodges on the second floor, came up to me naked, and in great alarm, and said he had had a scuffle with thieves. I came down stairs, and let in the watchman and people who had assembled about the house; then went to examine the house, and found a desk in the parlour wrenched open, and a metal watch taken out - a silk handkerchief was taken from my hat, which was on the sideboard. I missed from the kitchen closet, a silver tea pot, seventeen spoons, a pepper box, and a pair of sugar tongs, which were all silver and worth 10 l. 10 s., together. I found all this property at Mr. Platt's house, and knew it to be mine. I saw Harrington's coat at Bow-street - he is my apprentice.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You do not know how the house was entered - A. No.

THE REVEREND GEORGE STOKES . I am a clergyman of the Establishment, and lodge on the second floor of Mr. Russell's house. I came home about eleven o'clock, the street door was then closed. I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and about three I was between asleep and awake, and saw four men in my room standing near my bed; my sitting room door was open, and they stood in a row - they told me to be quiet, and threatened if I did not to shoot me. I am not quite certain but think I saw one pistol. One of them asked who the landlord was, I said nothing; then they left one as guard over me, and I thought he had a pistol - I kept my eyes nearly shut during the time. The other three went into my sitting room - I waited a few minutes, and then gave a sudden spring on the man, and cried out most lustily; he and I had a struggle across the sitting room, to the stair case, I then gave him a push and sent him down stairs; then went up to Mr. Russell and informed him. I believe the other three ran down stairs, for I saw no more of them.

Q. Had the man who was guard over you, any light so that you could distinguish his features - A. I think I saw them standing with a candle in one of their hands. I cannot speak to any certainty, whether either of the prisoners are the men. A gold watch, with three gold seals, and a gold chain, worth about 10 l. together was taken from a little table in my bed-room; also a pair of spectacles and a silk handkerchief. I saw the watch and appendages in an hour or two in the hands of Mr. Fitch. I saw the handkerchief at Bow-street, but have not found the spectacles. I saw the prisoners at the watch-house, and from the voice of Desmond I thought he was one.

Cross-examined. Q. You will not swear to either of them - A. I only speak to the resemblance of voice.

CHARLOTTE LATTY . I am a single woman, and in Mr. Russell's service. I let in Mr. Archer about twenty minutes after Mr. Stokes, then bolted the door, and put the chain up - the windows were all safe. I slept in the kitchen. I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and was not awoke till Mr. Russell came down. I found the office window on the ground floor, at the back of the house open - a pane of glass was broken, which was whole when I went to bed; nearly the whole pane was out - I am sure the window was shut down when I went to bed, and half the shutter shut. When I was alarmed I found all the shutters up and the window up; it looks into the back yard. I had a gold watch, with two gold seals, and a key, worth about 7 l., which was stolen; it hung up over the kitchen dresser; I had shut the kitchen door when I went to bed. I also lost two 5 l. notes, ten sovereigns, and 15 s., from a box on the dresser, which was locked - I found it broken open, and taken into the parlour. A coat belonging to Richard Harrington , the apprentice, was taken from the door of the kitchen closet; it was there when I went to bed. Sixteen silver spoons were taken from a desk in the kitchen, which was not locked - a silver castor worth 1 l., and a silver tea pot, worth 4 l. from the kitchen cupboard. I was not awoke by them.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite sure the window was shut down - A. Yes. I was in the office, and looked at the window when I went to bed. I suppose they got out the same way as they got in.

MR. RUSSELL. The office is a back room, and looks into Mr. Oddy's yard, and is surrounded by a high wall. I produce a plan of the premises. They could get from New-court, over a high wall, into Mr. Oddy's yard.

WILLIAM FITCH . I am a law stationer, and live opposite Mr. Russell's; he is of the same business. The rattle

sprang at a little after three o'clock; I dressed myself and came out, it was dark - I immediately went over to Mr. Russell's house, and found the watchmen and neighbours assembled, and saw Desmond in the custody of a watchman in a quarter of an hour. It was supposed other people were in the house, and I was in New-court, and in front of the house, keeping watch to prevent an escape. I found a metal watch without appendages, and a gold watch chain, and seals on the wood work at the top of the wall, in New-court, which I think is fifteen feet high; but there were marks on a lower part of the wall outside, like the scraping of feet, and the inside of the wood work was broken away, and appeared quite fresh. Mr. Stokes claimed the gold watch, and Russell the metal one.

FERDINAND O'COLLINS . I am a tax gatherer, and live at No. 16, Carey-street, at the corner of New-court. Mr. Russell's house is at the opposite corner. I was alarmed by a rattle about three o'clock; I got up and went with the constable and watchman into Mr. Platt's house, which is the third house from Mr. Russell's, and communicates with the yard, into which Russell's office looks, and in the back parlour which is used as an office - the window of which was closed, I found Davis concealed under the table; I secured and delivered him to Bowen - he was without his hat, and desired me if I found it to let him have it, I went there thinking the thieves could not have escaped, and must have gone into the adjoining houses.

Cross-examined. Q. He might be one of the family for what you know - A. I should have been informed if he was so.

MICHAEL BOWEN . I am a watchman. I heard rattles spring - Mr. Russell's door was open. I went in and found no thieves there - I found the back office window up, went to the watch-house for assistance, returned and went into Boswell-court; I came out again, and Mr. O'Collins gave Davis in my charge; I took him to the watch-house, he was without his hat - it was a wet night, his clothes appeared dry; he could not have been out long. Desmond was brought to the watch-house in about a quarter of an hour.

THOMAS QUENNELL . I am a watchman of Shire-lane, and Temple Bar. At three o'clock I heard the rattle spring - I came down Carey-street, and heard a scuffle in the two pair of stairs of Russell's house; I stopped at the door, a gentleman put his head out of window and called out thieves! I sprung my rattle, and remained at the street door, and in a short time heard the chain of the door drop, it opened a little way, and I saw the glimpse of three mens faces - I up with my stick and said,

"If either of you attempt to come out I will knock your brains out;" I made a blow at them. They closed the door in my face, and broke my stick. Thomas a watchman came up; I called to the people within to let me in, and in ten or twelve minutes Mr. Russell met me in; Thomas followed me in; we saw the office window open - I heard a rumbling of men in Mr. Oddy's yard, which is enclosed by New-court wall, it has a door leading into the court which was fast. More watchman came up, and I placed them in New-court to prevent an escape that way. Thomas and I called to the private watchman to open the gates of New Boswell-court, and we two (only) went in. We knocked at Mr. Oddy's door and were let in by the servant; we searched in the lower part of the house, but found nobody; we then went into his yard, which the office looks into, and found a silk hat near the window of Mr. Russell's house; it has not been claimed by any person belonging to the house - it was given to Davis at Bow-street to try on, and appeared too small - he said it was not his. We then gained admission into Mr. Platt's house, who has a window looking into the yard; we went through a back door into the yard, and found Desmond in the yard; he said,

"Gentlemen, I deliver myself up to you;" he had no shoes on - he was not known at Mr. Platts. I then asked who were his associates; or thieves with him; he said no person but himself - I said I knew there must be more for I saw three faces in Mr. Russell's house - he still said there was none but himself; I delivered him over to a watchman to take to the watch-house - I then went back to make further search, and after day light found five table, nine tea, and three salt spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs, all silver, on the tiles of an outhouse of Mr. Platt's house, Mr. Russell claimed them. I found six picklock keys of different sizes with them; also two skeleton keys, (one of them broken); a large door key and another small key. As I returned from lodging Desmond at the watch-house, Davis was delivered to me; he was searched at the office, and nothing was found about him.

ALEXANDER THOMAS . I am a watchman, my beat is opposite Mr. Russell's. I have heard Quennell's account, it is correct. We found the picklock keys on the tiles of the wash-house, and the spoons. I found in the same place a pistol loaded with powder only; no ball or slugs, and a phosphorus box; also two handkerchiefs, one of which Mr. Stokes claimed, and Russell the other, and also the plate. In Oddy's yard I found a hat. Oddy's servant gave me a coat, a silver tea pot, and a pair of shoes. Russell claimed the tea pot as his own, and the coat as his apprentice's. Desmond had no shoes, and I lent him these to walk to the watch-house, and to Bow-street - they appeared rather too small; he walked with the heels down. Another pair of shoes, and a small iron crow were found in Mr. Stokes's room. I found two chisels with the spoons, and in the yard a dark lantern.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SCOTT . I am a constable. I was alarmed at the watch-house a little after three o'clock, and went to Mr. Russell's. Desmond was given into my charge without any shoes. Fitch delivered me the gold and metal watches.

MR. STOKES. When I went to bed my sitting-room door was shut. I found it open after the struggle. I found a pair of shoes, a hat, and an iron crow in my bedroom, which were not there when I went to bed. I found my writing desk forced open, but nothing taken out.

JOHN SCOTT . Both the hats were tried on the prisoners, neither of them exactly fitted.

DAVIS'S Defence. I know nothing at all of it.

DESMOND - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

DAVIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

First Middlesex before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-140

673. CHARLES WELLMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charlotte Hemming , spinster , on the King's highway, on the 14th of March , putting her in fear,

and taking from her person, and against her will, one handkerchief, value 4 s. , her property.

The prosecutrix stating herself to be married, the prisoner on this indictment, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-141

674. RALPH BOTELLER JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , in the dwelling-house of Nelly Probyn , widow , one 20 l. Bank note , her property.

The prosecutrix did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-142

675. RICHARD THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , two combs, value 1 s.; one knife, value 6 d., and 4 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, the property of John De Courcey , from his person .

JOHN DE COURCEY . I live in Kalmell-buildings. On the 17th of March, about twelve o'clock at night. I was coming home, and at the corner of North Audley-street , I fell in with a tailor - I had been to see a friend, and was quite sober; we had some words, and struck one another; he called watch, and I ran away, but came back, and saw the prisoner, who is a watchman, knock a woman down, and cut her over the eye - I went to her assistance; he laid hold of her to lift her up - I was struck and knocked down myself. The woman was my landlady, and was with me at the time. My coat and waistcoat were torn off my back, and when they were returned to me, this property was gone.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the prisoner took them - A. I swear he took my coat and waistcoat, and returned it without them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The prisoner indicted you for the assault, and since that you have charged him with this felony - A. Yes. The prisoner preferred the first indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-143

675. RICHARD THOMAS was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , one shawl, value 10 s., the goods of Jeremiah Keith , from the person of Eleanor, his wife .

ELEANOR KEITH . I was with De Courcey on this night; I had been with him half an hour - we had been drinking tea with a few friends. We left my house about nine o'clock.

Q. Do you drink tea after nine o'clock - A. Sometimes. I met De Courcey in the street, by accident. My husband was rather in liquor. The prisoner knocked me down, and robbed me of my shawl.

Q. And your husband was with you - A. He was senseless.

Q. How came the watchman to knock you down - A. The rattles had sprung, but I had nothing to do with it. We asked the prisoner to let us go.

Q. What, he took you up as being disorderly - A. I do not know - he did take us to the watch-house, and to Marlborough-street.

Q. Did you pay 5 s. for being drunk in the street - A Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-144

676. WILLIAM SHERLOCK and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th March , 30 lbs. of brass moulding, value 5 l., belonging to Thomas Parkinson and Robert Henry Parkinson , fixed to their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Parkinson .

THIRD COUNT, for stealing the same - not stating it to be fixed.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter, and live in Castle-street. On the 15th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoners standing against Mr. Parkinson's window, at the corner of Winslow-street . I passed them twice, suspecting them. Foxhall was with me, and watched them for five minutes - I then saw them both lift the stall-board off the window, and Sherlock put it on his shoulder. He went into Castle-street, where I stopped him. Williams ran away; I described him, and he was apprehended next day; I am certain of him.

THOMAS FOXHALL . I am a watchman. I was with Bidgood, and saw the prisoners by the shop very busy, and saw them take the moulding off the window; Sherlock put it on his shoulder. Bidgood seized him, and Williams ran off. I saw him next morning, and am positive of him.

ADAM SAMPSON . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Parkinson . He only lives in the house, but is in partnership with Robert Henry Parkinson . I missed the moulding directly Sherlock was brought in.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. Williams was described to me - I saw him waiting about the office, and took him.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

SHERLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-145

677. ROBERT BURGESS was indicted for stealing on the 9th of April , one shawl, value 5 s., one gown, value 5 s., two frocks, value 3 s., two caps, value 5 s., and one necklace, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am wife of Thomas Smith , a plumber , who lives at Hoxton. On the 9th of April these things were in the lower room of my father's house, at Edmonton ; they were safe at ten o'clock at night, I missed them next morning. Somebody had broken in the back way.

SOLOMON RIGGLESWORTH . I am the prosecutrix's father; I am gardener. On the 9th of April, about six o'clock in the morning, I went out to work, and left the back door on the latch, and about fifty yards off, I met the prisoner.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a hostler at the King's Head, Lower Edmonton. On the day after the robbery, I saw the prisoner at Stamford-hill; he offered me the duplicate of a gown and silk shawl, pawned for 5 s., at Newington - he wanted 18 d. for it. I went home and told Smith of it. I knew him before.

GEORGE HUNTER . I manage the business of Mr. Parsons, at Newington. On the 9th of April a man pawned a gown and shawl in the name of Robert Burgess , Edmonton.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE GRAY . I am constable; about the 1st of April I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-146

678. ELEANOR CURTIS was indicted for stealing on the 13th of April , five sovereigns, the monies of William Ware , from his person .

WILLIAM WARE . I live at Birmingham, and am a painter and glazier . On the 13th of April I was in town, and between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in St. Giles's drinking at a house with two women of the town, the prisoner was one, they called me in as I went by, between three and four o'clock, I staid till about nine o'clock, and then retired; I missed my money and charged the prisoner with it, as I saw her take it out of my breeches, she denied it and ran away - I called a watchman, and she was taken the same night.

FRANCIS JOHN GATES . I am a patrol; about one o'clock in the morning I was in George-street; a watchman was searching a house for the prisoner, she came in at the street door, and Ware charged her with this robbery - she denied it.

JOHN DEWSELL . I am a patrol; I took the other woman; I found Ware and her in the room when he called watch; I found nothing on her - he did not appear in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. He and the other woman came into my apartment, and sent me out for beer, and when I returned, the door was locked, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-147

679. SAMUEL COXHEAD was indicted for stealing on the 29th of March , two blankets, value 4 s.; a pillow, value 1 s., and two sheets, value 5 s.. the goods of John Putnam , in a lodging-room, let to him .

JOHN PUTNAM . I live in Ray-street - I let this lodging to a woman, and not to the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-148

680. THOMAS HAUGHTON and JOHN MAGRAW was indicted for stealing on the 17th of March , two hundred pounds of lead, value 10 s., belonging to Peter Belton , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

PETER BELTON . I keep the Rising Sun, public-house, Hackney-road . On the 17th of March, between four and five o'clock; I was called up by Mills, I looked out on my leads and saw two pieces of lead rolled up, which were safe the afternoon before; the officer brought me some more, which was fitted to the roof with the rest, and the whole exactly corresponded with it.

CHARLES MIELL . I am a watchman. About a quarter before five in the morning, I was close to Belton's house, and saw Haughton under the wall; when he saw me he went away; I caught hold of him, and asked, what he was doing; he said

"Nothing particular;" I saw that his coat was all over dirt, and told Scribe to take him; I went to where he stood, and found a piece of lead; he said,

"If you will make haste, you will catch Magraw on the top;" I immediately alarmed Belton, and heard somebody drop from the building, and saw Magraw running away from the house; I am certain of him; I took him on Monday; Berris followed him - two rolls of lead were found on the roof.

JOHN JAMES BERRIS . I was with Miell; Haughton said to me,

"I have taken this from the top, and you will find Magraw on the top;" Magraw dropped from the top, and I ran after him for five or six hundred yards, and then lost sight of him.

JOHN SCRIBE . I heard a man drop, and saw Macraw running away - I saw his face, and am sure of him.

HAUGHTON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

MAGRAW - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-149

681. SAMUEL WEEDON and THOMAS ALSEY were indicted for stealing on the 21st of April , at Little Stanmore, one lamb, price 1 l. , the property of Samuel Stone .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL STONE . I live at Little Stanmore ; I had twenty lambs, and saw them all safe on Thursday afternoon, the 18th of April, about four o'clock, in a field, close to my house. On Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, I missed one; Pugh fetched me to the next field, where I found the skin, head, and four feet, entrails, and one kidney; I knew to be the skin of one of my lambs. I had taken particular notice of it, as I had sold this and another to a butcher, but this remained in my care, I compared the skin and four feet with some lamb which was found, and can swear it belongs to that skin - we fitted it.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You sold two - A. Yes; One was gone; he marked this one, but not the one he took away. I saw him mark it, and this was a brown headed one - but the other was not so much brown headed.

JOSEPH PUGH . On Sunday afternoon, about two o'clock I was birds nesting, and in Stones's field, next to where his lambs are kept, and I found the skin, head, entrails, four feet, and one kidney. I fetched Stone to the place. I am a gardener.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you heard of the lamb being stolen - A. No, Sir.

RICHARD ANDREWS . I am a bay salesman, and live at Little Stanmore. I know the prisoners, they live in Edgware parish, about four hundred yards from Stone's. I went with a constable and a search warrant, to the house of Simm's, about half-past seven o'clock Sunday evening - I did not then know that the prisoners lived there - we found a woman there, and searched the house, and in the room the woman was in, we found part of a fore quarter of lamb, boiled, and in the adjoining room on a table I found a hind quarter, undressed, and gave them to Hinton. I apprehended Alsey in bed two doors from this house, on that evening; I said we must search; he said he had no objection

- I remained with him while Hinton searched, and brought up, part of a fore quarter of lamb, baked in a pie, a hind quarter undressed, and a piece of lights - we did not ask where he got it, nor did he give any account of it. I compared all the lamb with the skin next morning - there is no doubt of its being part of the carcase, from that skin. there was a piece of flesh left by the hind leg in the skin, which matches exactly. I produce both skin and meat; it matches the skin, and the two quarters match. I apprehended Weedon that evening, and told him I had been to his house, and found lamb there; he said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Simms keeps the house - A. Yes. I believe he has no lodgers but Weedon.

VINCENT HINTON . I am a constable. I accompanied Andrews, and searched Simm's house; I cannot say that Weedon lodged there. We found the lamb produced there. I apprehended Weedon near my own house, and told him he was charged with stealing a lamb - he was willing to go. Andrew's account is correct.

SAMUEL STONE . The lamb belongs to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you - A. Seventeen. They belong to me, and not to my mother; they feed on her pasture, but I pay her, and I bought them with my own money.

RICHARD ANDREWS re-examined. (Looking at the prisoners examination) I saw the Magistrate sign this paper, and saw the prisoners put their marks to it - no threat or inducement was held out to them in my presence (read).

The following extracts from the prisoners examinations were here read.

" Samuel Weedon , being examined, denies having killed or stolen the said lamb, and says that the lamb found in his house was given him by a man of the name of Taylor, of Finchley, about eight o'clock on Saturday night."

S. WEEDON, X his mark.

"Thomas Alsey says, he denies having killed or stolen the said lamb, and says that the lamb found in his house, he purchased on Saturday night last of a butcher, who lives within a few doors of the Hero of Maida, public-house, on Maida Hill; that he paid 5 d. a pound for it, and that there was exactly eight pounds."

THOMAS ALSEY , X his mark.

Taken before me, J. ANDERSON, April 22, 1822.

WILLIAM SIMMS . Samuel Weedon lodges with me. I was not at home when the lamb was found. The room it was found in belonged to Weedon.

Two witnesses gave Alsey a good character.

WEEDON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

ALSEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of their characters.

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-150

682. JOHN NIGHTINGALE was indicted for perjury . This case was precisely the same as that of John Paynter , convicted last Session, page 236. The defendant had sworn he was not at the waggon office of Messrs. Russell, with Paynter, on any part of the 1st of December, 1820. The same witnesses, as on the former trial, deposed that he was. The defendant called no witnesses. It is presumed unnecessary to re-state further particulars.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and then Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-151

NINTH DAY. FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1822.

683. WILLIAM PASSINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , one bushel of pollard and beans mixed together, value 1 s., and one sack, value 6 d. , the goods of James Tillyer and Richard Blunt Tillyer .

JAMES TILLYER . I am a farmer , in partnership with Richard Blunt Tillyer . The prisoner was my labourer ; his business was to put the corn in the barn, and feed the horses at breakfast, and dinner time, when the men left work. I received information; and on the 19th of February, about a quarter past one in the night, I was watching, and he passed close by me near my own premises; he crossed my orchard into the straw shed, and returned in about ten minutes, with about a bushel of beans and pollard in a sack. I seized him with it; he had no business on the premises. I attended before the Magistrates, and saw him sign this paper (read) -

"The prisoner confesses that at different times he stole corn from Mr. Tillyer's premises; and that a man named John Thorp was in the habit of receiving it, and gave him 1 s. 3 d. a bushel for beans."

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-152

684. THOMAS EDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , one pocket book, value 1 s., and eighteen sovereigns, the property of John Matthews , from his person .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a carver and gilder , and live in Plumber's-row, Hoxton. On the 29th of March, I received two sovereigns and 10 s. from Mr. Edwards, of Woolwich. On the 30th of March, I had eighteen sovereigns in a bag, made from the pocket of an old pair of breeches; it was tied up. I had received ten of the sovereigns from Mr. Blissett, of Leadenhall-street, and six from Mr. York. I counted them on the morning of the 30th of March, and put them into my right-hand waistcoat pocket. I went to the Princess Royal, in Paul-street , and saw the prisoner there; I knew him before. He asked me to take some porter; which I did, and said

"You treated me when I had no money to treat myself, and I will treat you now, as I have money." He said he would have some gin and peppermint; I fetched a quartern from the bar; this was about 11 o'clock. We drank and talked together some time, he came and sat by my side, by the fire-place. I had a pipe which confused me so, that I fell asleep, and about one o'clock, Toogood came and awoke me. I felt and missed the bag and sovereigns. The prisoner was then gone; nobody but him had sat near me. I am sure the bag of sovereigns were safe when I paid for the liquor. He was taken that night by the watchman. I saw him next morning,

and said

"Eden you have got my property." He said

"Who saw me." I said

"Never mind that; give me my property back, and I'll make you a present of 5 l." I have not seen it since then. I produce a bag similar to that I lost.

JOHN TOOGOOD . I am a labourer. I was at the Princess Royal, and saw them together; the prisoner sat on his left hand; they sat together for three-quarters of an hour. Matthews fell asleep. Two men came in before that, and went out again; they did not go near him. I went into the back-yard, and while he was asleep, the prisoner came there to me, in about two minutes, and said he was off; I asked which way, he said to Blackfriar's Bridge; I said I was going that way, and we would walk together, we went out together, without going through the tap-room, and went to the King's Arms, Hill-street, Finsbury; he called for a pint of porter, and pulled out 2 1/4 d; I said that would not do to pay for it. He then called for a pot, and shewed me an old pocket, which he took from his left-hand waistcoat pocket, and said he picked it up against Mr. Matthews. It was like the one produced; it was an old pocket; I neither saw gold or silver in it, it appeared to have something in it. I left him there, and went back to Matthews, and he missed his pocket and money. I returned to the King's Arms, and he was gone. He had told me he was going to call at the Pied Horse, Chiswell-street, we went, but he was not there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Matthews say liquor had overcome him, and he was quite stupid - A. I saw that he was, they were both drunk; the prisoner made no secret of picking it up.

JOHN BLISSETT . I saw my father pay Matthews ten sovereigns on the 23d of March.

RICHARD YORK . On the 23d of March I paid him six sovereigns.

THOMAS STREETLAND . I am an officer. On the 31st of March, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house. I found some silver on him.

HENRY BAILEY . I am a watchman. I apprehended him in Tabernacle-square.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked who had his purse, and said if I would tell him he would give me 5 l. I never saw him with more than 1 s. He had a woman with him, and went backward for half an hour.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I had no woman with me.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-153

685. THOMAS SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , one model of a Revenue cutter, value 10 s. the goods of Robert Williams .

ROBERT WILLIAMS . I am a lighterman , and live at Aste's-row, Islington . This model was in my garden, which is enclosed by a pailing six feet high. I saw it safe on the 4th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and missed it between six and seven o'clock next morning, and saw it in White Bear gardens, Kingsland-road, on the 11th April. The prisoner is our neighbour.

JOHN HEARD . I am a labourer, and live in the Hackney-road. The prisoner passed me on the 5th of April, about five o'clock in the morning, crossing the field, going to the City-road, with the model on his shoulder, about half a mile from the prosecutor's. The one produced is the same. I am sure of his person,

JONAS FREEMANTLE , I am a goldsmith, and live in White Bear gardens, Kingsland-road. On the 6th of April, about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming through Church-street, with the model on his shoulder, offering it for sale. He offered it for sale; I bought it of him. He asked 3 s., I had but 2 s. 6 d., he said he was distressed, and I should have it. I am certain he is the man, he was dressed as a sailor. I put it outside my door, and the prosecutor claimed it.

NICHOLAS BRADY . I live in White Bear gardens, and was with Freemantle when he bought the model of the prisoner.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am a constable. On the 6th of April, I saw the prisoner in Chiswell-street with the model.

NICHOLAS DAWKINS . I am an officer. On the 16th of April, I took the prisoner in Lower-street, Islington, and asked if he had any knowledge of the model, he said No.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it in Rosemary-branch-fields, and took it all through Islington; could find no owner, and offered it for sale.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-154

686. JAMES PERKS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , five bottles, value 1 s., and four quarts of wine, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Shone .

Mr. THOMAS SHONE . I am a wine-merchant , and live in Gloucester-place . The prisoner lived footman with me for seven weeks. In consequence of suspicion, I sent for an officer, to search all the servants. The prisoner's box was searched, and five bottles of Port were produced, which are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You sent him to the cellar at times - A. Yes. I never told him to take more than was wanted for the time.

MR. SEBASTIAN FRIDAY . I live at No. 17, Gloucester-place. On the 18th of April, I called at Mr. Shone's and in consequence of what I heard, I sent for an officer. The prisoner's box was opened in his presence, and five bottles of wine found. On the first bottle being produced, he said it was sent to him by his sister from St. Luke's. When I found another bottle, I said I thought it was master's; he denied it: and on looking at a third bottle, Mr. Shone's seal was on the cork; he then said he had taken it from his master's cellar, and that none of the other servants knew it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he took it to be ready when it was wanted - A. No.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am a constable. I opened the prisoner's box, and found the wine; he said it came from his sister's, and afterwards that it was his master's, and it was what most servants did.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it to be ready when called for, as I did not like to go into the cellar when I had my white livery on.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-155

687. THOMAS FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , one coat, value 8 s. , the goods of Charles Everett Bilby .

CHARLES EVERETT BILBY . I am a labourer . My coat was in the cart, in Whitechapel . I had hold of the horse's head. I had come from Henley. I saw the prisoner take it from the back of the cart; he had got about a yard and a half when I ran and took him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-156

688. JOHN FRANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , two tea trays, value 8 s. , the goods of Frederick Holst .

JOHN THURLOW . I am a coach-painter. On the 31st of March I was assisting in putting out a fire at Old-street, at Mr. Holst's house, in Whitecross-street ; several neighbours were taking care of the furniture. I saw a person much like the prisoner with a tea tray. I did not see where he got it from. I saw another tea tray thrown out of the window, and he took that also; I was going to catch it, and he stepped forward to take it up. I said

"What are you going to do with this;" he said to take it over the way; I said do. He had a blue jacket on.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a green-grocer, and live in Whitecross-street. I was at the fire; I saw the prisoner in Bunhill-row, with two tea trays standing against a door. I seized him, and asked how he came by them, he said he had nothing to do with them, and that there was a man gone a-head.

JOHN WACKETT . I was at the fire, and saw two tea trays thrown out of the window; a man very much like the prisoner took them; I went to Bunhill-row with Harris; I heard the tea trays rattling; I turned round, and saw the prisoner standing with them against a door - he was secured.

JAMES HENLEY . I am a constable; I was at the fire, and was informed a man had run down Coleman-street; I went to Bunhill-row, and took the prisoner about three yards from the trays; I asked him how he came by them; he said, it was not him, but another man who had ran away; he said, he had not been at the fire; I said,

"You know you have, for you have some flower on you," the fire was at a pastry-cook's, and there was a good deal of flower about.

MARY HOLST . I am wife of Frederick Holst , the tea-trays are ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw them standing by a door; Henley came and asked if they belonged to me; I said, No; a man had gone along very quick, and perhaps they were his; but he took me; he brought a man to swear to me, but the man said the person had a light fustian jacket on.

JOSEPH ROBLOW . I live at No. 25, Whitecross-street, and am a butcher. On the morning of the fire I saw a person go by my window with the tea trays - he appeared to me to have a white fustian jacket on.

Q. Perhaps it was flowery - A. I cannot say - the man was taller and stouter than the prisoner; I do not think he is the same man.

Q. Then you do not swear the prisoner is not the man - A. No; he seemed to me quite a different man; I did not see his face; I was looking out of the first floor window; there was flower on his shoulder - I know nothing of the prisoner - he found me out somehow.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-157

689. JOHN GUTTERIDGE was indicted for stealing on the 13th of March , one tin can, value 2 s. , the goods of James Prickett .

JAMES PRICKETT . I am a milkman , and live in Baldwin's-gardens. On the 13th of March I was going along Fleet-street , at three o'clock, and left my pail at a door, with about five quarts of milk; I returned in five minutes, and it was gone.

JOHN FORBES . I was in St. John-street, about seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner was pointed out to me; I stopped him, and asked where he got the can which he had been selling, he said,

"Why, it is not yours, you do not look like a milkman;" I said, I was an officer, and took him; he then said, he picked it up in the street.

ANN STRINGER . On the 13th of March the prisoner brought this can to my mother's, who keeps an iron shop in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell; I bought it of him for 6 d.; I did not know the value of it; I do not recollect what he asked for it; it would have sold for 9 d.; he said, he was a milkman, but was tired of the trade.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I found it at the corner of Bouverie-street, with some milk spilt about.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-158

690. THOMAS GODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , one pair of pantaloons, value 14 s., one shirt, value 4 s., and a waistcoat, value 7 s. , the goods of Edward Probert .

EDWARD PROBERT . I am a pensioner ; the prisoner was in the same company with me at Jersey; I met him at Blandford in October, we drank together at two or three public-houses, and went into a public-house at Hounslow ; I had a bundle containing pantaloons, shirt, and waistcoat, I left it in his care while I went out; I returned in a quarter of an hour, and saw him going up the street with it in his hand; a man who was with me pursued but lost him; he was not taken till the 3d of April, at Chelsea, where he was receiving his pension - my instructions were with the bundle.

JAMES POPLE . On the 3d of April I took the prisoner; he said, he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him at a public-house; he drank freely, pulled off his coat, and offered it for sale, and when we got to the end of Hounslow; I was near home, and went home, leaving him in the public-house with the bundle by his side.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-159

691. FRANCES ABRAHAMS was indicted for putting off ten pieces of counterfeit milled money resembling shillings, at a lower rate and value than the same by their denominations did import, and were counterfeited for .

MR. LAW, conducted the prosecution.

PRISCILLA RANSON . I am the wife of Thomas Ranson , and live in Nottingham-Court, Long-acre. On Sunday, the 5th of March, I was in company with Armstrong; he sent me to purchase counterfeit shillings of the prisoner; I had no money at all, he gave me two shillings; I went to Petticoat-lane with Ann Porter, and saw the prisoner, and told her I wanted ten bobs, and she gave me ten counterfeit shillings; I gave her two shillings for them; I had seen her before - I took them to Armstrong and told him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you been convicted of any offence of this sort - A. No; nor was I ever tried - Porter was an utterer of coin, and has been a great sufferer by the prisoner.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 15th of March I was with Ranson; I searched her; my son gave her two shillings at the public-house: she had no money about her; I went to the Bull's Head, Crispin-street, and waited about ten minutes; she came and gave me the ten counterfeit shillings; I then went to Cobb's-yard, Petticoat-lane with my two sons, Vann and Mance; I was the last in the room; I saw the prisoner in Mance's custody; there was a chest of drawers in the room, and in the top drawer I found two hundred and fourteen shillings; one hundred and twenty half-crowns, and twenty-nine six-pences, all counterfeit.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know that she lives there - Q. She put some clothes on which she took out of the drawer - there was a young woman in bed in the room - the two marked shillings were not found.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am the son of the last witness; Ranson described the prisoner's dress to me, and upon going into the room, I found the prisoner to answer the description; I asked her if she had any money in the apartments, good or bad; she said, No; she said, she lived there; my father took from the top drawer the counterfeit money produced; I found nothing on her; I asked how she came by the bad money; she said, it was left there by a young man; she did not know his name or where he lived; she gave Mance the key of the drawer; I saw a young man at the top of Cobb's-yard, as we brought her out, and he gave a signal to her.

JOHN MANCE . I was at the Baker and Basket, public-house; the account the witness has given is correct; Vann and I first went to the house; the prisoner said the property in the drawers belonged to her; there was some man's clothing in the room, which she said belonged to a young man she was going to marry, but she did not know his name, or where he lived.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was with the witness; I searched Ranson before she went - the witness's account is correct.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint; the ten shillings are all counterfeit from the same dye, and have never been in circulation; the rest of the shillings are counterfeit, and of the same dye; the six-pences and half-crowns are all counterfeit - the half-crowns are of three different dyes.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-160

692. THOMAS BAXTER was indicted for a like offence .

DAVID EDWARDS . I am a shoemaker, and live at the Duke of Northumberlad, next door to the Worship-street Office. I have been acquainted with the officers for a year. On the 13th of April I met the prisoner by appointment; he was to bring me twenty counterfeit shillings; he came in after me, and said he was sorry to detain me; we left the house, and went up Noble-street, and saw a woman standing there, and just before I got up to her; he said

"This is my old woman," I said,

"What is that your wife," he said

"Yes, she has got the stuff," meaning counterfeit money; he said,

"You may as well deal with her as me;" I objected to it, and said I would never trust a woman with my business - he asked me to step on a little way, I did so, and on turning round saw the woman give him a parcel; he followed me up the street leading into Gee-street, he there stepped up to me, and shifted the counterfeit money slily into my hand - I gave him 6 s. good money, which we had agreed on before. I could not get him to go the way I wanted; we went up Gee-street, into Compton-street; his woman kept with us all the time, and then we parted, and agreed to meet on the following Monday, at the same place. We all three went into a public-house in Compton-street, and at the door, he said he wished me to meet at this house on Monday - I objected to that; he said he would rather, because it was out of his parish, and the officers would not expect to see him there. I said it was taking me so much out of my way. We then agreed to meet at the White Lion, public-house, on Monday, and I ordered another score; I was afraid he was aware of what I was after, and I took a circuitous round to Worship-street - I found the officers were not there; and I gave the counterfeit money to Mance. On Monday I went to the White Lion, and was there about a quarter of an hour; he came in and said

"Have you seen my wife;" I said No; he said

"She is looking after you, you may as well walk with me" - I went out with him, and let him lead me where he pleased - he took me to the City-road. He was apprehended at six o'clock in the evening; he told me he had had so much call for them during the holidays, that he had made himself bankrupt, for he had sold all out, and in order to keep his customers together, he was obliged to buy of other people. I saw his wife standing under the workhouse wall, City-road.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Do you get your living by shoe-making - A. No. I go on messages for the officers. I have only dealt with one man besides the prisoner.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I have heard Edwards's statement. He delivered me twenty counterfeit shilling on Saturday the 13th, which I produce. I had frequent communications with him. I saw him, and the prisoner in company together in Leonard-street, and took them both; he acted under our direction. I searched him before he went to buy the money, and saw six good shillings delivered to him.

THOMAS VANN . Edwards acted under our direction, and I had instructions from the Solicitor of the Mint.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was engaged with them. I apprehended the prisoner, and asked if he knew that man; he said

"I have seen him - he was trying to get a place for me, and it seems now as if he had got one."

Mr. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . The twenty shillings are all counterfeit, of the same dye, and have never been in circulation.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-161

693. MICHEAL HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one copper, value 16 s. , the goods of James White .

JAMES LODGE . I am a fishmonger. On the 13th of March, between four and five o'clock, I was by Hughes's house, at Somers Town , and saw the prisoner take a copper from his door, put it on his head, and walk off with it. I pointed him out to White, who took him.

SOPHIA WHITE . Lodge alarmed me; I ran up the street, and seized the prisoner with the copper on his head. He said it was not mine.

JAMES WHITE . I came up and took it off his head - it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A bricklayer took me to this man's door, and told me to take the copper as he was going to fix it.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-162

694. JOHN JOHNSON and JOHN CHRISTOPHER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of James Upton , from his person .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 28th of March, about half-past eight o'clock at night, I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoners in company together, watched, and saw them attempt a gentleman's pocket - I followed them into Lincoln's Inn-fields , and saw Johnson lift Mr. Upton's pocket up, with one hand, and take the handkerchief out with the other - Christopher was close by. I immediately seized them both, and Johnson dropped it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was with Thompson, his account is correct.

JAMES UPTON . I was in Middle-row; my handkerchief was in my left hand pocket - I did not feel it taken. I heard a scuffle, turned round, and saw the prisoners in custody. I claimed the handkerchief.

JOHNSON'S Defence. They have both false sworn themselves.

CHRISTOPHER'S Defence. Johnson had nothing to do with it. I was the unfortunate person who took it. Thompson has false sworn himself.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

CHRISTOPHER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-163

695. ROBERT JONES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-164

696. MARY KITCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. , the goods of Philip Brown .

PHILIP BROWN . I keep the Neptune, public-house, Clarendon-street, Somers Town .

JOHN BOSTON . I live in Henry-street, Hampstead-road. On the 2d of March, at ten o'clock in the morning, I was passing through Thornaugh-street, and saw the prisoner with one Prior, and saw the handle of a quart pot behind her, which induced me to suspect her. I found she had another under her arm, and her shawl thrown over them - I took them both; Prior had a pint pot in his hat squeezed flat, and one in his handkerchief, and one under his waistcoat - the two the prisoner had had Brown's name on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-165

697. OBEDIAH LAWLESS and ROBERT BAINBRIDGE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , fourteen pounds of bacon, value 4 s. , the goods of Benjamin Brennand .

SUSAN BRENNAND . I am the wife of Benjamin Brennand , a cheese-monger . On the 12th of April, about eight o'clock at night, I went into the cellar, leaving nobody in the shop; I returned in a minute, and saw Bainbridge in custody, with fourteen pounds of bacon under his arm, which he had taken off a cheese in the window. The officer was bringing him in at the door, with his shoes off; the window was shut.

Prisoner BAINBRIDGE. Q. Can you swear to it - A. I bought it, and cut it myself.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I was in Goswell-street, and saw the prisoners attempt to take something from a stationer's shop. I watched them across the road to Brennand's; they passed the shop, looked in, and returned. I concealed myself in the door way, and saw Brennand go into her cellar; Bainbridge then went into the shop, took the bacon, and came out with his shoes off. Lawless was looking through the window all the time. I seized Bainbridge, and he ran away - next morning I took him on Saffron-hill. I am not quite certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAINBRIDGE'S Defence. I was looking for a place, and saw a man running, and took me. A gentleman said,

"Don't take him - there he goes;" he said,

"Never mind, I have had him in custody before;" which is unfortunately the case.

BAINBRIDGE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

LAWLESS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-166

698. ELEANOR LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , three keys, value 1 s., one bag;

1 d., and two half crowns, the property of William Anderson from his person .

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am a labourer , and live in St. John-street; I got up very early to go to work at Newgate-market, about half past four o'clock; I was returning up Snow-hill to look for something; the prisoner came across, and asked where she could get a coach; I said in Smithfield, and when we got there, she said she had no money to pay for it; I said, then she could not have one. She said she was very wet, and asked me to treat her with liquor; we went into a public house in Greenhill's-rents, and I paid for some liquor, and came out, as I was in a hurry to go to market. She followed me to Swan-alley , where I lodge; I unlocked the door, and she wanted to come in. I said she should not - she pushed in, and I pushed her out - this money was in a canvass purse, in my waistcoat pocket, and I suppose at this time she took it; I shut her out, and in two minutes missed my keys - I ran down stairs, and found her still outside the door. I charged her with having my keys; she said she had not, and wanted to come in again. I pulled the keys out of her breast: I then felt and missed my money. The watchman took her into a back room, and produced my half crowns.

JAMES METCALFE . I took her in charge - she resisted being searched. I found the purse and a half crown in her handkerchief; she said it was her own.

JAMES HILL . I am a patrol - I took her in charge - she said she had no money at all.

Prisoner's Defence. He took me up a court, and gave her the money, but afterwards wanted it back; I called for the watchman myself.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-167

699. REBECCA MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , one gown, value 6 s., two petticoats, value 2 s., one pair of stays, value 2 s., one pair of stockings, value 1 s., one pair of boots, value 2 s., one handkerchief, value 6 d., one bonnet, value 4 s., one purse, value 1 d., one thimble, 1 d., and seventeen shillings in money , the property of of Esther Duncombe , spinster .

ESTHER DUNCOMBE . I am a single woman. I live at Bromley, Kent. I came to town on a visit to my aunt, at No. 41, Rathbone-place . I slept with the prisoner at No. 5, and went to bed before her, about ten o'clock; the money was in my pocket.

Q. Was she a stranger to you - A. I never saw her before. I could not sleep at my aunt's, as she had no accommodation for me, and I was recommended to sleep with her. She did not come to bed at all. I awoke about six o'clock in the morning, and my clothes, consisting of the articles stated in the indictment, were gone. A person in the next room fetched my aunt. This was Saturday, and on Monday I found her in custody, with all my clothes, but my money was gone.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERDIGE . I am an officer. At three o'clock, on Monday morning, I apprehended the prisoner asleep in a waggon, at Beckonsfield, Buckinghamshire; the clothes were in her box. I asked her how she came to do it, she said she did not know, and that she was going to Ludlow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Judgment Respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-168

700. WILLIAM SHEERING and WILLIAM STEPHENS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , forty pounds of lead, value 10 s., the goods of John Smith , and fixed to his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building of his.

ALFRED SMITH . I am brother to John Smith , who has a building in Fifteenfoot-lane, St. Pancras . On the 24th of February, I saw the lead safe, and on the 26th, after the prisoners were taken, I found it all stripped off the roof of the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. I believe you know Sherring bears a good character - A. I hear so.

JOHN BLAKE , JUN. I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in Gray's Inn-lane-road. About eight o'clock in the morning, I was opening shop, and saw the prisoners opposite, with something heavy. I called my father, who went after them. Sherring was carrying a basket; they were brought back, and the basket was full of lead.

JOHN BLAKE , SENR. I went after them, and saw them in Cromer-street. Sheering was carrying a basket, and I believe Stephens to be the man who was with him. He stopped to rest from the weight; I went up and asked what he had in the basket, which was covered over; he said old stuff, that he had brought from Battle Bridge. I said if he would tell me where, I would go and see if it was right - if so, I would let him go - he refused, and the other ran away. I took Sherring to the watchhouse - went with a constable, and took Stephens in George-street, Battle Bridge, in about an hour and a half. I afterward took the lead to the premises, and 51 lbs. of it matched the roof, but there was 101 lbs. in all. I believe he has been an industrious lad.

GEORGE HUNT . I am a plumber, and fitted 51 lbs. of the lead to the place; it was all that was taken. Sheering bore a good character.

SHERRING - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Whipped and Discharged.

STEPHENS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-169

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 1822.

701. EMMA PARROTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a watch, value 20 s. the goods of William Filler .

WILLIAM FILLER . I live in Broad-street . The prisoner was servant to my lodger. On the 1st of April, I missed a watch from the kitchen mantle-piece. She had access to the kitchen.

WILLIAM HONSHALL . I am a cabinet-maker. The prisoner and I were brought up children together. On the 9th of April, I saw her near her father's house, in Stacey-street, she gave me this watch to pawn. I pawned it at

Alder's, in her name, for 16 s., and gave her the money. - She said it was her father's. She gave it me as we were going to Tothill-field's fair.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Were you taken into custody about this - A. Yes; I was kept one day. I met her by accident. I was never in the house.

WILLIAM LAKE . I am servant to Mr. Alsey, of Berwick-street. I took a watch in pawn from a young man, in the name of Emma Parrot .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-170

702. THOMAS CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , one handkerchief, value 5 s., the goods of James Waltho ; and one watch, value 30 s. , the goods of Mary Ivory , spinster .

JAMES WALTHO . I am servant to Prince Esterhazy, who lives at Chandos-house. On the 26th February, the prisoner came to the house with two rolls for breakfast, and when he was gone, I missed my handkerchief off the hall table. I ran out and overtook him at the corner of Mansell-street, he cried and fell down to prevent my taking him. I took him back, and asked him for my handkerchief, he took it from his pocket and threw it on the table. I gave him in charge.

MARY IVORY . I live at the house. My watch hung up in the hall cupboard.

JOHN WHALES . I took him in charge; I found the watch in his coat pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-171

703. MARY YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , thirteen yards of lawn, value 10 s. the goods of William Haynes , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HAYNES . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Edgeware-road . On the 6th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and asked to see some fine linen, she looked over a variety of goods and left, ordering them to be sent to No. 3, Lesson Grove, for the inspection of a gentleman. Suspecting her from her manner, I followed her, and found this piece of lawn concealed under her cloak; she turned round and said,

"For God's sake forgive me," and gave it into my hand. There were other people in the shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-172

704. EDWARD WELLS and THOMAS MATTHEWS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , seven handkerchiefs, value 30 s. , the goods of William Todd .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . On 18th March, I saw the prisoner in Great Russell-street , loitering about Mr. Todd's shop, I watched and saw Wells pull a piece of handkerchiefs partly through the window, I took him in the act of drawing it out.

BENJAMIN TODD . My father keeps the shop, the piece of handkerchiefs was not entirely removed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-173

705. ANN TURNER , were indicted of stealing, on the 24th of March , four pounds of soap, value 2 s., and six shillings , the property of Charles Grevill , Esq.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a butler to Charles Grevill , Esq., of George Street, Hanover Square , the prisoner was laundry-maid ; master had several times lost money from his library table-drawer. The prisoner had no business there. On 16th of March, I marked 10 s., and on the 21st, I marked 12 s. on the reverse side, and put them in the drawer. On the 24th, I missed 6 s., some of each mark. I had borrowed money of different servants, but could discover none of the marked shillings, and on the 26th, I paid the servants their board-wages, and had change from them all. There are fourteen servants in the house, I then sent for Plank.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They could all go to the library as well as her - A. Certainly, she paid me back 2 s., one of which I marked when I paid her.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I took her in charge; she said she knew nothing of it, and all the money she had changed was a sovereign with Mr. Barber, grocer, of York-street, Westminster. I said she had given the butler two of the shillings stolen from the drawer - she said it was what she received from the grocer.

Prisoner. I leave my Defence to my Counsel.

JAMES STANBURY . I am a servant to Mr. Barber. The prisoner changed a sovereign at our house on the 22d or 23d of March, and received about 17 s. change. I do not know whether other servants of Mr. Grevill's deal with us.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-174

706. MARTIN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , two bridles, value 10 s.; one collar, value 7 s., and three houses, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Claridge , and MATTHEW PADGETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM ROSE . I am servant to Robert Claridge , a farmer , at Finchley . On the 11th of February, I locked these things all safe in the stable at seven o'clock at night, and next morning at six o'clock found the boards pulled down, and the things stolen; they had tried to force the door open, but had not succeeded. About a fortnight after, I saw the bridles at Johnson's. The stable yard is fenced all round. Sullivan had come into the stable between three and four on the 11th, and asked if I had any horse hair to sell.

SAMUEL JOHNSON . I am a collar and harness maker, and live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell. On the 15th of March I saw Padgett in Smithfield-market, and bought the bridles of him. I said that before I paid him, he must go to somebody, and be identified, for I was afraid it was stolen. I took him to several people, who said they would be answerable for him, and I paid him.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On the 2d of April, Padgett was brought to the office to me; he said he bought the things of an Irishman, who carried oranges and lemons, and would find him if he could. Sullivan was brought to me on the 4th of April by Coulson - I asked how he came by the bridle and collar; he said he bought them of a man on the other side of Highgate, for 3 s. or 4 s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he not say he examined carefully to ascertain if they were honestly come by - A. He did.

CHARLES READ . I took Padgett in the Kingsland-road. I told him I took him for selling the bridles to Johnson; he said he bought them of an Irishman, who sold oranges, who called him up at seven or eight o'clock - he denied knowing any thing of the collar - his wife contradicted him; he then said he had sold it for 2 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM COULSON. I am a constable of Pancras, I apprehended Sullivan on Easter Sunday, in Catherine Wheel-alley, by Padgett's information - his wife went with me to find him. I told him I took him for stealing a bridle and harness from a stable at Finchley; he said he knew nothing at all of it - I then told him who he had sold them to, and where Padgett lived - he said he did not know him. he wanted to know who dare detain him; I took him to the watch-house, and on Monday morning, he said he bought them of a cadger on Highgate Hill, for 3 s., and sold them to Padgett for 5 s., but he never was at Finchley.

Cross-examined. Q. If it had not been for Padgett you would not have found him - A. No.

(Property produced and sworn to).

SULLIVAN'S Defence. They never were in my hands. Padgett said he bought them at a sale.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

PADGETT - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-175

707. ISAAC SQUINCE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one coat, value 25 s. , the goods of John Dixon , and MARY CARTER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

HANNAH WALLIS . I am servant to John Dixon , who lives at Dalston . On Sunday evening the 3d of March, about seven o'clock, Squince came and said he had brought some oranges which had been ordered by my master; I said I was sure they were not ordered - he had something in a handkerchief. He said they were ordered; I went up to enquire leaving him alone in the passage where the coat hung - when I came down I missed it, and him; he was found in Spitalfields that evening. I am sure he is the boy.

JOHN DIXON . I live at Dalston. My servant informed me the coat was gone. The prisoner was taken that evening. I saw the coat on Wednesday, and knew it, it was a box coat. I had ordered no oranges.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman of Spitalfields. On Sunday night the 3d of March, about a quarter to eleven o'clock, I took Carter in Bell-lane, with this coat tied up in a shawl. She said she picked it up at the corner of Bell-lane. Directly as I took her, Squince, (who was just before her ran away); they did not appear to know each other. As I returned I found him in South-street, and directly I made towards him; he ran off, and was stopped. He said he lived in Webb-square.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a private watchman. I heard the alarm, and stopped Squince.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SQUINCE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

CARTER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-176

708. GEORGE PRYOR was indicted for stealing on the 2d of March , two pewter pots, value 1 s. 2 d. , the goods of Charles Fisher .

CHARLES FISHER . I keep the Jubilee, public-house, George-street, Somers Town ; these pots were taken from a customers house; I found them at Marlborough-street, on the 2d of March, they have my name and sign on them, they were flatted down, but were quite good before.

JOHN BOSTON . I am a coach-maker. On Saturday morning, the 2d of March, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Upper Thornaugh-street, with a young woman; I took them both, the woman had pots about her, which were not flatted; I took a pint pot from the prisoner's hat, and another from his waistcoat.

JOHN JONES . The prisoner was given in my charge; I asked where he got the pots - he gave no answer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the road.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-177

709. HENRY PORTER was indicted for stealing on the 11th of April , one pair of half boots, value 4 s. , the goods of John Bell .

JOHN BELL . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Middle-row, St. Giles's . On the 11th of April, about one o'clock, the prisoner and two others came in, the prisoner cheapened some boots; he left them, and they went further on, and in five minutes one of them returned, and tried a pair on; I turned my head, and saw a pair snatched down, and saw the prisoner running away; I called Stop thief! and he was stopped with them.

THOMAS CHILD . I live near Bell; I pursued the prisoner up Compton-street; he was stopped in Crown-street, in my sight, and I took the boots from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The lads asked me to look at the boots for them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-178

710. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY BLACKWELL . I am a surgical instrument-maker ; the prisoner was my apprentice for two years, and received money on my account, which he ought to pay me immediately as he received it. On the 13th of April I sent him to Mr. Evans for 1 l. 1 s. 6 d., he returned about eight o'clock in the evening, and said he had not got it, for the shop was shut - he was taken up next morning.

DANIEL STEVENS . I am foreman to Mr. Evans; Blackwell works for him. On Saturday evening, the 13th of April, about seven o'clock, the prisoner brought the work home, and presented his masters bill, and receipt; I saw a sovereign and some silver paid him - it was all paid in money by the clerk.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Have you a perfect recollection of the money being paid - A. I sat next to the clerk when he paid him.

THOMAS GOOK . I apprehended him on Sunday morning he was then in liquor, and denied all knowledge of it; when he was sober; he said, he had spent it, and expressed his contrition.

Prisoner's Defence. The constable said if I gave him money he would let me off.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-179

711. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 5th of April , five sacks, value 1 s., one fowl, value 1 s., one bridle, value 1 s., one pair of girths, value 4 d., one gimblet, value 2 d. , the goods of William Nicholson .

WILLIAM NICHOLSON . I live in Hornsey-lane . On Thursday night, the 6th of April, at half-past eight o'clock, I saw these things safe in a shed adjoining my house; the door was fastened by a strap - I missed them next morning, the fowl was alive.

JAMES CLARK . I live at Upper Holloway, and am a baker - three sacks of mine were in Nicholson's possession.

WILLIAM BRITTON . I am a watchman; my beat is about a mile from the prosecutors. About ten minutes before three o'clock I saw the prisoner with a sack on his back, I asked what was in it; he said, some sacks; that he met two men in the road, about five miles back, who told him to take the sack up, and take them to some inn in town; he could not tell the sign, or where it was, and that when they got to the inn they would give him some beer; I found the articles stated in the indictment in it - the fowl was quite warm, and its head wrung off.

ROBERT BROWN . The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse - I found a gimblet in his pocket which Nicholson claims.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed - two vagabonds led me into this scrape.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-180

712. JOHN THACKER was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March , one snuff-box, value 2 s., the goods of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Eland, of Holborn. On the 15th of March between eight and nine o'clock, I was coming through Gray's Inn-lane; there was a crowd, and I stopped to see what was the matter; a person said I was robbed; I felt, and missed my snuff box - the prisoner was walking along, but was stopped, and the box found between his waistcoat and shirt.

JAMES METCALF . I am a constable; I saw the prisoner go behind Jones and put his hand against his pocket, draw it back, and put something in his pocket - I followed and took the box from his bosom, he was alone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the crowd.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-181

713. HENRY WHITE was indicted for stealing on the 16th of February , six shirts, value 2 l., four handkerchiefs, value 8 s., four pair of stockings, value 5 s., one spoon value 9 d., the goods of Hugh Miller , and two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. , the goods of James Fletcher .

JAMES FLETCHER . I am servant to Mr. Hugh Miller , who lives in George-street, Hanover-square; the prisoner occasionally came to assist me; my handkerchief was in the kitchen, and master's was in the bed-room; some things were missed from another place, for which he was apprehended, and at the office these things were produced which we had not missed.

JOHN ELLIOTT . I am shopman to Mr. Tate, a pawnbroker. Between the 26th of June and the 12th of March, the prisoner pawned three shirts for 6 s. each, and another for 5 s., also four handkerchiefs.

WILLIAM BYLES . I am shopman to Mess. Chaffers and Co. pawnbrokers, Greek-street, Soho; the prisoner pawned two shirts with me for 6 s. 6 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT ANDREWS . I apprehended him, and found duplicates of this property on him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-182

714. WILLIAM LIMEN was indicted for stealing on the 13th of March , twelve locks, value 12 s. , the goods of Edward May and Aaron Morritt .

GEORGE CLAPHAM. I am servant to Messrs. May and Morritt, of Oxford-street ; the prisoner came in and asked for curtain rings; he then asked for screw-rings, I turned round to get them, and saw him put a parcel on his pocket, I seized him, and he produced twelve locks from his pocket, but I did not see him produce them myself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-183

715. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing on the 26th March , six pounds of cheese, value 3 s. , the goods of John Lewis .

JOHN LEWIS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Peter's-lane . On the 26th of March, half a cheese was stolen from my window.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. About ten o'clock at night I saw the prisoner with another man; I watched and saw the other go into Lewis's shop and take the cheese; the prisoner went to the door and met him with it; took it and wrapped it up in a cloth - they went different ways, I took him and he dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is useless speaking, for if I say one thing they will swear another - I was alone.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-184

716. MARY BEE was indicted for stealing on the 27th of March , twenty yards of cotton, value 15 s., the goods of Charles Ford , privately in his shop .

The prosecutor stating the cotton to be the joint property of himself, and William Ford , the prisoner (on this indictment) was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-185

717. THOMAS EDWARDS , THOMAS JACOBS , and JOHN DAY were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Oliver Dixon Green , from his person .

OLIVER DIXON GREEN . I am a school-master , and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. On the 18th of April, at a quarter before eight o'clock at night, I went along King-street and Wellington-street, with my wife; a few paces up Wellington-street , Waddington tapped me on the shoulder. I missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the three prisoners about twelve yards off, standing at a butcher's window, at the corner of King-street. Waddington went up, enclosed them in his arms, and pushed them all into the butcher's shop.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am a constable. I first saw the prisoners at a linen draper's shop, in St. John-street, together. I watched them following a lady and gentleman, and in about ten minutes, I saw them in King-street, near Mr. Green. I walked on the opposite side, and saw Day draw a handkerchief out of Mr. Green's pocket; they crossed over to my side. I crossed, and told Mr. Green, then ran over to the butcher's, and pushed them into the shop. Edwards ran out, and Mr. Green pulled him in again; and in the scuffle, I saw him take the handkerchief out of his hat, and throw it down. I picked it up close behind him.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Jacobs did nothing - A. He was with the others.

JACOB'S Defence. I was not near him.

DAY'S Defence. The officer swears utterly false.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JACOBS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

DAY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-186

718. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , one fender, value 30 s. , the goods of Cornelius Norris .

CORNELIUS NORRIS . I am a broker , and live in Leather-lane . On the 23d of February, this fender was tied to a chair; between five and six o'clock in the evening the cord was cut by somebody. I saw the prisoner take it away; I ran and secured him; he threw it down, said he was in liquor, and it was a mistake.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I live opposite Norris, and saw the prisoner throw it down. He appeared drunk.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY

Strongly recommended to mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-187

719. THOMAS SMALE and JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , one trunk, value 20 s., twenty-seven shifts, value 4 l., twelve caps, value 6 s., fifteen handkerchiefs, value 7 s., twenty-four towels, value 24 s., and six petticoats, value 6 s. , the goods of Sophia Meihan .

ELIZA WATKINS . I am servant to Miss Sophia Meihan ; she had returned from Brighton at the latter end of March, and a box, containing this property, was to come by Shepherd's van, to be delivered at No. 19, York-place, Baker-street. I found them at Bow-street.

JOHN FELLOWS . I am a carpenter, and live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury. On the 20th of March, about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock, I was in Little Russell-street and saw a man running as hard as he could, with a trunk, the prisoners were close behind him; he pitched it into a public house door way, and crossed into Museum-street. The prisoners stood opposite the door. Smale crossed, and took up the trunk, and followed the man. White stood at the corner till he passed them, and then ran after him to the end of Great Russell-street. I ran down Gilbert-street; saw Taylor, and told him to come with me; I got into a Great Russell-street, and laid hold of Smale with the trunk, and asked where he was going to take it; he said that a man asked him to carry it - the other man was in the middle of the road, and ran away. I found White behind, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I secured Smale with the box; he said he was taking it into the City.

WILLIAM BOTHWITH . I saw the prisoners with another man, who got away; White was walking with that man; they appeared to be talking together. Fellows took Smale with the trunk; the other then ran way; I secured White.

ROBERT SHEPHERD . I am proprietor of the Brighton van. On the 19th of March the trunk came up from Brighton, and arrived safe at the office on the 20th, and was then put into our cart to be delivered as directed. I found it at Bow-street, with the same direction on it.

AARON SHAW . I am porter to Mr. Sheppard. On the 20th of March, I had the trunk in my cart to deliver at No. 19, York-place; it was stolen at the corner of Bowle's-yard, where I stopped to deliver a parcel, at half past twelve o'clock - I was not absent above five minutes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMALE'S Defence. I was going to Orange-street - a man said he would pay me to carry the trunk.

SMALE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-188

720. GEORGE ROBERTS was indicted for stealing on the 12th of March , one handkerchief, value 18 d., the goods of George Sanderson , from the person of Sarah, his wife .

SARAH SANDERSON . I am the wife of George Sanderson. On the 12th of March, about twelve o'clock. I was in Spitalfields Market, and lost a handkerchief from the bottom of a flag basket; it had a quantity of garden stuff over it. The officer seized the prisoner with it - it was safe just before.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer. I was in the market and heard a cry - the prisoner ran by me; I took him, and found the handkerchief in his bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave 6 d. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy.

Whipped and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-189

721. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , twenty-eight pounds of rope, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Jones Pitcher and William Pitcher ; and one chisel, value 6 d. , the goods of John Spencer .

THOMAS SPOIL . I am a constable. I was watching the prosecutor's premises in the Dock Yard, on the 5th of April, and about twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come over the pailing; he went into the saw pit, and remained there about an hour and a half; and about two o'clock he came out, with this rope on his shoulder. I stopped him; he said he picked it up; I found the chisel under his shirt; he said he found that by the rope.

THOMAS WALLIS . I am servant to H. J. Pitcher and W. Pitcher; the rope is their's, and was in the saw pit loose.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I work at Messrs. Pitchers'; the rope was safe in the saw pit, loose; it is now wound up.

JOHN SPENCER . I am a carpenter. I lost a chisel off my bench in the yard.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-190

722. JOHN CONNER and JOHN SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , fourteen pounds of salt petre, value 5 s.; seven pounds of bay salt, value 3 s.; and seven pounds of red lead, value 3 s. , the goods of William Brooks .

GEORGE AYRES . I am shopman to Mr. Cooper, a grocer, of Duke-street, Bloomsbury. On the 29th of March, I packed up these articles, and delivered them to Brooks, to carry to Chalford.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a carrier , of Chalford. I received the parcel from Ayres; and about eight o'clock at night, I was in Oxford-street , near Bond-street, and was asked if I had lost a parcel; I looked, and missed this one from the middle of the cart: it was produced immediately.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a painter. I was at the corner of Queen-street and Oxford-street, and saw a man walking behind Brooks's cart, and saw the legs of another man hanging out of the cart; he was sitting on the hind part, and gave a parcel to Scott, who was behind, and he came away with it under his arm. I seized and gave him to Budden, then went towards Conner, who was in the cart, but he ran up John-street, and I lost him in Oxford-street. He was taken in half an hour; but I will swear to him.

WILLIAM BUDDEN . I was in Oxford-road; Davis gave Scott to me, I held him by the collar, he gave a sudden turn, threw the parcel down, and as I stooped to pick it up, he got off; I followed, and lost him; I saw him at the watch-house soon after, and am sure of him.

FRANCIS HUMPHRIES. I am a patrol. I heard an alarm about a quarter past eight o'clock, and saw Scott running among the coaches; I followed him down Queen-street, and took him in the Mews. Budden saw him soon after, and was positive to him.

JAMES HICKS . I am an officer. I was in John-street, Oxford-street, on the 29th of March, heard an alarm; saw Conner running, followed and took him in Oxford-street. Davis said he was the man who took the parcel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SCOTT'S Defence. Hearing an alarm, I ran with others, and was stopped; the people called out that I was not the man, but he took me to the watch-house.

CONNER - NOT GUILTY .

SCOTT - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-191

723. MARY MURRAY and ELIZA GRIFFITHS were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , four pounds of bacon, value 2 s. , the property of Edmund Stolworthy .

The Prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-192

724. JOHN MACLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one plough, value 5 s.; four planes, value 7 s.; three chisels, value 18 d.; one oil-stone, value 2 s.; and one square, value 18 d. , the goods of James Brasher .

JAMES BRASHER . I am a carpenter , and live in Mason's-alley, Basinghall-street. The prisoner worked for me, and I lent him all these tools, but one plane; but did not allow him to take them off the premises. He left me before he had finished his job. I met him three weeks afterward, in Paul's-alley, Whitecross-street, with a quantity of pawnbroker's duplicates in his hand, I asked him to let me see them; he ran off, I followed: he was secured, and fifty-four duplicates found on him, some of which were for my tools.

LEONARD MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. The prisoner pawned a plough with me.

JOHN CLARENCE . I am servant to Mr. Cassell. The prisoner pawned three planes and a chisel.

THOMAS MATTHEWS . He pawned a plane and oil-stone with me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-193

725. MARY FLYNN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , six frocks, value 3 s.; one quilt, value 1 s.; two aprons, value 18 d.; two sheets, value 5 s.; three yards of linen, value 4 s.; one pair of boots, value 3 s.; one gown, value 2 s.; one flat iron, value 6 d., and a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. , the goods of Cornelius Harrington .

CORNELIUS HARRINGTON . I live in High-street, St. Giles . I employed the prisoner to take care of my children

and lodging. On the 8th of March she left without warning, and I missed these things.

CHARLES ELLIS . I am a pawn-broker, and live in Drury-lane. I have two frocks, an apron, one quilt, and a pair of shoes, pawned in the name of Flynn - I did not take them in.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Monmouth-street. I have a shirt, some linen and cotton, pawned in the name of Mary Flynn . I did not take them in.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-194

726. RICHARD COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , two trowels, value 3 s. and two small tools, value 2 s. , the goods of Charles Thomas .

CHARLES THOMAS . I am a plasterer . On the 4th of April. I was working at a corner house in Regent's Park , and left my tools under the garret stair-case. I went on Saturday morning, and they were gone.

THOMAS KELLY . I work at the house, and have known the prisoner two years - he worked as a bricklayer. I was playing by the house on Good Friday, and saw him go into the corner house; I followed him up stairs, and saw him go under the garret stairs; he looked at the tools, and asked if they were stone-mason's tools; I said Yes, and he came down. He took nothing then.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. On Saturday evening, the 6th April, I took the prisoner; and before I spoke to him, he said

"I know nothing of the tools." I found a trowel on the top of a cupboard in his room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin. Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-195

727. THOMAS BOWMAN and ELIZA BOWMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , nineteen jugs, value 4 s.; twenty mugs, value 18 d.; fourteen mustard pots, value 2 s.; two chamber pots, value 1 s. 10 d.; two basins, value 2 s.; seventeen dishes, value 4 s.; and two baskets, value 5 s. , the goods of John Richards .

The Prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-196

728. JAMES BRIXEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , one sheet, value 2 s., and two curtains, value 2 s., the goods of William Palmer , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM PALMER . I live in Globe-street, Bethnal-green . In February, 1821, the prisoner took a furnished room of me, at 4 s. a week, and left in May, without notice. He owed me 5 l. 15 s., money lent. I went into his room, and missed the sheet and curtains. I met him in March last, and asked what he had done with my property; he denied it. I gave him in charge; he then said he meant to bring them back.

JOSEPH REEVES. I am an officer. I took him in charge in a public-house; he immediately ran out, I followed and secured him. He said he would return them. He would not tell where he lived. I found a letter on him directed to Legg-alley; I found his wife there, and she gave me two duplicates.

JOHN HILL . I am servant to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, of Shoreditch. I have two curtains and a sheet pawned in the names of John and William Perry . I do not know who by.

Prisoner. I pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-197

ELEVENTH DAY. MONDAY, APRIL 29, 1822.

729. WILLIAM JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , one piano-forte, value 20 l. , the goods of James Nutting .

JAMES NUTTING . I am a piano-forte maker , and live in Dean-street, Soho. Two or three days previous to the 31st of January, the prisoner came and left his card, stating himself as a tailor, living at 32, Cumberland-street-road. I enquired, and found he did live there. He said he wanted a piano-forte for a most respectable lady, who had his first floor; he hired it at 16 s. a month, and referred me to Mr. J. Bunning, No. 14, Cumberland-street, and then left. I made enquiry, and was satisfied. We had no further conversation. I went to his house about the middle of the day on the 31st of January, I was to have a month in advance, and 2 s. for the carriage, which the man who took it brought back. I did not see him again till I saw him in custody. He called at my house, when I was out, and paid 3 s. more. On the 9th of February, I found my piano at Mr. Green's shop, in Newman-street, about three minutes walk from my house.

Cross-examined by PRENDERGAST. Q. You found his representation correct - A. Yes. It was worth twenty guineas; I would not sell it for less.

JAMES GOODWIN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Stafford-street, Lisson Green, Paddington. On the 31st of January, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the private door of my house, and gave a double knock; I answered the door - he wished to know if I would take a piano-forte in pledge, and produced a card. After some hesitation, I agreed to go and look at it; I went to his house, No. 32, Cumberland-street, and examined the piano - I agreed to advance him 10 l. on it; it was brought to my house the same evening by two porters, and the prisoner with them. I gave him the money next morning. On the 8th of February it was redeemed by a person named Green, who paid the interest and principal.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a furniture broker, and live in Newman's-passage, Newman-street. I redeemed the piano-forte on the 8th of February - I believe the one produced to be the same. I have known the prisoner a year and a half; he came to me on the 7th of February, and asked if I would buy a piano-forte - I refused, he said it was a very good one if I liked to buy it. I said if I can buy it worth the money I will. He said it belonged to a lodger on his first floor, and he wanted to sell it for her;

as she wanted some money to pay her rent. I told him to call the next morning at ten o'clock, and if I could I would look at it; he came next morning, and took me to Goodwin's, and just before we got there, he gave me the duplicate, and stood on the other side of the way while I went in; he said he would wait there. I looked at it, and redeemed it.

Q. Did he give you any reason why he would not go into the shop with you - A. He said if they would not let me have it he would go in himself - he said,

"You take this ticket in, and I will meet you at the public-house;" he said he would not go in - I did not ask him why. I had no suspicion of him. I redeemed it for 10 l. and 2 s. 6 d., interest. The prisoner wanted 6 l. for the ticket, I said I would give him 5 l., which I did - I gave him part of it in the public-house, and part at home, where he gave me a receipt.

Q. Then he did not go nearer to the shop than the public-house - A. Yes. I looked at it, then went over, and told him what I would give him for the ticket. I redeemed it, and we both went home together - he asked what he should give me for it back again in a week's time. I said,

"If you want it back, why do you sell it;" he said he thought he should want it again - I said I would rather have the money than the piano, for mine was a bad place for business, and he should have it back for the same money, and if he brought any one to buy it, and got 2 l. on it, I should expect something. It had not been in my shop two hours before Mr. Nutting's man claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. You agreed to let him have it back at the end of a week or fortnight - A. Yes. He made no secret of it. While he was out of the way, his wife gave me the delivery note, which the prosecutor had sent with it.

COURT. Q. What did he get out of the way - A. I do not know.

Q. What did you mean when you said,

"While he was out of the way" - A. He was not at home, and the officers said he was out of the way. His wife said he was afraid to come home, for fear of the officers.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I found the piano forte at the officers.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of April, I had been looking for him from the 9th of February. I waited at his house four hours before I could gain admission, and then found him laying on the roof, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock at night. It was at a house in Clerkenwell, which he had taken the day before the piano was pawned.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a letter to say that a distress was to be put into my house for rent, and pawned the piano to pay my rent. I asked Green to advance me something on the ticket for a time, and shewed him the delivery note, and said I did not want to dispose of it altogether, or I should get into trouble. He looked at it, and said he would advance but 4 l. I said,

"I shall want it away again, and pray keep it."

SAMUEL JONES . I live in Circus-street. Two days before the month was up, I tendered the prosecutor another months hire for the instrument, by the prisoner's direction.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-198

730. CATHERINE AVIS was indicted for stealing, on 4th April , one sheet, valve 5 s.; one quilt, value 6 s.; one shirt, value 4 s.; three handkerchiefs, value 2 s; one shawl, value 2 s, and one apron, value 3 d. , the goods of Thomas Murrell . and GEORGE AGENT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

THOMAS MURRELL . I am a lodger in the second floor front room, of No. 33, Brick Lane . On the 4th of April, the articles stated in the indictment were in my room. I went out between five and six o'clock in the evening and locked the door; I returned about a quarter before nine. The prisoner Avis had lived with me as a wife, nearly a fortnight; she went out one day, and did not return for a week; she had a key of the room, but told me she had lost it. The shift was mine. I had been living with a woman before, who is dead. I knew the prisoner wore it. I missed all these things except the shawl, I am not certain whether I missed that. The prisoner was taken on the 15th of April. She used these things when she lived with me.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You allowed her to pawn articles for your mutual support - A. Yes, while she was with me.

Q. The other prisoner was wicked enough to gain her affections - A. She lived with him before she came to me. She said he had ill-used her, and she would not return. I allowed her to wear some of these things.

CATHERINE JARMAN . I live at No. 33, Brick-lane. I keep the house. Murrell brought the prisoner home; she lived a fortnight with him, and then went away, and came back in a week, and Mr. Jarman called him down, and said he would not suffer him to be in the house if he lived with her, and they Murrell turned her away; this was on the day before Good Friday. On the 4th of April, the male prisoner came between seven and eight o'clock, and asked me for a 1 d. of tobacco, and while I was serving him, she came in, and went up stairs. Agent gave me a bad sixpence, which I refused, and he went out, and then Avis came down with a large bundle in her hands. I was afraid to stop her. When Murrell came I told him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Agent was on the spot all the while - A. Yes.

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am an officer. On the 15th of April, I took Avis. I found she had a gown tied in a handkerchief, and a shawl was on a woman's back by her side, to whom she said she had lent it. She said she lodged at No. 2, Clement's-lane; when I came there I found a Agent there; he said it was his lodging. I found a handkerchief, an apron, and two small keys, one of which fits the prosecutor's room.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-199

731. JOHN M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , two shirts, value 2 s. , the goods of Joseph Fisher .

SARAH FISHER . I am the wife of Joseph Fisher . We live at Hornsey . These shirts were in the drying' ground, which is not fenced all round. They were stolen on Wednesday, the 20th of March, between two and three o'clock; they had been hanging out for an hour before.

EDWARD VASS . I am pot-boy at the Compasses, Hornsey. I saw the prisoner take two shirts off the line, and put them in his pocket. I told my mistress. Howard pursued and took him with the shirts.

JOHN HOWARD . I ran and stopped the prisoner about fifty yards from the drying ground, and took the shirts from under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-200

732. RICHARD FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , two coats, value 15 s. and one waistcoat, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Yuille , Esq.

JONATHAN CROW . I am servant to Thomas Yuville , Esq., of Bedford-square . On the 16th of April, these things were in the servant's hall; about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I left them there to brush. I missed them in about an hour, and saw them at Bow-street, about eleven o'clock.

MARY WRIGHT . My husband is a beadle, we live in Tottenham-court-road, I was coming along Bedford-square at a quarter past nine o'clock, and saw a man before me like a dustman; I looked down the prosecutor's area, and saw the prisoner coming out of the area door with a bag on his shoulder; he shut the door softly, which made me suspect, - he came up the steps, and pulled the gate too. I followed him, intending to tell the first man I met, and in Prince's-street, Drury-lane, I met a constable and told him; I am sure he is the man.

PHILIP APPLETON . I am a constable. Wright pointed the prisoner out to me, I followed him into Fleet-street. He appeared a sweep. He had a companion; I asked a man to take his companion. I asked the prisoner what he had in his bag, he said rope. I said I was an officer; he immediately threw it down and ran off, I pursued and secured him; the other got off. The bag contained two coats and a waistcoat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other man took me there, as he said, to sweep a chimney; and when I came out, he gave me the sack to carry, saying it was soot. I did not know but he had swept the chimney.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-201

733. ANN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , two yards of linen cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of William Hartwright .

MARY ANN HARTWRIGHT . I am the wife of William Hartwright , a silversmith ; we live in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's . The linen cloth was in my back parlour. The prisoner lodged with an acquaintance of mine. She has sometimes gone on errands for my landlord. She came into my place, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and sat down, she appeared much in liquor, and staid about an hour. The linen laid on the bureau bedstead. I went down stairs, and when I came up, she was gone, and I missed it. I had only left my children in the room with her.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. I took a remnant of linen in pawn of a woman, on the 20th of March, in the name of Thornton. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner; the prosecutrix claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE HARTWRIGHT . I am ten years old. The prisoner was in my mother's room, and mother went down stairs. I did not see her meddle with the cloth. She went away before mother came up.

ROBERT FEARMAN . I am an hair-dresser, and live in Brick-lane. The prisoner lodged with me. I found a duplicate of this linen in the privy of my house, down in the soil.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am a constable. I apprehended her on Friday, the 22nd of March. The prosecutrix asked what she had done with the linen, she said she did not know what she meant. The prosecutrix said she was confident that she had taken it, she denied it. I produce the duplicate.

JOHN BURGESS . This is the duplicate I gave the person.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband treated the prosecutrix with liquor, and gave her money. She said she would have no more to do with it.

MRS. HARTWRIGHT. It is false.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-202

734. JOHN WARD was indicted for stealing on the 14th of March , one umbrella, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Jenkins .

RICHARD JENKINS . I am employed in the East India Warehouse. On the 14th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the Two Brewers, public-house; I put my umbrella down on my left side, the prisoner was drinking with another man in the same box for four hours, and left before me; a short time afterwards I missed my umbrella, and found it at Worship-street five days after, with a piece of new leather put to it.

ROBERT WARD . I am a silk weaver; I sat next to the prisoner in the same box, on the left hand side, and I saw him take the umbrella and put it down by himself, and in a short time he got up and took it out; I did not then know but it was his own, but Jenkins afterwards missed it.

HYAMS PHILLIPS . I am a dealer in clothes; I live six doors from the Two Brewers. On the 15th of April, about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner sold me this umbrella for 1 s. 9 d.; Jenkins afterwards claimed it - I made no alteration in it.

SAMUEL HOWLY . I am a constable, and took the prisoner; he at first denied the charge, but afterwards said he sold it to Phillips.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-203

735. CHARLES GWYNN and JAMES JONES were indicted for stealing on the 15th of April , ten pounds of feathers, value 15 s., two pillows, value 6 s., ten jars, value 5 s., eighteen plates, value 3 s., and one powder flask, value 4 d. , the goods of Swithin Gibbon .

SWITHIN GIBBON. I keep a chandler's shop in Duke-street, St. George's in the East . On the 15th of April, about a quarter past nine o'clock in the morning, (the feathers were in a bed, the pillows were nailed up in the cupboard, with the rest of the things in a room on the first floor; the prisoners had slept in my house for five nights, in the same room where they were;) Jones was going out with the feathers; Gwynn remained behind; I found the bed stripped, and the cupboard broken open, and these things gone - I stopped Jones as he was going out with the feathers in a bag - every thing was safe on the 30th of March.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a constable; I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoners; I found the bed had been ripped, and sewn up again; more feathers had been stolen; the nails had been drawn from the cupboard; I found a powder flask in Gwynn's pocket; he said he picked it up in the street; Gibbon said it was one of the things that were nailed up in the cupboard; they said the bag of feathers was under the bed, and they were going to sell them.

SWITHIN GIBBON. This flask was in the cupboard with the things.

JONES'S Defence. I never knew there was a closet in the room - we went to sell the feathers, which were under the bed.

GWYNN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year and Publickly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-204

736. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for embezzling, on the 29th of December , the sum of 3 l. 3 s. 3 1/2 d. in monies numbered, which he had received on account of James Clark , his employer .

JAMES CLARK . I am a publican ; the prisoner was my pot-boy for two years; he collected money from my customers, and generally accounted to me on the same day that he received it - he never kept any book, but was to pay me as he received it. On the 21st of October I sent Mr. Lord in a hill of 1 l. 2 s. 8 d. for porter - the prisoner was to call for the money; I asked him about it; he said, he had never received it; he staid with me till the 29th of December; Lord's bill ran on till 27th of December, it then amounted to 3 l. 3 s. 3 1/2 d. On the 29th of October, at night, he left me without warning, and was taken in about six weeks.

JOHN LORD . I dealt with Mr. Clark; I paid the prisoner for the beer regularly every night, as it was delivered; it was generally about 1 s. 3 d. a-day - Clark applied to me after he absconded.

JOHN DAVIES . I am an officer. On the 24th of February I took the prisoner in Fitzroy-market; I asked what money he had received of his master's; he said, he kept no account, but he had taken a good deal, and if his master would give him time he would repay him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of embezzling to the amount of 1 s. 3 d.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-205

737. JAMES BALCHIN and EDWARD GARDNER were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Rock , from his person .

WILLIAM ROCK . I am a tailor , and live in Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane. On the 31st of March, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening, I was going along Barbican ; a gentleman gave me information, and on turning round, I saw the prisoners about a yard from me. One of them had my handkerchief - I did not feel it taken.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On Wednesday, the 3d of March, about half past eight o'clock at night, I was in Barbican, and saw the two prisoners attempt a gentleman's pocket; they did not succeed. About two minutes after they crossed over to the prosecutor. I saw them attempt his pocket several times; and at the end of Golden-lane, Balchin got the handkerchief quite out, and gave it to Gardner. I went over; when they saw us they ran up Whitecross-street. I took Balchin, and Keys took Gardner.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a constable. I was with Jordan, and saw the prisoners attempting pockets. I saw Balchin take the handkerchief, and give it to Gardner, whom I took, and told him to keep his hands from his pockets, and just as we went into a public house, I saw him drop the handkerchief - Coulton took it up.

WILLIAM COULTON . I am a constable. Keys's account is correct - I saw Gardner drop it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BALCHIN'S Defence. I never saw it.

BALCHIN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

GARDNER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-206

738. RICHARD PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , four wheel bands, value 18 d., and two brass lopers, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Withers .

THOMAS WITHERS . I am a rope and twine maker , and live at Mile End, New Town, the prisoner lives in the parish; I was going to the ground about twenty minutes before six o'clock, and one James gave me information, I went after the prisoner, and found him with two other boys, I found the two lopers in his pocket, he said nothing about it, the wheel bands were stolen off the wheels.

ROBERT CHRISTY . I took charge of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. These two boy gave me them to carry, they ran away when they saw Withers.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-207

739. JAMES BROWN , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , one cream jug, value 10 d., one shift, value 2 s., one pair of trowsers, value 1 s., and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. , the goods of Cairn M'Evoy .

CAIRN M'EVOY. I live in Church-lane, St. Gile's, the prisoner lodged in the same room as myself for two months; I lost these thing, and secured him on suspicion, he said he had taken them, I took him to Marlborough-st.

ISABELLA HONEY . I keep a clothes shop in Church-lane, the prisoner sold me the shift and cream jug for 1 s.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-208

740. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 26 ozs. of butter, value 1 s. 7 d., the goods of William Saker , from the person of Henry Saker .

HENRY SAKER . I am ten years old; my father keeps a butter shop in Osborne-street, Whitechapel. On the 22d of March, he sent me to take some butter to Betsy-street, to Mr. Coutts, it was between eight and nine o'clock at night. Three or four men were together; one shoved me, and the other took it out of my basket - a woman came behind, and said,

"That man has taken the butter out of your basket," she pointed him out, I knew him directly, it was the prisoner - he had it under his coat. A gentleman ran out of a shop, and stopped him - it was in Cable-street.

DANIEL HYDE . I live in Cable-street. On the 22d of March, I heard the woman call the boy, and say, the man had taken something out of his basket - I went out, and saw the prisoner about two hundred yards off, in company with four more; I seized him, the others went off - he denied having taken any thing from the boy; I found the butter under his coat - he said he received it from some person as he came along.

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my charge - I found some raw meat concealed in his hat, and some in his pocket.

WILLIAM SAKER . I sent the boy out with one pound ten ounces of butter. The paper it was in has my hand writing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-209

741. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 236 lbs. of lead, value 2 l., belonging to Samuel Hawes , and fixed to the dwelling-house of Susannah Turner , widow .

SAMUEL HAWES , I am a boot-maker , and live in Swallow-place, Oxford-street. Mrs. Susannah Turner inhabited a house, belonging to me - I saw the lead work safe about a week before. I found the prisoner in custody with some lead. I then went to the house in Maida-vale, Paddington, and found all the pipes and edges stripped off. I saw it compared with the house, it fitted.

THOMAS LANGTON . I am a hay binder, and live in Charles-street, Lisson Green. I was at work in a rick-yard, near this house, on Monday the 15th of April, about ten or eleven in the morning, and under some rubbish I found a piece of lead, about a hundred yards from the house, and about two yards further I found more. I told Wallis, and watched, and about half-past seven o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner with it on his back, about a hundred yards from the place where it was concealed. I asked what he had on his back; he answered nothing - I found it was the lead; it weighed about 50 lbs. He took us back to the place, and shewed us where he had it from, and four pieces were left behind - it weighed in all 236 lbs. He said he was nearly all night getting it there. I saw one piece fitted to the roof.

JAMES WALLIS . I am gardener to Mr. Nevitt. I work close by the premises. I watched the place where the lead was concealed, and about half-past seven o'clock saw the prisoner come and take it away from the place. Langton stopped him - there was four more pieces of lead left behind. He said he took it off a house at Kilburn, and it took him nearly all night to get it there. I saw it fitted to the prosecutor's house, and have no doubt of its being taken from there.

WILLIAM SELIERS. I am a constable. I fitted the lead to the building, it came from there.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it laying in this place, took it up, and was bringing it away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-210

742. JACOB RYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , one scale beam, value 3 s. , the goods of John Brown .

JOHN BROWN. I am a broker , and live at Islington . This scale beam was in my shop on the 27th of February. I found it at Hatton-garden. I had not missed it before. The prisoner is a stranger - it was not outside the shop.

WILLIAM READ , JUN. I stopped the prisoner on Saffron-hill, with this scale beam on his shoulder, about four o'clock in the afternoon - he said he was in distress, but gave no account how he got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It laid a good way from the house, any one would have thought it was dropped.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-211

743. JOHN MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , three pewter pots, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Frederick Menti .

THOMAS WHITE . I am servant to Frederick Menti , who keeps the Penton Arms, Baron-street, Pentonville . I was collecting the pots on the 26th of March, and had them in a barrow, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning - I left the barrow while I went down a court, for about three minutes - I did not notice that any were taken when I returned. I know the pots to be my master's.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 26th of March, I was at my door at Battle-bridge, and saw the prisoner running with a basket - I followed him; he jumped over a fence, basket and all - two pint pots fell out with Menti's name and sign on them. Somebody picked up a quart pot of the same name. I got over the fence and

secured him behind a dust hill. There was a parcel of shavings in the basket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The officer came and said,

"Are you not the lad who had the basket," I said No, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-212

744. JAMES ALDHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one silver fork, value 12 s. , the goods of Edward Ottey .

EDWARD OTTEY . I keep the Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand . On 28th February, I missed this fork; the prisoner's father came occasionally to the house, as one of the Freemason's club. I have seen the prisoner in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He was half silly, was he not - A. I have heard so. I have had the tavern six years. Every thing was sold off when I took it - I cannot say this fork was ever in my possession; I missed one.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker. On Saturday evening the 30th of March, about nine o'clock, the prisoner brought a silver fork to our shop to pawn, but observing the words,

"Crown and Anchor, No. 58," on it, but nearly obliterated, I asked whose it was; he said it was his own, and he gave 15 s. for it to Mr. Harper, near Temple bar. I sent for an officer to enquire of Mr. Harper, and then gave the prisoner in charge.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. I was sent for. I sent a watchman to enquire of Mr. Harper, and in consequence of what he said, I took the prisoner in charge.

MR. OTTY. I cannot swear that it is mine, as the plate was sold before I took the house, which it might be marked the same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-213

745. ANN BARRETT and CATHERINE SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , one watch, value 14 l. the goods of Robert Brown , from his person .

ROBERT BROWN . I am a commercial traveller , and live in Burr-street, East Smithfield. On Friday the 22d of March, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was going home, and missed my watch in Upper East Smithfield - it was safe on Tower-hill. I saw nothing of the prisoners. I was quite sober - I suppose a man robbed me, for about two hundred yards from where I missed it, a man came out of a dark passage, and ran against me, as if by accident; he fell down, begged my pardon, and ran off. Before that two woman accosted me just as I left Tower-hill, and asked for something to drink; one of them was much taller than either of the prisoners - they both went away in less then a minute.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane. On the 23d of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, Barrett offered this watch in pawn; seeing it was a valuable one, and the papers being taken out; I asked her whose it was; she said,

"I am sent with it;" immediately after a man came in and said it was his watch, and that he bought it of a friend; he immediately went out and never returned. I detained Barrett. About an hour after Sullivan looked into the shop; I was told she was connected with her, and so I took her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HART . I took them in charge, as Sullivan said it was her own, and that a gentleman gave it her to keep till he brought her a sovereign, and she gave it to Barrett to pawn.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. A young woman who was in my company gave it me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-214

756. JAMES KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one coat, value 18 d. , the goods of Robert Franklin .

ROBERT FRANKLIN . I am a labourer in the London Docks . I had my coat in the crane room, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning. I was called about eleven o'clock, and found it on the prisoner's back.

ROBERT LAMBERT . I am a labourer in the Docks, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, I saw Kelly there - I asked where he was at work, he said at No. 3 - the coat was at No. 5, he had no coat on then. I saw him come down from No. 5, with this coat on - I asked where he got it; he begged pardon, and said he hoped I would say nothing about it. The prosecutor claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left my coat in the room, and by mistake took this.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-215

747. JOSEPH GABEL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , one watch, value 25 s., and two seals, value 5 s., the goods of Andrew Collins , from his person .

ANDREW COLLINS . I sell fruit , and live in Bond's-place, Goswell-street. I was going down Chiswell-street , on the 21st of April, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I had two seals fastened to my watch; the prisoner came behind me and took hold of the ribbon, - I saw the watch going, and had hold of his arm; he handed the watch over his shoulder to somebody, but they would not take it. I kept hold of him till somebody behind shoved me down, and he got away. I called Stop thief! and he was stopped; I am certain of him.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Hewitt, of Bethnal-green. I was in Chiswell-street, between five and six o'clock, and heard the cry; I saw the prisoner trying to make off, and seized him about two yards from Collins, who was rising from the ground. I saw the watch drop from his left hand. Several persons ran away when I took him; he said nothing, but hallooed and called for assistance.

THOMAS CROCKFORD . I am a paper-hanger. I was with Hill, and heard the cry; Hill seized the prisoner, and said there is your watch, I picked it up. I heard the cry of

"rescue," but they all ran away.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along with a funeral procession. The prosecutor called out that he was robbed,

I happened to see a friend, and ran to overtake him, when I was seized; two people ran by me as fast as possible, and they, no doubt, committed the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18220417-216

748. JAMES DAVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of James Wood .

JAMES WOOD . I am a carman . On the 26th of March, I was coming to town with a load of straw, my coat hung on the shaft quite safe. In Whitechapel I was told it was gone. The prisoner was brought back with it in about ten minutes.

WILLIAM PHIPPS . I am a coachman. I was in Whitechapel about ten o'clock in the morning, and saw the prosecutor with his cart. I saw the prisoner take the coat and run off with it; I called Stop thief! and saw Higgs take him; he threw it down.

THOMAS HIGGS . I am a waterman. I saw the prisoner with the coat. I followed and took him; he threw it over the wall. I got it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They came up and asked if I knew any thing of it; I said No. Somebody threw it over the wall, and they collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-217

749. ISAAC CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one window curtain, value 15 s.; three cushion covers, value 5 s.; and five bed curtains, value 16 s. , the goods of Henry Hayler .

JOHN FRANCES FAIRS . On the 16th of April, I went to Mr. Haylers house, No. 12, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square , at half-past nine o'clock at night, I saw a person standing against the railing loitering about, I went to the street door, and found it just opening; I pushed it open and found the prisoner in the passage, he dropped a bundle behind the door, and walked by me very quick; I followed him about ten yards, and asked him what he had been doing there, he said to see Mr. Williams; I knew there was no such person there, and secured him. Mr. Hayler came and picked up the bundle; his clothes were painted.

HENRY HAYLER . I am a painter, and live in Henrietta-street; I had painted my front parlour on that day, and left the window open to dry the paint; I saw it about two hours before Fairs gave an alarm; I found the prisoner in the passage, where I found a bundle containing the curtains and other things, which he had taken from the parlour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-218

750. PHOEBE CAFFREY was indicted for stealing on the 27th of February , one shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Harrison .

MARGARET HARRISON . I am the wife of John Harrison , and live in Earl's-row, St. George in the East ; the prisoner lodged five months with me. On the 27th of February I missed a shawl, and fetched an officer; she abused me very much; she denied having it; I never lent it her - there were more valuable things there which she might have taken.

WILLIAM SMELLIE . I am a pawnbroker - I took this piece of calico in pawn, it is not a shawl.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-219

751. THOMAS BEWLEY was indicted for stealing on the 21st of April , three waistcoats, value 2 s.; two gowns, value 18 s.; six frocks, value 6 s.; three bed gowns, value 18 s.; one mantle, value 1 s.; four shirts, value 10 d.; five caps, value 2 d., and two pair of gloves, value 1 s. , the goods of William Hayslem .

WILLIAM HAYSLEM . I live at Bethnal-green . On the 17th of April the prisoner came and took a lodging of me; these things were in two boxes by his bed, locked. On the 21st he went to bed about half-past eight o'clock, and at half-past ten o'clock I heard him coming down stairs; he said,

"It is me, I am going away;" I said,

"It is a pretty time to go;" he said he had no work; I shut the street-door and sent for an officer; the watchman came; he would not let him take him; I found he had a bundle containing my property - we found some more things on him at the watchhouse.

JOHN COTTON . I am a patrol; I took the prisoner with the bundle; I found a bunch of curtain rings, a piece of lace, and two pair of gloves on him.

JAMES STRADMEN . I saw him searched and the things found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-220

752. THOMAS BROWNE was indicted for stealing on the 28th of March , five pounds of pork, value 2 s. 6 d. , the goods of Edmund Elton .

THOMAS WHITAKER . I know the prosecutor's shop in Market-street, Oxford-market . On the 28th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner standing outside the window, and take two pieces of pork; he put them under his coat and walked away; I asked what he had there; he said, nothing but his own property; I said, I should see; he then ran off - I followed, and took him; he dropped one piece; the other I took from him - he appeared distressed.

EDMUND ELTON . I am a cheesemonger; I was not at home - the pork was mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no victuals for two days.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined One Week .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-221

753. CATHERINE BURKE was indicted for stealing on the 21st of April , one carpet, value 9 s., and two saucepans, value 1 s. the goods of James Parker .

ANN MATHER . I live at Mr. Parker's, in Hatton-wall .

On the 21st of April, about nine o'clock at night; I went across the yard to the kitchen; I found the prisoner there moving shavings; she said, she came for two shillings, which she left with a lady on the first floor; I called mistress, who came and desired her to go; she refused, and we sent for the watchman; I had left the carpet in the kitchen, and found it in the yard; nobody but her could have put it there - it was ten o'clock at night.

ESTHER PACKER . I am the wife of James Packer . - The prisoner is a stranger; I sent for the watchman; the spoon and carpet were moved from the kitchen; they were safe half an hour before. She would not go away when I told her; she was rather drunk; and said my first floor lodger owed her two shillings.

MARY CROSBY . I lodge in the first floor. I don't know the prisoner; nor do I owe her any money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-222

754. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one coat, value 30 s. , the goods of William Smith .

RICHARD MINTER . I know Wm. Smith , he is a pawnbroker , and lives in Lower-street, Islington. I was about five doors from his house, and saw three young men lurking about; I watched them, and saw the prisoner snatch the coat from the door, where it hung. I followed him - he dropped it - a young man stopped him.

EDWARD BROWN. I heard the alarm, and took the prisoner.

SAMUEL AMES . I saw him throw the coat down; and picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-223

755. JAMES SHEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one hat, value 8 s., the goods of Thomas Wood , and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , the goods of Simon Purdue .

ANTONIO DUCATEL . On the 17th of April I was at Paddington , about twelve o'clock in the morning, and saw a gentleman's gig standing at a door, and saw the prisoner take a bundle out of the gig, and run off with it. I gave information; it was hat in a handkerchief.

SIMON PURDUE . I am servant to Thomas Wood ; the gig stood at No. 45, Paddington-street. I was in the house; I left a hat, tied in a handkerchief; I had not left it a moment before the alarm was given; I missed it, and pursued the man, but could not see him; I gave information at the office, and saw the handkerchief two days afterwards, but have never found the hat.

THOMAS POYLE . I am servant to Mr. Stone, a pawnbroker in Oxford-street. On the 17th of April, about one or two o'clock, the handkerchief was pawned by the prisoner. I am sure of him.

(Handkerchief produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM DAY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 17th. I found the duplicate of the handkerchief in his shoe.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

Reference Number: t18220417-224

756. ANN UNDERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th March , one pair of boots, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Southgate .

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. On the 6th of March, about five o'clock in the evening, I watched the prisoner from street to street; I saw her go into Cromer-street . I saw her go up the stairs of a house, of which the door was open; she came down stairs, then went down into the kitchen, and as she came out, I took her in charge. I found a pair of boots in her apron; she only had three farthings on her.

ROBERT SOUTHGATE , JUN. My father belongs to the house; the boots are his; they were in the back kitchen.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.


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